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Sample records for cadarache swimming pool reactor

  1. Backfitting swimming pool reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations based on measurements in a critical assembly, and experiments to disclose fuel element surface temperatures in case of accidents like stopping of primary coolant flow during full power operation, have shown that the power of the swimming pool type research reactor FRG-2 (15 MW, operating since 1967) might be raised to 21 MW within the present rules of science and technology, without major alterations of the pool buildings and the cooling systems. A backfitting program is carried through to adjust the reactor control systems of FRG-2 and FRG-1 (5 MW, housed in the same reactor hall) to the present safety rules and recommendations, to ensure FRG-2 operation at 21 MW for the next decade. (author)

  2. Core neutronics of a swimming pool research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial cores of the 5 MW swimming pool research reactor of the Nuclear Research Centre, Tehran have been analyzed using the computer codes METHUSELAH and EQUIPOISE. The effective multiplication factor, critical mass, moderator temperature and void coefficients of the core have been calculated and compared with vendor's values. Calculated values agree reasonably well with the vendor's results. (author)

  3. Control Rods in high-Flux Swimming-Pool Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Control-rod problems in open swimming-pool high-flux and high specific power research reactors are examined in the light of the calibrations and experiments made during the construction of the SILOE reactor. Control-rod operating experience for this reactor at 13 MW is also described. 2. The following are considered in turn: (a) Reactivity balances and reactivity values for the different types of rod tested (cadmium, B4C , rare earths and combinations of these different elements). (b) Flux peaks set up in the core by the presence of the control rods, their incidence on the specific power, the fast fluxes that can be obtained and means of increasing them. (c ) The technological problems involved in constructing the rods. (d) In-pile cooling, vibration, deformation and scram-time problems. 3. In conclusion, current studies on control rods in open swimming-pool reactors operating in the 10 - 30 1W range are briefly summarized. (author)

  4. Remote maintenance considerations for swimming pool tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swimming Pool Tokamak Reactor (SPTR) is one of the candidate devices which are expected to demonstrate physical and engineering feasibility for fusion power reactors. In SPTR, water shield is adopted instead of solid shield structures. Among the advantages of SPTR are, from viewpoint of remote maintenance, small handling weight and high space availability between TF coils and a vacuum vessel. On the other hand, high dose rate during reactor repair and adverse effects on remote maintenance equipment by the shielding water might be the disadvantage of SPTR, where it is assumed that the shielding water is drained during reactor repair. Since the design of SPTR is still at the preliminary stage, for remote maintenance, much effort has been directed to clarification of design conditions such as environment and handling weight. As for the remote maintenance system concepts, studies have been focussed on those for a vacuum vessel and its internal structure (blanket, divertor and protection walls) expected to be repaired more frequently. The vacuum vessel assembly is divided into 21 sectors and number of TF coils is 14. A pair of TF coils are connected with each other by antitorque beams on the whole side surface. Vacuum vessel cassettes and associated blanket, divertor and protection walls are replaced through seven windows between TF coils pairs. Therefore each vacuum vessel cassette is required moving mechanisms in toroidal and radial directions. Options for slide mechanisms are wheels, balls, rollers and water bearings. Options for driving the cassette are self-driving by hydraulic motors and external driving by rack-pinion, wires or specific vehicles. As a result of studies, the moving mechanism with wheels and hydraulic motors has been selected for the reference design, and the system with water bearings and rack-pinion as an alternative. Furthermore typical concepts have been obtained for remote maintenance equipment such as wall-mounted manipulators, tools for

  5. An analysis of postulated accident for 49-2 Swimming Pool Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal hydrodynamic code RETRAN-02 is used for safety analysis of Swimming Pool Reactor. Accident of partial-loss of flow, loss of offsite electric power and unexpected reactivity insertion are analysed and discussed. These results will be helpful for operation safety of the reactor

  6. Swimming pool cleaner poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swimming pool cleaner poisoning occurs when someone swallows this type of cleaner, touches it, or breathes in ... The harmful substances in swimming pool cleaner are: Bromine ... copper Chlorine Soda ash Sodium bicarbonate Various mild acids

  7. Swimming pool granuloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    A swimming pool granuloma is a long-term (chronic) skin infection. It is caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium marinum . ... A swimming pool granuloma occurs when water containing Mycobacterium marinum bacteria enters a break in the skin. Signs of ...

  8. Justify of implementation of a hot water layer system in swimming pool research reactor IEA-R1m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IPEN/CNEN-SP has a swimming pool research reactor (IEA-R1m) in operation since 1957 at 2 MW. In 1998, after some modifications, its nominal power increased to 5 MW. Among these modifications some adaptations had to be accomplished in the radiological protection and operational procedure. The present work aim to study the need of implementation of a hot water layer in order to reduce the dose in the workers in the vicinity of the reactor swimming pool. Applying the principles of radioprotection optimization, it was concluded that the decision of the construction of one hot water layer system in the reactor swimming pool, is not necessary. (author)

  9. Determination of 16N and 19O activities in loop water of swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of activities for 16N and 19O nuclei in the loop water of swimming pool reactor at China Institute of Atomic Energy were carried out. In order to verify the experiment results, a calculation for same purpose was also performed. The results show their coincidence is well in uncertainty range. The evaluated recommendation data for 18O(n, γ)19O reaction cross sections are also given in the paper. (authors)

  10. Production and release of 14C from a swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual production rate of 14C in the Apsara swimming pool reactor works out to be about 2.94 mCi. The concentration distribution of 14C in different compartments viz. pool water, reactor hall air and ion-exchange resin ranged from 200 to 440 pCi/l, 0.09 to 0.38 pCi/l, an average concentration of 8.16 pCi/g respectively. The mean residence time of 14C in pool water is evaluated to be about 7 days taking into account various sinks. The study revealed atmospheric exchange at the air-water interface as the dominant process responsible for the loss of 14C from the pool water. (author). 7 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Probabilistic analysis of some safety aspects of a swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A probabilistic risk analysis of some safety aspects without the investigation of radioactivity release has been performed for the 10 MW (thermal) swimming-pool research reactor SAPHIR. Our presentation is focused on the 7 internal initiating events found to be relevant with respect to accident sequences that could result with core melt due to loss of coolant or overcriticality. The results are given by the core melt frequencies for the investigated accident sequences. It could be demonstrated by our investigation that the core melt hazard of the reactor is extremely low. (author)

  12. Effect of reactivity insertion rate on peak power and temperatures in swimming pool type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is essential to study the reactor behavior under different accidental conditions and take proper measures for its safe operation. We have studied the effect of reactivity insertion, with and without scram conditions, on peak power and temperatures of fuel, cladding and coolant in typical swimming pool type research reactor. The reactivity ranging from 1 $ to 2 $ and insertion times from 0.25 to 1 second have been considered. The computer code PARET has been used and results are presented in this article. (author)

  13. Conceptual design of swimming pool type tokamak power reactor (SPTR-P)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary design study of a tokamak power reactor utilizing the deuterium/tritium/lithium fuel cycle based on a swimming pool type reactor (SPTR) concept is presented. Its primary aim is to investigate the characteristics of the swimming-pool concept in which water replaces much of the steel normally required for shielding. The major design features are: steady state operation, RF wave for plasma heating and current drive, solid tritium breeder material (Li2O), modified austenitic stainless steel as first wall and blanket structural material, pumped limiter for ash exhaust, unified assembling of blanket and vacuum vessel and pressurized water cooling. The huge and heavy solid shield structure protecting superconducting magnets which brings about great difficulties in repair and maintenance is eliminated by submerging the reactor in a water pool. The water plays a role of shielding. In addition the water shield concept reduces radioactive waste disposal and to ease radiation streaming shielding. Key design parameters are: net electric power of 1000 MW, fusion power of 3200 MW, neutron wall loading of 3.3 MW/m2, major radius of 6.9 m, plasma radius of 2.0 m, plasma elongation of 1.6, plasma current of 16 MA, total beta of 7 %, toroidal field on axis of 5.2 T. (author)

  14. Swimming Pool Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Safety & Prevention Immunizations All Around At Home At Play ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Swimming Pool Safety Page Content ​What is the best way to ...

  15. Application of neutron noise analysis to a swimming pool research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is part of a programme of establishing practical applications of neutron noise techniques to a swimming pool research reactor and deals with two different items: (1) The identification of local boiling caused e.g. by a partial blockage of the coolant flow in a fuel element. Local boiling can easily lead to a burn-out situation. The onset of boiling can be detected by neutron noise analysis and a boiling detection system is presently under development. (2) The measurement of the time evolution of the reactivity induced by xenon after reactor shut-down by an on-line reactivity meter based on neutron noise analysis. From the data, the prompt neutron decay constant at delayed critical, the equilibrium xenon reactivity worth, and an estimate of the average steady-state power flux in the core before reactor shut-down were obtained. (author)

  16. Radiation shielding considerations for the repair and maintenance of a swimming pool-type tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation shielding relevant to the repair and maintenance of a swimming pool-type tokamak reactor is considered. The dose rate during the reactor operation can be made low enough for personnel access into the reactor room if a 2m thick water layer is installed above the magnet cryostat. The dose rate 24 h after shutdown is such that the human access is allowed above the magnet cryostat. Sufficient water layer thickness is provided in the inboard space for the operation of automatic welder/cutter while retaining the magnet shielding capability. Some forced cooling is required for the decay heat removal in the first wall. The penetration shield thickness around the neutral beam injector port is estimated to be barely sufficient in terms of the magnet radiation damage. (orig.)

  17. Swimming Pools and Molluscum Contagiosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Travelers' Health: Smallpox & Other Orthopoxvirus-Associated Infections Poxvirus Swimming Pools Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The ... often ask if molluscum virus can spread in swimming pools. There is also concern that it can ...

  18. A Versatile Cobalt-60 Irradiation Facility within a Swimming-Pool Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IRR-1 enriched-fuel swimming-pool-type reactor incorporates a concrete-shielded gamma cell for using the radiation from spent fuel elements. A versatile 60Co irradiation facility was added at relatively low cost. The 30 000 Ci 60Co source runs on a carriage at the bottom of the reactor pool. The source plaque completely covers the aluminium window between the pool and the irradiation cell. This geometry allows for a ''source-to-target'' overlap; therefore, dose-rate homogeneity within ±20% is attained inside two commercial cases (43 x 31 x 31 cm) or two commercial sacks (80 x 45 x 45 cm) and within ±10% in two flat boxes (40 x 20 x 5 cm) irradiated simultaneously. A set of steel and aluminium screens attached to two rotating turn-tables permits irradiation of commercial cases at any desired dose-rate smaller than 100 000 R/h without the need for turning over at half-time. Two special underwater canisters allow long-term irradiation of flat specimens at dose-rates of less than 600 000 R/h, while the source is used for normal short-term irradiations in the gamma cell. Safety is ensured by a visible and audible indicator and alarm system and by an elaborate interlock system. A system of ionizing gauges and recorders permits measurement of dose-rates over the range 0. 001 to 1 000 000 R/h. Isodose curves for the irradiation chamber have been determined. The cell is soon to be modified to include a refrigeration plant and a timing system for automatic control of source movement. The disadvantages of low source utilization inherent in required source-to-target overlap and of one sided utilization of the radiation are more than compensated for by the possibility of pilot-scale irradiation of commercial cases and by the greater versatility and low cost. This installation is therefore recommended for all similar swimming-pool reactors. It is especially valuable for countries desiring to embark on a food irradiation programme at minimum cost but with maximum

  19. Temperature coefficient of reactivity of a typical swimming pool type research reactor using low enriched uranium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature coefficients of reactivity of a swimming pool type material test research reactor have been calculated using standard computer codes. It is observed that the core reactivity loss due to increase in water temperature and void formation is sensitive to control rod position at criticality. The reactivity decreases more rapidly when the core volume is small. (author)

  20. Flow of kinetic parameters in a typical swimming pool type research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Masood [Nuclear Engineering Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)], E-mail: masiqbal@hotmail.com; Mahmood, Tayyab; Pervez, Showket [Nuclear Engineering Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2008-03-15

    Calculations were performed to estimate the variation in kinetic parameters (delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron generation time) in different core configurations of a typical swimming pool type research reactor. Pakistan research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) was employed for this study. The effect due to burnup of the core was also studied. Calculations were performed with the help of computer codes WIMSD/4 and CITATION. Precursors yield was modified according to the neutron flux averaging only. This is the simple way to calculate the precursor yield for a particular core. The kinetic parameters are different for different core configurations. The {beta}{sub eff} decreases with 1.33 x 10{sup -6}/% burnup whereas prompt neutron generation time increases with 6.42 x 10{sup -8} s/% burnup. The results were compared with safety analysis report and with published values and were found in good agreement. This study provides the confidence to understand the change in the kinetic parameters of research reactors with core change and also with burnup of the core.

  1. Flow of kinetic parameters in a typical swimming pool type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations were performed to estimate the variation in kinetic parameters (delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron generation time) in different core configurations of a typical swimming pool type research reactor. Pakistan research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) was employed for this study. The effect due to burnup of the core was also studied. Calculations were performed with the help of computer codes WIMSD/4 and CITATION. Precursors yield was modified according to the neutron flux averaging only. This is the simple way to calculate the precursor yield for a particular core. The kinetic parameters are different for different core configurations. The βeff decreases with 1.33 x 10-6/% burnup whereas prompt neutron generation time increases with 6.42 x 10-8 s/% burnup. The results were compared with safety analysis report and with published values and were found in good agreement. This study provides the confidence to understand the change in the kinetic parameters of research reactors with core change and also with burnup of the core

  2. Reactor physics calculations and their experimental validation for conversion and upgrading of a typical swimming pool type research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali Khan, Liaquat; Ahmad, Nasir E-mail: epg.piaas@dgcc.org.pk; Zafar, M.S.; Ahmad, Ayaz

    2000-07-01

    Detailed neutronic analysis of a typical swimming pool type research reactor, Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1), was carried out for conversion of its core from 93% highly enriched uranium to 20% low enriched uranium fuel with power upgrading from 5 to 10 MW. Standard computer codes WIMS-D/4 and CITATION were employed to calculate core excess reactivity, power defect, reactivity effect of xenon and samarium, reactivity worth of fuel element, worth of control rods, shutdown margin, reactivity feedback coefficients, neutron flux and power peaking factors. A series of low and high power tests were performed on the newly converted core to determine its performance. A comparison between the calculated and measured results is presented in this article. The agreement is generally good.

  3. Reactor physics calculations and their experimental validation for conversion and upgrading of a typical swimming pool type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed neutronic analysis of a typical swimming pool type research reactor, Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1), was carried out for conversion of its core from 93% highly enriched uranium to 20% low enriched uranium fuel with power upgrading from 5 to 10 MW. Standard computer codes WIMS-D/4 and CITATION were employed to calculate core excess reactivity, power defect, reactivity effect of xenon and samarium, reactivity worth of fuel element, worth of control rods, shutdown margin, reactivity feedback coefficients, neutron flux and power peaking factors. A series of low and high power tests were performed on the newly converted core to determine its performance. A comparison between the calculated and measured results is presented in this article. The agreement is generally good

  4. Grundfoss: Chlorination of Swimming Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Hogan, John; Andreassen, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools.......Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools....

  5. 21 CFR 1250.89 - Swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Swimming pools. 1250.89 Section 1250.89 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.89 Swimming pools. (a) Fill and draw swimming pools shall not be installed or used. (b) Swimming pools of the recirculation type shall...

  6. Parametric evaluation of mixed (low and high enriched) fuel core for a swimming pool type research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhtyar, S.; Iqbal, M.; Israr, M.; Pervez, S.; Salahuddin, A. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2004-07-01

    A study has been carried out to evaluate the performance of a swimming pool type research reactor core comprised of mixed (low and high enriched) uranium fuel. The study includes the calculations of core reactivity, worth of control rods and core criticality at the Beginning Of Life (BOL) of the core and for two operating conditions Cold Zero Power (CZP) and Hot Full Power (HFP). Further, to ensure safe and stable operation of the core from nuclear design point of view, average power densities in the fuel region, power peaking factors, axial power distribution in the hot channel and reactivity feed back coefficients have also been calculated. Two group fluxes have also been determined at different irradiation locations. All these calculations have been carried out employing reactor lattice code WIMS-D14 and reactor analysis code CITATION The calculated results show reasonably good agreement with the quoted operational data of the previous LEU cores. (Author)

  7. Parametric evaluation of mixed (low and high enriched) fuel core for a swimming pool type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been carried out to evaluate the performance of a swimming pool type research reactor core comprised of mixed (low and high enriched) uranium fuel. The study includes the calculations of core reactivity, worth of control rods and core criticality at the Beginning Of Life (BOL) of the core and for two operating conditions Cold Zero Power (CZP) and Hot Full Power (HFP). Further, to ensure safe and stable operation of the core from nuclear design point of view, average power densities in the fuel region, power peaking factors, axial power distribution in the hot channel and reactivity feed back coefficients have also been calculated. Two group fluxes have also been determined at different irradiation locations. All these calculations have been carried out employing reactor lattice code WIMS-D14 and reactor analysis code CITATION The calculated results show reasonably good agreement with the quoted operational data of the previous LEU cores. (Author)

  8. Evaluation of LOCA in a swimming-pool type reactor using the 3D-AIRLOCA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 3D-AIRLOCA code was used to calculate core temperature evolution curves in the wake of a full LOCA in a swimming pool type reactor, resulting in complete core exposure and dryout within about 1000 sec of the initiating event. The results show that fuel integrity loss thresholds (450 C for softening and 650 C for melting) are reached and exceeded over large fractions of the core at power levels as low as 2 MW. At 4.5 MW, the softening threshold is reached even when the accident occurs up to 12 hours after reactor shutdown for continuous operation, and up to 2 hrs after shutdown for intermittent (6 hrs/day, 4 days a week) operation. The situation is even more severe in blockage cases, when the air flow through the core is blocked by residual water at the grid plate level. It is concluded that substantial fission product releases are quite likely in this class of accidents. (orig.)

  9. Determination of neutron energy spectrum at a pneumatic rabbit station of a typical swimming pool type material test research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkawi, S.R.; Ahmad, N. E-mail: nasir@pieas.edu.pk

    2002-01-01

    The method of multiple foil activation was used to measure the neutron energy spectrum, experimentally, at a rabbit station of Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1), which is a typical swimming pool type material test research reactor. The computer codes MSITER and SANDBP were used to adjust the spectrum. The pre-information required by the adjustment codes was obtained by modelling the core and its surroundings in three-dimensions by using the one dimensional transport theory code WIMS-D/4 and the multidimensional finite difference diffusion theory code CITATION. The input spectrum covariance information required by MSITER code was also calculated from the CITATION output. A comparison between calculated and adjusted spectra shows a good agreement.

  10. Determination of neutron energy spectrum at a pneumatic rabbit station of a typical swimming pool type material test research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of multiple foil activation was used to measure the neutron energy spectrum, experimentally, at a rabbit station of Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1), which is a typical swimming pool type material test research reactor. The computer codes MSITER and SANDBP were used to adjust the spectrum. The pre-information required by the adjustment codes was obtained by modelling the core and its surroundings in three-dimensions by using the one dimensional transport theory code WIMS-D/4 and the multidimensional finite difference diffusion theory code CITATION. The input spectrum covariance information required by MSITER code was also calculated from the CITATION output. A comparison between calculated and adjusted spectra shows a good agreement

  11. Evaluation of LOCA in a swimming-pool type reactor using the 3D-AIRLOCA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 3D-AIRLOCA code was used to calculate core temperature evolution curves in the wake of a full LOCA in a swimming pool type reactor, resulting in complete core exposure and dryout within about 1000 sec of the initiating event. The results show that fuel integrity loss thresholds (450 C for softening and 650 C for melting) are reached and exceeded over large fractions of the core at powr levels as low as 2 MW. At 4.5 MW, the softening threshold is reached even when the accident occurs up to 12 hours after reactor shutdown for continuous operation, and up to 2 hrs after shutdown for intermittent (6 hrs/day, 4 days a week) operation. The situation is even more severe in blockage cases, when the air flow through the core is blocked by residual water at the grid plate level. It is concluded that substantial fission product releases are quite likely in this class of accidents. (orig.)

  12. Calculations of partial LOCA in a swimming-pool-reactor with MTR-elements and planned mock-up experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A partial uncovering of the MTR fuel plates of the swimming pool reactor SAPHIR located at the Swiss Federal Reactor Research Institute (E.I.R.) could be caused by a loss of coolant accident due to a beam tube break. The transient temperature excursions of the fuel plates during the LOCA have been predicted with computer simulations. Because a reliable prediction of the flow regime and hence the heat transfer in the uncovered part of the plate is not possible with current knowledge, a parametric study employing different heat transfer models is presented in this paper. The results show, that the heat transfer model in the uncovered part of the fuel plate has an important influence on the predicted temperatures. A mock-up experimental facility, which will supply data for the heat transfer occuring in the uncovered part, will also be described at the end of the paper. (author)

  13. Maintenance operation by divers on a swimming-pool type reactor (Osiris, CEN Saclay). Technical and medical prevention: an example of multidisciplinary ergonomic step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maintenance works in a swimming-pool reactor was performed by a team of divers. A multidisciplinary ergonomic study had previously defined the working procedure. The ergonomic approach is analysed. The divers' working techniques are described. After work, medical tests showed that previsions were verified and proved the methods as safe. This technique by divers' interventions should open new possibilities in nuclear industry

  14. Apparatus for irradiating in a magnetic field in a swimming pool type reactor, at high or low temperatures (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An apparatus for irradiation in a swimming-pool with a magnetic field of 5000 oersteds is described. An aluminium coil with a very high current density is water cooled. A relatively great Volume can be used in the coil center, and two furnaces can be introduced, or a liquid nitrogen cryostat. (author)

  15. Irradiations in swimming-pool type reactors from room temperature up to 2000 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiations which have been, and are being carried out in the Melusine and Siloe reactors in connection with pure or applied research projects, are effected in widely varying conditions; amongst these, for example, the temperature may vary from -250 deg C to +2000 deg C The eight devices presented are designed for irradiations effected at temperatures of from room temperature up to 2000 deg C. 1. Irradiation device for irradiation at normal temperatures 2. The 'PEF' device 3. The 'CHOUCA' device, 150 to 900 deg C 4. The 'CYRANO' device for EL 4 conditions 5. 'HT' capsules, 800-1000 deg C 6. The 'HEBE' furnace 1400 deg C 7. The 'PEC' device, 1400 deg C 8. The 'HF' furnace 2000 deg C. (authors)

  16. Preliminary steps in partial decommissioning of a swimming pool type reactor Apsara: a health physics experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Apsara reactor after 50 years of extensive use in production of radio-isotopes, neutron radiography, neutron beam research, shielding experiments etc., is undergoing a partial decommissioning to facilitate refurbishment and up gradation to 2 MWth power using lower enriched Uranium fuel. Partial decommissioning involves defueling and removal of core components as a first step. Radiological safety in defueling is discussed in this paper. Defueling is carried out from top of pile where the radiation level was < 0.10 mR/h, under the strict stipulation that no fuel is to be lifted above water surface during transfer and hence no dose is consumed for this job. Collective dose consumed in the job was only in the SFSB area in Dhruva reactor and was 8.20 person mSv (59% of budgeted dose). This was possible by thorough mock up at Dhruva, SFSB for irradiated fuel handling, satisfying ALARA and refining the procedure. Also radiation mapping of core components, grid plate before and after removal of dry and wet guide tubes were carried out. It was observed that the top portion of grid plate showed a maximum radiation level which was 2-3 times that at bottom portion. The positions around the dry guide tubes G 1 and G 7 showed high radiation levels of 30 R/h. On removing them, the radiation levels reduced to 0.3 -0.5 R/h in all positions. This acted as an input for planning to cut and remove various core components, as also for segregation of high active/low active/inactive components from waste disposal point of view. For example the dry guide tubes G 1 and G 7 was cut and disposed as active waste with upper portion as Cat I and lower portion (was in core region) as Cat II radioactive waste

  17. Guide for decontaminating swimming pool at schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident due to the Great East Japan Earthquake, a huge amount of radioactive materials was widely dispersed and precipitated into the environment. Swimming pools in Fukushima prefectures were contaminated with the radioactives. We JAEA carried out several demonstration tests to decontaminate the radioactives and discharge the pool water safely. We concluded the results obtained from the tests as 'Guide for decontaminating Swimming Pool at School' and released it quickly. Following this, we also released the guide in English. This manuscript, as an experimental report of the swimming pool water decontamination, is consisted from the guide in Japanese and English prepared. (author)

  18. Airways disorders and the swimming pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougault, Valérie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2013-08-01

    Concerns have been expressed about the possible detrimental effects of chlorine derivatives in indoor swimming pool environments. Indeed, a controversy has arisen regarding the possibility that chlorine commonly used worldwide as a disinfectant favors the development of asthma and allergic diseases. The effects of swimming in indoor chlorinated pools on the airways in recreational and elite swimmers are presented. Recent studies on the influence of swimming on airway inflammation and remodeling in competitive swimmers, and the phenotypic characteristics of asthma in this population are reviewed. Preventative measures that could potentially reduce the untoward effects of pool environment on airways of swimmers are discussed. PMID:23830132

  19. Next tokamak design. Swimming pool type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to relieve the difficulties of repair and maintenance and to make the reactor size compact, a concept of swimming pool type reactor which is installed in a waterpool has been proposed. A design study of the concept as the Next Tokamak has been carried out with the following major parameters. The reactor has a double null poloidal divertor and blanket with tritium breeding ratio of >1.0, fusion power 420 MW, major radius 5.3 m, plasma radius 1.1 m, Bt on axis 5.2 T, plasma current 3.9 MA. The design study covers the reactor overall systems including reactor structure, reactor cooling system, repair and maintenance, reactor building, etc. As the result of this study the following conclusions were reached. The advantages over a conventional tokamak reactor are as follows: (1) The size of TF coil can be considerably reduced while retaining sufficient space for repair and maintenance because a solid shield is eliminated. (2) Since the distances between plasma and PF coils become small, the required capacity of electric power supply is reduced. (3) Technologies for the repair and maintenance are simplified and disassembling and reassembling of vacuum vessel can be done with realistic and credible remote handling technique. (4) The problem caused by radiation streaming can be considerably eased. (5) Radioactive waste disposal is reduced considerably because a solid shield is eliminated. (6) Because a vacuum vessel may be easily replaced in this concept, it will have a convenient flexibility for an experimental reactor. (7) Advantages of this concept can be also applied to a power reactor. Recently we started a new design of SPTR with slightly modified plasma parameters aiming for smaller-size reactor. In this paper the new design will be discussed briefly. (author)

  20. Strategies for chemically healthy public swimming pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht

    overview of the strategies which can be used to achieve microbiological safe water with low levels of DBPs to ensure healthy environment for bathers. There are different approaches to achieve healthy environment in public swimming pools which in this thesis are divided into three strategies: alternatives...... to chlorination, removal of precursors and DBPs, and inhibition of the DBP formation. None of the alternative disinfection agents which are used for private swimming pools are applicable for public swimming pools. Thus chlorine is the most likely future disinfectant in public swimming pools. The...... compound which is less reactive towards chlorine. Ozone is also able to remove combined chlorine and other DBPs but the reaction is slow. Activated carbon is able to adsorb precursors and DBPs except chloramines which are removed by catalytic reaction. Formation of DBPs is unavoidable. However, the...

  1. Health risks of early swimming pool attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoefer, Yvonne; Zutavern, Anne; Brockow, Inken; Schäfer, Torsten; Krämer, Ursula; Schaaf, Beate; Herbarth, Olf; von Berg, Andrea; Wichmann, H-Erich; Heinrich, Joachim

    2008-07-01

    Swimming pool attendance and exposure to chlorination by-products showed adverse health effects on children. We assessed whether early swimming pool attendance, especially baby swimming, is related to higher rates of early infections and to the development of allergic diseases. In 2003-2005, 2192 children were analysed for the 6-year follow-up of a prospective birth cohort study. Data on early swimming pool attendance, other lifestyle factors and medical history were collected by parental-administered questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate associations. Babies who did not participate in baby swimming had lower rates of infection in the 1st year of life (i) diarrhoea: OR 0.68 CI 95% 0.54-0.85; (ii) otitis media: OR 0.81 CI 95% 0.62-1.05; (iii) airway infections: OR 0.85 CI 95% 0.67-1.09. No clear association could be found between late or non-swimmers and atopic dermatitis or hay fever until the age of 6 years, while higher rates of asthma were found (OR 2.15 95% CI 1.16-3.99), however, potentially due to reverse causation. The study indicates that, in terms of infections, baby swimming might not be as harmless as commonly thought. Further evidence is needed to make conclusions if the current regulations on chlorine in Germany might not protect swimming pool attendees from an increased risk of gastrointestinal infections. In terms of developing atopic diseases there is no verifiable detrimental effect of early swimming. PMID:17869580

  2. Swimming pool-induced asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, S; Vivaldo, T; Morelli, M; Carlucci, P; Zuccotti, G V

    2011-01-01

    A 13-year-old elite swimmer presented with wheezing after indoor swimming training. On the basis of her clinical history and the tests performed, exercise-induced asthma and mold-induced asthma were ruled out and a diagnosis of chlorine-induced asthma was made. PMID:21548454

  3. Performance Study of Swimming Pool Heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this report is to perform a controlled laboratory study on the efficiency and emissions of swimming pool heaters based on a limited field investigation into the range of expected variations in operational parameters. Swimming pool heater sales trends have indicated a significant decline in the number of conventional natural gas-fired swimming pool heaters (NGPH). On Long Island the decline has been quite sharp, on the order of 50%, in new installations since 2001. The major portion of the decline has been offset by a significant increase in the sales of electric powered heat pump pool heaters (HPPH) that have been gaining market favor. National Grid contracted with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to measure performance factors in order to compare the relative energy, environmental and economic consequences of using one technology versus the other. A field study was deemed inappropriate because of the wide range of differences in actual load variations (pool size), geographic orientations, ground plantings and shading variations, number of hours of use, seasonal use variations, occupancy patterns, hour of the day use patterns, temperature selection, etc. A decision was made to perform a controlled laboratory study based on a limited field investigation into the range of expected operational variations in parameters. Critical to this are the frequency of use, temperature selection, and sizing of the heater to the associated pool heating loads. This would be accomplished by installing a limited amount of relatively simple compact field data acquisition units on selected pool installations. This data included gas usage when available and alternately heater power or gas consumption rates were inferred from the manufacturer's specifications when direct metering was not available in the field. Figure 1 illustrates a typical pool heater installation layout.

  4. Swimming Pools, Swimming pools, licensed - name, address, contact, volume, Published in 2006, Iowa Dept. of Public Health.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Swimming Pools dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2006. It is described as 'Swimming pools, licensed - name,...

  5. The Cinema of the Swimming Pool

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Christopher; Hirsch, Pam

    2014-01-01

    The swimming pool frequently appears in film not merely as a setting but as a dynamic site where social, political, cultural and aesthetic forces converge. What is it about this space that has so fascinated filmmakers and what kinds of cinematic investigations does it encourage? This collection features essays by an eclectic, international range of film researchers. Amongst the works analysed are classics such as The Cameraman (1928), The Philadelphia Story (1940) and La Piscine (1969); cult ...

  6. Thermal analyses of solar swimming pool heating in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotels and swimming clubs in Pakistan pay huge gas bills for heating Swimming pools in winter. Winter days in most parts of Pakistan remain sunny and unglazed low cost solar collectors may be used to extend the swimming season. Installing the pool in a wind-protected area, which receives unobstructed solar radiation, may further reduce the size of the solar collectors required to heat the swimming pools. The pools should be covered with plastic sheet to eliminate evaporative heat losses and to prevent dust and tree leaves falling in the pool. The results of the thermal analysis show that in some parts of the country, a solar exposed pool can maintain comfortable temperature simply by using a plastic sheet on the pool surface. On the other hand, there are cities where solar collector array equal to twice the surface area of the pool is required to keep desired temperature in winter. (author)

  7. Swimming pool drownings and near-drownings among California preschoolers.

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, A A; Trent, R B

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a significant but poorly understood public health problem, the authors compiled data on swimming pool drownings and near-drownings requiring hospitalization for California children ages 1 to 4. METHODS: Data from death certificates were used to analyze swimming pool drownings, and hospital discharge data were used to analyze near-drownings. RESULTS: Among California preschoolers in 1993, pool immersion incidents were the leading cause of injury death and the eighth lead...

  8. Neutronics design of the next tokamak. (Swimming pool type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A swimming pool type tokamak reactor (SPTR) has been proposed in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute as a candidate for the next generation tokamak reactor after the JT-60. The concept of the SPTR evolved from an incentive to relieve the difficulties of repair and maintenance procedures of a tokamak reactor. After about two years of the reactor design studies, several advantages of the SPTR over the conventional tokamak reactors such as the ease of penetration shielding, reduction in solid radwaste have been shown. On the other hand, some drawbacks and uncertainties of the SPTR have also been pointed out but so far no serious defect negating the concept has been found. This paper describes the neutronics aspect of the SPTR based mostly on the result of one dimensional calculations. At first, the radiation shielding capability of water is compared with those of other candidate materials used in the blanket and shield of fusion reactors. Based on the result of the comparison and other requirements such as tritium breeding, thermal mechanical design, repair and maintenance procedures, the material arrangements of the blanket and shield are determined. The result of the blanket neutronics calculations, the radiation shielding calculations for the superconducting magnets, shutdown dose calculations are given together with major penetration shielding considerations. (author)

  9. Estimated environmental radionuclide transfer and deposition into outdoor swimming pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2011, a large radioactive discharge occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. This plant is located within a climatically temperate region where outdoor swimming pools are popular. Although it is relatively easy to decontaminate pools by refilling them with fresh water, it is difficult to maintain safe conditions given highly contaminated diurnal dust falls from the surrounding contaminated ground. Our objectives in this paper were to conduct daily radioactivity measurements, to determine the quantity of radioactive contaminants from the surrounding environment that invade outdoor pools, and to investigate the efficacy of traditional pool cleaners in removing radioactive contaminants. The depositions in the paper filterable particulates ranged from 0 to 62,5 Bq/m2/day, with the highest levels found in the southern Tohoku District containing Fukushima Prefecture and in the Kanto District containing Tokyo Metro. They were approximately correlated with the ground contamination. Traditional pool cleaners eliminated 99% of contaminants at the bottom of the pool, reducing the concentration to 41 Bq/m2 after cleaning. Authors recommended the deposition or the blown radionuclides into outdoor swimming pools must be considered into pool regulations when the environments exactly polluted with radionuclides. - Highlights: • Deposition into outdoor swimming pool in a habitable areas estimated 72 Bq/m2/day. • More than 500 Bq/m2/day deposition will exceed our national guideline (10 Bq/l) of swimming pool. • Vacuum pool cleaner eliminates 99% radionuclides deposition

  10. Allegheny County Public Swimming Pool, Hot Tub, and Spa Inspections

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Public swimming pool, hot tub, and spa facilities are licensed and inspected once each year to assure proper water quality, sanitation, lifeguard coverage and...

  11. Health impact of disinfection by-products in swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Cristina M; Font-Ribera, Laia

    2012-01-01

    This article is focused on the epidemiological evidence on the health impacts related to disinfection by-products (DBPs) in swimming pools, which is a chemical hazard generated as an undesired consequence to reduce the microbial pathogens. Specific DBPs are carcinogenic, fetotoxic and/or irritant to the airways according to experimental studies. Epidemiological evidence shows that swimming in pools during pregnancy is not associated with an increased risk of reproductive outcomes. An epidemiological study suggested an increased risk of bladder cancer with swimming pool attendance, although evidence is inconclusive. A higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms including asthma is found among swimming pool workers and elite swimmers, although the causality of this association is unclear. The body of evidence in children indicates that asthma is not increased by swimming pool attendance. Overall, the available knowledge suggests that the health benefits of swimming outweigh the potential health risks of chemical contamination. However, the positive effects of swimming should be enhanced by minimising potential risks. PMID:23247135

  12. Health impact of disinfection by-products in swimming pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M. Villanueva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is focused on the epidemiological evidence on the health impacts related to disinfection by-products (DBPs in swimming pools, which is a chemical hazard generated as an undesired consequence to reduce the microbial pathogens. Specific DBPs are carcinogenic, fetotoxic and/or irritant to the airways according to experimental studies. Epidemiological evidence shows that swimming in pools during pregnancy is not associated with an increased risk of reproductive outcomes. An epidemiological study suggested an increased risk of bladder cancer with swimming pool attendance, although evidence is inconclusive. A higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms including asthma is found among swimming pool workers and elite swimmers, although the causality of this association is unclear. The body of evidence in children indicates that asthma is not increased by swimming pool attendance. Overall, the available knowledge suggests that the health benefits of swimming outweigh the potential health risks of chemical contamination. However, the positive effects of swimming should be enhanced by minimising potential risks.

  13. Health impact of disinfection by-products in swimming pools

    OpenAIRE

    Villanueva, Cristina M.; Laia Font-Ribera

    2012-01-01

    This article is focused on the epidemiological evidence on the health impacts related to disinfection by-products (DBPs) in swimming pools, which is a chemical hazard generated as an undesired consequence to reduce the microbial pathogens. Specific DBPs are carcinogenic, fetotoxic and/or irritant to the airways according to experimental studies. Epidemiological evidence shows that swimming in pools during pregnancy is not associated with an increased risk of reproductive outcomes. An epidemio...

  14. ITER at Cadarache; ITER a Cadarache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-06-15

    This public information document presents the ITER project (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), the definition of the fusion, the international cooperation and the advantages of the project. It presents also the site of Cadarache, an appropriate scientifical and economical environment. The last part of the documentation recalls the historical aspect of the project and the today mobilization of all partners. (A.L.B.)

  15. Inorganic Chemical Composition of Swimming Pools in Amman-Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bety Saqarat

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring was carried out during summer 2011 in three types of swimming pools in Amman-Jordan. Thirty six water samples, collected from three users type of swimming pools (adults, family and infants, were examined for its major ionic composition (HCO3-, Cl-, NO3-, SO4=, Ca+2, Mg+2, Na+, K+ and PO4+4 in addition to its BOD and COD content. All of the examined samples from the swimming pools water were acceptable according to the local and WHO standards. The type and number of users as well as the maintenance of the swimming pool water influenced the water quality. The results showed that there was a noticeable increase in NO3, PO4 and Cl than other ions. All of the examined samples from the swimming pools water were acceptable according to the local and WHO standards and although the water of the infant’s users changed frequently, it showed the highest concentration of most of the parameters and Adults’ pool showed the lowest.

  16. Device and process for recovery and disposal of radioactive wastes underwater in a swimming pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The device comprises a suction head and a filter fixed to a pole, for safe removing of loose parts (even brittle ones like nuclear fuel) in the core or on the bottom of the swimming pool during reactor shut down for maintenance

  17. Rotating and retractable lighting device for a swimming pool containing radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lighting device is retractable under the action of appliances working in the swimming pool or thanks to various impacts. Each arm is assembled pivoting around a vertical axis. Return means as spring allow to bring back in a balanced angular position the arm carrying a headlight in a determined angular position after the arm and the headlight having been spread from this position in an intentional or fortuitous way. Application to lighting devices for nuclear reactor swimming pools. (Author). 4 figs., 3 refs

  18. Non-electric applications of pool-type nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper recommends the use of pool-type light water reactors for thermal energy production. Safety and reliability of these reactors were already demonstrated to the public by the long-term operation of swimming pool research reactors. The paper presents the design experience of two projects: Apatity Underground Nuclear Heating Plant and Nuclear Sea-Water Desalination Plant. The simplicity of pool-type reactors, the ease of their manufacturing and maintenance make this type of a heat source attractive to the countries without a developed nuclear industry. (author). 6 figs, 1 tab

  19. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Swimming Pools, Atlanta, Georgia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-05-29

    In this podcast, Dan Rutz speaks with Dr. Joan Shields, a guest researcher with the Healthy Swimming Program at CDC, about an article in June 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases reporting on the results of a test of swimming pools in the greater Atlanta, Georgia area. Dr. Shields tested 160 pools in metro Atlanta last year for Cryptosporidium and Giardia. These germs cause most recreational water associated outbreaks.  Created: 5/29/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 5/29/2008.

  20. Decontamination of outdoor school swimming pools in Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident following the Great East Japan Earthquake, many school swimming pools in Fukushima have suspended water discharge, due to concerns that pool water which contains radioactive fallout is discharged into a river or waterway for agricultural use. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency conducted researches and examinations on the existing absorbent method and the flocculation method as ways for decontaminating pool water. By reviewing and improving these methods through decontamination demonstrations at eight pools in Fukushima, a practical decontamination method for outdoor pools has been established. This report summarizes the methods and results of the decontamination demonstrations carried out at the schools. Also, the surface density of fallout estimated at one of the pools is also presented and discussed in connection with the overall collection ratio of radiocesium at the pool. (author)

  1. Acanthamoeba species in Swimming Pools of Cairo, Egypt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Al-Herrawy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The free-living amoebae Acanthamoeba spp. have been recognized as etiologic agents of amoebic encephalitis, keratitis, otitis, lung lesions and other skin infections mainly in immuno-compromised individuals. The purpose of this study is to detect the presence of Acanthamoeba in swimming pools in Egypt using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR method.Water samples were collected from 10 different swimming pools in Cairo, Egypt. Samples were cultured on non-nutrient agar for the detection of Acanthamoeba isolates that were confirmed by PCR amplification using genus specific primers. The molecularly confirmed Acanthamoeba isolates were morphologically identified to the species level.Members of genus Acanthamoeba were detected in 49.2% of the examined swimming-pool water samples. Morphologically, six Acanthamoeba species were isolated from the examined swimming pool water namely A. polyphaga, A.castellanii, A. rhysodes, A. mauritaniensis, A. royreba and A. triangularis. All the identified species of Acanthamoeba were molecularly confirmed to be related to the genus Acanthamoeba.The isolated species of Acanthamoeba could provoke variable degrees of infections to the swimmers. The culture method is cheaper and easier than PCR techniques that are faster for the detection of free-living amoebae.

  2. Estimated environmental radionuclide transfer and deposition into outdoor swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, Kazumi; Nagata, Izumi; Sueki, Keisuke

    2014-10-01

    In 2011, a large radioactive discharge occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. This plant is located within a climatically temperate region where outdoor swimming pools are popular. Although it is relatively easy to decontaminate pools by refilling them with fresh water, it is difficult to maintain safe conditions given highly contaminated diurnal dust falls from the surrounding contaminated ground. Our objectives in this paper were to conduct daily radioactivity measurements, to determine the quantity of radioactive contaminants from the surrounding environment that invade outdoor pools, and to investigate the efficacy of traditional pool cleaners in removing radioactive contaminants. The depositions in the paper filterable particulates ranged from 0 to 62,5 Bq/m(2)/day, with the highest levels found in the southern Tohoku District containing Fukushima Prefecture and in the Kanto District containing Tokyo Metro. They were approximately correlated with the ground contamination. Traditional pool cleaners eliminated 99% of contaminants at the bottom of the pool, reducing the concentration to 41 Bq/m(2) after cleaning. Authors recommended the deposition or the blown radionuclides into outdoor swimming pools must be considered into pool regulations when the environments exactly polluted with radionuclides. PMID:24878717

  3. Comprehensive Identification of Chemical DBPs from Chlorinated and Brominated Swimming Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swimming pools have been recently recognized as important routes of exposure to potentially harmful chemicals. Previous epidemiologic research has shown increased incidence of asthma and other respiratory effects for people who have significant indoor swimming pool exposures, an...

  4. Indoor swimming pool attendance and respiratory and dermal health in schoolchildren: HITEA Catalonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Font-Ribera, L.; Villanueva, C.M.; Gracia-Lavedan, E.; Borràs-Santos, A.; Kogevinas, M.; Zock, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Health benefits of swimming in pools may outweigh adverse health outcomes in children, but evidence from epidemiological studies is scarce or inconclusive for different health outcomes. We evaluated the association between indoor swimming pool attendance during childhood and respiratory

  5. Swimming pool attendance and respiratory symptoms and allergies among Dutch children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J.H.; Fuertes, E.; Krop, E.J.M.; Spithoven, J.; Tromp, P.; Heederik, D.J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To describe associations among swimming, respiratory health, allergen sensitisation and Clara cell protein 16 (CC16) levels in Dutch schoolchildren. Trichloramine levels in swimming pool air were determined to assess potential exposure levels. Methods: Respiratory health and pool attenda

  6. Swimming pool attendance and respiratory symptoms and allergies among Dutch children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J.H.; Fuertes, E.; Krop, E.J.M.; Spithoven, J.; Tromp, P.; Heederik, D.J.J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To describe associations among swimming, respiratory health, allergen sensitisation and Clara cell protein 16 (CC16) levels in Dutch schoolchildren. Trichloramine levels in swimming pool air were determined to assess potential exposure levels. METHODS Respiratory health and pool attendanc

  7. ITER at Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This public information document presents the ITER project (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), the definition of the fusion, the international cooperation and the advantages of the project. It presents also the site of Cadarache, an appropriate scientifical and economical environment. The last part of the documentation recalls the historical aspect of the project and the today mobilization of all partners. (A.L.B.)

  8. ENERGY SAVING AT OPERATION OF OUTDOOR SWIMMING POOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Ivin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Energy saving is a major problem in modern power engineering and various energy-consuming devices. They include outdoor swimming pools. In order to maintain them in working condition, especially in winter period, it takes significant amount of thermal energy. Task of heat loss substantial decrease in open swimming pools is considered in the article (on DNURT example. Methodology. The method of determining the mass and heat loss on the basis of criteria equations of heat and mass transfer theory is used. Findings. Calculations of the actual DNURT pool heat loss for different seasons, as for natural convection both for air forced motion above the free water surface are performed. It is shown that for the adiabatic evaporation conditions of water from the pool in winter during blow-off with wind the heat loss can be up to 2 kW/m2 on surface. To reduce these losses it is offered to cover water surface in a pool with a special material with low thermal conductivity on the basis of porous polyethylene during the time when the pool is not used for other purposes. It is shown that the implementation of these standards will reduce the actual heat loss, at least 5-6 times. Originality. The solution of important environmental and energy problem thanks to reducing heat losses by the pool in different times of a year and correspondingly lower emissions of power generating enterprises. Practical value. It is shown that the coating surface of the pool with poorly heat-conducting and easy to install coating will let, at a minimum, to reduce the actual heat loss on 5-6 times and reduce the emissions of power plants generating energy for pool heating.

  9. Occurrence and daily variability of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Tiffany L L; Coleman, Heather M; Khan, Stuart J

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the presence and daily variability of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in public swimming pools. Various types of public swimming pool water were analysed, taken from freshwater indoor swimming pools, outdoor swimming pools, spa pools and seawater swimming pools. Swimming pool water samples were analysed for 30 PPCPs using solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). All PPCPs were below quantification limits in seawater pools. However, caffeine was detected in 12 chlorinated swimming pools at concentrations up to 1540 ng/L and ibuprofen was observed in 7 chlorinated pools at concentrations up to 83 ng/L. Caffeine and ibuprofen concentrations were below quantification limits in all fill water samples, eliminating this as their source in swimming pools. High variations in caffeine concentrations monitored throughout the day roughly reflect bather loads in swimming pools. Future monitoring of these compounds may assist in evaluating what portion of organic matter measured in swimming pools may come from human excretions. PMID:26705754

  10. Study of Fungal Contamination of Indoor Public Swimming Pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Nanbakhsh

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are found in different environments with variable distribution patterns depending on various factors. The aim of this study was determination of fungal contaminants in public swimming pools in Uromia, Iran. The fungal contaminations of four indoor swimming pools were studied by using membrane filtration and swab sampling method. Samples were collected by a manual plastic pump, in a 200 ml sterilized bottle. All samples were collected within 2 hours and then transferred to the laboratory. A total of 384 samples including water and environmental surfaces were collected and tested for the presence of fungi in different seasons within one year. In addition to the above information, some physical and chemical parameters such as temperature, residual chlorine, pH, turbidity of water and the number of swimmers were studied. Findings indicated that, the average temperature, pH, residual chlorine and turbidity of water in the swimming pools within one year were: 29.9°C, 8.1, 0.6 ppm and 0.8 NTU respectively. The most common fungi recovered were as follows: Asepergillus Spp. 56.25%, Candida spp. 22.9%, Rhizopus spp. 4.16 %, other filamentous fungi 16.6% and other yeast species 2.8%. The fungi such as Alternaria, Cladosporium, Philophora and Trichophyton mentagrophytis were isolated from dressing room, bathing room and other places out of pools. According to these results and previous studies on pools, it has been indicated that contamination by fungi in the pools is not significant in water and environment. Presence of dermatophytic fungus from dressing room is probably due to human contact.

  11. Software for the Design of Swimming Pool Dehumidifiers Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubina, Aleš; Blasinski, Petr; Tesař, Zdeněk

    2013-06-01

    The article deals with the description and solution of physical phenomena taking place during evaporation of water. The topicality of the theme is given a number of built indoor swimming pool and wellness centers at present. In addressing HVAC systems serving these areas, it is necessary to know the various design parameters in the interior including the water temperature as the pool temperature and humidity. Following is a description of the calculation module, air handling units, including optimizing the settings of the physical changes in order to ensure the lowest energy consumption for air treatment and required maintaining internal microclimate parameters.

  12. Analysis of SBO Accident and Natural Circulation of 49-2 Swimming Pool Reactor%49-2游泳池式反应堆全场断电事故与自然循环能力分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴园园; 刘天才; 孙微

    2012-01-01

    在全场断电事故下,采用RELAP5/MOD3.3程序对49-2游泳池式反应堆系统热工水力参数瞬态特性进行计算分析,验证反应堆利用自然循环和自身负反应性对事故的缓解能力,并简要讨论了堆芯通道和主泵惰转对事故后果及进程的影响.计算结果表明,在49-2反应堆发生全场断电事故且紧急停堆系统失效后,反应堆可依靠自身的负反应性使反应堆处于停堆状态,并能形成稳定的自然循环,导出堆芯余热,验证了49-2反应堆在全场断电超设计基准事故中是安全的.%The transient thermal hydraulic characteristics of 49-2 Swimming Pool Reactor (SPR) were analyzed by RELAP5/MOD3. 3 code to verify the capability of natural circulation and minus reactivity feedback for accident mitigation under the condition of station blackout (SBO). Then, the effects on accident consequence and sequence for core channels and primary pumps were briefly discussed. The calculation results show that the reactor can be shutdown by the effect of minus reactivity feedback, and the residual heat can be removed through the stable natural circulation. Therefore, it demonstrates that the 49-2 SPR is safe during the accident of SBO.

  13. Investigation on the applicability of Piety's on-line PSD-pattern recognition algorithm to boiling detection by neutron-noise at a swimming-pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron noise signal of an initiation-of-boiling experiment performed at the SAPHIR reactor has been analyzed by the PSD-pattern recognition algorithm of Piety (1977); the results indicate that the onset of boiling can be detected by this method. Improved confidence statements for the statistical decision discriminants are given. (Auth.)

  14. An Investigation on Physicochemical and Microbial Water Quality of Swimming Pools in Yazd

    OpenAIRE

    M Dehvari; M Amrollahi; V Dad; MH Ehrampoush; MT Ghaneian; B Jamshidi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Disrespect of health regulations and proper disinfection of water and swimming pools is effective in incidence of health problems and transfer of infectious diseases to swimmers. The aim of this research was to investigate water of swimming pools in Yazd city and compare the results with national standards. Methods: In this study, 11 active covered swimming pools of Yazd city were sampled as census. Parameters of temperature, pH, amount of free and Combined chlorine residual, tu...

  15. Semi-Automatic Detection of Swimming Pools from Aerial High-Resolution Images and LIDAR Data

    OpenAIRE

    Borja Rodríguez-Cuenca; Maria C. Alonso

    2014-01-01

    Bodies of water, particularly swimming pools, are land covers of high interest. Their maintenance involves energy costs that authorities must take into consideration. In addition, swimming pools are important water sources for firefighting. However, they also provide a habitat for mosquitoes to breed, potentially posing a serious health threat of mosquito-borne disease. This paper presents a novel semi-automatic method of detecting swimming pools in urban environments from aerial images and L...

  16. Quantification of continual anthropogenic pollutants released in swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuten, M G A; Peters, M C F M; Daanen, H A M; de Kreuk, M K; Rietveld, L C; van Dijk, J C

    2014-04-15

    Disinfection in swimming pools is often performed by chlorination, However, anthropogenic pollutants from swimmers will react with chlorine and form disinfection by-products (DBPs). DBPs are unwanted from a health point of view, because some are irritating, while others might be carcinogenic. The reduction of anthropogenic pollutants will lead to a reduction in DBPs. This paper investigates the continual release of anthropogenic pollutants by means of controlled sweat experiments in a pool tank during laboratory time-series experiments (LTS experiments) and also during on-site experiments (OS experiments) in a swimming pool. The sweat released during the OS and LTS experiments was very similar. The sweat rate found was 0.1-0.2 L/m(2)/h at water temperatures below 29 °C and increased linearly with increasing water temperatures to 0.8 L/m(2)/h at 35 °C. The continual anthropogenic pollutant release (CAPR) not only consisted of sweat, particles (mainly skin fragments and hair) and micro-organisms, but also sebum (skin lipids) has to be considered. The release of most components can be explained by the composition of sweat. The average release during 30 min of exercise is 250 mg/bather non-purgeable organic carbon (NPOC), 77.3 mg/bather total nitrogen (TN), 37.1 mg/bather urea and 10.1 mg/bather ammonium. The release of NPOC cannot be explained by the composition of sweat and is most probably a result of sebum release. The average release of other components was 1.31 × 10(9) # particles/bather (2-50 μm), 5.2 μg/bather intracellular adenosine triphosphate (cATP) and 9.3 × 10(6) intact cell count/bather (iCC). The pool water temperature was the main parameter to restrain the CAPR. This study showed that a significant amount of the total anthropogenic pollutants release is due to unhygienic behaviour of bathers. PMID:24530546

  17. Blanket and vacuum vessel design of the next tokamak. (Swimming pool type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural design study of a reactor module for a swimming pool type reactor (SPTR) was conducted. Since pool water plays the role of radiation shielding in the SPTR, the module does not have a solid shield. It consists of tritium breeding blankets, divertor collector plates and a vacuum vessel. The object of this study is to show the reactor module design which has a simple structure and a sufficient tritium breeding ratio. A large coverage of the plasma chamber surface with tritium breeding blanket is essential in order to obtain a high tritium breeding ratio. A breeding blanket is also placed behind the divertor collector plate, i.e. in the upper and lower region, as well as in the outboard and inboard regions of the module. A concept in which the first wall is an integral part of the blanket is employed to minimize the thickness of structural and cooling material brazed in front of the breeding material (Li2O) and to enhance the tritium breeding capability. In order to simplify the module structure the vacuum vessel and breeding blanket is also integrated in the inboard region. One of the features inherent in the swimming pool type reactor is an additional external force on the vacuum vessel, namely hydraulic pressure. A detailed structural analysis of the vacuum vessel is performed. Divertor collector plates are assemblies of co-axial tubes. They minimize the electromagnetic force on the plate induced by the plasma disruption. A thermal and structural analysis and life time estimation of the first wall and divertor collector plates are performed. (author)

  18. Bacteriological Assessment of Water Quality of Public Swimming Pools in the Accra Metropolis, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A. Pesewu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Water is essential for life and in most parts of the world including Ghana it is used for various activities such as drinking, bathing and recreational purposes. The objective of this study was to assess the bacteriological quality of swimming pools’ water in the Accra Metropolis. Five swimming pools were selected randomly and a research team visited the pools to collect water samples and at the same time administer short questionnaires about the characteristics of the pools. The average number of swimmers, swimming bathing loads, average age group of pool users, methods of disinfection, type of chlorine used, recycling, and treatment of the water before and after use were investigated. During the visit, water samples were collected for total coliform, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus counts using the Membrane Filtration (MF method and cultured on chromogenic media. Most (60% of the selected swimming pools had a bathing load≤20 per day. The operators of the pools disinfect their pools’ water with chorine but majority (60% of the pool operators chlorinated their pools manually with powdered chlorine. The 20 water samples investigated show that 48% of swimming pools water was contaminated with S. aureus, 30.4% with Ps. aeruginosa , 20.9% with total coli form and 0.7% with E. coli. The E. coli count found in this study was very low indicating that the selected swimming pools were not feacally polluted at the time of sampling. It is recommended that future studies should use large sample sizes.

  19. Survey of bacterial contamination of environment of swimming pools in Yazd city, in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jafari Mansoorian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infections are readily transmitted as a result of bacterial contamination of swimming pools. Therefore, hygiene and preventing the contamination of swimming pools is of particular importance. The objective of this study was to determine the amount of bacterial contamination in indoor pools of Yazd in 2013. Methods: In this descriptive and analytical study, all indoor swimming pools of Yazd (12 pools were evaluated during the spring and summer of 2013, in terms of bacterial contamination. In order to determine contamination, a sterile cotton swab was used for sampling. On average, 45 samples were taken from different surfaces in each pool (shower, dressing room, sitting places in sauna, platforms and around the pool. In total, about 540 samples from all pools were tested for bacterial contamination. Results: The results show that from 540 samples, bacterial contamination was observed in about 93 samples (17.22%; and was seen more in showers, edges of the pool and jacuzzis, and the slippers used in swimming pools. The most important isolated bacteria types were E. coli, Actinobacteria, Pseudomonas alcaligenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia. Conclusion: The results indicate the presence of bacterial contamination on the surface of these places. It is recommended that health authorities should pay more attention to cleaning and disinfecting surfaces around the pool, showers, dressing rooms etc, to prevent infectious disease transfer as a result of contact with contaminated swimming pool surfaces.

  20. Livermore pool-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Livermore Pool-Type Reactor (LPTR) has served a dual purpose since 1958--as an instrument for fundamental research and as a tool for measurement and calibration. Our early efforts centered on neutron-diffraction, fission, and capture gamma-ray studies. During the 1960's it was used for extensive calibration work associated with radiochemical and physical measurements on nuclear-explosive tests. Since 1970 the principal applications have been for trace-element measurements and radiation-damage studies. Today's research program is dominated by radiochemical studies of the shorter-lived fission products and by research on the mechanisms of radiation damage. Trace-element measurement for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program is the major measurement application today

  1. Semi-Automatic Detection of Swimming Pools from Aerial High-Resolution Images and LIDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borja Rodríguez-Cuenca

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bodies of water, particularly swimming pools, are land covers of high interest. Their maintenance involves energy costs that authorities must take into consideration. In addition, swimming pools are important water sources for firefighting. However, they also provide a habitat for mosquitoes to breed, potentially posing a serious health threat of mosquito-borne disease. This paper presents a novel semi-automatic method of detecting swimming pools in urban environments from aerial images and LIDAR data. A new index for detecting swimming pools is presented (Normalized Difference Swimming Pools Index that is combined with three other decision indices using the Dempster–Shafer theory to determine the locations of swimming pools. The proposed method was tested in an urban area of the city of Alcalá de Henares in Madrid, Spain. The method detected all existing swimming pools in the studied area with an overall accuracy of 99.86%, similar to the results obtained by support vector machines (SVM supervised classification.

  2. Mathematical modelling and simulation of the thermal performance of a solar heated indoor swimming pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mančić Marko V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Buildings with indoor swimming pools have a large energy footprint. The source of major energy loss is the swimming pool hall where air humidity is increased by evaporation from the pool water surface. This increases energy consumption for heating and ventilation of the pool hall, fresh water supply loss and heat demand for pool water heating. In this paper, a mathematical model of the swimming pool was made to assess energy demands of an indoor swimming pool building. The mathematical model of the swimming pool is used with the created multi-zone building model in TRNSYS software to determine pool hall energy demand and pool losses. Energy loss for pool water and pool hall heating and ventilation are analyzed for different target pool water and air temperatures. The simulation showed that pool water heating accounts for around 22%, whereas heating and ventilation of the pool hall for around 60% of the total pool hall heat demand. With a change of preset controller air and water temperatures in simulations, evaporation loss was in the range 46-54% of the total pool losses. A solar thermal sanitary hot water system was modelled and simulated to analyze it's potential for energy savings of the presented demand side model. The simulation showed that up to 87% of water heating demands could be met by the solar thermal system, while avoiding stagnation. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 42006: Research and development of energy and environmentally highly effective polygeneration systems based on using renewable energy sources

  3. Water treatment in public swimming pools - reduction of energy consumption; Vandbehandling i svoemmebade - reduktion af energiforbrug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammerich, H.; Radisch, N. (Ramboell, Koege (Denmark)); Olesen, Jens Christian (Gladsaxe Sportscenter, Gladsaxe (Denmark)) (and others)

    2010-04-15

    Measurements were made in five public swimming baths, and energy savings were achieved using new filters, pumps, water treatment control depending on bather load, etc. In a 50 metre pool, electricity consumption for water treatment decreased by 50%, and in a hot-water/paddling pool, electricity consumption decreased by 30-40% while still maintaining satisfactory water quality - even during periods of heavy bather load. In another swimming bath, ventilation electricity consumption was reduced by 15%. The results will e.g. be used to revise the Danish executive order on swimming pools and water quality to allow bather load-dependent water circulation. (ln)

  4. Titanium distribution in swimming pool water is dominated by dissolved species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increased use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) in consumer products such as sunscreen has raised concerns about their possible risk to human and environmental health. In this work, we report the occurrence, size fractionation and behavior of titanium (Ti) in a children's swimming pool. Size-fractionated samples were analyzed for Ti using ICP-MS. Total titanium concentrations ([Ti]) in the pool water ranged between 21 μg/L and 60 μg/L and increased throughout the 101-day sampling period while [Ti] in tap water remained relatively constant. The majority of [Ti] was found in the dissolved phase (<1 kDa), with only a minor fraction of total [Ti] being considered either particulate or microparticulate. Simple models suggest that evaporation may account for the observed variation in [Ti], while sunscreen may be a relevant source of particulate and microparticule Ti. Compared to diet, incidental ingestion of nano-Ti from swimming pool water is minimal. -- Highlights: •Total titanium concentrations in unfiltered swimming pool water ranged between 21 and 60 μg/L. •Evaporation of the swimming pool water is suspected of causing a temporal increase in [Ti]. •The vast majority of Ti is found in the dissolved phase (<1 kD). •Swimming pools are not a significant Ti source for human exposure via ingestion. -- In children's swimming pool water, the majority of titanium is found in the dissolved phase

  5. Bacteriological quality of some swimming pools in Alexandria with special reference to Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoud, Ghada; Abbass, Aleya; Abaza, Amani; Hazzah, Walaa

    2016-07-01

    Swimming pools have been identified as posing some public health risks to users due to either bacterial or chemical contamination. As a result, maintaining good swimming pool water quality is an important issue in preventing health risks for bathers. This study aimed to evaluate the bacteriological quality of some swimming pools in Alexandria and to investigate the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) in water samples. A total of 120 water samples from 10 swimming pools were collected. Bacteriological analysis included heterotrophic plate count (HPC) using pour plate method; enumeration of total coliforms (TC), Escherichia coli (E. coli) and S. aureus by membrane filtration technique. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on isolated S. aureus. Residual chlorine and pH were measured at swimming pools side. HPC was the least complying microbial parameter, followed by TC. S. aureus was recovered from 18 samples; 9 isolates were methicillin resistant S.aureus (MRSA), compared to E. coli that was detected in 7 samples. HPC and TC showed statistically significant correlations with all investigated parameters. In conclusion, the examined pools showed poor quality regarding all examined parameters collectively according to the Egyptian guidelines, which necessitates implementation of proper measures to ensure safer environment in swimming pools. PMID:27312255

  6. Childhood asthma and environmental exposures at swimming pools: state of the science and research recommendations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weisel, C.P.; Richardson, S.D.; Nemery, B.; Aggazzotti, G.; Baraldi, E.; Blatchley, E.R.; Blount, B.C.; Carlsen, K.H.; Eggleston, P.A.; Frimmel, F.H.; Goodman, M.; Gordon, G.; Grinshpun, S.A.; Heederik, D.J.J.; Kogevinas, M.; LaKind, J.S.; Nieuwenhuijsen, M.J.; Piper, F.C.; Sattar, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have explored the potential for swimming pool disinfection by-products (DBPs), which are respiratory irritants, to cause asthma in young children. Here we describe the state of the science on methods for understanding children's exposure to DBPs and biologics at swimming p

  7. Indoor swimming pool attendance and respiratory and dermal health in schoolchildren: HITEA Catalonia.

    OpenAIRE

    Font-Ribera, L.; Villanueva, C M; Gracia-Lavedan, E.; Borràs-Santos, A.; Kogevinas, M; Zock, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Health benefits of swimming in pools may outweigh adverse health outcomes in children, but evidence from epidemiological studies is scarce or inconclusive for different health outcomes. We evaluated the association between indoor swimming pool attendance during childhood and respiratory and dermal conditions and symptoms in Catalan schoolchildren. Methods: Cross-sectional study in 2758 children aged 6–12 years from 18 primary schools in Barcelona province. Information on regular i...

  8. Swimming pool attendance is related to asthma among atopic school children: a population-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Martin; Hedman, Linnéa; Nordberg, Gunnar; Forsberg, Bertil; Eriksson, Kåre; Rönmark, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Background: By-products of water disinfectants have been suggested to cause asthma, especially in atopic children. However, studies on indoor swimming pool attendance and asthma in children have presented conflicting results. The present study examined the relationship between indoor swimming pool attendance and asthma among sensitized and non-sensitized children aged 11-12 years. Methods: An extended ISAAC questionnaire was sent to the families of all children attending fifth or sixth grade,...

  9. Childhood asthma and environmental exposures at swimming pools: state of the science and research recommendations.

    OpenAIRE

    Weisel, C P; Richardson, S.D.; Nemery, B.; Aggazzotti, G.; Baraldi, E.; Blatchley, E.R.; Blount, B.C.; Carlsen, K H; Eggleston, P. A.; Frimmel, F.H.; Goodman, M.; Gordon, G.; Grinshpun, S. A.; Heederik, D.J.J.; Kogevinas, M

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have explored the potential for swimming pool disinfection by-products (DBPs), which are respiratory irritants, to cause asthma in young children. Here we describe the state of the science on methods for understanding children's exposure to DBPs and biologics at swimming pools and associations with new-onset childhood asthma and recommend a research agenda to improve our understanding of this issue. DATA SOURCES: A workshop was held in Leuven, Belgium, 21-23 August ...

  10. On-Line Realtime Water Quality Monitoring and Control for Swimming Pools

    OpenAIRE

    Duffy, Paul; Woods, Gerard; O'Hogain, sean; Walsh, James; Caplier, C.

    2009-01-01

    Effective swimming pool water quality monitoring and control systems are important to safeguard public health and for bather comfort. Most Irish swimming pool monitoring systems rely heavily on manual methods for sampling, testing and data recording of important parameters. Microbiological testing is infrequent and results can often take days. The goal of this research is to develop a water quality monitoring and control system with real time data logging, automatic data analysis, remote moni...

  11. Swimming pool attendance and risk of asthma and allergic symptoms in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font-Ribera, L; Kogevinas, M; Zock, J-P; Nieuwenhuijsen, M J; Heederik, D; Villanueva, C M

    2009-12-01

    Increased asthma risk has been associated with pool attendance in children but evidence is inconsistent and inconclusive. A survey was conducted of 3,223 9-12-yr-old children in Sabadell (Spain) to evaluate association between swimming pool attendance and prevalence of asthma and allergic conditions and symptoms. Parents completed a questionnaire on lifetime frequency of pool attendance and symptoms in the last 12 months (wheezing, asthma medication, rhinitis and allergic rhinitis), ever having asthma and eczema, and potential confounders. Indicators of indoor and outdoor swimming pool attendance early in life, cumulatively and currently were calculated. Swimming pool attendance before the age of 2 yrs was associated with slightly lower prevalence of current asthma (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.43-1.46), rhinitis (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.68-1.08) and allergic rhinitis symptoms (OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.54-0.96) compared to those who started attending swimming pools after 4 yrs of age. An increased prevalence of eczema was associated with duration of lifetime pool attendance (OR 1.71, 95%CI 1.38-2.12 for >5 yrs versus 0 yrs). Swimming pool attendance in Spanish children was associated with slightly less upper and lower respiratory tract symptoms and with more eczema. Longitudinal studies are required to confirm these findings and avoid potential reverse causation. PMID:19443529

  12. Internal exposure by natural radiation and decontamination of swimming pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This explanation concerns the scientific knowledge and finding of the title subjects for general public to understand their present radiation environment, id est (i.e.), at about 1 year after the Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant Accident (FDPPA). The first described is the world history of radiation exposure, where A-bomb explosion in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Three Mile Island Power Plant Accident and Chernobyl Accident are told about their teachings and about internal nuclides at FDPPA: the author points out the natural high abundance of K-40 in contrast to the release of I-131, and Cs-137/-134 in the accident. The second is described about the effect of radiations on human cells, where characteristics, measurements, unit and their derived radionuclides of alpha, beta and gamma rays are explained together with their biological influences. Also explained are hydroxy-radical formation by alpha and beta rays in the internal exposure, and comparison of external photons, gamma and more risky ultraviolet rays. Third, the author mentions about man's natural functions to protect radiation hazard. Presented are an easy calculation and a comparison of K-40 and Cs-137 contents (weight and Bq) in the body and in the swimming pool with reference to Chernobyl standards. Internal exposure by natural radionuclides like K-40 and others, is also calculated, which is found equivalent to 0.29 mSv/y based on about 5,630 Bq/60 kg body weight. Finally, explained are the knowledge and practice of decontamination, where various adsorbents like zeolite (molecular sieve), ion exchanger, charcoal and natural zeolites (alumino-silicate) are compared and the last agent, clay easily and economically available, is recommended for decontamination. Clay material is said to adsorb 87% of Cs-137 at as low level as 750 mg/L and the author has an experience to use it successfully for decontamination of the pool. Importantly, the radioactivity of the resultant sludge should not exceed 8,000 Bq/kg. (T.T.)

  13. Recent developments in post-irradiation examination techniques for water reactor fuel. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting held in Cadarache, France, 17-21 October 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the invitation of the Government of France, following a proposal of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT) the IAEA convened a Technical Committee meeting from 14 to 21 October 1994 in Cadarache to discuss recent technical advances and improvements in the field of post-irradiation examination (PIE) of fuel used in nuclear power plants. Fifty participants representing 14 countries attended the meeting and 30 papers were presented and discussed during five technical sessions. Working Groups composed of the session chairmen and authors of papers prepared summaries of each session including conclusions and recommendations for future work. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. The key role of critical mock-up facilities for neutronic physics assessment of advanced reactors: an overview of Cea Cadarache tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Experimental Physics section of CEA Cadarache operates three critical facilities devoted to neutronic studies of advanced reactors (EOLE, MINERVE and MASURCA) covering a large scope of interests. These include 100% MOX core in ABWR qualification, knowledge improvement of basic nuclear data for heavy nuclides for new options of the fuel cycle - especially the multi-recycling of plutonium - and accelerator-driven systems neutronic behaviour for transmutation studies. The paper describes these facilities, the scientific programmes associated and the progressive improvement of experimental techniques, the aim being to significantly reduce the uncertainties regarding the evaluation of the physical parameters. (authors)

  15. TRR-1/M1 reactor pool refurbishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pool refurbishment of the TRR-1/M1 is intended to maintain the pool and irradiation facilities in the operable condition prior to the next decade before making decision whether the reactor will be shutdown and decommissioning or used for other purposes. What ever reason the TRR-1/M1 will serve as a training tool for scientists or engineers, and isotopes production or other analytical works for a period of time until the new research reactor will be established. (orig.)

  16. Swimming pool attendance and risk of asthma and allergic symptoms in children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Font-Ribera, L.; Kogevinas, M.; Zock, J.P.; Nieuwenhuijsen, M.J.; Heederik, D.; Villanueva, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Increased asthma risk has been associated with pool attendance in children but evidence is inconsistent and inconclusive. A survey was conducted of 3,223 9-12-yr-old children in Sabadell (Spain) to evaluate association between swimming pool attendance and prevalence of asthma and allergic conditions

  17. Determination of Monochloroacetic Acid in Swimming Pool Water by Ion Chromatography-Conductivity Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pythias B. Espino

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an analytical method involving ion chromatography with conductivity detection was developed and optimized for the determination of monochloroacetic acid in swimming pool water. The ion chromatographic method has a detection limit of 0.02 mg L-1 and linear range of 0.05 to 1.0 mg L-1 with correlation coeff icient of 0.9992. The method is reproducible with percent RSD of 0.052% (n=10. The recovery of monochloroacetic acid spiked in different water types (bottled, tap and swimming pool water ranged from 28 to 122%. In dilute solutions, chloride and bromide were simultaneously analyzed along with monochloroacetic acid using the optimized method. Chloride and bromide have detection limits of 0.01 to 0.05 mg L-1, respectively. The usefulness of the ion chromatographic method was demonstrated in the analysis of monochloroacetic acid in swimming pool water samples. In such highly-chlorinated samples, an Ag/H cartridge was used prior to the ion chromatographic determination so as to minimize the signal due to chloride ion. Monochloroacetic acid was detected in concentrations between 0.020 and 0.093 mg L-1 in three of the six swimming pool water samples studied. The presence of monochloroacetic acid in the swimming pool water samples suggests the possible occurrence of other disinfection by-products in these waters.

  18. Stade NPP. Dismantling of the reactor pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharf, Daniel; Dziwis, Joachim [E.ON Anlagenservice GmbH Nukleartechnik, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Kemp, Lutz-Hagen [KKW Stade GmbH und Co. oHG, Stade (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Within the scope of the 4{sup th} partial decommissioning permission of Stade NPP the activated and contaminated structures of the reactor pool had to be dismantled in order to gain a completely non-radioactive reactor pool area for the subsequent clearance measurement of the reactor building. In order to achieve the aim it was intended to remove the activated pool liner sheets, its activated framework and several contaminated ventilation channels made of stainless steel, the concrete walls of the reactor pool entirely or in parts depending on their activation level, as well as the remaining activated carbon steel structures of the reactor pool bottom. Embedded in the concrete walls there were several highly contaminated excore tubes and the contaminated pool top edge, which were intended to be removed to its full extent. The contract of the Stade NPP initiated reactor pool dismantling project had been awarded to E.ON Anlagenservice GmbH (EAS) and its subsupplier sat. Kerntechnik GmbH for the concrete dismantling works and was performed as follows. In order to minimize the radiation level in the main working area in accordance with the ALARA principle, the liner sheets and middle parts of its framework were removed by means of angle grinders first, as they were the most dose rate relevant parts. As a result the primary average radiation level in the reactor pool (measured in a distance of 500 mm from the walls) was lowered from 40 {mu}Sv/h to less than 2 {mu}Sv/h. After the minimization of the radiation level in the working area the main dismantling step started with the cutting of the reactor pool walls in blocks by means of diamond rope cutters. Once a concrete block was cut out, it was transported into the fuel pool by means of a crane and crane fork, examined radiologically, marked area by area and segmented to debris by means of an electrical excavator with a hydraulic chisel. Afterwards the debris and carbon steel parts were fractioned and packed for further

  19. Stade NPP. Dismantling of the reactor pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the scope of the 4th partial decommissioning permission of Stade NPP the activated and contaminated structures of the reactor pool had to be dismantled in order to gain a completely non-radioactive reactor pool area for the subsequent clearance measurement of the reactor building. In order to achieve the aim it was intended to remove the activated pool liner sheets, its activated framework and several contaminated ventilation channels made of stainless steel, the concrete walls of the reactor pool entirely or in parts depending on their activation level, as well as the remaining activated carbon steel structures of the reactor pool bottom. Embedded in the concrete walls there were several highly contaminated excore tubes and the contaminated pool top edge, which were intended to be removed to its full extent. The contract of the Stade NPP initiated reactor pool dismantling project had been awarded to E.ON Anlagenservice GmbH (EAS) and its subsupplier sat. Kerntechnik GmbH for the concrete dismantling works and was performed as follows. In order to minimize the radiation level in the main working area in accordance with the ALARA principle, the liner sheets and middle parts of its framework were removed by means of angle grinders first, as they were the most dose rate relevant parts. As a result the primary average radiation level in the reactor pool (measured in a distance of 500 mm from the walls) was lowered from 40 μSv/h to less than 2 μSv/h. After the minimization of the radiation level in the working area the main dismantling step started with the cutting of the reactor pool walls in blocks by means of diamond rope cutters. Once a concrete block was cut out, it was transported into the fuel pool by means of a crane and crane fork, examined radiologically, marked area by area and segmented to debris by means of an electrical excavator with a hydraulic chisel. Afterwards the debris and carbon steel parts were fractioned and packed for further treatment

  20. Infant swimming in chlorinated pools and the risks of bronchiolitis, asthma and allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisin, C; Sardella, A; Marcucci, F; Bernard, A

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies suggest that swimming in chlorinated pools during infancy may increase the risks of lower respiratory tract infection. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of swimming in chlorinated pools on the risks of bronchiolitis and its late consequences. A total of 430 children (47% female; mean age 5.7 yrs) in 30 kindergartens were examined. Parents completed a questionnaire regarding the child's health history, swimming practice and potential confounders. Attendance at indoor or outdoor chlorinated pools ever before the age of 2 yrs was associated with an increased risk of bronchiolitis (OR 1.68; 95% CI 1.08-2.68; p = 0.03), which was exposure-dependent for both types of pool (p-value for trend 20 h spent in chlorinated pools during infancy. Infant swimmers who developed bronchiolitis also showed higher risks of asthma and respiratory allergies later in childhood. Swimming pool attendance during infancy is associated with a higher risk of bronchiolitis, with ensuing increased risks of asthma and allergic sensitisation. PMID:20075053

  1. Swimming pool, respiratory health, and childhood asthma: should we change our beliefs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyan, Z S; Carraro, S; Piacentini, G; Baraldi, E

    2009-01-01

    Swimming is often recommended as a sport because of its several benefits to health. It is also recommended in asthmatic children as a sport with a lower potential for prompting exercise-induced asthma. However, there is growing interest in the potentially harmful effects of repeated respiratory tract exposure to chlorinated products and the problem of possible swimming-related health hazards is gaining importance at international level. It is already known that acute exposure to chlorine gas as in swimming pool accidents causes lung damage and also that elite swimmers may have increased airway inflammation and bronchial hyperreactivity, probably as a result of repeated exposure to chlorine derivatives. Recently some studies have been conducted to investigate whether repeated exposure to chlorine by-products in recreational swimmers might also lead to lung damage. In addition, some studies have been lately published on the even more debated issue of the possible harmful effects of baby swimming on respiratory health. This article reviews and discusses data from the literature on the effects of chlorine derivatives in different categories of people routinely attending swimming pools. The need for longitudinal studies is emphasized to definitely clarify any role of chlorinated swimming pool attendance in the development of asthma in recreational swimmers. PMID:19061232

  2. Disinfection by-product formation of UV treated swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Water samples from 3 indoor swimming pool facilities were tested to evaluate UV-induced effects on swimming pool water chemistry. Concentration change of several DBPs was investigated in experiments including medium pressure UV treatment with and without chlorine and post-UV chlorination. Post......-UV chlorine consumption increased, dose-dependently, with UV treatment dose. A clear absence of trihalomethane formation by UV and UV with chlorine was observed. The post-UV chlorination clearly induced formation of DBPs; however, for the total trihalomethanes (TTHM), the inductions were not more than what...... could be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation of DBPs. The...

  3. Mathematical model development of heat and mass exchange processes in the outdoor swimming pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Shaptala

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Currently exploitation of outdoor swimming pools is often not cost-effective and, despite of their relevance, such pools are closed in large quantities. At this time there is no the whole mathematical model which would allow assessing qualitatively the effect of energy-saving measures. The aim of this work is to develop a mathematical model of heat and mass exchange processes for calculating basic heat and mass losses that occur during its exploitation. Methodology. The method for determination of heat and mass loses based on the theory of similarity criteria equations is used. Findings. The main types of heat and mass losses of outdoor pool were analyzed. The most significant types were allocated and mathematically described. Namely: by evaporation of water from the surface of the pool, by natural and forced convection, by radiation to the environment, heat consumption for water heating. Originality. The mathematical model of heat and mass exchange process of the outdoor swimming pool was developed, which allows calculating the basic heat and mass loses that occur during its exploitation. Practical value. The method of determining heat and mass loses of outdoor swimming pool as a software system was developed and implemented. It is based on the mathematical model proposed by the authors. This method can be used for the conceptual design of energy-efficient structures of outdoor pools, to assess their use of energy-intensive and selecting the optimum energy-saving measures. A further step in research in this area is the experimental validation of the method of calculation of heat losses in outdoor swimming pools with its use as an example the pool of Dnipropetrovsk National University of Railway Transport named after Academician V. Lazaryan. The outdoor pool, with water heating- up from the boiler room of the university, is operated year-round.

  4. Definition and quantification of initial anthropogenic pollutant release in swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuten, M G A; Schets, F M; Schijven, J F; Verberk, J Q J C; van Dijk, J C

    2012-07-01

    Pollutants, brought into a swimming pool by bathers, will react with chlorine to form disinfection by-products (DBPs). Some of these DBPs are found to be respiratory and ocular irritant and might be associated with asthma, or might even be carcinogenic. As DBPs in swimming pools are formed from bather-shed-pollutants, a reduction of these pollutants will lead to a reduction of DBPs. Until now, however, the release of pollutants by bathers has not been studied in detail. The study described in this paper focuses on the release of these pollutants, further called anthropogenic pollutants. The objective was to define and quantify the initial anthropogenic pollutants, by using a standardised shower cabin and a standardised showering protocol in laboratory time-series experiments and on-site experiments in swimming pools. The time-series experiments resulted in a definition of the initial anthropogenic pollutant release: the amount of pollutants released from a person in a standardised shower cabin during the first 60 s of showering. The data from the time-series experiments were used to create a model of pollutant release. The model can be used to predict the initial anthropogenic pollutant release as well as the effects of showering. On-site experiments were performed at four different swimming pools, including one outdoor pool. Results of these on-site showering experiments correspond with the time-series and model outcomes. Anthropogenic pollutant release (both chemical and microbiological) in swimming pool water can be reduced by pre-swim showering, very likely resulting in decreased DBPs formation and chlorine demand. PMID:22560894

  5. "Mappings of secrecy and disclosure": The Swimming Pool Library, the closet, and the empire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukes, T

    1996-01-01

    The Swimming Pool Library is a novel of the closet that also offers a post-colonial reading of homosexuality in contemporary culture. Through its interpretation of gay life as a dialogic between Wildean and Gidean readings of homosexuality, and its examination of the closet as what Sedgwick calls "the defining structure of gay oppression," the novel analyzes the tensions of political oppression against sexual freedom. The Swimming Pool Library is thus seen as a text in conflict with itself about the very issues it raises: closeting and gay liberation, sexual freedom and sexual responsibility, loyalty to the past and duty in the present. PMID:8895031

  6. Fungal Contamination of Indoor Public Swimming Pools, Ahwaz, South-west of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rafiei

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Using public swimming pools during different seasons and poor health behavior could be responsible in transmis­sion of fungal disease through pool water and its environment. Therefore, this research was conducted to investi­gate fungal agents of indoor public swimming pools of Ahwaz, capital city of Khouzestan Province, south-west of Iran."nMethods: Ten indoor swimming pools of Ahwaz were investigated during two seasons for 6 months. Water specimens were col­lected by pump and environment samples including shower-bath area, margin of pool walls, dressing rooms, and slip­pers, by sterile carpet pieces. All specimens were cultured in SC and SCC culture media and fungal agents identification were based on macroscopic, microscopic characteristic and complement tests when it was necessary. Data analyzing was per­formed using SPSS version 13 for descriptive analyzing."nResults: A total of 593 samples were collected from different parts of pools. Interestingly in 13 samples from environ­mental places, dermatophytes were isolated as follows: Trichophyton mentagrophytes, T. rubrum, T. verrucosum and Epidermo­phyton floccosum 5, 4, 3 and 1 cases respectively. Ten cases of dermatophytes were isolated from floor of dressing area. Three hundred seventy two saprophytic fungi species and 32 yeasts were recovered from water and environment sur­faces samples. Aspergillus, Penicillium and Mucor were the most common isolated saprophytic fungi."nConclusion: Existence of saprophytic fungi and yeast in pools water seems to be an indicator of their resistance to detergent agents. In addition, yeast water contamination could be from swimmers. Dermatophytes isolation from pools environment ar­eas and foot washing sink, reveals the importance of public swimming pools in disease transmission. Because dressing places are being used by all of the swimmers, take care of hygienic discipline in these places should be noted by health pol­icy markers.

  7. Monitoring organic loading to swimming pools by fluorescence excitation–emission matrix with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seredynska-Sobecka, Bozena; Stedmon, Colin; Boe-Hansen, Rasmus; Waul, Christopher Kevin; Arvin, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence Excitation–Emission Matrix spectroscopy combined with parallel factor analysis was employed to monitor water quality and organic contamination in swimming pools. The fluorescence signal of the swimming pool organic matter was low but increased slightly through the day. The analysis...

  8. Modeling Target Disinfection By-Product Dynamics in Indoor Swimming Pools

    OpenAIRE

    Mondal, Barnard S; Troy, Cary; Afifi, Mehrnaz; Weng, Shih-Chi; Blatchley, Ernest R.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorination is the primary disinfection method for swimming pools in the United States; however, chlorine also reacts with pollutants (e.g., sweat, urine and anthropogenic compounds) to form disinfection by-products (DBPs). Some DBPs are asthma causing (e.g. nitrogen-trichloride) and even carcinogens (e.g., trihalomethanes and nitrosamines). Consequently, exposure to DBPs poses health risks to patrons and staff in pool environments. Furthermore, volatilization of DBPs is enhanced by bather a...

  9. Heated indoor swimming pools, infants, and the pathogenesis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a neurogenic hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    McMaster Marianne E

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In a case-control study a statistically significant association was recorded between the introduction of infants to heated indoor swimming pools and the development of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). In this paper, a neurogenic hypothesis is formulated to explain how toxins produced by chlorine in such pools may act deleteriously on the infant's immature central nervous system, comprising brain and spinal cord, to produce the deformity of AIS. Presentation of the hy...

  10. Health-Related Behaviors in Swimming Pool Users: Influence of Knowledge of Regulations and Awareness of Health Risks

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Gallè; Laura Dallolio; Manfredo Marotta; Alessandra Raggi; Valeria Di Onofrio; Giorgio Liguori; Francesco Toni; Erica Leoni

    2016-01-01

    Background: Swimming pool attendance exposes users to infection and chemical risks that could be largely reduced with the adoption of healthy behaviors. This study aims to investigate if the knowledge of swimming pool regulations and awareness of health risks can be associated with users’ health-related behaviors. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using self-administered questionnaires to collect data from two different target groups of swimming users: 184 adults and 184 children...

  11. Cancer risk assessment from exposure to trihalomethanes in tap water and swimming pool water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANYAKAPO Mallika; SOONTORNCHAI Sarisak; PAOPUREE Pongsri

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the concentration of trihalomethanes (THMs) in tap water and swimming pool water in the area of the Nakhon Path-om Municipality during the period April 2005-March 2006.The concentrations of total THMs,chloroform,bromodichloromethane,dibromochloromethane and bromoform in tap water were 12.70-41.74,6.72-29.19,1.12-11.75,0.63-3.55 and 0.08-3.40 μg/L,respectively,whereas those in swimming pool water were 26.15-65.09,9.50-36.97,8.90-18.01,5.19-22.78 and ND-6.56 μg/L,respectively.It implied that the concentration of THMs in swimming pool water was higher than those in tap water,particularly,brominated-THMs.Both tap water and swimming pool water contained concentrations of total THMs below the standards of the World Health Organization (WHO),European Union (EU) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) phase Ⅰ,but 1 out of 60 tap water samples and 60 out of 72 swimming pool water samples contained those over the Standard of the USEPA phase Ⅱ.From the two cases of cancer risk assessment including Case Ⅰ Non-Swimmer and Case Ⅱ Swimmer,assessment of cancer risk of non-swimmers from exposure to THMs at the highest and the average concentrations was 4.43×10-5 and 2.19×10-5,respectively,which can be classified as acceptable risk according to the Standard of USEPA.Assessment of cancer risk of swimmers from exposure to THMs at the highest and the average concentrations was 1.47×10-3 and 7.99×10-4,respectively,which can be classified as unacceptable risk and needs to be improved.Risk of THMs exposure from swimming was 93.9%-94.2% of the total risk.Cancer risk of THMs concluded from various routes in descending order was:skin exposure while swimming,gastro-intestinal exposure from tap water intake,and skin exposure to tap water and gastro-intestinal exposure while swimming.Cancer risk from skin exposure while swimming was 94.18% of the total cancer risk.

  12. Laboratory studies on the effect of ozonation on THM formation in swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Cheema, Waqas Akram;

    2015-01-01

    =17 min; t½,4=18 min). For drinking water, ozone decomposition was fast for the first dose of ozone (t½,1=4 min) and then decreased for the second and third dose of ozone (t½,2=19 min; t½,3=17 min). Chlorination after ozonation revealed that ozone removed reactivity of the dissolved organic carbon toward......Water samples from indoor swimming pool were ozonated at different pH values to evaluate the effect of pH on decomposition of ozone in swimming pool water. Furthermore, drinking and pool water were repeatedly ozonated followed by chlorination to evaluate THM formation. Decomposition of ozone was...... chlorine for drinking water as lower TTHM formation occurred than in non-ozonated samples. For pool water, a higher TTHM formation was observed in ozonated than non-ozonated pool water. Thus, it was observed that ozone reacts markedly different in swimming pool water from the known pattern in drinking...

  13. Swimming Pool Water Treatment Chemicals and/or Processes. Standard No. 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI.

    Chemicals or processes used or intended for use, in the treatment of swimming pool water are covered. Minimum public health limits or acceptability in regard to toxicity, biocidal effectiveness, and chemical behavior and analysis are presented. The appendices give guidelines to the scientific and statistically sound evaluations to determine the…

  14. Childhood Asthma and Environmental Exposures at Swimming Pools: State of the Science and Research Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent studies have explored the potential for swimming pool disinfection byproducts (DBPs) which are respiratory irritants to cause asthma in young children. While these studies raise concerns, gaps still exist in our knowledge regarding the exact causal agents and mechanisms f...

  15. Swimming Pool Hygiene: Self-Monitoring, Task Clarification, and Performance Feedback Increase Lifeguard Cleaning Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Henry M. S.; Ludwig, Timothy D.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of task clarification, self-monitoring, and performance feedback on cleaning behaviors of 9 lifeguards in 3 performance areas (vacuuming, lobby tidying, and pool deck maintenance) were investigated using an ABA reversal design at a county swim complex. A specific task in each performance area was used as a behavioral control. Following…

  16. Photolytic removal of DBPs by medium pressure UV in swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Zortea, R.; Piketty, A.;

    2013-01-01

    Medium pressure UV is used for controlling the concentration of combined chlorine (chloramines) in many public swimming pools. Little is known about the fate of other disinfection by-products (DBPs) in UV treatment. Photolysis by medium pressure UV treatment was investigated for 12 DBPs reported to...

  17. Centrifugal Pumps for Swimming Pools. National Sanitation Foundation Standard Number 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI. Committee for Swimming Pool Equipment Standards.

    The pumps discussed herein are intended to be used for recirculating water in swimming pools, both public and private. Included are the basic components which may be a part of a pump such as the housing, strainer, impeller, valves, and such other parts as are attached or a part of the pump as supplied by the manufacturer. This standard is intended…

  18. Enhancing swimming pool safety by the use of range-imaging cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerardyn, D.; Boulanger, S.; Kuijk, M.

    2015-05-01

    Drowning is the cause of death of 372.000 people, each year worldwide, according to the report of November 2014 of the World Health Organization.1 Currently, most swimming pools only use lifeguards to detect drowning people. In some modern swimming pools, camera-based detection systems are nowadays being integrated. However, these systems have to be mounted underwater, mostly as a replacement of the underwater lighting. In contrast, we are interested in range imaging cameras mounted on the ceiling of the swimming pool, allowing to distinguish swimmers at the surface from drowning people underwater, while keeping the large field-of-view and minimizing occlusions. However, we have to take into account that the water surface of a swimming pool is not a flat, but mostly rippled surface, and that the water is transparent for visible light, but less transparent for infrared or ultraviolet light. We investigated the use of different types of 3D cameras to detect objects underwater at different depths and with different amplitudes of surface perturbations. Specifically, we performed measurements with a commercial Time-of-Flight camera, a commercial structured-light depth camera and our own Time-of-Flight system. Our own system uses pulsed Time-of-Flight and emits light of 785 nm. The measured distances between the camera and the object are influenced through the perturbations on the water surface. Due to the timing of our Time-of-Flight camera, our system is theoretically able to minimize the influence of the reflections of a partially-reflecting surface. The combination of a post image-acquisition filter compensating for the perturbations and the use of a light source with shorter wavelengths to enlarge the depth range can improve the current commercial cameras. As a result, we can conclude that low-cost range imagers can increase swimming pool safety, by inserting a post-processing filter and the use of another light source.

  19. An Investigation on Physicochemical and Microbial Water Quality of Swimming Pools in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Dehvari

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Disrespect of health regulations and proper disinfection of water and swimming pools is effective in incidence of health problems and transfer of infectious diseases to swimmers. The aim of this research was to investigate water of swimming pools in Yazd city and compare the results with national standards. Methods: In this study, 11 active covered swimming pools of Yazd city were sampled as census. Parameters of temperature, pH, amount of free and Combined chlorine residual, turbidity, alkalinity, hardness, the population of heterotrophic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, fecal streptococci, and fecal coliforms were studied. Sampling has been conducted every two weaks for 3 months and samples were analyzed under standard procedures. Results: In this research, amount of pH in 84.73%, free residual chlorine in 44.18%, Combined residual chlorine in 72.45%, alkalinity in19.82%, turbidity in 86.36%, hardness in 57.18% and temperature in 13.73% Samples were desirable. The fecal streptococci bacteria was not shown in all the swimming pools and population of heterotrophic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and fecal coliforms in 56.73%, 93.27%, 79.36% and 91.45% cases were desirable, respectively. Statistical analysis indicated that there is a direct relationship between Water turbidity and population of heterotraphic bacteria. Conclusion: According to the results, the parameters of heterotrophic bacteria population, also the alkalinity and temperature had the least compliant with the standards that shows the necessity for continuous monitoring of physical, chemical and microbial parameters and also control of filtration and disinfection of water condition of swimming pools.

  20. Health effects of disinfection by-products in chlorinated swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florentin, Arnaud; Hautemanière, Alexis; Hartemann, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    Increased attendance at swimming pools is correlated with higher input of organic and minerals pollutants introduced by swimmers in the swimming pool water. In most swimming pools, microbiological control is performed by disinfection with the addition of chlorine. Chlorine is now well-known to lead to the formation of many disinfection by-products (DBPs) including trihalomethanes and chloramines. The hypothesis of a link between the presence of eye and skin irritation syndromes in swimmers and contact with swimming pool water treated with chlorine was initially proposed by Mood (1953). During recent decades many epidemiological studies have described the importance of DBPs generated with natural or imported organic matter present in water. Many of these DBPs are suspected to be toxic or even carcinogenic. Trihalomethanes and haloacetic acid families are the most studied but others DBPs, like chloral hydrate, haloacetonitriles, N-nitrosodimethylamine and the bromate ion, are emerging compounds of interest. Epidemiological data about the risk of cancer are still controversial. However, numerous publications highlight a toxic risk especially the risk of allergy and respiratory symptoms for babies and elite swimmers. The few publications dedicated to risk assessment do not suggest increased risk, other than for elite swimmers. These publications are likely to underestimate the risk associated with DBPs because of the lack of data in the literature precludes the calculation of risk associated with certain compounds or certain pathways. Thus for regulations, the need to take into account the risks associated with disinfection by-products is now important without forgetting the need of the control of microbiological hazards in swimming pools. PMID:21885333

  1. THE ASSESSMENT OF THE PUBLIC SWIMMING POOLS FOR THE PURPOSES OF THE LİFEGUARD SERVICE

    OpenAIRE

    Gundogdu, Cemal

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the case of selection and education of the lifeguards at public pools is studied. For this purpose, the control list related to the lifeguard education and selection in total 80 swimming pools,olympic-semi olympic,open and closed, that are used for sportive purposes belonging to Youth and Sport General Directorship and Local adminstration," was filled by the natural observations and face to face contact technics. As a result, it is found that, the pools in Turkey are n...

  2. Photolytic removal of DBPs by medium pressure UV in swimming pool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medium pressure UV is used for controlling the concentration of combined chlorine (chloramines) in many public swimming pools. Little is known about the fate of other disinfection by-products (DBPs) in UV treatment. Photolysis by medium pressure UV treatment was investigated for 12 DBPs reported to be found in swimming pool water: chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, bromoform, dichloroacetonitrile, bromochloroacetonitrile, dibromoacetronitrile, trichloroacetonitrile, trichloronitromethane, dichloropropanone, trichloropropanone, and chloral hydrate. First order photolysis constants ranged 26-fold from 0.020 min−1 for chloroform to 0.523 min−1 for trichloronitromethane. The rate constants generally increased with bromine substitution. Using the UV removal of combined chlorine as an actinometer, the rate constants were recalculated to actual treatment doses of UV applied in a swimming pool. In an investigated public pool the UV dose was equivalent to an applied electrical energy of 1.34 kWh m−3 d−1 and the UV dose required to removed 90% of trichloronitromethane was 0.4 kWh m−3 d−1, while 2.6 kWh m−3 d−1 was required for chloral hydrate and the bromine containing haloacetonitriles and trihalomethanes ranged from 0.6 to 3.1 kWh m−3 d−1. It was predicted thus that a beneficial side-effect of applying UV for removing combined chlorine from the pool water could be a significant removal of trichloronitromethane, chloral hydrate and the bromine containing haloacetonitriles and trihalomethanes. - Highlights: ► UV irradiation is able to degrade all 12 investigated disinfection by-products. ► Bromine species are easier to remove than their chlorinated analogues. ► UV dose used for combined chlorine was comparable with doses required for DBP removal. ► Significant removal of some disinfection by-products in swimming pools is indicated

  3. What’s in the Pool? A Comprehensive Identification of Disinfection By-Products and Assessment of Mutagenicity of Chlorinated and Brominated Swimming Pool Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swimming pool disinfectants and disinfection by-products (DBPs) have been linked to human health effects, including asthma and bladder cancer, but no studies have provided a comprehensive identification of DBPs in pool water and related those DBPs to the mutagenicity of pool wate...

  4. Microflora of nuclear research reactor pool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The circulation of pool water through the nuclear reactor core produces a bactericidal effect on the microflora due to the influence of various kinds of radiation. The microbe contents return to their initial level in 2 to 4 months after the circulation has stopped. The microflora comprises mainly cocci in large numbers, G-positive rods and fungi, and lower amounts of G-negative rods as compared with the water with which the reactor pool was initially filled. Increased amounts are present of radiation-resistant forms exhibiting intense production of catalase and nuclease. Supposedly, the presence of these enzymes is in some way beneficial to the microbes in their survival in the high-radiation zones. (author). 1 fig., 2 tabs., 12 refs

  5. What’s in the Pool? A Comprehensive Identification of Disinfection By-Products and Assessment of Mutagenicity of Chlorinated and Brominated Swimming Pool Water

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, S.D.; Demarini, D.M.; Kogevinas, M; Fernandez, P.; Marco, E.; Lourencetti, C.; Balleste, C.; Heederik, D; Meliefste, K.; McKague, A.B.; Marcos, R.; Font-Ribera, L.; J.O. Grimalt; Villanueva, C M

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Swimming pool disinfectants and disinfection by-products (DBPs) have been linked to human health effects, including asthma and bladder cancer, but no studies have provided a comprehensive identification of DBPs in the water and related that to mutagenicity. OBJECTIVES: We performed a comprehensive identification of DBPs and disinfectant species in waters from public swimming pools in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain, that disinfect with either chlorine or bromine, and we determined the...

  6. Swimming Pools, File name = RECREATION. Swimming pools are a portion of this dataset. http://www.harfordcountymd.gov/gis/Index.cfm, Published in 2007, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Harford County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Swimming Pools dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2007. It is described as 'File...

  7. Particles in swimming pool filters – Does pH determine the DBP formation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Willach, Sarah; Mosbæk, Hans;

    2012-01-01

    countries, and the non-regulated haloacetic acids (HAAs) and haloacetonitriles (HANs) were investigated at 6.0⩽pH⩽8.0, under controlled chlorination conditions. The investigated particles were collected from a hot tub with a drum micro filter. In two series of experiments with either constant initial active......The formation was investigated for different groups of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during chlorination of filter particles from swimming pools at different pH-values and the toxicity was estimated. Specifically, the formation of the DBP group trihalomethanes (THMs), which is regulated in many...... or initial free chlorine concentrations the particles were chlorinated at different pH-values in the relevant range for swimming pools. THM and HAA formations were reduced by decreasing pH while HAN formation increased with decreasing pH. Based on the organic content the relative DBP formation from...

  8. Efficiency of heat pump ventilation and water heating system in an indoor swimming pool

    OpenAIRE

    Безродний, Михайло Костянтинович; Кутра, Дмитро Сергійович; Морощук, Олександр Олександрович

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic efficiency of the heat pump ventilation and water heating system of indoor swimming pool with partial exhaust air recirculation and heat pump bypass is analyzed in the paper. The purpose of the work is to determine the system efficiency depending on the change of fresh supply air temperature, ventilation system intensity and heat pump bypassing factor. As a result of implementing the developed mathematical model using the method of successive approximations, dependences of t...

  9. Pulmonary Epithelial Integrity in Children: Relationship to Ambient Ozone Exposure and Swimming Pool Attendance

    OpenAIRE

    Lagerkvist, Birgitta Json; Bernard, Alfred; Blomberg, Anders; Bergstrom, Erik; Forsberg, Bertil; Holmstrom, Karin; Karp, Kjell; Lundstrom, Nils-Goran; Segerstedt, Bo; Svensson, Mona; Nordberg, Gunnar

    2004-01-01

    Airway irritants such as ozone are known to impair lung function and induce airway inflammation. Clara cell protein (CC16) is a small anti-inflammatory protein secreted by the nonciliated bronchiolar Clara cells. CC16 in serum has been proposed as a noninvasive and sensitive marker of lung epithelial injury. In this study, we used lung function and serum CC16 concentration to examine the pulmonary responses to ambient O3 exposure and swimming pool attendance. The measurements were made on 57 ...

  10. New method for determination of trihalomethanes in exhaled breath: Applications to swimming pool and bath environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the estimation of the human intake of trihalomethanes (THMs), namely chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane and bromoform, during showering and bathing is reported. The method is based on the determination of these compounds in exhaled breath that is collected by solid adsorption on Tenax using a device specifically designed for this purpose. Instrumental measurements were performed by automatic thermal desorption coupled to gas chromatography with electron capture detection. THMs in exhaled breath samples were determined during showering and swimming pool attendance. The levels of these compounds in indoor air and water were also determined as reference for interpretation of the exhaled breath results. The THM concentrations in exhaled breath of the volunteers measured before the exposure experiments showed a close correspondence with the THMs levels in indoor air where the sampler was located. Limits of detection in exhaled breath were dependent on THM analytes and experimental sites. They ranged between 170 and 710 ng m-3 in the swimming pool studies and between 97 and 460 ng m-3 in the showering studies. Application of this method to THMs determination during showering and swimming pool activities revealed statistically significant increases in THMs concentrations when comparing exhaled breath before and after exposure.

  11. Prevalence of Ocular, Respiratory and Cutaneous Symptoms in Indoor Swimming Pool Workers and Exposure to Disinfection By-Products (DBPs)

    OpenAIRE

    Guglielmina Fantuzzi; Elena Righi; Guerrino Predieri; Pierluigi Giacobazzi; Katia Mastroianni; Gabriella Aggazzotti

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of self-reported respiratory, ocular and cutaneous symptoms in subjects working at indoor swimming pools and to assess the relationship between frequency of declared symptoms and occupational exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs). Twenty indoor swimming pools in the Emilia Romagna region of Italy were included in the study. Information about the health status of 133 employees was collected using a self-adminis...

  12. Photolytic removal of DBPs by medium pressure UV in swimming pool water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Kamilla M.S. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Zortea, Raissa [Department of Land, Environment and Geotechnology Engineering, Polytechnic University of Turin (Italy); Piketty, Aurelia [Institute of Chemistry, Industrial and Chemical Engineering and Technology (INP-ENCIACET), National Polytechnic Institute of Toulouse (France); Vega, Sergio Rodriguez [Chemical Engineering, Complutense University of Madrid (Spain); Andersen, Henrik Rasmus, E-mail: Henrik@ndersen.net [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark)

    2013-01-15

    Medium pressure UV is used for controlling the concentration of combined chlorine (chloramines) in many public swimming pools. Little is known about the fate of other disinfection by-products (DBPs) in UV treatment. Photolysis by medium pressure UV treatment was investigated for 12 DBPs reported to be found in swimming pool water: chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, bromoform, dichloroacetonitrile, bromochloroacetonitrile, dibromoacetronitrile, trichloroacetonitrile, trichloronitromethane, dichloropropanone, trichloropropanone, and chloral hydrate. First order photolysis constants ranged 26-fold from 0.020 min{sup −1} for chloroform to 0.523 min{sup −1} for trichloronitromethane. The rate constants generally increased with bromine substitution. Using the UV removal of combined chlorine as an actinometer, the rate constants were recalculated to actual treatment doses of UV applied in a swimming pool. In an investigated public pool the UV dose was equivalent to an applied electrical energy of 1.34 kWh m{sup −3} d{sup −1} and the UV dose required to removed 90% of trichloronitromethane was 0.4 kWh m{sup −3} d{sup −1}, while 2.6 kWh m{sup −3} d{sup −1} was required for chloral hydrate and the bromine containing haloacetonitriles and trihalomethanes ranged from 0.6 to 3.1 kWh m{sup −3} d{sup −1}. It was predicted thus that a beneficial side-effect of applying UV for removing combined chlorine from the pool water could be a significant removal of trichloronitromethane, chloral hydrate and the bromine containing haloacetonitriles and trihalomethanes. - Highlights: ► UV irradiation is able to degrade all 12 investigated disinfection by-products. ► Bromine species are easier to remove than their chlorinated analogues. ► UV dose used for combined chlorine was comparable with doses required for DBP removal. ► Significant removal of some disinfection by-products in swimming pools is indicated.

  13. Ecology of dermatophytes and other keratinophilic fungi in swimming pools and polluted and unpolluted streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Shtayeh, M S; Khaleel, Tayseer Kh M; Jamous, Rana M

    2002-01-01

    The biodiversity and richness of keratinophilic fungal communities including dermatophytes were assessed in three stream sites and three swimming pools in the Nablus district in Palestine, using hair baiting (HBT) and surface dilution plate (SDP) techniques, over 8- and 6-month periods, respectively. The effect of wastewater effluent and selected ecological factors on these fungi in relation to species diversity and population densities were also considered. Fifty keratinophilic fungal species were recovered from the aquatic habitats studied, of which 42 were recovered from stream sites and 22 from swimming pools. Of these fungi 6 were either dermatophytes (Microsporum gypseum, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes) or dermatophyte related species (Chrysosporium merdarium, Ch. tropicum, Ch. keratinophilum and T. terrestre). The most frequently isolated species in the three pools were Acremonium strictum and Cladosporium cladosporioides, using Sabouraud dextrose agar medium (SDA). The most abundant species were Acr. strictum, and Aspergillus flavus. However, only 4 species were isolated using the SDA medium amended with 5-flurocytosine (5-FC). The most frequent and abundant species in the three stream sites using SDA medium were Geotricum candidum, and Penicillium chrysogenum. The most frequent species in the three sites using the 5-FC medium, was Paecilomyces lilacinus. Using HBT, the most abundant and frequent species in the three stream sites were G. candidum, and Pa. lilacinus, on SDA medium, and Pa. lilacinus, and Gliocladium nigrovirens on the 5-FC medium. The 5-FC medium was more suitable for the isolation of dermatophytes and closely related species than the SDA medium; 6 were recovered on 5-FC, whereas only one on the SDA medium. Variation in the levels of keratinophilic fungal populations from the three stream sites sampled 5 times over an 8-month period, followed comparable fluctuation patterns. Wastewater affected fungal population densities with the highest

  14. Determining a pool - type reactor fuel policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refuelling the 10 to 15 MW pool type reactor considered here will occur frequently (some 10 elements every 3 to 4 weeks). It is therefore necessary to determine the most economic fuel policy. This study proposes to define a strategy that will make it possible to decide on the number and characteristics of the shipment containers, as well as on the means of storage, so as to reduce the risks as much as possible should the basic parameters of the study vary. Among these parameters, the respective influence of which is investigated, chemical reprocessing costs play a vital part. Two examples of optimum fuel management are given according to whether the reprocessing charges applied are those of the old or of the 1961 U.S. AEC base charges for reprocessing highly enriched irradiated fuel. (authors)

  15. Temporal change of radiocesium level in the school swimming pools in Kawamata after Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tremendous amount of radioactive nuclides were released into the environment due to the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. In order to understand the behavior of these radioactive nuclides, we have investigated radiocesium level in the school swimming pools in Kawamata away about 40 km from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant. Water samples were collected on April 30, July 27, and November 9, 2011. These samples were absorbed to ion exchange resin and measured with a Ge semiconductor detector at ICRR, the University of Tokyo for 134Cs(2.06 y) and 137Cs(30.07 y). Change of ratio and concentration of these radiocesium few months after the accident were examined. We also examined the changes of ratio and concentration before and after the replacement of the pools water. The result of the measurements will be reported with review of relevant literatures. (author)

  16. Isolation and identification of Acanthamoeba spp. from thermal swimming pools and spas in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabres, Laura Fuhrich; Rosa Dos Santos, Sayonara Peixoto; Benitez, Lisianne Brittes; Rott, Marilise Brittes

    2016-06-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) are widely distributed in soil and water. A few number of them are implicated in human disease: Acanthamoeba spp., Naegleria fowleri, Balamuthia mandrillaris and Sappinia diploidea. Species of Acanthamoeba can cause keratitis and brain infections. In this study, 72 water samples were taken from both hot tubs and thermal swimming pools in the city of Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil, to determine the presence of Acanthamoeba in the water as well as perform the phenotypic and genotypic characterization of the isolates. The identification of the isolates was based on the cysts morphology and PCR amplification using genus-specific oligonucleotides. When the isolates were submitted to PCR reaction only 8 were confirmed as belonging to the genus Acanthamoeba. The sequences analysis when compared to the sequences in the GenBank, showed genotype distribution in group T3 (12,5%), T5 (12,5%), T4 (25%) and T15 (50%). The results of this study confirmed the presence of potentially pathogenic isolates of free living amoebae in hot swimming pool and spas which can present risks to human health. PMID:27078644

  17. A survey of fungi and some indicator bacteria in chlorinated water of indoor public swimming pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, R.; Hirn, J.

    1981-01-01

    Fifty-four water samples, of volume 500 ml, originating from six public indoor fresh water swimming pools were examined for the presence of fungi and some indicator bacteria by a membrane-filter method. Sabouraud-dextrose agar and selective Candida albicans-medium were used for isolation and identification of fungi. In all but one of the samples the free chlorine content was above 0.40 mg/l. No Candida albicans were detected. Molds and unidentified yeasts were isolated from 29 of the samples. The following species were recorded: Acremonium spp., ALternaria sp., Aspergillus spp., Candida guilliermondii, Chaetomium sp., Cladosporium spp., Clasterosporium sp., Fusarium spp., Geotrichium sp., Penicillium spp., Petriellidium boydii and Phoma spp. Their occurrence was sporadic, each species mostly appearing as single colonies only, with a maximum of 5 colonies. Bacterial growth was noticed in 15 samples, but only in the sample of low free chlorine content did this reach significant proportions. The study indicates that the standard of chlorination is, at least in general, an adequate measure against fungal contamination of swimming pool water. However, the spectrum of mold species encountered encourages a further search for possible indicator species among these organisms.

  18. [Update of DIN 19.643--treatment and disinfection of swimming pool and bathing tub water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hässelbarth, U

    1992-08-01

    German Standards Specification DIN 19,643 is at present under revision for health reasons and because of both negative and positive experiences gathered in practice. To enable adaptation of the standards specification to future developments, a Part I of the specification is being created comprising the demands to be made on the quality of the water and general demands on the construction and operation of swimming pools and tubs and basins in bath houses, e.g. in spas or municipal swimming pools. The subsequent parts of the new specification (Part 2 to Part n) concern the demands to be made on individual combinations of processes; these can be supplemented at any time in accordance with technical progress without requiring revision of the entire standards specification. Essential innovations are the reformulation of the required efficiency of disinfection, the introduction of the parameters Legionella pneumophila, trihalogen methane (THM) and the reduction of the limit value for chloramines. Technically speaking, the new features concern the automatic measurement of the auxiliary parameters of hygiene such as redox potential, pH value and free chlorine, automatic control of disinfectant additions, automatic filter rinsing with fluidization of the filter-bed to a prescribed minimum bed expansion, and the sight-glas at the filter container. The demands made on Jacuzzi and warm water spouted bed besins are integrated into the specification, thus obviating the need for German Standards Specification DIN 19,644. PMID:1392275

  19. Report transparency and nuclear safety 2007 CEA Cadarache; Rapport transparence et securite nucleaire 2007 CEA Cadarache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This report presents the activities of the CEA Center of Cadarache for the year 2007. The actions concerning the safety, the radiation protection, the significant events, the release control and the environmental impacts and the wastes stored on the center are discussed. More especially the report discusses the beginning of the RJH reactor construction, the fourth generation reactors research programs, the implementing of la Rotonde the new radioactive wastes management installation, the renovation of the LECA. (A.L.B.)

  20. What's in The Pool? A Comprehensive Identification Of Disinfection By-Products and Assessment of Mutagenicity of Chlorinated and Brominated Swimming Pool Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swimming pool disinfectants and disinfection by-products (DBPs) have been linked to human health effects, including asthma and bladder cancer, but no studies have provided a comprehensive identification of DBPs in the water and related that to mutagenicity. We performed a compreh...

  1. What's in the pool? A comprehensive identification of disinfection by-products and assessment of mutagenicity of chlorinated and brominated swimming pool water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richardson, S.D.; Demarini, D.M.; Kogevinas, M.; Fernandez, P.; Marco, E.; Lourencetti, C.; Balleste, C.; Heederik, D.; Meliefste, K.; McKague, A.B.; Marcos, R.; Font-Ribera, L.; Grimalt, J.O.; Villanueva, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Swimming pool disinfectants and disinfection by-products (DBPs) have been linked to human health effects, including asthma and bladder cancer, but no studies have provided a comprehensive identification of DBPs in the water and related that to mutagenicity. OBJECTIVES: We performed a com

  2. Comparison of swimming pools alternative passive and active heating systems based on renewable energy sources in Southern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article examines different passive and active heating systems for swimming pools. The passive systems introduced in this article are: * The swimming pools' enclosure. * The placement of floating insulating covers on the pools' surfaces whenever they are not used. The examined active systems in this article are: * A biomass heater. * A biomass heater and solar collectors combi-system. * Vertical geothermal heat exchangers (GHE) co-operating with geothermal heat pumps (GHP). The methodology employed for the introduced systems' evaluation is the arithmetic computational simulation of the swimming pools' annual heating, using annual time series of averaged hourly values for the available solar radiation and the calculated pools' thermal power demand (heating loads). The dimensioning of the active systems aims at the maximisation of the heating production from R.E.S. (renewable energy sources). and the optimisation of the corresponding investments' economic indexes. The examined systems are evaluated technically and economically versus fundamental criteria. It is proved that significant reduction of the heating loads is achieved with the introduced passive systems. The reduced swimming pools' heating loads can be successfully covered by the proposed R.E.S. active systems. The fossil fuels consumption is eliminated. The corresponding investments' payback periods can be lower than 5 years. - Highlights: • The passive solar systems reduce the swimming pools heating loads more than 90%. • The examined active heating system exhibit payback periods lower than 3.5 years. • The energy saving is maximised with a biomass heater – solar collectors system. • Single biomass heaters exhibits the shortest payback period. • GHE–GHP can be used in cases of low solar radiation and lack of biomass fuels

  3. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini [Water ApS, Farum Gydevej 64, 3520 Farum (Denmark); Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljøvej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Hansen, Kamilla M.S., E-mail: kmsh@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljøvej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Andersen, Henrik R. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljøvej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-07-01

    Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during experimental UV treatment of pool water has previously been reported with little concurrence between laboratory studies, field studies and research groups. In the current study, changes in concentration of seven out of eleven investigated volatile DBPs were observed in experiments using medium pressure UV treatment, with and without chlorine and after post-UV chlorination. Results showed that post-UV chlorine consumption increased, dose-dependently, with UV treatment dose. A clear absence of trihalomethane formation by UV and UV with chlorine was observed, while small yet statistically significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile and dichloropropanone concentrations were detected. Results indicate that post-UV chlorination clearly induced secondary formation of several DBPs. However, the formation of total trihalomethanes was no greater than what could be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation for most DBPs. Concurrence for induction of trihalomethanes was identified between post-UV chlorination treatments and simulated extended chlorination time treatment. Trihalomethanes could not be induced by UV treatment of water from a continuously UV treated pool. This indicates that literature reports of experimentally induced trihalomethane formation by UV may be a result of kinetic increase in formation by UV. However, this does not imply that higher trihalomethane concentrations would occur in pools that apply continuous UV treatment. The bromine fraction of halogens in formed trihalomethanes increased with UV dose. This indicates that UV removes bromine atoms from larger molecules that participate in trihalomethane production during post-UV chlorination. Additionally, no significant

  4. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during experimental UV treatment of pool water has previously been reported with little concurrence between laboratory studies, field studies and research groups. In the current study, changes in concentration of seven out of eleven investigated volatile DBPs were observed in experiments using medium pressure UV treatment, with and without chlorine and after post-UV chlorination. Results showed that post-UV chlorine consumption increased, dose-dependently, with UV treatment dose. A clear absence of trihalomethane formation by UV and UV with chlorine was observed, while small yet statistically significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile and dichloropropanone concentrations were detected. Results indicate that post-UV chlorination clearly induced secondary formation of several DBPs. However, the formation of total trihalomethanes was no greater than what could be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation for most DBPs. Concurrence for induction of trihalomethanes was identified between post-UV chlorination treatments and simulated extended chlorination time treatment. Trihalomethanes could not be induced by UV treatment of water from a continuously UV treated pool. This indicates that literature reports of experimentally induced trihalomethane formation by UV may be a result of kinetic increase in formation by UV. However, this does not imply that higher trihalomethane concentrations would occur in pools that apply continuous UV treatment. The bromine fraction of halogens in formed trihalomethanes increased with UV dose. This indicates that UV removes bromine atoms from larger molecules that participate in trihalomethane production during post-UV chlorination. Additionally, no significant

  5. Sleeping Beauty. Revitalisation of the old indoor swimming pool Heidelberg; Sleeping Beauty. Revitalisierung des alten Hallenbads Heidelberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Jochen

    2010-07-01

    Since its closure before nearly 30 years due to safety aspects, the monument protected indoor swimming pool in Heidelberg (Federal Republic of Germany) dilapidated appreciably. Only after moving away of the local council from its demand of the wet use, an investor could be found.

  6. Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) spent fuel pool conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) is the one and only research reactor in Malaysia that has been safely operated and maintained since 1982. In order to enhance technical capabilities and competencies especially in nuclear reactor engineering a feasibility study on RTP power upgrading was proposed to serve future needs for advance nuclear science and technology in the country with the capability of designing and develop reactor system. The need of a Spent Fuel Pool begins with the discharge of spent fuel elements from RTP for temporary storage that includes all activities related to the storage of fuel until it is either sent for reprocessed or sent for final disposal. To support RTP power upgrading there will be major RTP systems replacement such as reactor components and a new temporary storage pool for fuel elements. The spent fuel pool is needed for temporarily store the irradiated fuel elements to accommodate a new reactor core structure. Spent fuel management has always been one of the most important stages in the nuclear fuel cycle and considered among the most common problems to all countries with nuclear reactors. The output of this paper will provide sufficient information to show the Spent Fuel Pool can be design and build with the adequate and reasonable safety assurance to support newly upgraded TRIGA PUSPATI TRIGA Research Reactor. (author)

  7. Cadarache - 20 years of plutonium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The qualitative and quantitative evolution of plutonium used is reviewed; more particularly, the isotopic composition of plutonium handled at the plutonium fuel fabrication plant of Cadarache has been considerably changing during these 20 last years. The evolution of fast neutron reactor fuel assemblies explains why the fabrication unit has to. The installations have been modified, as also the fuel assembly fabrication process. Changes can be classified in 3 categories: the transformations related to mass evolution, those related more particularly to the plutonium isotopic composition, finally those related to the waste treatment process. These transformations concerned workshops, apparatus and equipments, the reinforcement of protections, criticality accident prevention, and safeguards

  8. Prevalence of ocular, respiratory and cutaneous symptoms in indoor swimming pool workers and exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantuzzi, Guglielmina; Righi, Elena; Predieri, Guerrino; Giacobazzi, Pierluigi; Mastroianni, Katia; Aggazzotti, Gabriella

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of self-reported respiratory, ocular and cutaneous symptoms in subjects working at indoor swimming pools and to assess the relationship between frequency of declared symptoms and occupational exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs). Twenty indoor swimming pools in the Emilia Romagna region of Italy were included in the study. Information about the health status of 133 employees was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Subjects working at swimming pools claimed to frequently experience the following symptoms: cold (65.4%), sneezing (52.6%), red eyes (48.9%) and itchy eyes (44.4%). Only 7.5% claimed to suffer from asthma. Red eyes, runny nose, voice loss and cold symptoms were declared more frequently by pool attendants (lifeguards and trainers) when compared with employees working in other areas of the facility (office, cafe, etc.). Pool attendants experienced generally more verrucas, mycosis, eczema and rash than others workers; however, only the difference in the frequency of self-declared mycosis was statistically significant (p = 0.010). Exposure to DBPs was evaluated using both environmental and biological monitoring. Trihalomethanes (THMs), the main DBPs, were evaluated in alveolar air samples collected from subjects. Swimming pool workers experienced different THM exposure levels: lifeguards and trainers showed the highest mean values of THMs in alveolar air samples (28.5 +/- 20.2 microg/m(3)), while subjects working in cafe areas (17.6 +/- 12.1 microg/m(3)), offices (14.4 +/- 12.0 microg/m(3)) and engine rooms (13.6 +/- 4.4 microg/m(3)) showed lower exposure levels. Employees with THM alveolar air values higher than 21 microg/m(3) (median value) experienced higher risks for red eyes (OR 6.2; 95% CI 2.6-14.9), itchy eyes (OR 3.5; 95% CI 1.5-8.0), dyspnea/asthma (OR 5.1; 95% CI 1.0-27.2) and blocked nose (OR 2.2; 95% CI 1.0-4.7) than subjects with less exposure

  9. Prevalence of Ocular, Respiratory and Cutaneous Symptoms in Indoor Swimming Pool Workers and Exposure to Disinfection By-Products (DBPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guglielmina Fantuzzi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of self-reported respiratory, ocular and cutaneous symptoms in subjects working at indoor swimming pools and to assess the relationship between frequency of declared symptoms and occupational exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs. Twenty indoor swimming pools in the Emilia Romagna region of Italy were included in the study. Information about the health status of 133 employees was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Subjects working at swimming pools claimed to frequently experience the following symptoms: cold (65.4%, sneezing (52.6%, red eyes (48.9% and itchy eyes (44.4%. Only 7.5% claimed to suffer from asthma. Red eyes, runny nose, voice loss and cold symptoms were declared more frequently by pool attendants (lifeguards and trainers when compared with employees working in other areas of the facility (office, cafe, etc.. Pool attendants experienced generally more verrucas, mycosis, eczema and rash than others workers; however, only the difference in the frequency of self-declared mycosis was statistically significant (p = 0.010. Exposure to DBPs was evaluated using both environmental and biological monitoring. Trihalomethanes (THMs, the main DBPs, were evaluated in alveolar air samples collected from subjects. Swimming pool workers experienced different THM exposure levels: lifeguards and trainers showed the highest mean values of THMs in alveolar air samples (28.5 ± 20.2 µg/m3, while subjects working in cafe areas (17.6 ± 12.1 µg/m3, offices (14.4 ± 12.0 µg/m3 and engine rooms (13.6 ± 4.4 µg/m3 showed lower exposure levels. Employees with THM alveolar air values higher than 21 µg/m3 (median value experienced higher risks for red eyes (OR 6.2; 95% CI 2.6–14.9, itchy eyes (OR 3.5; 95% CI 1.5–8.0, dyspnea/asthma (OR 5.1; 95% CI 1.0–27.2 and blocked nose (OR 2.2; 95% CI 1.0–4.7 than subjects with less exposure. This study confirms

  10. Diarrhea and Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pool What to Do if You Have Diarrhea Diarrhea and Swimming Diarrhea and swimming don’t mix! ... small amount of pool water to become infected. Diarrhea and Spreading Illness at the Pool Infectious diarrhea ...

  11. Health-Related Behaviors in Swimming Pool Users: Influence of Knowledge of Regulations and Awareness of Health Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallè, Francesca; Dallolio, Laura; Marotta, Manfredo; Raggi, Alessandra; Di Onofrio, Valeria; Liguori, Giorgio; Toni, Francesco; Leoni, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Background: Swimming pool attendance exposes users to infection and chemical risks that could be largely reduced with the adoption of healthy behaviors. This study aims to investigate if the knowledge of swimming pool regulations and awareness of health risks can be associated with users’ health-related behaviors. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using self-administered questionnaires to collect data from two different target groups of swimming users: 184 adults and 184 children/adolescents. The association between specific variables and patterns of behaviors and knowledge was assessed through multivariate logistic regression models. Results: Although more than 80% of both groups declared they knew the regulations, compliance with healthy behaviors was often unsatisfactory, especially in adolescents and youth. In the children/adolescents group, healthy behaviors significantly increased with the frequency of attendance per week. In both groups, compliance increased with educational level (of parents for children/adolescents), while no positive association was observed between viewing the regulations and adopting appropriate behaviors. In the adult group, a higher knowledge/awareness of health risks was related to decreased odds of at least one unhealthy behavior. Conclusions: Guaranteeing the public display of regulations in swimming facilities is not sufficient to promote and change health-related behaviors. Much more attention should be given to educational interventions aimed to increase knowledge of health risks and the awareness that bathers are directly responsible for their own well-being. PMID:27213417

  12. Analytical simulation of boiling water reactor pressure suppression pool swell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a loss-of-coolant accident, the pressure suppression pool of a boiling water reactor swells as a steam/air mixture is expelled from the drywell into the pool and large gas bubbles are formed beneath the surface. Many tests have been performed to quantify pool swell loads, but analytical methods have been limited in their ability to provide accurate loading estimates. With advancement of numerical methods, it is now feasible to numerically simulate the pool swell process. A finite difference solution algorithm is used to solve the transient imcompressible equations for the liquid flow field. Boundary conditions at the fluid-gas interface are determined using a simplified gas flow model. The program is used to simulate several pool swell tests: comparison of the simulation with test data shows good agreement

  13. Analytical simulation of boiling water reactor pressure suppression pool swell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widener, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    In a loss-of-coolant accident, the pressure suppression pool of a boiling water reactor swells as a steam/air mixture is expelled from the drywell into the pool and large gas bubbles are formed beneath the surface. Many tests have been performed to quantify pool swell loads, but analytical methods have been limited in their ability to provide accurate loading estimates. With advancement of numerical methods, it is now feasible to numerically simulate the pool swell process. A finite difference solution algorithm is used to solve the transient imcompressible equations for the liquid flow field. Boundary conditions at the fluid-gas interface are determined using a simplified gas flow model. The program is used to simulate several pool swell tests: comparison of the simulation with test data shows good agreement.

  14. Airborne trichloramine (NCl(3)) levels and self-reported health symptoms in indoor swimming pool workers: dose-response relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantuzzi, Guglielmina; Righi, Elena; Predieri, Guerrino; Giacobazzi, Pierluigi; Petra, Berchotd; Aggazzotti, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that attendance at indoor chlorinated swimming pool is a risk factor for irritative ocular and respiratory symptoms and bronchial asthma is well known in literature, although epidemiological evidence is still inconclusive. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between airborne trichloramine (NCl(3)) levels and irritative symptoms in swimming pool employees in order to obtain detailed data regarding dose-response relationships and to identify the airborne NCl(3) exposure level, if any, without health effects. A total of 20 indoor swimming pools in the Emilia Romagna region of Italy were included in the study. Information about the health status of 128 employees was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Exposure to airborne NCl(3) was evaluated in indoor swimming pools by a modified DPD/KI method. The results of the study evidenced a mean value of airborne NCl(3) of 0.65±0.20 mg/m(3) (ranging from 0.20 to 1.02 mg/m(3)). Both ocular and upper respiratory symptoms, in particular red eyes, runny nose, voice loss and cold symptoms, were declared more frequently by lifeguards and trainers when compared with employees working in other areas of the facility (office, cafe, and so on). Pool attendants exposed to airborne NCl(3) levels of >0.5 mg/m(3) experienced higher risks for runny nose (OR: 2.91; 95% CI: 1.22-6.93) red eyes (OR: 3.16; 95% CI: 1.46-6.82), voice loss (OR: 3.56; 95% CI: 1.60-7.95) and itchy eyes (OR: 2.23; 95% CI: 1.04-4.78) than other employees. Moreover, red eyes, itchy eyes, runny nose and voice loss are related to airborne NCl(3) levels, with strong dose-response relationships. In conclusion, this study shows that lifeguards and trainers experience ocular and respiratory irritative symptoms more frequently than employees not exposed. Irritative symptoms become significant starting from airborne NCl(3) levels of >0.5 mg/m(3), confirming that the WHO-recommended value can be considered protective in

  15. Convective cooling in a pool-type research reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipaun, Susan; Usman, Shoaib

    2016-01-01

    A reactor produces heat arising from fission reactions in the nuclear core. In the Missouri University of Science and Technology research reactor (MSTR), this heat is removed by natural convection where the coolant/moderator is demineralised water. Heat energy is transferred from the core into the coolant, and the heated water eventually evaporates from the open pool surface. A secondary cooling system was installed to actively remove excess heat arising from prolonged reactor operations. The nuclear core consists of uranium silicide aluminium dispersion fuel (U3Si2Al) in the form of rectangular plates. Gaps between the plates allow coolant to pass through and carry away heat. A study was carried out to map out heat flow as well as to predict the system's performance via STAR-CCM+ simulation. The core was approximated as porous media with porosity of 0.7027. The reactor is rated 200kW and total heat density is approximately 1.07+E7 Wm-3. An MSTR model consisting of 20% of MSTR's nuclear core in a third of the reactor pool was developed. At 35% pump capacity, the simulation results for the MSTR model showed that water is drawn out of the pool at a rate 1.28 kg s-1 from the 4" pipe, and predicted pool surface temperature not exceeding 30°C.

  16. Convective cooling in a pool-type research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipaun, Susan, E-mail: susan@nm.gov.my [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Industrial Technology Division, Blok 29T, Bangi 43200, Selangor (Malaysia); Usman, Shoaib, E-mail: usmans@mst.edu [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Nuclear Engineering, 222 Fulton Hall 301 W.14th St., Rolla 64509 MO (United States)

    2016-01-22

    A reactor produces heat arising from fission reactions in the nuclear core. In the Missouri University of Science and Technology research reactor (MSTR), this heat is removed by natural convection where the coolant/moderator is demineralised water. Heat energy is transferred from the core into the coolant, and the heated water eventually evaporates from the open pool surface. A secondary cooling system was installed to actively remove excess heat arising from prolonged reactor operations. The nuclear core consists of uranium silicide aluminium dispersion fuel (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}Al) in the form of rectangular plates. Gaps between the plates allow coolant to pass through and carry away heat. A study was carried out to map out heat flow as well as to predict the system’s performance via STAR-CCM+ simulation. The core was approximated as porous media with porosity of 0.7027. The reactor is rated 200kW and total heat density is approximately 1.07+E7 Wm{sup −3}. An MSTR model consisting of 20% of MSTR’s nuclear core in a third of the reactor pool was developed. At 35% pump capacity, the simulation results for the MSTR model showed that water is drawn out of the pool at a rate 1.28 kg s{sup −1} from the 4” pipe, and predicted pool surface temperature not exceeding 30°C.

  17. Convective cooling in a pool-type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reactor produces heat arising from fission reactions in the nuclear core. In the Missouri University of Science and Technology research reactor (MSTR), this heat is removed by natural convection where the coolant/moderator is demineralised water. Heat energy is transferred from the core into the coolant, and the heated water eventually evaporates from the open pool surface. A secondary cooling system was installed to actively remove excess heat arising from prolonged reactor operations. The nuclear core consists of uranium silicide aluminium dispersion fuel (U3Si2Al) in the form of rectangular plates. Gaps between the plates allow coolant to pass through and carry away heat. A study was carried out to map out heat flow as well as to predict the system’s performance via STAR-CCM+ simulation. The core was approximated as porous media with porosity of 0.7027. The reactor is rated 200kW and total heat density is approximately 1.07+E7 Wm−3. An MSTR model consisting of 20% of MSTR’s nuclear core in a third of the reactor pool was developed. At 35% pump capacity, the simulation results for the MSTR model showed that water is drawn out of the pool at a rate 1.28 kg s−1 from the 4” pipe, and predicted pool surface temperature not exceeding 30°C

  18. Plenum separator system for pool-type nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pool-type liquid-metal-heat-transfer nuclear reactor is described which consists of: a vertically disposed generally cylindrical reactor vessel having a closed bottom portion, and a closure head atop the reactor vessel and closing the reactor vessel; the reactor vessel enclosing the major components of the nuclear reactor which include a reactor core supported at a centrally disposed lower portion of the reactor vessel; a bottom-supported gas-plenum-forming hollow cylindrical member closed at its upper end, the hollow cylindrical member sealed to and supported by the reactor vessel; a hollow cylindrically conformed neutron shield member spaced from and radially surrounding the reactor core; separate liquid-metal plena confining liquid metal during normal reactor operation and comprising a hot upper plenum, a cold lower plenum and intermediate temperature plena; the liquid metal intakes of the liquid metal pumps positioned in the cold lower plenum with the cooler liquid metal therein being pumped upwardly through the reactor core to be heated and exit therefrom in a turbulent fashion; and the liquid metal intakes of the heat exchangers positioned within the hot upper plenum and the liquid metal discharges of the heat exchangers positioned within the cold lower plenum to discharge cooled liquid metal into the cold lower plenum

  19. Design guide for Category III reactors: pool type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) in the ERDA Manual requires that all DOE-owned reactors be sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that gives adequate consideration to health and safety factors. Specific guidance pertinent to the safety of DOE-owned reactors is found in Chapter 0540 of the ERDA Manual. The purpose of this Design Guide is to provide additional guidance to aid the DOE facility contractor in meeting the requirement that the siting, design, construction, modification, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of DOE-owned reactors be in accordance with generally uniform standards, guides, and codes which are comparable to those applied to similar reactors licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This Design Guide deals principally with the design and functional requirement of Category III reactor structures, components, and systems

  20. Observation of fallout deposition in an outdoor swimming pool 50 km away from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP), outdoor school swimming pools at Fukushima were decontaminated to curb the redistribution of radioactivity into downstream farmlands. In the process, the radioactivity concentrations of the pool water and sediment substances (residue) were measured to estimate the deposition density of the fallout. At a pool situated 50 km away from the NPP, the average concentrations of radiocesium (134+137Cs) for the water and residue were quantified as 170 Bq L−1 and 3.6 × 105 Bq kg−1, respectively. Taking account of the radioactivity concentrations and of the water balance in and around the pool, the deposition density of radiocesium, as of August 2011, was precisely determined to be 0.32 ± 0.03 MBq m−2 (k = 1). The density corroborated the previous results obtained by other methods, i.e., airborne surveys, in-situ Ge surveys and soil samplings at neighboring locations. Other than radiocesium, the only gamma-emitting nuclide detected was 110mAg, with a concentration of 560 Bq kg−1 in the residue. The radioactivity concentrations of 89Sr, 90Sr, 238Pu and 239+240Pu in the water were all less than the minimum detectable activities – 2, 0.1, 0.002 and 0.002 Bq L−1, respectively. - Highlights: • Deposition density of radiocesium was estimated at a swimming pool in Fukushima. • The density was determined with a small standard uncertainty of approximately 10%. • Water balance was simulated for estimating radioactivity budget in the pool. • Detected gamma-emitting nuclide was 110mAg other than radiocesium. • Radiocesium was much dominant compared with 89Sr, 90Sr, 110mAg, 238Pu and 239+240Pu

  1. A pilot-scale study of Cryptosporidium-sized microsphere removals from swimming pools via sand filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Amburgey, James E

    2016-02-01

    Cryptosporidium species are the most common cause of gastrointestinal illness in treated recreational water venues. In order to protect public health during swimming, Cryptosporidium-sized microsphere removals by high-rate sand filtration with six coagulants were evaluated with a 5.5 m(3) pilot-scale swimming pool. A sand filter without coagulation removed 20-63% of Cryptosporidium-sized microspheres. Cryptosporidium-sized microsphere removals exceeded 98% by sand filtration with five of the six tested coagulants. Continuously feeding coagulants A, B, and F (i.e., organic polymers) led to coagulant accumulation in the system and decreased removals over time (chitosan-based product that removed fewer microspheres compared with other products, filter efficiency. PMID:26837835

  2. Report transparency and nuclear safety 2007 CEA Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the activities of the CEA Center of Cadarache for the year 2007. The actions concerning the safety, the radiation protection, the significant events, the release control and the environmental impacts and the wastes stored on the center are discussed. More especially the report discusses the beginning of the RJH reactor construction, the fourth generation reactors research programs, the implementing of la Rotonde the new radioactive wastes management installation, the renovation of the LECA. (A.L.B.)

  3. Dynamic simulation and thermo-economic analysis of a PhotoVoltaic/Thermal collector heating system for an indoor–outdoor swimming pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A PV/T heating system for indoor–outdoor swimming pools is proposed. • A comparison among some thermal pool models available in literature is carried out. • Dynamic simulations of the thermal behavior of the swimming-pools are performed. • PV/T thermal energy is used to heat the swimming pool and for DHW production. • Energy and economic parametric analyses of the proposed system are presented. - Abstract: This paper presents an analysis of an innovative renewable energy plant serving an existing indoor/outdoor swimming pool located in Naples. The proposed solar hybrid system is designed in order to balance the remarkable energy demand of the swimming pool facility and to ensure suitable comfort conditions for swimmers. With the aim to accomplish such goals, the dynamic thermal behavior of the swimming pool was analyzed as a function of the thermo-hygrometric conditions of the indoor space and on the meteorological conditions of the pool site. In order to properly design and size the proposed renewable energy system, different thermal pool loss formulations for the calculation of the swimming pool thermal balance, in indoor and outdoor regimes, are adopted. The solar hybrid system consists of a water cooled photovoltaic/thermal collectors plant (PV/T), designed to meet a part of the facility demands of electricity and heat. Electricity is completely utilized by the facility, while the produced thermal energy is primarily used to meet the pool thermal demand and secondarily for sanitary hot water scopes. In order to carry out dynamic simulations and sensitivity analyses, the system performance is designed and dynamically simulated in TRNSYS environment. The developed simulation model enables the calculation of both the indoor and outdoor swimming pool thermal losses and the overall energy and economic system performance. Such results are obtained as a function of the thermo-hygrometric conditions of the environment, of the occupants and the

  4. UV filters interaction in the chlorinated swimming pool, a new challenge for urbanization, a need for community scale investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifan, Hamidreza; Klein, David; Morse, Audra N

    2016-07-01

    Sunscreen products and some personal care products contain the Ultraviolet (UV) chemical filters, which are entering the surface water. Public concerns about secondary effects of these compounds are growing because of the contamination of the aquatic environment that may reach to potentially toxic concentration levels. This article highlights the reaction of certain UV filters with hypochlorite disinfectant in the presence of sunlight. Due to urbanization and industrialization, use of outdoor plastic swimming pools is increasing. The relatively smaller volume of these pools compared to larger pools may increase the concentration of the UV filters in the pool and their potential interactions with materials of human origin (urine, sweat, cosmetics, skin cells, and hair) to the levels of toxicity concerns for children through the creation of disinfection by products (DBP). Based on our analysis, the minimum concentration levels of 2.85, 1.9, 1.78 and 0.95g/L, respectively, for EHMC, OC, 4-MBC and BP3 UV filters in children pools are predicted. Therefore, this article calls for an urgent investigation of potential toxic effects of the UV filters, the creation of DBPs and their subsequent impacts on human health. PMID:27088731

  5. ‘Right now, Sophie *swims in the pool?!’: Brain potentials of grammatical aspect processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique eFlecken

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether brain potentials of grammatical aspect processing resemble semantic or morpho-syntactic processing, or whether they instead are characterized by an entirely distinct pattern in the same individuals. We studied aspect from the perspective of agreement between the temporal information in the context (temporal adverbials, e.g., Right now and a morpho-syntactic marker of grammatical aspect (e.g., progressive is swimming. Participants read questions providing a temporal context that was progressive (What is Sophie doing in the pool right now? or habitual (What does Sophie do in the pool every Monday?. Following a lead-in sentence context such as Right now, Sophie…, we measured ERPs time-locked to verb phrases in four different conditions, e.g., (a is swimming (control; (b *is cooking (semantic violation; (c *are swimming (morpho-syntactic violation; or (d?swims (aspect mismatch; …in the pool. The collected ERPs show typical N400 and P600 effects for semantics and morpho-syntax, while aspect processing elicited an Early Negativity (250-350 ms. The aspect-related Negativity was short-lived and had a central scalp distribution with an anterior onset. This differentiates it not only from the semantic N400 effect, but also from the typical (LAN (Left Anterior Negativity, that is frequently reported for various types of agreement processing. Moreover, aspect processing was not accompanied by a clear P600 modulation.We argue that the specific context for each item in this experiment provided a trigger for agreement checking with temporal information encoded on the verb, i.e., morphological aspect marking. The aspect-related Negativity obtained for aspect agreement mismatches reflects a violated expectation concerning verbal inflection (in the example above, the expected verb phrase was Sophie is X-ing rather than Sophie X-s in condition d. The absence of an additional P600 for aspect processing suggests that the mismatch did not

  6. Radiological consequences of a postulated cooling channel blockage incident at a pool-type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of the radiological consequences of a postulated coolant flow blockage incident at the Hoger Onderwijs Reactor (HOR) is being presented. The HOR is a swimming-pool type research reactor with a maximum licensed power of 3 MW. Assuming a sudden blockage of cooling channels in the high power density region of the core, the source term for the release of radioactivity into the environment was calculated. The magnitude of this source term is required by actions of the HOR protection system as well as by physical processes acting on the fission products. Hence, almost 99% of the calculated release from the containment consists of noble gases; most of the aerosol-type activity set free in the environment results from the decay of these noble gases. The deposit of long-living radionuclides outside the reactor building is very low. Radio-iodine will be the main contributor to the environmental radiation dose, ingestion of contaminated food being the critical pathway. Despite the conservativeness of most assumptions used, the calculated thyroid dose for critical individuals at all distances from the site boundary remains well below the emergency reference levels recommended by national and international organizations and the national dose limit for members of the public

  7. Challenges and lessons-learned during the reactor pool repair at the Penn State Breazeale Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On October 10, 2007, operators of the Penn State Breazeale Reactor (PSBR) observed the reactor pool level had decreased more than expected over the weekend. Upon further investigation, the staff confirmed that a small leak of 10 gallons had developed in the 52 year old unlined pool. The staff immediately informed the appropriate regulatory authorities and set about finding a solution. Over the next six weeks, the reactor staff worked with University personnel, contractors and regulators to fix the leak and return the facility to normal operation. The Penn State reactor was the first university research reactor licensed by the Atomic Energy Commission. The facility has had several minor pool leaks since its construction in 1955, with the latest occurring in 1976. Each time, the leak was located and repaired with concrete and an epoxy coating. The 2007 leak repair was more extensive involving three-step process that required hydro-lazing the pool wall, removing old sealant, and covering the areas with an epoxy concrete. After these processes the entire pool wall surface was sealed with a polyurea coating. The response from the State of Pennsylvania and US-NRC regulatory authorities was much more involved than earlier leak events. Although public risk was never an issue, the US-NRC immediately dispatched inspectors to the facility so that senior officials could be knowledgeable and responsive to the public's information needs. Additionally, the University set up a team to provide the public and news organizations with ongoing status of the investigation and repair activities. This team allowed the reactor staff to remain focused on the technical aspects of the repair and interface with the regulators. The PSBR pool leak detection and repair will be discussed. Also, PSBR administration and staff, other PSBR functions, coordination with US-NRC and the state of Pennsylvania officials will be presented and experiences gained from this event will be shared with the other

  8. Stabilization of reactor fuel storage pool-TTP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed work includes evaluating standard and improved technologies an designing an integrated demonstration system to clean the water and sludge the fuel storage pools. The water released would meet drinking water standards and tritium standards. The volume of radioactive sludge would be reduced by partial separation of the sludge and radionuclides and eventual solidification of the hazardous and radioactive waste. The scope of the wo includes a survey of needs and applicable technologies, system engineering evaluation, conceptual design, detailed design, fabrication of the integrat demonstration system, and testing of the system. The survey task will locate potential specific customers within the DOE complex, and outside of the DOE complex throughout the United States, that be able to utilize the narrowly focused technology to stabilize/shutdown reactor fuel storage pools, responsible parties will be located and asked respond to a survey about their specific process requirements. Literature searches will be run through technical and scientific databases to locate technologies that may be an improvement over the standard baselined technol for cleanup of radioactively-contaminated pools. Systems engineering will provide decision analysis support for the development, evaluation, design, test functions of the treatment of pool water and sludge

  9. Conceptual design of a pool type molten salt breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The renewed interest in molten salt coolant technology is backed by the 50 years history of molten salt nuclear technology development, mainly in Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In Indian context MSBR is found to be one of the options for sustainable nuclear energy generation, especially in the third stage of the nuclear programme. The system can be operated at high temperature which makes high efficiency power conversion and efficient hydrogen generation through thermo-chemical reactions possible. At present development is in progress in BARC on two molten salt reactor concepts, one is pool type and the other is loop type. Here the design of pool type concept with 850MWe power is described. The core is designed to operate in the fast spectrum region so the conversion of 233U breeding is possible from thorium. Preliminary thermal hydraulic analysis is carried out with LiF-ThF4-UF4 as the primary fuel and coolant. The blanket material is also a molten salt, LiF-ThF4. Reactor physics calculations are also carried out for the feasibility studies of the core design of the reactor. FLiNaK is used as the secondary coolant for the calculations. Both forced circulation and natural circulation options are evaluated. (author)

  10. Shielding Calculations for The New Spent Fuel Storage Pool of Etrr1 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCNP code was used to model and simulate the new spent fuel storage pool of Etrr1 research reactor. Shielding calculations for the pool were performed to calculate the radiation dose through different pool layers. Radiation sources for photons and neutrons inside the pool were determined under different conditions. Key parameters that affect the radiation dose outside the pool were studied. Comparison with the designer values was performed, agreement and disagreement were investigated. Radiation safety of the pool has been verified

  11. Microbiological quality of swimming-pool waters in the province of Badajoz (Spain); Calidad microbiologica de las aguas de piscina en la provinca de Badajoz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalba Doblas, A. M.; Ambel Carracedo, M. P.; Cobos Rodriguez, J. G.

    2006-07-01

    The object of the actual work is to evaluate the microbiological quality of swimming pool waters in the province of Badajoz, 79 samples in 33 cities, according to criteria required by the Decreto 54/2002 of the Comunidad Autonoma of Extremadura. the work describes the possible origins of the pollution in the swimming-pool waters and the risks. The parameters analyzed were Termotolerant Coliforms, Faecal streptococci, S. aureus, P. aerogenes, Sulphate reducing bacteria and Salmonella spp. Results show that 62% of these fulfil microbiological quality criteria. the presence of Sulphate reducing bacteria was found in 24% of the samples, and P. aerogenes was detected in 16% of them. (Author) 20 refs.

  12. Wastewater treatment in a compact intensified wetland system at the Badboot: a floating swimming pool in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oirschot, D; Wallace, S; Van Deun, R

    2015-09-01

    The Badboot (Dutch for swimming pool boat) is a floating swimming pool located in the city center of Antwerp in Belgium. The overall design consists of a recycled ferry boat that serves as a restaurant and next to that a newly built ship that harbours an Olympic size swimming pool, sun decks, locker rooms with showers, and a party space. A major design goal of the project was to make the ship as environmentally friendly as possible. To avoid discharge of contaminated waste water in the Antwerp docks, the ship includes onsite treatment of wastewater in a compact constructed wetland. The treatment wetland system was designed to treat wastewater from visitor locker rooms, showers, toilets, two bars, and the wastewater from the restaurant kitchen. Due to the limited space on board the ship, only 188 m(2) could be allocated to a wetland treatment system. As a result, part of the design included intensification of the wetland treatment process through the use of Forced Bed Aeration, which injects small quantities of air in a very uniform grid pattern throughout the wetland with a mechanical air compressor. The system was monitored between August 2012 and March 2013 (with additional sampling in the autumn of 2014). Flows and loads to the wetland were highly variable, but removal efficiency was extremely high; 99.5 % for chemical oxygen demand (COD), 88.6 % for total nitrogen and 97.2 % for ammonia. The treatment performance was assessed using a first-order, tanks-in-series model (the P-k-C* model) and found to be roughly equivalent to similar intensified wetlands operating in Germany. However, treatment performance was substantially better than data reported on passive wetlands, likely as a result of intensification. Even with mechanically assisted aeration, the total oxygen delivered to the treatment wetlands was insufficient to support conventional nitrification and denitrification, so it is likely that alternate nitrogen removal pathways, such as anammox, are

  13. Refurbishment of Pakistan research reactor (PARR-1) for stainless steel lining of the reactor pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) is a pool-type research reactor. Reactor aging has resulted in the increase of water seepage from the concrete walls of the reactor pool. To stop the seepage, it was decided to augment the existing pool walls with an inner lining of stainless steel. This could be achieved only if the pool walls could be accessed unhindered and without excessive radiation doses. For this purpose a partial decommissioning was done by removing all active core components including standard/control fuel elements, reflector elements, beam tubes, thermal shield, core support structure, grid plate and the pool's ceramic tiles, etc. An overall decommissioning program was devised which included procedures specific to each item. This led to the development of a fuel transport cask for transportation, and an interim fuel storage bay for temporary storage of fuel elements (until final disposal). The safety of workers and the environment was ensured by the use of specially designed remote handling tools, appropriate shielding and pre-planned exposure reduction procedures based on the ALARA principle. During the implementation of this program, liquid and solid wastes generated were legally disposed of. It is felt that the experience gained during the refurbishment of PARR-1 to install the stainless steel liner will prove useful and better planning and execution for the future decommissioning of PARR-1, in particular, and for other research reactors like PARR-2 (27 kW MNSR), in general. Furthermore, due to the worldwide activities on decommissioning, especially those communicated through the IAEA CRP on 'Decommissioning Techniques for Research Reactors', the importance of early planning has been well recognized. This has made possible the implementation of some early steps like better record keeping, rehiring of trained manpower, and creation of interim and final waste storage. (author)

  14. The IRSN Institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety Cadarache Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research programs of the IRSN in the Cadarache Center concern the nuclear safety (reactor safety, nuclear fuels behavior during accidents, fires in nuclear installations), the protection and the control of radioactive materials, the human and the environment protection. The programs are presented and discussed. This presentation includes also the regional impact of the Institute at Cadarache (economical impact, relations with the universities and international meetings). (A.L.B.)

  15. Comparison of pool/loop configurations in the JAEA fast reactor feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JAEA conducted a feasibility study on commercialized fast breeder reactor cycle systems from 1999 to 2006 (FS). In the FS, various fast reactor concepts with various power levels, coolant materials and plant configurations were proposed and competed. In the large-scale sodium cooled reactor region, four nuclear industry vendors proposed each original advanced sodium cooled reactor concept in 1999. One was a loop concept which was named 'JSFR' later and the other three were pool concepts. The first competition among the four concepts showed that the economical competitiveness of JSFR is better than pool concepts. Therefore, in the 2000 study, one pool concept was selected and the selected pool concept was refined to compete with JSFR. In this appendix, the selected FS pool concept is described and the pool/loop comparative study in the FS is briefly summarized. Schematic illustration of the reactor vessel of the FS pool is shown. Relation of reactor vessel diameters and electric output of various sodium-cooled reactor concepts are compared. The comparison shows that the FS pool concept has a smaller reactor vessel than recent conceptual large reactors such as SPX-2, SNR-2, EFR and BN-1600. The material amount comparison shows that the reactor vessel and primary system material amount of the FS pool concept is heavier than that of the FS loop concept (JSFR) by approximately 250ton. Because the reactor vessel diameter comparison of various concepts shows that the FS pool concept is one of the most compact pool configurations, the FS pool/loop competition is thought to provide comparative information between the most economical loop and pool concepts

  16. Research reactors - an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. The Recreational Water Cycle: From Source Water to Tap Water to Spa and Swimming Pool Water: Effects of Disinfectants and Precursors and Implications for Exposure and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current study investigates the effect of different disinfection treatments on the disinfection by-products (DBPs) formed in finished drinking water vs. tap water vs. swimming pool water vs. spa waters. To this end, complete water pathway samples (untreated source waters ->fi...

  18. From Source Water to Tap Water to Spa and Swimming Pool Water: Effects of Disinfectanta and Precursors and Implications for Exposure and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction The current study investigated the effect of different disinfection treatments on the disinfection by-products (DBPs) formed in finished drinking water vs. tap water vs. swimming pool water vs. spa waters. To this end, samples across the complete water pathway (untr...

  19. The reactor Cabri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has become necessary to construct in France a reactor which would permit the investigation of the conditions of functioning of future installations, the choice, the testing and the development of safety devices to be adopted. A water reactor of a type corresponding to the latest CEA constructions in the field of laboratory or university reactors was decided upon: it appeared important to be able to evaluate the risks entailed and to study the possibilities of increasing the power, always demanded by the users; on the other hand, it is particularly interesting to clarify the phenomena of power oscillation and the risks of burn out. The work programme for CABRI will be associated with the work carried out on the American Sperts of the same type, during its construction, very useful contacts were made with the American specialists who designed the se reactors. A brief description of the reactor is given in the communication as well as the work programme for the first years with respect to the objectives up to now envisaged. Rough description of the reactor. CABRI is an open core swimming-pool reactor without any lateral protection, housed in a reinforced building with controlled leakage, in the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache. It lies alone in the middle of an area whose radius is 300 meters long. Control and measurements equipment stand out on the edge of that zone. It consumes MTR fuel elements. The control-safety rods are propelled by compressed air. The maximum flow rate of cooling circuit is 1500 m3/h. Transient measurements are recorded in a RW330 unit. Aims and work programme. CABRI is meant for: - studies on the safety of water reactors - for the definition of the safety margins under working conditions: research of maximum power at which a swimming-pool reactor may operate with respect to a cooling accident, of local boiling effect on the nuclear behaviour of the reactor, performances of the control and safety instruments under exceptional

  20. The risk of contracting infectious diseases in public swimming pools: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsófia Barna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A review of pathogenic microorganisms presenting risk of infection in pool based artificial recreational water venues is extracted from the available scientific literature. The microorganisms are grouped both according to their way of spread and their survival and growth strategies and their characteristics relevant for the pool and spa based recreation are discussed. In order to put the proposed risks on a solid basis, among others a ten year excerpt of the waterborne disease statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC is used throughout the article.

  1. Natural and mixed convection in the cylindrical pool of TRIGA reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, R.; Tiselj, I.; Matkovič, M.

    2016-05-01

    Temperature fields within the pool of the JSI TRIGA MARK II nuclear research reactor were measured to collect data for validation of the thermal hydraulics computational model of the reactor tank. In this context temperature of the coolant was measured simultaneously at sixty different positions within the pool during steady state operation and two transients. The obtained data revealed local peculiarities of the cooling water dynamics inside the pool and were used to estimate the coolant bulk velocity above the reactor core. Mixed natural and forced convection in the pool were simulated with a Computational Fluid Dynamics code. A relatively simple CFD model based on Unsteady RANS turbulence model was found to be sufficient for accurate prediction of the temperature fields in the pool during the reactor operation. Our results show that the simple geometry of the TRIGA pool reactor makes it a suitable candidate for a simple natural circulation benchmark in cylindrical geometry.

  2. An Innovative Hybrid Loop-Pool Design for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existing sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) have two types of designs--loop type and pool type. In the loop type design, such as JOYO (Japan) [1] and MONJU (Japan), the primary coolant is circulated through intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) external to the reactor tank. The major advantages of loop design include compactness and easy maintenance. The disadvantage is higher possibility of sodium leakage. In the pool type design such as EBR-II (USA), BN-600M(Russia), Superphenix (France) and European Fast Reactor [2], the reactor core, primary pumps, IHXs and direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) heat exchangers (DHX) all are immersed in a pool of sodium coolant within the reactor vessel, making a loss of primary coolant extremely unlikely. However, the pool type design makes primary system large. In the latest ANL's Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) design [3], the primary system is configured in a pool-type arrangement. The hot sodium at core outlet temperature in hot pool is separated from the cold sodium at core inlet temperature in cold pool by a single integrated structure called Redan. Redan provides the exchange of the hot sodium from hot pool to cold pool through IHXs. The IHXs were chosen as the traditional tube-shell design. This type of IHXs is large in size and hence large reactor vessel is needed

  3. Operational and research activities of Tsing Hua open pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsing Hua Open Pool Reaction (THOR) is the first nuclear reactor to become operational in Taiwan. It reached its first critical on April 13, 1961. Until now, THOR has been operated successfully for 27 years. The major missions of THOR include radioisotope production, neutron activation analysis, nuclear science and engineering researches, education, and personnel training. The THOR was originally loaded with HEU MTR-type fuels. A gradual fuel replacing program using LEU TRIGA fuel to replace MTR started in 1977. By 1987, THOR was loaded with all TRIGA fuels. This paper gives a brief history of THOR, its current status, the core conversion work, some selected research topics, and its improvement plan. (author)

  4. Environmental monitoring in the area of the Cadarache Nuclear Studies Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cadarache Centre is part of the French nuclear programme providing for extensive development of research and hence of personnel and installations. It is essentially a centre for testing prototype reactors intended for use in power stations or for ship propulsion. In addition, experimental studies are carried out in connection with reactor structural materials and fuel elements. Various studies related to reactor physics, radiation protection, plant biology, etc. are also undertaken. This article describes the Cadarache site and the monitoring programme to assess the levels of radioactivity released from it.

  5. An insight of disinfection by-product (DBP) formation by alternative disinfectants for swimming pool disinfection under tropical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linyan; Schmalz, Christina; Zhou, Jin; Zwiener, Christian; Chang, Victor W-C; Ge, Liya; Wan, Man Pun

    2016-09-15

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) is the most commonly used disinfectant in pool treatment system. Outdoor pools usually suffer from the strong sunlight irradiation which degrades the free chlorine rapidly. In addition, more pools start to adopt the recirculation of swimming pool water, which intensifies the disinfection by-product (DBP) accumulation issue. Given these potential drawbacks of using NaClO in the tropical environment, two alternative organic-based disinfectants, trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA, C3Cl3N3O3) and bromochlorodimethylhydantoin (BCDMH, C5H6BrClN2O2), were investigated and compared to NaClO in terms of their self-degradation and the formation of DBPs, including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), under simulated tropical climate conditions. The result reveals that halogen stabilizer, TCCA, had the advantages of slower free chlorine degradation and lower DBP concentration compared to NaClO, which makes it a good alternative disinfectant. BCDMH was not recommended mainly due to the highly reactive disinfecting ingredient, hypobromous acid (HBrO), which fails to sustain the continuous disinfection requirement. Total disinfectant dosage was the main factor that affects residual chlorine/bromine and THM/HAA formation regardless of different disinfectant dosing methods, e.g. shock dosing (one-time spiking) in the beginning, and continuous dosing during the whole experimental period. Two-stage second-order-kinetic-based models demonstrate a good correlation between the measured and predicted data for chlorine decay (R(2) ≥ 0.95), THM (R(2) ≥ 0.99) and HAA (R(2) ≥ 0.83) formation. Higher temperature was found to enhance the DBP formation due to the temperature dependence of reaction rates. Thus, temperature control of pools, especially for those preferring higher temperatures (e.g. hydrotherapy and spa), should take both bather comfort and DBP formation potential into consideration. It is also observed that chlorine competition

  6. System for reducing heat losses from indoor swimming pools by use of automatic covers. Final report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This final report is an account of the principal activities of Lof Energy Systems, Inc. in a two-year project funded by the Energy Related Inventions Program (ERIP) of the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary objective has been the development of a fully practical and economical system for saving energy in indoor swimming pools by use of motorized covers. The goal is wide-spread use of a fully developed product, in institutional swimming pools. Four major tasks, depicted in the accompanying Performance Schedule, have been completed, and one other has been initiated and its completion committed. Principal accomplishments have been the selection and improvement of cover materials and designs, lengthening and strengthening of reels and improvements in motorized components and their control, design and installation of pool covers in full scale demonstration and evaluation of fully developed commercial system, preparation and dissemination of manuals and reports, finalization of arrangements for Underwriters Laboratory certification of products, and final report preparation and submission. Of greatest significance has been the successful demonstration of the fully developed system and the verification and reporting by an energy consultant of the large savings resulting from pool cover use. Probably the best evidence of success of the DOE-ERIP project in advancing this invention to a commercial stage is its acceptance for sale by the Lincoln Equipment Company, a national distributor of swimming pool supplies and equipment. A copy of the relevant page in the Lincoln catalog is included in this report as Annex A. Representatives of that company now offer Tof motorized pool cover systems to their pool owner customers. In addition to the plans for securing UL certification the company expects to continue making design improvements that can increase system reliability, durability, and cost-effectiveness.

  7. Criticality calculations for the spent fuel storage pools for Etrr1 and Etrr2 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A criticality analysis of two spent fuel storage pools for Etrr1 and Etrr2 research reactors was performed. The multiplication factor for the pools was calculated as a function of relevant lattice physics parameters. Monte Carlo code MNCP-4A code was used in the criticality calculations. The results were compared with those given by CITATION code and results obtained formerly during the design phase of the pools with the MONK 6.3 code. Safety of the pools was confirmed. (author)

  8. Hot Water Layer and Thermal Stratification in an Open-pool type Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong-Seok; Yoon, Hyun-Gi; Choi, Jeongwoon; Kim, Seong-Hoon; Chi, Dae-Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In many open-pool type research reactors, a hot water layer is introduced in the upper part of the pool as a shielding layer to reduce the radiation level on the pool top. By maintaining the hot water layer in a properly higher temperature than the lower part of the pool, a thermally stratified region is developed below the hot water layer and the flows in the lower part of the pool is successfully isolated from the upper part of the pool. This reduces a mass transport from the lower part of the pool to the pool upper part and consequently the radioactivity level on the pool top is also diminished. In this study, the characteristics of the hot water layer and the thermally stratified region in the pool of the KIJANG Research Reactor (KJRR) are investigated. Numerical simulation on a 3D simplified model of the pool of KJRR is conducted using the commercial CFD software ANSYS FLUENT 13.0. The results show initial time evolutions of the temperatures and the flow velocities in the pool toward each quasi steady state. For the shielding analysis in the pool which is required to estimate the radioactivity of the hot water layer, the mixing rate between the hot water layer and the lower part of the pool is important variable as well as the thicknesses of the hot water layer and the stratified region. In further study, the mixing rate will be estimated by post processing the obtained results.

  9. RUTA pool-type reactor for heat supply and the possibility for its application area expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RUTA, a reactor facility with a pool-type reactor, has been designed for heat supply of residential districts. A relatively low potential of the heat generated by the reactor requires a special approach to building up heat supply systems with RUTA facilities. The application of the RUTA facility as a heat source for seawater thermal distillation has been considered. It is possible to use the reactor for neutron therapy. The reactor optimization provides for the improvement of the facility's consumer qualities. (author)

  10. Geothermal heat for Erding. 2. Energy and wellness, geothermal heating station and hot-water indoor swimming pool; Geowaerme fuer Erding 2. Energie und Wellness, Geothermieheizwerk und Thermalbad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenzer, H. (comp.); Bussmann, W.

    1999-07-01

    This 17:20 minute VHS-PAL video film describes the project 'Geothermal heat for Erding 2', i.e. the construction of the geothermal heating station and a modern hot-water indoor swimming pool. [German] Der vorliegende VHS-PAL-Videofilm beschreibt innerhalb von 17:20 Min. Lauflaenge das Projekt 'Geowaerme fuer Erding 2'. Gezeigt werden die Entstehungsphasen dieses Projektes bestehend aus einem Geothermieheizwerk und einem modernen Thermalbad. (AKF)

  11. Steps of Healthy Swimming: Protection against Recreational Water Illnesses (RWIs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skin, Ear, & Eye Illness Respiratory Illness Neurologic Illness Wound Infections Other Illnesses Swimming Pool Operation & Disinfection Microbial Testing & Disinfection Swimming Pool Chemicals Injuries & Outdoor ...

  12. Twentieth anniversary of German nuclear reactor insurance pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the peaceful utilization of nuclear energy was launched, insurance companies in the countries concerned faced a risk whose magnitude intially was unfathomable and for whose assessment they were not experienced enough, either with respect to the hazard probability or the potential extent of a damage. For this reason a pool, an association on a pro rata base, was organized on a national level by all insurance companies willing to offer coverage. In addition, to further spread the risk, worldwide mutual cooperation was agreed upon among the national pools. The 107 companies which presently make up the German pool cooperate with pools in twenty other countries. (orig.)

  13. Radiometric analysis of the spent fuel pool water and reactor coolant of ET-RR.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims at analysis of radioactivity levels in the water of spent fuel pool and reactor core of the Egyptian 2MW research reactor (ET-RR.1 at Inshas). Gamma spectrometric and laser fluorimetric analysis have been used for carrying out this study. The fission product 137Cs and activation product 60Co are found with very high concentration in the spent fuel storage pool water. Thirteen isotopes; La-140, Cr-51, Ba-140, I-131, Cs-137, Ce-144, Nb-95, Ce-141, Zr-95, Ru-103, Cs-134, Nd-147 and Zn-65 are identified in the reactor core water. However no radiological hazard resulted because the fission products are contained within the shielded reactor pool. The radioactivity released into the reactor coolant water is mainly controlled by the diffusion mechanism. (orig.)

  14. TRIGA-III research reactor pool inspection using an underwater vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, T. K.; Lee, J. R.; Kim, S. H.; Yoon, J. S.; Lee, B. J. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-10-01

    For the inspection of radioactivity at the nuclear reactor and spent fuel storage pool, an underwater vehicle system has been developed. This underwater vehicle is navigated freely by five thruster which are controlled by developed control system and has a faculty of radiation detection at the inner wall and special point in pool using the radiation detector which is attached to the bottom of the vehicle. In this paper, the developed underwater vehicle and its components are described in detail. Also, the field test result in TRIGA-III research reactor pool is described.

  15. Thermohydraulic analysis of loss of forced flow accident in a pool type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper shows a calculation model for the fuel and pool water temperatures, and the internal building pressure of a 5 MW pool-type reactor, in the hypothetical event of the forced flow interruption. it is obtained the solution of the thermal energy and the momentum conservation equations in one dimension, which represent the heat conduction and natural convection in the coolant. The reactor building pressure increment due to the partial pool water evaporation is also calculated, using a homogenous model with thermal equilibrium of the phases (liquid water and steam) and the existing air. The heat loss to the building walls is also considered. (Author)

  16. Criticality safety for the new spent fuel storage pool of Etrr-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etrr-1 is the first egyptian research reactor, it is 36 years old. The decision is taken to equipped the reactor with a new spent fuel storage pool. The facility houses a storage pool besides a handling region. The safety regulations require that the pool when filled with full capacity of fuel assembly FA must be subcritical over a long period during normal and accidental conditions. The present work studies this issues at different pool temperatures. The key parameters affecting pool criticality as lattice pitch and U235 loads are investigated. WIMS and CITATION codes are used in the calculations. The results show good agreement when compared with design calculations which is performed by MCNP code

  17. Quality control of pool water from IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of the pool water monitoring program of the IEA-R1 reactor of IPEN/CNEN-SP in normal operation. The considered period was previous to the systems upgrade and modernization for the new reactor operation condition: a power of 5 MW and operation time of 100 hours weekly. (author)

  18. RELAP5 Analysis of the Hybrid Loop-Pool Design for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao; Cliff Davis

    2008-06-01

    An innovative hybrid loop-pool design for sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR-Hybrid) has been recently proposed. This design takes advantage of the inherent safety of a pool design and the compactness of a loop design to improve economics and safety of SFRs. In the hybrid loop-pool design, primary loops are formed by connecting the reactor outlet plenum (hot pool), intermediate heat exchangers (IHX), primary pumps and the reactor inlet plenum with pipes. The primary loops are immersed in the cold pool (buffer pool). Passive safety systems -- modular Pool Reactor Auxiliary Cooling Systems (PRACS) – are added to transfer decay heat from the primary system to the buffer pool during loss of forced circulation (LOFC) transients. The primary systems and the buffer pool are thermally coupled by the PRACS, which is composed of PRACS heat exchangers (PHX), fluidic diodes and connecting pipes. Fluidic diodes are simple, passive devices that provide large flow resistance in one direction and small flow resistance in reverse direction. Direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) heat exchangers (DHX) are immersed in the cold pool to transfer decay heat to the environment by natural circulation. To prove the design concepts, especially how the passive safety systems behave during transients such as LOFC with scram, a RELAP5-3D model for the hybrid loop-pool design was developed. The simulations were done for both steady-state and transient conditions. This paper presents the details of RELAP5-3D analysis as well as the calculated thermal response during LOFC with scram. The 250 MW thermal power conventional pool type design of GNEP’s Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) developed by Argonne National Laboratory was used as the reference reactor core and primary loop design. The reactor inlet temperature is 355 °C and the outlet temperature is 510 °C. The core design is the same as that for ABTR. The steady state buffer pool temperature is the same as the reactor inlet

  19. Criticality safety calculations of the Soreq research reactor storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IRR-l spent fuel is to be relocated in a storage pool. The present paper describes the actual facility and summarizes the Monte Carlo criticality safety calculations. The fuel elements are to be placed inside cadmium boxes to reduce their reactivity. The fuel element is 7.6 cm by 8.0 cm in the horizontal plane. The cadmium box is effectively 9.7 cm by 9.7 cm, providing significant water between the cadmium and the fuel element. The present calculations show that the spent fuel storage pool is criticality safe even for fresh fuel elements. (author)

  20. Development of system design and seismic performance evaluation for reactor pool working platform of a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Design of reactor pool working platform (RPWP) is newly proposed for an open-tank-in-pool type research reactor. • Main concept of RPWP is to minimize the pool top radiation level. • Framework for seismic performance evaluation of nuclear SSCs in a deterministic and a probabilistic manner is proposed. • Structural integrity, serviceability, and seismic margin of the RPWP are evaluated during and after seismic events. -- Abstract: The reactor pool working platform (RPWP) has been newly designed for an open-tank-in-pool type research reactor, and its seismic response, structural integrity, serviceability, and seismic margin have been evaluated during and after seismic events in this paper. The main important concept of the RPWP is to minimize the pool top radiation level by physically covering the reactor pool of the open-tank-in-pool type research reactor and suppressing the rise of flow induced by the primary cooling system. It is also to provide easy handling of the irradiated objects under the pool water by providing guide tubes and refueling cover to make the radioisotopes irradiated and protect the reactor structure assembly. For this concept, the new three dimensional design model of the RPWP is established for manufacturing, installation and operation, and the analytical model is developed to analyze the seismic performance. Since it is submerged under and influenced by water, the hydrodynamic effect is taken into account by using the hydrodynamic added mass method. To investigate the dynamic characteristics of the RPWP, a modal analysis of the developed analytical model is performed. To evaluate the structural integrity and serviceability of the RPWP, the response spectrum analysis and response time history analysis have been performed under the static load and the seismic load of a safe shutdown earthquake (SSE). Their stresses are analyzed for the structural integrity. The possibility of an impact between the RPWP and the most

  1. Detection of fission products release in the research reactor 'RA' spent fuel storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent fuel resulting from 25 years of operating the 6.5/10 MW thermal heavy water moderated and cooled research reactor RA at the VINCA Institute is presently all stored in the temporary spent fuel storage pool in the basement of the reactor building. In 1984, the reactor was shut down for refurbishment, which for a number of reasons has not yet been completed. Recent investigations show that independent of the future status of the research reactor, safe disposal of the so far irradiated fuel must be the subject of primary concern. The present status of the research reactor RA spent fuel storage pool at the VINCA Institute presents a serious safety problem. Action is therefore initiated in two directions. First, safety of the existing spent fuel storage should be improved. Second, transferring spent fuel into another, presumably dry storage space should be considered. By storing the previously irradiated fuel of the research reactor RA in a newly built storage space, sufficient free space will be provided in the existing spent fuel storage pool for the newly irradiated fuel when the reactor starts operation again. In the case that it would be decided to decommission the research reactor RA, the newly built storage space would provide safe disposal for the fuel irradiated so far

  2. The Fluid Dynamics Analysis of the RSG GAS Reactor's Pool with FLUENT 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RSG-GAS reactor has been operating for eighteen years, and as long as the operation there were many changes on its characteristics. Therefore, some safety analysis must be recalculated and reviewed to ensuring the safety of reactor operation. Safety analysis is carried out by modeling the system and virtually simulation of the severe accident in the model. Accuracy of the analysis is strongly depending on the similarity of the model to actual system to be modeled. One of the data that required in the safety analyses is the fluid flow pattern of reactor pool where the core is placed inside. The data is very useful when the modeling in the comprehensive safety analyses of RSG-GAS is carried out. The fluid flow pattern analysis was tried unsuccessfully, since the modeling was inappropriate. In this research, computational fluid dynamic analysis of the reactor pool is conducted utilizing FLUENT 6. The software solves three dimensionally mass, momentum and energy conservation equations, and also considers the turbulence and the boundaries condition with many model provided on it. The analysis resulted in an appropriate model of the reactor's pool for FLUENT 6 and fluid flow pattern of the RSG-GAS reactor pool. The calculation was converged easily and the resulted flow pattern has strong correlation with the actual condition, therefore the results of the analysis are acceptable. And this successful analysis results have not been achieving previously in RSG-GAS. (author)

  3. Technical outline of a high temperature pool reactor with inherent passive safety features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many reactor designers world wide have successfully established technologies for very small reactors (less than 10 MWTH), and technologies for large power reactors (greater than 1000 MWTH), but have not developed small reactors (between 10 MWTH and 1000 MWth) which are safe, economic, and capable of meeting user technical, economic, and safety requirements. This is largely because the very small reactor technologies and the power reactor technologies are not amiable to safe and economic upsizing/downsizing. This paper postulates that new technologies, or novel combinations of existing technologies are necessary to the design of safe and economic small reactors. The paper then suggest a set of requirements that must be satisfied by a small reactor design, and defines a pool reactor that utilizes lead coolant and TRISO fuel which has the potential for meeting these requirements. This reactor, named LEADIR-PS, (an acronym for LEAD-cooled Integral Reactor, Passively Safe) incorporates the inherent safety features of the Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (MWGR), while avoiding the cost of reactor and steam generator pressure vessels, and the safety concerns regarding pressure vessel rupture. This paper includes the description of a standard 200MW thermal reactor module based on this concept, called LEADIR-PS 200. (author)

  4. Statistical evaluation of potential damage to the Al(OH)3 layer on nTiO2 particles in the presence of swimming pool and seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanosized TiO2 particles (nTiO2) are usually coated with an Al(OH)3 layer when used in sunscreen to shield against the harmful effects of free radicals that are generated when these particles are exposed to UV radiation. Therefore, it is vital to insure the structural stability of these particles in the environment where the protective layer may be damaged and adverse health and environmental effects can occur. This study utilized X-ray analysis (SEM–EDS) to provide a qualitative and semi-quantitative assessment of the chemical and physical characteristics of Al(OH)3-coated original and damaged nTiO2 particles (used in sunscreen lotion formulations) in the presence of both swimming pool and seawater. Also, by utilizing statistical tools, a distribution of Al/Ti (%) on the particle surface was determined and evaluated. It was found that 45 min of treatment with swimming pool and seawater significantly induced the redistribution of Al/Ti (%), which changed the surface characteristics of particles and, therefore, may have induced undesired photo-activity and the consequent formation of free radicals.

  5. Distribution of 16N and 19O in the reactor pool water of the THOR facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive 16N and 19O in the Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor, produced from 16O(n,p)16N and 18O(n,γ)19O reactions, respectively, have been measured using a rapid sampling device and gamma-ray spectroscopic systems. The radioactivity of the 7-s half-life 16N and 27-s half-life 19O in the pool water are monitored in the power range from 1 W to 1 MW. The three-dimensional concentration of these radionuclides in the water coolant is also contour mapped down to the detection limit of 10 Bq/l. The spatial distribution of the short-lived radionuclides in the reactor pool, resulting from both the neutron flux distribution and heat transfer characteristics external to the core, is discussed for reactor operation at various power levels

  6. Development, Implementation and Experimental Validations of Activation Products Models for Water Pool Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some parameters were obtained both calculations and experiments in order to determined the source of the meaning activation products in water pool reactors. In this case, the study was done in RA-6 reactor (Centro Atomico Bariloche - Argentina).In normal operation, neutron flux on core activates aluminium plates.The activity on coolant water came from its impurities activation and meanly from some quantity of aluminium that, once activated, leave the cladding and is transported by water cooling system.This quantity depends of the 'recoil range' of each activation reaction.The 'staying time' on pool (the time that nuclides are circulating on the reactor pool) is another characteristic parameter of the system.Stationary state activity of some nuclides depends of this time.Also, several theoretical models of activation on coolant water system are showed, and their experimental validations

  7. Basic CFD investigation of decay heat removal in a pool type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety is one of the most important and desirable characteristic in a nuclear plant. Natural circulation cooling systems are noted for providing passive safety. These systems can be used as mechanism for removing the residual heat from the reactor, or even as the main cooling system for heated sections, such as the core. In this work, a computational fluid-dynamics (CFD) code is used to simulate the process of natural circulation in an open pool research reactor after its shutdown. The physical model studied is similar to the Open Pool Australian Light water reactor (OPAL), and contains the core, cooling pool, reflecting tank, circulation pipes and chimney. For best computing performance, the core region was modeled as a porous media, where the parameters were obtained from a separately detailed CFD analysis. (author)

  8. Experience on Maintenance of Thai Research Reactor's 'Small-Section' Pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor pool of TRR-1/M1 has been used since 1962 when the reactor building was constructed. Periodic maintenance of the reactor pool has been conducted by cleaning the pool surface and re-painting with epoxy coating. The TRR-1/M1 pool basically consists of two sections referred as 'large-section' and 'small-section'. The latest re-painting activity of the 'large-section' pool was performed in 2006 but the 'small-section' pool had not been re-painted for more than 10 years. Therefore, to assure that the 'small-section' pool can maintain leak-proof condition, the re-painting of the 'small-section' pool was performed in the early 2012. A project team was organized specially for this project and a detailed execution plan was developed. The project activities include removing foreign objects and highly activated materials from the pool section, cleaning, inspecting, re-painting the pool surface and testing for water leaks. Preparation of the repainting activities had begun 2 years in advance. During the time, the reactor core had been relocated to operate in the large-section pool away from the working area in order to minimize radioactivity. The challenge of this project was to handle 4 sets of highly radioactive bolts and nuts which support the weight of the 'void tank' irradiation facility. These bolts and nuts were made from stainless steel and had been in the flux region since the installation of the 'void tank' irradiation facility approximately 30 years ago. Dose rate measurement at the contacts of these bolts and nuts were found to be in the range of 10 . 20 R/hr. The strategy to minimize the dose rate of the workers to conduct the pool repainting in the area was to remove the bolts and nuts and replace with new ones before entering the area. Special tools were improvised in order to remove the bolts and nuts under water. During the execution of the project, close radiation monitoring was performed by the radiation protection team. The project was conducted

  9. Enriched uranium workshops towards decommissioning CEA Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author presents the post operational clean-out following the shut down of the ATUE nuclear facility implemented in the Cadarache research Center (France) and preceding the dismantling operations. ATUE was constructed in 1965, in the support of the fuel cycle industry, to develop the dry process of UF6 to UO2 conversion and the wet process with step of nitric acid solution, solvent purification by exchange columns, ammonium precipitation and hydrogen reduction. The dismantling organization, methods and technology are also presented and discussed. In a last part the author highlights some important points of the project. (A.L.B.)

  10. Radiation protection at the Cadarache research center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article recalls the French law about radiation protection and its evolution due to the implementation of the 2013/59-EURATOM directive that separates the missions of counsel from the more operative missions of the person appointed as 'competent in radiation protection'. The organisation of the radiation protection of the Cadarache research center is presented. The issue of sub-contracting and the respect of an adequate standard of radioprotection is detailed since 2 facilities operated by AREVA are being dismantled on the site. (A.C.)

  11. Remote Participation at JET from DRFC Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DRFC at the CEA/Cadarache has participated in the EFDA-JET Programme via the Task Agreement for Profile Control Studies in 1999 and via the EFDA-JET agreement in 2000. Several physicists have been seconded to Culham to work JET and many others have participated in the program 'at distance'. This task has necessitated careful consideration of working methods, often with 'ad-hoc' remote working solutions, but has led to a clear identification of the technical needs for Remote Participation (RP) for the new European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA). We have contributed substantial input into the working groups evaluating the technical needs of RP

  12. TRIGA reactor spent fuel pool under severe earthquake conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplemental criticality safety analysis of a pool type storage for TRIGA spent fuel at 'Jozef Stefan' Institute in Ljubljana, Slovenia, is presented. Previous results (Ravnik, M, Glumac, B., 1996) have shown that subcriticality is not guaranteed for some postulated accidents. To mitigate this deficiency, a study was made about replacing a certain number of fuel elements in the rack with absorber rods (Glumac, B., Ravnik, M., Logar, M., 1997) to lower the supercriticality probability, when the pitch is decreased to contact (as a consequence of a severe earthquake) in a square arrangement. The criticality analysis for the hexagonal contact pitch is presented in this paper, following the same scenario as outlined above. The Monte Carlo computer code MCNP4B with ENDF-B/VI library and detailed three dimensional geometry was used. First, the analysis about the influence of the number of triangular fuel piles on the bottom that could appear, if the fuel rack, made of three segments, disintegrates, is presented. Next, the number of uniformly mixed absorber rods in the lattice needed to sustain the subcriticality of the storage for hexagonal contact pitch is studied. Because of supercriticality possibility due to random mixing of the absorber rods in the case of lattice compaction, a probabilistic study was made in order to sample the probability density functions for random lattice loadings of the absorber rods. The results show that reasonably low probabilities for supercriticality can be achieved even when fresh 12 wt.% standard TRIGA fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool. (orig.)

  13. Effects of nuclear island connected buildings on seismic behaviour of reactor internals in a pool type fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seismic analysis of reactor assembly housing the primary circuit of a typical 500 MWe capacity pool type fast breeder reactor (PFBR) is reported. The reactor assembly is supported on the reactor vault within the nuclear island connected buildings (NICB). The seismic responses, viz. critical displacements, sloshing heights, stresses and strain energy values in the vessels are determined for the reactor assembly by detailed finite element analysis including the fluid-structure interaction and sloshing effects. Analysis is carried out to quantify the effects of inter-connection of the reactor vault with the adjacent buildings under the assumptions that the reactor vault along with reactor assembly is: (1) an isolated structural system from the adjacent buildings within reactor containment building (RCB) and (2) connected with the adjacent civil structures through floor slabs. Analysis indicates that, by inter-connecting the vault with the NICB, there are overall increases of all the governing parameters which decide the seismic design criteria. The significant effects are increases of: (1) radial and axial displacements of core top and absorber rods and vertical accelerations of core subassemblies which are of concern to reactor safety, (2) primary membrane stress intensities for the inner vessel and (3) strain energies developed at the critical portions which can enhance the buckling risks of main vessel, inner vessel and thermal baffles. Hence, it is preferable to isolate the reactor vault, directly constructing from the base raft without inter-connecting it with the NICB, from the seismic loading considerations

  14. Fast determination of octinoxate and oxybenzone uv filters in swimming pool waters by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry after solid-phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmazcan, Ö; Kanakaki, C; Izgi, B; Rosenberg, E

    2015-07-01

    A fast gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the analysis of the potential endocrine disrupters octinoxate and oxybenzone in swimming pool water samples based on the solvent-free solid-phase microextraction technique. The low-pressure gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method used for the fast identification of UV filter substances was compared to a conventional method in terms of sensitivity and speed. The fast method proposed resulted in 2 min runs, leading to an eightfold decrease in the total analysis time and a sevenfold improvement in detection limits. The main parameters affecting the solid-phase microextraction process were also studied in detail and the optimized conditions were as follows: fiber coating, polyacrylate; extraction mode, direct immersion; extraction temperature, 25°C; sample volume, 5 mL; extraction time 45 min; pH 6.5. Under the optimized conditions, a linear response was obtained in the concentration range of 0.5-25 μg/L with correlation coefficients in the range 0.990-0.999. The limits of detection were 0.17-0.29 μg/L, and the recoveries were 80-83%. Combined method uncertainty was assessed and found to be less than 7% for both analytes for concentrations equal to or higher than 5 μg/L. Pool water samples were analyzed to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method. Neither octinoxate nor oxybenzone were detected in the swimming pool water samples at concentrations above the respective limits of detection. PMID:25931007

  15. Garigliano Nuclear Power Plant, Italy: Decontamination and Rearranging of Reactor Canal and Spent Fuel Pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garigliano nuclear power plant was a 506 MW(th), first generation, dual cycle BWR. It started operation in 1964 and finally shut down in 1978, following the discovery of serious damage to a secondary steam generator. This section describes decontamination activities carried out in 1991–1993 in preparation for safe enclosure of Garigliano reactor building.1 Activities were carried out after completion of spent fuel transport off-site (1985–1987). A schematic of the spent fuel pool and adjacent areas is provided. Decontamination activities included the following: (a) Agitation and resuspension of pool sediments using water jets and water filtration. (b) Lowering of water level and parallel decontamination of pool walls with high pressure water jets of approximately 700 kg/cm2. (c) Removal, decontamination and interim storage on gangways of equipment located on the pool south-east wall. (d) Removal, decontamination and storage of the fuel transport container platform. (e) Removal of four fuel racks to their pool wall bearings, decontamination and transfer to the fresh fuel room. (f) Decontamination of the vessel head platform, removal from the reactor canal, brushing and coating to allow preservation and fixing of loose contamination. Eventually, this component was placed back in the reactor canal. (g) Construction in the reactor canal of an interim structure supporting fuel racks. At the completion of the work, this structure was dismounted, decontaminated and removed. (h) Removal of fuel racks (five at a time) to their pool wall bearings, decontamination and interim storage in the reactor canal. (i) Gradual lowering of the pool water level to some 50 cm from the pool floor and parallel decontamination of fixed structures and walls. (j) Discovery by visual inspection and radiological checks, of activated components on the floor of the pool. Retrieval of all this material, segmentation as needed, temporary storage in containers and later transfer to the high

  16. Fast neutron spectrum in the reflector of swimming pool reactor behind metallics slabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large perturbations of fast neutron spectrum were measured behind lead, aluminium and iron slabs in the Siloette reflector at the CENG. The neutron slowing down is chiefly depending of the inelastic reaction. The reaction cross section increases with energy; a spectrum softening is deduced. This is verified. We tried to determine the spectrum shape by calculation to fit the measurements. Calculations were firstly made in unidimensional geometry by the NIOBE transport equation resolution code and by the SANE Monte-Carlo code. The results does not agree with the experimental determined values. Finally a semi-empirical method for studying a tridimensional geometry was chosen. We have obtained calculation results in a perfect agreement with measurements. The method is described. (author)

  17. TRIGA reactor spent fuel pool under severe earthquake conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logar, M. [Univ. of Maribor (Slovenia). Fac. of Elec. Eng.; Glumac, B.; Maucec, M. [`Jozef Stefan` Institute, Jamova 39, POB 100, 1111 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1998-07-01

    Supplemental criticality safety analysis of a pool type storage for TRIGA spent fuel at `Jozef Stefan` Institute in Ljubljana, Slovenia, is presented. Previous results (Ravnik, M, Glumac, B., 1996) have shown that subcriticality is not guaranteed for some postulated accidents. To mitigate this deficiency, a study was made about replacing a certain number of fuel elements in the rack with absorber rods (Glumac, B., Ravnik, M., Logar, M., 1997) to lower the supercriticality probability, when the pitch is decreased to contact (as a consequence of a severe earthquake) in a square arrangement. The criticality analysis for the hexagonal contact pitch is presented in this paper, following the same scenario as outlined above. The Monte Carlo computer code MCNP4B with ENDF-B/VI library and detailed three dimensional geometry was used. First, the analysis about the influence of the number of triangular fuel piles on the bottom that could appear, if the fuel rack, made of three segments, disintegrates, is presented. Next, the number of uniformly mixed absorber rods in the lattice needed to sustain the subcriticality of the storage for hexagonal contact pitch is studied. Because of supercriticality possibility due to random mixing of the absorber rods in the case of lattice compaction, a probabilistic study was made in order to sample the probability density functions for random lattice loadings of the absorber rods. The results show that reasonably low probabilities for supercriticality can be achieved even when fresh 12 wt.% standard TRIGA fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool. (orig.) 7 refs.

  18. Quantitative analysis of gamma ray emitting radionuclide in reactor pool water of HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myong Seop; Kim, Hee Gon; Ahn, Guk Hoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-11-15

    The species and concentrations of the radionuclide in the primary coolant of HANARO were analyzed by using the gamma ray spectroscopy. The full energy peak efficiency for the volume source was calibrated as function of the photon energy for an HRGs detector. The primary coolant of HANARO was picked at the primary coolant purification system, and the water at the upper part of the reactor pool was taken at about 20cm under the pool surface. In the primary coolant, the concentrations of Na-24, Mg-27 and Al-28 were much higher than those of other nuclide, and they were in 1{approx}6x10'6'Bq/liter. Their origins were radiative reactions of aluminium used as the structure material and cladding of the nuclear fuel. The concentrations of Xe-138 and Xe-133 were relatively higher than those of other fission fragments. The source of the fission fragments in the coolant was the surface contamination of the nuclear fuel by uranium. Ar-41, Ce-141, Na-24 and Xe-133 were detected in the water at the upper part of the reactor pool. Na-24 was the main source of the pool top radiation level, and Xe-133 and Ar-41 were the main gaseous radionuclide released through the reactor pool surface.

  19. Quantitative analysis of gamma-ray emitting radionuclide in reactor pool water of HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myong-Seop; Kim, Hee-Gon; Ahn, Guk-Hoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-11-15

    The species and concentrations of the radionuclide in the primary coolant of HANARO were analyzed by using the gamma-ray spectroscopy. The full-energy peak efficiency for the volume source was calibrated as a function of the photon energy for an HPGe detector. The primary coolant of HANARO was picked at the primary coolant purification system, and the water at the upper part of the reactor pool was taken at about 20 cm under the pool surface. In the primary coolant, the concentrations of Na-24, Mg-27 and Al-28 were much higher than those of other nuclide, and they were in 1-6 x 10{sup 6} Bq/liter. Their origins were radiative reactions of aluminium used as the structure material and cladding of the nuclear fuel. The concentrations of Xe-138 and Xe-133 were relatively higher than those of other fission fragments. The source of the fission fragments in the coolant was the surface contamination of the nuclear fuel by uranium. Ar-41, Ce-141, Na-24 and Xe-133 were detected in the water at the upper part of the reactor pool. Na-24 was the main source of the pool top radiation level, and Xe-133 and Ar-41 were the main gaseous radionuclide released through the reactor pool surface.

  20. Quantitative analysis of gamma ray emitting radionuclide in reactor pool water of HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The species and concentrations of the radionuclide in the primary coolant of HANARO were analyzed by using the gamma ray spectroscopy. The full energy peak efficiency for the volume source was calibrated as function of the photon energy for an HRGs detector. The primary coolant of HANARO was picked at the primary coolant purification system, and the water at the upper part of the reactor pool was taken at about 20cm under the pool surface. In the primary coolant, the concentrations of Na-24, Mg-27 and Al-28 were much higher than those of other nuclide, and they were in 1∼6x10'6'Bq/liter. Their origins were radiative reactions of aluminium used as the structure material and cladding of the nuclear fuel. The concentrations of Xe-138 and Xe-133 were relatively higher than those of other fission fragments. The source of the fission fragments in the coolant was the surface contamination of the nuclear fuel by uranium. Ar-41, Ce-141, Na-24 and Xe-133 were detected in the water at the upper part of the reactor pool. Na-24 was the main source of the pool top radiation level, and Xe-133 and Ar-41 were the main gaseous radionuclide released through the reactor pool surface

  1. Storage of water reactor spent fuel in water pools. Survey of world experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following discharge from a nuclear reactor, spent fuel has to be stored in water pools at the reactor site to allow for radioactive decay and cooling. After this initial storage period, the future treatment of spent fuel depends on the fuel cycle concept chosen. Spent fuel can either be treated by chemical processing or conditioning for final disposal at the relevant fuel cycle facilities, or be held in interim storage - at the reactor site or at a central storage facility. Recent forecasts predict that, by the year 2000, more than 150,000 tonnes of heavy metal from spent LWR fuel will have been accumulated. Because of postponed commitments regarding spent fuel treatment, a significant amount of spent fuel will still be held in storage at that time. Although very positive experience with wet storage has been gained over the past 40 years, making wet storage a proven technology, it appears desirable to summarize all available data for the benefit of designers, storage pool operators, licensing agenices and the general public. Such data will be essential for assessing the viability of extended water pool storage of spent nuclear fuel. In 1979, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD jointly issued a questionnaire dealing with all aspects of water pool storage. This report summarizes the information received from storage pool operators

  2. CFD aided analysis of a scaled down model of the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research reactors are commonly built inside deep pools that provide radiological and thermal protection and easy access to its core. Reactors with thermal power in the order of MW usually use an auxiliary thermal-hydraulic circuit at the top of its pool to create a purified hot water layer (HWL). Thermal-hydraulic analysis of the flow configuration in the pool and HWL is paramount to insure radiological protection. A useful tool for these analyses is the application of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics). To obtain satisfactory results using CFD it is necessary the verification and validation of the CFD numerical model. Verification is divided in code and solution verifications. In the first one establishes the correctness of the CFD code implementation and in the former estimates the numerical accuracy of a particular calculation. Validation is performed through comparison of numerical and experimental results. This paper presents a dimensional analysis of the RMB (Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor) pool to determine a scaled down experimental installation able to aid in the HWL numerical investigation. Two CFD models were created one with the same dimensions and boundary conditions of the reactor prototype and the other with 1/10 proportion size and boundary conditions set to achieve the same inertial and buoyant forces proportions represented by Froude Number between the two models. Results comparing the HWL thickness show consistence between the prototype and the scaled down model behavior. (author)

  3. CFD aided analysis of a scaled down model of the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, Fernando L.A.; Lima, Claubia P.B.; Costa, Antonella L.; Veloso, Maria A.F., E-mail: ando.schweizer@gmail.com, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: mdora@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Santos, Andre A.C.; Costa, Antonio C.L., E-mail: aacs@cdtn.br, E-mail: aclc@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN/-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Research reactors are commonly built inside deep pools that provide radiological and thermal protection and easy access to its core. Reactors with thermal power in the order of MW usually use an auxiliary thermal-hydraulic circuit at the top of its pool to create a purified hot water layer (HWL). Thermal-hydraulic analysis of the flow configuration in the pool and HWL is paramount to insure radiological protection. A useful tool for these analyses is the application of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics). To obtain satisfactory results using CFD it is necessary the verification and validation of the CFD numerical model. Verification is divided in code and solution verifications. In the first one establishes the correctness of the CFD code implementation and in the former estimates the numerical accuracy of a particular calculation. Validation is performed through comparison of numerical and experimental results. This paper presents a dimensional analysis of the RMB (Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor) pool to determine a scaled down experimental installation able to aid in the HWL numerical investigation. Two CFD models were created one with the same dimensions and boundary conditions of the reactor prototype and the other with 1/10 proportion size and boundary conditions set to achieve the same inertial and buoyant forces proportions represented by Froude Number between the two models. Results comparing the HWL thickness show consistence between the prototype and the scaled down model behavior. (author)

  4. Cost estimates of operating onsite spent fuel pools after final reactor shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents estimates of the annual costs of operating spent fuel pools at nuclear power stations after the final shutdown of one or more onsite reactors. Its purpose is to provide basic spent fuel storage cost information for use in evaluating DOE's reference nuclear waste management system, as well as alternate systems. The basic model of an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) used in this study was based on General Electric Corporation's Morris Operation and was modified to reflect mean storage capabilities at an unspecified, or ''generic,'' US reactor site. Cost data for the model came from several sources, including both operating and shutdown nuclear power stations and existing ISFSIs. Duke Power Company has estimated ISFSI costs based on existing spent fuel storage costs at its nuclear power stations. Similarly, nuclear material handling facilities such as the Morris Operation, the West Valley Demonstration Project, and the retired Humbolt Bay nuclear power station have compiled spent fuel storage cost data based on years of operating experience. Consideration was given to the following factors that would cause operating costs to vary among pools: (1) The number of spent fuel pools at a given reactor site; (2) the number of operating and shutdown reactors onsite; (3) geographic location; and (4) pool storage capacity. 10 ref., 6 figs., 7 tabs

  5. Progress activities of reactor utilization in 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charoen, Sakda [Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2003-03-01

    Thai Research Reactor - 1/Modification 1(TRR-1/M1) is a multipurpose research reactor with nominal power of 2 MW. The reactor is a swimming pool type, cooled and moderate with light water, using the LEU-fuel. The reactor has been utilized for radioisotope production, neutron beam experiments and reactor physic experiments. The reactor operation data and reactor utilization in 2000 are presented. (author)

  6. Progress activities of reactor utilization in 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thai Research Reactor - 1/Modification 1(TRR-1/M1) is a multipurpose research reactor with nominal power of 2 MW. The reactor is a swimming pool type, cooled and moderate with light water, using the LEU-fuel. The reactor has been utilized for radioisotope production, neutron beam experiments and reactor physic experiments. The reactor operation data and reactor utilization in 2000 are presented. (author)

  7. Gamma ray shielding calculation benchmark exercise comparison of Monte Carlo simulation and experimental methods of gamma radiation field mapping in the pool of Apsara reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apsara is a swimming pool type research reactor loaded with Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. The reactor is designed for a maximum power level of 1 MW and is normally operated up to 400 KW. The pool water serves as coolant, moderator and reflector besides providing shielding. In addition, graphite and beryllium oxide incased in aluminum boxes are used as in-core reflector. The core is mounted on a square grid of aluminum, 56x56x15 cm with 49 holes on a 7 x 7 square lattice (77 mm pitch), containing fuel elements, control elements, reflectors, irradiation tubes, neutron source and fission counter. This study served in validation of the experimental measurements conducted using GM counter based detector and diode based detectors. In addition, the comparison provided a confirmation of the accuracy of the radiation transport simulation techniques used for dose rate evaluation in case of complex source geometries and large shield materials present. The experimental measurements thus served in bench marking the simulation methods adopted for radiation transport used to arrive at reactor physics and radiological safety parameters of interest

  8. Effect of ozonation of swimming pool water on formation of volatile disinfection by-products - A laboratory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Cheema, Waqas Akram;

    2016-01-01

    approximated 17-19 min in all samples. Subsequent chlorination revealed ozone removed reactivity of dissolved organic carbon toward chlorine for tap and polluted pool water, decreasing formation rate of trihalomethanes (TTHM). In pool water higher rates of TTHM formation was observed after the initial ozone...... dosage, however this decreased with subsequent treatments. For tap and polluted pool water, ozone reacted directly with the pollutants resulting in a short ozone half-life, removing reactivity towards chlorine oxidation and preventing TTHM production. Conversely for pool water samples, due to the long...... half-life of ozone, the molecule decomposed to hydroxyl radicals. These in turn reacted with aqueous organic matter increasing chlorine reactivity and rates of TTHM formation. Formation of other non-regulated volatile byproducts (e.g. dichloracetonitrile, trichlorpropanone and trichloronitromethane...

  9. Integral needs for MOX powders: state of the art at Cea Cadarache on MOX fuel experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several experimental programmes have been conducted at CEA connected with the use of MOX in commercial PWR or innovative concepts, such as high conversion light water reactors (HCLWRs) and at various moderation ratios. Measurements of integral parameters of interest were performed using fission chambers and gamma-scanning techniques, or by oscillation techniques. This paper presents an overview of the experimental programmes performed at the EOLE and MINERVE facilities located at CEA Cadarache. (author)

  10. The Cadarache 1 MV porcelain SINGAP bushing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1 MV bushing is considered as one of the most technically challenging components of the ITER neutral beam injectors, necessitating the design and manufacture of large ceramic insulators beyond the range of current industrial production. The ITER radiation environment and the fact that the bushing forms part of the tritium barrier demand a component of great reliability and safety. An R and D task has been launched for the fabrication of a prototype bushing based on the SINgle GAP, SINGle APerture (SINGAP) 1 MeV accelerator being developed in the EU. We present the design of this prototype, which is to be tested at Cadarache, and compare it with the SINGAP bushing proposed for the ITER injectors

  11. Spectacular energy technology: Panorama-Sauna Holzweiler. KfW funds indoor swimming pools as 'process heat'; Energetisch spektakulaer: Panorama-Sauna Holzweiler. KfW foerdert Schwimmbaeder als 'Prozesswaerme'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meissner, Rolf

    2008-11-15

    The ''Panorama-Sauna'' at Grafschaft is a big indoor swimming pool and Sauna centre in a rural region not far from Cologne and Koblenz. The charm of this spectacular solar project is in its minimalism. Conventional solar thermal power systems, in contrast, tend to be complex and prone to failure. (orig.)

  12. Perseveration on place reversals in spatial swimming pool tasks: further evidence for place learning in hippocampal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whishaw, I Q; Tomie, J A

    1997-01-01

    Animals with damage to the fimbria-fornix (FF) or cells of the hippocampus (HIP) can learn a place problem but cannot learn matching-to-place problems, which feature a series of place "reversals." The two experiments described in the present report were designed to examine the causes of impairment on reversal learning. In experiment 1, control, HIP, and FF groups were trained to asymptote on a place problem, and then the location of the platform was moved. Control rats learned the reversal response more quickly than the initial response; the HIP rats learned both problems at the same rate. Swim analysis showed that the impairment in the lesion group on the reversal response was aggravated by perseverative returns to the first learned place. In experiment 2, control and FF groups were trained on a task in which the platform was visible on three daily trials and hidden on one daily trial. After 10 days, the platforms were moved. In the reversal response, the FF group showed enhanced performance on the cue trials and severely impaired performance on the place trials relative to initial learning and control performance. Swim analysis showed that FF rats perseverated on the initial place response in place trials. These experiments provide further evidence for place learning in hippocampal rats and show that perseverative responses contribute to impairments in new learning. The results are discussed in relation to the idea that the hippocampus mediates spatial mapping and/or uses self-movement cues to solve spatial problems. PMID:9287076

  13. Lung hyperpermeability and asthma prevalence in schoolchildren: unexpected associations with the attendance at indoor chlorinated swimming pools

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, Alfred; Carbonnelle, Sylviane; Michel, O; Higuet, S; de Burbure, Claire; Buchet, Jean-Pierre; Hermans, Cédric; Dumont, Xavier; Doyle, I

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: To study whether exposure to nitrogen trichloride in indoor chlorinated pools may affect the respiratory epithelium of children and increase the risk of some lung diseases such as asthma. METHODS: In 226 healthy children, serum surfactant associated proteins A and B (SP-A and SP-B), 16 kDa Clara cell protein (CC16), and IgE were measured. Lung specific proteins were measured in the serum of 16 children and 13 adults before and after exposure to NCl(3) in an indoor chlorinated pool. Rela...

  14. Design of neutron radiography facility in pool for the reactor RA-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RA-10 project consists in the design and construction of a multipurpose reactor for multiple applications, including radioisotopes production, material testing and an in pool facility for neutron imaging. Neutron imaging is a powerful tool for studies of materials and offer several advantages among other attenuation-based techniques. In this study mechanical and neutronic requirements for the RA-10 in pool neutron imaging facility are described. The MCNP neutronic model and the mechanical design satisfying these requirements in a first engineering stage are described. (author)

  15. Experimental study of prompt neutron decay constant α for 300# pool reactor under mixed core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental study of prompt neutron decay constant α for 300# pool reactor under mixed core was carried out through a suit of reactor power spectral density measurement system. The two channel continuous current signals of neutron in the reactor were acquired by ionization chamber DL129 which was symmetrically putted in reactor core. The power spectral density, for two channel signals, was computed using the application program of data acquirement and data process analysis. Finally, by using the non-linear least squares method, the prompt neutron decay constant α was fitted. By comparison, the experimental results well accord to the theory calculation within the error range. The deviation can meet the actual need of project. (authors)

  16. Speech by Prime Minister Francois Fillon. Visit of the Jules Horowitz experimental reactor works on the Commissariat a l'Energie et aux Energies Alternatives site. Cadarache, May 3, 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this speech, the French Prime Minister evokes the present context, the importance of strategic technologies, and the challenge of investing in these technologies within a context of reduction of public expenses. He comments the decision of his government to finance research and education activities in different domains, and more specifically in the energy sector with this fourth generation Jules Horowitz experimental reactor. He recalls that the nuclear sector has always been very important to the eyes of the successive French governments, and outlines how this reactor will contribute to reactor operational optimization, lifetime extension and safety, nuclear fuel development, etc.

  17. Overview of pool hydraulic design of Indian prototype fast breeder reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Velusamy; P Chellapandi; S C Chetal; Baldev Raj

    2010-04-01

    Thermal hydraulics plays an important role in the design of liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor components, where thermal loads are dominant. Detailed thermal hydraulic investigations of reactor components considering multi-physics heat transfer are essential for choosing optimum designs among the various possibilities. Pool hydraulics is multi-dimensional in nature and simple one-dimensional treatment for the same is often inadequate. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) plays a critical role in the design of pool type reactors and becomes an increasingly popular tool, thanks to the advancements in computing technology. In this paper, thermal hydraulic characteristics of a fast breeder reactor, design limits and challenging thermal hydraulic investigations carried out towards successful design of Indian Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) that is under construction, are highlighted. Special attention is paid to phenomena like thermal stratification, thermal stripping, gas entrainment, inter-wrapper flow in decay heat removal and multiphysics cellular convection. The issues in these phenomena and the design solutions to address them satisfactorily are elaborated. Experiments performed for special phenomena, which are not amenable for CFD treatment and experiments carried out for validation of the computer codes have also been described.

  18. Engineering, safety, and economic evaluations of ASPIRE [Advanced Safe Pool Immersed REactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preconceptual design of a tokamak fusion reactor concept called ASPIRE (Advanced Safe Pool Immersed REactor) has been developed. This concept provides many of the attractive features that are needed to enhance the capability of fusion to become the power generation technology for the 21st century. Specifically, these features are: inherent safety, low pressure, environmental compatibility, moderate unit size, high availability, high thermal efficiency, simplicity, low radioactive inventory, Class C radioactive waste disposal, and low cost of electricity. We have based ASPIRE on a second stability tokamak. However, the concept is equally applicable to a first stability tokamak or to most other magnetic fusion systems

  19. Simulation of the Gamma Dose Rate in Loss of Pool Water Accident of the Second Egyptian Research Reactor ETRR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Second Egyptian Research Reactor ETRR-2, is a pool type reactor, a sudden loss of pool water resulting of leaving the core region un-covered. The reactor core is surrounded by chimney chambers whose water is isolated from pool water. This accident would lead to significant external dose. A model is developed and is used to calculate the dose rates for key access and traffic plans from indirect line of sight of the core have a maximum dose rate. The model developed uses the discrete ordinate method as implemented in the code DOT 3.5

  20. Effect of pH on the formation of disinfection byproducts in swimming pool water – Is less THM better?

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Willach, Sarah; Antoniou, Maria; Mosbæk, Hans; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the formation and predicted toxicity of different groups of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) from human exudates in relation to chlorination of pool water at different pH values. Specifically, the formation of the DBP groups trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs), haloacetonitriles (HANs) and trichloramine (NCl3), resulting from the chlorination of body fluid analog, were investigated at 6.0 ≤ pH ≤ 8.0. Either the initial concentration of active chorine or free ...

  1. Eddy current testing of PWR fuel pencils in the pool of the Osiris reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nondestructive testing bench is described. It is devoted to examination of high residual power fuel pencils without stress on the cladding nor interference with cooling. Guiding by fluid bearings decrease the background noise. Scanning speed is limited only by safety criteria and data acquisition configuration. Simultaneous control of various parameters is possible. Associated to an irradiation loop, loaded and unloaded in a reactor swinning pool, this bench can follow fuel pencil degradation after each irradiation cycle

  2. Conceptual design of reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) spent fuel pool cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After undergo about 30 years of safe operation, Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) was planned to be upgraded to ensure continuous operation at optimum safety condition. In the meantime, upgrading is essential to get higher flux to diversify the reactor utilization. Spent fuel pool is needed for temporary storage of the irradiated fuel before sending it back to original country for reprocessing, reuse after the upgrading accomplished or final disposal. The irradiated fuel elements need to be secure physically with continuous cooling to ensure the safety of the fuels itself. The decay heat probably still exist even though the fuel elements not in the reactor core. Therefore, appropriate cooling is required to remove the heat produced by decay of the fission product in the irradiated fuel element. The design of spent fuel pool cooling system (SFPCS) was come to mind in order to provide the sufficient cooling to the irradiated fuel elements and also as a shielding. The spent fuel pool cooling system generally equipped with pumps, heat exchanger, water storage tank, valve and piping. The design of the system is based on criteria of the primary cooling system. This paper provides the conceptual design of the spent fuel cooling system. (author)

  3. Fuel Burnup and Fuel Pool Shielding Analysis for Bushehr Nuclear Reactor VVER-1000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadad, Kamal; Ayobian, Navid

    Bushehr Nuclear power plant (BNPP) is currently under construction. The VVER-1000 reactor will be loaded with 126 tons of about 4% enriched fuel having 3-years life cycle. The spent fuel (SF) will be transferred into the spent fuel pool (SPF), where it stays for 8 years before being transferred to Russia. The SPF plays a crucial role during 8 years when the SP resides in there. This paper investigates the shielding of this structure as it is designed to shield the SF radiation. In this study, the SF isotope inventory, for different cycles and with different burnups, was calculated using WIMS/4D transport code. Using MCNP4C nuclear code, the intensity of γ rays was obtained in different layers of SFP shields. These layers include the water above fuel assemblies (FA) in pool, concrete wall of the pool and water laid above transferring fuels. Results show that γ rays leakage from the shield in the mentioned layers are in agreement with the plant's PSAR data. Finally we analyzed an accident were the water height above the FA in the pool drops to 47 cm. In this case it was observed that exposure dose above pool, 10 and 30 days from the accident, are still high and in the levels of 1000 and 758 R/hr.

  4. TJ-II operation tracking from Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TJ-II remote participation system was designed to follow the TJ-II discharge production, even allowing the physicist in charge of operation to be in a remote location. The system has been based on both web servers and Java technology. These elements were chosen due to its open character, security properties, platform independence and technological maturity. Web pages and Java applications permit users to access experimental systems, data servers and the operation logbook. Security resources are provided by the PAPI system, a distributed authentication and authorization system. The TJ-II remote participation tools have allowed us to command and follow the stellarator operation from Cadarache. Over 1,000 digitizer channels and more than 20 diagnostic control systems were remotely available from web pages for monitoring/programming purposes. One Java application provided on-line information about the acquisition status of channels and acquisition cards. A second Java application showed temporal evolution signals that were refreshed in an automated way on the screen after each shot. A third Java application provided access to the operation logbook. In addition to these tools, we used the VRVS video conferencing system (FUSION community, X-Point room) and the EFDA Messenger Service for instant messaging (Jabber client). (Author)

  5. TJ-II operation tracking from Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TJ-II remote participation system was designed to follow the TJ-II discharge production, even allowing the physicist in charge of operation to be in a remote location. The system has been based on both web servers and Java technology. These elements were chosen due to its open character, security properties, platform independency and technological maturity. Web pages and Java applications permit users to access experimental systems, data servers and the operation logbook. Security resources are provided by the PAPI system, a distributed authentication and authorization system. The TJ-II remote participation tools have allowed us to command and follow the stellarator operation from Cadarache. Over 1,000 digitizer channels and more than 20 diagnostic control systems were remotely available from web pages for monitoring/programming purposes. One Java application provided on-line information about the acquisition status of channels and acquisition cards. A second Java application showed temporal evolution signals that were refreshed in an automated way on the screen after each shot. A third Java application provided access to the operation logbook. In addition to these tools, we used the VRVS videoconferencing system (FUSION community, X-Point room) and the EFDA Messenger Service for instant messaging (Jabber client). (author)

  6. Design guide for Category III reactors: pool type reactors. [US DOE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynda, W J; Lobner, P R; Powell, R W; Straker, E A

    1978-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) in the ERDA Manual requires that all DOE-owned reactors be sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that gives adequate consideration to health and safety factors. Specific guidance pertinent to the safety of DOE-owned reactors is found in Chapter 0540 of the ERDA Manual. The purpose of this Design Guide is to provide additional guidance to aid the DOE facility contractor in meeting the requirement that the siting, design, construction, modification, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of DOE-owned reactors be in accordance with generally uniform standards, guides, and codes which are comparable to those applied to similar reactors licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This Design Guide deals principally with the design and functional requirement of Category III reactor structures, components, and systems.

  7. Equipment and methods for examinations of fuel rods in the MIR reactor storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide range of tests of fuel rods and structural materials of water-cooled power reactors is performed in the loop facilities (LFs) of the MIR reactor. Depending on the objectives and tasks of different experiments, the performance of periodical interim examinations of irradiated items is required. However, as a result of some circumstances, it is not always possible to conduct them in hot cells. In this context, JSC 'SSC RIAR' has developed the equipment for interim examinations of fuel rods and design components of the experimental fuel assemblies (EFAs) in the MIR reactor storage pool (SP). Besides, this equipment can be used for cleaning of the examined items from surface deposits prior to the measurements. The paper describes the main characteristics and capabilities of the developed equipment, methodical aspects of the performed interim examinations, as well as some experimental results obtained using this equipment. In future, its upgrade is planned. (author)

  8. Commissioning of the Open Pool Australian Lightwater (OPAL) research reactor - A health physics perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 2006 and 2007 the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) commissioned OPAL, a 20 MW open pool Research Reactor. This commissioning involved three stages; Stage A, testing the reactors systems prior to fuel loading, Stage B, first loading of fuel, achieving first criticality, reactor characterisation and systems testing up to 400kW, and Stage C, raising the power of the reactor in steps, up to its full operating power of 20MW. Prior to and following fuel loading a series of radiation measurements were made throughout the plant. These included dose rates, radioactivity in air, on surfaces and in cooling and shielding liquids. Installed continuous monitoring and portable equipment were used. Health physics measurements were repeated at increasing reactor power levels to check engineering design features and design of plant for radiation protection aspects. A Radiation Protection Plan and associated monitoring programs were implemented, including establishing and maintaining area, task and personnel monitoring regimes in the facility. Health Physics assessments and advice at each stage, played a major role in this commissioning process. This paper discusses the health physics experience of commissioning the OPAL Research Reactor and describes health physics results, actions taken and lessons learned during commissioning. (author)

  9. Commissioning of the Open Pool Australian Light water (OPAL) research reactor: a health physics perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 2006 and 2007 the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) commissioned OPAL, a 20 MW open pool Research Reactor. This commissioning involved three stages: Stage A: testing the reactors systems prior to fuel loading; Stage B: first loading of fuel, achieving first criticality, reactor characterisation and systems testing up to 400 kw; and Stage C: raising the power of the reactor in steps, up to its full operating power of 20 MW. Prior to and following fuel loading a series of radiation measurements were made throughout the plant. These included dose rates, radioactivity in air, on surfaces and in cooling and shielding liquids. Installed continuous monitoring and portable equipment were used. Health physics measurements were repeated at increasing reactor power levels to check engineering design features and design of plant for radiation protection aspects. A Radiation Protection Plan and associated monitoring programs were implemented, including establishing and maintaining area, task and personnel monitoring regimes in the facility. Health Physics assessments and advice at each stage, played a major role in this commissioning process. This paper discusses the health physics experience of commissioning the OPAL Research Reactor and describes health physics results, actions taken and lessons learned during commissioning. (author)

  10. Numerical simulation of sodium pool fires in liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Liquid Metal-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR), the leakage of sodium can result in sodium fires. Due to sodium's high chemical reactivity in contact with air and water, sodium fires will lead to an immediate increase of the air temperature and pressure in the containment. This will harm the integrity of the containment. In order to estimate and foresee the sequence of this accident, or to prevent the accident and alleviate the influence of the accident, it is necessary to develop programs to analyze such sodium fire accidents. Based on the work of predecessors, flame sheet model is produced and used to analyze sodium pool fire accidents. Combustion model and heat transfer model are included and expatiated. And the comparison between the analytical and experimental results shows the program is creditable and reasonable. This program is more realistic to simulate the sodium pool fire accidents and can be used for nuclear safety judgement. (authors)

  11. Effect of pH on the formation of disinfection byproducts in swimming pool water--is less THM better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Kamilla M S; Willach, Sarah; Antoniou, Maria G; Mosbæk, Hans; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Andersen, Henrik R

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated the formation and predicted toxicity of different groups of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) from human exudates in relation to chlorination of pool water at different pH values. Specifically, the formation of the DBP groups trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs), haloacetonitriles (HANs) and trichloramine (NCl(3)), resulting from the chlorination of body fluid analog, were investigated at 6.0 ≤ pH ≤ 8.0. Either the initial concentration of active chorine or free chlorine was kept constant in the tested pH range. THM formation was reduced by decreasing pH but HAN, and NCl(3) formation increased at decreasing pH whereas the formation of HAAs remained constant. Under our experimental conditions, the formation of NCl(3) (suspected asthma inducing compound) at pH = 6.0 was an order of magnitude higher than at pH = 7.5. Furthermore, the effect of the presence of bromide on DBP formation was investigated and found to follow the same pH dependency as without bromide present, with the overall DBP formation increasing, except for HAAs. Estimation of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of the chlorinated human exudates showed that among the quantified DBP groups, HAN formation were responsible for the majority of the toxicity from the measured DBPs in both absence and presence of bromide. PMID:23026126

  12. Local heat transfer from the corium melt pool to the boiling water reactor pressure vessel wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study considers in-vessel accident progression after core melt relocation to the lower head of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and formation of a melt pool containing a forest of Control Rod Guide Tubes (CRGTs) cooled by purging flows. Descending streams of melt that flow along cooled surfaces of CRGT, and impinge on the bottom surface of the vessel wall can significantly increase local heat transfer. The area of enhanced heat transfer enlarges with decreasing of the melt Prandtl (Pr) number, while the peaking value of the heat transfer coefficient is a non-monotone function of Pr number. The melt Pr number depends on the melt composition (fractions of metallic and oxidic melt components) and thus is inherently uncertain parameter of the core melting and relocation scenarios. The effect of Pr number in the range of 1.02 - 0.03 on the local and integral thermal loads on the vessel wall is examined using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Heat transfer models obtained on the base of CFD simulations are implemented in the Phase-change Effective Convectivity Model (PECM) for simulation of reactor-scale accident progression heat transfer in real 3D geometry of the BWR lower plenum. We found that the influence of the low Pr number on the thermal loads in a big melt pool becomes more significant at later time, than rapid acceleration of the creep in the vessel wall. This result suggests that global vessel failure is insensitive to the melt composition in the considered 0.7 m deep melt pool configuration. However, it is not clear yet if the low Pr number effect has an influence on vessel failure mode in the other possible melt pool configurations. (author)

  13. Development of the impression material for the replica of the reactor components in pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is a very difficult and time-consuming work to remove and install the components because of its inherent characteristics and the physical interference with other components in the reactor core. We developed to easily inspect the wear marks or the deformation of the reactor components, for our purpose, a proper impression compound from the commercial material usually called vinylpolysiloxane which dentists are generally using. A proper mixing rate of the additional silica powder, the chemical catalyst and the commercial material was decided through various tests to ensure the good workability, appropriate hardening time as well as taking a good replication of the reactor components. To develop the compound satisfying applicable conditions in the reactor pool, we considered the tool handling time, the water temperature, deformations of the compound during tool handling, and radiation damages of the compound in the reactor core. We had finally developed the impression material for our purpose and successfully accomplished the inspection of the wear marks for a few fuel channels. Also, we have another plan to inspect the deformation of the spider pin of the fuel channel by using an impression material

  14. Online failed fuel identification using delayed neutron detector signals in pool type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In todays world, nuclear reactors are at the forefront of modern day innovation and reactor designs are increasingly incorporating cutting edge technology. It is of utmost importance to detect failure or defects in any part of a nuclear reactor for healthy operation of reactor as well as the safety aspects of the environment. Despite careful fabrication and manufacturing of fuel pins, there is a chance of clad failure. After fuel pin clad rupture takes place, it allows fission products to enter in to sodium pool. There are some potential consequences due to this such as Total Instantaneous Blockage (TIB) of coolant and primary component contamination. At present, the failed fuel detection techniques such as cover gas monitoring (alarming the operator), delayed neutron detection (DND-automatic trip) and standalone failed fuel localization module (FFLM) are exercised in various reactors. The first technique is a quantitative measurement of increase in the cover gas activity background whereas DND system causes automatic trip on detecting certain level of activity during clad wet rupture. FFLM is subsequently used to identify the failed fuel subassembly. The later although accurate, but mainly suffers from downtime and reduction in power during identification process. The proposed scheme, reported in this paper, reduces the operation of FFLM by predicting the faulty sector and therefore reducing reactor down time and thermal shocks. The neutron evolution pattern gets modulated because fission products are the delay neutron precursors. When they travel along with coolant to Intermediate heat Exchangers, experienced three effects i.e. delay; decay and dilution which make the neutron pulse frequency vary depending on the location of failed fuel sub assembly. This paper discusses the method that is followed to study the frequency domain properties, so that it is possible to detect exact fuel subassembly failure online, before the reactor automatically trips. (author)

  15. modeling of a total loss pool water accident in mtr reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    in this study , it is intended to analyze early phases of a protected loss of coolant accident (LOCA)for MTR reactor. and to show the applicability of the presented model to the other similar types of research reactors. the transient situation since the time when coolant is beginning to be lost throughout one or more of the main coolant pipes which were supposed to be broken guillotine-like to the time when the core is totally uncovered is investigated. the modeling of the problem was separated into two phases; in the first phase when the water level of the pool is being decreased in a pre-estimated time -dependent way calculated by using modified Bernoulli equation, the conservation equation are solved by using shooting method. the later phase, when water level reaches the top level of fuel plates and begins to decrease until bottom of the core, and the fuel plates are being cooled by air.

  16. Decay heat removal in pool type fast reactor using passive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Three dimensional thermal hydraulic analysis of decay heat system in a fast reactor model predictions compared with experimental results from PHENIX. ► Calculations confirm adequacy of natural convection in decay heat removal. ► Inter-wrapper flow found to reduce peak temperatures by 50 K in the blanket zone. - Abstract: Post shutdown decay heat removal in a fast reactor is one of the most important safety functions which must be accomplished with a very high reliability. To achieve high reliability, the fast breeder reactor design has emphasized on passive or near passive decay heat removal systems utilizing the natural convection in the heat removal path. A typical passive decay heat removal system used in recent designs of fast breeder reactors consists of a sodium to sodium heat exchanger and sodium to air heat exchanger which together remove heat directly from the hot pool to the final heat sink, which is air. Since these are safety systems, it is necessary to confirm the design with detailed numerical analysis. The numerical studies include pool hydraulics, natural convection phenomena in closed loops, flow through narrow gaps between SA, multi-scale modeling, etc. Toward understanding the evolution of thermal hydraulic parameters during natural convection decay heat removal, a three-dimensional CFD model for the primary system coupled with an appropriate one-dimensional model for the secondary system is proposed. The model has been validated against the results of natural convection test conducted in PHENIX reactor. Adopting the model for the Indian PFBR, six different decay heat removal cases have been studied which bring out the effect of safety grade decay heat removal system (SGDHRS) capacity, secondary sodium inventory and inter-wrapper flow heat transfer on the subassembly outlet temperatures that are important for safety evaluation of the reactor. From the results, it is concluded that the delay in initiation of SGDHRS, replacement

  17. Criticality calculations for a spent fuel storage pool for a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the methodology for the calculation of the constant of effective multiplication for the arrangement of spent fuel assemblies in the pool of a BWR type reactor is shown. Calculations were done for the pool of spent fuel specified in FSAR and for the assemblies that is thought a conservative composition of high enrichment and without Gadolinium, giving credit to the stainless steel boxes of the frames that keep the assemblies. To carry out this simulation, RECORD and MIXQUIC codes were used. With record code, macroscopic cross sections, two energy groups, for the characteristics of the thought assemblies were obtained. Cross sections, as well as the dimensions of the frames that keep the fuel assemblies were used as input data for MIXQUIC code. With this code, criticality calculations in two dimensions were done, supposing that there is not leak of neutrons along the axial of the main line. Additional calculations, supposing changes in the temperature, distance among fuel assemblies and the thickness of the stainless steel box of the frame were done. The obtained results, including the effect in tolerances due to temperature, weight and thickness, show that the arrangement in the pool, when frames are fully charged, is subcritical by less than 5% in δK. (Author)

  18. Thermal hydraulics in the hot pool of Fast Breeder Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium cooled Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) of 40 MWt/13 MWe capacity is in operation at Kalpakkam, near Chennai. Presently it is operating with a core of 10.5 MWt. Knowledge of temperatures and flow pattern in the hot pool of FBTR is essential to assess the thermal stresses in the hot pool. While theoretical analysis of the hot pool has been conducted by a three-dimensional code to access the temperature profile, it involves tuning due to complex geometry, thermal stresses and vibration. With this in view, an experimental model was fabricated in 1/4 scale using acrylic material and tests were conducted in water. Initially hydraulic studies were conducted with ambient water maintaining Froude number similarity. After that thermal studies were conducted using hot and cold water maintaining Richardson similitude. In both cases Euler similarity was also maintained. Studies were conducted simulating both low and full power operating conditions. This paper discusses the model simulation, similarity criteria, the various thermal hydraulic studies that were carried out, the results obtained and the comparison with the prototype measurements.

  19. Current activities of chemical applications of Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor (THOR) is a swiming pool type research reactor operated and maintained by the University. The functions of THOR are two folds, i.e. (1) teaching and training of nuclear scientists and engineers, and (2) promotion of peaceful uses of atomic energy in Taiwan. Thus, besides the educational program THOR has been offering neutron irradiation service on regular schedule (30 hrs. per week full power operation at 1 MW with neutron flux of ca. 2 x 1012 n cm-2 sec.-1 since 1963). Among many other projects chemical application of THOR has been one of the important program implimented in early days. Following two projects have been set up with rather limited budget: (1) Production and supply of short-lived radioisotopes (both general purpose and medical use) for domestic use. (2) Application of neutron activation analysis in the fields of environmental, geological, biological and material science. It turned out that quite fruitful results have been obtained. It is the purpose of this paper to describe in detail some of the characteristic aspects on the utilization of THOR in the field of chemical application. (author)

  20. Pressure drop calculation in a fuel element of a pool type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even with the advances of hardware in computer sciences, sometimes it is necessary to simplify the simulation in order to optimize the results given the same calculation runtime. The object of this study is a thermodynamic analysis of the core of a pool type research reactor, focusing on natural circulation. Due to the high geometrical complexity of the core, the scale transfer process becomes an essential step to the thermodynamic study of the reactor. This process takes place by determining the effective equivalent properties obtained from a detailed simulation of the core and transferring them to a porous medium having a coarse mesh while preserving the overall characteristics. In this way, it will be able to obtain the quadratic resistance coefficient KQ by calculating the pressure drop inside the fuel element. To observe in detail the behavior of this flow, longitudinal and transversal cross sections will be made in different points, thereby observing the velocity and pressure distributions. The analysis will provide detailed data on the fluid flow between the fuel plates enabling the observation of possible critical points or undesired behavior. The whole analysis was made by using the commercial code ANSYS CFX ver. 12.1. This is study will provide data, as a first step to enable future simulations which will consider the entire reactor. (author)

  1. COMMIX-1C code estimation for the pool dynamics of Istanbul Technical University TRIGA MARK-II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the COMMIX-1C code is used to investigate the pool dynamics of Istanbul Technical University (ITU)TRIGA MARK-II reactor by simulating the velocity, pressure and temperature distributions in the reactor pool as a function of core design parameters and pool configuration. COMMIX-1C is multi-purpose, three-dimensional. transient, single-phase, thermal-hydraulics computer code. For the mass, momentum and energy equations, it uses a porous-medium formulation, a finite-volume algorithm, a flow modulated skew-upwind discretization scheme to reduce numerical diffusion and k-ε two-equation turbulence model. Its implementation for the particular system requires geometric and physical modelling decisions. ITU TRIGA MARK-II reactor pool is considered partly as continuum and partly as porous medium. All the major pool components are explicitly modelled in the simulation. Shape of the pool structure and computational cells are accounted for using the concept of directional surface permeability, volume porosity, distributed resistance, and distributed heat source or sink. The results are compared to the results of the computer codes TRISTAN, TRIGATH and TRIGATH-R

  2. Whole core analysis of an open pool research reactor under the most severe loss of coolant accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work the accident in which either the outlet or the inlet coolant pipe connected to the bottom of the reactor tank in an open pool research reactor is completely ruptured has been analyzed. The 3-D transient computer code ThEAP-I developed at Democritus NRC has been utilized and applied to the 5 MW Greek Research Reactor (GRR-1). The results show that a partial melting of the reactor core is possible for the GRR-1, the amount of melting being roughly and conservatively estimated to be of the order of 20%. (author)

  3. Corium behaviour research at CEA Cadarache. The PLINIUS prototypic corium experimental platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the hypothetical case of a Light Water Reactor severe accident, the reactor core could melt and form with structure materials, and eventually concrete, a complex mixture called corium. The knowledge of corium behaviour is one of the key to increase the safety of the nuclear reactors. In the framework of severe accident studies, CEA has undertaken for many years a large RandD program devoted to this topic. At CEA-Cadarache, a specific platform, called PLINIUS, has been developed and is dedicated to studies of prototypic corium (i.e. with uranium dioxide). In this paper, the PLINIUS platform four facilities and the experiments on corium behaviour are described.(author)

  4. The use and evolution of the CEA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    organic liquids under irradiation. The equipments of Melusine are now being modernized. Siloe, another swimming-pool reactor, has been operating at 15 MW since the end of 1963. The performances achieved constitute a considerable progress in the field of swimming-pool reactors, since the fluxes obtained with Siloe are in the same order of magnitude than those which needed till now a tank type structure, whose numerous disadvantages in the fitting of experiments are well known. Siloe will be used mostly in the study of structural materials, graphites, refractory fissile materials, and for solid state physics. The reactor Pegase, in service in the Cadarache Nuclear Centre since 1963, is intended solely for testing full-scale fuel elements of EDF and EL 4 types. The current programme, for the eight loops of the reactor, covers the elements for the reactors EDF 2, EDF 3 and EL 4. New loops are in the course of being studied for the fuel elements of the EDF 4 and EDF 5 reactors. The general line of the CEA programmes has shown up the considerable need for fast neutron irradiations. The reactor Osiris which is in the course of being constructed will serve to complement the CEA's equipment in this field and at the same time fill the gap which will be left in the near future in the Centre de Saclay by the closing down of EL 2. Osiris is a light water reactor whose special structure will allow it to function at 50 MW without the disadvantages usually associated with the presence of a heavy waterproof tank. This reactor, which should be put into service in 1966, is mainly intended for the investigation of structural materials, graphite and refractory fuels; it will also serve to increase the production of high specific activity isotopes, and to develop activation analysis techniques. (authors)

  5. Characterization of radioactive contaminants and water treatment trials for the Taiwan Research Reactor's spent fuel pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Deal with a practical radioactive contamination in Taiwan Research Reactor spent fuel pool water. ► Identify the properties of radioactive contaminants and performance test for water treatment materials. ► The radioactive solids were primary attributed by ruptured spent fuels, spent resins, and metal debris. ► The radioactive ions were major composed by uranium and fission products. ► Diatomite-based ceramic depth filter can simultaneously removal radioactive solids and ions. - Abstract: There were approximately 926 m3 of water contaminated by fission products and actinides in the Taiwan Research Reactor's spent fuel pool (TRR SFP). The solid and ionic contaminants were thoroughly characterized using radiochemical analyses, scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) in this study. The sludge was made up of agglomerates contaminated by spent fuel particles. Suspended solids from spent ion-exchange resins interfered with the clarity of the water. In addition, the ionic radionuclides such as 137Cs, 90Sr, U, and α-emitters, present in the water were measured. Various filters and cation-exchange resins were employed for water treatment trials, and the results indicated that the solid and ionic contaminants could be effectively removed through the use of <0.9 μm filters and cation exchange resins, respectively. Interestingly, the removal of U was obviously efficient by cation exchange resin, and the ceramic depth filter composed of diatomite exhibited the properties of both filtration and adsorption. It was found that the ceramic depth filter could adsorb β-emitters, α-emitters, and uranium ions. The diatomite-based ceramic depth filter was able to simultaneously eliminate particles and adsorb ionic radionuclides from water.

  6. Transient analysis of dissolution of a reactor bottom head into a melt pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissolution of the bottom head of a heavy-water reactor into a pool of molten fuel under severe accident conditions is investigated using a distributed-parameter model. The main objectives are to determine the rate of dissolution-front propagation and to estimate the extent to which the bottom head is thinned owing to dissolution. The model consists mainly of partitioning the bottom head into a number of rings and analyzing the transient dissolution of each ring with a localized lumped-parameter model. For each of the rings, the dissolution is modeled using a mass transfer coefficient, the temperature distribution is considered to be one dimensional and quasisteady and the heat flux across the melt-bottom head interface is modeled using a heat transfer coefficient. The distribution of the heat transfer coefficients is considered to be quasi-steady and is based on the heat transfer calculation results obtained using the ACCORD code. The model thus takes into account both the variation of heat fluxes over the melt pool-bottom head interface and the variations of interface mass transfer with time and with position along the interface. The basic equations and their solution method for the distributed-parameter model are described. Comparisons of calculation results with those obtained previously using the overall lumped-parameter model are presented

  7. E-SCAPE: A scale facility for liquid-metal, pool-type reactor thermal hydraulic investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The E-SCAPE facility is a thermal hydraulic scale model of the MYRRHA fast reactor. • The focus is on mixing and stratification in liquid-metal pool-type reactors. • Forced convection, natural convection and the transition are investigated. • Extensive instrumentation allows validation of computational models. • System thermal hydraulic and CFD models have been used for facility design. - Abstract: MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hYbrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is a flexible fast-spectrum research reactor under design at SCK·CEN. MYRRHA is a pool-type reactor with lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) as primary coolant. The proper understanding of the thermal hydraulic phenomena occurring in the reactor pool is an important issue in the design and licensing of the MYRRHA system and liquid-metal cooled reactors by extension. Model experiments are necessary for understanding the physics, for validating experimental tools and to qualify the design for the licensing. The E-SCAPE (European SCAled Pool Experiment) facility at SCK·CEN is a thermal hydraulic 1/6-scale model of the MYRRHA reactor, with an electrical core simulator, cooled by LBE. It provides experimental feedback to the designers on the forced and natural circulation flow patterns. Moreover, it enables to validate the computational methods for their use with LBE. The paper will elaborate on the design of the E-SCAPE facility and its main parameters. Also the experimental matrix and the pre-test analysis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and system thermal hydraulics codes will be described

  8. E-SCAPE: A scale facility for liquid-metal, pool-type reactor thermal hydraulic investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Tichelen, Katrien, E-mail: kvtichel@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Mirelli, Fabio, E-mail: fmirelli@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Greco, Matteo, E-mail: mgreco@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Viviani, Giorgia, E-mail: giorgiaviviani@gmail.com [University of Pisa, Lungarno Pacinotti 43, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The E-SCAPE facility is a thermal hydraulic scale model of the MYRRHA fast reactor. • The focus is on mixing and stratification in liquid-metal pool-type reactors. • Forced convection, natural convection and the transition are investigated. • Extensive instrumentation allows validation of computational models. • System thermal hydraulic and CFD models have been used for facility design. - Abstract: MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hYbrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is a flexible fast-spectrum research reactor under design at SCK·CEN. MYRRHA is a pool-type reactor with lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) as primary coolant. The proper understanding of the thermal hydraulic phenomena occurring in the reactor pool is an important issue in the design and licensing of the MYRRHA system and liquid-metal cooled reactors by extension. Model experiments are necessary for understanding the physics, for validating experimental tools and to qualify the design for the licensing. The E-SCAPE (European SCAled Pool Experiment) facility at SCK·CEN is a thermal hydraulic 1/6-scale model of the MYRRHA reactor, with an electrical core simulator, cooled by LBE. It provides experimental feedback to the designers on the forced and natural circulation flow patterns. Moreover, it enables to validate the computational methods for their use with LBE. The paper will elaborate on the design of the E-SCAPE facility and its main parameters. Also the experimental matrix and the pre-test analysis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and system thermal hydraulics codes will be described.

  9. Evaluation of pool swell velocity during large break loss of coolant accident in boiling water reactor Mark III containment design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Jin, E-mail: jinyan10@gmail.co [GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy, 3901 Castle Hayne Road, Wilmington, M/L-30, NC 28402 (United States); Bolger, Francis [GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy, 3901 Castle Hayne Road, Wilmington, M/L-30, NC 28402 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    In boiling water reactor (BWR) design, safety scenarios such as main steam line break need to be evaluated. After the main steam line break, the steam will fill the upper dry well of the containment. It will then enter the vertical vent and eventually flow into the suppression pool via horizontal vents. The steam will create large bubbles in the suppression pool and cause the pool to swell. The impact of the pool swell on the equipment inside the pool and containment structure needed to be evaluated for licensing. GE has conducted a series of one-third scale three-vent air tests in supporting the horizontal vent pressure suppression system used in Mark III containment design for General Electric BWR plants. During the test, the air-water interface locations were tracked by conductivity probes. The pressure was measured at many locations inside the test rig as well. The purpose of the test was to provide a basis for the pool swell load definition for the Mark III containment. In this paper, a transient three-dimensional CFD model to simulate the one-third scale Mark III suppression pool swell process is illustrated. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) multiphase model is used to explicitly track the interface between the water liquid and the air. The CFD results such as flow velocity, pressure, interface locations are compared to the data from the test. Through comparisons, a technical approach to numerically model the pool swell phenomenon is established and benchmarked.

  10. Evaluation of pool swell velocity during large break loss of coolant accident in boiling water reactor Mark III containment design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In boiling water reactor (BWR) design, safety scenarios such as main steam line break need to be evaluated. After the main steam line break, the steam will fill the upper dry well of the containment. It will then enter the vertical vent and eventually flow into the suppression pool via horizontal vents. The steam will create large bubbles in the suppression pool and cause the pool to swell. The impact of the pool swell on the equipment inside the pool and containment structure needed to be evaluated for licensing. GE has conducted a series of one-third scale three-vent air tests in supporting the horizontal vent pressure suppression system used in Mark III containment design for General Electric BWR plants. During the test, the air-water interface locations were tracked by conductivity probes. The pressure was measured at many locations inside the test rig as well. The purpose of the test was to provide a basis for the pool swell load definition for the Mark III containment. In this paper, a transient three-dimensional CFD model to simulate the one-third scale Mark III suppression pool swell process is illustrated. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) multiphase model is used to explicitly track the interface between the water liquid and the air. The CFD results such as flow velocity, pressure, interface locations are compared to the data from the test. Through comparisons, a technical approach to numerically model the pool swell phenomenon is established and benchmarked.

  11. Do-it-yourself solar installations. Theory and practice of solar collector technology. Water heating, swimming-pool heating and space heating. 8. ed. Solaranlagen im Selbstbau. Theorie und Praxis der Sonnenkollektortechnik. Warmwasserbereitung, Schwimmbad- und Raumheizung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz-Ladener, C.; Ladener, H.

    1989-01-01

    Elements of solar technology such as collectors, storage facilities and heat transport facilities are used to show how solar installations are planned, measured and built nowadays. Proven do-it-yourself systems for water-heating, swimming-pools and space heating are described and examples of completed DIY systems are presented. Not only the DIY enthusiast but also the purchaser of ready-made solar installations can see the state of the technology and get concrete help in reaching decisions from reading about experiences with the performance of solar installations and details of costs and economic viability. (orig.).

  12. Geneva 24 Hours Swim

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 18th edition of the Geneva 24 hours swim competition will take place at the Vernets Swimming Pool on the 4th and 5th of October. More information and the results of previous years are given at: http://www.carouge-natation.com/24_heures/home_24_heures.htm Last year, CERN obtained first position in the inter-company category with a total of 152.3 kms swam by 45 participants. We are counting on your support to repeat this excellent performance this year. For those who would like to train, the Livron swimming pool in Meyrin is open as from Monday the 8th September. For further information please do not hesitate to contact us. Gino de Bilio and Catherine Delamare

  13. Geneva 24 hours swim

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 18th edition of the Geneva 24 hours swim competition will take place at the Vernets Swimming Pool on the 4th and 5th of October. More information and the results of previous years are given at: http://www.carouge-natation.com/24_heures/home_24_heures.htm Last year, CERN obtained first position in the inter-company category with a total of 152.3 kms swam by 45 participants. We are counting on your support to repeat this excellent performance this year. For those who would like to train, the Livron swimming pool in Meyrin is open as from Monday the 8th September. For further information please do not hesitate to contact us. Gino de Bilio and Catherine Delamare

  14. Development of a fuel failure monitoring method for a pool-type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on developing a sensitive monitoring method of possible release of fission products (FP) from a fuel element have been made for a pool-type research reactor. It consists of introducing gas bubbles into reactor coolant water to extract effectively the dissolved fission rare gases, 89Kr and 138Xe, produced somewhere in the core, and counting their respective daughter nuclides, 89Rb and 138Cs with high efficiency. The measurements were done by either method, (I) on a filter paper by sucking the bubbled gas and air covering water of the reactor tank, or (II) in the washing water of bubbled gas sampled into a bottle at the water surface. The followings are the summary of the results obtained. (1) DE increased as much as 30 times or more compared with no gas bubbling. (2) DE largely increased with increasing flow rate of introducing gas. (3) DE increased with increasing depth of the gas exit in the water. (4) DE at the same depth depended on the position of gas exit. It was larger for 'side' position than for 'center', due to the water convection in the tank. (5) DE largely depended on the condition of whether the primary cooling system was operated or not. (6) In Method II, DE depended on the time of standing, and it showed maximum at the theoretically predicted value. (7) The theoretical analysis for the effect of depth suggests that DE should be proportional to the value =(1+D /1033)2-(1+D /1033)5/3=, where D is the depth (in cm). The trend agreed at least partly with the observed data. (8) As a continuous mode experiment, we constructed an automatic fuel monitoring system for routine use by adopting Method II. It is composed of an intermittent sampling of the bubbling gas into bottle at the water surface, washing it with water after definite time of standing, and measuring the nuclides contained in the water. (J.P.N.)

  15. The radionuclides of primary coolant in HANARO and the recent activities performed to reduce the radioactivity or reactor pool water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minjin [HANARO Research Reactor Centre, Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-01

    In HANARO reactor, there have been activities to identify the principal radionuclides and to quantify them under the normal operation. The purposes of such activities were to establish the measure by which we can reduce the radioactivity of the reactor pool water and detect, in early stage, the abnormal symptoms due to the leakage of radioactive materials from the irradiation sample or the damage of the nuclear fuel, etc. The typical radionuclides produced by the activation of reactor coolant are N{sup 16} and Ar{sup 41}. The radionuclides produced by the activation of the core structural material consist of Na{sup 24}, Mn{sup 56}, and W{sup 187}. Of the various radionuclides, governing the radiation level at the pool surface are Na{sup 24}, Ar{sup 41}, Mn{sup 58}, and W{sup 187}. By establishing the hot water layer system on the pool surface, we expected that the radionuclides such as Ar{sup 41} and Mn{sup 56} whose half-life are relatively short could be removed to a certain extent. Since the content of radioactivity of Na{sup 24} occupies about 60% of the total radioactivity, we assumed that the total radiation level would be greatly reduced if we could decrease the radiation level of Na{sup 24}. However the actual radiation level has not been reduced as much as we expected. Therefore, some experiments have been carried out to find the actual causes afterwards. What we learned through the experiments are that any disturbance in reactor pool water layer causes increase of the pool surface radiation level and even if we maintain the hot water layer well, reactor shutdown will be very much likely to happen once the hot water layer is disturbed. (author)

  16. Statistical evaluation of potential damage to the Al(OH){sub 3} layer on nTiO{sub 2} particles in the presence of swimming pool and seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virkutyte, Jurate [Pegasus Technical Services, Inc (United States); Al-Abed, Souhail R., E-mail: al-abed.souhail@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Nanosized TiO{sub 2} particles (nTiO{sub 2}) are usually coated with an Al(OH){sub 3} layer when used in sunscreen to shield against the harmful effects of free radicals that are generated when these particles are exposed to UV radiation. Therefore, it is vital to insure the structural stability of these particles in the environment where the protective layer may be damaged and adverse health and environmental effects can occur. This study utilized X-ray analysis (SEM-EDS) to provide a qualitative and semi-quantitative assessment of the chemical and physical characteristics of Al(OH){sub 3}-coated original and damaged nTiO{sub 2} particles (used in sunscreen lotion formulations) in the presence of both swimming pool and seawater. Also, by utilizing statistical tools, a distribution of Al/Ti (%) on the particle surface was determined and evaluated. It was found that 45 min of treatment with swimming pool and seawater significantly induced the redistribution of Al/Ti (%), which changed the surface characteristics of particles and, therefore, may have induced undesired photo-activity and the consequent formation of free radicals.

  17. The solar heating system of the sport centre 'Guillamo Swimming Pool' in Sierre, Switzerland; Installation solaire thermique. Complexe sportif de la piscine de Guillamo - Rapport final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This illustrated report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy describes the refurbishment and the extension of the sport centre 'Guillamo Swimming Pool' in Sierre, Switzerland. The original building built in 1978 included three swimming pools (two indoor and one small outdoor). In 2005 a three-room fitness centre, a wellness centre and a bar were added to the compound and the old building and technical installations refurbished. At the same time a 591 m{sup 2} solar collector array was added. Unglazed selective solar absorbers were mounted on the 5{sup o} tilted flat roof. They insure at the same time the water tightness of the roof, a feature that lead to a significant cost reduction of the project. Before 2005 the natural gas consumption of the centre was 1.3 to 1.7 GWh/year. After the construction work the consumption was about 1.6 GWh, including a contribution of 0.06 GWh from the solar collectors. This last figure is disappointing. The reasons for this are mainly attributed by the authors to a very poor integration of the solar collectors into the conventional heat generation and distribution system, which do not enable the solar collectors to deliver the heat quantity they should. Changes should be made on the hydraulics of the whole system and on the control algorithms and settings.

  18. The ITER management advisory committee (MAC) meeting in Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER management advisory committee meeting was held on 8 March in Cadarache, France. The main topics were the ITER EDA Status Report in the period between the ITER Meeting in Yokohama (October 1990) and February 1999. In particular, the management advisory committee shares the director's concern about the uncertainties against which the whole project operates at present. They also noted that the definition of an appropriate framework for continued US involvement in on-going projects is a very important issue

  19. Meeting of the ITER CTA Project Board at Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting of the ITER CTA Project Board took place on the occasion of the N4 Meeting at Cadarache, France on 3-4 June 2002. The Project Board members and experts from Canada, EU, Japan and Russian Federation and the International Team attended the meeting. The parts informed each other of the latest developments concerning the ITER project in their respective countries, among them, offers for ITER potential site from the EU and Japan

  20. Reduced scale simulations of boiling water reactor pool swell: some limitations to the scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several potential sources of misscaling in reduced scale experimental tests have been systematically investigated. Increases in the enthalpy in-flux during pool swell increase resultant uploads; slight boundary flexibility due to small air bubbles attached to the pool walls or true fluid structure interaction can increase peak pool boundary loads; the presence of water vapor in the wetwell airspace can either increase or decrease pool swell uploads, depending on the vapor fraction initially present. 14 refs

  1. Development of thermal-hydraulic system analysis code SSC-K for pool-type liquid metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Supper System Code of KAERI (SSC-K) is a best-estimate system code for analyzing an variety of off-normal or accident of a pool type design. It is developed at KAERI on the basis of SSC-L developed at BNL to analyze pool-type LMR transients. Because of inherent difference between th pool and loop design, the major modefications of SSC-L is required for the safety analysis of KALIMER. The major difference between KALIMER and general loop type LMRs exists in the primary heat transport system. In KALIMER, all of the essential components consisted of the primary heat transport system are located within the reactor vessel. This is contrast to the loop type LMRs, in which all the primary components are connected via piping to form loops attached externally to the reactor vessel. KALIMER has only one cover gas space. This eliminates the need for separate cover gas systems over liquid level in pump tanks and upper plenum. Since the sodium in hot pool is separated from cold pool by insulated barrier in KALIMER, The liquid level in hot pool is different from that in the cold pool mainly due to hydraulic losses and pump suction heads occuring during flow through the circulation pathes. In some accident conditions the liquid in the hot pool is flooded into cold pool and forms the natural circulation flow path. During the loss of heat sink transients, this will provided as a major heat rejection mechanism with the passive decay heat removal system. Since the pipes in the primary system exist only between pump discharge and core inlet plenum and are submerged in cold pool, a pipe rupture accident becomes less severe due to a constant back pressure exerted against the coolant flow from break. The intermediate and steam generator systems of both are generally identical. To adapt SSC-K to KALIMER design, the major modification of SSC-L has been made for the safety analysis of KALIMER. Test runs have been performed for the qualitative verification of the developed models. The

  2. Migration of activation products in discharges pool in T.H.O.R. nuclear research reactor site boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to material degradation in tubing, the heat exchanger for the primary coolant of the 1 MW Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor(THOR) has minor leakage to the secondary cooling system since 1970. In the past twenty years, trace amount of Co-58, 60, Cr-51, Cs-137, Mn-54, Sc-46, and Zn-65 have been leaked through the cooling system, accumulated and trapped eventually in the discharge pool right in front of the THOR facility. The distribution of these activation products in mud at different depths and various locations in the pool was measured with standard procedures of radioactive soil sampling and counting techniques. Concentration of activation products, with no more than 40 kBq/kg. dry at the hottest spot, was contour-mapped to reveal the migration of these trace level radioactive products in a period of 20 years

  3. Performance analyses of the pool-top radiation level reduction systems at the ETRR-2 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the performance of the hot water layer system, HWLS, and the interconnection system, IS, at the ETRR-2 research reactor is presented. The behavior of the HWLS during the formation period of the hot water layer has been studied and is presented together with the pool-top measured radiation level associated with that behavior. Two different designs of the HWLS have been experimentally evaluated. For these two different designs, the radiation level at the ETRR-2 pool-top were characterized and discussed. The effect of adding a water purification system to the HWLS is demonstrated as well as the effect of the IS on the pool-top radiation level considering different operational conditions of the HWLS. The study shows the importance of these systems from the radiological protection point of view. (orig.)

  4. Three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction dynamics of a pool-reactor in-tank component. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulak, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    The safety evaluation of reactor-components often involves the analysis of various types of fluid/structural components interacting in three-dimensional space. For example, in the design of a pool-type reactor several vital in-tank components such as the primary pumps and the intermediate heat exchangers are contained within the primary tank. Typically, these components are suspended from the deck structure and largely submersed in the sodium pool. Because of this positioning these components are vulnerable to structural damage due to pressure wave propagation in the tank during a CDA. In order to assess the structural integrity of these components it is necessary to perform a dynamic analysis in three-dimensional space which accounts for the fluid-structure coupling. A model is developed which has many of the salient features of this fluid-structural component system.

  5. Ageing Management and Preventice Measures for Reactor Pool Liners, Beam Tubes and Spent Fuel Storage Tank at the Dalat Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dien, Nguyen Nhi; Dien, Nguyen Minh; Su, Trang Cao [Nuclear Research Institute, Henoi (Viet Nam)

    2013-07-01

    The 500-kw Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) was reconstructed from the original 250-kW TRIGA Mark II as named of VN-001. In the framework of the reconstruction project during the 1982-1984 period, some structures of the TRIGA reactor constructed in the early sixties, such as the aluminum tank, graphite reflector, thermal column, four horizontal beam tubes, etc. have been remained. It means, such components are more than 50 years old and are facing with ageing issues. The structural materials of the pool liner and other components of TRIGA were made of aluminum alloy 6061 and aluminum cladding fuel assemblies. Some other parts, such as reactor core, irradiation rotary rack around the core, vertical irradiation facilities, etc. were replaced by the former Soviet Union's design with structural materials of aluminum alloy CAV-1. The reactor core has been loaded with HEU VVR-M2 fuel assemblies of 36% enrichment alloy CAV-1. The reactor core has been loaded with HEU VVR-M2 fuel assemblies of U-Al alloy 36% and of UO{sub 2} 19.75% enrichment used aluminum as fuel cladding. For ageing management and preventive measures of corrosion, an underwater high-resolution video camera system had been designed for visual inspections. A home-made cleaning system was also designed for cleaning the pool and other components. Water chemistry of the reactor pool and spent fuel storage was monitored regularly. In September-November 2011, all four horizontal channels were cleaned inside and visual inspection was done using special camera system. It was the first time from 1963 such activity could be done. Based on results obtained we could convince that inside all horizontal channels are in good condition and leakage could not be occurred. All 106 HEU spent fuel assemblies stored in the spent fuel pool in good condition. The visual inspection was done using under water camera too. The results obtained show that the surface of all HEU SFA is good and leakage was not occurred. The

  6. Simulation of the gamma dose rate in a loss of pool water accident of the second Egyptian research reactor ET-RR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second Egyptian research reactor ET-RR-2, is a pool type reactor. A sudden loss of pool water would leave the core region uncovered. The reactor core is surrounded by chimney chambers with water isolated from the pool water. This accident would lead to significant external doses. A model is developed and used to calculate the dose rates for key access-areas and traffic plans from indirect line of sight of the core which have a maximum dose rate. The model developed uses the discrete ordinate method as implemented in the code DOT3.5. (orig.)

  7. Taking Human and organizational factors into account in AREVA NC Cadarache dismantling projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA NC Cadarache fabricated MOX fuel (fuel assemblies made with a mixture of uranium and plutonium oxides) and FBR fuel (fast breeder reactor) for 40 years. In 2003, commercial fuel fabrication was stopped and the plant began implementing a plan to remove the nuclear material and clean up its two production buildings and laboratory. The objective is to reduce the radiological activity in the process facilities to IAEA level 2 and transferred them back to the owner French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). The type of facilities to be dismantled (glove boxes, tanks, etc.) and the products involved (uranium and plutonium), in the form of powder, require a high degree of manual operation. Human and Organizational Factors (HOF) therefore play a key role in the depth defense concept. (author)

  8. Computational simulation of the natural circulation occurring in an experimental test section of a pool type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work presents a computational simulation of the natural circulation phenomenon developing in an experimental test section of a pool type research reactor. The test section has been designed using a reduced scale in height 1:4.7 in relation to a pool type 30 MW research reactor prototype. It comprises a cylindrical vessel, which is opened to atmosphere, and representing the reactor pool; a natural circulation pipe, a lower plenum, and a heater containing electrical resistors in rectangular plate format, which represents the fuel elements, with a chimney positioned on the top of the resistor assembly. In the computational simulation, it was used a commercial CFD software, without any turbulence model. Besides, in the presence of the natural circulation, a laminar flow has been assumed and the equations of the mass conservation, momentum and energy were solved by the finite element method. In addition, the results of the simulation are presented in terms of velocities and temperatures differences, respectively: at inlet and outlet of the heater and of the natural circulation pipe. (author)

  9. Computational simulation of the natural circulation occurring in an experimental test section of a pool type research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Francisco R.T. do; Lima Junior, Carlos A.S.; Oliveira, Andre F.S. de; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Faccini, Jose L.H.; Moreira, Maria L., E-mail: rogerio.tdn@gmail.com, E-mail: souzalima_ca@ien.gov.br, E-mail: oliveira.afelipe@gmail.com, E-mail: raoniwa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: faccini@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The present work presents a computational simulation of the natural circulation phenomenon developing in an experimental test section of a pool type research reactor. The test section has been designed using a reduced scale in height 1:4.7 in relation to a pool type 30 MW research reactor prototype. It comprises a cylindrical vessel, which is opened to atmosphere, and representing the reactor pool; a natural circulation pipe, a lower plenum, and a heater containing electrical resistors in rectangular plate format, which represents the fuel elements, with a chimney positioned on the top of the resistor assembly. In the computational simulation, it was used a commercial CFD software, without any turbulence model. Besides, in the presence of the natural circulation, a laminar flow has been assumed and the equations of the mass conservation, momentum and energy were solved by the finite element method. In addition, the results of the simulation are presented in terms of velocities and temperatures differences, respectively: at inlet and outlet of the heater and of the natural circulation pipe. (author)

  10. Progressive Increase in Disinfection Byproducts and Mutagenicity from Source to Tap to Swimming Pool and Spa Water: Impact of Human Inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiber, Eric J; DeMarini, David M; Ravuri, Sridevi A; Liberatore, Hannah K; Cuthbertson, Amy A; Thompson-Klemish, Alexis; Byer, Jonathan D; Schmid, Judith E; Afifi, Mehrnaz Z; Blatchley, Ernest R; Richardson, Susan D

    2016-07-01

    Pools and spas are enjoyed throughout the world for exercise and relaxation. However, there are no previous studies on mutagenicity of disinfected spa (hot tub) waters or comprehensive identification of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) formed in spas. Using 28 water samples from seven sites, we report the first integrated mutagenicity and comprehensive analytical chemistry of spas treated with chlorine, bromine, or ozone, along with pools treated with these same disinfectants. Gas chromatography (GC) with high-resolution mass spectrometry, membrane-introduction mass spectrometry, and GC-electron capture detection were used to comprehensively identify and quantify DBPs and other contaminants. Mutagenicity was assessed by the Salmonella mutagenicity assay. More than 100 DBPs were identified, including a new class of DBPs, bromoimidazoles. Organic extracts of brominated pool/spa waters were 1.8× more mutagenic than chlorinated ones; spa waters were 1.7× more mutagenic than pools. Pool and spa samples were 2.4 and 4.1× more mutagenic, respectively, than corresponding tap waters. The concentration of the sum of 21 DBPs measured quantitatively increased from finished to tap to pool to spa; and mutagenic potency increased from finished/tap to pools to spas. Mutagenic potencies of samples from a chlorinated site correlated best with brominated haloacetic acid concentrations (Br-HAAs) (r = 0.98) and nitrogen-containing DBPs (N-DBPs) (r = 0.97) and the least with Br-trihalomethanes (r = 0.29) and Br-N-DBPs (r = 0.04). The mutagenic potencies of samples from a brominated site correlated best (r = 0.82) with the concentrations of the nine HAAs, Br-HAAs, and Br-DBPs. Human use increased significantly the DBP concentrations and mutagenic potencies for most pools and spas. These data provide evidence that human precursors can increase mutagenic potencies of pools and spas and that this increase is associated with increased DBP concentrations. PMID:27124361

  11. Technical Aspect of Shielded SIMS Installation in CEA Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A shielded IMS 6f has been installed in the LECA facility, CEA Cadarache France. The nuclearization was performed by CAMECA Company, which sells the standard IMS 6f. Working on nuclear materials requires in depth modifications of the apparatus itself. Despite these modifications, the shielded SIMS has the same level of performance as the standard apparatus. The design of the modified apparatus is presented and the safety aspects are emphasised. The shielded SIMS should be allowed to handle irradiated samples at the end of 2001. (Author)

  12. A new impulse in the development of nuclear pool-type reactors for underground heating plant: Designing, running background and possible perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper considers the concept of energy supply with using ultimately safe pool-type integral nuclear reactors. Safety and reliability of these reactors has already been demonstrated to the public by the long-term operation of this type various research reactors. The reactor and power plant design features, new approach to the nuclear safety, the nuclear upgrading of existing energy system in a small Russian town are considered in the paper

  13. Contaminación del aire interior y del agua de baño en piscinas cubiertas de Guipúzcoa Indoor air and bathing water pollution in indoor swimming pools in Guipúzcoa (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreto Santa Marina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Describir los niveles de contaminantes presentes en las piscinas cubiertas de Guipúzcoa, tanto en el agua de baño como en el aire, y estudiar la relación entre estos contaminantes y otras variables relacionadas con los sistemas de ventilación y el uso de las instalaciones. Métodos: De las 35 piscinas cubiertas registradas en Guipúzcoa se estudiaron las 20 más utilizadas por nadadores. Cada instalación se muestreó 2 días no consecutivos y se midieron los niveles de cloro libre y combinado y trihalometanos en el agua, así como los de cloro total y cloroformo en el aire. Como indicador de la renovación del aire se midió el dióxido de carbono (CO2. Resultados: El nivel medio de cloro en el aire fue de 0,4mg/m³ y el de cloroformo de 22µg/m³. Los valores de cloro libre y combinado de todas las piscinas se mantuvieron dentro de los valores reglamentarios. El nivel medio de cloroformo del agua de baño fue de 13,7µg/l. El valor del cloroformo del aire puede predecirse razonablemente (R²=0,85, y las variables predictoras son el cloroformo del agua, el CO2 y el número de bañistas del día. Conclusiones: Los niveles de contaminantes en el agua y en el aire de las piscinas de Guipúzcoa son inferiores a los descritos en otros estudios. Sin embargo, utilizando la concentración de 0,5mg/m³ de cloro total en aire, propuesta como valor de referencia para la protección de los nadadores con actividad intensa, un 20% de las instalaciones superarían dicho valor.Objective: To describe levels of pollutants found in indoor swimming pools in Guipúzcoa (Basque Country, Spain, both in the bathing water and in the air, and to study the association between these pollutants and other variables related to ventilation systems and the use of installations. Methods: Of the 35 indoor swimming pools registered in Guipúzcoa, the 20 most frequently used by swimmers were studied. Each installation was sampled on two nonconsecutive days. Free and

  14. Intensive post operation clean out (Poco) in AREVA NC Cadarache dismantling projects: economic value and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After fabricating plutonium fuels for 40 years (Fast Breeder Reactor, MOX), commercial operations at the AREVA NC Cadarache plant ended in 2003 and post operation clean out of its production buildings and laboratory started. AREVA objective is to achieve IAEA level 2 cleanup of the process facilities and transfer them to their owner, the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). There are two main opposite dismantling scenarios: very limited cleanup to optimize man power, or intensive cleanup of the facilities to optimize the quantity of long lived level waste as much as possible. Economic and environmental considerations lead the choice between these two options. (author)

  15. A model for the analysis of loss of decay heat removal accident in MTR pool type research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a loss of coolant accident leading to total emptying of the reactor pool, the decay heat could be removed through air natural convection. However, under partial pool emptying the core is partially submerged and the coolant circulation inside the fuel element could no more be possible. In such conditions, a core overheat take place, and the heat is essentially diffused from the core to its periphery by combined thermal radiation and conduction. In order to predict fuel element temperature evolution under such conditions a mathematical model is performed. The model is based on a three dimensional geometry and takes into account a variety of core configurations including fuel elements (standard and control), reflector elements and grid plates. The homogeneous flow model is used and the time and space dependent non-linear partial differential fluid conservation equations are solved using a semi-implicit finite difference method. Preliminary tests of the developed model were made by considering a series of hypothetical accidents. In the current framework a loss of decay heat removal accidents in the IAEA benchmark open pool MTR-type research reactor is considered. It is shown that in the case of a low core immersion height no water boiling is observed and the fuel surface temperature rise remains below the melting point of the aluminium cladding. (author)

  16. Calculation and mapping of gamma radiation field in the pool of Apsara reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical simulation of the radiation transport occurring in the Apsara core and bulk shield was carried out using two different radiation transport codes, MCNP and QADCG. The MCNP is a Monte Carlo based statistical method solving Boltzmann transport equation, where as the latter code QADCG is a point kernel based deterministic method with build-up factor correction. The aim of the simulation was to do a dose mapping and estimate the expected value of gamma dose rates at various locations where experimental measurements were conducted. Details regarding the simulation techniques employed by both the MCNP and QADCG software with reference to the Apsara core and shield geometry and source gamma energy distribution in the fuel plates are presented in this report. Different types of particle tallies requested in MCNP and QADCG are discussed. Details of variance reduction methods employed in reducing the statistical uncertainty of Monte Carlo simulation are also mentioned in the report. The statistical errors associated with Monte Carlo based simulation varied between 3% - 6% in most of the energy bins that contribute to the total fluence and hence to the dose rates. It was observed that the experimental values and the theoretically simulated values match each other closely following a similar trend except for certain experimental locations which had photon flux contributions from extraneous sources like the N-16 activity present in water, beam tubes and pool liner towards shielding corner. It is seen that the theoretical values are found to be larger than experimental values by factors ranging from 1.1 to 3 depending on the water shield thickness. This study served in validation of the experimental measurements conducted by GM counter based teletector and dipole based detectors. In addition, the comparison provided a confirmation of the accuracy of the radiation transport simulation techniques used for dose rate evaluation in case of complex source geometries and

  17. Neutronic temperature determination in irradiation facilities of the RP-0 nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RP-10 a swimming pool MTR type research reactor that attained power of 10 MW. The neutron temperature has been measurement in four different positions of the reactor at 300Kw of power, for this purpose was used the direct method, proposed for De Corte et al. The results were presented and discussed. (authors)

  18. Energy utilized intelligently. Energy-cooperation between an industrial plant and open-air swimming pool; Energie intelligent genutzt. Energie-Kooperation zwischen Industriebetrieb und Freizeitbad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergjan, B. [agn Paul Niederberghaus und Partner GmbH, Ibbenbueren (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    The open-air bassin AquaMagis at Plettenberg uses the waste heat of the near-by situated Aluminium rolling manufacturing Novelis, which had to be cooled expensively in former times. So operating cost for heating the pool are saved in a five number account, carbon dioxide emissions reduced to about 30 % and the extensive waste heat cooling nearly avoided. (GL)

  19. The radiation risks of the accident spectrum of the Greek research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Greek Research Reactor is a 5MW swimming pool type reactor located within Athens area, a large population center of 3081000 inhabitants. The consequence analysis of the reactor focuses on the risks stemming from reactivity, coolant flow blockage, and loss of coolant accidents. Individual doses are estimated to a distance of 20km from the reactor site. Collective exposure and latent health effects for the inhabitants of the region are also calculated. (author)

  20. Description of the RA-3 research reactor as a model facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Argentine RA-3 reactor is described as a model facility for the information to be provided to the IAEA in accordance with the requirements of the Model Additional Protocol. RA-3 reactor was designed as a 5 MW swimming pool reactor, moderated and cooled with light water. Its fuel was 90% enriched uranium. The reactor started its operation in 1967, has been modified and improved in many components, including the core, that now is fueled with moderately enriched uranium

  1. Simulation of a steam bubble transport in the primary system of the pool type lead cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool-type design makes Lead cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) economically competitive with other advanced reactor designs considered under the Generation IV framework. However, close proximity of steam generator to the core increases the risks associated with Steam Generator Tube Rupture/Leakage (SGTR/SGTL) such as voiding of the core and resulting reactivity insertion and/or local damage (burnout) of fuel rod cladding. Analysis of consequences of SGTL provided in present paper suggests that small bubbles of steam can be dragged by the turbulent coolant flow into the core region. Trajectories of the bubbles are determined by location of the leak, bubbles size and turbulent flow field of lead coolant. The influence of epistemic uncertainty in drag coefficient on prediction of the fraction of bubbles that can reach the core and accumulate in the primary coolant system is discussed in the paper. (author)

  2. The life-extension and upgrade program of the Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor (THOR) and its research prospectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor (THOR) has been operated for thirty years. It is the regulations of the ROCAEC that any reactor shall be decommissioned after forty-year operation since the first fuel loading. Therefore, for extending the lifetime of THOR, it is necessary to have a life-extension program to be approved by the ROCAEC and also completed by the year of 1997. At the same time, for proceeding new research purposes, it is planed to upgrade the thermal power of THOR from 1 Wth up to 3 Wth and hopefully to reach the maximum thermal neutron flux of 5x1013 n/cm2.s and the fast flux close to that order. New research directions involve (a) boron-captured neutron cancer therapy (BNCT) (b) small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). (author)

  3. Report on transparency and nuclear safety 2014 - Cadarache CEA centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document proposes, first, a presentation of the Cadarache CEA centre, of its activities and installations, gives a rather detailed overview of measures related to safety and to radiation protection within these activities and installations. Then it reports significant events related to safety and to radiation protection which occurred in 2014 and have been declared to the ASN. Next, it discusses the results of release measurements (liquid and gaseous effluents, radiological assessment, and chemical assessment for various installations) and the control of the chemical and radiological impact of these gaseous and liquid effluents on the environment. Finally, it addresses the issue of radioactive wastes which are stored in the different nuclear base installations of the Centre, indicates the different measures aimed at limiting the volume of these warehoused wastes and addresses their impact on health and on the environment. Nature and quantities of warehoused wastes are specified. Remarks and recommendations of the CHSCT are given

  4. Processing of radioactive effluents in Cadarache research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French Atomic Energy Commission (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique - CEA) is studying the design of a new plant for processing liquid aqueous radioactive effluents produced on Cadarache Research Centre. Effluents to be processed are low and medium activity effluents, with, for some of them, important concentrations of actinides, and which lead to the production of A and B category solid wastes, according to the French legislation, and suitable for final disposal. The objectives in terms of minimization of discharge's activity level and solid waste production have guided a selection of processes and their arrangement, in order to optimise decontamination and volume concentration factors. Seeded-ultrafiltration and vitrification with cold crucible melter are part of the selected processes for which developments are in progress in CEA for application to the characteristics of the project. (authors)

  5. Tenth ITER negotiations and related meetings [Cadarache, France, September 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the issue of ITER siting settled at the Ministerial Meeting for ITER in Moscow of 28 June 2005, detailed joint work towards all the other aspects of the agreement on the implementation of the ITER international fusion energy research project resumed as delegations from China, the European Union, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation and the United States of America met at the agreed site of Cadarache in the period 7-15 September 2005 for intensive working sessions culminating in the tenth official meeting of the ITER Negotiators. The major advances made were reported to the Tenth Official Meeting of the Negotiators on 12 September at which all delegations reiterated their intention to proceed together with the construction of ITER at the earliest date, and expressed their satisfaction on progress made in defining the process for designation of top ITER officials. In particular, the delegations expressed the wish to see Japan identify suitably qualified candidate(s) to be designated as Nominee Director General. In a separate meeting, the ITER delegates had an informal exchange with a delegation from India on India's interest in the possibility of participating in ITER. The Committee took a number of organizational decisions aimed at preparing for the start of construction. In particular it was agreed to establish, under the Transitional Arrangements, an ITER Joint Work Site at Cadarache. This now provides the institutional frame to start assembling international personnel and to undertake joint technical work at the ITER Site. In addition, the CEA was mandated to represent ITER, in collaboration with the International Team, in the public debate now in progress in France and in the regulatory and licensing process until the ITER Organization itself will be in a position to take the role over

  6. Safety aspects of the cleaning and conditioning of radioactive sludge from spent fuel storage pool on 'RA' Research reactor in the Vinca Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent fuel elements from nuclear reactors in the Vinca Institute have been temporary stored in water filled storage pool. Due to the fact that the water in the spent fuel elements storage pool have not been purified for a long time, all metallic components submerged in the water have been hardly corroded and significant amount of the sludge has been settled on the bottom of the pool. As a first step in improving spent fuel elements storage conditions and slowing down corrosion in the storage spent fuel elements pool we have decided to remove the sludge from the bottom of the pool. Although not high, but slightly radioactive, this sludge had to be treated as radioactive waste material. Some safety aspects and radiation protection measures in the process of the spent fuel storage pool cleaning are presented in this paper

  7. Sloshing and fluid-structure interaction in a 400-MWe pool-type advanced fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the seismic analysis of a 400-MWe advanced fast reactor under 0.3 g SSE ground excitation. Two types of analyses are performed - the sloshing analysis and the fluid-structure interaction analysis. In the sloshing analysis, the sloshing frequency and wave patterns are calculated. The maximum wave height and the sloshing forces exerted on the submerged components and the primary tank are evaluated. In the fluid-structure interaction analysis, the maximum horizontal acceleration for the reactor core and the relative displacement between the reactor core and UIS are examined. The fluid-coupling phenomena between various components are investigated. Seismic stresses at critical areas are examined. The results obtained from this study are very useful to the design of the advanced reactors. Meanwhile, the computer code FLUSTR-ANL has proved to be a useful analytical tool for assessing the complicated seismic fluid-structure interactions and sloshing in the fast reactor systems. 10 refs., 25 figs

  8. Failure Status Design of the Air Operated Valves and Solenoid Valves of Hot Water Layer System in the Open-pool Type Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the HWLS has ion exchangers, ionized radionuclides in the hot water layer are also purified. Thus the dose at the pool top should be maintained as low as reasonably achievable when the reactor is in normal operation. The HWLS consists of pumps, ion exchangers, heaters, flow meter orifices, all the necessary inter-connecting pipes, valves, and instruments, located in the HWLS equipment room as shown in Fig. 1. Each component, such as the pump, ion exchanger, strainer, and heater has 100% capacity to ensure that failure of one component does not result in the functional failure of the whole system. The suction line is split to the inlet of each pump to take the pool water to the ion exchangers. The design flow rate passes through the ion exchanger to remove the radioactive ions and impurities, and then go to the heater. The coolant is heated up to the desired temperature and flows back to the upper part of the reactor pool. Demineralized water is also supplied to the reactor pool by the HWLS when the pool water level drops to low level by an evaporation loss in order to maintain the normal pool water level. Operability of the HWLS will be maintained when all valves are fully opened. And, opening status of the valve in the demi-water make-up line has no impact the reactor operation. There are results of the failure status design of the air operated valves and solenoid valves

  9. Demolition of the Karlstein Superheated Steam Reactor Spent Fuel Pool, Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Karlstein superheated steam reactor started operation in October 1969. A number of failures in the fuel elements, associated with a concept design problem, resulted in final shutdown in April 1971. The reactor was then used as a test bed for reactor safety experiments from 1974 until the end of 1991. The spectrum of experiments simulating accidents under design and beyond design conditions included simulation of aeroplane crashes, earthquake experiments, material parameter studies, loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs), hydrogen distribution, hydrogen deflagration and burning experiments

  10. Liquid sloshing in gravity driven water pool of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor - pool liquid under design seismic load and slosh control studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloshing phenomenon is well understood in regular cylindrical and rectangular liquid tanks subjected to earthquake. However, seismic behaviour of water in complex geometry such as a sectored annular tank, e.g., Gravity Driven Water Pool (GDWP) which is located in Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) need to be investigated in detail in the view of safety significance. Initially, for validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) procedure, square and four sectored square tanks are taken. Slosh height and liquid pressure are calculated over time through theoretical and experimental procedures. Results from theoretical and experimental approaches are compared with CFD results and found to be in agreement. The present work has two main objectives. The first one is to investigate the sloshing behaviour in an un-baffled and baffled three dimensional single sector of GDWP of AHWR under sinusoidal excitation. Other one is to study the sloshing in GDWP water using simulated seismic load along the three orthogonal directions. This simulated seismic load is generated from design basis floor response spectrum data (FRS) of AHWR building. For this, the annular tank is modelled along with water and numerical simulation is carried out. The sinusoidal and earthquake excitations are applied as acceleration force along with gravity. For the earthquake case, acceleration-time history is generated compatible to the design FRS of AHWR building. The free surface is captured by Volume of Fluid (VOF) technique and the fluid domain is solved by finite volume method while the structural domain is solved by finite element approach. Un-baffled and baffled tank configurations are compared to show the reduction in wave height under excitation. The interaction between the fluid and pool wall deformation is simulated using a partitioned fluid-structure coupling. In the earthquake case, a user subroutine function is developed to convert FRS in to time history of acceleration in three directions

  11. Welding of stainless steel pool of pressurized water reactor nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of stainless steel lining of million kilowatt grade pressurized water reactor nuclear power station is a new technology. The author introduces its welding method, parameter verification measure and key factors of construction quality control and so on

  12. Experimental Measurement and MCNP5 Model of the Gamma Dose Distribution in the University of Utah TRIGA Reactor Pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma doses for the University of Utah TRIGA Reactor (UUTR) are estimated based on the MCNP5 model, and by measurements based on the thermo luminescent detectors (TLDs). In the experiment the gamma dose rate above the UUTR core was obtained by placing TLD-400s every 10 cm from the core top up to 150 cm measured from the surface of the UUTR core, and then every 50 cm up to 300 cm. The dose rate was also obtained at the pool surface level using a Ludlum model 19-survey meter. The measurements are obtained at a steady state thermal power of 90 kW. The MCNP5 model closely followed the experimental setup. The MCNP5 values of the dose immediately above the core were just under 30 percent difference compared to the measured values, which is within the TLD response of ± 30 percent. The TLD error is observed to remain fairly constant at around 5% of the mean. As the gamma dose approaches the lower limit for the TLDs (1 rem), the error rises almost exponentially reaching 80%. The difference between the simulated and measured gamma doses increases as the distance from the core increases. This difference at the surface of the UUTR pool is around 90 percent (the experimental gamma dose being 90% higher). The main source of the difference is due to statistical error of the MCNP5 calculation. The larger the size of the geometry, the more computational time is required to reduce the statistical error. Another source of error is the contribution of nitrogen-16 that is generated from (n, p) reaction with oxygen in the reactor pool water. The (n, p) reaction was not considered in our current MCNP5 model. Therefore, the MCNP5 model can be improved as follows: taking into account the fuel burn up that will correlate more accurately dose estimates near the surface of the pool due to the gamma emission from fission fragments, and taking into a consideration a production and transport of nitrogen-16 that will improve the dose estimates especially at the surface of the UUTR core. (author)

  13. Feynman-alpha technique for measurement of detector dead time using a 30 kW tank-in-pool research reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Akaho, E H K; Intsiful, J D K; Maakuu, B T; Nyarko, B J B

    2002-01-01

    Reactor noise analysis was carried out for Ghana Research Reactor-1 GHARR-1, a tank-in-pool type reactor using the Feynman-alpha technique (variance-to-mean method). Measurements made at different detector positions and under subcritical conditions showed that the technique could not be used to determine the prompt decay constant for the reactor which is Be reflected with photo-neutron background. However, for very low dwell times the technique was used to measure the dead time of the detector which compares favourably with the value obtained using the alpha-conventional method.

  14. Feynman-{alpha} technique for measurement of detector dead time using a 30 kW tank-in-pool research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akaho, E.H.K. E-mail: nnri@idngh.com; Intsiful, J.D.K.; Maakuu, B.T.; Anim-Sampong, S.; Nyarko, B.J.B

    2002-03-01

    Reactor noise analysis was carried out for Ghana Research Reactor-1 GHARR-1, a tank-in-pool type reactor using the Feynman-{alpha} technique (variance-to-mean method). Measurements made at different detector positions and under subcritical conditions showed that the technique could not be used to determine the prompt decay constant for the reactor which is Be reflected with photo-neutron background. However, for very low dwell times the technique was used to measure the dead time of the detector which compares favourably with the value obtained using the {alpha}-conventional method.

  15. Feynman-α technique for measurement of detector dead time using a 30 kW tank-in-pool research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor noise analysis was carried out for Ghana Research Reactor-1 GHARR-1, a tank-in-pool type reactor using the Feynman-α technique (variance-to-mean method). Measurements made at different detector positions and under subcritical conditions showed that the technique could not be used to determine the prompt decay constant for the reactor which is Be reflected with photo-neutron background. However, for very low dwell times the technique was used to measure the dead time of the detector which compares favourably with the value obtained using the α-conventional method

  16. The giant superconducting magnet system of 10,000 tons mass for fusion experiment at Cadarache, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) being built at Cadarache, France has many unique features and is one of the biggest scientific adventures in the history of science and technology. Seven partners (India, EU, US, China, Japan, Korea and Russia) have made an International Organization situated at Cadarache, France to provide direction and co-ordination for R and D and construction of this project. The R and D labs and manufacturing industries are spread in these seven partner countries. Components manufactured in these countries will be transported to Cadarache in France for assembly. Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat is coordinating this project activities on behalf of India. The magnet system, required for confinement and control of plasma leading to fusion reaction in ITER is one of the key systems of this project. There are 18 TF (Toroidal Field) Coils, 6 PF (Poloidal Field) coils, 6 CS (Central Solenoid) coils and 18 correction coils (CC), all of which are of superconducting type. All TF and CS coils have Nb3Sn superconductor and all PF and CC coils have NbTi superconductor. Each TF coil has height 15 m and width 9 m and 330 tons mass. The biggest PF coil has diameter 24 m and 300 tons mass. The total mass of these superconducting magnet systems is about 10000 tons. Use of Nb3Sn superconductor for manufacturing superconducting cables for successful use had not reached a matured stage earlier and this project gave a thrust for significant R and D activities worldwide and now due to this project, it is a matured and reliable technology. The jacketing and manufacturing of long cables need up to about 760 m long special infrastructure at Industry. The special building built for PF coil winding at ITER, Cadarache site is of size 250 m X 45 m. All these coils are made using cable-in-conduit conductors (CICC). These long CICCs have to carry current as high as 68 kA in case of TF coils. Due to this high current and

  17. A CFD based approach for thermal hydraulic design of main vessel cooling system of pool type fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We study thermal hydraulic design of main vessel cooling system of fast reactors. ► A CFD based approach is proposed for determination of coolant flow rate. ► Effect of cooling system ovality on temperature asymmetry is quantified. ► Suitable flow distribution device is identified to achieve acceptable flow field. ► To compare efficacy of various devices, a flow mal-distribution index is defined. - Abstract: A computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) based approach is proposed for the thermal hydraulic design of the main vessel cooling system for pool type sodium cooled reactors. Usage of the proposed method is demonstrated by applying it to a future Indian commercial fast breeder reactor. Towards quantifying the amount of sodium flow rate for the main vessel cooling system, two-dimensional CFD investigations have been performed. The conjugate conduction–convection models adopted for this purpose are validated against sodium experiments available in literature. The required flow fraction has been determined to be 2.6% of core flow, which is 175.6 kg/s at full power conditions. The heat loss from the hot pool to the cold pool through the main vessel cooling system is estimated to be 10.6 MW at full power and 3.7 MW at 20% power conditions. By detailed three-dimensional CFD studies, the effect of ovality in the main vessel cooling annuli due to manufacturing tolerances has been assessed and the associated circumferential temperature difference in the main vessel is determined to be 14 °C, which is less than the permissible upper limit of 30 °C. The uniformity of sodium flow in the cooling annulus has been investigated by a three-dimensional hydraulic analysis with a view to identify a suitable passive device that can render a uniform velocity distribution. To compare the effectiveness of various devices, a flow mal-distribution index is defined. Detailed parametric studies have been carried out to identify an appropriate porous jet breaker

  18. Inherently safe pool-type reactor as a generator of low-grade heat for district heating, air conditioning and salt water desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The society has a heavy demand for low-grade heat to satisfy its various needs. Different factors govern the expediency of applying nuclear reactors for these purposes. The required capacity of heat sources varies in a very wide range. In a majority of cases heat sources have to be located in the immediate vicinity of the users, therefore, nuclear reactors to be used for heat generation must feature enhanced safety. Pool-type reactors can be successfully used for producing low-grade heat. Owing to their design they feature a very high safety level. The absence of positive pressure excludes the possibility of a sudden rupture of reactor tank (vessel) or a fast loss of coolant. The availability of a large amount of water in the tank ensures long-term accumulation of residual heat. The adopted integral layout of equipment, as well as natural circulation of primary coolant improve reactor reliability and safety even further. Negative temperature coefficients of reactivity provide for reactor self-protection against reactivity accidents. Pool-type reactors can be used in newly established heat supply systems and can be built in the operation systems as well, which allows to reduce fossil fuel consumption by 80-90% depending on local conditions. Pool-type reactor heat can be used for desalinating salt water and for cooling water in absorption refrigerating machines with subsequent utilization of cold water for air conditioning, cooling of special premises, and the like. Pool-type reactors can also generate electric power to their in-house needs as well as household power requirements of a neighboring town. (orig.)

  19. PASLOCA: two-dimensional code for loss of primary coolant accident analysis in pool type reactors for use in micro computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve the better performance of the MILOCA code, a 2-dimensional code for Loss of Coolant Accident Analysis in pool type research reactor for use in IBM-PC, an adaptation of the code was made from FORTRAN to PASCAL. This paper presents also the heat transfer model calculation from the fuel elements to the air after the draining of the pool water. As an example, the analysis made for the IAEA 2 MW reference reactor is presented. Differences in computing time between the two versions are also shown. (author)

  20. Report on transparency and nuclear safety - Cadarache CEA centre - 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A first volume proposes a presentation of the Cadarache CEA centre, of its activities and installations, gives a rather detailed overview of measures related to safety and to radiation protection within these activities and installations. It also reports significant events related to safety and to radiation protection which occurred in 2012 and have been declared to the ASN. It discusses the results of release measurements (liquid and gaseous effluents, radiological assessment, and chemical assessment for various installations) and the control of the chemical and radiological impact of these gaseous and liquid effluents on the environment. It addresses the issue of radioactive wastes which are stored in the different nuclear base installations of the Centre, indicates the different measures aimed at limiting the volume of these warehoused wastes and addresses their impact on health and on the environment. Nature and quantities of warehoused wastes are specified. The second volume concerns some specific installations (INB 32 or ATPu, and INB 54 or LPC) which belong to AREVA NC. The same topics are addressed: presentation of the facilities, arrangements regarding safety and radiation protection, significant events related to safety and radiation protection, measurements of effluents and their impact on the environment, warehoused wastes. Remarks and recommendations of the CHSCT are given

  1. Criticality safety assessment of a TRIGA reactor spent fuel pool under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview paper on the criticality safety analysis of a pool type storage for a TRIGA spent fuel at the ''Jozef Stefan'' Institute in Ljubljana, Slovenia, is presented. It was shown in that subcriticality is not guaranteed for some postulated accidents (an earthquake with subsequent fuel rack disintegration resulting in contact fuel pitch). To mitigate this deficiency, a study was made about replacing a certain number of fuel elements in the rack with absorber rods in order to lower the probability for supercriticality to acceptable level. (author)

  2. Swimming Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, Corinna C.; Krüger, Carsten; Herminghaus, Stephan; Bahr, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Swimming droplets are artificial microswimmers based on liquid droplets that show self-propelled motion when immersed in a second liquid. These systems are of tremendous interest as experimental models for the study of collective dynamics far from thermal equilibrium. For biological systems, such as bacterial colonies, plankton, or fish swarms, swimming droplets can provide a vital link between simulations and real life. We review the experimental systems and discuss the mechanisms of self-propulsion. Most systems are based on surfactant-stabilized droplets, the surfactant layer of which is modified in a way that leads to a steady Marangoni stress resulting in an autonomous motion of the droplet. The modification of the surfactant layer is caused either by the advection of a chemical reactant or by a solubilization process. Some types of swimming droplets possess a very simple design and long active periods, rendering them promising model systems for future studies of collective behavior.

  3. Optimisation of the flow path in a conceptual pool type reactor under natural circulation with lead coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This contribution investigates the effects of a bypass flow blocking bottom plate and the influence of the heat transfer between the hot and cold leg in a small pool type reactor cooled through natural convection with lead coolant. The computations are carried out using 3D computational fluid dynamics, where small-detail parts, such as the core and heat exchangers are modeled using a porous media approach. The introduction of full conjugate heat transfer shows that the heat transfer between the hot and cold leg can deteriorate flow in the cold leg and lead to recirculation zones. These zones become even more pronounced with the introduction of a bottom plate, which on the other hand also increases the flow through the core and lowers the maximum temperature in the core by approximately 150 K. Based on the results, redesign suggestions for the bottom plate and the internal wall are made. (author)

  4. Research and manufacture of Rossi-α measurement device for pool thermal reactor based on virtual instrument technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper designs a set of Rossi-α measurement device for pool thermal reactor based on virtual instrument technology. This device makes PXI-6602 high-speed synchronization counter as the hardware measurement platform. By using Labview 8.5 program, the application program of data acquirement and data process analysis of the measurement device have been designed. In addition, By using Fluke-282 arbitrary waveform generator, one channel square signal which frequency and voltage are respectively defined as 200 Hz and 5 V have been produced. By using application analysis program, the pulse counter simulation test has been completed for this channel square signal. According to the test results, the measurement device reaches the measurement use requirements. (authors)

  5. Some aspects of criticality safety of TRIGA reactor spent fuel pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Additional criticality safety analysis of a pool type storage for TRIGA spent fuel at ''Jozef Stefan'' Institute in Ljubljana, Slovenia, is presented. Previous results have shown that subcriticality is not guaranteed for some postulated accidents. To mitigate this deficiency, a study was made about replacing a certain number of fuel elements in the rack with absorber rods. For this purpose Monte Carlo computer code MCNP4A with ENDF-B/V library and detailed three dimensional fuel rack model was used. A short study of different absorber rods design is presented. At first the analysis was done about the number of uniformly mixed absorber rods in the lattice needed to sustain the subcriticality of the storage when pitch is decreased from rack design pitch of 8cm to contact, assuming that the absorber rods remain in their proper positions. Because of supercriticality possibility due to random mixing of the absorber rods during lattice compaction, a probabilistic study was made, sampling the probability density functions for random lattice loadings of the absorber rods. The results show reasonably low probabilities for supercriticality even for fresh 12 wt% enriched standard TRIGA fuel stored in the spent fuel pool. (orig.)

  6. Characterization of radioactive contaminants and water treatment trials for the Taiwan Research Reactor's spent fuel pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chun-Ping, E-mail: chunping@iner.gov.tw [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, 1000, Wenhua Road, Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Tzung-Yi; Chiao, Ling-Huan; Chen, Hong-Bin [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, 1000, Wenhua Road, Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2012-09-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deal with a practical radioactive contamination in Taiwan Research Reactor spent fuel pool water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identify the properties of radioactive contaminants and performance test for water treatment materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The radioactive solids were primary attributed by ruptured spent fuels, spent resins, and metal debris. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The radioactive ions were major composed by uranium and fission products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diatomite-based ceramic depth filter can simultaneously removal radioactive solids and ions. - Abstract: There were approximately 926 m{sup 3} of water contaminated by fission products and actinides in the Taiwan Research Reactor's spent fuel pool (TRR SFP). The solid and ionic contaminants were thoroughly characterized using radiochemical analyses, scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) in this study. The sludge was made up of agglomerates contaminated by spent fuel particles. Suspended solids from spent ion-exchange resins interfered with the clarity of the water. In addition, the ionic radionuclides such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, U, and {alpha}-emitters, present in the water were measured. Various filters and cation-exchange resins were employed for water treatment trials, and the results indicated that the solid and ionic contaminants could be effectively removed through the use of <0.9 {mu}m filters and cation exchange resins, respectively. Interestingly, the removal of U was obviously efficient by cation exchange resin, and the ceramic depth filter composed of diatomite exhibited the properties of both filtration and adsorption. It was found that the ceramic depth filter could adsorb {beta}-emitters, {alpha}-emitters, and uranium ions. The diatomite-based ceramic depth filter was able to simultaneously

  7. Current Status of Activation Analysis Using Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activation analysis may be considered to be one of the most practical applications in the utilization of research reactor. One of the obvious advantages of this method is its high sensitivity for many elements. Using the average research reactor, it is feasible to determine the content of element in various matrices, to an order of as low as 0,001 microgram. Although the detection, sensitivities of other analytical methods also have been improved very much in recent years by using newly developed instruments, these methods can rival the activation analysis in sensitivity for only a certain limited number of elements. Thus, at present, the technique of activation analysis seems to offer the highest sensitivity for the greatest number of elements

  8. Breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reasons for the development of fast reactors are briefly reviewed (a propitious neutron balance oriented towards a maximum uranium burnup) and its special requirements (cooling, fissile material density and reprocessing) discussed. The three stages in the French program of fast reactor development are outlined with Rapsodie at Cadarache, Phenix at Marcoule, and Super Phenix at Creys-Malville. The more specific features of the program of research and development are emphasized: kinetics and the core, the fuel and the components

  9. Corrosion of aluminium-clad spent fuel in the research reactor RA storage pool, IAEA CRP Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium-Clad Spent Fuel in Water no. 11968/RBF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the IAEA CRP 'Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium-Clad Spent Fuel in Water' a study on corrosion of aluminium cladding of the TVR-S type of enriched uranium spent fuel elements of the research reactor RA in the storage water pool is examined. The project comprises activities on monitoring of the water chemistry in the RA spent fuel storage pool, periodic corrosion monitoring, metallographic examination of corrosion surfaces and examination of the rack stored previously in the pool according to the strategy and the protocol supplied by the IAEA. This is a 9 month Progress Report on the Programme including brief history, details on spent fuel basins, results of monitoring of chemical parameters and radioactivity of the pool water, and some results of experimental examinations of corrosion process on the aluminium coupon rack, including information on laboratory facilities and equipment used. (author)

  10. Evaluation of the aptitude for the service of the pool of the TRIGA Mark III reactor of the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the evaluation of the structural integrity of the pool of the TRIGA Mark III reactor of the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico, which was realized in July 2001, as an element to determine those actions for preventive and corrective maintenance which owner must do it for a safety and efficient operation of the component in the next years. (Author)

  11. N-16 power monitoring system of the RP-10 pool-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preliminary results of monitoring of power of the RP-10 nuclear reactor by measuring the activity of gamma radiation 16N content in the coolant are presented. A detector NaI(Tl) placed in a window that communicates the decay tank and the pump room of the primary cooling circuit was used. Measurements were performed for different levels of power, from 0,5 to 10 MW. Results show a linear behavior between the power of operation and the activity of 16N. (orig.)

  12. Progress activity of Thai Research Reactor in 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thai Research Reactor-1/Modification 1 (TRR-1/M1) is a multipurpose research reactor with nominal power of 2 MW. The reactor is a swimming pool type, cooled and moderate with light water, using the LEU-fuel. TRR-1/M1 has been operated and utilized for various applications such as neutron activation analysis, radioisotope production, gem irradiation, neutron radiography and research works. To expand and promote the utilization of research reactor, the new 10 MW Research Reactor will be established in the Ongkarak Nuclear Research Center (ONRC) project and the project will be finished in the near future. (author)

  13. Optical inspections of research reactor tanks and tank components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By the end of 1987 worldwide there were 326 research reactors in operation, 276 of them operating more than 10 years, and 195 of them operating more than 20 years. The majority of these reactors are swimming-pool type or tank type reactors using aluminium as structural material. Although aluminium has prooven its excellent properties for reactor application in primary system, it is however subjected to various types of corrosion if it gets into contact with other materials such as mild steel in the presence of destilled water. This paper describes various methods of research reactor tank inspections, maintenance and repair possibilities. 9 figs. (Author)

  14. Significance of coast down time on safety and availability of a pool type fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Plant dynamics studies for quantifying the benefits of flow coast down time. • Establishment of minimum flow coast down time required for safety. • Assessment of influence of flow coast down on enhancing plant availability. • Synthesis of thermo mechanical benefits of flow coast down time on component design. - Abstract: Plant dynamic investigation towards establishing the influence of flow coast down time of primary and secondary sodium systems on safety and availability of plant has been carried out based on one dimensional analysis. From safety considerations, a minimum flow coast down time for primary sodium circuit is essential to be provided to limit the consequences of loss of flow event within allowable limits. Apart from safety benefits, large primary coast down time also improves plant availability by the elimination of reactor SCRAM during short term power failure events. Threshold values of SCRAM parameters also need optimization. By suitably selecting the threshold values for SCRAM parameters, significant reduction in the inertia of pumping systems can be derived to obtain desirable results on plant availability. With the optimization of threshold values and primary flow coast down behaviour equivalent to a halving time of 8 s, there is a possibility to eliminate reactor SCRAM during short term power failure events extending up to 0.75 s duration. Benefits of secondary flow halving on reducing transient thermal loading on components have also been investigated and mixed effects have been observed

  15. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the Worcester Polytechnic Institute open-pool training reactor, Docket No. 50-134

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) for a renewal of Operating License R-61 to continue to operate the WPI 10-kW open-pool training reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Worcester Polytechnic Institute and is located on the WPI campus in Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts. The staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by WPI without endangering the health and safety of the public

  16. Fukushima - calculation of the reactor core inventory and storage pools Dai-ichi 1 to Dai-ichi 4, an estimation of a source term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inventory of the reactor core and spent fuel storage pool of the reactors at Dai-ichi 1 to Dai-ichi 4 was determined to need a realistic estimate of the source (released into the atmosphere environment) and modelling of radiological impact of the events in Fukushima NPP. Calculations of inventories were carried out by the methodology that is used in systems to support emergency response and crisis management anymore. Calculations were made based on a model that respects knowledge of real fuels and fuel cycles for individual reactors Dai-ichi. Necessary input data for training the model and calculate inventories are obtained from the IAEA PRIS database.

  17. Gene characteristics and serotype of adenovirus strains in an outbreak through a municipal swimming pool%经游泳池水传播的腺病毒毒株血清型及基因特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李秀娟; 田会方; 徐保红; 赵冬; 潘琢; 蒋瑞平

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the gene characteristics and serotype of adenovirus strains in an outbreak through a municipal swimming pool. Methods The serotype of sixteen adenovirus positive samples detected by using respiratory virus multiple PCR joint inspection kit were tested with tvpe specific primers of adenovirus type 3, 7 and 21. And the completely hexon genes and fiber genes of three adenovirus positive specimens were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and completely sequence determination was conducted. Results All the sixteen adenovirus positive samples were human adenovirus type 7. The three adenovirus serotype 7 isolates had the same hexon gene and fiber gene sequence, the nucleic acid homology was 100%. Compared with the adenovirus serotype 7 outbreak in Shaanxi province, China, which associated with a severe lower respiratory tracted disease in infants 7the three adenovirus positive samples and Shaanxi adenovirus strain shared the same sequence,and no significant genetic variations were found. Conclusion The viral pathogen related to the adenovirus in the outbreak through municipal swimming pool is the type 7. Sequences of the hexon gene and fiber gene are similar to the adenovirus serotype 7 strain in the outbreak in Shaanxi province, none variation is found.%目的 研究经游泳池水传播的腺病毒毒株血清型及基因特征.方法 对采用呼吸道病毒多重PCR法检测阳性的16份咽试子样品进行了腺病毒3型、7型及21型的特异性PCR检测,并对其中3份标本进行了腺病毒六联体(hexon)基因和纤毛(fiber)基因的全序列测定,将测定结果与Genbank数据库公开的核酸序列进行同源性比对,绘制进化树.结果 16份腺病毒阳性样品均为腺病毒7型;3份样品间hexon基因和ber基因核酸序列完全一致,同源性为100%;同时,该3份标本的hexon基因和ber基因核酸序列与引起我国陕西省婴儿严重急性下呼吸道感染暴发的腺病毒毒株的核酸序

  18. Design of a decay tank for a pool type research reactor with a CFD model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conceptual primary cooling system (PCS) was designed for adequate cooling of the core of a research reactor. The primary coolant after passing through the reactor core contains many kinds of radio-nuclides. A decay tank provides a delayed transit time to ensure that the N-16 activity decreases enough before the coolant leaves the decay tank's shielding room. The size of the decay tank should be enlarged to provide sufficient transit time. However, there was a limitation: to minimize the tank size, it should be designed with an internal baffle, which affects the pressure loss in the system and net positive suction head (NPSH) of the PCS pump. Therefore, the decay tank should be optimized for size and the internal baffle. A vertical type decay tank was chosen to optimize the geometrical arrangement of PCS and the vertical internal baffle was installed to minimize the number of internal structures. The preliminary geometry of the tank and the internal baffle were determined to satisfy the required delayed transit time by calculating the maximum velocity and the flow path length of the circular and the annular sections of the tank. The commercially available CFD model, FLUENT, which solves the Navier-Stokes and turbulent models, was used to specifically design the decay tank with the preliminarily calculated geometry and the related flow rate. Several turbulence models, standard k-ε model, renormalization group (RNG) model, and realizable k-ε model, were conducted to isolate the root cause of these differences. By comparing the results of the velocity profile and the characteristics of each model, a detailed design study was simulated using the realizable k-ε model. A user-defined scalar equation was solved to estimate the delayed transit time. The size and the internal baffle that satisfy the required transit time were determined based on the CFD results. (author)

  19. Handling process of assemblies and fuel pins during the re-loading of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this invention is to propose a process of handling assemblies and fuel pins, when reloading a nuclear reactor enclosing assemblies comprising a skeleton closed at the two ends inside of which fuel pins are disposed in vertical position. The reloading is made with the reactor vessel opened, and comprises: the transfer of fuel assemblies from a position to another in the reactor, the replacements of defective or spent assemblies by new assemblies and different controls using the surrounding swimming pool. Every replaced assembly is taken from the reactor vessel, put in a transfer container and transported in horizontal position in the fuel swimming pool near the reactor, this process allows a better re-use of the fuel pins which have not been completely spent in the changed assemblies using the skeletons of this assemblies during unloading

  20. Is swimming during pregnancy a safe exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Mette; Kogevinas, Manolis; Andersen, Per Kragh; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Olsen, Jørn

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise in pregnancy is recommended in many countries, and swimming is considered by many to be an ideal activity for pregnant women. Disinfection by-products in swimming pool water may, however, be associated with adverse effects on various reproductive outcomes. We examined the...... association between swimming in pregnancy and preterm and postterm birth, fetal growth measures, small-for-gestational-age, and congenital malformations. METHODS: We used self-reported exercise data (swimming, bicycling, or no exercise) that were prospectively collected twice during pregnancy for 74......,486 singleton pregnancies. Recruitment to The Danish National Birth Cohort took place 1996-2002. Using Cox, linear and logistic regression analyses, depending on the outcome, we compared swimmers with physically inactive pregnant women; to separate a possible swimming effect from an effect of exercise...

  1. Simulation of power excursions - Osiris reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the experimental work accomplished in the U.S.A. on Borax 1 and SPERT 1 and the accident of SL 1, the 'Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique' started a research program about the safety of its own swimming Pool reactors, with regard to power excursions. The first research work led to the design of programmed explosive charges, adapted to the simulation of a power excursion. This report describes the application of these methods to the investigation of Osiris safety. (author)

  2. Strategies for chemically healthy public swimming pools

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Mosbæk, Hans

    2013-01-01

    I Danmark er offentlige svømmebade en vigtig mulighed for rekreative aktiviteter og fysisk træning samt et redskab for genoptræning. Tilsætning af klor anvendes altid til at kontrollere vand¬kvaliteten og hindre spredning af infektioner mellem badende. Klor oxiderer vandforureningen fra de badende, hvilket holder bassinvandet rent, men der dannes klorerede desinfektions¬biprodukter. Der er identificeret mere end 100 klorbiprodukter i svømme¬bads¬vand, hvor nogle har vist sig at være genotoksi...

  3. Investigation of a long term passive cooling system using two-phase thermosyphon loops for the nuclear reactor spent fuel pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A passive cooling system using two-phase thermosyphon for the spent fuel pool was proposed. • Effect of fill charge ratio on the two-phase thermosyphon loop performance was analyzed. • A thermo-hydraulic decoupling analysis method was introduced for the passive system. • Natural circulation of water in spent fuel pool was simulated and analyzed. - Abstract: Given postulated accidents that go beyond the plant design basis, long term passive cooling for the nuclear reactor spent fuel pool is important to demonstrate. Large amount of heat transport with small temperature difference is required. Two-phase thermosyphon loops are suitable for these cases. Flow and heat transfer characteristics of a two-phase thermosyphon loop were numerically investigated using RELAP5 code. Effects of fill charge ratio on the heat transfer were analyzed. The fill charge ratio should be chosen between 30% and 80%, smaller than 30% or larger than 80% will reduce the heat transfer. Based on the analysis of two-phase thermosyphon loops, a complete design of a passive cooling system for the spent fuel pool was proposed. An analysis method for decoupling of the thermo-hydraulics of the water natural circulation in spent fuel pool, two-phase flow of ammonia in thermosyphon loop and air natural circulation in cooling tower was presented. The results indicate that 1528 two-phase thermosyphon loops can passively remove 16 MW decay heat from the spent fuel pool successfully. Finally, the velocity and temperature distributions in the spent fuel pool were numerically simulated using ANSYS FLUENT software. It was proved that natural circulation of water in spent fuel pool can be realized with the present design. The temperature uniformity was fairly well and the maximum water temperature was 81 °C

  4. Seismic risk and safety of nuclear installations. A look at the Cadarache Centre; Risque sismique et surete des installations nucleaires. Regards sur le Centre de Cadarache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verrhiest-Leblanc, G.; Chevallier, A. [Autorite de Surete Nucleaire 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-11-15

    After a brief recall of some important seismic events which occurred in the past in the south-eastern part of France, the authors indicate the nuclear installations present in this region. They outline the difference between requirements for a usual building and for basic nuclear installations. They indicate laws and regulations which are to be applied to these installations like to any hazardous industrial installation. They describe the seismic risk as it has been determined for the Cadarache area, and evoke the para-seismic design of new nuclear installations which are to be built in Cadarache and actions for a para-seismic reinforcement of existing constructions. Finally, they evoke organisational aspects (emergency plans) and the approach for a better information and transparency about the seismic risk

  5. Contributions of research reactors in science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, N.M.; Bashir, J.

    1994-01-01

    In the present paper, after defining a research reactor, its basic constituents, types of reactors, and their distribution in the world, some typical examples of their uses are given. Particular emphasis is placed on the contribution of PARR-1 (Pakistan Research Reactor-1), the 5MW Swimming Pool Research reactor which first became critical at the Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH) in Dec. 1965 and attained its full power in June 1966. This was and still is the major research facility at PINSTECH for research and development.

  6. Contributions of research Reactors in science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper, after defining a research reactor, its basic constituents, types of reactors, their distribution in the world, some typical examples of their uses are given. Particular emphasis in placed on the contribution of PARR-I (Pakistan Research Reactor-I), the 5 MW Swimming Pool Research reactor which first became critical at the Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH) in Dec. 1965 and attained its full power in June 1966. This is still the major research facility at PINSTECH for research and development. (author)

  7. Corrosion resistance of SAV-1 aluminium alloy after operating in the core of the WWR-K reactor and storage in the water pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work was devoted to study of corrosion resistance of the WWR-K fuel assembly shroud material SAV-1 aluminum alloy. The data of monitoring of surface conditions for the casing an automatic control rod and an ejector rod after full operating in the reactor core and long storage in a temporary water pool were presented. Some regularities of corrosion development in material, irradiated with different neutron fluence were obtained.

  8. Shipment of 255 DIDO fuel elements to the Savannah River Site to empty the storage and reactor pools at Risoe National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DR-3 reactor, owned and operated by the Danish National Laboratory, was built in the late 1950's and initiated operation in January 1960. At that time the DR-1 and DR-2 reactors were already in operation. The main purpose if of Danish research reactor DR-3 was material and fuel testing. Until 1989 the reactor utilized HEU fuel elements. Conversion to the LEU fuel cycle was accomplished in 1990. DOE restarted the return program of for Foreign Research Reactor fuel elements to the United States in 1994. From that time, through 1998, three IUO4 casks (one cask in 1994) operated by Transnucleaire (now named Cogema Logistics, ACL) were used to transport Risoe's fuel to the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC in the USA. In 1999, Risoe elected to issue a request for proposal to transport DR-3 the DIDO fuel elements to SRS with a new licensed cask designed to replace the IUO4 cask. ACL was awarded the contract to transport the irradiated fuel from DR-3 to SRS for the remainder of the FRR Fuel Return program (2009). However, on September 28, 2000, the Board of Governors of Risoe National Laboratory decided to shut down the Danish research reactor of DR3. There had been of R2 technical problems (corrosion on the aluminum reactor tank) and, due to anticipated increasing operational expenses, the Board elected to close the reactor facility. Shortly thereafter, the Danish Government asked the National Laboratory to empty the reactor and its reactor and storage pools containing a total of 255 Dido irradiated fuel elements and ship them to Savannah Rive Site. At that time, ACL was in the process of licensing the new TN-MTR package in the USA. The early shut down of the DR-3 reactor and consequently the resultant new shipping schedule was not compatible with ACL's equipment and licensing schedule for the cask. (author)

  9. Neutronics and thermohydraulics of the reactor C.E.N.E. Part II; Analisis neutronico y termohidraulico del reactor C.E.N.E. Parte II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, R.

    1976-07-01

    In this report the analysis of neutronics thermohydraulics and shielding of the 10 HWt swimming pool reactor C.E.N.E is included. In each of these chapters is given a short description of the theoretical model used, along with the theoretical versus experimental checking carried out, whenever possible, with the reactors JEN-I and JEN-II of Junta de Energia Nuclear. (Author) 11 refs.

  10. Neutronics and thermohydraulics of the reactor C.E.N.E.-Part I; Analisis neutronico y termohidraulico del reactor C.E.N.E. Parte I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, R.; Ahnert, C.; Naudin, A. E.; Martinez Fanegas, R.; Minguez, E.; Rovira, A.

    1976-07-01

    In this report the analysis of neutronics (both statics and kinetics), of the 10 MWt swimming pool reactor C.E.N.E, is included. In each of these chapters is given a short description of the theoretical model used, along with the theoretical versus experimental checking, carried out, whenever possible, with the reactors JEN-I and JEN-II of Junta de Energia Nuclear. (Author) 11 refs.

  11. Successful scaling-up of self-sustained pyrolysis of oil palm biomass under pool-type reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Juferi; Shirai, Yoshihito; Andou, Yoshito; Mohd Ali, Ahmad Amiruddin; Othman, Mohd Ridzuan; Ibrahim, Izzudin; Yamamoto, Akio; Yasuda, Nobuhiko; Hassan, Mohd Ali

    2016-02-01

    An appropriate technology for waste utilisation, especially for a large amount of abundant pressed-shredded oil palm empty fruit bunch (OFEFB), is important for the oil palm industry. Self-sustained pyrolysis, whereby oil palm biomass was combusted by itself to provide the heat for pyrolysis without an electrical heater, is more preferable owing to its simplicity, ease of operation and low energy requirement. In this study, biochar production under self-sustained pyrolysis of oil palm biomass in the form of oil palm empty fruit bunch was tested in a 3-t large-scale pool-type reactor. During the pyrolysis process, the biomass was loaded layer by layer when the smoke appeared on the top, to minimise the entrance of oxygen. This method had significantly increased the yield of biochar. In our previous report, we have tested on a 30-kg pilot-scale capacity under self-sustained pyrolysis and found that the higher heating value (HHV) obtained was 22.6-24.7 MJ kg(-1) with a 23.5%-25.0% yield. In this scaled-up study, a 3-t large-scale procedure produced HHV of 22.0-24.3 MJ kg(-1) with a 30%-34% yield based on a wet-weight basis. The maximum self-sustained pyrolysis temperature for the large-scale procedure can reach between 600 °C and 700 °C. We concluded that large-scale biochar production under self-sustained pyrolysis was successfully conducted owing to the comparable biochar produced, compared with medium-scale and other studies with an electrical heating element, making it an appropriate technology for waste utilisation, particularly for the oil palm industry. PMID:26612557

  12. PROPERTIES OF SWIMMING WATER

    OpenAIRE

    Tayfun KIR; Zakir COBANOÐLU

    2004-01-01

    Swimming waters may be hazardous on human health. So, The physicians who work in the facilities, which include swimming areas, are responsible to prevent risks. To ensure hygiene of swimming water, European Swimming Water Directive offers microbiological, physical, and chemical criteria. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2004; 3(5.000): 103-104

  13. Neutronics and thermohydraulics of the reactor C.E.N.E.-Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the analysis of neutronics (both statics and kinetics), of the 10 MWt swimming pool reactor C.E.N.E, is included. In each of these chapters is given a short description of the theoretical model used, along with the theoretical versus experimental checking, carried out, whenever possible, with the reactors JEN-I and JEN-II of Junta de Energia Nuclear. (Author) 11 refs

  14. Neutronics and thermohydraulics of the reactor C.E.N.E. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the analysis of neutronics thermohydraulics and shielding of the 10 HWt swimming pool reactor C.E.N.E is included. In each of these chapters is given a short description of the theoretical model used, along with the theoretical versus experimental checking carried out, whenever possible, with the reactors JEN-I and JEN-II of Junta de Energia Nuclear. (Author) 11 refs

  15. Enforcement of control decree for radiation protection devices on the Cadarache center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the Cadarache center there are nearly 1800 mobile devices and 800 fixed. The periodic calibration checks are performed by type with the same sources on every installation of the Center. A commune methodology was developed by type of device. It is presented in the form of cards with a phasing of operations as a picture. (N.C.)

  16. An Information Building on Radioactivity and Nuclear Energy for the French CEA Cadarache Research Center - 13492

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CEA Cadarache research center is one of the 10 research centers of the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). Distributed throughout various research platforms, it focuses on nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, new energy technologies (hydrogen, solar, biomass) and fundamental research in the field of vegetal biology. It is the most important technological research and development centers for energy in Europe. Considering the sensitive nature of nuclear activities, the questions surrounding the issue of radioactive waste, the nuclear energy and the social, economic and environmental concerns for present and future generations, the French Government asked nuclear actors to open communication and to give all the information asked by the Local Information Commission (CLI) and the public [1]. In this context, the CEA Cadarache has decided to better show and explain its expertise and experience in the area of nuclear energy and nuclear power plant design, and to make it available to stakeholders and to the public. CEA Cadarache receives each year more than 9000 visitors. To complete technical visits of the research facilities and laboratories, a scientific cultural center has been built in 2011 to inform the public on CEA Cadarache research activities and to facilitate the acceptance of nuclear energy in a way suited to the level of knowledge of the visitors. A modern interactive exhibition of 150 m2 allows visitors to find out more about energy, CEA Cadarache research programs, radioactive waste management and radiological impact on the research center activities. It also offers an auditorium for group discussions and for school groups to discover science through enjoyment. This communication center has received several thousand visitors since its opening on October 2011; the initial results of this experience are now available. It's possible to explain the design of this exhibition, to give some statistics on the number of the visitors, their

  17. Experimental study for research and development of a super fast reactor. (2) Oscillatory condensation of high temperature vapor directly discharged into sub-cooled liquid pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of pressure oscillation and the observation of condensation behavior of a vapor discharge into sub-cooled liquid cool has been carried out to obtain a basic data for the evaluation of safety of the LOCA in the supercritical pressure light water cooled fast reactor (Super Fast Reactor). In the experiment, HCFC 123 is used as the test fluid. HCFC 123 is easy for handling due to its low critical pressure and temperature, and therefore, the experimental conditions can be set easily to make systematic data. The vapor at high temperature is discharged into the sub-cooled liquid pool through a submerged single pipe vertically fixed. The oscillatory condensation is observed. The condensation oscillation produces pressure oscillation in the liquid pool. The condensing interface area becomes small as the increase of the degree of sub-cooling. The pressure frequency has a period of millisecond order and the frequency and amplitude of the pressure oscillation increase with increasing the degree of sub-cooling and mass flux of the vapor, like the results of some conventional water vapor injection tests. In the present study, it is also consistently discussed the influence of the vapor temperature, mass flux, mass flow rate, back pressure of the liquid pool, pipe diameter and the degree of sub-cooling on the pressure amplitude and condensation behavior. (author)

  18. Literature survey 'Impact of the Cadarache Centre activity on the environment'. Survey performed by the CRIIRAD laboratory for the Cadarache's CLI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a presentation of the Cadarache Centre installations and activities, this document reports a literature survey based on the documents provided by the Centre and related to dismissals and incidents since the beginning of the Centre activity, and to environment control during some critical periods. Several issues are discussed: the radioactive atmospheric effluents and their impact, the control of underground waters, the control of surface water environment (impact of liquid radioactive effluents and monitoring of run-off waters), soil and food chain monitoring. For each of these themes, control and monitoring data are analysed

  19. Continuously tritium monitoring of the pipe of liquid effluents at the Cea Cadarache; Controle en continu du tritium de la conduite des effluents liquides du CEA Cadarache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pira, Y

    2004-07-01

    This report is oriented toward the radiation protection of environment that is an essential component of radiation protection. It is necessary to detect any solid, liquid or gaseous abnormal release and to find its origin. The present study bears on a detection instrument in continuously to find tritium in liquid effluents of the Cea Cadarache. After having study the functioning principle of this device, an evaluation of its performances has been realised ( back noise, yield, detection limit) and to a checking in real conditions of utilization. (N.C.)

  20. Reracking of fuel pools, experience with improved codes and design for reactor sites with high seismic loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reracking of existing pools to the maximum extent is desirable from the economical point of view. Although the load onto the storage rack structure and the fuel pool bottom will be increased, new improved codes, optimized structural qualification procedures and advanced design enable to demonstrate the structural integrity for all normal and accident conditions so that the design provides a safe compact storage of spent fuel under any condition.(author)

  1. EFFECTS OF THREE FEEDBACK CONDITIONS ON AEROBIC SWIM SPEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pérez Soriano

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was twofold: (a to develop an underwater chronometer capable to provide feedback while the athlete is swimming, as well as being a control tool for the coach, and (b to analyse its feedback effect on swim pace control compared with feedback provided by the coach and with no feedback, in 25 m and 50 m swimming pools. 30 male swimmers of national level volunteer to participate. Each swimmer swam 3 x 200 m at aerobic speed (AS and 3 x 200 m just under the anaerobic threshold speed (AnS, each swam repetition with a different feedback condition: chronometer, coach and without feedback. Results (a validate the chronometer system developed and (b show that swimmers pace control is affected by the type of feedback provided, the swim speed elected and the size of the swimming pool

  2. Activities for extending the lifetime of MINT research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokhari, Adnan; Kassim, Mohammad Suhaimi [Malaysian Inst. for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi, Kajang (Malaysia)

    1998-10-01

    MINT TRIGA Reactor is a 1-MW swimming pool nuclear reactor commissioned in June 1982. Since then, it has been used for research, isotope production, neutron activation, neutron radiography and manpower training. The total operating time till the end on September 1997 is 16968 hours with cumulative total energy release of 11188 MW-hours. After more than fifteen years of successful operation, some deterioration in components and associated systems has been observed. This paper describes some of the activities carried out to increase the lifetime and to reduce the shutdown time of the reactor. (author)

  3. Corrosion of aluminium alloy test coupons in the WWR-K reactor cooling pool and wet storage tank in Almaty, Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion of a number of aluminium alloy coupons was studied. The coupons were assembled in racks and exposed to water in the storage pools for spent nuclear fuels of the WWR-K reactor in Almaty, Kazakhstan. The maximum duration of exposure of the racks was 921 days. Mass loss of the coupons, depth of pits and the average pit sizes on the coupons were determined. The data was evaluated and compared as a function of coupon position in the rack, time of exposition and nature of contact between coupons (none, crevice or bimetallic). (author)

  4. Resistance to irradiation of micro-algae growing in the storage pools of a nuclear reactor investigated by NMR and neutron spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A green Chlorophycean micro-alga surviving high irradiation doses has been discovered in the storage pools of a nuclear reactor. Investigating the mechanisms sustaining its properties is of peculiar interest. Metabolic impact of irradiation on the micro-alga as well as structural macromolecular impact were investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron backscattering spectroscopy. Carbohydrate, amino acid and organic acid content studied as a function of the irradiation dose revealed an intense protein repair activity. Resilience was extracted according to irradiation dose and compared to that of other extremophile species. (authors)

  5. SWIMMING CLASSES IN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ OPINION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Bielec

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of modern physical education is not only to develop motor abilities of the students, but most of all prevent them from epidemic youth diseases such as obesity or postural defects. Positive attitudes to swimming as a long-life physical activity, instilled in adolescence should be beneficial in adult life. The group of 130 boys and 116 girls of 7th grade junior high school (mean age 14.6 was asked in the survey to present their opinion of obligatory swimming lessons at school. Students of both sexes claimed that they liked swimming classes because they could improve their swimming skills (59% of answers and because of health-related character of water exercises (38%. 33% of students regarded swimming lessons as boring and monotonous, and 25% of them complained about poor pool conditions like chlorine smell, crowded lanes, too low temperature. Majority of the surveyed students saw practical role of swimming in saving others life.

  6. ARC Code TI: Swim

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Swim is a software information service for the grid built on top of Pour, which is an information service framework developed at NASA. Swim provides true software...

  7. Thai research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) was established in 1962, as a reactor center, by the virtue of the Atomic Energy for Peace Act, under operational policy and authority of the Thai Atomic Energy for Peace Commission (TAEPC); and under administration of Ministry of Science, Technology and Energy. It owns and operates the only Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1). The TRR-1/M1 is a mixed reactor system constituting of the old MTR type swimming pool, irradiation facilities and cooling system; and TRIGA Mark III core and control instrumentation. The general performance of TRR-1/M1 is summarized in Table I. The safe operation of TRR-1/M1 is regulated by Reactor Safety Committee (RSC), established under TAEPC, and Health Physics Group of OAEP. The RCS has responsibility and duty to review of and make recommendations on Reactor Standing Orders, Reactor Operation Procedures, Reactor Core Loading and Requests for Reactor Experiments. In addition,there also exist of Emergency Procedures which is administered by OAEP. The Reactor Operation Procedures constitute of reactor operating procedures, system operating procedures and reactor maintenance procedures. At the level of reactor routine operating procedures, there is a set of Specifications on Safety and Operation Limits and Code of Practice from which reactor shift supervisor and operators must follow in order to assure the safe operation of TRR-1/M1. Table II is the summary of such specifications. The OAEP is now upgrading certain major components of the TRR-1/M1 such as the cooling system, the ventilation system and monitoring equipment to ensure their adequately safe and reliable performance under normal and emergency conditions. Furthermore, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been providing assistance in areas of operation and maintenance and safety analysis. (author)

  8. HEALTHY AND SAFETY SWIMMING

    OpenAIRE

    Suleyman CEYLAN

    2005-01-01

    Swimming is a sport which has own rules, styles, and fields, however, is one of the most performed avocation as amateur and a joke especially at summer months. Although one of the most beneficial sports, swimming can cause a number of several health problems such as infectious diseases, allergic events, or traumas, if it is not done at adequate conditions and eligible style. In this paper, the factors such as preparing to swimming, health and safety features of swimming areas, important healt...

  9. Performance diagnosis in swimming

    OpenAIRE

    J. P. Vilas-Boas; Fernandes, R.J.; Barbosa, Tiago M; Keskinen, K.L.

    2007-01-01

    Energy expenditure as a function of swimming velocity is one of the major topics of interest in swimming science. Understanding the mechanisms behind swimming performance and training need new scientific approaches, while most of the existing knowledge on the bioenergetics of the four swimming strokes has already a number of years. The purpose of this presentation is to synthesize the most recent contributions of our research group in the domain of the bioenergetic evaluation of the swi...

  10. Evaluation of final vapor pressures in the loss of flow accident in an irradiation device of a pool reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reliability feature, are described for a device containing samples, at a temperatures of 300 grade centigrades, in a reactor core for a long time. After an examination of the maximum accident event, the maximum vapour pressure originated by the inlet of reactor cooling water into the experimental device, is evaluated

  11. Nondestructive testing of PWR type fuel rods by eddy currents and metrology in the OSIRIS reactor pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Saclay Reactor Department has developed a nondestructive test bench, now installed above channel 1 of the OSIRIS reactor. As part of investigations into the dynamics of PWR fuel degradation, a number of fuel rods underwent metrological and eddy current inspection, after irradiation

  12. Swimming Safely (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-05-22

    Almost 4,000 people die from drowning each year in the U.S. You can also get sick at the pool. This podcast discusses swimming pool safety tips.  Created: 5/22/2014 by MMWR.   Date Released: 5/22/2014.

  13. 2006 transparency and nuclear safety report. CEA Cadarache. Volumes 1 + 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a general presentation of the Cadarache site and of its nuclear installations, the first volume of this report describes the various measures concerning the site safety: safety organisation, general measures, measures related to various risks, control of emergency situations, inspections, audits and second level control, measures in basic nuclear installations. It describes the measures concerning the radioprotection on this site: organisation, significant facts, and dose measurement results. It describes significant events which occurred in relationship with nuclear safety and radioprotection, presents results of release measurements and of radiological and chemical assessments of the impact these releases on the environment. The report then describes measures implemented to limit the volume of stored radioactive wastes and also their impact on health and on the environment. It proposes a series of tables indicating the nature and quantities of wastes which are stored in the different basic nuclear installations of Cadarache. The second volume proposes the same information for two specific nuclear installations belonging to Areva and located in Cadarache, the INB 32 and 54 (INB stands for basic nuclear installation), for which the significant events occurred on the 19. of January and on the 6. of November 2006. For these installations, release measurements concern gaseous and liquid releases

  14. 2008 transparency and nuclear safety report. CEA Cadarache. Volumes 1 + 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a general presentation of the Cadarache site and of its nuclear installations, the first volume of this report describes the various measures concerning the site safety: safety organisation, general measures, measures related to various risks, control of emergency situations, inspections, audits and second level control, measures in basic nuclear installations. It describes the measures concerning the radioprotection on this site: organisation, significant facts, and dose measurement results. It describes significant events which occurred in relationship with nuclear safety and radioprotection, presents results of release measurements and of radiological and chemical assessments of the impact these releases on the environment. The report then describes measures implemented to limit the volume of stored radioactive wastes and also their impact on health and on the environment. It proposes a series of tables indicating the nature and quantities of wastes which are stored in the different basic nuclear installations of Cadarache. The second volume proposes the same information for two specific nuclear installations belonging to Areva and located in Cadarache, the INB 32 and 54 (INB stands for basic nuclear installation) for which significant events occurred on the 18. and on the 21. of November 2008. For these installations, release measurements concern gaseous and liquid releases

  15. 2007 transparency and nuclear safety report. CEA Cadarache. Volumes 1 + 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a general presentation of the Cadarache site and of its nuclear installations, the first volume of this report describes the various measures concerning the site safety: safety organisation, general measures, measures related to various risks, control of emergency situations, inspections, audits and second level control, measures in basic nuclear installations. It describes the measures concerning the radioprotection on this site: organisation, significant facts, and dose measurement results. It describes significant events which occurred in relationship with nuclear safety and radioprotection, presents results of release measurements and of radiological and chemical assessments of the impact these releases on the environment. The report then describes measures implemented to limit the volume of stored radioactive wastes and also their impact on health and on the environment. It provides a series of tables indicating the nature and quantities of wastes which are stored in the different basic nuclear installations of Cadarache. It reports the recommendations expressed by the CHSCT (committee on hygiene, security and working conditions) after the 2006 report. The second volume proposes the same information for two specific nuclear installations belonging to Areva and located in Cadarache, the INB 32 and 54 (INB stands for basic nuclear installation), for which the significant events occurred on the 13. of March and on the 25. of May 2007. For these installations, release measurements concern gaseous and liquid releases

  16. 2009 transparency and nuclear safety report. CEA Cadarache. Volumes 1 + 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a general presentation of the Cadarache site and of its nuclear installations, the first volume of this report describes the various measures concerning the site safety (safety organisation, general measures, measures related to various risks, inspections, control of emergency situations, audits and second level control, measures in basic nuclear installations) and radioprotection (organisation, significant facts, dosimeter results). It describes significant events which occurred in relationship with nuclear safety and radioprotection, presents results of measurements of releases and of their impact on the environment (chemical and radiological assessment). Then after a description of measures to limit the volume of stored radioactive wastes and their impact on health and on the environment, tables indicate the nature and quantities of wastes which are stored in the different basic nuclear installations of Cadarache. The second volume proposes the same information for two specific nuclear installations belonging to Areva and located in Cadarache, the INB 32 and 54 (INB stands for basic nuclear installation) for which a significant event occurred on the 6 October 2009. For these installations, release measurements concern gaseous and liquid releases

  17. Influence of high-permeability discs in an axisymmetric model of the Cadarache dynamo experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesecke, A.; Nore, C.; Stefani, F.; Gerbeth, G.; Léorat, J.; Herreman, W.; Luddens, F.; Guermond, J.-L.

    2012-05-01

    Numerical simulations of the kinematic induction equation are performed on a model configuration of the Cadarache von-Kármán-sodium dynamo experiment. The effect of a localized axisymmetric distribution of relative permeability μr that represents soft iron material within the conducting fluid flow is investigated. The critical magnetic Reynolds number Rmc for dynamo action of the first non-axisymmetric mode roughly scales like Rmcμr - Rmc∞∝μ-1/2r, i.e. the threshold decreases as μr increases. This scaling law suggests a skin effect mechanism in the soft iron discs. More important with regard to the Cadarache dynamo experiment, we observe a purely toroidal axisymmetric mode localized in the high-permeability discs which becomes dominant for large μr. In this limit, the toroidal mode is close to the onset of dynamo action with a (negative) growth rate that is rather independent of the magnetic Reynolds number. We qualitatively explain this effect by paramagnetic pumping at the fluid/disc interface and propose a simplified model that quantitatively reproduces numerical results. The crucial role of the high-permeability discs in the mode selection in the Cadarache dynamo experiment cannot be inferred from computations using idealized pseudo-vacuum boundary conditions (H × n = 0).

  18. Some particular aspects of control in nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the experience acquired in France on the question, of reactor safety. Since a special paper is being presented on reactors of the graphite gas type, the safety of the other types studied in France is discussed here: - heavy water-gas reactors, - fast neutron reactors, - water research reactors of the swimming-pool and tank types. The safety rules peculiar to the different types are explained, with emphasis on their influence on the reactor designs and on the power limits they impose. The corresponding safety studies are presented, particular stress being placed on the original work developed in these fields. Special mention is made of the experimental systems constructed for these studies: the reactor CABRI, pile loop for depressurization tests, loops outside the pile, mock-ups etc. (authors)

  19. REX 2000 core : a new material testing reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    REX 2000 is a new research reactor project entirely dedicated to technological irradiations, which should be located on the CEA site of CADARACHE. It will be aimed at satisfying the future needs for the validation of new concepts of nuclear materials and fuels, and will take over and replace the present experimental reactors, which are 30 to 40 years old. The fundamental studies started by the CEA in 1993, on future irradiation needs expected in 2005, lead to the design of a reactor which will essentially meet the needs of PWRs, without forgetting the other fields such as FBRs, fusion... The current reactor project is based on a light water open pool concept, with a thermal power of 100 MW, in about 150 l, and characterized by an in-core-central hole. It reaches neutronic flux levels twice those of present French reactor fluxes. It allows many irradiations in the central loop under high fast neutron flux, in order to accelerate the aging of materials and analyze their behaviour. It also enables the achievement of power transient tests under high thermal neutron flux gradients. These performances are obtained with high forced flow rates and upward flow in the core, in order to preserve the operating flexibility of the reactor. This leads to the design of a specific assembly design. (author)

  20. Conceptual design of multipurpose compact research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceptual design of the high-performance and low-cost multipurpose compact research reactor which will be expected to construct in the nuclear power plant introduction countries, started from 2010 in JAEA and nuclear-related companies in Japan. The aims of this conceptual design are to achieve highly safe reactor, economical design, high availability factor and advanced irradiation utilization. One of the basic reactor concept was determined as swimming pool type, thermal power of 10MW and water cooled and moderated reactor with plate type fuel element same as the JMTR. It is expected that the research reactors are used for human resource development, progress of the science and technology, expansion of industry use, lifetime extension of LWRs and so on. (author)

  1. 用于池式快堆系统分析的钠池三维模型开发%Development of Three-Dimensional Sodium Pool Model for System Analysis of Pool-Type Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    隋丹婷; 陆道纲; 张盼

    2012-01-01

    由于池式快堆钠池内的热工水力学特性对反应堆的安全运行有重要影响,本文采用基于交错网格的SIMPLE算法开发直角坐标系和柱坐标系下钠池三维计算软件.应用CFX软件进行验证之后,完成了三维流场分析程序与系统分析软件SAC-CFR的耦合,并用耦合后的程序分析日本文殊快堆45%功率稳态运行工况上腔室内的流场分布,初步验证了堆芯上腔三维化的SAC-CFR用于系统分析的有效性,为进一步开发事故模型、非能动余热排出系统模型做准备.%As the thermal-hydraulic characteristic in sodium pool is crucial for safety operation of liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), a three-dimensional sodium pool thermal-hydraulic analysis code was developed based on SIMPLE algorithm on stagger grid under Cartesian coordinates and cylindrical coordinates. After the validation with CFX, coupling between the analysis code and SAC-CFR was completed) and then the coupled code was applied to the flow field analysis in upper plenum of Monju Plant at 45% thermal power steady-state operation condition, which preliminary shows the effectiveness of the system analysis with coupled code and makes preparations for further development of accident analysis model and passive residual heat removal system.

  2. Emission and transmission tomography systems to be developed for the future needs of Jules Horowitz material testing reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotiluoto, Petri; Wasastjerna, Frej; Kekki, Tommi; Sipilä, Heikki; Banzuzi, Kukka; Kinnunen, Petri; Heikinheimo, Liisa

    2009-08-01

    The new 100 MW Jules Horowitz material testing reactor will be built in Cadarache, France. It will support, for instance, research on new types of innovative nuclear fuel. As a Finnish in-kind contribution, 3D emission and transmission tomography equipment will be delivered for both the reactor and the active component storage pool. The image reconstruction of activities inside the used nuclear fuel will be based on gamma spectrometry measurements. A new type of underwater digital X-ray linear detector array is under development for transmission imaging, based on GaAs and direct conversion of X-rays into an electrical signal. A shared collimator will be used for both emission and transmission measurements. Some preliminary design has been performed. For the current design, the expected gamma spectrometric response of a typical high-purity germanium detector has been simulated with MCNP for minimum and maximum source activities (specified by CEA) to be measured in future.

  3. Teaching Sodium Fast Reactors in CEA-INSTN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conclusion: Education and Training: - a key element for the future of the development of Sodium Fast Reactors, and more particularly ASTRID project. - a tool to create a new generation of skilled nuclear engineers in the field. - a unique mean to share basic knowledge, operational feedback, safety approaches. The two entities aimed to deliver Training sessions, i.e. Sodium School in Cadarache, and INSTN-Cadarache, are ready: - to conceive and propose tailored sessions, - to collaborate with other foreign Education and Training Entities

  4. Effects of Nanofluid for In-Vessel Retention External Reactor Vessel Cooling on Critical Heat Flux using Pool Boiling Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-vessel retention (IVR) is one of the severe accident management (SAM) strategies that are used in some nuclear power plants: AP600, AP1000, Loviisa and APR1400. One way of IVR is the method of external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC). When core melts and deposits on the bottom of reactor vessel, ERVC is starting to flood the reactor cavity to remove the decay heat through the wall of the reactor vessel. This process can improve the plant economics by reducing regulatory requirements. And increased safety margin leads to gain public acceptance. In this system, the heat removal is restricted by thermal limit called by critical heat flux (CHF). Besides, as advanced light water reactors such as South Korea's APR-1400, thermal safety margin is deceased. So, it is essential to get more safety margin. There are some approaches to enhance the ERVC: using the coating on the vessel outer surface, increasing the reactor cavity flood level, streamlining the gap between the vessel and the vessel insulation. Many investigations have been performed to evaluate the coolability of IVR In this paper, we firstly investigated the coating effects in the critical heat flux among the above mentioned approach methods. During the boiling phenomenon, a thin layer was formed on the heater surface in the nanofluid. This coating mechanism is well known theoretically. Nanofluids are colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles in traditional heat transfer fluids. One of the most interesting characteristics of nanofluids is their capability to enhance the critical heat flux (CHF) significantly. Nanofluid is made by typical particle materials. Materials of nanoparticles include metals (e.g., silver, copper, gold), metal oxides (e.g., titania, alumina, silica, zirconia), carbon allotrope (e.g., carbon nanotube, graphite). We selected the grapheneoxide nanofluid which is a kind of carbon allotrope. Graphene-oxide is attractive material with the high thermal conductivity and stable dispersion ability in

  5. Intercomparison of the finite difference and nodal discrete ordinates and surface flux transport methods for a LWR pool-reactor benchmark problem in X-Y geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present work is to compare and discuss the three of the most advanced two dimensional transport methods, the finite difference and nodal discrete ordinates and surface flux method, incorporated into the transport codes TWODANT, TWOTRAN-NODAL, MULTIMEDIUM and SURCU. For intercomparison the eigenvalue and the neutron flux distribution are calculated using these codes in the LWR pool reactor benchmark problem. Additionally the results are compared with some results obtained by French collision probability transport codes MARSYAS and TRIDENT. Because the transport solution of this benchmark problem is close to its diffusion solution some results obtained by the finite element diffusion code FINELM and the finite difference diffusion code DIFF-2D are included

  6. Fractionated BNCT for locally recurrent head and neck cancer: Experience from a phase I/II clinical trial at Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To introduce our experience of treating locally and regionally recurrent head and neck cancer patients with BNCT at Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor in Taiwan, 12 patients (M/F=10/2, median age 55.5 Y/O) were enrolled and 11 received two fractions of treatment. Fractionated BNCT at 30-day interval with adaptive planning according to changed T/N ratios was feasible, effective and safe for selected recurrent head and neck cancer in this trial. - Highlights: • We treated 12 patients with recurrent Head and Neck (H and N) cancer after radical surgery and radiotherapy since 2010. • Four complete response (CR) and 3 partial response (PR) were found. Total response rate was 58%. • Two patients had local control longer than one year. • No grade 4 or higher toxicity was noted for both acute and chronic effects

  7. Swimming hall water treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Valtonen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to see how ultraviolet light-treatment can improve water disinfection at Pori central swimming hall. The swimming hall has already an option for ultraviolet disinfection system, but there hasn’t been any immediate need for it to be utilized in combination with more conventional water treatment methods. Nevertheless, growing visitor numbers are already straining the swimming hall’s water treatment systems and some improvement was h...

  8. Results of a large scale neutron spectrometry and dosimetry comparison exercise at the Cadarache moderator assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eurados Working Group 7 recently organised a large-scale comparison of neutron spectrometry and dosimetry measurements at the IPSN/SDOS laboratory of the CEA Cadarache Research Centre in France. A large number of participants took part with a range of instruments including spectrometers, tissue-equivalent proportional counters, personal dosemeters, and survey instruments. The neutron field used for the exercise was a primarily low energy neutron spectrum similar to those which have been measured recently around nuclear facilities. This paper presents the results of the measurements and attempts to draw conclusions about the accuracy attainable with the various devices, their advantages and drawbacks, and potential problems. (author)

  9. Influence of high permeability disks in an axisymmetric model of the Cadarache dynamo experiment

    OpenAIRE

    A. Giesecke; Nore, C.; Stefani, F.; Gerbeth, G.; Léorat, J.; Herreman, W; Luddens, F.; Guermond, J.-L

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the kinematic induction equation are performed on a model configuration of the Cadarache von-K\\'arm\\'an-Sodium dynamo experiment. The effect of a localized axisymmetric distribution of relative permeability {\\mu} that represents soft iron material within the conducting fluid flow is investigated. The critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm^c for dynamo action of the first non-axisymmetric mode roughly scales like Rm^c({\\mu})-Rm^c({\\mu}->infinity) ~ {\\mu}^(-1/2) i.e. the ...

  10. French fission products experiments performed in Cadarache and Valduc. Results comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cofunded by Cogema, two complementary experimental programmes on burn up credit (BUC) related to fission products (FPs) are performed by CEA and IRSN at Cadarache and Valduc. After shortly recalling the main characteristics of each experiment, a first comparison of some results is presented, especially the energy range in which most part of cross section absorption are qualified. Both experiments exhibit great quality and accurate results, giving a high degree of confidence to the whole experimental French process of qualification devoted to BUC. (author)

  11. Swimming Orientation for Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mary Lou

    1990-01-01

    Techniques which are designed to dispel fears and promote confident learning are offered to preschool swimming instructors. Safety, class organization, water games, and class activities are discussed. (IAH)

  12. One-dimensional thermohydraulic model of the nucleus and lower and upper pool regions of the reactor RMB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer codes used in construction of nuclear reactors projects, specifically with regard to the thermo-hydraulics concepts part of your core, whose main goal reproduce actual operating conditions in order to predict quantitatively the limiting conditions of operation so that the safety limit is not exceeded. Computational methods for studies of fluid flow are developed around the world, including Brazil. With the evolution of computers application of numerical methods greatly reduced response time results, and tends to further decrease the extent that the computers and processors develop, making it feasible to use programming accident simulations of heat transfer reactors. The software developed in this paper presents a method for analyzing the thermo-hydraulic behavior of the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) after its shutdown. The software solves the conservations equations applied to the core and also the lower and upper regions of the RMB. The thermo-hydraulics characteristics studied are: the temperatures of the core, cladding and refrigerant, the mass flow and the heat transfer. The numerical resolution was performed using the Matlab language and the outputs are presented in graphs and tables forms. (author)

  13. Steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of the equilibrium core of Pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) has been carried out. RELAP5/Mod 3.4 (a best-estimate system code) was employed. PARR-1 is a swimming pool type research reactor using MTR (Material Testing Reactor) type fuel. It uses low enriched uranium (<20%) fuel with light water flowing from top to bottom under gravity. Standard correlations were employed to compute various parameters, which include: coolant velocity distribution in the core; critical velocity; pressure drop; saturation temperature; temperature distribution in the core, OFI (onset of flow instability) and DNB (departure from nucleate boiling)

  14. Utilization Status and Development Layout of Research Reactors in Tsinghua University, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University (INET), as the largest education institute of nuclear science in P.R. China, operates three research reactors. How to broaden the utilization of our RRs is the challenge we have to face. In this article, current utilization status of the swimming pool reactor will be introduced. The feasibility of developing the RRs into training center and the advantages of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTR-10) for nuclear hydrogen production will be put forward. (author)

  15. Steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of the equilibrium core of Pakistan research reactor-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokhari, I.H. [SDTP User Group, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, P.O. Nilore 45650, Islamabad (Pakistan)], E-mail: ihbokhari@yahoo.co.uk; Mahmood, T.; Chaudri, K.S. [SDTP User Group, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, P.O. Nilore 45650, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2007-10-15

    Steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) has been carried out. RELAP5/Mod 3.4 (a best-estimate system code) was employed. PARR-1 is a swimming pool type research reactor using MTR (Material Testing Reactor) type fuel. It uses low enriched uranium (<20%) fuel with light water flowing from top to bottom under gravity. Standard correlations were employed to compute various parameters, which include: coolant velocity distribution in the core; critical velocity; pressure drop; saturation temperature; temperature distribution in the core, OFI (onset of flow instability) and DNB (departure from nucleate boiling)

  16. Influence of high permeability disks in an axisymmetric model of the Cadarache dynamo experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Giesecke, A; Stefani, F; Gerbeth, G; Léorat, J; Herreman, W; Luddens, F; Guermond, J -L

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the kinematic induction equation are performed on a model configuration of the Cadarache von-K\\'arm\\'an-Sodium dynamo experiment. The effect of a localized axisymmetric distribution of relative permeability {\\mu} that represents soft iron material within the conducting fluid flow is investigated. The critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm^c for dynamo action of the first non-axisymmetric mode roughly scales like Rm^c({\\mu})-Rm^c({\\mu}->infinity) ~ {\\mu}^(-1/2) i.e. the threshold decreases as {\\mu} increases. This scaling law suggests a skin effect mechanism in the soft iron disks. More important with regard to the Cadarache dynamo experiment, we observe a purely toroidal axisymmetric mode localized in the high permeability disks which becomes dominant for large {\\mu}. In this limit, the toroidal mode is close to the onset of dynamo action with a (negative) growth-rate that is rather independent of the magnetic Reynolds number. We qualitatively explain this effect by paramagnetic pumping...

  17. Cadarache, January 17, 2012. A nuclear crisis exercise with a seismic dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As France is a region with a moderate seismicity, the new French seismic zoning indicates that the Cadarache CEA centre and the surrounding communities are located in a region exhibiting a seismicity which is greater than the metropolitan average. Therefore, a project of organizing a nuclear crisis exercise emerged with taking this seismic risk into account. This exercise took place on the 17 January 2012. This article presents its objectives which addressed the ability of public authorities and of the operator to manage a nuclear accident caused by an earthquake and its consequences in terms of civilian security and nuclear safety. The article also briefly presents the Cadarache centre within its seismic environment, and how the seismic risk had been taken into account when designing and dimensioning some of its installations. It also evokes the ASN prescriptions made after the decennial safety inspections. Several actors, institutions and organizations have been involved in the exercise and in its preparation, and this preparation had some consequences on the awareness of local authorities on the seismic risk. The adopted scenario is briefly presented as well as the performance of simulations. The main lessons learned are briefly discussed

  18. Experimental and numerical investigations on roof slab of a pool type sodium cooled fast reactor based on model studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The structural integrity of the roof slab of 500 MWe sodium cooled fast reactor is predicted under static loading conditions. • A scaling down approach was adopted to reduce the cost of experimentation. • Experiments on 1/12th scaled down model of the roof slab made of Perspex material are carried out and test data is compared with the results of numerical simulation. • The investigations carried out on the model demonstrate the robustness of the analysis as well as raise the confidence on the structural integrity of the roof slab. - Abstract: The objective of the work is to predict the structural integrity of the roof slab of 500 MWe sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) under static loading conditions. The roof slab is an annular box type structure consisting of top and bottom plates with connecting stiffeners and has been designed to support various components such as control plug, pumps and heat exchangers entering into the main vessel of the reactor. The net static load acting on it is about 3800 t under normal condition and about 5000 t under design basis earthquake. Experiments on 1/12th scaled down model of the roof slab are carried out and test data is compared with the results of numerical simulation by finite element analysis. The numerical as well as experimental investigations carried out on the model demonstrate the robustness of assumptions made for the analysis carried out towards respecting design code limits as well as raise the confidence on the structural integrity of the roof slab

  19. Effect of coupon orientation on corrosion behavior of aluminium alloy coupons in the spent fuel storage section of the IEA-R1 research reactor pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The objectives of the IAEA sponsored Regional Technical Co-operation Project for Latin America (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Peru) are to provide the basic conditions to define a regional strategy for managing spent fuel and to provide solutions, taking into consideration the economic and technological realities of the countries involved. In particular, to determine the basic conditions for managing research reactor (RR) spent fuel during operation and interim storage as well as final disposal, and to establish forms of regional cooperation for spent fuel characterization, safety, regulation and public communication. This project is divided into 4 subprojects: (1) spent fuel characterization; (2) safety and regulation; (3) options for spent fuel storage and disposal; (4) public information and communication. Corrosion monitoring and surveillance is one of the activities of the subproject 'spent fuel characterization'. The dominant fuel type used in the Latin American (LA) RRs is plate-type (MTR), LEU, oxide fuel (U3O8-Al) clad in Al, followed by TRIGA-type (U-Zr-H) rods. Almost all the spent fuels from LA RRs are stored in storage racks within the reactor pool, in decay pools or in away-from-reactor wet basins. Two of the countries participating in the Regional Project (Argentina and Brazil) were (and continue to be) participants of the IAEA sponsored coordinated research project (CRP) on 'Corrosion of research reactor Al-clad spent fuel in water'. The corrosion surveillance activities of the Regional Project are based on this CRP. The main objective of this activity is to evaluate the effect of LA spent fuel basin parameters on the corrosion behaviour of RR fuel cladding. This evaluation consists of exposing racks containing Al alloy and stainless steel coupons at the different spent fuel basins. Al alloy coupons fabricated under conditions similar to those used to prepare fuel plates have been used. The surface conditions of the Al coupons

  20. SAFETY AND MANAGEMENT OF SWIMING POOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal GÜNDOĞDU

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study,it was investigated the situation related to the safety and management of swimming pools belongs to municipality This study was planned to determine the present situation related to the safety and management of open,half-olympic and closed swimming pools which are especially used for sports activities,to find out the deficiencies in practise and to overcome these.Our study included totally 80 open,closed,olympic, half-olympic public swimming pools(the pools that belongs to municipality,private administration and university,the colleges connected to the ministry of education, Military schools and police college.In our research,search,natural observation and meeting methods were used.In accordance with this aim the checklist questions,which were prepared for health and safety controls in swimming pools, were tested on the people by face-to-face meeting method. While the statistical evaluation of the available results were being done,frequency and percentage dispersion obtained from checklist was found.It was found that the 52 % of the training and lifeguard choise of the pools in Turkey,64 % of the emergency action equipment,71 % of the signs and signboards for the safety of the pool,75 % of the pool edge and its surroundings are not suitable for the standards and that these threaten the swimmers health importantly.Consequently,we are in the opinion that the pool staff should receive the periodical training about the first aid and using emergency situation equipment.And it is necessary that the Ministry Responsible for sports,Ministry of Interior,Ministry of Health,Ministry of Tourism be cooperate with water sports federations and the related civil society organizationsKey Words: .

  1. Loss of Coolant Accident Analysis for Israel Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main objectives of reactor safety systems is to keep the reactor core in condition that does not permit any release of radioactivity into the environment. In order to ensure this, the reactor must have sufficient safety margins during all possible operational and accident conditions. This paper focuses on the analysis of loss of coolant accident (LOCA), which is one of the most severe scenarios among other hypothetical events such as reactivity induced accidents, loss of flow accident, etc. The analysis was carried out for the Israel Research Reactor 1 (IRR-1), which is a 5MW swimming pool type research reactor. The IRR-1 core consists of MTR highlyenriched uranium (HEU) fuel type, and is reflected by Graphite elements. During normal operation, the reactor core is cooled by downward forced flow of light water circulated by a primary cooling circuit pump. But during shutdown stage, the reactor core is cooled by upward natural convection flow through a safety flapper valve. There could be several primary causes to initiate a LOCA in research reactors, such as breaks in the piping system, ruptures of the beam tubes, and concrete wall failures of the reactor pool. Although probability of large break accident in research reactors is very low, once the accident occurs, it may cause major core damages, so it must be considered

  2. Swimming type inspection device and system thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides a swimming type inspection device which can be reduced in the size, easily accessible to each portion of a reactor, and increase the degree of freedom of swimming and visual range, and facilitate visual inspection. The swimming type inspection device comprises two photographing devices, a device which can obtain propelling force by rotation of impellers, two second propelling devices having impellers disposed in perpendicular to the rotating axis of the impellers of the first propelling device, a control device for controlling control signals of first and second propelling devices and driving devices therefor and control image signals of the photographing devices, and transmission section for wireless transmitting of the control signals and the image signals. (N.H.)

  3. The Effect of Concurrent Visual Feedback on Controlling Swimming Speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczepan Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Developing the ability to control the speed of swimming is an important part of swimming training. Maintaining a defined constant speed makes it possible for the athlete to swim economically at a low physiological cost. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of concurrent visual feedback transmitted by the Leader device on the control of swimming speed in a single exercise test. Material and methods. The study involved a group of expert swimmers (n = 20. Prior to the experiment, the race time for the 100 m distance was determined for each of the participants. In the experiment, the participants swam the distance of 100 m without feedback and with visual feedback. In both variants, the task of the participants was to swim the test distance in a time as close as possible to the time designated prior to the experiment. In the first version of the experiment (without feedback, the participants swam the test distance without receiving real-time feedback on their swimming speed. In the second version (with visual feedback, the participants followed a beam of light moving across the bottom of the swimming pool, generated by the Leader device. Results. During swimming with visual feedback, the 100 m race time was significantly closer to the time designated. The difference between the pre-determined time and the time obtained was significantly statistically lower during swimming with visual feedback (p = 0.00002. Conclusions. Concurrently transmitting visual feedback to athletes improves their control of swimming speed. The Leader device has proven useful in controlling swimming speed.

  4. Experimental studies on sodium fires. Application to reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental program developed at the Cadarache Center by the Department of Nuclear Safety is described. The most important part of the program relates to great pool fires occuring in tight or poorly ventilated vessels. The purpose is to simulate sodium leakage resulting from pipe rupture in the secondary cooling system. The program has two parts. Cassandre for pool fires at 550 deg C and Lucifer for pool fires of 300 kg over 2m2

  5. Functional reliability evaluation of an MTR-pool type research reactor core using the load–capacity interference model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Load–capacity concept is used for reliability evaluation. • Functional Reliability is evaluated in normal operation. • Status of reactor core in normal operation is considered as multiple states. • Latin Hypercube Sampling is used for sampling in uncertainty propagation. • Core heat transfer coefficient is identified as the dominant parameter. - Abstract: This paper presents the functional reliability evaluation of Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) core in normal operation. The concept of functional reliability, borrowed from reliability physics, uses the well-known resistance–stress or load–capacity interference model that is used in the structural reliability framework. To use the load–capacity interference model, uncertainties of significant parameters in system performance are propagated into system dynamics modeled with RELAP5/Mod 3.2 using Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) method and exceedance probability (EP) model is used as quantification method. The proposed method in this paper solves a common problem in reliability analysis, i.e., lack of sufficient failure data in specific operating conditions. Although defining failure criteria in normal operation are difficult, this paper focuses on the application of multiple states criteria to determine the status of a system. The status of the reactor core in normal operation is considered multiple states regarding to a performance representative parameter that is temperature in this work. Outlet temperatures of fuel hot and average channels were selected to be performance indicators in normal operation. Consulting with TRR engineers and operators as well as safety analysis report, two failure states were considered exceeding 65.1 °C and 58.9 °C for the hot channel and 50.4 °C and 45.6 °C for the average channel as upper and lower limits respectively. The calculated reliability was 9.1e−01 with 95% of confidence interval, which is in good agreement with experimental results. Using

  6. Proposal of novel method of continuous monitoring of possible fuel failure of a pool-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the course of studies on fuel failure detection, we have found that the bubbling of a gas such as nitrogen into a reactor coolant water effectively purges the dissolved fission rare gases (89Kr, T1/2=3.15 min, and 138Xe, T1/2=14.08 min) and that the respective daughter nuclides (89Rb, T1/2=15.15 min and 138Cs, T1/2=33.41 min) are detected in the washing water of the collected gas mixture. The detected activity depends on the time of standing between sampling and washing of the gas, and the dependence agreed well with the theoretical prediction from the consecutive radioactive decay for both pairs (89Kr-89Rb, and 138Xe-138Cs). Based on these findings, we have recently constructed a semi-continuous fuel monitoring system, which consists of an automatic and intermittent gas sampler (1 litre bottles) and a bottle conveying unit. After standing for a definite time, bottled gas is shaken with a small amount of water, and the activity of the water is measured. This system operates satisfactorily, but the whole system involves several sophisticated steps so that is rather costly. Quite recently we have got an idea of a simpler, more economical, fully automated continuous system. The system consists in principle only of a large cylinder with packing materials just as in a fractional distiller. On the top of the cylinder there are an inlet of washing water and an outlet of the gas, and at the bottom there are an inlet of the collected gas from the coolant and an outlet of the washing water. The whole system can be operated fully automatically and continuously, with continuous feeding of bubbling gas into the reactor coolant. This has not yet been experimentally tested at present, and in this presentation, information about the setup parameters such as the flow rate of the bubbling gas, the volume of the cylinder and vacant space, the flow rate of the washing water, etc. are reported

  7. Web software for the control and management of radiation protection devices in the Cadarache site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This series of slides presents how to use a new software dedicated to the management of the periodical controls that have to be performed on the equipment involved in radiation protection. This software is ready to be dispatched on the CEA site of Cadarache. This software gives information on: the device to be controlled, the controls that have to be performed, the procedures to follow to make the test, the equipment necessary for the test particularly the need for radioactive sources, the maintenance of the device, the previous measurements and in the end the device's conformity. An evaluation of the conformity of all the devices present in a building or an area or of a particular type can be easily obtained. (A.C.)

  8. Evolution of ITER Tritium Confinement strategy and adaptation to Cadarache site conditions and French regulatory requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER Nuclear Buildings include the Tokamak, Tritium and Diagnostic Buildings (Tokamak Complex) and the Hot Cell and Low Level Radioactive Waste Buildings (Hot Cell Complex). The Tritium Confinement strategy of the Nuclear Buildings comprises key features of the atmosphere and vent detritiation systems and the heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. The designs developed during the ITER EDA (engineering design activities) for these systems need to be adapted to the specific conditions of the Cadarache site and modified to conform with the regulatory requirements applicable to installations nucleaires de base (INB) - basic nuclear installations - in France. The highest priority for such adaptation has been identified as the Tritium Confinement of the Tokamak Complex and the progress in development of a robust, coherent design concept compliant with French practice is described in the paper

  9. NOCHAR Polymers: An Aqueous and Organic Liquid Solidification Process for Cadarache LOR (Liquides Organiques Radioactifs) - 13195

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To handle the Very Low Level Waste (VLLW) and the Low Level Waste (LLW) in France, two options can be considered: the incineration at CENTRACO facility and the disposal facility on ANDRA sites. The waste acceptance in these radwaste routes is dependent upon the adequacy between the waste characteristics (physical chemistry and radiological) and the radwaste route specifications. If the waste characteristics are incompatible with the radwaste route specifications (presence of significant quantities of chlorine, fluorine, organic component etc or/and high activity limits), it is necessary to find an alternative solution that consists of a waste pre-treatment process. In the context of the problematic Cadarache LOR (Liquides Organiques Radioactifs) waste streams, two radioactive scintillation cocktails have to be treated. The first one is composed of organic liquids at 13.1 % (diphenyloxazol, mesitylene, TBP, xylene) and water at 86.9 %. The second one is composed of TBP at 8.6 % and water at 91.4 %. They contain chlorine, fluorine and sulphate and have got alpha/beta/gamma spectra with mass activities equal to some kBq.g-1. Therefore, tritium is present and creates the second problematic waste stream. As a consequence, in order for disposal acceptance at the ANDRA site, it is necessary to pre-treat the waste. The NOCHAR polymers as an aqueous and organic liquid solidification process seem to be an adequate solution. Indeed, these polymers constitute an important variety of products applied to the treatment of radioactive aqueous and organic liquids (solvent, oil, solvent/oil mixing etc) and sludge through a mechanical and chemical solidification process. For Cadarache LOR, N910 and N960 respectively dedicated to the organic and aqueous liquids solidification are considered. With the N910, the organic waste solidification occurs in two steps. As the organic liquid travels moves through the polymer strands, the strands swell and immobilise the liquid. Then as the

  10. Sand swimming lizard: sandfish

    CERN Document Server

    Maladen, Ryan D; Kamor, Adam; Goldman, Daniel I

    2009-01-01

    We use high-speed x-ray imaging to reveal how a small (~10cm) desert dwelling lizard, the sandfish (Scincus scincus), swims within a granular medium [1]. On the surface, the lizard uses a standard diagonal gait, but once below the surface, the organism no longer uses limbs for propulsion. Instead it propagates a large amplitude single period sinusoidal traveling wave down its body and tail to propel itself at speeds up to ~1.5 body-length/sec. Motivated by these experiments we study a numerical model of the sandfish as it swims within a validated soft sphere Molecular Dynamics granular media simulation. We use this model as a tool to understand dynamics like flow fields and forces generated as the animal swims within the granular media. [1] Maladen, R.D. and Ding, Y. and Li, C. and Goldman, D.I., Undulatory Swimming in Sand: Subsurface Locomotion of the Sandfish Lizard, Science, 325, 314, 2009

  11. Simulation of decay heat removal by natural convection in a pool type fast reactor model-ramona-with coupled 1D/2D thermal hydraulic code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasinathan, N.; Rajakumar, A.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Chetal, S.C. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    1995-09-01

    Post shutdown decay heat removal is an important safety requirement in any nuclear system. In order to improve the reliability of this function, Liquid metal (sodium) cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) are equipped with redundant hot pool dipped immersion coolers connected to natural draught air cooled heat exchangers through intermediate sodium circuits. During decay heat removal, flow through the core, immersion cooler primary side and in the intermediate sodium circuits are also through natural convection. In order to establish the viability and validate computer codes used in making predictions, a 1:20 scale experimental model called RAMONA with water as coolant has been built and experimental simulation of decay heat removal situation has been performed at KfK Karlsruhe. Results of two such experiments have been compiled and published as benchmarks. This paper brings out the results of the numerical simulation of one of the benchmark case through a 1D/2D coupled code system, DHDYN-1D/THYC-2D and the salient features of the comparisons. Brief description of the formulations of the codes are also included.

  12. Electromechanical drive for a reactor control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention is related to control systems of nuclear researche swimming pool-type reactors. The presented electromechanical drive for a nuclear reactor control system consists of an electromagnetic grip of control element with magnet power supply cable, drum and flexible element, e.g., wire rope. Two branches of the rope which are separated from the electromagnet to the core and the drum form the closed loop. To decrease the dimensions of the drive, the magnet power supply cable serves as a loop flexible element which goes from the electromagnet to the core. For a particular reactor the drive, made according to the invention is 100 mm shorter and 20 mm narrower as compared with the known one, and that is rather significant in cases when a drive is to be installed directly on a control system channel

  13. Pakistan research reactor-1 and its upgradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article the author describes the procedure of renovation and upgradation of a swimming pool type Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) installed at PINSTECH. The reactor originally designed for a thermal power of 5 MW using highly enriched uranium as has been upgraded 10 MW with low enriched uranium as fuel. All the required safety precaution has been also modified with the new requirements. The cooling system of PARR-1 was modified to meet the requirements of upgraded power of 10 MW. In order to ensure safety for upgraded PARR-1 and to bring the reactor the current safety standards, some additional safety systems have been provided. An emergency core cooling system ECCS has been installed to remove core decay heat in case of loss of coolant accident (LOCA). (A.B.)

  14. An Account of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thirteen Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has built and operated 13 nuclear reactors in its 66-year history. The first was the graphite reactor, the world's first operational nuclear reactor, which served as a plutonium production pilot plant during World War II. It was followed by two aqueous-homogeneous reactors and two red-hot molten-salt reactors that were parts of power-reactor development programs and by eight others designed for research and radioisotope production. One of the eight was an all-metal fast burst reactor used for health physics studies. All of the others were light-water cooled and moderated, including the famous swimming-pool reactor that was copied dozens of times around the world. Two of the reactors were hoisted 200 feet into the air to study the shielding needs of proposed nuclear-powered aircraft. The final reactor, and the only one still operating today, is the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that was built particularly for the production of californium and other heavy elements. With the world's highest flux and recent upgrades that include the addition of a cold neutron source, the 44-year-old HFIR continues to be a valuable tool for research and isotope production, attracting some 500 scientific visitors and guests to Oak Ridge each year. This report describes all of the reactors and their histories.

  15. Neutron measurements in MASURCA reactor: preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of the studies on ADS, an experimental program is in progress in collaboration with the CEA team of the small nuclear reactor MASURCA at Cadarache. We report the first test of neutron flux measurement and the status of the program. (authors)

  16. The RES Reactor. A test reactor for the French naval propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Cadarache nuclear research centre the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) operates, with the support of TECHNICATOME as nuclear operator, the experimental facilities which are necessary for the French naval propulsion program. Since the sixties these facilities have brought a large contribution to the development and to the technical support for the nuclear propulsion; they have been used also to train the French Navy operators. The last experimental reactor, the RNG, is now at the end of its life cycle after thirty years of a profitable operation. A replacement reactor is needed to sustain any evolution of the naval propulsion reactors as well as to guarantee a safe operation and a high level of availability of the existing onboard reactors. The aim of the RES program is namely to build such a test facility. Its construction program started in 2003. By the year 2009 the RES reactor will take over the mission of the RNG. We present hereafter: - A brief history of the French experimental reactors built in support to the naval propulsion, - The needs of the naval propulsion and the related objectives of the RES program, - The corresponding architecture and main characteristics of the RES facility, - The current status of the RES construction. The contents of the paper is as follows: 1. Introduction; 2. History of the French nuclear propulsion experimental reactors; 3. Needs of the naval propulsion and related objectives of the RES reactor; 4. RES architecture and main characteristics; 4.1. The pool module; 4.2. The reactor module; 4.3. The RES reactor, an innovative concept; 5. Realisation status; 6. Conclusion. To summarize, from the year 2009 the RES will be an efficient facility available for irradiation and qualification programs. Its large experimental capabilities will allow relevant fuel and core irradiations. This will give access to a real progress in the knowledge of fuel and core physics as well as in the related simulation tools. This reactor

  17. KROTOS FCI experimental programme at CEA Cadarache: new features and status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnet, J.M.; Bullado, Y.; Journeau, C.; Fouquart, P.; Piluso, P.; Sergeant, C.; Magallon, D. [CEA-Cadarache, DTN/STRI/LMA, Bat 708, BP1, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance cedex (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: KROTOS facility has been operated by the European Commission at JRC-Ispra for many years until 1999 as part of the FARO/KROTOS programme. The programme had to be stopped at JRC due to new EC priorities, and an agreement was concluded with CEA to transfer the KROTOS facility and know-how to Cadarache to continue investigating the pending FCI issues. By this agreement, CEA became owner of the facility. The main objective of the KROTOS programme at CEA Cadarache is understanding the role of melt properties in steam explosion propagation and energetics and, in particular, steam explosion behaviour of prototypical corium melts. Possible influence of physicochemical processes on explosiveness will also be explored. Actually, analysis of alumina debris produced at Ispra have shown that formation of metastable phases and chemical reaction with water at high temperature may play a significant role in enhancing heat transfer to water in the explosion phase. In order to reach the objective, steam explosion experiments are performed in well characterised conditions for a large spectrum of conditions and melt compositions of interest for both in- and ex-vessel situations. A trigger is applied as a rule. Advanced technology and instrumentation is used to reduce uncertainties on initial conditions and characterise the various phases of an explosion, with emphasis on high energy X-ray cinematography to qualify pre-mixing. This advanced instrumentation will enable the measurement of detailed variables to consolidate the qualification of the FCI codes. The use of high energy X-rays made it necessary to construct a new building to house the facility and its components. The facility should newly become operative early 2005. Main improvements with respect to Ispra concern melt delivery, hydrogen measurement and X-ray imaging. Preliminary studies have demonstrated that identification of the pre-mixture-water interface and coherent melt jet core, and

  18. Vernal Pools

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This is a polygon layer representing existing vernal pool complexes in California's Central Valley, as identified and mapped by Dr. Robert F. Holland. The purpose...

  19. Neutron detection in an atomic reactor core using semi-conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the first part describes the principle of nuclear particle detection by means of semiconductor diodes and the general application of these. The second part describes fabrication of the device used to estimate thermic neutron fluxes in core of a swimming pool type reactor. The useful volume (2.9 mm thickness) is in the light water moderator, between combustible elements plates. The results, principally obtained in the core of Siloette reactor at the 'Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble' at low power, are mentioned in the third part. Flux maps have been set and comparison between converter's products: Bore 10, Lithium 6, Uranium 235 is made. (author)

  20. CREATINE SUPPLEMENTATION AND SWIM PERFORMANCE: A BRIEF REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa J. Hopwood

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional supplements are popular among athletes participating in a wide variety of sports. Creatine is one of the most commonly used dietary supplements, as it has been shown to be beneficial in improving performance during repeated bouts of high-intensity anaerobic activity. This review examines the specific effects of creatine supplementation on swimming performance, and considers the effects of creatine supplementation on various measures of power development in this population. Research performed on the effect of creatine supplementation on swimming performance indicates that whilst creatine supplementation is ineffective in improving performance during a single sprint swim, dietary creatine supplementation may benefit repeated interval swim set performance. Considering the relationship between sprint swimming performance and measurements of power, the effect of creatine supplementation on power development in swimmers has also been examined. When measured on a swim bench ergometer, power development does show some improvement following a creatine supplementation regime. How this improvement in power output transfers to performance in the pool is uncertain. Although some evidence exists to suggest a gender effect on the performance improvements seen in swimmers following creatine supplementation, the majority of research indicates that male and female swimmers respond equally to supplementation. A major limitation to previous research is the lack of consideration given to the possible stroke dependant effect of creatine supplementation on swimming performance. The majority of the research conducted to date has involved examination of the freestyle swimming stroke only. The potential for performance improvements in the breaststroke and butterfly swimming strokes is discussed, with regards to the biomechanical differences and differences in efficiency between these strokes and freestyle

  1. Can two spheres swim?

    CERN Document Server

    Klotsa, Daphne; Hill, Richard J A; Bowley, Roger M; Swift, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    We describe experiments and simulations demonstrating the propulsion of a neutrally-buoyant swimmer that consists of a pair of spheres attached by a spring, placed in a vibrating fluid. The vibration of the fluid induces relative motion of the spheres which, for sufficiently large amplitudes, can lead to motion of the center of mass of the two spheres. We find that the swimming speed obtained from both experiment and simulation agree and collapse onto a single curve if plotted as a function of the streaming Reynolds number, suggesting that the propulsion is related to streaming flows. There appears to be a critical onset value of the streaming Reynolds number for swimming to occur. The mechanism for swimming is traced to a jet of fluid generated by the relative motion of the spheres.

  2. Flow modelling in fractured aquifers, development of multi-continua model (direct and inverse problems) and application to the CEA/Cadarache site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis concerns the modelling of aquifer flows under the CEA/Cadarache site. The author reports the implementation of a numerical simulation tool adapted to large scale flows in fractured media, and its application to the Cadarache nuclear site. After a description of the site geological and hydrogeological characteristics, the author presents the conceptual model on which the modelling is based, presents the inverse model which allows a better definition of parameters, reports the validation of the inverse approach by means of synthetic and semi-synthetic cases. Then, he reports experiments and simulation of the Cadarache site

  3. Exercise-training intervention studies in competitive swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspenes, Stian Thoresen; Karlsen, Trine

    2012-06-01

    Competitive swimming has a long history and is currently one of the largest Olympic sports, with 16 pool events. Several aspects separate swimming from most other sports such as (i) the prone position; (ii) simultaneous use of arms and legs for propulsion; (iii) water immersion (i.e. hydrostatic pressure on thorax and controlled respiration); (iv) propulsive forces that are applied against a fluctuant element; and (v) minimal influence of equipment on performance. Competitive swimmers are suggested to have specific anthropometrical features compared with other athletes, but are nevertheless dependent on physiological adaptations to enhance their performance. Swimmers thus engage in large volumes of training in the pool and on dry land. Strength training of various forms is widely used, and the energetic systems are addressed by aerobic and anaerobic swimming training. The aim of the current review was to report results from controlled exercise training trials within competitive swimming. From a structured literature search we found 17 controlled intervention studies that covered strength or resistance training, assisted sprint swimming, arms-only training, leg-kick training, respiratory muscle training, training the energy delivery systems and combined interventions across the aforementioned categories. Nine of the included studies were randomized controlled trials. Among the included studies we found indications that heavy strength training on dry land (one to five repetitions maximum with pull-downs for three sets with maximal effort in the concentric phase) or sprint swimming with resistance towards propulsion (maximal pushing with the arms against fixed points or pulling a perforated bowl) may be efficient for enhanced performance, and may also possibly have positive effects on stroke mechanics. The largest effect size (ES) on swimming performance was found in 50 m freestyle after a dry-land strength training regimen of maximum six repetitions across three

  4. Evaluation of the aptitude for the service of the pool of the TRIGA Mark III reactor of the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico; Evaluacion de la aptitud para el servicio de la piscina del reactor TRIGA Mark III del Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares de Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merino C, J.; Gachuz M, M.; Diaz S, A.; Arganis J, C.; Gonzalez R, C.; Nava G, T.; Medina R, M.J. [Departamento de Sintesis y Caracterizacion de Materiales del ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    This work describes the evaluation of the structural integrity of the pool of the TRIGA Mark III reactor of the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico, which was realized in July 2001, as an element to determine those actions for preventive and corrective maintenance which owner must do it for a safety and efficient operation of the component in the next years. (Author)

  5. Swimming Performance Assessment in Fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Keith B Tierney

    2011-01-01

    Swimming performance tests of fish have been integral to studies of muscle energetics, swimming mechanics, gas exchange, cardiac physiology, disease, pollution, hypoxia and temperature. This paper describes a flexible protocol to assess fish swimming performance using equipment in which water velocity can be controlled. The protocol involves one to several stepped increases in flow speed that are intended to cause fish to fatigue. Step speeds and their duration can be set to capture swimming ...

  6. The pool chlorine hypothesis and asthma among boys.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cotter, A

    2012-01-31

    Swimming pool sanitation has largely been concerned with the microbiological quality of pool water, which is normally treated using a number of chlorine products. Recent studies have pointed to the potential hazards of chlorine by-products to the respiratory epithelium, particularly in indoor, poorly ventilated, pools. The aim of our study was to elucidate whether chronic exposure to indoor chlorinated swimming pools was associated with an increased likelihood of the development of asthma in boys. METHODS: The subjects were boys aged between 6 and 12 years. Data was collected by means of parental responses to a standardized asthma questionnaire (ISAAC: International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood), supplemented with additional questions regarding frequency of attendance, number of years attendance, whether the child is a swimming team member. The questionnaire return rate was 71\\/% (n = 121). 23 boys were excluded on the basis that they had asthma before they started swimming (n = 97). There was a significant association between number of years a boy had been swimming and the likelihood of wheezing in the last 12 months (p = 0.009; OR = 1.351; 95% CI = 1.077-1.693) and diagnosed asthma (p = 0.046; OR = 1.299; 95% CI = 1.004-1.506). The greater the number the number of years a boy had been attending an indoor, chlorinated pool, the greater the likelihood of wheezing in the last 12 months or "had asthma". Age, parental smoking habits and being a swimming team member had no association with any of the asthma variables examined. Swimming pool attendance may be a risk factor in asthma in boys.

  7. Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a structure of ABWR-type reactor buildings, which can increase the capacity of a spent fuel storage area at a low cost and improved earthquake proofness. In the reactor building, the floor of a spent fuel pool is made flat, and a depth of the pool water satisfying requirement for shielding is ensured. In addition, a depth of pool water is also maintained for a equipment provisionally storing pool for storing spent fuels, and a capacity for a spent fuel storage area is increased by utilizing surplus space of the equipment provisionally storing pool. Since the flattened floor of the spent fuel pool is flushed with the floor of the equipment provisionally storing pool, transfer of horizontal loads applied to the building upon occurrence of earthquakes is made smooth, to improve earthquake proofness of the building. (T.M.)

  8. Swimming stadium in Prague

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svobodová, Markéta

    Prague: Prostor - architektura, interiér, design, 2012 - (Švácha, R.), s. 208-211 ISBN 978-80-87064-09-2 Institutional support: RVO:68378033 Keywords : swimming stadium * Richard Ferdinand Podzemný * Gustav Kuchař Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage

  9. Transient stratification modelling of a corium pool in a LWR vessel lower head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Tellier, R., E-mail: romain.le-tellier@cea.fr; Saas, L.; Bajard, S.

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • A kinetic stratification model is proposed for the simulation of the in-vessel corium behaviour during a LWR severe accident. • The different associated “modes” of vessel failure by thermal focusing effect are highlighted and discussed. • A sensitivity study for a 1650 MWe GenIII PWR is presented with this model in order to illustrate the associated R&D issues. - Abstract: In the context of light water reactor severe accidents analysis, this paper is focused on one key parameter of in-vessel corium phenomenology: the immiscible phases stratification and its impact on the heat flux distribution at the corium pool lateral boundary with the so-called focusing effect related to a “thin” top metal phase and the potential vessel failure at that point. More particularly, based on the limited knowledge of the stratification transient phenomenon derived from the MASCA-RCW experiment, a basic model is proposed that can be used for corium in lower head sensitivity analyses. It has been implemented in the PROCOR platform developed at CEA Cadarache. A short parametric study on a simple hypothetical transient is presented in order to highlight the different focusing effect “modes” that can be encountered based on this in-vessel corium pool model. An early mode may occur during the formation of the top metal layer while two other modes may appear later during the thinning of this top metal layer because of thermochemically induced mass transfers. Some associated relevant parameters (model or scenario-dependent) and modelling issues are mentioned and illustrated with some results of a Monte-Carlo based sensitivity calculation on the transient behaviour of the corium in the lower head of a 1650 MWe GenIII PWR. Within the limiting modelling hypotheses, the thermal modelling of the steel layer for small (centimetre) heights and the mass diffusivity (limited in this case to the uranium diffusivity in the oxidic layer) are main sensitive parameters.

  10. Independent Confirmatory Survey Report for the University of Arizona Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Tucson, Arizona DCN:2051-SR-01-0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Arizona (University) research reactor is a TRIGA swimming pool type reactor designed by General Atomics and constructed at the University in 1958. The reactor first went into operation in December of 1958 under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license R-52 until final shut down on May 18, 2010. Initial site characterization activities were conducted in February 2009 during ongoing reactor operations to assess the radiological status of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL) excluding the reactor tank, associated components, and operating systems. Additional post-shutdown characterization activities were performed to complete characterization activities as well as verify assumptions made in the Decommissioning Plan (DP) that were based on a separate activation analysis (ESI 2009 and WMG 2009). Final status survey (FSS) activities began shortly after the issuance of the FSS plan in May 2011. The contractor completed measurement and sampling activities during the week of August 29, 2011.

  11. Test devices in Jules Horowitz Reactor dedicated to the material studies in support to the current and future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is a tank pool Material Testing Reactor with a maximum thermal power designed at 100 MW. JHR is being built in the CEA Cadarache site and will take over the Osiris reactor whose decommissioning is planned. JHR's design allows a large experimental capability (around 20 experiments at the same time) inside the reactor core, close to the fuel with high fast neutron flux or outside the reactor core, in the reflector with higher thermal neutron flux. A special attention has been put on the improvement of the thermal stability and gradients of the interest zones in samples despite strong gamma heating and on an improvement of the instrumentation devoted to the experiments. This paper presents the JHR and its main experimental devices that include the MICA (Material Irradiation Capsule) device, the CALIPSO (in-Core Advanced Loop for Irradiation in Potassium and Sodium) loop, the OCCITANE (Out-of-Core Capsule for Irradiation Testing of Ageing by Neutrons) rig, and the CLOE (Corrosion Loop Experiment) loop. JHR will play an important role for Gen IV reactors: CEA studies the feasibility of transmutation capsules, of metal liquid irradiation loops for JHR

  12. Safety requirements applied to research reactors in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    , the safety requirements in this case are the resistance and leaktightness of the pool and the resistance of the containment building to the water column and overpressure due to this accident. A number of tests were performed to validate the safety demonstrations relating to these issues for the above-mentioned reactors. These tests were particularly aimed at: checking the mechanical strength of the pool structures in the event of a BORAX accident; determining the operating limits of the fuels used; examining the impact on the core of a pressurized irradiation loop rupture; validating the design of clad failure detection systems. The safety reviews systematically performed at the request of the safety authority, for reactors that have been in operation for more than 10 years have not called into question the above-mentioned safety requirements. The main requests of the safety authority following the assessments made by the IRSN and presented to the standing group of experts for the nuclear reactors have concerned the need for upgrading the facilities to take into account in particular the evolutions of the requirements relating to internal and external hazards. In particular, this has led to facilities being reinforced to increase their earthquake resistance, and to improvements concerning fire protection and the management of post-accident situations. The aging of facilities has been addressed by gradually refurbishing their equipment and replacing their instrumentation, their control and protection systems and those structures affected by high radiation doses. The operating experience feedback acquired from existing research reactors, the evolution of certain safety requirements, and the progress achieved in the methodology adopted for the study of research reactor safety have been taken into account in the design of the new RJH reactor (P = 100 MW) which is planned to be constructed in the Cadarache site. The final paper will provide the detailed presentation of the

  13. LWR Fuel Gas Characterization at CEA Cadarache LECA-STAR Hot Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim to improve LWR fuel behaviour led CEA to improve its PIE capacities in term of test devices and characterization techniques in the shielded hot cells of the LECA-STAR facility, located in Cadarache. A presentation of these capacities is made, focusing on gas characterization : - annealing test devices used for transient simulations. These devices are test facilities allowing to simulate a very large range of conditions (temperature, atmosphere, pressure etc); - characterization techniques : optical microscopy, for microstructure characterizations on polished samples; scanning electron microscopy (SEM) used both on polished samples and on fractographs; Electron Probe Micro-Analyzer (EPMA) for quantitative elementary analysis and elementary mappings; Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (SIMS), for isotopic analysis, mapping depth profiles and gas measurements. It shows an overview of their main applications for the study of fuel behaviour under nominal operating conditions but also under simulated accidental conditions and storage conditions. Two detailed examples of the use of these techniques working together on the same samples, are then presented, focusing on fission gas characterizations. The first one is a 72 GW.d.t-1 high burnup UO2 PWR fuel for which detailed characterizations have been performed before and after a LOCA type condition annealing test. The second one is a 35 GW.d.t-1 UO2 PWR fuel for which these characterizations have been done before and after a ramp test at 100 W.cm-1.min-1 up to a 90 s maximum power hold time at 520 W.cm-1. In both cases, the complementarities of these various techniques show the interest of such detailed characterizations. (author)

  14. Pooling Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING WENLEI

    2010-01-01

    @@ While the 1997 Asian financial crisis gave birth to the Chiang Mai Initiative,a foreign currency reserve pool to address short-term liquidity difficulties in the region,the 2008global financial crisis promoted Asian political leaders,bankers and scholars to seek closer regional financial cooperation based on the initiative's framework.

  15. The jules Horowitz reactor: experimental possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Jules Horowitz Reactor is a new research reactor dedicated to materials and nuclear fuel testing. This reactor will be located at the CEA research centre at Cadarache and the first criticality is foreseen around 2008-2010. After a short overview of the fuel, materials testing and service possibilities of the reactor this paper is reviews two techniques which are intended to be developed on the Jules Horowitz Reactor to measure fission gas release: - The development of a new sensor to be used on-line and to measure pressure and composition of the gas released in a rod or elsewhere. - The Fission Product Laboratory. (author)

  16. Strengthening DiD in Emergency Preparedness and Response by Pre-Establishing Tools and Criteria for the Effective Protection of the Public During a Severe Emergency at a Light Water Reactor or its Spent Fuel Pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defence in depth can be divided into two parts: first, to prevent accidents and, second, if prevention fails, to limit their consequences and prevent any evolution to more serious conditions. This paper will cover the second part, by providing tools and criteria to be used during a severe emergency to limit the consequences to the public from a severe accident. Severe radiation-induced consequences among the public off-site are only possible if there is significant damage to fuel in the reactor core or spent fuel pools. Consequently, the tools and criteria have been specifically developed for individuals responsible for making and for acting on decisions to protect the public in the event of an emergency involving actual or projected severe damage to the fuel in the reactor core or spent fuel pool of a light water reactor (LWR). These tools and criteria, developed by the IAEA’s Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC), will facilitate the implementation of the ‘Emergency Response’ defence in depth concept. (author)

  17. Respiratory Function and Changes in Lung Epithelium Biomarkers after a Short-Training Intervention in Chlorinated vs. Ozone Indoor Pools

    OpenAIRE

    Álvaro Fernández-Luna; Leonor Gallardo; María Plaza-Carmona; Jorge García-Unanue; Javier Sánchez-Sánchez; José Luis Felipe; Pablo Burillo; Ignacio Ara

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Swimming in indoor pools treated with combined chemical treatments (e.g. ozone) may reduce direct exposure to disinfection byproducts and thus have less negative effects on respiratory function compared to chlorinated pools. The aim of this study is to analyze the effects of a short-term training intervention on respiratory function and lung epithelial damage in adults exercising in indoor swimming pool waters treated with different disinfection methods (chlorine vs. ozone with br...

  18. Mixing by Swimming Algae

    CERN Document Server

    Guasto, Jeffrey S; Gollub, J P; Pesci, Adriana I; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2009-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video, we demonstrate the microscale mixing enhancement of passive tracer particles in suspensions of swimming microalgae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. These biflagellated, single-celled eukaryotes (10 micron diameter) swim with a "breaststroke" pulling motion of their flagella at speeds of about 100 microns/s and exhibit heterogeneous trajectory shapes. Fluorescent tracer particles (2 micron diameter) allowed us to quantify the enhanced mixing caused by the swimmers, which is relevant to suspension feeding and biogenic mixing. Without swimmers present, tracer particles diffuse slowly due solely to Brownian motion. As the swimmer concentration is increased, the probability density functions (PDFs) of tracer displacements develop strong exponential tails, and the Gaussian core broadens. High-speed imaging (500 Hz) of tracer-swimmer interactions demonstrates the importance of flagellar beating in creating oscillatory flows that exceed Brownian motion out to about 5 cell radii from the swimm...

  19. Stirring by swimming bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the stirring of an inviscid fluid caused by the locomotion of bodies through it. The swimmers are approximated by non-interacting cylinders or spheres moving steadily along straight lines. We find the displacement of fluid particles caused by the nearby passage of a swimmer as a function of an impact parameter. We use this to compute the effective diffusion coefficient from the random walk of a fluid particle under the influence of a distribution of swimming bodies. We compare with the results of simulations. For typical sizes, densities and swimming velocities of schools of krill, the effective diffusivity in this model is five times the thermal diffusivity. However, we estimate that viscosity increases this value by two orders of magnitude.

  20. Computer codes used during upgrading activities at MINT TRIGA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammad Suhaimi Kassim; Adnan Bokhari; Mohd. Idris Taib [Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research, Kajang (Malaysia)

    1999-10-01

    MINT TRIGA Reactor is a 1-MW swimming pool nuclear research reactor commissioned in 1982. In 1993, a project was initiated to upgrade the thermal power to 2 MW. The IAEA assistance was sought to assist the various activities relevant to an upgrading exercise. For neutronics calculations, the IAEA has provided expert assistance to introduce the WIMS code, TRIGAP, and EXTERMINATOR2. For thermal-hydraulics calculations, PARET and RELAP5 were introduced. Shielding codes include ANISN and MERCURE. However, in the middle of 1997, MINT has decided to change the scope of the project to safety upgrading of the MINT Reactor. This paper describes some of the activities carried out during the upgrading process. (author)

  1. performance analysis of radiation level reduction systems for ETRR-2 main pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    during the operation rectors, fission of the nuclear fuel, neutron activation of structural materials, corrosion products and impurities in reactor coolant water from a radio-nuclide take place. even with the most rigorous controls, some gases, liquid and solid particles escape to the environment. these materials could affect humans and the environment in direct or indirect way . the reactor hall ventilation system is one of the systems, used with the intention, to reduce the quantity of the released radioactive products. the ventilation system used in the egyptian second research reactor ETRR-2, is an example of these ventilation systems . it contains an air curtain in the main pool. in view of radiation effects it would appear that, without hot water layer system, swimming pool reactors can not be operated at higher power levels than about 1 MW [29]. the ETRR-2 contains a hot water layer system ( HWL), in the upper most part of the reactor main pool. in the present study, the role of ETRR-2 reactor hall ventilation system (with an air curtain ) on the release of radioactive products from the reactor has been experimentally studied in normal operating conditions at full power. a model is devolved to describe the reactor hall ventilation system which includes the air curtain effect. the experimental were used to test the model by measuring the activity level of two types of isotopes; activation products and fission products. type (1)isotope is argon-41(Ar41), which is a noble gas having high activity release rate is chosen to represent an activation product. whereas type (2) isotope is iodine-131 (I131), which is a fission product and it has a low activity release rate. it is considered, from radiological point of view as one of the most dangerous radioisotopes. the experimental results has shown that the model is adequate for describing the effect of reactor hall ventilation on the radioactive releases from the reactor. the results of I131, showed a better

  2. Water droplets also swim!

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Marjolein; Izri, Ziane; Michelin, Sébastien; Dauchot, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    Recently there has been a surge of interest in producing artificial swimmers. One possible path is to produce self-propelling droplets in a liquid phase. The self-propulsion often relies on complex mechanisms at the droplet interface, involving chemical reactions and the adsorption-desorption kinetics of the surfactant. Here, we report the spontaneous swimming of droplets in a very simple system: water droplets immersed in an oil-surfactant medium. The swimmers consist of pure water, with no additional chemical species inside: water droplets also swim! The swimming is very robust: the droplets are able to transport cargo such as large colloids, salt crystals, and even cells. In this talk we discuss the origin of the spontaneous motion. Water from the droplet is solubilized by the reverse micellar solution, creating a concentration gradient of swollen reverse micelles around each droplet. By generalizing a recently proposed instability mechanism, we explain how spontaneous motion emerges in this system at sufficiently large Péclet number. Our water droplets in an oil-surfactant medium constitute the first experimental realization of spontaneous motion of isotropic particles driven by this instability mechanism.

  3. About the safety analysis of Istanbul TRIGA Mark II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accidents potentially related to the operation of TRIGA Mark-II reactor have been analysed in Safety Analysis Report of ITU Research Reactor, with special consideration being given to site characteristics. The maximum credible accident which can take place in a swimming pool type research reactor - accidental dropping of a fuel element into of the critical reactor core - is considered. In the safety analysis of pool type reactors BORAX accident is also included. The following events are abnormal incidents that should be taken into account: 1. Cladding rupture. 2. Reactivity accident. 3. Loss of coolant accident. Fission product release during an accident is analysed. Even though the possibility is believed to be exceedingly remote, the most unfavourable assumptions are made: the rapid insertion of the total excess' reactivity in the reactor operating at a power less then 1 kW; Coincidence of the reactivity insertion and loss of coolant accident; Cladding rupture occurring at one of the highest power density fuel elements as a consequence; Emergency ventilation system failure, leading to a vanishing filter efficiency. It is shown that, even under this most unfavourable condition, the maximum radiation to which the nearby inhabitants will be subjected, is 3.8 x 10-2 mRem per 1/2 hr. Even in the hypothetical case of the coincidence of four abnormal incidents the resulting radiation dose to the population does not exceed much the magnitude of the permissible dose of the ICRP recommendations

  4. Pool scrubbing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Source Term Project in the Third Frame Work Programme of the European Union Was conducted under and important joined effort on pool scrubbing research. CIEMAT was the Task Manager of the project and several other organizations participated in it: JRC-Ispra, NNC Limited, RUB-NES and UPM. The project was divided into several tasks. A peer review of the models in the pool scrubbing codes SPARC90 and BUSCA-AUG92 was made, considering the different aspects in the hydrodynamic phenomenology, particle retention and fission product vapor abortions. Several dominant risk accident sequences were analyzed with MAAP, SPARC90 and BUSCA-AUG92 codes, and the predictions were compared. A churn-turbulent model was developed for the hydrodynamic behaviour of the pool. Finally, an experimental programme in the PECA facility of CIEMAT was conducted in order to study the decontamination factor under jet injection regime, and the experimental observations were compared with the SPARC and BUSCA codes. (Author)

  5. Keila Tervisekeskus. Ujula = Keila Health Club. Swimming Pool / Ain Padrik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Padrik, Ain, 1947-

    2001-01-01

    Projekteerija: Arhitektuuribüroo Künnapu & Padrik. Arhitektid Ain Padrik ja Kristi Alamaa, sisearhitekt Sirje Männik. Konstruktsioonid: Jaan Laks, A-Grupp. Ujulas on võistlus- ja lastebassein, suvel on avatud välibassein. 5 ill.: I korruse plaan, ristlõige, vaated

  6. Surveillance and risk management in public swimming pools

    OpenAIRE

    Pascal Lebihain; Elie Vignac

    2014-01-01

    La France compte aujourd’hui plus de 4500 piscines publiques (PP), ou privées d’accès payant, réparties sur son territoire, qui fournissent le plus souvent des services de qualité orientés sur l’apprentissage de la natation, la détente, le sport ou encore la forme. D’un point de vue systémique, ces équipements comptent de nombreux acteurs tant internes qu’externes, usagers, professionnels ou bénévoles, qui tentent tous de s’adapter à leur complexité croissante. Dans une société de plus en plu...

  7. Use of natural gas for swimming facilities: Energy savings and environmental compatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last twenty years, natural gas consumption has greatly increased in the civil sector and this trend will be confirmed in the next decade which will have a considerable increase in the domestic Italian distribution and in national supply networks. Swimming centres, particularly those equipped with covered swimming-pools and therefore characterized by continuous operation during the year, have significant energy consumption, with the same volume, compared with other civil users. This is due not only to the particular operating characteristics of the swimming pool but, in most cases, to the little attention payed to running costs and thus to energy savings. Natural gas, as a versatile fuel of good quality, can offer a valid contribution to the limitation of the energy consumption of swimming centres, as well as, to the abatement of air pollution, in particular, if it is employed together with new technologies such as the cogeneration and gas fuelled heat pumps

  8. An Account of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thirteen Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, Murray Wilford [ORNL

    2009-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has built and operated 13 nuclear reactors in its 66-year history. The first was the graphite reactor, the world's first operational nuclear reactor, which served as a plutonium production pilot plant during World War II. It was followed by two aqueous-homogeneous reactors and two red-hot molten-salt reactors that were parts of power-reactor development programs and by eight others designed for research and radioisotope production. One of the eight was an all-metal fast burst reactor used for health physics studies. All of the others were light-water cooled and moderated, including the famous swimming-pool reactor that was copied dozens of times around the world. Two of the reactors were hoisted 200 feet into the air to study the shielding needs of proposed nuclear-powered aircraft. The final reactor, and the only one still operating today, is the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that was built particularly for the production of californium and other heavy elements. With the world's highest flux and recent upgrades that include the addition of a cold neutron source, the 44-year-old HFIR continues to be a valuable tool for research and isotope production, attracting some 500 scientific visitors and guests to Oak Ridge each year. This report describes all of the reactors and their histories.

  9. Current status and ageing management of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) is a 500 kW swimming pool type reactor loaded with the Soviet WWR-M2 fuel elements, moderated and cooled by light water. It was reconstructed and upgraded from the former 250 kW TRIGA Mark-II reactor built in 1963. The first criticality of the renovated reactor was in November 1983 and it has been put in regular operation at nominal power since March 1984. The DNRR is operated mainly in continuous runs of 100 hrs every 4 weeks, for radioisotope production, neutron activation analyses and other research purposes. The remaining time is devoted to maintenance work and to short runs for reactor physics studies as well. From its first start-up to the end of 1998, it totaled about 20,000 hrs of operation at nominal power. After ten years of operation, reactor general inspection and refurbishment were implemented in the 1992-1996 period. In April 1994, refueling work was executed with adding of 11 fresh fuel elements to the reactor core. At present, the reactor has been working with 100-fuel element configuration. Corrosion study has been implemented by visual inspection of the reactor pool tank and some other inside components which remain unchanged from the previous TRIGA reactor. The inspections were carried out with the assistance of some experts from other countries. Some visual inspection results have been obtained and the nature of the electrochemical corrosion and related aspects were little by little identified. In this paper, the operation status of the Dalat reactor is presented, and some activities related to the ageing management of the reactor pool tank and its inside components are also discussed. (author)

  10. Radio-transmitted electromyogram signals as indicators of swimming speed in lake trout and brown trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorstad, E.B.; Økland, F.; Koed, Anders;

    2000-01-01

    Swimming speed and average electromyogram (EMG) pulse intervals were highly correlated in individual lake trout Salvelinus namaycush (r(2)=0.52-0.89) and brown trout Salmo trutta (r(2)=0.45-0.96). High correlations were found also for pooled data in both lake trout (r(2)=0.90) and brown trout of...... the Ema stock (r(2)=0.96) and Laerdal stock (r(2)=0.96). The linear relationship between swimming speed and average EMG pulse intervals differed significantly among lake trout and the brown trout stocks. This successful calibration of EMGs to swimming speed opens the possibility of recording swimming...... speed of free swimming lake trout and brown trout in situ. EMGs can also be calibrated to oxygen consumption to record energy expenditure. (C) 2000 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles...

  11. Stress corrosion (Astm G30-90 standard) in 08x18H10T stainless steel of nuclear fuel storage pool in WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the water storage of the irradiated nuclear fuel has been an important factor in its management. The actual pools have its walls covered with inoxidable steel and heat exchangers to dissipate the residual heat from fuel. It is essential to control the water purity to eliminate those conditions which aid to the corrosion process in fuel and at related components. The steel used in this research was obtained from an austenitic inoxidizable steel standardized with titanium 08x18H10T (Type 321) similar to one of the two steel coatings used to cover walls and the pools floor. the test consisted in the specimen deformation through an U ply according to the Astm G30-90 standard. The exposition of the deformed specimen it was realized in simulated conditions to the chemical regime used in pools. (Author)

  12. Investigación de un brote respiratorio agudo por exposición a cloro gas en una piscina pública Investigation of an outbreak of acute respiratory illness due to exposure to chlorine gas in a public swimming pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Almagro Nievas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Se diseñó un estudio de casos y controles para investigar el accidente químico ocurrido en una piscina pública en el verano de 2005 y describir los factores ambientales responsables, analizar el efecto del cloro gas y valorar la evolución clínica y funcional del aparato respiratorio. Las intervenciones fueron las siguientes: inspecciones ambientales, encuesta epidemiológica (variables sociodemográficas, ubicación en el momento del accidente, olor percibido y seguimiento clínico y espirométrico de la función respiratoria. Se encuestaron 65 casos y 48 controles. El suceso se produjo al mezclar accidentalmente ácido clorhídrico e hipoclorito sódico, lo que generó cloro gas. Los síntomas predominantes fueron tos y disnea. El riesgo de enfermar en niños era 10 veces mayor si tenían una enfermedad respiratoria previa y 4 veces superior si estaban a una distancia inferior a 40 m del lugar del accidente. Todos los casos evolucionaron hacia la curación, excepto uno que tenía antecedentes asmáticos.A case-control study was designed to investigate a chemical accident that occurred in a swimming-pool in the summer of 2005. The aim was to describe the environmental factors involved in the accident, to assess the effect of chlorine gas on the respiratory system, and to perform a clinical and spirometric follow-up. The following interventions were carried out: environmental inspection, epidemiologic survey (including sociodemographic variables, location at the time of the accident, perception of an abnormal smell, and clinical and spirometric outcomes to assess respiratory function. Sixty-five cases and 48 controls were identified and interviewed. The accident was produced by accidental admixture of hydrochloric acid with sodium hypochlorite resulting in chlorine gas release. The main clinical symptoms were dyspnea and cough. The risk of becoming ill was 10-fold higher in children with a previous lung disease and was 4-fold higher when

  13. Report on transparency and nuclear safety, Cadarache 2011, Volume 1 + Volume 2 INB 32 and 54 Areva NC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For respectively different sites all situated in Cadarache, the CEA Centre on the one hand, and the AREVA nuclear base installation INB 32 and 54 on the other hand, these volumes propose a presentation of their activities and installations, a description of measures regarding safety and radiation protection, a description of significant events regarding nuclear safety and radiation protection, a presentation and discussion of results of measurements of releases and of their impact on the environment, and a description of the different radioactive wastes stored on the concerned site

  14. Rapport d'étude : La perception des risques majeurs par les riverains du CEA de Cadarache

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Alexia; Régner, Isabelle; Schleyer-Lindenmann, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Ce rapport d'étude vient répondre aux interrogations de son commanditaire, la CLI (Commission Local d'Information) du CEA (Commissariat à l'énergie Atomique) de Cadarache. Il s'organise en trois partie : une première partie établit un état des lieux des connaissances des risques majeurs par les habitants. Les risques majeurs officiellement recensés sont : le risque feu de forêt, le risque inondation, le risque sismique, le risque de mouvement de terrain, le risque de rupture de barrage, et le...

  15. Effect of Beetroot Juice Supplementation on Aerobic Response during Swimming

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Pinna; Silvana Roberto; Raffaele Milia; Elisabetta Marongiu; Sergio Olla; Andrea Loi; Gian Mario Migliaccio; Johnny Padulo; Carmine Orlandi; Filippo Tocco; Alberto Concu; Antonio Crisafulli

    2014-01-01

    The beneficial effects of beetroot juice supplementation (BJS) have been tested during cycling, walking, and running. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether BJS can also improve performance in swimmers. Fourteen moderately trained male master swimmers were recruited and underwent two incremental swimming tests randomly assigned in a pool during which workload, oxygen uptake (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2), pulmonary ventilation (VE), and aerobic energy cost (AEC) ...

  16. Steam jet direct condensation in a water suppression pool

    OpenAIRE

    Aramayo Hernández, Clara Inés

    2013-01-01

    Direct contact condensation (DCC) of a steam jet discharged into a subcooled water pool is an efficient way to condensate a large quantities of water at high pressure and temperature without introducing any complex device. This phenomenon is used in many nuclear engineering fields, such as pressure suppression pool in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs), condensing pool in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) and suppression tank in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER...

  17. Dossier: research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research reactors are used at the CEA (the French atomic energy commission) since many years. Their number has been reduced but they remain unique tools that CEA valorize continuously. The results of the programs involving such reactors are of prime importance for the operation of Electricite de France (EdF) park of existing power plants but also for the design of future nuclear power plants and future research reactors. This dossier presents three examples of research reactors in use at the CEA: Osiris and Orphee (CEA-Saclay), devoted to nuclear energy and fundamental research, respectively, and the critical mockups Eole, Minerve and Masurca (CEA-Cadarache) devoted to nuclear data libraries and neutronic calculation. (J.S.)

  18. La Jolla Children's Pool Beach Management and Water Quality Improvement Project

    OpenAIRE

    Elwany, Hany; Flick, Reinhard; Nichols, Jean; Lindquist, Anne-Lise

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the proposed La Jolla Children's Pool Beach Management and Water Quality Improvement Project. Approximately 3,000 cubic yards of sand will be removed from the Children's Pool beach. Removing the sand decreases the beach width and restores the sheltered water pool area to its 1940s configuration. Reducing the width of the beach will make the pool safer for swimming by isolating swimmers from open-ocean wave activity. It should also improve water circulation and quality.

  19. Hospital hydrotherapy pools treated with ultra violet light: bad bacteriological quality and presence of thermophilic Naegleria.

    OpenAIRE

    De Jonckheere, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The microbiological quality of eight halogenated and two u.v.-treated hydrotherapy pools in hospitals was investigated. The microbiological quality of halogenated hydrotherapy pools was comparable to halogenated public swimming pools, although in some Pseudomonas aeruginosa and faecal pollution indicators were more frequent due to bad management. On the other hand u.v.-treated hydrotherapy pools had very bad microbiological quality. Apart from faecal pollution indicators, P. aeruginosa was pr...

  20. Influence of mobile games on the process of teaching of students that can not swim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strelnykov G.L.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Considered direction in teaching of students to swimming in terms 25 meter pool. 30 students took part in an experiment. The place of mobile games in the process of teaching of novices is certain. Information of results of testing of level of physical preparedness of students is presented. Positive influence of mobile games on the process of mastering of skills of swimming and co-operations on water is marked. Forms and methods of mastering of skills and conduct in water are offered. The motive mode and forms of organization of educational process of not able to swim students is recommended.

  1. Examining self-training procedures in leisure swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J Potdevin, Francois; Normani, Clement; Pelayo, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    appears to be general health benefits whereas people aged from 20 to 30 appears to be concerned about a global health benefits and a body shape effects.Excepted middle age people, recreational swimmers have low control quality of their session even if they have a good skill level. This suggests to improve health strategy education and swimming pool environment. PMID:24421731

  2. Transversal heat exchange in a rectangular channel heated non-uniformly. Application to the calculation of temperatures in a cell of the reactor Siloe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the techniques used for cooling nuclear reactors, the existence of flux peaks is a great nuisance. The case is considered here of a fuel lattice made up of plates and thus giving rectangular cooling channels. A theoretical and practical study has been made of transversal heat exchange in this structure. An example is given of an application which is in the form of a calculation of the temperature distributions at the exit of a cooling channel of the swimming-pool type reactor Siloe operating at 10 MW. (author)

  3. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the University of Virginia open-pool research reactor. Docket No. 50-062

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Virginia for a renewal of Operating Licence R-66 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned by the University of Virginia and is located on the campus in Charlottesville, Virginia. Based on its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the University without endangering the health and safety of the public or endangering the environment

  4. Paramecia swimming in viscous flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.; Jana, S.; Giarra, M.; Vlachos, P. P.; Jung, S.

    2015-12-01

    Ciliates like Paramecia exhibit fore-aft asymmetry in their body shapes, and preferentially swim in the direction of the slender anterior rather than the wider posterior. However, the physical reasons for this preference are not well understood. In this work, we propose that specific features of the fluid flow around swimming Paramecia confer some energetic advantage to the preferred swimming direction. Therefore, we seek to understand the effects of body asymmetry and swimming direction on the efficiency of swimming and the flux of fluid into the cilia layer (and thus of food into the oral groove), which we assumed to be primary factors in the energy budgets of these organisms. To this end, we combined numerical techniques (the boundary element method) and laboratory experiments (micro particle image velocimetry) to develop a quantitative model of the flow around a Paramecium and investigate the effect of the body shape on the velocity fields, as well as on the swimming and feeding behaviors. Both simulation and experimental results show that velocity fields exhibit fore-aft asymmetry. Moreover, the shape asymmetry revealed an increase of the fluid flux into the cilia layer compared to symmetric body shapes. Under the assumption that cilia fluid intake and feeding efficiency are primary factors in the energy budgets of Paramecia, our model predicts that the anterior swimming direction is energetically favorable to the posterior swimming direction.

  5. Optimality Principles of Undulatory Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nangia, Nishant; Bale, Rahul; Patankar, Neelesh

    2015-11-01

    A number of dimensionless quantities derived from a fish's kinematic and morphological parameters have been used to describe the hydrodynamics of swimming. In particular, body/caudal fin swimmers have been found to swim within a relatively narrow range of these quantities in nature, e.g., Strouhal number or the optimal specific wavelength. It has been hypothesized or shown that these constraints arise due to maximization of swimming speed, efficiency, or cost of transport in certain domains of this large dimensionless parameter space. Using fully resolved simulations of undulatory patterns, we investigate the existence of various optimality principles in fish swimming. Using scaling arguments, we relate various dimensionless parameters to each other. Based on these findings, we make design recommendations on how kinematic parameters for a swimming robot or vehicle should be chosen. This work is supported by NSF Grants CBET-0828749, CMMI-0941674, CBET-1066575 and the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1324585.

  6. Utilization of plastic detector for pool water radioactivity control of IEA-R1 reactor. Examination of fuel element irradiation behaviour fabricated at IPEN/CNEN-SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the examination of fuel element irradiation behavior that were fabricated at IPEN/CNEN/SP Metalurgical Departament, it was provided a detection system for pool water radioactivity measurements. This system uses a plastic scintillator detector produced at IPEN/CNEN-SP Health Physics Department, with dimensions and shape apropriated for such work. The detection system shows a sensibility of 4.125x10-2 dps/cm3 and 20% of efficiency for 131 I radiations. (author)

  7. Experimental study of void behavior in a suppression pool of a boiling water reactor during the blowdown period of a loss of coolant accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassame, Somboon

    The possible failure of an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) train due to a large amount of entrained gas in the ECCS pump suction piping in a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) is one of the potential engineering problems faced in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) power plant. To analyze potential gas intrusion into the ECCS pump suction piping, the study of void behavior in the Suppression Pool (SP) during the LOCA is necessary. The void fraction distribution and void penetration are considered as the key parameters in the problem analysis. Two sets of experiments, namely, steady-state tests and transient tests were conducted using the Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integral Test Assembly for ESBWR application (PUMA-E) to study void behavior in the SP during the blowdown. The design of the test apparatus used is based on the scaling analysis from a prototypical BWR containment (MARK-I) with consideration of the downcomer size, the SP water level, and the downcomer water submergence depth. Several instruments were installed to obtain the required experimental data, such as inlet gas volumetric flow, void fraction, pressure, and temperature. For the steady-state tests, the air was injected through a downcomer pipe in the SP in order to simulate the physical phenomena in the SP during the initial blowdown of LOCA. Thirty tests were performed with two different downcomer sizes (0.076 and 0.102 m), various air volumetric flow rates or flux (0.003 to 0.153 m3/s or 0.5 to 24.7 m/s), initial downcomer void conditions (fully filled with water, partially void, and completely void) and air velocity ramp rates (one to two seconds). Two phases of the experiment were observed, namely, the initial phase and the quasi-steady phase. The initial phase produced the maximum void penetration depth; and the quasi-steady phase showed less void penetration with oscillation in the void penetration. The air volumetric flow rate was found to have a minor effect on the void fraction

  8. Fast flux measurements by means of threshold detectors on the reactor 'Melusine'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using existing data on the (n,p) and (n,α) threshold reactions we have carried out fast flux measurements on the swimming pool type reactor 'Melusine'. Four common elements: P, S, Mg, Al were chosen because from the point of view of fast spectrum analysis they represent a fairly good energy range from 2.4 MeV to 8 MeV. The fission flux value found in the central element at a power of 1 MW is 1.4 x 1013 n/cm2/s ± 0.14. (author)

  9. Development of Pool-type Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor System Analysis Code%池式钠冷快堆系统分析程序开发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晋; 张东辉; 胡文军

    2016-01-01

    针对池式钠冷快堆的特点,在对快堆系统的水力模型、热工模型和中子动力学模型进行详细分类和建模的基础上,利用 FORTRAN95语言开发了可用于池式钠冷快堆事故分析的系统分析程序(FASYS程序)。以中国实验快堆为计算对象对FASYS程序模型进行了初步验证,所获得的结果和试验值与其他系统程序计算值符合良好,证明了所开发的系统分析程序的正确性。%According to the characteristics of pool‐type sodium‐cooled fast reactor ,and with the fast reactor hydraulic model , thermal model and neutron kinetics model thoroughly classified and developed ,a fast reactor system analysis code (FASYS code) was developed by FORTRAN95 language for pool‐type sodium‐cooled fast reactor acci‐dent analysis .Transient conditions in CEFR were calculated with FASYS code and the results were used for code validation .The calculation results are consistent with the test data and other fast reactor system analysis code results , and the correctness of the FASYS code is proved .

  10. 多孔介质方法在池式快堆系统分析软件SAC-CFR三维钠池计算模型中的应用%Application of Porous Medium Method on Three-Dimensional Sodium Pool Model for Pool-Type Fast Reactor System Analysis Code SAC-CFR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    隋丹婷; 陆道纲; 任丽霞; 刘一哲

    2012-01-01

    为准确分析池式快堆热钠池内的热工水力学特性,在已开发出的用于池式快堆系统分析的钠池三维计算模型的基础上,应用多孔介质方法建立钠池内中间热交换器、主泵、事故热交换器及屏蔽柱模型,完成了含有多孔介质模型和复杂几何边界的钠池三维计算模型开发.将该模型嵌入池式快堆系统分析软件SAC-CFR后,分析了中国实验快堆在稳态运行和紧急停堆工况下钠池内的流场分布,初步证明了所采用的多孔介质模型的合理性,为下一步非能动余热排出系统模型的开发做准备.%To simulate the fluid dynamic and thermal characteristics in sodium pool accurately , newly three-dimensional hot pool analysis model with porous medium model and complex geometry was developed after incorporating the porous model of penetration components into three-dimensional model developed already for system analysis of pool-type fast reactor. Penetration components include intermediate heat exchanger, primary pump, decay heat exchanger, and radial shielding. After coupling with the system analysis code SAC-CFR, the newly coupled code was applied to analyze the flow field in hot pool under steady-state operation condition and after scram. The agreement between the computational flow field and the geometry of hot pool shows the effectiveness of porous medium model, which makes preparations for further development of passive residual heat removal system.

  11. Optimally swimming Stokesian robots

    CERN Document Server

    Alouges, François; Heltai, Luca; Lefebvre, Aline; Merlet, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    We study self propelled stokesian robots composed of assemblies of balls, in dimensions 2 and 3, and prove that they are able to control their position and orientation. This is a result of controllability, and its proof relies on applying Chow's theorem in an analytic framework, similarly to what has been done in [3] for an axisymmetric system swimming along the axis of symmetry. However, we simplify drastically the analyticity result given in [3] and apply it to a situation where more complex swimmers move either in a plane or in three-dimensional space, hence experiencing also rotations. We then focus our attention on energetically optimal strokes, which we are able to compute numerically. Some examples of computed optimal strokes are discussed in detail.

  12. Lung function in volunteers before and after exposure to trichloramine in indoor pool environments and asthma in a cohort of pool workers

    OpenAIRE

    Nordberg, Gunnar F.; Lundström, Nils-Göran; Forsberg, Bertil; Hagenbjörk-Gustafsson, Annika; Lagerkvist, Birgitta J-son; Nilsson, Johan; Svensson, Mona; Blomberg, Anders; Nilsson, Leif; Bernard, Alfred; Dumont, Xavier; Bertilsson, Helen; Eriksson, Kåre

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Exposure to trichloramine (NCl(3)) in indoor swimming-pool environments is known to cause mucous membrane irritation, but if it gives rise to changes in lung function or asthma in adults is not known. (1) We determined lung function in volunteers before and after exposure to indoor pool environments. (2) We studied the occurrence of respiratory symptoms and asthma in a cohort of pool workers. DESIGN/METHODS/PARTICIPANTS: (1) We studied two groups of volunteers, 37 previously non-e...

  13. Decommissioning of the Rapsodie fast reactor: developing a strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RAPSODIE experimental fast neutron reactor at Cadarache (France) was operated from 1962 to 1982. The initial decommissioning operations began immediately, reaching IAEA stage 2 in 1994. Since then, the facility has been maintained under surveillance pending final dismantling scheduled to begin in 2020. New studies are now in progress to accelerate the dismantling process. The present status of the reactor block is described, the advantages and drawbacks of early dismantling are considered, and various dismantling scenarios are discussed. (author)

  14. Swimming Performance and Metabolism of Golden Shiners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The swimming ability and metabolism of golden shiners, Notemigonus crysoleucas, was examined using swim tunnel respirometery. The oxygen consumption and tail beat frequencies at various swimming speeds, an estimation of the standard metabolic rate, and the critical swimming speed (Ucrit) was determ...

  15. Power control of water reactors using nitrogen 16 activity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Grenoble Nuclear Research Centre, the open-core swimming pool reactors Melusine (2 MW) and Siloe (15 MW) are controlled at a constant overall power using nitrogen-16 channels. The conventional linear control channels react instantaneously to the rapid power fluctuations, this being necessary for the safety of the reactors, but their power indications are erroneous since they are affected by local deformations of the thermal flux caused by the compensation movements of the control rods. The nitrogen-16 channels on the other hand give an indication of the overall power proportional to the mean fission flux and independent of the rod movements, but their response time is 15 seconds, A constant overall power control is thus possible by a slow correction of the reference signal given by the automatic control governed by thu linear channels by means of a correction term given by the 'N-16' channels: This is done automatically in Melusine and manually in Siloe. (authors)

  16. Pakistan upgrades PARR-1 and converts to LEU. [Upgrading of research reactor and conversion to low enriched uranium fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-12-01

    The Pakistan Research Reactor, PARR-1, is a 5MW swimming pool type reactor originally designed to use MTR type fuel elements fabricated from uranium enriched to more than 90%. After about 24 years of satisfactory operation it is now planned to convert the reactor to use low enriched (20%) uranium fuel. The opportunity will also be taken to upgrade the reactor power to about 9MW. This power upgrading will meet the demand for higher neutron fluxes for experimental and radioisotope production as well as compensating for the neutron flux penalty arising from conversion from high enriched to low enriched fuel. During the process of conversion and upgrading it is also proposed to renovate existing services and associated systems and to add certain new safety related engineering. (author).

  17. Significant problems of swimming in Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    Kachurovs'kyy D.O.

    2009-01-01

    The variants of decision of problems of swimming are considered in the article. Are presented prognoses of possible results. Complex approach is offered in the decision of the marked problems. Directions are rotined forming for the citizens of vitally important skill of swimming. The variants of decision of problem of teaching swimming of rural population and increase of amount of gettings busy are offered swimming. Traditions of domestic rest are considered in swimming complexes. The ways of...

  18. Topological swimming in a quantum sea

    OpenAIRE

    Avron, J. E.; Gutkin, B.; Oaknin, D. H.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a quantum theory of swimming for swimmers that are small relative to the coherence length of the medium. The quantum swimming equation is derived from known results on quantum pumps. For a one-dimensional Fermi gas at zero temperature we find that swimming is topological: The distance covered in one swimming stroke is quantized in half integer multiples of the Fermi wave length. Moreover, one can swim without dissipation.

  19. Theory of swimming filaments in viscoelastic media

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Henry C.; Powers, Thomas R.; Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by the swimming of sperm in the non-Newtonian fluids of the female mammalian reproductive tract, we examine the swimming of filaments in the nonlinear viscoelastic Upper Convected Maxwell model. We obtain the swimming velocity and hydrodynamic force exerted on an infinitely long cylinder with prescribed beating pattern. We use these results to examine the swimming of a simplified sliding-filament model for a sperm flagellum. Viscoelasticity tends to decrease swimming speed, and chan...

  20. Prediction of Long Term Corrosion Behaviour in Nuclear Waste Systems. Proceedings of an International Workshop, Cadarache, France, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This 36. book of the European Federation of Corrosion series contains the proceedings of the International Workshop on 'Prediction of Long Term Corrosion Behaviour in Nuclear Waste Systems' that took place in Cadarache, France in November 2001. The EFC Working Party on Nuclear Corrosion, which sponsored this Workshop, had already considered in 1991 that the long term integrity of Radioactive Waste storage was a crucial problem in the development of nuclear energy for electricity production. At that time, it was realized that public opinion on Nuclear Energy, was concerned not only with the risk of a nuclear accidents but also with the safety of long term storage of high level nuclear wastes. The nuclear community and the public demanded that any technical barrier for preventing long term radionuclides from entering the biosphere should be effective and guaranteed for 10,000 or more. The integrity of the waste containers, particularly their resistance to possible internal and external corrosion, is the most important aspect of this requirement. For the last ten years, the importance of programmes on long term corrosion on nuclear waste canisters has become of major significance to the international community. The Cadarache Workshop included reports on these programmes from eight countries. These approached the long term corrosion tests, but also by the development of the necessary deterministic and empirical models for extrapolating the behaviour of the selected materials. The difficulties involved in developing such models of corrosion behaviour and in demonstrating their validity has been underlined many times. The Proceedings contains in all an Introduction by Professor G. Beranger and 33 papers grouped in four parts as follows: 1 - R and D corrosion programmes (5 papers); 2 - Laboratory and in situ testing (11 papers); 3 - Historical and archaeological analogues (5 papers); and 4 - Fundamental issues, models and prediction

  1. System Wide Information Management (SWIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritz, Mike; McGowan, Shirley; Ramos, Cal

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation lists questions regarding the implementation of System Wide Information Management (SWIM). Some of the questions concern policy issues and strategies, technology issues and strategies, or transition issues and strategies.

  2. Amoeboid swimming in a channel

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Hao; Hu, W -F; Thiébaud, M; Rafaï, S; Peyla, P; Lai, M -C; Misbah, C

    2016-01-01

    Several micro-organisms, such as bacteria, algae, or spermatozoa, use flagellum or cilium activity to swim in a fluid. Many other organisms use rather ample shape deformation, described as amoeboid, to propel themselves, either crawling on a substrate or swimming. Many eukaryotic cells were believed to require an underlying substratum to migrate (crawl) by using ample membrane deformation (like blebbing). There is now an increasing evidence that a large variety of cells (including those of the immune system) can migrate without the assistance of focal adhesion, and can perform swimming as efficiently as crawling. This paper deals with a detailed analysis of amoeboid swimming in a confined fluid, by modeling the swimmer as an inextensible membrane deploying local active forces. The swimmer exhibits a rich behavior: it can settle into a straight trajectory in the channel, or can navigate from one wall to the other, depending on confinement. Furthermore, the nature of the swimmer is found to be affected by the c...

  3. Fluid dynamics: Swimming across scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Johannes; Friedrich, Benjamin M.

    2014-10-01

    The myriad creatures that inhabit the waters of our planet all swim using different mechanisms. Now, a simple relation links key physical observables of underwater locomotion, on scales ranging from millimetres to tens of metres.

  4. Swim pressure of active matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatori, Sho; Yan, Wen; Brady, John; Caltech Team

    2014-11-01

    Through their self-motion, all active matter systems generate a unique ``swim pressure'' that is entirely athermal in origin. This new source for the active stress exists at all scales in both living and nonliving active systems, and also applies to larger organisms where inertia is important (i.e., the Stokes number is not small). Here we explain the origin of the swim stress and develop a simple thermodynamic model to study the self-assembly and phase separation in active soft matter. Our new swim stress perspective can help analyze and exploit a wide class of active soft matter, from swimming bacteria and catalytic nanobots, schools of fish and birds, and molecular motors that activate the cellular cytoskeleton.

  5. Effect of Beetroot Juice Supplementation on Aerobic Response during Swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Pinna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial effects of beetroot juice supplementation (BJS have been tested during cycling, walking, and running. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether BJS can also improve performance in swimmers. Fourteen moderately trained male master swimmers were recruited and underwent two incremental swimming tests randomly assigned in a pool during which workload, oxygen uptake (VO2, carbon dioxide production (VCO2, pulmonary ventilation (VE, and aerobic energy cost (AEC of swimming were measured. One was a control swimming test (CSW and the other a swimming test after six days of BJS (0.5l/day organic beetroot juice containing about 5.5 mmol of NO3−. Results show that workload at anaerobic threshold was significantly increased by BJS as compared to the CSW test (6.3 ± 1 and 6.7 ± 1.1 kg during the CSW and the BJS test respectively. Moreover, AEC was significantly reduced during the BJS test (1.9 ± 0.5 during the SW test vs. 1.7 ± 0.3 kcal·kg−1·h−1 during the BJS test. The other variables lacked a statistically significant effect with BJS. The present investigation provides evidence that BJS positively affects performance of swimmers as it reduces the AEC and increases the workload at anaerobic threshold.

  6. Hawaii ESI: POOLS (Anchialine Pool Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for anchialine pools in Hawaii. Anchialine pools are small, relatively shallow coastal ponds that occur...

  7. Water Evaporation in Swimming Baths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldgård, Carl-Erik

    This paper is publishing measuring results from models and full-scale baths of the evaporation in swimming baths, both public baths and retraining baths. Moreover, the heat balance of the basin water is measured. In addition the full-scale measurements have given many experiences which are...... represented in instructions for carrying out and running swimming baths. If you follow the instructions you can achieve less investments, less heat consumption and a better comfort to the bathers....

  8. Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To provide a spray cooling structure wherein the steam phase in a bwr reactor vessel can sufficiently be cooled and the upper cap and flanges in the vessel can be cooled rapidly which kept from direct contaction with cold water. Constitution: An apertured shielding is provided in parallel spaced apart from the inner wall surface at the upper portion of a reactor vessel equipped with a spray nozzle, and the lower end of the shielding and the inner wall of the vessel are closed to each other so as to store the cooling water. Upon spray cooling, cooling water jetting out from the nozzle cools the vapor phase in the vessel and then hits against the shielding. Then the cooling water mostly falls as it is, while partially enters through the apertures to the back of the shielding plate, abuts against stoppers and falls down. The stoppers are formed in an inverted L shape so that the spray water may not in direct contaction with the inner wall of the vessel. (Horiuchi, T.)

  9. An assessment of the consequences of a research reactor credible accident release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the consequences of a serious credible accident, a coolant flow blockage accident (CFBA) of the Greek research reactor (GRR) is presented. GRR, a 5 MW swimming pool type reactor, is located within Athens the largest population centre of Greece concentrating 32% of its population. To estimate the source term 31 isotopes are taken into consideration and conservative figures of fission product release are adopted. To estimate the CFBA consequences a CRAC2 consequence model version is used. Doses and individual cancer risk from exposure to the passing radioactive cloud are estimated up to a distance of 20km from the reactor site. Collective exposure and latent health effects due to initial exposure and chronic exposure from inhalation of resuspended radionuclides and exposure to groundshine from contaminated ground are estimated for the total Athens area of 3081000 inhabitants. The results of the analysis suggest that the CFBA consequences are not significant. 10 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  10. Application of nanofiltration for pool water treatment: Assessing reduction potential of disinfection by-products

    OpenAIRE

    Cuesta, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Disinfection of water is mandatory for swimming pools. Most of them use Chlorine or its derivates for that purpose. When entering the pool bathers bring substances such as sweat, hairs and cosmetics that react with disinfectants and form disinfection by-products (DBPs) which are known to be harmful for human health. In order to avoid the formation of these undesirable products new technologies for pool water treatment must be developed or alternatively a control system of the DBPs in the p...

  11. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  12. Jules Horowitz reactor, basic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the shutdown of the SILOE reactor in 1997, the OSIRIS reactor has ensured the needs regarding technological irradiation at CEA including those of its industrial partners and customers. The Jules Horowitz Reactor will replace it. It has the ambition to provide the necessary nuclear data and maintain a fission research capacity in Europe after 2010. This capacity should be service-oriented. It will be established in Cadarache. The Jules Horowitz reactor will also: represent a significant step in term of performances and experimental capabilities; be designed with a high flexibility, in order to satisfy the current demand from European industry, research and be able to accommodate future requirements; reach a high level of safety, according to the best current practice. This paper will present the main functionalities and the design options resulting from the 'preliminary design' studies. (author)

  13. Jules Horowitz Reactor, basic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the shutdown of the SILOE reactor in 1997, the OSIRIS reactor has ensured the needs regarding technological irradiation at CEA including those of its industrial partners and customers. The Jules Horowitz Reactor will replace it. It has the ambition to provide the necessary nuclear data and maintain a fission research capacity in Europe after 2010. This capacity should be service-oriented. It will be established in Cadarache. The Jules Horowitz reactor will also: - represent a significant step in term of performances and experimental capabilities, - be designed with a high flexibility, in order to satisfy the current demand from European industry, research and be able to accommodate future requirements, - reach a high level of safety, according to the best current practice. This paper will present the main functionalities and the design options resulting from the 'preliminary design' studies. (authors)

  14. Swimming and other activities: applied aspects of fish swimming performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Santos, Theodore R.

    2011-01-01

    Human activities such as hydropower development, water withdrawals, and commercial fisheries often put fish species at risk. Engineered solutions designed to protect species or their life stages are frequently based on assumptions about swimming performance and behaviors. In many cases, however, the appropriate data to support these designs are either unavailable or misapplied. This article provides an overview of the state of knowledge of fish swimming performance – where the data come from and how they are applied – identifying both gaps in knowledge and common errors in application, with guidance on how to avoid repeating mistakes, as well as suggestions for further study.

  15. Swimming and Persons with Mild Persistant Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Arandelovic

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to analyze the effect of recreational swimming on lung function and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR in patients with mild persistent asthma. This study included 65 patients with mild persistent asthma, who were divided into two groups: experimental group A (n = 45 and control group B (n = 20. Patients from both groups were treated with low doses of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS and short-acting β2 agonists salbutamol as needed. Our program for patients in group A was combined asthma education with swimming (twice a week on a 1-h basis for the following 6 months. At the end of the study, in Group A, we found a statistically significant increase of lung function parameters FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (3.55 vs. 3.65 (p < 0.01, FVC (forced vital capacity (4.27 vs. 4.37 (p < 0.05, PEF (peak expiratory flow (7.08 vs. 7.46 (p < 0.01, and statistically significant decrease of BHR (PD20 0.58 vs. 2.01 (p < 0.001. In Group B, there was a statistically significant improvement of FEV1 3.29 vs. 3.33 (p < 0.05 and although FVC, FEV1/FVC, and PEF were improved, it was not significant. When Groups A and B were compared at the end of the study, there was a statistically significant difference of FVC (4.01 vs. 4.37, FEV1 (3.33 vs. 3.55, PEF (6.79 vs.7.46, and variability (p <0.001, and statistically significantly decreased BHR in Group A (2.01 vs. 1.75 (p < 0.001. Engagement of patients with mild persistent asthma in recreational swimming in nonchlorinated pools, combined with regular medical treatment and education, leads to better improvement of their parameters of lung function and also to more significant decrease of their airway hyperresponsiveness compared to patients treated with traditional medicine

  16. Swimming as a limit cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, Henry O

    2012-01-01

    Steady swimming can be characterized as both periodic and stable. These characteristics are the very definition of limit cycles, and so we ask "Can we view swimming as a limit cycle?" In this paper we will find that the answer is "yes". We will define a class of dissipative systems which correspond to the passive dynamics of a body immersed in a Navier-Stokes fluid (i.e. the dynamics of a dead fish). Upon performing reduction by symmetry we will find a hyperbolically stable fixed point which corresponds to the stability of a dead fish in stagnant water. Given a periodic force on the shape of the body we will invoke the persistence theorem to assert the existence of a loop which approximately satisfies the exact equations of motion. If we lift this loop with a phase reconstruction formula we will find that the lifted loops are not loops, but stable trajectories which represent regular periodic motion reminiscent of swimming.

  17. Current status of the Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first Thai Research Reactor, TRR-1 went critical on 27 October 1962 at the maximum power of 1 MW. It was located at Office of Atoms for Peace (OAP) in Bangkok. Since then, TRR-1 was continuously operated and eventually shut down in 1975. Plate type, high-enriched uranium (HEU) and U3O8A1 cladding were used as the reactor fuel. Light water was used as moderator and coolant as well. In 1975, because of the problem from fuel supplier and also to supporting the Treaty of Non Proliferation of Nuclear Weapon or NPT, TRR-1 was shut down for modification. The reactor core and control system were disassembled and replaced by TRIGA Mark III. A new core was a hexagonal core shape designed by General Atomics (GA). Afterwards, TRR-1 was officially renamed to the Thai Research Reactor-1/Modification 1 (TRR-1/M1). TRR-1/M1 is a multipurpose swimming pool type reactor with nominal power of 2 MW. The TRR-1/M1 uses uranium enriched at 20% in U-235 (LEU) and ZrH alloy as fuel. Light water is also used as coolant and moderator. At present, the reactor is operating with core No.14. The reactor has been serving for various kinds of utilization namely, radioisotope production, neutron activation analysis, beam experiments and reactor physics experiments. (author)

  18. Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS) has been designed to meet multi-agency hydrologic database needs for Kansas. The SWIMS project was...

  19. Safe operation and maintenance of research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1) was established in 1961 at the Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP), Bangkok. The reactor was light water moderated and cooled, using HEU plate-type with U3O8- Al fuel meat and swimming pool type. The reactor went first critical on October 27, 1962 and had been licensed to operate at 1 MW (thermal). On June 30, 1975 the reactor was shutdown for modification and the core and control system was disassemble and replaced by that of TRIGA Mark III type while the pool cooling system, irradiation facilities and other were kept. Thus the name TRR-1/M1' has been designed due to this modification the fuel has been changed from HEU plate type to Uranium Zirconium Hydride (UZrH) Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) which include 4 Fuel Follower Control Rods and 1 Air Follower Control Rod. The TRR-1/M1 went critical on November 7, 1977 and the purpose of the operation are training, isotope production and research. Nowadays the TRR-1/M1 has been operated with core loading No.12 which released power of 1,056 MWD. (as of October 1998). The TRR-1/M1 has been operated at the power of 1.2 MW, three days a week with 34 hours per week, Shut-down on Monday for weekly maintenance and Tuesday for special experiment. The everage energy released is about 40.8 MW-hour per week. Every year, the TRR-1/M1 is shut-down about 2 months between February to March for yearly maintenance. (author)

  20. Safe operation and maintenance of research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munsorn, S. [Reactor Operation Division, Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Chatuchak, Bangkok (Thailand)

    1999-10-01

    The first Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1) was established in 1961 at the Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP), Bangkok. The reactor was light water moderated and cooled, using HEU plate-type with U{sub 3}O{sub 8}- Al fuel meat and swimming pool type. The reactor went first critical on October 27, 1962 and had been licensed to operate at 1 MW (thermal). On June 30, 1975 the reactor was shutdown for modification and the core and control system was disassemble and replaced by that of TRIGA Mark III type while the pool cooling system, irradiation facilities and other were kept. Thus the name TRR-1/M1' has been designed due to this modification the fuel has been changed from HEU plate type to Uranium Zirconium Hydride (UZrH) Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) which include 4 Fuel Follower Control Rods and 1 Air Follower Control Rod. The TRR-1/M1 went critical on November 7, 1977 and the purpose of the operation are training, isotope production and research. Nowadays the TRR-1/M1 has been operated with core loading No.12 which released power of 1,056 MWD. (as of October 1998). The TRR-1/M1 has been operated at the power of 1.2 MW, three days a week with 34 hours per week, Shut-down on Monday for weekly maintenance and Tuesday for special experiment. The everage energy released is about 40.8 MW-hour per week. Every year, the TRR-1/M1 is shut-down about 2 months between February to March for yearly maintenance. (author)