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Sample records for cadarache swimming pool reactor

  1. Swimming Pool Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Swimming Pool Safety Page Content ​What is the best way to keep my child safe around swimming pools? An adult should actively watch children at ...

  2. Swimming pool granuloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquarium granuloma; Fish tank granuloma; Mycobacterium marinum infection ... A swimming pool granuloma occurs when water containing Mycobacterium marinum bacteria enter a break in the skin. Signs of a skin infection appear ...

  3. Swimming Pools and Molluscum Contagiosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Travelers’ Health: Smallpox & Other Orthopoxvirus-Associated Infections Poxvirus Swimming Pools Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The ... often ask if molluscum virus can spread in swimming pools. There is also concern that it can ...

  4. Grundfoss: Chlorination of Swimming Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Hogan, John; Andreassen, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools.......Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools....

  5. 21 CFR 1250.89 - Swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Swimming pools. 1250.89 Section 1250.89 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.89 Swimming pools. (a) Fill and draw swimming pools shall not be installed or used. (b) Swimming pools of the recirculation type shall be...

  6. ITER at Cadarache; ITER a Cadarache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-06-15

    This public information document presents the ITER project (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), the definition of the fusion, the international cooperation and the advantages of the project. It presents also the site of Cadarache, an appropriate scientifical and economical environment. The last part of the documentation recalls the historical aspect of the project and the today mobilization of all partners. (A.L.B.)

  7. Swimming Pools. Managing School Facilities, Guide 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department for Education and Employment, London (England). Architects and Building Branch.

    This guide for schools with swimming pools offers advice concerning appropriate training for pool managers, the importance of water quality and testing, safety in the handling of chemicals, maintenance and cleaning requirements, pool security, and health concerns. The guide covers both indoor and outdoor pools, explains some technical terms,…

  8. Ingestion of swimming pool water by recreational

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Swimming pool water ingestion data. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Dufour, A., L. Wymer, M. Magnuson, T. Behymer, and R. Cantu. Ingestion...

  9. [Chlorine concentrations in the air of indoor swimming pools and their effects on swimming pool workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Luna, Álvaro; Burillo, Pablo; Felipe, José Luis; Gallardo, Leonor; Tamaral, Francisco Manuel

    2013-01-01

    To describe chlorine levels in the air of indoor swimming pools in Castilla-La Mancha (Spain) and relate them to other chemical parameters in the installation and to the health problems perceived by swimming pool workers. We analyzed 21 pools with chlorine as chemical treatment in Castilla-La Mancha. The iodometry method was applied to measure chlorine concentrations in the air. The concentrations of free and combined chlorine in water, pH and temperature were also evaluated. Health problems were surveyed in 230 swimming pool workers in these facilities. The mean chlorine level in the air of swimming pools was 4.3 ± 2.3mg/m(3). The pH values were within the legal limits. The temperature parameters did not comply with regulations in 17 of the 21 pools analyzed. In the pools where chlorine values in the air were above the legal regulations, a significantly higher percentage of swimming pool workers perceived eye irritation, dryness and irritation of skin, and ear problems. Chlorine values in the air of indoor swimming pools were higher than those reported in similar studies. Most of the facilities (85%) exceeded the concentration of 1.5mg/m(3) established as the limit for the risk of irritating effects. The concentration of chlorine in indoor swimming pool air has a direct effect on the self-perceived health problems of swimming pool workers. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. The Chemistry of Swimming Pool Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Carl; Langhus, David L.

    2007-01-01

    The study of chemistry involved in the maintenance of a swimming pool provides a lot of chemical education to the students, including the demonstration of the importance of pH in water chemistry. The various chemical aspects hidden in the maintenance of the pool are being described.

  11. Virulent Naegleria fowleri in indoor swimming pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadlec, V; Skvárová, J; Cerva, L; Nebáznivá, D

    1980-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri was isolated from water during a hygienic inspection of a swimming pool in December 1977. This swimming pool was identified as a source of the infectious agent in the years 1962-1965, when a large outbreak of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAME) occurred. First two strains of N. fowleri, pathogenic for white mice after intracerebral and intranasal inoculation, were isolated from water of outlet troughs, additional strains were then isolated from various places; particularly from a cavity in the damaged wall of the pool. The incubation temperature did not inhibit a simultaneous growth of amoebae of the genera Acanthamoeba, Flabellula, Hartmannella and Vahlkampfia in the primocultures. Epidemiological investigations did not reveal any new case of PAME in relation with the occurrence of pathogenic N. fowleri in the swimming pool.

  12. Swimming Pool Electrical Injuries: Steps Toward Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Jun; Burnweit, Cathy A

    2017-01-09

    Electrical injuries in swimming pools are an important pediatric public health concern. We sought to (1) improve our understanding of the clinical presentation and outcomes following and (2) describe the epidemiology of swimming pool electrical injuries in the United States. We reviewed 4 cases of pediatric (public (23.9%) and sports facilities (19.1%). Electrical outlets or receptacles (39.8%) were most commonly implicated, followed by electrical system doors (18.2%), electric wiring systems (17.0%), thermostats (16.3%), hair dryers (4.6%), and radios (4.1%). Pediatric cases represented 48.4% of swimming pool-related electrical injuries reported to NEISS. Electrical injuries occurring in and around swimming pools remain an important source of morbidity and mortality. Although NEISS monitors sentinel events, current efforts at preventing such cases are less than adequate. All electrical outlets near swimming pools should be properly wired with ground fault circuit interrupter devices. Possible approaches to increasing safe electrical device installation are through strengthening public awareness and education of the potential for injury, as well as changes to current inspection regulations.

  13. Swimming level of pupils from elementary schools with own swimming pool

    OpenAIRE

    Zálupská, Klára

    2012-01-01

    Title: Swimming level of pupils from primary school with private swimming pool. Work objectives: The aim is to identify assess level of swimming of pupils from first to ninth grade of primary school with a private pool in Chomutov district using continuous swimming test with regular swimming lessons, which is started in the first grade and persists until the ninth grade. The condition was organizing a school swimming lessons once a week for 45 minutes in all grades. Methodology: Swimming leve...

  14. Mitigating the impact of swimming pools on domestic water demand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the impact that swimming pools have on domestic water demand. The results support the contention that properties with swimming pools use significantly more water than those without. This study estimated the additional demand resulting from swimming pools at between 2.2–2.4 kℓ/month or 7–8% of total water demand.

  15. Strategies for chemically healthy public swimming pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht

    spreading of pathogens between swimmers because of its residual disinfection effect. In addition to potential contamination of pathogenic microorganisms, swimming pool water is polluted by organic matter deposited from the bathers such as saliva, urine, sweat, hair and personal care products. Since chlorine...... avoided. Hair and skin cells are precursors for DBPs so good filtration with fast removal of particles could also be an option to obtain lower DBPs formation. Another way to remove precursors is to ozonate the pool water, since ozonation of the precursors leads to organic compound which is less reactive...... affected the investigated groups of DBPs differently. An analogue consisting of the main component in urine and sweat and particles consisting of skin cells and hair were used as precursor material and in both cases the formation of THMs decreased with decreasing pH while HAN formation increased...

  16. Dehumidification by heat pump in indoor swimming pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eymery, J.C. (Electricite de France, 75 - Paris)

    1982-10-01

    The values of the quantity of water evaporated in an indoor swimming pool are determined and technical alternatives for dehumidification are discussed; standard process by air replacement; new process by heat pump, with recovery of the latent heat of the moist air in the swimming pool hall. The author offers an example of the dimensioning of the heat pump and gives energy balances (fuel and electricity comsumption) of existing swimming pools equipped subsequently.

  17. Energy conservation in outdoor swimming pools. Pt. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskam, F.

    1987-11-01

    Part two of the report discusses the energy characteristics of three more BMFT/EC-supported demonstration plants (outdoor and indoor swimming pools) intended to investigate into low-cost energy supplies. Photographs, schematic sketches, tables, and figures facilitate access to the solar systems (collector surfaces, heat exchangers, water supply), the coverings (plastic foils), heat recovery systems recovering heat from the outgoing air (indoor swimming pools) and from filter backwash water as well as to other important aspects (swimming pool structures, site selection, climatic conditions). Water treatment and water heating systems are shown in a function diagram. (HWJ).

  18. How to improve hygienic behaviour in holiday park swimming pools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stronks, I.; Keuten, M.G.A.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on contamination of swimming pool water showed that the hygienic behaviour of swimmers is the most important factor. The suggested hygienic behaviour is; having a pre-swim shower and using the toilet when nature calls. Knowing the importance of hygienic behaviour is one thing,

  19. Quantification of continual anthropogenic pollutant release in swimming pools (poster)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, M.C.F.M.; Keuten, M.G.A.; Daanen, H.; De Kreuk, M.K.; Rietveld, L.C.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Dijk, H.

    2013-01-01

    The amount of pollutants brought into the swimming pool water by swimmers is called anthropogenic pollutant release. The continual pollutant release is the amount of pollutants which is released during the submerged swimming period. The actual level of the continual pollutant release has not been

  20. Allegheny County Public Swimming Pool, Hot Tub, and Spa Inspections

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Public swimming pool, hot tub, and spa facilities are licensed and inspected once each year to assure proper water quality, sanitation, lifeguard coverage and...

  1. Virulent Naegleria fowleri in an indoor swimming pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadlec, V; Cerva, L; Skvárová, J

    1978-09-15

    A reservoir of pathogenic Naegleria fowleri has been located in the cracked wall of a swimming pool where repeated outbreaks of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis were observed between 1962 and 1965.

  2. Health impact of disinfection by-products in swimming pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M. Villanueva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is focused on the epidemiological evidence on the health impacts related to disinfection by-products (DBPs in swimming pools, which is a chemical hazard generated as an undesired consequence to reduce the microbial pathogens. Specific DBPs are carcinogenic, fetotoxic and/or irritant to the airways according to experimental studies. Epidemiological evidence shows that swimming in pools during pregnancy is not associated with an increased risk of reproductive outcomes. An epidemiological study suggested an increased risk of bladder cancer with swimming pool attendance, although evidence is inconclusive. A higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms including asthma is found among swimming pool workers and elite swimmers, although the causality of this association is unclear. The body of evidence in children indicates that asthma is not increased by swimming pool attendance. Overall, the available knowledge suggests that the health benefits of swimming outweigh the potential health risks of chemical contamination. However, the positive effects of swimming should be enhanced by minimising potential risks.

  3. Study on water evaporation rate from indoor swimming pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rzeźnik Ilona

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The air relative humidity in closed spaces of indoor swimming pools influences significantly on users thermal comfort and the stability of the building structure, so its preservation on suitable level is very important. For this purpose, buildings are equipped with HVAC systems which provide adequate level of humidity. The selection of devices and their technical parameters is made using the mathematical models of water evaporation rate in the unoccupied and occupied indoor swimming pool. In the literature, there are many papers describing this phenomena but the results differ from each other. The aim of the study was the experimental verification of published models of evaporation rate in the pool. The tests carried out on a laboratory scale, using model of indoor swimming pool, measuring 99cm/68cm/22cm. The model was equipped with water spray installation with six nozzles to simulate conditions during the use of the swimming pool. The measurements were made for conditions of sports pools (water temperature 24°C and recreational swimming pool (water temperature 34°C. According to the recommendations the air temperature was about 2°C higher than water temperature, and the relative humidity ranged from 40% to 55%. Models Shah and Biasin & Krumm were characterized by the best fit to the results of measurements on a laboratory scale.

  4. Study on water evaporation rate from indoor swimming pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeźnik, Ilona

    2017-11-01

    The air relative humidity in closed spaces of indoor swimming pools influences significantly on users thermal comfort and the stability of the building structure, so its preservation on suitable level is very important. For this purpose, buildings are equipped with HVAC systems which provide adequate level of humidity. The selection of devices and their technical parameters is made using the mathematical models of water evaporation rate in the unoccupied and occupied indoor swimming pool. In the literature, there are many papers describing this phenomena but the results differ from each other. The aim of the study was the experimental verification of published models of evaporation rate in the pool. The tests carried out on a laboratory scale, using model of indoor swimming pool, measuring 99cm/68cm/22cm. The model was equipped with water spray installation with six nozzles to simulate conditions during the use of the swimming pool. The measurements were made for conditions of sports pools (water temperature 24°C) and recreational swimming pool (water temperature 34°C). According to the recommendations the air temperature was about 2°C higher than water temperature, and the relative humidity ranged from 40% to 55%. Models Shah and Biasin & Krumm were characterized by the best fit to the results of measurements on a laboratory scale.

  5. Characterization of microbial populations associated with natural swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanovas-Massana, Arnau; Blanch, Anicet R

    2013-03-01

    Natural swimming pools are artificially created bodies of water that are intended for human recreational bathing and have no chemical disinfection treatment. The microbial populations in four private natural swimming pools were analysed to assess the typical microbiological parameters, establish the origin of faecal contamination in the water, and predict the behaviour of larger systems that are open to the public. For this purpose, faecal coliforms, E. coli, enterococci, aerobic heterotrophic bacteria and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were enumerated in summer and winter. Moreover, faecal coliforms and enterococci populations were biochemically phenotyped with the Phene-Plate System, the diversity and similarity indexes were calculated and the isolates were identified. Three of the four natural pools exceeded the E. coli or enterococci limits stated in the recommendations for natural swimming pools. The concentrations of P. aeruginosa and aerobic heterotrophic bacteria were acceptable. The results suggest that wildlife was an important source of faecal pollution in the pools. Since there is a lack of regulations on these systems, and the health risks are higher than in conventional swimming pools, further research is needed to establish the parameters for ensuring safe bathing in private and public natural swimming pools. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Swimming pool deck as environmental reservoir of Fusarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buot, G; Toutous-Trellu, L; Hennequin, C

    2010-08-01

    While investigations on fungal contamination of swimming pools usually focus on dermatophytes, data on other potentially pathogenic molds are scarce. Here, we report the investigation of fungal colonization of the deck surrounding a hospital physical therapy swimming pool. Five series of samples from 8 sites were collected over one year from the pool surroundings. Concomitantly, 58 patients using the swimming pool were examined and samples obtained from those with suspected onychomycosis. All surface samples were positive for fungi, with Fusarium the most frequently recovered from 22 of 27 samples of sites surrounding the pool. Among the outpatients evaluated, two presented with a mixed onychomycosis from which Fusarium and Trichophyton rubrum were isolated. The questions of possible acquisition from the swimming pool area must be considered in both cases as the ungual lesions had developed within the previous three months. This warrants further studies to better understand the epidemiology of potentially pathogenic molds in areas surrounding pools in order to adopt appropriate measures to avoid contamination. This is of particular importance within medical institutions, considering the potential role of Fusarium onychomycosis as a starting point for disseminated infections in immunocompromised patients.

  7. Sanitary Conditions of Public Swimming Pools in Amman, Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Abu Aqoulah

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in the summer of 2005 and investigated all of active public swimming pools (85 out of 93 in Amman, the capital of Jordan. The aim of this study was to find out if these swimming pools are in compliance with Jordanian Standards for Swimming Pools Water (JS 1562/2004. The pools were surveyed against the water microbial quality and other physicochemical parameters indicated in the standards. Two samples from each pool were collected for microbial analysis and pools monitoring were carried out during the afternoon of the weekends when the pools are most heavily used. The results indicated overall poor compliance with the standards. Compliance of the pools water to the microbial parameters was 56.5%, for residual chlorine 49.4%, for pH 87.7%, water temperature 48.8%, and bathing load 70.6%. The results also indicated that water microbial quality deteriorated with time. Multivariate analysis showed significant association of water contamination with time of sample collection, residual chlorine, water temperature and load of swimmers. The poor compliance was attributed to lack of proper disinfection, staff training, proper maintenance, and timely inspection.

  8. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Swimming Pools, Atlanta, Georgia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-05-29

    In this podcast, Dan Rutz speaks with Dr. Joan Shields, a guest researcher with the Healthy Swimming Program at CDC, about an article in June 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases reporting on the results of a test of swimming pools in the greater Atlanta, Georgia area. Dr. Shields tested 160 pools in metro Atlanta last year for Cryptosporidium and Giardia. These germs cause most recreational water associated outbreaks.  Created: 5/29/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 5/29/2008.

  9. Ingestion of swimming pool water by recreational swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, A P; Behymer, T D; Cantú, R; Magnuson, M; Wymer, L J

    2017-06-01

    The volume of water ingested by swimmers while swimming is of great interest to individuals who develop risk assessments using quantitative microbial risk assessment or epidemiological approaches. We have used chloroisocyanurate disinfected swimming pool waters to determine the amount of water swallowed by swimmers during swimming activity. The chloroisocyanurate, which is in equilibrium with chlorine and cyanuric acid in the pool water, provides a biomarker, cyanuric acid, that once swallowed passes through the body into the urine unchanged. The concentration of cyanuric acid in a 24 hour urine specimen and the concentration in pool water can be used to calculate the amount of water swallowed. Our study population of 549 participants, which was about evenly divided by gender, and young and adult swimmers, indicated that swimmers ingest about 32 mL per hour (arithmetic mean) and that children swallowed about four times as much water as adults during swimming activities. It was also observed that males had a tendency to swallow more water than females during swimming activity and that children spent about twice as much time in the water than adults.

  10. Report transparency and nuclear safety 2007 CEA Cadarache; Rapport transparence et securite nucleaire 2007 CEA Cadarache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This report presents the activities of the CEA Center of Cadarache for the year 2007. The actions concerning the safety, the radiation protection, the significant events, the release control and the environmental impacts and the wastes stored on the center are discussed. More especially the report discusses the beginning of the RJH reactor construction, the fourth generation reactors research programs, the implementing of la Rotonde the new radioactive wastes management installation, the renovation of the LECA. (A.L.B.)

  11. Delinquent mortgages, neglected swimming pools, and West Nile virus, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisen, William K; Takahashi, Richard M; Carroll, Brian D; Quiring, Rob

    2008-11-01

    Adjustable rate mortgages and the downturn in the California housing market caused a 300% increase in notices of delinquency in Bakersfield, Kern County. This led to large numbers of neglected swimming pools, which were associated with a 276% increase in the number of human West Nile virus cases during the summer of 2007.

  12. Mitigating the impact of swimming pools on domestic water demand

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: urban water management, swimming pools, water demand management ... need to implement desalination schemes by ensuring water is ... significant saving of potable water and delay the need to invest in further water supply infrastructure such as dams and desali- nation plants. Such a ban would need to be ...

  13. Isolation of Fungi in Swimming pools in Enugu, Nigeria | Mbata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The most common fungi recovered were as follows: Cladosporium spp 74%, Penicillium spp 38%, Aspergillus spp 35%, Rhizopus spp 6% and ... have with the water and aerosol, there should be proper monitoring and sanitation for successful control and management of swimming pool related fungal infections.

  14. Acanthamoeba species in Swimming Pools of Cairo, Egypt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Al-Herrawy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The free-living amoebae Acanthamoeba spp. have been recognized as etiologic agents of amoebic encephalitis, keratitis, otitis, lung lesions and other skin infections mainly in immuno-compromised individuals. The purpose of this study is to detect the presence of Acanthamoeba in swimming pools in Egypt using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR method.Water samples were collected from 10 different swimming pools in Cairo, Egypt. Samples were cultured on non-nutrient agar for the detection of Acanthamoeba isolates that were confirmed by PCR amplification using genus specific primers. The molecularly confirmed Acanthamoeba isolates were morphologically identified to the species level.Members of genus Acanthamoeba were detected in 49.2% of the examined swimming-pool water samples. Morphologically, six Acanthamoeba species were isolated from the examined swimming pool water namely A. polyphaga, A.castellanii, A. rhysodes, A. mauritaniensis, A. royreba and A. triangularis. All the identified species of Acanthamoeba were molecularly confirmed to be related to the genus Acanthamoeba.The isolated species of Acanthamoeba could provoke variable degrees of infections to the swimmers. The culture method is cheaper and easier than PCR techniques that are faster for the detection of free-living amoebae.

  15. Swimming pool attendance and respiratory symptoms and allergies among Dutch children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J.H.; Fuertes, E.; Krop, E.J.M.; Spithoven, J.; Tromp, P.; Heederik, D.J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To describe associations among swimming, respiratory health, allergen sensitisation and Clara cell protein 16 (CC16) levels in Dutch schoolchildren. Trichloramine levels in swimming pool air were determined to assess potential exposure levels. Methods: Respiratory health and pool

  16. Presence of virulent strains of amphizoic amoebae in swimming pools of the city of Szczecin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Górnik, Katarzyna; Kuźna-Grygiel, Wanda

    2004-01-01

    .... No pathogenic strains were detected in the water sampled in the indoor swimming pools, and the virulent strains, AD 16, AD 148, AD 166, AM 17, and AM 148, were found only in the open-air swimming pools...

  17. Indoor swimming pool attendance and respiratory and dermal health in schoolchildren: HITEA Catalonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Font-Ribera, L.; Villanueva, C.M.; Gracia-Lavedan, E.; Borràs-Santos, A.; Kogevinas, M.; Zock, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Health benefits of swimming in pools may outweigh adverse health outcomes in children, but evidence from epidemiological studies is scarce or inconclusive for different health outcomes. We evaluated the association between indoor swimming pool attendance during childhood and respiratory

  18. Swimming pool attendance and respiratory symptoms and allergies among Dutch children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J.H.; Fuertes, E.; Krop, E.J.M.; Spithoven, J.; Tromp, P.; Heederik, D.J.J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To describe associations among swimming, respiratory health, allergen sensitisation and Clara cell protein 16 (CC16) levels in Dutch schoolchildren. Trichloramine levels in swimming pool air were determined to assess potential exposure levels. METHODS Respiratory health and pool

  19. Energy conservation in outdoor swimming pools. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskam, F.

    1987-09-01

    The paper reports about several EC- and BMFT-supported demonstration programs aiming at reducing the operating costs of outdoor and indoor swimming pools with the help of solar energy and additional measures such as energy conservation and heat recovery. Presenting a number of relevant characteristics an illustrated survey sums up the results available after an operating period of several years. Apart from referring to the basic findings the paper informs about organizational aspects. The measures and systems applied comprise solar water heating systems, coverings to reduce heat losses, and heat recovery systems recovering heat from filter backwash water, showers and the outgoing air. Details are given on how the different systems were realized in three demonstration swimming pools. (HWJ).

  20. Presence and select determinants of organophosphate flame retardants in public swimming pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teo, Tiffany L.L., E-mail: tiffany.teo@unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Kensington NSW 2052 (Australia); Coleman, Heather M., E-mail: h.coleman@ulster.ac.uk [Nanotechnology and Integrated BioEngineering Centre, School of Engineering, University of Ulster, Jordanstown, County Antrim BT37 0QB, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Khan, Stuart J., E-mail: s.khan@unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Kensington NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-11-01

    The occurrence of five organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) consisting of tributyl phosphate (TNBP), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCIPP), tris(1.3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) in swimming pools were investigated. Fifteen chlorinated public swimming pools were sampled, including indoor pools, outdoor pools and spa pools. The analyses were carried out using isotope dilution gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. All five PFRs were detected in swimming pool waters with concentrations ranging from 5–27 ng/L (TNBP), 7–293 ng/L (TCEP), 62–1180 ng/L (TCIPP), 10–670 ng/L (TDCIPP) and 8–132 ng/L (TPHP). The concentrations of PFRs were generally higher in indoor swimming pools compared to outdoor swimming pools. In municipal water supplies, used to fill the swimming pools in three of the sampling locations, the five PFRs were all below the limit of quantifications, eliminating this as the source. Potential leaching of PFRs from commonly used swimming equipment, including newly purchased kickboards and swimsuits was investigated. These experiments revealed that PFRs leached from swimsuits, and may be a source of PFRs in swimming pools. A quantitative risk assessment revealed that the health risk to PFRs via swimming pools was generally low and below commonly applied health risk benchmarks. - Highlights: • TNBP, TCEP, TCIPP, TDCIPP and TPHP were detected in chlorinated swimming pools. • PFRs were below the LOQ in fill water samples collected from 3 locations. • TCIPP was observed to have the highest concentrations in swimming pools. • PFRs are leaching from swimsuits and may be a source in swimming pools. • Health risks through oral and dermal exposure to PFRs in swimming pools were low.

  1. Laboratory studies on the effect of ozonation on THM formation in swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Cheema, Waqas Akram

    2015-01-01

    Water samples from indoor swimming pool were ozonated at different pH values to evaluate the effect of pH on decomposition of ozone in swimming pool water. Furthermore, drinking and pool water were repeatedly ozonated followed by chlorination to evaluate THM formation. Decomposition of ozone was ...

  2. Evaluation and Treatment of Swimming Pool Avoidance Exhibited by an Adolescent Girl with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, John T.; Vollmer, Timothy R.; Hovanetz, Alyson N.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated and treated swimming pool avoidance that was exhibited by a 14-year-old girl diagnosed with autism. In part, treatment involved blocking for flopping (dropping to the ground) and elopement (running away from the pool) and access to food for movements toward a swimming pool. Treatment also involved reinforcement for exposure to various…

  3. Swimming Lessons: Learning, New Materialisms, Posthumanism, and Post Qualitative Research Emerge through a Pool Poem

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Lucinda

    2016-01-01

    This article shifts from the formal learning spaces of school and university to an Australian public swimming pool to playfully engage some of the dilemmas that recent theory poses for curriculum studies. The article enacts multiple diffractions (Barad, 2007) as theory becomes swimming and swimming becomes theory, and ideas and movements are…

  4. Determinants of chlorination by-products in indoor swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessonneau, Vincent; Derbez, Mickaël; Clément, Michel; Thomas, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    Water and air quality of fifteen swimming pools using chlorine disinfection was measured during eight sampling campaigns in Rennes, France. Concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) and trichloramine (NCl(3)) in air as well as concentrations of parameters, including total organic carbon (TOC), chlorine (free, combined and total), pH, Kjeldhal nitrogen (KN), chloride ions and THMs in water and air temperature, were measured. Water and air samples were collected during 3h in the morning and afternoon, during high and low attendance days, in summer and winter. Data analysis was perfomed by multivariate ordinary least square (OLS) and quantile (QR) regressions, from both data quality and other parameters such as the ratio between the number of visitors and the volume of water available V/W, the proportion of air re-circulated and the number of swimmers during sampling. The geometric means (GM±95% CIs) of the sum of THMs (TTHM) and NCl(3) in air were 74.9±6.7 μg/m(3) and 190±10 μg/m(3), respectively. As expected, concentrations of TTHM in air were correlated to concentrations of TTHM in water. Concentrations of TTHM and NCl(3) in air measured in winter were significantly higher than in summer, depicting that low air exchange rate in winter lead to accumulation of pollutants. NCl(3) (especially at higher quantiles) and TTHM concentrations in air were associated to the number of swimmers. NCl(3) was also linked to air temperature and pH. Moreover TTHM and NCl(3) in air seemed to be affected by additional determinants including the volume of hall and the ratio V/W. In a process of reducing exposure, the OLS regression provides useful information on key parameters influencing concentrations of THMs and NCl(3) in indoor swimming pools. In addition, QR allows identifying factors associated to elevated levels of contamination. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Swimming pools and health-related behaviours: results of an Italian multicentre study on showering habits among pool users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquarella, C; Veronesi, L; Napoli, C; Castaldi, S; Pasquarella, M L; Saccani, E; Colucci, M E; Auxilia, F; Gallè, F; Di Onofrio, V; Tafuri, S; Signorelli, C; Liguori, G

    2013-07-01

    Showering before entering a swimming pool is highly recommended to reduce the risk of biological and chemical contamination. This study evaluated the behaviour of indoor swimming pool users; analysed the variables associated with lack of showering; and assessed awareness of the importance of showering. Cross-sectional study. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data about users of swimming pools located in five different Italian cities. The association between specific variables and the lack of showering was assessed. P swim showering was 'to wash oneself' (50.5%); or 'to get used to the temperature of the water' (44.3%); and 5.2% answered 'for both reasons'. Risk factors significantly associated with lack of showering were: female sex (odds ratio (OR) 1.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-1.59), age 14-17 years (OR 5.09, 95% CI 3.40-7.64); not reading the swimming pool rules (OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.10-1.41); living in Central Italy (OR 3.3, 95% CI 2.65-4.1) or Southern Italy (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.18-1.55); and previous/current attendance of a swimming course (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.48-1.97). The results revealed low compliance with the rule of showering before entering a swimming pool, and little awareness of the preventive role of showering in the hygienic management of swimming pools. There is a need for targeted educational interventions to inform swimming pool users of the reasons for the importance of showering before entering a pool. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantification of continual anthropogenic pollutants released in swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuten, M G A; Peters, M C F M; Daanen, H A M; de Kreuk, M K; Rietveld, L C; van Dijk, J C

    2014-04-15

    Disinfection in swimming pools is often performed by chlorination, However, anthropogenic pollutants from swimmers will react with chlorine and form disinfection by-products (DBPs). DBPs are unwanted from a health point of view, because some are irritating, while others might be carcinogenic. The reduction of anthropogenic pollutants will lead to a reduction in DBPs. This paper investigates the continual release of anthropogenic pollutants by means of controlled sweat experiments in a pool tank during laboratory time-series experiments (LTS experiments) and also during on-site experiments (OS experiments) in a swimming pool. The sweat released during the OS and LTS experiments was very similar. The sweat rate found was 0.1-0.2 L/m(2)/h at water temperatures below 29 °C and increased linearly with increasing water temperatures to 0.8 L/m(2)/h at 35 °C. The continual anthropogenic pollutant release (CAPR) not only consisted of sweat, particles (mainly skin fragments and hair) and micro-organisms, but also sebum (skin lipids) has to be considered. The release of most components can be explained by the composition of sweat. The average release during 30 min of exercise is 250 mg/bather non-purgeable organic carbon (NPOC), 77.3 mg/bather total nitrogen (TN), 37.1 mg/bather urea and 10.1 mg/bather ammonium. The release of NPOC cannot be explained by the composition of sweat and is most probably a result of sebum release. The average release of other components was 1.31 × 10(9) # particles/bather (2-50 μm), 5.2 μg/bather intracellular adenosine triphosphate (cATP) and 9.3 × 10(6) intact cell count/bather (iCC). The pool water temperature was the main parameter to restrain the CAPR. This study showed that a significant amount of the total anthropogenic pollutants release is due to unhygienic behaviour of bathers. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Disinfection by-product formation of UV treated swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Water samples from 3 indoor swimming pool facilities were tested to evaluate UV-induced effects on swimming pool water chemistry. Concentration change of several DBPs was investigated in experiments including medium pressure UV treatment with and without chlorine and post-UV chlorination. Post-UV...

  8. RECESSED AUTOMATIC SURFACE SKIMMERS FOR SWIMMING POOLS. NATIONAL SANITATION FOUNDATION STANDARD NUMBER 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI.

    THE NATIONAL SANITATION FOUNDATION STANDARD ON SWIMMING POOL EQUIPMENT CONCERNS ITSELF WITH THE SUCCESSFUL APPLICATION OF SURFACE SKIMMERS TO SWIMMING POOLS. THE MINIMUM DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS ESTABLISHED BY THIS STANDARD ARE SET FORTH TO PROVIDE A MEANS OF EVALUATING THE OVERALL CONSTRUCTION AND EFFECTIVENESS OF THE UNIT. ADDITIONAL…

  9. Survey of bacterial contamination of environment of swimming pools in Yazd city, in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jafari Mansoorian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infections are readily transmitted as a result of bacterial contamination of swimming pools. Therefore, hygiene and preventing the contamination of swimming pools is of particular importance. The objective of this study was to determine the amount of bacterial contamination in indoor pools of Yazd in 2013. Methods: In this descriptive and analytical study, all indoor swimming pools of Yazd (12 pools were evaluated during the spring and summer of 2013, in terms of bacterial contamination. In order to determine contamination, a sterile cotton swab was used for sampling. On average, 45 samples were taken from different surfaces in each pool (shower, dressing room, sitting places in sauna, platforms and around the pool. In total, about 540 samples from all pools were tested for bacterial contamination. Results: The results show that from 540 samples, bacterial contamination was observed in about 93 samples (17.22%; and was seen more in showers, edges of the pool and jacuzzis, and the slippers used in swimming pools. The most important isolated bacteria types were E. coli, Actinobacteria, Pseudomonas alcaligenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia. Conclusion: The results indicate the presence of bacterial contamination on the surface of these places. It is recommended that health authorities should pay more attention to cleaning and disinfecting surfaces around the pool, showers, dressing rooms etc, to prevent infectious disease transfer as a result of contact with contaminated swimming pool surfaces.

  10. Occurrence, origin, and toxicity of disinfection byproducts in chlorinated swimming pools: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasfi, Tarek; Coulomb, Bruno; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2017-05-01

    Disinfection treatments are critical to conserve the microbiological quality of swimming pool water and to prevent water-borne infections. The formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in swimming pools is an undesirable consequence resulting from reactions of disinfectants (e.g. chlorine) with organic and inorganic matter present in pool water, mainly brought by bathers. A considerable body of occurrence studies has identified several classes of DBPs in swimming pools with more than 100 compounds detected, mainly in chlorinated freshwater pools. Trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs), haloacetaldehydes (HALs) are among the major DBPs in swimming pools. Other DBPs such as haloacetonitriles (HAN), haloamines, nitrosamines, and halobenzoquinones have also been detected. Researchers have been interested in identifying the precursors responsible for the formation of DBPs. In swimming pools, anthropogenic organic loads brought by swimmers increase the complexity of pool water chemistry. When human inputs (e.g. sweat, urine, hair, skin and personal care products) containing very diverse organic compounds are introduced to pools by swimmers, they react with chlorine resulting in the formation of complex mixtures of DBPs. The overwhelming majority of the total organic halide (TOX) content is still unknown in swimming pools. Exposure of swimmers to DBPs can take place through multiple routes, depending on the chemical properties of each DBP. Toxicological studies have shown that swimming pool water can be mutagenic with different potencies reported in different studies. Many DBPs have been shown to be genotoxic and carcinogenic. DBPs were also shown to induce reproductive and neurotoxic adverse effects in animal studies. Epidemiologic studies in humans have shown that exposure to DBPs increases the risk of respiratory adverse effects and bladder cancer. Association between DBPs and other health effects are still inconclusive. Data gathered in the present review

  11. Comparison of Chemical, Biological and Physical Quality Assessment of Indoor Swimming Pools in Shahrekord City, Iran in 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Fadaei, Abdolmajid; Amiri, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that mismanaged swimming pools could transmit water-borne diseases. The objective of the present study was the quality assessment of chemical, biological and physical characteristics of swimming pools in Shahrekord city, southwest of Iran. The two main indoor swimming pools of Shahrekord city were considered during the summer and winter of 2013. The number of 459 samples were analysed from swimming pools, showers and dressing rooms for chemical, biological and phys...

  12. Semi-Automatic Detection of Swimming Pools from Aerial High-Resolution Images and LIDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borja Rodríguez-Cuenca

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bodies of water, particularly swimming pools, are land covers of high interest. Their maintenance involves energy costs that authorities must take into consideration. In addition, swimming pools are important water sources for firefighting. However, they also provide a habitat for mosquitoes to breed, potentially posing a serious health threat of mosquito-borne disease. This paper presents a novel semi-automatic method of detecting swimming pools in urban environments from aerial images and LIDAR data. A new index for detecting swimming pools is presented (Normalized Difference Swimming Pools Index that is combined with three other decision indices using the Dempster–Shafer theory to determine the locations of swimming pools. The proposed method was tested in an urban area of the city of Alcalá de Henares in Madrid, Spain. The method detected all existing swimming pools in the studied area with an overall accuracy of 99.86%, similar to the results obtained by support vector machines (SVM supervised classification.

  13. Identification of disinfection by-products in freshwater and seawater swimming pools and evaluation of genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasfi, Tarek; De Méo, Michel; Coulomb, Bruno; Di Giorgio, Carole; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in swimming pools has been linked to adverse health effects. Numerous DBPs that occur in swimming pools are genotoxic and carcinogenic. This toxicity is of a greater concern in the case of brominated DBPs that have been shown to have substantially greater toxicities than their chlorinated analogs. In chlorinated seawater swimming pools, brominated DBPs are formed due to the high content of bromide. Nevertheless, very little data is reported about DBP occurrence and mutagenicity of water in these pools. In the present study, three seawater and one freshwater swimming pools located in Southeastern France were investigated to determine qualitatively and quantitatively their DBP contents. An evaluation of the genotoxic properties of water samples of the freshwater pool and a seawater pool was conducted through the Salmonella assay (Ames test). The predominant DBPs identified in the freshwater pool were chlorinated species and included trichloroacetic acid, chloral hydrate, dichloroacetonitrile, 1,1,1-trichloropropanone and chloroform. In the seawater pools, brominated DBPs were the predominant species and included dibromoacetic acid, bromoform and dibromoacetonitile. Bromal hydrate levels were also reported. In both types of pools, haloacetic acids were the most prevalent chemical class among the analyzed DBP classes. The distribution of other DBP classes varied depending on the type of pool. As to genotoxicity, the results of Ames test showed higher mutagenicity in the freshwater pool as a consequence of its considerably higher DBP contents in comparison to the tested seawater pool. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mathematical modelling and simulation of the thermal performance of a solar heated indoor swimming pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mančić Marko V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Buildings with indoor swimming pools have a large energy footprint. The source of major energy loss is the swimming pool hall where air humidity is increased by evaporation from the pool water surface. This increases energy consumption for heating and ventilation of the pool hall, fresh water supply loss and heat demand for pool water heating. In this paper, a mathematical model of the swimming pool was made to assess energy demands of an indoor swimming pool building. The mathematical model of the swimming pool is used with the created multi-zone building model in TRNSYS software to determine pool hall energy demand and pool losses. Energy loss for pool water and pool hall heating and ventilation are analyzed for different target pool water and air temperatures. The simulation showed that pool water heating accounts for around 22%, whereas heating and ventilation of the pool hall for around 60% of the total pool hall heat demand. With a change of preset controller air and water temperatures in simulations, evaporation loss was in the range 46-54% of the total pool losses. A solar thermal sanitary hot water system was modelled and simulated to analyze it's potential for energy savings of the presented demand side model. The simulation showed that up to 87% of water heating demands could be met by the solar thermal system, while avoiding stagnation. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 42006: Research and development of energy and environmentally highly effective polygeneration systems based on using renewable energy sources

  15. Water treatment in public swimming pools - reduction of energy consumption; Vandbehandling i svoemmebade - reduktion af energiforbrug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammerich, H.; Radisch, N. (Ramboell, Koege (Denmark)); Olesen, Jens Christian (Gladsaxe Sportscenter, Gladsaxe (Denmark)) (and others)

    2010-04-15

    Measurements were made in five public swimming baths, and energy savings were achieved using new filters, pumps, water treatment control depending on bather load, etc. In a 50 metre pool, electricity consumption for water treatment decreased by 50%, and in a hot-water/paddling pool, electricity consumption decreased by 30-40% while still maintaining satisfactory water quality - even during periods of heavy bather load. In another swimming bath, ventilation electricity consumption was reduced by 15%. The results will e.g. be used to revise the Danish executive order on swimming pools and water quality to allow bather load-dependent water circulation. (ln)

  16. Occurrence and human exposure of parabens and their chlorinated derivatives in swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhui; Shi, Yali; Gao, Lihong; Liu, Jiemin; Cai, Yaqi

    2015-11-01

    As an emerging group of endocrine-disrupting chemicals, parabens have attracted growing attention due to their potential effects on human health. In the present study, the occurrence and distribution of eight parabens, four chlorinated parabens, and their common hydrolysis product, p-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHBA), were investigated in 39 swimming pools in Beijing, China. Methyl paraben and propyl paraben were the predominant compounds in swimming pools, accounting for 91.2 % of the total parabens. It is noteworthy that octyl paraben, a paraben with longer chain, was firstly detected in this study. There were several factors affecting the levels of parabens among the 39 swimming pools. The concentrations of parabens and chlorinated derivatives detected in indoor pools (144 ng L(-1)) were roughly 20-fold higher than those in outdoor pools (6.78 ng L(-1)). Hotel pools appear to present higher level of target compounds (361 ng L(-1)) than that in health club (228 ng L(-1)), municipal (130 ng L(-1)), school (75.6 ng L(-1)), and community pools (63.0 ng L(-1)). Moreover, the level of these compounds in pools during weekends (174 ng L(-1)) was much higher than that during weekdays (52.3 ng L(-1)). The dynamics of target compounds were also investigated to provide a general trend of the level of parabens in a school indoor swimming pool during a 14-week period. Human exposure assessment was conducted to estimate the potential risk of exposure to parabens and their chlorinated derivatives in swimming pools. Considering the total exposure dose of multiple parabens, human exposure to parabens from the water of swimming pools is negligible. However, the threat of these parabens to children in swimming pool should be concerned.

  17. THE USE OF MEMBRANE TECHNIQUES IN SWIMMING POOL WATER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Łaskawiec

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper has determined the suitability of membrane processes (UF ultrafiltration, UF, and nanofiltration, NF for the purification of waste streams, so-called backwash water, obtained from washing filtration beds in a swimming pool water system. The backwash water samples were taken from the circuits located in two indoor facilities with a different purpose of the basins. Moreover, the samples were characterized by varying quality, as described by selected physicochemical parameters (such as turbidity and ultraviolet absorbance UV254. Commercial membranes were used for the tests. The transport-separation properties of the membranes were determined based on the volumetric flux of the permeate. In addition, backwash water samples before and after the membrane process were subjected to toxicological assessment using the Microtox® screening test. The performed processes contributed to a significant reduction in turbidity and the value of UV254 ultraviolet absorbance, both in the ultrafiltration and nanofiltration processes. Whereas, significant differences in transport properties were noted within individual processes. A great influence of backwash water quality, including physicochemical parameters, on the course and results of the membrane filtration processes was demonstrated. In all of the nanofiltration cycles carried out, the removal of the toxic properties of the backwash water with respect to bacteria in the Microtox® test was found. Nevertheless, samples with high values of resultant physicochemical parameters after the ultrafiltration process were still characterized by high toxicity. Pressure membrane processes show high effectiveness in the removal of contaminants from backwash water. However, it is necessary to introduce supporting processes aimed at reducing membrane pore blocking by deposits and organic compounds, and in the case of ultrafiltration, assuring the safety of the purified stream in terms of the toxicological effect.

  18. Determination of the energy costs of heated open air swimming pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rado, L. (Ruhrgas A.G., Essen (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Gewerbe- und Heizungsberatung)

    1975-10-01

    Heated open-air swimming pools are a potent group of energy consumers which has great importance because of the increasing general costs and energy prices. This is why energy costs should be precalculated when choosing the heating system and the sort of energy. A method is presented to calculate the costs for heating the water, heating, ventilating, and air conditioning in the auxiliary buildings, as well as for heating service water and producing service heat for swimming pools.

  19. Health effects from swimming training in chlorinated pools and the corresponding metabolic stress pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Hua Li

    Full Text Available Chlorination is the most popular method for disinfecting swimming pool water; however, although pathogens are being killed, many toxic compounds, called disinfection by-products (DBPs, are formed. Numerous epidemiological publications have associated the chlorination of pools with dysfunctions of the respiratory system and with some other diseases. However, the findings concerning these associations are not always consistent and have not been confirmed by toxicological studies. Therefore, the health effects from swimming in chlorinated pools and the corresponding stress reactions in organisms are unclear. In this study, we show that although the growth and behaviors of experimental rats were not affected, their health, training effects and metabolic profiles were significantly affected by a 12-week swimming training program in chlorinated water identical to that of public pools. Interestingly, the eyes and skin are the organs that are more directly affected than the lungs by the irritants in chlorinated water; instead of chlorination, training intensity, training frequency and choking on water may be the primary factors for lung damage induced by swimming. Among the five major organs (the heart, liver, spleen, lungs and kidneys, the liver is the most likely target of DBPs. Through metabolomics analysis, the corresponding metabolic stress pathways and a defensive system focusing on taurine were presented, based on which the corresponding countermeasures can be developed for swimming athletes and for others who spend a lot of time in chlorinated swimming pools.

  20. Health effects from swimming training in chlorinated pools and the corresponding metabolic stress pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang-Hua; Wang, Zhi-Hui; Zhu, Xiao-Juan; Deng, Zhao-Hui; Cai, Can-Xin; Qiu, Li-Qiang; Chen, Wei; Lin, Ya-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Chlorination is the most popular method for disinfecting swimming pool water; however, although pathogens are being killed, many toxic compounds, called disinfection by-products (DBPs), are formed. Numerous epidemiological publications have associated the chlorination of pools with dysfunctions of the respiratory system and with some other diseases. However, the findings concerning these associations are not always consistent and have not been confirmed by toxicological studies. Therefore, the health effects from swimming in chlorinated pools and the corresponding stress reactions in organisms are unclear. In this study, we show that although the growth and behaviors of experimental rats were not affected, their health, training effects and metabolic profiles were significantly affected by a 12-week swimming training program in chlorinated water identical to that of public pools. Interestingly, the eyes and skin are the organs that are more directly affected than the lungs by the irritants in chlorinated water; instead of chlorination, training intensity, training frequency and choking on water may be the primary factors for lung damage induced by swimming. Among the five major organs (the heart, liver, spleen, lungs and kidneys), the liver is the most likely target of DBPs. Through metabolomics analysis, the corresponding metabolic stress pathways and a defensive system focusing on taurine were presented, based on which the corresponding countermeasures can be developed for swimming athletes and for others who spend a lot of time in chlorinated swimming pools.

  1. Health effects associated with indoor swimming pools: a suspected toxic chloramine exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaydos-Daniels, S Cornelia; Beach, Michael J; Shwe, Thein; Magri, Julie; Bixler, Danae

    2008-02-01

    A cohort and environmental study tested the hypothesis that suspected exposure to chloramines (by-products of chlorine for disinfection and ammonia from human sources) from a hotel's indoor swimming pool was associated with an outbreak among children who had attended a party at the pool. Retrospective cohort study. A case was defined as any hotel guest/visitor on 5-6 October 2002 who experienced three or more symptoms typical of chloramine exposure on either day after visiting the hotel. A cohort study and an environmental assessment were performed to determine the association between pool exposure and illness. Of 128 individuals interviewed, 32 met the case definition. Common symptoms among case patients were cough (84%), eye irritation (78%) and rash (34%). Illness was associated with entering the pool area [odds ratio (OR) 19.9; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.3-172], but more strongly with swimming (OR 72.0; 95% CI 9.1-568). Pool chloramine levels on 6 October 2002 were > or = 0.7ppm (optimal level=0ppm; state maximum=0.5ppm). The pool operator lacked formal training in pool maintenance. High chloramine levels may have caused illness in individuals who were either in or near the pool. This outbreak underscores the need for regular pool maintenance, improved air quality, education and certification for all operators of public and semipublic pools, and education about healthy swimming practices.

  2. Determination of Monochloroacetic Acid in Swimming Pool Water by Ion Chromatography-Conductivity Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pythias B. Espino

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an analytical method involving ion chromatography with conductivity detection was developed and optimized for the determination of monochloroacetic acid in swimming pool water. The ion chromatographic method has a detection limit of 0.02 mg L-1 and linear range of 0.05 to 1.0 mg L-1 with correlation coeff icient of 0.9992. The method is reproducible with percent RSD of 0.052% (n=10. The recovery of monochloroacetic acid spiked in different water types (bottled, tap and swimming pool water ranged from 28 to 122%. In dilute solutions, chloride and bromide were simultaneously analyzed along with monochloroacetic acid using the optimized method. Chloride and bromide have detection limits of 0.01 to 0.05 mg L-1, respectively. The usefulness of the ion chromatographic method was demonstrated in the analysis of monochloroacetic acid in swimming pool water samples. In such highly-chlorinated samples, an Ag/H cartridge was used prior to the ion chromatographic determination so as to minimize the signal due to chloride ion. Monochloroacetic acid was detected in concentrations between 0.020 and 0.093 mg L-1 in three of the six swimming pool water samples studied. The presence of monochloroacetic acid in the swimming pool water samples suggests the possible occurrence of other disinfection by-products in these waters.

  3. Swimming pools and intra-city climates: Influences on residential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-14

    Dec 14, 2011 ... elimination. Information on the influences of these 2 potential determinants in the study could inform certain policies, con- sumption behaviour and management strategies. A question to be considered throughout this study is whether the seemingly luxury activities, such as irrigating gardens and swimming ...

  4. Assessment of water quality of some swimming pools: a case study in Alexandria, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Salam, Magda Magdy

    2012-12-01

    In spite of the importance and popularity of swimming pools in summer, they have been identified as posing some public health risks to users due to either chemical or microbiological contamination. This study was carried out aiming at assessing the quality of water for some Alexandria's swimming pools in order to determine its compliance with the Egyptian standards no. 418/1995. Five swimming pools were selected randomly from different districts. Physical and chemical parameters, as well as biological examination of a total of 30 samples, were carried out using standard analytical methods. Water samples were collected from the studied swimming pools monthly over 6 months and pool water monitoring was carried out during afternoon of the weekends when the pools were most heavily used. The results indicated overall poor compliance with the standards. Compliance of the pool water to the microbial parameters, residual chlorine, pH, and turbidity were 56.7% (17 samples), 20% (6 samples), 46.7% (14 samples), and 46.7% (14 samples), respectively. Statistical analysis showed significant association between water contamination with microbial indicators and physical-chemical aspects such as residual chlorine, temperature, turbidity, and load of swimmers. Furthermore, Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia lamblia cysts has been found in 10% of samples. It was concluded that there is a need to improve disinfection and cleaning procedures, with consideration given to safety, and size of the pool in relation to bathing load. There is also a need to monitor swimming pool water quality continuously, and to increase bather hygienic practices and awareness of the risks as well as training of governmental inspectors.

  5. Assessment of Physicochemical and Microbiological Quality of Public Swimming Pools in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedeme, Kokebe; Legese, Melese Hailu; Gonfa, Almaz; Girma, Somson

    2017-01-01

    From swimming pools, bathers may acquire many potential pathogens or may be affected by the physicochemical characteristics of water used during bathing. Hence, this study aimed at assessing the physicochemical and microbiological quality of public swimming pools located at different hotels and recreation center in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A cross sectional study was carried out from February to May, 2016. Nine hotels and one recreation center which recognized to have public swimming services were included. A total of 60 swimming pool water samples from 10 swimming pools were collected at deeper, shallow and intake point twice on a weekly basis using a 250 ml sterile bottle containing sodium thiosulphate. PH, residual chlorine and temperature of samples were recorded at the time of collection. Sample containing bottles were transported in ice box to microbiological laboratory and analyzed on the same day. Standard cultural and biochemical methods were used for isolation and characterization of the main microbial groups. Total viable count, total coliform count, fecal coliform count and E. coli were determined. Data was analyzed using SPSS Version 20. Average PH and temperature of swimming pool water samples were 7.1 and 29oC respectively. Of all analyzed water samples, 58.4% (n=35/60) of them had PH range of 7.2-7.8, 58.3% (n=35/60) of samples had temperature in the range of 21oC-32oC and 25% (n=15/60) of water samples had residual chlorine in the range of 2-3mg/l. 73.3% (n=44/60) of the samples had a total viable count below 200 MPN/ml and 70% (n-42/60) of the samples had Total Coliform Count values less than 2 MPN/100 ml. Moreover, 66.7% (n=40/60) of the samples had fecal coliform counts falling below 1 MPN /100 ml. E. coli was absent in 70% (n=42/60) of the samples while it was present in 30% (n=18/60) of the samples. PH, residual chlorine and temperature value of majority of the swimming pools' water samples were within the acceptable limit. Regarding microbial

  6. The Ineffectiveness of Manual Treatment of Swimming Pools NNAJI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    Swimmers are usually endangered when they swallow contaminated pool water, inhale toxic disinfection by products such as trihalomethane (Nickmilder and Bernard, 2007) or by skin adsorption (Villanueva et al, 2007). The chance of infection through swallowing of pool water increases with the amount of water swallowed ...

  7. Swimming pool, respiratory health, and childhood asthma: should we change our beliefs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyan, Z S; Carraro, S; Piacentini, G; Baraldi, E

    2009-01-01

    Swimming is often recommended as a sport because of its several benefits to health. It is also recommended in asthmatic children as a sport with a lower potential for prompting exercise-induced asthma. However, there is growing interest in the potentially harmful effects of repeated respiratory tract exposure to chlorinated products and the problem of possible swimming-related health hazards is gaining importance at international level. It is already known that acute exposure to chlorine gas as in swimming pool accidents causes lung damage and also that elite swimmers may have increased airway inflammation and bronchial hyperreactivity, probably as a result of repeated exposure to chlorine derivatives. Recently some studies have been conducted to investigate whether repeated exposure to chlorine by-products in recreational swimmers might also lead to lung damage. In addition, some studies have been lately published on the even more debated issue of the possible harmful effects of baby swimming on respiratory health. This article reviews and discusses data from the literature on the effects of chlorine derivatives in different categories of people routinely attending swimming pools. The need for longitudinal studies is emphasized to definitely clarify any role of chlorinated swimming pool attendance in the development of asthma in recreational swimmers. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Automation of water supply and recirculation-filtration of water at a swimming pool using Zelio PLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniş, C. M.; Popa, G. N.; Iagăr, A.

    2018-01-01

    The paper proposes the use of the Zelio PLC for the automation of the water supply and recirculation-filtration system of a swimming pool. To do this, the Zelio SR3B261BD - 24V DC with 10 digital inputs (24V DC) and 10 digital outputs (relay contacts) was used. The proposed application makes the control of the water supply pumps and the water recirculation-filtration from a swimming pool. The recirculation-filtration systems for pools and swimming pools are designed to ensure water cleaning and recirculation to achieve optimum quality and lasting service life. The water filtration process is one of the important steps in water treatment in polls and swimming pools. It consists in recirculation of the entire volume of water and begins by absorbing the water in the pool by means of a pump followed by the passing of water through the filter, disinfectant and pH dosing, and reintroducing the water back into the pool or swimming pool through the discharge holes. Filters must to work 24 hours a day to remove pollutants from pools or swimming pools users. Filtration removes suspension particles with different origins. All newly built pools and swimming pools must be fitted with water recirculation systems, and existing ones will be equipped with water recirculation and water treatment systems.

  9. Effect of nano silica on water quality, health and safety in swimming pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Farhadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study has been to review of using nano-silica on the efficiency of water treatment of the swimming pool. The current research was an experimental study and was performed in-vitro and experimentally. At first, a nano-particle, called "Nano-Silica", was prepared in the laboratory and herbal additives such as turmeric, curries, saffron and cinnamon were used to increase its antibacterial property. Then, for performing microbiological tests, the water samples of Urmia University's swimming pool were studied in a multi-stage process, in two parts including water samples before adding the nano-particle and after the addition of the nano-particle. Finally, to study the safety and safety, among the relevant factors, the PH and turbidity were studied in the laboratory again in two parts, including before and after the addition of the nano-particle. The survey results showed that there are averages of 2.0633 and 1.0325 before and after adding the nano-particle, respectively, which is higher (P the curries with 92% and the turmeric with 85% had the most antibacterial properties. But the nano-particle did not adjust the swimming pool water PH up to the optimal level of 7.2. However, it reduced the swimming pool water turbidity significantly. This study showed that by using the nano-silica and adding the herbal additives such as cinnamon and saffron, the swimming pool water treatment has reached to a better quality. Keywords: quality, health, safety, nano silica, swimming pool.

  10. Effect of nano silica on water quality, health and safety in swimming pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirmohammad Kashef

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study has been to review of using nano-silica on the efficiency of water treatment of the swimming pool. The current research was an experimental study and was performed in-vitro and experimentally. At first, a nano-particle, called "Nano-Silica", was prepared in the laboratory and herbal additives such as turmeric, curries, saffron and cinnamon were used to increase its antibacterial property. Then, for performing microbiological tests, the water samples of Urmia University's swimming pool were studied in a multi-stage process, in two parts including water samples before adding the nano-particle and after the addition of the nano-particle. Finally, to study the safety and safety, among the relevant factors, the PH and turbidity were studied in the laboratory again in two parts, including before and after the addition of the nano-particle. The survey results showed that there are averages of 2.0633 and 1.0325 before and after adding the nano-particle, respectively, which is higher (P <0.05. Among the mentioned additives, the curries with 92% and the turmeric with 85% had the most antibacterial properties. But the nano-particle did not adjust the swimming pool water PH up to the optimal level of 7.2. However, it reduced the swimming pool water turbidity significantly. This study showed that by using the nano-silica and adding the herbal additives such as cinnamon and saffron, the swimming pool water treatment has reached to a better quality. Keywords: quality, health, safety, nano silica, swimming pool.

  11. The effect of UV treatment on highly polluted and normal operated swimming pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    “It should be light blue, transparent” (Mario Andrada, speakerman, Olympic Games, Rio, 2016) was the comment for the “green lake”. Swimming pools are sensitive recirculating systems. A malfunction in water treatment units or a poor operating decision could possibly lead to health-endangering or a......“It should be light blue, transparent” (Mario Andrada, speakerman, Olympic Games, Rio, 2016) was the comment for the “green lake”. Swimming pools are sensitive recirculating systems. A malfunction in water treatment units or a poor operating decision could possibly lead to health...

  12. Fungal Contamination of Indoor Public Swimming Pools, Ahwaz, South-west of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiei, A; Amirrajab, N

    2010-01-01

    Using public swimming pools during different seasons and poor health behavior could be responsible in transmission of fungal disease through pool water and its environment. Therefore, this research was conducted to investigate fungal agents of indoor public swimming pools of Ahwaz, capital city of Khouzestan Province, south-west of Iran. Ten indoor swimming pools of Ahwaz were investigated during two seasons for 6 months. Water specimens were collected by pump and environment samples including shower-bath area, margin of pool walls, dressing rooms, and slippers, by sterile carpet pieces. All specimens were cultured in SC and SCC culture media and fungal agents identification were based on macroscopic, microscopic characteristic and complement tests when it was necessary. Data analyzing was performed using SPSS version 13 for descriptive analyzing. A total of 593 samples were collected from different parts of pools. Interestingly in 13 samples from environmental places, dermatophytes were isolated as follows: Trichophyton mentagrophytes, T. rubrum, T. verrucosum and Epidermophyton floccosum 5, 4, 3 and 1 cases respectively. Ten cases of dermatophytes were isolated from floor of dressing area. Three hundred seventy two saprophytic fungi species and 32 yeasts were recovered from water and environment surfaces samples. Aspergillus, Penicillium and Mucor were the most common isolated saprophytic fungi. Existence of saprophytic fungi and yeast in pools water seems to be an indicator of their resistance to detergent agents. In addition, yeast water contamination could be from swimmers. Dermatophytes isolation from pools environment areas and foot washing sink, reveals the importance of public swimming pools in disease transmission. Because dressing places are being used by all of the swimmers, take care of hygienic discipline in these places should be noted by health policy markers.

  13. Exposure levels to brominated compounds in seawater swimming pools treated with chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parinet, Julien; Tabaries, Sophie; Coulomb, Bruno; Vassalo, Laurent; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2012-03-01

    Despite evidence of formation of brominated compounds in seawater swimming pools treated with chlorine, no data about exposure levels to these compounds have been reported. To address this issue, a survey has been carried out in four establishments (representing 8 pools) fed with seawater and devoted to relaxing and cure treatments (thalassotherapy centres located in Southeast of France). Carcinogenic and mutagenic brominated disinfection byproducts (trihalomethanes -THM- and halogenated acetic acids -HAA-) were quantified at varying levels, statistically related to organic loadings brought by bathers, and not from marine organic matter, and also linked to activities carried out in the pools (watergym vs swimming). Bromoform and dibromoacetic acid, the most abundant THM and HAA detected, were measured at levels up to 18-fold greater than the maximum contaminant levels of 60 and 80 μg/L fixed by US.EPA in drinking waters. The correlations between these disinfection byproducts and other environmental factors such as nitrogen, pH, temperature, free residual chlorine, UV(254), chloride and bromide concentrations, and daily frequentation were examined. Because thalassotherapy and seawater swimming pools (hotels, cruise ships,…) are increasing in use around the world and because carcinogenic and mutagenic brominated byproducts may be produced in chlorinated seawater swimming pools, specific care should be taken to assure cleanliness of users (swimmers and patients taking the waters) and to increase water circulation through media filters to reduce levels of brominated byproducts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of chemical, biological and physical quality assessment of indoor swimming pools in Shahrekord City, Iran in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadaei, Abdolmajid; Amiri, Masoud

    2014-11-30

    Previous studies have shown that mismanaged swimming pools could transmit water-borne diseases. The objective of the present study was the quality assessment of chemical, biological and physical characteristics of swimming pools in Shahrekord city, southwest of Iran. The two main indoor swimming pools of Shahrekord city were considered during the summer and winter of 2013. The number of 459 samples were analysed from swimming pools, showers and dressing rooms for chemical, biological and physical quality assessment. The most prevalent fungi were Aspergillus (48.91%), Penicillium (22.9%), Nocardia (11.31%), Cladosporium (8.41%). Rhizopus (6.18%), Scopulariopsis (6.21%), Fusarium (5.31%), and Mucor (1.38%). The most fungal contamination sites for both swimming pools were showers. Results showed that the values of total faecal coliform, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionalla, Escherichia coli and Heterotrophic Plate Count (HPC) for both swimming pools exceeded the guidelines, except for Staphylococcus aureus. The correlation coefficient between bathers load and total faecal coliform, heterotrophic bacteria was 0.949. The turbidity, free residual chlorine, and hardness of both swimming pools were not compliance with standard guidelines. Therefore, the improvement of disinfection and cleaning procedures is necessary, due to the different users and daily bather loads of each pool, as well as monitoring the water quality and increasing of the knowledge of swimming pool users on the risks of these potential diseases.

  15. Potential negative effects of chlorinated swimming pool attendance on health of swimmers and associated staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Zarzoso

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Swimming is a recommended activity to achieve good health and to prevent certain pathologies of the circulatory, pulmonary and locomotive systems. However, recent research has focused on the possible hazard of chlorinated swimming pools. Chlorine reacts with organic compounds found in the water, giving way to the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs. DBPs enter the human body by water ingestion, inhalation and dermal absorption. The most important DBPs are trihalomethanes, like chloroform, and chloramines, mainly trichloramine. Acute problems by accidental exposure to chlorine and its DBPs were reported years ago but their chronic effects have only been known since the beginning of the 21st century. Recent studies connect swimming in chlorinated pools with the prevalence of panting, asthma and hay fever. Besides, several DBPs are volatile and can be inhaled, not only by swimmers but also by those near the swimming pool. Although there are other environmental factors that could contribute to the increase of respiratory disorders, some authors have given rise to the so-called „chlorine hypothesis” which postulates that the increase in asthma in developed countries can be explained, in part, by the effects of DBPs present in chlorinated swimming pools. In order to constrain their potential negative effects, it is necessary (a to control the amount of chemical agents used in swimming pools, (b not to raise water temperature excessively, (c to maintain effective ventilation and (d to have strict hygiene rules for swimmers. However, the best way to avoid these problems would be using alternative disinfection systems.

  16. Occurrence and simulation of trihalomethanes in swimming pool water: A simple prediction method based on DOC and mass balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Di; Saravia, Florencia; Abbt-Braun, Gudrun; Horn, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Trihalomethanes (THM) are the most typical disinfection by-products (DBPs) found in public swimming pool water. DBPs are produced when organic and inorganic matter in water reacts with chemical disinfectants. The irregular contribution of substances from pool visitors and long contact time with disinfectant make the forecast of THM in pool water a challenge. In this work occurrence of THM in a public indoor swimming pool was investigated and correlated with the dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Daily sampling of pool water for 26 days showed a positive correlation between DOC and THM with a time delay of about two days, while THM and DOC didn't directly correlate with the number of visitors. Based on the results and mass-balance in the pool water, a simple simulation model for estimating THM concentration in indoor swimming pool water was proposed. Formation of THM from DOC, volatilization into air and elimination by pool water treatment were included in the simulation. Formation ratio of THM gained from laboratory analysis using native pool water and information from field study in an indoor swimming pool reduced the uncertainty of the simulation. The simulation was validated by measurements in the swimming pool for 50 days. The simulated results were in good compliance with measured results. This work provides a useful and simple method for predicting THM concentration and its accumulation trend for long term in indoor swimming pool water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Monitoring organic loading to swimming pools by fluorescence excitation–emission matrix with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seredynska-Sobecka, Bozena; Stedmon, Colin; Boe-Hansen, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence Excitation–Emission Matrix spectroscopy combined with parallel factor analysis was employed to monitor water quality and organic contamination in swimming pools. The fluorescence signal of the swimming pool organic matter was low but increased slightly through the day. The analysis...

  18. Volatile disinfection by-product analysis from chlorinated indoor swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, William A; Li, Jing; Wen, Yuli; Johnston, Jessica; Blatchley, Michael R; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2009-07-01

    Chlorination of indoor swimming pools is practiced for disinfection and oxidation of reduced compounds that are introduced to water by swimmers. However, there is growing concern associated with formation for chlorinated disinfection by-products (DBPs) in these settings. Volatile DBPs are of particular concern because they may promote respiratory ailments and other adverse health effects among swimmers and patrons of indoor pool facilities. To examine the scope of this issue, water samples were collected from 11 pools over a 6month period and analyzed for free chlorine and their volatile DBP content. Eleven volatile DBPs were identified: monochloramine (NH(2)Cl), dichloramine (NHCl(2)), trichloramine (NCl(3)), chloroform (CHCl(3)), bromoform (CHBr(3)), dichlorobromomethane (CHBrCl(2)), dibromochloromethane (CHBr(2)Cl), cyanogen chloride (CNCl), cyanogen bromide (CNBr), dichloroacetonitrile (CNCHCl(2)), and dichloromethylamine (CH(3)NCl(2)). Of these 11 DBPs, 10 were identified as regularly occurring, with CHBrCl(2) only appearing sporadically. Pool water samples were analyzed for residual chlorine compounds using the DPD colorimetric method and by membrane introduction mass spectrometry (MIMS). These two methods were chosen as complementary measures of residual chlorine, and to allow for comparisons between the methods. The DPD method was demonstrated to consistently overestimate inorganic chloramine content in swimming pools. Pairwise correlations among the measured volatile DBPs allowed identification of dichloromethylamine and dichloroacetonitrile as potential swimming pool water quality indicator compounds.

  19. Associations between testicular hormones at adolescence and attendance at chlorinated swimming pools during childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickmilder, M; Bernard, A

    2011-10-01

    The goal was to evaluate the associations between testicular hormones at adolescence and the exposure to chlorination by-products when attending chlorinated swimming pools. We obtained serum samples from 361 school male adolescents (aged 14-18years) who had visited swimming pools disinfected with chlorine or by copper-silver ionization. We analysed serum concentrations of inhibin B (two different assays), total and free testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS). There were strong inverse associations between serum levels of inhibin B (both assays) or of total testosterone, adjusted or unadjusted for gonadotropins and the time adolescents had spent in indoor chlorinated pools, especially during their childhood. Adolescents having attended indoor chlorinated pools for more than 250h before the age of 10years or for more than 125h before the age of 7years were about three times more likely to have an abnormally low serum inhibin B and/or total testosterone (copper-silver pool. Swimming in indoor chlorinated pools during childhood is strongly associated with lower levels of serum inhibin B and total testosterone. The absorption of reprotoxic chlorination by-products across the highly permeable scrotum might explain these associations. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Andrology © 2011 European Academy of Andrology.

  20. Optimal pH in chlorinated swimming pools - balancing formation of by-products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify the optimal pH range for chlorinated swimming pools the formation of trihalomethanes, haloacetonitriles and trichloramine was investigated in the pH-range 6.5–7.5 in batch experiments. An artificial body fluid analogue was used to simulate bather load as the precursor for by...

  1. Swimming Pool Water Treatment Chemicals and/or Processes. Standard No. 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI.

    Chemicals or processes used or intended for use, in the treatment of swimming pool water are covered. Minimum public health limits or acceptability in regard to toxicity, biocidal effectiveness, and chemical behavior and analysis are presented. The appendices give guidelines to the scientific and statistically sound evaluations to determine the…

  2. Color Fringes Bordering Black Stripes at the Bottom of a Swimming Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Gonzalo; Rojas, Roberto; Slüsarenko, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    We have observed a nice example of chromatic dispersion due to refraction in water, in the form of color fringes bordering the black stripes that exist at the bottom of a swimming pool. Here we give a qualitative description of the phenomenon, explaining the role of the black stripes and the dispersive index of refraction of water.

  3. Photolytic removal of DBPs by medium pressure UV in swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Zortea, R.; Piketty, A.

    2013-01-01

    Medium pressure UV is used for controlling the concentration of combined chlorine (chloramines) in many public swimming pools. Little is known about the fate of other disinfection by-products (DBPs) in UV treatment. Photolysis by medium pressure UV treatment was investigated for 12 DBPs reported...

  4. [Surveillance of the sanitary conditions of a public swimming pool in the city of Palermo (Italy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maida, Carmelo Massimo; Di Benedetto, Maria Antonella; Firenze, Alberto; Calamusa, Giuseppe; Di Piazza, Florinda; Milici, Maria Eleonora; Romano, Nino

    2008-01-01

    In a previous study we evaluated the microbiological quality of water of seven pools in the city of Palermo through evaluation of bacterial indicators of faecal contamination and of protozoa (Giardia and Cryptosporidium). In this study we also searched for the presence of fungi in two swimming pools of a public swimming facility in the same city. Samples were collected from both pools, their filtration systems and floor surfaces of the facility. Chemical-physical and microbiological examination of water of the two pools have shown that quality of water depends on the concentration of residual free chlorine and on the number of bathers in the pool. The values of four microbiological parameters (bacterial load at 22 degrees C and 36 degrees C, presence of coagulase-negative Staphylococci and Pseudomonas spp.) increased with diminishing chlorine concentrations and with increasing number of pool users. Faecal bacteria, Giardia and Cryptosporidium were not found. On the other hand, various fungi were isolated from floor surfaces and pool water even in the presence of optimal chlorine concentrations. This study confirms the importance of regular maintenance of pool disinfection systems and suggests the need to search for other micro-organisms not included in the current legislation (Giardia, Cryptosporidium and fungi).

  5. Health effects of disinfection by-products in chlorinated swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florentin, Arnaud; Hautemanière, Alexis; Hartemann, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    Increased attendance at swimming pools is correlated with higher input of organic and minerals pollutants introduced by swimmers in the swimming pool water. In most swimming pools, microbiological control is performed by disinfection with the addition of chlorine. Chlorine is now well-known to lead to the formation of many disinfection by-products (DBPs) including trihalomethanes and chloramines. The hypothesis of a link between the presence of eye and skin irritation syndromes in swimmers and contact with swimming pool water treated with chlorine was initially proposed by Mood (1953). During recent decades many epidemiological studies have described the importance of DBPs generated with natural or imported organic matter present in water. Many of these DBPs are suspected to be toxic or even carcinogenic. Trihalomethanes and haloacetic acid families are the most studied but others DBPs, like chloral hydrate, haloacetonitriles, N-nitrosodimethylamine and the bromate ion, are emerging compounds of interest. Epidemiological data about the risk of cancer are still controversial. However, numerous publications highlight a toxic risk especially the risk of allergy and respiratory symptoms for babies and elite swimmers. The few publications dedicated to risk assessment do not suggest increased risk, other than for elite swimmers. These publications are likely to underestimate the risk associated with DBPs because of the lack of data in the literature precludes the calculation of risk associated with certain compounds or certain pathways. Thus for regulations, the need to take into account the risks associated with disinfection by-products is now important without forgetting the need of the control of microbiological hazards in swimming pools. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. An Investigation on Physicochemical and Microbial Water Quality of Swimming Pools in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Dehvari

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Disrespect of health regulations and proper disinfection of water and swimming pools is effective in incidence of health problems and transfer of infectious diseases to swimmers. The aim of this research was to investigate water of swimming pools in Yazd city and compare the results with national standards. Methods: In this study, 11 active covered swimming pools of Yazd city were sampled as census. Parameters of temperature, pH, amount of free and Combined chlorine residual, turbidity, alkalinity, hardness, the population of heterotrophic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, fecal streptococci, and fecal coliforms were studied. Sampling has been conducted every two weaks for 3 months and samples were analyzed under standard procedures. Results: In this research, amount of pH in 84.73%, free residual chlorine in 44.18%, Combined residual chlorine in 72.45%, alkalinity in19.82%, turbidity in 86.36%, hardness in 57.18% and temperature in 13.73% Samples were desirable. The fecal streptococci bacteria was not shown in all the swimming pools and population of heterotrophic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and fecal coliforms in 56.73%, 93.27%, 79.36% and 91.45% cases were desirable, respectively. Statistical analysis indicated that there is a direct relationship between Water turbidity and population of heterotraphic bacteria. Conclusion: According to the results, the parameters of heterotrophic bacteria population, also the alkalinity and temperature had the least compliant with the standards that shows the necessity for continuous monitoring of physical, chemical and microbial parameters and also control of filtration and disinfection of water condition of swimming pools.

  7. Bioanalytical and chemical evaluation of disinfection by-products in swimming pool water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ruby Y L; Farré, Maria José; Stalter, Daniel; Tang, Janet Y M; Molendijk, Jeffrey; Escher, Beate I

    2014-08-01

    Pool water disinfection is vital to prevent microbial pathogens. However, potentially hazardous disinfection by-products (DBP) are formed from the reaction between disinfectants and organic/inorganic precursors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of DBPs in various swimming pool types in Brisbane, Australia, including outdoor, indoor and baby pools, and the dynamics after a complete water renewal. Chemical analysis of 36 regulated and commonly found DBPs and total adsorbable organic halogens as well as in vitro bioassays targeting cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and genotoxicity were used to evaluate swimming pool water quality. Dichloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid dominated in the pool water samples with higher levels (up to 2600 μg/L) than the health guideline values set by the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines (100 μg/L). Chlorinated DBPs occurred at higher concentrations compared to tap water, while brominated DBPs decreased gradually with increasing pool water age. Biological effects were expressed as chloroacetic acid equivalent concentrations and compared to predicted effects from chemical analysis and biological characterisation of haloacetic acids. The quantified haloacetic acids explained 35-118% of the absorbable organic halogens but less than 4% of the observed non-specific toxicity (cytotoxicity), and less than 1% of the observed oxidative stress response and genotoxicity. While the DBP concentrations in Australian pools found in this study are not likely to cause any adverse health effect, they are higher than in other countries and could be reduced by better hygiene of pool users, such as thorough showering prior to entering the pool and avoiding urination during swimming. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Determination of Bacterial Quality of Water in Randomly Selected Swimming Pools in Kampala City, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Margaret Ekopai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Swimming pools have become major recreation facilities for leisure and sports in cities across the world, but the standard guidelines, particularly in developing countries, are not adhered to because little is known about the contaminants in the pools and the possible health risks involved. This study provides a survey of bacterial quality of water from swimming pools in Kampala. A total of 26 water samples were collected from 13 outdoor swimming pools in Kampala between January and June 2016 and analysed for total aerobic plate count (TPC, Escherichia coli, coliforms, and Salmonella. The heterotrophic bacterial load ranged between 0 and 6.35 × 105 cfu/ml, where 6.35 × 105 cfu/ml was the highest load and 3 × 101 cfu/ml the least. The highest average TPC was 6.19 × 105 cfu/ml and the lowest 5.07 × 103 cfu/ml. 30.8% of the pools had TPC within acceptable limits (≤5 × 102 cfu/ml, whereas 69.2% were highly contaminated and did not conform to the Uganda National Water and Sewerage Corporation standards of recreational water quality for both treated (0 cfu/100 mls water and untreated (10 cfu/100 mls water. Although no positive results were yielded for E. coli, coliforms, and Salmonella, TPC represented the presence of heterotrophic bacteria which are often indicated in opportunistic infections.

  9. Trihalomethanes in chlorine and bromine disinfected swimming pools: air-water distributions and human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourencetti, Carolina; Grimalt, Joan O; Marco, Esther; Fernandez, Pilar; Font-Ribera, Laia; Villanueva, Cristina M; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2012-09-15

    This first study of trihalomethanes (THMs) in swimming pools using bromine agents for water disinfection under real conditions shows that the mixtures of these compounds are largely dominated by bromoform in a similar process as chloroform becomes the dominant THM in pools disinfected with chlorine agents. Bromoform largely predominates in air and water of the pool installations whose concentration changes are linearly correlated. However, the air concentrations of bromoform account for about 6-11% of the expected concentrations according to theoretical partitioning defined by the Henry law. Bromoform in exhaled air of swimmers is correlated with the air concentrations of this disinfectant by-product in the pool building. Comparison of the THM exhaled air concentrations between swimmers and volunteers bathing in the water without swimming or standing in the building outside the water suggest that physical activity enhance exposure to these disinfectant by-products. They also indicate that in swimming pools, besides inhalation, dermal absorption is a relevant route for the incorporation of THMs, particularly those with lower degree of bromination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevalence of Simkania negevensis in chlorinated water from spa swimming pools and domestic supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, M; Cremonini, E; Di Francesco, A; Dallolio, L; Biondi, R; Muthusamy, R; Leoni, E

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of Simkania negevensis in the chlorinated water of spa swimming pools and domestic network systems. A total of 10 and 36 samples were collected from two domestic water supplies and four spa facilities, respectively. Simkania negevensis was isolated in Acanthamoeba castellanii monolayers and detected by Gimenez staining and immunofluorescence test. Simkania negevensis DNA, extracted from the positive samples, was confirmed by a nested PCR assay followed by sequencing. Simkania negevensis was detected in 41·3% of samples (domestic water: 50%; untreated spa supply water: 25%; chlorinated spa pool water: 42·9%) from all the examined water systems in successive samplings performed in 1 year. The presence of S. negevensis was not correlated with the counts of Heterotrophic Bacteria and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Unlike Legionella spp., which were never isolated from the swimming-pool water samples, S. negevensis was also detected in chlorinated spa water. This investigation shows that Simkania is widespread in natural and man-made aquatic environments, which may represent possible sources of infection: in the swimming pools, in particular, the aerosol generated by the water movement could increase the risk of inhalation of infected particles. This study represents the first evidence of the presence of S. negevensis in spa pool water. Sero-epidemiological surveys on spa users could help to clarify its transmission in this environment. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Gene expression changes in blood RNA after swimming in a chlorinated pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Lucas A; Font-Ribera, Laia; Bustamante, Mariona; Sumoy, Lauro; Grimalt, Joan O; Bonnin, Sarah; Aguilar, Maria; Mattlin, Heidi; Hummel, Manuela; Ferrer, Anna; Kogevinas, Manolis; Villanueva, Cristina M

    2017-08-01

    Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBP) such as trihalomethanes (THM) in swimming pools has been linked to adverse health effects in humans, but their biological mechanisms are unclear. We evaluated short-term changes in blood gene expression of adult recreational swimmers after swimming in a chlorinated pool. Volunteers swam 40min in an indoor chlorinated pool. Blood samples were drawn and four THM (chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane and bromoform) were measured in exhaled breath before and after swimming. Intensity of physical activity was measured as metabolic equivalents (METs). Gene expression in whole blood mRNA was evaluated using IlluminaHumanHT-12v3 Expression-BeadChip. Linear mixed models were used to evaluate the relationship between gene expression changes and THM exposure. Thirty-seven before-after pairs were analyzed. The median increase from baseline to after swimming were: 0.7 to 2.3 for MET, and 1.4 to 7.1μg/m(3) for exhaled total THM (sum of the four THM). Exhaled THM increased on average 0.94μg/m(3) per 1 MET. While 1643 probes were differentially expressed post-exposure. Of them, 189 were also associated with exhaled levels of individual/total THM or MET after False Discovery Rate. The observed associations with the exhaled THM were low to moderate (Log-fold change range: -0.17 to 0.15). In conclusion, we identified short-term gene expression changes associated with swimming in a pool that were minor in magnitude and their biological meaning was unspecific. The high collinearity between exhaled THM levels and intensity of physical activity precluded mutually adjusted models with both covariates. These exploratory results should be validated in future studies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Potential risks of TiO{sub 2} and ZnO nanoparticles released from sunscreens into outdoor swimming pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Soo-kyung [Center for Water Resource Cycle, Green City Technology Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Energy Environment Policy and Technology, Green School, Korea University (KU)-Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun-ju [Center for Water Resource Cycle, Green City Technology Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaesang [Energy Environment Policy and Technology, Green School, Korea University (KU)-Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seunghak, E-mail: seunglee@kist.re.kr [Center for Water Resource Cycle, Green City Technology Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Energy Environment Policy and Technology, Green School, Korea University (KU)-Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Nanoparticles from sunscreen products can be released into public pools. • Nanoparticles and organic ingredients can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). • A negative impact of ROS should not be significant in swimming pool. - Abstract: The potential risks of nanoparticles (NPs) in sunscreens being released into swimming water were evaluated by a series of laboratory experiments simulating the fate and transport of NPs in outdoor swimming pools. NPs released from sunscreen-applied skin were estimated using pig skins covered with five different commercial sunscreens containing TiO{sub 2}, ZnO, or both at various concentrations. Assuming that the swimming water treatment processes consisted of filtration, UV irradiation, heating, and chlorination, possible removal of the released NPs by each process was estimated. Generation of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) by the NPs under sunlight and after UV photochemical treatment were measured, and the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration possibly present in the swimming pool was calculated based on some specific scenarios of operating an outdoor swimming pool. It was found that a significant amount of the NPs in sunscreens could be released into the swimming water, and accumulate during circulation through the treatment system. However, the concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} possibly present in the swimming pool should be below the level at which an adverse effect to bathers is concerned.

  13. Economic use of energy in indoor and outdoor swimming pools. 2. ed. Rationelle Energieverwendung in Hallen- und Freibaedern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deyle, W.; Fey, H.; Luboschik, U.; Roskam, F.; Schlesiger, G.

    1987-01-01

    By using solar energy and by supporting measures for energy conservation and heat recovery, the energy expenditure in swimming pools can be reduced. In order to show the operators of swimming pools and architects and civil engineers the possibilities which can be exhausted in reconstruction and new buildings, the existing planning aid was compiled. The information given in this are based on several successfully completed research and trial projects. Detailed information is given on energy demand (heat, electricity, annual energy demand on indoor and outdoor swimming pools) as well as on economical energy utilization (planning the building, technical installations), control and regulation, covering the pool (upper and lower hall installations, economy, costs) and heat recovery from water (waste water, heat pump). Following this, solar installations are described (foundations, system aircuits, assembly space, performance control, maintenance). In the appendix to the planning aid there is a report on six demonstration schemes (outdoor and indoor swimming pools). (HWJ).

  14. Occurrence of brominated disinfection byproducts in the air and water of chlorinated seawater swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasfi, Tarek; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Coulomb, Bruno; Vassalo, Laurent; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2017-05-01

    An undesirable consequence of disinfection is the formation of chemical contaminants known as disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Chronic exposure to DBPs has been linked to adverse health effects. The occurrence of DBPs in chlorinated pools filled with seawater (such as thalassotherapy pools and pools in spas) has received little attention so far. The present study evaluated the speciation and levels of disinfection byproducts in indoor swimming pools filled with seawater and treated with chlorine. Water and air samples were collected from three indoor swimming pools located in Southern France. Several classes of DBPs including trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, and trihaloacetaldehydes were analyzed in water. Halogenated volatile organic compounds were analyzed in air. Extractable organic halides (EOX) contents were determined using combustion/micro-coulometry system. The speciation of DBPs identified in the three pools was predominantly brominated. The mean (arithmetic) concentration of bromoform, dibromoacetic acid, tribromoacetic acid, dibromoacetonitrile and bromal hydrate in the three pools was 79.2, 72.9, 59.9, 26.9 and 10.0μg/L, respectively. By weight, HAAs represented the most abundant chemical class followed by THMs. In air, bromoform was the most abundant THM occurring at a mean concentration of 133.2μg/m(3) in the three pools. The mean EOX level was 706μgCl(-)/L for the three pools. In average, the quantified DBPs accounted for only 14% of EOX, thus 86% of EOX remained unknown. Further research is warranted to identify the unknown DBPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Payroll System in Swimming Pool Tasa Using Visual Basic .Net 2003

    OpenAIRE

    Parcel Natalnael Hutabarat; Rahayu Noveandini, SKom, MM

    2008-01-01

    With the proposed payroll system built on this design, it can replace the manual system to process payroll, and expect to be able to overcome the weaknesses that have been faced by TASA and the swimming pool is also a way to simplify payroll activities TASA which during the many weaknesses . With the system that uses computer services is expected to help TASA employee wage freeze.

  16. Assessment of fungal contamination in a group of Lisbon's gymnasiums with a swimming pool

    OpenAIRE

    Viegas, Carla; Alves,Célia; CAROLINO,Elisabete; Pinheiro, Catarina; Rosado, Laura; Santos, Carlos Silva

    2011-01-01

    The study’s main purpose was the assessment of the environmental fungal contamination, the exploration of possible associations between related environmental variables and the study of the relationship between fungal contamination of air and surfaces. A descriptive study was developed based upon air and surfaces monitoring for fungal contamination in ten indoor gymnasiums with a swimming pool located in Lisbon’s urban area. Fifty 200 litres air samples and 120 surface swabs were collected....

  17. Degradation of Organic UV filters in Chlorinated Seawater Swimming Pools: Transformation Pathways and Bromoform Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasfi, Tarek; Coulomb, Bruno; Ravier, Sylvain; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2017-12-05

    Organic ultraviolet (UV) filters are used in sunscreens and other personal-care products to protect against harmful effects of exposure to UV solar radiation. Little is known about the fate of UV filters in seawater swimming pools disinfected with chlorine. The present study investigated the occurrence and fate of five commonly used organic UV filters, namely dioxybenzone, oxybenzone, avobenzone, 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate, and octocrylene, in chlorinated seawater swimming pools. Pool samples were collected to monitor the variation of UV filter concentrations during pool opening hours. Furthermore, laboratory-controlled chlorination experiments were conducted in seawater spiked with UV filters to investigate the reactivity of UV filters. Extracts of chlorination reaction samples were analyzed using high-resolution mass spectrometry and electron-capture detection to identify the potentially formed byproducts. In the collected pool samples, all the UV filters except dioxybenzone were detected. Chlorination reactions showed that only octocrylene was stable in chlorinated seawater. The four reactive UV filters generated brominated transformation products and disinfection byproducts. This formation of brominated products resulted from reactions between the reactive UV filters and bromine, which is formed rapidly when chlorine is added to seawater. Based on the identified byproducts, the transformation pathways of the reactive UV filters were proposed for the first time. Bromoform was generated by all the reactive UV filters at different yields. Bromal hydrate was also detected as one of the byproducts generated by oxybenzone and dioxybenzone.

  18. Prevalence and antimicrobial-resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in swimming pools and hot tubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Jonathan K; Lee, Jiyoung

    2011-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen in recreational waters and the primary cause of hot tub folliculitis and otitis externa. The aim of this surveillance study was to determine the background prevalence and antimicrobial resistance profile of P. aeruginosa in swimming pools and hot tubs. A convenience sample of 108 samples was obtained from three hot tubs and eight indoor swimming pools. Water and swab samples were processed using membrane filtration, followed by confirmation with polymerase chain reaction. Twenty-three samples (21%) were positive for P. aeruginosa, and 23 isolates underwent susceptibility testing using the microdilution method. Resistance was noted to several antibiotic agents, including amikacin (intermediate), aztreonam, ceftriaxone, gentamicin, imipenem, meropenem (intermediate), ticarcillin/clavulanic acid, tobramycin (intermediate), and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The results of this surveillance study indicate that 96% of P. aeruginosa isolates tested from swimming pools and hot tubs were multidrug resistant. These results may have important implications for cystic fibrosis patients and other immune-suppressed individuals, for whom infection with multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa would have greater impact. Our results underlie the importance of rigorous facility maintenance, and provide prevalence data on the occurrence of antimicrobial resistant strains of this important recreational water-associated and nosocomial pathogen.

  19. Prevalence and Antimicrobial-Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Swimming Pools and Hot Tubs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan K. Lutz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen in recreational waters and the primary cause of hot tub folliculitis and otitis externa. The aim of this surveillance study was to determine the background prevalence and antimicrobial resistance profile of P. aeruginosa in swimming pools and hot tubs. A convenience sample of 108 samples was obtained from three hot tubs and eight indoor swimming pools. Water and swab samples were processed using membrane filtration, followed by confirmation with polymerase chain reaction. Twenty-three samples (21% were positive for P. aeruginosa, and 23 isolates underwent susceptibility testing using the microdilution method. Resistance was noted to several antibiotic agents, including amikacin (intermediate, aztreonam, ceftriaxone, gentamicin, imipenem, meropenem (intermediate, ticarcillin/clavulanic acid, tobramycin (intermediate, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The results of this surveillance study indicate that 96% of P. aeruginosa isolates tested from swimming pools and hot tubs were multidrug resistant. These results may have important implications for cystic fibrosis patients and other immune-suppressed individuals, for whom infection with multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa would have greater impact. Our results underlie the importance of rigorous facility maintenance, and provide prevalence data on the occurrence of antimicrobial resistant strains of this important recreational water-associated and nosocomial pathogen.

  20. New method for determination of trihalomethanes in exhaled breath: Applications to swimming pool and bath environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lourencetti, Carolina; Ballester, Clara; Fernandez, Pilar; Marco, Esther [Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Prado, Celia; Periago, Juan F. [Institute of Safety and Occupational Health (ISSL), Murcia (Spain); Grimalt, Joan O., E-mail: joan.grimalt@idaea.csic.es [Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2010-03-03

    A method for the estimation of the human intake of trihalomethanes (THMs), namely chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane and bromoform, during showering and bathing is reported. The method is based on the determination of these compounds in exhaled breath that is collected by solid adsorption on Tenax using a device specifically designed for this purpose. Instrumental measurements were performed by automatic thermal desorption coupled to gas chromatography with electron capture detection. THMs in exhaled breath samples were determined during showering and swimming pool attendance. The levels of these compounds in indoor air and water were also determined as reference for interpretation of the exhaled breath results. The THM concentrations in exhaled breath of the volunteers measured before the exposure experiments showed a close correspondence with the THMs levels in indoor air where the sampler was located. Limits of detection in exhaled breath were dependent on THM analytes and experimental sites. They ranged between 170 and 710 ng m{sup -3} in the swimming pool studies and between 97 and 460 ng m{sup -3} in the showering studies. Application of this method to THMs determination during showering and swimming pool activities revealed statistically significant increases in THMs concentrations when comparing exhaled breath before and after exposure.

  1. Rapid Assay for In Situ Identification of Coagulase-Positive Staphylococci Recovered by Membrane Filtration from Swimming Pool Water

    OpenAIRE

    Klapes, N. Arlene; Vesley, Donald

    1986-01-01

    A rapid, in situ thermonuclease test that identifies colonies of Staphylococcus aureus among staphylococci isolated from swimming pool water by membrane filtration recovery on various selective and differential media is described.

  2. Decontamination of outdoor school swimming pools in Fukushima after the nuclear accident in March 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saegusa, J; Kurikami, H; Yasuda, R; Kurihara, K; Arai, S; Kuroki, R; Matsuhashi, S; Ozawa, T; Goto, H; Takano, T; Mitamura, H; Nagano, T; Naganawa, H; Yoshida, Z; Funaki, H; Tokizawa, T; Nakayama, S

    2013-03-01

    Because of radioactive fallout resulting from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident, water discharge from many outdoor swimming pools in Fukushima was suspended out of concern that radiocesium in the pool water would flow into farmlands. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency has reviewed the existing flocculation method for decontaminating pool water and established a practical decontamination method by demonstrating the process at eight pools in Fukushima. In this method, zeolite powder and a flocculant are used for capturing radiocesium present in pool water. The supernatant is discharged if the radiocesium concentration is less than the targeted level. The radioactive residue is collected and stored in a temporary storage space. Radioactivity concentration in water is measured with a NaI(Tl) or Ge detector installed near the pool. The demonstration results showed that the pool water in which the radiocesium concentration was more than a few hundred Bq L was readily purified by the method, and the radiocesium concentration was reduced to less than 100 Bq L. The ambient dose rates around the temporary storage space were slightly elevated; however, the total increase was up to 30% of the background dose rates when the residue was shielded with sandbags.

  3. QUALITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF INDOOR SWIMMING POOL AND SEASONAL BATHING RESORTS WATER USING MICROTOX® TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Łaskawiec

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The tests were to specify the toxic effect on the basis of Vibrio fischeri luminescence inhibition caused by chemical compounds present in pool water samples. The testing tool was Microtox®; This biotest produces quick results thus making it a comfortable tool for testing water for various toxicants. Furthermore, UV254 absorbance measure was carried out and its value was a proxy parameter for defining participation of precursors to disinfection by-products in the samples. Some of the samples had high UV254 values, one of them was 144 m 1. The Microtox® quality tests of indoor and outdoor swimming pool water presented in the paper proved impact of such factors like air exchange or supply of pool water circulation on water quality. Seasonal bathing waters had lower toxicity values. In the context of the work specifies that the impurities in the water cause its toxicity. However, there was no relationship between high UV254 absorbance values and higher toxicity of the samples. The toxicological analysis may serve as a screening test of swimming pool water quality. It is of key importance to check the free chlorine value for a water sample. High chlorine concentration can cause higher bioluminescence inhibition values.

  4. FEASIBILITY STUDY OF USING COMPLEX OF HYDROGEN PEROXIDE AND SILVER FOR DISINFECTING SWIMMING POOL WATER AND ITS ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nabizadeh ، N. Samadi ، Z. Sadeghpour ، M. Beikzadeh

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this research the application of Nanosil containing hydrogen peroxide and silver was studied in disinfecting swimming pool water and it's Environment. The effect of the disinfectant on Candida albicans (ATCC No. 10231, Aspergillus niger (ATCCNo. 16404, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC No. 9027, Serratia marcescens (PTCC No. 1111, Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC No. 10031 and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC No. 29737 was evaluated. The main objective of this experiment was to determine the effective dose of Nanosil which could be used for disinfecting the environment of swimming pools and other surface area. Then, the effectiveness of Nanosil was studied in two private and one public swimming pools. Heterotrophic plate count, thermotolerant coliforms, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus were monitored as the target microorganisms in disinfection practice According to the result of this study, it is recommended to apply the Nanosil with the concentration of ≥3% (30000 mg/L for contact time of 30 min or more for practical disinfection in swimming pools environment. The application of Nanosil in real conditions of two private and one public swimming pools indicated that the acceptable microbial quality is also achievable if the disinfectant residual concentration would be as high as 20 mg/L in swimming pool water.

  5. Photolytic removal of DBPs by medium pressure UV in swimming pool water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Kamilla M.S. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Zortea, Raissa [Department of Land, Environment and Geotechnology Engineering, Polytechnic University of Turin (Italy); Piketty, Aurelia [Institute of Chemistry, Industrial and Chemical Engineering and Technology (INP-ENCIACET), National Polytechnic Institute of Toulouse (France); Vega, Sergio Rodriguez [Chemical Engineering, Complutense University of Madrid (Spain); Andersen, Henrik Rasmus, E-mail: Henrik@ndersen.net [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark)

    2013-01-15

    Medium pressure UV is used for controlling the concentration of combined chlorine (chloramines) in many public swimming pools. Little is known about the fate of other disinfection by-products (DBPs) in UV treatment. Photolysis by medium pressure UV treatment was investigated for 12 DBPs reported to be found in swimming pool water: chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, bromoform, dichloroacetonitrile, bromochloroacetonitrile, dibromoacetronitrile, trichloroacetonitrile, trichloronitromethane, dichloropropanone, trichloropropanone, and chloral hydrate. First order photolysis constants ranged 26-fold from 0.020 min{sup −1} for chloroform to 0.523 min{sup −1} for trichloronitromethane. The rate constants generally increased with bromine substitution. Using the UV removal of combined chlorine as an actinometer, the rate constants were recalculated to actual treatment doses of UV applied in a swimming pool. In an investigated public pool the UV dose was equivalent to an applied electrical energy of 1.34 kWh m{sup −3} d{sup −1} and the UV dose required to removed 90% of trichloronitromethane was 0.4 kWh m{sup −3} d{sup −1}, while 2.6 kWh m{sup −3} d{sup −1} was required for chloral hydrate and the bromine containing haloacetonitriles and trihalomethanes ranged from 0.6 to 3.1 kWh m{sup −3} d{sup −1}. It was predicted thus that a beneficial side-effect of applying UV for removing combined chlorine from the pool water could be a significant removal of trichloronitromethane, chloral hydrate and the bromine containing haloacetonitriles and trihalomethanes. - Highlights: ► UV irradiation is able to degrade all 12 investigated disinfection by-products. ► Bromine species are easier to remove than their chlorinated analogues. ► UV dose used for combined chlorine was comparable with doses required for DBP removal. ► Significant removal of some disinfection by-products in swimming pools is indicated.

  6. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation for most DBPs. Concurrence...... trihalomethane formation by UV may be a result of kinetic increase in formation by UV. However, this does not imply that higher trihalomethane concentrations would occur in pools that apply continuous UV treatment. The bromine fraction of halogens in formed trihalomethanes increased with UV dose. This indicates......Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during experimental UV treatment of pool water has previously been reported with little concurrence between laboratory studies, field studies and research groups. In the current study, changes in concentration of seven out of eleven investigated volatile...

  7. Ecology of dermatophytes and other keratinophilic fungi in swimming pools and polluted and unpolluted streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Shtayeh, M S; Khaleel, Tayseer Kh M; Jamous, Rana M

    2002-01-01

    The biodiversity and richness of keratinophilic fungal communities including dermatophytes were assessed in three stream sites and three swimming pools in the Nablus district in Palestine, using hair baiting (HBT) and surface dilution plate (SDP) techniques, over 8- and 6-month periods, respectively. The effect of wastewater effluent and selected ecological factors on these fungi in relation to species diversity and population densities were also considered. Fifty keratinophilic fungal species were recovered from the aquatic habitats studied, of which 42 were recovered from stream sites and 22 from swimming pools. Of these fungi 6 were either dermatophytes (Microsporum gypseum, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes) or dermatophyte related species (Chrysosporium merdarium, Ch. tropicum, Ch. keratinophilum and T. terrestre). The most frequently isolated species in the three pools were Acremonium strictum and Cladosporium cladosporioides, using Sabouraud dextrose agar medium (SDA). The most abundant species were Acr. strictum, and Aspergillus flavus. However, only 4 species were isolated using the SDA medium amended with 5-flurocytosine (5-FC). The most frequent and abundant species in the three stream sites using SDA medium were Geotricum candidum, and Penicillium chrysogenum. The most frequent species in the three sites using the 5-FC medium, was Paecilomyces lilacinus. Using HBT, the most abundant and frequent species in the three stream sites were G. candidum, and Pa. lilacinus, on SDA medium, and Pa. lilacinus, and Gliocladium nigrovirens on the 5-FC medium. The 5-FC medium was more suitable for the isolation of dermatophytes and closely related species than the SDA medium; 6 were recovered on 5-FC, whereas only one on the SDA medium. Variation in the levels of keratinophilic fungal populations from the three stream sites sampled 5 times over an 8-month period, followed comparable fluctuation patterns. Wastewater affected fungal population densities with the highest

  8. Photolysis of inorganic chloramines and efficiency of trichloramine abatement by UV treatment of swimming pool water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltermann, Fabian; Widler, Tobias; Canonica, Silvio; von Gunten, Urs

    2014-06-01

    Trichloramine, one of the three inorganic chloramines (mono-, di- and trichloramine), is a problematic disinfection by-product in recreational pool water since it causes skin and eye irritations as well as irritations of the respiratory tract. The most commonly used chloramine mitigation strategy in pool water is UV treatment. Experiments with membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) confirmed that inorganic chloramines are effectively degraded by UV irradiation with low-pressure (LP) and medium-pressure (MP) mercury lamps (apparent quantum yields (QY): NH2Cl = 0.50 (LP) and 0.31 (MP) mol einstein(-1), NHCl2: 1.06 (LP) and 0.85 (MP) mol einstein(-1)). Trichloramine showed the fastest depletion with a quantum yield slightly above 2 mol einstein(-1) in purified (LP and MP) and pool water (MP). This high quantum yield can partly be explained by reactions involving OH radicals (purified water) and the reaction of trichloramine with moieties formed during UV irradiation of pool water. The presence of free chlorine affects trichloramine degradation (QY: ∼1.5 mol einstein(-1)) since it scavenges OH radicals and competes with trichloramine for reactive species (e.g. organic amines). Measurements in a pool facility revealed that the installed UV reactors degraded trichloramine by 40-50% as expected from laboratory experiments. However, trichloramine reduction in the pools was less pronounced than in the UV reactors. Model calculations combining pool hydraulics with formation/abatement of trichloramine showed that there was a fast trichloramine formation in the pool from the residual chlorine and nitrogenous precursors. The main factors influencing trichloramine concentrations in pool water are the free chlorine concentration and the UV treatment in combination with the recirculation rate through the water treatment system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of selection of pH in swimming pool on formation of chlorination by-products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Willach, Sarah; Mosbæk, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Chlorine is used as disinfection agent in public swimming pools, but also reacts with organic matter in the water forming chlorinat ed disinfection by-products. In order to evaluate the effect of choice of pHsetpoint in the pool we investigated the effect of chlorination of artificial body fluid ...

  10. Destruction of disinfection byproducts and their precursors in swimming pool water by combined UV treatment and ozonation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheema, Waqas Akram; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    Both UV treatment and ozonation are used to reduce different types of disinfection byproducts (DBP) in swimming pools. UV treatment is most common as it is particularly efficient in removing the repulsive chlorine like smelling chloramines (combined chlorine). UV treatment of a pool water increased...

  11. Kick, Stroke and Swim: Complement Your Swimming Program by Engaging the Whole Body on Dry Land and in the Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Susan; Duell, Kelly; Dehaven, Carole; Heidorn, Brent

    2017-01-01

    The Kick, Stroke and Swim (KSS) program can be used to engage students in swimming-skill acquisition and fitness training using a variety of modalities, strategies and techniques on dry land. Practicing swim strokes and techniques on land gives all levels of swimmers--from beginner to competitive--a kinesthetic awareness of the individual…

  12. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1996-01-01

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  13. Effect of ozonation of swimming pool water on formation of volatile disinfection by-products - A laboratory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Cheema, Waqas Akram

    2016-01-01

    Ozonation experiments were performed using unchlorinated tap water used for filling municipal swimming pools, actual pool water and pool water polluted by addition of fresh tap water and artificial body fluid to evaluate ozone kinetics and water quality effects on formation of volatile disinfection...... was approximated 17-19 min in all samples. Subsequent chlorination revealed ozone removed reactivity of dissolved organic carbon toward chlorine for tap and polluted pool water, decreasing formation rate of trihalomethanes (TTHM). In pool water higher rates of TTHM formation was observed after the initial ozone...

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Swimming Pool Water: Evidences and Perspectives for a New Control Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Guida

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is frequently isolated in swimming pool settings. Nine recreational and rehabilitative swimming pools were monitored according to the local legislation. The presence of P. aeruginosa was correlated to chlorine concentration. The ability of the isolates to form a biofilm on plastic materials was also investigated. In 59.5% of the samples, microbial contamination exceeded the threshold values. P. aeruginosa was isolated in 50.8% of these samples. The presence of P. aeruginosa was not correlated with free or total chlorine amount (R2 < 0.1. All the isolates were moderate- to strong-forming biofilm (Optical Density O.D.570 range 0.7–1.2. To control biofilm formation and P. aeruginosa colonization, Quantum FreeBioEnergy© (QFBE, FreeBioEnergy, Brisighella, Italy, has been applied with encouraging preliminary results. It is a new, promising control strategy based on the change of an electromagnetic field which is responsible for the proliferation of some microorganisms involved in biofilm formation, such as P. aeruginosa.

  15. [Investigation and comparison of behaviours of adults and children in swimming pools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, M; Bodina, A; Bonali, D; Bascucci, B; Pellino, P; Castaldi, S

    2011-01-01

    The swimmers health's protection must be achieved through the implementation of structures that respect safety standards, the best management of the structures and the users'compliance with rules that minimize the potential risks to health, now clearly identified by the World Health Organization in specific guidelines and by the national and regional legislation. An anonymous questionnaire has been used in order to detect the level of knowledge of hygienic risks and the behaviour of costumers (adults and children) of swimming pool. Comparing the answers, statistically significant differences in the behaviours of adults and children were found in order to protect their own and others' health. In particular children do shower and go through footbath before entering the swimming pool more than adults (respectively 89.2% versus 77.4% and 89.2% versus 79.4%). No differences in the behaviours of the two groups were found in the use of dedicated footwear and caps. Children are predisposed to follow the rules because they are more loyal to duty, while adults comply with the rules only when it is clear the advantage to protect their health. This paper underline the importance of health education programs that can help people to understand the importance of adopting certain behaviours in order to prevent risks and promote health for the benefit of all.

  16. A survey of fungi and some indicator bacteria in chlorinated water of indoor public swimming pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, R.; Hirn, J.

    1981-01-01

    Fifty-four water samples, of volume 500 ml, originating from six public indoor fresh water swimming pools were examined for the presence of fungi and some indicator bacteria by a membrane-filter method. Sabouraud-dextrose agar and selective Candida albicans-medium were used for isolation and identification of fungi. In all but one of the samples the free chlorine content was above 0.40 mg/l. No Candida albicans were detected. Molds and unidentified yeasts were isolated from 29 of the samples. The following species were recorded: Acremonium spp., ALternaria sp., Aspergillus spp., Candida guilliermondii, Chaetomium sp., Cladosporium spp., Clasterosporium sp., Fusarium spp., Geotrichium sp., Penicillium spp., Petriellidium boydii and Phoma spp. Their occurrence was sporadic, each species mostly appearing as single colonies only, with a maximum of 5 colonies. Bacterial growth was noticed in 15 samples, but only in the sample of low free chlorine content did this reach significant proportions. The study indicates that the standard of chlorination is, at least in general, an adequate measure against fungal contamination of swimming pool water. However, the spectrum of mold species encountered encourages a further search for possible indicator species among these organisms.

  17. Chloroform in indoor swimming-pool air: monitoring and modeling coupled with the effects of environmental conditions and occupant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, H T; Chen, M J; Lin, C H; Chou, W S; Chen, J H

    2009-08-01

    Human exposure to chloroform in indoor swimming pools has been recognized as a potential health concern. Although environmental monitoring is a useful technique to investigate chloroform concentrations in indoor swimming-pool air, in practice, the interpretations of measured data would inevitably run into difficulties due to the complex interactions among the numerous variables, including environmental conditions and occupant activities. Considering of the relevant variables of environmental conditions and occupant activities, a mathematical model was first proposed to predict the chloroform concentration in indoor swimming-pool air. The developed model provides a straightforward, conceptually simple way to predict the indoor air chloroform concentration by calculating the mass flux, J, and the Péclet number, Pe, and by using a heuristic value of the indoor airflow recycle ratio, R. The good agreement between model simulation and measured data demonstrates the feasibility of using the presented model for indoor air quality management, operational guidelines and health-related risk assessment.

  18. What's in the pool? A comprehensive identification of disinfection by-products and assessment of mutagenicity of chlorinated and brominated swimming pool water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richardson, S.D.; Demarini, D.M.; Kogevinas, M.; Fernandez, P.; Marco, E.; Lourencetti, C.; Balleste, C.; Heederik, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072910542; Meliefste, K.; McKague, A.B.; Marcos, R.; Font-Ribera, L.; Grimalt, J.O.; Villanueva, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Swimming pool disinfectants and disinfection by-products (DBPs) have been linked to human health effects, including asthma and bladder cancer, but no studies have provided a comprehensive identification of DBPs in the water and related that to mutagenicity. OBJECTIVES: We performed a

  19. Trihalomethanes in Lisbon indoor swimming pools: occurrence, determining factors, and health risk classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Zelinda Isabel; Rebelo, Maria Helena; Silva, Manuela Manso; Alves, Ana Martins; Cabral, Maria da Conceição; Almeida, Ana Cristina; Aguiar, Fátima Rôxo; de Oliveira, Anabela Lopes; Nogueira, Ana Cruz; Pinhal, Hermínia Rodrigues; Aguiar, Pedro Manuel; Cardoso, Ana Sofia

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of water quality from indoor swimming pools, using chorine-based disinfection techniques, was performed during a 6-mo period to study the occurrence, distribution, and concentration factors of trihalomethanes (THM). Several parameters such as levels of water THM, water and air chloroform, water bromodichloromethane (BDCM), water dibromochloromethane (DBCM), water bromoform (BF), free residual chlorine (FrCl), pH, water and air temperature, and permanganate water oxidizability (PWO) were determined in each pool during that period. Chloroform (CF(W)) was the THM detected at higher concentrations in all pools, followed by BDCM, DBCM, and BF detected at 99, 34, and 6% of the samples, respectively. Water THM concentrations ranged from 10.1 to 155 μg/L, with 6.5% of the samples presenting values above 100 μg/L (parametric value established in Portuguese law DL 306/2007). In this study, air chloroform (CF(Air)) concentrations ranged from 45 to 373 μg/m³ with 24% of the samples presenting values above 136 μg/m³ (considered high exposure value). Several significant correlations were observed between total THM and other parameters, namely, CF(W), CF(Air), FrCl, water temperature (T(W)), and PWO. These correlations indicate that FrCl, T(W) and PWO are parameters that influence THM formation. The exposure criterion established for water THM enabled the inclusion of 67% of Lisbon pools in the high exposure group, which reinforces the need for an improvement in pool water quality.

  20. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini [Water ApS, Farum Gydevej 64, 3520 Farum (Denmark); Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljøvej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Hansen, Kamilla M.S., E-mail: kmsh@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljøvej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Andersen, Henrik R. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljøvej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-07-01

    Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during experimental UV treatment of pool water has previously been reported with little concurrence between laboratory studies, field studies and research groups. In the current study, changes in concentration of seven out of eleven investigated volatile DBPs were observed in experiments using medium pressure UV treatment, with and without chlorine and after post-UV chlorination. Results showed that post-UV chlorine consumption increased, dose-dependently, with UV treatment dose. A clear absence of trihalomethane formation by UV and UV with chlorine was observed, while small yet statistically significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile and dichloropropanone concentrations were detected. Results indicate that post-UV chlorination clearly induced secondary formation of several DBPs. However, the formation of total trihalomethanes was no greater than what could be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation for most DBPs. Concurrence for induction of trihalomethanes was identified between post-UV chlorination treatments and simulated extended chlorination time treatment. Trihalomethanes could not be induced by UV treatment of water from a continuously UV treated pool. This indicates that literature reports of experimentally induced trihalomethane formation by UV may be a result of kinetic increase in formation by UV. However, this does not imply that higher trihalomethane concentrations would occur in pools that apply continuous UV treatment. The bromine fraction of halogens in formed trihalomethanes increased with UV dose. This indicates that UV removes bromine atoms from larger molecules that participate in trihalomethane production during post-UV chlorination. Additionally, no significant

  1. Surveillance and Molecular Identification of Acanthamoeba and Naegleria Species in Two Swimming Pools in Alexandria University, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Z. AL-HERRAWY

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Swimming in contaminated water was reported to be associated with Acanthamoeba and N. fowleri human infections. The present study was carried out with the aim of isolation and identification of the different species of Acanthamoeba and Naegleria from two swimming pools in Alexandria University. Methods: Samples were collected from the swimming pools of Alexandria University Stadium and Faculty of Agriculture-Alexandria University during the period from May 2012 to April 2013.Results: Free-living amoebae were prevalent in the collected samples. Molecular characterization confirmed the identity of ten Acanthamoeba isolates and seven Naegleria isolates. Acanthamoeba T3, T4, T5, T11 and T15 genotypes were identified. Acanthamoeba T4 was the most prevalent genotype.Conclusion: The relatively high prevalence of Acanthamoeba, especially genotype T4, indicates the presence of a health hazard to swimmers particularly those wearing contact lenses. Naegleria fowleri was not found during the present study. 

  2. Surveillance and Molecular Identification of Acanthamoeba and Naegleria Species in Two Swimming Pools in Alexandria University, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-HERRAWY, Ahmad Z.; KHALIL, Mahmoud I.; EL-SHERIF, Soheir S.; OMAR, Fatima A. E.; LOTFY, Wael M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Swimming in contaminated water was reported to be associated with Acanthamoeba and N. fowleri human infections. The present study was carried out with the aim of isolation and identification of the different species of Acanthamoeba and Naegleria from two swimming pools in Alexandria University. Methods: Samples were collected from the swimming pools of Alexandria University Stadium and Faculty of Agriculture-Alexandria University during the period from May 2012 to April 2013. Results: Free-living amoebae were prevalent in the collected samples. Molecular characterization confirmed the identity of ten Acanthamoeba isolates and seven Naegleria isolates. Acanthamoeba T3, T4, T5, T11 and T15 genotypes were identified. Acanthamoeba T4 was the most prevalent genotype. Conclusion: The relatively high prevalence of Acanthamoeba, especially genotype T4, indicates the presence of a health hazard to swimmers particularly those wearing contact lenses. Naegleria fowleri was not found during the present study. PMID:28761479

  3. Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... But you might run into some jellyfish or Portuguese man-of-wars. These umbrella-shaped, nearly clear ... Here are some other good water safety tips: Learn to swim. Ask your parents to contact your ...

  4. Natural and mixed convection in the cylindrical pool of TRIGA reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, R.; Tiselj, I.; Matkovič, M.

    2017-02-01

    Temperature fields within the pool of the JSI TRIGA MARK II nuclear research reactor were measured to collect data for validation of the thermal hydraulics computational model of the reactor tank. In this context temperature of the coolant was measured simultaneously at sixty different positions within the pool during steady state operation and two transients. The obtained data revealed local peculiarities of the cooling water dynamics inside the pool and were used to estimate the coolant bulk velocity above the reactor core. Mixed natural and forced convection in the pool were simulated with a Computational Fluid Dynamics code. A relatively simple CFD model based on Unsteady RANS turbulence model was found to be sufficient for accurate prediction of the temperature fields in the pool during the reactor operation. Our results show that the simple geometry of the TRIGA pool reactor makes it a suitable candidate for a simple natural circulation benchmark in cylindrical geometry.

  5. Impact of combining chlorine dioxide and chlorine on DBP formation in simulated indoor swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daekyun; Ates, Nuray; Kaplan Bekaroglu, Sehnaz Sule; Selbes, Meric; Karanfil, Tanju

    2017-08-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the combined use of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and chlorine (Cl2) on the speciation and kinetics of disinfection by-product (DBP) formation in swimming pools using synthetic pool waters prepared with a body fluid analog (BFA) and/or fresh natural water. At 1:25 (mass ratio) of ClO2 to Cl2, there was no significant reduction in the formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) for both BFA solution and natural water compared to the application of Cl2 alone. When the mass ratio of ClO2 to Cl2 increased to 1:1, substantial decreases in both THMs and HAAs were observed in the natural water, while there was almost no change of DBP formations in the BFA solution. Haloacetonitriles and halonitromethanes levels in both water matrices remained similar. In the presence of bromide, the overall DBP formation increased in both BFA solution and natural water. For the DBP formation kinetics, after 72hr of contact time, very low formation of THMs and HAAs was observed for the use of ClO2 only. Compared to Cl2 control, however, applying the 1:1 mixture of ClO2/Cl2 reduced THMs by >60% and HAAs by >50%. Chlorite was maintained below 1.0mg/L, while the formation of chlorate significantly increased over the reaction time. Finally, in a bench-scale indoor pool experiment, applying ClO2 and Cl2 simultaneously produced less THMs compared to Cl2 control and kept chlorite at <0.4mg/L, while HAAs and chlorate accumulated over 4-week operation period. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Monitoring and factors affecting levels of airborne and water bromoform in chlorinated seawater swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudenne, Jean-Luc; Parinet, Julien; Demelas, Carine; Manasfi, Tarek; Coulomb, Bruno

    2017-08-01

    Water and air quality of eight seawater swimming pools using chlorine disinfection was measured during four sampling campaigns, spread on one full-year, and in four thalassotherapy centers located in Southeast of France. Concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) in air and in water as well as concentrations of parameters, including nonpurgeable organic carbon (NPOC), free residual chlorine (Clf), pH, Kjeldhal Nitrogen (KN), salinity, conductivity, bromide ions and, water and air temperature, were measured. Water and air samples were collected in triplicates morning - at the opening of the pools -, noon and night - at the closing of the pools -, in summer and winter. Data analysis was performed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and rotated component matrix, from both data quality and other parameters such as TOC, aromaticity (UV254), pH, hygrometry, and free residual chlorine (Clf). This statistical analysis demonstrates a high correlation between TOC, Clf and UV254 and THM levels found in air and water, particularly for the major ones (CHBr3 in water: 300.0μg/L mean, 1029.0μg/L maximum; CHBr3 in air: 266.1μg/m3 mean, 1600.0μg/m3 maximum, and CHClBr2 in water: 18.9μg/L mean, 81.0μg/L maximum; CHClBr2 in air: 13.6μg/m3 mean, 150.0μg/m3 maximum). These high levels of bromoform (CHBr3) are particularly worrisome in such health institutions, even these levels do not exceed the Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 5mg/m3 as an 8hour time-weighted average currently fixed by various administrations, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Detection and quantification of human adenovirus genomes in Acanthamoeba isolated from swimming pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODRIGO STAGGEMEIER

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Acanthamoeba is the most common free-living environmental amoeba, it may serve as an important vehicle for various microorganisms living in the same environment, such as viruses, being pathogenic to humans. This study aimed to detect and quantify human adenoviruses (HAdV in Acanthamoebas isolated from water samples collected from swimming pools in the city of Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil. Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba were isolated from water samples, and isolates (n=16 were used to investigate the occurrence of HAdVs. HAdV detection was performed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. HAdVs were detected in 62.5% (10/16 of Acanthamoeba isolates, ranging from 3.24x103 to 5.14x105 DNA copies per milliliter of isolate. HAdV viral loads found in this study are not negligible, especially because HAdV infections are associated with several human diseases, including gastroenteritis, respiratory distress, and ocular diseases. These findings reinforce the concept that Acanthamoeba may act as a reservoir and promote HAdV transmission through water.

  8. Modifying the food supply at a community swimming pool: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Beverley; Dumbrell, Susan

    2011-04-01

    We report on a process evaluation of a project that aimed to replace energy-dense, nutrient-poor (EDNP) items at a community swimming pool kiosk. The analytic framework was the Analysis Grid for Environments Linked to Obesity (ANGELO). To contribute to health promotion practice in recreational settings, the process evaluation sought to determine the extent to which project'controversies' modified project objectives and strategies. The case study method captured the project narrative. The primary data were interviews with key project participants, supplemented with project records and media articles.These were analysed thematically. The socio-cultural and political environments, particularly the capacity to exercise choice in relation to ENDP products, had considerable influence on the project. In the face of two controversies -"I thought everyone was signed up to it"and "We can't deny the kiddies their ice-cream" it was necessary for the project partners to modify the objectives and strategies and substantially change the target. The setting is highly responsive to both the micro and macro socio-cultural and political aspects of the environment.

  9. Electromagnetic Interference from Swimming Pool Generator Current Causing Inappropriate ICD Discharges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Samuel Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic interference (EMI includes any electromagnetic field signal that can be detected by device circuitry, with potentially serious consequences: incorrect sensing, pacing, device mode switching, and defibrillation. This is a unique case of extracardiac EMI by alternating current leakage from a submerged motor used to recycle chlorinated water, resulting in false rhythm detection and inappropriate ICD discharge. A 31-year-old female with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and Medtronic dual-chamber ICD placement presented after several inappropriate ICD shocks at the public swimming pool. Patient had never received prior shocks and device was appropriate at all regular follow-ups. Intracardiac electrograms revealed unique, high-frequency signals at exactly 120 msec suggestive of EMI from a strong external source of alternating current. Electrical artifact was incorrectly sensed as a ventricular arrhythmia which resulted in discharge. ICD parameters including sensing, pacing thresholds, and impedance were all normal suggesting against device malfunction. With device failure and intracardiac sources excluded, EMI was therefore strongly suspected. Avoidance of EMI source brought complete resolution with no further inappropriate shocks. After exclusion of intracardiac interference, device malfunction, and abnormal settings, extracardiac etiologies such as EMI must be thoughtfully considered and excluded. Elimination of inappropriate shocks is to “first, do no harm.”

  10. Prevalence of Ocular, Respiratory and Cutaneous Symptoms in Indoor Swimming Pool Workers and Exposure to Disinfection By-Products (DBPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guglielmina Fantuzzi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of self-reported respiratory, ocular and cutaneous symptoms in subjects working at indoor swimming pools and to assess the relationship between frequency of declared symptoms and occupational exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs. Twenty indoor swimming pools in the Emilia Romagna region of Italy were included in the study. Information about the health status of 133 employees was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Subjects working at swimming pools claimed to frequently experience the following symptoms: cold (65.4%, sneezing (52.6%, red eyes (48.9% and itchy eyes (44.4%. Only 7.5% claimed to suffer from asthma. Red eyes, runny nose, voice loss and cold symptoms were declared more frequently by pool attendants (lifeguards and trainers when compared with employees working in other areas of the facility (office, cafe, etc.. Pool attendants experienced generally more verrucas, mycosis, eczema and rash than others workers; however, only the difference in the frequency of self-declared mycosis was statistically significant (p = 0.010. Exposure to DBPs was evaluated using both environmental and biological monitoring. Trihalomethanes (THMs, the main DBPs, were evaluated in alveolar air samples collected from subjects. Swimming pool workers experienced different THM exposure levels: lifeguards and trainers showed the highest mean values of THMs in alveolar air samples (28.5 ± 20.2 µg/m3, while subjects working in cafe areas (17.6 ± 12.1 µg/m3, offices (14.4 ± 12.0 µg/m3 and engine rooms (13.6 ± 4.4 µg/m3 showed lower exposure levels. Employees with THM alveolar air values higher than 21 µg/m3 (median value experienced higher risks for red eyes (OR 6.2; 95% CI 2.6–14.9, itchy eyes (OR 3.5; 95% CI 1.5–8.0, dyspnea/asthma (OR 5.1; 95% CI 1.0–27.2 and blocked nose (OR 2.2; 95% CI 1.0–4.7 than subjects with less exposure. This study confirms

  11. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-11-01

    A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

  12. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia and the Relationship between Protozoa and Water Quality Indicators in Swimming Pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shumin; Yin, Pengna; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Sike

    2017-04-01

    A total of 60 samples were collected from 35 swimming pools in Beijing, China, and the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia were investigated. The results showed that 16.7% and 15.0% of samples were positive for Cryptosporidium oocyst and Giardia cysts, respectively, with a mean concentration of 0.30 oocysts/10 L and 0.27 cysts/10 L. The oocysts and cysts were found to have higher rates of occurrence in August than in May. Genotyping confirmed the presence of Cryptosporidium hominis, C. parvum, and Giardia assemblages A and B, all of which were associated with human infections. The predominant species/assemblages were C. hominis and Giardia assemblage A. Analyses of the relationships between parasite oocysts/cysts, indicator bacteria, and physical-chemical parameters revealed that there was no correlation between 2 parasites and fecal bacterial indicators, whilst there was a significant correlation between protozoa and urea concentration, which indicates that urea concentration rather than fecal bacterial indicators might be an appropriate index for chlorine-resistant protozoa in swimming pools. This study provides useful information to improve the safety of swimming pool water and deduce the risk of protozoan infections.

  13. Removal of haloacetic acids from swimming pool water by reverse osmosis and nanofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linyan; She, Qianhong; Wan, Man Pun; Wang, Rong; Chang, Victor W-C; Tang, Chuyang Y

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies report high concentrations of haloacetic acids (HAAs), a prevalent class of toxic disinfection by-products, in swimming pool water (SPW). We investigated the removal of 9 HAAs by four commercial reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membranes. Under typical SPW conditions (pH 7.5 and 50 mM ionic strength), HAA rejections were >60% for NF270 with molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) equal to 266 Da and equal or higher than 90% for XLE, NF90 and SB50 with MWCOs of 96, 118 and 152 Da, respectively, as a result of the combined effects of size exclusion and charge repulsion. We further included 7 neutral hydrophilic surrogates as molecular probes to resolve the rejection mechanisms. In the absence of strong electrostatic interaction (e.g., pH 3.5), the rejection data of HAAs and surrogates by various membranes fall onto an identical size-exclusion (SE) curve when plotted against the relative-size parameter, i.e., the ratio of molecular radius over membrane pore radius. The independence of this SE curve on molecular structures and membrane properties reveals that the relative-size parameter is a more fundamental SE descriptor compared to molecular weight. An effective molecular size with the Stokes radius accounting for size exclusion and the Debye length accounting for electrostatic interaction was further used to evaluate the rejection. The current study provides valuable insights on the rejection of trace contaminants by RO/NF membranes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Influence of physical activity in the intake of trihalomethanes in indoor swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Esther; Lourencetti, Carolina; Grimalt, Joan O; Gari, Mercè; Fernández, Pilar; Font-Ribera, Laia; Villanueva, Cristina M; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2015-07-01

    This study describes the relationship between physical activity and intake of trihalomethanes (THMs), namely chloroform (CHCl3), bromodichloromethane (CHCl2Br), dibromochloromethane (CHClBr2) and bromoform (CHBr3), in individuals exposed in two indoor swimming pools which used different disinfection agents, chlorine (Cl-SP) and bromine (Br-SP). CHCl3 and CHBr3 were the dominant compounds in air and water of the Cl-SP and Br-SP, respectively. Physical exercise was assessed from distance swum and energy expenditure. The changes in exhaled breath concentrations of these compounds were measured from the differences after and before physical activity. A clear dependence between distance swum or energy expenditure and exhaled breath THM concentrations was observed. The statistically significant relationships involved higher THM concentrations at higher distances swum. However, air concentration was the major factor determining the CHCl3 and CHCl2Br intake in swimmers whereas distance swum was the main factor for CHBr3 intake. These two causes of THM incorporation into swimmers concurrently intensify the concentrations of these compounds into exhaled breath and pointed to inhalation as primary mechanism for THM uptake. Furthermore, the rates of THM incorporation were proportionally higher as higher was the degree of bromination of the THM species. This trend suggested that air-water partition mechanisms in the pulmonary system determined higher retention of the THM compounds with lower Henry's Law volatility constants than those of higher constant values. Inhalation is therefore the primary mechanisms for THM exposure of swimmers in indoor buildings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Occupational Exposure to Trichloramine and Trihalomethanes in Swedish Indoor Swimming Pools: Evaluation of Personal and Stationary Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, Jessica; Graff, Pål; Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss; Westberg, Håkan; Eriksson, Kåre; Löfstedt, Håkan

    2015-10-01

    Chlorination is a method commonly used to keep indoor swimming pool water free from pathogens. However, chlorination of swimming pools produces several potentially hazardous by-products as the chlorine reacts with nitrogen containing organic matter. Up till now, exposure assessments in indoor swimming pools have relied on stationary measurements at the poolside, used as a proxy for personal exposure. However, measurements at fixed locations are known to differ from personal exposure. Eight public swimming pool facilities in four Swedish cities were included in this survey. Personal and stationary sampling was performed during day or evening shift. Samplers were placed at different fixed positions around the pool facilities, at ~1.5 m above the floor level and 0-1 m from the poolside. In total, 52 personal and 110 stationary samples of trichloramine and 51 personal and 109 stationary samples of trihalomethanes, were collected. The average concentration of trichloramine for personal sampling was 71 µg m(-3), ranging from 1 to 240 µg m(-3) and for stationary samples 179 µg m(-3), ranging from 1 to 640 µg m(-3). The air concentrations of chloroform were well below the occupational exposure limit (OEL). For the linear regression analysis and prediction of personal exposure to trichloramine from stationary sampling, only data from personal that spent >50% of their workday in the pool area were included. The linear regression analysis showed a correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.693 and a significant regression coefficient β of 0.621; (95% CI = 0.329-0.912, P = 0.001). The trichloramine exposure levels determined in this study were well below the recommended air concentration level of 500 µg m(-3); a WHO reference value based on stationary sampling. Our regression data suggest a relation between personal exposure and area sampling of 1:2, implying an OEL of 250 µg m(-3) based on personal sampling. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  16. Apparatus for draining lower drywell pool water into suppresion pool in boiling water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus which mitigates temperature stratification in the suppression pool water caused by hot water drained into the suppression pool from the lower drywell pool. The outlet of a spillover hole formed in the inner bounding wall of the suppression pool is connected to and in flow communication with one end of piping. The inlet end of the piping is above the water level in the suppression pool. The piping is routed down the vertical downcomer duct and through a hole formed in the thin wall separating the downcomer duct from the suppression pool water. The piping discharge end preferably has an elevation at or near the bottom of the suppression pool and has a location in the horizontal plane which is removed from the point where the piping first emerges on the suppression pool side of the inner bounding wall of the suppression pool. This enables water at the surface of the lower drywell pool to flow into and be discharged at the bottom of the suppression pool.

  17. An Architectural Self - Criticism: The Accessibility Analysis of Berlika Park Swimming Pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Demirkan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Urban designers and architects have to clearly understand the physical features and needs of the people they are designing for. In the designing process fields such as   anthropometry, biomechanics, ergonomics, biology and physics require scientific verification to architects. But it can easily be forgotten that there are physically-challenged persons. All users experience any place by using their ability to move and perceive. If designers don’t take into account the special circumstances in the design process for physically-challenged persons, the accessibility of the place becomes impossible. At the same time a sustainable and an accessible place is truly a sign of urban rights being recognized. In this context, human rights are not only important for disciplines such as law, sociology, psychology and political sciences but also they must be important for design disciplines such as architecture, urban and interior design. This research based on the rights to exercise for physically-challenged persons aims to analyze the accessibility of the place. I was a member of the design team and today an active user of the facility-Berlika Park Swimming Pool-chosen for this study. Photographs were taken of different areas of the facility not compliant with TSE standards -TS9111 - TS 12576. Within this context, the structure was examined in terms of mobility constraints under the titles of accessible route, the arrangement of immediate surroundings of the building, arrangement of the entrance of the building, arrangement of the accessibility inside the building, signs, elevators, and fire emergency alert systems. The problematic areas of the building were identified and analyzed. This research aims to make the building more accessible place and a new modification project is being planned. But it is necessary to examine the building or the environment during its design process and solve the problems without the need of renovation project. The design

  18. Henry's law constant of N,N-dichloromethylamine: application to the contamination of the atmosphere of indoor swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimetiere, Nicolas; De Laat, Joseph

    2009-10-01

    The volatility of N,N-dichloromethylamine (DCMA), a disinfection by-product formed during chlorination of swimming pool water, has been investigated in the present work. The Henry's law constants for DCMA were experimentally determined at five temperatures (5, 15, 25, 35 and 45 degrees C) using the single equilibrium technique. The volumic ratio between the gas and the water phases in the headspace vessels ranged from 1 to 60 and the initial concentration of DCMA in the aqueous solutions was approximately 2mM. The values obtained for the dimensionless Henry's law constant varied from 0.047 at 5 degrees C to 0.312 at 45 degrees C. The temperature dependence of the Henry's law constants followed the van't Hoff equation. Trace levels of DCMA (16-70 microg m(-3)) were detected in the atmosphere of an indoor swimming pool whereas the concentrations of DCMA in water pools were in the range 8.8-15 microg L(-1).

  19. Wastewater treatment in a compact intensified wetland system at the Badboot: a floating swimming pool in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oirschot, D; Wallace, S; Van Deun, R

    2015-09-01

    The Badboot (Dutch for swimming pool boat) is a floating swimming pool located in the city center of Antwerp in Belgium. The overall design consists of a recycled ferry boat that serves as a restaurant and next to that a newly built ship that harbours an Olympic size swimming pool, sun decks, locker rooms with showers, and a party space. A major design goal of the project was to make the ship as environmentally friendly as possible. To avoid discharge of contaminated waste water in the Antwerp docks, the ship includes onsite treatment of wastewater in a compact constructed wetland. The treatment wetland system was designed to treat wastewater from visitor locker rooms, showers, toilets, two bars, and the wastewater from the restaurant kitchen. Due to the limited space on board the ship, only 188 m(2) could be allocated to a wetland treatment system. As a result, part of the design included intensification of the wetland treatment process through the use of Forced Bed Aeration, which injects small quantities of air in a very uniform grid pattern throughout the wetland with a mechanical air compressor. The system was monitored between August 2012 and March 2013 (with additional sampling in the autumn of 2014). Flows and loads to the wetland were highly variable, but removal efficiency was extremely high; 99.5 % for chemical oxygen demand (COD), 88.6 % for total nitrogen and 97.2 % for ammonia. The treatment performance was assessed using a first-order, tanks-in-series model (the P-k-C* model) and found to be roughly equivalent to similar intensified wetlands operating in Germany. However, treatment performance was substantially better than data reported on passive wetlands, likely as a result of intensification. Even with mechanically assisted aeration, the total oxygen delivered to the treatment wetlands was insufficient to support conventional nitrification and denitrification, so it is likely that alternate nitrogen removal pathways, such as anammox, are

  20. Assessment of occupational and public exposure to trichloramine in Swiss indoor swimming pools: a proposal for an occupational exposure limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrat, Jean; Donzé, Gérard; Iseli, Christophe; Perret, Daniel; Tomicic, Catherine; Schenk, Olivier

    2012-04-01

    The presence of trichloramine in the air in different indoor swimming pools has been studied in several countries. In almost all studies, the results show a possible health impact due to trichloramine among pool attendants. The main objectives of our study were to evaluate, for the first time in Switzerland, occupational and public trichloramine exposure in a representative panel of indoor pools and to propose an occupational exposure limit for trichloramine. Measurements were done in 30 indoor swimming pools located in three regions of Switzerland: Jura, Neuchâtel, and Fribourg. All investigations were performed during the 2007-2008 winter season in order to assure closed windows and standard ventilation conditions. Trichloramine air samplings were performed at 130 cm above the floor around the pool. Analyses of free chlorine and bounded chlorine were performed on-site, and water samples were immediately sent to the laboratory for analysis of trihalomethanes, urea, and dissolved organic carbon. A health questionnaire was distributed to all the participants. Our results indicate that in all the studied facilities except one, the trichloramine concentrations were below the French reference value of 0.5 mg m(-3), and only three were equal to or slightly over 0.3 mg m(-3). Overall, our results point out a very low and consistent range of trichloramine concentrations (mean concentration of trichloramine: 0.114 ± 0.043 mg m(-3)). A total of 184 questionnaires were filled out by pool workers. Of the study population, 66% were men (n = 117), 21% were smokers (9 women and 29 men), and only 7% (n = 13) were ex-smokers. The control group was composed of 71 persons (38 men and 33 women); 22% (n = 15) were smokers and 24% (n = 16) ex-smokers. Our results demonstrate an increasing risk of irritative symptoms up to a level of 0.2-0.3 mg m(-3) of trichloramine. The health data in our study, as well as the review of the literature, strongly suggest fixing the trichloramine

  1. Evaluation of biological and physico-chemical quality of public swimming pools, Hamadan (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edris Hoseinzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: As results showed the residual chlorine in pools water was lower than standard level and as regard to microbial contamination in pool water, it can be concluded that the disinfection system has been impaired.

  2. Chemical Safety Alert: Safe Storage and Handling of Swimming Pool Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazards of pool water treatment and maintenance chemicals (e.g., chlorine), and the protective measures pool owners should take to prevent fires, toxic vapor releases, and injuries. Triggered by improper wetting, mixing, or self-reactivity over time.

  3. ‘Right now, Sophie *swims in the pool?!’: Brain potentials of grammatical aspect processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique eFlecken

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether brain potentials of grammatical aspect processing resemble semantic or morpho-syntactic processing, or whether they instead are characterized by an entirely distinct pattern in the same individuals. We studied aspect from the perspective of agreement between the temporal information in the context (temporal adverbials, e.g., Right now and a morpho-syntactic marker of grammatical aspect (e.g., progressive is swimming. Participants read questions providing a temporal context that was progressive (What is Sophie doing in the pool right now? or habitual (What does Sophie do in the pool every Monday?. Following a lead-in sentence context such as Right now, Sophie…, we measured ERPs time-locked to verb phrases in four different conditions, e.g., (a is swimming (control; (b *is cooking (semantic violation; (c *are swimming (morpho-syntactic violation; or (d?swims (aspect mismatch; …in the pool. The collected ERPs show typical N400 and P600 effects for semantics and morpho-syntax, while aspect processing elicited an Early Negativity (250-350 ms. The aspect-related Negativity was short-lived and had a central scalp distribution with an anterior onset. This differentiates it not only from the semantic N400 effect, but also from the typical (LAN (Left Anterior Negativity, that is frequently reported for various types of agreement processing. Moreover, aspect processing was not accompanied by a clear P600 modulation.We argue that the specific context for each item in this experiment provided a trigger for agreement checking with temporal information encoded on the verb, i.e., morphological aspect marking. The aspect-related Negativity obtained for aspect agreement mismatches reflects a violated expectation concerning verbal inflection (in the example above, the expected verb phrase was Sophie is X-ing rather than Sophie X-s in condition d. The absence of an additional P600 for aspect processing suggests that the mismatch did not

  4. Administrative Files 1957, 1958, 1961 Related to Livermore Pool-Type Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinly, C. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1961-11-01

    These are administrative files from 1957, 1958, and 1961 related to Livermore Pool-Type Reactor. The following is an excerpt form the first file: The Livermore Pool Type Reactor has been designed as a versatile research facility to serve the programs of the Livermore Branch of the University of California Radiation Laboratory. Average thermal neutron flux in the reactor will be approximately 7 x 1012 neutrons/cm2-sec. with a maximum flux in the central "flux trap" of near 3 x 1013 neutrons/cm2-sec. In this way the high flux necessary for special experiments can be achieved with the reactor operating at one megawatt.

  5. Nanofiltration for enhanced removal of disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors in swimming pool water-retention and water quality estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klüpfel, A M; Glauner, T; Zwiener, C; Frimmel, F H

    2011-01-01

    Three nanofiltration (NF) membranes with a chlorine tolerance > or = 1 mg L-1 were applied to reduce DBPs and their precursors in swimming pool water. A lab scale plant with crossflow modules was installed in by-pass at the sand filter outlet of a swimming pool for a period of several weeks. The chlorine tolerances of the membranes SB90 and NP030 were found to be adequate for filtration under swimming pool water conditions over the given experimental period. Retention of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and adsorbable organic halogens (AOX) were about 70% and 80% for SB90 and 50% and 40% for NP030, respectively. DOC accumulation in the pool and the expected fresh water consumption for a treatment system consisting of ultrafiltration (UF) and NF with backwash water treatment were estimated by mass balances based on the results. Mass balances were calculated also for a German public swimming pool with a conventional water treatment system (flocculation-sand filtration-chlorination) and were compared to DOC on-line measurements. Calculation of DOC mass balances for different UF-NF treatment scenarios showed that pool water quality could be improved significantly compared to the conventional treatment system.

  6. Microbiological quality of swimming-pool waters in the province of Badajoz (Spain); Calidad microbiologica de las aguas de piscina en la provinca de Badajoz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalba Doblas, A. M.; Ambel Carracedo, M. P.; Cobos Rodriguez, J. G.

    2006-07-01

    The object of the actual work is to evaluate the microbiological quality of swimming pool waters in the province of Badajoz, 79 samples in 33 cities, according to criteria required by the Decreto 54/2002 of the Comunidad Autonoma of Extremadura. the work describes the possible origins of the pollution in the swimming-pool waters and the risks. The parameters analyzed were Termotolerant Coliforms, Faecal streptococci, S. aureus, P. aerogenes, Sulphate reducing bacteria and Salmonella spp. Results show that 62% of these fulfil microbiological quality criteria. the presence of Sulphate reducing bacteria was found in 24% of the samples, and P. aerogenes was detected in 16% of them. (Author) 20 refs.

  7. Radiological performance of hot water layer system in open pool type reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Abdelhady

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the calculated dose rate carried out by using MicroShield code to show the importance of hot water layer system (HWL in 22 MW open pool type reactor from the radiation protection safety point of view. The paper presents the dose rate profiles over the pool surface in normal and abnormal operations of HWL system. The results show that, in case of losing the hot water layer effect, the radiation dose rate profiles over the pool surface will increase from values lower than the worker permissible dose limits to values very higher than the permissible dose limits.

  8. The effect of UV treatment on highly polluted and normal operated swimming pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    to decrease when the sample was subjected to post-UV chlorination in the normal operated pool, having the opposite result in the highly polluted pool. The addition of nitrate (when subjected to irradiation it forms radicals) and the subsequent post-UV chlorination were contradicting with the radical...... organic carbon (TOC) and the potential effect of increased nitrate concentration on disinfection by-product (DBP) formation in pool water. Concentration change on total trihalomethanes (TTHM) was investigated utilising medium pressure UV treatment in conjunction with chlorine. Post-UV chlorine consumption...... increased, UV dose-dependently. The post-UV chlorination clearly induced TTHM formation in both polluted and normal operated pools. However, elevated TOC concentration did not increase significantly the DBP formation. Regarding the brominated fraction of the halogens in the formed TTHMs, it appeared...

  9. Evaluation of the Pseudalert/Quanti-Tray MPN Test for the Rapid Enumeration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Swimming Pool and Spa Pool Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartory, David P; Brewer, Megan; Beswick, Agnieszka; Steggles, Darron

    2015-12-01

    This study assessed the performance of a new most probable number test (Pseudalert/Quanti-Tray) for the enumeration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from swimming pool and spa pool waters by comparing it to the international and national membrane filtration-based culture methods for P. aeruginosa: ISO 16266:2006 and UK The Microbiology of Drinking Water-Part 8 (MoDW Part 8) which both use Pseudomonas CN agar. The comparison was based on the calculation of mean relative differences between the two methods conducted according to ISO 17994:2014. Using both routine pool water samples (149 from 8 laboratories) and artificially contaminated samples (309 from 7 laboratories), paired counts from each sample and enumeration method were analysed. For routine samples, there were insufficient data for a conclusive assessment, but the data do indicate at least equivalent performance of Pseudalert/Quanti-Tray to the reference methods. For the artificially contaminated samples, the data also did not result in a statistically conclusive assessment but did indicate potentially better performance of Pseudalert/Quanti-Tray. Combining the data from the routine samples and artificially contaminated samples resulted in an ISO 17994 outcome that the two methods were not statistically significantly different. Thus, the Pseudalert/Quanti-Tray method is an acceptable alternative to ISO 16266 and MoDW Part 8. The Pseudalert/Quanti-Tray method has the advantage in that it does not require confirmation testing, and of providing confirmed counts within 24-28 h incubation compared to 40-48 h or longer for the ISO 16266 and MoDW Part 8 methods.

  10. The risk of contracting infectious diseases in public swimming pools: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsófia Barna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A review of pathogenic microorganisms presenting risk of infection in pool based artificial recreational water venues is extracted from the available scientific literature. The microorganisms are grouped both according to their way of spread and their survival and growth strategies and their characteristics relevant for the pool and spa based recreation are discussed. In order to put the proposed risks on a solid basis, among others a ten year excerpt of the waterborne disease statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC is used throughout the article.

  11. Design guide for Category III reactors: pool type reactors. [US DOE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynda, W J; Lobner, P R; Powell, R W; Straker, E A

    1978-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) in the ERDA Manual requires that all DOE-owned reactors be sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that gives adequate consideration to health and safety factors. Specific guidance pertinent to the safety of DOE-owned reactors is found in Chapter 0540 of the ERDA Manual. The purpose of this Design Guide is to provide additional guidance to aid the DOE facility contractor in meeting the requirement that the siting, design, construction, modification, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of DOE-owned reactors be in accordance with generally uniform standards, guides, and codes which are comparable to those applied to similar reactors licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This Design Guide deals principally with the design and functional requirement of Category III reactor structures, components, and systems.

  12. The Recreational Water Cycle: From Source Water to Tap Water to Spa and Swimming Pool Water: Effects of Disinfectants and Precursors and Implications for Exposure and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current study investigates the effect of different disinfection treatments on the disinfection by-products (DBPs) formed in finished drinking water vs. tap water vs. swimming pool water vs. spa waters. To this end, complete water pathway samples (untreated source waters ->fi...

  13. From Source Water to Tap Water to Spa and Swimming Pool Water: Effects of Disinfectanta and Precursors and Implications for Exposure and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction The current study investigated the effect of different disinfection treatments on the disinfection by-products (DBPs) formed in finished drinking water vs. tap water vs. swimming pool water vs. spa waters. To this end, samples across the complete water pathway (untr...

  14. Calorimetric Analysis to Infer Primary Circuit Flow in Integral and Pool-Type Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coble, Jamie; Tarver, Ryan; Hines, J. Wesley

    2017-02-01

    Primary system flow rate is a key parameter for monitoring and controlling thermal power in a nuclear power plant. The existing fleet of large light water reactors uses direct measurements of primary flow rate with the application of venturi meters, orifice plates, and magnetic flowmeters in primary loop piping. Integral light water reactors and pool-type advanced reactor designs, however, have largely eliminated primary loop piping to improve the inherent safety characteristics of these reactors. Furthermore, longer operating cycles between maintenance opportunities (typically 4 to 40 years) limit the applicability of these direct measurement methods over the operating period. Methods to infer the primary flow rate based on other, easily measured parameters are needed to ensure the operability of integral and pool-type reactors. Calorimetric analysis across the intermediate heat exchanger was investigated for real-time inference of primary flow rate. Heat balance equations were applied to an experimental forced flow loop to evaluate the efficacy of this approach. When appropriate time delays and heat losses are accounted for, the primary flow rate was inferred with accuracy and 95% prediction variance of 1.57 and 4.80 % mean value, respectively.

  15. Analysis of the radiation level variation at the reactor pool top

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Guk Hoon; Park, Cheol; Lee, Byung Chul; Park, Sang Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-11-01

    During HANARO commissioning test on ascending power, pool surface radiation level was found to be highly larger than the design target. Hence, the reasons were investigated in various aspects through experiment and analysis, and the several suggestions to minimize possible the radiation level at the pool top were proposed and tested step by step, including the installation of hot water layer system. As the results of these effort, the pool surface radiation level is about 6,000 nGy/hr at 20 MW, which is 1/30 less than that of the early commissioning test. It is expected from this result that the pool surface radiation level will be around 9,000 nGy/hr at 30 MW of normal operation, which is larger than the design target but less than the value corresponding to the acceptance criteria of 25,000 nGy/hr on the allowable dose for worker at site. Meanwhile, as the pool surface radiation monitors were installed 55 cm below inside the pool from the pool top and the stay of operation staffs at the pool top would be limited and very short, no radiation safety problems are expected even if the alarm setting is adjusted slightly higher. Consequently, the adjustment of alarm setting value for the radiation level of the reactor pool top is necessary from 12,500 nGy/hr to 20,000 nGy/hr, considering the measuring error and the operation range of related systems. 18 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs. (Author)

  16. Role of calcium ions on the removal of haloacetic acids from swimming pool water by nanofiltration: mechanisms and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linyan; Zhou, Jin; She, Qianhong; Wan, Man Pun; Wang, Rong; Chang, Victor W-C; Tang, Chuyang Y

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the removal of haloacetic acids (HAAs) from swimming pool waters (SPWs) by two nanofiltration membranes NF270 and NF90. The strong matrix effect (particularly by Ca(2+)) on membrane rejection prompts us to systematically investigate the mechanistic role of Ca(2+) in HAA rejection. At typical SPW pH of 7.5, NF90 maintained consistently high rejection of HAAs (>95%) with little influence by Ca(2+), thanks to the dominance of size exclusion effect for this tight membrane (pore radius ∼ 0.31 nm). In contrast, the rejections of both inorganic ions (e.g., Na(+) and Cl(-)) and HAA anions were decreased at higher Ca(2+) concentration for NF270 (pore radius ∼ 0.40 nm). Further tests show that the rejection of neutral hydrophilic molecular probes and the membrane pore size were not affected by Ca(2+). Although Ca(2+) is unable to form strong complex with HAAs, we observed the binding of Ca(2+) to NF270 together with a reduction in its surface charge. Therefore, the formation of membrane-Ca(2+) complex, which weakens charge interaction effect, was responsible for the reduced HAA rejection. The current study reveals important mechanistic insights of the matrix effect on trace contaminant rejection, which is critical for a better understanding of their fate and removal in membrane-based treatment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. [Lung function testing in children before and after an age-adapted SCUBA dive in a swimming pool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollin, P; Christmann, M; Kroker, A; Zielen, S

    2011-05-01

    The number of children that SCUBA dive is increasing. Airway narrowing while SCUBA diving can cause dangerous complications like pulmonary barotrauma and arterial gas embolism. Statistics show that children are at an increased risk. Since data are scarce, the goal of this study was to gain new knowledge about acute lung function changes in children while SCUBA diving. 41 children aged 8 - 14 years underwent lung function testing (spirometry and residual volume measurement) before and after a single age-adapted SCUBA dive in a swimming pool. A significant reduction of the dynamic expiratory lung function parameters FEV (1) (p  10 % (12 % - 21 %) was found in 5 children (12.2 %). The majority of the children (87.8 %) did not show any relevant lung function changes. Five children had a considerable reduction of FEV (1). Signs indicate the importance of bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR) as a key factor. Children with asthma or BHR should not SCUBA dive. A detailed medical examination is recommended (including an unspecific bronchial provocation test) before starting to dive. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Healthy Swimming/Recreational Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tub/Spa Test Strips Inflatable & Plastic Kiddie Pools Water Play Areas & Interactive Fountains Swim Diapers & Swim Pants Breastfeeding in Pools & Hot Tubs/Spas Recreational Water Illnesses Diarrheal Illness Rashes Ear Infections Respiratory Infections ...

  19. Detectability prediction for a thermoacoustic sensor in the breazeale nuclear reactor pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hrisko, Joshua [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Garrett, Steven [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Laboratory experiments have suggested that thermoacoustic engines can be in- corporated within nuclear fuel rods. Such engines would radiate sounds that could be used to measure and acoustically-telemeter information about the op- eration of the nuclear reactor (e.g., coolant temperature or uxes of neutrons or other energetic particles) or the physical condition of the nuclear fuel itself (e.g., changes in temperature, evolved gases) that are encoded as the frequency and/or amplitude of the radiated sound [IEEE Measurement and Instrumen- tation 16(3), 18-25 (2013)]. For such acoustic information to be detectable, it is important to characterize the vibroacoustical environments within reactors. Measurements will be presented of the background noise spectra (with and with- out coolant pumps) and reverberation times within the 70,000 gallon pool that cools and shields the fuel in the 1 MW research reactor on Penn State's campus using two hydrophones, a piezoelectric projector, and an accelerometer. Sev- eral signal-processing techniques will be demonstrated to enhance the measured results. Background vibrational measurement were also taken at the 250 MW Advanced Test Reactor, located at the Idaho National Laboratory, using ac- celerometers mounted outside the reactor's pressure vessel and on plumbing will also be presented. The detectability predictions made in the thesis were validated in September 2015 using a nuclear ssion-heated thermoacoustic sensor that was placed in the core of the Breazeale Nuclear Reactor on Penn State's campus. Some features of the thermoacoustic device used in that experiment will also be revealed. [Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. Occurrence and Spatial and Temporal Variations of Disinfection By-Products in the Water and Air of Two Indoor Swimming Pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tardif Robert

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve disinfection by-product (DBP exposure assessment, this study was designed to document both water and air levels of these chemical contaminants in two indoor swimming pools and to analyze their within-day and day-to-day variations in both of them. Intensive sampling was carried out during two one-week campaigns to measure trihalomethanes (THMs and chloramines (CAMs in water and air, and haloacetic acids (HAAs in water several times daily. Water samples were systematically collected at three locations in each pool and air samples were collected at various heights around the pool and in other rooms (e.g., changing room in the buildings. In addition, the ability of various models to predict air concentrations from water was tested using this database. No clear trends, but actual variations of contamination levels, appeared for both water and air according to the sampling locations and times. Likewise, the available models resulted in realistic but imprecise estimates of air contamination levels from water. This study supports the recommendation that suitable minimal air and water sampling should be carried out in swimming pools to assess exposure to DBPs.

  1. Swimming pool cleaner poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood in the stool Burns of the food pipe (esophagus) Severe abdominal pain Nausea Vomiting (may contain ... the stomach ( gastric lavage ) Washing of the skin (irrigation), perhaps every few hours for several days

  2. Analysis of trihalomethanes in water and air from indoor swimming pools using HS-SPME/GC/ECD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Christopher S A; Boaventura, Rui A R; Pereira, Isabel B

    2011-01-01

    Headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) with further quantification by gas chromatography and electron capture detector (GC/ECD) was used to analyze trihalomethanes (THMs) in water and air from indoor swimming pools (ISPs). High correlation coefficients were obtained for the calibration lines in water with detection limits of 0.2 μg/L for trichloromethane (TCM) and bromodichloromethane (BDCM), 0.1 μg/L for dibromochloromethane (DBCM) and 0.5 μg/L for tribromomethane (TBM). Coefficients of variation values were 5-10% for repeatability and 15-25% for reproducibility. In air analysis, high correlation coefficients were also obtained for the calibration lines with detection limits of 2.5 μg/m(3) for TCM and BDCM and 1.25 μg/m(3) for DBCM and TBM. Repeatability and reproducibility coefficients of variation were the same as in water analysis. Analytical results from a survey in four Portuguese ISPs showed that the mean concentration of total trihalomethanes (TTHMs) in water ranged from 22±2 to 577±58 μg/L. In the lack of European specific regulation for THMs in water from ISPs and taking into consideration that ingestion is a form of exposure, TTHMs' values were compared with European drinking water maximum contamination level (100 μg/L, Directive 98/83/CE). From the reported TTHMs mean concentration values in ISPs' water, 40% exceeded that value. TTHMs values determined in the air (T = 30°C) ranged from 98±10 to 1225±123 μg/m(3) and from 51±5 μg/m(3)to 519±52 μg/m(3)at 5 and 150 cm above the water surface, respectively. As expected, swimmers are more exposed to high concentrations of THMs than lifeguards. As there is no European specific regulation for THMs in ISPs' air, the highest TCM values were compared with maximum values reported in the literature for ISPs (1630 μg/m(3)) and with the inhalation exposure limit (10,000 μg/m(3)) established for TCM by European occupational legislation (Directive 2000/39/CE).

  3. SPARC fast reactor design : Design of two passively safe metal-fuelled sodium-cooled pool-type small modular fast reactors with Autonomous Reactivity Control

    OpenAIRE

    Lindström, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    In this master thesis a small modular sodium-cooled metal-fuelled pool-type fast reactor design, called SPARC - Safe and Passive with Autonomous Reactivity control, has been designed. The long term reactivity changes in the SPARC are managed by implementation of the the Autonomous Reactivity Control (ARC) system, which is the novelty of the design. The overall design is mainly based on the Integral Fast Reactor project (IFR), which experimentally demonstrated the passive safety characteristic...

  4. Removals of cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and cryptosporidium-sized polystyrene microspheres from swimming pool water by diatomaceous earth filtration and perlite-sand filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Amburgey, James E; Hill, Vincent R; Murphy, Jennifer L; Schneeberger, Chandra L; Arrowood, Michael J; Yuan, Tao

    2017-06-01

    Removal of Cryptosporidium-sized microspheres and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts from swimming pools was investigated using diatomaceous earth (DE) precoat filtration and perlite-sand filtration. In pilot-scale experiments, microsphere removals of up to 2 log were obtained with 0.7 kg·DE/m2 at a filtration rate of 5 m/h. A slightly higher microsphere removal (2.3 log) was obtained for these DE-precoated filters when the filtration rate was 3.6 m/h. Additionally, pilot-scale perlite-sand filters achieved greater than 2 log removal when at least 0.37 kg/m2 of perlite was used compared to 0.1-0.4 log removal without perlite both at a surface loading rate of 37 m/h. Full-scale testing achieved 2.7 log of microspheres and oocysts removal when 0.7 kg·DE/m2 was used at 3.6 m/h. Removals were significantly decreased by a 15-minute interruption of the flow (without any mechanical agitation) to the DE filter in pilot-scale studies, which was not observed in full-scale filters. Microsphere removals were 2.7 log by perlite-sand filtration in a full-scale swimming pool filter operated at 34 m/h with 0.5 kg/m2 of perlite. The results demonstrate that either a DE precoat filter or a perlite-sand filter can improve the efficiency of removal of microspheres and oocysts from swimming pools over a standard sand filter under the conditions studied.

  5. Declassification of radioactive water from a pool type reactor after nuclear facility dismantling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, J. M.; Sancho, M.; García-Fayos, B.; Verdú, G.; Serrano, C.; Ruiz-Martínez, J. T.

    2017-09-01

    This work is aimed to the treatment of the radioactive water from a dismantled nuclear facility with an experimental pool type reactor. The main objective of the treatment is to declassify the maximum volume of water and thus decrease the volume of radioactive liquid waste to be managed. In a preliminary stage, simulation of treatment by the combination of reverse osmosis (RO) and evaporation have been performed. Predicted results showed that the combination of membrane and evaporation technologies would result in a volume reduction factor higher than 600. The estimated time to complete the treatment was around 650 h (25-30 days). For different economical and organizational reasons which are explained in this paper, the final treatment of the real waste had to be reduced and only evaporation was applied. The volume reduction factor achieved in the real treatment was around 170, and the time spent for treatment was 194 days.

  6. The radionuclides of primary coolant in HANARO and the recent activities performed to reduce the radioactivity or reactor pool water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minjin [HANARO Research Reactor Centre, Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-01

    In HANARO reactor, there have been activities to identify the principal radionuclides and to quantify them under the normal operation. The purposes of such activities were to establish the measure by which we can reduce the radioactivity of the reactor pool water and detect, in early stage, the abnormal symptoms due to the leakage of radioactive materials from the irradiation sample or the damage of the nuclear fuel, etc. The typical radionuclides produced by the activation of reactor coolant are N{sup 16} and Ar{sup 41}. The radionuclides produced by the activation of the core structural material consist of Na{sup 24}, Mn{sup 56}, and W{sup 187}. Of the various radionuclides, governing the radiation level at the pool surface are Na{sup 24}, Ar{sup 41}, Mn{sup 58}, and W{sup 187}. By establishing the hot water layer system on the pool surface, we expected that the radionuclides such as Ar{sup 41} and Mn{sup 56} whose half-life are relatively short could be removed to a certain extent. Since the content of radioactivity of Na{sup 24} occupies about 60% of the total radioactivity, we assumed that the total radiation level would be greatly reduced if we could decrease the radiation level of Na{sup 24}. However the actual radiation level has not been reduced as much as we expected. Therefore, some experiments have been carried out to find the actual causes afterwards. What we learned through the experiments are that any disturbance in reactor pool water layer causes increase of the pool surface radiation level and even if we maintain the hot water layer well, reactor shutdown will be very much likely to happen once the hot water layer is disturbed. (author)

  7. Combined UV treatment and ozonation for the removal of by-product precursors in swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheema, Waqas Akram; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    dosage prior to contact with chlorine. Furthermore, ozone had a half-life of 5 min in non-UV treated pool water whereas complete consumption of ozone was obtained in less than 2 min in UV treated pool water. The ozonation of UV-treated pool water induced the formation of some DBPs that are not commonly...... reported in this medium, in particular trichloronitromethane, which is noteworthy for its genotoxicity, though this issue was removed by UV treatment when repeated combined UV/ozone treatment interchanging with chlorination was conducted over a 24-h period. The discovered reaction could form the basis...

  8. Disinfectant effect of chloride treatment on swimming pool water and water intended for human consumption in the Balearic Islands (Spain); Efecto desinfectante del tramiento con cloro en aguas de piscinas y aguas destinadas al consumo umano en Baleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sastre-Coll, A.; Duran Abad, M.; Rosello Jimenez, C.; Monegal, M. R.; Adrover Julia, M. M.; Baberhauserhaide, K.; Gonzalez Ensenat, M.; Vidal Oliver, M.; Arderiu Costas, E.; Lliteras Riutort, R. M.; Menas Ribas, I.; Reviriego Riudavets, B.; Pozo fernandez, M.; Mir Massanet, F.

    2008-07-01

    The disinfectant effect of chlorine treatments on swimming pool water and water intended for human consumption in the Balearic Islands was assessed. the results show a correct disinfection in drinking water with 0,3 mg/l of free chlorine concentration. On the other hand 0,5 and 2.0 mg/l of free chlorine are needed to disinfect the swimming pool water during low and high tourist season respectively. The lack of the disinfectant effect of smaller free chlorine doses seems to be related to the pH values of the water analysed. (Author)

  9. The application of computational fluid dynamics and small-scale physical models to assess the effects of operational practices on the risk to public health within large indoor swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Lowell; Chew, John; Woodley, Iain; Colbourne, Jeni; Pond, Katherine

    2015-12-01

    Swimming pools provide an excellent facility for exercise and leisure but are also prone to contamination from microbial pathogens. The study modelled a 50-m × 20-m swimming pool using both a small-scale physical model and computational fluid dynamics to investigate how water and pathogens move around a pool in order to identify potential risk spots. Our study revealed a number of lessons for pool operators, designers and policy-makers: disinfection reaches the majority of a full-scale pool in approximately 16 minutes operating at the maximum permissible inlet velocity of 0.5 m/s. This suggests that where a pool is designed to have 15 paired inlets it is capable of distributing disinfectant throughout the water body within an acceptable time frame. However, the study also showed that the exchange rate of water is not uniform across the pool tank and that there is potential for areas of the pool tank to retain contaminated water for significant periods of time. 'Dead spots' exist at either end of the pool where pathogens could remain. This is particularly significant if there is a faecal release into the pool by bathers infected with Cryptosporidium parvum, increasing the potential for waterborne disease transmission.

  10. Progressive Increase in Disinfection Byproducts and Mutagenicity from Sourceto Tap to Swimming Pool and Spa Water: Implications for Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pools and spas are enjoyed throughout the world for exercise and relaxation. However, there are no previous studies on the mutagenicity of disinfected spa (hot tub) waters or comprehensive identification of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) formed in spas. Using 28 water samples f...

  11. Effect of medium-pressure UV-lamp treatment on disinfection by-products in chlorinated seawater swimming pool waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheema, Waqas Akram; Manasfi, Tarek; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht

    2017-01-01

    experiments using a medium-pressure UV lamp. Chlorine consumption increased following post-UV chlorination, most likely because UV irradiation degraded organic matter in the pool samples to more chlorine-reactive organic matter. Haloacetic acid (HAA) concentrations decreased significantly, due to photo...

  12. Spectacular energy technology: Panorama-Sauna Holzweiler. KfW funds indoor swimming pools as 'process heat'; Energetisch spektakulaer: Panorama-Sauna Holzweiler. KfW foerdert Schwimmbaeder als 'Prozesswaerme'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meissner, Rolf

    2008-11-15

    The ''Panorama-Sauna'' at Grafschaft is a big indoor swimming pool and Sauna centre in a rural region not far from Cologne and Koblenz. The charm of this spectacular solar project is in its minimalism. Conventional solar thermal power systems, in contrast, tend to be complex and prone to failure. (orig.)

  13. Development of thermal-hydraulic system analysis code SSC-K for pool-type liquid metal reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Doo; Kwon, Y.M.; Suk, S.D.; Chang, W.P.; Hahn, D.H

    1999-03-01

    The Supper System Code of KAERI (SSC-K) is a best-estimate system code for analyzing an variety of off-normal or accident of a pool type design. It is developed at KAERI on the basis of SSC-L developed at BNL to analyze pool-type LMR transients. Because of inherent difference between th pool and loop design, the major modefications of SSC-L is required for the safety analysis of KALIMER. The major difference between KALIMER and general loop type LMRs exists in the primary heat transport system. In KALIMER, all of the essential components consisted of the primary heat transport system are located within the reactor vessel. This is contrast to the loop type LMRs, in which all the primary components are connected via piping to form loops attached externally to the reactor vessel. KALIMER has only one cover gas space. This eliminates the need for separate cover gas systems over liquid level in pump tanks and upper plenum. Since the sodium in hot pool is separated from cold pool by insulated barrier in KALIMER, The liquid level in hot pool is different from that in the cold pool mainly due to hydraulic losses and pump suction heads occuring during flow through the circulation pathes. In some accident conditions the liquid in the hot pool is flooded into cold pool and forms the natural circulation flow path. During the loss of heat sink transients, this will provided as a major heat rejection mechanism with the passive decay heat removal system. Since the pipes in the primary system exist only between pump discharge and core inlet plenum and are submerged in cold pool, a pipe rupture accident becomes less severe due to a constant back pressure exerted against the coolant flow from break. The intermediate and steam generator systems of both are generally identical. To adapt SSC-K to KALIMER design, the major modification of SSC-L has been made for the safety analysis of KALIMER. Test runs have been performed for the qualitative verification of the developed models. The

  14. Investigation of some disinfection chemicals and water quality parameters in swimming pools in the city center and districts of Canakkale, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Tolga; Yilmaz, Selehattin; Turkoglu, Muhammet; Sadikoglu, Murat

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the variations in concentrations of some disinfection chemicals such as cyanuric acid (CyA), free chlorine (FC), and residual chlorine (RC), which affect human health, were investigated in the water of swimming pools. In addition, quality parameters such as temperature, pH, and total alkalinity (TA) in 44 swimming pools located in the city center and districts of Canakkale, Turkey, were examined in the summer period. While FC and RC amounts were analyzed using tablet tests with N-N-diethyl phenylenediamine (DPD 1) and potassium iodine (DPD 3) using the colorimetric method in the comparator, TA and CyA levels were measured with a photometric method. Temperature and pH were measured using YSI 556 MPS. Levels of CyA, FC, RC, pH, temperature, and TA varied between 0.00 and 725.0 mg L-1 (108.0 ± 111.4 mg L-1), 0.00 and 5.00 mg L-1 (1.60 ± 0.962 mg L-1), 0 and 0.55 mg L-1 (0.087 ± 0.059), 6.40 and 8.20 mg L-1 (7.30 ± 0.038 mg L-1), 22.0 and 32.0 °C (27.6 ± 1.45 °C), and 0.00 and 391.0 mg L-1 (129.3 ± 89.0), respectively. The findings were compared to standard limit values of the Ministry of Health of the Turkish Republic and other countries. Not only maximum concentrations of CyA but also the average concentrations exceeded the standard limit values of different countries in July and August with high tourism activity in Turkey. Although there is no problem in view of average values of other quality parameters, there are some problems in view of the maximum values in pool waters compared to standard limit values.

  15. Trihalometanos en el agua de piscinas en cuatro zonas de España participantes en el proyecto INMA Trihalomethanes in swimming pool water in four areas of Spain participating in the INMA project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Font-Ribera

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: La natación es uno de los deportes más practicados en España, por personas de todas las edades y condiciones físicas. También es una vía de exposición a subproductos de la desinfección, compuestos potencialmente tóxicos. Su concentración en el agua de las piscinas no está legislada y es poco conocida. El objetivo de este trabajo es describir la concentración de trihalometanos en el agua de piscinas de los municipios de cuatro cohortes del estudio INMA. Métodos: En julio de 2009 se analizaron los trihalometanos en el agua de piscinas (n=27 de Asturias, Granada, Valencia y Sabadell. Resultados: La concentración media de trihalometanos totales fue de 42,7µg/l (desviación estándar [DE]=19,1 en las piscinas interiores y de 151,2µg/l (DE=80,7 en las exteriores, predominando siempre el cloroformo. Granada tuvo los valores más bajos. Conclusión: La concentración de trihalometanos en el agua de piscinas presenta una gran variabilidad. Las piscinas exteriores tienen valores más altos, superando mayoritariamente los límites legales establecidos para el agua de consumo.Objective: Swimming is one of the most widely practiced sports in Spain among people of all ages and physical conditions. This activity is also a source of exposure to disinfection by-products (DBP, which are potentially toxic. The DBP concentration in swimming pool water is not regulated and is poorly known. The aim of this study was to describe trihalomethane concentrations in swimming pool water in the municipalities of four cohorts of the INMA project. Methods: In July 2009, trihalomethanes were analyzed in water from 27 swimming pools in Asturias, Granada, Valencia and Sabadell. Results: The mean total trihalomethane concentration was 42.7µg/L (standard deviation [SD]=19.1 in indoor pools and 151.2µg/L (SD=80.7 in outdoor pools. In all pools, the most abundant trihalomethane was always chloroform. The lowest levels were found in Granada. Conclusion

  16. Regeneration in Swimming

    OpenAIRE

    Lehocký, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Topic: Regeneration in the swimming Aim: Using a questionnaire to find out information and views on the need of regeneration and its use. Process the results and evaluate the survey data into synoptic tables and graphs. Giving a comprehensive overview of the field of regeneration in the swimming sport. Method: The research group of our work happened 30 swimmers - participants Championship Czech Republic 2005 in short swimming pool at the age of 15-33 years. Results: It was confirmed that most...

  17. Diarrhea and Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Externa) "Swimmer's Ear" (Otitis Externa) Prevention Head Lice MRSA Pinworm & Swimming Other Recreational Water-related Issues Pools & ... Professionals Aquatics Staff Travelers En Español Publications, Data, & Statistics Disease & Outbreak Tracking Prevention Commentaries Diarrhea & Vomiting Skin, ...

  18. Experimental evaluation of a heat pump for the water-supply heating of a public swimming pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, R.; Vaca, M.; Terres, H.; Lizardi, A.; Morales, J.; Chávez, S.

    2017-01-01

    In this work the analysis of the thermodynamic behavior of heat pumps (HP) which supply the energy needed in the public pool at the Aquatic Center of Azcapotzalco was performed. There are 18 installed HP’s but only those needed to provide the energy required are alternately activated. The evaluation was conducted during May and June of 2015. We selected one of the HP to implement temperature and pressure gauges at the inlet and outlet of the compressor. The measurements were made every day at three times, 6:30, 13:00 and 18:00 hours. In a period of 24 hours, 1 000 L evaporated, there was no variation registered overnight, since the pool was covered with plastic to avoid loss of the fluid. The heat pump provided 150 kW to maintain the water temperature at the right level of operation, namely 28 °C. The coefficients of performance (COP) of the HP were 6.39 at 6:30, 7.42 at 13:00 and 7:32 at 18:00 hrs., values which are very close to the one provided by the manufacturer.

  19. An Assessment of Fission Product Scrubbing in Sodium Pools Following a Core Damage Event in a Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucknor, M.; Farmer, M.; Grabaskas, D.

    2017-06-26

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has stated that mechanistic source term (MST) calculations are expected to be required as part of the advanced reactor licensing process. A recent study by Argonne National Laboratory has concluded that fission product scrubbing in sodium pools is an important aspect of an MST calculation for a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). To model the phenomena associated with sodium pool scrubbing, a computational tool, developed as part of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) program, was utilized in an MST trial calculation. This tool was developed by applying classical theories of aerosol scrubbing to the decontamination of gases produced as a result of postulated fuel pin failures during an SFR accident scenario. The model currently considers aerosol capture by Brownian diffusion, inertial deposition, and gravitational sedimentation. The effects of sodium vapour condensation on aerosol scrubbing are also treated. This paper provides details of the individual scrubbing mechanisms utilized in the IFR code as well as results from a trial mechanistic source term assessment led by Argonne National Laboratory in 2016.

  20. Effect of pH on the formation of disinfection byproducts in swimming pool water – Is less THM better?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Willach, Sarah; Antoniou, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the formation and predicted toxicity of different groups of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) from human exudates in relation to chlorination of pool water at different pH values. Specifically, the formation of the DBP groups trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs......), haloacetonitriles (HANs) and trichloramine (NCl3), resulting from the chlorination of body fluid analog, were investigated at 6.0 ≤ pH ≤ 8.0. Either the initial concentration of active chorine or free chlorine was kept constant in the tested pH range. THM formation was reduced by decreasing pH but HAN, and NCl3...... formation increased at decreasing pH whereas the formation of HAAs remained constant. Under our experimental conditions, the formation of NCl3 (suspected asthma inducing compound) at pH = 6.0 was an order of magnitude higher than at pH = 7.5. Furthermore, the effect of the presence of bromide on DBP...

  1. Influence of high-permeability discs in an axisymmetric model of the Cadarache dynamo experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesecke, A.; Nore, C.; Stefani, F.; Gerbeth, G.; Léorat, J.; Herreman, W.; Luddens, F.; Guermond, J.-L.

    2012-05-01

    Numerical simulations of the kinematic induction equation are performed on a model configuration of the Cadarache von-Kármán-sodium dynamo experiment. The effect of a localized axisymmetric distribution of relative permeability μr that represents soft iron material within the conducting fluid flow is investigated. The critical magnetic Reynolds number Rmc for dynamo action of the first non-axisymmetric mode roughly scales like Rmcμr - Rmc∞∝μ-1/2r, i.e. the threshold decreases as μr increases. This scaling law suggests a skin effect mechanism in the soft iron discs. More important with regard to the Cadarache dynamo experiment, we observe a purely toroidal axisymmetric mode localized in the high-permeability discs which becomes dominant for large μr. In this limit, the toroidal mode is close to the onset of dynamo action with a (negative) growth rate that is rather independent of the magnetic Reynolds number. We qualitatively explain this effect by paramagnetic pumping at the fluid/disc interface and propose a simplified model that quantitatively reproduces numerical results. The crucial role of the high-permeability discs in the mode selection in the Cadarache dynamo experiment cannot be inferred from computations using idealized pseudo-vacuum boundary conditions (H × n = 0).

  2. Assessment of the possibility of using flocculation to improve properties of ultrafiltration membranes used in the purification of swimming pool water system washings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łaskawiec Edyta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the possibility of using an in-line mode flocculation–ultrafiltration system for the purification of backwash water from flushing the beds of pressure filters used in the indoor swimming pool water treatment circulation. The effect of flocculation operational conditions (the flocculant dose in the range from 16 to 240 mg/dm3 and the process temperature of 8–30°C on the transport-separation properties of ultrafiltration membranes has been examined. To establish the effectiveness of the conducted processes, the contaminant retention coefficients, among others, were determined (based on the measurements of turbidity and UV254 ultraviolet absorbance. A significant influence of the flocculation process operational parameters on the performance of ultrafiltration was noted. With increasing flocculant dose, the efficiency of contaminant removal in the ultrafiltration process increased simultaneously. Moreover, the change in the temperature conditions of the flocculation process had a fundamental effect on the transport properties of the ultrafiltration membranes. The most advantageous temperature for conducting the processes was considered to be 21°C. Under those conditions, all flocculant doses contributed to a significant improvement in the transport properties of the ultrafiltration membranes. High values of the contamination retention coefficients and the permeate volumetric flux were obtained already at a flocculant dose of 80,160 and 240 mg/dm3.

  3. Evaluation of Total Coliform, Fecal Coliform and Residual Chlorine in Swimming Pools in Kermanshah on the Season, the type of Pool, Disinfection System and Source of Water Supply in the during of three years (2010-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K SHarafi

    2014-11-01

    From the results , although the pools of water quality parameters has been studied in almost ideal But in summer, especially on a female pools and pools with wells water supply source than other pools , to be more oversight .

  4. Feynman-alpha technique for measurement of detector dead time using a 30 kW tank-in-pool research reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Akaho, E H K; Intsiful, J D K; Maakuu, B T; Nyarko, B J B

    2002-01-01

    Reactor noise analysis was carried out for Ghana Research Reactor-1 GHARR-1, a tank-in-pool type reactor using the Feynman-alpha technique (variance-to-mean method). Measurements made at different detector positions and under subcritical conditions showed that the technique could not be used to determine the prompt decay constant for the reactor which is Be reflected with photo-neutron background. However, for very low dwell times the technique was used to measure the dead time of the detector which compares favourably with the value obtained using the alpha-conventional method.

  5. Impaired spatial performance in rats with retrosplenial lesions: importance of the spatial problem and the rat strain in identifying lesion effects in a swimming pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker, K Troy; Whishaw, Ian Q

    2002-02-01

    Behavioral, electrophysiological, and anatomical evidence suggests that retrosplenial (RS) cortex (areas RSA and RSG) plays a role in spatial navigation. This conclusion has been questioned in recent work, suggesting that it is damage to the underlying cingulum bundle (CG) (areas CG and IG), and not RS, that disrupts spatial place learning (Aggleton et al., 2000). We revisited this issue by comparing Long-Evans rats, the strain used in studies that report RS deficits, to Dark Agouti rats, the strain in which no RS deficit has been reported. Rat groups with RS, RS + CG, or no lesion were tested on a place task in a swimming pool, a test of nonspatial and spatial learning, and a matching-to-place task, a relatively selective test of spatial learning. Long-Evans rats given RS and RS + CG lesions, either before or after training on the two tasks, were impaired on both tasks, a deficit not attributable to impaired visual acuity. Control Dark Agouti rats and RS Dark Agouti rats, although not different on the place task, were both significantly impaired relative to Long-Evans rats. The RS Dark Agouti group, however, was also impaired on the matching-to-place task. Thus, we show that RS cortex is part of an extended neural circuit involved in spatial behavior in both Long-Evans and Dark Agouti rats, but its role in the place task may be masked by an innate nonspatial deficit in Dark Agouti rats. The results are discussed in relation to the importance of assessing spatial learning with appropriate spatial tests, the problems of interpretation posed by rat strain differences, and the role of retrosplenial cortex in spatial behavior.

  6. Public swimming in Roudnice nad Labem

    OpenAIRE

    Trč, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Title: Public swimming in Roudnice nad Labem Target: This thesis aims to explore the public's interest in swimming, chart the course of their visits to the swimming pool and find out personal interest in improving swimming techniques. Assess the importance of the swimming section for the public with regard to the possibility of physical activity for children and youth. Methods: Information from public in Roudnice nad Labem were obtained by using questionnaires. The results of the questionnair...

  7. On-line monitoring of the dynamics of trihalomethane concentrations in a warm public swimming pool using an unsupervised membrane inlet mass spectrometry system with off-site real-time surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Gert H; Klausen, Morten M; Hansen, Vagn A; Lauritsen, Frants R

    2010-01-01

    To study the long-term dynamics of trihalomethanes (THMs) in a warm (31-33 degrees C) public swimming pool, we built a robust membrane inlet mass spectrometer that could perform unsupervised, on-site monitoring of the concentration of these compounds with off-site, real-time surveillance. The instrument was installed in a technical room below the pool and operated continuously for more than a year practically only interrupted for filament replacements every 6-8 weeks. One to two days after a filament replacement, the instrument stabilized and kept its calibration until shortly before the next filament burnout. The on-line monitoring of THMs revealed a daily rhythm in the concentrations of chloroform and bromodichloromethane. They increased during the pool's closing hours and decreased during opening hours with the minimum concentration being approximately half of the maximum. Over the 1 year monitoring period, the variation in the maximum registered daily concentration was 30-100 microg/L for chloroform. The variation of bromodichloromethane was 5-10 microg/L, except during bursts of 1-2 days duration, where the concentration of bromodichloromethane could reach 100 microg/L. The burst in bromodichloromethane concentration was directly correlated with salt addition (sodium chloride) to the pool water for use in the pool's electrolytic in-line chlorination system. A correlation between THM removal from the pool water and the operation of a strong water jet system was also found. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Swimming performance in surf: the influence of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, M; Reilly, T; Rees, A; Spray, G; Golden, F

    2008-11-01

    This study tested the hypothesis (H1) that surf swimming involves a quantifiable experience component. Sixty-five beach lifeguards with (n = 35) and without surf experience (n = 30) completed: a best effort 200-m swim in a 25-m pool, a calm and a surf sea; an anthropometric survey; maximum effort 30-s swim bench test; 50-m pool swim (25 m underwater). In both groups, time to swim 200 m was slower in calm seas than in the pool and slower in surf than in either calm seas or the pool (p surf conditions (p surf experience as a predictor of surf swim time (R(2) = 0.32, p surf swimming. This limits the usefulness of pool swim times and other land-based tests as predictors of surf swimming performance. The hypothesis (H1) is accepted.

  9. Geneva 24 Hours Swim

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 18th edition of the Geneva 24 hours swim competition will take place at the Vernets Swimming Pool on the 4th and 5th of October. More information and the results of previous years are given at: http://www.carouge-natation.com/24_heures/home_24_heures.htm Last year, CERN obtained first position in the inter-company category with a total of 152.3 kms swam by 45 participants. We are counting on your support to repeat this excellent performance this year. For those who would like to train, the Livron swimming pool in Meyrin is open as from Monday the 8th September. For further information please do not hesitate to contact us. Gino de Bilio and Catherine Delamare

  10. Geneva 24 hours swim

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 18th edition of the Geneva 24 hours swim competition will take place at the Vernets Swimming Pool on the 4th and 5th of October. More information and the results of previous years are given at: http://www.carouge-natation.com/24_heures/home_24_heures.htm Last year, CERN obtained first position in the inter-company category with a total of 152.3 kms swam by 45 participants. We are counting on your support to repeat this excellent performance this year. For those who would like to train, the Livron swimming pool in Meyrin is open as from Monday the 8th September. For further information please do not hesitate to contact us. Gino de Bilio and Catherine Delamare

  11. Statistical evaluation of potential damage to the Al(OH){sub 3} layer on nTiO{sub 2} particles in the presence of swimming pool and seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virkutyte, Jurate [Pegasus Technical Services, Inc (United States); Al-Abed, Souhail R., E-mail: al-abed.souhail@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Nanosized TiO{sub 2} particles (nTiO{sub 2}) are usually coated with an Al(OH){sub 3} layer when used in sunscreen to shield against the harmful effects of free radicals that are generated when these particles are exposed to UV radiation. Therefore, it is vital to insure the structural stability of these particles in the environment where the protective layer may be damaged and adverse health and environmental effects can occur. This study utilized X-ray analysis (SEM-EDS) to provide a qualitative and semi-quantitative assessment of the chemical and physical characteristics of Al(OH){sub 3}-coated original and damaged nTiO{sub 2} particles (used in sunscreen lotion formulations) in the presence of both swimming pool and seawater. Also, by utilizing statistical tools, a distribution of Al/Ti (%) on the particle surface was determined and evaluated. It was found that 45 min of treatment with swimming pool and seawater significantly induced the redistribution of Al/Ti (%), which changed the surface characteristics of particles and, therefore, may have induced undesired photo-activity and the consequent formation of free radicals.

  12. The solar heating system of the sport centre 'Guillamo Swimming Pool' in Sierre, Switzerland; Installation solaire thermique. Complexe sportif de la piscine de Guillamo - Rapport final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This illustrated report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy describes the refurbishment and the extension of the sport centre 'Guillamo Swimming Pool' in Sierre, Switzerland. The original building built in 1978 included three swimming pools (two indoor and one small outdoor). In 2005 a three-room fitness centre, a wellness centre and a bar were added to the compound and the old building and technical installations refurbished. At the same time a 591 m{sup 2} solar collector array was added. Unglazed selective solar absorbers were mounted on the 5{sup o} tilted flat roof. They insure at the same time the water tightness of the roof, a feature that lead to a significant cost reduction of the project. Before 2005 the natural gas consumption of the centre was 1.3 to 1.7 GWh/year. After the construction work the consumption was about 1.6 GWh, including a contribution of 0.06 GWh from the solar collectors. This last figure is disappointing. The reasons for this are mainly attributed by the authors to a very poor integration of the solar collectors into the conventional heat generation and distribution system, which do not enable the solar collectors to deliver the heat quantity they should. Changes should be made on the hydraulics of the whole system and on the control algorithms and settings.

  13. KROTOS FCI experimental programme at CEA Cadarache: new features and status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnet, J.M.; Bullado, Y.; Journeau, C.; Fouquart, P.; Piluso, P.; Sergeant, C.; Magallon, D. [CEA-Cadarache, DTN/STRI/LMA, Bat 708, BP1, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance cedex (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: KROTOS facility has been operated by the European Commission at JRC-Ispra for many years until 1999 as part of the FARO/KROTOS programme. The programme had to be stopped at JRC due to new EC priorities, and an agreement was concluded with CEA to transfer the KROTOS facility and know-how to Cadarache to continue investigating the pending FCI issues. By this agreement, CEA became owner of the facility. The main objective of the KROTOS programme at CEA Cadarache is understanding the role of melt properties in steam explosion propagation and energetics and, in particular, steam explosion behaviour of prototypical corium melts. Possible influence of physicochemical processes on explosiveness will also be explored. Actually, analysis of alumina debris produced at Ispra have shown that formation of metastable phases and chemical reaction with water at high temperature may play a significant role in enhancing heat transfer to water in the explosion phase. In order to reach the objective, steam explosion experiments are performed in well characterised conditions for a large spectrum of conditions and melt compositions of interest for both in- and ex-vessel situations. A trigger is applied as a rule. Advanced technology and instrumentation is used to reduce uncertainties on initial conditions and characterise the various phases of an explosion, with emphasis on high energy X-ray cinematography to qualify pre-mixing. This advanced instrumentation will enable the measurement of detailed variables to consolidate the qualification of the FCI codes. The use of high energy X-rays made it necessary to construct a new building to house the facility and its components. The facility should newly become operative early 2005. Main improvements with respect to Ispra concern melt delivery, hydrogen measurement and X-ray imaging. Preliminary studies have demonstrated that identification of the pre-mixture-water interface and coherent melt jet core, and

  14. Development, validation and application of an effective convectivity model for simulation of melt pool heat transfer in a light water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Chi Thanh

    2007-12-15

    Severe accidents in a Light Water Reactor (LWR) have been a subject of the research for the last three decades. The research in this area aims to further understanding of the inherent physical phenomena and reduce the uncertainties surrounding their quantification, with the ultimate goal of developing models that can be applied to safety analysis of nuclear reactors. The research is also focusing on evaluation of the proposed accident management schemes for mitigating the consequences of such accidents. During a hypothetical severe accident, whatever the scenario, there is likelihood that the core material will be relocated and accumulated in the lower plenum in the form of a debris bed or a melt pool. Physical phenomena involved in a severe accident progression are complex. The interactions of core debris or melt with the reactor structures depend very much on the debris bed or melt pool thermal hydraulics. That is why predictions of heat transfer during melt pool formation in the reactor lower head are important for the safety assessment. The main purpose of the present study is to advance a method for describing turbulent natural convection heat transfer of a melt pool, and to develop a computational platform for cost-effective, sufficiently-accurate numerical simulations and analyses of Core Melt-Structure-Water Interactions in the LWR lower head during a postulated severe core-melting accident. Given the insights gained from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations, a physics-based model and computationally-efficient tools are developed for multi-dimensional simulations of transient thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the lower plenum of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) during the late phase of an in-vessel core melt progression. A model is developed for the core debris bed heat up and formation of a melt pool in the lower head of the reactor vessel, and implemented in a commercial CFD code. To describe the natural convection heat transfer inside the

  15. Web application for the control and management of radioprotection equipment in the Cadarache centre; Application WEB pour le controle et la gestion des appareils de radioprotection sur le centre de Cadarache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-07-01

    The author describes a web 2-type application which has been developed for the periodic calibration controls of radioprotection equipment in Cadarache. This application aims at offering an easy and immediate and even remote access to information, at selecting information with respect to uses (radioprotection department, administrator, and so on), at securing and safeguarding homogeneous data, at editing control statistics. The different functionalities are briefly presented with their displayed interface

  16. Successful scaling-up of self-sustained pyrolysis of oil palm biomass under pool-type reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Juferi; Shirai, Yoshihito; Andou, Yoshito; Mohd Ali, Ahmad Amiruddin; Othman, Mohd Ridzuan; Ibrahim, Izzudin; Yamamoto, Akio; Yasuda, Nobuhiko; Hassan, Mohd Ali

    2016-02-01

    An appropriate technology for waste utilisation, especially for a large amount of abundant pressed-shredded oil palm empty fruit bunch (OFEFB), is important for the oil palm industry. Self-sustained pyrolysis, whereby oil palm biomass was combusted by itself to provide the heat for pyrolysis without an electrical heater, is more preferable owing to its simplicity, ease of operation and low energy requirement. In this study, biochar production under self-sustained pyrolysis of oil palm biomass in the form of oil palm empty fruit bunch was tested in a 3-t large-scale pool-type reactor. During the pyrolysis process, the biomass was loaded layer by layer when the smoke appeared on the top, to minimise the entrance of oxygen. This method had significantly increased the yield of biochar. In our previous report, we have tested on a 30-kg pilot-scale capacity under self-sustained pyrolysis and found that the higher heating value (HHV) obtained was 22.6-24.7 MJ kg(-1) with a 23.5%-25.0% yield. In this scaled-up study, a 3-t large-scale procedure produced HHV of 22.0-24.3 MJ kg(-1) with a 30%-34% yield based on a wet-weight basis. The maximum self-sustained pyrolysis temperature for the large-scale procedure can reach between 600 °C and 700 °C. We concluded that large-scale biochar production under self-sustained pyrolysis was successfully conducted owing to the comparable biochar produced, compared with medium-scale and other studies with an electrical heating element, making it an appropriate technology for waste utilisation, particularly for the oil palm industry. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Neutronics and thermohydraulics of the reactor C.E.N.E. Part II; Analisis neutronico y termohidraulico del reactor C.E.N.E. Parte II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, R.

    1976-07-01

    In this report the analysis of neutronics thermohydraulics and shielding of the 10 HWt swimming pool reactor C.E.N.E is included. In each of these chapters is given a short description of the theoretical model used, along with the theoretical versus experimental checking carried out, whenever possible, with the reactors JEN-I and JEN-II of Junta de Energia Nuclear. (Author) 11 refs.

  18. Neutronics and thermohydraulics of the reactor C.E.N.E.-Part I; Analisis neutronico y termohidraulico del reactor C.E.N.E. Parte I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, R.; Ahnert, C.; Naudin, A. E.; Martinez Fanegas, R.; Minguez, E.; Rovira, A.

    1976-07-01

    In this report the analysis of neutronics (both statics and kinetics), of the 10 MWt swimming pool reactor C.E.N.E, is included. In each of these chapters is given a short description of the theoretical model used, along with the theoretical versus experimental checking, carried out, whenever possible, with the reactors JEN-I and JEN-II of Junta de Energia Nuclear. (Author) 11 refs.

  19. Water Penetration into Middle Ear Through Ventilation Tubes in Children While Swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Che Wang

    2009-02-01

    Conclusion: Water penetration into the middle ear through ventilation tubes and middle ear infection are not likely when surface swimming. Children with ventilation tubes can enjoy swimming without protection in clean chlorinated swimming pools.

  20. Contaminación del aire interior y del agua de baño en piscinas cubiertas de Guipúzcoa Indoor air and bathing water pollution in indoor swimming pools in Guipúzcoa (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreto Santa Marina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Describir los niveles de contaminantes presentes en las piscinas cubiertas de Guipúzcoa, tanto en el agua de baño como en el aire, y estudiar la relación entre estos contaminantes y otras variables relacionadas con los sistemas de ventilación y el uso de las instalaciones. Métodos: De las 35 piscinas cubiertas registradas en Guipúzcoa se estudiaron las 20 más utilizadas por nadadores. Cada instalación se muestreó 2 días no consecutivos y se midieron los niveles de cloro libre y combinado y trihalometanos en el agua, así como los de cloro total y cloroformo en el aire. Como indicador de la renovación del aire se midió el dióxido de carbono (CO2. Resultados: El nivel medio de cloro en el aire fue de 0,4mg/m³ y el de cloroformo de 22µg/m³. Los valores de cloro libre y combinado de todas las piscinas se mantuvieron dentro de los valores reglamentarios. El nivel medio de cloroformo del agua de baño fue de 13,7µg/l. El valor del cloroformo del aire puede predecirse razonablemente (R²=0,85, y las variables predictoras son el cloroformo del agua, el CO2 y el número de bañistas del día. Conclusiones: Los niveles de contaminantes en el agua y en el aire de las piscinas de Guipúzcoa son inferiores a los descritos en otros estudios. Sin embargo, utilizando la concentración de 0,5mg/m³ de cloro total en aire, propuesta como valor de referencia para la protección de los nadadores con actividad intensa, un 20% de las instalaciones superarían dicho valor.Objective: To describe levels of pollutants found in indoor swimming pools in Guipúzcoa (Basque Country, Spain, both in the bathing water and in the air, and to study the association between these pollutants and other variables related to ventilation systems and the use of installations. Methods: Of the 35 indoor swimming pools registered in Guipúzcoa, the 20 most frequently used by swimmers were studied. Each installation was sampled on two nonconsecutive days. Free and

  1. Activities for extending the lifetime of MINT research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokhari, Adnan; Kassim, Mohammad Suhaimi [Malaysian Inst. for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi, Kajang (Malaysia)

    1998-10-01

    MINT TRIGA Reactor is a 1-MW swimming pool nuclear reactor commissioned in June 1982. Since then, it has been used for research, isotope production, neutron activation, neutron radiography and manpower training. The total operating time till the end on September 1997 is 16968 hours with cumulative total energy release of 11188 MW-hours. After more than fifteen years of successful operation, some deterioration in components and associated systems has been observed. This paper describes some of the activities carried out to increase the lifetime and to reduce the shutdown time of the reactor. (author)

  2. Progressive Increase in Disinfection By-products and Mutagenicity from Source to Tap to Swimming Pool and Spa Water: Impact of Human Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pools and spas are enjoyed throughout the world for exercise and relaxation. However, there are no previous studies on mutagenicity of disinfected spa (hot tub) waters or comprehensive identification of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) formed in spas. Using 28 water samples from ...

  3. Swimming physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmér, I

    1992-05-01

    Swimming takes place in a medium, that presents different gravitational and resistive forces, respiratory conditions and thermal stress compared to air. The energy cost of propulsion in swimming is high, but a considerable reduction occurs at a given velocity as result of regular swim training. In medley swimmers the energy cost is lowest for front crawl, followed by backstroke, butterfly and breast-stroke. Cardiac output is probably not limiting for performance since swimmers easily achieve higher values during running. Maximal heart rate, however, is lowered by approx. 10 beats/min during swimming compared to running. Most likely active muscle mass is smaller and rate of power production lesser in swimming. Local factors, such as peripheral circulation, capillary density, perfusion pressure and metabolic capacity of active muscles, are important determinants of the power production capacity and emphasize the role of swim specific training movements. Improved swimming technique and efficiency are likely to explain much of the continuous progress in performance. Rational principles based on improved understanding of the biomechanics and physiology of swimming should be guidelines for swimmers and coaches in their efforts to explore the limits of human performance.

  4. Investigation of the Thermal Performance of a Vertical Two-Phase Closed Thermosyphon as a Passive Cooling System for a Nuclear Reactor Spent Fuel Storage Pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhsinun Hadi Kusuma

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The decay heat that is produced by nuclear reactor spent fuel must be cooled in a spent fuel storage pool. A wickless heat pipe or a vertical two-phase closed thermosyphon (TPCT is used to remove this decay heat. The objective of this research is to investigate the thermal performance of a prototype model for a large-scale vertical TPCT as a passive cooling system for a nuclear research reactor spent fuel storage pool. An experimental investigation and numerical simulation using RELAP5/MOD 3.2 were used to investigate the TPCT thermal performance. The effects of the initial pressure, filling ratio, and heat load were analyzed. Demineralized water was used as the TPCT working fluid. The cooled water was circulated in the water jacket as a cooling system. The experimental results show that the best thermal performance was obtained at a thermal resistance of 0.22°C/W, the lowest initial pressure, a filling ratio of 60%, and a high evaporator heat load. The simulation model that was experimentally validated showed a pattern and trend line similar to those of the experiment and can be used to predict the heat transfer phenomena of TPCT with varying inputs.

  5. Investigation of the thermal performance of a vertical two-phase closed thermosyphon as a passive cooling system for a nuclear reactor spent fuel storage pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusuma, Mukhsinun Hadi; Putra, Nandy; Imawan, Ficky Augusta [Heat Transfer Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering Universitas Indonesia, Kampus (Indonesia); Antariksawan, Anhar Riza [Centre for Nuclear Reactor Safety and Technology, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN), Kawasan Puspiptek Serpong (Indonesia)

    2017-04-15

    The decay heat that is produced by nuclear reactor spent fuel must be cooled in a spent fuel storage pool. A wickless heat pipe or a vertical two-phase closed thermosyphon (TPCT) is used to remove this decay heat. The objective of this research is to investigate the thermal performance of a prototype model for a large-scale vertical TPCT as a passive cooling system for a nuclear research reactor spent fuel storage pool. An experimental investigation and numerical simulation using RELAP5/MOD 3.2 were used to investigate the TPCT thermal performance. The effects of the initial pressure, filling ratio, and heat load were analyzed. Demineralized water was used as the TPCT working fluid. The cooled water was circulated in the water jacket as a cooling system. The experimental results show that the best thermal performance was obtained at a thermal resistance of 0.22°C/W, the lowest initial pressure, a filling ratio of 60%, and a high evaporator heat load. The simulation model that was experimentally validated showed a pattern and trend line similar to those of the experiment and can be used to predict the heat transfer phenomena of TPCT with varying inputs.

  6. Photoneutron effects on pulse reactor kinetics for the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parma, Edward J., Jr.

    2009-06-01

    The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) is a swimming-pool type pulsed reactor that maintains an epithermal neutron flux and a nine-inch diameter central dry cavity. One of its uses is neutron and gamma-ray irradiation damage studies on electronic components under transient reactor power conditions. In analyzing the experimental results, careful attention must be paid to the kinetics associated with the reactor to ensure that the transient behavior of the electronic device is understood. Since the ACRR fuel maintains a substantial amount of beryllium, copious quantities of photoneutrons are produced that can significantly alter the expected behavior of the reactor power, especially following a reactor pulse. In order to understand these photoneutron effects on the reactor kinetics, the KIFLE transient reactor-analysis code was modified to include the photoneutron groups associated with the beryllium. The time-dependent behavior of the reactor power was analyzed for small and large pulses, assuming several initial conditions including following several pulses during the day, and following a long steady-state power run. The results indicate that, for these types of initial conditions, the photoneutron contribution to the reactor pulse energy can have a few to tens of percent effect.

  7. SAFETY AND MANAGEMENT OF SWIMING POOLS

    OpenAIRE

    Cemal GÜNDOĞDU; EKENCİ, GÜNER; Tekin COLAKOGLU

    2008-01-01

    In this study,it was investigated the situation related to the safety and management of swimming pools belongs to municipality This study was planned to determine the present situation related to the safety and management of open,half-olympic and closed swimming pools which are especially used for sports activities,to find out the deficiencies in practise and to overcome these.Our study included totally 80 open,closed,olympic, half-olympic public swimming pools(the pools that belongs to munic...

  8. Web software for the control and management of radiation protection devices in the Cadarache site; Application WEB pour le controle et la gestion des appareils de radioprotection sur le centre de Cadarache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltritti, F. [CEA Cadarache 13108 St Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2010-07-01

    This series of slides presents how to use a new software dedicated to the management of the periodical controls that have to be performed on the equipment involved in radiation protection. This software is ready to be dispatched on the CEA site of Cadarache. This software gives information on: the device to be controlled, the controls that have to be performed, the procedures to follow to make the test, the equipment necessary for the test particularly the need for radioactive sources, the maintenance of the device, the previous measurements and in the end the device's conformity. An evaluation of the conformity of all the devices present in a building or an area or of a particular type can be easily obtained. (A.C.)

  9. Fuel shuffling optimization for the Delft research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geemert, R. van; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Gibcus, H.P.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Interfaculty Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands); Quist, A.J. [Delft Univ., Fac. of Applied Mathematics and Informatics, Delft (Netherlands)

    1997-07-01

    A fuel shuffling optimization procedure is proposed for the Hoger Onderwijs Reactor (HOR) in Delft, the Netherlands, a 2 MWth swimming-pool type research reactor. In order to cope with the fluctuatory behaviour of objective functions in loading pattern optimization, the proposed cyclic permutation optimization procedure features a gradual transition from global to local search behaviour via the introduction of stochastic tests for the number of fuel assemblies involved in a cyclic permutation. The possible objectives and the safety and operation constraints, as well as the optimization procedure, are discussed, followed by some optimization results for the HOR. (author)

  10. Swimming Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, Corinna C.; Krüger, Carsten; Herminghaus, Stephan; Bahr, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Swimming droplets are artificial microswimmers based on liquid droplets that show self-propelled motion when immersed in a second liquid. These systems are of tremendous interest as experimental models for the study of collective dynamics far from thermal equilibrium. For biological systems, such as bacterial colonies, plankton, or fish swarms, swimming droplets can provide a vital link between simulations and real life. We review the experimental systems and discuss the mechanisms of self-propulsion. Most systems are based on surfactant-stabilized droplets, the surfactant layer of which is modified in a way that leads to a steady Marangoni stress resulting in an autonomous motion of the droplet. The modification of the surfactant layer is caused either by the advection of a chemical reactant or by a solubilization process. Some types of swimming droplets possess a very simple design and long active periods, rendering them promising model systems for future studies of collective behavior.

  11. Evaluation of induced radioactivity in structural material of Toshiba Training Reactor 'TTR1'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Mikio; Kurosawa, Masahiko; Haruguchi, Yoshiko

    2005-01-01

    A decommissioning programme for the Toshiba Training Reactor (TTR1), a swimming pool type reactor used for reactor physics experiments and material irradiation, was started in August 2001. As a part of the programme, induced radioactivity in structural material was evaluated using neutron flux data obtained with the three-dimensional Sn code TORT. Induced activity was calculated with the isotope generation code ORIGEN-79 using activation cross section data created from multi-group library based on JENDL-3. The obtained results for radioactivities such as 60Co, 65Zn, 54Mn and 152Eu were compared with measured ones, and the present calculational method was confirmed to have enough accuracy.

  12. Independent Confirmatory Survey Report for the University of Arizona Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Tucson, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nick A. Altic

    2011-11-11

    The University of Arizona (University) research reactor is a TRIGA swimming pool type reactor designed by General Atomics and constructed at the University in 1958. The reactor first went into operation in December of 1958 under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license R-52 until final shut down on May 18, 2010. Initial site characterization activities were conducted in February 2009 during ongoing reactor operations to assess the radiological status of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL) excluding the reactor tank, associated components, and operating systems. Additional post-shutdown characterization activities were performed to complete characterization activities as well as verify assumptions made in the Decommissioning Plan (DP) that were based on a separate activation analysis (ESI 2009 and WMG 2009). Final status survey (FSS) activities began shortly after the issuance of the FSS plan in May 2011. The contractor completed measurement and sampling activities during the week of August 29, 2011.

  13. Jules Horowitz Reactor, basic design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergamaschi, Y.; Bouilloux, Y.; Chantoin, P.; Guigon, B.; Bravo, X.; Germain, C.; Rommens, M.; Tremodeux, P

    2003-07-01

    Since the shutdown of the SILOE reactor in 1997, the OSIRIS reactor has ensured the needs regarding technological irradiation at CEA including those of its industrial partners and customers. The Jules Horowitz Reactor will replace it. It has the ambition to provide the necessary nuclear data and maintain a fission research capacity in Europe after 2010. This capacity should be service-oriented. It will be established in Cadarache. The Jules Horowitz reactor will also: - represent a significant step in term of performances and experimental capabilities, - be designed with a high flexibility, in order to satisfy the current demand from European industry, research and be able to accommodate future requirements, - reach a high level of safety, according to the best current practice. This paper will present the main functionalities and the design options resulting from the 'preliminary design' studies. (authors)

  14. Is swimming during pregnancy a safe exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Mette; Kogevinas, Manolis; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise in pregnancy is recommended in many countries, and swimming is considered by many to be an ideal activity for pregnant women. Disinfection by-products in swimming pool water may, however, be associated with adverse effects on various reproductive outcomes. We examined...... the association between swimming in pregnancy and preterm and postterm birth, fetal growth measures, small-for-gestational-age, and congenital malformations. METHODS: We used self-reported exercise data (swimming, bicycling, or no exercise) that were prospectively collected twice during pregnancy for 74......,486 singleton pregnancies. Recruitment to The Danish National Birth Cohort took place 1996-2002. Using Cox, linear and logistic regression analyses, depending on the outcome, we compared swimmers with physically inactive pregnant women; to separate a possible swimming effect from an effect of exercise...

  15. CDC Study Finds Fecal Contamination in Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... swimming pools, water parks, hot tubs, interactive fountains, water play areas, lakes, rivers, or oceans. To view the report, please visit www.cdc.gov/mmwr. CDC recommends that all swimmers take the ... out of the water. Do not swim when you have diarrhea. Shower ...

  16. Swimming Eigenworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bussel, Frank; Khan, Zeina; Rahman, Mizanur; Vanapalli, Siva; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2014-03-01

    The nematode C. Elegans is a much studied organism, with a fully mapped genome, cell structure, and nervous system; however, aspects of its behavior have yet to be elucidated, particularly with respect to motility under various conditions. Recently the ``Eigenworm'' technique has emerged as a promising avenue of exploration: via principle component analysis it has been shown that the state space of a healthy crawling worm is low dimensional, in that its shape can be well described by a linear combination of just four eigenmodes. So far, use of this methodology with swimming worms has been somewhat tentative, though medical research such as drug screening is commonly done with nematodes in fluid environments e.g. well plates. Here we give initial results for healthy worms swimming in liquids of varying viscosity. The main result is that at the low viscosities (M9 buffer solution) the state space is even lower dimensional than that for the crawling worm, with only two significant eigenmodes; and that as viscosity increases so does the number of modes needed for an adequate shape description. As well, the shapes of the eigenmodes undergo significant transitions across the range of viscosities looked at.

  17. An Account of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thirteen Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, Murray Wilford [ORNL

    2009-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has built and operated 13 nuclear reactors in its 66-year history. The first was the graphite reactor, the world's first operational nuclear reactor, which served as a plutonium production pilot plant during World War II. It was followed by two aqueous-homogeneous reactors and two red-hot molten-salt reactors that were parts of power-reactor development programs and by eight others designed for research and radioisotope production. One of the eight was an all-metal fast burst reactor used for health physics studies. All of the others were light-water cooled and moderated, including the famous swimming-pool reactor that was copied dozens of times around the world. Two of the reactors were hoisted 200 feet into the air to study the shielding needs of proposed nuclear-powered aircraft. The final reactor, and the only one still operating today, is the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that was built particularly for the production of californium and other heavy elements. With the world's highest flux and recent upgrades that include the addition of a cold neutron source, the 44-year-old HFIR continues to be a valuable tool for research and isotope production, attracting some 500 scientific visitors and guests to Oak Ridge each year. This report describes all of the reactors and their histories.

  18. Evaluation of the aptitude for the service of the pool of the TRIGA Mark III reactor of the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico; Evaluacion de la aptitud para el servicio de la piscina del reactor TRIGA Mark III del Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares de Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merino C, J.; Gachuz M, M.; Diaz S, A.; Arganis J, C.; Gonzalez R, C.; Nava G, T.; Medina R, M.J. [Departamento de Sintesis y Caracterizacion de Materiales del ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    This work describes the evaluation of the structural integrity of the pool of the TRIGA Mark III reactor of the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico, which was realized in July 2001, as an element to determine those actions for preventive and corrective maintenance which owner must do it for a safety and efficient operation of the component in the next years. (Author)

  19. Coccomyxa actinabiotis sp. nov. (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta), a new green microalga living in the spent fuel cooling pool of a nuclear reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivasseau, Corinne; Farhi, Emmanuel; Compagnon, Estelle; de Gouvion Saint Cyr, Diane; van Lis, Robert; Falconet, Denis; Kuntz, Marcel; Atteia, Ariane; Couté, Alain

    2016-10-01

    Life can thrive in extreme environments where inhospitable conditions prevail. Organisms which resist, for example, acidity, pressure, low or high temperature, have been found in harsh environments. Most of them are bacteria and archaea. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is considered to be a champion among all living organisms, surviving extreme ionizing radiation levels. We have discovered a new extremophile eukaryotic organism that possesses a resistance to ionizing radiations similar to that of D. radiodurans. This microorganism, an autotrophic freshwater green microalga, lives in a peculiar environment, namely the cooling pool of a nuclear reactor containing spent nuclear fuels, where it is continuously submitted to nutritive, metallic, and radiative stress. We investigated its morphology and its ultrastructure by light, fluorescence and electron microscopy as well as its biochemical properties. Its resistance to UV and gamma radiation was assessed. When submitted to different dose rates of the order of some tens of mGy · h -1 to several thousands of Gy · h -1 , the microalga revealed to be able to survive intense gamma-rays irradiation, up to 2,000 times the dose lethal to human. The nuclear genome region spanning the genes for small subunit ribosomal RNA-Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) 1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2-28S rRNA (beginning) was sequenced (4,065 bp). The phylogenetic position of the microalga was inferred from the 18S rRNA gene. All the revealed characteristics make the alga a new species of the genus Coccomyxa in the class Trebouxiophyceae, which we name Coccomyxa actinabiotis sp. nov. © 2016 Phycological Society of America.

  20. FOEHN: The critical experiment for the Franco-German High Flux Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharmer, K.; Eckert, H. G. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany)

    1991-01-01

    A critical experiment for the Franco-German High Flux Reactor was carried out in the French reactor EOLE (CEN Cadarache). The purpose of the experiment was to check the calculation methods in a realistic geometry and to measure effects that can only be calculated imprecisely (e.g. beam hole effects). The structure of the experiment and the measurement and calculation methods are described. A detailed comparison between theoretical and experimental results was performed. 30 refs., 105 figs.

  1. Protocol of actuation before occurrence of 'molluscum contagiosum' for use in public swimming pools Protocolo de actuación ante la aparición de casos de molusco contagioso en piscinas de uso público

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ángel Bautista Cotorruelo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective is to develop a protocol for the disinfection of episodes of Molluscum contagiosum and establish an objective indicator. Molluscum contagiosum is a virus of Poxviridae Family. This virus produces a common infection in children that occurs when they come into direct contact with a lesion or with contaminated objects. In November 2008 is received at the Servicio de Sanidad Ambiental (Dirección General de Salud Pública, Consejería de Sanidad y Consumo, Comunidad Autónoma de la Región de Murcia a telephone call from the Epidemiology Service, which reported the existence of about 12-15 cases of children affected by Molluscum contagiosum. In addition, they indicated us that the suspicions fell on the Municipal Pool Cover Alhama de Murcia. Immediately we contacted the responsible staff and we send them a protocol developed with information from several sources. The analysis of articles used for water activities showed absence of Molluscum contagiosum. We selected "absence of molds and yeasts” as indicator. All this coincided with the disappearance of the cases. Months later, in March 2009 we detected new cases of children affected in another pool in the town of Alcantarilla. Due to the success of the methodology used in the earlier incident we performed the same actions and we obtained the same results. The protocol developed by this Service is effective to avoid the occurrence of more cases. We propose the “absence of molds and yeasts” as an indicator to evaluate the presence of Molluscum contagiosum. Coinciding with the update of the rules of public swimming pools in our Region we have introduced an article that indicates that the objects used for water activities must be disinfected after each use.El objetivo principal fue elaborar un protocolo de actuación para el caso de episodios de infección de molusco contagioso y un indicador objetivo, que nos permita hacer un seguimiento. El virus del molusco contagioso

  2. PROPERTIES OF SWIMMING WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayfun KIR

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Swimming waters may be hazardous on human health. So, The physicians who work in the facilities, which include swimming areas, are responsible to prevent risks. To ensure hygiene of swimming water, European Swimming Water Directive offers microbiological, physical, and chemical criteria. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2004; 3(5.000: 103-104

  3. Front crawl swimming analysis using accelerometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espinosa, Hugo G; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup; Thiel, David V

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical characteristics such as stroke rate and stroke length can be used to determine the velocity of a swimmer and can be analysed in both a swimming pool and a flume. The aim of the present preliminary study was to investigate the differences between the acceleration data collected from ...

  4. EFFECTS OF THREE FEEDBACK CONDITIONS ON AEROBIC SWIM SPEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pérez Soriano

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was twofold: (a to develop an underwater chronometer capable to provide feedback while the athlete is swimming, as well as being a control tool for the coach, and (b to analyse its feedback effect on swim pace control compared with feedback provided by the coach and with no feedback, in 25 m and 50 m swimming pools. 30 male swimmers of national level volunteer to participate. Each swimmer swam 3 x 200 m at aerobic speed (AS and 3 x 200 m just under the anaerobic threshold speed (AnS, each swam repetition with a different feedback condition: chronometer, coach and without feedback. Results (a validate the chronometer system developed and (b show that swimmers pace control is affected by the type of feedback provided, the swim speed elected and the size of the swimming pool

  5. ARC Code TI: Swim

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Swim is a software information service for the grid built on top of Pour, which is an information service framework developed at NASA. Swim provides true software...

  6. 2012 Swimming Season Factsheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  7. Methodics of obstacle swimming

    OpenAIRE

    Picka, Matěj

    2015-01-01

    Title: Methodics of Obstacle swimming Objective: The objectve of my disertation is to define requirments for Obstacle swimming and present the most effective methods for mastering in this discipline of Military Penthatlon Methods: Methods of pedagogical research Methods or theoretical and empirical research Results: The outcome of this thesis is to create methodics for obstacle swimming, show major mistakes in overcoming obstacles and give examples for ideal training session for swimming itse...

  8. HEALTHY AND SAFETY SWIMMING

    OpenAIRE

    Suleyman CEYLAN

    2005-01-01

    Swimming is a sport which has own rules, styles, and fields, however, is one of the most performed avocation as amateur and a joke especially at summer months. Although one of the most beneficial sports, swimming can cause a number of several health problems such as infectious diseases, allergic events, or traumas, if it is not done at adequate conditions and eligible style. In this paper, the factors such as preparing to swimming, health and safety features of swimming areas, important healt...

  9. SWIMMING CLASSES IN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ OPINION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Bielec

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of modern physical education is not only to develop motor abilities of the students, but most of all prevent them from epidemic youth diseases such as obesity or postural defects. Positive attitudes to swimming as a long-life physical activity, instilled in adolescence should be beneficial in adult life. The group of 130 boys and 116 girls of 7th grade junior high school (mean age 14.6 was asked in the survey to present their opinion of obligatory swimming lessons at school. Students of both sexes claimed that they liked swimming classes because they could improve their swimming skills (59% of answers and because of health-related character of water exercises (38%. 33% of students regarded swimming lessons as boring and monotonous, and 25% of them complained about poor pool conditions like chlorine smell, crowded lanes, too low temperature. Majority of the surveyed students saw practical role of swimming in saving others life.

  10. Swimming Safely (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-05-22

    Almost 4,000 people die from drowning each year in the U.S. You can also get sick at the pool. This podcast discusses swimming pool safety tips.  Created: 5/22/2014 by MMWR.   Date Released: 5/22/2014.

  11. The Water's Not Fine: U.S. Pool-Linked Infection Doubles in 2 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165702.html The Water's Not Fine: U.S. Pool-Linked Infection Doubles in ... doubled in recent years at swimming pools and water playgrounds in the United States, health officials warn. ...

  12. Conceptual analyses of neutronic and equilibrium refueling parameters to develop a cost-effective multi-purpose pool-type research reactor using WIMSD and CITVAP codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedayat, Afshin, E-mail: ahedayat@aeoi.org.ir

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Introducing a high-beneficent and low-cost multipurpose research reactor. • High technical documents and standard safety issues are introduced coherently. • High effective conceptual neutronic analyses and fuel management strategy. • Gaining high score design criteria and safety margins via 3-D core modeling. • Capacity and capability to produce all medical and industrial radioisotopes. - Abstract: In this paper, neutronic and equilibrium refueling parameters of a multi-purpose cost-effective research reactor have been studied and analyzed. It has been tried to provide periodic and long-term requirements of the irradiating applications coherently. The WIMSD5B and CITVAP codes are used to calculate neutronic parameters and simulate fuel management strategy. The used nuclear data, codes, and calculating methods have been severally benchmarked and verified, successfully. Fundamental concepts, design criteria, and safety issues are introduced and discussed, coherently. Design criteria are selected to gain the most economic benefits per capital costs via minimum required reactor power. Accurate, fast and simplified models have been tried for an integrated decision making and analyses using deterministic codes. Core management, power effects, fuel consumption and burn up effects, and also a complete simulation of the fuel management strategy are presented and analyzed. Results show that the supposed reactor core design can be promisingly suitable in accordance with the commercial multi-purpose irradiating applications. It also retains Operating Limits and Conditions (OLCs) due to standard safety issues, conservatively where safety parameters are calculated using best estimate tools. Such reactor core configuration and integrated refueling task can effectively enhance the Quality Assurance (QA) of the general irradiating applications of the current MTR within their power limits and corresponding OLCs.

  13. Swimming and the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Jason M; Khanna, Neel; Chesler, Roseann; Salciccioli, Louis

    2013-09-20

    Exercise training is accepted to be beneficial in lowering morbidity and mortality in patients with cardiac disease. Swimming is a popular recreational activity, gaining recognition as an effective option in maintaining and improving cardiovascular fitness. Swimming is a unique form of exercise, differing from land-based exercises such as running in many aspects including medium, position, breathing pattern, and the muscle groups used. Water immersion places compressive forces on the body with resulting physiologic effects. We reviewed the physiologic effects and cardiovascular responses to swimming, the cardiac adaptations to swim training, swimming as a cardiac disease risk factor modifier, and the effects of swimming in those with cardiac disease conditions such as coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure and the long-QT syndrome. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. HEALTHY AND SAFETY SWIMMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleyman CEYLAN

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Swimming is a sport which has own rules, styles, and fields, however, is one of the most performed avocation as amateur and a joke especially at summer months. Although one of the most beneficial sports, swimming can cause a number of several health problems such as infectious diseases, allergic events, or traumas, if it is not done at adequate conditions and eligible style. In this paper, the factors such as preparing to swimming, health and safety features of swimming areas, important health behavior, wearing, feeding etc. that effected healthy swimming will be reviewed and evaluated. At the last part of the paper, it will be made some proposals to readers on healthy and safety swimming. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2005; 4(4.000: 209-221

  15. Measurements of Thermal Power at the TRIGA Mark II Reactor in Ljubljana Using Multiple Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žerovnik, Gašper; Snoj, Luka; Trkov, Andrej; Barbot, Loïc; Fourmentel, Damien; Villard, Jean-François

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the current bilateral project between CEA Cadarache and JSI is to improve the accuracy of the online thermal power monitoring at the JSI TRIGA reactor. Simultaneously, a new wide range multichannel acquisition system for fission chambers, recently developed by CEA, is tested. In the paper, calculational and experimental power calibration methods are described. The focus is on use of multiple detectors in combination with pre-calculated and pre-measured control-rod-position-dependent correction factors to improve the reactor power reading. The system will be implemented and tested at the JSI TRIGA reactor in 2014.

  16. Effect of the starting and turning performances on the subsequent swimming parameters of elite swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Santiago; Roig, Andreu

    2017-03-01

    In the present research, we examined the effect of the starting and turning performances on the subsequent swimming parameters by (1) comparing the starting and turning velocities with the swimming parameters on the emersion and mid-pool segments and (2) by relating the individual behaviour of swimmers during the start and turns with subsequent behaviour on each swimming lap. One hundred and twelve 100 m performances on the FINA 2013 World Swimming Championships were analysed by an image-processing system (InThePool 2.0®). At the point of the start emersion, the swimming parameters of the 100-m elite swimmers were substantially greater than the mid-pool parameters, except on the breaststroke races. On the other hand, no diminution in the swimming parameters was observed between the turn emersion and the mid-pool swimming, except on the butterfly and backstroke male races. Changes on the surface swimming kinematics were not generally related to the starting or turning parameters, although male swimmers who develop faster starts seem to achieve faster velocities at emersion. Race analysts should be aware of a transfer of momentum when swimmers emerge from underwater with implications on the subsequent swimming kinematics, especially for male swimmers who employ underwater undulatory techniques.

  17. Energy efficiency in swimming baths. Protecting climate - reduction of expenses; Energieeffizienz in Schwimmbaedern. Klima schuetzen - Kosten senken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-04-15

    Today, swimming with the school class, in the club or with the family and friends is an important component of the socially and sportive life. Indoor and outdoor swimming pools are indispensable for fitness programs and sports. The contribution under consideration reports on measures necessary for a rational, economic and resource conserving application of energy in swimming pools in respect of a future-oriented and holistic energy concept.

  18. Creatine supplementation and swim performance: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Melissa J; Graham, Kenneth; Rooney, Kieron B

    2006-03-01

    Nutritional supplements are popular among athletes participating in a wide variety of sports. Creatine is one of the most commonly used dietary supplements, as it has been shown to be beneficial in improving performance during repeated bouts of high-intensity anaerobic activity. This review examines the specific effects of creatine supplementation on swimming performance, and considers the effects of creatine supplementation on various measures of power development in this population. Research performed on the effect of creatine supplementation on swimming performance indicates that whilst creatine supplementation is ineffective in improving performance during a single sprint swim, dietary creatine supplementation may benefit repeated interval swim set performance. Considering the relationship between sprint swimming performance and measurements of power, the effect of creatine supplementation on power development in swimmers has also been examined. When measured on a swim bench ergometer, power development does show some improvement following a creatine supplementation regime. How this improvement in power output transfers to performance in the pool is uncertain. Although some evidence exists to suggest a gender effect on the performance improvements seen in swimmers following creatine supplementation, the majority of research indicates that male and female swimmers respond equally to supplementation. A major limitation to previous research is the lack of consideration given to the possible stroke dependant effect of creatine supplementation on swimming performance. The majority of the research conducted to date has involved examination of the freestyle swimming stroke only. The potential for performance improvements in the breaststroke and butterfly swimming strokes is discussed, with regards to the biomechanical differences and differences in efficiency between these strokes and freestyle. Key PointsCreatine supplementation does not improve single sprint

  19. Critical evaluation of oxygen-uptake assessment in swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ana; Figueiredo, Pedro; Pendergast, David; Kjendlie, Per-Ludvik; Vilas-Boas, João P; Fernandes, Ricardo J

    2014-03-01

    Swimming has become an important area of sport science research since the 1970s, with the bioenergetic factors assuming a fundamental performance-influencing role. The purpose of this study was to conduct a critical evaluation of the literature concerning oxygen-uptake (VO2) assessment in swimming, by describing the equipment and methods used and emphasizing the recent works conducted in ecological conditions. Particularly in swimming, due to the inherent technical constraints imposed by swimming in a water environment, assessment of VO2max was not accomplished until the 1960s. Later, the development of automated portable measurement devices allowed VO2max to be assessed more easily, even in ecological swimming conditions, but few studies have been conducted in swimming-pool conditions with portable breath-by-breath telemetric systems. An inverse relationship exists between the velocity corresponding to VO2max and the time a swimmer can sustain it at this velocity. The energy cost of swimming varies according to its association with velocity variability. As, in the end, the supply of oxygen (whose limitation may be due to central-O2 delivery and transportation to the working muscles-or peripheral factors-O2 diffusion and utilization in the muscles) is one of the critical factors that determine swimming performance, VO2 kinetics and its maximal values are critical in understanding swimmers' behavior in competition and to develop efficient training programs.

  20. The Effect of Concurrent Visual Feedback on Controlling Swimming Speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczepan Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Developing the ability to control the speed of swimming is an important part of swimming training. Maintaining a defined constant speed makes it possible for the athlete to swim economically at a low physiological cost. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of concurrent visual feedback transmitted by the Leader device on the control of swimming speed in a single exercise test. Material and methods. The study involved a group of expert swimmers (n = 20. Prior to the experiment, the race time for the 100 m distance was determined for each of the participants. In the experiment, the participants swam the distance of 100 m without feedback and with visual feedback. In both variants, the task of the participants was to swim the test distance in a time as close as possible to the time designated prior to the experiment. In the first version of the experiment (without feedback, the participants swam the test distance without receiving real-time feedback on their swimming speed. In the second version (with visual feedback, the participants followed a beam of light moving across the bottom of the swimming pool, generated by the Leader device. Results. During swimming with visual feedback, the 100 m race time was significantly closer to the time designated. The difference between the pre-determined time and the time obtained was significantly statistically lower during swimming with visual feedback (p = 0.00002. Conclusions. Concurrently transmitting visual feedback to athletes improves their control of swimming speed. The Leader device has proven useful in controlling swimming speed.

  1. Vernal Pools

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This is a polygon layer representing existing vernal pool complexes in California's Central Valley, as identified and mapped by Dr. Robert F. Holland. The purpose of...

  2. Simulated front crawl swimming performance related to critical speed and critical power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toussaint, H.M.; Wakayoshi, K.; Hollander, A.P.; Ogita, F.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Competitive pool swimming events range in distance from 50 to 1500 m. Given the difference in performance times (±23-1000 s), the contribution of the aerobic and anaerobic energy systems changes considerably with race distance. In training practice the regression line between swimming

  3. A Guide to Swimming Instruction for Developmentally Disabled Children. Report Number 8168.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Susan

    The swimming instruction guide presents teaching techniques and skill progressions for developmentally disabled individuals and includes program development and administrative guidelines. Part 1 discusses swimming and developmentally disabled children, program planning and preparation elements (including pool, scheduling, staff, parents,…

  4. Radioactivity and radioprotection: the every day life in a nuclear installation. Press tour at CEA/GRENOBLE 18 november 1999; Radioactivite et radioprotection: la vie quotidienne dans une installation nucleaire. Voyage de presse au Centre CEA/CADARACHE 18 novembre 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    In the framework of the public information, this paper gives a general information on the radioactivity and the radioprotection at the CEA/Cadarache center. A first part is devoted to a presentation of the radioactivity with definitions and radiation effects on the human being and the environment. An other part presents the radioprotection activities and regulations. The last part deals with specific activities of the CEA/Cadarache: the CASCAD installations for spent fuels storage, the LECA Laboratory for the Examination of Active Fuels and a dismantling installation for big irradiated objects. Historical aspects of the CEA/Cadarache are also provided. (A.L.B.)

  5. Measurement of the Residual Stresses and Investigation of Their Effects on a Hardfaced Grid Plate due to Thermal Cycling in a Pool Type Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Balaguru

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR, grid plate is a critical component which is made of 316 L(N SS. It is supported on core support structure. The grid plate supports the core subassemblies and maintains their verticality. Most of the components of SFR are made of 316 L(N/304 L(N SS and they are in contact with the liquid-metal sodium which acts as a coolant. The peak operating temperature in SFR is 550°C. However, the self-welding starts at 500°C. To avoid self-welding and galling, hardfacing of the grid plate has become necessary. Nickel based cobalt-free colmonoy 5 has been identified as the hardfacing material due to its lower dose rate by Plasma Transferred Arc Welding (PTAW. This paper is concerned with the measurement and investigations of the effects of the residual stress generated due to thermal cycling on a scale-down physical model of the grid plate. Finite element analysis of the hardfaced grid plate model is performed for obtaining residual stresses using elastoplastic analysis and hence the results are validated. The effects of the residual stresses due to thermal cycling on the hardfaced grid plate model are studied.

  6. Laryngoscopy during swimming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsted, Emil S; Swanton, Laura L; van van Someren, Ken

    2017-01-01

    Exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO) is a key differential diagnosis for respiratory symptoms in athletes and is particularly prevalent in aquatic athletes. A definitive diagnosis of EILO is dependent on laryngoscopy, performed continuously, while an athlete engages in the sport...... that precipitates their symptoms. This report provides the first description of the feasibility of performing continuous laryngoscopy during exercise in a swimming environment. The report describes the methodology and safety of the use of continuous laryngoscopy while swimming. Laryngoscope, 2017....

  7. Radioactive waste storage at the CEA Centre in Cadarache; transfer from the -storage yard- to the CEDRA facility: an illustration of changes in the safety requirements; L'entreposage de dechets nucleaires sur le Centre CEA de Cadarache: du -Parc d'entreposage- vers l'installation CEDRA: une illustration de l'evolution des exigences de surete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verrhiest-Leblanc, G. [Autorite de Surete Nucleaire, Chargee d' Affaires, 75 - Paris (France); Tord, Ch. [Autorite de Surete Nucleaire, adjoint au chef de la Division de Marseille, 75 - Paris (France)

    2011-02-15

    A lot of changes have been made to the nuclear waste storage and disposal strategy over the last few years thanks to technological progress and changes in the requirements applicable in the sector. In this article, the authors present a concrete example of the actions undertaken, at the request of the French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN), by the CEA Centre at Cadarache, regarding the Cadarache Centre waste storage facility (BNI 56), a facility which was originally intended as a permanent repository for solid waste. Commissioned in 1969, BNI 56 is made up of various trenches and pits which no longer meet current ASN requirements. To clean up these trenches, a legacy from the past, now requires considerable resources and involves many problems, especially due to uncertainty surrounding the nature, activity levels, packaging and volume of this waste. ASN ensures that the CEA will fully assume its overriding responsibility in the matter and implement safe, rigorous and transparent management solutions for all the waste. The BNI 56 trenches are an ongoing and concrete example of the difficulties inherent in recovering waste from storage and dismantling former facilities the design of which failed to take such aspects into account. This waste is now being repackaged so that it can be stored at a new basic nuclear installation called CEDRA (packaging and storage of radioactive waste) which complies with the safety requirements currently in force. This facility, commissioned in 2006, is intended for the storage of Type B solid radioactive waste for a period of 50 years pending construction of a deep geological repository or long-term storage facility. (authors)

  8. Safe Swimming (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-06-01

    Most outbreaks linked to pools and water playgrounds are caused by Cryptosporidium. This podcast discusses ways to keep you healthy and safe while swimming.  Created: 6/1/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 6/1/2017.

  9. The pool chlorine hypothesis and asthma among boys.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cotter, A

    2012-01-31

    Swimming pool sanitation has largely been concerned with the microbiological quality of pool water, which is normally treated using a number of chlorine products. Recent studies have pointed to the potential hazards of chlorine by-products to the respiratory epithelium, particularly in indoor, poorly ventilated, pools. The aim of our study was to elucidate whether chronic exposure to indoor chlorinated swimming pools was associated with an increased likelihood of the development of asthma in boys. METHODS: The subjects were boys aged between 6 and 12 years. Data was collected by means of parental responses to a standardized asthma questionnaire (ISAAC: International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood), supplemented with additional questions regarding frequency of attendance, number of years attendance, whether the child is a swimming team member. The questionnaire return rate was 71\\/% (n = 121). 23 boys were excluded on the basis that they had asthma before they started swimming (n = 97). There was a significant association between number of years a boy had been swimming and the likelihood of wheezing in the last 12 months (p = 0.009; OR = 1.351; 95% CI = 1.077-1.693) and diagnosed asthma (p = 0.046; OR = 1.299; 95% CI = 1.004-1.506). The greater the number the number of years a boy had been attending an indoor, chlorinated pool, the greater the likelihood of wheezing in the last 12 months or "had asthma". Age, parental smoking habits and being a swimming team member had no association with any of the asthma variables examined. Swimming pool attendance may be a risk factor in asthma in boys.

  10. Demolition to Green-Field conditions of the FRJ-1 (MERLIN) research reactor. Successes and hurdles in the demolition of a research reactor of the megawatt class; Der Rueckbau des Forschungsreaktors FRJ-1 (MERLIN) bis zur 'Gruenen Wiese'. Erfolge und Huerden beim Rueckbau eines Forschungsreaktors der Megawatt-Klasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahn, Burkhard; Printz, Rudolf; Matela, Karel; Zehbe, Carsten; Stauch, Bernhard; Zander, Iven [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    The Juelich-1 Research Reactor (FRJ-1), also referred to as MERLIN (Medium Energy Research Light Water Moderated Industrial Nuclear Reactor), was a light-water moderated and cooled swimming pool reactor of British design. The cornerstone in the erection of the reactor building was laid on June 11, 1958. Reactor operation was started on February 23, 1962. The plant was last run at a thermal power of 10 MW and shut down for good in 1985 after 23 years of operation. After the fuel elements had been removed and most of the experimental installations dismantled, some first steps towards demolition were taken in 1995. Demolition on a large scale began in 1996. September 8, 2008 was a special day: On the area of the former reactor hall, an oak tree was planted as a symbol of the 'green field' and of the original oak wood which had to make way for the construction of reactors in Juelich. An oak tree now stands in the place of the reactor unit. Was that all? It was not, for there were ancillary systems, operations, utility and hygiene buildings which had to be pulled down. Decontamination and clearance measurements were completed. The application for clearance was prepared and completed. Conventional demolition was started in 2009. After completion of that step, the last chapter about demolition of the FRJ-1 research reactor has been written, and the book can be closed. (orig.)

  11. Development of the user interface for visualization of the auxiliary systems of the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor; Desarrollo de la interface de usuario para la visualizacion de los sistemas auxiliares del reactor nuclear Triga Mark III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merced D, J. E.

    2016-07-01

    The Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) has a nuclear research reactor type swimming pool with movable core cooled and moderate with light water. The nominal maximum power of the reactor is 1 MW in steady-state operation and can be pulsed at a maximum power of 2,000 MW for approximately 10 milliseconds. This reactor is mainly used to study the effects of radiation on various materials and substances. In 2001 the new control console of the nuclear reactor was installed which was based on two digital computers, one computer controls the bar management mechanisms and the other the systems to the reactor operator. In 2004, the control computer was replaced and the software was updated. Within the modernization and/or updating of the TRIGA Mark III reactor of ININ, is intended (theme of this work) to develop the user interface for the visualization of the auxiliary systems, through a Man-Machine Interface module for the renewal process of the control console. The man-machine interface system to be developed will have communication with the programmable logic controllers that will be constantly monitored and controlled to obtain real-time variables of the reactor behavior. (Author)

  12. CREATINE SUPPLEMENTATION AND SWIM PERFORMANCE: A BRIEF REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa J. Hopwood

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional supplements are popular among athletes participating in a wide variety of sports. Creatine is one of the most commonly used dietary supplements, as it has been shown to be beneficial in improving performance during repeated bouts of high-intensity anaerobic activity. This review examines the specific effects of creatine supplementation on swimming performance, and considers the effects of creatine supplementation on various measures of power development in this population. Research performed on the effect of creatine supplementation on swimming performance indicates that whilst creatine supplementation is ineffective in improving performance during a single sprint swim, dietary creatine supplementation may benefit repeated interval swim set performance. Considering the relationship between sprint swimming performance and measurements of power, the effect of creatine supplementation on power development in swimmers has also been examined. When measured on a swim bench ergometer, power development does show some improvement following a creatine supplementation regime. How this improvement in power output transfers to performance in the pool is uncertain. Although some evidence exists to suggest a gender effect on the performance improvements seen in swimmers following creatine supplementation, the majority of research indicates that male and female swimmers respond equally to supplementation. A major limitation to previous research is the lack of consideration given to the possible stroke dependant effect of creatine supplementation on swimming performance. The majority of the research conducted to date has involved examination of the freestyle swimming stroke only. The potential for performance improvements in the breaststroke and butterfly swimming strokes is discussed, with regards to the biomechanical differences and differences in efficiency between these strokes and freestyle

  13. 2008 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  14. 2010 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  15. 2009 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  16. 2007 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  17. 2006 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  18. Swimming Performance Assessment in Fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Tierney, Keith B.

    2011-01-01

    Swimming performance tests of fish have been integral to studies of muscle energetics, swimming mechanics, gas exchange, cardiac physiology, disease, pollution, hypoxia and temperature. This paper describes a flexible protocol to assess fish swimming performance using equipment in which water velocity can be controlled. The protocol involves one to several stepped increases in flow speed that are intended to cause fish to fatigue. Step speeds and their duration can be set to capture swimming ...

  19. Environmental and personal determinants of the uptake of disinfection by-products during swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Font-Ribera, Laia; Kogevinas, Manolis; Schmalz, Christina; Zwiener, Christian; Marco, Esther; Grimalt, Joan O; Liu, Jiaqi; Zhang, Xiangru; Mitch, William; Critelli, Rossana; Naccarati, Alessio; Heederik, Dick; Spithoven, Jack; Arjona, Lourdes; de Bont, Jeroen; Gracia-Lavedan, Esther; Villanueva, Cristina M

    BACKGROUND: Trihalomethanes (THMs) in exhaled breath and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) in urine are internal dose biomarkers of exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) in swimming pools. OBJECTIVE: We assessed how these biomarkers reflect the levels of a battery of DBPs in pool water and

  20. Swimming pools and intra-city climates: Influences on residential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water demand management can be effective as a resource management approach if demand estimation is accurate and consumption determinants are defined. While determinants such as household income, regional climate, water price, property size and household occupancy have been comprehensively studied and ...

  1. Renovation of an alkali–aggregate reaction damaged swimming pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka Lahdensivu

    2015-12-01

    Based on the assessment, it was decided to repair the damaged concrete and stop the ASR by proper waterproofing. Tensile and compressive strength tests on the concrete indicated that a relatively light renovation method was sufficient because the deterioration of the concrete was still incipient and the target service life of the repairs was only 20–25 years. Self-compacting concrete was determined to be a good solution for concreting the narrow spaces between dense reinforcement. Self-compacting concrete was used also for concreting the splash canals and supporting consoles. The renovation was based on installing proper waterproofing between the concrete surface and the ceramic tiling.

  2. Chemical Emergency Preparedness and Prevention Advisory: Swimming Pool Chemicals: Chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This June 1990 advisory to Local Emergency Planning Committees (LEPCs) suggests they address risk from chlorine, an extremely hazardous substance, even when below the threshold planning quantity stated in Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act.

  3. Infections Unlikely to be Spread Through Swimming Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... recreational water facilities. What is MRSA? Staphylococcus aureus (“staph”) is a germ that often lives in the ... methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , is a type of staph germ that is resistant to certain antibiotics. In ...

  4. Keila Tervisekeskus. Ujula = Keila Health Club. Swimming Pool / Ain Padrik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Padrik, Ain, 1947-

    2001-01-01

    Projekteerija: Arhitektuuribüroo Künnapu & Padrik. Arhitektid Ain Padrik ja Kristi Alamaa, sisearhitekt Sirje Männik. Konstruktsioonid: Jaan Laks, A-Grupp. Ujulas on võistlus- ja lastebassein, suvel on avatud välibassein. 5 ill.: I korruse plaan, ristlõige, vaated

  5. Swimming attendance during childhood and development of asthma: Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeriani, Federica; Protano, Carmela; Vitali, Matteo; Romano Spica, Vincenzo

    2017-05-01

    The association between asthma and swimming pool attendance has not been demonstrated and currently there are conflicting results. In order to clarify the association between asthma diagnosis in children and swimming pool attendance, and to assess the consistency of the available epidemiological studies, we completed a literature analysis on the relationship between the exposure to disinfection by-products in indoor swimming pools during childhood and asthma diagnosis. Following the Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) criteria, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed by searching MEDLINE via PubMed, TOXNET, and Scopus databases (from inception to 20 April 2015) using the key word "Asthma" together with "swimming pool", "disinfection by-products", "indoor air pollution" and "children". Inclusion criteria were: English language, a complete analytic study design involving a cohort of children (0-16 years), a well-defined definition of exposure, and the presence of data on effect and variance. Studies on in vivo, in vitro or professional and accidental exposure were excluded. After a screening process, seven reports (n = 5851 subjects) were included out of a total of 2928 references. The reported OR of the association between swimming pool attendance and asthma prevalence ranged from 0.58 to 2.30. The present meta-analysis failed to identify a significant difference in asthma development between children attending swimming pools and controls (OR, 1.084; 95% CI: 0.89-1.31). Swimming in childhood does not increase the likelihood of doctor-diagnosed asthma. Based on this meta-analysis review, the association of the disease with indoor pool attendance is still unclear. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  6. Swimming performance assessment in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Keith B

    2011-05-20

    Swimming performance tests of fish have been integral to studies of muscle energetics, swimming mechanics, gas exchange, cardiac physiology, disease, pollution, hypoxia and temperature. This paper describes a flexible protocol to assess fish swimming performance using equipment in which water velocity can be controlled. The protocol involves one to several stepped increases in flow speed that are intended to cause fish to fatigue. Step speeds and their duration can be set to capture swimming abilities of different physiological and ecological relevance. Most frequently step size is set to determine critical swimming velocity (U(crit;)), which is intended to capture maximum sustained swimming ability. Traditionally this test has consisted of approximately ten steps each of 20 min duration. However, steps of shorter duration (e.g. 1 min) are increasingly being utilized to capture acceleration ability or burst swimming performance. Regardless of step size, swimming tests can be repeated over time to gauge individual variation and recovery ability. Endpoints related to swimming such as measures of metabolic rate, fin use, ventilation rate, and of behavior, such as the distance between schooling fish, are often included before, during and after swimming tests. Given the diversity of fish species, the number of unexplored research questions, and the importance of many species to global ecology and economic health, studies of fish swimming performance will remain popular and invaluable for the foreseeable future.

  7. Pool fencing for preventing drowning in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D C; Rivara, F P

    2000-01-01

    In most industrialized countries, drowning ranks second or third behind motor vehicles and fires as a cause of unintentional injury deaths to children under the age of 15. Death rates from drowning are highest in children less than five years old. Pool fencing is a passive environmental intervention designed to reduce unintended access to swimming pools and thus prevent drowning in the preschool age group. Because of the magnitude of the problem and the potential effectiveness of fencing we decided to evaluate the effect of pool fencing as a drowning prevention strategy for young children. To determine if pool fencing prevents drowning in young children. We used Cochrane Collaboration search strategy of electronic databases, searched reference lists of past reviews and review articles, Cochrane International Register of RCT's, studies from government agencies in the United States and Australia, and contacted colleagues from International Society for Child and Adolescent Injury Prevention, World Injury Network, and CDC funded Injury Control and Research Centers. In order to be selected a study had to be designed to evaluate pool fencing in a defined population and provide relevant and interpretable data which objectively measured the risk of drowning or near drowning or provided rates of these outcomes in fenced and unfenced pools. The completed studies meeting selection criteria employed a case-control design. No randomized controlled studies have been identified. Three published studies met selection criteria. Data were extracted by two reviewers using standard abstract form. Odds ratios with 95% CI, and incidence rates, were calculated for drowning and near-drowning. Attributable Risk percent (AR%) was calculated to report the reduction in drowning due to pool fencing. Case control studies which evaluate pool fencing interventions indicate that pool fencing significantly reduces the risk of drowning. Odds ratio for the risk of drowning or near drowning in a

  8. The evolution of doses in the IEA-R1 reactor environment and tendencies based on the current results; Evolucao das doses no ambiente do Reator IEA-R1 e tendencias com base nos resultados atuais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoda, Eduardo Yoshio

    2016-11-01

    The IPEN / CNEN-SP have a Nuclear Research Reactor-NRR named IEA-R1, in operation from 1957. It is an open swimming pool reactor using light water as shielding, moderator and as cooling, the volume of this pool is 273m{sup 3}.Until 1995 the reactor operated daily at a power of 2,0 MW. From June of that year, after a few safety modifications the reactor began operating in continuous way from Monday to Wednesday without shutdown totalizing 64 hours per week and the power was increased to 4,5MW also. Because of these changes, continuous operation and increased power, workers' doses would tend to increase. In the past several studies were conducted seeking ways to reduce the workers' doses. A study was made on the possibility to introduce a shielding at the top of the reactor core with a hot water layer. Studies have shown that a major limitation for operating a reactor at high power comes from the gamma radiation emitted by the sodium-24. Other elements such as magnesium-27, aluminum-28, Argon-51, contribute considerably to the water activity of the pool. The introduction of a hot water layer on the swimming pool would form a layer of surface, stable and free of radioactive elements with a 1.5m to 2m thickness creates a shielding to radiation from radioactive elements dissolved in water. Optimization studies proved that the installation of the hot layer was not necessary for the regime and the current power reactor operation, because other procedures adopted were more effective. From this decision the Radiological Protection Reactor Team, set up a dose assessment program to ensure them remained in low values based on principles established in national and international standards. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the individual doses of OEI (Occupationally Exposed Individual), which will be checked increasing doses resulting from recent changes in reactor operation regime and suggested viable safety and protection options, in the first instance to

  9. Determination of the exposition rapidity in the level 49.90 of the reactor building for the decrease in the water level of the spent fuel pool; Determinacion de la rapidez de exposion en el nivel 49.90 del edificio del reactor por la disminucion en el nivel de agua de la alberca de combustible gastado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mijangos D, Z. E.; Herrera H, S. F.; Cruz G, M. A.; Amador C, C., E-mail: zoedelfin@gmail.com [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Subgerencia de Ingenieria, Km 44.5 Carretera Cardel-Nautla, 91476 Laguna Verde, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The fuel assemblies storage in the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V) represents a crucial aspect, due to the generated dose by the decay heat of the present radio-nuclides in the assemblies retired of the reactor core, after their useful life. These spent assemblies are located inside the spent fuel pool (SFP), in the level 49.90 m in the Reload Floor of the Reactor building of NPP-L V. This leads to the protection at personnel applying the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) criteria, fulfilling the established dose criteria by the Regulator Body the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS). Considering the loss scenario of the cooling system of the SFP, in which the SFP water vaporizes, is important to know the water level in which the limit of effective dose equivalent is fulfilled for the personnel. Also, is important for the instrumentation of the SFP, for the useful life of the same instruments. In this work is obtained the exposition rapidity corresponding to different water levels of SFP in the Reload Floor of NPP-L V, to identify the minimum level of water where the limit of effective dose equivalent is fulfilled of 25 rem s to the personnel, established in the Article 48 of the General Regulation of Radiological Safety of CNSNS and the Chapter 50 Section 67 of the 10-Cfr of Nuclear Regulatory Commission in USA. The water level is also identified where the exposition rapidity is of 15 m R/hr, being the value of the set point of the area radiation monitor D21-Re-N003-1, located to 125 cm over the level 49.90 meters of the Reload Floor of NPP-L V. (Author)

  10. Mechanics of Mammalian Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Timothy; Legac, Paul; Fish, Frank; Williams, Terrie; Mark, Russell; Hutchison, Sean

    2008-03-01

    Propulsion of large mammals (i.e. dolphins and humans) has been of great interest for both technological and athletic reasons. The foundational question is how fast can a mammal swim? Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) has been modified to be safely used on swimmers and dolphins. Experiments of dolphins performing various swimming behaviors were performed at the Long Marine Laboratory, University of California, Santa Cruz. Vortices generated by the dolphins' tail motions were used to estimate thrust production. Also, a two-dimensional dynamic force balance was constructed to study and improve the mechanics of elite swimmers. Paired with an underwater video camera, the forces seen could be directly related to the motion of the swimmer. These force measurements could be correlated to time resolved DPIV measurements of flow around the swimmers. Measurements made with swimmers, Megan Jendrick (2000 Olympic gold medalist) and Ariana Kukors (4x US National Champion), as well as data from trials with two dolphins will be presented.

  11. Investigación de un brote respiratorio agudo por exposición a cloro gas en una piscina pública Investigation of an outbreak of acute respiratory illness due to exposure to chlorine gas in a public swimming pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Almagro Nievas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Se diseñó un estudio de casos y controles para investigar el accidente químico ocurrido en una piscina pública en el verano de 2005 y describir los factores ambientales responsables, analizar el efecto del cloro gas y valorar la evolución clínica y funcional del aparato respiratorio. Las intervenciones fueron las siguientes: inspecciones ambientales, encuesta epidemiológica (variables sociodemográficas, ubicación en el momento del accidente, olor percibido y seguimiento clínico y espirométrico de la función respiratoria. Se encuestaron 65 casos y 48 controles. El suceso se produjo al mezclar accidentalmente ácido clorhídrico e hipoclorito sódico, lo que generó cloro gas. Los síntomas predominantes fueron tos y disnea. El riesgo de enfermar en niños era 10 veces mayor si tenían una enfermedad respiratoria previa y 4 veces superior si estaban a una distancia inferior a 40 m del lugar del accidente. Todos los casos evolucionaron hacia la curación, excepto uno que tenía antecedentes asmáticos.A case-control study was designed to investigate a chemical accident that occurred in a swimming-pool in the summer of 2005. The aim was to describe the environmental factors involved in the accident, to assess the effect of chlorine gas on the respiratory system, and to perform a clinical and spirometric follow-up. The following interventions were carried out: environmental inspection, epidemiologic survey (including sociodemographic variables, location at the time of the accident, perception of an abnormal smell, and clinical and spirometric outcomes to assess respiratory function. Sixty-five cases and 48 controls were identified and interviewed. The accident was produced by accidental admixture of hydrochloric acid with sodium hypochlorite resulting in chlorine gas release. The main clinical symptoms were dyspnea and cough. The risk of becoming ill was 10-fold higher in children with a previous lung disease and was 4-fold higher when

  12. Achieving compliance with pool fencing legislation in New Zealand: how much progress has been made in 10 years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliver, Pauline; Chalmers, David; Cousins, Kimberley

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess current levels of enforcement and compliance with the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987, and to determine if enforcement activity and compliance has changed since 1997. A postal questionnaire was sent to all of 73 territorial authorities in New Zealand. Main outcome measures include number and rates of swimming pools (per 1000 dwellings and per 1000 population); mean number of building consents and code compliance certificates issued for pools per territorial authority; mean number of pool inspections made per territorial authority; and the proportion of pools complying with the requirements of the Act. There was around a 9% increase in the prevalence of domestic swimming pools in New Zealand, from 46 pools/1000 dwellings in 1997 to 50 pools/1000 dwellings in 2006 was observed. There has been a 65% increase in the proportion of pools reported as complying with the Act. The proportion of authorities reporting a programme of re-inspection for domestic swimming pools increased from 28% in 1997 to 63% in 2006. There has also been an increase in the proportion of domestic swimming pools recorded as complying with the Act. Finally, a considerable improvement in the enforcement and monitoring activities of territorial authorities in New Zealand was found.

  13. Water droplets also swim!

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Marjolein; Izri, Ziane; Michelin, Sébastien; Dauchot, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    Recently there has been a surge of interest in producing artificial swimmers. One possible path is to produce self-propelling droplets in a liquid phase. The self-propulsion often relies on complex mechanisms at the droplet interface, involving chemical reactions and the adsorption-desorption kinetics of the surfactant. Here, we report the spontaneous swimming of droplets in a very simple system: water droplets immersed in an oil-surfactant medium. The swimmers consist of pure water, with no additional chemical species inside: water droplets also swim! The swimming is very robust: the droplets are able to transport cargo such as large colloids, salt crystals, and even cells. In this talk we discuss the origin of the spontaneous motion. Water from the droplet is solubilized by the reverse micellar solution, creating a concentration gradient of swollen reverse micelles around each droplet. By generalizing a recently proposed instability mechanism, we explain how spontaneous motion emerges in this system at sufficiently large Péclet number. Our water droplets in an oil-surfactant medium constitute the first experimental realization of spontaneous motion of isotropic particles driven by this instability mechanism.

  14. Do swimming goggles limit microbial contamination of contact lenses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yvonne T; Tran, Jess; Truong, Michelle; Harmis, Najat; Zhu, Hua; Stapleton, Fiona

    2011-04-01

    Wearing goggles over contact lenses while swimming is often recommended by eye care professionals. Limited data are available to assess this recommendation. The purpose of this study was to examine whether wearing goggles while swimming limits bacterial colonization on contact lenses and whether the type of lens worn affects contamination rates. Twenty-three subjects underwent two swimming sessions at an ocean (salt water) pool (Maroubra beach Rock Pool, Sydney, Australia). Silicone hydrogel (Ciba Focus Night and Day) or hydrogel lenses (Ciba Focus Daily) were inserted into subjects' eyes before 30 min of swimming sessions, and subjects used modified goggles to mimic goggled and non-goggled conditions. At the end of each session, lenses were collected for microbial investigation. Viable bacterial colonies were classified as gram positive and gram negative and enumerated. The level of bacterial colonization on contact lenses between goggled and non-goggled conditions and between the two lens materials were compared. The range of colony forming units recovered from goggled lenses were 0 to 930 compared with 0 to 1210 on non-goggled lenses. The majority of subjects (16/23) had more microorganisms in the non-goggled condition than when wearing goggles (p = 0.03). Gram negative organisms were found in three non-goggled lenses. No significant difference was shown in the number of bacteria isolated from silicone hydrogel and hydrogel lenses (p > 0.6) irrespective of wearing goggles. Water samples had consistently higher numbers of bacterial counts than those adhered to the lenses; however, no association was found between the number of bacteria in the water sample and those found on the contact lenses. Consistently, fewer bacterial colonies were found on the goggled contact lens, thus suggesting goggles offer some protection against bacterial colonization of contact lenses while swimming. These data would support the recommendation encouraging lens wearers to use goggles

  15. Effects of In-Water Passive Recovery on Sprint Swimming Performance and Heart Rate in Adolescent Swimmers

    OpenAIRE

    Casuso, Rafael A.; Emilio Martínez-López, Fidel Hita-Contreras, Irene Ruiz-Cazalilla, David Cruz-Díaz, Antonio Martínez-Amat

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to test the hypothesis that sprint swimming performance is enhanced by in-water passive recovery (IN) after sprint swimming bouts in well-trained adolescent swimmers. Using a randomized crossover study design, twelve well-trained adolescent swimmers performed two tests at the swimming pool after preliminary testing. They performed 5 bouts of 100m all-out swimming separated by 5 minutes of passive rest. Their individual in- or out-of-water passive recovery condi...

  16. Simulation and transient analyses of a complete passive heat removal system in a downward cooling pool-type material testing reactor against a complete station blackout and long-term natural convection mode using the RELAP5/3.2 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedayat, Afshin [Reactor and Nuclear Safety School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    In this paper, a complete station blackout (SBO) or complete loss of electrical power supplies is simulated and analyzed in a downward cooling 5-MW pool-type Material Testing Reactor (MTR). The scenario is traced in the absence of active cooling systems and operators. The code nodalization is successfully benchmarked against experimental data of the reactor's operating parameters. The passive heat removal system includes downward water cooling after pump breakdown by the force of gravity (where the coolant streams down to the unfilled portion of the holdup tank), safety flapper opening, flow reversal from a downward to an upward cooling direction, and then the upward free convection heat removal throughout the flapper safety valve, lower plenum, and fuel assemblies. Both short-term and long-term natural core cooling conditions are simulated and investigated using the RELAP5 code. Short-term analyses focus on the safety flapper valve operation and flow reversal mode. Long-term analyses include simulation of both complete SBO and long-term operation of the free convection mode. Results are promising for pool-type MTRs because this allows operators to investigate RELAP code abilities for MTR thermal–hydraulic simulations without any oscillation; moreover, the Tehran Research Reactor is conservatively safe against the complete SBO and long-term free convection operation.

  17. Nuclear reactor building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, P.F.; Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

    1994-04-05

    A reactor building for enclosing a nuclear reactor includes a containment vessel having a wetwell disposed therein. The wetwell includes inner and outer walls, a floor, and a roof defining a wetwell pool and a suppression chamber disposed there above. The wetwell and containment vessel define a drywell surrounding the reactor. A plurality of vents are disposed in the wetwell pool in flow communication with the drywell for channeling into the wetwell pool steam released in the drywell from the reactor during a LOCA for example, for condensing the steam. A shell is disposed inside the wetwell and extends into the wetwell pool to define a dry gap devoid of wetwell water and disposed in flow communication with the suppression chamber. In a preferred embodiment, the wetwell roof is in the form of a slab disposed on spaced apart support beams which define there between an auxiliary chamber. The dry gap, and additionally the auxiliary chamber, provide increased volume to the suppression chamber for improving pressure margin. 4 figures.

  18. Childhood drownings and fencing of outdoor pools in the United States, 1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, P; Branche, C M; Sacks, J J; Ryan, G; Peddicord, J

    1998-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of proper fencing around outdoor swimming pools among US households and to describe this fencing in relation to demographic and other household factors. To estimate the number of drownings among children fencing around all residential pools in the United States. A 1994, randomly dialed national telephone survey contacted 5238 adults who reported demographic information and household characteristics including whether the household had an outdoor swimming pool and the fencing around the pool. Data were weighted to obtain national estimates and percentages. The number of preventable drownings was estimated with a population-attributable risk equation. Approximately 18.5 million American households owned or had access to an outdoor swimming pool in 1994, and 76% (13.9 million) of them appeared to have had adequate fencing. Adequate fencing was associated with household income and type of home. We estimate that 19% of pool-related drownings among children fenced. Adequate pool fencing prevents a child from having access to a swimming pool if a responsible adult is not present and has been promoted as a method to prevent drowning. Our research suggests that even if all residential pools in the United States were properly fenced, most drownings among children <5 years of age would not be prevented. Thus, additional strategies to prevent drowning will be needed.

  19. IEA-R1 Nuclear Research Reactor: 58 Years of Operating Experience and Utilization for Research, Teaching and Radioisotopes Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, Jose Patricio Nahuel; Filho, Tufic Madi; Saxena, Rajendra; Filho, Walter Ricci [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN-CNEN/SP, Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242 Cid Universitaria CEP: 05508-000- Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    IEA-R1 research reactor at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (Nuclear and Energy Research Institute) IPEN, Sao Paulo, Brazil is the largest power research reactor in Brazil, with a maximum power rating of 5 MWth. It is being used for basic and applied research in the nuclear and neutron related sciences, for the production of radioisotopes for medical and industrial applications, and for providing services of neutron activation analysis, real time neutron radiography, and neutron transmutation doping of silicon. IEA-R1 is a swimming pool reactor, with light water as the coolant and moderator, and graphite and beryllium as reflectors. The reactor was commissioned on September 16, 1957 and achieved its first criticality. It is currently operating at 4.5 MWth with a 60-hour cycle per week. In the early sixties, IPEN produced {sup 131}I, {sup 32}P, {sup 198}Au, {sup 24}Na, {sup 35}S, {sup 51}Cr and labeled compounds for medical use. During the past several years, a concerted effort has been made in order to upgrade the reactor power to 5 MWth through refurbishment and modernization programs. One of the reasons for this decision was to produce {sup 99}Mo at IPEN. The reactor cycle will be gradually increased to 120 hours per week continuous operation. It is anticipated that these programs will assure the safe and sustainable operation of the IEA-R1 reactor for several more years, to produce important primary radioisotopes {sup 99}Mo, {sup 125}I, {sup 131}I, {sup 153}Sm and {sup 192}Ir. Currently, all aspects of dealing with fuel element fabrication, fuel transportation, isotope processing, and spent fuel storage are handled by IPEN at the site. The reactor modernization program is slated for completion by 2015. This paper describes 58 years of operating experience and utilization of the IEA-R1 research reactor for research, teaching and radioisotopes production. (authors)

  20. Hawaii ESI: POOLS (Anchialine Pool Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for anchialine pools in Hawaii. Anchialine pools are small, relatively shallow coastal ponds that occur...

  1. Influence of mobile games on the process of teaching of students that can not swim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strelnykov G.L.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Considered direction in teaching of students to swimming in terms 25 meter pool. 30 students took part in an experiment. The place of mobile games in the process of teaching of novices is certain. Information of results of testing of level of physical preparedness of students is presented. Positive influence of mobile games on the process of mastering of skills of swimming and co-operations on water is marked. Forms and methods of mastering of skills and conduct in water are offered. The motive mode and forms of organization of educational process of not able to swim students is recommended.

  2. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report July- September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edler, S. K.

    1980-12-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from April 1 through June 30, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission {NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  3. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report April -June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edler, S. K.

    1980-11-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from April 1 through June 30, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission {NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  4. Reduction of the pool-top radiation level in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choong-Sung; Park, Sang-Jun; Kim, Heonil; Park, Yong-Chul; Choi, Young-San [HANARO Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-08-01

    HANARO is an open-tank-in-pool type reactor. Pool water is the only shielding to minimize the pool top radiation level. During the power ascension test of HANARO, the measured pool top radiation level was higher than the design value because some of the activation products in the coolant reached the pool surface. In order to suppress this rising coolant, the hot water layer system (HWL) was designed and installed to maintain l.2 meter-deep hot water layer whose temperature is 5degC higher than that of the underneath pool surface. After the installation of the HWL system, however, the radiation level of the pool-top did not satisfy the design value. The operation modes of the hot water layer system and the other systems in the reactor pool, which had an effect on the formation of the hot water layer, were changed to reduce pool-top radiation level. After the above efforts, the temperature and the radioactivity distribution in the pool was measured to confirm whether this system blocked the rising coolant. The radiation level at the pool-top was significantly reduced below one tenth of that before installing the HWL and satisfied the design value. It was also confirmed by calculation that this hot water layer system would significantly reduce the release of fission gases to the reactor hall and the environment during the hypothetical accident as well. (author)

  5. Paramecia swimming in viscous flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.; Jana, S.; Giarra, M.; Vlachos, P. P.; Jung, S.

    2015-12-01

    Ciliates like Paramecia exhibit fore-aft asymmetry in their body shapes, and preferentially swim in the direction of the slender anterior rather than the wider posterior. However, the physical reasons for this preference are not well understood. In this work, we propose that specific features of the fluid flow around swimming Paramecia confer some energetic advantage to the preferred swimming direction. Therefore, we seek to understand the effects of body asymmetry and swimming direction on the efficiency of swimming and the flux of fluid into the cilia layer (and thus of food into the oral groove), which we assumed to be primary factors in the energy budgets of these organisms. To this end, we combined numerical techniques (the boundary element method) and laboratory experiments (micro particle image velocimetry) to develop a quantitative model of the flow around a Paramecium and investigate the effect of the body shape on the velocity fields, as well as on the swimming and feeding behaviors. Both simulation and experimental results show that velocity fields exhibit fore-aft asymmetry. Moreover, the shape asymmetry revealed an increase of the fluid flux into the cilia layer compared to symmetric body shapes. Under the assumption that cilia fluid intake and feeding efficiency are primary factors in the energy budgets of Paramecia, our model predicts that the anterior swimming direction is energetically favorable to the posterior swimming direction.

  6. The Impact of Baby Swimming on Introductory and Elementary Swimming Training

    OpenAIRE

    Břízová, Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    THESIS ANNOTATION Title: The Impact of Baby Swimming on Introductory and Elementary Swimming Training Aim: To assess the impact of 'baby swimming' on the successfulness in introductory and partly in elementary swimming training, and to find out whether also other circumstances (for example the length of attendance at 'baby swimming') have some influence on introductory swimming training. Methods: We used a questionnaire method for the parents of children who had attended 'baby swimming' and f...

  7. Nutrition considerations for open-water swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Gregory; Koivisto, Anu; Gerrard, David; Burke, Louise M

    2014-08-01

    Open-water swimming (OWS) is a rapidly developing discipline. Events of 5-25 km are featured at FINA World Championships, and the international circuit includes races of 5-88 km. The Olympic OWS event, introduced in 2008, is contested over 10 km. Differing venues present changing environmental conditions, including water and ambient temperatures, humidity, solar radiation, and unpredictable tides. Furthermore, the duration of most OWS events (1-6 hr) creates unique physiological challenges to thermoregulation, hydration status, and muscle fuel stores. Current nutrition recommendations for open-water training and competition are either an extension of recommendations from pool swimming or are extrapolated from other athletic populations with similar physiological requirements. Competition nutrition should focus on optimizing prerace hydration and glycogen stores. Although swimmers should rely on self-supplied fuel and fluid sources for shorter events, for races of 10 km or greater, fluid and fuel replacement can occur from feeding pontoons when tactically appropriate. Over the longer races, feeding pontoons should be used to achieve desirable targets of up to 90 g/ hr of carbohydrates from multitransportable sources. Exposure to variable water and ambient temperatures will play a significant role in determining race nutrition strategies. For example, in extreme environments, thermoregulation may be assisted by manipulating the temperature of the ingested fluids. Swimmers are encouraged to work with nutrition experts to develop effective and efficient strategies that enhance performance through appropriate in-competition nutrition.

  8. Ageing implementation and refurbishment development at the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor: a 15 years experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, Jose Patricio N.; Ricci Filho, Walter; Carvalho, Marcos R. de; Berretta, Jose Roberto; Marra Neto, Adolfo, E-mail: ahiru@ipen.b, E-mail: wricci@ipen.b, E-mail: carvalho@ipen.b, E-mail: jrretta@ipen.b, E-mail: amneto@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    IPEN (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares) is a nuclear research center established into the Secretary of Science and Technology from the government of the state of Sao Paulo, and administered both technically and financially by Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), a federal government organization under the Ministry of Science and Technology. The institute is located inside the campus of the University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo city, Brazil. One of major nuclear facilities at IPEN is the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor. It is the unique Brazilian research reactor with substantial power level suitable for application with research in physics, chemistry, biology and engineering, as well as radioisotope production for medical and other applications. Designed and built by Babcok-Wilcox, in accordance with technical specifications established by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission, and financed by the US Atoms for Peace Program, it is a swimming pool type reactor, moderated and cooled by light water and uses graphite and beryllium as reflector elements. The first criticality was achieved on September 16, 1957 and the reactor is currently operating at 4.0 MW on a 64h per week cycle. Since 1996, an IEA-R1 reactor ageing study was established at the Research Reactor Center (CRPq) related with general deterioration of components belonging to some operational systems, as cooling towers from secondary cooling system, piping and pumps, sample irradiation devices, radiation monitoring system, fuel elements, rod drive mechanisms, nuclear and process instrumentation and safety operational system. Although basic structures are almost the same as the original design, several improvements and modifications in components, systems and structures had been made along reactor life. This work aims to show the development of the ageing program in the IEA-R1 reactor and the upgrading (modernization) that was carried out, concerning several equipment and system in the

  9. Swimming Performance and Metabolism of Golden Shiners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The swimming ability and metabolism of golden shiners, Notemigonus crysoleucas, was examined using swim tunnel respirometery. The oxygen consumption and tail beat frequencies at various swimming speeds, an estimation of the standard metabolic rate, and the critical swimming speed (Ucrit) was determ...

  10. Swimming ability and physiological response to swimming fatigue in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The swimming endurance of kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus (11.04 ± 2.43 g) at five swimming speeds (23.0, 26.7, 31.0, 34.6 and 38.6 cm s-1) was determined in a circulating flume at 25.7 ± 0.7°C. The plasma glucose and total protein, hepatopancreas and pleopods muscle glycogen concentrations were ...

  11. Overview of pool hydraulic design of Indian prototype fast breeder ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) plays a critical role in the design of pool type reactors and becomes an increasingly popular tool, thanks to the advancements in computing technology. In this paper, thermal hydraulic characteristics of a fast breeder reactor, design limits and challenging thermal hydraulic investigations ...

  12. An unadjusted 25 group neutron cross section set for fast reactor core calculations from JENDL-2 library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devan, K.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Lee, S.M. [Nuclear Data Section Indira Ganhi Centre for Atomic Research, Tamilnadu (India)

    1994-12-31

    We have created a 25 group neutron cross section set (IGCJENDL) for nuclides of interest to LMFBRs from the Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library - Version 2 (JENDL-2) in the format of French adjusted Cadarache Version 2 set (1969). The integral validation of IGCJENDL set was done by analyzing nine fast critical assemblies proposed by Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG). The calculated integral parameters agreed reasonably well with the reported measured values. It is found that this set predicts the integral parameters, k-eff in particular, close to that predicted by adjusted CARNAVAL IV (French) or BNAB-78 (Russian) sets, for a 1200 MWe theoretical benchmark, representing a large power reactor.

  13. System Wide Information Management (SWIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritz, Mike; McGowan, Shirley; Ramos, Cal

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation lists questions regarding the implementation of System Wide Information Management (SWIM). Some of the questions concern policy issues and strategies, technology issues and strategies, or transition issues and strategies.

  14. H Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The H Reactor was the first reactor to be built at Hanford after World War II.It became operational in October of 1949, and represented the fourth nuclear reactor on...

  15. Effect of Beetroot Juice Supplementation on Aerobic Response during Swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Pinna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial effects of beetroot juice supplementation (BJS have been tested during cycling, walking, and running. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether BJS can also improve performance in swimmers. Fourteen moderately trained male master swimmers were recruited and underwent two incremental swimming tests randomly assigned in a pool during which workload, oxygen uptake (VO2, carbon dioxide production (VCO2, pulmonary ventilation (VE, and aerobic energy cost (AEC of swimming were measured. One was a control swimming test (CSW and the other a swimming test after six days of BJS (0.5l/day organic beetroot juice containing about 5.5 mmol of NO3−. Results show that workload at anaerobic threshold was significantly increased by BJS as compared to the CSW test (6.3 ± 1 and 6.7 ± 1.1 kg during the CSW and the BJS test respectively. Moreover, AEC was significantly reduced during the BJS test (1.9 ± 0.5 during the SW test vs. 1.7 ± 0.3 kcal·kg−1·h−1 during the BJS test. The other variables lacked a statistically significant effect with BJS. The present investigation provides evidence that BJS positively affects performance of swimmers as it reduces the AEC and increases the workload at anaerobic threshold.

  16. Is paramecium swimming autonomic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Toplosky, Norman; Hansen, Joshua

    2010-11-01

    We seek to explore if the swimming of paramecium has an underlying autonomic mechanism. Such robotic elements may be useful in capturing the disturbance field in an environment in real time. Experimental evidence is emerging that motion control neurons of other animals may be present in paramecium as well. The limit cycle determined using analog simulation of the coupled nonlinear oscillators of olivo-cerebellar dynamics (ieee joe 33, 563-578, 2008) agrees with the tracks of the cilium of a biological paramecium. A 4-motor apparatus has been built that reproduces the kinematics of the cilium motion. The motion of the biological cilium has been analyzed and compared with the results of the finite element modeling of forces on a cilium. The modeling equates applied torque at the base of the cilium with drag, the cilium stiffness being phase dependent. A low friction pendulum apparatus with a multiplicity of electromagnetic actuators is being built for verifying the maps of the attractor basin computed using the olivo-cerebellar dynamics for different initial conditions. Sponsored by ONR 33.

  17. Swimming with the Shoal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Ann

    2017-10-01

    This article responds to Yuli Rahmawati and Peter Charles Taylor's piece and explores my role as a science teacher, science teacher educator and researcher in two contexts, Sierra Leone and Bhutan. In the first part of the article I reflect on my 3 years as a science teacher in Sierra Leone and demonstrate resonances with Yuli's accounts of culture shock and with her positioning of herself in a third space. I also reflect on the importance of colleagues in helping me reshape my identity as a science teacher in this new context. The second part of the article reflects on much shorter periods of time in Bhutan and my work as a teacher educator and researcher where, unlike Sierra Leone, it was not possible because of the short periods I worked there, to occupy a third space. I close by discussing how in Bhutan, but also Sierra Leone, collaboration with colleagues allowed me to contribute my own expertise, despite my lack of a deep understanding of the cultural context, in a way that was as valuable as possible. I liken this way of collaborative working in my professional life as `swimming with the shoal'.

  18. Influence of pre-school swimming on level of swimming abilities of early schol age children

    OpenAIRE

    Velová, Lenka

    2011-01-01

    My thesis paper is focused on children swimming from their birth to early school age. The pivotal part of the paper is the comparison of swimming abilities between primary school children who have passed pre-school swimming training and those who have had no training at all. Theoretical framework of the paper is then focused on general swimming theory, characteristics of children's evolutionary stages within the context of swimming and definition of basic swimming skills.

  19. Hydrodynamic advantages of swimming by salp chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Kelly R; Weihs, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    Salps are marine invertebrates comprising multiple jet-propelled swimming units during a colonial life-cycle stage. Using theory, we show that asynchronous swimming with multiple pulsed jets yields substantial hydrodynamic benefit due to the production of steady swimming velocities, which limit drag. Laboratory comparisons of swimming kinematics of aggregate salps (Salpa fusiformis and Weelia cylindrica) using high-speed video supported that asynchronous swimming by aggregates results in a smoother velocity profile and showed that this smoother velocity profile is the result of uncoordinated, asynchronous swimming by individual zooids. In situ flow visualizations of W. cylindrica swimming wakes revealed that another consequence of asynchronous swimming is that fluid interactions between jet wakes are minimized. Although the advantages of multi-jet propulsion have been mentioned elsewhere, this is the first time that the theory has been quantified and the role of asynchronous swimming verified using experimental data from the laboratory and the field. © 2017 The Author(s).

  20. Radio-transmitted electromyogram signals as indicators of swimming speed in lake trout and brown trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorstad, E.B.; Økland, F.; Koed, Anders

    2000-01-01

    Swimming speed and average electromyogram (EMG) pulse intervals were highly correlated in individual lake trout Salvelinus namaycush (r(2)=0.52-0.89) and brown trout Salmo trutta (r(2)=0.45-0.96). High correlations were found also for pooled data in both lake trout (r(2)=0.90) and brown trout...

  1. EFFICIENCY OF DIFFERENT METHODOLOGICAL MODELS OF SWIMMING PRACTICE WITH PRE-SCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Krivokapić

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available On the sample of 68 preschool boys and girls aged five to six years two models of swimming teaching realised with purpose to research their efficacity. lt was finded before that they were nonswimers. Testers deviated in two similar groups by basic motor and cognitive abilities. First model of swim teaching, signed as time deviated learning, was realised at the cloused swimming pool with 36 testers which exercised twice of week during three months. Second model of swim teaching, signed as time concentrated learning, was realised as a two-week course with 32 testers which exercised at the sea side. Two control assessment of swimming level knowledge were made during experimental process, and a final assesment was made at the and of the experiment Scaling tehnicque was used for assesing. An analysis of the obtained data resulted in the following conclusions: the both models of swim teaching were efficacity and majority of children accepted swim knovvledge. Results of time concentrated model learning were statistical significance beter then time deviated learning only in the control assesments, but the svviming level knowledge was not different in the final assment. That conclusion shows that model of time concentrated learning has more efficacity in the begining, and model of time deviated learning in the later period of teaching

  2. THE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT MODELS OF SWIMMING TRAINING (DEFINED IN RELATION TO ANAEROBIC THRESHOLD ON THE INCREASE OF SWIM SPEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Krivokapić

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available On the sample of 32 fourth grade students of some Belgrade highs schools, who had the physical education classes carried out at the city’s swimming pools, an attempt was made to evaluate the effects of the two different programmes of swimming training in different intensity zones, defi ned relative to the anaerobic threshold. The examinees were divided into two groups out of 15 i.e. 17 participants who were not (according to statistics signifi cantly different in terms of average time and heart frequency during the 400 m swimming test and heart frequency and time measured after 50 m in the moment of reaching the anaerobic threshold. The fi rst training model consisted of swimming at the intensity level within the zone below anaerobic threshold, while the second model involved occasional swimming at a higher intensity sometimes surpassing the anaerobic threshold. The experimentalprogramme with both sub-groups lasted 8 weeks with 3 training sessions per week, 2 ‘of which we’re identical for both experimental groups, with the third one differing regarding the swimming intensity, this in the fi rst group being still in the zone below, and in the second group occasionally in the zone above the anaerobic threshold. The amount of training and the duration were the same in both programmes. The aim of the research , was to evaluate and to compare the effects of the two training models, using as the basic criteria possible changes of average time and heart frequency during the 400 m swimming test and heart frequency and time measured after 50 m in the moment of reaching the anaerobic thereshold. On the basis of the statistical analysis of the obtained data, it is possible to conclude that in both experimental groups there were statistically signifi cant changes of average values concerning all the physiological variables. Although the difference in effi ciency of applied experimental programmes is not defi ned, we can claim that both of experimental

  3. Nutrition for swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Gregory; Boyd, Kevin T; Burke, Louise M; Koivisto, Anu

    2014-08-01

    Swimming is a sport that requires considerable training commitment to reach individual performance goals. Nutrition requirements are specific to the macrocycle, microcycle, and individual session. Swimmers should ensure suitable energy availability to support training while maintaining long term health. Carbohydrate intake, both over the day and in relation to a workout, should be manipulated (3-10 g/kg of body mass/day) according to the fuel demands of training and the varying importance of undertaking these sessions with high carbohydrate availability. Swimmers should aim to consume 0.3 g of high-biological-value protein per kilogram of body mass immediately after key sessions and at regular intervals throughout the day to promote tissue adaptation. A mixed diet consisting of a variety of nutrient-dense food choices should be sufficient to meet the micronutrient requirements of most swimmers. Specific dietary supplements may prove beneficial to swimmers in unique situations, but should be tried only with the support of trained professionals. All swimmers, particularly adolescent and youth swimmers, are encouraged to focus on a well-planned diet to maximize training performance, which ensures sufficient energy availability especially during periods of growth and development. Swimmers are encouraged to avoid rapid weight fluctuations; rather, optimal body composition should be achieved over longer periods by modest dietary modifications that improve their food choices. During periods of reduced energy expenditure (taper, injury, off season) swimmers are encouraged to match energy intake to requirement. Swimmers undertaking demanding competition programs should ensure suitable recovery practices are used to maintain adequate glycogen stores over the entirety of the competition period.

  4. Pool scrubbing models for iodine components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, K. [Battelle Ingenieurtechnik GmbH, Eschborn (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    Pool scrubbing is an important mechanism to retain radioactive fission products from being carried into the containment atmosphere or into the secondary piping system. A number of models and computer codes has been developed to predict the retention of aerosols and fission product vapours that are released from the core and injected into water pools of BWR and PWR type reactors during severe accidents. Important codes in this field are BUSCA, SPARC and SUPRA. The present paper summarizes the models for scrubbing of gaseous Iodine components in these codes, discusses the experimental validation, and gives an assessment of the state of knowledge reached and the open questions which persist. The retention of gaseous Iodine components is modelled by the various codes in a very heterogeneous manner. Differences show up in the chemical species considered, the treatment of mass transfer boundary layers on the gaseous and liquid sides, the gas-liquid interface geometry, calculation of equilibrium concentrations and numerical procedures. Especially important is the determination of the pool water pH value. This value is affected by basic aerosols deposited in the water, e.g. Cesium and Rubidium compounds. A consistent model requires a mass balance of these compounds in the pool, thus effectively coupling the pool scrubbing phenomena of aerosols and gaseous Iodine species. Since the water pool conditions are also affected by drainage flow of condensate water from different regions in the containment, and desorption of dissolved gases on the pool surface is determined by the gas concentrations above the pool, some basic limitations of specialized pool scrubbing codes are given. The paper draws conclusions about the necessity of coupling between containment thermal-hydraulics and pool scrubbing models, and proposes ways of further simulation model development in order to improve source term predictions. (author) 2 tabs., refs.

  5. The science of pooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, E.

    1995-10-01

    The pooling of data from radon studies is described. Pooling refers to the analysis of original data from several studies, not meta-analysis in which summary measures from published data are analyzed. A main objective for pooling is to reduce uncertainty and to obtain more precise estimates of risk than would be available from any single study.

  6. Swimming and other activities: applied aspects of fish swimming performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Santos, Theodore R.; Farrell, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Human activities such as hydropower development, water withdrawals, and commercial fisheries often put fish species at risk. Engineered solutions designed to protect species or their life stages are frequently based on assumptions about swimming performance and behaviors. In many cases, however, the appropriate data to support these designs are either unavailable or misapplied. This article provides an overview of the state of knowledge of fish swimming performance – where the data come from and how they are applied – identifying both gaps in knowledge and common errors in application, with guidance on how to avoid repeating mistakes, as well as suggestions for further study.

  7. PACING DEVICE FOR SWIMMING. MECHANICAL CONSTRUCTION OF CONSTANT SPEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MESSINIS S.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The pace in swimming is very important because it allows swimmers to allocate their forces accordingly, and therefore a distance to travel as quickly as possible. The training pace at different swimmingspeeds and combinations thereof, is an important part of training before the competitions.The definition and maintenance of the stable and swimmer specific speed is difficult to achieve and requires considerable effort and experience. To determine the desired rate of accuracy by the researchers and their coaches used till now, various audio and visual media.However, some of these institutions did not very accurately measure the rate and not all styles of swimming, while other aspects affect the proper swimming. In this construction, a key objective is to solve the problems occurring in the previous constructions, the modern technological development of them and the adaption of the specificities of different swimming styles.This device consists of an electro 3 / 8 of the horse, a flange, a single inverter from 3 / 8 to ½ of the horse, pulleys with taper Bush, flange axle, pulleys, platforms and a 52 meters cable. The assembly and operation is as follows: At the edge of the pool next to the platform is placed the base of pulleys, the electro setis connected to the inverter and the axle flange.Precisely opposite is positioned the other base. Along the pool «moves» the cable that connects the two bases, located 150 cm above the water. A fixed point on the cable is marked with paint in order to be visible to the swimmer during backstroke swimming while for other styles we adapt a lamination at the cable vertically inthe pool, above the surface a sheet of 15 cm which is painted with strong color that is visible from the athlete and will precede him. Setting the speed with inverter it starts from one end of the tank leading to the other, doing a circular motion.The swimmer is required to follow the marked point of the cable in the backstroke or

  8. Investigation of the condition of spent-fuel pool components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustas, F.M.; Bates, S.O.; Opitz, B.E.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Perez, J.M. Jr.; Farnsworth, R.K.

    1981-09-01

    It is currently projected that spent nuclear fuel, which is discharged from the reactor and then stored in water pools, may remain in those pools for several decades. Other studies have addressed the expected integrity of the spent fuel during extended water storage; this study assesses the integrity of metallic spent fuel pool components. Results from metallurgical examinations of specimens taken from stainless steel and aluminum components exposed in spent fuel pools are presented. Licensee Event Reports (LERs) relating to problems with spent fuel components were assessed and are summarized to define the types of operational problems that have occurred. The major conclusions of this study are: aluminum and stainless steel spent fuel pool components have a good history of performance in both deionized and borated water pools. Although some operational problems involving pool components have occurred, these problems have had minimal impacts.

  9. Synchronised Swimming of Two Fish

    CERN Document Server

    Novati, Guido; Alexeev, Dmitry; Rossinelli, Diego; van Rees, Wim M; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2016-01-01

    We study the fluid dynamics of two fish-like bodies with synchronised swimming patterns. Our studies are based on two-dimensional simulations of viscous incompressible flows. We distinguish between motion patterns that are externally imposed on the swimmers and self-propelled swimmers that learn manoeuvres to achieve certain goals. Simulations of two rigid bodies executing pre-specified motion indicate that flow-mediated interactions can lead to substantial drag reduction and may even generate thrust intermittently. In turn we examine two self-propelled swimmers arranged in a leader-follower configuration, with a-priori specified body-deformations. We find that the swimming of the leader remains largely unaffected, while the follower experiences either an increase or decrease in swimming speed, depending on the initial conditions. Finally, we consider a follower that synchronises its motion so as to minimise its lateral deviations from the leader's path. The leader employs a steady gait while the follower use...

  10. Current Warm-Up Practices and Contemporary Issues Faced by Elite Swimming Coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Courtney J; Pyne, David B; Raglin, John S; Thompson, Kevin G; Rattray, Ben

    2016-12-01

    McGowan, CJ, Pyne, DB, Raglin, JS, Thompson, KG, and Rattray, B. Current warm-up practices and contemporary issues faced by elite swimming coaches. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3471-3480, 2016-A better understanding of current swimming warm-up strategies is needed to improve their effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to describe current precompetition warm-up practices and identify contemporary issues faced by elite swimming coaches during competition. Forty-six state-international level swimming coaches provided information through a questionnaire on their prescription of volume, intensity, and recovery within their pool and dryland-based competition warm-ups, and challenges faced during the final stages of event preparation. Coaches identified four key objectives of the precompetition warm-up: physiological (elevate body temperature and increase muscle activation), kinesthetic (tactile preparation, increase "feel" of the water), tactical (race-pace rehearsal), and mental (improve focus, reduce anxiety). Pool warm-up volume ranged from ∼1300 to 2100 m, beginning with 400-1000 m of continuous, low-intensity (∼50-70% of perceived maximal exertion) swimming, followed by 200-600 m of stroke drills and 1-2 sets (100-400 m in length) of increasing intensity (∼60-90%) swimming, concluding with 3-4 race or near race-pace efforts (25-100 m; ∼90-100%) and 100-400 m easy swimming. Dryland-based warm-up exercises, involving stretch cords and skipping, were also commonly prescribed. Coaches preferred swimmers complete their warm-up 20-30 minutes before race start. Lengthy marshalling periods (15-20+ minutes) and the time required to don racing suits (>10 minutes) were identified as complicating issues. Coaches believed that the pool warm-up affords athletes the opportunity to gain a tactile feel for the water and surrounding pool environment. The combination of dryland-based activation exercises followed by pool-based warm-up routines seems to be the preferred

  11. Validation of GPS and accelerometer technology in swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beanland, Emma; Main, Luana C; Aisbett, Brad; Gastin, Paul; Netto, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the validity of an integrated accelerometer and Global Positioning System (GPS) device to quantify swimming kinematics variables in swimming. Criterion validation study. Twenty-one sub-elite swimmers completed three 100 m efforts (one butterfly, breaststroke and freestyle) in an outdoor 50 m Olympic pool. A GPS device with an integrated tri-axial accelerometer was used to obtain mid-pool velocity and stroke count of each effort. This data was compared to velocity and stroke count data obtained from concurrently recorded digital video of the performance. A strong relationship was detected between the accelerometer stroke count and the video criterion measure for both breaststroke (r>0.98) and butterfly (r>0.99). Also, no significant differences were detected between the GPS velocity and video obtained velocity for both freestyle and breaststroke. There was a significant difference between the GPS velocity and criterion measure for butterfly. Acceptable standard error and 95% limits of agreement were obtained for freestyle (0.13 m s(-1), 0.36 m s(-1)) and breaststroke (0.12 m s(-1), 0.33 m s(-1)) compared to butterfly (0.18 m s(-1), 0.50 m s(-1)). Relative error measurements ranged between 10.2 and 13.4% across the three strokes. The integrated accelerometer and GPS device offers a valid and accurate tool for stroke count quantification in breaststroke and butterfly as well as measuring mid-pool swimming velocity in freestyle and breaststroke. The application of GPS technology in the outdoor training environment suggests advantageous practical benefits for swimmers, coaches and sports scientists. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. All rights reserved.

  12. Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharbaugh, John E.

    1987-01-01

    An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment

  13. Swimming and Persons with Mild Persistant Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Arandelovic

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to analyze the effect of recreational swimming on lung function and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR in patients with mild persistent asthma. This study included 65 patients with mild persistent asthma, who were divided into two groups: experimental group A (n = 45 and control group B (n = 20. Patients from both groups were treated with low doses of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS and short-acting β2 agonists salbutamol as needed. Our program for patients in group A was combined asthma education with swimming (twice a week on a 1-h basis for the following 6 months. At the end of the study, in Group A, we found a statistically significant increase of lung function parameters FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (3.55 vs. 3.65 (p < 0.01, FVC (forced vital capacity (4.27 vs. 4.37 (p < 0.05, PEF (peak expiratory flow (7.08 vs. 7.46 (p < 0.01, and statistically significant decrease of BHR (PD20 0.58 vs. 2.01 (p < 0.001. In Group B, there was a statistically significant improvement of FEV1 3.29 vs. 3.33 (p < 0.05 and although FVC, FEV1/FVC, and PEF were improved, it was not significant. When Groups A and B were compared at the end of the study, there was a statistically significant difference of FVC (4.01 vs. 4.37, FEV1 (3.33 vs. 3.55, PEF (6.79 vs.7.46, and variability (p <0.001, and statistically significantly decreased BHR in Group A (2.01 vs. 1.75 (p < 0.001. Engagement of patients with mild persistent asthma in recreational swimming in nonchlorinated pools, combined with regular medical treatment and education, leads to better improvement of their parameters of lung function and also to more significant decrease of their airway hyperresponsiveness compared to patients treated with traditional medicine

  14. Water Evaporation in Swimming Baths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldgård, Carl-Erik

    This paper is publishing measuring results from models and full-scale baths of the evaporation in swimming baths, both public baths and retraining baths. Moreover, the heat balance of the basin water is measured. In addition the full-scale measurements have given many experiences which are repres......This paper is publishing measuring results from models and full-scale baths of the evaporation in swimming baths, both public baths and retraining baths. Moreover, the heat balance of the basin water is measured. In addition the full-scale measurements have given many experiences which...

  15. Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS) has been designed to meet multi-agency hydrologic database needs for Kansas. The SWIMS project was supported...

  16. Health promotion and the social gradient: the free swimming initiative for children and young people in Bristol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audrey, S; Wheeler, B W; Mills, J; Ben-Shlomo, Y

    2012-11-01

    To examine whether the free swimming initiative in Bristol was associated with higher uptake in more affluent areas ('inverse use law'). Secondary analysis of statistical data on free swimming session attendances in Bristol, recorded from January to June 2010. Individual postcode data were linked to lower-layer super output area (LSOA) of residence and the specific pool attended. The dataset comprised 58,582 swims by 13,881 unique individuals between January and June 2010. The influence of age group, gender, season, distance from pool and area deprivation score (English Index of Multiple Deprivation) on swimming uptake rates was examined. Higher uptake rates were found amongst girls and older children. Higher attendance was also related to proximity to pool and warmer season. No association was found between area deprivation and uptake rate (P = 0.31). Lower uptake rates in deprived areas were more marked if they were further away from a pool and in the winter season (P-value for interactions swimming initiative in England may have removed an opportunity to promote physical activity across the social gradient. The evaluation of public health initiatives should examine effects across the social gradient, and clarify which aspects of interventions enhance the participation of poorer sections of society. Copyright © 2012 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  18. Modelling swimming hydrodynamics to enhance performance

    OpenAIRE

    D.A. Marinho; Rouboa, A.; Barbosa, Tiago M.; Silva, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Swimming assessment is one of the most complex but outstanding and fascinating topics in biomechanics. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology is one of the different methods that have been applied in swimming research to observe and understand water movements around the human body and its application to improve swimming performance. CFD has been applied attempting to understand deeply the biomechanical basis of swimming. Several studies have been conducted willing to analy...

  19. 13 CFR 120.1704 - Pool Loans eligible for Pooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Loans eligible for Pooling. (a) General Pool Loan eligibility requirements. For a First Lien Position... zoos—712130 (“Zoos and Botanical Gardens”). (b) SBA review of a Pool Loan prior to pool formation. SBA...

  20. 36 CFR 327.5 - Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Swimming. 327.5 Section 327.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY RULES AND REGULATIONS... Swimming. (a) Swimming, wading, snorkeling or scuba diving at one's own risk is permitted, except at...

  1. 36 CFR 331.10 - Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Swimming. 331.10 Section 331.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY REGULATIONS..., KENTUCKY AND INDIANA § 331.10 Swimming. Swimming is prohibited unless authorized in writing by the District...

  2. 43 CFR 423.36 - Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Swimming. 423.36 Section 423.36 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Swimming. (a) You may swim, wade, snorkel, scuba dive, raft, or tube at your own risk in Reclamation waters...

  3. Reactor safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    1962-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  4. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  5. The influence of elements of synchronized swimming on technique of the selected swimming strokes

    OpenAIRE

    Široký, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Title: The influence of elements of synchronized swimming on technique of the selected swimming strokes Objectives: The objective of the thesis is to assess the effect of the elements of synchronized swimming at improving the techniques of swimming. Methods: The results were detected by overt observation with active participation and subsequent scaling on the ordinal scale 1 to 5. Results: The results show that the influence of the elements of synchronized swimming on improving the technique ...

  6. Fluid Mechanics of Fish Swimming

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 1. Fluid Mechanics of Fish Swimming - Lift-based Propulsion. Jaywant H Arakeri. General Article Volume 14 Issue 1 January 2009 pp 32-46. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. A mechanism for efficient swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Hariri, Hossein; Saadat, Mehdi; Brandes, Aaron; Saraiya, Vishaal; Bart-Smith, Hilary

    2015-11-01

    We present experimental measurements of hydrodynamic performance as well as wake visualization for a freely swimming 3D foil with pure pitching motion. The foil is constrained to move in its axial direction. It is shown that the iso-lines for speed and input power (or economy) coincide in the dimensional frequency versus amplitude plane, up to a critical amplitude. The critical amplitude is independent from swimming speed. It is shown that all swimming gaits (combination of frequency and amplitude) share a single value for Strouhal number (for amplitudes below the critical amplitude), when plotted in non-dimensional frequency vs. amplitude plane. Additionally, it is shown that the swimming gaits with amplitudes equal to the critical amplitude are energetically superior to others. This finding provides a fundamental mechanism for an important observation made by Bainbridge (1958) namely, most fish (such as trout, dace, goldfish, cod and dolphins) maintain constant tail-beat amplitude during cruise, and their speed is correlated linearly with their tail-beat frequency. The results also support prior findings of Saadat and Haj-Hariri (2013). Supported by ONR MURI Grant N00014-14-1-0533.

  8. Sports Medicine Meets Synchronized Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenz, Betty J.; And Others

    This collection of articles contains information about synchronized swimming. Topics covered include general physiology and cardiovascular conditioning, flexibility exercises, body composition, strength training, nutrition, coach-athlete relationships, coping with competition stress and performance anxiety, and eye care. Chapters are included on…

  9. Shape Optimization of Swimming Sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkening, J.; Hosoi, A.E.

    2005-03-01

    The swimming behavior of a flexible sheet which moves by propagating deformation waves along its body was first studied by G. I. Taylor in 1951. In addition to being of theoretical interest, this problem serves as a useful model of the locomotion of gastropods and various micro-organisms. Although the mechanics of swimming via wave propagation has been studied extensively, relatively little work has been done to define or describe optimal swimming by this mechanism.We carry out this objective for a sheet that is separated from a rigid substrate by a thin film of viscous Newtonian fluid. Using a lubrication approximation to model the dynamics, we derive the relevant Euler-Lagrange equations to optimize swimming speed and efficiency. The optimization equations are solved numerically using two different schemes: a limited memory BFGS method that uses cubic splines to represent the wave profile, and a multi-shooting Runge-Kutta approach that uses the Levenberg-Marquardt method to vary the parameters of the equations until the constraints are satisfied. The former approach is less efficient but generalizes nicely to the non-lubrication setting. For each optimization problem we obtain a one parameter family of solutions that becomes singular in a self-similar fashion as the parameter approaches a critical value. We explore the validity of the lubrication approximation near this singular limit by monitoring higher order corrections to the zeroth order theory and by comparing the results with finite element solutions of the full Stokes equations.

  10. Fluid Mechanics of Fish Swimming

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user

    shark). Redrawn from Review of Fish. Swimming Modes for Aquatic. Locomotion, IEEE Journal of. Oceanic Engineering, Vol.24,. No.2, pp. 237–252, 1999, D M. Lane, M Sfakiotakis and J B C. Davies, Heriot-Watt University. undulatory → oscillatory caudaltail¯n (B C F ) m otions are know n collectively as. B C F sw im m ers.

  11. Repairing liner of the reactor; Reparacion del liner del reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar H, F. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2001-07-15

    Due to the corrosion problems of the aluminum coating of the reactor pool, a periodic inspections program by ultrasound to evaluate the advance grade and the corrosion speed was settled down. This inspections have shown the necessity to repair some areas, in those that the slimming is significant, of not making it can arrive to the water escape of the reactor pool. The objective of the repair is to place patches of plates of 1/4 inch aluminum thickness in the areas of the reactor 'liner', in those that it has been detected by ultrasound a smaller thickness or similar to 3 mm. To carry out this the fuels are move (of the core and those that are decaying) to a temporary storage, the structure of the core is confined in a tank that this placed inside the pool of the reactor, a shield is placed in the thermal column and it is completely extracted the water for to leave uncover the 'liner' of the reactor. (Author)

  12. The Effect of Swimming Experience on Acquisition and Retention of Swimming-Based Taste Aversion Learning in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Takahisa; Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2010-01-01

    Swimming endows rats with an aversion to a taste solution consumed before swimming. The present study explored whether the experience of swimming before or after the taste-swimming trials interferes with swimming-based taste aversion learning. Experiment 1 demonstrated that a single preexposure to 20 min of swimming was as effective as four or…

  13. Suspension biomechanics of swimming microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Takuji

    2009-10-06

    Micro-organisms play a vital role in many biological, medical and engineering phenomena. Some recent research efforts have demonstrated the importance of biomechanics in understanding certain aspects of micro-organism behaviours such as locomotion and collective motions of cells. In particular, spatio-temporal coherent structures found in a bacterial suspension have been the focus of many research studies over the last few years. Recent studies have shown that macroscopic properties of a suspension, such as rheology and diffusion, are strongly affected by meso-scale flow structures generated by swimming microbes. Since the meso-scale flow structures are strongly affected by the interactions between microbes, a bottom-up strategy, i.e. from a cellular level to a continuum suspension level, represents the natural approach to the study of a suspension of swimming microbes. In this paper, we first provide a summary of existing biomechanical research on interactions between a pair of swimming micro-organisms, as a two-body interaction is the simplest many-body interaction. We show that interactions between two nearby swimming micro-organisms are described well by existing mathematical models. Then, collective motions formed by a group of swimming micro-organisms are discussed. We show that some collective motions of micro-organisms, such as coherent structures of bacterial suspensions, are satisfactorily explained by fluid dynamics. Lastly, we discuss how macroscopic suspension properties are changed by the microscopic characteristics of the cell suspension. The fundamental knowledge we present will be useful in obtaining a better understanding of the behaviour of micro-organisms.

  14. The Jules Horowitz reactor (JHR), a European material testing reactor (MTR), with extended experimental capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballagny, A.; Bergamaschi, Y.; Bouilloux, Y.; Bravo, X.; Guigon, B.; Rommens, M.; Tremodeux, P. [CEA Cadarache, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire DEN, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)]|[CEA Saclay Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire DEN, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2003-07-01

    The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is the European MTR (Material Testing Reactor) designed to provide, after 2010, the necessary knowledge for keeping the existing power plants in operation and to design innovative reactors types with new objectives such as: minimizing the radioactive waste production, taking into account additional safety requirements, preventing risks of nuclear proliferation... To achieve such an ambitious objective. The JHR is designed with a high flexibility in order to satisfy the current demand from European industry, research and to be able to accommodate future requirements. The JHR will offer a wide range of performances and services in gathering, in a single site at Cadarache, all the necessary functionalities and facilities for an effective production of results: e.g. fuel fabrication laboratories, preparation of the instrumented devices, interpretation of the experiments, modelling. The JHR must rely on a top level scientific environment based on experts teams from CEA and EC and local universities. With a thermal flux of 7,4.10{sup 14} ncm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and a fast flux of 6,4.10{sup 14} ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, it is possible to carry out irradiation experiments on materials and fuels whatever the reactor type considered. It will also be possible to carry out locally, fast neutron irradiation to achieve damage effect up to 25 dpa/year. (dpa = displacement per atom.) The study of the fuels behavior under accidental conditions, from analytical experiments, on a limited amount of irradiated fuel, is a major objective of the project. These oriented safety tests are possible by taking into account specific requirements in the design of the facility such as the tightness level of the containment building, the addition of an alpha hot cell and a laboratory for on line fission products measurement. (authors)

  15. Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, Frederick H. [Argonne National Laboratory; Jacobson, Norman H.

    1968-09-01

    This booklet discusses research reactors - reactors designed to provide a source of neutrons and/or gamma radiation for research, or to aid in the investigation of the effects of radiation on any type of material.

  16. Micro- and nanorobots swimming in heterogeneous liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Bradley J; Peyer, Kathrin E

    2014-09-23

    Essentially all experimental investigations of swimming micro- and nanorobots have focused on swimming in homogeneous Newtonian liquids. In this issue of ACS Nano, Schamel et al. investigate the actuation of "nanopropellers" in a viscoelastic biological gel that illustrates the importance of the size of the nanostructure relative to the gel mesh size. In this Perspective, we shed further light on the swimming performance of larger microrobots swimming in heterogeneous liquids. One of the interesting results of our work is that earlier findings on the swimming performance of motile bacteria in heterogeneous liquids agree, in principle, with our results. We also discuss future research directions that should be pursued in this fascinating interdisciplinary field.

  17. Significant problems of swimming in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kachurovs'kyy D.O.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The variants of decision of problems of swimming are considered in the article. Are presented prognoses of possible results. Complex approach is offered in the decision of the marked problems. Directions are rotined forming for the citizens of vitally important skill of swimming. The variants of decision of problem of teaching swimming of rural population and increase of amount of gettings busy are offered swimming. Traditions of domestic rest are considered in swimming complexes. The ways of increase of level of physical preparation are set student, worker and servicemen.

  18. The CABRI fast neutron Hodoscope: Renovation, qualification program and first results following the experimental reactor restart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, V.; Mirotta, S.; Guillot, J.; Biard, B.

    2018-01-01

    The CABRI experimental pulse reactor, located at the Cadarache nuclear research center, southern France, is devoted to the study of Reactivity Initiated Accidents (RIA). For the purpose of the CABRI International Program (CIP), managed and funded by IRSN, in the framework of an OECD/NEA agreement, a huge renovation of the facility has been conducted since 2003. The Cabri Water Loop was then installed to ensure prototypical Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) conditions for testing irradiated fuel rods. The hodoscope installed in the CABRI reactor is a unique online fuel motion monitoring system, operated by IRSN and dedicated to the measurement of the fast neutrons emitted by the tested rod during the power pulse. It is one of the distinctive features of the CABRI reactor facility, which is operated by CEA. The system is able to determine the fuel motion, if any, with a time resolution of 1 ms and a spatial resolution of 3 mm. The hodoscope equipment has been upgraded as well during the CABRI facility renovation. This paper presents the main outcomes achieved with the hodoscope since October 2015, date of the first criticality of the CABRI reactor in its new Cabri Water Loop configuration. Results obtained during reactor commissioning phase functioning, either in steady-state mode (at low and high power, up to 23 MW) or in transient mode (start-up, possibly beyond 20 GW), are discussed.

  19. Theory of swimming filaments in viscoelastic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Henry

    2008-03-01

    Microorganisms often encounter and must move through complex media. What aspects of propulsion are altered when swimming in viscoelastic gels and fluids? Motivated by the swimming of sperm through the mucus of the female mammalian reproductive tract, we examine the swimming of filaments in nonlinearly viscoelastic fluids. We obtain the swimming velocity and hydrodynamic force exerted on an infinitely long cylinder with prescribed beating pattern. We apply these results to study the swimming of a simplified sliding-filament model for a sperm flagellum. Viscoelasticity tends to decrease swimming speed. The viscoelastic response of the fluid can change the shapes of beating patterns, and changes in the beating patterns can even lead to reversal of the swimming direction.

  20. Pre-task music improves swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirmaul, B P; Dos Santos, R V; Da Silva Neto, L V

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of pre-task music on swimming performance and other psychological variables. A randomized counterbalanced within-subjects (experimental and control condition) design was employed. Eighteen regional level male swimmers performed two 200-m freestyle swimming time trials. Participants were exposed to either 5 minutes of self-selected music (pre-task music condition) or 5 minutes of silence (control condition) and, after 1 minute, performed the swimming task. Swimming time was significantly shorter (-1.44%) in the pre-task music condition. Listening to pre-task music increased motivation to perform the swimming task, while arousal remained unchanged. While fatigue increased after the swimming task in both conditions, vigor, ratings of perceived exertion and affective valence were unaltered. It is concluded, for the first time, that pre-task music improves swimming performance.

  1. Stress corrosion (Astm G30-90 standard) in 08x18H10T stainless steel of nuclear fuel storage pool in WWER reactors; Corrosion bajo esfuerzo (Norma ASTM G30-90) en acero inoxidable 08x18H10T de piscinas de almacenamiento de combustible nuclear en reactores V.V.E.R

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, V.; Zamora R, L. [Centro de Estudios Aplicados al Desarrollo Nuclear (Cuba)

    1997-07-01

    At the water storage of the irradiated nuclear fuel has been an important factor in its management. The actual pools have its walls covered with inoxidable steel and heat exchangers to dissipate the residual heat from fuel. It is essential to control the water purity to eliminate those conditions which aid to the corrosion process in fuel and at related components. The steel used in this research was obtained from an austenitic inoxidizable steel standardized with titanium 08x18H10T (Type 321) similar to one of the two steel coatings used to cover walls and the pools floor. the test consisted in the specimen deformation through an U ply according to the Astm G30-90 standard. The exposition of the deformed specimen it was realized in simulated conditions to the chemical regime used in pools. (Author)

  2. CONVECTION REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

    1960-03-22

    An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

  3. Some particular aspects of control in nuclear power reactors; Conception de la surete en france et influence des imperatifs de surete sur la conception des reacteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vathaire, F. de; Vernier, Ph.; Pascouet, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    This paper reviews the experience acquired in France on the question, of reactor safety. Since a special paper is being presented on reactors of the graphite gas type, the safety of the other types studied in France is discussed here: - heavy water-gas reactors, - fast neutron reactors, - water research reactors of the swimming-pool and tank types. The safety rules peculiar to the different types are explained, with emphasis on their influence on the reactor designs and on the power limits they impose. The corresponding safety studies are presented, particular stress being placed on the original work developed in these fields. Special mention is made of the experimental systems constructed for these studies: the reactor CABRI, pile loop for depressurization tests, loops outside the pile, mock-ups etc. (authors) [French] La presente communication propose une synthese de l'experience acquise en France en matiere de surete des reacteurs. Les reacteurs de la filiere graphite-gaz faisant l'objet d'une communication particuliere, on examine ici la surete des autres types de reacteurs etudies en France: - reacteurs eau lourde-gaz, - reacteurs a neutrons rapides, - reacteurs de recherche a eau des types piscines et tank. Les imperatifs de surete propres aux differentes filieres sont developpes, en mettant l'accent sur leur influence sur la conception des reacteurs et sur les limitations de puissance qu'ils entrainent. Les etudes de surete correspondantes sont presentees, en insistant plus particulierement sur les travaux originaux developpes dans ces domaines. On indique notamment les moyens d'essais qui ont ete construits pour ces etudes: le reacteur CABRI, boucle en pile pour essais de depressurisation, boucles hors pile, maquettes, etc. (auteurs)

  4. A next-generation reactor concept: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1992-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as reactor technology for the 21st century. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system, in particular passive safety and waste management. The IFR concept consists of four technical features: (1) liquid sodium cooling, (2) pool-type reactor configuration, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing.

  5. A next-generation reactor concept: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1992-07-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as reactor technology for the 21st century. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system, in particular passive safety and waste management. The IFR concept consists of four technical features: (1) liquid sodium cooling, (2) pool-type reactor configuration, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing.

  6. Annual report on JEN-1 reactor; Informe periodico del Reactor JEN-1 correspondiente al ano 1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, J.

    1972-07-01

    In the annual report on the JEN-1 reactor the main features of the reactor operations and maintenance are described. The reactor has been critical for 1831 hours, what means 65,8% of the total working time. Maintenance and pool water contamination have occupied the rest of the time. The maintenance schedule is shown in detail according to three subjects. The main failures and reactor scrams are also described. The daily maximum values of the water activity are given so as the activity of the air in the reactor hall. (Author)

  7. Hospital hydrotherapy pools treated with ultra violet light: bad bacteriological quality and presence of thermophilic Naegleria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jonckheere, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The microbiological quality of eight halogenated and two u.v.-treated hydrotherapy pools in hospitals was investigated. The microbiological quality of halogenated hydrotherapy pools was comparable to halogenated public swimming pools, although in some Pseudomonas aeruginosa and faecal pollution indicators were more frequent due to bad management. On the other hand u.v.-treated hydrotherapy pools had very bad microbiological quality. Apart from faecal pollution indicators, P. aeruginosa was present in very high numbers. Halogenated hydrotherapy pools were not highly contaminated with amoebae, and Naegleria spp. were never detected. On the other hand u.v.-treated pools contained very high numbers of thermophilic Naegleria. The Naegleria isolated were identified as N. lovaniensis, a species commonly found in association with N. fowleri. Isoenzyme analysis showed a different type of N. lovaniensis was present in each of two u.v.-treated pools. Images Plate 1 PMID:7061835

  8. The influence of explosive power on the performance of an elite swimmer in 25 and 50 metre pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Baumrtová

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Each swimming stroke, and each distance, requires a different approach to strength training. For sprinters in swimming the most essential part is explosive power. The goal of this case study was to find out how explosive training can influence the performance in both long course and short course meters swimming pools. This study was conducted with the cooperation of an elite swimmer over a time period of 6 years. Tests were performed twice a year (June and November during the years of 2010–2016. The Myotest device was used to measure countermovement jump height. Swimming performance was evaluated by FINA points in the swimmer’s three main disciplines. ANOVA, Cohen’s d and regression equation were used for statistical analysis. The results showed that explosive power does not influence performance in the 50m swimming pool (p = 0.25; r2 = 0.08. However the performance in the 25m pool is directly linked to the level of explosive power of the lower limbs (p < 0.001; r2 = 0.85. The results of the swimmer in the 25m pool are closely related to the level of explosive power of the lower limbs. Performance in the 50m pool might not be affected by level of lower limb power.

  9. Paramecium swimming in capillary tube

    CERN Document Server

    Jana, Saikat; Jung, Sunghwan

    2010-01-01

    Swimming organisms in their natural habitat navigate through a wide array of geometries and chemical environments. Interaction with the boundaries is ubiquitous and can significantly modify the swimming characteristics of the organism as observed under ideal conditions. We study the dynamics of ciliary locomotion in Paramecium multimicronucleatum and observe the effect of the solid boundaries on the velocities in the near field of the organism. Experimental observations show that Paramecium executes helical trajectories that slowly transition to straight line motion as the diameter of the capillary tubes decrease. Theoretically this system is modeled as an undulating cylinder with pressure gradient and compared with experiments; showing that such considerations are necessary for modeling finite sized organisms in the restrictive geometries.

  10. Effects of In-Water Passive Recovery on Sprint Swimming Performance and Heart Rate in Adolescent Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael A. Casuso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to test the hypothesis that sprint swimming performance is enhanced by in-water passive recovery (IN after sprint swimming bouts in well-trained adolescent swimmers. Using a randomized crossover study design, twelve well-trained adolescent swimmers performed two tests at the swimming pool after preliminary testing. They performed 5 bouts of 100m all-out swimming separated by 5 minutes of passive rest. Their individual in- or out-of-water passive recovery condition was randomized on the first day. In their second visit to the swimming pool the opposite recovery condition was indicated. More than 60% of the subjects which rested in-water were faster in the 5th bout when compared to the OUT group. However, no significant differences were found in blood lactate when IN and OUT were compared. After the first bout peak heart rate (HR peak was lower in subsequent bouts for IN recovery when compared with OUT (p < 0.001. Thus, coaches and researchers should take into account that IN passive recovery may decrease loss of performance and diminish HR peak during sprint swimming bouts. This is particularly important given the use that many coaches give to HR as a tool in daily training.

  11. Can polish university female students swim?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podstawski Robert

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim of the work: There are only few studies in Polish and foreign literature providing solid information on swimming skills of university students. The aim of the study carried out at the University of Warmia & Mazury in Olsztyn was to determine swimming skills of Polish university female students starting their studies. Material and methods: The study was conducted in 2012 on 298 female students of the 1 st year course, at the age of 19 – 20. Anonymous questionnaire was used in the research. Results: It has been shown that almost 72% of the women could not swim at all, and 26% swam poorly. Within the group of women able to swim, the greatest percentage was set by women using classical style (49% and “their own” one (27% and only 13% of the students used crawl, 9% - back stroke and 2% - butterfly style. Of all the women declaring swimming abilities, the biggest percentage (16% could cover the distance of only 20 – 50 m; fewer students (6% covered the distance of 50 – 100 m; and 5% could swim only 20 m. Only a marginal number of students (2% could cover the distance from 100 to 1000 m; none could swim more than 1000 m. Conclusions: The study showed a very pessimistic picture of swimming skills of Polish university female students in respect of the number of women able to swim, their knowledge of swimming styles, and the length of the covered distance.

  12. Cetacean Swimming with Prosthetic Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode-Oke, Ayodeji; Ren, Yan; Dong, Haibo; Fish, Frank

    2016-11-01

    During entanglement in fishing gear, dolphins can suffer abrasions and amputations of flukes and fins. As a result, if the dolphin survives the ordeal, swimming performance is altered. Current rehabilitation technques is the use of prosthesis to regain swimming ability. In this work, analyses are focused on two dolphins with locomotive impairment; Winter (currently living in Clearwater Marine Aquarium in Florida) and Fuji (lived in Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium in Japan). Fuji lost about 75% of its fluke surface to necrosis (death of cells) and Winter lost its tail due to amputation. Both dolphins are aided by prosthetic tails that mimic the shape of a real dolphin tail. Using 3D surface reconstruction techniques and a high fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow solver, we were able to elucidate the kinematics and hydrodynamics and fluke deformation of these swimmers to clarify the effectiveness of prostheses in helping the dolphins regain their swimming ability. Associated with the performance, we identified distinct features in the wake structures that can explain this gap in the performance compared to a healthy dolphin. This work was supported by ONR MURI Grant Number N00014-14-1-0533.

  13. Nutritional recommendations for synchronized swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Sherry; Benardot, Dan; Mountjoy, Margo

    2014-08-01

    The sport of synchronized swimming is unique, because it combines speed, power, and endurance with precise synchronized movements and high-risk acrobatic maneuvers. Athletes must train and compete while spending a great amount of time underwater, upside down, and without the luxury of easily available oxygen. This review assesses the scientific evidence with respect to the physiological demands, energy expenditure, and body composition in these athletes. The role of appropriate energy requirements and guidelines for carbohydrate, protein, fat, and micronutrients for elite synchronized swimmers are reviewed. Because of the aesthetic nature of the sport, which prioritizes leanness, the risks of energy and macronutrient deficiencies are of significant concern. Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport and disordered eating/eating disorders are also of concern for these female athletes. An approach to the healthy management of body composition in synchronized swimming is outlined. Synchronized swimmers should be encouraged to consume a well-balanced diet with sufficient energy to meet demands and to time the intake of carbohydrate, protein, and fat to optimize performance and body composition. Micronutrients of concern for this female athlete population include iron, calcium, and vitamin D. This article reviews the physiological demands of synchronized swimming and makes nutritional recommendations for recovery, training, and competition to help optimize athletic performance and to reduce risks for weight-related medical issues that are of particular concern for elite synchronized swimmers.

  14. [Swimming performance in the aged].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letzelter, M; Jungermann, C; Freitag, W

    1986-01-01

    The deterioration of performance caused by aging was examined in 3,469 swimmers divided into 9 age groups and 4 styles of swimming. Comparisons using cross and longitudinal sections show that older swimmers become progressively slower, and the reduction of speed in all styles of swimming follows a quadratic trend. The losses of efficiency increase with age group, being by far the most in back-stroke and the least in crawl swimming. The combined longitudinal and cross sectional comparisons confirm this result, but not without any exception, for very often no statistically significant differences could be recognized between adjacent age groups. The interindividual comparison shows that it is also possible to maintain or even improve the efficiency over 10 to 12 years, even in the fifth or sixth decade of age, if the intensity and volume of training can be increased. The curve comprising reductions in the later stages of life may additionally be caused by the smaller number of persons per group and the deficient homogeneity within these groups. In addition to this, the tendency towards higher losses in older age groups is not significant, if only the best competitors of each age group are compared.

  15. PDA: Pooled DNA analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chin-Yu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association mapping using abundant single nucleotide polymorphisms is a powerful tool for identifying disease susceptibility genes for complex traits and exploring possible genetic diversity. Genotyping large numbers of SNPs individually is performed routinely but is cost prohibitive for large-scale genetic studies. DNA pooling is a reliable and cost-saving alternative genotyping method. However, no software has been developed for complete pooled-DNA analyses, including data standardization, allele frequency estimation, and single/multipoint DNA pooling association tests. This motivated the development of the software, 'PDA' (Pooled DNA Analyzer, to analyze pooled DNA data. Results We develop the software, PDA, for the analysis of pooled-DNA data. PDA is originally implemented with the MATLAB® language, but it can also be executed on a Windows system without installing the MATLAB®. PDA provides estimates of the coefficient of preferential amplification and allele frequency. PDA considers an extended single-point association test, which can compare allele frequencies between two DNA pools constructed under different experimental conditions. Moreover, PDA also provides novel chromosome-wide multipoint association tests based on p-value combinations and a sliding-window concept. This new multipoint testing procedure overcomes a computational bottleneck of conventional haplotype-oriented multipoint methods in DNA pooling analyses and can handle data sets having a large pool size and/or large numbers of polymorphic markers. All of the PDA functions are illustrated in the four bona fide examples. Conclusion PDA is simple to operate and does not require that users have a strong statistical background. The software is available at http://www.ibms.sinica.edu.tw/%7Ecsjfann/first%20flow/pda.htm.

  16. A simplified model of decontamination by BWR steam suppression pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, D.A.

    1997-05-01

    Phenomena that can decontaminate aerosol-laden gases sparging through steam suppression pools of boiling water reactors during reactor accidents are described. Uncertainties in aerosol properties, aerosol behavior within gas bubbles, and bubble behavior in plumes affect predictions of decontamination by steam suppression pools. Uncertainties in the boundary and initial conditions that are dictated by the progression of severe reactor accidents and that will affect predictions of decontamination by steam suppression pools are discussed. Ten parameters that characterize boundary and initial condition uncertainties, nine parameters that characterize aerosol property and behavior uncertainties, and eleven parameters that characterize uncertainties in the behavior of bubbles in steam suppression pools are identified. Ranges for the values of these parameters and subjective probability distributions for parametric values within the ranges are defined. These uncertain parameters are used in Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses to develop uncertainty distributions for the decontamination that can be achieved by steam suppression pools and the size distribution of aerosols that do emerge from such pools. A simplified model of decontamination by steam suppression pools is developed by correlating features of the uncertainty distributions for total decontamination factor, DF(total), mean size of emerging aerosol particles, d{sub p}, and the standard deviation of the emerging aerosol size distribution, {sigma}, with pool depth, H. Correlations of the median values of the uncertainty distributions are suggested as the best estimate of decontamination by suppression pools. Correlations of the 10 percentile and 90 percentile values of the uncertainty distributions characterize the uncertainty in the best estimates. 295 refs., 121 figs., 113 tabs.

  17. Determination of the energy spectrum of the neutrons in the central thimble of the reactor core TRIGA Mark III; Determinacion del espectro de energia de los neutrones en el dedal central del nucleo del reactor Triga Mark III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra M, M. A.

    2014-07-01

    This thesis presents the neutron spectrum measurements inside the core of the TRIGA Mark III reactor at 1 MW power in steady-state, with the bridge placed in the center of the swimming pool, using several metallic threshold foils. The activation detectors are inserted in the Central Thimble of the reactor core, all the foils are irradiated in the same position and irradiation conditions (one by one). The threshold detectors are made of different materials such as: Au{sup 197}, Ni{sup 58}, In{sup 115}, Mg{sup 24}, Al{sup 27}, Fe{sup 58}, Co{sup 59} and Cu{sup 63}, they were selected to cover the full range the energies (10{sup -10} to 20 MeV) of the neutron spectrum in the reactor core. After the irradiation, the activation detectors were measured by means of spectrometry gamma, using a high resolution counting system with a hyper pure Germanium crystal, in order to obtain the saturation activity per target nuclide. The saturation activity is one of the main input data together with the initial spectrum, for the computational code SANDBP (hungarian version of the code SAND-II), which through an iterative adjustment, gives the calculated spectrum. The different saturation activities are necessary for the unfolding method, used by the computational code SANDBP. This research work is very important, since the knowledge of the energetic and spatial distribution of the neutron flux in the irradiation facilities, allows to characterize properly the irradiation facilities, just like, to estimate with a good precision various physics parameters of the reactor such as: neutron fluxes (thermal, intermediate and fast), neutronic dose, neutron activation analysis (NAA), spectral indices (cadmium ratio), buckling, fuel burnup, safety parameters (reactivity, temperature distribution, peak factors). In addition, the knowledge of the already mentioned parameters can give a best use of reactor, optimizing the irradiations requested by the users for their production process or

  18. What’s In the Pool? (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-05-30

    As summer approaches, more and more people will head to the pool, but dangers lurk in the form of waterborne diseases. In this podcast, Michele Hlavsa discusses ways to avoid waterborne diseases while swimming.  Created: 5/30/2013 by MMWR.   Date Released: 5/30/2013.

  19. Vitamin D Pooling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers brought together investigators from 10 cohorts to conduct a large prospective epidemiologic study of the association between vitamin D status and seven rarer cancers.

  20. Current Methodologies in Baby and Infant Swimming

    OpenAIRE

    Boldišová, Šárka

    2009-01-01

    Thesis describes history of infant a baby swimming in Czech republic and worlwide. It brings an overview of current methods and methodologies of infant a baby swimming worlwide and in the Czech republic. Thesis describes in a reasonable detail methodology, developed by BabyClub Plaváček. Second - practical part of the thesis tries to evaluate hypothesis concerning methodologies used in infant and baby swimming. Evaluation is done upon questionaries and their evaluation. This thesis describes ...

  1. REACTOR COOLING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  2. Teaching children the freestyle swimming stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Vajglová, Kateřina

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare two groups of children both practicing the freestyle swimming stroke. One group attended the Juklík swimming club from an early age and the second group attended swimming lessons provided through primary school. An integral part of this study was to compare the teaching methods, preparations and objectives used in the two models. Results of these observations are displayed in the form of graphs based on the results of an identical swimming test. KEYWORDS Sw...

  3. Efficient Management Design for Swimming Exercise Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Kyunghun; Kyung, Taewon; Kim, Wonhyun; Shin, Chungsick; Song, Youngjae; Lee, Moo Yeol; Lee, Hyunwoo; Cho, Yongchan

    2009-01-01

    Exercise-mediated physical treatment has attracted much recent interest. In particular, swimming is a representative exercise treatment method recommended for patients experiencing muscular and cardiovascular diseases...

  4. Use of employments on swimming in pulling in and restoration microcycles in the training process of the highly skilled sportsmen of the highly skilled heavy weight sambo wrestlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakorko I.P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Expedience of the use of the sporting and health swimming is grounded in precontest preparation of the highly skilled sportsmen unarmed self-defence. 10 sportsmen took part in research (weight over 90 kg. Offered to recommendation on the use of swimming in renewal of sportsmen after the competition and trainings loadings. On employments, swimming was utillized a method crawl on a breast and by a method breast-stroke. Length of path of pool is 25 meters. The level of influence of trainings is set on swimming of different orientation on the general consisting of the sportsman unarmed self-defence of context of preparation and renewal during the specialized competition activity. It is recommended in training on swimming to utillize overcoming at full pelt of cutting-off 250 meters in the mode to 5 minutes (time of competition fight is in the fight of sambo-5 of minutes.

  5. A Comparative Analysis of Swimming Styles in Competitive Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Loebbecke, Alfred; Mittal, Rajat; Gupta, Varun; Mark, Russell

    2007-11-01

    High-fidelity numerical simulations are being used to conduct a critical evaluation of swimming strokes in competitive swimming. We combine computational fluid dynamics (CFD), laser body scans, animation software, and video footage to develop accurate models of Olympic level swimmers and use these to examine contrasting styles of the dolphin kick as well as the arm strokes in back and front crawl stroke. In the dolphin kick, the focus is on examining the effects of Strouhal number, kick amplitude, frequency, and technique on thrust production. In the back stroke, we examine the performance of the so called ``flat stroke'' versus the ``deep catch,'' The most important aspect that separates the two major types of back stroke is the alignment or angle of attack of the palm during the stroke. In one style of front crawl arm stroke, there is greater elbow joint flexion, shoulder abduction and sculling whereas the other style consists of a straight arm pull dominated by simple shoulder flexion. Underlying the use of these two styles is the larger and more fundamental issue of the role of lift versus drag in thrust production and we use the current simulations to examine this issue in detail.

  6. Effect of swimming on peak expiratory flow rate of atopic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemanian, Mohammad Hassan; Shirkhoda, Shima; Nakhjavani, Mina; Mozafari, Habibeh

    2009-06-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the role of swimming on mechanic of lung in healthy individual and patients with asthma. A total 76 girls who took part in the course of regular swimming session three day per week for eight weeks enrolled in this study. All of them completed ISAAC written questionnaire and individual who was suspected of asthma or other atopic diseases was referred to allergist for more evaluation. Peak expiratory flow rate was recorded for participants at beginning, one hour after swimming and two months later. According to ISAAC questionnaire 35.4% had asthma or other atopic diseases. Increase in PEFR more than 20% of personal best was seen in 21.9% after one hour swimming and in 27.6% after two months. Increase in PEFR was significant in healthy individual and asthmatic patients and obese but was not significant in patients with allergic rhinitis or eczema. This study suggests swimming in indoor pool is useful for patients with asthma in spite of potential toxic role of chlorine in exacerbation of asthma symptoms and lung mechanics.

  7. Environmental and personal determinants of the uptake of disinfection by-products during swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font-Ribera, Laia; Kogevinas, Manolis; Schmalz, Christina; Zwiener, Christian; Marco, Esther; Grimalt, Joan O; Liu, Jiaqi; Zhang, Xiangru; Mitch, William; Critelli, Rossana; Naccarati, Alessio; Heederik, Dick; Spithoven, Jack; Arjona, Lourdes; de Bont, Jeroen; Gracia-Lavedan, Esther; Villanueva, Cristina M

    2016-08-01

    Trihalomethanes (THMs) in exhaled breath and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) in urine are internal dose biomarkers of exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) in swimming pools. We assessed how these biomarkers reflect the levels of a battery of DBPs in pool water and trichloramine in air, and evaluated personal determinants. A total of 116 adults swam during 40min in a chlorinated indoor pool. We measured chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane and bromoform in exhaled breath and TCAA in urine before and after swimming, trichloramine in air and several DBPs in water. Personal determinants included sex, age, body mass index (BMI), distance swum, energy expenditure, heart rate and 12 polymorphisms in GSTT1, GSTZ1 and CYP2E1 genes. Median level of exhaled total THMs and creatinine adjusted urine TCAA increased from 0.5 to 14.4µg/m(3) and from 2.5 to 5.8µmol/mol after swimming, respectively. The increase in exhaled brominated THMs was correlated with brominated THMs, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, haloketones, chloramines, total organic carbon and total organic halogen in water and trichloramine in air. Such correlations were not detected for exhaled chloroform, total THMs or urine TCAA. Exhaled THM increased more in men, urine TCAA increased more in women, and both were affected by exercise intensity. Genetic variants were associated with differential increases in exposure biomarkers. Our findings suggest that, although affected by sex, physical activity and polymorphisms in key metabolizing enzymes, brominated THMs in exhaled breath could be used as a non-invasive DBP exposure biomarker in swimming pools with bromide-containing source waters. This warrants confirmation with new studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Undulatory swimming in viscoelastic fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Xiaoning

    2011-01-01

    The effects of fluid elasticity on the swimming behavior of the nematode \\emph{Caenorhabditis elegans} are experimentally investigated by tracking the nematode's motion and measuring the corresponding velocity fields. We find that fluid elasticity hinders self-propulsion. Compared to Newtonian solutions, fluid elasticity leads to 35% slower propulsion speed. Furthermore, self-propulsion decreases as elastic stresses grow in magnitude in the fluid. This decrease in self-propulsion in viscoelastic fluids is related to the stretching of flexible molecules near hyperbolic points in the flow.

  9. Knee pain in competitive swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeo, S A

    1999-04-01

    The high volume of training in competitive swimming results in cumulative overload injuries. Knee pain ranks second to shoulder pain as a common complaint in competitive swimmers. Most knee pain occurs on the medial side of the knee and, most commonly, in breaststroke swimmers; however, knee pain may accompany all strokes. This article reviews the incidence of knee pain, the biomechanic and anatomic factors predisposing to injury, specific injury patterns, injury diagnosis, and the treatment and prevention of injury to the knee in swimmers.

  10. Multifunctional reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Multifunctional reactors are single pieces of equipment in which, besides the reaction, other functions are carried out simultaneously. The other functions can be a heat, mass or momentum transfer operation and even another reaction. Multifunctional reactors are not new, but they have received much

  11. Review and assessment of pool scrubbing models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz, L.E.; Escudero, M.J.; Peyres, V.; Polo, J.; Lopez, J.

    1996-07-01

    Decontamination of fission products bearing bubbles as they pass through aqueous pools becomes a crucial phenomenon for source term evaluation of hypothetical risk dominant sequences of Light Water Reactors. In the present report a peer review and assessment of models encapsulated in SPARC and BUSCA codes is presented. Several aspects of pool scrubbing have been addressed: particle removal, fission product vapour retention and bubble hydrodynamics. Particular emphasis has been given to the close link between retention and hydrodynamics, from both modelling and experimental point of view. In addition, RHR and SGTR sequences were simulated with SPARC90 and BUSCA-AUG92 codes, and their results were compared with those obtained with MAAP 3.0B. As a result of this work, model capabilities and shortcomings have been assessed and some areas susceptible of further research have been identified. (Author) 73 refs.

  12. Evolución del grado de implantación de programas de autocontrol en las piscinas de temporada en Araba/Álava Evolution of the implementation level of self-monitoring programmes for outdoor swimming pools in Araba/Álava Evolução do grau de implementação de programas de autocontrolo em piscinas sazonais em Araba/Álava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arantza Armentia Álvarez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo principal de este estudio ha sido realizar una valoración de la evolución del grado de implantación de programas de autocontrol en las piscinas descubiertas de Araba/Álava durante seis años (2006-2011. Para ello, en las inspecciones se cumplimentaron protocolos de comprobación basados en instrucciones técnicas, elaboradas para aunar criterios y valorar los diferentes planes del Programa de autocontrol (Estos planes son: 1. Tratamiento y vigilancia del agua; 2. Análisis del agua; 3. Limpieza y desinfección; 4. Seguridad, buenas prácticas e información al usuario; 5. Revisión y mantenimiento; 6. Control de plagas; 7. Proveedores, productos y servicios. Además, se usó una valoración consensuada de cada plan, con el fin de valorar objetivamente las instalaciones y la implantación del autocontrol.The main aim of this study was to carry out an assessment of the implementation level of the self-monitoring programme for outdoor swimming pools in Araba/Álava over a six-year period (2006-2011. For this purpose, inspections were carried out using checklists based on technical guidelines designed to unify criteria and assess the different plans within each self-monitoring programme, including the following: 1. Water Treatment and Monitoring; 2. Water analysis; 3. Cleansing and Disinfection; 4. Safety, Best Practices and User information; 5. Inspection and Maintenance; 6. Pest control; 7. Suppliers, Products and Services. Consensus-based assessments of each plan were also used to objectively evaluate the facilities and the level of implementation of the self-monitoring programme.Este estudo teve como objectivo principal realizar uma avaliação da evolução do grau de implementação de programas de auto controlo nas piscinas descobertas de Álava durante um período de seis anos (2006-2011. Nesse sentido, foram realizadas inspeções técnicas respeitando protocolos assentes em listas de verificação, destinados a unificar

  13. OSMOSE program : statistical review of oscillation measurements in the MINERVE reactor R1-UO2 configuration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoven, G.; Klann, R.; Zhong, Z.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-08-28

    The OSMOSE program is a collaboration on reactor physics experiments between the United States Department of Energy and the France Commissariat Energie Atomique. At the working level, it is a collaborative effort between the Argonne National Laboratory and the CEA Cadarache Research Center. The objective of this program is to measure very accurate integral reaction rates in representative spectra for the actinides important to future nuclear system designs, and to provide the experimental data for improving the basic nuclear data files. The main outcome of the OSMOSE measurement program will be an experimental database of reactivity-worth measurements in different neutron spectra for the heavy nuclides. This database can then be used as a benchmark to verify and validate reactor analysis codes. The OSMOSE program (Oscillation in Minerve of isotopes in Eupraxic Spectra) aims at improving neutronic predictions of advanced nuclear fuels through oscillation measurements in the MINERVE facility on samples containing the following separated actinides: {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 236}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, {sup 242}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 243}Am, {sup 244}Cm, and {sup 245}Cm. The first part of this report provides an overview of the experimental protocol and the typical processing of a series of experimental results which is currently performed at CEA-Cadarache. In the second part of the report, improvements to this technique are presented, as well as the program that was created to process oscillation measurement results from the MINERVE facility in the future.

  14. Propulsive force in front crawl swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, M.A.M.; de Groot, G.; Hollander, A.P.

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the propulsive forces in front crawl arm swimming, derived from a three-dimensional kinematic analysis, these values were compared with mean drag forces. The propulsive forces during front crawl swimming using the arms only were calculated using three-dimensional kinematic analysis

  15. Swimming and muscle structure in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierts, I.L.Y.

    1999-01-01

    In this series of studies the relations between swimming behaviour of fish in general and extreme swimming responses in particular (called fast starts or escape responses) and the structure and ontogeny of the muscle system was investigated. Special attention was paid to relate functional

  16. Basic Land Drills for Swimming Stroke Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Teaching swimming strokes can be a challenging task in physical education. The purpose of the article is to introduce 12 on land drills that can be utilized to facilitate the learning of swimming strokes, including elementary back stroke, sidestroke, front crawl, back stroke, breaststroke, and butterfly. Each drill consists of four components…

  17. Swimming dynamics of bidirectional artificial flagella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Namdeo, S.; Khaderi, S. N.; Onck, P. R.

    2013-01-01

    We study magnetic artificial flagella whose swimming speed and direction can be controlled using light and magnetic field as external triggers. The dependence of the swimming velocity on the system parameters (e. g., length, stiffness, fluid viscosity, and magnetic field) is explored using a

  18. Swimming Motility Reduces Deposition to Silica Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Nanxi [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Massoudieh, Arash [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Liang, Xiaomeng [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Hu, Dehong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kamai, Tamir [Agricultural Research Organization, Bet Dagan (Israel); Ginn, Timothy R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Zilles, Julie L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Nguyen, Thanh H. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The role of swimming motility on bacterial transport and fate in porous media was evaluated. We present microscopic evidence showing that strong swimming motility reduces attachment of Azotobacter vinelandii cells to silica surfaces. Applying global and cluster statistical analyses to microscopic videos taken under non-flow conditions, wild type, flagellated A. vinelandii strain DJ showed strong swimming ability with an average speed of 13.1 μm/s, DJ77 showed impaired swimming averaged at 8.7 μm/s, and both the non-flagellated JZ52 and chemically treated DJ cells were non-motile. Quantitative analyses of trajectories observed at different distances above the collector of a radial stagnation point flow cell (RSPF) revealed that both swimming and non-swimming cells moved with the flow when at a distance of at least 20 μm from the collector surface. Near the surface, DJ cells showed both horizontal and vertical movement diverging them from reaching surfaces, while chemically treated DJ cells moved with the flow to reach surfaces, suggesting that strong swimming reduced attachment. In agreement with the RSPF results, the deposition rates obtained for two-dimensional multiple-collector micromodels were also lowest for DJ, while DJ77 and JZ52 showed similar values. Strong swimming specifically reduced deposition on the upstream surfaces of the micromodel collectors.

  19. Optimal Swimming at low Reynolds numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Avron, J. E.; Gat, O.; Kenneth, O.

    2004-01-01

    Efficient swimming at low Reynolds numbers is a major concern of microbots. To compare the efficiencies of different swimmers we introduce the notion of ``swimming drag coefficient'' which allows for the ranking of swimmers. We find the optimal swimmer within a certain class of two dimensional swimmers using conformal mappings techniques.

  20. Comparison between swimming in clothes and swimming in swimming wear in view of physical and physiological exercise intensity in a group of children.

    OpenAIRE

    崔, 勝旭; 黒川, 隆志; 仰木, 孝治; 胡,泰志

    1995-01-01

    The comparison of the effect of swimming in swimming wear and swimming in T-shirts or in T-shirts and pants to the swimming speed, frequency and length of strokes, and heart rate was made with a view to preventing children from drowning accidents. Ten children were allowed to devote all their energy to swim a span of 25m with the front crawl stroke, the breast stroke and the back crawl stroke. The results were as follows: (1) The front crawl stroke in swimming wear showed the fastest swim...

  1. Swimming Dynamics and Propulsive Efficiency of Squids throughout Ontogeny

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ian K. Bartol; Paul S. Krueger; Joseph T. Thompson; William J. Stewart

    2008-01-01

    .... These morphological changes and varying flow conditions affect swimming performance in squids. To determine how swimming dynamics and propulsive efficiency change throughout ontogeny, digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV...

  2. The Backstroke Swimming Start: State of the Art

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karla de Jesus; Kelly de Jesus; Ricardo J. Fernandes; João Paulo Vilas-Boas; Ross Sanders

    2014-01-01

    .... These included two swimming specific publications, eight peer-reviewed journal articles, three from the Biomechanics and Medicine in Swimming Congress series, eight from the International Society...

  3. Peculiarities of a backstroke swimming technique acceleration in elementary education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liliya Sheyko

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: to research the possibility of intensification and improvement of the efficiency of swimming training for adults by use of accelerated learning backstroke swimming techniques. Material & Methods...

  4. Income pooling within families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonke, Jens; Uldall-Poulsen, Hans

    This paper analyses the phenomenon of income-pooling by applying the Danish household expenditure survey, merged with authoritative register information. Responses to additional questions on income sharing among 1696 couples also allows us to analyses whether the intra-household distribution...... of resources reflects individual preferences, the distribution of power, and pre-marital experiences. The analyses show that most Danish households use some type of income pooling and that the likelihood of income pooling varies considerably according to individual characteristics (age, education, occupation......, past partners, upbringing) and household characteristics (household income, duration of marriage, location of residence and the existence of public goods, including children). However, when all variables are evaluated in a common model, only the duration of marriage and the existence of children...

  5. Swimming level classification of young school age children and their success in a long distance swimming test

    OpenAIRE

    Nováková, Martina

    2010-01-01

    Title: Swimming level classification of young school age children and their success in a long distance swimming test Work objectives: The outcome of our work is comparison and evaluation of the initial and final swimming lenght in a test of long distance swimming. This test is taken during one swimming course. Methodology: Data which were obtained by testing a certain group of people and were statistically processed, showed the swimming level and performance of the young school age children. ...

  6. The swim force as a body force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wen; Brady, John

    2015-11-01

    Net (as opposed to random) motion of active matter results from an average swim (or propulsive) force. It is shown that the average swim force acts like a body force - an internal body force [Yan and Brady, Soft Matter, DOI:10.1039/C5SM01318F]. As a result, the particle-pressure exerted on a container wall is the sum of the swim pressure [Takatori et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014, 113, 028103] and the `weight' of the active particles. A continuum mechanical description is possible when variations occur on scales larger than the run length of the active particles and gives a Boltzmann-like distribution from a balance of the swim force and the swim pressure. Active particles may also display `action at a distance' and accumulate adjacent to (or be depleted from) a boundary without any external forces. In the momentum balance for the suspension - the mixture of active particles plus fluid - only external body forces appear.

  7. Prey capture by freely swimming flagellates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Anders; Dolger, Julia; Nielsen, Lasse Tor; Kiorboe, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Flagellates are unicellular microswimmers that propel themselves using one or several beating flagella. Here, we explore the dependence of swimming kinematics and prey clearance rate on flagellar arrangement and determine optimal flagellar arrangements and essential trade-offs. To describe near-cell flows around freely swimming flagellates we consider a model in which the cell is represented by a no-slip sphere and each flagellum by a point force. For uniflagellates pulled by a single flagellum the model suggests that a long flagellum favors fast swimming, whereas high clearance rate is favored by a very short flagellum. For biflagellates with both a longitudinal and a transversal flagellum we explore the helical swimming kinematics and the prey capture sites. We compare our predictions with observations of swimming kinematics, prey capture, and flows around common marine flagellates. The Centre for Ocean Life is a VKR Centre of Excellence supported by the Villum Foundation.

  8. Winter swimming improves general well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttunen, Pirkko; Kokko, Leena; Ylijukuri, Virpi

    2004-05-01

    This study deals with the effects of regular winter swimming on the mood of the swimmers. Profile of Mood State (POMS) and OIRE questionnaires were completed before (October) and after (January) the four-month winter swimming period. In the beginning, there were no significant differences in the mood states and subjective feelings between the swimmers and the controls. The swimmers had more diseases (about 50%) diagnosed by a physician. Tension, fatigue, memory and mood negative state points in the swimmers significantly decreased with the duration of the swimming period. After four months, the swimmers felt themselves to be more energetic, active and brisk than the controls. Vigour-activity scores were significantly greater (p winter swimming had relieved pains. Improvement of general well-being is thus a benefit induced by regular winter swimming.

  9. Real-time monitoring of swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Gonzalo, R; Lemkaddem, A; Renevey, Ph; Calvo, E Muntane; Lemay, M; Cox, K; Ashby, D; Willardson, J; Bertschi, M

    2016-08-01

    This article presents the performance results of a novel algorithm for swimming analysis in real-time within a low-power wrist-worn device. The estimated parameters are: lap count, stroke count, time in lap, total swimming time, pace/speed per lap, total swam distance, and swimming efficiency (SWOLF). In addition, several swimming styles are automatically detected. Results were obtained using a database composed of 13 different swimmers spanning 646 laps and 858.78 min of total swam time. The final precision achieved in lap detection ranges between 99.7% and 100%, and the classification of the different swimming styles reached a sensitivity and specificity above 98%. We demonstrate that a swimmers performance can be fully analyzed with the smart bracelet containing the novel algorithm. The presented algorithm has been licensed to ICON Health & Fitness Inc. for their line of wearables under the brand iFit.

  10. A time-motion analysis of elite solo synchronized swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alentejano, Teresa; Marshall, Dru; Bell, Gordon

    2008-03-01

    To determine the total amount and relative time periods of face immersion (FI) in a synchronized swimming solo routine and the relationship between FI, distance covered, and the technical-merit score of the 11 top Canadian soloists at a synchronized swimming national championship (mean age 20 +/- 1.8 y, height 173.3 +/- 4.1 cm, and body mass 58.3 +/- 4 kg). Videotape and timing of solo performances combined with manual tracking of pool patterns. Analysis of performance revealed that an average of 18 FI periods, mean of 6.8 s, were performed for an average total time of 133.7 +/- 27.1 s (range 102.2 to 199.8 s). The average longest FI time period was 25.45 +/- 6.2 s (range 18.18 to 38.72 s), and most (10/11) of these were in the first third of the solo. The mean total horizontal distance covered was 57.61 +/- 6.84 m (range 48.61 to 68.2 m), and the total horizontal distance covered relative to time was 0.276 +/- 0.034 m/s (range 0.235 to 0.340 m/s). No significant relationships were found between any of the FI periods and the distance covered or between the technical-merit score and FI periods. Each solo contained 6 to 8 underwater sequences, none of which were longer than 40 seconds, the cutoff deemed dangerous by FINA (Fédération Internationale de Natation). This study shows that the times underwater for solos in Canada are within safety limits recommended by FINA and that judging in Canada is not related to underwater periods of swimming.

  11. Design Considerations for Economically Competitive Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao

    2009-05-01

    The technological viability of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) has been established by various experimental and prototype (demonstration) reactors such as EBR-II, FFTF, Phénix, JOYO, BN-600 etc. However, the economic competitiveness of SFR has not been proven yet. The perceived high cost premium of SFRs over LWRs has been the primary impediment to the commercial expansion of SFR technologies. In this paper, cost reduction options are discussed for advanced SFR designs. These include a hybrid loop-pool design to optimize the primary system, multiple reheat and intercooling helium Brayton cycle for the power conversion system and the potential for suppression of intermediate heat transport system. The design options for the fully passive decay heat removal systems are also thoroughly examined. These include direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS), reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) and the newly proposed pool reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) in the context of the hybrid loop-pool design.

  12. Vibro-acoustic Imaging at the Breazeale Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James Arthur [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jewell, James Keith [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lee, James Edwin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The INL is developing Vibro-acoustic imaging technology to characterize microstructure in fuels and materials in spent fuel pools and within reactor vessels. A vibro-acoustic development laboratory has been established at the INL. The progress in developing the vibro-acoustic technology at the INL is the focus of this report. A successful technology demonstration was performed in a working TRIGA research reactor. Vibro-acoustic imaging was performed in the reactor pool of the Breazeale reactor in late September of 2015. A confocal transducer driven at a nominal 3 MHz was used to collect the 60 kHz differential beat frequency induced in a spent TRIGA fuel rod and empty gamma tube located in the main reactor water pool. Data was collected and analyzed with the INLDAS data acquisition software using a short time Fourier transform.

  13. Costs of swimming measured at optimum speed: scale effects, differences between swimming styles, taxonomic groups and submerged and surface swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videler, J J; Nolet, B A

    1990-01-01

    1. Data on swimming energy expenditure of 30 submerged and nine surface swimmers, covering different swimming styles and taxonomic groups, are selected from the literature. 2. The costs of transport at the optimum speed are compared and related to body mass and Re numbers. 3. Fish and turtles use relatively less and most surface swimmers slightly more energy than the other submerged swimmers; man and mink are poorly adapted to swimming. 4. The metabolic rate in W at optimum speed is approximately equal to the body mass in kg for fish and turtles and three times the mass figure for the other submerged swimmers.

  14. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  15. Methods for measurement of energy expenditure and substrate concentrations in swimming rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benthem, L; Bolhuis, J W; van der Leest, J; Steffens, A B; Zock, J P; Zijlstra, W G

    1994-07-01

    A measuring system is described for the determination of oxygen consumption (Vo2) and carbon dioxide production (Vco2) in swimming rats. Vo2 and Vco2 were measured by means of an O2-analyzer (Ametek S3A) and a mass spectrometer (Balzers QMG 511), respectively, combined with a gas flow meter. The measurements were made in a 5-1 metabolic chamber on top of a swimming pool in which a water flow of 0.22 m/s was maintained. The rats were fitted with an indwelling catheter with its tip at the entrance of the right atrium for the repeated determination of energy substrate and hormone concentrations, before, during, and after swimming. The inaccuracy of the Vo2 and Vco2 measurements was 0.18% and 0.31% of the reading, respectively; the imprecision was 2.15% and 2.59%. This high accuracy and precision of the system was attained by measuring room air for 20 s after each 100 s of measuring air from the metabolic chamber, and by using demineralized water in the swimming pool. Vo2 during steady-state swimming was 1.89 +/- 0.06 mmol/kg.min (ca. 60% Vo2max), indicating moderate exercise. Respiratory quotient (RQ), during steady-state exercise, was 0.80 +/- 0.01. Vo2 and RQ resulted in rates for carbohydrate and fat utilization of 15.6 +/- 0.8 and 15.1 +/- 0.7 mg/kg.min, respectively.

  16. Swimming eel-like robot

    OpenAIRE

    Vanderwegen, Gilles; Barbason, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Le mémoire "Swimming eel-like robot" consiste en la réalisation d'un robot à nage anguilliforme afin d'obtenir des résultats expérimentaux permettant de critiquer des simulations réalisées dans le cadre d'un doctorat à l'Université Catholique de Louvain. Les étapes importantes du projet sont la conception, le dimensionnement, le contrôle du robot et l'analyse cinématique et dynamique de sa nage. La phase de conception est basée sur deux critères restrictifs. Le premier est le respect du "desi...

  17. Reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldoncini, Marica; Callegari, Ivan; Fiorentini, Giovanni; Mantovani, Fabio; Ricci, Barbara; Strati, Virginia; Xhixha, Gerti

    2015-03-01

    Antineutrinos produced at nuclear reactors constitute a severe source of background for the detection of geoneutrinos, which bring to the Earth's surface information about natural radioactivity in the whole planet. In this framework, we provide a reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors, in view of reactors operational records yearly published by the International Atomic Energy Agency. We evaluate the expected signal from commercial reactors for ongoing (KamLAND and Borexino), planned (SNO +), and proposed (Juno, RENO-50, LENA, and Hanohano) experimental sites. Uncertainties related to reactor antineutrino production, propagation, and detection processes are estimated using a Monte Carlo-based approach, which provides an overall site-dependent uncertainty on the signal in the geoneutrino energy window on the order of 3%. We also implement the off-equilibrium correction to the reference reactor spectra associated with the long-lived isotopes, and we estimate a 2.4% increase of the unoscillated event rate in the geoneutrino energy window due to the storage of spent nuclear fuels in the cooling pools. We predict that the research reactors contribute to less than 0.2% to the commercial reactor signal in the investigated 14 sites. We perform a multitemporal analysis of the expected reactor signal over a time lapse of ten years using reactor operational records collected in a comprehensive database published at www.fe.infn.it/antineutrino.

  18. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-07-14

    High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

  19. Krill (Meganyctiphanes norvegica) swim faster at night

    KAUST Repository

    Klevjer, Thor A.

    2011-05-01

    Krill are key members in marine food webs, and measurement of swimming speed is vital to assess their bioenergetic budgets, feeding, and encounters with predators. We document a consistent and marked diel signal in swimming speed of krill in their natural habitat that is not related to diel vertical migration. The results were obtained using a bottom-mounted, upward-looking echo sounder at 150-m depth in the Oslofjord, Norway, spanning 5 months from late autumn to spring at a temporal resolution of ~1–2 records s−1. Swimming speed was assessed using acoustic target tracking of individual krill. At the start of the registration period, both daytime and nocturnal average swimming speeds of Meganyctiphanes norvegica were ~ 3.5 cm s−1 (~ 1 body lengths ([bl] s−1) in waters with oxygen concentrations of ~ 15–20% O2 saturation. Following intrusion of more oxygenated water, nocturnal average swimming speeds increased to ~ 10 cm s−1 (~ 3 bl s−1), i.e., more than double that of daytime swimming speeds in the same period. We hypothesize that krill activity during the first period was limited by oxygen, and the enhanced swimming at night subsequent to the water renewal is due to increased feeding activity under lessened danger of predation in darkness.

  20. The Effects of Leg Kick on Swimming Speed and Arm-Stroke Efficiency in the Front Crawl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Ricardo Peterson; de Souza Castro, Flávio Antônio; Figueiredo, Pedro; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Zamparo, Paola

    2017-07-01

    To analyze the effects of swimming pace on the relative contribution of leg kick to swimming speed and to compare arm-stroke efficiency (ηF) assessed when swimming with the arms only (SAO) and while swimming front crawl (FCS) using individual and fixed adjustments to arm-stroke and leg-kick contribution to forward speed. Twenty-nine master swimmers (21 men, 8 women) performed SAO and FCS at 6 self-selected speeds from very slow to maximal. The average swimming speed (v), stroke frequency (SF), and stroke length (SL) were assessed in the central 10 m of the swimming pool. Then, a 2nd-order polynomial regression was used to obtain values of v at paired SF. The percentage difference in v between FCS and SAO, for each paired SF, was used to calculate the relative contributions of the arm stroke (AC) and leg kick (LC) to FCS. Then ηF was calculated using the indirect "paddle-wheel" approach in 3 different ways: using general, individual, and no adjustments to AC. The LC increased with SF (and speed) from -1% ± 4% to 11% ± 1% (P arm stroke and leg kick should be individually estimated to reduce errors when calculating arm-stroke efficiency at different speeds and in different swimmers.

  1. SWIM EVERYDAY TO KEEP DEMENTIA AWAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Singh

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A sound mind resides in a sound body. Many individuals with an active lifestyle show sharp mental skills at an advanced age. Regular exercise has been shown to exert numerous beneficial effects on brawn as well as brain. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of swimming on memory of rodents. A specially designed hexagonal water maze was used for the swimming exposures of animals. The learning and memory parameters were measured using exteroceptive behavioral models such as Elevated plus-maze, Hebb-Williams maze and Passive avoidance apparatus. The rodents (rats and mice were divided into twelve groups. The swimming exposure to the rodents was for 10- minute period during each session and there were two swimming exposures on each day. Rats and mice were subjected to swimming for -15 and -30 consecutive days. Control group animals were not subjected to swimming during above period. The learning index and memory score of all the animals was recorded on 1st, 2nd, 15th, 16th, 30th and 31st day employing above exteroceptive models. It was observed that rodents that underwent swimming regularly for 30- days showed sharp memories, when tested on above behavioral models whereas, control group animals showed decline in memory scores. Those animals, which underwent swimming for 15- days only showed good memory on 16th day, which however, declined after 30-days. These results emphasize the role of regular physical exercise particularly swimming in the maintenance and promotion of brain functions. The underlying physiological mechanism for improvement of memory appears to be the result of enhanced neurogenesis.

  2. Swimming and feeding of mixotrophic biflagellates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dölger, Julia; Nielsen, Lasse Tor; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Many unicellular flagellates are mixotrophic and access resources through both photosynthesis and prey capture. Their fitness depends on those processes as well as on swimming and predator avoidance. How does the flagellar arrangement and beat pattern of the flagellate affect swimming speed...... with variable position next to a no-slip sphere. Utilizing the observations and the model we find that puller force arrangements favour feeding, whereas equatorial force arrangements favour fast and quiet swimming. We determine the capture rates of both passive and motile prey, and we show that the flow...

  3. Swimming performance and metabolism of cultured golden shiners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The swimming ability and metabolism of golden shiners, Notemigonus crysoleucas, was examined using swim tunnel respirometery. The oxygen consumption and tail beat frequencies at various swimming speeds, an estimation of the standard metabolic rate, and the critical swimming speed (Ucrit) was determ...

  4. THE EFFECTS OF THE SWIMMING TRAINING MODEL AIMED AT THE IMPROVEMENT OF FUNCTIONAL ABILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Krivokapić

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available On the sample of 32 fourth grade students of some Belgrade highs schools, who had the physical education classes carried out at the city’s swimming pools, an attempt was made to evaluate the effects of the two different programmes of swimming training in different intensity zones, defined relative to the anaerobic threshold. The subjects were divided into two sub-samples of 15 and 17 participants respectively. Before the research began there was no statistically significant difference between them, regarding the observed functional variables. The first training model consisted of swimming at the intensity level within the zone below anaerobic threshold, while the second model involved occasional swimming at a higher intensity sometimes surpassing the anaerobic threshold. The experimental programme with both sub-groups lasted 8 weeks with 3 training sessions per week, 2 of which were identical for both experimental groups, with the third one differing regarding the swimming intensity, this in the first group being still in the zone below, and in the second group occasionally in the zone above the anaerobic threshold. The amount of training and the duration were the same in both programmes. The aim of the research was to evaluate and to compare the effects of the two training models, using as the basic criteria possible changes of the 5 observed functional parameters: morning pulse, absolute and relative oxygen consumption, the heart frequency and the split time in 50 m swimming in the moment of reaching the anaerobic threshold. On the basis of the statistical analysis of the obtained data, it is possible to conclude that in both experimental groups there were statistically significant changes of average values concerning all the physiological variables. Although the difference in the efficiency of the applied experimental programmes is not determined, it can be said that both experimental treatments significantly influenced the improvement of

  5. Swimming without a spine: Computational modeling and analysis of the swimming hydrodynamics of the Spanish Dancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuoyu; Mittal, Rajat

    2017-10-16

    Incompressible flow simulations are used to study the swimming of a Spanish Dancer (Hexabranchus sanguineus), a soft-bodied invertebrate marine gastropod that swims by combining body pitching with undulations of its large mantle. A simple model based on a field video is employed as the basis for the model and coupling of the flow with the body acceleration enables us to examine the free swimming of this animal. Simulations indicate propulsive efficiencies of up to about 57% and terminal swimming speeds of 1.33 body lengths per cycle. Examination of the effect of body planform on the swimming hydrodynamics suggests that the planform of this animal is likely adapted to enhance its swimming performance. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  6. CERN Electronics Pool presentations

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The CERN Electronics Pool has organised a series of presentations in collaboration with oscilloscope manufacturers. The last one will take place according to the schedule below.   Time will be available at the end of the presentation to discuss your personal needs. The Agilent presentation had to be postponed and will be organised later. -     Lecroy: Thursday, 24 November 2011, in 530-R-030, 14:00 to 16:30.

  7. Stochastic Pooling Networks

    OpenAIRE

    McDonnell, Mark D; Amblard, Pierre-Olivier; Stocks, Nigel G.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce and define the concept of a stochastic pooling network (SPN), as a model for sensor systems where redundancy and two forms of 'noise' -- lossy compression and randomness -- interact in surprising ways. Our approach to analyzing SPNs is information theoretic. We define an SPN as a network with multiple nodes that each produce noisy and compressed measurements of the same information. An SPN must combine all these measurements into a single further compressed network output, in a w...

  8. Effects of pool-fencing ordinances and other factors on childhood drowning in Los Angeles County, 1990-1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, H; Bingham, T; Reza, A

    2000-04-01

    This study estimated the effects of local pool-fencing ordinances and other factors on the rate of childhood drowning in Los Angeles County, California. Stage 1 was a retrospective dynamic cohort study of all drownings among children younger than 10 years that occurred in residential swimming pools in Los Angeles County between 1990 and 1995. Stage 2 was a matched case-control study that compared pools in which childhood drownings occurred (cases) with randomly selected pools in which drownings did not occur (controls). The drowning rate was relatively high among toddlers (aged 1-4 years), boys, and African Americans and in areas with a high density of residential swimming pools. Pool-fencing ordinances were not associated with a reduced overall rate of childhood drowning. Local ordinances enacted in Los Angeles County before 1996 do not appear to have been effective in reducing the rate of childhood drowning in residential pools. Possible reasons for this ineffectiveness are insufficient building codes for isolating pools from homes, inadequate enforcement of the ordinances, and inadequate operation or maintenance of fencing equipment by pool owners.

  9. Achieving compliance with pool fencing legislation in New Zealand: a survey of regulatory authorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, L.; Chalmers, D.; Langley, J.; Alsop, J.; McBean, C.

    1999-01-01

    Objectives—To identify the status of compliance and enforcement of New Zealand's Fencing of Swimming Pools Act (FOSP Act), 10 years after its introduction, and to identify methods for improving both compliance with the act and the process of enforcement. Methods—A postal questionnaire was sent to all 74 authorities in New Zealand in which they were asked questions about their enforcement of the FOSP Act. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with 12 authorities to supplement the data obtained in the postal survey. Results—Based on responses to the survey, it was estimated that there are over 59 000 domestic swimming pools in New Zealand, giving rates of 46 pools/1000 dwellings and 16 pools/1000 persons. The authorities reported that 44% of pools complied with the act, and a further 4% had been granted exemptions. Nineteen per cent of pools were reported to not comply with the act, and the compliance status of a further 33% was not known, or not stated by the authority. Only 9% of authorities had procedures for locating and inspecting pools, while 28% had a programme of reinspection to ensure that pools continued to comply. Pool owner resistance was considered to be the main difficulty with enforcing the act, and nearly half of the authorities believed publicity or education was needed to overcome these barriers. Fifty two per cent of authorities had publicised the act during the 12 months preceding the survey. Conclusions—Due to ambiguities within the legislation, and differing levels of commitment by authorities to locate pools and monitor compliance, compliance with the FOSP Act is not consistent nationally. If the act were less ambiguous, there would be greater consistency and more enforcement. PMID:10385830

  10. 13 CFR 120.611 - Pools backing Pool Certificates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pools backing Pool Certificates. 120.611 Section 120.611 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS... forth in the Program Guide, each Pool must have: (1) A minimum number of guaranteed portions of loans...

  11. Optimal Strouhal number for swimming animals

    CERN Document Server

    Eloy, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the swimming performances of aquatic animals, an important dimensionless quantity is the Strouhal number, St = fA/U, with f the tail-beat frequency, A the peak-to-peak tail amplitude, and U the swimming velocity. Experiments with flapping foils have exhibited maximum propulsive efficiency in the interval 0.25 < St < 0.35 and it has been argued that animals likely evolved to swim in the same narrow interval. Using Lighthill's elongated-body theory to address undulatory propulsion, it is demonstrated here that the optimal Strouhal number increases from 0.15 to 0.8 for animals spanning from the largest cetaceans to the smallest tadpoles. To assess the validity of this model, the swimming kinematics of 53 different species of aquatic animals have been compiled from the literature and it shows that their Strouhal numbers are consistently near the predicted optimum.

  12. The Fluid Dynamics of Competitive Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Timothy; Mark, Russell; Hutchison, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Nowhere in sport is performance so dependent on the interaction of the athlete with the surrounding medium than in competitive swimming. As a result, understanding (at least implicitly) and controlling (explicitly) the fluid dynamics of swimming are essential to earning a spot on the medal stand. This is an extremely complex, highly multidisciplinary problem with a broad spectrum of research approaches. This review attempts to provide a historical framework for the fluid dynamics-related aspects of human swimming research, principally conducted roughly over the past five decades, with an emphasis on the past 25 years. The literature is organized below to show a continuous integration of computational and experimental technologies into the sport. Illustrations from the authors' collaborations over a 10-year period, coupling the knowledge and experience of an elite-level coach, a lead biomechanician at USA Swimming, and an experimental fluid dynamicist, are intended to bring relevance and immediacy to the review.

  13. Can phoretic particles swim in two dimensions?

    CERN Document Server

    Sondak, David; Heng, Siyu; Vinsonhaler, Rebecca; Lauga, Eric; Thiffeault, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Artificial phoretic particles swim using self-generated gradients in chemical species (self-diffusiophoresis) or charges and currents (self-electrophoresis). These particles can be used to study the physics of collective motion in active matter and might have promising applications in bioengineering. In the case of self-diffusiophoresis, the classical physical model relies on a steady solution of the diffusion equation, from which chemical gradients, phoretic flows and ultimately the swimming velocity, may be derived. Motivated by disk-shaped particles in thin films and under confinement, we examine the extension to two dimensions. Because the two-dimensional diffusion equation lacks a steady state with the correct boundary conditions, Laplace transforms must be used to study the long-time behavior of the problem and determine the swimming velocity. For fixed chemical fluxes on the particle surface, we find that the swimming velocity ultimately always decays logarithmically in time. In the case of finite Pecl...

  14. Swimming Performance of Toy Robotic Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petelina, Nina; Mendelson, Leah; Techet, Alexandra

    2015-11-01

    HEXBUG AquaBotsTM are a commercially available small robot fish that come in a variety of ``species''. These models have varying caudal fin shapes and randomly-varied modes of swimming including forward locomotion, diving, and turning. In this study, we assess the repeatability and performance of the HEXBUG swimming behaviors and discuss the use of these toys to develop experimental techniques and analysis methods to study live fish swimming. In order to determine whether these simple, affordable model fish can be a valid representation for live fish movement, two models, an angelfish and a shark, were studied using 2D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and 3D Synthetic Aperture PIV. In a series of experiments, the robotic fish were either allowed to swim freely or towed in one direction at a constant speed. The resultant measurements of the caudal fin wake are compared to data from previous studies of a real fish and simplified flapping propulsors.

  15. Swimming training at the lower school of primary schools

    OpenAIRE

    Vavrošová, Karolína

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is aimed on the topic of swimming training on the first grade of primary school. The theoretical part is processed according to available resources, history and importance of swimming, characterized by basic swimming training of children at school age and younger. The practical part is focused on the research sample, a swimming schools and children who participated in basic swimming training. Following sections of this thesis are analyzing the research sample, which consists of sw...

  16. Current state of swimming teaching to preschool children in Prague

    OpenAIRE

    Krischová, Jitka

    2012-01-01

    Abstraction The subject of the bachelor thesis is the current situation of swimming courses for kindergartens. The paper aims to study the quality and conditions of teaching basic swimming skills in selected swimming schools and provides approximate number and age of children participating in the courses in Prague. The theoretical part of the thesis deals with swimming and its importance in general and describes methodological and organizational specifics of swimming teaching at preschool age...

  17. ECS DAAC Data Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiebuzinski, A. B.; Bories, C. M.; Kalluri, S.

    2002-12-01

    As part of its Earth Observing System (EOS), NASA supports operations for several satellites including Landsat 7, Terra, and Aqua. ECS (EOSDIS Core System) is a vast archival and distribution system and includes several Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) located around the United States. EOSDIS reached a milestone in February when its data holdings exceeded one petabyte (1,000 terabytes) in size. It has been operational since 1999 and originally was intended to serve a large community of Earth Science researchers studying global climate change. The Synergy Program was initiated in 2000 with the purpose of exploring and expanding the use of remote sensing data beyond the traditional research community to the applications community including natural resource managers, disaster/emergency managers, urban planners and others. This included facilitating data access at the DAACs to enable non-researchers to exploit the data for their specific applications. The combined volume of data archived daily across the DAACs is of the order of three terabytes. These archived data are made available to the research community and to general users of ECS data. Currently, the average data volume distributed daily is two terabytes, which combined with an ever-increasing need for timely access to these data, taxes the ECS processing and archival resources for more real-time use than was previously intended for research purposes. As a result, the delivery of data sets to users was being delayed in many cases, to unacceptable limits. Raytheon, under the auspices of the Synergy Program, investigated methods at making data more accessible at a lower cost of resources (processing and archival) at the DAACs. Large on-line caches (as big as 70 Terabytes) of data were determined to be a solution that would allow users who require contemporary data to access them without having to pull it from the archive. These on-line caches are referred to as "Data Pools." In the Data Pool concept

  18. Trunk muscle activity during front crawl swimming

    OpenAIRE

    Martens, Jonas; Pellegrims, Ward; Einarsson, Ingi Thor; Fernandes, Ricardo; Staes, Filip; Daly, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Core stability training is of increasing interest to both researchers and coaches. Sufficient core stability is needed to balance forces generated by the upper and lower extremities separately (Hibbs et al., 2008). In swimming the development of wireless EMG has created new possibilities to study underwater muscle activity with little hinder. The purpose here was to analyze lower trunk muscle activation during front crawl swimming and examine how trunk muscle activity is relat...

  19. Winter swimming improves general well-being

    OpenAIRE

    Huttunen, Pirkko; Kokko, Leena; Ylijukuri, Virpi

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. This study deals with the effects of regular winter swimming on the mood of the swimmers. Methods. Profile of Mood State (POMS) and OIRE questionnaires were completed before (October) and after (January) the fourmonth winter swimming period. Results. In the beginning, there were no significant differences in the mood states and subjective feelings between the swimmers and the controls. The swimmers had more diseases (about 50%) diagnosed by a physician. Tension, fatigue, memory an...

  20. Reactor Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Lasserre, T; Lasserre, Thierry; Sobel, Henry W.

    2005-01-01

    We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments, that toe the cutting edge of neutrino research. Short baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and are still searching for important phenomena such as the neutrino magnetic moment. They could open the door to the measurement of coherent neutrino scattering in a near future. Middle and long baseline oscillation experiments at Chooz and KamLAND have played a relevant role in neutrino oscillation physics in the last years. It is now widely accepted that a new middle baseline disappearance reactor neutrino experiment with multiple detectors could provide a clean measurement of the last undetermined neutrino mixing angle theta13. We conclude by opening on possible use of neutrinos for Society: NonProliferation of Nuclear materials and Geophysics.

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-10-14

    A method is presented for loading and unloading rod type fuel elements of a neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, solld moderator, liquid cooled type. In the embodiment illustrated, the fuel rods are disposed in vertical coolant channels in the reactor core. The fuel rods are loaded and unloaded through the upper openings of the channels which are immersed in the coolant liquid, such as water. Unloading is accomplished by means of a coffer dam assembly having an outer sleeve which is placed in sealing relation around the upper opening. A radiation shield sleeve is disposed in and reciprocable through the coffer dam sleeve. A fuel rod engaging member operates through the axial bore in the radiation shield sleeve to withdraw the fuel rod from its position in the reactor coolant channel into the shield, the shield snd rod then being removed. Loading is accomplished in the reverse procedure.

  2. Measurement of hydrodynamic force generation by swimming dolphins using bubble DPIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Frank E; Legac, Paul; Williams, Terrie M; Wei, Timothy

    2014-01-15

    Attempts to measure the propulsive forces produced by swimming dolphins have been limited. Previous uses of computational hydrodynamic models and gliding experiments have provided estimates of thrust production by dolphins, but these were indirect tests that relied on various assumptions. The thrust produced by two actively swimming bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) was directly measured using digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). For dolphins swimming in a large outdoor pool, the DPIV method used illuminated microbubbles that were generated in a narrow sheet from a finely porous hose and a compressed air source. The movement of the bubbles was tracked with a high-speed video camera. Dolphins swam at speeds of 0.7 to 3.4 m s(-1) within the bubble sheet oriented along the midsagittal plane of the animal. The wake of the dolphin was visualized as the microbubbles were displaced because of the action of the propulsive flukes and jet flow. The oscillations of the dolphin flukes were shown to generate strong vortices in the wake. Thrust production was measured from the vortex strength through the Kutta-Joukowski theorem of aerodynamics. The dolphins generated up to 700 N during small amplitude swimming and up to 1468 N during large amplitude starts. The results of this study demonstrated that bubble DPIV can be used effectively to measure the thrust produced by large-bodied dolphins.

  3. Pool chemical--associated health events in public and residential settings - United States, 1983-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-15

    Swimming is the second most popular exercise in the United States, with approximately 339 million swimming visits to recreational water venues, including disinfected ones (e.g., pools, water parks, and interactive fountains), each year. Pool chemicals are added to the water in these venues to prevent transmission of infectious pathogens. These chemicals can cause injury when handled inappropriately or when operators fail to use appropriate personal protective equipment. This report summarizes 36 pool chemical--associated health events reported to the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) for public aquatic venues during 1983--2006 and includes analyses of 1998-2007 data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) and 2007 data from the National Poison Data System (NPDS). NYSDOH reported primarily summertime health events resulting in acute respiratory illness. NEISS and NPDS data revealed that pool chemical--associated injuries or exposures led to thousands of estimated annual emergency department (ED) visits or actual poison center consultations, respectively. These pool chemical--associated health events can be prevented through 1) improved design and engineering and 2) education and training that stresses safe pool-chemical handling and storage practices and safe and preventive maintenance of equipment.

  4. Neutronic reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wende, Charles W. J.; Babcock, Dale F.; Menegus, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor includes an active portion with fissionable fuel and neutron moderating material surrounded by neutron reflecting material. A control element in the active portion includes a group of movable rods constructed of neutron-absorbing material. Each rod is movable with respect to the other rods to vary the absorption of neutrons and effect control over neutron flux.

  5. Neutronic reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babcock, D.F.; Menegus, R.L.; Wende, C.W.

    1983-01-04

    A nuclear reactor includes an active portion with fissionable fuel and neutron moderating material surrounded by neutron reflecting material. A control element in the active portion includes a group of movable rods constructed of neutron-absorbing material. Each rod is movable with respect to the other rods to vary the absorption of neutrons and effect control over neutron flux.

  6. The Productive Ligurian Pool

    CERN Document Server

    Casella, E; Couvelard, X; Caldeira, R M A

    2011-01-01

    In contrast with the behavior of the eddies in the open-ocean, the sub-mesoscale eddies generated in the constricted Ligurian Basin (NW Mediterranean), are unproductive but their combined effect, arranged in a rim-like fashion, contributes to the containment of a Productive Ligurian Pool (PLP). Data de- rived from MODIS satellite sensor showed persistent higher chlorophyll con- centrations in the centre of the basin, concurrent with high EKE values in its surroundings, derived from AVISO altimetry merged products. This sug- gested that this 'productive pool' is maintained by the intense (sub)mesoscale eddy activity in the rim. Numerical realistic experiments, using a Regional Ocean Model System, forced by MERCATOR and by a high-resolution COSMO- l7 atmospheric model, also showed that most of the sub-mesoscale eddies, during 2009 and 2010, are concentrated in the rim surrounding the basin, contributing to the formation of a basin-scale cyclonic gyre. We hypothesized that the interaction between eddies in the r...

  7. Assessment of three-dimensional joint kinematics of the upper limb during simulated swimming using wearable inertial-magnetic measurement units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantozzi, Silvia; Giovanardi, Andrea; Magalhães, Fabrício Anício; Di Michele, Rocco; Cortesi, Matteo; Gatta, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the joint kinematics during swimming plays a fundamental role both in sports conditioning and in clinical contexts. Contrary to the traditional video analysis, wearable inertial-magnetic measurements units (IMMUs) allow to analyse both the underwater and aerial phases of the swimming stroke over the whole length of the swimming pool. Furthermore, the rapid calibration and short data processing required by IMMUs provide coaches and athletes with an immediate feedback on swimming kinematics during training. This study aimed to develop a protocol to assess the three-dimensional kinematics of the upper limbs during swimming using IMMUs. Kinematics were evaluated during simulated dry-land swimming trials performed in the laboratory by eight swimmers. A stereo-photogrammetric system was used as the gold standard. The results showed high coefficient of multiple correlation (CMC) values, with median (first-third quartile) of 0.97 (0.93-0.95) and 0.99 (0.97-0.99) for simulated front-crawl and breaststroke, respectively. Furthermore, the joint angles were estimated with an accuracy increasing from distal to proximal joints, with wrist indices showing median CMC values always higher than 0.90. The present findings represent an important step towards the practical use of technology based on IMMUs for the kinematic analysis of swimming in applied contexts.

  8. A computational model of amoeboid cell swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Eric J.; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2017-10-01

    Amoeboid cells propel by generating pseudopods that are finger-like protrusions of the cell body that continually grow, bifurcate, and retract. Pseudopod-driven motility of amoeboid cells represents a complex and multiscale process that involves bio-molecular reactions, cell deformation, and cytoplasmic and extracellular fluid motion. Here we present a 3D model of pseudopod-driven swimming of an amoeba suspended in a fluid without any adhesion and in the absence of any chemoattractant. Our model is based on front-tracking/immersed-boundary methods, and it combines large deformation of the cell, a coarse-grain model for molecular reactions, and cytoplasmic and extracellular fluid flow. The predicted shapes of the swimming cell from our model show similarity with experimental observations. We predict that the swimming behavior changes from random-like to persistent unidirectional motion, and that the swimming speed increases, with increasing cell deformability and protein diffusivity. The unidirectionality in cell swimming is observed without any external cues and as a direct result of a change in pseudopod dynamics. We find that pseudopods become preferentially focused near the front of the cell and appear in greater numbers with increasing cell deformability and protein diffusivity, thereby increasing the swimming speed and making the cell shape more elongated. We find that the swimming speed is minimum when the cytoplasm viscosity is close to the extracellular fluid viscosity. We further find that the speed increases significantly as the cytoplasm becomes less viscous compared with the extracellular fluid, resembling the viscous fingering phenomenon observed in interfacial flows. While these results support the notion that softer cells migrate more aggressively, they also suggest a strong coupling between membrane elasticity, membrane protein diffusivity, and fluid viscosity.

  9. Large pool LMFBR design. Final report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wett, J. F.; Churchill, J. R.

    1979-03-01

    The design effort reported is an extension on past design effort and continuous concentration on those parts of the nuclear island unique to a commercial size pool type LMFBR. In particular, the work covers the reactor vessel, deck, rotating plugs, upper and lower internals, internal plenum separator system, IHX, pumps, cold traps, intermediate system layout, containment/confinement system, plot plan, and residual heat removal systems. Preliminary thermal, hydraulic, stress, and system analyses are also presented.

  10. State of the art on nuclear heating measurement methods and expected improvements in zero power research reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Guillou Mael

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the recent methodological advances suitable for nuclear heating measurements in zero power research reactors. This bibliographical work is part of an experimental approach currently in progress at CEA Cadarache, aiming at optimizing photon heating measurements in low-power research reactors. It provides an overview of the application fields of the most widely used detectors, namely thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs and optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters. Starting from the methodology currently implemented at CEA, the expected improvements relate to the experimental determination of the neutron component, which is a key point conditioning the accuracy of photon heating measurements in mixed n–γ field. A recently developed methodology based on the use of 7Li and 6Li-enriched TLDs, precalibrated both in photon and neutron fields, is a promising approach to deconvolute the two components of nuclear heating. We also investigate the different methods of optical fiber dosimetry, with a view to assess the feasibility of online photon heating measurements, whose primary benefit is to overcome constraints related to the withdrawal of dosimeters from the reactor immediately after irradiation. Moreover, a fibered setup could allow measuring the instantaneous dose rate during irradiation, as well as the delayed photon dose after reactor shutdown. Some insights from potential further developments are given. Obviously, any improvement of the technique has to lead to a measurement uncertainty at least equal to that of the currently used methodology (∼5% at 1σ.

  11. Fish Swimming and Bird/Insect Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Theodore Yaotsu

    2011-01-01

    This expository review is devoted to fish swimming and bird/insect flight. (a) The simple waving motion of an elongated flexible ribbon plate of constant width propagating a wave distally down the plate to swim forward in a fluid, initially at rest, is first considered to provide a fundamental concept on energy conservation. It is generalized to include variations in body width and thickness, with appended dorsal, ventral and caudal fins shedding vortices to closely simulate fish swimming, for which a nonlinear theory is presented for large-amplitude propulsion. (b) For bird flight, the pioneering studies on oscillatory rigid wings are discussed with delineating a fully nonlinear unsteady theory for a two-dimensional flexible wing with arbitrary variations in shape and trajectory to provide a comparative study with experiments. (c) For insect flight, recent advances are reviewed by items on aerodynamic theory and modeling, computational methods, and experiments, for forward and hovering flights with producing leading-edge vortex to yield unsteady high lift. (d) Prospects are explored on extracting prevailing intrinsic flow energy by fish and bird to enhance thrust for propulsion. (e) The mechanical and biological principles are drawn together for unified studies on the energetics in deriving metabolic power for animal locomotion, leading to the surprising discovery that the hydrodynamic viscous drag on swimming fish is largely associated with laminar boundary layers, thus drawing valid and sound evidences for a resounding resolution to the long-standing fish-swim paradox proclaimed by Gray (1936, 1968 ).

  12. Energetics of swimming of a sea turtle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prange, H D

    1976-02-01

    Young (mean mass 735 g) green turtles (Chelonia mydas) were able to swim in a water channel at sustained speeds between 0-14 and 0-35 m.s-1. Oxygen consumption at rest was was 0-07 l.kg-1.h-1; at maximum swimming speed oxygen consumption was 3-4 times greater than at rest for a given individual. In comparison with other animals of the same body mass the cost of transport for the green turtle (0.186lO2.kg-1.km-1) is less than that for flying birds but greater than that for fish. From drag measurements it was calculated that the aerobic efficiency of swimming was between 1 and 10%; the higher efficiencies were found at the higher swimming speeds. Based upon the drag calculations for young turtles, it is estimated that adult turtles making the round-trip breeding migration between Brazil and Ascension Island (4800 km) would require the equivalent of about 21% of their body mass in fat stores to account for the energetic cost of swimming.

  13. United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure - TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrell, Douglas [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2008-10-29

    . Reactor pool surface area is small (the cask could not be lowered into the pool) and entrance into the facility is limited: facility entrance door is 7 feet tall by 5 feet wide and crane limit is 1 ton. Future requests for fresh fuel or spent fuel shipments need to be communicated to program office (provide documentation to justify request). Other university concerns or assistance are to be communicated to program for consideration into future plans for DOE funding. Sufficient funding is the future challenge for new fresh fuel for recurring fuel needs and spent fuel shipments.

  14. The Association between Anthropometric Variables, Functional Movement Screen Scores and 100 m Freestyle Swimming Performance in Youth Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Bond

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the association between anthropometric variables, Functional Movement Screen (FMS scores and 100 m freestyle swimming performance in early adolescent swimmers. Fifty competitive, national level, youth swimmers (21 males, 29 females, mean age ± SD = 13.5 ± 1.5 years, age range 11–16 years performed an “all-out” 100 m freestyle (front crawl swim as fast as they could in a 50 m pool. A median divide for 100 m timed swim was also used to divide the sample into faster or slower groups. Height, body mass, skinfolds and limb lengths were also assessed. Maturation was calculated by proxy using anthropometric measures and participants also undertook the FMS as a measure of functional performance. Backwards linear regression indicated a significant model (p = 0.0001, Adjusted R2 = 0.638 explaining 63.8% of the variance in swim performance with total sum of skinfolds, upper leg length, lower leg length, hand length and total height significantly contributing to the model. Swimmers who were classed as fast had lower total sum of skinfolds (p = 0.005 and higher total FMS score (p = 0.005 compared to their slower peers. In summary, this study indicates that anthropometric variables significantly explained the variance in 100 m freestyle swimming performance in youth swimmers.

  15. Simulation of power excursions - Osiris reactor; Simulation des excursions de puissance - pile Osiris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascouet, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    Following the experimental work accomplished in the U.S.A. on Borax 1 and SPERT 1 and the accident of SL 1, the 'Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique' started a research program about the safety of its own swimming Pool reactors, with regard to power excursions. The first research work led to the design of programmed explosive charges, adapted to the simulation of a power excursion. This report describes the application of these methods to the investigation of Osiris safety. (author) [French] A la suite des essais effectues aux U.S.A. sur BORAX 1 et SPERT 1 et de l'accident survenu a SL 1, le Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique a lance un programme d'etudes sur la surete de ses reacteurs piscines vis-a-vis des excursions de puissance. Les premieres etudes ont abouti A la mise au point de charges programmees capables de simuler une excursion de puissance. On trouvera dans le present rapport l'application de ces methodes a l'etude de la surete d'OSIRIS. (auteur)

  16. PHYSIOLOGICAL, BIOMECHANICAL AND ANTHROPOMETRICAL PREDICTORS OF SPRINT SWIMMING PERFORMANCE IN ADOLESCENT SWIMMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelin Lätt

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationships between 100-m front crawl swimming performance and relevant biomechanical, anthropometrical and physiological parameters in male adolescent swimmers. Twenty five male swimmers (mean ± SD: age 15. 2 ± 1.9 years; height 1.76 ± 0.09 m; body mass 63.3 ± 10.9 kg performed an all-out 100-m front crawl swimming test in a 25-m pool. A respiratory snorkel and valve system with low hydrodynamic resistance was used to collect expired air. Oxygen uptake was measured breath-by-breath by a portable metabolic cart. Swimming velocity, stroke rate (SR, stroke length and stroke index (SI were assessed during the test by time video analysis. Blood samples for lactate measurement were taken from the fingertip pre exercise and at the third and fifth minute of recovery to estimate net blood lactate accumulation (?La. The energy cost of swimming was estimated from oxygen uptake and blood lactate energy equivalent values. Basic anthropometry included body height, body mass and arm span. Body composition parameters were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA. Results indicate that biomechanical factors (90.3% explained most of 100-m front crawl swimming performance variability in these adolescent male swimmers, followed by anthropometrical (45.8% and physiological (45.2% parameters. SI was the best single predictor of performance, while arm span and ∆La were the best anthropometrical and physiological indicators, respectively. SI and SR alone explained 92.6% of the variance in competitive performance. These results confirm the importance of considering specific stroke technical parameters when predicting success in young swimmers.

  17. Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project: Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The Test Area North (TAN) Pool is located within the fenced TAN facility boundaries on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The TAN pool stores 344 canisters of core debris from the March, 1979, Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 reactor accident; fuel assemblies from Loss-of-Fluid Tests (LOFT); and Government-owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies. The LOFT and government owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies are hereafter referred to collectively as {open_quotes}commercial fuels{close_quotes} except where distinction between the two is important to the analysis. DOE proposes to remove the canisters of TMI core debris and commercial fuels from the TAN Pool and transfer them to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim dry storage until an alternate storage location other than at the INEL, or a permanent federal spent nuclear fuel (SNF) repository is available. The TAN Pool would be drained and placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for refurbishment or eventual decommissioning. This environmental assessment (EA) identifies and evaluates environmental impacts associated with (1) constructing an Interim Storage System (ISS) at ICPP; (2) removing the TMI and commercial fuels from the pool and transporting them to ICPP for placement in an ISS, and (3) draining and stabilizing the TAN Pool. Miscellaneous hardware would be removed and decontaminated or disposed of in the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). This EA also describes the environmental consequences of the no action alternative.

  18. Determinant kinantropometric factors in swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Vilas-Boas

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to present a bibliographic review, based on the specialized literature, of the kineantropometric characteristics of swimmers and their importance for swimming performance. The main conclusions were: (i swimmers are taller and heavier than the general population; (ii swimmers present an high index of arm span/height (explained by a large biacromial diameter and long the upper arm; (iii high values for the biacromial/bicristal diameter ratio were found, offering a lower drag coeffi cient; (iv high length and surface area arm and leg values were observed (which positively infl uence their propulsion capacity; (v elite male swimmers presents a ectomorph-endomorph somatotype and elite female swimmers are central or balanced mesomorphs (vi swimmers exhibit a higher percentage of body mass than other athletes, which may benefi t positively their floatation. RESUMO O objetivo deste trabalho é apresentar uma revisão bibliográfi ca das principais características cineantropométricas do nadador e a forma como estas infl uenciam a sua prestação na modalidade. As principais conclusões obtidas foram as seguintes: (i os nadadores são mais altos e pesados do que a população em geral; (ii os nadadores apresentam um elevado índice envergadura/ altura, explicitando valores elevados do diâmetro biacromial e do comprimento dos MS; (iii verifi ca-se uma elevada razão entre os diâmetros biacromial e bicristal, traduzindo um fator decisivo na modalidade: a promoção de um coefi ciente de arrasto inferior; (iv foram observados elevados valores de comprimento e superfície dos membros dos nadadores (afetando positivamente a sua capacidade propulsiva; (v os nadadores de elite apresentam um somatótipo médio ecto-mesomorfo e as nadadoras são centrais ou mesomorfas equilibradas; (vi como grupo, os nadadores apresentam um maior percentual de massa gorda do que outros desportistas, fator este que poderá beneficiálos relativamente

  19. Undulatory swimming in fluids with polymer networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gagnon, D A; Arratia, P E

    2013-01-01

    The motility behavior of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans in polymeric solutions of varying concentrations is systematically investigated in experiments using tracking and velocimetry methods. As the polymer concentration is increased, the solution undergoes a transition from the semi-dilute to the concentrated regime, where these rod-like polymers entangle, align, and form networks. Remarkably, we find an enhancement in the nematode's swimming speed of approximately 65% in concentrated solutions compared to semi-dilute solutions. Using velocimetry methods, we show that the undulatory swimming motion of the nematode induces an anisotropic mechanical response in the fluid. This anisotropy, which arises from the fluid micro-structure, is responsible for the observed increase in swimming speed.

  20. An integrative CFD model of lamprey swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chia-Yu; McMillen, Tyler; Fauci, Lisa

    2008-11-01

    Swimming due to sinusoidal body undulations is observed across the full spectrum of swimming organisms, from microscopic flagella to fish. These undulations are achieved due to internal force-generating mechanisms, which, in the case of lamprey are due to a wave of neural activation from head to tail which gives rise to a wave of muscle activation. These active forces are also mediated by passive structural forces. Here we present recent results on a computational model of a swimming lamprey that couples activation of discrete muscle segments, passive elastic forces, and a surrounding viscous, incompressible fluid. The fluid dynamics is modeled by the Navier-Stokes equations at appropriate Reynolds numbers, where the resulting flow field and vortex shedding may be measured.

  1. Flow analysis of C. elegans swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas; Gagnon, David; Arratia, Paulo; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Improved understanding of microscopic swimming has the potential to impact numerous biomedical and industrial processes. A crucial means of analyzing these systems is through experimental observation of flow fields, from which it is important to be able to accurately deduce swimmer physics such as power consumption, drag forces, and efficiency. We examine the swimming of the nematode worm C. elegans, a model system for undulatory micro-propulsion. Using experimental data of swimmer geometry and kinematics, we employ the regularized stokeslet boundary element method to simulate the swimming of this worm outside the regime of slender-body theory. Simulated flow fields are then compared with experimentally extracted values confined to the swimmer beat plane, demonstrating good agreement. We finally address the question of how to estimate three-dimensional flow information from two-dimensional measurements.

  2. The swimming mechanics of Artemia Salina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Angulo, A.; Ramos-Musalem, A. K.; Zenit, R.

    2013-11-01

    An experimental study to analyze the swimming strategy of a small crustacean (Artemia Salina) was conducted. This animal has a series of eleven pairs of paddle-like appendices in its thorax. These legs move in metachronal-wave fashion to achieve locomotion. To quantify the swimming performance, both high speed video recordings of the legs motion and time-resolved PIV measurements of the induced propulsive jet were conducted. Experiments were conducted for both tethered and freely swimming specimens. We found that despite their small size, the propulsion is achieved by an inertial mechanism. An analysis of the efficiency of the leg wave-like motion is presented and discussed. A brief discussion on the mixing capability of the induced flow is also presented.

  3. Particle Image Velocimetry Around Swimming Paramecia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarra, Matthew; Jana, Saikat; Jung, Sunghwan; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2011-11-01

    Microorganisms like paramecia propel themselves by synchronously beating thousands of cilia that cover their bodies. Using micro-particle image velocimetry (μPIV), we quantitatively measured velocity fields created by the movement of Paramecium multimicronucleatum through a thin (~100 μm) film of water. These velocity fields exhibited different features during different swimming maneuvers, which we qualitatively categorized as straight forward, turning, or backward motion. We present the velocity fields measured around organisms during each type of motion, as well as calculated path lines and fields of vorticity. For paramecia swimming along a straight path, we observed dipole-like flow structures that are characteristic of a prolate-spheroid translating axially in a quiescent fluid. Turning and backward-swimming organisms showed qualitatively different patterns of vortices around their bodies. Finally, we offer hypotheses about the roles of these different flow patterns in the organism's ability to maneuver.

  4. Muscle dynamics in fish during steady swimming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shadwick, RE; Steffensen, JF; Katz, SL

    1998-01-01

    SYNOPSIS. Recent research in fish locomotion has been dominated by an interest in the dynamic mechanical properties of the swimming musculature. Prior observations have indicated that waves of muscle activation travel along the body of an undulating fish faster than the resulting waves of muscular...... contraction, suggesting that the phase relation between the muscle strain cycle and its activation must vary along the body. Since this phase relation is critical in determining how the muscle performs in cyclic contractions, the possibility has emerged that dynamic muscle function may change with axial...... position in swimming fish. Quantification of muscle contractile properties in cyclic contractions relies on in vitro experiments using strain and activation data collected in vivo. In this paper we discuss the relation between these parameters and body kinematics. Using videoradiographic data from swimming...

  5. Energetics of swimming of schooling fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, John Fleng

    2012-01-01

    , i.e. nearest neighbour distance, water temperature, gill oxygen extraction, gill ventilation capacity, etc. Fish swimming in a school have been shown to have energetic advantages when trailing behind neighbours, resulting in up to 20% energy saving. The effect of this energy saving is that the fish......Soc for experimental Biol Annual Meeting - Salzburg 2012 John F. Steffensen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark) When a fish school swims through the water, every individual consumes a certain amount of oxygen, which means that less will be available for the trailing fish in the school. In 1967 Mc......Farland and Moss reported that the oxygen saturation decreased approximately 30% from the front to the rear of an approximately 150-m long school of mullets swimming in normoxic water. They also observed that the decline in oxygen saturation at the rear resulted in the school disintegrating into smaller separate...

  6. SWIMMING BEHAVIOR OF DEVELOPMENTAL STAGES OF THE CALANOID COPEPOD TEMORA-LONGICORNIS AT DIFFERENT FOOD CONCENTRATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDUREN, LA; VIDELER, JJ

    1995-01-01

    The swimming behaviour of developmental stages of the marine calanoid copepod Temora longicornis was studied using 2-dimensional observations under a microscope and a 3-dimensional filming technique to analyze swimming mode, swimming speed and swimming trajectories under different food

  7. Analysis of swimming performance: perceptions and practices of US-based swimming coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Robert; Corley, Gavin; Godfrey, Alan; Osborough, Conor; Newell, John; Quinlan, Leo Richard; ÓLaighin, Gearóid

    2016-01-01

    In elite swimming, a broad range of methods are used to assess performance, inform coaching practices and monitor athletic progression. The aim of this paper was to examine the performance analysis practices of swimming coaches and to explore the reasons behind the decisions that coaches take when analysing performance. Survey data were analysed from 298 Level 3 competitive swimming coaches (245 male, 53 female) based in the United States. Results were compiled to provide a generalised picture of practices and perceptions and to examine key emerging themes. It was found that a disparity exists between the importance swim coaches place on biomechanical analysis of swimming performance and the types of analyses that are actually conducted. Video-based methods are most frequently employed, with over 70% of coaches using these methods at least monthly, with analyses being mainly qualitative in nature rather than quantitative. Barriers to the more widespread use of quantitative biomechanical analysis in elite swimming environments were explored. Constraints include time, cost and availability of resources, but other factors such as sources of information on swimming performance and analysis and control over service provision are also discussed, with particular emphasis on video-based methods and emerging sensor-based technologies.

  8. Determination of a quantitative parameter to evaluate swimming technique based on the maximal tethered swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soncin, Rafael; Mezêncio, Bruno; Ferreira, Jacielle Carolina; Rodrigues, Sara Andrade; Huebner, Rudolf; Serrão, Julio Cerca; Szmuchrowski, Leszek

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to propose a new force parameter, associated with swimmers' technique and performance. Twelve swimmers performed five repetitions of 25 m sprint crawl and a tethered swimming test with maximal effort. The parameters calculated were: the mean swimming velocity for crawl sprint, the mean propulsive force of the tethered swimming test as well as an oscillation parameter calculated from force fluctuation. The oscillation parameter evaluates the force variation around the mean force during the tethered test as a measure of swimming technique. Two parameters showed significant correlations with swimming velocity: the mean force during the tethered swimming (r = 0.85) and the product of the mean force square root and the oscillation (r = 0.86). However, the intercept coefficient was significantly different from zero only for the mean force, suggesting that although the correlation coefficient of the parameters was similar, part of the mean velocity magnitude that was not associated with the mean force was associated with the product of the mean force square root and the oscillation. Thus, force fluctuation during tethered swimming can be used as a quantitative index of swimmers' technique.

  9. Propulsive efficiency of frog swimming with different feet and swimming patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jizhuang, Fan; Wei, Zhang; Bowen, Yuan; Gangfeng, Liu

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aquatic and terrestrial animals have different swimming performances and mechanical efficiencies based on their different swimming methods. To explore propulsion in swimming frogs, this study calculated mechanical efficiencies based on data describing aquatic and terrestrial webbed-foot shapes and swimming patterns. First, a simplified frog model and dynamic equation were established, and hydrodynamic forces on the foot were computed according to computational fluid dynamic calculations. Then, a two-link mechanism was used to stand in for the diverse and complicated hind legs found in different frog species, in order to simplify the input work calculation. Joint torques were derived based on the virtual work principle to compute the efficiency of foot propulsion. Finally, two feet and swimming patterns were combined to compute propulsive efficiency. The aquatic frog demonstrated a propulsive efficiency (43.11%) between those of drag-based and lift-based propulsions, while the terrestrial frog efficiency (29.58%) fell within the range of drag-based propulsion. The results illustrate the main factor of swimming patterns for swimming performance and efficiency. PMID:28302669

  10. Propulsive efficiency of frog swimming with different feet and swimming patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jizhuang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic and terrestrial animals have different swimming performances and mechanical efficiencies based on their different swimming methods. To explore propulsion in swimming frogs, this study calculated mechanical efficiencies based on data describing aquatic and terrestrial webbed-foot shapes and swimming patterns. First, a simplified frog model and dynamic equation were established, and hydrodynamic forces on the foot were computed according to computational fluid dynamic calculations. Then, a two-link mechanism was used to stand in for the diverse and complicated hind legs found in different frog species, in order to simplify the input work calculation. Joint torques were derived based on the virtual work principle to compute the efficiency of foot propulsion. Finally, two feet and swimming patterns were combined to compute propulsive efficiency. The aquatic frog demonstrated a propulsive efficiency (43.11% between those of drag-based and lift-based propulsions, while the terrestrial frog efficiency (29.58% fell within the range of drag-based propulsion. The results illustrate the main factor of swimming patterns for swimming performance and efficiency.

  11. Spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity. Annual report, FY 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Bailey, W.J.; Bradley, E.R.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Langstaff, D.C.

    1981-09-01

    During program FY 1980 staff members of the Spent Fuel and Fuel Pool Component Integrity Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) completed the following major tasks: represented DOE on the international Behavior of Fuel Assemblies in Storage (BEFAST) Committee; the program manager, A.B. Johnson, Jr., participated in an International Survey of Water Reactor Spent Fuel Storage Experience, which was conducted jointly by the International Atomic Energy Agency (Vienna) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (Paris); provided written testimony and cross statement for the Proposed Rulemaking on Storage and Disposal of Nuclear Waste; acquired and began examination of the world's oldest pool-stored Zircaloy-clad fuel from the Shippingport reactor, stored approx. 21 years in deionized water; acquired and began examination of stainless-clad spent fuel from the Connecticut Yankee Reactor (PWR); negotiated for specimens from components stored in spent fuel pools at fuel storage facilities from the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina, Zion (PWR) spent fuel pool, Zion, Illinois, and La Crosse (BWR) spent fuel pool, La Crosse, Wisconsin; planned for examinations in FY 81 of specimens from the three spent fuel pools; investigated a low-temperature stress corrosion cracking mechanism that developed in piping at a few PWR spent fuel pools. This report summarizes the results of these activities and investigations. Details are provided in the presentationsand publications generated under this program and summarized in Appendix A.

  12. Diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binford, F.T.

    1984-01-01

    This study deals with diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors -- specifically, MTR fuel; pool- or tank-type research reactors with light-water moderator; and water, beryllium, or graphite reflectors, and which have a power level of 25 MW(t) or more. The objective is to provide assistance to the IAEA in documentation of criteria and inspection observables related to undeclared plutonium production in the reactors described above, including: criteria for undeclared plutonium production, necessary design information for implementation of these criteria, verification guidelines including neutron physics and heat transfer, and safeguards measures to facilitate the detection of undeclared plutonium production at large research reactors.

  13. Particles in swimming pool filters – Does pH determine the DBP formation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Willach, Sarah; Mosbæk, Hans

    2012-01-01

    countries, and the non-regulated haloacetic acids (HAAs) and haloacetonitriles (HANs) were investigated at 6.0⩽pH⩽8.0, under controlled chlorination conditions. The investigated particles were collected from a hot tub with a drum micro filter. In two series of experiments with either constant initial active...

  14. Operating experiences with rotary air-to-air heat exchangers: hospitals, schools, nursing homes, swimming pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Systems utilizing rotary air-to-air heat exchangers are discussed. Basic considerations of use (fresh air requirements, system configurations, cost considerations), typical system layout/design considerations, and operating observations by engineers, staff and maintenance personnel are described.

  15. Use of the Term “Shock” in Swimming Pool, Hot Tubs, and Spa Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has determined that shock treatment and super-chlorination are terms usually used to describe claims to kill or control visible algae growth. Claims to kill, prevent or control algae or bacteria are pesticide claims.

  16. Swimming-based pica in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2016-09-01

    We have recently demonstrated that voluntary or forced running in activity wheels yields pica behavior (kaolin clay intake) in rats (Nakajima, 2016; Nakajima and Katayama, 2014). The present study provides experimental evidence that a single 40-min session of swimming in water also generates pica in rats, while showering rats with water does not produce such behavior. Because kaolin intake has been regarded as a measure of nausea in rats, this finding suggests that swimming activity, as well as voluntary or forced running, induces nausea in rats. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. The Swimming Efficiency of Magnetotactic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, A. J.

    2005-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are widespread in the oxic-anoxic transition zone (OATZ) of freshwater and marine sediments. They have chains of magnetic particles and exert a high degree of control over their synthesis. Evidently they find it worth the energy cost of synthesizing these particles. The existing model for magnetotaxis compare a one-dimensional search along a magnetic field line with the three-dimensional "run and tumble" behavior of bacteria like E. coli. However, this model is inadequate in more than one respect. First, a search along a field line is only advantageous for relatively steep field lines. Second, most bacterial moments are too small for the one-dimensional approximation to be accurate. Third, it will be shown that tumbling behavior is incompatible with at least one kind of magnetotaxis. Instead, all known magnetotactic bacteria can reverse their direction of swimming. Models are developed for the swimming efficiency of the two kinds of magnetotaxis identified by Frankel et al. (1997). These are polar and axial magneto-aerotaxis (MA), where aerotaxis is an energy-sensing behavior that helps the bacterium find the optimal oxygen concentration. In both kinds of taxis torque on the magnetic chains tends to align the bacteria with the Earth's field. This torque is countered by viscous drag and Brownian rotation. Polar MA has a switch-like response of swimming direction to the oxygen concentration. This type of aerotaxis also uses the direction of the magnetic field to determine which way to swim. In zero field or in a field with the wrong sign this mechanism fails. Axial MA uses a more conventional aerotaxis that responds to gradients in the energy or redox state. This mechanism works reasonably well even in zero field, and also for any field direction as long as the field is not too large. The swimming efficiency of magnetotactic bacteria is determined by two factors: a geometrical factor based on the distribution of bacterial orientations, and the

  18. Estimating energy expenditure during front crawl swimming using accelerometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup; Espinosa, Hugo G.; Van Thiel, David H

    2014-01-01

    The determination of energy expenditure is of major interest in training load and performance assessment. Small, wireless accelerometer units have the potential to characterise energy expenditure during swimming. The correlation between absorbed oxygen versus flume swimming speed and absorbed oxy...

  19. Convection in arc weld pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oreper, G.M.; Eagar, T.W.; Szekely, J.

    1982-11-01

    A mathematical model was developed to account for convection and temperature distributions in stationary arc weld pools driven by buoyancy, electromagnetic and surface tension forces. It is shown that the electromagnetic and surface tension forces dominate the flow behavior. In some cases, these forces produce double circulation loops, which are indirectly confirmed by experimental measurements of segregation in the weld pool. It is also shown that the surface tension driven flows are very effective in dissipating the incident energy flux on the pool surface which, in turn, reduces the vaporization from the weld pool.

  20. Physiological, biomechanical and anthropometrical predictors of sprint swimming performance in adolescent swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lätt, Evelin; Jürimäe, Jaak; Mäestu, Jarek; Purge, Priit; Rämson, Raul; Haljaste, Kaja; Keskinen, Kari L; Rodriguez, Ferran A; Jürimäe, Toivo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationships between 100-m front crawl swimming performance and relevant biomechanical, anthropometrical and physiological parameters in male adolescent swimmers. Twenty five male swimmers (mean ± SD: age 15. 2 ± 1.9 years; height 1.76 ± 0.09 m; body mass 63.3 ± 10.9 kg) performed an all-out 100-m front crawl swimming test in a 25-m pool. A respiratory snorkel and valve system with low hydrodynamic resistance was used to collect expired air. Oxygen uptake was measured breath-by-breath by a portable metabolic cart. Swimming velocity, stroke rate (SR), stroke length and stroke index (SI) were assessed during the test by time video analysis. Blood samples for lactate measurement were taken from the fingertip pre exercise and at the third and fifth minute of recovery to estimate net blood lactate accumulation (ΔLa). The energy cost of swimming was estimated from oxygen uptake and blood lactate energy equivalent values. Basic anthropometry included body height, body mass and arm span. Body composition parameters were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Results indicate that biomechanical factors (90.3%) explained most of 100-m front crawl swimming performance variability in these adolescent male swimmers, followed by anthropometrical (45.8%) and physiological (45.2%) parameters. SI was the best single predictor of performance, while arm span and ∆La were the best anthropometrical and physiological indicators, respectively. SI and SR alone explained 92.6% of the variance in competitive performance. These results confirm the importance of considering specific stroke technical parameters when predicting success in young swimmers. Key pointsThis study investigated the influence of different anthropometrical, physiological and biomechanical parameters on 100-m swimming performance in adolescent boys.Biomechanical factors contributed most to sprint swimming performance in these young male swimmers (90

  1. REHABILITATION OF LUMBAR HYPERLORDOSIS THROUGH SWIMMING-SPECIFIC EXERCISES

    OpenAIRE

    Petrea Renato-Gabriel; Rusu Diana-Elena

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show the importance and utility of swimming within rehabilitation and therapeutic programs for posture deficiencies, in our context for the rehabilitation of lumbar hyperlordosis. We consider that, by using exercises specific to swimming and means specific to acquiring swimming procedures, we will reduce the range of lumbar hyperlordosis. More precisely, we believe that, through exercises specific to swimming, we will reduce the range of lumbar hyperlordosis by...

  2. Specifies of teaching swimming to children with autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Baštová, Miroslava

    2017-01-01

    Title: Specifics of teaching swimming to children with autism spectrum disorder. Objectives: Creation and implementation of the concept of preparatory and basic swimming lessons for children with autism spectrum disorder. Evaluation of information on continuing education and the achieved level of swimming skills and swimming locomotion observed in children with autism spectrum disorder. Presentation and qualitative assessment of the four case studies and subsequent design of guidelines for sw...

  3. US reactor spent-fuel storage capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.J.; Hoffman, C.C.; Caviness, C.K.

    1982-06-01

    The spent-fuel storage situation at reactors in the US is described. The focus of the report is on the reactors that are developing a spent-fuel storage problem and the alternatives the utilities are utilizing and planning to use to minimize the problem. The alternatives the utilities are using and/or considering are described and include: high-density storage racks, double-tiered storage racks, rod consolidation, dry storage systems, fuel transshipments, and at-reactor storage pools. All of these alternatives are not available to every reactor and utility that is faced with a spent-fuel storage problem. Generally, utilities are reracking or are planning to rerack those spent-fuel pools that can be reracked with higher-density racks or double-tiered racks. Where reracking is not feasible, then fuel transshipments are being performed or considered. Since none of the other alternatives have been fully approved and licensed, these alternatives are all being evaluated. More specifically, this report concentrates on the reactors that are projected to lose full-core reserve discharge capability by the end of 1990. Reactor discharge dates, spent-fuel storage capacity, and inventory were integrated to project the loss of full-core reserve. The primary results from the integration of this data revealed that 40 reactors were projected to lose full-core reserve prior to 1990. These 40 reactors represent 23 different utilities. Each utility is aware of their own spent-fuel storage problem, and each utility is progressing to minimize the problem or evaluating all the alternatives.

  4. Nuclear Reactors. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: How Reactors Work; Reactor Design; Research, Teaching, and Materials Testing; Reactors (Research, Teaching and Materials); Production Reactors; Reactors for Electric Power…

  5. Current Trends in Swimming Lessons of Preschool Children

    OpenAIRE

    Duspivová, Hana

    2010-01-01

    The thesis charts current options in preschool children swimming learning, organization, procedures, objectives and results achieved in specific groups through observation, interviews and questionnaires. The aim ofthe thesis was based on the observed data and recommended procedure to create its own methodology, which was verified by their own practice. Keywords Child, preschool age, swimming lessons (methods, procedures, organization), swimming methods.

  6. Ion-swimming speed variation of Vibrio cholerae cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present work we report the variation in swimming speed of Vibrio cholerae with respect to the change in concentration of sodium ions in the medium. We have also studied the variation in swimming speed with respect to temperature. We find that the swimming speed initially shows a linear increase with the increase of ...

  7. 76 FR 60732 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Navesink (Swimming) River, NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Navesink (Swimming) River, NJ AGENCY... the Oceanic Bridge at mile 4.5 across the Navesink (Swimming) River between Oceanic and Locust Point...-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Oceanic Bridge, across the Navesink (Swimming) River, mile 4.5...

  8. Photocatalytic reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Brian L.; Fain, Douglas E.; Stockdale, John A. D.

    1999-01-01

    A photocatalytic reactor for processing selected reactants from a fluid medium comprising at least one permeable photocatalytic membrane having a photocatalytic material. The material forms an area of chemically active sites when illuminated by light at selected wavelengths. When the fluid medium is passed through the illuminated membrane, the reactants are processed at these sites separating the processed fluid from the unprocessed fluid. A light source is provided and a light transmitting means, including an optical fiber, for transmitting light from the light source to the membrane.

  9. Present state of the liner of the reactor; Estado actual del liner del reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar H, F.; Raya A, R.; Mazon R, R. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2001-07-15

    When being presented to work the operation personnel of the reactor, on Monday January 10, 1983, they noticed that the reactor pool was overflowing of water and the floor of the room was partially flooded. The personnel proceeded to revise the feedwater systems to the pool, the Emergency Cooling System of the core and that of Water of Reinstatement, was found that the passing valve of this last it was lightly open. It was discovered that the water that was flooded in the floor of the room it came from the relief valves of the ports TW-1 and RW-2 and of three glides that were in the Thermal Column area. It was proceeded to lower the one level of water of the pool to their normal position and it was clean the water flooded in the salts. (Author)

  10. Fluid viscoelasticity promotes collective swimming of sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Lin, Chungwei; Harvey, Benedict; Fiore, Alyssa G; Ardon, Florencia; Wu, Mingming; Suarez, Susan S

    2017-06-09

    From flocking birds to swarming insects, interactions of organisms large and small lead to the emergence of collective dynamics. Here, we report striking collective swimming of bovine sperm in dynamic clusters, enabled by the viscoelasticity of the fluid. Sperm oriented in the same direction within each cluster, and cluster size and cell-cell alignment strength increased with viscoelasticity of the fluid. In contrast, sperm swam randomly and individually in Newtonian (nonelastic) fluids of low and high viscosity. Analysis of the fluid motion surrounding individual swimming sperm indicated that sperm-fluid interaction was facilitated by the elastic component of the fluid. In humans, as well as cattle, sperm are naturally deposited at the entrance to the cervix and must swim through viscoelastic cervical mucus and other mucoid secretions to reach the site of fertilization. Collective swimming induced by elasticity may thus facilitate sperm migration and contribute to successful fertilization. We note that almost all biological fluids (e.g. mucus and blood) are viscoelastic in nature, and this finding highlights the importance of fluid elasticity in biological function.

  11. Effect of winter swimming on haematological parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Giovanni; Ricci, Cristian; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Winter swimming represents an intensive short-term exposure to cold, and thus it is considered a strong physical stress. Cold-based treatments, i.e. immersions in cold water, are spreading in sport medicine for improving recovery following muscle traumas, although a universal acceptance of that method is not still achieved. Fifteen healthy subjects (13 males and 2 females) were recruited among the participants to a 150 meters long swimming race in cold water (6 degrees C). Blood samples were collected the day before and immediately after the race and a panel of haematological parameters was evaluated. Swimming in cold water induced a significant variation in the blood cell fraction composition compared to the rest condition, as measured the day before the competition. Red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets count increased significantly (4.7%, P = 0.005; 40.6%, P mere haemoconcentration. When represented by brief exposure to cold water, winter swimming induces strong non-pathological modifications of haematological homeostasis.

  12. Quiet swimming at low Reynolds number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Wadhwa, Navish; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    -Stokeslet model of a swimming organism which uses breast stroke type kinematics is an example of such a quiet swimmer. We show that the fluid disturbance in both the near field and the far field is significantly reduced by appropriately arranging the propulsion apparatus, and we find that the far field power laws...

  13. Hydrodynamics of undulatory underwater swimming: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaboy, Chris; Coleman, Simon; Sanders, Ross H

    2009-11-01

    Undulatory underwater swimming (UUS) occurs in the starts and turns of three of the four competitive swimming strokes and plays a significant role in overall swimming performance. The majority of research examining UUS is comparative in nature, dominated by studies comparing aquatic animals' undulatory locomotion with the UUS performance of humans. More recently, research directly examining human forms of UUS have been undertaken, providing further insight into the factors which influence swimming velocity and efficiency. This paper reviews studies which have examined the hydromechanical, biomechanical, and coordination aspects of UUS performance in both animals and humans. The present work provides a comprehensive evaluation of the key factors which combine to influence UUS performance examining (1) the role of end-effector frequency and body amplitudes in the production of a propulsive waveform, (2) the effects of morphology on the wavelength of the propulsive waveform and its subsequent impact on the mode of UUS adopted, and (3) the interactions of the undulatory movements to simultaneously optimise propulsive impulse whilst minimising the active drag experienced. In conclusion, the review recommends that further research is required to fully appreciate the complexity of UUS and examine how humans can further optimise performance.

  14. What Research Tells the Coach About Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, John A.

    This booklet is designed to make research findings about swimming available with interpretations for practical application. Chapter 1, "Physical Characteristics of Swimmers," discusses somatotyping, body composition, and growth. Chapter 2, "Physiological Characteristics of Swimmers," discusses resting rate, vital capacity, effects of water…

  15. [Lumbar hypermobility: where swimming becomes hydrotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergeay, D; De Neve, M

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the authors discuss the clinical problem of lumbar hypermobility. The therapeutical possibilities are resumed briefly. The philosophy of medical training therapy ("Heilgymnastik") is described. More extensive the extra-advantages of hydrotherapy (methodical back-stroke swimming) are searched for in a theoretical deductive way. The authors found that: 1. swimming is a low-impact sport so far as the articulations are concerned, 2. back-stroke is done mainly in a lumbar kyphosis, 3. swimming is also an excellent cardiopulmonary training, 4. when swimming the muscles of the shoulder girdle and pelvic girdle are trained in a nearly isokinetic way (power-endurance), 5. the short transverso-spinal muscles are indirectly trained in their tonic more than phasic stretch reflex (posture function), 6. the muscles of the trunk are trained in a nearly isometric way in the appropriate angles (erect position), 7. the position of the head in the water facilitates the abdominal muscles (tonic neck reflex), 8. the cool temperature of the water generates training-enhancing stress-responses, 9. endurance-training is ideal for the postural function of the lower back muscles (especially the deeper layers near the spine) which are anatomical and physiological suited for this purpose, 10. warming-up and cooling-down procedures prepare the neuromuscular, the cardiovascular and metabolic functions before the workout-session (a cold shower afterwards acts to tonicize the skin and muscles).

  16. Surveillance and Conformity in Competitive Youth Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    Underpinned by a Foucauldian analysis of sporting practices, this paper identifies the disciplinary mechanism of surveillance at work in competitive youth swimming. It highlights the ways in which swimmers and their coaches are subject to and apply this mechanism to produce embodied conformity to normative behaviour and obedient, docile bodies.…

  17. Healthy Swimming Is a Partnership Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    While one cannot control the water chemistry, he/she can control personal hygiene and facility cleanliness. Giardia and cryptosporidium (crypto) are only two of the many recreational water illnesses (RWIs) that can turn happy swim memories into serious illness situations. In this article, the author discusses three factors that determine how…

  18. Swimming overuse injuries associated with triathlon training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, James; Bales, Karrn

    2012-12-01

    Most triathlon overuse injuries occur due to the running and cycling aspects of the sport. By nature of swimming being a non-weight-bearing sport, triathletes have a tendency to use swimming for rehabilitation and recovery. Swimming has a significantly lower injury rate than the other 2 disciplines in a triathlon. Most triathletes use the freestyle stroke, because it is typically the first stroke learned, it is for many the fastest stroke, and by lifting the head the freestyle stroke allows triathletes to sight their direction, which is important in open water swimming. During the freestyle stroke, the shoulder undergoes repetitive overhead motion, and shoulder pain is the most common and well-documented site of musculoskeletal pain in competitive swimmers. It is felt that the pathologic process is attributable to repetitive overhead motion causing microtrauma in the shoulder from either mechanical impingement or generalized laxity or both. Without sufficient rest and recovery, the development of inflammation and pain may result. Depending on the age of the triathlete and the exact etiology of the shoulder pain, treatment options range from nonsurgical to surgical in nature.

  19. Extreme swimming: The oceanic migrations of anguillids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Righton, David; Aarestrup, Kim; Jellyman, Don

    2013-01-01

    to their natal habitat to spawn. In temperate species, the migrations are extreme, requiring larvae and adults to swim thousands of km before reaching their destination, but the migrations of tropical species (hundreds of km) are still remarkable in comparison with many other fish species. To achieve...

  20. Swimming Performance of Adult Asian Carp: Field Assessment Using a Mobile Swim Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    left side, outflow is located on the right side. The collimator grid can be seen at right . The mobile tunnel was newly designed and constructed by...chute with the river (Varble et al. 2007). The Silver Carp contained in the chute were abundant, large, and sexually mature. Methods. The swim...robustness were < 12% (Table 4). Swimming performance is influenced by a complex suite of factors. These may be intrinsic, such as fish size, reproductive

  1. Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

    2008-06-30

    Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores reated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcme the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better themal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor.

  2. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T [Huntington Beach, CA; Sahimi, Muhammad [Altadena, CA; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak [Richmond, CA; Harale, Aadesh [Los Angeles, CA; Park, Byoung-Gi [Yeosu, KR; Liu, Paul K. T. [Lafayette Hill, PA

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  3. D and DR Reactors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The world's second full-scale nuclear reactor was the D Reactor at Hanford which was built in the early 1940's and went operational in December of 1944.D Reactor ran...

  4. Reactor transient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menegus, R.L.

    1956-05-31

    The authors are planning a calculation to be done on the Univac at the Louviers Building to estimate the effect of xenon transients, a high reactor power. This memorandum outlines the reasons why they prefer to do the work at Louviers rather than at another location, such as N.Y.U. They are to calculate the response of the reactor to a sudden change in position of the half rods. Qualitatively, the response will be a change in the rooftop ratio of the neutron flux. The rooftop ratio may oscillate with high damping, or, instead, it may oscillate for many cycles. It has not been possible for them to determine this response by hand calculation because of the complexity of the problem, and yet it is important for them to be certain that high power operation will not lead us to inherently unstable operation. Therefore they have resorted to machine computation. The system of differential equations that describes the response has seven dependent variables; therefore there are seven equations, each coupled with one or more of the others. The authors have discussed the problem with R.R. Haefner at the plant, and it is his opinion that the IBM 650 cannot adequately handle the system of seven equations because the characteristic time constants vary over a range of about 10{sup 8}. The Univac located at the Louviers Building is said to be satisfactory for this computation.

  5. Microbiological Analysis in Three Diverse Natural Geothermal Bathing Pools in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorolfsdottir, Berglind Osk Th.; Marteinsson, Viggo Thor

    2013-01-01

    Natural thermal bathing pools contain geothermal water that is very popular to bathe in but the water is not sterilized, irradiated or treated in any way. Increasing tourism in Iceland will lead to increasing numbers of bath guests, which can in turn affect the microbial flora in the pools and therefore user safety. Today, there is no legislation that applies to natural geothermal pools in Iceland, as the water is not used for consumption and the pools are not defined as public swimming pools. In this study, we conducted a microbiological analysis on three popular but different natural pools in Iceland, located at Lýsuhóll, Hveravellir and Landmannalaugar. Total bacterial counts were performed by flow cytometry, and with plate count at 22 °C, 37 °C and 50 °C. The presence of viable coliforms, Enterococcus spp. and pseudomonads were investigated by growth experiments on selective media. All samples were screened for noroviruses by real time PCR. The results indicate higher fecal contamination in the geothermal pools where the geothermal water flow was low and bathing guest count was high during the day. The number of cultivated Pseudomonas spp. was high (13,000–40,000 cfu/100 mL) in the natural pools, and several strains were isolated and classified as opportunistic pathogens. Norovirus was not detected in the three pools. DNA was extracted from one-liter samples in each pool and analyzed by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Microbial diversity analysis revealed different microbial communities between the pools and they were primarily composed of alpha-, beta- and gammaproteobacteria. PMID:23493033

  6. Solar energy system demonstration project at Wilmington Swim School, New Castle, Delaware. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    This document is the Final Report of the Solar Energy System located at the Wilmington, Swim School, New Castle, Delaware. This active solar system is composed of 2,700 square feet of Revere liquid flat plate collectors piped to a 2,800 gallon concrete storage tank located below ground near the building. A micro-computer based control system selects the optimal applications of the stored energy among space, domestic water and pool alternatives. The controlled logic is planned for serving the heat loads in the following order: space heat-new addition, domestic water-entire facility, and pool heating-entire facility. A modified trombe wall passive operation the active system will bypass the areas being served passively. The system was designed for a 40 percent heating and a 30 percent hot water solar contribution.

  7. Operating manual for the Bulk Shielding Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-03-01

    The BSR is a pool-type reactor. It has the capabilities of continuous operation at a power level of 2 MW or at any desired lower power level. This manual presents descriptive and operational information. The reactor and its auxiliary facilities are described from physical and operational viewpoints. Detailed operating procedures are included which are applicable from source-level startup to full-power operation. Also included are procedures relative to the safety of personnel and equipment in the areas of experiments, radiation and contamination control, emergency actions, and general safety. This manual supersedes all previous operating manuals for the BSR.

  8. Operating manual for the Bulk Shielding Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-04-01

    The BSR is a pool-type reactor. It has the capabilities of continuous operation at a power level of 2 MW or at any desired lower power level. This manual presents descriptive and operational information. The reactor and its auxillary facilities are described from physical and operational viewpoints. Detailed operating procedures are included which are applicable from source-level startup to full-power operation. Also included are procedures relative to the safety of personnel and equipment in the areas of experiments, radiation and contamination control, emergency actions, and general safety. This manual supercedes all previous operating manuals for the BSR.

  9. Conditioned ethanol aversion in rats induced by voluntary wheel running, forced swimming, and electric shock: an implication for aversion therapy of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2004-01-01

    This study was planned to demonstrate rats' acquisition of aversion to ethanol solution consumed before voluntary running, forced swimming, or electric shock delivery. Wistar rats under water deprivation were allotted to four groups of eight rats each, and all rats were allowed to drink 5% ethanol solution for 15 min. Immediately after the ethanol drinking, rats of Group Run were put into the individual running wheels for 15 min, those of Group Swim were put into the individual swimming pools for 15 min, those of Group Shock received electric shocks for 15 min (15 0.45-mA shocks of 0.7s with the intershock interval of 1 min) in the individual small chambers, and those of Group Control were directly returned back to the home cages. This procedure was repeated for six days, followed by a two-day choice test of ethanol aversion where a bottle containing 5% ethanol solution and a bottle of tap water were simultaneously presented for 15 min. In the test, Groups Run, Swim, and Shock drank ethanol solution significantly less than tapwater, while Group Control drank both fluids equally. The effects of running, swimming, and shock were equivalent. The successful demonstration of acquired ethanol aversion induced by exercise (running and swimming) or shock in rats suggests an avenue for clinical application of exercise and shock treatments for human alcoholics, though there are many issues to be resolved before the practical use.

  10. Experimental investigation of BWR Suppression Pool stratification during RCIC system operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solom, Matthew, E-mail: msolom@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, MS-0748, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0748 (United States); Vierow Kirkland, Karen [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, MS 3133, College Station, TX 77843-3133 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • An experiment at Texas A&M University explored extended RCIC System operations. • Thermal stratification in Suppression Pools was found to develop and later disappear. • Greater containment pressure led to much greater vertical thermal stratification. - Abstract: In Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants with the Mark I containment, the condition of the Suppression Pool can be a large influence on overall plant safety. When the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling (RCIC) System is operating, steam from the reactor drives the RCIC turbine and is then exhausted to the Suppression Pool. When subcooled, the pool can readily condense the steam, warming it up in the process. However, if hot spots or thermal stratification appear, this can limit the Suppression Pool’s ability to perform its safety functions, and can be a limiting factor for RCIC System operation. In order to better understand the RCIC system and its true limits of long-term operation, an experimental model of the system was constructed at the Laboratory for Nuclear Heat Transfer Systems at Texas A&M University (TAMU). These tests provide confirmation of thermal stratification in the Suppression Pool from RCIC System operations, and show a significant degree of dependence on pressure in the airspace above the pool. In the TAMU facility, vertical thermal stratification was limited to 21 °C when fully vented to atmospheric pressure, while pre-pressurization led to stratification well in excess of 60 °C.

  11. Optimal swimming strategies in mate searching pelagic copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Male copepods must swim to find females, but swimming increases the risk of meeting predators and is expensive in terms of energy expenditure. Here I address the trade-offs between gains and risks and the question of how much and how fast to swim using simple models that optimise the number...... of lifetime mate encounters. Radically different swimming strategies are predicted for different feeding behaviours, and these predictions are tested experimentally using representative species. In general, male swimming speeds and the difference in swimming speeds between the genders are predicted...... and observed to increase with increasing conflict between mate searching and feeding. It is high in ambush feeders, where searching (swimming) and feeding are mutually exclusive and low in species, where the matured males do not feed at all. Ambush feeding males alternate between stationary ambush feeding...

  12. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  13. Operation experience of the Indonesian multipurpose research reactor RSG-GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastowo, Hudi; Tarigan, Alim [Multipurpose Reactor Center, National Nuclear Energy Agency of the Republic of Indonesia (PRSG-BATAN), Kawasan PUSPIPTEK Serpong, Tangerang (Indonesia)

    1999-08-01

    RSG-GAS is a multipurpose research reactor with nominal power of 30 MW, operated by BATAN since 1987. The reactor is an open pool type, cooled and moderated with light water, using the LEU-MTR fuel element in the form of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al dispersion. Up to know, the reactor have been operated around 30,000 hours to serve the user. The reactor have been utilized to produce radioisotope, neutron beam experiments, irradiation of fuel element and its structural material, and reactor physics experiments. This report will explain in further detail concerning operational experience of this reactor, i.e. reactor operation data, reactor utilization, research program, technical problems and it solutions, plant modification and improvement, and development plan to enhance better reactor operation performance and its utilization. (author)

  14. Energetics of median and paired fin swimming, body and caudal fin swimming, and gait transition in parrotfish (Scarus schlegeli) and triggerfish (Rhinecanthus aculeatus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsmeyer, Keith E; Steffensen, John Fleng; Herskin, Jannik

    2002-01-01

    To determine the energetic costs of rigid-body, median or paired-fin (MPF) swimming versus undulatory, body-caudal fin (BCF) swimming, we measured oxygen consumption as a function of swimming speed in two MPF swimming specialists, Schlegel's parrotfish and Picasso triggerfish. The parrotfish swam.......1 L s(-1) (30 min U(crit)). In both species, the rates of increase in oxygen consumption with swimming speed were higher during BCF swimming than during rigid-body MPF swimming. Our results indicate that, for these species, undulatory swimming is energetically more costly than rigid-body swimming......, and therefore support the hypothesis that MPF swimming is more efficient. In addition, use of the BCF gait at higher swimming speed increased the cost of transport in both species beyond that predicted for MPF swimming at the same speeds. This suggests that, unlike for terrestrial locomotion, gait transition...

  15. ENERGY STAR Certified Pool Pumps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 1.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Pool Pumps that are effective as of February 15,...

  16. Swimming Dynamics of the Lyme Disease Spirochete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vig, Dhruv K.; Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2012-11-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, swims by undulating its cell body in the form of a traveling flat wave, a process driven by rotating internal flagella. We study B. burgdorferi’s swimming by treating the cell body and flagella as linearly elastic filaments. The dynamics of the cell are then determined from the balance between elastic and resistive forces and moments. We find that planar, traveling waves only exist when the flagella are effectively anchored at both ends of the bacterium and that these traveling flat waves rotate as they undulate. The model predicts how the undulation frequency is related to the torque from the flagellar motors and how the stiffness of the cell body and flagella affect the undulations and morphology.

  17. Biomechanics of competitive front crawl swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, H M; Beek, P J

    1992-01-01

    Essential performance-determining factors in front crawl swimming can be analysed within a biomechanical framework, in reference to the physiological basis of performance. These factors include: active drag forces, effective propulsive forces, propelling efficiency and power output. The success of a swimmer is determined by the ability to generate propulsive force, while reducing the resistance to forward motion. Although for a given competitive stroke a range of optimal stroking styles may be expected across a sample of swimmers, a common element of technique related to a high performance level is the use of complex sculling motions of the hands to generate especially lift forces. By changing the orientation of the hand the propulsive force acting on the hand is aimed successfully in the direction of motion. Furthermore, the swimming velocity (v) is related to drag (A), power input (Pi, the rate of energy liberation via the aerobic/anaerobic metabolism), the gross efficiency (eg), propelling efficiency (ep), and power output (Po) according to: [formula; see text] Based on the research available at present it is concluded that: (a) drag in groups of elite swimmers homogeneous with respect to swimming technique is determined by anthropometric dimensions; (b) total mechanical power output (Po) is important since improvement in performance is related to increased Po. Furthermore, it shows dramatic changes with training and possibly reflects the size of the 'swimming engine'; (c) propelling efficiency seems to be important since it is much higher in elite swimmers (61%) than in triathletes (44%); and (d) distance per stroke gives a fairly good indication of propelling efficiency and may be used to evaluate individual progress in technical ability.

  18. Quality Versus Quantity Debate in Swimming: Perceptions and Training Practices of Expert Swimming Coaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugent Frank J.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The debate over low-volume, high-intensity training versus high-volume, low-intensity training, commonly known as Quality versus Quantity, respectively, is a frequent topic of discussion among swimming coaches and academics. The aim of this study was to explore expert coaches’ perceptions of quality and quantity coaching philosophies in competitive swimming and to investigate their current training practices. A purposeful sample of 11 expert swimming coaches was recruited for this study. The study was a mixed methods design and involved each coach participating in 1 semi-structured interview and completing 1 closed-ended questionnaire. The main findings of this study were that coaches felt quality training programmes would lead to short term results for youth swimmers, but were in many cases more appropriate for senior swimmers. The coaches suggested that quantity training programmes built an aerobic base for youth swimmers, promoted technical development through a focus on slower swimming and helped to enhance recovery from training or competition. However, the coaches continuously suggested that quantity training programmes must be performed with good technique and they felt this was a misunderstood element. This study was a critical step towards gaining a richer and broader understanding on the debate over Quality versus Quantity training from an expert swimming coaches’ perspective which was not currently available in the research literature.

  19. Quality versus Quantity Debate in Swimming: Perceptions and Training Practices of Expert Swimming Coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Frank J; Comyns, Thomas M; Warrington, Giles D

    2017-06-01

    The debate over low-volume, high-intensity training versus high-volume, low-intensity training, commonly known as Quality versus Quantity, respectively, is a frequent topic of discussion among swimming coaches and academics. The aim of this study was to explore expert coaches' perceptions of quality and quantity coaching philosophies in competitive swimming and to investigate their current training practices. A purposeful sample of 11 expert swimming coaches was recruited for this study. The study was a mixed methods design and involved each coach participating in 1 semi-structured interview and completing 1 closed-ended questionnaire. The main findings of this study were that coaches felt quality training programmes would lead to short term results for youth swimmers, but were in many cases more appropriate for senior swimmers. The coaches suggested that quantity training programmes built an aerobic base for youth swimmers, promoted technical development through a focus on slower swimming and helped to enhance recovery from training or competition. However, the coaches continuously suggested that quantity training programmes must be performed with good technique and they felt this was a misunderstood element. This study was a critical step towards gaining a richer and broader understanding on the debate over Quality versus Quantity training from an expert swimming coaches' perspective which was not currently available in the research literature.

  20. Controlled-frequency breath swimming improves swimming performance and running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, K M; Guenette, J A; Smoliga, J M; Zavorsky, G S

    2015-02-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue can negatively impact athletic performance, but swimming has beneficial effects on the respiratory system and may reduce susceptibility to fatigue. Limiting breath frequency during swimming further stresses the respiratory system through hypercapnia and mechanical loading and may lead to appreciable improvements in respiratory muscle strength. This study assessed the effects of controlled-frequency breath (CFB) swimming on pulmonary function. Eighteen subjects (10 men), average (standard deviation) age 25 (6) years, body mass index 24.4 (3.7) kg/m(2), underwent baseline testing to assess pulmonary function, running economy, aerobic capacity, and swimming performance. Subjects were then randomized to either CFB or stroke-matched (SM) condition. Subjects completed 12 training sessions, in which CFB subjects took two breaths per length and SM subjects took seven. Post-training, maximum expiratory pressure improved by 11% (15) for all 18 subjects (P swimming may improve muscular oxygen utilization during terrestrial exercise in novice swimmers. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.