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Sample records for cadarache fuel element testing reactor

  1. REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS TESTING CONTAINER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitham, G.K.; Smith, R.R.

    1963-01-15

    This patent shows a method for detecting leaks in jacketed fuel elements. The element is placed in a sealed tank within a nuclear reactor, and, while the reactor operates, the element is sparged with gas. The gas is then led outside the reactor and monitored for radioactive Xe or Kr. (AEC)

  2. JACKETED REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1958-12-01

    A fuel element is described for fast reactors comprised of a core of uranium metal containing material and a jacket around the core, the jacket consisting of from 2.5 to 15 percent of titanium, from 1 to 5 percent of niobium, and from 80 to 96.5 percent of vanadium.

  3. Sipping test update device for fuel elements cladding inspections in IPR-r1 TRIGA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, R.R.; Mesquita, A.Z.; Andrade, E.P.D.; Gual, Maritza R., E-mail: rrr@cdtn.br, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br, E-mail: edson@cdtn.br, E-mail: maritzargual@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    It is in progress at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN (Nuclear Technology Development Center), a research project that aims to investigate possible leaks in the fuel elements of the TRIGA reactor, located in this research center. This paper presents the final form of sipping test device for TRIGA reactor, and results of the first experiments setup. Mechanical support strength tests were made by knotting device on the crane, charged with water from the conventional water supply, and tests outside the reactor pool with the use of new non-irradiated fuel elements encapsulated in stainless steel, and available safe stored in this unit. It is expected that tests with graphite elements from reactor pool are done soon after and also the test experiment with the first fuel elements in service positioned in the B ring (central ring) of the reactor core in the coming months. (author)

  4. Criticality safety evaluation for the Advanced Test Reactor enhanced low enriched uranium fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montierth, Leland M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-07-19

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) convert program is developing a high uranium density fuel based on a low enriched uranium (LEU) uranium-molybdenum alloy. Testing of prototypic GTRI fuel elements is necessary to demonstrate integrated fuel performance behavior and scale-up of fabrication techniques. GTRI Enhanced LEU Fuel (ELF) elements based on the ATR-Standard Size elements (all plates fueled) are to be fabricated for testing in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). While a specific ELF element design will eventually be provided for detailed analyses and in-core testing, this criticality safety evaluation (CSE) is intended to evaluate a hypothetical ELF element design for criticality safety purposes. Existing criticality analyses have analyzed Standard (HEU) ATR elements from which controls have been derived. This CSE documents analysis that determines the reactivity of the hypothetical ELF fuel elements relative to HEU ATR elements and whether the existing HEU ATR element controls bound the ELF element. The initial calculations presented in this CSE analyzed the original ELF design, now referred to as Mod 0.1. In addition, as part of a fuel meat thickness optimization effort for reactor performance, other designs have been evaluated. As of early 2014 the most current conceptual designs are Mk1A and Mk1B, that were previously referred to as conceptual designs Mod 0.10 and Mod 0.11, respectively. Revision 1 evaluates the reactivity of the ATR HEU Mark IV elements for a comparison with the Mark VII elements.

  5. FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, C.H.

    1961-11-21

    A fuel element is designed which is particularly adapted for reactors of high power density used to generate steam for the production of electricity. The fuel element consists of inner and outer concentric tubes forming an annular chamber within which is contained fissionable fuel pellet segments, wedge members interposed between the fuel segments, and a spring which, acting with wedge members, urges said fuel pellets radially into contact against the inner surface of the outer tube. The wedge members may be a fertile material convertible into fissionable fuel material by absorbing neutrons emitted from the fissionable fuel pellet segments. The costly grinding of cylindrical fuel pellets to close tolerances for snug engagement is reduced because the need to finish the exact size is eliminated. (AEC)

  6. Enhanced Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Element for the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, M. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); DeHart, M. D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Morrell, S. R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jamison, R. K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nef, E. C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nigg, D. W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Under the current US Department of Energy (DOE) policy and planning scenario, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and its associated critical facility (ATRC) will be reconfigured to operate on low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This effort has produced a conceptual design for an Enhanced LEU Fuel (ELF) element. This fuel features monolithic U-10Mo fuel foils and aluminum cladding separated by a thin zirconium barrier. As with previous iterations of the ELF design, radial power peaking is managed using different U-10Mo foil thicknesses in different plates of the element. The lead fuel element design, ELF Mk1A, features only three fuel meat thicknesses, a reduction from the previous iterations meant to simplify manufacturing. Evaluation of the ELF Mk1A fuel design against reactor performance requirements is ongoing, as are investigations of the impact of manufacturing uncertainty on safety margins. The element design has been evaluated in what are expected to be the most demanding design basis accident scenarios and has met all initial thermal-hydraulic criteria.

  7. Gamma spectroscopy for analysis of high temperature reactor fuel element KueFA tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, O.; Laurie, M.; Bottomley, P.D.W.; Rondinella, V.V. [European Commission - Joint Research Centre, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU); Allelein, H.J. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Reaktorsicherheit und -technik

    2013-07-01

    The High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is characterized by an advanced design with passive safety features. Fuel elements are constituted by a graphite matrix containing sub-mm-sized fuel particles with TRISO (TRi-ISOtropic) coating designed to provide high fission product retention. During a loss of coolant accident scenario in a HTR the maximum temperature is foreseen to be in the range of 1600-1650 C, remaining well below the melting point of the fuel. An experimental assessment of the fuel behaviour under accident conditions is necessary to investigate the quality of fission product retention of TRISO coated particles in a given fuel element and to validate relevant computer codes. The device used to perform these studies is the cold finger apparatus KueFA (KuehlFinger-Apparatur). (orig.)

  8. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT AND CORE SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, W.T.

    1958-09-01

    This patent relates to neutronic reactors and in particular to an improved fuel element and a novel reactor core system for facilitating removal of contaminating fission products, as they are fermed, from association with the flssionable fuel, so as to mitigate the interferent effects of such fission products during reactor operation. The fuel elements are comprised of tubular members impervious to fluid and contatning on their interior surfaces a thin layer of fissionable material providing a central void. The core structure is comprised of a plurality of the tubular fuel elements arranged in parallel and a closed manifold connected to their ends. In the reactor the core structure is dispersed in a water moderator and coolant within a pressure vessel, and a means connected to said manifuld is provided for withdrawing and disposing of mobile fission product contamination from the interior of the feel tubes and manifold.

  9. Compact Fuel Element Environment Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D. E.; Mireles, O. R.; Hickman, R. R.; Broadway, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse (I(sub sp)) and relatively high thrust to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames. Conventional, storable propellants produce average I(sub sp). Nuclear thermal rockets (NTRs) capable of high I(sub sp) thrust have been proposed. NTR employs heat produced by fission reaction to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen, which is then forced through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3,000 K) and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high-temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements are limited. The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements that employ high melting point metals, ceramics, or a combination (cermet) as a structural matrix into which the nuclear fuel is distributed. It is not necessary to include fissile material in test samples intended to explore high-temperature hydrogen exposure of the structural support matrices. A small-scale test bed designed to heat fuel element samples via noncontact radio frequency heating and expose samples to hydrogen for typical mission durations has been developed to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without employing fissile material. This Technical Memorandum details the test bed design and results of testing conducted to date.

  10. Fundamental aspects of nuclear reactor fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olander, D.R.

    1976-01-01

    The book presented is designed to function both as a text for first-year graduate courses in nuclear materials and as a reference for workers involved in the materials design and performance aspects of nuclear power plants. The contents are arranged under the following chapter headings: statistical thermodynamics, thermal properties of solids, crystal structures, cohesive energy of solids, chemical equilibrium, point defects in solids, diffusion in solids, dislocations and grain boundaries, equation of state of UO/sub 2/, fuel element thermal performance, fuel chemistry, behavior of solid fission products in oxide fuel elements, swelling due to fission gases, pore migration and fuel restructuring kinetics, fission gas release, mechanical properties of UO/sub 2/, radiation damage, radiation effects in metals, interaction of sodium and stainless steel, modeling of the structural behavior of fuel elements and assemblies. (DG)

  11. VENTED FUEL ELEMENT FOR GAS-COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furgerson, W.T.

    1963-12-17

    A hollow, porous-walled fuel element filled with fissionable fuel and provided with an outlet port through its wall is described. In operation in a gas-cooled reactor, the element is connected, through its outlet port, to the vacuum side of a pump that causes a portion of the coolant gas flowing over the exterior surface of the element to be drawn through the porous walls thereof and out through the outlet port. This continuous purging gas flow sweeps away gaseous fission products as they are released by the fissioning fuel. (AEC) A fuel element for a nuclear reactor incorporating a body of metal of melting point lower than the temperature of operation of the reactor and a nuclear fuel in finely divided form dispersed in the body of metal as a settled slurry is presented. (AEC)

  12. Performance tests for integral reactor nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Dong-Seong; Yim, Jeong-Sik; Lee, Chong-Tak; Kim, Han-Soo; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ho; Cheon, Jin-Sik; Oh, Je-Yong

    2006-02-15

    An integral type reactor SMART plans to utilize metallic Zr-U fuel which is Zr-based alloy with 34{approx}38 wt% U. In order to verify the technologies for the design and manufacturing of the fuel and get a license, performance tests were carried out. Experimental Fuel Assembly (EFA) manufactured in KAERI is being successfully irradiated in the MIR reactor of RIAR from September 4 2004, and it has achieved burnup of 0.21 g/cc as of January 25 2006. Thermal properties of irradiated Zr-U fuel were measured. Up to the phase transformation temperature, thermal diffusivity increased linearly in proportion to temperature. However its dependence on the burnup was not significant. RIA tests with 4 unirradiated Zr-U fuel rods were performed in Kurchatov Institute to establish a safety criterion. In the case of the un-irradiated Zr-U fuel, the energy deposition during the control rod ejection accident should be less than 172 cal/g to prevent the failure accompanying fuel fragmentation and dispersal. Finally the irradiation tests of fuel rods have been performed at HANARO. The HITE-2 test was successfully completed up to a burnup of 0.31 g/cc. The HITE-3 test began in February 2004 and will be continued up to a target burnup of 0.6 g/cc.

  13. Nuclear reactor fuel element having improved heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, J.E.; Begej, S.; Williford, R.E.; Christensen, J.A.

    1982-03-03

    A nuclear reactor fuel element having improved heat transfer between fuel material and cladding is described. The element consists of an outer cladding tube divided into an upper fuel section containing a central core of fissionable or mixed fissionable and fertile fuel material, slightly smaller in diameter than the inner surface of the cladding tube and a small lower accumulator section, the cladding tube being which is filled with a low molecular weight gas to transfer heat from fuel material to cladding during irradiation. A plurality of essentially vertical grooves in the fuel section extend downward and communicate with the accumulator section. The radial depth of the grooves is sufficient to provide a thermal gradient between the hot fuel surface and the relatively cooler cladding surface to allow thermal segregation to take place between the low molecular weight heat transfer gas and high molecular weight fission product gases produced by the fuel material during irradiation.

  14. Burnup measurements on spent fuel elements of the RP-10 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vela Mora, Mariano; Gallardo Padilla, Alberto; Palomino, Jose Luis Castro, E-mail: mvela@ipen.gob.p [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN/Peru), Lima (Peru). Grupo de Calculo, Analisis y Seguridad de Reactores; Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac, E-mail: laaterre@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work describes the measurement, using nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, of the average burnup attained by Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements irradiated in the RP-10 research reactor. Measurements were performed at the reactor storage pool area using {sup 137}Cs as the only burnup monitor, even for spent fuel elements with cooling times much shorter than two years. The experimental apparatus was previously calibrated in efficiency to obtain absolute average burnup values, which were compared against corresponding ones furnished by reactor physics calculations. The mean deviation between both values amounts to 6%. (author)

  15. Reactor fuel element heat conduction via numerical Laplace transform inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapol, Barry D.; Furfaro, Roberto [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering], e-mail: ganapol@cowboy.ame.arizona.edu

    2001-07-01

    A newly developed numerical Laplace transform inversion (NLTI) will be presented to determine the transient temperature distribution within a nuclear reactor fuel element. The NLTI considered in this presentation has evolved to its present state over the past 10 years of application. The methodology adopted is one that relies on acceleration of the convergence of an infinite series towards its limit. The inversion will be applied to the prediction of the transient temperature distribution within an MTR type nuclear fuel element through a novel formulation of the solution to the transformed heat conduction equation. (author)

  16. Structural analysis of the SNAP-8 developmental reactor fuel element cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalcher, A.W.

    1969-04-15

    Primary, secondary, and thermal stresses were calculated and evaluated for the SNAP-8 developmental reactor fuel element cladding. The effects of fabrication and assembly stresses, as well as test and operational stresses were included in the analysis. With the assumption that fuel-swelling-induced stresses are nil, the analytical results indicate that the cladding assembly is structurally adequate for the proposed operation.

  17. ITER at Cadarache; ITER a Cadarache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-06-15

    This public information document presents the ITER project (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), the definition of the fusion, the international cooperation and the advantages of the project. It presents also the site of Cadarache, an appropriate scientifical and economical environment. The last part of the documentation recalls the historical aspect of the project and the today mobilization of all partners. (A.L.B.)

  18. Review of Transient Testing of Fast Reactor Fuels in the Transient REActor Test Facility (TREAT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, C.; Wachs, D.; Carmack, J.; Woolstenhulme, N.

    2017-01-01

    The restart of the Transient REActor Test (TREAT) facility provides a unique opportunity to engage the fast reactor fuels community to reinitiate in-pile experimental safety studies. Historically, the TREAT facility played a critical role in characterizing the behavior of both metal and oxide fast reactor fuels under off-normal conditions, irradiating hundreds of fuel pins to support fast reactor fuel development programs. The resulting test data has provided validation for a multitude of fuel performance and severe accident analysis computer codes. This paper will provide a review of the historical database of TREAT experiments including experiment design, instrumentation, test objectives, and salient findings. Additionally, the paper will provide an introduction to the current and future experiment plans of the U.S. transient testing program at TREAT.

  19. Simulation on reactor TRIGA Puspati core kinetics fueled with thorium (Th) based fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Abdul Aziz; Pauzi, Anas Muhamad; Rahman, Shaik Mohmmed Haikhal Abdul; Zin, Muhamad Rawi Muhammad; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Idris, Faridah Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    In confronting global energy requirement and the search for better technologies, there is a real case for widening the range of potential variations in the design of nuclear power plants. Smaller and simpler reactors are attractive, provided they can meet safety and security standards and non-proliferation issues. On fuel cycle aspect, thorium fuel cycles produce much less plutonium and other radioactive transuranic elements than uranium fuel cycles. Although not fissile itself, Th-232 will absorb slow neutrons to produce uranium-233 (233U), which is fissile. By introducing Thorium, the numbers of highly enriched uranium fuel element can be reduced while maintaining the core neutronic performance. This paper describes the core kinetic of a small research reactor core like TRIGA fueled with a Th filled fuel element matrix using a general purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code.

  20. Nuclear fuel elements design, fabrication and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Frost, Brian R T

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Elements: Design, Fabrication and Performance is concerned with the design, fabrication, and performance of nuclear fuel elements, with emphasis on fast reactor fuel elements. Topics range from fuel types and the irradiation behavior of fuels to cladding and duct materials, fuel element design and modeling, fuel element performance testing and qualification, and the performance of water reactor fuels. Fast reactor fuel elements, research and test reactor fuel elements, and unconventional fuel elements are also covered. This volume consists of 12 chapters and begins with an overvie

  1. 77 FR 16868 - Quality Verification for Plate-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... COMMISSION Quality Verification for Plate-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test...-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test Reactors,'' is temporarily identified... verifying the quality of plate-type uranium-aluminum fuel elements used in research and test reactors (RTRs...

  2. 78 FR 33132 - Quality Verification for Plate-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... COMMISSION Quality Verification for Plate-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test... Verification for Plate-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test Reactors.'' This guide... plate-type uranium-aluminum fuel elements used in research and test reactors (RTRs). ADDRESSES: Please...

  3. Development, Testing and Validation of a Waste Assay System for the Measurement and Characterisation of Active Spent Fuel Element Debris From UK Magnox Reactors - 12533

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, John A.; Burke, Kevin J.; Looman, Marc R.; Towner, Antony C.N. [ANTECH, A. N. Technology Ltd., Unit 6, Thames Park, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, OX10 9TA (United Kingdom); Phillips, Martin E. [Nympsfield Nuclear Ltd, Chapel House, The Cross, Nympsfield, Stonehouse GL10 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the development, testing and validation of a waste measurement instrument for characterising active remote handled radioactive waste arising from the operation of Magnox reactors in the United Kingdom. Following operation in UK Magnox gas cooled reactors and a subsequent period of cooling, parts of the magnesium-aluminium alloy cladding were removed from spent fuel and the uranium fuel rods with the remaining cladding were removed to Sellafield for treatment. The resultant Magnox based spent fuel element debris (FED), which constitutes active intermediate level waste (ILW) has been stored in concrete vaults at the reactor sites. As part of the decommissioning of the FED vaults the FED must be removed, measured and characterised and placed in intermediate storage containers. The present system was developed for use at the Trawsfynydd nuclear power station (NPS), which is in the decommissioning phase, but the approach is potentially applicable to FED characterisation at all of the Magnox reactors. The measurement system consists of a heavily shielded and collimated high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector with electromechanical cooling and a high count-rate preamplifier and digital multichannel pulse height analyser. The HPGe based detector system is controlled by a software code, which stores the measurement result and allows a comprehensive analysis of the measured FED data. Fuel element debris is removed from the vault and placed on a tray to a uniform depth of typically 10 cm for measurement. The tray is positioned approximately 1.2 meters above the detector which views the FED through a tungsten collimator with an inverted pyramid shape. At other Magnox sites the positions may be reversed with the shielded and collimated HPGe detector located above the tray on which the FED is measured. A comprehensive Monte Carlo modelling and analysis of the measurement process has been performed in order to optimise the measurement geometry and eliminate

  4. Induction Heating Model of Cermet Fuel Element Environmental Test (CFEET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Carlos F.; Bradley, D. E.; Cavender, D. P.; Mireles, O. R.; Hickman, R. R.; Trent, D.; Stewart, E.

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse and relatively high thrust to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames. Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTR) are capable of producing a high specific impulse by employing heat produced by a fission reactor to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3000 K) and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high-temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements are limited. The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements due to large thermal gradients; therefore, high-melting-point ceramics-metallic matrix composites (cermets) are one of the fuels under consideration as part of the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) Advance Exploration System (AES) technology project at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The purpose of testing and analytical modeling is to determine their ability to survive and maintain thermal performance in a prototypical NTR reactor environment of exposure to hydrogen at very high temperatures and obtain data to assess the properties of the non-nuclear support materials. The fission process and the resulting heating performance are well known and do not require that active fissile material to be integrated in this testing. A small-scale test bed; Compact Fuel Element Environmental Tester (CFEET), designed to heat fuel element samples via induction heating and expose samples to hydrogen is being developed at MSFC to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without utilizing fissile material. This paper details the analytical approach to help design and optimize the test bed using COMSOL Multiphysics for predicting thermal gradients induced by electromagnetic heating (Induction heating) and Thermal Desktop for radiation calculations.

  5. Fabrication procedures for manufacturing High Flux Isotope Reactor fuel elements - 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, R.W.; Morin, R.A.

    1999-12-01

    The original fabrication procedures written in 1968 delineated the manufacturing procedures at that time. Since 1968, there have been a number of procedural changes. This rewrite of the fabrication procedures incorporates these changes. The entire fuel core of this reactor is made up of two fuel elements. Each element consists of one annular array of fuel plates. These annuli are identified as the inner and outer fuel elements, since one fits inside the other. The inner element consists of 171 identical fuel plates, and the outer element contains 369 identical fuel plates differing slightly from those in the inner element. Both sets of fuel plates contain U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powder as the fuel, dispersed in an aluminum powder matrix and clad with aluminum. Procedures for manufacturing and inspection of the fuel elements are described and illustrated.

  6. PROCESS OF DISSOLVING FUEL ELEMENTS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, E.M.V.; Bauer, D.T.; Hahn, H.T.

    1963-09-01

    A process is described for dissolving stainless-steelor zirconium-clad uranium dioxide fuel elements by immersing the elements in molten lead chloride, adding copper, cuprous chloride, or cupric chloride as a catalyst and passing chlorine through the salt mixture. (AEC)

  7. FISSILE MATERIAL AND FUEL ELEMENTS FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, B.E.

    1961-08-15

    The fissile material consists of about 64 to 70% (weight) zirconium dioxide, 15 to 19% uranium dioxide, and 8 to 17% calcium oxide. The fissile material is formed into sintered composites which are disposed in a compartmented fuel element, comprising essentially a flat filler plate having a plurality of compartments therein, enclosed in cladding plates of the same material as the filler plate. The resultant fuel has good resistance to corrosion in high temperature pressurized water, good dimensional stability to elevated temperatures, and good resistance to thermal shock. (AEC)

  8. U-Mo Monolithic Fuel for Nuclear Research and Test Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad

    2017-11-02

    The metallic fuel selected to replace the current HEU fuels in the research and test reactors is the LEU-10 weight % Mo alloy in the form of a thin sheet or foil encapsulated in AA6061 aluminum alloy with a zirconium interlayer. In order to effectively lead this pursuit, new developments in processing and fabrication of the fuel elements have been initiated, along with a better understanding of material behavior before and after irradiation as a result of these new developments. This editorial note gives an introduction about research and test reactors, need for HEU to LEU conversion, fuel requirements, high uranium density monolithic fuel development and an overview of the four articles published in the December 2017 issue of JOM under a special topic titled “U-Mo Monolithic Fuel for Nuclear Research and Test Reactors”.

  9. Design and in-core fuel management of reload fuel elements for reactors made by other manufacturers. Auslegung und Einsatzplanung von Nachlade-Brennelementen fuer Reaktoren anderer Hersteller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neufert, A.; Urban, P.

    1990-12-01

    By the end of 1990 Siemens had performed fuel element designs and in-core fuel management for 94 operating cycles in 27 pressurized and boiling water reactors of other manufacturers. Together with the client different fuel element designs are developed and proof is furnished of the reactor physics compatibility of different fuel elements from various producers, and of plant safety. (DG).

  10. Hazards summary memorandum: Savannah River reactors the production of tritium using tubular fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babcock, D.F.; Menegus, R.L.

    1956-09-01

    The Savannah River reactors were operated initially for the production of plutonium, and used slug-type natural uranium fuel elements. Recently one reactor was converted to the production of tritium, and other reactors will be converted soon. slug-type elements (of enriched uranium-aluminum) were charged into this reactor in order to reduce to a minimum the development effort required before the shift to tritium was made. It was recognized, however, that the slug elements would be deficient in that they would give a low yield of tritium per atom of uranium-235 destroyed because of the large parasitic capture of neutrons by aluminum. Also the production rate of tritium would be low because of the small amount of surface available for the transfer of the fission heat. Both of these shortcomings will be reduced materially by the substitution of tubular elements for the slugs now employed. The development of this type of element has progressed so that a full reactor loading of tubular fuel elements is contemplated for early 1957. The special hazards related to the production of tritium using tubular fuel elements are described in this memorandum which has been written as a supplement to a report entitled ``Reactor Safety Determination -- Savannah River Plant`` (DPW-56-106), one section of which described the hazards associated with the production of tritium from slug elements.

  11. Subcritical Noise Analysis Measurements with Fresh and Spent Research Reactor Fuels Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Kryter, R.C.; Miller, V.C.

    1999-02-01

    The verification of the subcriticality is of utmost importance for the safe transportation and storage of nuclear reactor fuels. Transportation containers and storage facilities are designed such that nuclear fuels remain in a subcritical state. Such designs often involve excess conservatism because of the lack of relevant experimental data to verify the accuracy of Monte Carlo codes used in nuclear criticality safety analyses. A joint experimental research program between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, Inc., and the University of Missouri was initiated to obtain measured quantities that could be directly related to the subcriticality of simple arrays of Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) fuel elements. A series of measurement were performed to assess the reactivity of materials such as BORAL, stainless steel, aluminum, and lead that are typically used in the construction of shipping casks. These materials were positioned between the fuel elements. In addition, a limited number of measurements were performed with configurations of fresh and spent (irradiated) fuel elements to ascertain the reactivity of the spent fuel elements. In these experiments, fresh fuel elements were replaced by spent fuel elements such that the subcritical reactivity change could be measured. The results of these measurements were used by Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions to determine the subcriticality of MURR fuel elements isolated by absorbing materials. The measurements were interpreted using the MCNP-DSP Monte Carlo code to obtain the subcritical neutron multiplication factor k(sub eff), and the bias in K(sub eff) that are used in criticality safety analyses.

  12. Review of Transient Fuel Test Results at Sandia National Laboratories and the Potential for Future Fast Reactor Fuel Transient Testing in the Annular Core Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A.; Pickard, Paul S.; Parma, Edward J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Kelly, John; Tikare, Veena [Sandia National Laboratories, Org 6872 MS-1146, PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Reactor driven transient tests of fast reactor fuels may be required to support the development and certification of new fuels for Fast Reactors. The results of the transient fuel tests will likely be needed to support licensing and to provide validation data to support the safety case for a variety of proposed fast fuel types and reactors. In general reactor driven transient tests are used to identify basic phenomenology during reactor transients and to determine the fuel performance limits and margins to failure during design basis accidents such as loss of flow, loss of heat sink, and reactivity insertion accidents. This paper provides a summary description of the previous Sandia Fuel Disruption and Transient Axial Relocation tests that were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission almost 25 years ago. These tests consisted of a number of capsule tests and flowing gas tests that used fission heating to disrupt fresh and irradiated MOX fuel. The behavior of the fuel disruption, the generation of aerosols and the melting and relocation of fuel and cladding was recorded on high speed cinematography. This paper will present videos of the fuel disruption that was observed in these tests which reveal stark differences in fuel behavior between fresh and irradiated fuel. Even though these tests were performed over 25 years ago, their results are still relevant to today's reactor designs. These types of transient tests are again being considered by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative to support the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership because of the need to perform tests on metal fuels and transuranic fuels. Because the Annular Core Research Reactor is the only transient test facility available within the US, a brief summary of Sandia's continued capability to perform these tests in the ACRR will also be provided. (authors)

  13. Postirradiation examination of recycle test elements from the Peach Bottom Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiegs, T.N.; Long, E.L. Jr.

    1978-12-01

    The Recycle Test Elements were a series of tests of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor fuels irradiated in Core 2 of the Peach Bottom Unit 1 Reactor. They tested a wide variety of fissile and fertile fuel types of prime interest when the tests were designed. The fuel types included UO/sub 2/, UC/sub 2/, (2Th,U)O/sub 2/, (4Th,U)O/sub 2/, ThC/sub 2/, and ThO/sub 2/. The mixed thorium--uranium oxides and the pure thorium oxide were tested as Biso-coated particles only, while the others were tested as both Biso- and Triso-coated particles. The Biso coatings on the fissile kernels contained the fission products inadequately but on the fertile kernels they did so acceptably. The results from accelerated and real-time tests on the particle types agreed well.

  14. Calibration of the Failed-Fuel-Element Detection Systems in the Aagesta Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strindehag, O.

    1966-06-15

    Results from a calibration of the systems for detection of fuel element ruptures in the Aagesta reactor are presented. The calibration was carried out by means of foils of zirconium-uranium alloy which were placed in a special fuel assembly. The release of fission products from these foils is due mainly to recoil and can be accurately calculated. Before the foils were used in the reactor their corrosion behaviour in high temperature water was investigated. The results obtained with the precipitator systems for bulk detection and localization are in good agreement with the expected performance. The sensitivity of these systems was found to be high enough for detection and localization of small defects of pin-hole type ({nu} = 10{sup -8}/s ). The general performance of the systems was satisfactory during the calibration tests, although a few adjustments are desirable. A bulk detecting system for monitoring of activities in the moderator, in which the {gamma}-radiation from coolant samples is measured directly after an ion exchanger, showed lower sensitivity than expected from calculations. It seems that the sensitivity of the latter system has to be improved to admit the detection of small defects. In the ion exchanger system, and to some extent in the precipitator systems, the background from A{sup 41} in the coolant limits the sensitivity. The calibration technique utilized seems to be of great advantage when investigating the performance of failed-fuel-element detection systems.

  15. Fuel-element failures in Hanford single-pass reactors 1944--1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gydesen, S.P.

    1993-07-01

    The primary objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. To estimate the doses, the staff of the Source Terms Task use operating information from historical documents to approximate the radioactive emissions. One source of radioactive emissions to the Columbia River came from leaks in the aluminum cladding of the uranium metal fuel elements in single-pass reactors. The purpose of this letter report is to provide photocopies of the documents that recorded these failures. The data from these documents will be used by the Source Terms Task to determine the contribution of single-pass reactor fuel-element failures to the radioactivity of the reactor effluent from 1944 through 1971. Each referenced fuel-element failure occurring in the Hanford single-pass reactors is addressed. The first recorded failure was in 1948, the last in 1970. No records of fuel-element failures were found in documents prior to 1948. Data on the approximately 2000 failures which occurred during the 28 years (1944--1971) of Hanford single-pass reactor operations are provided in this report.

  16. Test design description Volume 2, Part 1. IFR-1 metal fuel irradiation test (AK-181) element as-built data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodds, N. E.

    1986-06-01

    The IFR-1 Test, designated as the AK-181 Test Assembly, will be the first irradiation test of wire wrapped, sodium-bonded metallic fuel elements in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The test is part of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuels program conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in support of the Innovative Reactor Concepts Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). One subassembly, containing 169 fuel elements, will be irradiated for 600 full power days to achieve 10 at.% burnup. Three metal fuel alloys (U-10Zr, U-8Pu-10Zr) will be irradiated in D9 cladding tubes. The metal fuel elements have a fuel-smeared density of 75% and each contains five slugs. The enriched zone contains three slugs and is 36-in. long. One 6.5-in. long depleted uranium axial blanket slug (DU-10Zr) was loaded at each end of the enriched zone. the fuel elements were fabricated at ANL-W and delivered to Westinghouse-Hanford for wirewrapping and assembly into the test article. This Test Design Description contains relevant data on compositions, densities, dimensions and weights for the cast fuel slugs and completed fuel elements. The elements conform to the requirements in MG-22, "Users` Guide for the Irradiation of Experiments in the FTR."

  17. The N-Reactor fuel testing program in the KER loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, T.W.

    1963-04-01

    The KER loops are four pressurized water-cooled in-reactor testing loops in which fuel, coolant and corrosion tests are being conducted for the N Reactor program. Two of the loops, KER-3 and KER-4, are equipped with N-size Zr-2 process tubes and have sufficient pumping and heat dissipation capacity to permit testing of 14-element charges of N fuel. The other two loops, HER-1 and KER-2, are fitted with Zr-2 process tubes of 2.1 in. inner diameter (vs 2.7 in. for N). The small loops can be used to test charges of N inner tubes or other elements sized at about 1.8 in. outer diameter or less. An inert sleeve must be used with N inner tubes to assure adequate coolant flow over both surfaces of the elements. The KE reactor active zone is 28 in. long com pared to 35 in. for N so the length of test charges is somewhat shorter than actual N charges will be. The purpose of this report is to review the testing environment, to discuss the testing program and to present the schedule as presently seen.

  18. Clad thickness variation N-Reactor fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, E.A.

    1966-05-12

    The current specifications for the cladding on {open_quotes}N{close_quotes} fuels were established early in the course of process development and were predicted on several basic considerations. Among these were: (a) a desire to provide an adequate safety factor in cladding thickness to insure against corrosion penetration and rupture from uranium swelling stresses; (b) an apprehension that the striations in the zircaloy cladding of the U/zircaloy interface and on the exterior surface might serve as stress-raisers, leading to untimely failures of the jacket; and (c) then existing process capability - the need to maintain a specified ratio between zircaloy and uranium in the billet assembly to effect satisfactory coextrusion. It now appears appropriate to review these specifications in an effort to determine whether some of them may be revised, with attendant gains in economy and/or operating smoothness.

  19. Porous nuclear fuel element for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L [Albuquerque, NM; Williams, Brian E [Pacoima, CA; Benander, Robert E [Pacoima, CA

    2011-03-01

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  20. Porous nuclear fuel element with internal skeleton for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2013-09-03

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  1. Consolidated fuel reprocessing program: Criticality experiments with fast test reactor fuel pins in an organic moderator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierman, S.R.

    1986-12-01

    The results obtained in a series of criticality experiments performed as part of a joint program on criticality data development between the United States Department of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan are presented in this report along with a complete description of the experiments. The experiments involved lattices of Fast Test Reactor (FTR) fuel pins in an organic moderator mixture similar to that used in the solvent extraction stage of fuel reprocessing. The experiments are designed to provide data for direct comparison with previously performed experimental measurements with water moderated lattices of FTR fuel pins. The same lattice arrangements and FTR fuel pin types are used in these organic moderated experimental assemblies as were used in the water moderated experiments. The organic moderator is a mixture of 38 wt % tributylphosphate in a normal paraffin hydrocarbon mixture of C{sub 11}H{sub 24} to C{sub 15}H{sub 32} molecules. Critical sizes of 1054.8, 599.2, 301.8, 199.5 and 165.3 fuel pins were obtained respectively for organic moderated lattices having 0.761 cm, 0.968 cm, 1.242 cm, 1.537 cm and 1.935 cm square lattice pitches as compared to 1046.9, 571.9, 293.9, 199.7 and 165.1 fuel pins for the same lattices water moderated.

  2. Low Cost Nuclear Thermal Rocket Cermet Fuel Element Environment Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, David E.; Mireles, Omar R.; Hickman, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse (Isp) and relatively high thrust in order to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames. Conventional, storable propellants produce average Isp. Nuclear thermal rockets (NTR) capable of high Isp thrust have been proposed. NTR employs heat produced by fission reaction to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen which is then forced through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3000K) and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements is limited. The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements which employ high-melting-point metals, ceramics or a combination (cermet) as a structural matrix into which the nuclear fuel is distributed. It is not necessary to include fissile material in test samples intended to explore high temperature hydrogen exposure of the structural support matrices. A small-scale test bed designed to heat fuel element samples via non-contact RF heating and expose samples to hydrogen is being developed to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without employing fissile material. This paper details the test bed design and results of testing conducted to date.

  3. CFD analysis of the 37-element fuel channel for CANDU6 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.T.; Rhee, B.W.; Park, J.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-01

    We analyzed the thermal-hydraulic behavior of coolant flow along fuel bundles with appendages of end support plate, spacer pad, and bearing pad, which are the CANDU6 characteristic design. The computer code used is a commercial CFD code, CFX-12. The present CFD analysis model calculates the conjugate heat transfer between the fuel and coolant. Using the same volumetric heat source as the O6 channel, the CFD predictions of the axial temperature distributions of the fuel element are compared with those by the CATHENA (one-dimensional safety analysis code for CANDU6 reactor). It is shown that CFX-12 predictions are in good agreement with those by the CATHENA code for the single liquid convection region (especially before the axial position of the first half of the channel length). However, the CFD analysis at the second half of the fuel channel, where the two-phase flow is expected to occur, over-predicts the fuel temperature, since the wall boiling model is not considered in the present CFD model. (author)

  4. STATUS OF TRISO FUEL IRRADIATIONS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR SUPPORTING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR DESIGNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, Michael; Petti, D. A.; Palmer, Joe

    2016-11-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and completed in October 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this experiment was to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment was significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control

  5. Assessment of Startup Fuel Options for a Test or Demonstration Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, Jon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hayes, Steven [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Walters, L. C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This document explores startup fuel options for a proposed test/demonstration fast reactor. The fuel options considered are the metallic fuels U-Zr and U-Pu-Zr and the ceramic fuels UO2 and UO2-PuO2 (MOX). Attributes of the candidate fuel choices considered were feedstock availability, fabrication feasibility, rough order of magnitude cost and schedule, and the existing irradiation performance database. The reactor-grade plutonium bearing fuels (U-Pu-Zr and MOX) were eliminated from consideration as the initial startup fuels because the availability and isotopics of domestic plutonium feedstock is uncertain. There are international sources of reactor grade plutonium feedstock but isotopics and availability are also uncertain. Weapons grade plutonium is the only possible source of Pu feedstock in sufficient quantities needed to fuel a startup core. Currently, the available U.S. source of (excess) weapons-grade plutonium is designated for irradiation in commercial light water reactors (LWR) to a level that would preclude diversion. Weapons-grade plutonium also contains a significant concentration of gallium. Gallium presents a potential issue for both the fabrication of MOX fuel as well as possible performance issues for metallic fuel. Also, the construction of a fuel fabrication line for plutonium fuels, with or without a line to remove gallium, is expected to be considerably more expensive than for uranium fuels. In the case of U-Pu-Zr, a relatively small number of fuel pins have been irradiated to high burnup, and in no case has a full assembly been irradiated to high burnup without disassembly and re-constitution. For MOX fuel, the irradiation database from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is extensive. If a significant source of either weapons-grade or reactor-grade Pu became available (i.e., from an international source), a startup core based on Pu could be reconsidered.

  6. Postirradiation examination and evaluation of Peach Bottom fuel test elements FTE-14 and FTE-15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzgraf, J.F.; McCord, F.; Miller, C.M.; Norman, B.L.; Saurwein, J.J.; Wallroth, C.F.

    1979-02-01

    Peach Bottom fuel test elements FTE-14 and FTE-15 were companion nonaccelerated tests of fuel rods and fuel particles representative of the Large High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (LHTGR). The purpose of the tests was to broaden the data base of H-327 graphite and various fuel types; specifically, UO/sub 2/, UC/sub 2/, weak acid resin UC/sub x//O/sub y/, and several fertile fuel types were tested. The irradiation reached peak fuel temperatures of 1600/sup 0/C volume- and time-averaged temperatures of 1300/sup 0/C, and fast fluence exposures up to 2 x 10/sup 25/ n/m/sup 2/ (E > 29 fJ)/sub HTGR/. Experimental results were compared with predictions based on accelerated irradiation tests, postirradiation heating, and other Peach Bottom test elements to validate HTGR design codes. The nuclear design predictions were modified by measurements which allowed the verification of thermal design calculations and thermocouple readings.

  7. Postirradiation examination and evaluation of Peach Bottom fuel test element FTE-6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallroth, C.F.; Holzgraf, J.F.; Jensen, D.D.

    1977-09-01

    Fuel test element FTE-6 was irradiated in the Peach Bottom high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) for 645 equivalent full power days. Four fuel varieties, contained in H-327 graphite bodies, were tested. A primary result of this test has been to demonstrate acceptable performance even with calculated high stresses in the graphite bodies. Heterogeneous fuel loadings in the element caused local power peaking and azimuthal power variations, deforming the graphite fuel bodies and thereby causing bowing nearly five times as large as the diametral clearance within the sleeve. The axial stresses resulting from interference between the fuel bodies and sleeve were estimated to have reached 45% of the ultimate material strength at the end of the irradiation. Residual stresses from differential contraction within the fuel body resulted in probable in-plane stress levels of 130% of the material strength at the end-of-life shutdown and of up to 150% of the strength at shutdown during the irradiation cycle. The high in-plane stresses are local peaks at the corners of a sharp notch in the element, which may account for the stresses failing to cause damage. The lack of observable damage, however, indicates that the methods and data used for stress analysis give results that are either fairly accurate or conservative.

  8. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for Advanced Test Reactor LEU Fuel Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd D. Christensen; Michael A. Lehto; Noel R. Duckwitz

    2012-05-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located in the ATR Complex of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), was constructed in the 1960s for the purpose of irradiating reactor fuels and materials. Other irradiation services, such as radioisotope production, are also performed at ATR. The ATR is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) matrix (UAlx) in an aluminum sandwich plate cladding. The National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) strategic mission includes efforts to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material at civilian sites around the world. Converting research reactors from using HEU to low-enriched uranium (LEU) was originally started in 1978 as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. Within this strategic mission, GTRI has three goals that provide a comprehensive approach to achieving this mission: The first goal, the driver for the modification that is the subject of this determination, is to convert research reactors from using HEU to LEU. Thus the mission of the ATR LEU Fuel Conversion Project is to convert the ATR and Advanced Test Reactor Critical facility (ATRC) (two of the six U.S. High-Performance Research Reactors [HPRR]) to LEU fuel by 2017. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project pre-conceptual design identified several issues that lead to the conclusion that the project is a major modification.

  9. Post irradiation examination of HANARO nucler mini-element fuel (metallographic and density test)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byung Ok; Hong, K. P.; Park, D. G.; Choo, Y. S.; Baik, S. J.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, H. C.; Jung, Y. H

    2001-05-01

    The post irradiation examination of a HANARO mini-element nuclear fuel, KH96C-004, was done in June 6, 2000. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the in-core performance and reliability of mini-element nuclear fuel for HANARO developed by the project ''The Nuclear Fuel Material Development of Research Reactor''. And, in order to examine the performance of mini-element nuclear fuel in normal output condition, the post irradiation examination of a nuclear fuel bundle composed by 6 mini nuclear fuel rods and 12 dummy fuel rods was performed. Based on these examination results, the safety and reliability of HANARO fuel and the basic data on the design of HANARO nuclear fuel can be ensured and obtained,.

  10. Fuel handling apparatus for a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawke, Basil C.

    1987-01-01

    Fuel handling apparatus for transporting fuel elements into and out of a nuclear reactor and transporting them within the reactor vessel extends through a penetration in the side of the reactor vessel. A lateral transport device carries the fuel elements laterally within the vessel and through the opening in the side of the vessel, and a reversible lifting device raises and lowers the fuel elements. In the preferred embodiment, the lifting device is supported by a pair of pivot arms.

  11. Eddy current examination of the nuclear fuel elements with aluminum 1100-F cladding of IPR-R1 research reactor: An initial study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Roger F. da; Silva Júnior, Silvério F. da; Frade, Rangel T. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nucelar (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Rodrigues, Juliano S., E-mail: rfs@cdtn.br, E-mail: silvasf@cdtn.br, E-mail: rtf@cdtn.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Tubes of aluminum 1100-F as well as tubes of AISI 304 stainless steel are used as cladding of the fuel elements of TRIGA IPR-R1 nuclear research reactor. Usually, these tubes are inspected by means of visual test and sipping test. The visual test allows the detection of changes occurred at the external fuel elements surface, such as those promoted by corrosion processes. However, this test method cannot be used for detection of internal discontinuities at the tube walls. Sipping test allows the detection of fuel elements whose cladding has failed, but it is not able to determine the place where the discontinuity is located. On the other hand, eddy current testing, an electromagnetic nondestructive test method, allows the detection of discontinuities and monitoring their growth. In previous works, the application of eddy current testing to evaluate the AISI 304 cladding fuel elements of TRIGA IPR-R1 was studied. In this paper, it is proposed an initial study about the use of eddy current testing for detection and characterization of discontinuities in the aluminum 1100-F fuel elements cladding. The study includes the development of probes and the design and manufacture of reference standards. (author)

  12. High-Voltage Thermionic Reactor Using Double-Sheath Fuel Elements, 3rd Interational Electrical Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schock, Alfred

    1972-06-01

    A novel design concept for a "flashlight-type" in-core thermionic reactor is described. This concept, called the "double-sheath" design in contrast to the previously considered "wet-sheath" and "dry-sheath" concepts, permits the build-up of high reactor output voltages, without the danger of cesium breakdown and shorts-to-ground. In addition to a description of the design and its functional components, a brief discussion of suggested fuel element fabrication and reactor assembly techniques is presented. The proposed design offers the potential of high reliability because only insulators at very low potentials (e.g.<3 volts) are in contact with cesium vapor; because there are no ceramic or cermet seals within the reactor (all are outside, beyond the reflectors); and because all vacuum-tight joints in the reactor are between ductile niobium components.

  13. A new MTR fuel for a new MTR reactor: UMo for the Jules Horowitz reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guigon, B. [CEA Cadarache, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire DEN, Reacteur Jules Horowitz, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Vacelet, H. [Compagnie pour l' Etude et la Realisation de Combustibles Atomiques, CERCA, Etablissement de Romans, 26 (France); Dornbusch, D. [Technicatome, Service d' Architecture Generale, 13 - Aix-en-Provence (France)

    2003-07-01

    Within some years, the Jules Horowitz Reactor will be the only working experimental reactor (material and fuel testing reactor) in France. It will have to provide facilities for a wide range of needs: from activation analysis to power reactor fuel qualification. In this paper will be presented the main characteristics of the Jules Horowitz Reactor: its total power, neutron flux, fuel element... Safety criteria will be explained. Finally merits and disadvantages of UMo compared to the standard U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel will be discussed. (authors)

  14. Simulated accident testing of a fuel element from the HFR-EU1bis irradiation campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, O., E-mail: Oliver.Seeger@ec.europa.eu; Knebel, K.; Weerd, W. de; Carbol, P.; Bottomley, P.D.W.; Rondinella, V.V.; Allelein, H.-J.

    2014-05-01

    The Cold Finger Apparatus (KühlFinger-Apparatur – KüFA) in operation at JRC-ITU is designed to experimentally examine the effects of Depressurization and LOss of Forced Circulation (DLOFC) accident scenarios on irradiated High Temperature Reactor (HTR) fuel pebbles. While remaining under an inert helium atmosphere, a HTR fuel pebble is subjected to heating schedules up to 1800 °C for several hundred hours. Fission gas release is monitored online during the experiment and volatile fission products are collected on condensation plates made of stainless steel positioned above the fuel sample on a “cold finger”, which is water-cooled to approximately 100 °C. Analysis of the substances deposited on the plates by means of gamma spectroscopy provides information on the fission product release as a function of time and temperature. The most recent KüFA test was performed on a fuel element irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten in the HFR-EU1bis campaign. The condensation plates feature dose rates up to 80 mSv/h and the lab background levels to some hundred μSv/h. Thus, effective collimation and background shielding is mandatory in order to perform a quantitatively accurate analysis of the samples by means of gamma spectroscopy. We present a detailed description of the experimental setup and the calibration procedure. The time-dependent fractional release of the volatile fission products {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs is shown. The results for the most recently tested fuel pebble HFR-EU1bis/5 are compared to data obtained for other fuel elements.

  15. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2009-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In

  16. Observed Changes in As-Fabricated U-10Mo Monolithic Fuel Microstructures After Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Dennis; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam; Madden, James

    2017-08-01

    A low-enriched uranium U-10Mo monolithic nuclear fuel is being developed by the Material Management and Minimization Program, earlier known as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program, for utilization in research and test reactors around the world that currently use high-enriched uranium fuels. As part of this program, reactor experiments are being performed in the Advanced Test Reactor. It must be demonstrated that this fuel type exhibits mechanical integrity, geometric stability, and predictable behavior to high powers and high fission densities in order for it to be a viable fuel for qualification. This paper provides an overview of the microstructures observed at different regions of interest in fuel plates before and after irradiation for fuel samples that have been tested. These fuel plates were fabricated using laboratory-scale fabrication methods. Observations regarding how microstructural changes during irradiation may impact fuel performance are discussed.

  17. Observed Changes in As-Fabricated U-10Mo Monolithic Fuel Microstructures After Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Dennis; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam; Madden, James

    2017-12-01

    A low-enriched uranium U-10Mo monolithic nuclear fuel is being developed by the Material Management and Minimization Program, earlier known as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program, for utilization in research and test reactors around the world that currently use high-enriched uranium fuels. As part of this program, reactor experiments are being performed in the Advanced Test Reactor. It must be demonstrated that this fuel type exhibits mechanical integrity, geometric stability, and predictable behavior to high powers and high fission densities in order for it to be a viable fuel for qualification. This paper provides an overview of the microstructures observed at different regions of interest in fuel plates before and after irradiation for fuel samples that have been tested. These fuel plates were fabricated using laboratory-scale fabrication methods. Observations regarding how microstructural changes during irradiation may impact fuel performance are discussed.

  18. Fuel element design for the enhanced destruction of plutonium in a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, D.C.; Porter, D.L.; Hayes, S.L.; Hill, R.N.

    1999-03-23

    A uranium-free fuel for a fast nuclear reactor comprising an alloy of Pu, Zr and Hf, wherein Hf is present in an amount less than about 10% by weight of the alloy. The fuel may be in the form of a Pu alloy surrounded by a Zr--Hf alloy or an alloy of Pu--Zr--Hf or a combination of both. 7 figs.

  19. Fuel element design for the enhanced destruction of plutonium in a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Douglas C.; Porter, Douglas L.; Hayes, Steven L.; Hill, Robert N.

    1997-12-01

    A uranium-free fuel for a fast nuclear reactor comprising an alloy of Pu, Zr and Hf, wherein Hf is present in an amount less than about 10% by weight of the alloy. The fuel may be in the form of a Pu alloy surrounded by a Zr-Hf alloy or an alloy of Pu-Zr-Hf or a combination of both.

  20. Recovery of enriched Uranium (20% U-235) from wastes obtained in the preparation of fuel elements for argonaut type reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uriarte, A.; Ramos, L.; Estrada, J.; Val, J. L. del

    1962-07-01

    Results obtained with the two following installations for recovering enriched uranium (20% U-235) from wastes obtained in the preparation of fuel elements for Argonaut type reactors are presented. Ion exchange unit to recover uranium form mother liquors resulting from the precipitation ammonium diuranate (ADU) from UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} solutions. Uranium recovery unit from solid wastes from the process of manufacture of fuel elements, consisting of a) waste dissolution, and b) extraction with 10% (v/v) TBP. (Author) 9 refs.

  1. Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and support systems will be briefly discussed, followed by the progress and status of the experiment to date.

  2. Characterization of a Neutron Beam Following Reconfiguration of the Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD Core and Addition of New Fuel Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron E. Craft

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The neutron radiography reactor (NRAD is a 250 kW Mark-II Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics (TRIGA reactor at Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID, USA. The East Radiography Station (ERS is one of two neutron beams at the NRAD used for neutron radiography, which sits beneath a large hot cell and is primarily used for neutron radiography of highly radioactive objects. Additional fuel elements were added to the NRAD core in 2013 to increase the excess reactivity of the reactor, and may have changed some characteristics of the neutron beamline. This report discusses characterization of the neutron beamline following the addition of fuel to the NRAD. This work includes determination of the facility category according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM standards, and also uses an array of gold foils to determine the neutron beam flux and evaluate the neutron beam profile. The NRAD ERS neutron beam is a Category I neutron radiography facility, the highest possible quality level according to the ASTM. Gold foil activation experiments show that the average neutron flux with length-to-diameter ratio (L/D = 125 is 5.96 × 106 n/cm2/s with a 2σ standard error of 2.90 × 105 n/cm2/s. The neutron beam profile can be considered flat for qualitative neutron radiographic evaluation purposes. However, the neutron beam profile should be taken into account for quantitative evaluation.

  3. Dissolution of Material and Test reactor Fuel in an H-Canyon Dissolver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, W. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Rudisill, T. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); O' Rourke, P. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-01-26

    In an amended record of decision for the management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Savannah River Site, the US Department of Energy has authorized the dissolution and recovery of U from 1000 bundles of Al-clad SNF. The SNF is fuel from domestic and foreign research reactors and is typically referred to as Material Test Reactor (MTR) fuel. Bundles of MTR fuel containing assemblies fabricated from U-Al alloys (or other U compounds) are currently dissolved using a Hg-catalyzed HNO3 flowsheet. Since the development of the existing flowsheet, improved experimental methods have been developed to more accurately characterize the offgas composition and generation rate during laboratory dissolutions. Recently, these new techniques were successfully used to develop a flowsheet for the dissolution of High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel. Using the data from the HFIR dissolution flowsheet development and necessary laboratory experiments, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to define flowsheet conditions for the dissolution of MTR fuels. With improved offgas characterization techniques, SRNL will be able define the number of bundles of fuel which can be charged to an H-Canyon dissolver with much less conservatism.

  4. Neutronic fuel element fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korton, George

    2004-02-24

    This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure

  5. Fuel composition optimization in a 78-element fuel bundle for use in a pressure tube type supercritical water-cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummel, D.W.; Novog, D.R. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    A 78-element fuel bundle containing a plutonium-thorium fuel mixture has been proposed for a Generation IV pressure tube type supercritical water-cooled reactor. In this work, using a lattice cell model created with the code DRAGON,the lattice pitch, fuel composition (fraction of PuO{sub 2} in ThO{sub 2}) and radial enrichment profile of the 78-element bundle is optimized using a merit function and a metaheuristic search algorithm.The merit function is designed such that the optimal fuel maximizes fuel utilization while minimizing peak element ratings and coolant void reactivity. A radial enrichment profile of 10 wt%, 11 wt% and 20 wt% PuO{sub 2} (inner to outer ring) with a lattice pitch of 25.0 cm was found to provide the optimal merit score based on the aforementioned criteria. (author)

  6. Characterization of a Neutron Beam Following Reconfiguration of the Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD) Core and Addition of New Fuel Elements

    OpenAIRE

    Aaron E. Craft; Bruce A. Hilton; Glen C. Papaioannou

    2016-01-01

    The neutron radiography reactor (NRAD) is a 250 kW Mark-II Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics (TRIGA) reactor at Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID, USA. The East Radiography Station (ERS) is one of two neutron beams at the NRAD used for neutron radiography, which sits beneath a large hot cell and is primarily used for neutron radiography of highly radioactive objects. Additional fuel elements were added to the NRAD core in 2013 to increase the excess reactivity of the reac...

  7. Identification and Quantification of Carbon Phases in Conversion Fuel for the Transient Reactor Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, Robert; Mata, Angelica; Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; van Rooyen, Isabella

    2016-06-01

    As part of an overall effort to convert US research reactors to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel use, a LEU conversion fuel is being designed for the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) at the Idaho National Laboratory. TREAT fuel compacts are comprised of UO2 fuel particles in a graphitic matrix material. In order to refine heat transfer modeling, as well as determine other physical and nuclear characteristics of the fuel, the amount and type of graphite and non-graphite phases within the fuel matrix must be known. In this study, we performed a series of complementary analyses, designed to allow detailed characterization of the graphite and phenolic resin based fuel matrix. Methods included Scanning Electron and Transmission Electron Microscopies, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction, and Dual-Beam Focused Ion Beam Tomography. Our results indicate that no single characterization technique will yield all of the desired information; however, through the use of statistical and empirical data analysis, such as curve fitting, partial least squares regression, volume extrapolation and spectra peak ratios, a degree of certainty for the quantity of each phase can be obtained.

  8. Burnup calculations using the OREST computer code for uranium dioxide fuel elements of boiling water reactors. Abbrandberechnung mit OREST fuer Urandioxid-Siedewasserreaktor-Brennelemente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesse, U.

    1991-01-01

    There are plans to also use plutonium containing fuel elements (mixed oxide fuel) in the BWR type reactors, with a proportion of up to one third of the entire fuel core. The new concept uses complete MOX fuel elements, as are used in the PWR type reactors. The OREST computer code has been designed for burnup calculations in PWRs. The situation in BWRs is different, as in these reactor types, fuel elements are heterogenous in design, and burnup calculations have to take into account the axial variations of the void fraction, so that multi-dimensional effects have to be calculated. The report explains that the one-dimensional OREST code can be enhanced by supplementing calculations, performed with the Monte-Carlo type KENO code in this case, and is thus suitable without restrictions for performing burnup calculations for MOX fuel elements in BWRs. The calculation method and performance is illustrated by the example of a UO{sub 2} fuel element of the Wuergassen reactor. The model calculations predict a relatively high residual activity in the upper part of the fuel element, and a distinct curium buildup in the lower third of the BWR fuel element. (orig./HP).

  9. A feasibility and optimization study to determine cooling time and burnup of advanced test reactor fuels using a nondestructive technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Jorge [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study presented is to determine the best available non-destructive technique necessary to collect validation data as well as to determine burn-up and cooling time of the fuel elements onsite at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) canal. This study makes a recommendation of the viability of implementing a permanent fuel scanning system at the ATR canal and leads3 to the full design of a permanent fuel scan system. The study consisted at first in determining if it was possible and which equipment was necessary to collect useful spectra from ATR fuel elements at the canal adjacent to the reactor. Once it was establish that useful spectra can be obtained at the ATR canal the next step was to determine which detector and which configuration was better suited to predict burnup and cooling time of fuel elements non-destructively. Three different detectors of High Purity Germanium (HPGe), Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), and High Pressure Xenon (HPXe) in two system configurations of above and below the water pool were used during the study. The data collected and analyzed was used to create burnup and cooling time calibration prediction curves for ATR fuel. The next stage of the study was to determine which of the three detectors tested was better suited for the permanent system. From spectra taken and the calibration curves obtained, it was determined that although the HPGe detector yielded better results, a detector that could better withstand the harsh environment of the ATR canal was needed. The in-situ nature of the measurements required a rugged fuel scanning system, low in maintenance and easy to control system. Based on the ATR canal feasibility measurements and calibration results it was determined that the LaBr3 detector was the best alternative for canal in-situ measurements; however in order to enhance the quality of the spectra collected using this scintillator a deconvolution method was developed. Following the development of the deconvolution method

  10. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) Fuel Element Testing in the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    To satisfy the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) testing milestone, a graphite composite fuel element using a uranium simulant was received from the Oakridge National Lab and tested in the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) at various operating conditions. The nominal operating conditions required to satisfy the milestone consisted of running the fuel element for a few minutes at a temperature of at least 2000 K with flowing hydrogen. This milestone test was successfully accomplished without incident.

  11. Gaseous fuel nuclear reactor research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenk, F. C.; Thom, K.

    1975-01-01

    Gaseous-fuel nuclear reactors are described; their distinguishing feature is the use of fissile fuels in a gaseous or plasma state, thereby breaking the barrier of temperature imposed by solid-fuel elements. This property creates a reactor heat source that may be able to heat the propellant of a rocket engine to 10,000 or 20,000 K. At this temperature level, gas-core reactors would provide the breakthrough in propulsion needed to open the entire solar system to manned and unmanned spacecraft. The possibility of fuel recycling makes possible efficiencies of up to 65% and nuclear safety at reduced cost, as well as high-thrust propulsion capabilities with specific impulse up to 5000 sec.

  12. Nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F

    2009-07-01

    nature of spent nuclear fuel, Anticipated evolution of fuel in dry storage, Anticipated evolution of fuel in deep geological disposal); Boiling-water reactor fuel (Similarities, and differences with PWR fuel, Axial and radial zoning, Rod and channel box sizes, Poisoning and reactivity control, Cladding specific characteristics, Trends in fuel evolution); 3 - Liquid-metal-cooled fast reactor fuel: Fast-neutron irradiation damage in structural materials (Fast-neutron-induced damage in metals, What materials should be used?); Fuels and targets for fast-reactor transmutation (Fast reactors: reactors affording the ability to carry out effective actinide transmutation, Recycling: homogeneous, or heterogeneous?); 4 - gas-cooled reactor fuel: Particle fuel (From the initial concept to the advanced TRISO particle concept, Kernel fabrication processes, Particle coating by chemical vapor deposition, Fuel element fabrication: particle compaction, Characterization of fuel particles, and elements, From HTR fuel to VHTR and GFR fuels: the GAIA facility at CEA/Cadarache); Irradiation behavior of particle fuels (Particle fuel: a variety of failure modes for a high-strength object, The amoeba effect, Fission product behavior, and diffusion in particle fuels); Mechanical modeling of particle fuel; Very-high-temperature reactor (VHTR) fuel; Gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) fuel (The specifications for GFR fuel, GFR fissile material, First containment baffler materials, GFR fuel element concepts); 5 - Research reactor fuels (A considerable feedback from experience, Conversion of French reactors to low-enriched ({<=}20% U-235)U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel, Conversion of all reactors: R and D requirements for high-performance reactors, An 'advanced' research reactor fuel: UMo, The startup fuel for the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) will still be U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al; 6 - An instrument for future fuel research: the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR): Fuel irradiation experiments in JHR, JHR: a flexible

  13. Shock and vibration tests of uranium mononitride fuel pellets for a space power nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    Shock and vibration tests were conducted on cylindrically shaped, depleted, uranium mononitride (UN) fuel pellets. The structural capabilities of the pellets were determined under exposure to shock and vibration loading which a nuclear reactor may encounter during launching into space. Various combinations of diametral and axial clearances between the pellets and their enclosing structures were tested. The results of these tests indicate that for present fabrication of UN pellets, a diametral clearance of 0.254 millimeter and an axial clearance of 0.025 millimeter are tolerable when subjected to launch-induced loads.

  14. The neutronic analysis of opportunity of ITER blanket element tests in RF research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopatkin, A.; Tocheniy, L. [ENTEK-RDIPE, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    In the framework of development of plan of in-pile radiative tests of ITER blanket elements the calculations are carried out of the models of tritium-producing elements in loop channels, placed in the number of Russian various type test reactors. There are presented: (1) The variants of models of blanket, on the base of which the set of experiment goal parameters and its ranges are formed; (2) Outline of loop channel; (3) The experimental opportunities of research reactors with thermal (SM-3, MIR, IVV-2M, RBT) and fast (BOR-60, EBR) spectra of neutrons; (4) The calculation procedures - settlement models, codes. The results are given: (1) power generation rates in components of channel; (2) the tritium breeding rate; (3) the helium production rate in beryllium; (4) the neutron group fluxes; (5) absorption rates in zones of loop channel. The possible reactivity effects due to experimental channel accommodation in reactor core and to radiated sample replace inside of the channel are shown. The last section includes the recommendations for the choice of reactor acceptable from the neutronics point of view, and for the next study directions and stages.

  15. Multiple Irradiation Capsule Experiment (MICE)-3B Irradiation Test of Space Fuel Specimens in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) - Close Out Documentation for Naval Reactors (NR) Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Chen; CM Regan; D. Noe

    2006-01-09

    Few data exist for UO{sub 2} or UN within the notional design space for the Prometheus-1 reactor (low fission rate, high temperature, long duration). As such, basic testing is required to validate predictions (and in some cases determine) performance aspects of these fuels. Therefore, the MICE-3B test of UO{sub 2} pellets was designed to provide data on gas release, unrestrained swelling, and restrained swelling at the upper range of fission rates expected for a space reactor. These data would be compared with model predictions and used to determine adequacy of a space reactor design basis relative to fission gas release and swelling of UO{sub 2} fuel and to assess potential pellet-clad interactions. A primary goal of an irradiation test for UN fuel was to assess performance issues currently associated with this fuel type such as gas release, swelling and transient performance. Information learned from this effort may have enabled use of UN fuel for future applications.

  16. Report transparency and nuclear safety 2007 CEA Cadarache; Rapport transparence et securite nucleaire 2007 CEA Cadarache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This report presents the activities of the CEA Center of Cadarache for the year 2007. The actions concerning the safety, the radiation protection, the significant events, the release control and the environmental impacts and the wastes stored on the center are discussed. More especially the report discusses the beginning of the RJH reactor construction, the fourth generation reactors research programs, the implementing of la Rotonde the new radioactive wastes management installation, the renovation of the LECA. (A.L.B.)

  17. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ELEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, R.J.; Leitten, C.F. Jr.

    1962-04-17

    A boron-10 containing reactor control element wherein the boron-10 is dispersed in a matrix material is describeri. The concentration of boron-10 in the matrix varies transversely across the element from a minimum at the surface to a maximum at the center of the element, prior to exposure to neutrons. (AEC)

  18. Fabrication and Comparison of Fuels for Advanced Gas Reactor Irradiation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Phillips; Charles Barnes; John Hunn

    2010-10-01

    As part of the program to demonstrate TRISO-coated fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a series of irradiation tests of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel are being performed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. In the first test, called “AGR-1,” graphite compacts containing approximately 300,000 coated particles were irradiated from December 2006 until November 2009. Development of AGR-1 fuel sought to replicate the properties of German TRISO-coated particles. No particle failures were seen in the nearly 3-year irradiation to a burn up of 19%. The AGR-1 particles were coated in a two-inch diameter coater. Following fabrication of AGR-1 fuel, process improvements and changes were made in each of the fabrication processes. Changes in the kernel fabrication process included replacing the carbon black powder feed with a surface-modified carbon slurry and shortening the sintering schedule. AGR-2 TRISO particles were produced in a six-inch diameter coater using a change size about twenty-one times that of the two-inch diameter coater used to coat AGR-1 particles. Changes were also made in the compacting process, including increasing the temperature and pressure of pressing and using a different type of press. Irradiation of AGR-2 fuel began in late spring 2010. Properties of AGR-2 fuel compare favorably with AGR-1 and historic German fuel. Kernels are more homogeneous in shape, chemistry and density. TRISO-particle sphericity, layer thickness standard deviations, and defect fractions are also comparable. In a sample of 317,000 particles from deconsolidated AGR-2 compacts, 3 exposed kernels were found in a leach test. No SiC defects were found in a sample of 250,000 deconsolidated particles, and no IPyC defects in a sample of 64,000 particles. The primary difference in properties between AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacts is that AGR-2 compacts have a higher matrix density, 1.6 g/cm3 compared to about 1.3 g/cm3 for AGR-1 compacts. Based on

  19. Fabrication of U-10 wt.%Zr Metallic Fuel Rodlets for Irradiation Test in BOR-60 Fast Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Hwan Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication technology for metallic fuel has been developed to produce the driver fuel in a PGSFR in Korea since 2007. In order to evaluate the irradiation integrity and validate the in-reactor of the starting metallic fuel with FMS cladding for the loading of the metallic fuel, U-10 wt.%Zr fuel rodlets were fabricated and evaluated for a verification of the starting driver fuel through an irradiation test in the BOR-60 fast reactor. The injection casting method was applied to U-10 wt.%Zr fuel slugs with a diameter of 5.5 mm. Consequently, fuel slugs per melting batch without casting defects were fabricated through the development of advanced casting technology and evaluation tests. The optimal GTAW welding conditions were also established through a number of experiments. In addition, a qualification test was carried out to prove the weld quality of the end plug welding of the metallic fuel rodlets. The wire wrapping of metallic fuel rodlets was successfully accomplished for the irradiation test. Thus, PGSFR fuel rodlets have been soundly fabricated for the irradiation test in a BOR-60 fast reactor.

  20. Effect of the fuel element bundle statistical characteristics on the evaluation of temperature in the sodium-cooled fast-neutron reactor core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.B. Tikhomirov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Different fuel element bundle models used to calculate the coolant and fuel cladding temperatures inside fuel assemblies have been analyzed as applied to sodium-cooled fast-neutron reactors. The drawbacks of the existing models have been identified. A bundle model based on an experimental study into the actual arrangement of the fuel elements within the AF shroud has been proposed. The model's capabilities and advantages, as compared to conservative models, have been shown with regard for the need to raise the reliability of the fuel cladding working temperature estimation.

  1. Recent irradiation tests of uranium-plutonium-zirconium metal fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Villarreal, R.; Hofman, G.L.; Beck, W.N.

    1986-09-01

    Uranium-Plutonium-Zirconium metal fuel irradiation tests to support the ANL Integral Fast Reactor concept are discussed. Satisfactory performance has been demonstrated to 2.9 at.% peak burnup in three alloys having 0, 8, and 19 wt % plutonium. Fuel swelling measurements at low burnup in alloys to 26 wt % plutonium show that fuel deformation is primarily radial in direction. Increasing the plutonium content in the fuel diminishes the rate of fuel-cladding gap closure and axial fuel column growth. Chemical redistribution occurs by 2.1 at.% peak burnup and generally involves the inward migration of zirconium and outward migration of uranium. Fission gas release to the plenum ranges from 46% to 56% in the alloys irradiated to 2.9 at.% peak burnup. No evidence of deleterious fuel-cladding chemical or mechanical interaction was observed.

  2. Development of RF plasma simulations of in-reactor tests of small models of the nuclear light bulb fuel region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, W. C.; Jaminet, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to develop test configurations and technology necessary to simulate the thermal environment and fuel region expected to exist in in-reactor tests of small models of nuclear light bulb configurations. Particular emphasis was directed at rf plasma tests of approximately full-scale models of an in-reactor cell suitable for tests in Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Nuclear Furnace. The in-reactor tests will involve vortex-stabilized fissioning uranium plasmas of approximately 200-kW power, 500-atm pressure and equivalent black-body radiating temperatures between 3220 and 3510 K.

  3. Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Wigeland; J. Cahalan

    2009-09-01

    Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance R. Wigeland , Idaho National Laboratory J. Cahalan, Argonne National Laboratory The sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor is currently being evaluated for the efficient transmutation of the highly-hazardous, long-lived, transuranic elements that are present in spent nuclear fuel. One of the fundamental choices that will be made is the selection of the fuel type for the fast reactor, whether oxide, metal, carbide, nitride, etc. It is likely that a decision on the fuel type will need to be made before many of the related technologies and facilities can be selected, from fuel fabrication to spent fuel reprocessing. A decision on fuel type should consider all impacts on the fast reactor system, including safety. Past work has demonstrated that the choice of fuel type may have a significant impact on the severity of consequences arising from accidents, especially for severe accidents of low probability. In this paper, the response of sodium-cooled fast reactors is discussed for both oxide and metal fuel types, highlighting the similarities and differences in reactor response and accident consequences. Any fast reactor facility must be designed to be able to successfully prevent, mitigate, or accommodate all consequences of potential events, including accidents. This is typically accomplished by using multiple barriers to the release of radiation, including the cladding on the fuel, the intact primary cooling system, and most visibly the reactor containment building. More recently, this has also included the use of ‘inherent safety’ concepts to reduce or eliminate the potential for serious damage in some cases. Past experience with oxide and metal fuel has demonstrated that both fuel types are suitable for use as fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. However, safety analyses for these two fuel types have also shown that there can be substantial differences in accident consequences due to the neutronic and

  4. The Jules Horowitz reactor (JHR), a European material testing reactor (MTR), with extended experimental capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballagny, A.; Bergamaschi, Y.; Bouilloux, Y.; Bravo, X.; Guigon, B.; Rommens, M.; Tremodeux, P. [CEA Cadarache, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire DEN, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)]|[CEA Saclay Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire DEN, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2003-07-01

    The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is the European MTR (Material Testing Reactor) designed to provide, after 2010, the necessary knowledge for keeping the existing power plants in operation and to design innovative reactors types with new objectives such as: minimizing the radioactive waste production, taking into account additional safety requirements, preventing risks of nuclear proliferation... To achieve such an ambitious objective. The JHR is designed with a high flexibility in order to satisfy the current demand from European industry, research and to be able to accommodate future requirements. The JHR will offer a wide range of performances and services in gathering, in a single site at Cadarache, all the necessary functionalities and facilities for an effective production of results: e.g. fuel fabrication laboratories, preparation of the instrumented devices, interpretation of the experiments, modelling. The JHR must rely on a top level scientific environment based on experts teams from CEA and EC and local universities. With a thermal flux of 7,4.10{sup 14} ncm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and a fast flux of 6,4.10{sup 14} ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, it is possible to carry out irradiation experiments on materials and fuels whatever the reactor type considered. It will also be possible to carry out locally, fast neutron irradiation to achieve damage effect up to 25 dpa/year. (dpa = displacement per atom.) The study of the fuels behavior under accidental conditions, from analytical experiments, on a limited amount of irradiated fuel, is a major objective of the project. These oriented safety tests are possible by taking into account specific requirements in the design of the facility such as the tightness level of the containment building, the addition of an alpha hot cell and a laboratory for on line fission products measurement. (authors)

  5. Reactor Physics Methods and Preconceptual Core Design Analyses for Conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor to Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Nigg; Sean R. Morrell

    2012-09-01

    Under the current long-term DOE policy and planning scenario, both the ATR and the ATRC will be reconfigured at an appropriate time within the next several years to operate with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This will be accomplished under the auspices of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, administered by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). At a minimum, the internal design and composition of the fuel element plates and support structure will change, to accommodate the need for low enrichment in a manner that maintains total core excess reactivity at a suitable level for anticipated operational needs throughout each cycle while respecting all control and shutdown margin requirements and power distribution limits. The complete engineering design and optimization of LEU cores for the ATR and the ATRC will require significant multi-year efforts in the areas of fuel design, development and testing, as well as a complete re-analysis of the relevant reactor physics parameters for a core composed of LEU fuel, with possible control system modifications. Ultimately, revalidation of the computational physics parameters per applicable national and international standards against data from experimental measurements for prototypes of the new ATR and ATRC core designs will also be required for Safety Analysis Report (SAR) changes to support routine operations with LEU. This report is focused on reactor physics analyses conducted during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 to support the initial development of several potential preconceptual fuel element designs that are suitable candidates for further study and refinement during FY-2013 and beyond. In a separate, but related, effort in the general area of computational support for ATR operations, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting a focused multiyear effort to introduce modern high-fidelity computational reactor physics software and associated validation protocols to replace

  6. Test Design Description: Volume 2, Part 1, MFF-1 and MFF-1A metal fuel irradiations (HF168 and HF169) element as-built data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodds, N. E.

    1987-06-01

    The metal fuel in FFTF (MFF) tests represented by the Test Design Description (TDD), Volume II, Part I will be the second irradiation test of full length Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel elements in FFTF. The MFF-1 Test, designated as the HF168 Test Assembly, will contain six sodium-bonded metallic fuel elements clad in HT9 interspersed in a basically oxide fuel assembly. The wire-wrapped elements will be irradiated to breach or 900 EFPD with peak nominal cladding temperatures of 1127{sup 0}F. The MFF-1A test, designated as the HF169 Test assembly, will also contain six sodium-bonded metallic fuel elements clad in HT9 interspersed in an oxide fuel assembly. The MFF-1A elements will be irradiated at a peak nominal cladding temperature of 1127{sup 0}F to 450 EFPD or until a cladding breach occurs. The metal fuel elements contain U-10Zr cast slugs and have a fuel-smeared density of 75%. The enriched zone is 36-in. long, composed of three slugs and has one 6.5-in. long depleted-uranium axial blanket slug (DU-10Zr) at each end. The metal fuel elements were fabricated at ANL-W and delivered to Westinghouse-Hanford for assembly into the test article. This Test Design Description contains only the relevant fabrication data for the metal fuel elements built at Argonne. The elements conform to the requirements in MG-22, "User`s Guide for the Irradiation of Experiments in the FTR."

  7. Development of Electrical Capacitance Sensors for Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) Testing at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Maolong; Ryals, Matthew; Ali, Amir; Blandford, Edward; Jensen, Colby; Condie, Keith; Svoboda, John; O' Brien, Robert

    2016-08-01

    A variety of instruments are being developed and qualified to support the Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) program and future transient irradiations at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The University of New Mexico (UNM) is working with INL to develop capacitance-based void sensors for determining the timing of critical boiling phenomena in static capsule fuel testing and the volume-averaged void fraction in flow-boiling in-pile water loop fuel testing. The static capsule sensor developed at INL is a plate-type configuration, while UNM is utilizing a ring-type capacitance sensor. Each sensor design has been theoretically and experimentally investigated at INL and UNM. Experiments are being performed at INL in an autoclave to investigate the performance of these sensors under representative Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) conditions in a static capsule. Experiments have been performed at UNM using air-water two-phase flow to determine the sensitivity and time response of the capacitance sensor under a flow boiling configuration. Initial measurements from the capacitance sensor have demonstrated the validity of the concept to enable real-time measurement of void fraction. The next steps include designing the cabling interface with the flow loop at UNM for Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) ATF testing at TREAT and further characterization of the measurement response for each sensor under varying conditions by experiments and modeling.

  8. CURRENT STATUS OF INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT BY SIPPING SYSTEM OF SPENT FUEL BUNDLES IRRADIATED IN CANDU REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JONG-YOUL PARK

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In terms of safety and the efficient management of spent fuel storage, detecting failed fuel is one of the most important tasks in a CANada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU reactor operation. It has been successfully demonstrated that in a CANDU reactor, on-power failed fuel detection and location systems, along with alarm area gamma monitors, can detect and locate defective and suspect fuel bundles before discharging them from the reactor to the spent fuel storage bay. In the reception bay, however, only visual inspection has been used to identify suspect bundles. Gaseous fission product and delayed neutron monitoring systems cannot precisely distinguish failed fuel elements from each fuel bundle. This study reports the use of a sipping system in a CANDU reactor for the integrity assessment of spent fuel bundles. The integrity assessment of spent fuel bundles using this sipping system has shown promise as a nondestructive test for detecting a defective fuel bundle in a CANDU reactor.

  9. Welding procedures used in the fabrication of fuel elements for the DON Reactor exponential experiment; La soldadura en la fabricacion de elementos combustibles destinados a una experiencia exponencial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Beltran, A.; Jaraiz Franco, E.; Rivas Diaz, M. de las

    1965-07-01

    This exponential experiment required 74 units (37 loaded with UO{sub 2} and 37 with UC) to simulate the Reactor fuel channels. Each unit was enclosed in a tube similar to the calandria ones. It contained the pressure tube, the shroud and the 19 rods cluster. Within the pressure tube, in touch with the elements, was the organic liquid. (Author)

  10. Neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor 64-element core upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, John D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA (registered) (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The interim critical configuration developed during the core upgrade, which contains only 62 fuel elements, has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The final 64-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has also been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (approximately ±1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  11. Gaseous fuel reactor research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, K.; Schneider, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews studies dealing with the concept of a gaseous fuel reactor and describes the structure and plans of the current NASA research program of experiments on uranium hexafluoride systems and uranium plasma systems. Results of research into the basic properties of uranium plasmas and fissioning gases are reported. The nuclear pumped laser is described, and the main results of experiments with these devices are summarized.

  12. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  13. Evaluation of Erosion of the Dummy “EE” Plate 19 in YA Type ATR Fuel Element During Reactor PALM Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, Jeffrey O. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Advanced Test Reactor; Glazoff, Michael V. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Advanced Test Reactor; Eiden, Thomas J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Advanced Test Reactor; Rezvoi, Aleksey V. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Advanced Test Reactor

    2016-08-01

    Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycle 153B-1 was a 14-day, high-power, powered axial locator mechanism (PALM) operating cycle that completed on April 12, 2013. Cycle 153B-1 was a typical operating cycle for the ATR, and did not result in any unusual plant transients. ATR was started up and shut down as scheduled. The PALM drive physically moves the selected experiments into and out of the core to simulate reactor startup and heat up, and shutdown and cooldown transients, while the reactor remains in steady-state conditions. However, after the cycle was over, when the fuel elements were removed from the core and inspected, several thousand flow-assisted erosion pits and “horseshoeing” defects were readily observed on the surface of the several YA-type fuel elements (these are aluminum “dummy” plates that contain no fuel). In order to understand these erosion phenomena, a thermal-hydraulic model of coolant channel 20 on a YA-M fuel element was generated. The boundaries of the model were the aluminum EE plate of a YA-M fuel element and a beryllium reflector block with 13 horizontal saw cuts which represented regions of zero flow. The heat generated in fuel plates 1 through 18 was modeled to be passing through the aluminum EE plate. The coolant channel 20 width was set at 0.058 in. (58 mils). It was established that the horizontal saw cuts had a significant effect on the temperature of the coolant. The flow, which was expected to vary linearly with gradual heating of the coolant as it passed through the channel, was extremely turbulent. The temperature rise, which was expected to be a smooth “S” curve, was represented by a series temperature rise “humps,” which occurred at each horizontal saw cut in the beryllium reflector block. Each of the 13 saw cuts had a chamfered edge which resulted in the coolant flow being re-directed as a jet across the coolant channel into the surface of the EE plate, which explained the temperature rise and the observed

  14. Fossil fuel furnace reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, William J.

    1987-01-01

    A fossil fuel furnace reactor is provided for simulating a continuous processing plant with a batch reactor. An internal reaction vessel contains a batch of shale oil, with the vessel having a relatively thin wall thickness for a heat transfer rate effective to simulate a process temperature history in the selected continuous processing plant. A heater jacket is disposed about the reactor vessel and defines a number of independent controllable temperature zones axially spaced along the reaction vessel. Each temperature zone can be energized to simulate a time-temperature history of process material through the continuous plant. A pressure vessel contains both the heater jacket and the reaction vessel at an operating pressure functionally selected to simulate the continuous processing plant. The process yield from the oil shale may be used as feedback information to software simulating operation of the continuous plant to provide operating parameters, i.e., temperature profiles, ambient atmosphere, operating pressure, material feed rates, etc., for simulation in the batch reactor.

  15. Numerical analysis on inlet and outlet sections of a test fuel assembly for a Supercritical Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiss, Attila, E-mail: kissa@reak.bme.hu; Vágó, Tamás; Aszódi, Attila

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • SCWR-FQT, first facility works with nuclear fuel cooled by SCW, was analysed. • The inlet and outlet section of the test fuel assembly was investigated by CFD. • Two thermohydraulic problems were revealed, described and analysed. • To solve them design changes were proposed and proven by further analysis. - Abstract: The Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR) is one of the six reactor concepts being investigated under the framework of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF). One of the major challenges in the development of a SCWR is to develop materials for the fuel and core structures that will be sufficiently corrosion-resistant to withstand supercritical water conditions. Previously, core, reactor and plant design concept of the European High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) have been worked out in substantial detail. As the next step, it has been proposed to carry out a fuel qualification test of a small scale fuel assembly in a research reactor under typical prototype conditions. Therefore design and licensing of an experimental facility for the fuel qualification test, including the small scale fuel assembly with four fuel rods, the required coolant loop with supercritical water and safety and auxiliary systems, is the scope of the project “Supercritical Water Reactor—Fuel Qualification Test” (SCWR-FQT). This project is a collaborative project co-funded by the European Commission, which takes advantage of a Chinese—European collaboration. As a sub-task of the SCWR-FQT project, the geometry of inlet and outlet sections of the fuel assembly has to be investigated and optimized according to thermohydraulic considerations such as expected stable and uniform inflow pattern and uniform outflow temperature field conditions. To accomplish this task three dimensional CFD analysis has been performed. During the analysis two main problems were identified. On the one hand, generation of a huge eddy was

  16. Brookhaven experience with handling and shipping of, and cask design for, reactor spent-fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugan, Francis A.

    1965-12-01

    The general problems in the area are presented. Solutions to the specific problems at Brookhaven are discussed in relation to the general problem. Presentation covers (a) fuel removal tools and equipment, and canal storage facilities; (b) methods of shipment; (c) brief review of the AEC and ICC regulatory requirements; and (d) optimized design of the shipping container. Specific solutions used by BNL over a six -year period are described. The need for complete and early analysis of the specific problem is indicated.

  17. Integrity assessment of research reactor fuel cladding and material testing using eddy current inspection; Avaliacao de integridade de revestimentos de combustiveis de reatores de pesquisa e teste de materiais utilizando o ensaio de correntes parasitas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alencar, Donizete Anderson de

    2004-07-01

    A methodology to perform the integrity assessment of research reactors nuclear fuels cladding, such as those installed in IPR-Rl (TRIGA) and IEA-R1 (MTR), using nondestructive electromagnetic inspection (eddy current) is presented. This methodology is constituted by: the development of calibration reference standards, specific for each type of fuel; the development of special test probes; the recommendations for the inspection equipment calibration; the construction of voltage based evaluation curves and the inspection procedures developed for the characterization of detected flaws. The test probes development, specially those designed for the inspection of MTR fuels cladding, which present access difficulties due to the narrow gap between fuel plates (2,89 mm for IEAR-R1), constituted a challenge that demanded the introduction of unusual materials and constructive techniques. The operational performance of the developed resources, as well as the special operative characteristics of the test probes, such as their immunity to adjacent fuel plates interference and electrical resistivity changes of the fuels meat are experimentally demonstrated. The practical applicability of the developed methodology is verified in non radioactive environment, using a dummy MTR fuel element model, similar to an IEA-R1 reactor fuel element, produced and installed in IPEN, Sao Paulo. The efficacy of the proposed methodology was verified by the achieved results. (author)

  18. Estimation of the activity and isotopic composition of the fuel elements of the reactor in decaying; Estimacion de la actividad y composicion isotopica de los elementos combustibles del reactor en decaimiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar H, F. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2001-03-15

    At the present time its are had 59 fuel elements, 3 control bars with follower and 2 instrumented irradiated fuels that its are decaying in the pool of the reactor. The burnt one that its have these fuels is not uniform, the quantity of U-235 that contain at the moment it varies between 33.5 g up to 35.2 and its have a decay of at least 12 years. The burnt of the fuels was obtained with the CREMAT code, this burnt was takes like base to estimate the current isotopic inventory and the activity of the same ones using the ORIGEN2 code. (Author)

  19. Desludging of N Reactor fuel canisters: Analysis, Test, and data requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The N Reactor fuel is currently stored in canisters in the K East (KE) and K West (KW) Basins. In KE, the canisters have open tops; in KW, the cans have sealed lids, but are vented to release gases. Corrosion products have formed on exposed uranium metal fuel, on carbon steel basin component surfaces, and on aluminum alloy canister surfaces. Much of the corrosion product is retained on the corroding surfaces; however, large inventories of particulates have been released. Some of the corrosion product particulates form sludge on the basin floors; some particulates are retained within the canisters. The floor sludge inventories are much greater in the KE Basin than in the KW Basin because KE Basin operated longer and its water chemistry was less controlled. Another important factor is the absence of lids on the KE canisters, allowing uranium corrosion products to escape and water-borne species, principally iron oxides, to settle in the canisters. The inventories of corrosion products, including those released as particulates inside the canisters, are only beginning to be characterized for the closed canisters in KW Basin. The dominant species in the KE floor sludge are oxides of aluminum, iron, and uranium. A large fraction of the aluminum and uranium floor sludge particulates may have been released during a major fuel segregation campaign in the 1980s, when fuel was emptied from 4990 canisters. Handling and jarring of the fuel and aluminum canisters seems likely to have released particulates from the heavily corroded surfaces. Four candidate methods are discussed for dealing with canister sludge emerged in the N Reactor fuel path forward: place fuel in multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) without desludging; drill holes in canisters and drain; drill holes in canisters and flush with water; and remove sludge and repackage the fuel.

  20. Evaluation of Corrosion of the Dummy “EE” Plate 19 in YA Type ATR Fuel Element During Reactor PALM Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, Jeffrey Owen [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Glazoff, Michael Vasily [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Eiden, Thomas John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rezvoi, Aleksey Victor [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycle 153B-1 was a 14-day, high-power, powered axial locator mechanism (PALM) operating cycle that completed on April 12, 2013. Cycle 153B-1 was a typical operating cycle for the ATR and did not result in any unusual plant transients. ATR was started up and shut down as scheduled. The PALM drive physically moves the selected experiments into and out of the core to simulate reactor startup and heat up, and shutdown and cooldown transients, while the reactor remains in steady state conditions. However, after the cycle was over, several thousand of the flow-assisted corrosion pits and “horseshoeing” defects were readily observable on the surface of the several YA-type fuel elements (these are “dummy” plates that contain no fuel). In order understand these corrosion phenomena a thermal-hydraulic model of coolant channel 20 on a YA-M fuel element was generated. The boundaries of the model were the aluminum EE plate of a YA-M fuel element and a beryllium reflector block with 13 horizontal saw cuts which represented regions of zero flow. The heat generated in fuel plates 1 through 18 was modeled to be passing through the aluminum EE plate. The coolant channel 20 width was set at 0.058 in. (58 mils). It was established that the horizontal saw cuts had a significant effect on the temperature of the coolant. The flow, which was expected to vary linearly with gradual heating of the coolant as it passed through the channel, was extremely turbulent. The temperature rise, which was expected to be a smooth “S” curve, was represented by a series temperature rise “humps,” which occurred at each horizontal saw cut in the beryllium reflector block. Each of the 13 saw cuts had a chamfered edge which resulted in the coolant flow being re-directed as a jet across the coolant channel into the surface of the EE plate, which explained the temperature rise and the observed sscalloping and possibly pitting degradation on the YA-M fuel elements. In

  1. Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2007-03-30

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185°C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (~50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185°C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention.

  2. Advanced research reactor fuel development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Pak, H. D.; Kim, K. H. [and others

    2000-05-01

    The fabrication technology of the U{sub 3}Si fuel dispersed in aluminum for the localization of HANARO driver fuel has been launches. The increase of production yield of LEU metal, the establishment of measurement method of homogeneity, and electron beam welding process were performed. Irradiation test under normal operation condition, had been carried out and any clues of the fuel assembly breakdown was not detected. The 2nd test fuel assembly has been irradiated at HANARO reactor since 17th June 1999. The quality assurance system has been re-established and the eddy current test technique has been developed. The irradiation test for U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersed fuels at HANARO reactor has been carried out in order to compare the in-pile performance of between the two types of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuels, prepared by both the atomization and comminution processes. KAERI has also conducted all safety-related works such as the design and the fabrication of irradiation rig, the analysis of irradiation behavior, thermal hydraulic characteristics, stress analysis for irradiation rig, and thermal analysis fuel plate, for the mini-plate prepared by international research cooperation being irradiated safely at HANARO. Pressure drop test, vibration test and endurance test were performed. The characterization on powders of U-(5.4 {approx} 10 wt%) Mo alloy depending on Mo content prepared by rotating disk centrifugal atomization process was carried out in order to investigate the phase stability of the atomized U-Mo alloy system. The {gamma}-U phase stability and the thermal compatibility of atomized U-16at.%Mo and U-14at.%Mo-2at.%X(: Ru, Os) dispersion fuel meats at an elevated temperature have been investigated. The volume increases of U-Mo compatibility specimens were almost the same as or smaller than those of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}. However the atomized alloy fuel exhibited a better irradiation performance than the comminuted alloy. The RERTR-3 irradiation test of nano

  3. Commissioning of the STAR test section for experimental simulation of loss of coolant accident using the EC-208 instrumented fuel assembly of the IEA-R1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maprelian, Eduardo; Torres, Walmir M.; Prado, Adelk C.; Umbehaun, Pedro E.; Franca, Renato L.; Santos, Samuel C.; Macedo, Luiz A.; Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: emaprel@ipen.br, E-mail: wmtorres@ipen.br, E-mail: acprado@ipen.br, E-mail: umbehaun@ipen.br, E-mail: rlfranca@ipen.br, E-mail: samuelcs@ipen.br, E-mail: lamacedo@ipen.br, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SO (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The three basic safety functions of Research Reactors (RR) are the safe shutdown of the reactor, the proper cooling of the decay heat of the fuel elements and the confinement of radioactive materials. Compared to Nuclear Power Reactors, RR power release is small, yet its three safety functions must be met to ensure the integrity of the reactor. During a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in pool type RR, partial or complete loss of pool water may occur, with consequent partial or complete uncovering of the fuel assemblies. In such an accident, the decay heat removal safety function must not be compromised. The Test Section for Experimental Simulation of Loss of Coolant Accident (STAR) is in commissioning phase. This test section will provide experimental data on partial and total uncovering of the EC-208 instrumented fuel assembly (IFA) irradiated in the IEA-R1. Experimental results will be useful in validation of computer codes for RR safety analysis, particularly on heat removal efficiency aspects (safety function) in accident conditions. STAR comprises a base on which is installed the IFA, the cylindrical stainless steel hull, the compressed air system for the test section emptying and refilling, and the instrumentation for temperature and level measurements. The commissioning tests or pre-operational check, consist of several preliminary tests to verify experimental procedures, the difficulties during assembling of STAR in the pool, the difficulties in control the emptying and refilling velocities, as well as, the repeatability capacity, tests of equipment, valves and systems and tests of instrumentation and data acquisition system. Safety, accuracy and easiness of operation will be checked. (author)

  4. Stationary Liquid Fuel Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Won Sik [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Grandy, Andrew [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Boroski, Andrew [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Krajtl, Lubomir [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Johnson, Terry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-30

    For effective burning of hazardous transuranic (TRU) elements of used nuclear fuel, a transformational advanced reactor concept named SLFFR (Stationary Liquid Fuel Fast Reactor) was proposed based on stationary molten metallic fuel. The fuel enters the reactor vessel in a solid form, and then it is heated to molten temperature in a small melting heater. The fuel is contained within a closed, thick container with penetrating coolant channels, and thus it is not mixed with coolant nor flow through the primary heat transfer circuit. The makeup fuel is semi- continuously added to the system, and thus a very small excess reactivity is required. Gaseous fission products are also removed continuously, and a fraction of the fuel is periodically drawn off from the fuel container to a processing facility where non-gaseous mixed fission products and other impurities are removed and then the cleaned fuel is recycled into the fuel container. A reference core design and a preliminary plant system design of a 1000 MWt TRU- burning SLFFR concept were developed using TRU-Ce-Co fuel, Ta-10W fuel container, and sodium coolant. Conservative design approaches were adopted to stay within the current material performance database. Detailed neutronics and thermal-fluidic analyses were performed to develop a reference core design. Region-dependent 33-group cross sections were generated based on the ENDF/B-VII.0 data using the MC2-3 code. Core and fuel cycle analyses were performed in theta-r-z geometries using the DIF3D and REBUS-3 codes. Reactivity coefficients and kinetics parameters were calculated using the VARI3D perturbation theory code. Thermo-fluidic analyses were performed using the ANSYS FLUENT computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. Figure 0.1 shows a schematic radial layout of the reference 1000 MWt SLFFR core, and Table 0.1 summarizes the main design parameters of SLFFR-1000 loop plant. The fuel container is a 2.5 cm thick cylinder with an inner radius of 87.5 cm. The fuel

  5. Fuel Fabrication and Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    The uranium from the enrichment plant is still in the form of UF6. UF6 is not suitable for use in a reactor due to its highly corrosive chemistry as well as its phase diagram. UF6 is converted into UO2 fuel pellets, which are in turn placed in fuel rods and assemblies. Reactor designs are variable in moderators, coolants, fuel, performance etc.The dream of energy ‘too-cheap to meter’ is no more, and now the nuclear power industry is pushing ahead with advanced reactor designs.

  6. Nuclear fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zocher, Roy W.

    1991-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element and a method of manufacturing the element. The fuel element is comprised of a metal primary container and a fuel pellet which is located inside it and which is often fragmented. The primary container is subjected to elevated pressure and temperature to deform the container such that the container conforms to the fuel pellet, that is, such that the container is in substantial contact with the surface of the pellet. This conformance eliminates clearances which permit rubbing together of fuel pellet fragments and rubbing of fuel pellet fragments against the container, thus reducing the amount of dust inside the fuel container and the amount of dust which may escape in the event of container breach. Also, as a result of the inventive method, fuel pellet fragments tend to adhere to one another to form a coherent non-fragmented mass; this reduces the tendency of a fragment to pierce the container in the event of impact.

  7. Nondestructive evaluation of plate type nuclear fuel elements during manufacturing stage using ultrasonic test method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, Mucio Jose Drumond de; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Alencar, Donizete Anderson de; Silva Junior, Silverio Ferreira da [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Nucleo de Tecnologia do Combustivel], e-mail: mjdb@cdtn.br, e-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.br, e-mail: daa@cdtn.br, e-mail: silvasf@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    Structural discontinuities, such as cracks and bonding lacks at the core/cladding interface can be introduced in plate type nuclear fuel elements during the manufacturing stages, due to the mechanical and thermal processing conditions. They can reduce the performance of the nuclear fuel during its operational life or contribute to its premature failure. Plate type nuclear fuels (PTNF) consist of a core formed by a dispersion of UO{sub 2} into a metallic matrix, involved by a metallic cladding. Nondestructive testing methods such as eddy current, radiography and ultrasonic have been used to detect and monitoring discontinuities generated in the fuel's manufacturing stage, each one presenting advantages and limitations. The use of ultrasonic testing for this purpose presents two main difficulties: the small thickness of the plates as well as the presence of materials with different characteristics. The study described in this paper presents the methodology used in the evaluation of a prototype of PTNF by ultrasonic testing method, using different test techniques and transducers. The main results obtained and the next steps to be developed in this activity are discussed. (author)

  8. Analysis and Experimental Qualification of an Irradiation Capsule Design for Testing Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Cladding in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kurt R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Daily, Charles R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The Advanced Fuels Campaign within the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is currently investigating a number of advanced nuclear fuel cladding concepts to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactors. Alumina-forming ferritic alloys (e.g., FeCrAl) are some of the leading candidates to replace traditional zirconium alloys due to their superior oxidation resistance, provided no prohibitive irradiation-induced embrittlement occurs. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed experimental designs to irradiate thin-walled cladding tubes with representative pressurized water reactor geometry in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) under relevant temperatures. These designs allow for post-irradiation examination (PIE) of cladding that closely resembles expected commercially viable geometries and microstructures. The experiments were designed using relatively inexpensive rabbit capsules for the irradiation vehicle. The simplistic designs combined with the extremely high neutron flux in the HFIR allow for rapid testing of a large test matrix, thus reducing the time and cost needed to advanced cladding materials closer to commercialization. The designs are flexible in that they allow for testing FeCrAl alloys, stainless steels, Inconel alloys, and zirconium alloys (as a reference material) both with and without hydrides. This will allow a direct comparison of the irradiation performance of advanced cladding materials with traditional zirconium alloys. PIE will include studies of dimensional change, microstructure variation, mechanical performance, etc. This work describes the capsule design, neutronic and thermal analyses, and flow testing that were performed to support the qualification of this new irradiation vehicle.

  9. High-/sup 240/Pu fuel worth in the Fast Test Reactor Engineering Mockup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daughtry, J.W.; Dobbin, K.D.

    1975-01-01

    Reactivity effects associated with the replacement of low-/sup 240/Pu fuel with high-/sup 240/Pu fuel were calculated and compared to measurements made in the FTR Engineering Mockup Critical (EMC). When the Pu and U isotopic compositions were changed in a way that increased the amounts of /sup 240/Pu and /sup 241/Pu and reduced the amounts of /sup 239/Pu and /sup 238/U while conserving total fissile mass and total fertile mass, the reactivity effect was positive. Calculation-to-experiment bias factors were obtained for this type of change and for the replacement of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ in subassembly-size zones of the EMC. The k/sub e/--k/sub c/ bias decreased when high-/sup 240/Pu fuel was introduced and increased when Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was replaced with U/sub 3/O/sub 8/. When the two changes were combined, their effects on the k/sub e/ --k/sub c/ bias tended to cancel out. The work described is related to plans for the utilization of light water reactor discharge Pu in the FTR.

  10. QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT JANUARY, FEBRUARY, MARCH, 1968 REACTOR FUELS AND MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS FOR FUELS AND MATERIALS BRANCH OF USAEC DIVISION OF REACTOR DEVELOPMENT AND TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, J. J.; de Halas, D. R.; Nightingale, R. E.; Worlton, D. C.

    1968-06-01

    Progress is reported in these areas: nuclear graphite; fuel development for gas-cooled reactors; HTGR graphite studies; nuclear ceramics; fast-reactor nitrides research; non-destructive testing; metallic fuels; basic swelling studies; ATR gas and water loop operation and maintenance; reactor fuels and materials; fast reactor dosimetry and damage analysis; and irradiation damage to reactor metals.

  11. FUEL ASSEMBLY FOR A NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.

    1958-04-29

    A fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor of the type wherein liquid coolant is circulated through the core of the reactor in contact with the external surface of the fuel elements is described. In this design a plurality of parallel plates containing fissionable material are spaced about one-tenth of an inch apart and are supported between a pair of spaced parallel side members generally perpendicular to the plates. The plates all have a small continuous and equal curvature in the same direction between the side members.

  12. Models for steady state and transient heat conduction in a nuclear power reactor fuel element; Modelos para conduccion de calor estacionaria y transiente en un elemento combustible de un reactor de potencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ventura, Mirta A. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    Two radial conduction models (one for steady state and another for unsteady state) in a nuclear power reactor fuel element have been developed. The objective is to obtain the temperatures in the fuel pellet and the cladding. The lumped-parameter hypothesis have been adopted to represent the system. The steady state model has been verified and both models have been compared. A method to calculate the conductance in the gap between the UO{sub 2} pellet and the clad and its associated uncertainty has been included in the steady state model. (author)

  13. Optimization of the distribution of bars with gadolinium oxide in reactor fuel elements PWR; Optimizacion de la distribucion de barras con oxido de gadolinio en elementos combustibles para reactores PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melgar Santa Cecilia, P. A.; Velazquez, J.; Ahnert Iglesias, C.

    2014-07-01

    In the schemes of low leakage, currently used in the majority of PWR reactors, it makes use of absorbent consumables for the effective control of the factors of peak, the critical concentration of initial boron and the moderator temperature coefficient. One of the most used absorbing is the oxide of gadolinium, which is integrated within the fuel pickup. Occurs a process of optimization of fuel elements with oxide of gadolinium, which allows for a smaller number of configurations with a low peak factor for bar. (Author)

  14. Simulated nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, Victor T.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for electrically simulating a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. It includes a heater assembly having a top end and a bottom end and a plurality of concentric heater tubes having electrical circuitry connected to a power source, and radially spaced from each other. An outer target tube and an inner target tube is concentric with the heater tubes and with each other, and the outer target tube surrounds and is radially spaced from the heater tubes. The inner target tube is surrounded by and radially spaced from the heater tubes and outer target tube. The top of the assembly is generally open to allow for the electrical power connection to the heater tubes, and the bottom of the assembly includes means for completing the electrical circuitry in the heater tubes to provide electrical resistance heating to simulate the power profile in a nuclear reactor. The embedded conductor elements in each heater tube is split into two halves for a substantial portion of its length and provided with electrical isolation such that each half of the conductor is joined at one end and is not joined at the other end.

  15. Assessment of Startup Fuel Options for the GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Carmack (062056); Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu (103171); David Alberstein

    2008-02-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Program (GNEP) includes a program element for the development and construction of an advanced sodium cooled fast reactor to demonstrate the burning (transmutation) of significant quantities of minor actinides obtained from a separations process and fabricated into a transuranic bearing fuel assembly. To demonstrate and qualify transuranic (TRU) fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype is needed. The ABR would necessarily be started up using conventional metal alloy or oxide (U or U, Pu) fuel. Startup fuel is needed for the ABR for the first 2 to 4 core loads of fuel in the ABR. Following start up, a series of advanced TRU bearing fuel assemblies will be irradiated in qualification lead test assemblies in the ABR. There are multiple options for this startup fuel. This report provides a description of the possible startup fuel options as well as possible fabrication alternatives available to the program in the current domestic and international facilities and infrastructure.

  16. Radioisotope concentrations in the PRTR primary coolant and helium system during operation with a failed fuel element(s)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, R.W.; Thomas, C.W.

    1961-09-07

    Fission product measurements in the PRTR primary D{sub 2}O and helium systems during the startup tests in May 1961, showed the presence of a defective fuel elements(s). Reactor operation was discontinued during the latter part of May and during June for reactor maintenance and fuel element inspection. On resumption of operation on July 1, a sampling and analytical program was initiated to study the radioisotope concentrations resulting from this defective element(s) which were present in the primary D{sub 2}O and helium systems during the various phases of reactor operation. The data accumulated during this study are to serve as background information in future fuel element rupture identification and location studies as well as serving as a guide in setting up the rupture monitor for the individual tubes of the PRTR reactor. A summary of the analytical results from this study and their theoretical interpretation is presented in this paper.

  17. KüFA safety testing of HTR fuel pebbles irradiated in the High Flux Reactor in Petten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, O., E-mail: oliver.seeger@rwth-aachen.de [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Safety of Irradiated Nuclear Materials Unit, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Laurie, M., E-mail: mathias.laurie@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Safety of Irradiated Nuclear Materials Unit, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Abjani, A. El; Ejton, J.; Boudaud, D.; Freis, D.; Carbol, P.; Rondinella, V.V. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Safety of Irradiated Nuclear Materials Unit, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Fütterer, M. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Energy and Transport (IET), Nuclear Reactor Integrity Assessment and Knowledge Management Unit, PO Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Allelein, H.-J. [Lehrstuhl für Reaktorsicherheit und -technik an der RWTH Aachen, Kackertstraße 9, 52072 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    The Cold Finger Apparatus (KühlFinger-Apparatur—KüFA) in operation at JRC-ITU is designed to experimentally scrutinize the effects of Depressurization LOss of Forced Circulation (D-LOFC) accident scenarios on irradiated High Temperature Reactor (HTR) fuel pebbles. Up to 1600 °C, the reference maximum temperature for these accidents, high-quality German HTR fuel pebbles have already demonstrated a small fission product release. This paper discusses and compares the releases obtained from KüFA-testing the pebbles HFR-K5/3 and HFR-EU1/3, which were both irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten. We present the time-dependent fractional release of the volatile fission product {sup 137}Cs as well as the fission gas {sup 85}Kr for both pebbles. For HFR-EU1/3 the isotopes {sup 134}Cs and {sup 154}Eu as well as the shorter-lived {sup 110m}Ag have also been measured. A detailed description of the experimental setup and its accuracy is given. The data for the recently tested pebbles is discussed in the context of previous results.

  18. Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Fuel-Performance Test Facility (FPTF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardini, J.A.; Brubaker, R.C.; Veith, D.J.; Giorgis, G.C.; Walker, D.E.; Seim, O.S.

    1982-01-01

    The Fuel-Performance Test Facility (FPTF) is the latest in a series of special EBR-II instrumented in-core test facilities. A flow control valve in the facility is programmed to vary the coolant flow, and thus the temperature, in an experimental-irradiation subassembly beneath it and coupled to it. In this way, thermal transients can be simulated in that subassembly without changing the temperatures in surrounding subassemblies. The FPTF also monitors sodium flow and temperature, and detects delayed neutrons in the sodium effluent from the experimental-irradiation subassembly beneath it. This facility also has an acoustical detector (high-temperature microphone) for detecting sodium boiling.

  19. Metal Fuel Development and Verification for Prototype Generation IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Bock Lee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Metal fuel is being developed for the prototype generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR to be built by 2028. U–Zr fuel is a driver for the initial core of the PGSFR, and U–transuranics (TRU–Zr fuel will gradually replace U–Zr fuel through its qualification in the PGSFR. Based on the vast worldwide experiences of U–Zr fuel, work on U–Zr fuel is focused on fuel design, fabrication of fuel components, and fuel verification tests. U–TRU–Zr fuel uses TRU recovered through pyroelectrochemical processing of spent PWR (pressurized water reactor fuels, which contains highly radioactive minor actinides and chemically active lanthanide or rare earth elements as carryover impurities. An advanced fuel slug casting system, which can prevent vaporization of volatile elements through a control of the atmospheric pressure of the casting chamber and also deal with chemically active lanthanide elements using protective coatings in the casting crucible, was developed. Fuel cladding of the ferritic–martensitic steel FC92, which has higher mechanical strength at a high temperature than conventional HT9 cladding, was developed and fabricated, and is being irradiated in the fast reactor.

  20. Design and Performance of the UO2 Fuel for the Topaz-II Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoth, Carl W.; Degaltsev, Yuri; Gontar, Alexander; Rakitskaya, Elena

    1994-07-01

    The Russian Topaz-II space reactor system is being modified for use for the United States - Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Project (NEPSTP). The nuclear reactor fuel consists of annular UO2 fuel pellets with 17 mm diameter and 9 mm height. The fuel is fabricated to high purity and high density (96% theoretical density). The reactor core contains 37 single-cell thermionic fuel elements (TFEs), each with approximately 40 fuel pellets. The fuel pellets are contained within an emitter tube of single crystal Mo-3%Nb with a tungsten coating on the outer surface to enhance thermionic emission. The fuel has evolved through an ongoing development program to provide low swelling and very high mechanical strength. Extensive irradiation testing, chemical compatibility testing, and vibration testing were conducted in Russia to verify the performance and lifetime capabilities of the fuel and TFE. This paper summarizes the fuel design, fuel development, and performance testing of the UO2 fuel for the TOPAZ-II reactor.

  1. FY15 Status Report: CIRFT Testing of Spent Nuclear Fuel Rods from Boiler Water Reactor Limerick

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jiang, Hao [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a systematic study of used nuclear fuel (UNF, also known as spent nuclear fuel [SNF]) integrity under simulated transportation environments using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot-cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in August 2013. Under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship, ORNL completed four benchmark tests, four static tests, and twelve dynamic or cycle tests on H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burn-up (HBU) fuel. The clad of the HBR fuels was made of Zircaloy-4. Testing was continued in fiscal year (FY) 2014 using Department of Energy (DOE) funds. The additional CIRFT was conducted on three HBR rods (R3, R4, and R5) in which two specimens failed and one specimen was tested to over 2.23 10⁷ cycles without failing. The data analysis on all the HBR UNF rods demonstrated that it is necessary to characterize the fatigue life of the UNF rods in terms of (1) the curvature amplitude and (2) the maximum absolute of curvature extremes. The maximum extremes are significant because they signify the maximum of tensile stress for the outer fiber of the bending rod. CIRFT testing has also addressed a large variation in hydrogen content on the HBR rods. While the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods, the hydrogen content also has an important effect on the lifetime attained at each load range tested. In FY 15, ten SNF rod segments from BWR Limerick were tested using ORNL CIRFT, with one under static and nine dynamic loading conditions. Under static unidirectional loading, a moment of 85 N·m was obtained at maximum curvature 4.0 m⁻¹. The specimen did not show any sign of failure in three repeated loading cycles to almost same maximum curvature. Ten cyclic tests were conducted with amplitude varying from 15.2 to 7.1 N·m. Failure was observed in nine of the tested rod specimens. The cycles to failure were

  2. Fuel Element Technical Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burley, H.H. [ed.

    1956-08-01

    It is the purpose of the Fuel Element Technical Manual to Provide a single document describing the fabrication processes used in the manufacture of the fuel element as well as the technical bases for these processes. The manual will be instrumental in the indoctrination of personnel new to the field and will provide a single data reference for all personnel involved in the design or manufacture of the fuel element. The material contained in this manual was assembled by members of the Engineering Department and the Manufacturing Department at the Hanford Atomic Products Operation between the dates October, 1955 and June, 1956. Arrangement of the manual. The manual is divided into six parts: Part I--introduction; Part II--technical bases; Part III--process; Part IV--plant and equipment; Part V--process control and improvement; and VI--safety.

  3. Advanced Reactor Fuels Irradiation Experiment Design Objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hayes, Steven Lowe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dempsey, Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the objectives of the current irradiation testing activities being undertaken by the Advanced Fuels Campaign relative to supporting the development and demonstration of innovative design features for metallic fuels in order to realize reliable performance to ultra-high burnups. The AFC-3 and AFC-4 test series are nearing completion; the experiments in this test series that have been completed or are in progress are reviewed and the objectives and test matrices for the final experiments in these two series are defined. The objectives, testing strategy, and test parameters associated with a future AFC test series, AFC-5, are documented. Finally, the future intersections and/or synergies of the AFC irradiation testing program with those of the TREAT transient testing program, emerging needs of proposed Versatile Test Reactor concepts, and the Joint Fuel Cycle Study program’s Integrated Recycle Test are discussed.

  4. PLUTONIUM METALLIC FUELS FOR FAST REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAN, MARIUS [Los Alamos National Laboratory; HECKER, SIEGFRIED S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-02-07

    Early interest in metallic plutonium fuels for fast reactors led to much research on plutonium alloy systems including binary solid solutions with the addition of aluminum, gallium, or zirconium and low-melting eutectic alloys with iron and nickel or cobalt. There was also interest in ternaries of these elements with plutonium and cerium. The solid solution and eutectic alloys have most unusual properties, including negative thermal expansion in some solid-solution alloys and the highest viscosity known for liquid metals in the Pu-Fe system. Although metallic fuels have many potential advantages over ceramic fuels, the early attempts were unsuccessful because these fuels suffered from high swelling rates during burn up and high smearing densities. The liquid metal fuels experienced excessive corrosion. Subsequent work on higher-melting U-PuZr metallic fuels was much more promising. In light of the recent rebirth of interest in fast reactors, we review some of the key properties of the early fuels and discuss the challenges presented by the ternary alloys.

  5. Thermophysical and Corrosion Characteristics of the Actual and Potential Fuel-Element Jackets of Light-Water Reactors in the Case of an Accident with Coolant Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyuk, S. S.; Kiselev, D. S.; Kuzma-Kichta, Yu. A.; Mokrushin, A. A.; Parshin, N. Ya.; Popov, E. B.; Soldatkin, D. M.; Fedik, I. I.

    2017-01-01

    Corrosion tests were carried out and experimental data are presented on the characteristics of steam-phase oxidation of fuel-element jackets made from an É110G zirconium alloy and vacuum-melted molybdenum in a temperature range of up to 1400°C at atmospheric pressure. The shut-down cooling characteristics on repeated flooding of model fuel assemblies of large-scale stands with fuel elements simulators having jackets made from various standard materials and those from a promising molybdenum one are compared. It is shown that interaction of steam with zirconium alloy is more intense than with molybdenum. At the present time the data on molybdenum are limited.

  6. Radionuclide release from research reactor spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtius, H., E-mail: h.curtius@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Energieforschung, IEF-6 Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik, Geb. 05.3, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kaiser, G.; Mueller, E.; Bosbach, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Energieforschung, IEF-6 Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik, Geb. 05.3, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-09-01

    (IV) oxyhydroxides species due to radiolytic effects cannot completely be ruled out. Solution concentrations of U were within the range of the solubility limits of the solid phase U(OH){sub 4}(am). The determined concentrations of U and Am in solution were about one order of magnitude higher for the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al fuel sample. Here, the formation of U/Si containing secondary phase components and their influence on radionuclide solubility cannot be ruled out. Results of this work show that the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al and UAl{sub x}-Al dispersed research reactor spent fuel samples dissolved completely within the test period of 3.5 years in MgCl{sub 2}-rich brine in the presence of Fe{sup 2+}. In view of final disposal this means that these fuel matrices represent no barrier. The radionuclides will be released instantaneously. Cs (the long-lived isotope {sup 135}Cs is of special concern with respect to final disposal) and Sr were classified as mobile radionuclide species. For U, Am, Pu and Eu, a reimmobilization was observed. Sorption is the process which is assumed to be responsible for the reimmobilization of the long-lived actinide Am and the lanthanide Eu. Solution concentrations of U and Pu seem to be controlled by their solubility controlling solid phases.

  7. Analysis of the ATR fuel element swaging process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richins, W.D.; Miller, G.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report documents a detailed evaluation of the swaging process used to connect fuel plates to side plates in Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel elements. The swaging is a mechanical process that begins with fitting a fuel plate into grooves in the side plates. Once a fuel plate is positioned, a lip on each of two side plate grooves is pressed into the fuel plate using swaging wheels to form the joints. Each connection must have a specified strength (measured in terms, of a pullout force capacity) to assure that these joints do not fail during reactor operation. The purpose of this study is to analyze the swaging process and associated procedural controls, and to provide recommendations to assure that the manufacturing process produces swaged connections that meet the minimum strength requirement. The current fuel element manufacturer, Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) of Lynchburg, Virginia, follows established procedures that include quality inspections and process controls in swaging these connections. The procedures have been approved by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies and are designed to assure repeatability of the process and structural integrity of each joint. Prior to July 1994, ATR fuel elements were placed in the Hydraulic Test Facility (HTF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (AGNAIL), Test Reactor Area (TRA) for application of Boehmite (an aluminum oxide) film and for checking structural integrity before placement of the elements into the ATR. The results presented in this report demonstrate that the pullout strength of the swaged connections is assured by the current manufacturing process (with several recommended enhancements) without the need for- testing each element in the HTF.

  8. Nuclear fuel in a reactor accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Peter C; Ewing, Rodney C; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2012-03-09

    Nuclear accidents that lead to melting of a reactor core create heterogeneous materials containing hundreds of radionuclides, many with short half-lives. The long-lived fission products and transuranium elements within damaged fuel remain a concern for millennia. Currently, accurate fundamental models for the prediction of release rates of radionuclides from fuel, especially in contact with water, after an accident remain limited. Relatively little is known about fuel corrosion and radionuclide release under the extreme chemical, radiation, and thermal conditions during and subsequent to a nuclear accident. We review the current understanding of nuclear fuel interactions with the environment, including studies over the relatively narrow range of geochemical, hydrological, and radiation environments relevant to geological repository performance, and discuss priorities for research needed to develop future predictive models.

  9. STAT, GAPS, STRAIN, DRWDIM: a system of computer codes for analyzing HTGR fuel test element metrology data. User's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saurwein, J.J.

    1977-08-01

    A system of computer codes has been developed to statistically reduce Peach Bottom fuel test element metrology data and to compare the material strains and fuel rod-fuel hole gaps computed from these data with HTGR design code predictions. The codes included in this system are STAT, STRAIN, GAPS, and DRWDIM. STAT statistically evaluates test element metrology data yielding fuel rod, fuel body, and sleeve irradiation-induced strains; fuel rod anisotropy; and additional data characterizing each analyzed fuel element. STRAIN compares test element fuel rod and fuel body irradiation-induced strains computed from metrology data with the corresponding design code predictions. GAPS compares test element fuel rod, fuel hole heat transfer gaps computed from metrology data with the corresponding design code predictions. DRWDIM plots the measured and predicted gaps and strains. Although specifically developed to expedite the analysis of Peach Bottom fuel test elements, this system can be applied, without extensive modification, to the analysis of Fort St. Vrain or other HTGR-type fuel test elements.

  10. Gel-sphere-pac reactor fuel fabrication and its application to a variety of fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, A.R.; Judkins, R.R. (comps.)

    1979-12-01

    The gel-sphere-pac fuel fabrication option was evaluated for its possible application to commercial scale fuel fabrication for 19 fuel element designs that use oxide fuel in metal clad rods. The dry gel spheres are prepared at the reprocessing plant and are then calcined, sintered, inspected, and loaded into fuel rods and packed by low-energy vibration. A fuel smear density of 83 to 88% theoretical can be obtained. All fuel fabrication process steps were defined and evaluated from fuel receiving to finished fuel element shipping. The evaluation also covers the feasibility of the process, the current status of technology, estimates of the required time and cost to develop the technology to commercial status, and the safety and licensability of commercial scale plants. The primary evaluation was for a Light-Water Reactor fuel element containing (U,Pu)O/sub 2/ fuel. The other 18 fuel element types - 3 for Light-Water Reactors, 1 for a Heavy-Water Reactor, 1 for a Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor, 7 for Liquid-Metal-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactors, and 3 pairs for Light-Water Prebreeder and Breeder Reactors - were compared with the Light-Water Reactor. The gel-sphere-pac option was found applicable to 17 of the 19 element types; the characteristics of a commercial scale plant were defined for these for making cost estimates for such plants. The evaluation clearly shows the gel-sphere-pac process to be a viable fuel fabrication option. Estimates indicate a significant potential fabrication cost advantage for the gel-sphere-pac process if a remotely operated and remotely maintained fuel fabrication plant is required.

  11. Neutron fluxes in test reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youinou, Gilles Jean-Michel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Communicate the fact that high-power water-cooled test reactors such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) or the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) cannot provide fast flux levels as high as sodium-cooled fast test reactors. The memo first presents some basics physics considerations about neutron fluxes in test reactors and then uses ATR, HFIR and JHR as an illustration of the performance of modern high-power water-cooled test reactors.

  12. Pebble Bed Reactor: core physics and fuel cycle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondy, D.R.; Worley, B.A.

    1979-10-01

    The Pebble Bed Reactor is a gas-cooled, graphite-moderated high-temperature reactor that is continuously fueled with small spherical fuel elements. The projected performance was studied over a broad range of reactor applicability. Calculations were done for a burner on a throwaway cycle, a converter with recycle, a prebreeder and breeder. The thorium fuel cycle was considered using low, medium (denatured), and highly enriched uranium. The base calculations were carried out for electrical energy generation in a 1200 MW/sub e/ plant. A steady-state, continuous-fueling model was developed and one- and two-dimensional calculations were used to characterize performance. Treating a single point in time effects considerable savings in computer time as opposed to following a long reactor history, permitting evaluation of reactor performance over a broad range of design parameters and operating modes.

  13. Technology Options for a Fast Spectrum Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. Wachs; R. W. King; I. Y. Glagolenko; Y. Shatilla

    2006-06-01

    Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory has evaluated technology options for a new fast spectrum reactor to meet the fast-spectrum irradiation requirements for the USDOE Generation IV (Gen IV) and Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) programs. The US currently has no capability for irradiation testing of large volumes of fuels or materials in a fast-spectrum reactor required to support the development of Gen IV fast reactor systems or to demonstrate actinide burning, a key element of the AFCI program. The technologies evaluated and the process used to select options for a fast irradiation test reactor (FITR) for further evaluation to support these programmatic objectives are outlined in this paper.

  14. Fuel accident performance testing for small HTRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, W.; Pott, G.; Nabielek, H.

    1990-04-01

    Irradiated spherical fuel elements containing 16400 coated UO 2 particles each were heated at temperatures between 1600 and 1800°C and the fission product release was measured. The demonstrated fission product retention at 1600°C establishes the basis for the design of small modular HTRs which inherently limit the temperature to 1600°C by passive means. In addition to this demonstration, the test data show that modern TRISO fuels provide an ample performance margin: release normally sets in at 1800°C; this occurs at 1600°C only with fuels irradiated under conditions which significantly exceed current reactor design requirements.

  15. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURAL CHANGES IN U-MO DISPERSED FUEL OF FULL-SIZE FUEL ELEMENTS AND MINI-RODS IRRADIATED IN THE MIR REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEKSEY. L. IZHUTOV

    2013-12-01

    The full-size fuel rods were irradiated up to an average burnup of ∼ 60%235U; the mini-rods were irradiated to an average burnup of ∼ 85%235U. The presented data show a significant increase of the void fraction in the U-Mo alloy as the U-235 burnup rises from ∼ 40% up to ∼ 85%. The effect of irradiation test conditions and U-235 burnup were analyzed with regard to the formation of an interaction layer between the matrix and fuel particles as well as generation of porosity in the U-Mo alloy. Shown here are changes in distribution of U fission products as the U-235 burnup increases from ∼ 40% up to ∼ 85%.

  16. Modeling and Testing of Non-Nuclear, Highpower Simulated Nuclear Thermal Rocket Reactor Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Daniel R.

    2005-01-01

    When the President offered his new vision for space exploration in January of 2004, he said, "Our third goal is to return to the moon by 2020, as the launching point for missions beyond," and, "With the experience and knowledge gained on the moon, we will then be ready to take the next steps of space exploration: human missions to Mars and to worlds beyond." A human mission to Mars implies the need to move large payloads as rapidly as possible, in an efficient and cost-effective manner. Furthermore, with the scientific advancements possible with Project Prometheus and its Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO), (these use electric propulsion), there is a renewed interest in deep space exploration propulsion systems. According to many mission analyses, nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP), with its relatively high thrust and high specific impulse, is a serious candidate for such missions. Nuclear rockets utilize fission energy to heat a reactor core to very high temperatures. Hydrogen gas flowing through the core then becomes superheated and exits the engine at very high exhaust velocities. The combination of temperature and low molecular weight results in an engine with specific impulses above 900 seconds. This is almost twice the performance of the LOX/LH2 space shuttle engines, and the impact of this performance would be to reduce the trip time of a manned Mars mission from the 2.5 years, possible with chemical engines, to about 12-14 months.

  17. Summary of Thermocouple Performance During Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor and Out-of-Pile Thermocouple Testing in Support of Such Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. J. Palmer; DC Haggard; J. W. Herter; M. Scervini; W. D. Swank; D. L. Knudson; R. S. Cherry

    2011-07-01

    High temperature gas reactor experiments create unique challenges for thermocouple based temperature measurements. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. This drift is particularly severe for high temperature platinum-rhodium thermocouples (Types S, R, and B); and tungsten-rhenium thermocouples (Types C and W). For lower temperature applications, previous experiences with type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluxes. Currently the use of these Nickel based thermocouples is limited when the temperature exceeds 1000°C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. High rates of open-circuit failure are also typical. Over the past ten years, three long-term Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments have been conducted with measured temperatures ranging from 700oC – 1200oC. A variety of standard Type N and specialty thermocouple designs have been used in these experiments with mixed results. A brief summary of thermocouple performance in these experiments is provided. Most recently, out of pile testing has been conducted on a variety of Type N thermocouple designs at the following (nominal) temperatures and durations: 1150oC and 1200oC for 2000 hours at each temperature, followed by 200 hours at 1250oC, and 200 hours at 1300oC. The standard Type N design utilizes high purity crushed MgO insulation and an Inconel 600 sheath. Several variations on the standard Type N design were tested, including Haynes 214 alloy sheath, spinel (MgAl2O4) insulation instead of MgO, a customized sheath developed at the University of Cambridge, and finally a loose assembly thermocouple with hard fired alumina

  18. Summary of thermocouple performance during advanced gas reactor fuel irradiation experiments in the advanced test reactor and out-of-pile thermocouple testing in support of such experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, A. J.; Haggard, DC; Herter, J. W.; Swank, W. D.; Knudson, D. L.; Cherry, R. S. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, MS 4112, Idaho Falls, ID, (United States); Scervini, M. [University of Cambridge, Department of Material Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, CB3 0FS, Cambridge, (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    High temperature gas reactor experiments create unique challenges for thermocouple-based temperature measurements. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time-dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time-dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. This drift is particularly severe for high temperature platinum-rhodium thermocouples (Types S, R, and B) and tungsten-rhenium thermocouples (Type C). For lower temperature applications, previous experiences with Type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly, Type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluence. Currently, the use of these nickel-based thermocouples is limited when the temperature exceeds 1000 deg. C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. High rates of open-circuit failure are also typical. Over the past 10 years, three long-term Advanced Gas Reactor experiments have been conducted with measured temperatures ranging from 700 deg. C - 1200 deg. C. A variety of standard Type N and specialty thermocouple designs have been used in these experiments with mixed results. A brief summary of thermocouple performance in these experiments is provided. Most recently, out-of-pile testing has been conducted on a variety of Type N thermocouple designs at the following (nominal) temperatures and durations: 1150 deg. C and 1200 deg. C for 2,000 hours at each temperature, followed by 200 hours at 1250 deg. C and 200 hours at 1300 deg. C. The standard Type N design utilizes high purity, crushed MgO insulation and an Inconel 600 sheath. Several variations on the standard Type N design were tested, including a Haynes 214 alloy sheath, spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) insulation instead of MgO, a customized sheath developed at the University of Cambridge, and finally a loose assembly

  19. Deep-Burn Modular Helium Reactor Fuel Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEachern, D

    2002-12-02

    This document contains the workscope, schedule and cost for the technology development tasks needed to satisfy the fuel and fission product transport Design Data Needs (DDNs) for the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR), operating in its role of transmuting transuranic (TRU) nuclides in spent fuel discharged from commercial light-water reactors (LWRs). In its application for transmutation, the GT-MHR is referred to as the Deep-Burn MHR (DB-MHR). This Fuel Development Plan (FDP) describes part of the overall program being undertaken by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), utilities, and industry to evaluate the use of the GT-MHR to transmute transuranic nuclides from spent nuclear fuel. The Fuel Development Plan (FDP) includes the work on fuel necessary to support the design and licensing of the DB-MHR. The FDP is organized into ten sections. Section 1 provides a summary of the most important features of the plan, including cost and schedule information. Section 2 describes the DB-MHR concept, the features of its fuel and the plan to develop coated particle fuel for transmutation. Section 3 describes the knowledge base for fabrication of coated particles, the experience with irradiation performance of coated particle fuels, the database for fission product transport in HTGR cores, and describes test data and calculations for the performance of coated particle fuel while in a repository. Section 4 presents the fuel performance requirements in terms of as-manufactured quality and performance of the fuel coatings under irradiation and accident conditions. These requirements are provisional because the design of the DB-MHR is in an early stage. However, the requirements are presented in this preliminary form to guide the initial work on the fuel development. Section 4 also presents limits on the irradiation conditions to which the coated particle fuel can be subjected for the core design. These limits are based on past irradiation experience. Section 5 describes

  20. Management of research reactor; dynamic characteristics analysis for reactor structures related with vibration of HANARO fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Chang Kee; Shim, Joo Sup [Shinwa Technology Information, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    The objective of this study is to deduce the dynamic correlation between the fuel assembly and the reactor structure. Dynamic characteristics analyses for reactor structure related with vibration of HANARO fuel assembly have been performed For the dynamic characteristic analysis, the in-air models of the round and hexagonal flow tubes, 18-element and 36-element fuel assemblies, and reactor structure were developed. By calculating the hydrodynamic mass and distributing it on the in-air models, the in-water models of the flow tubes, the fuel assemblies, and the reactor structure were developed. Then, modal analyses for developed in-air and in-water models have been performed. Especially, two 18-element fuel assemblies and three 36-element fuel assemblies were included in the in-water reactor models. For the verification of the modal analysis results, the natural frequencies and the mode shapes of the fuel assembly were compared with those obtained from the experiment. Finally the analysis results of the reactor structure were compared with them performed by AECL Based on the reactor model without PCS piping, the in-water reactor model including the fuel assemblies was developed, and its modal analysis was performed. The analysis results demonstrate that there are no resonance between the fuel assembly and the reactor structures. 26 refs., 419 figs., 85 tabs. (Author)

  1. FCRD Advanced Reactor (Transmutation) Fuels Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janney, Dawn Elizabeth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Papesch, Cynthia Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Transmutation of minor actinides such as Np, Am, and Cm in spent nuclear fuel is of international interest because of its potential for reducing the long-term health and safety hazards caused by the radioactivity of the spent fuel. One important approach to transmutation (currently being pursued by the DOE Fuel Cycle Research & Development Advanced Fuels Campaign) involves incorporating the minor actinides into U-Pu-Zr alloys, which can be used as fuel in fast reactors. U-Pu-Zr alloys are well suited for electrolytic refining, which leads to incorporation rare-earth fission products such as La, Ce, Pr, and Nd. It is, therefore, important to understand not only the properties of U-Pu-Zr alloys but also those of U-Pu-Zr alloys with concentrations of minor actinides (Np, Am) and rare-earth elements (La, Ce, Pr, and Nd) similar to those in reprocessed fuel. In addition to requiring extensive safety precautions, alloys containing U, Pu, and minor actinides (Np and Am) are difficult to study for numerous reasons, including their complex phase transformations, characteristically sluggish phasetransformation kinetics, tendency to produce experimental results that vary depending on the histories of individual samples, rapid oxidation, and sensitivity to contaminants such as oxygen in concentrations below a hundred parts per million. Although less toxic, rare-earth elements such as La, Ce, Pr, and Nd are also difficult to study for similar reasons. Many of the experimental measurements were made before 1980, and the level of documentation for experimental methods and results varies widely. It is, therefore, not surprising that little is known with certainty about U-Pu-Zr alloys, particularly those that also contain minor actinides and rare-earth elements. General acceptance of results commonly indicates that there is only a single measurement for a particular property. This handbook summarizes currently available information about U, Pu, Zr, Np, Am, La, Ce, Pr, and Nd and

  2. Central fuel worth in the Fast Test Reactor (FTR) engineering mockup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbin, K.D.; Daughtry, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    An experiment was performed in the FTR-EMC to measure the total reactivity worth and the axial worth profile of withdrawing the central subassembly into the axial regions above the core. Calculations using three-dimensional X-Y-Z and two-dimensional R-Z models have been made to obtain reactivity worths for comparison with the experimental results. Another experiment measured the reactivity worth of replacing the fueled section of the central subassembly with sodium channel composition. The purposes of the analysis of this experiment are: (1) to determine if the C/E values obtained in the earlier three-dimensional calculations could be reproduced using another experiment from the FTR engineering mockup for comparison, (2) to determine what type of axial buckling adjustments are required to give the same calculated central fuel worths with a two-dimensional X-Y model that were obtained using the three-dimensional model, and (3) to obtain C/E values for the worths of an inner driver subassembly and an outer driver subassembly relative to sodium channel composition at the center of the EMC. A brief description of the experiments, a detailed explanation of the analytical methods, the measured and calculated results, and a comparison of these results.

  3. Development of nuclear fuel for integrated reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kee Nam; Kim, H. K.; Kang, H. S.; Yoon, K. H.; Chun, T. H.; In, W. K.; Oh, D. S.; Kim, D. W.; Woo, Y. M

    1999-04-01

    The spacer grid assembly which provides both lateral and vertical support for the fuel rods and also provides a flow channel between the fuel rods to afford the heat transfer from the fuel pellet into the coolant in a reactor, is one of the major structural components of nuclear fuel for LWR. Therefore, the spacer grid assembly is a highly ranked component when the improvement of hardware is pursued for promoting fuel performance. Main objective of this project is to develop the inherent spacer grid assembly and to research relevant technologies on the spacer grid assembly. And, the UO{sub 2}-based SMART fuel is preliminarily designed for the 330MWt class SMART, which is planned to produce heat as well as electricity. Results from this project are listed as follows. 1. Three kinds of spacer grid candidates have been invented and applied for domestic and US patents. In addition, the demo SG(3x3 array) were fabricated, which the mechanical/structural test was carried out with. 2. The mechanical/structural technologies related to the spacer grid development are studied and relevant test requirements were established. 3. Preliminary design data of the UO{sub 2}-based SMART fuel have been produced. The structural characteristics of several components such as the top/bottom end piece and the holddown spring assembly were analysed by consulting the numerical method.

  4. Local stability tests in Dresden 2 boiling water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    March-Leuba, J.; Fry, D.N.; Buchanan, M.E.; McNew, C.O.

    1984-04-01

    This report presents the results of a local stability test performed at Dresden Unit 2 in May 1983 to determine the effect of a new fuel element design on local channel stability. This test was performed because the diameter of the new fuel rods increases the heat transfer coefficient, making the reactor more responsive and, thus, more susceptible to instabilities. After four of the new fuel elements with a 9 x 9 array of fuel rods were loaded into Dresden 2, the test was performed by inserting an adjacent control rod all the way in and then withdrawing it to its original position at maximum speed. At the moment of the test, reactor conditions were 52.7% power and 38.9% flow. Both the new 9 x 9 fuel elements and the standard 8 x 8 ones proved to be locally stable when operating at minimum pump speed at the beginning of cycle in Dresden 2, and no significant difference was found between the behavior of the two fuel types. Finally, Dresden 2 showed a high degree of stability during control rod and normal noise type perturbations.

  5. Comparison of depletion results for a boiling water reactor fuel element with CASMO and SCALE 6.1 (TRITON/NEWT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesado, C.; Morera, D.; Miro, R.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G., E-mail: cmesado@isirym.upv.es, E-mail: dmorera@isirym.upv.es, E-mail: rmiro@isirym.upv.es, E-mail: tbarrachina@isirym.upv.es, E-mail: gverdu@isirym.upv.es [Universitat Politecnica de Valencia (UPV), Valencia (Spain). Institute for the Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety; Concejal, Alberto, E-mail: acbe@iberdrola.es [Iberdrola Ingenieria y Construcion, S.A.U, Madrid (Spain); Soler, Amparo, E-mail: asoler@iberdrola.es [SEA Propulsion S. L., Madrid (Spain); Melara, Jose, E-mail: j.melara@iberdrola.es [Iberdrola Generacion Nuclear, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    In this work, the results of depletion calculations with CASMO and SCALE 6.1 (TRITON) are compared. To achieve it, a region of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel element is modeled, using both codes. To take into account different operating conditions, the simulations are repeated with different void fraction, ranging from null void fraction to a void fraction closed to one. Special care was used to keep in mind that the homogenization of the materials and the two group approach was the same in both codes. Additionally, KENO-VI and MCDANCOFF modules are used. The k-effective calculated by KENO-VI is used to ensure that the starting point was correct and MCDANCOFF module is used to calculate the Dancoff factors in order to improve the model accuracy. To validate the whole process, a comparison of k{sub eff}, and cross-sections collapsed and homogenized is shown. The results show a very good agreement, with an average error around the 1.75%. Furthermore, an automatic process for translating CASMO data to SCALE input decks was developed. The reason for the translation is the fact that SCALE's TRITON module is a new code very powerful and continuously being developed. Thus, great advantage can be taken from the current and future SCALE features. This is hoped to produce more realistic models, and hence, increase the accuracy of neutronic libraries. (author)

  6. Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor - Rev. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Gail Lynn; Mc Cardell, Richard Keith; Illum, Douglas Brent

    2002-09-01

    The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was developed by Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to demonstrate the potential of a water-cooled, thorium oxide fuel cycle breeder reactor. The LWBR core operated from 1977-82 without major incident. The fuel and fuel components suffered minimal damage during operation, and the reactor testing was deemed successful. Extensive destructive and nondestructive postirradiation examinations confirmed that the fuel was in good condition with minimal amounts of cladding deformities and fuel pellet cracks. Fuel was placed in wet storage upon arrival at the Expended Core Facility, then dried and sent to the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center for underground dry storage. It is likely that the fuel remains in good condition at its current underground dry storage location at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Reports show no indication of damage to the core associated with shipping, loading, or storage.

  7. Proliferation Resistant Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, L W; Moody, K J; Bradley, K S; Lorenzana, H E

    2011-02-18

    Global appetite for fission power is projected to grow dramatically this century, and for good reason. Despite considerable research to identify new sources of energy, fission remains the most plentiful and practical alternative to fossil fuels. The environmental challenges of fossil fuel have made the fission power option increasingly attractive, particularly as we are forced to rely on reserves in ecologically fragile or politically unstable corners of the globe. Caught between a globally eroding fossil fuel reserve as well as the uncertainty and considerable costs in the development of fusion power, most of the world will most likely come to rely on fission power for at least the remainder of the 21st century. Despite inevitable growth, fission power faces enduring challenges in sustainability and security. One of fission power's greatest hurdles to universal acceptance is the risk of potential misuse for nefarious purposes of fissionable byproducts in spent fuel, such as plutonium. With this issue in mind, we have discussed intrinsic concepts in this report that are motivated by the premise that the utility, desirability, and applicability of nuclear materials can be reduced. In a general sense, the intrinsic solutions aim to reduce or eliminate the quantity of existing weapons usable material; avoid production of new weapons-usable material through enrichment, breeding, extraction; or employ engineering solutions to make the fuel cycle less useful or more difficult for producing weapons-usable material. By their nature, these schemes require modifications to existing fuel cycles. As such, the concomitants of these modifications require engagement from the nuclear reactor and fuel-design community to fully assess their effects. Unfortunately, active pursuit of any scheme that could further complicate the spread of domestic nuclear power will probably be understandably unpopular. Nevertheless, the nonproliferation and counterterrorism issues are paramount

  8. Preliminary neutronic analysis of a cavity test reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmarsh, C. L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A reference configuration was calculated for a cavity test reactor to be used for testing the gascore nuclear rocket concept. A thermal flux of 4.1 x 10 to the 14th power neutrons per square centimeter per second in the cavity was provided by a driver fuel loading of 6.4 kg of enriched uranium in MTR fuel elements. The reactor was moderated and cooled by heavy water and reflected with 25.4 cm of beryllium. Power generation of 41.3 MW in the driver fuel is rejected to a heat sink. Design effort was directed toward minimization of driver power while maintaining 2.7 MW in the cavity during a test run. Ancillary data on material reactivity worths, reactivity coefficients, flux spectra, and power distributions are reported.

  9. Fresh-Core Reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) Reactor with Uranium(20)-Erbium-Zirconium-Hydride Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Thomas L. Maddock; Margaret A. Marshall; Leland M. Montierth

    2011-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA® (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The 60-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The initial critical configuration developed during the fuel loading process, which contains only 56 fuel elements, has not been evaluated as it is very similar to the evaluated core configuration. The benchmark eigenvalue is 1.0012 ± 0.0029. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (~±1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  10. Fresh-Core Reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) Reactor with Uranium(20)-Erbium-Zirconium-Hydride Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Thomas L. Maddock; Margaret A. Marshall; Leland M. Montierth

    2013-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA® (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The initial critical configuration developed during the fuel loading process, which contains only 56 fuel elements, has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The 60-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has also been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (~±1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  11. Fresh-Core Reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) Reactor with Uranium(20)-Erbium-Zirconium-Hydride Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, John D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maddock, Thomas L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Marshall, Margaret A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Montierth, Leland M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Ning [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Phillips, Ann Marie [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schreck, Kenneth A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Briggs, J. Blair [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Woolstenhulme, Eric W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bolin, John M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Veca, Anthony [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); McKnight, Richard D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lell, Richard M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA® (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The 60-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The initial critical configuration developed during the fuel loading process, which contains only 56 fuel elements, has not been evaluated as it is very similar to the evaluated core configuration. The benchmark eigenvalue is 1.0012 ± 0.0029. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (~±1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  12. Light water reactor fuel response during reactivity initiated accident experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, P. E.; McCardell, R. K.; Martinson, Z. R.; Seiffert, S. L.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental results from six recent Power Burst Facility (PBF) reactivity initiated accident (RIA) tests are compared with data from previous Special Power Excursion Reactor Test (SPERT), and Japanese Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) tests. The RIA fuel behavior experimental program recently started in the PBF is being conducted with coolant conditions typical of hot-startup conditions in a commercial boiling water reactor. The SPERT and NSRR test programs investigated the behavior of single or small clusters of light water reactor (LWR) type fuel rods under approximate room temperature and atmospheric pressure conditions in capsules containing stagnant water. As observed in the SPERT and NSRR tests, energy deposition, and consequent enthalpy increase in the PBF test fuel, appears to be the single most important variable. However, the consequences of failure at boiling water hot-startup system conditions appear to be more severe than previously observed in either the stagnant capsule SPERT or NSRR tests. Metallographic examination of both previously unirradiated and irradiated PBF fuel rod cross sections revealed extensive variation in cladding wall thicknesses (involving considerable plastic flow) and fuel shattering along grain boundaries in both restructured and unrestructured fuel regions. Oxidation of the cladding resulted in fracture at the location of cladding thinning and disintegration of the rods during quench. In addition,swelling of the gaseous and potentially volatile fission products in previously irradiated fuel resulted in volume increases of up to 180% and blockage of the coolant channels within the flow shrouds surrounding the fuel rods.

  13. Studies on capacity management for factories of nuclear fuel for research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negro, Miguel Luiz Miotto; Durazzo, Michelangelo; Mesquita, Marco Aurélio de; Carvalho, Elita Fontenele Urano de; Andrade, Delvonei Alves de, E-mail: mlnegro@ipen.br, E-mail: mdurazzo@ipen.br, E-mail: elitaucf@ipen.br, E-mail: delvonei@ipen.br, E-mail: mamesqui@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade de São Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politécnica. Departamento de Engenharia de Produção

    2017-11-01

    The use and the power of nuclear reactors for research and materials testing is increasing worldwide. That implies the demand for nuclear fuel for this kind of reactors is rising. Thus, the production facilities of this kind of fuel need reliable guidance on how to augment their production in order to meet the increasing demand efficiently, safely and keeping good quality. Focus is given to factories that produce plate type fuel elements loaded with LEU U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al fuel, which are typically used in nuclear research reactors. Of the various production routes for this kind of fuel, we chose the route which uses hydrolysis of uranium hexafluoride. Raising the capacity of this kind of plants faces several problems, especially regarding safety against nuclear criticality. Some of these problems are briefly addressed. The new issue of the paper is the application of knowledge from the area of production administration to the fabrication of nuclear fuel for research reactors. A specific method for the increase in production capacity is proposed. That method was tested by means of discrete event simulation. The data were collected from the nuclear fuel factory at IPEN. The results indicated the proposed method achieved its goal as well as ways of raising production capacity in up to 50%. (author). (author)

  14. MOX fuel assembly and reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, Motoo; Shimada, Hidemitsu; Kaneto, Kunikazu; Koyama, Jun-ichi; Uchikawa, Sadao [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Izutsu, Sadayuki; Fujita, Satoshi

    1998-03-10

    MOX fuel assemblies containing fuel rods of mixed oxide (MOX) of uranium and plutonium are loaded to a reactor core of a BWR type reactor. The fuel assembly comprises lattice like arranged fuel rods, one large diameter water rod disposed at the central portion and a channel box surrounding them. An average enrichment degree A of fission plutonium of fuel rods arranged at the outermost layer region and an average enrichment degree B of fission plutonium of fuel rods arranged at the inner layer region satisfy the relation of B/A {>=} 2.2. It is preferable that the average enrichment degree C of fission plutonium of fuel rods arranged at the outermost corner portions and the enrichment degree A satisfy the relation: C/A {<=} 0.5. With such a constitution, even in a case where the MOX fuel assemblies and uranium fuel assemblies are disposed together, thermal margin can be improved. (I.N.)

  15. The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Petti; Hans Gougar; Gary Bell

    2005-05-01

    The Department of Energy has established the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program to address the following overall goals: Provide a baseline fuel qualification data set in support of the licensing and operation of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). Gas-reactor fuel performance demonstration and qualification comprise the longest duration research and development (R&D) task for the NGNP feasibility. The baseline fuel form is to be demonstrated and qualified for a peak fuel centerline temperature of 1250°C. Support near-term deployment of an NGNP by reducing market entry risks posed by technical uncertainties associated with fuel production and qualification. Utilize international collaboration mechanisms to extend the value of DOE resources. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, postirradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process, key fuel properties, the irradiation performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. Fuel performance modeling and analysis of the fission product behavior in the primary circuit are important aspects of this work. The performance models are considered essential for several reasons, including guidance for the plant designer in establishing the core design and operating limits, and demonstration to the licensing authority that the applicant has a thorough understanding of the in-service behavior of the fuel system. The fission product behavior task will also provide primary source term data needed for licensing. An overview of the program and recent progress will be presented.

  16. Sodium fast reactors with closed fuel cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Raj, Baldev; Vasudeva Rao, PR 0

    2015-01-01

    Sodium Fast Reactors with Closed Fuel Cycle delivers a detailed discussion of an important technology that is being harnessed for commercial energy production in many parts of the world. Presenting the state of the art of sodium-cooled fast reactors with closed fuel cycles, this book:Offers in-depth coverage of reactor physics, materials, design, safety analysis, validations, engineering, construction, and commissioning aspectsFeatures a special chapter on allied sciences to highlight advanced reactor core materials, specialized manufacturing technologies, chemical sensors, in-service inspecti

  17. About a fuel for burnup reactor of periodical pulsed nuclear pumped laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, A.I.; Lukin, A.V.; Magda, L.E.; Magda, E.P.; Pogrebov, I.S.; Putnikov, I.S.; Khmelnitsky, D.V.; Scherbakov, A.P. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, Snezhinsk (Russian Federation)

    1998-07-01

    A physical scheme of burnup reactor for a Periodic Pulsed Nuclear Pumped Laser was supposed. Calculations of its neutron physical parameters were made. The general layout and construction of basic elements of the reactor are discussed. The requirements for the fuel and fuel elements are established. (author)

  18. The Conceptual Design for a Fuel Assembly of a New Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, J-S.; Cho, Y-G.; Yoon, D-B.; Dan, H-J.; Chae, H-T.; Park, C.

    2004-10-06

    A new Research Reactor (ARR) has been under design by KAERI since 2002. In this work, as a first step for the design of the fuel assembly of the ARR, the conceptual design has been carried out. The vibration characteristics of the tubular fuel model and the locking performance of the preliminary designed locking devices were investigated. In order to investigate the effects of the stiffener on the vibration characteristics of the tubular fuel, a modal analysis was performed for the finite element models of the tubular fuels with stiffeners and without stiffeners. The analysis results show that the vibration characteristics of the tubular fuel with stiffeners are better than those of the tubular fuel without stiffeners. To investigate the locking performance of the preliminary designed locking devices for the fuel assembly of the ARR, the elements of the locking devices were fabricated. Then the torsional resistance, fixing status and vibration characteristics of the locking devices were tested. The test results show that using the locking device with fins on the bottom guide can prevent the torsional motion of the fuel assembly, and that additional springs or guides on the top of the fuel assembly are needed to suppress the lateral motion of the fuel assembly. Based on the modal analysis and experimental results, the fuel assembly and locking devices of the ARR were designed and its prototype was fabricated. The locking performance, pressure drop characteristics and vibration characteristics of the newly designed fuel assembly will be tested in the near future.

  19. United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure - TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrell, Douglas [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2008-10-29

    The purpose of the United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program is to provide fresh nuclear reactor fuel to United States universities at no, or low, cost to the university. The title of the fuel remains with the United States government and when universities are finished with the fuel, the fuel is returned to the United States government. The program is funded by the United States Department of Energy - Nuclear Energy division, managed by Department of Energy - Idaho Field Office, and contracted to the Idaho National Laboratory's Management and Operations Contractor - Battelle Energy Alliance. Program has been at Idaho since 1977 and INL subcontracts with 26 United States domestic reactor facilities (13 TRIGA facilities, 9 plate fuel facilities, 2 AGN facilities, 1 Pulstar fuel facility, 1 Critical facility). University has not shipped fuel since 1968 and as such, we have no present procedures for shipping spent fuel. In addition: floor loading rate is unknown, many interferences must be removed to allow direct access to the reactor tank, floor space in the reactor cell is very limited, pavement ends inside our fence; some of the surface is not finished. The whole approach is narrow, curving and downhill. A truck large enough to transport the cask cannot pull into the lot and then back out (nearly impossible / refused by drivers); a large capacity (100 ton), long boom crane would have to be used due to loading dock obstructions. Access to the entrance door is on a sidewalk. The campus uses it as a road for construction equipment, deliveries and security response. Large trees are on both sides of sidewalk. Spent fuel shipments have never been done, no procedures approved or in place, no approved casks, no accident or safety analysis for spent fuel loading. Any cask assembly used in this facility will have to be removed from one crane, moved on the floor and then attached to another crane to get from the staging area to the reactor room

  20. MODERATOR ELEMENTS FOR UNIFORM POWER NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balent, R.

    1963-03-12

    This patent describes a method of obtaining a flatter flux and more uniform power generation across the core of a nuclear reactor. The method comprises using moderator elements having differing moderating strength. The elements have an increasing amount of the better moderating material as a function of radial and/or axial distance from the reactor core center. (AEC)

  1. A simple gamma spectrometry method for evaluating the burnup of MTR-type HEU fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makmal, T. [The Unit of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of The Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Nuclear Physics and Engineering Division, Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Aviv, O. [Radiation Safety Division, Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Gilad, E., E-mail: gilade@bgu.ac.il [The Unit of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of The Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2016-10-21

    A simple method for the evaluation of the burnup of a materials testing reactor (MTR) fuel element by gamma spectrometry is presented. The method was applied to a highly enriched uranium MTR nuclear fuel element that was irradiated in a 5 MW pool-type research reactor for a total period of 34 years. The experimental approach is based on in-situ measurements of the MTR fuel element in the reactor pool by a portable high-purity germanium detector located in a gamma cell. To corroborate the method, analytical calculations (based on the irradiation history of the fuel element) and computer simulations using a dedicated fuel cycle burnup code ORIGEN2 were performed. The burnup of the MTR fuel element was found to be 52.4±8.8%, which is in good agreement with the analytical calculations and the computer simulations. The method presented here is suitable for research reactors with either a regular or an irregular irradiation regime and for reactors with limited infrastructure and/or resources. In addition, its simplicity and the enhanced safety it confers may render this method suitable for IAEA inspectors in fuel element burnup assessments during on-site inspections. - Highlights: • Simple, inexpensive, safe and flexible experimental setup that can be quickly deployed. • Experimental results are thoroughly corroborated against ORIGEN2 burnup code. • Experimental uncertainty of 9% and 5% deviation between measurements and simulations. • Very high burnup MTR fuel element is examined, with 60% depletion of {sup 235}U. • Impact of highly irregular irradiation regime on burnup evaluation is studied.

  2. Acceptance testing of the eddy current probes for measurement of aluminum hydroxide coating thickness on K West Basin fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitner, A.L.

    1998-08-21

    During a recent visual inspection campaign of fuel elements stored in the K West Basin, it was noted that fuel elements contained in sealed aluminum canisters had a heavy translucent type coating on their surfaces (Pitner 1997a). Subsequent sampling of this coating in a hot cell (Pitner 1997b) and analysis of the material identified it as aluminum hydroxide. Because of the relatively high water content of this material, safety related concerns are raised with respect to long term storage of this fuel in Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs). A campaign in the basin is planned to demonstrate whether this coating can be removed by mechanical brushing (Bridges 1998). Part of this campaign involves before-and-after measurements of the coating thickness to determine the effectiveness of coating removal by the brushing machine. Measurements of the as-deposited coating thickness on multiple fuel elements are also expected to provide total coating inventory information needed for MCO safety evaluations. The measurement technique must be capable of measuring coating thicknesses on the order of several mils, with a measurement accuracy of 0.5 mil. Several different methods for quantitatively measuring these thin coatings were considered in selecting the most promising approach. Ultrasonic measurement was investigated, but it was determined that due to the thin coating depth and the high water content of the material, the signal would likely pass directly through to the cladding without ever sensing the coating surface. X-ray fluorescence was also identified as a candidate technique, but would not work because the high gamma background from the irradiated fuel would swamp out the low energy aluminum signal. Laser interferometry could possibly be applied, but considerable development would be required and it was considered to be high risk on a short term basis. The consensus reached was that standard eddy current techniques for coating thickness measurement had the best chance for

  3. US reactor spent-fuel storage capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.J.; Hoffman, C.C.; Caviness, C.K.

    1982-06-01

    The spent-fuel storage situation at reactors in the US is described. The focus of the report is on the reactors that are developing a spent-fuel storage problem and the alternatives the utilities are utilizing and planning to use to minimize the problem. The alternatives the utilities are using and/or considering are described and include: high-density storage racks, double-tiered storage racks, rod consolidation, dry storage systems, fuel transshipments, and at-reactor storage pools. All of these alternatives are not available to every reactor and utility that is faced with a spent-fuel storage problem. Generally, utilities are reracking or are planning to rerack those spent-fuel pools that can be reracked with higher-density racks or double-tiered racks. Where reracking is not feasible, then fuel transshipments are being performed or considered. Since none of the other alternatives have been fully approved and licensed, these alternatives are all being evaluated. More specifically, this report concentrates on the reactors that are projected to lose full-core reserve discharge capability by the end of 1990. Reactor discharge dates, spent-fuel storage capacity, and inventory were integrated to project the loss of full-core reserve. The primary results from the integration of this data revealed that 40 reactors were projected to lose full-core reserve prior to 1990. These 40 reactors represent 23 different utilities. Each utility is aware of their own spent-fuel storage problem, and each utility is progressing to minimize the problem or evaluating all the alternatives.

  4. Proceedings of the Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting - WRFPM / Top Fuel 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-06-15

    SFEN, ENS, SNR, ANS, AESJ, CNS KNS, IAEA and NEA are jointly organizing the 2009 International Water Reactor Fuel Performance / TopFuel 2009 Meeting following the 2008 KNS Water Reactor Performance Meeting held during October 19-23, 2008 in Seoul, Korea. This meeting is held annually on a tri-annual rotational basis in Europe, USA and Asia. In 2009, this meeting will be held in Paris, September 6-10, 2009 in coordination with the Global 2009 Conference at the same date and place. That would lead to a common opening session, some common technical presentations, a common exhibition and common social events. The technical scope of the meeting includes all aspects of nuclear fuel from fuel rod to core design as well as manufacturing, performance in commercial and test reactors or on-going and future developments and trends. Emphasis will be placed on fuel reliability in the general context of nuclear 'Renaissance' and recycling perspective. The meeting includes selectively front and/or back end issues that impact fuel designs and performance. In this frame, the conference track devoted to 'Concepts for transportation and interim storage of spent fuels and conditioned waste' will be shared with 'GLOBAL' conference. Technical Tracks: - 1. Fuel Performance, Reliability and Operational Experience: Fuel operating experience and performance; experience with high burn-up fuels; water side corrosion; stress corrosion cracking; MOX fuel performance; post irradiation data on lead fuel assemblies; radiation effects; water chemistry and corrosion counter-measures. - 2. Transient Fuel Behaviour and Safety Related Issues: Transient fuel behavior and criteria (RIA, LOCA, ATWS, Ramp tests..). Fuel safety-related issues such as PCI (pellet cladding interaction), transient fission gas releases and cladding bursting/ballooning during transient events - Advances in fuel performance modeling and core reload methodology, small and large-scale fuel testing

  5. Pyrometric fuel particle measurements in pressurised reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernberg, R.; Joutsenoja, T. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    A fiberoptic two-colour pyrometric technique for fuel particle temperature and size measurement is modified and applied to three pressurized reactors of different type in Finland, Germany and France. A modification of the pyrometric method for simultaneous in situ measurement of the temperature and size of individual pulverized coal particles at the pressurized entrained flow reactor in Jyvaeskylae was developed and several series of measurements were made. In Orleans a fiberoptic pyrometric device was installed to a pressurised thermogravimetric reactor and the two-colour temperatures of fuel samples were measured. Some results of these measurements are presented. The project belongs to EU`s Joule 2 extension research programme. (author)

  6. Summary engineering description of underwater fuel storage facility for foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlke, H.J.; Johnson, D.A.; Rawlins, J.K.; Searle, D.K.; Wachs, G.W.

    1994-10-01

    This document is a summary description for an Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) for foreign research reactor (FRR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A FRR SNF environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared and will include both wet and dry storage facilities as storage alternatives. For the UFSF presented in this document, a specific site is not chosen. This facility can be sited at any one of the five locations under consideration in the EIS. These locations are the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. Generic facility environmental impacts and emissions are provided in this report. A baseline fuel element is defined in Section 2.2, and the results of a fission product analysis are presented. Requirements for a storage facility have been researched and are summarized in Section 3. Section 4 describes three facility options: (1) the Centralized-UFSF, which would store the entire fuel element quantity in a single facility at a single location, (2) the Regionalized Large-UFSF, which would store 75% of the fuel element quantity in some region of the country, and (3) the Regionalized Small-UFSF, which would store 25% of the fuel element quantity, with the possibility of a number of these facilities in various regions throughout the country. The operational philosophy is presented in Section 5, and Section 6 contains a description of the equipment. Section 7 defines the utilities required for the facility. Cost estimates are discussed in Section 8, and detailed cost estimates are included. Impacts to worker safety, public safety, and the environment are discussed in Section 9. Accidental releases are presented in Section 10. Standard Environmental Impact Forms are included in Section 11.

  7. SIMULATION OF THE NUCLEAR-REACTOR ACTIVE-ZONE ELEMENTS WITH THICK ROTATING LAYER OF MICRO-PARTICLE FUEL FOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE TRANSMUTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Sorokin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effective transmutation of radioactive isotopes into the stable ones with the use of neutrons requires the neutron high-flux and the spectra with significant part of fast and resonance neutrons. It is advisable to alternate a range of specified-duration irradiation sessions with revamping the composition of waste. The depleted fuel of the commercial reactor comprises near 1 % of such isotopes of their individual mass in the batch loading which amounts to several tens of kilograms. The article considers a perspective nuclear reactor for radioactive waste transmutation as regards its design, thermal physics and hydrodynamics. Mobile microparticles of the fuel build up the active zone of the reactor and form a steady dense ringshaped layer. The layer rotates within immovable vortex chamber using the energy of the coolant, i.e. water. The micro particles cool down with the coolant unmediated.The  formulaic  valuation  of  the  device  capacity  with  water  under  pressure  comes to 1–5 MW per 1 liter of the layer. The condition of avoided boiling sets the most restrictive limitations  to  the  capacity.  The  bulk  of  the  layer  constricts  to  tens  of  liters  inasmuch as enlarging the chamber dimensions reduces the rotary acceleration and the force confining the fuel micro-particles on the free surface of the layer. The author offers and substantiates with calculations the active zone composed of several layers or a layer with a large ratio of the volume to the surface area for achieving criticality of nuclear fuel load with limitations on enrichment. The vortex chambers in case of the active zone of several layers can have the joint coolant exscapes along the axis. Implementation of the chambers with reverse vortices in composite active zones with joint escapes allows reducing the flow rotation below the vortex reactor along the coolant course.

  8. Upgraded HFIR Fuel Element Welding System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sease, John D [ORNL

    2010-02-01

    The welding of aluminum-clad fuel plates into aluminum alloy 6061 side plate tubing is a unique design feature of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel assemblies as 101 full-penetration circumferential gas metal arc welds (GMAW) are required in the fabrication of each assembly. In a HFIR fuel assembly, 540 aluminum-clad fuel plates are assembled into two nested annular fuel elements 610 mm (24-inches) long. The welding process for the HFIR fuel elements was developed in the early 1960 s and about 450 HFIR fuel assemblies have been successfully welded using the GMAW process qualified in the 1960 s. In recent years because of the degradation of the electronic and mechanical components in the old HFIR welding system, reportable defects in plate attachment or adapter welds have been present in almost all completed fuel assemblies. In October 2008, a contract was awarded to AMET, Inc., of Rexburg, Idaho, to replace the old welding equipment with standard commercially available welding components to the maximum extent possible while maintaining the qualified HFIR welding process. The upgraded HFIR welding system represents a major improvement in the welding system used in welding HFIR fuel elements for the previous 40 years. In this upgrade, the new inner GMAW torch is a significant advancement over the original inner GMAW torch previously used. The innovative breakthrough in the new inner welding torch design is the way the direction of the cast in the 0.762 mm (0.030-inch) diameter aluminum weld wire is changed so that the weld wire emerging from the contact tip is straight in the plane perpendicular to the welding direction without creating any significant drag resistance in the feeding of the weld wire.

  9. Three-component U-Pu-Th fuel for plutonium irradiation in heavy water reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peel Ross

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses concepts for three-component fuel bundles containing plutonium, uranium and thorium for use in pressurised heavy water reactors, and cases for and against implementation of such a nuclear energy system in the United Kingdom. Heavy water reactors are used extensively in Canada, and are deploying within India and China, whilst the UK is considering the use of heavy water reactors to manage its plutonium inventory of 140 tonnes. The UK heavy water reactor proposal uses a mixed oxide (MOX fuel of plutonium in depleted uranium, within the enhanced CANDU-6 (EC-6 reactor. This work proposes an alternative heterogeneous fuel concept based on the same reactor and CANFLEX fuel bundle, with eight large-diameter fuel elements loaded with natural thorium oxide and 35 small-diameter fuel elements loaded with a MOX of plutonium and reprocessed uranium stocks from UK MAGNOX and AGR reactors. Indicative neutronic calculations suggest that such a fuel would be neutronically feasible. A similar MOX may alternatively be fabricated from reprocessed <5% enriched light water reactor fuel, such as the fuel of the AREVA EPR reactor, to consume newly produced plutonium from reprocessing, similar to the DUPIC (direct use of PWR fuel in CANDU process.

  10. Validation of High-Fidelity Reactor Physics Models for Support of the KJRR Experimental Campaign in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigg, David W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nielsen, Joseph W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Norman, Daren R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute is currently in the process of qualifying a Low-Enriched Uranium fuel element design for the new Ki-Jang Research Reactor (KJRR). As part of this effort, a prototype KJRR fuel element was irradiated for several operating cycles in the Northeast Flux Trap of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. The KJRR fuel element contained a very large quantity of fissile material (618g 235U) in comparison with historical ATR experiment standards (<1g 235U), and its presence in the ATR flux trap was expected to create a neutronic configuration that would be well outside of the approved validation envelope for the reactor physics analysis methods used to support ATR operations. Accordingly it was necessary, prior to high-power irradiation of the KJRR fuel element in the ATR, to conduct an extensive set of new low-power physics measurements with the KJRR fuel element installed in the ATR Critical Facility (ATRC), a companion facility to the ATR that is located in an immediately adjacent building, sharing the same fuel handling and storage canal. The new measurements had the objective of expanding the validation envelope for the computational reactor physics tools used to support ATR operations and safety analysis to include the planned KJRR irradiation in the ATR and similar experiments that are anticipated in the future. The computational and experimental results demonstrated that the neutronic behavior of the KJRR fuel element in the ATRC is well-understood, both in terms of its general effects on core excess reactivity and fission power distributions, its effects on the calibration of the core lobe power measurement system, as well as in terms of its own internal fission rate distribution and total fission power per unit ATRC core power. Taken as a whole, these results have significantly extended the ATR physics validation envelope, thereby enabling an entire new class of irradiation experiments.

  11. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report July- September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edler, S. K.

    1980-12-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from April 1 through June 30, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission {NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  12. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report April -June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edler, S. K.

    1980-11-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from April 1 through June 30, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission {NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  13. Impact of uranium concentration reduction in side plates of the fuel elements of IEA-R1 reactor on neutronic and thermal hydraulic analyses; Impacto da reducao na concentracao de uranio nas placas laterais dos elementos combustiveis do reator IEA-R1 nas analises neutronica e termo-hidraulica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, Ilka Antonia

    2013-09-01

    This master thesis presents a study to verify the impact of the uranium concentration reduction in the side plates of the reactor IEA-R1 fuel elements on the neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analyses. To develop such study, a previous IPEN-CNEN/SP research was reproduced by simulating the fuel elements burn-up, with side plate uranium density reduced to 50, 60 and 70% of the standard fuel element plates. This research begins with the neutronic analysis using the computer code HAMMER and the first step consists in the calculation of the cross section of all materials presented at the reactor core, with their initial concentration; the second step consists in the calculation of the fast and thermal neutron group fluxes and power densities for fuel elements using the computer code CITATION. HAMMER output data is used as input data. Once the neutronic analysis is finished and the most critical fuel elements with highest power density have been defined, the thermal-hydraulics analysis begins. This analysis uses MCTR-IEA-R1 thermal-hydraulics model, which equations are solved by commercial code EES. Thermalhydraulics analysis input is the power density data calculated by CITATION: it is considered the highest power density on each fuel element, where there is a higher energy release and, consequently, higher temperatures. This data is used on energy balance equations to calculate temperatures on critical fuel element regions. Reactor operation comparison for three different uranium densities on fuel side plates is presented. Uranium density reduction contributes to the cladding surface temperature to remain below the established limit, as reactor operation safety requirement and it does not affect significantly fuel element final burn-up nor reactor reactivity. The reduction of uranium in the side plates of the fuel elements of the IEA-R1 showed to be a viable option to avoid corrosion problems due to high temperatures. (author)

  14. MOX fuel assembly and reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Hidemitsu; Aoyama, Motoo

    1997-09-25

    A MOX fuel assembly capable of increasing plutonium charge while securing the effect of reactivity control, and a reactor core comprising the same. The assembly comprises fuel rods including MOX fuel rods containing MOX fuel pellets incorporated there and a water rod arranged in the form of a square lattice. The MOX fuel rods include those containing burnable poisons, and the percentage Nfr(%) of the number of the MOX fuel rods containing burnable poisons based on the total number of the fuel rods and the mean weight percentage Cag(%) of the burnable poisons contained in the MOX fuel rods satisfy at least either of the following requirements: -1.7 Cag + 21.8 {<=} Nfr {<=} -4.4 Cag + 56.1, 0.5 {<=} Cag {<=} 5.0. (author) figs.

  15. Uranium density reduction on fuel element side plates assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, Ilka A. [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade, Delvonei A.; Domingos, Douglas B.; Umbehaun, Pedro E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    During operation of IEA-R1 research reactor, located at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN - CNEN/SP, an abnormal oxidation on some fuel elements was noted. It was also verified, among the possible causes of the problem, that the most likely one was insufficient cooling of the elements in the core. One of the propositions to solve or minimize the problem is to reduce uranium density on fuel elements side plates. In this paper, the influence of this change on neutronic and thermal hydraulic parameters for IEA-R1 reactor is verified by simulations with the codes HAMMER and CITATION. Results are presented and discussed. (author)

  16. Integrated Recycling Test Fuel Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.S. Fielding; K.H. Kim; B. Grover; J. Smith; J. King; K. Wendt; D. Chapman; L. Zirker

    2013-03-01

    The Integrated Recycling Test is a collaborative irradiation test that will electrochemically recycle used light water reactor fuel into metallic fuel feedstock. The feedstock will be fabricated into a metallic fast reactor type fuel that will be irradiation tested in a drop in capsule test in the Advanced Test Reactor on the Idaho National Laboratory site. This paper will summarize the fuel fabrication activities and design efforts. Casting development will include developing a casting process and system. The closure welding system will be based on the gas tungsten arc burst welding process. The settler/bonder system has been designed to be a simple system which provides heating and controllable impact energy to ensure wetting between the fuel and cladding. The final major pieces of equipment to be designed are the weld and sodium bond inspection system. Both x-radiography and ultrasonic inspection techniques have been examine experimentally and found to be feasible, however the final remote system has not been designed. Conceptual designs for radiography and an ultrasonic system have been made.

  17. Research reactor fuel element corrosion under repository relevant conditions. Separation, identification, and quantification of secondary alteration phases of UAl{sub x}-Al in MgCl{sub 2}-rich brine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinkenberg, M.; Neumann, A.; Curtius, H.; Kaiser, G.; Bosbach, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Energie und Klimaforschung (IEK-6), Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit

    2014-07-01

    The corrosion of the UAl{sub x}-Al research reactor fuel type in synthetic MgCl{sub 2}-rich brine (static batch-type experiments) was investigated with respect to the long-term safety of directly disposed research reactor fuel elements in salt formations. During corrosion, crystalline secondary phases were formed, which may serve as a barrier against radionuclide migration. For an optimized identification and quantification of the secondary phases using X-ray diffraction, a sample treatment to separate and enrich the secondary phases is necessary. A grain size fractionation was carried out in iso-propanol. A chemical composition and phase characterization of the secondary phases was accomplished. The results of the chemical investigations reveal that only traces of Al and U were dissolved. The separation and enrichment of secondary phases were carried out reproducible and successfully. Due to the phase characterization by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction the following secondary phases were unambiguously identified: Mg-Al-Cl layered double hydroxide, lesukite, Fe layered double hydroxide (green rust), lawrencite, Fe (elemental), and traces of uncorroded fuel (UAl{sub 4}). The quantitative analysis showed that LDH compounds and lesukite are the major crystalline phases. All other observed compounds were only present in trace amounts, i.e. constituting accessories. The Rietveld analysis also revealed the high content of amorphous phases of approximately 30%, which are expected to include the uranium as U(OH){sub 4}.

  18. Environmental concerns regarding a materials test reactor fuel fabrication facility at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute - IPEN; Atomos para el desarrollo de Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, G. R. T.; Durazzo, M.; Carvalho, E. F. U. [IPEN, CNEN-SP, P.O. Box 11049, CEP 05422-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Riella, H. G. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Campus Universitario, Florianopolis, CEP 88040-900 (Brazil)]. e-mail: grsantos@ipen.br

    2008-07-01

    The aim of the industrial activities success, front to a more and more informed and demanding society and to a more and more competitive market demands an environmental administration policy which doesn't limit itself to assist the legislation but anticipate and prevent, in a responsible way, possible damages to the environment. One of the maim programs of the Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research of the national Commission of Nuclear Energy located in Brazil, through the Center of Nuclear Fuel - CCN - is to manufacture MTR-type fuel elements using low-enrichment uranium (20 wt% {sup 2}35U), to supply its IEA-RI research reactor. Integrated in this program, this work aims at well developing and assuring a methodology to implant an environment, health and safety policy, foreseeing its management with the use of detailed data reports and through the adoption of new tools for improving the management, in order to fulfil the applicable legislation and accomplish all the environmental, operational and works aspects. The applied methodology for the effluents management comprises different aspects, including the specific environmental legislation of a country, main available effluents treatment techniques, process flow analyses from raw materials and intakes to products, generated effluents, residuals and emissions. Data collections were accomplished for points gathering and tests characterization, classification and compatibility of the generated effluents and their eventual environmental impacts. This study aims to implant the Sustainable Concept in order to guarantee access to financial resources, allowing cost reduction, maximizing long-term profits, preventing and reducing environmental accident risks and stimulating both the attraction and the keeping of a motivated manpower. Work on this project has already started and, even though many technical actions have not still ended, the results have being extremely valuable. These results can already give to

  19. Reactor Simulator Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Webster, Kenny L.; Pearson, Boise J.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Nuclear Systems Office Fission Surface Power Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) project, a reactor simulator test loop (RxSim) was design & built to perform integrated testing of the TDU components. In particular, the objectives of RxSim testing was to verify the operation of the core simulator, the instrumentation and control system, and the ground support gas and vacuum test equipment. In addition, it was decided to include a thermal test of a cold trap purification design and a pump performance test at pump voltages up to 150 V since the targeted mass flow rate of 1.75 kg/s was not obtained in the RxSim at the originally constrained voltage of 120 V. This paper summarizes RxSim testing. The gas and vacuum ground support test equipment performed effectively in NaK fill, loop pressurization, and NaK drain operations. The instrumentation and control system effectively controlled loop temperature and flow rates or pump voltage to targeted settings. The cold trap design was able to obtain the targeted cold temperature of 480 K. An outlet temperature of 636 K was obtained which was lower than the predicted 750 K but 156 K higher than the cold temperature indicating the design provided some heat regeneration. The annular linear induction pump (ALIP) tested was able to produce a maximum flow rate of 1.53 kg/s at 800 K when operated at 150 V and 53 Hz.

  20. Core analysis during transition from 37-element fuel to CANFLEX-NU fuel in CANDU 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    An 1200-day time-dependent fuel-management for the transition from 37-element fuel to CANFLEX-NU fuel in a CANDU 6 reactor has been simulated to show the compatibility of the CANFLEX-NU fuel with the reactor operation. The simulation calculations were carried out with the RFSP code, provided by cell averaged fuel properties obtained from the POWDERPUFS-V code. The refueling scheme for both fuels was an eight bundle shift at a time. The simulation results show that the maximum channel and bundle powers were maintained below the license limit of the CANDU 6. This indicates that the CANFLEX-NU fuel bundle is compatible with the CANDU 6 reactor operation during the transition period. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  1. Damper mechanism for nuclear reactor control elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, William Elwood

    1976-01-01

    A damper mechanism which provides a nuclear reactor control element decelerating function at the end of the scram stroke. The total damping function is produced by the combination of two assemblies, which operate in sequence. First, a tapered dashram assembly decelerates the control element to a lower velocity, after which a spring hydraulic damper assembly takes over to complete the final damping.

  2. QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT JANUARY, FEBRUARY, MARCH, 1967 REACTOR FUELS AND MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS FOR FUELS AND MATERIALS BRANCH OF USAEC DEVISION OF REACTOR DEVELOPMENT AND TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albaugh, F. W.; Bush, S. H.; Cadwell, J. J.; de Halas, D. R.; Worlton, D. C.

    1967-06-01

    Work is reported in the areas of: fast fuels oxides and nitrides; nuclear ceramics; nuclear graphite; basic swelling studies; irradiation damage to reactor metals; ATR gas loop operation and maintenance; metallic fuels; nondestructive testing research; and fast reactor dosimetry and damage analysis.

  3. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Options Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Preliminary scoping calculations are being performed for a 100 MWt gas-cooled test reactor. The initial design uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to identify some reactor design features to investigate further. Current status of the effort is described.

  4. Pyrometric fuel particle measurements in pressurised reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernberg, R.; Joutsenoja, T. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    A fibre-optic two-colour pyrometric technique for fuel particle temperature and size measurement is modified and applied to three pressurised reactors of different type in Finland, Germany and France. A modification of the pyrometric method for simultaneous in situ measurement of the temperature and size of individual pulverised coal particles at the pressurised entrained flow reactor of VTT Energy in Jyvaeskylae was developed and several series of measurements were made in order to study the effects of oxygen concentration (3-30 vol%) and pressure (0.2-1.0 MPa) on the particle temperature. The fuels used in the experiments were Westerholt, Polish and Goettelborn hvb coals, Gardanne lignite and Niederberg anthracite. The initial nominal fuel particle size varied in the experiments from 70 to 250 ,{mu}m and the gas temperature was typically 1173 K. For the anthracite also the effects of gas temperature (1073-1423K) and CO{sub 2} concentration (6-80 vol%) were studied. In Orleans a fibreoptic pyrometric device was installed to a pressurised thermogravimetric reactor of CNRS and the two-colour temperatures of fuel samples were measured. The fuel in the experiments was pulverised Goettelborn char. The reliability of optical temperature measurement in this particular application was analysed. In Essen a fibre-optic pyrometric technique that is capable to measure bed and fuel particle temperatures was applied to an atmospheric fluidised bed reactor of DMT. The effects of oxygen concentration (3-8 vol%) and bed temperature (1123-1193 K) on the fuel particle temperature were studied. The fuels in these were Westerholt coal and char and EBV-coal. Some results of these measurements are presented. The project belonged to EU`s Joule 2 extension research programme (contract JOU2-CT93-0331). (orig.)

  5. Discrete element modelling of pebble packing in pebble bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suikkanen, Heikki, E-mail: heikki.suikkanen@lut.fi; Ritvanen, Jouni, E-mail: jouni.ritvanen@lut.fi; Jalali, Payman, E-mail: payman.jalali@lut.fi; Kyrki-Rajamäki, Riitta, E-mail: riitta.kyrki-rajamaki@lut.fi

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • A discrete element method code is developed for pebble bed reactor analyses. • Methods are established to extract packing information at various spatial scales. • Packing simulations inside annular core geometry are done varying input parameters. • The restitution coefficient has the strongest effect on the resulting packing density. • Detailed analyses reveal local densification especially near the walls. - Abstract: It is important to understand the packing characteristics and behaviour of the randomly packed pebble bed to further analyse the reactor physical and thermal-hydraulic behaviour and to design a safe and economically feasible pebble bed reactor. The objective of this work was to establish methods to model and analyse the pebble packing in detail to provide useful tools and data for further analyses. Discrete element method (DEM) is a well acknowledged method for analysing granular materials, such as the fuel pebbles in a pebble bed reactor. In this work, a DEM computer code was written specifically for pebble bed analyses. Analysis methods were established to extract data at various spatial scales from the pebble beds resulting from the DEM simulations. A comparison with available experimental data was performed to validate the DEM implementation. To test the code implementation in full-scale reactor calculations, DEM packing simulations were done in annular geometry with 450,000 pebbles. Effects of the initial packing configuration, friction and restitution coefficients and pebble size distribution to the resulting pebble bed were investigated. The packing simulations revealed that from the investigated parameters the restitution coefficient had the largest effect on the resulting average packing density while other parameters had smaller effects. Detailed local packing density analysis of pebble beds with different average densities revealed local variations especially strong in the regions near the walls. The implemented DEM

  6. Reactor Simulator Testing Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Test Objectives Summary: a) Verify operation of the core simulator, the instrumentation & control system, and the ground support gas and vacuum test equipment. b) Examine cooling & heat regeneration performance of the cold trap purification. c) Test the ALIP pump at voltages beyond 120V to see if the targeted mass flow rate of 1.75 kg/s can be obtained in the RxSim. Testing Highlights: a) Gas and vacuum ground support test equipment performed effectively for operations (NaK fill, loop pressurization, and NaK drain). b) Instrumentation & Control system effectively controlled loop temperature and flow rates or pump voltage to targeted settings and ramped within prescribed constraints. It effectively interacted with reactor simulator control model and defaulted back to temperature control mode if the transient fluctuations didn't dampen. c) Cold trap design was able to obtain the targeted cold temperature of 480 K. An outlet temperature of 636 K was obtained which was lower than the predicted 750 K but 156 K higher than the minimum temperature indicating the design provided some heat regeneration. d) ALIP produce a maximum flow rate of 1.53 kg/s at 800 K when operated at 150 V and 53 Hz.

  7. Optimally moderated nuclear fission reactor and fuel source therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ougouag, Abderrafi M [Idaho Falls, ID; Terry, William K [Shelley, ID; Gougar, Hans D [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-07-22

    An improved nuclear fission reactor of the continuous fueling type involves determining an asymptotic equilibrium state for the nuclear fission reactor and providing the reactor with a moderator-to-fuel ratio that is optimally moderated for the asymptotic equilibrium state of the nuclear fission reactor; the fuel-to-moderator ratio allowing the nuclear fission reactor to be substantially continuously operated in an optimally moderated state.

  8. Fuel shuffling optimization for the Delft research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geemert, R. van; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Gibcus, H.P.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Interfaculty Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands); Quist, A.J. [Delft Univ., Fac. of Applied Mathematics and Informatics, Delft (Netherlands)

    1997-07-01

    A fuel shuffling optimization procedure is proposed for the Hoger Onderwijs Reactor (HOR) in Delft, the Netherlands, a 2 MWth swimming-pool type research reactor. In order to cope with the fluctuatory behaviour of objective functions in loading pattern optimization, the proposed cyclic permutation optimization procedure features a gradual transition from global to local search behaviour via the introduction of stochastic tests for the number of fuel assemblies involved in a cyclic permutation. The possible objectives and the safety and operation constraints, as well as the optimization procedure, are discussed, followed by some optimization results for the HOR. (author)

  9. Strengthening the nuclear-reactor fuel cycle against proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travelli, A.; Snelgrove, J.; Persiani, P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Arms Control and Nonproliferation Program

    1992-12-31

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducts several research programs that serve to reduce the risks of fissile-material diversion from the nuclear-reactor fuel cycle. The objectives are to provide economical and efficient neutron or power generation with the minimum of inherent risks, and to further minimize risks by utilizing sophisticated techniques to detect attempts at material diversion. This paper will discuss the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, the Isotope Correlation Technique (ICT), and Proliferation-Resistant Closed-Cycle Reactors. The first two are sponsored by the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation.

  10. Application of nondestructive methods for qualification of high density fuels in the IEA-R1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jose E.R.; Silva, Antonio T.; Domingos, Douglas B.; Terremoto, Luis A.A., E-mail: jersilva@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    IPEN/CNEN-SP manufactures fuels to be used in its research reactor - the IEA-R1. To qualify those fuels, it is necessary to check if they have a good performance under irradiation. As Brazil still does not have nuclear research reactors with high neutron fluxes, or suitable hot cells for carrying out post-irradiation examination of nuclear fuels, IPEN/CNEN-SP has conducted a fuel qualification program based on the use of uranium compounds (U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersed in Al matrix) internationally tested and qualified to be used in research reactors, and has attained experience in the technological development stages for the manufacturing of fuel plates, irradiation and non-destructive post-irradiation testing. Fuel elements containing low volume fractions of fuel in the dispersion were manufactured and irradiated successfully directly in the core of the IEA-R1. However, there are plans at IPEN/CNEN-SP to increase the uranium density of the fuels. Ten fuel miniplates (five containing U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al and five containing U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al), with densities of 3.2 gU/cm{sup 3} and 4.8 gU/cm{sup 3} respectively, are being irradiated inside an irradiation device placed in a peripheral position of the IEA-R1 core. Non-destructive methods will be used to evaluate irradiation performance of the fuel miniplates after successive cycles of irradiation, by means: monitoring the reactor parameters during operation; periodic underwater visual inspection of fuel miniplates, eventual sipping test for fuel miniplates suspected of leakage and underwater measuring of the miniplate thickness for assessment of the fuel miniplate swelling. (author)

  11. Plutonium Discharge Rates and Spent Nuclear Fuel Inventory Estimates for Nuclear Reactors Worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian K. Castle; Shauna A. Hoiland; Richard A. Rankin; James W. Sterbentz

    2012-09-01

    This report presents a preliminary survey and analysis of the five primary types of commercial nuclear power reactors currently in use around the world. Plutonium mass discharge rates from the reactors’ spent fuel at reload are estimated based on a simple methodology that is able to use limited reactor burnup and operational characteristics collected from a variety of public domain sources. Selected commercial reactor operating and nuclear core characteristics are also given for each reactor type. In addition to the worldwide commercial reactors survey, a materials test reactor survey was conducted to identify reactors of this type with a significant core power rating. Over 100 material or research reactors with a core power rating >1 MW fall into this category. Fuel characteristics and spent fuel inventories for these material test reactors are also provided herein.

  12. Effect of kinetic parameters on simultaneous ramp reactivity insertion plus beam tube flooding accident in a typical low enriched U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al fuel-based material testing reactor-type research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasir, Rubina; Mirza, Nasir M. [Dept. of, Physics, Air University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mirza, Sikander M. [Dept. of, Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Post Office Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2017-06-15

    This work looks at the effect of changes in kinetic parameters on simultaneous reactivity insertions and beam tube flooding in a typical material testing reactor-type research reactor with low enriched high density (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al) fuel. Using a modified PARET code, various ramp reactivity insertions (from $0.1/0.5 s to $1.3/0.5 s) plus beam tube flooding ($0.5/0.25 s) accidents under uncontrolled conditions were analyzed to find their effects on peak power, net reactivity, and temperature. Then, the effects of changes in kinetic parameters including the Doppler coefficient, prompt neutron lifetime, and delayed neutron fractions on simultaneous reactivity insertion and beam tube flooding accidents were analyzed. Results show that the power peak values are significantly sensitive to the Doppler coefficient of the system in coupled accidents. The material testing reactor-type system under such a coupled accident is not very sensitive to changes in the prompt neutron life time; the core under such a coupled transient is not very sensitive to changes in the effective delayed neutron fraction.

  13. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The 15th annual Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) international meeting was organized by Ris{o} National Laboratory in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency and Argonne National Laboratory. The topics of the meeting were the following: National Programs, Fuel Fabrication, Licensing Aspects, States of Conversion, Fuel Testing, and Fuel Cycle. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  14. Development of a Monolithic Research Reactor Fuel Type at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, C.R.; Briggs, R.J.

    2004-10-06

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program has been tasked with the conversion of research reactors from highly enriched to low-enriched uranium (LEU). To convert several high power reactors, monolithic fuel, a new fuel type, is being developed. This fuel type replaces the standard fuel dispersion with a fuel alloy foil, which allows for fuel densities far in excess of that found in dispersion fuel. The single-piece fuel foil also contains a significantly lower interface area between the fuel and the aluminum in the plate than the standard fuel type, limiting the amount of detrimental fuel-aluminum interaction that can occur. Implementation of monolithic fuel is dependant on the development of a suitable fabrication method as traditional roll-bonding techniques are inadequate.

  15. Technical specifications, Hanford production reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, W.D. [comp.

    1962-06-25

    These technical specifications are applicable to the eight operating production reactor facilities, B, C, D, DR, F, H, KE, and KW. Covered are operating and performance restrictions and administrative procedures. Areas covered by the operating and performance restrictions are reactivity, reactor control and safety elements, power level, temperature and heat flux, reactor fuel loadings, reactor coolant systems, reactor confinement, test facilities, code compliance, and reactor scram set points. Administrative procedures include process control procedures, training programs, audits and inspections, and reports and records.

  16. EBR-II Breached Fuel Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehto, W K; Koenig, J F; Seim, O S; Olp, R H; Strain, R V; Colburn, R P

    1979-01-01

    The Breached Fuel Test Facility (BFTF) is a multipurpose experimental facility, designed to provide the capability to conduct and monitor safety and fuel behavior experiments under move severe conditions than previously allowed in EBR-II. The facility consists of an outer thimble assembly with an internal instrument stalk which extends from the reactor floor through the primary tank cover to the top of the core. Coolant from a breached element test is directed upward to the instrument train above the core. The BFTF has the capability to measure flow, temperature, particle size distribution and deposition, and delayed neutron levels for breach site characterization. This paper describes the design, the instrumentation, the operational safety concerns and the initial experiments.

  17. MOX fuel assembly and reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Hidemitsu; Koyama, Jun-ichi; Aoyama, Motoo

    1998-06-26

    The MOX fuel assembly of the present invention is of a c-lattice type loaded to a BWR type reactor. 74 MOX fuel rods filled with mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium and two water rods disposed to a space equal to that for 7 MOX fuel rods are arranged in 9 x 9 matrix. MOX fuel rods having the lowest enrichment degree are disposed to four corners of the 9 x 9 matrix. The enrichment degree means a ratio of the weight of fission products based on the total weight of fuels. Two MOX fuel rods having the same enrichment degree are arranged in each direction so as to be continuous from the MOX fuel rods at four corners in the direction of the same row and different column and same column and the different row. In addition, among the outermost circumferential portion of the 9 x 9 matrix, MOX fuel rods having a lower enrichment degree next to the MOX fuel rods having the lowest enrichment degree are arranged, each by three to a portion where MOX fuel rods having the lowest enrichment degree are not disposed. (I.N.)

  18. SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE & AFTER IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SCHWINKENDORF, K.N.

    2006-05-12

    With the shutdown of the Hanford PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant) reprocessing plant in the 1970s, adequate storage capacity for spent Hanford N Reactor fuel elements in the K and N Reactor pools became a concern. To maximize space utilization in the pools, accounting for fuel burnup was considered. Calculations indicated that at typical fuel exposures for N Reactor, the spent-fuel critical mass would be twice the critical mass for green fuel. A decision was reached to test the calculational result with a definitive experiment. If the results proved positive, storage capacity could be increased and N Reactor operation could be prolonged. An experiment to be conducted in the N Reactor spent-fuel storage pool was designed and assembled and the services of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories (BNWL) (now Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]) critical mass laboratory were procured for the measurements. The experiments were performed in April 1975 in the Hanford N Reactor fuel storage pool. The fuel elements were MKIA fuel assemblies, comprising two concentric tubes of low-enriched metallic uranium. Two separate sets of measurements were performed: one with ''green'' (fresh) fuel and one with spent fuel. Both the green and spent fuel, were measured in the same geometry. The spent-fuel MKIA assemblies had an average burnup of 2865 MWd (megawatt days)/t. A constraint was imposed restricting the measurements to a subcritical limit of k{sub eff} = 0.97. Subcritical count rate data was obtained with pulsed-neutron and approach-to-critical measurements. Ten (10) configurations with green fuel and nine (9) configurations with spent fuel are described and evaluated. Of these, 3 green fuel and 4 spent fuel loading configurations were considered to serve as benchmark models. However, shortcomings in experimental data failed to meet the high standards for a benchmark problem. Nevertheless, the data provided by these subcritical measurements can

  19. Safety report concerning the reactor Pegase - volume 1 - Description of the installation - volume 2 - Safety of the installations; Rapport de surete du reacteur pegase - tome 1 - Description des installations - tome 2 - Surete des installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacour, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Legoin, P. [S.E.M. Hispano-Suiza, 92 - Colombes (France)

    1964-07-01

    In the first volume: This report is a description of the reactor Pegase, given with a view to examine the safety of the installations. The Cadarache site at which they are situated is briefly described, in particular because of the consequences on the techniques employed for building Pegase. A description is also given of the original aspects of the reactor. The independent loops which are designed for full-scale testing of fuel elements used in natural uranium-gas-graphite reactor systems are described in this report, together with their operational and control equipment. In the second volume: In the present report are examined the accidents which could cause damage to the Pegase reactor installation. Among possible causes of accidents considered are the seismicity of the region, an excessive power excursion of the reactor and a fracture in the sealing of an independent loop. Although all possible precautions have been taken to offset the effects of such accidents, their ultimate consequences are considered here. The importance is stressed of the security action and regulations which, added to the precautions taken for the construction, ensure the safety of the installations. (authors) [French] Dans le volume 1: Ce rapport est une description du reacteur Pegase, afin d'examiner la surete des installations. Le site de CADARACHE ou elles sont situees, a ete sommairement decrit, en particulier, a cause des consequences sur les techniques mises en oeuvre pour la realisation de Pegase. Nous nous sommes egalement attache a decrire les aspects originaux du reacteur. Les boucles autonomes destinees a tester en vraie grandeur des elements combustibles de la filiere uranium naturel graphite-gaz, ainsi que leurs dispositifs de controle et d'exploitation, figurent egalement dans ce rapport. Dans le volume 2: Dans le present rapport, nous examinons des accidents pouvant endommager des installations du reacteur Pegase. Les origines d'accidents examines

  20. REACTOR COOLING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  1. Thermal-mechanical behavior of fuel element in SCWR design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, R.; Yetisir, M.; Hamilton, H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a study on thermal-mechanical behavior of a fuel element proposed for the Canadian Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor (SCWR). In the Canadian SCWR, the coolant pressure is 25 MPa, and the temperature is 350{sup o}C at the inlet and 625{sup o}C at the outlet of the reactor core. Critical design decisions for fuel design will be the selection of the fuel sheath material and details of the fuel element design options (sheath thickness, pellet-clad gap, internal pressure, etc.). The analysis presented in this paper predicted temperature, stress and strain in the fuel element of the Canadian SCWR with a collapsible sheath using ANSYS. Typical conditions for the evaluation of the fuel behavior, such as linear heat generation rate, coolant temperature and sheath surface heat transfer coefficient, were extracted from core and fuel channel designs. The temperature distribution in the fuel element is predicted by a thermal model and then the thermal model is coupled sequentially with a structural model to predict fuel sheath deformation under the predicted temperature distribution and external (coolant) pressure. Nonlinear thermo-mechanical simulations include nonlinear buckling with elastic-plastic deformation. Three sheath collapse phenomena are considered: (1) elastic collapse by buckling, (2) longitudinal ridging and (3) plastic collapse by yielding. The numerical models are validated against analytical and experimental data. The presented results show the temperature distribution, deformed shape, stress and strain of the fuel element, allowing the designers to select appropriate sheath material and element design options for the SCWR fuel element design. (author)

  2. Behavior of actinides in the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, J.C. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Nuclear Science Center; Lineberry, M.J. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Technology Development Div.

    1994-06-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development by Argonne National Laboratory uses metallic fuels instead of ceramics. This allows electrorefining of spent fuels and presents opportunities for recycling minor actinide elements. Four minor actinides ({sup 237}Np, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am) determine the waste storage requirements of spent fuel from all types of fission reactors. These nuclides behave the same as uranium and other plutonium isotopes in electrorefining, so they can be recycled back to the reactor without elaborate chemical processing. An experiment has been designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the high-energy neutron spectra of the IFR in consuming these four nuclides and plutonium. Eighteen sets of seven actinide and five light metal targets have been selected for ten day exposure in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 which serves as a prototype of the IFR. Post-irradiation analyses of the exposed targets by gamma, alpha, and mass spectroscopy are used to determine nuclear reaction-rates and neutron spectra. These experimental data increase the authors` confidence in their ability to predict reaction rates in candidate IFR designs using a variety of neutron transport and diffusion programs.

  3. MODEL SIMULATION OF GEOMETRY AND STRESS-STRAIN VARIATION OF BATAN FUEL PIN PROTOTYPE DURING IRRADIATION TEST IN RSG-GAS REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwardi Suwardi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MODEL SIMULATION OF GEOMETRY AND STRESS-STRAIN VARIATION OF BATAN FUEL PIN PROTOTYPE DURING IRRADIATION TEST IN RSG-GAS REACTOR*. The first short fuel pin containing natural UO2 pellet in Zry4 cladding has been prepared at the CNFT (Center for Nuclear Fuel Technology then a ramp test will be performed. The present work is part of designing first irradiation experiments in the PRTF (Power Ramp Test Facility of RSG-GAS 30 MW reactor. The thermal mechanic of the pin during irradiation has simulated. The geometry variation of pellet and cladding is modeled by taking into account different phenomena such as thermal expansion, densification, swelling by fission product, thermal creep and radiation growth. The cladding variation is modeled by thermal expansion, thermal and irradiation creeps. The material properties are modeled by MATPRO and standard numerical parameter of TRANSURANUS code. Results of irradiation simulation with 9 kW/m LHR indicates that pellet-clad contacts onset from 0.090 mm initial gaps after 806 d, when pellet radius expansion attain 0.015 mm while inner cladding creep-down 0.075 mm. A newer computation data show that the maximum measured LHR of n-UO2 pin in the PRTF 12.4 kW/m. The next simulation will be done with a higher LHR, up to ~ 25 kW/m. MODEL SIMULASI VARIASI GEOMETRI DAN STRESS-STRAIN DARI PROTOTIP BAHAN BAKAR PIN BATAN SELAMA UJI IRADIASI DI REAKTOR RSG-GAS. Pusat Teknologi Bahan Bakar Nuklir (PTBBN telah menyiapkan tangkai (pin bahan bakar pendek perdana yang berisi pelet UO2 alam dalam kelongsong paduan zircaloy untuk dilakukan uji iradiasi daya naik. Penelitian ini merupakan bagian dari perancangan percobaan iradiasi pertama di PRTF (Power Ramp Test Fasility yang terpasang di reaktor serbaguna RSG-GAS berdaya 30 MW. Telah dilakukan pemodelan dan simulasi kinerja termal mekanikal pin selama iradiasi. Variasi geometri pelet dan kelongsong selama pengujian dimodelkan dengan memperhatikan fenomena ekspansi termal

  4. Safeguards instrument to monitor spent reactor fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, N.; Dowdy, E. J.; Holt, D. M.; Stump, C.

    1981-10-01

    A hand held instrument for monitoring irradiated nuclear fuel inventories located in water filled storage ponds has been developed. This instrument provides sufficient precise qualitative and quantitative information to be useful as a confirmatory technique to International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors, and is believed to be of potential use to nuclear fuel managers and to operators of spent fuel storage facilities, both at reactor and away from reactor, and to operators of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Because the Cerenkov radiation glow can barely be seen by the unaided eye under darkened conditions, a night vision device is incorporated to aid the operator in locating the fuel assembly to be measured. Beam splitting optics placed in front of the image intensifier and a preset aperture select a predetermined portion of the observed scene for measurement of the light intensity using a photomultiplier (PM) tube and digital readout. The PM tube gain is adjusted by use of an internal optical reference source, providing long term repeatability and instrument to instrument consistency. Interchangeable lenses accommodate various viewing and measuring conditions.

  5. Reference Neutron Radiographs of Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    Reference neutron radiographs of nuclear reactor fuel were produced by the Euraton Neutron Radiography Working Group and published in 1984 by the Reidel Publishing Company. In this collection a classification is given of the various neutron radiographic findings, that can occur in different parts...... of pelletized, annular and vibro-conpacted nuclear fuel pins. Those parts of the pins are shown where changes of appearance differ from those for the parts as fabricated. Also radiographs of those as fabricated parts are included. The collection contains 158 neutron radiographs, reproduced on photographic paper...

  6. Pebble Fuel Handling and Reactivity Control for Salt-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Per [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Greenspan, Ehud [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2015-02-09

    -PREX facility uses novel digital x-ray tomography methods to track both the translational and rotational motion of spherical pebbles, which provides unique experimental results that can be used to validate discrete element method (DEM) simulations of pebble motion. The validation effort supported by the X-PREX facility provides a means to build confidence in analysis of pebble bed configuration and residence time distributions that impact the neutronics, thermal hydraulics, and safety analysis of pebble bed reactor cores. Experimental and DEM simulation results are reported for silo drainage, a classical problem in the granular flow literature, at several hopper angles. These studies include conventional converging and novel diverging geometries that provide additional flexibility in the design of pebble bed reactor cores. Excellent agreement is found between the X-PREX experimental and DEM simulation results. This report also includes results for additional studies relevant to the design and analysis of pebble bed reactor cores including the study of forces on shut down blades inserted directly into a packed bed and pebble flow in a cylindrical hopper that is representative of a small test reactor.

  7. Advanced burner test reactor preconceptual design report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y. I.; Finck, P. J.; Grandy, C.; Cahalan, J.; Deitrich, L.; Dunn, F.; Fallin, D.; Farmer, M.; Fanning, T.; Kim, T.; Krajtl, L.; Lomperski, S.; Moisseytsev, A.; Momozaki, Y.; Sienicki, J.; Park, Y.; Tang, Y.; Reed, C.; Tzanos, C; Wiedmeyer, S.; Yang, W.; Chikazawa, Y.; JAEA

    2008-12-16

    The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand, to address nuclear waste management concerns and to promote non-proliferation. Implementation of the GNEP requires development and demonstration of three major technologies: (1) Light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel separations technologies that will recover transuranics to be recycled for fuel but not separate plutonium from other transuranics, thereby providing proliferation-resistance; (2) Advanced Burner Reactors (ABRs) based on a fast spectrum that transmute the recycled transuranics to produce energy while also reducing the long term radiotoxicity and decay heat loading in the repository; and (3) Fast reactor fuel recycling technologies to recover and refabricate the transuranics for repeated recycling in the fast reactor system. The primary mission of the ABR Program is to demonstrate the transmutation of transuranics recovered from the LWR spent fuel, and hence the benefits of the fuel cycle closure to nuclear waste management. The transmutation, or burning of the transuranics is accomplished by fissioning and this is most effectively done in a fast spectrum. In the thermal spectrum of commercial LWRs, some transuranics capture neutrons and become even heavier transuranics rather than being fissioned. Even with repeated recycling, only about 30% can be transmuted, which is an intrinsic limitation of all thermal spectrum reactors. Only in a fast spectrum can all transuranics be effectively fissioned to eliminate their long-term radiotoxicity and decay heat. The Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) is the first step in demonstrating the transmutation technologies. It directly supports development of a prototype full-scale Advanced Burner Reactor, which would be followed by commercial deployment of ABRs. The primary objectives of the ABTR are: (1) To demonstrate reactor-based transmutation of transuranics as part of an

  8. Reprocessing of research reactor fuel the Dounreay option

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartwright, P.

    1997-08-01

    Reprocessing is a proven process for the treatment of spent U/Al Research Reactor fuel. At Dounreay 12679 elements have been reprocessed during the past 30 years. For reactors converting to LEU fuel the uranium recovered in reprocessing can be blended down to less than 20% U{sub 235}, enrichment and be fabricated into new elements. For reactors already converted to LEU it is technically possible to reprocess spent silicide fuel to reduce the U{sub 235} burden and present to a repository only stable conditioned waste. The main waste stream from reprocessing which contains the Fission products is collected in underground storage tanks where it is kept for a period of at least five years before being converted to a stable solid form for return to the country of origin for subsequent storage/disposal. Discharges to the environment from reprocessing are low and are limited to the radioactive gases contained in the spent fuel and a low level liquid waste steam. Both of these discharges are independently monitored, and controlled within strict discharge limits set by the UK Government`s Scottish Office. Transportation of spent fuel to Dounreay has been undertaken using many routes from mainland Europe and has utilised over the past few years both chartered and scheduled vessel services. Several different transport containers have been handled and are currently licensed in the UK. This paper provides a short history of MTR reprocessing at Dounreay, and provides information to show reprocessing can satisfy the needs of MTR operators, showing that reprocessing is a valuable asset in non-proliferation terms, offers a complete solution and is environmentally acceptable.

  9. Study on the effect of the CANFLEX-NU fuel element bowing on the critical heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suk, Ho Chun; Cho, Moon Sung; Jeon, Ji Su

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the CANFLEX-NU fuel element bowing on the critical heat flux is reviewed and analyzed, which is requested by KINS as the Government design licensing condition for the use of the fuel bundles in CANDU power reactors. The effect of the gap between two adjacent fuel elements on the critical heat flux and onset-of-dryout power is studied. The reduction of the width of a single inter-rod gap from its nominal size to the minimum manufacture allowance of 1 mm has a negligible effects on the thermal-hydraulic performance of the bundle for the given set of boundary conditions applied to the CANFLEX-43 element bundle in an uncrept channel. As expected, the in-reactor irradiation test results show that there are no evidence of the element bow problems on the bundle performance.

  10. Zirconium alloys for fuel element structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bart, G.; Bertsch, J

    2005-07-01

    Today more than 400 light water power reactors (LWRs) operate worldwide providing approximately 17% of the world's electricity demand. One important component for their successful operation is the fuel tube, made out of a zirconium alloy. A huge number of out-of-pile and in-pile experiments have been performed to improve step by step the fuel for higher burn-up and to reduce the failure rates of fuel pins close to zero. The influencing parameters for excellent or poor cladding behaviour are numerous and sometimes counteract each other. The process of cladding corrosion is slow, difficult to follow, the mechanistic understanding at best incomplete. A vast amount of literature documents the abundant tests and comes up with hypotheses and models for the materials behaviour. PSI has supported for the past 20 years the development of high burn-up fuel cladding by microstructural research studies and service work in post-irradiation examination of test pins. This article reviews the development of the cladding tubes, focussing on the chemical and materials science aspects. (author)

  11. The CABRI fast neutron Hodoscope: Renovation, qualification program and first results following the experimental reactor restart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, V.; Mirotta, S.; Guillot, J.; Biard, B.

    2018-01-01

    The CABRI experimental pulse reactor, located at the Cadarache nuclear research center, southern France, is devoted to the study of Reactivity Initiated Accidents (RIA). For the purpose of the CABRI International Program (CIP), managed and funded by IRSN, in the framework of an OECD/NEA agreement, a huge renovation of the facility has been conducted since 2003. The Cabri Water Loop was then installed to ensure prototypical Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) conditions for testing irradiated fuel rods. The hodoscope installed in the CABRI reactor is a unique online fuel motion monitoring system, operated by IRSN and dedicated to the measurement of the fast neutrons emitted by the tested rod during the power pulse. It is one of the distinctive features of the CABRI reactor facility, which is operated by CEA. The system is able to determine the fuel motion, if any, with a time resolution of 1 ms and a spatial resolution of 3 mm. The hodoscope equipment has been upgraded as well during the CABRI facility renovation. This paper presents the main outcomes achieved with the hodoscope since October 2015, date of the first criticality of the CABRI reactor in its new Cabri Water Loop configuration. Results obtained during reactor commissioning phase functioning, either in steady-state mode (at low and high power, up to 23 MW) or in transient mode (start-up, possibly beyond 20 GW), are discussed.

  12. Synergistic Smart Fuel For In-pile Nuclear Reactor Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Randall A. Ali; Steven L . Garrett

    2013-10-01

    In March 2011, an earthquake of magnitude 9.0 on the Richter scale struck Japan with its epicenter on the northeast coast, near the Tohoku region. In addition to the immense physical destruction and casualties across the country, several nuclear power plants (NPP) were affected. It was the Fukushima Daiichi NPP that experienced the most severe and irreversible damage. The earthquake brought the reactors at Fukushima to an automatic shutdown and because the power transmission lines were damaged, emergency diesel generators (EDGs) were activated to ensure that there was continued cooling of the reactors and spent fuel pools. The situation was being successfully managed until the tsunami hit about forty-five minutes later with a maximum wave height of approximately 15 m. The influx of water submerged the EDGs, the electrical switchgear, and dc batteries, resulting in the total loss of power to the reactors.2 At this point, the situation became critical. There was a loss of the sensors and instrumentation within the reactor that could have provided valuable information to guide the operators to make informed decisions and avoid the unfortunate events that followed. In the light of these events, we have developed and tested a potential self-powered thermoacoustic system, which will have the ability to serve as a temperature sensor and can transmit data independently of electronic networks. Such a device is synergistic with the harsh environment of the nuclear reactor as it utilizes the heat from the nuclear fuel to provide the input power.

  13. Calibration of a fuel-to-cladding gap conductance model for fast reactor fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.B.

    1978-05-01

    The report presents refined methods for calculation of fuel temperatures in PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ fuel in Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) fuel pins. Of primary concern is the calculation of the temperature changes across the fuel-to-cladding gap of pins with fuel burnups that range from 60 to 10,900 MWd/MTM (0.006 to 1.12 at.%). Described in particular are: (1) a proposed set of heat transfer formulations and corresponding material properties for modeling radial heat transfer through the fuel and cladding; and (2) the calibration of a fuel-to-cladding gap conductance model, as part of a thermal performance computer code (SIEX-M1) which incorporates the proposed heat transfer expressions, using integral thermal performance data from two unique in-reactor experiments. The test data used are from the HEDL P-19 and P-20 experiments which were irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number Two (EBR-II), for the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL).

  14. Microminiature nuclear reactor using liquid thorium fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Kazuo.

    1988-11-07

    Purpose: To provide a microminiature nuclear reactor of about 0.2 - 20,000 KW power. Constitution: A reactor core having graphite moderator disposed cylindrically therein has a volume of 200 - 3000 liter and a height/ diameter ratio of about 1.10 - 1.30, in which the inside is divided into two regions, that is, a central region I and a blanket region II. The gap ratio of the moderator in the central region I is set to about 10% and that in the blanket region II is set to about 30%. Nuclear fuel-containing salts flow through the gaps in the moderators of the central region I and the blanket region II. Uranium in the nuclear fuels causes nuclear fission to generate energy and tritium is converted into uranium by neutrons generated upon nuclear fission to continue the reaction. Critical value can be attained even if the neutron density is made uniform and low. The fuel conversion ratio is as high as 50 - 70%, design, manufacture, operation and maintenance are easy and the installation and the running costs can be saved. (Furukawa, K.).

  15. Spent nuclear fuel discharges from U.S. reactors 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    Spent Nuclear Fuel Discharges from US Reactors 1994 provides current statistical data on fuel assemblies irradiated at commercial nuclear reactors operating in the US. This year`s report provides data on the current inventories and storage capacities at these reactors. Detailed statistics on the data are presented in four chapters that highlight 1994 spent fuel discharges, storage capacities and inventories, canister and nonfuel component data, and assembly characteristics. Five appendices, a glossary, and bibliography are also included. 10 figs., 34 tabs.

  16. V.S.O.P. (99/09) computer code system for reactor physics and fuel cycle simulation. Version 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruetten, H.J.; Haas, K.A.; Brockmann, H.; Ohlig, U.; Pohl, C.; Scherer, W.

    2010-07-15

    V.S.O.P. (99/ 09) represents the further development of V.S.O.P. (99/ 05). Compared to its precursor, the code system has been improved again in many details. The main motivation for this new code version was to update the basic nuclear libraries used by the code system. Thus, all cross section libraries involved in the code have now been based on ENDF/B-VII. V.S.O.P. is a computer code system for the comprehensive numerical simulation of the physics of thermal reactors. It implies the setup of the reactor and of the fuel element, processing of cross sections, neutron spectrum evaluation, neutron diffusion calculation in two or three dimensions, fuel burnup, fuel shuffling, reactor control, thermal hydraulics and fuel cycle costs. The thermal hydraulics part (steady state and time-dependent) is restricted to gas-cooled reactors and to two spatial dimensions. The code can simulate the reactor operation from the initial core towards the equilibrium core. This latest code version was developed and tested under the WINDOWS-XP - operating system. (orig.)

  17. Thermal–hydraulic characteristics for CANFLEX fuel channel using burnable poison in CANDU reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ho Bae

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The thermal–hydraulic characteristics for the CANadian Deuterium Uranium Flexible (CANFLEX-burnable poison (BP fuel channel, which is loaded with a BP at the center ring based on the CANFLEX-RU (recycled uranium fuel channel, are evaluated and compared with that of standard 37-element and CANFLEX-NU (natural uranium fuel channels. The distributions of fuel temperature and critical channel power for the CANFLEX-BP fuel channel are calculated using the NUclear Heat Transport CIRcuit Thermohydraulics Analysis Code (NUCIRC code for various creep rate and burnup. CANFLEX-BP fuel channel has been revealed to have a lower fuel temperature compared with that of a standard 37-element fuel channel, especially for high power channels. The critical channel power of CANFLEX-BP fuel channel has increased by about 10%, relative to that of a standard 37-element fuel channel for 380 channels in a core, and has higher value relative to that of the CANFLEX-NU fuel channel except the channels in the outer core. This study has shown that the use of a BP is feasible to enhance the thermal performance by the axial heat flux distribution, as well as the improvement of the reactor physical safety characteristics, and thus the reactor safety can be improved by the use of BP in a CANDU reactor.

  18. Fabrication procedures for manufacturing high uranium concentration dispersion fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Jose Antonio Batista de; Durazzo, Michelangelo, E-mail: jasouza@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    IPEN developed and made available for routine production the technology for manufacturing dispersion type fuel elements for use in research reactors. However, the fuel produced at IPEN is limited to the uranium concentration of 3.0 g U/c m3 by using the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al dispersion. Increasing the uranium concentration of the fuel is interesting by the possibility of increasing the reactor core reactivity and lifetime of the fuel. It is possible to increase the concentration of uranium in the fuel up to the technological limit of 4.8 g U/c m3 for the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al dispersion, which is well placed around the world. This new fuel will be applicable in the new Brazilian- Multipurpose Reactor RMB. This study aimed to develop the manufacturing process of high uranium concentration fuel, redefining the procedures currently used in the manufacture of IPEN. This paper describes the main procedures adjustments that will be necessary. (author)

  19. SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE & AFTER IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TOFFER, H.

    2006-07-18

    With the shutdown of the Hanford PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant) reprocessing plant in the 1970s, adequate storage capacity for spent Hanford N Reactor fuel elements in the K and N Reactor pools became a concern. To maximize space utilization in the pools, accounting for fuel burnup was considered. Fuel that had experienced a neutron environment in a reactor is known as spent, exposed, or irradiated fuel. In contrast fuel that has not yet been placed in a reactor is known as green, unexposed, or unirradiated fuel. Calculations indicated that at typical fuel exposures for N Reactor, the spent-fuel critical mass would be twice the critical mass for green fuel. A decision was reached to test the calculational result with a definitive experiment. If the results proved positive, storage capacity could be increased and N Reactor operation could be prolonged. An experiment to be conducted in the N Reactor spent-fuel storage pool was designed and assembled (References 1 and 2) and the services of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories (BNWL) (now Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]) critical mass laboratory were procured for the measurements (Reference 3). The experiments were performed in April 1975 in the Hanford N Reactor fuel storage pool. The fuel elements were MKIA fuel assemblies, comprised of two concentric tubes of low-enriched metallic uranium. Two separate sets of measurements were performed: one with unirradiated fuel and one with irradiated fuel. Both the unirradiated and irradiated fuel, were measured in the same geometry. The spent-fuel MKIA assemblies had an average burnup of 2865 MWd (megawatt days)/t. A constraint was imposed restricting the measurements to a subcritical limit of k{sub eff} = 0.97. Subcritical count rate data was obtained with pulsed-neutron and approach-to-critical measurements. Ten (10) configurations with green fuel and nine (9) configurations with spent fuel are described and evaluated. Of these, three (3) green fuel

  20. Modification of Neutron Kinetic Code for Plate Type Fuel Nuclear Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Ud-Din Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is conducted on the modification of neutron kinetic code for the plate type fuel nuclear reactor. REMARK is a neutron kinetic code that works only for the cylindrical type fuel nuclear reactor. In this research, our main emphasis is on the modification of this code in order to be applicable for the plate type fuel nuclear reactor. For this purpose, detailed mathematical studies have been performed and are subjected to write the program in Fortran language. Since REMARK code is written in Fortran language, so we have developed the program in Fortran and then inserted it into the source library of the code. The main emphasis is on the modification of subroutine in the source library of the code for hexagonal fuel assemblies with plate type fuel elements in it. The number of steps involved in the modification of the code has been included in the paper. The verification studies were performed by considering the small modular reactor with hexagonal assemblies and plate type fuel in it to find out the power distribution of the reactor core. The purpose of the research is to make the code work for the hexagonal fuel assemblies with plate type fuel element.

  1. A CFD M&S PROCESS FOR FAST REACTOR FUEL ASSEMBLIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurt D. Hamman; Ray A. Berry

    2008-09-01

    A CFD modeling and simulation process for large-scale problems using an arbitrary fast reactor fuel assembly design was evaluated. Three dimensional flow distributions of sodium for several fast reactor fuel assembly pin spacing configurations were simulated on high performance computers using commercial CFD software. This research focused on 19-pin fuel assembly “benchmark” geometry, similar in design to the Advanced Burner Test Reactor, where each pin is separated by helical wire-wrap spacers. Several two-equation turbulence models including the k-e and SST (Menter) k-? were evaluated. Considerable effort was taken to resolve the momentum boundary layer, so as to eliminate the need for wall functions and reduce computational uncertainty. High performance computers were required to generate the hybrid meshes needed to predict secondary flows created by the wire-wrap spacers; computational meshes ranging from 65 to 85 million elements were common. A general validation methodology was followed, including mesh refinement and comparison of numerical results with empirical correlations. Predictions for velocity, temperature, and pressure distribution are shown. The uncertainty of numerical models, importance of high fidelity experimental data, and the challenges associated with simulating and validating large production-type problems are presented.

  2. Surface and subsurface deposits on irradiated N Reactor fuel stored in the Hanford K Basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitner, A.L.

    1998-01-16

    Irradiated N Reactor uranium metal fuel is being stored in two water filled basins in the 1OO K Area. The Integrated Process Strategy for this fuel involves transfer to containers called Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCO`s) and vacuum drying the MCO`s to remove free water prior to extended dry storage. A major concern for MCO loading of this fuel is potential bound water in subsurface particulate material near damaged areas on the fuel elements, and in surface coating deposits. To investigate these characteristics, selected fuel elements were transferred to a hot cell for examination and sampling per the K Basins Spent Nuclear Fuel characterization plan. Fuel elements were taken from both K East Basin where the fuel is stored in open canisters, and from K West Basin where the canisters are sealed and contain a corrosion inhibitor.

  3. Behavior of a VVER fuel element tested under severe accident conditions in the CORA facility. Test results of experiment CORA-W1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Noack, V.; Schanz, G.; Schumacher, G.; Sepold, L.

    1994-01-01

    Test bundle CORA-W1 was without absorber material. As in the earlier CORA tests the test bundles were subjected to temperature transients of a slow heatup rate in a steam environment. The transient phases of the test were initiated with a temperature ramp rate of 1 K/s. With these conditions a so-called small-break LOCA was simulated. The temperature escalation due to the exothermal zirconium/niobium-steam reaction started at about 1200 C, leading the bundle to a maximum temperature of approximately 1900 C. With the movement of the melt also heat is transported to the lower region. Below 300 mm elevation the test bundle remained intact due to the axial temeprature distribution. W2 ist characterized by a strong oxidation above 300 mm elevation. Besides the severe oxidation the test bundle resulted in considerable fuel dissolution by ZrNb1/UO{sub 2} interaction in the upper part, complete spacer destruction at 600 mm due to chemical interactions between steel and the ZSrNb1 cladding. Despite some specific features the material behavior of the VVER-1000 bundle is comparable to that observed in the PWR and BWR test using fuel elements typical for Western countries. (orig./HP) [Deutsch] Versuchsbuendel CORA-W1 hatte kein Absorberelement. Wie in den CORA-Versuchen zuvor wurden die Testbuendel in Dampfatmosphaere Temperaturtransienten mit langsamer Aufheizrate ausgesetzt. Damit wurde ein Unfallablauf fuer einen LWR simuliert, der sich aus einem Kuehlmittelverluststoerfall durch Auftreten eines sogenannten kleinen Lecks entwickeln kann. Die Temperatureskalation - aufgrund der exothermen Zirkon/Niob-Wasserdampfreaktion - setzte ab ca. 1100 C ein. Die Hoechsttemperaturen im Buendel betrugen 2000 C. Die Versuchsdaten des Experiments CORA-W1 werden zusammen mit ersten Ergebnissen der Nachuntersuchung dargelegt. Das Versuchsbuendel weist eine starke Oxidation im oberen Bereich auf. Der untere Buendelabschnitt (bis 400 mm) blieb aufgrund der niedrigen Temperaturen in diesem

  4. Mathematical simulation of hydrocarbon fuel conversion in heat-protection elements of hypersonic aircrafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranov, A. L.; Korabel'nikov, A. V.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    We consider a mathematical model of hydrocarbon fuel conversion in a thermochemical reactor as an element of heat protection of a hypersonic aircraft. The application of this model has made it possible to enrich information obtained in experimental studies.

  5. Integral reactor system and method for fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Neil Edward; Brown, Michael S.; Cheekatamaria, Praveen; Deng, Thomas; Dimitrakopoulos, James; Litka, Anthony F.

    2017-03-07

    A reactor system is integrated internally within an anode-side cavity of a fuel cell. The reactor system is configured to convert higher hydrocarbons to smaller species while mitigating the lower production of solid carbon. The reactor system may incorporate one or more of a pre-reforming section, an anode exhaust gas recirculation device, and a reforming section.

  6. Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illum, D.B.; Olson, G.L.; McCardell, R.K.

    1999-01-01

    The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was a small water cooled, U-233/Th-232 cycle breeder reactor developed by the Pittsburgh Naval Reactors to improve utilization of the nation's nuclear fuel resources in light water reactors. The LWBR was operated at Shippingport Atomic Power Station (APS), which was a Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly Atomic Energy Commission)-owned reactor plant. Shippingport APS was the first large-scale, central-station nuclear power plant in the United States and the first plant of such size in the world operated solely to produce electric power. The Shippingport LWBR was operated successfully from 1977 to 1982 at the APS. During the five years of operation, the LWBR generated more than 29,000 effective full power hours (EFPH) of energy. After final shutdown, the 39 core modules of the LWBR were shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) at Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). At ECF, 12 of the 39 modules were dismantled and about 1000 of more than 17,000 rods were removed from the modules of proof-of-breeding and fuel performance testing. Some of the removed rods were kept at ECF, some were sent to Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in Idaho and some to ANL-East in Chicago for a variety of physical, chemical and radiological examinations. All rods and rod sections remaining after the experiments were shipped back to ECF, where modules and loose rods were repackaged in liners for dry storage. In a series of shipments, the liners were transported from ECF to Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The 47 liners containing the fully-rodded and partially-derodded core modules, the loose rods, and the rod scraps, are now stored in underground dry wells at CPP-749.

  7. Radiolytic production of chemical fuels in fusion reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, J D

    1977-06-01

    Miley's energy flow diagram for fusion reactor systems is extended to include radiolytic production of chemical fuel. Systematic study of the economics and the overall efficiencies of fusion reactor systems leads to a criterion for evaluating the potential of radiolytic production of chemical fuel as a means of enhancing the performance of a fusion reactor system. The ecumenicity of the schema is demonstrated by application to (1) tokamaks, (2) mirror machines, (3) theta-pinch reactors, (4) laser-heated solenoids, and (5) inertially confined, laser-pellet devices. Pure fusion reactors as well as fusion-fission hybrids are considered.

  8. FASTER Test Reactor Preconceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandy, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Belch, H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brunett, A. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heidet, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hill, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoffman, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jin, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mohamed, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moisseytsev, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Passerini, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sienicki, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sumner, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vilim, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hayes, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The FASTER test reactor plant is a sodium-cooled fast spectrum test reactor that provides high levels of fast and thermal neutron flux for scientific research and development. The 120MWe FASTER reactor plant has a superheated steam power conversion system which provides electrical power to a local grid allowing for recovery of operating costs for the reactor plant.

  9. Performance of low smeared density sodium-cooled fast reactor metal fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, D.L., E-mail: Douglas.Porter@inl.gov; Chichester, H.J.M.; Medvedev, P.G.; Hayes, S.L.; Teague, M.C.

    2015-10-15

    An experiment was performed in the Experimental Breeder Rector-II (EBR-II) in the 1990s to show that metallic fast reactor fuel could be used in reactors with a single, once-through core. To prove the long duration, high burnup, high neutron exposure capability an experiment where the fuel pin was designed with a very large fission gas plenum and very low fuel smeared density (SD). The experiment, X496, operated to only 8.3 at.% burnup because the EBR-II reactor was scheduled for shut-down at that time. Many of the examinations of the fuel pins only funded recently with the resurgence of reactor designs using very high-burnup fuel. The results showed that, despite the low smeared density of 59% the fuel swelled radially to contact the cladding, fission gas release appeared to be slightly higher than demonstrated in conventional 75%SD fuel tests and axial growth was about the same as 75% SD fuel. There were axial positions in some of the fuel pins which showed evidence of fuel restructuring and an absence of fission products with low melting points and gaseous precursors (Cs and Rb). A model to investigate whether these areas may have overheated due to a loss of bond sodium indicates that it is a possible explanation for the fuel restructuring and something to be considered for fuel performance modeling of low SD fuel.

  10. Genetic algorithms for nuclear reactor fuel load and reload optimization problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Sobolev

    2017-09-01

    The efficiency of use of the developed model of the genetic algorithm is demonstrated by the test example of a BN type reactor. The results of the test run demonstrated that the use of the proposed approach allows searching for optimal reactor load mapping for each separate core reshuffling operation. The main objective of the performed study was to demonstrate the applicability and efficiency of the new up-to-date approach to solving the problem of fuel loading into a nuclear reactor.

  11. Irradiation Tests Supporting LEU Conversion of Very High Power Research Reactors in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolstenhulme, N. E.; Cole, J. I.; Glagolenko, I.; Holdaway, K. K.; Housley, G. K.; Rabin, B. H.

    2016-10-01

    The US fuel development team is developing a high density uranium-molybdenum alloy monolithic fuel to enable conversion of five high-power research reactors. Previous irradiation tests have demonstrated promising behavior for this fuel design. A series of future irradiation tests will enable selection of final fuel fabrication process and provide data to qualify the fuel at moderately-high power conditions for use in three of these five reactors. The remaining two reactors, namely the Advanced Test Reactor and High Flux Isotope Reactor, require additional irradiation tests to develop and demonstrate the fuel’s performance with even higher power conditions, complex design features, and other unique conditions. This paper reviews the program’s current irradiation testing plans for these moderately-high irradiation conditions and presents conceptual testing strategies to illustrate how subsequent irradiation tests will build upon this initial data package to enable conversion of these two very-high power research reactors.

  12. HEAVY WATER COMPONENTS TEST REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

    2011-10-13

    The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) Decommissioning Project was initiated in 2009 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Removal Action with funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). This paper summarizes the history prior to 2009, the major D&D activities, and final end state of the facility at completion of decommissioning in June 2011. The HWCTR facility was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. In 2009 the $1.6 billion allocation from the ARRA to SRS for site footprint reduction at SRS reopened the doors to HWCTR - this time for final decommissioning. Alternative studies concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning was to remove the reactor vessel, both steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. The transfer coffin, originally above grade, was to be placed in the cavity vacated by the reactor vessel and the remaining below grade spaces would be grouted. Once all above equipment

  13. Reactor-specific spent fuel discharge projections, 1987-2020

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walling, R.C.; Heeb, C.M.; Purcell, W.L.

    1988-03-01

    The creation of five reactor-specific spent fuel data bases that contain information on the projected amounts of spent fuel to be discharged from U.S. commercial nuclear reactors through the year 2020 is described. The data bases contain detailed spent fuel information from existing, planned, and projected pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water eactors (BWR), and one existing high temperature gas reactor (HTGR). The projections are based on individual reactor information supplied by the U.S. reactor owners. The basic information is adjusted to conform to Energy Information Administration (EIA) forecasts for nuclear installed capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharged. The EIA cases considered are: No New Orders (assumes increasing burnup), No New Orders with No Increased Burnup, Upper Reference (assumes increasing burnup), Upper Reference with No Increased Burnup, and Lower Reference (assumes increasing burnup). Detailed, by-reactor tables are provided for annual discharged amounts of spent fuel, for storage requirements assuming maximum at-reactor storage, and for storage requirements assuming maximum at-reactor storage plus intra-utility transshipment of spent fuel. 8 refs., 8 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. Reactor-specific spent fuel discharge projections: 1986 to 2020

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeb, C.M.; Walling, R.C.; Purcell, W.L.

    1987-03-01

    The creation of five reactor-specific spent fuel data bases that contain information on the projected amounts of spent fuel to be discharged from US commercial nuclear reactors through the year 2020 is described. The data bases contain detailed spent-fuel information from existing, planned, and projected pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water reactors (BWR). The projections are based on individual reactor information supplied by the US reactor owners. The basic information is adjusted to conform to Energy Information Agency (EIA) forecasts for nuclear installed capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharged. The EIA cases considered are: (1) No new orders with extended burnup, (2) No new orders with constant burnup, (3) Upper reference (which assumes extended burnup), (4) Upper reference with constant burnup, and (5) Lower reference (which assumes extended burnup). Detailed, by-reactor tables are provided for annual discharged amounts of spent fuel, for storage requirements assuming maximum-at-reactor storage, and for storage requirements assuming maximum-at-reactor plus intra-utility transshipment of spent fuel. 6 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Classification of spent reactor fuel for nuclear forensics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew E; Turner, Phillip; Zimmerman, Colin; Goulermas, John Y

    2014-06-03

    In this paper we demonstrate the use of pattern recognition and machine learning techniques to determine the reactor type from which spent reactor fuel has originated. This has been done using the isotopic and elemental measurements of the sample and proves to be very useful in the field of nuclear forensics. Nuclear materials contain many variables (impurities and isotopes) that are very difficult to consider individually. A method that considers all material parameters simultaneously is advantageous. Currently the field of nuclear forensics focuses on the analysis of key material properties to determine details about the materials processing history, for example, utilizing known half-lives of isotopes can determine when the material was last processed (Stanley, F. E. J. Anal. At. Spectrom. 2012, 27, 1821; Varga, Z.; Wallenius, M.; Mayer, K.; Keegan, E.; Millet, S. Anal. Chem. 2009, 81, 8327-8334). However, it has been demonstrated that multivariate statistical analysis of isotopic concentrations can complement these method and are able to make use of a greater level of information through dimensionality reduction techniques (Robel, M.; Kristo, M. J. J. Environ. Radioact. 2008, 99, 1789-1797; Robel, M.; Kristo, M. J.; Heller, M. A. Nuclear Forensic Inferences Using Iterative Multidimensional Statistics. In Proceedings of the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management 50th Annual Meeting, Tucson, AZ, July 2009; 12 pages; Nicolaou, G. J. Environ. Radioact. 2006, 86, 313-318; Pajo, L.; Mayer, K.; Koch, L. Fresenius' J. Anal. Chem. 2001, 371, 348-352). There has been some success in using such multidimensional statistical methods to determine details about the history of spent reactor fuel (Robel, M.; Kristo, M. J. J. Environ. Radioact. 2008, 99, 1789-1797). Here, we aim to expand on these findings by pursuing more robust dimensionality reduction techniques based on manifold embedding which are able to better capture the intrinsic data set information. Furthermore, we

  16. Design and Testing of a Labview- Controlled Catalytic Packed- Bed Reactor System For Production of Hydrocarbon Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Street, J.; Yu, F.; Warnock, J.; Wooten, J.; Columbus, E.; White, M. G.

    2012-05-01

    Gasified woody biomass (producer gas) was converted over a Mo/H+ZSM-5 catalyst to produce gasolinerange hydrocarbons. The effect of contaminants in the producer gas showed that key retardants in the system included ammonia and oxygen. The production of gasoline-range hydrocarbons derived from producer gas was studied and compared with gasoline-range hydrocarbon production from two control syngas mixes. Certain mole ratios of syngas mixes were introduced into the system to evaluate whether or not the heat created from the exothermic reaction could be properly controlled. Contaminant-free syngas was used to determine hydrocarbon production with similar mole values of the producer gas from the gasifier. Contaminant-free syngas was also used to test an ideal contaminant-free synthesis gas situation to mimic our particular downdraft gasifier. Producer gas was used in this study to determine the feasibility of using producer gas to create gasoline-range hydrocarbons on an industrial scale using a specific Mo/H+ZSM-5 catalyst. It was determined that after removing the ammonia, other contaminants poisoned the catalyst and retarded the hydrocarbon production process as well.

  17. The reactor core TRIGA Mark-III with fuels type 30/20; El nucleo del reactor TRIGA Mark-III con combustible tipo 30/20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar H, F., E-mail: fortunato.aguilar@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    This work describes the calculation series carried out with the program MCNP5 in order to define the configuration of the reactor core with fuels 30/20 (fuels with 30% of uranium content in the Or-Zr-H mixture and a nominal enrichment of 20%). To select the configuration of the reactor core more appropriate to the necessities and future uses of the reactor, the following criterions were taken into account: a) the excess in the reactor reactivity, b) the switch out margin and c) to have new irradiation facilities inside the reactor core. Taking into account these criterions is proceeded to know the characteristics of the components that form the reactor core (dimensions, geometry, materials, densities and positions), was elaborated a base model of the reactor core, for the MCNP5 code, with a configuration composed by 85 fuel elements, 4 control bars and the corresponding structural elements. The high reactivity excess obtained with this model, gave the rule to realize other models of the reactor core in which the reactivity excess and the switch out margin were approximate to the values established in the technical specifications of the reactor operation. Several models were realized until finding the satisfactory model; this is composite for 74 fuels, 4 control bars and 6 additional experimental positions inside the reactor core. (Author)

  18. FASTER test reactor preconceptual design report summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandy, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Belch, H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brunett, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heidet, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hill, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoffman, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jin, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mohamed, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moisseytsev, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Passerini, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sienicki, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sumner, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vilim, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hayes, Steven [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-29

    The FASTER reactor plant is a sodium-cooled fast spectrum test reactor that provides high levels of fast and thermal neutron flux for scientific research and development. The 120MWe FASTER reactor plant has a superheated steam power conversion system which provides electrical power to a local grid allowing for recovery of operating costs for the reactor plant.

  19. Future Transient Testing of Advanced Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Carmack

    2009-09-01

    The transient in-reactor fuels testing workshop was held on May 4–5, 2009 at Idaho National Laboratory. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a forum where technical experts in transient testing of nuclear fuels could meet directly with technical instrumentation experts and nuclear fuel modeling and simulation experts to discuss needed advancements in transient testing to support a basic understanding of nuclear fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. The workshop was attended by representatives from Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique CEA, Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Department of Energy (DOE), AREVA, General Electric – Global Nuclear Fuels (GE-GNF), Westinghouse, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), universities, and several DOE national laboratories. Transient testing of fuels and materials generates information required for advanced fuels in future nuclear power plants. Future nuclear power plants will rely heavily on advanced computer modeling and simulation that describes fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. TREAT is an ideal facility for this testing because of its flexibility, proven operation and material condition. The opportunity exists to develop advanced instrumentation and data collection that can support modeling and simulation needs much better than was possible in the past. In order to take advantage of these opportunities, test programs must be carefully designed to yield basic information to support modeling before conducting integral performance tests. An early start of TREAT and operation at low power would provide significant dividends in training, development of instrumentation, and checkout of reactor systems. Early start of TREAT (2015) is needed to support the requirements of potential users of TREAT and include the testing of full length fuel irradiated in the FFTF reactor. The capabilities provided by TREAT are needed for the development of nuclear power and the following benefits will be realized by

  20. Target-fueled nuclear reactor for medical isotope production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Richard L.; Parma, Edward J.

    2017-06-27

    A small, low-enriched, passively safe, low-power nuclear reactor comprises a core of target and fuel pins that can be processed to produce the medical isotope .sup.99Mo and other fission product isotopes. The fuel for the reactor and the targets for the .sup.99Mo production are the same. The fuel can be low enriched uranium oxide, enriched to less than 20% .sup.235U. The reactor power level can be 1 to 2 MW. The reactor is passively safe and maintains negative reactivity coefficients. The total radionuclide inventory in the reactor core is minimized since the fuel/target pins are removed and processed after 7 to 21 days.

  1. Latest achievements of CEA and AREVA NP on HTR fuel fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charollais, Francois [CEA Cadarache, DEN/CAD/DEC/SPUA, Bat. 315, BP1, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)], E-mail: francois.charollais@cea.fr; Perrais, Christophe; Moulinier, Dominique [CEA Cadarache, DEN/CAD/DEC/SPUA, Bat. 315, BP1, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Perez, Marc [CEA Grenoble, DRT/GRE/DTEN/S3ME, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Vitali, Marie-Pierre [CERCA, BP 1114, 26104 Romans sur Isere Cedex (France)

    2008-11-15

    Extensive research and development programs on the (Very) High Temperature gas cooled Reactor (V/HTR) are being conducted by many countries mainly promoted by the attractiveness of this concept and its capability for other applications than electricity production, such as high temperature process heat and cogeneration. In this international context, the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and AREVA NP through its project called ANTARES (Areva New Technology for Advanced Reactor Energy Supply) conduct a V/HTR fuel development and qualification program, among which one major activity is dedicated to the mastering of the nuclear fuel fabrication technology. The fuel concept selected for this project is the compact design based on UO{sub 2} kernels and SiC coating. First laboratory-scale experiments were performed to recover the know-how of HTR-coated particles and fuel element manufacturing. The different stages of UO{sub 2} kernel fabrication by the Gel Supported Precipitation (GSP) process were reviewed and improved. Experimental conditions for the Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) of coatings have been defined on dummy kernels supported by a modelling approach of the CVD process. The compacting processes formerly used at CERCA were reviewed and updated. In order to support a future industrial manufacturing factory and to meet the next short-term challenge, which is the fabrication of coated particle batches that will be compacted for the first irradiation test scheduled in OSIRIS, a lab-scale experimental manufacturing facility, named CAPRI (CEA and AREVA PRoduction Integrated) line has been set up and is in operation since early 2005. The CAPRI line is composed of a manufacturing line for TRISO particles, named GAIA, located at CEA Cadarache, and a compacting line for fuel elements based at CERCA, AREVA NP Subsidiary, Romans. Since early 2005, many tests have been performed leading to a better understanding and optimization of coating particle and compact

  2. FLOWSHEET EVALUATION FOR THE DISSOLVING AND NEUTRALIZATION OF SODIUM REACTOR EXPERIMENT USED NUCLEAR FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, W. E.; Hansen, E. K.; Shehee, T. C.

    2012-10-30

    This report includes the literature review, hydrogen off-gas calculations, and hydrogen generation tests to determine that H-Canyon can safely dissolve the Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE; thorium fuel), Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR; aluminum alloy fuel), and Denmark Reactor (DR-3; silicide fuel, aluminum alloy fuel, and aluminum oxide fuel) assemblies in the L-Bundles with respect to the hydrogen levels in the projected peak off-gas rates. This is provided that the number of L-Bundles charged to the dissolver is controlled. Examination of SRE dissolution for potential issues has aided in predicting the optimal batching scenario. The calculations detailed in this report demonstrate that the FNR, SRE, and DR-3 used nuclear fuel (UNF) are bounded by MURR UNF and may be charged using the controls outlined for MURR dissolution in a prior report.

  3. Development of alternative fuel assembly for WWER-1000 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solonin, M.I.; Bibilashvili, Y.K.; Sokolov, N.B. [Vserossijskij Nauchno-Issledovatel`skij Inst. Neorganicheskikh Materialov, Moscow (Russian Federation); Panyushkin, A.K.; Tsibulia, V. [Mashinostroitelniy Zavod, Karl Marx st. 12, Electrostal 144001 (Russian Federation); Samoylov, O.B.; Kurilev, V.B.; Kuul, V.S.; Kaidalov, V.B.; Peskov, R.A.; Ershov, V.F. [OKBM, N. Novgorod 603074 (Russian Federation)

    1997-10-01

    An alternative design of fuel assembly has been developed for the WWER-1000 reactor with the aim of assuring a geometrical stability of the core during operation. The fuel assembly provides enhanced safety and substantial improvement in the WWER-1000 fuel cycle economics. (orig.)

  4. Gel-sphere-pac fuel for thermal reactors: assessment of fabrication technology and irradiation performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatty, R.L. Norman, R.E.; Notz, K.J. (comps.)

    1979-11-01

    Recent interest in proliferation-resistant fuel cycles for light-water reactors has focused attention on spiked plutonium and /sup 233/U-Th fuels, requiring remote refabrication. The gel-sphere-pac process for fabricating metal-clad fuel elements has drawn special attention because it involves fewer steps. Gel-sphere-pac fabrication technology involves two major areas: the preparation of fuel spheres of high density and loading these spheres into rods in an efficiently packed geometry. Gel sphere preparation involves three major steps: preparation of a sol or of a special solution (broth), gelation of droplets of sol or broth to give semirigid spheres of controlled size, and drying and sintering these spheres to a high density. Gelation may be accomplished by water extraction (suitable only for sols) or ammonia gelation (suitable for both sols and broths but used almost exclusively with broths). Ammonia gelation can be accomplished either externally, via ammonia gas and ammonium hydroxide, or internally via an added ammonia generator such as hexamethylenetetramine. Sphere-pac fuel rod fabrication involves controlled blending and metering of three sizes of spheres into the rod and packing by low- to medium-energy vibration to achieve about 88% smear density; these sizes have diametral ratios of about 40:10:1 and are blended in size fraction amounts of about 60% coarse, 18% medium, and 22% fine. Irradiation test results indicate that sphere-pac fuel performs at least as well as pellet fuel, and may in fact offer an advantage in significantly reducing mechanical and chemical interaction between the fuel and cladding. The normal feed for gel sphere preparation, heavy metal nitrate solution, is the usual product of fuel reprocessing, so that fabrication of gel spheres performs all the functions performed by both conversion and pellet fabrication in the case of pellet technology.

  5. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2006-01-31

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

  6. Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.T. (Skip) Robinson; James P. Meagher; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Siv Aasland; Charles Besecker; Jack Chen Bart A. van Hassel; Olga Polevaya; Rafey Khan; Piyush Pilaniwalla

    2002-12-31

    This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from November 1, 2001 to December 31, 2002 in the following task areas: Task 1: Materials Development; Task 2: Composite Development; Task 4: Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8: Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; 8.2 Nuvera Fuel Cell Program; and Task 10: Program Management. Major progress has been made towards developing high temperature, high performance, robust, oxygen transport elements. In addition, a novel reactor design has been proposed that co-produces hydrogen, lowers cost and improves system operability. Fuel and engine testing is progressing well, but was delayed somewhat due to the hiatus in program funding in 2002. The Nuvera fuel cell portion of the program was completed on schedule and delivered promising results regarding low emission fuels for transportation fuel cells. The evaluation of ultra-clean diesel fuels continues in single cylinder (SCTE) and multiple cylinder (MCTE) test rigs at International Truck and Engine. FT diesel and a BP oxygenate showed significant emissions reductions in comparison to baseline petroleum diesel fuels. Overall through the end of 2002 the program remains under budget, but behind schedule in some areas.

  7. MRT fuel element inspection at Dounreay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, J.

    1997-08-01

    To ensure that their production and inspection processes are performed in an acceptable manner, ie. auditable and traceable, the MTR Fuel Element Fabrication Plant at Dounreay operates to a documented quality system. This quality system, together with the fuel element manufacturing and inspection operations, has been independently certified to ISO9002-1987, EN29002-1987 and BS5750:Pt2:1987 by Lloyd`s Register Quality Assurance Limited (LRQA). This certification also provides dual accreditation to the relevant German, Dutch and Australian certification bodies. This paper briefly describes the quality system, together with the various inspection stages involved in the manufacture of MTR fuel elements at Dounreay.

  8. Advanced Fuels Campaign Light Water Reactor Accident Tolerant Fuel Performance Metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brad Merrill; Melissa Teague; Robert Youngblood; Larry Ott; Kevin Robb; Michael Todosow; Chris Stanek; Mitchell Farmer; Michael Billone; Robert Montgomery; Nicholas Brown; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2014-02-01

    The safe, reliable and economic operation of the nation’s nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the United States’ nuclear industry. As a result, continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels, remains central to industry’s success. Decades of research combined with continual operation have produced steady advancements in technology and yielded an extensive base of data, experience, and knowledge on light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance under both normal and accident conditions. In 2011, following the Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. As a result of direction from the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) initiated an Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) Development program. The complex multiphysics behavior of LWR nuclear fuel makes defining specific material or design improvements difficult; as such, establishing qualitative attributes is critical to guide the design and development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. This report summarizes a common set of technical evaluation metrics to aid in the optimization and down selection of candidate designs. As used herein, “metrics” describe a set of technical bases by which multiple concepts can be fairly evaluated against a common baseline and against one another. Furthermore, this report describes a proposed technical evaluation methodology that can be applied to assess the ability of each concept to meet performance and safety goals relative to the current UO2 – zirconium alloy system and relative to one another. The resultant ranked evaluation can then inform concept down-selection, such that the most promising accident tolerant fuel design option(s) can continue to be developed for lead test rod or lead test assembly

  9. Fuel particles for high temperature reactors; Combustibles a particules pour reacteurs a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pheip, M. [CEA Cadarache (DEN/CAD/DEC/SESC/LIPA), 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France). Dept. d' Etudes des Combustibles; Masson, M. [CEA Valrho, Dept. Radiochimie et Procedes, 30 (France); Perrais, Ch. [CEA Cadarache (DEN/DEC/SPUA), 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France). Dept. d' Etudes des Combustibles; Pelletier, M. [CEA Cadarache (DEN/DEC/SESC), 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France). Dept. d' Etudes des Combustibles

    2007-07-15

    The concept of fuel particles with a millimeter size was born at the end of the 1950's and is the reference concept of high or very high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTR/VHTR). The specificity of this fuel concerns its fine divided structure, its all-ceramic composition and its micro-confining properties with respect to fission products. These 3 properties when combined together allow the access to high temperatures and to a high level of safety. This article presents: 1 - the general properties of particle fuels; 2 - the fabrication and control of fuel elements: nuclei elaboration processes, vapor deposition coating of nuclei, shaping of fuel elements, quality control of fabrication; 3 - the fuel particles behaviour under irradiation: mechanical and thermal behaviour, behaviour and diffusion of fission products, ruining mode; 4 - the reprocessing of particle fuels: stakes and options, direct storage, separation of constituents, processing of carbonous wastes; 5 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  10. Micro-Reactor Physics of MOX-Fueled Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, T.

    2001-06-17

    Recently, fuel assemblies of light water reactors have become complicated because of the extension of fuel burnup and the use of high-enriched Gd and mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, etc. In conventional assembly calculations, the detailed flux distribution, spectrum distribution, and space dependence of self-shielding within a fuel pellet are not directly taken into account. The experimental and theoretical study of investigating these microscopic properties is named micro-reactor physics. The purpose of this work is to show the importance of micro-reactor physics in the analysis of MOX fuel assemblies. Several authors have done related studies; however, their studies are limited to fuel pin cells, and they are never mentioned with regard to burnup effect, which is important for actual core design.

  11. Structural analysis of fuel rod applied to pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Danilo P.; Pinheiro, Andre Ricardo M.; Lotto, André A., E-mail: danilo.pinheiro@marinha.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CTMSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The design of fuel assemblies applied to Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) has several requirements and acceptance criteria that must be attended for licensing. In the case of PWR fuel rods, an important mechanical structural requirement is to keep the radial stability when submitted to the coolant external pressure. In the framework of the Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) program new materials have been studied to replace zirconium based alloys as cladding, including iron-based alloys. In this sense, efforts have been made to evaluate the behavior of these materials under PWR conditions. The present work aims to evaluate the collapse cold pressure of a stainless steel thin-walled tube similar to that used as cladding material of fuel rods by means of the comparison of numeric data, and experimental results. As a result of the simulations, it was observed that the collapse pressure has a value intermediate value between those found by regulatory requirements and analytical calculations. The experiment was carried out for the validation of the computational model using test specimens of thin-walled tubes considering empty tube. The test specimens were sealed at both ends by means of welding. They were subjected to a high pressure device until the collapse of the tubes. Preliminary results obtained from experiments with the empty test specimens indicate that the computational model can be validated for stainless steel cladding, considering the difference between collapse pressure indicated in the regulatory document and the actual limit pressure concerning to radial instability of tubes with the studied characteristics. (author)

  12. Experimental assessment of accident scenarios for the high temperature reactor fuel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, O.; Laurie, M.; Bottomley, P.D.W.; Rondinella, V.V. [European Commission, Joint Research Center, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Transuranium Elements; Avincola, V. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Materialien (IAM-AWP); Allelein, H.J. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Reaktorsicherheit und -technik

    2013-11-15

    The High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is characterized by an advanced design with passive safety features. Fuel elements are constituted by a graphite matrix containing sub-mm-sized fuel particles with TRi-ISOtropic (TRISO) coating, designed to provide high fission product retention. During a loss of coolant accident scenario in a HTR the maximum temperature is foreseen to be in the range of 1,600 to 1,650 C, remaining well below the melting point of the fuel. Two key aspects associated with the safety of HTR fuel are assessed in this paper: fission product retention at temperatures up to 1,800 C is analyzed with the Cold Finger Apparatus (KueFA) while the behaviour of HTR-relevant fuel materials in an oxidizing environment is studied with the Corrosion Apparatus KORA. The KueFA is used to observe the combined effects of Depressurization and LOss of Forced Circulation (DLOFC) accident scenarios on HTR fuel. Originally designed at the Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ), an adapted KueFA operates on irradiated fuel in hot cell at JRC-ITU. A fuel pebble is heated in helium atmosphere for several hundred hours, mimicking accident temperatures up to 1,800 C and realistic temperature transients. Nongaseous volatile fission products released from the fuel condense on a water cooled stainless steel plate dubbed 'Cold Finger'. Exchanging plates frequently during the experiment and analyzing plate deposits by means of High Purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma spectroscopy allows a reconstruction of the fission product release as a function of time and temperature. To achieve a good quantification of the release, a careful calibration of the setup is necessary and a collimator needs to be used in some cases. The analysis of condensation plates from recent KueFA tests shows that fission product release quantification is possible at high and low activity levels. Another relevant HTR accident scenario is air ingress into the reactor vessel as a consequence of a DLOFC incident. In

  13. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Laboratory; Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Laboratory; Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Laboratory; Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Laboratory; Kinsey, James Carl [Idaho National Laboratory; Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Laboratory; Kumar, Akansha [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-04-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200 MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technological readiness level, licensing approach and costs.

  14. Preliminary Options Assessment of Versatile Irradiation Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Ramazan Sonat [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this report is to summarize the work undertaken at INL from April 2016 to January 2017 and aimed at analyzing some options for designing and building a versatile test reactor; the scope of work was agreed upon with DOE-NE. Section 2 presents some results related to KNK II and PRISM Mod A. Section 3 presents some alternatives to the VCTR presented in [ ] as well as a neutronic parametric study to assess the minimum power requirement needed for a 235U metal fueled fast test reactor capable to generate a fast (>100 keV) flux of 4.0 x 1015 n /cm2-s at the test location. Section 4 presents some results regarding a fundamental characteristic of test reactors, namely displacement per atom (dpa) in test samples. Section 5 presents the INL assessment of the ANL fast test reactor design FASTER. Section 6 presents a summary.

  15. Fabrication and Testing of a Modular Micro-Pocket Fission Detector Instrumentation System for Test Nuclear Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reichenberger Michael A.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Advancements in nuclear reactor core modeling and computational capability have encouraged further development of in-core neutron sensors. Measurement of the neutron-flux distribution within the reactor core provides a more complete understanding of the operating conditions in the reactor than typical ex-core sensors. Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors have been developed and tested previously but have been limited to single-node operation and have utilized highly specialized designs. The development of a widely deployable, multi-node Micro-Pocket Fission Detector assembly will enhance nuclear research capabilities. A modular, four-node Micro-Pocket Fission Detector array was designed, fabricated, and tested at Kansas State University. The array was constructed from materials that do not significantly perturb the neutron flux in the reactor core. All four sensor nodes were equally spaced axially in the array to span the fuel-region of the reactor core. The array was filled with neon gas, serving as an ionization medium in the small cavities of the Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors. The modular design of the instrument facilitates the testing and deployment of numerous sensor arrays. The unified design drastically improved device ruggedness and simplified construction from previous designs. Five 8-mm penetrations in the upper grid plate of the Kansas State University TRIGA Mk. II research nuclear reactor were utilized to deploy the array between fuel elements in the core. The Micro-Pocket Fission Detector array was coupled to an electronic support system which has been specially developed to support pulse-mode operation. The Micro-Pocket Fission Detector array composed of four sensors was used to monitor local neutron flux at a constant reactor power of 100 kWth at different axial locations simultaneously. The array was positioned at five different radial locations within the core to emulate the deployment of multiple arrays and develop a 2-dimensional

  16. Fabrication and Testing of a Modular Micro-Pocket Fission Detector Instrumentation System for Test Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenberger, Michael A.; Nichols, Daniel M.; Stevenson, Sarah R.; Swope, Tanner M.; Hilger, Caden W.; Roberts, Jeremy A.; Unruh, Troy C.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2018-01-01

    Advancements in nuclear reactor core modeling and computational capability have encouraged further development of in-core neutron sensors. Measurement of the neutron-flux distribution within the reactor core provides a more complete understanding of the operating conditions in the reactor than typical ex-core sensors. Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors have been developed and tested previously but have been limited to single-node operation and have utilized highly specialized designs. The development of a widely deployable, multi-node Micro-Pocket Fission Detector assembly will enhance nuclear research capabilities. A modular, four-node Micro-Pocket Fission Detector array was designed, fabricated, and tested at Kansas State University. The array was constructed from materials that do not significantly perturb the neutron flux in the reactor core. All four sensor nodes were equally spaced axially in the array to span the fuel-region of the reactor core. The array was filled with neon gas, serving as an ionization medium in the small cavities of the Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors. The modular design of the instrument facilitates the testing and deployment of numerous sensor arrays. The unified design drastically improved device ruggedness and simplified construction from previous designs. Five 8-mm penetrations in the upper grid plate of the Kansas State University TRIGA Mk. II research nuclear reactor were utilized to deploy the array between fuel elements in the core. The Micro-Pocket Fission Detector array was coupled to an electronic support system which has been specially developed to support pulse-mode operation. The Micro-Pocket Fission Detector array composed of four sensors was used to monitor local neutron flux at a constant reactor power of 100 kWth at different axial locations simultaneously. The array was positioned at five different radial locations within the core to emulate the deployment of multiple arrays and develop a 2-dimensional measurement of

  17. Fuels Preparation Department monthly report, August 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-09-08

    This report discusses activities from the fuels processing department. Activities described include personnel statistics concerning injuries and accidents; operating plans concerning the N loading activities, 305 test reactor, projection fuel elements; process fuel element testing, and general engineering operations from the department.

  18. Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site.

  19. Pebble bed reactor fuel cycle optimization using particle swarm algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavron, Barak, E-mail: btavron@bgu.ac.il [Planning, Development and Technology Division, Israel Electric Corporation Ltd., P.O. Box 10, Haifa 31000 (Israel); Shwageraus, Eugene, E-mail: es607@cam.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Particle swarm method has been developed for fuel cycle optimization of PBR reactor. • Results show uranium utilization low sensitivity to fuel and core design parameters. • Multi-zone fuel loading pattern leads to a small improvement in uranium utilization. • Thorium mixes with highly enriched uranium yields the best uranium utilization. - Abstract: Pebble bed reactors (PBR) features, such as robust thermo-mechanical fuel design and on-line continuous fueling, facilitate wide range of fuel cycle alternatives. A range off fuel pebble types, containing different amounts of fertile or fissile fuel material, may be loaded into the reactor core. Several fuel loading zones may be used since radial mixing of the pebbles was shown to be limited. This radial separation suggests the possibility to implement the “seed-blanket” concept for the utilization of fertile fuels such as thorium, and for enhancing reactor fuel utilization. In this study, the particle-swarm meta-heuristic evolutionary optimization method (PSO) has been used to find optimal fuel cycle design which yields the highest natural uranium utilization. The PSO method is known for solving efficiently complex problems with non-linear objective function, continuous or discrete parameters and complex constrains. The VSOP system of codes has been used for PBR fuel utilization calculations and MATLAB script has been used to implement the PSO algorithm. Optimization of PBR natural uranium utilization (NUU) has been carried out for 3000 MWth High Temperature Reactor design (HTR) operating on the Once Trough Then Out (OTTO) fuel management scheme, and for 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) operating on the multi-pass (MEDUL) fuel management scheme. Results showed only a modest improvement in the NUU (<5%) over reference designs. Investigation of thorium fuel cases showed that the use of HEU in combination with thorium results in the most favorable reactor performance in terms of

  20. Fast reactor fuel pin behaviour modelling in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, J.R.; Hughes, H.

    1979-05-01

    Two fuel behavior codes have been applied extensively to fast reactor problems; SLEUTH developed at Springfields Nuclear Laboratory and FRUMP at AERE Harwell. Other UKAEA Establishments and those of the CEGB have contributed work which has been important in model development. The codes themselves are available for use by the various organizations concerned with fast reactors.

  1. Power generation costs for alternate reactor fuel cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolen, G.R.; Delene, J.G.

    1980-09-01

    The total electric generating costs at the power plant busbar are estimated for various nuclear reactor fuel cycles which may be considered for power generation in the future. The reactor systems include pressurized water reactors (PWR), heavy-water reactors (HWR), high-temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR), liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), light-water pre-breeder and breeder reactors (LWPR, LWBR), and a fast mixed spectrum reactor (FMSR). Fuel cycles include once-through, uranium-only recycle, and full recycle of the uranium and plutonium in the spent fuel assemblies. The U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ price for economic transition from once-through LWR fuel cycles to both PWR recycle and LMFBR systems is estimated. Electric power generation costs were determined both for a reference set of unit cost parameters and for a range of uncertainty in these parameters. In addition, cost sensitivity parameters are provided so that independent estimations can be made for alternate cost assumptions.

  2. Dissolution flowsheet for high flux isotope reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-27

    As part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) processing campaign, H-Canyon is planning to begin dissolving High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel in late FY17 or early FY18. Each HFIR fuel core contains inner and outer fuel elements which were fabricated from uranium oxide (U3O8) dispersed in a continuous Al phase using traditional powder metallurgy techniques. Fuels fabricated in this manner, like other SNF’s processed in H-Canyon, dissolve by the same general mechanisms with similar gas generation rates and the production of H2. The HFIR fuel cores will be dissolved and the recovered U will be down-blended into low-enriched U. HFIR fuel was previously processed in H-Canyon using a unique insert in both the 6.1D and 6.4D dissolvers. Multiple cores will be charged to the same dissolver solution maximizing the concentration of dissolved Al. The objective of this study was to identify flowsheet conditions through literature review and laboratory experimentation to safely and efficiently dissolve the HFIR fuel in H-Canyon. Laboratory-scale experiments were performed to evaluate the dissolution of HFIR fuel using both Al 1100 and Al 6061 T6 alloy coupons. The Al 1100 alloy was considered a representative surrogate which provided an upper bound on the generation of flammable (i.e., H2) gas during the dissolution process. The dissolution of the Al 6061 T6 alloy proceeded at a slower rate than the Al 1100 alloy and was used to verify that the target Al concentration in solution could be achieved for the selected Hg concentration. Mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy were used to provide continuous monitoring of the concentration of H2 and other permanent gases in the dissolution offgas allowing the development of H2 generation rate profiles. The H2 generation rates were subsequently used to evaluate if a full HFIR core could be dissolved in an H-Canyon dissolver without exceeding 60% of the

  3. Performance and fuel-cycle cost analysis of one JANUS 30 conceptual design for several fuel-element-design options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurdin, M.; Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.

    1982-01-01

    The performance and fuel cycle costs for a 25 MW, JANUS 30 reactor conceptual design by INTERATOM, Federal Republic of Germany, for BATAN, Republic of Indonesia have been studied using 19.75% enriched uranium in four fuel element design options. All of these fuel element designs have either been proposed by INTERATOM for various reactors or are currently in use with 93% enriched uranium in reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany. Aluminide, oxide, and silicide fuels were studied for selected designs using the range of uranium densities that are either currently qualified or are being developed and demonstrated internationally. To assess the long-term fuel adaptation strategy as well as the present fuel acceptance, reactor performance and annual fuel cycle costs were computed for seventeen cases based on a representative end-of-cycle excess reactivity and duty factor. In addition, a study was made to provide data for evaluating the trade-off between the increased safety associated with thicker cladding and the economic penalty due to increased fuel consumption.

  4. Improvement on fabrication process of CANDU type reactor fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Bum; Chung, Sang Tae; Kim, Hyung Soo; Park, Choon Ho

    1993-05-01

    The study on fabrication of the nuclear fuel for heavy water cooled reactor is performed. Among the fabrication processes of nuclear fuel, welding thickness between fuel rod and end cap can occur a serious error in total fuel length. Therefore, for nuclear fuel design, the thickness of end cap and changed weight of zircaloy-4 tube must be measured accurately. For welding performance, microstructure of welding point is investigated successfully. The result of the study shows the possibility of cost reduction and quality improvement by simplification of fabrication process of nuclear fuel. (Author).

  5. Spent nuclear fuel discharges from US reactors 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Nuclear Fuel Data Survey, Form RW-859. This form is used to collect data on fuel assemblies irradiated at commercial nuclear reactors operating in the United States, and the current inventories and storage capacities of those reactors. These data are important to the design and operation of the equipment and facilities that DOE will use for the future acceptance, transportation, and disposal of spent fuels. The data collected and presented identifies trends in burnup, enrichment, and spent nuclear fuel discharged form commercial light-water reactor as of December 31, 1993. The document covers not only spent nuclear fuel discharges; but also site capacities and inventories; canisters and nonfuel components; and assembly type characteristics.

  6. High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) graphite pebble fuel: Review of technologies for reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcwilliams, A. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-08

    This report reviews literature on reprocessing high temperature gas-cooled reactor graphite fuel components. A basic review of the various fuel components used in the pebble bed type reactors is provided along with a survey of synthesis methods for the fabrication of the fuel components. Several disposal options are considered for the graphite pebble fuel elements including the storage of intact pebbles, volume reduction by separating the graphite from fuel kernels, and complete processing of the pebbles for waste storage. Existing methods for graphite removal are presented and generally consist of mechanical separation techniques such as crushing and grinding chemical techniques through the use of acid digestion and oxidation. Potential methods for reprocessing the graphite pebbles include improvements to existing methods and novel technologies that have not previously been investigated for nuclear graphite waste applications. The best overall method will be dependent on the desired final waste form and needs to factor in the technical efficiency, political concerns, cost, and implementation.

  7. Power level effects on thorium-based fuels in pressure-tube heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromley, B.P.; Edwards, G.W.R., E-mail: blair.bromley@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Sambavalingam, P. [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Lattice and core physics modeling and calculations have been performed to quantify the impact of power/flux levels on the reactivity and achievable burnup for 35-element fuel bundles made with Pu/Th or U-233/Th. The fissile content in these bundles has been adjusted to produce on the order of 20 MWd/kg burnup in homogeneous cores in a 700 MWe-class pressure-tube heavy water reactor, operating on a once-through thorium cycle. Results demonstrate that the impact of the power/flux level is modest for Pu/Th fuels but significant for U-233/Th fuels. In particular, high power/flux reduces the breeding and burnup potential of U-233/Th fuels. Thus, there may be an incentive to operate reactors with U-233/Th fuels at a lower power density or to develop alternative refueling schemes that will lower the time-average specific power, thereby increasing burnup.(author)

  8. Dynamic Analysis of the Thorium Fuel Cycle in CANDU Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Park, Chang Je

    2006-02-15

    The thorium fuel recycle scenarios through the Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor have been analyzed for two types of thorium fuel: homogeneous ThO{sub 2}UO{sub 2} and ThO{sub 2}UO{sub 2}-DUPIC fuels. The recycling is performed through the dry process fuel technology which has a proliferation resistance. For the once-through fuel cycle model, the existing nuclear power plant construction plan was considered up to 2016, while the nuclear demand growth rate from the year 2016 was assumed to be 0%. After setting up the once-through fuel cycle model, the thorium fuel CANDU reactor was modeled to investigate the fuel cycle parameters. In this analysis, the spent fuel inventory as well as the amount of plutonium, minor actinides and fission products of the multiple recycling fuel cycle were estimated and compared to those of the once-through fuel cycle. From the analysis results, it was found that the closed or partially closed thorium fuel cycle can be constructed through the dry process technology. Also, it is known that both the homogeneous and heterogeneous thorium fuel cycles can reduce the SF accumulation and save the natural uranium resource compared with the once-through cycle. From the material balance view point, the heterogeneous thorium fuel cycle seems to be more feasible. It is recommended, however, the economic analysis should be performed in future.

  9. Measurement station for interim inspections of Lightbridge metallic fuel rods at the Halden Boiling Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartmann C.

    2018-01-01

    therefore been necessary to perform a careful design study of the probe geometry. For this, finite element analysis (FEA has been performed in combination with practical validation tests on representative fuel dummies with machined flaws to find the probe geometry that best detects a hidden flaw. Tests performed thus far show that gaps down to 25 μm thickness can be detected with good repeatability and good discrimination from lift-off signals.

  10. Measurement station for interim inspections of Lightbridge metallic fuel rods at the Halden Boiling Water Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, C.; Totemeier, A.; Holcombe, S.; Liverud, J.; Limi, M.; Hansen, J. E.; Navestad, E. AB(; )

    2018-01-01

    necessary to perform a careful design study of the probe geometry. For this, finite element analysis (FEA) has been performed in combination with practical validation tests on representative fuel dummies with machined flaws to find the probe geometry that best detects a hidden flaw. Tests performed thus far show that gaps down to 25 μm thickness can be detected with good repeatability and good discrimination from lift-off signals.

  11. Metallic Reactor Fuel Fabrication for SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Ko, Young-Mo; Woo, Yoon-Myung; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The metal fuel for an SFR has such advantages such as simple fabrication procedures, good neutron economy, high thermal conductivity, excellent compatibility with a Na coolant, and inherent passive safety 1. U-Zr metal fuel for SFR is now being developed by KAERI as a national R and D program of Korea. The fabrication technology of metal fuel for SFR has been under development in Korea as a national nuclear R and D program since 2007. The fabrication process for SFR fuel is composed of (1) fuel slug casting, (2) loading and fabrication of the fuel rods, and (3) fabrication of the final fuel assemblies. Fuel slug casting is the dominant source of fuel losses and recycled streams in this fabrication process. Fabrication on the rod type metallic fuel was carried out for the purpose of establishing a practical fabrication method. Rod-type fuel slugs were fabricated by injection casting. Metallic fuel slugs fabricated showed a general appearance was smooth.

  12. Neutronics qualification of the Jules Horowitz reactor fuel by interpretation of the VALMONT experimental program - Transposition of the uncertainties on the reactivity of JHR with JEF2.2 and JEFF3.1.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leray, O.; Hudelot, J. P. [DEN Nuclear Projects Laboratory, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Antony, M. [DEN Experimental Physics Laboratory, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Doederlein, C. [DEN Nuclear Projects Laboratory, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Santamarina, A. [DEN Reactor and Cycle Physics Service, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Bernard, D. [DEN Physical Studies Laboratory, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Vaglio-Gaudard, C. [DEN Nuclear Projects Laboratory, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2011-07-01

    The new European material testing Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR), currently under construction in Cadarache center (CEA France), will use LEU (20% enrichment in {sup 235}U) fuels (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} for the start up and UMoAl in the future) which are quite different from the industrial oxide fuel, for which an extensive neutronics qualification database has been established. The HORUS3D/N neutronics calculation scheme, used for the design and safety studies of the JHR, is being developed within the framework of a rigorous verification-validation-qualification methodology. In this framework, the experimental VALMONT (Validation of Aluminium Molybdenum uranium fuel for Neutronics) program has been performed in the MINERVE facility of CEA Cadarache (France), in order to qualify the capability of HORUS3D/N to accurately calculate the reactivity of the JHR reactor. The MINERVE facility using the oscillation technique provides accurate measurements of reactivity effect of samples. The VALMONT program includes oscillations of samples of UAl{sub x}/Al and UMo/Al with enrichments ranging from 0.2% to 20% and Uranium densities from 2.2 to 8 g/cm{sup 3}. The geometry of the samples and the pitch of the experimental lattice ensure maximum representativeness with the neutron spectrum expected for JHR. By comparing the effect of the sample with the one of a known fuel specimen, the reactivity effect can be measured in absolute terms and be compared to computational results. Special attention was paid to the rigorous determination and reduction of the experimental uncertainties. The calculational analysis of the VALMONT results was performed with the French deterministic code APOLLO2. A comparison of the impact of the different calculation methods, data libraries and energy meshes that were tested is presented. The interpretation of the VALMONT experimental program allowed the qualification of JHR fuel UMoAl8 (with an enrichment of 19.75% {sup 235}U) by the Minerve

  13. Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

    2013-03-19

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

  14. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    The international effort to develop new research reactor fuel materials and designs based on the use of low-enriched uranium, instead of highly-enriched uranium, has made much progress during the eight years since its inception. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialist in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the ninth of a series which began in 1978. All previous meetings of this series are listed on the facing page. The focus of this meeting was on the LEU fuel demonstration which was in progress at the Oak Ridge Research (ORR) reactor, not far from where the meeting was held. The visit to the ORR, where a silicide LEU fuel with 4.8 g A/cm/sup 3/ was by then in routine use, illustrated how far work has progressed.

  15. Reactor Simulator Integration and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfield, M. P.; Webster, K. L.; Pearson, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Nuclear Systems Office Fission Surface Power Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) project, a reactor simulator (RxSim) test loop was designed and built to perform integrated testing of the TDU components. In particular, the objectives of RxSim testing were to verify the operation of the core simulator, the instrumentation and control system, and the ground support gas and vacuum test equipment. In addition, it was decided to include a thermal test of a cold trap purification design and a pump performance test at pump voltages up to 150 V because the targeted mass flow rate of 1.75 kg/s was not obtained in the RxSim at the originally constrained voltage of 120 V. This Technical Memorandum summarizes RxSim testing. The gas and vacuum ground support test equipment performed effectively in NaK fill, loop pressurization, and NaK drain operations. The instrumentation and control system effectively controlled loop temperature and flow rates or pump voltage to targeted settings. The cold trap design was able to obtain the targeted cold temperature of 480 K. An outlet temperature of 636 K was obtained, which was lower than the predicted 750 K but 156 K higher than the cold temperature, indicating the design provided some heat regeneration. The annular linear induction pump tested was able to produce a maximum flow rate of 1.53 kg/s at 800 K when operated at 150 V and 53 Hz.

  16. Determination of equilibrium fuel composition for fast reactor in closed fuel cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ternovykha Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Technique of evaluation of multiplying and reactivity characteristics of fast reactor operating in the mode of multiple refueling is presented. We describe the calculation model of the vertical section of the reactor. Calculation validations of the possibility of correct application of methods and models are given. Results on the isotopic composition, mass feed, and changes in the reactivity of the reactor in closed fuel cycle are obtained. Recommendations for choosing perspective fuel compositions for further research are proposed.

  17. Determination of equilibrium fuel composition for fast reactor in closed fuel cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternovykha, Mikhail; Tikhomirov, Georgy; Khomyakov, Yury; Suslov, Igor

    2017-09-01

    Technique of evaluation of multiplying and reactivity characteristics of fast reactor operating in the mode of multiple refueling is presented. We describe the calculation model of the vertical section of the reactor. Calculation validations of the possibility of correct application of methods and models are given. Results on the isotopic composition, mass feed, and changes in the reactivity of the reactor in closed fuel cycle are obtained. Recommendations for choosing perspective fuel compositions for further research are proposed.

  18. Neutronic tests and reactivity balance in the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Rose Mary Gomes do Prado; Souza, Luiz Claudio Andrade, E-mail: souzarm@cdtn.br, E-mail: lcas@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the 2014 neutronic tests performed on CDTN's TRIGA IPR-R1 research reactor. Such tests are performed annually, as prescribed by the Safety Analysis Report. The three control rods, Regulating, Shim and Safety, were calibrated and their worth determined to be 0.52 $, 3.08 $ and 2.78 $, respectively. The Shim rod takes 0.44 s to shutdown the reactor and the Safety rod 0.48 s. The maximum reactivity insertion rates are 48 pcm/s by the Shim rod and 46 pcm/s by the Safety rod. Total reactivity excess is 1.88 $. The temperature reactivity coefficient determined is -0.94 cent/deg C. A reactivity insertion of 0.71 $ is necessary in order to achieve the licensed maximum reactor power of 100 kW. Reactivity losses due to xenon poisoning, after operating for 8 h at maximum power, is 0.20 $, and the insertion of a void tube in the Central Thimble corresponds to 0.22 $. A significant amount of reactivity is required to overcome the temperature effect and allow the reactor to operate at full power for extended periods of time. Given all these reactivity losses, a new fuel element should soon be added to the core in order to increase the reactivity excess. Adding this new fuel element to the C ring and moving the element withdrawn from that position to the F ring, replacing a graphite dummy element, would increase 45.5 cents in the reactivity excess worth. Calculations and experimental results will be used to optimize a new core configuration for the reactor. (author)

  19. Gas-cooled thorium reactor with fuel block of the unified design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Shamanin

    2015-11-01

    Analysis of information materials pertaining to the use of thorium as fuel element in rector facilities of the new generation and of its future potential was performed in the present study. Results of the first phase of neutronics studies of 3D model of high-temperatures gas-cooled reactor facility on the basis of unified design of the fuel block are presented. Calculation 3D model was developed using the software code of the MCU-5 series. Several optimal configurations of the reactor core were selected according to the results of comparison of neutronics characteristics of the examined options for the purpose of development of small-size modular nuclear power installations with power up to 60MW. Results of calculations of reactivity margin of the reactor, neutron flux distribution and power density profiles are presented for the selected options of reactor core configuration.

  20. Multiple recycling of fuel in prototype fast breeder reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In a thermal neutron reactor, multiple recycle of U–Pu fuel is not possible due to degradation of fissile content of Pu in just one recycle. In the FBR closed fuel cycle, possibility of multi-recycle has been recognized. In the present study, Pu-239 equivalence approach is used to demonstrate the feasibility of achieving ...

  1. Development of fuels and structural materials for fast breeder reactors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fast breeder reactors (FBRs) are destined to play a crucial role inthe Indian nuclear power programme in the foreseeable future. FBR technology involves a multi-disciplinary approach to solve the various challenges in the areas of fuel and materials development. Fuels for FBRs have significantly higher concentration of ...

  2. Development of dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Isao; Seki, Yasushi [Department of Fusion Engineering Research, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Sasaki, Makoto; Shintani, Kiyonori; Kim, Yeong-Chan

    1999-02-01

    A dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle of a fusion experimental reactor has been developed. The code follows the fuel inventory change with time in the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system during 2 days pulse operation cycles. The time dependence of the fuel inventory distribution is evaluated considering the fuel burn and exhaust in the plasma chamber, purification and supply functions. For each subsystem of the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system, the fuel inventory equation is written based on the equation of state considering the fuel burn and the function of exhaust, purification, and supply. The processing constants of subsystem for steady states were taken from the values in the ITER Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) report. Using this code, the time dependence of the fuel supply and inventory depending on the burn state and subsystem processing functions are shown. (author)

  3. Ammonia removal via microbial fuel cell (MFC) dynamic reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabiad, I.; Ali, U. F. M.; Zakarya, I. A.; Ibrahim, N.; Radzi, R. W.; Zulkurnai, N. Z.; Azmi, N. H.

    2017-06-01

    Landfill leachate is generally known as high-strength wastewater that is difficult to handle and contains dissolved extracts and suspended matter. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were designed to treat landfill leachate while continuously producing power (voltage output). Three different anodes were tested in MFC reactors: carbon black, activated carbon, and zinc electrodes. Movements in the MFC reactor during treatment were also a key factor for testing. Results showed a difference in ammonia levels in the three anodes used. The study compared the efficiency of static and dynamic modes of MFC in removing ammonia. Continual leachate movement in the reactor could increase the rate of removal of the ammonia components. The setup provided a viable condition for maximum removal because the reactor movement caused the sludge to disintegrate, which allowed ammonia to separate easily from the parent leachate. Ammonia removal also resulted from the transfer of ammonium through the membrane or from ammonia loss. Constant exchange of ionic content benefited the MFC performance by increasing power production and decreasing internal electrode material resistance. This paper presents the results of the analyses of leachate treatment from the solid waste landfill located in Padang Siding Landfill, Perlis. The performance of ammonia removal was enhanced using different types of electrodes. In both modes, activated carbon performed better than black carbon and zinc. The respective percentages of ammonia removal for activated carbon of dynamic over static were 96.6%, 66.6%, and 92.8% for activated carbon, zinc, and black carbon. The results provide further information on the possibility of using MFCs in landfill leachate treatment systems.

  4. Advancements in the behavioral modeling of fuel elements and related structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M.C.; Montgomery, R.O.; Rashid, Y.R.; Head, J.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); ANATECH Research Corp., San Diego, CA (USA); Royal Naval Coll., Greenwich (UK))

    1989-01-01

    An important aspect of the design and analysis of nuclear reactors is the ability to predict the behavior of fuel elements in the adverse environment of a reactor system. By understanding the thermomechanical behavior of the different materials which constitute a nuclear fuel element, analysis and predictions can be made regarding the integrity and reliability of fuel element designs. The SMiRT conference series, through the division on fuel elements and the post-conference seminars on fuel element modeling, provided technical forums for the international participation in the exchange of knowledge concerning the thermomechanical modeling of fuel elements. This paper discusses the technical advances in the behavioral modeling of fuel elements presented at the SMiRT conference series since its inception in 1971. Progress in the areas of material properties and constitutive relationships, modeling methodologies, and integral modeling approaches was reviewed and is summarized in light of their impact on the thermomechanical modeling of nuclear fuel elements. 34 refs., 5 tabs.

  5. Study of Reduced-Enrichment Uranium Fuel Possibility for Research Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruppel V.A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Having analyzed the results obtained in the work, it is possible to conclude that the flux density of fast and thermal neutrons in the shell of fuel elements in EFA in REU-zone decreased on average by 5% for UO2 fuel and by 7% for U9%Mo fuel. Change of neutrons flux density during the cycle does not exceed 4% for both fuel types. On average the fuel burnup in reactor core during the cycle for UO2 and U9%Mo increased by 2.8%. It is 1% less that in HEU-zone, which is conditioned by higher initial loading of 235U in fuel assembly with REU fuel.

  6. Technology Implementation Plan: Irradiation Testing and Qualification for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rader, Jordan D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This document is a notional technology implementation plan (TIP) for the development, testing, and qualification of a prototypic fuel element to support design and construction of a nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) engine, specifically its pre-flight ground test. This TIP outlines a generic methodology for the progression from non-nuclear out-of-pile (OOP) testing through nuclear in-pile (IP) testing, at operational temperatures, flows, and specific powers, of an NTP fuel element in an existing test reactor. Subsequent post-irradiation examination (PIE) will occur in existing radiological facilities. Further, the methodology is intended to be nonspecific with respect to fuel types and irradiation or examination facilities. The goals of OOP and IP testing are to provide confidence in the operational performance of fuel system concepts and provide data to program leadership for system optimization and fuel down-selection. The test methodology, parameters, collected data, and analytical results from OOP, IP, and PIE will be documented for reference by the NTP operator and the appropriate regulatory and oversight authorities. Final full-scale integrated testing would be performed separately by the reactor operator as part of the preflight ground test.

  7. Fuel Performance Characterisation under Various PWR Conditions: Description of the Annealing Test Facilities available at the LECA-STAR laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontillon, Y.; Cornu, B.; Clement, S.; Ferroud-Plattet, M.P.; Malgouyres, P.P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA/DEN/DEC/SA3C - Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, BP1, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2008-07-01

    The aim to improve LWR fuel behaviour has led Cea to improve its post-irradiation examination capacities in term of test facilities and characterization techniques in the shielded hot cells of the LECA-STAR facility, located in Cadarache Cea center. as far as the annealing test facilities are concerned, fuel qualification and improvement of knowledge require a set of furnaces which are already used or will be used. The main characteristics of these furnaces strongly depend on the experimental objectives. The aim of this paper is to review the main aspects of these specific experiments concerning: (i) fission gas release from high burn up fuel, (ii) global fission product release in severe-accident conditions and (iii) fuel microstructural changes, potential cladding failure, radionuclide source terms... under conditions representative of long term dry storage and geological disposal. (authors)

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF OTM SYNGAS PROCESS AND TESTING OF SYNGAS-DERIVED ULTRA-CLEAN FUELS IN DIESEL ENGINES AND FUEL CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.T. (Skip) Robinson; James P. Meagher; Ravi Prasad

    2001-10-31

    This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from January 1 through September 15, 2001 in the following task areas: Task 1--materials development; Task 2--composite element development; Task 3--tube fabrication; Task 4--reactor design and process optimization; Task 5--catalyst development; Task 6--P-1 operation; Task 8--fuels and engine testing; and Task 10--project management. OTM benchmark material, LCM1, exceeds the commercial oxygen flux target and was determined to be sufficiently robust to carry on process development activities. Work will continue on second-generation OTM materials that will satisfy commercial life targets. Three fabrication techniques for composite elements were determined to be technically feasible. These techniques will be studied and a lead manufacturing process for both small and large-scale elements will be selected in the next Budget Period. Experiments in six P-0 reactors, the long tube tester (LTT) and the P-1 pilot plant were conducted. Significant progress in process optimization was made through both the experimental program and modeling studies of alternate reactor designs and process configurations. Three tailored catalyst candidates for use in OTM process reactors were identified. Fuels for the International diesel engine and Nuvera fuel cell tests were ordered and delivered. Fuels testing and engine development work is now underway.

  9. The manufacture of LEU fuel elements at Dounreay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, J.

    1997-08-01

    Two LEU test elements are being manufactured at Dounreay for test irradiation in the HFR at Petten, The Netherlands. This paper describes the installation of equipment and the development of the fabrication and inspection techniques necessary for the manufacture of LEU fuel plates. The author`s experience in overcoming the technical problems of stray fuel particles, dog-boning, uranium homogeneity and the measurement of uranium distribution is also described.

  10. Fuel processing in integrated micro-structured heat-exchanger reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, G.; Schürer, J.; Tiemann, D.; Wichert, M.; Zapf, R.; Hessel, V.; Löwe, H.

    Micro-structured fuel processors are under development at IMM for different fuels such as methanol, ethanol, propane/butane (LPG), gasoline and diesel. The target application are mobile, portable and small scale stationary auxiliary power units (APU) based upon fuel cell technology. The key feature of the systems is an integrated plate heat-exchanger technology which allows for the thermal integration of several functions in a single device. Steam reforming may be coupled with catalytic combustion in separate flow paths of a heat-exchanger. Reactors and complete fuel processors are tested up to the size range of 5 kW power output of a corresponding fuel cell. On top of reactor and system prototyping and testing, catalyst coatings are under development at IMM for numerous reactions such as steam reforming of LPG, ethanol and methanol, catalytic combustion of LPG and methanol, and for CO clean-up reactions, namely water-gas shift, methanation and the preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide. These catalysts are investigated in specially developed testing reactors. In selected cases 1000 h stability testing is performed on catalyst coatings at weight hourly space velocities, which are sufficiently high to meet the demands of future fuel processing reactors.

  11. Spent fuel test. Climax data acquisition system integration report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyholm, R.A.; Brough, W.G.; Rector, N.L.

    1982-06-01

    The Spent Fuel Test - Climax (SFT-C) is a test of the retrievable, deep geologic storage of commercially generated, spent nuclear reactor fuel in granitic rock. Eleven spent fuel assemblies, together with 6 electrical simulators and 20 guard heaters, are emplaced 420 m below the surface in the Climax granite at the Nevada Test Site. On June 2, 1978, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) secured funding for the SFT-C, and completed spent fuel emplacement May 28, 1980. This multi-year duration test is located in a remote area and is unattended much of the time. An extensive array of radiological safety and geotechnical instrumentation is deployed to monitor the test performance. A dual minicomputer-based data acquisition system collects and processes data from more than 900 analog instruments. This report documents the design and functions of the hardware and software elements of the Data Acquisition System and describes the supporting facilities which include environmental enclosures, heating/air-conditioning/humidity systems, power distribution systems, fire suppression systems, remote terminal stations, telephone/modem communications, and workshop areas. 9 figures.

  12. Modelling of LOCA Tests with the BISON Fuel Performance Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, Richard L [Idaho National Laboratory; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-05-01

    BISON is a modern finite-element based, multidimensional nuclear fuel performance code that is under development at Idaho National Laboratory (USA). Recent advances of BISON include the extension of the code to the analysis of LWR fuel rod behaviour during loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). In this work, BISON models for the phenomena relevant to LWR cladding behaviour during LOCAs are described, followed by presentation of code results for the simulation of LOCA tests. Analysed experiments include separate effects tests of cladding ballooning and burst, as well as the Halden IFA-650.2 fuel rod test. Two-dimensional modelling of the experiments is performed, and calculations are compared to available experimental data. Comparisons include cladding burst pressure and temperature in separate effects tests, as well as the evolution of fuel rod inner pressure during ballooning and time to cladding burst. Furthermore, BISON three-dimensional simulations of separate effects tests are performed, which demonstrate the capability to reproduce the effect of azimuthal temperature variations in the cladding. The work has been carried out in the frame of the collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory and Halden Reactor Project, and the IAEA Coordinated Research Project FUMAC.

  13. Experimental assessment of accident scenarios for the high temperature reactor fuel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, O.; Avincola, V.; Bottomley, P.D.W.; Rondinella, V.V. [European Commission Joint Research Centre - Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU) (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    The High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is an advanced reactor concept with particular safety features. Fuel elements are constituted by a graphite matrix containing sub-mm-sized fuel particles with TRISO (tri-isotropic) coating designed to provide high fission product retention. Passive safety features of the HTR include a low power density in the core compared to other reactor designs; this ensures sufficient heat transport in a loss of coolant accident scenario. The temperature during such events would not exceed 1600 C, remaining well below the melting point of the fuel. An experimental assessment of the fuel behaviour under severe accident conditions is necessary to confirm the fission product retention of TRISO coated particles and to validate relevant computer codes. Though helium is used as coolant for the HTR system, additional corrosion effects come into play in case of an in-leakage affecting the primary circuit. The experimental scope of the present work focuses on two key aspects associated with the HTR fuel safety. Fission product retention at high temperatures (up to {proportional_to}1800 C) is analyzed with the so-called cold finger apparatus (KueFA: Kuehlfinger-Apparatur), while the performance of HTR fuel elements in case of air/steam ingress accidents is assessed with a high temperature corrosion apparatus (KORA: Korrosions-Apparatur). (orig.)

  14. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. E. Shropshire

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  15. Licos, a fuel performance code for innovative fuel elements or experimental devices design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfer, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.helfer@cea.fr; Bejaoui, Syriac, E-mail: syriac.bejaoui@cea.fr; Michel, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.michel@cea.fr

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The Licos fuel performance code is introduced. • Advanced features, such as dependency algorithm and kriging are described. • First results on three dimensional modelling of the SFR fuel pin are given. • Application to the DIAMINO design computations is discussed. - Abstract: This paper provides an overview of the Licos fuel performance code which has been developed for several years within the platform pleiades, co-developed by the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and its industrial partners Électricité de France (EDF) and AREVA. CEA engineers have been using Licos to back multidimensional thermo-mechanical studies on innovative fuel elements design and experimental device pre-and post-irradiation computations. Studies made with Licos thus encompass a wide range of situations, including most nuclear systems used or studied in France in recent years (PWR, SFR or GFR), normal and off-normal operating conditions, and a large selection of materials (either for fuel, absorber, coolant and cladding). The aim of this paper is to give some insights about some innovative features in the design of Licos (dependency management, kriging, mfront, etc.). We also present two studies that demonstrate the flexibility of this code. The first one shows how Licos can be combined with the Germinal monodimensional fuel performance code to demonstrate the interest of a three dimensional modelling of the fuel relocation phenomenon in the Sodium Fast Reactor fuel pin. The second one describes how Licos was used to model the DIAMINO experiment.

  16. Modeling of Flow in Nuclear Reactor Fuel Cell Outlet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František URBAN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Safe and effective load of nuclear reactor fuel cells demands qualitative and quantitative analysis of relations between coolant temperature in fuel cell outlet temperature measured by thermocouple and middle temperature of coolant in thermocouple plane position. In laboratory at Insitute of thermal power engineering of the Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava was installed an experimental physical fuel cell model of VVER 440 nuclear power plant with V 213 nuclear reactors. Objective of measurements on physical model was temperature and velocity profiles analysis in the fuel cell outlet. In this paper the measured temperature and velocity profiles are compared with the results of CFD simulation of fuel cell physical model coolant flow.

  17. Parametric Thermal Models of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley K. Heath

    2014-03-01

    This work supports the restart of transient testing in the United States using the Department of Energy’s Transient Reactor Test Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. It also supports the Global Threat Reduction Initiative by reducing proliferation risk of high enriched uranium fuel. The work involves the creation of a nuclear fuel assembly model using the fuel performance code known as BISON. The model simulates the thermal behavior of a nuclear fuel assembly during steady state and transient operational modes. Additional models of the same geometry but differing material properties are created to perform parametric studies. The results show that fuel and cladding thermal conductivity have the greatest effect on fuel temperature under the steady state operational mode. Fuel density and fuel specific heat have the greatest effect for transient operational model. When considering a new fuel type it is recommended to use materials that decrease the specific heat of the fuel and the thermal conductivity of the fuel’s cladding in order to deal with higher density fuels that accompany the LEU conversion process. Data on the latest operating conditions of TREAT need to be attained in order to validate BISON’s results. BISON’s models for TREAT (material models, boundary convection models) are modest and need additional work to ensure accuracy and confidence in results.

  18. Reactor Physics Behavior of Transuranic-Bearing TRISO-Particle Fuel in a Pressurized Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael A. Pope; R. Sonat Sen; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Gilles Youinou; Brian Boer

    2012-04-01

    Calculations have been performed to assess the neutronic behavior of pins of Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in otherwise-conventional Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel pins. The FCM fuel contains transuranic (TRU)-only oxide fuel in tri-isotropic (TRISO) particles with the TRU loading coming from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Use of the TRISO particle fuel would provide an additional barrier to fission product release in the event of cladding failure. Depletion calculations were performed to evaluate reactivity-limited burnup of the TRU-only FCM fuel. These calculations showed that due to relatively little space available for fuel, the achievable burnup with these pins alone is quite small. Various reactivity parameters were also evaluated at each burnup step including moderator temperature coefficient (MTC), Doppler, and soluble boron worth. These were compared to reference UO{sub 2} and MOX unit cells. The TRU-only FCM fuel exhibits degraded MTC and Doppler coefficients relative to UO{sub 2} and MOX. Also, the reactivity effects of coolant voiding suggest that the behavior of this fuel would be similar to a MOX fuel of very high plutonium fraction, which are known to have positive void reactivity. In general, loading of TRU-only FCM fuel into an assembly without significant quantities of uranium presents challenges to the reactor design. However, if such FCM fuel pins are included in a heterogeneous assembly alongside LEU fuel pins, the overall reactivity behavior would be dominated by the uranium pins while attractive TRU destruction performance levels in the TRU-only FCM fuel pins is. From this work, it is concluded that use of heterogeneous assemblies such as these appears feasible from a preliminary reactor physics standpoint.

  19. Fast Flux Test Facility fuel and test management: The first 10 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, R.A.; Bennett, C.L.; Campbell, L.R.; Dobbin, K.D.; Tang, E.L.

    1991-07-01

    Core design and fuel and test management have been performed efficiently at the Fast Flux Test Facility. No outages have been extended to adjust core loadings. Development of mixed oxide fuels for advanced liquid metal breeder reactors has been carried out successfully. In fact, the fuel performance is extraordinary. Failures have been so infrequent that further development and refinement of fuel requirements seem appropriate and could lead to a significant reduction in projected electrical busbar costs. The Fast Flux Test Facility is also involved in early metal fuel development tests and appears to be an ideal test bed for any further fuel development or refinement testing. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Testing piezoelectric sensors in a nuclear reactor environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Brian T.; Suprock, Andy; Tittmann, Bernhard

    2017-02-01

    Several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs, such as the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD), Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC), Light Water Reactor Sustainability, and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants (NGNP), are investigating new fuels, materials, and inspection paradigms for advanced and existing reactors. A key objective of such programs is to understand the performance of these fuels and materials during irradiation. In DOE-NE's FCRD program, ultrasonic based technology was identified as a key approach that should be pursued to obtain the high-fidelity, high-accuracy data required to characterize the behavior and performance of new candidate fuels and structural materials during irradiation testing. The radiation, high temperatures, and pressure can limit the available tools and characterization methods. In this work piezoelectric transducers capable of making these measurements are developed. Specifically, three piezoelectric sensors (Bismuth Titanate, Aluminum Nitride, and Zinc Oxide) are tested in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research reactor to a fast neutron fluence of 8.65×1020 nf/cm2. It is demonstrated that Bismuth Titanate is capable of transduction up to 5 × 1020 nf/cm2, Zinc Oxide is capable of transduction up to at least 6.27 × 1020 nf/cm2, and Aluminum Nitride is capable of transduction up to at least 8.65 × 1020 nf/cm2.

  1. Regulatory Technology Development Plan - Sodium Fast Reactor. Mechanistic Source Term - Metal Fuel Radionuclide Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabaskas, David [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bucknor, Matthew [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jerden, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The development of an accurate and defensible mechanistic source term will be vital for the future licensing efforts of metal fuel, pool-type sodium fast reactors. To assist in the creation of a comprehensive mechanistic source term, the current effort sought to estimate the release fraction of radionuclides from metal fuel pins to the primary sodium coolant during fuel pin failures at a variety of temperature conditions. These release estimates were based on the findings of an extensive literature search, which reviewed past experimentation and reactor fuel damage accidents. Data sources for each radionuclide of interest were reviewed to establish release fractions, along with possible release dependencies, and the corresponding uncertainty levels. Although the current knowledge base is substantial, and radionuclide release fractions were established for the elements deemed important for the determination of offsite consequences following a reactor accident, gaps were found pertaining to several radionuclides. First, there is uncertainty regarding the transport behavior of several radionuclides (iodine, barium, strontium, tellurium, and europium) during metal fuel irradiation to high burnup levels. The migration of these radionuclides within the fuel matrix and bond sodium region can greatly affect their release during pin failure incidents. Post-irradiation examination of existing high burnup metal fuel can likely resolve this knowledge gap. Second, data regarding the radionuclide release from molten high burnup metal fuel in sodium is sparse, which makes the assessment of radionuclide release from fuel melting accidents at high fuel burnup levels difficult. This gap could be addressed through fuel melting experimentation with samples from the existing high burnup metal fuel inventory.

  2. Fuel assembly design study for a reactor with supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmeister, J. [RWE Power AG, Huyssenallee 2, D-45128 Essen (Germany); Waata, C. [ANSYS Germany GmbH, Staudenfeldweg 12, D-83624 Otterfing (Germany); Starflinger, J. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Schulenberg, T. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)]. E-mail: thomas.schulenberg@iket.fzk.de; Laurien, E. [University of Stuttgart, Institute for Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE), Pfaffenwaldring 31, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    The European concept of the High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) differs from current light water reactors in a higher system pressure beyond the critical point of water, as well as a higher heat-up of the coolant within the core and thus higher core outlet temperatures, leading to a significant increase in turbine power and thermal efficiency of the power plant. The motivation to develop a novel fuel assembly for the HPLWR is caused by the high variation of coolant density in the core by more than a factor of seven. A systematic design study shows that a square fuel assembly with two rows of fuel rods and a central moderator box is best to minimize the structural material, to optimize the moderator to fuel ratio and to reduce differences of fuel rod power. Using neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analyses, a detailed mechanical design of a fuel assembly of the HPLWR has been worked out. Moreover, concepts for the head piece, the foot piece, the steam plenum and the lower mixing plenum, including the lower core plate, have been developed to account for the individual flow paths of this reactor. These allow a leak-tight counter current flow of moderator water and coolant as well as uniform mixing of different mass flows. The assembly design concept can be used as a general key component for any advanced core design of this reactor.

  3. U. S. reactor spent-fuel storage capabilities. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.J.; Hoffman, C.C.; Caviness, C.K.

    1982-06-01

    This report describes the spent-fuel storage situation at reactors in the United States. The focus of the report is on the reactors that are developing a spent-fuel storage problem and the alternatives the utilities are utilizing and planning to use to minimize the problem. The alternatives the utilities are using and/or considering are described in the report and include: High-density storage racks; Double-tiered storage racks; Rod consolidation; Dry storage systems; Fuel transshipments; and At-reactor storage pools. All of these alternatives are not available to every reactor and utility that is faced with a spent-fuel storage problem. Generally, utilities are reracking or are planning to rerack those spent-fuel pools that can be reracked with higher-density racks or double-tiered racks. Where reracking is not feasible, then fuel transshipments are being performed or considered. Since none of these other alternatives have been fully approved and licensed, these alternatives are all being evaluated.

  4. Rover fuel element development activities: July-September 1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, J.M.; Marrow, G.B.

    1971-11-30

    Experimental studies designed to fabricate NERVA graphite fuel elements capable of cyclic operations at exit gas temperatures of approximately 4400/degree/R were continued during this report period. Carbon precursor materials, manufacturing parameters, and deposition of carbide films are included in these studies. Accomplishments include the following: three commercial powders were extruded into elements having a desirable coefficient of thermal expansion; molded graphites using low-fired filler carbons and uncured short organic fibers produced graphites having an improved strain-to-failure value; thick-walled tubes of vapor-deposited zirconium carbide were produced, and the chemical composition was determined; vapor-deposited zirconium carbide coatings were applied to fuel-element bores; experimental graphite fuel elements were hot-gas tested; uranium-loaded ion exchange beads survived a heat treatment cycle of 2800/degree/C for three hours. Organic precursor carbon studies were oriented toward modification of the CAI polymers. 2 refs., 66 figs., 23 tabs.

  5. BISON and MARMOT Development for Modeling Fast Reactor Fuel Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Williamson, Richard L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, Daniel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Medvedev, Pavel G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    BISON and MARMOT are two codes under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for engineering scale and lower length scale fuel performance modeling. It is desired to add capabilities for fast reactor applications to these codes. The fast reactor fuel types under consideration are metal (U-Pu-Zr) and oxide (MOX). The cladding types of interest include 316SS, D9, and HT9. The purpose of this report is to outline the proposed plans for code development and provide an overview of the models added to the BISON and MARMOT codes for fast reactor fuel behavior. A brief overview of preliminary discussions on the formation of a bilateral agreement between the Idaho National Laboratory and the National Nuclear Laboratory in the United Kingdom is presented.

  6. Innovative microbial fuel cell for electricity production from anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Min, Booki; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    A submersible microbial fuel cell (SMFC) was developed by immersing an anode electrode and a cathode chamber in an anaerobic reactor. Domestic wastewater was used as the medium and the inoculum in the experiments. The SMFC could successfully generate a stable voltage of 0.428 ± 0.003 V with a fixed...... 470 Ω resistor from acetate. From the polarization test, the maximum power density of 204 mW m−2 was obtained at current density of 595 mA m−2 (external resistance = 180 Ω). The power generation showed a saturation-type relationship as a function of wastewater strength, with a maximum power density...... (Pmax) of 218 mW m−2 and a saturation constant (Ks) of 244 mg L−1. The main limitations for achieving higher electricity production in the SMFC were identified as the high internal resistance at the electrolyte and the inefficient electron transfer at the cathode electrode. As the current increased...

  7. Spent fuel data base: commercial light water reactors. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauf, M.J.; Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1979-12-01

    As a consequence of this country's non-proliferation policy, the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has been delayed indefinitely. This has resulted in spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel being considered as a potential waste form for disposal. Since the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is currently developing methodologies for use in the regulation of the management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes, a comprehensive data base describing LWR fuel technology must be compiled. This document provides that technology baseline and, as such, will support the development of those evaluation standards and criteria applicable to spent nuclear fuel.

  8. High Density Fuel Development for Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel Wachs; Dennis Keiser; Mitchell Meyer; Douglas Burkes; Curtis Clark; Glenn Moore; Jan-Fong Jue; Totju Totev; Gerard Hofman; Tom Wiencek; Yeon So Kim; Jim Snelgrove

    2007-09-01

    An international effort to develop, qualify, and license high and very high density fuels has been underway for several years within the framework of multi-national RERTR programs. The current development status is the result of significant contributions from many laboratories, specifically CNEA in Argentina, AECL in Canada, CEA in France, TUM in Germany, KAERI in Korea, VNIIM, RDIPE, IPPE, NCCP and RIARR in Russia, INL, ANL and Y-12 in USA. These programs are mainly engaged with UMo dispersion fuels with densities from 6 to 8 gU/cm3 (high density fuel) and UMo monolithic fuel with density as high as 16 gU/cm3 (very high density fuel). This paper, mainly focused on the French & US programs, gives the status of high density UMo fuel development and perspectives on their qualification.

  9. Radioactivity and radioprotection: the every day life in a nuclear installation. Press tour at CEA/GRENOBLE 18 november 1999; Radioactivite et radioprotection: la vie quotidienne dans une installation nucleaire. Voyage de presse au Centre CEA/CADARACHE 18 novembre 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    In the framework of the public information, this paper gives a general information on the radioactivity and the radioprotection at the CEA/Cadarache center. A first part is devoted to a presentation of the radioactivity with definitions and radiation effects on the human being and the environment. An other part presents the radioprotection activities and regulations. The last part deals with specific activities of the CEA/Cadarache: the CASCAD installations for spent fuels storage, the LECA Laboratory for the Examination of Active Fuels and a dismantling installation for big irradiated objects. Historical aspects of the CEA/Cadarache are also provided. (A.L.B.)

  10. Gap Size Uncertainty Quantification in Advanced Gas Reactor TRISO Fuel Irradiation Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Binh T.; Einerson, Jeffrey J.; Hawkes, Grant L.; Lybeck, Nancy J.; Petti, David A.

    2016-10-01

    The Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-3/4 experiment is the combination of the third and fourth tests conducted within the tristructural isotropic fuel development and qualification research program. The AGR-3/4 test consists of twelve independent capsules containing a fuel stack in the center surrounded by three graphite cylinders and shrouded by a stainless steel shell. This capsule design enables temperature control of both the fuel and the graphite rings by varying the neon/helium gas mixture flowing through the four resulting gaps. Knowledge of fuel and graphite temperatures is crucial for establishing the functional relationship between fission product release and irradiation thermal conditions. These temperatures are predicted for each capsule using the commercial finite-element heat transfer code ABAQUS. Uncertainty quantification reveals that the gap size uncertainties are among the dominant factors contributing to predicted temperature uncertainty due to high input sensitivity and uncertainty. Gap size uncertainty originates from the fact that all gap sizes vary with time due to dimensional changes of the fuel compacts and three graphite rings caused by extended exposure to high temperatures and fast neutron irradiation. Gap sizes are estimated using as-fabricated dimensional measurements at the start of irradiation and post irradiation examination dimensional measurements at the end of irradiation. Uncertainties in these measurements provide a basis for quantifying gap size uncertainty. However, lack of gap size measurements during irradiation and lack of knowledge about the dimension change rates lead to gap size modeling assumptions, which could increase gap size uncertainty. In addition, the dimensional measurements are performed at room temperature, and must be corrected to account for thermal expansion of the materials at high irradiation temperatures. Uncertainty in the thermal expansion coefficients for the graphite materials used in the AGR-3/4 capsules

  11. Test tasks for verification of program codes for calculation of neutron-physical characteristics of the BN series reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirov, Georgy; Ternovikh, Mikhail; Smirnov, Anton; Saldikov, Ivan; Bahdanovich, Rynat; Gerasimov, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    System of test tasks is presented with the fast reactor BN-1200 with nitride fuel as prototype. The system of test tasks includes three test based on different geometric models. Model of fuel element in homogeneous and in heterogeneous form, model of fuel assembly in height-heterogeneous and full heterogeneous form, and modeling of the active core of BN-1200 reactor. Cross-verification of program codes was performed. Transition from simple geometry to more complex one allows to identify the causes of discrepancies in the results during the early stage of cross-verification of codes. This system of tests can be applied for certification of engineering programs based on the method of Monte Carlo to the calculation of full-scale models of the reactor core of the BN series. The developed tasks take into account the basic layout and structural features of the reactor BN-1200. They are intended for study of neutron-physical characteristics, estimation of influence of heterogeneous structure and influence of diffusion approximation. The development of system of test tasks allowed to perform independent testing of programs for calculation of neutron-physical characteristics: engineering programs JARFR and TRIGEX, and codes MCU, TDMCC, and MMK based on the method of Monte Carlo.

  12. Results of the Irradiation of R6R018 in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam B Robinson; Daniel Wachs; Pavel Medvedev; Curtis Clark; Gray Chang; Misti Lillo; Jan-Fong Jue; Glenn Moore; Jared Wight

    2010-04-01

    For over 30 years the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program has worked to provide the fuel technology and analytical support required to convert research and test reactors from nuclear fuels that utilize highly enriched uranium (HEU) to fuels based on low-enriched uranium (LEU) (defined as <20% U-235). This effort is driven by a desire to minimize international civilian commerce in weapons usable materials. The RERTR fuel development program has executed a wide array of fuel tests over the last decade that clearly established the viability of research reactor fuels based on uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloys. Fuel testing has included a large number of dispersion type fuels capable of providing uranium densities up to approximately 8.5 g U/cc (~1.7 g U-235/cc at 20% enrichment). The dispersion fuel designs tested are very similar to existing research test reactor fuels in that the U-Mo particles simply replace the current fuel phase within the matrix. In 2003 it became evident that the first generation U-Mo-based dispersion fuel within an aluminum matrix exhibited significant fuel performance problems at high power and burn-up. These issues have been successfully addressed with a modest modification to the matrix material composition. Testing has shown that small additions of silicon (2–5 wt%) to the aluminum (Al) matrix stabilizes the fuel performance. The fuel plate R6R018 which was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as part of the RERTR-9B experiment was part of an investigation into the role of the silicon content in the matrix. This plate consisted of a U-7Mo fuel phase dispersed in an Al-3.5Si matrix clad in Al-6061. This report outlines the fabrication history, the as fabricated analysis performed prior to irradiation, the irradiation conditions, the post irradiation examination results, and an analysis of the plates behavior.

  13. Radiative capture on $^{242}$Pu for MOX fuel reactors

    CERN Multimedia

    The use of MOX fuel (mixed-oxide fuel made of UO$_{2}$ and PuO$_{2}$) in nuclear reactors allows substituting a large fraction of the enriched Uranium by Plutonium reprocessed from spent fuel. Indeed around 66% of the plutonium from spent fuel is made of $^{239}$Pu and $^{241}$Pu, which are fissile in thermal reactors. A typical reactor of this type uses a fuel with 7% reprocessed Pu and 93% depleted U, thus profiting from both the spent fuel and the remaining $^{238}$U following the $^{235}$U enrichment. With the use of such new fuel compositions rich in Pu the better knowledge of the capture and fission cross sections of the Pu isotopes becomes very important. This is clearly stated in the recent OECD NEA’s “High Priority Request List” and in the WPEC-26 “Uncertainty and target accuracy assessment for innovative systems using recent covariance data evaluations” report. In particular, a new series of cross section evaluations have been recently carried out jointly by the European (JEFF) and United ...

  14. Optimization of thorium-uranium content in a 54-element fuel bundle for use in a CANDU-SCWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummel, D.W.; Novog, D.R. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Engineering Physics, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    A new 54-element fuel bundle design has been proposed for use in a pressure-tube supercritical water-cooled reactor, a pre-conceptual evolution of existing CANDU reactors. Pursuant to the goals of the Generation IV International Forum regarding advancement in nuclear fuel cycles, optimization of the thorium and uranium content in each ring of fuel elements has been studied with the objectives of maximizing the achievable fuel utilization (burnup) and total thorium content within the bundle, while simultaneously minimizing the linear element ratings and coolant void reactivity. The bundle was modeled within a reactor lattice cell using WIMS-AECL, and the uranium and thorium content in each ring of fuel elements was optimized using a weighted merit function of the aforementioned criteria and a metaheuristic search algorithm. (author)

  15. Renewing Liquid Fueled Molten Salt Reactor Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towell, Rusty; NEXT Lab Team

    2016-09-01

    Globally there is a desperate need for affordable, safe, and clean energy on demand. More than anything else, this would raise the living conditions of those in poverty around the world. An advanced reactor that utilizes liquid fuel and molten salts is capable of meeting these needs. Although, this technology was demonstrated in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at ORNL in the 60's, little progress has been made since the program was cancelled over 40 years ago. A new research effort has been initiated to advance the technical readiness level of key reactor components. This presentation will explain the motivation and initial steps for this new research initiative.

  16. Reactor-specific spent fuel discharge projections, 1984 to 2020

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeb, C.M.; Libby, R.A.; Holter, G.M.

    1985-04-01

    The original spent fuel utility data base (SFDB) has been adjusted to produce agreement with the EIA nuclear energy generation forecast. The procedure developed allows the detail of the utility data base to remain intact, while the overall nuclear generation is changed to match any uniform nuclear generation forecast. This procedure adjusts the weight of the reactor discharges as reported on the SFDB and makes a minimal (less than 10%) change in the original discharge exposures in order to preserve discharges of an integral number of fuel assemblies. The procedure used in developing the reactor-specific spent fuel discharge projections, as well as the resulting data bases themselves, are described in detail in this report. Discussions of the procedure cover the following topics: a description of the data base; data base adjustment procedures; addition of generic power reactors; and accuracy of the data base adjustments. Reactor-specific discharge and storage requirements are presented. Annual and cumulative discharge projections are provided. Annual and cumulative requirements for additional storage are shown for the maximum at-reactor (AR) storage assumption, and for the maximum AR with transshipment assumption. These compare directly to the storage requirements from the utility-supplied data, as reported in the Spent Fuel Storage Requirements Report. The results presented in this report include: the disaggregated spent fuel discharge projections; and disaggregated projections of requirements for additional spent fuel storage capacity prior to 1998. Descriptions of the methodology and the results are included in this report. Details supporting the discussions in the main body of the report, including descriptions of the capacity and fuel discharge projections, are included. 3 refs., 6 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Comparative analysis of preliminary design core of TRIGA Bandung using fuel element plate MTR in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadhan, Anwar Ilmar; Umar, Efrizon; Tandian, Nathanael Panagung; Suwono, Aryadi

    2017-01-01

    TRIGA Bandung is a research nuclear reactor owned by Indonesia, located in Bandung with a power of 2 MWth. Nuclear research reactor TRIGA Bandung is used as a center for applied research and development in the field of application of the nuclear technologies. TRIGA Bandung is currently still using a cylindrical fuel element, this raises a new problem - the limited number of existing fuel element. The purpose of this research is the development of the preliminary core design of a nuclear research reactor TRIGA Bandung using fuel element plate MTR. The research method is modeling and simulation the preliminary design core of nuclear research reactor TRIGA Bandung using comparative method of porous media and non-porous media with CFD code. This research shows the velocity flow and temperature distribution and the influence of pressure from the comparison method of k-ɛ standard model and porous media model at the preliminary design in the core area of TRIGA Bandung research reactor with fuel element plate MTR.

  18. Artificial neural networks for spatial distribution of fuel assemblies in reload of PWR reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Edyene; Castro, Victor F.; Velásquez, Carlos E.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências e Técnicas Nucleares

    2017-07-01

    An artificial neural network methodology is being developed in order to find an optimum spatial distribution of the fuel assemblies in a nuclear reactor core during reload. The main bounding parameter of the modelling was the neutron multiplication factor, k{sub ef{sub f}}. The characteristics of the network are defined by the nuclear parameters: cycle, burnup, enrichment, fuel type, and average power peak of each element. These parameters were obtained by the ORNL nuclear code package SCALE6.0. As for the artificial neural network, the ANN Feedforward Multi{sub L}ayer{sub P}erceptron with various layers and neurons were constructed. Three algorithms were used and tested: LM (Levenberg-Marquardt), SCG (Scaled Conjugate Gradient) and BayR (Bayesian Regularization). Artificial neural network have implemented using MATLAB 2015a version. As preliminary results, the spatial distribution of the fuel assemblies in the core using a neural network was slightly better than the standard core. (author)

  19. Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

    2010-05-05

    The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these

  20. POST-IRRADIATION ANALYSES OF U-MO DISPERSION FUEL RODS OF KOMO TESTS AT HANARO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.J. RYU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since 2001, a series of five irradiation test campaigns for atomized U-Mo dispersion fuel rods, KOMO-1, -2, -3, -4, and -5, has been conducted at HANARO (Korea in order to develop high performance low enriched uranium dispersion fuel for research reactors. The KOMO irradiation tests provided valuable information on the irradiation behavior of U-Mo fuel that results from the distinct fuel design and irradiation conditions of the rod fuel for HANARO. Full size U-Mo dispersion fuel rods of 4–5 g-U/cm3 were irradiated at a maximum linear power of approximately 105 kW/m up to 85% of the initial U-235 depletion burnup without breakaway swelling or fuel cladding failure. Electron probe microanalyses of the irradiated samples showed localized distribution of the silicon that was added in the matrix during fuel fabrication and confirmed its beneficial effect on interaction layer growth during irradiation. The modifications of U-Mo fuel particles by the addition of a ternary alloying element (Ti or Zr, additional protective coatings (silicide or nitride, and the use of larger fuel particles resulted in significantly reduced interaction layers between fuel particles and Al.

  1. Innovative microbial fuel cell for electricity production from anaerobic reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Booki; Angelidaki, Irini

    A submersible microbial fuel cell (SMFC) was developed by immersing an anode electrode and a cathode chamber in an anaerobic reactor. Domestic wastewater was used as the medium and the inoculum in the experiments. The SMFC could successfully generate a stable voltage of 0.428 ± 0.003 V with a fixed 470 Ω resistor from acetate. From the polarization test, the maximum power density of 204 mW m -2 was obtained at current density of 595 mA m -2 (external resistance = 180 Ω). The power generation showed a saturation-type relationship as a function of wastewater strength, with a maximum power density (P max) of 218 mW m -2 and a saturation constant (K s) of 244 mg L -1. The main limitations for achieving higher electricity production in the SMFC were identified as the high internal resistance at the electrolyte and the inefficient electron transfer at the cathode electrode. As the current increased, a large portion of voltage drop was caused by the ohmic (electrolyte) resistance of the medium present between two electrodes, although the two electrodes were closely positioned (about 3 cm distance; internal resistance = 35 ± 2 Ω). The open circuit potential (0.393 V vs. a standard hydrogen electrode) of the cathode was much smaller than the theoretical value (0.804 V). Besides, the short circuit potential of the cathode electrode decreased during the power generation in the SMFC. These results demonstrate that the SMFC could successfully generate electricity from wastewater, and has a great potential for electricity production from existing anaerobic reactors or other anaerobic environments such as sediments. The advantage of the SMFC is that no special anaerobic chamber (anode chamber) is needed, as existing anaerobic reactors can be used, where the cathode chamber and anode electrode are immersed.

  2. Hybrid fusion reactor for production of nuclear fuel with minimum radioactive contamination of the fuel cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikhov, E. P.; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Azizov, E. A.; Ignatiev, V. V.; Subbotin, S. A.; Tsibulskiy, V. F.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the results of the system research on the coordinated development of nuclear and fusion power engineering in the current century. Considering the increasing problems of resource procurement, including limited natural uranium resources, it seems reasonable to use fusion reactors as high-power neutron sources for production of nuclear fuel in a blanket. It is shown that the share of fusion sources in this structural configuration of the energy system can be relatively small. A fundamentally important aspect of this solution to the problem of closure of the fuel cycle is that recycling of highly active spent fuel can be abandoned. Radioactivity released during the recycling of the spent fuel from the hybrid reactor blanket is at least two orders of magnitude lower than during the production of the same number of fissile isotopes after the recycling of the spent fuel from a fast reactor.

  3. Neutron intensity of fast reactor spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamatsu, Misao; Aoyama, Takafumi [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-03-01

    Neutron intensity of spent fuel of the JOYO Mk-II core with a burnup of 62,500 MWd/t and cooling time of 5.2 years was measured at the spent fuel storage pond. The measured data were compared with the calculated values based on the JOYO core management code system `MAGI`, and the average C/E approximately 1.2 was obtained. It was found that the axial neutron intensity didn`t simply follow the burnup distribution, and the neutron intensity was locally increased at the bottom end of the fuel region due to an accumulation of {sup 244}Cm. (author)

  4. Irradiation test plan of DUPIC fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Ki Kwang; Song, K. C.; Park, H. S. and others

    2000-04-01

    The objective of the irradiation test of DUPIC fuel at HANARO is to obtain the data of in-core behavior and evaluate the nuclear, thermal and mechanical performance of DUPIC fuel. The irradiation of DUPIC fuel will start at April 25, 2000 for about 2 months, and the burnup of 2,000 MWD/MTU will be attained for this period. The pre-irradiation examinations for DUPIC fuel, such as visual inspection, dimension measurement, He leak test and microstructure observation, was carried out. The post-irradiation examination items for the irradiated DUPIC fuel are planned to be the NDA test, visual inspection and dimension measurement, as well as the analyses for the fission gas release, the microstructure of pellets and the distribution and shape of imbedded nuclides. The DUPIC mini-elements were fabricated in the DFDF (IMEF M6 cell) using the G23-G2 rod. For the HANARO core calculation, the initial composition of DUPIC fuel was estimated using ORIGEN-2 code based on the burnup history of the G23-G2 rod. The design features of DUPIC pellets, the mini-element and the irradiation capsule, were supplemented considering the characteristics of DUPIC fuel and the results from the irradiation test of the simulated DUPIC fuel performed in 1999. The nuclear, thermohydraulic and mechanical characteristics of DUPIC fuel under the normal operation condition were evaluated for the safety analysis on the HANARO. Using these results, potential accidents initiated by DUPIC fuel were estimated, and Safety analyses on the locked rotor and RIA accidents were carried out in order to assess the integrity of DUPIC fuel under the accident condition initiated by the HANARO. Based on the results of these safety analyses, the supplemental countermeasures for securing the sufficient thermal margins were set up, as well. At the last, similar overseas and domestic cases were introduced.

  5. Consistent neutron-physical and thermal-physical calculations of fuel rods of VVER type reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tikhomirov Georgy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For modeling the isotopic composition of fuel, and maximum temperatures at different moments of time, one can use different algorithms and codes. In connection with the development of new types of fuel assemblies and progress in computer technology, the task makes important to increase accuracy in modeling of the above characteristics of fuel assemblies during the operation. Calculations of neutronphysical characteristics of fuel rods are mainly based on models using averaged temperature, thermal conductivity factors, and heat power density. In this paper, complex approach is presented, based on modern algorithms, methods and codes to solve separate tasks of thermal conductivity, neutron transport, and nuclide transformation kinetics. It allows to perform neutron-physical and thermal-physical calculation of the reactor with detailed temperature distribution, with account of temperature-depending thermal conductivity and other characteristics. It was applied to studies of fuel cell of the VVER-1000 reactor. When developing new algorithms and programs, which should improve the accuracy of modeling the isotopic composition and maximum temperature in the fuel rod, it is necessary to have a set of test tasks for verification. The proposed approach can be used for development of such verification base for testing calculation of fuel rods of VVER type reactors

  6. Sipping machine control system new design to perform integrity of nuclear fuel test in Cofrentes power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, M., E-mail: mpalomo@iqn.upv.es [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain); Urrea, M., E-mail: Matias.urrea@iberdrola.es [C.N.Cofrentes - Iberdrola Generacion S.A., Cofrentes, Valencia (Spain); Curiel, M., E-mail: m.curiel@lainsa.com [LAINSA Grupo Dominguis, Valencia (Spain); Arnaldos, A., E-mail: a.arnaldos@titaniast.com [TITANIA Servicios Tecnologicos SL, Grupo Dominguis, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    This paper we present is related to SIPPING machine control system new design to perform integrity of nuclear fuel test. This test is a non destructive technique used for evaluating the radiated nuclear fuel coating structural integrity. It is based on the radioactive emission detection of fission elements in the reactor cooling system, using the fuel inspection equipment (SIPPING). SIPPING equipment consists of one simultaneous test bell-shaped vessel of eight fuel elements, and another one for individual element test, a control workstation and some accessories (cables, thermocouples, hoses). SIPPING inspection is carried out by means of fuel element vessel. Through air injection, water flows around the element and heat evacuation is reduced, so fuel elements temperature increases. Those elements with faults shall expelled fission components dissolved in water and/or as a gas component. The project aim is the SIPPING system control design and software based on LabVIEW, for control, monitoring and documentation of the SIPPING Test. This project shall give a major functionality to the system and, at the same time, shall facilitate the user a friendlier and interactive environment allowing: to substitute the present work platform with a real-time electronic system based on cRIO and a control software ad-hoc designed for SIPPING system; to equip new system of a major redundancy for data storage, minimising loss probability of the same. (author)

  7. Sipping machine control system new design to perform integrity of nuclear fuel test in Cofrentes power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curiel, M. [Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales SAU, Sorolla Center, local 10, Av. de las Cortes Valencianas No. 58, 46015 Valencia (Spain); Palomo, M. J. [ISIRYM, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, Valencia (Spain); Urrea, M. [Iberdrola Generacion S. A., Central Nuclear Cofrentes, Carretera Almansa Requena s/n, 04662 Cofrentes, Valencia (Spain); Vaquer, J., E-mail: m.curiel@lainsa.co [TITANIA Servicios Tecnologicos SL, Sorolla Center, local 10, Av. de las Cortes Valencianas No. 58, 46015 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    This paper related to Sipping machine control system new design to perform integrity of nuclear fuel test. This test is a non destructive technique used for evaluating the radiated nuclear fuel coating structural integrity. It is based on the radioactive emission detection of fission elements in the reactor cooling system, using the fuel inspection equipment Sipping. The equipment consists of one simultaneous test bell-shaped vessel of eight fuel elements, and another one for individual element test, a control workstation and some accessories (cables, thermocouples, hoses). Sipping inspection is carried out by means of fuel element vessel. Through air injection, water flows around the element and heat evacuation is reduced, so fuel elements temperature increases. Those elements with faults shall expelled fission components dissolved in water and/or as a gas component. The project aim is the Sipping system control design and software based on LabVIEWTM, for control, monitoring and documentation of the Sipping test. This project shall give a major functionality to the system and, at the same time, shall facilitate the user a friendlier and interactive environment allowing: 1) To substitute the present work platform with a real-time electronic system based on cRIO and a control software ad-hoc designed for Sipping system. 2) To equip new system of a major redundancy for data storage, minimising loss probability of the same. (Author)

  8. Reactor-based management of used nuclear fuel: assessment of major options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, Phillip J; Wigeland, Roald A; Hill, Robert N

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the current status of the ongoing Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) program in the U.S. Department of Energy that is investigating the potential for using the processing and recycling of used nuclear fuel to improve radioactive waste management, including used fuel. A key element of the strategies is to use nuclear reactors for further irradiation of recovered chemical elements to transmute certain long-lived highly-radioactive isotopes into less hazardous isotopes. Both thermal and fast neutron spectrum reactors are being studied as part of integrated nuclear energy systems where separations, transmutation, and disposal are considered. Radiotoxicity is being used as one of the metrics for estimating the hazard of used fuel and the processing of wastes resulting from separations and recycle-fuel fabrication. Decay heat from the used fuel and/or wastes destined for disposal is used as a metric for use of a geologic repository. Results to date indicate that the most promising options appear to be those using fast reactors in a repeated recycle mode to limit buildup of higher actinides, since the transuranic elements are a key contributor to the radiotoxicity and decay heat. Using such an approach, there could be much lower environmental impact from the high-level waste as compared to direct disposal of the used fuel, but there would likely be greater generation of low-level wastes that will also require disposal. An additional potential waste management benefit is having the ability to tailor waste forms and contents to one or more targeted disposal environments (i.e., to be able to put waste in environments best-suited for the waste contents and forms). Copyright © 2010 Health Physics Society

  9. A preliminary neutronic evaluation of high temperature engineering test reactor using the SCALE6 code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanure, L. P. A. R.; Sousa, R. V.; Costa, D. F.; Cardoso, F.; Veloso, M. A. F.; Pereira, C.

    2014-02-01

    Neutronic parameters of some fourth generation nuclear reactors have been investigated at the Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear/UFMG. Previous studies show the possibility to increase the transmutation capabilities of these fourth generation systems to achieve significant reduction concerning transuranic elements in spent fuel. To validate the studies, a benchmark on core physics analysis, related to initial testing of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor and provided by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was simulated using the Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE). The CSAS6/KENO-VI control sequence and the 44-group ENDF/B-V 0 cross-section neutron library were used to evaluate the keff (effective multiplication factor) and the result presents good agreement with experimental value.

  10. PT IP-754 physics testing of H Reactor: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, A.D.; Masche, G.C.

    1965-10-07

    Significant changes in fuel design, operating levels, loading geometry, and moderator condition have taken place since the Hanford reactors started operation. Changes which affect nuclear safety parameters require continuing analysis of the possible effects on safety system strengths and maximum potential reactivities. For this reason the shutdown of a Hanford reactor offered an excellent opportunity to measure many of the above factors without a significant production loss. Therefore a test program was proposed and carried out at H Reactor starting April 22, 1965 and ending May 5, 1965. All of the tests were designed to provide information concerning parameters which affect nuclear safety and control calculation limits. This document is a summary of the deactivation test results without application and recommendations to specific nuclear safety questions. Rather, it is intended that the results listed herein will serve as a basis for further study and application to nuclear safety technology.

  11. Dissolution Flowsheet for High Flux Isotope Reactor Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, W. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Rudisill, T. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); O' Rourke, P. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Karay, N. S [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-27

    As part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) processing campaign, H-Canyon is planning to begin dissolving High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel in late FY17 or early FY18. Each HFIR fuel core contains inner and outer fuel elements which were fabricated from uranium oxide (U3O8) dispersed in a continuous Al phase using traditional powder metallurgy techniques. Fuels fabricated in this manner, like other SNF’s processed in H-Canyon, dissolve by the same general mechanisms with similar gas generation rates and the production of H2. The HFIR fuel cores will be dissolved and the recovered U will be down-blended into low-enriched U. HFIR fuel was previously processed in H-Canyon using a unique insert in both the 6.1D and 6.4D dissolvers. Multiple cores will be charged to the same dissolver solution maximizing the concentration of dissolved Al. The objective of this study was to identify flowsheet conditions through literature review and laboratory experimentation to safely and efficiently dissolve the HFIR fuel in H-Canyon. Laboratory-scale experiments were performed to evaluate the dissolution of HFIR fuel using both Al 1100 and Al 6061 T6 alloy coupons. The Al 1100 alloy was considered a representative surrogate which provided an upper bound on the generation of flammable (i.e., H2) gas during the dissolution process. The dissolution of the Al 6061 T6 alloy proceeded at a slower rate than the Al 1100 alloy, and was used to verify that the target Al concentration in solution could be achieved for the selected Hg concentration. Mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy were used to provide continuous monitoring of the concentration of H2 and other permanent gases in the dissolution offgas, allowing the development of H2 generation rate profiles. The H2 generation rates were subsequently used to evaluate if a full HFIR core could be dissolved in an H-Canyon dissolver without exceeding 60% of the

  12. Thermo-Elastic Finite Element Analyses of Annular Nuclear Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Y. D.; Kwon, S. B.; Rho, K. T.; Kim, M. S.; Song, H. J.

    In this study, we tried to examine the pros and cons of the annular type of fuel concerning mainly with the temperatures and stresses of pellet and cladding. The inner and outer gaps between pellet and cladding may play an important role on the temperature distribution and stress distribution of fuel system. Thus, we tested several inner and outer gap cases, and we evaluated the effect of gaps on fuel systems. We conducted thermo-elastic-plastic-creep analyses using an in-house thermo-elastic-plastic-creep finite element program that adopted the 'effective-stress-function' algorithm. Most analyses were conducted until the gaps disappeared; however, certain analyses lasted for 1582 days, after which the fuels were replaced. Further study on the optimal gaps sizes for annular nuclear fuel systems is still required.

  13. Comparison of fuel assemblies in lead cooled fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, A.; Sanchez, H.; Aguilar, L.; Espinosa P, G., E-mail: alejandria.peval@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This paper presents a comparison of the thermal-fluid processes in the core, fuel heat transfer, and thermal power between two fuel assemblies: square and hexagonal, in a lead-cooled fast reactor (Lfr). A multi-physics reduced order model for the analysis of Lfr single channel is developed in this work. The work focused on a coupling between process of neutron kinetic, fuel heat transfer process and thermal-fluid, in a single channel. The thermal power is obtained from neutron point kinetics model, considering a non-uniform power distribution. The analysis of the processes of thermal-fluid considers thermal expansion effects. The transient heat transfer in fuel is carried out in an annular geometry, and one-dimensional in radial direction for each axial node. The results presented in comparing these assemblies consider the temperature field in the fuel, in the thermal fluid and under steady state, and transient conditions. Transients consider flow of coolant and inlet temperature of coolant. The mathematical model of Lfr considers three main modules: the heat transfer in the annular fuel, the power generation with feedback effects on neutronic, and the thermal-fluid in the single channel. The modeling of nuclear reactors in general, the coupling is crucial by the feedback between the neutron processes with fuel heat transfer, and thermo-fluid, where is very common the numerical instabilities, after all it has to refine the model to achieve the design data. In this work is considered as a reference the ELSY reactor for the heat transfer analysis in the fuel and pure lead properties for analyzing the thermal-fluid. The results found shows that the hexagonal array has highest temperature in the fuel, respect to square array. (Author)

  14. F2 phenomenological test on fuel motion (Interim report). [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palm, R.G.; Fink, C.L.; Stewart, R.R.; Gehl, S.M.; Rothman, A.B.

    1976-09-01

    TREAT F-series tests are being conducted to provide data on fuel motion at accident power levels from one to about ten times design for use in development of fuel motion models. Test F2 was conducted to evaluate motion of high power fuel in a hypothetical LMFBR unprotected TUC (transient undercooling) accident. Fuel and fuel-boundary conditions following coolant boiling and dryout under TUC conditions are achieved in each F-series test with a single fuel element surrounded by a nuclear heated wall in a dry test capsule. Test F2 was conducted with a low burnup but restructured fuel element to investigate the effect of fuel vapor pressure on fuel motion. Results are presented and discussed.

  15. Development of reactor graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, G.; Mindermann, D.; Wilhelmi, G.; Persicke, H.; Ulsamer, W.

    1990-04-01

    The German graphite development programme for High Temperature Reactors has been based on the assumption that reactor graphite for core components with lifetime fluences of up to 4 × 10 22 neutrons per cm 2 (EDN) at 400°C can be manufactured from regular pitch coke. The use of secondary coke and vibrational moulding techniques have allowed production of materials with very small anisotropy, high strength, and high purity which are the most important properties of reactor graphite. A variety of graphite grades has been tested in fast neutron irradiation experiments. The results show that suitable graphites for modern High Temperature Reactors with spherical fuel elements are available.

  16. Study of the uniform corrosion of an aluminium alloy used for the fuel cladding of the Jules Horowitz experimental reactor; Etude de la corrosion uniforme d'un alliage d'aluminium utilise comme gainage du combustible nucleaire du reacteur experimental Jules Horowitz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wintergerst, M. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SEMI), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    For the Jules Horowitz new material testing reactor, an aluminium base alloy, AlFeNi, will be used for the cladding of the fuel plates. Taking into account the thermal properties of the alloy and of its oxide, the corrosion of the fuel cans presents many problems. The aim of this thesis is to provide a growing kinetic of the oxide layer at the surface of the AlFeNi fuel can in order to predict the life time of fuel element. Thus the mechanism of degradation of the cladding will be describe in order to integrate the different parameters of the operating reactor. (A.L.B.)

  17. Fuel element development committee: Annual report from the General Electric Company, Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, M.; Minor, J.E.; Stringer, J.T.

    1964-08-14

    A summary of HAPO activities is given to include separate sections on the N-Reactor and other current production reactors. Specific programs and fuel performance for current production reactor fuels is discussed. Also, the production status, fuel performance, development program and process technology for N-Reactor fuels is presented.

  18. Requalification of SPERT (Special Power Excursion Reactor Test) pins for use in university reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Dates, L.R.

    1986-12-01

    A series of nondestructive and destructive examinations have been performed on a representative sample of stainless steel-clad UO/sub 2/ fuel pins procured in the early-to-mid 1960s for the SPERT program. These examinations were undertaken in order to requalify the SPERT pins for use in converting university research reactors from the use of highly enriched uranium to the use of low-enriched uranium. The requalification program included visual and dimensional inspections of fuel pins and fuel pellets, radiographic inspections of welds, fill gas analyses, and chemical and spectrographic analyses of fuel and cladding materials. In general all attributes tested were within or very close to specified values, although some weld defects not covered by the original specifications were found. 1 ref., 4 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. Synergistic smart fuel for in-pile nuclear reactor measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.A.; Kotter, D.K. [Idaho National Laboratories, Idaho Falls (United States); Ali, R.A.; Garrett, S.L. [Penn State University, University Park, State College, PA 16801 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The thermo-acoustic fuel rod sensor developed in this research has demonstrated a novel technique for monitoring the temperature within the core of a nuclear reactor or the temperature of the surrounding heat-transfer fluid. It uses the heat from the nuclear fuel to generate sustained acoustic oscillations whose frequency will be indicative of the temperature. Converting a nuclear fuel rod into this type of thermo-acoustic sensor simply requires the insertion of a porous material (stack). This sensor has demonstrated a synergy with the elevated temperatures that exist within the nuclear reactor using materials that have only minimal susceptibility to high-energy particle fluxes. When the sensor is in operation, the sound waves radiated from the fuel rod resonator will propagate through the surrounding cooling fluid. The frequency of these oscillations is directly correlated with an effective temperature within the fuel rod resonator. This device is self-powered and is operational even in case of total loss of power of the reactor.

  20. Electrolysis cell for reprocessing plutonium reactor fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W.E.; Steindler, M.J.; Burris, L.

    1985-01-04

    An electrolytic cell for refining a mixture of metals including spent fuel containing U and Pu contaminated with other metals is claimed. The cell includes a metallic pot containing a metallic pool as one anode at a lower level, a fused salt as the electrolyte at an intermediate level and a cathode and an anode basket in spaced-apart positions in the electrolyte with the cathode and anode being retractable to positions above the electrolyte during which spent fuel may be added to the anode basket. The anode basket is extendable into the lower pool to dissolve at least some metallic contaminants; the anode basket contains the spent fuel acting as a second anode when in the electrolyte.

  1. Electrolysis cell for reprocessing plutonium reactor fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William E.; Steindler, Martin J.; Burris, Leslie

    1986-01-01

    An electrolytic cell for refining a mixture of metals including spent fuel containing U and Pu contaminated with other metals, the cell including a metallic pot containing a metallic pool as one anode at a lower level, a fused salt as the electrolyte at an intermediate level and a cathode and an anode basket in spaced-apart positions in the electrolyte with the cathode and anode being retractable to positions above the electrolyte during which spent fuel may be added to the anode basket and the anode basket being extendable into the lower pool to dissolve at least some metallic contaminants, the anode basket containing the spent fuel acting as a second anode when in the electrolyte.

  2. Thermal barrier and support for nuclear reactor fuel core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Jr., William S.; Pickering, J. Larry; Black, William E.

    1987-01-01

    A thermal barrier/core support for the fuel core of a nuclear reactor having a metallic cylinder secured to the reactor vessel liner and surrounded by fibrous insulation material. A top cap is secured to the upper end of the metallic cylinder that locates and orients a cover block and post seat. Under normal operating conditions, the metallic cylinder supports the entire load exerted by its associated fuel core post. Disposed within the metallic cylinder is a column of ceramic material, the height of which is less than that of the metallic cylinder, and thus is not normally load bearing. In the event of a temperature excursion beyond the design limits of the metallic cylinder and resulting in deformation of the cylinder, the ceramic column will abut the top cap to support the fuel core post.

  3. Thermal assessment of Shippingport pressurized water reactor blanket fuel assemblies within a multi-canister overpack within the canister storage building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HEARD, F.J.

    1999-04-09

    A series of analyses were performed to assess the thermal performance characteristics of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assemblies as loaded within a Multi-Canister Overpack within the Canister Storage Building. A two-dimensional finite element was developed, with enough detail to model the individual fuel plates: including the fuel wafers, cladding, and flow channels.

  4. Public information circular for shipments of irradiated reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    The circular has been prepared to provide information on the shipment of irradiated reactor fuel (spent fuel) subject to regulation by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). It provides a brief description of spent fuel shipment safety and safeguards requirements of general interest, a summary of data for 1979--1991 highway and railway shipments, and a listing, by State, of recent highway and railway shipment routes. The enclosed route information reflects specific NRC approvals that have been granted in response to requests for shipments of spent fuel. This publication does not constitute authority for carriers or other persons to use the routes described to ship spent fuel, other categories of nuclear waste, or other materials.

  5. Public information circular for shipments of irradiated reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This circular has been prepared to provide information on the shipment of irradiated reactor fuel (spent fuel) subject to regulation by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). It provides a brief description of spent fuel shipment safety and safeguards requirements of general interest, a summary of data for 1979--1989 highway and railway shipments, and a listing, by State, of recent highway and railway shipment routes. The enclosed route information reflects specific NRC approvals that have been granted in response to requests for shipments of spent fuel. This publication does not constitute authority for carriers or other persons to use the routes described to ship spent fuel, other categories of nuclear waste, or other materials. 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Sodium fast reactor fuels and materials : research needs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denman, Matthew R.; Porter, Douglas (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Art (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Lambert, John (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Hayes, Steven (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting. Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Idaho Falls, ID); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL)

    2011-09-01

    An expert panel was assembled to identify gaps in fuels and materials research prior to licensing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) design. The expert panel considered both metal and oxide fuels, various cladding and duct materials, structural materials, fuel performance codes, fabrication capability and records, and transient behavior of fuel types. A methodology was developed to rate the relative importance of phenomena and properties both as to importance to a regulatory body and the maturity of the technology base. The technology base for fuels and cladding was divided into three regimes: information of high maturity under conservative operating conditions, information of low maturity under more aggressive operating conditions, and future design expectations where meager data exist.

  7. An Evaluation of the Annular Fuel and Bottle-Shaped Fuel Concepts for Sodium Fast Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Memmott, Matthew; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hejzlar, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Two innovative fuel concepts, the internally and externally cooled annular fuel and the bottle-shaped fuel, were investigated with the goal of increasing the power density and reduce the pressure drop in the sodium-cooled fast reactor, respectively. The concepts were explored for both high- and low-conversion core configurations, and metal and oxide fuels. The annular fuel concept is best suited for low-conversion metal-fuelled cores, where it can enable a power uprate of ~20%; the magnitude ...

  8. STEADY STATE MODELING OF THE MINIMUM CRITICAL CORE OF THE TRANSIENT REACTOR TEST FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony L. Alberti; Todd S. Palmer; Javier Ortensi; Mark D. DeHart

    2016-05-01

    With the advent of next generation reactor systems and new fuel designs, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has identified the need for the resumption of transient testing of nuclear fuels. The DOE has decided that the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is best suited for future testing. TREAT is a thermal neutron spectrum, air-cooled, nuclear test facility that is designed to test nuclear fuels in transient scenarios. These specific scenarios range from simple temperature transients to full fuel melt accidents. DOE has expressed a desire to develop a simulation capability that will accurately model the experiments before they are irradiated at the facility. It is the aim for this capability to have an emphasis on effective and safe operation while minimizing experimental time and cost. The multi physics platform MOOSE has been selected as the framework for this project. The goals for this work are to identify the fundamental neutronics properties of TREAT and to develop an accurate steady state model for future multiphysics transient simulations. In order to minimize computational cost, the effect of spatial homogenization and angular discretization are investigated. It was found that significant anisotropy is present in TREAT assemblies and to capture this effect, explicit modeling of cooling channels and inter-element gaps is necessary. For this modeling scheme, single element calculations at 293 K gave power distributions with a root mean square difference of 0.076% from those of reference SERPENT calculations. The minimum critical core configuration with identical gap and channel treatment at 293 K resulted in a root mean square, total core, radial power distribution 2.423% different than those of reference SERPENT solutions.

  9. Performance and emissions of a catalytic reactor with propane, diesel, and Jet A fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, D.N.

    1977-01-01

    As part of the ERDA-funded Gas Turbine Highway Vehicle Systems project, tests were made to determine the performance and emissions of a catalytic reactor operated with propane, No. 2 diesel, and Jet A fuels. A 12-cm diameter and 16-cm long catalytic reactor using a proprietary noble metal catalyst was operated at an inlet temperature of 800 K, a pressure of 3 x 10/sup 5/ Pa and reference velocities of 10 to 15 m/s. No significant differences between the performance of the three fuels were observed when 98.5% purity propane was used. The combustion efficiency for 99.8% purity propane tested later was significantly lower, however. The diesel fuel contained 135 ppM of bound nitrogen and consequently produced the highest NO/sub x/ emissions of the three fuels. As much as 85% of the bound nitrogen was converted to NO/sub x/. Steady-state emissions goals based on half the most stringent proposed automotive standards were met when the reactor was operated at an adiabatic combustion temperature higher than 1350 K with all fuels except the 99.8% purity propane. With that fuel, a minimum temperature of 1480 K was required.

  10. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of research reactor core with different LEU fuel types using RELAP5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sahlamy, Neama M. [Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2017-11-15

    In the current work, comparisons between the core performances when using different LEU fuels are done. The fuels tested are UA1{sub X}-A1, U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al, and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al fuels with 19.7 % enrichment. Calculations are done using RELAP5 code to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic performance of the IAEA benchmark 10 MW reactor. First, a reassessment of the slow reactivity insertion transient with UA1{sub X}-A1 LEU fuel to compare the results with those reported in the IAEA TECDOC [1]. Then, comparisons between the thermal-hydraulic core performances when using the three LEU fuels are done. The assessment is performed at initial power of 1.0 W. The reactor power is calculated using the RELAP5 point kinetic model. The reactivity feedback, from changes in water density and fuel temperature, is considered for all cases. From the results it is noticed that U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al fuel gives the best fuel performance since it has the minimum value of peak fuel temperature and the minimum peak clad surface temperature, as operating parameters. Also, it gives the maximum value of the Critical Heat Flux Ratio and the lowest tendency to flow instability occurrence.

  11. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  12. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinsey, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  13. Irradiation Testing Vehicles for Fast Reactors from Open Test Assemblies to Closed Loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sienicki, James J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Grandy, Christopher [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-12-15

    A review of irradiation testing vehicle approaches and designs that have been incorporated into past Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) or envisioned for incorporation has been carried out. The objective is to understand the essential features of the approaches and designs so that they can inform test vehicle designs for a future U.S. Fast Test Reactor. Fast test reactor designs examined include EBR-II, FFTF, JOYO, BOR-60, PHÉNIX, JHR, and MBIR. Previous designers exhibited great ingenuity in overcoming design and operational challenges especially when the original reactor plant’s mission changed to an irradiation testing mission as in the EBRII reactor plant. The various irradiation testing vehicles can be categorized as: Uninstrumented open assemblies that fit into core locations; Instrumented open test assemblies that fit into special core locations; Self-contained closed loops; and External closed loops. A special emphasis is devoted to closed loops as they are regarded as a very desirable feature of a future U.S. Fast Test Reactor. Closed loops are an important technology for irradiation of fuels and materials in separate controlled environments. The impact of closed loops on the design of fast reactors is also discussed in this report.

  14. Preliminary decay heat calculations for the fuel loaded irradiation loop device of the RMB multipurpose Brazilian reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campolina, Daniel; Costa, Antonio Carlos L. da; Andrade, Edison P., E-mail: campolina@cdtn.br, E-mail: aclp@cdtn.br, E-mail: epa@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (SETRE/CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Tecnologia de Reatores

    2017-07-01

    The structuring project of the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) is responsible for meeting the capacity to develop and test materials and nuclear fuel for the Brazilian Nuclear Program. An irradiation test device (Loop) capable of performing fuel test for power reactor rods is being conceived for RMB reflector. In this work preliminary neutronic calculations have been carried out in order to determine parameters to the cooling system of the Loop basic design. The heat released as a result of radioactive decay of fuel samples was calculated using ORIGEN-ARP and it resulted less than 200 W after 1 hour of irradiation interruption. (author)

  15. Determining Reactor Fuel Type from Continuous Antineutrino Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffke, Patrick; Huber, Patrick

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the ability of an antineutrino detector to determine the fuel type of a reactor. A hypothetical 5-ton antineutrino detector is placed 25 m from the core and measures the spectral shape and rate of antineutrinos emitted by fission fragments in the core for a number of 90-d periods. Our results indicate that four major fuel types can be differentiated from the variation of fission fractions over the irradiation time with a true positive probability of detection at approximately 95%. In addition, we demonstrate that antineutrinos can identify the burnup at which weapons-grade mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel would be reduced to reactor-grade MOX, on average, providing assurance that plutonium-disposition goals are met. We also investigate removal scenarios where plutonium is purposefully diverted from a mixture of MOX and low-enriched uranium fuel. Finally, we discuss how our analysis is impacted by a spectral distortion around 6 MeV observed in the antineutrino spectrum measured from commercial power reactors.

  16. CANFLEX fuel bundle cross-flow endurance test (test report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Deok; Chung, C. H.; Chang, S. K.; Kim, B. D.

    1997-04-01

    As part of the normal refuelling sequence of CANDU nuclear reactor, both new and irradiated bundles can be parked in the cross-flow region of the liner tubes. This situation occurs normally for a few minutes. The fuel bundle which is subjected to the cross-flow should be capable of withstanding the consequences of cross flow for normal periods, and maintain its mechanical integrity. The cross-flow endurance test was conducted for CANFLEX bundle, latest developed nuclear fuel, at CANDU-Hot Test Loop. The test was carried out during 4 hours at the inlet cross-flow region. After the test, the bundle successfully met all acceptance criteria after the 4 hours cross-flow test. (author). 2 refs., 3 tabs.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Particle Flow Motion in a Two-Dimensional Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor with Discrete Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Modular pebble-bed nuclear reactor (MPBNR technology is promising due to its attractive features such as high fuel performance and inherent safety. Particle motion of fuel and graphite pebbles is highly associated with the performance of pebbled-bed modular nuclear reactor. To understand the mechanism of pebble’s motion in the reactor, we numerically studied the influence of number ratio of fuel and graphite pebbles, funnel angle of the reactor, height of guide ring on the distribution of pebble position, and velocity by means of discrete element method (DEM in a two-dimensional MPBNR. Velocity distributions at different areas of the reactor as well as mixing characteristics of fuel and graphite pebbles were investigated. Both fuel and graphite pebbles moved downward, and a uniform motion was formed in the column zone, while pebbles motion in the cone zone was accelerated due to the decrease of the cross sectional flow area. The number ratio of fuel and graphite pebbles and the height of guide ring had a minor influence on the velocity distribution of pebbles, while the variation of funnel angle had an obvious impact on the velocity distribution. Simulated results agreed well with the work in the literature.

  18. Fuel Economy Testing and Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s Fuel Economy pages provide information on current standards and how federal agencies work to enforce those laws, testing for national Corporate Average Fuel Economy or CAFE standards, and what you can do to reduce your own vehicle emissions.

  19. Advanced Demonstration and Test Reactor Options Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hill, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gehin, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Heidet, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kinsey, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Grandy, Christopher [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Qualls, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Nicholas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hoffman, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Croson, D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Global efforts to address climate change will require large-scale decarbonization of energy production in the United States and elsewhere. Nuclear power already provides 20% of electricity production in the United States (U.S.) and is increasing in countries undergoing rapid growth around the world. Because reliable, grid-stabilizing, low emission electricity generation, energy security, and energy resource diversity will be increasingly valued, nuclear power’s share of electricity production has a potential to grow. In addition, there are non electricity applications (e.g., process heat, desalination, hydrogen production) that could be better served by advanced nuclear systems. Thus, the timely development, demonstration, and commercialization of advanced nuclear reactors could diversify the nuclear technologies available and offer attractive technology options to expand the impact of nuclear energy for electricity generation and non-electricity missions. The purpose of this planning study is to provide transparent and defensible technology options for a test and/or demonstration reactor(s) to be built to support public policy, innovation and long term commercialization within the context of the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) broader commitment to pursuing an “all of the above” clean energy strategy and associated time lines. This planning study includes identification of the key features and timing needed for advanced test or demonstration reactors to support research, development, and technology demonstration leading to the commercialization of power plants built upon these advanced reactor platforms. This planning study is consistent with the Congressional language contained within the fiscal year 2015 appropriation that directed the DOE to conduct a planning study to evaluate “advanced reactor technology options, capabilities, and requirements within the context of national needs and public policy to support innovation in nuclear energy

  20. Used Fuel Testing Transportation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Steven B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Best, Ralph E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Maheras, Steven J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jensen, Philip J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); England, Jeffery L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); LeDuc, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-09-25

    This report identifies shipping packages/casks that might be used by the Used Nuclear Fuel Disposition Campaign Program (UFDC) to ship fuel rods and pieces of fuel rods taken from high-burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) assemblies to and between research facilities for purposes of evaluation and testing. Also identified are the actions that would need to be taken, if any, to obtain U.S. Nuclear Regulatory (NRC) or other regulatory authority approval to use each of the packages and/or shipping casks for this purpose.

  1. Detecting pin diversion from pressurized water reactors spent fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Young S.; Sitaraman, Shivakumar

    2017-01-10

    Detecting diversion of spent fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) by determining possible diversion including the steps of providing a detector cluster containing gamma ray and neutron detectors, inserting the detector cluster containing the gamma ray and neutron detectors into the spent fuel assembly through the guide tube holes in the spent fuel assembly, measuring gamma ray and neutron radiation responses of the gamma ray and neutron detectors in the guide tube holes, processing the gamma ray and neutron radiation responses at the guide tube locations by normalizing them to the maximum value among each set of responses and taking the ratio of the gamma ray and neutron responses at the guide tube locations and normalizing the ratios to the maximum value among them and producing three signatures, gamma, neutron, and gamma-neutron ratio, based on these normalized values, and producing an output that consists of these signatures that can indicate possible diversion of the pins from the spent fuel assembly.

  2. Thermal Hydraulic Characteristics of Fuel Defects in Plate Type Nuclear Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodey, Isaac T [ORNL

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent flow coupled with heat transfer is investigated for a High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel plate. The Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Models are used for fluid dynamics and the transfer of heat from a thermal nuclear fuel plate using the Multi-physics code COMSOL. Simulation outcomes are compared with experimental data from the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor Thermal Hydraulic Test Loop. The computational results for the High Flux Isotope Reactor core system provide a more physically accurate simulation of this system by modeling the turbulent flow field in conjunction with the diffusion of thermal energy within the solid and fluid phases of the model domain. Recommendations are made regarding Nusselt number correlations and material properties for future thermal hydraulic modeling efforts

  3. Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities. Sections 1-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.

    1982-09-01

    The Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program was initiated to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. This report, the first from the program, defines and describes fuel cycle elements that are being considered in the program. One type of facility (and in some cases two) is described that is representative of each element of the fuel cycle. The descriptions are based on real industrial-scale facilities that are current state-of-the-art, or on conceptual facilities where none now exist. Each representative fuel cycle facility is assumed to be located on the appropriate one of four hypothetical but representative sites described. The fuel cycles considered are for Light Water Reactors with once-through flow of spent fuel, and with plutonium and uranium recycle. Representative facilities for the following fuel cycle elements are described for uranium (or uranium plus plutonium where appropriate): mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, mixed-oxide fuel refabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, high-level waste storage, transuranic waste storage, spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal, low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal, and transportation. For each representative facility the description includes: mainline process, effluent processing and waste management, facility and hardware description, safety-related information and potential alternative concepts for that fuel cycle element. The emphasis of the descriptive material is on safety-related information. This includes: operating and maintenance requirements, input/output of major materials, identification and inventories of hazardous materials (particularly radioactive materials), unit operations involved, potential accident driving forces, containment and shielding, and degree of hands-on operation.

  4. Conceptual design of fuel transfer cask for Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamad, Shalina Sheik; Hamzah, Mohd Arif Arif B.

    2014-02-01

    Spent fuel transfer cask is used to transfer a spent fuel from the reactor tank to the spent fuel storage or for spent fuel inspection. Typically, the cask made from steel cylinders that are either welded or bolted closed. The cylinder is enclosed with additional steel, concrete, or other material to provide radiation shielding and containment of the spent fuel. This paper will discuss the Conceptual Design of fuel transfer cask for Reactor TRIGA Puspati (RTP).

  5. Recent results on the RIA test in IGR reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asmolov, V.; Yegorova, L. [Nuclear Safety Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-01-01

    At the 23d WRSM meeting the data base characterizing results of VVER high burnup fuel rods tests under reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) conditions was presented. Comparison of PWR and VVER failure thresholds was given also. Additional analysis of the obtained results was being carried out during 1996. The results of analysis show that the two different failure mechanisms were observed for PWR and VVER fuel rods. Some factors which can be as the possible reasons of these differences are presented. First of them is the state of preirradiated cladding. Published test data for PWR high burnup fuel rods demonstrated that the PWR high burnup fuel rods failed at the RIA test are characterized by very high level of oxidation and hydriding for the claddings. Corresponding researches were performed at Institute of Atomic Reactors (RLAR, Dimitrovgrad, Russia) for large set of VVER high burnup fuel rods. Results of these investigations show that preirradiated commercial Zr-1%Nb claddings practically keep their initial levels of oxidation and H{sub 2} concentration. Consequently the VVER preirradiated cladding must keep the high level of mechanical properties. The second reason leading to differences between failure mechanisms for two types of high burnup fuel rods can be the test conditions. Now such kind of analysis have been performed by two methods.

  6. A Simplified Supercritical Fast Reactor with Thorium Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Super-Critical water-cooled Fast Reactor (SCFR is a feasible option for the Gen-IV SCWR designs, in which much less moderator and thus coolant are needed for transferring the fission heat from the core compared with the traditional LWRs. The fast spectrum of SCFR is useful for fuel breeding and thorium utilization, which is then beneficial for enhancing the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle. A SCFR core is constructed in this work, with the aim of simplifying the mechanical structure and keeping negative coolant void reactivity during the whole core life. A core burnup simulation scheme based on Monte Carlo lattice homogenization is adopted in this study, and the reactor physics analysis has been performed with DU-MOX and Th-MOX fuel. The main issues discussed include the fuel conversion ratio and the coolant void reactivity. The analysis shows that thorium-based fuel can provide inherent safety for SCFR without use of blanket, which is favorable for the mechanical design of SCFR.

  7. Interim Report on Fluid-Fuel Thermal Breeder Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacPherson, H. G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Alexander, L. G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carter, W. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chapman, R. H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kinyon, B. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, J. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1960-03-15

    The merits of aqueous-homogeneous {AHBR), graphite-moderated molten salt (MSBR) , and graphite-moderated liquid-bismuth (LBBR) breeder reactors operated at nearly comparable fuel-cycle costs (~1.5 mills/kwhr) were evaluated. The net electrical plant capability was assumed to be 1000 MwE, and the fuel and fertile streams were processed continuously on-site. The specific powers based on fuel were 1.2, 1.2, and 0.5 MwE/kg respectively, and 5.9, 3.7, and 5.3 MwE/tonne based on thorium. Net breeding ratios were 1.10, 1.07, and 1.07, giving doubling times of 5-1/2, 11, and 25 full power years . The fuel-cycle costs at the design points selected were 1.4, 1.3, and 1.6 mills/kwhr . The AHBR has an advantage in breeding ratio and doubling time because D2O is superior to graphite as a moderator in breeder reactors. MSBR has an advantage in fuel-cycle costs and in inventory of uranium in the fertile stream as a result of using a solution blanket.

  8. Advanced fuels for plutonium management in pressurized water reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile, A.; Dufour, Ph; Golfier, H.; Grouiller, J. P.; Guillet, J. L.; Poinot, Ch; Youinou, G.; Zaetta, A.

    2003-06-01

    Several fuel concepts are under investigation at CEA with the aim of manage plutonium inventories in pressurized water reactors. This options range from the use of mature technologies like MOX adapted in the case of MOX-EUS (enriched uranium support) and COmbustible Recyclage A ILot (CORAIL) assemblies to more innovative technologies using IMF like DUPLEX and advanced plutonium assembly (APA). The plutonium burning performances reported to the electrical production go from 7 to 60 kg (TW h) -1. More detailed analysis covering economic, sustainability, reliability and safety aspects and their integration in the whole fuel cycle would allow identifying the best candidate.

  9. A Multi-Dimensional Heat Transfer Model of a Tie-Tube and Hexagonal Fuel Element for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, C. F.; Mireles, O. R.; Stewart, E.

    2016-01-01

    The Space Capable Cryogenic Thermal Engine (SCCTE) effort considers a nuclear thermal rocket design based around a Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU) design fission reactor. The reactor core is comprised of bundled hexagonal fuel elements that directly heat hydrogen for expansion in a thrust chamber and hexagonal tie-tubes that house zirconium hydride moderator mass for the purpose of thermalizing fast neutrons resulting from fission events. Created 3D steady state Hex fuel rod model with 1D flow channels. Hand Calculation were used to set up initial conditions for fluid flow. The Hex Fuel rod uses 1D flow paths to model the channels using empirical correlations for heat transfer in a pipe. Created a 2-D axisymmetric transient to steady state model using the CFD turbulent flow and Heat Transfer module in COMSOL. This model was developed to find and understand the hydrogen flow that might effect the thermal gradients axially and at the end of the tie tube where the flow turns and enters an annulus. The Hex fuel rod and Tie tube models were made based on requirements given to us by CSNR and the SCCTE team. The models helped simplify and understand the physics and assumptions. Using pipe correlations reduced the complexity of the 3-D fuel rod model and is numerically more stable and computationally more time-efficient compared to the CFD approach. The 2-D axisymmetric tie tube model can be used as a reference "Virtual test model" for comparing and improving 3-D Models.

  10. HRB-22 capsule irradiation test for HTGR fuel. JAERI/USDOE collaborative irradiation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minato, Kazuo; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Kousaku [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    1998-03-01

    As a JAERI/USDOE collaborative irradiation test for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel, JAERI fuel compacts were irradiated in the HRB-22 irradiation capsule in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Postirradiation examinations also were performed at ORNL. This report describes 1) the preirradiation characterization of the irradiation samples of annular-shaped fuel compacts containing the Triso-coated fuel particles, 2) the irradiation conditions and fission gas releases during the irradiation to measure the performance of the coated particle fuel, 3) the postirradiation examinations of the disassembled capsule involving visual inspection, metrology, ceramography and gamma-ray spectrometry of the samples, and 4) the accident condition tests on the irradiated fuels at 1600 to 1800degC to obtain information about fuel performance and fission product release behavior under accident conditions. (author)

  11. Small Externally-fueled Heat Pipe Thermionic Reactor (SEHPTR) for dual mode applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, John; Jacox, Michael; Zubrin, Robert

    1992-07-01

    The Small Externally Fueled Heat-Pipe Thermionic Reactor (SEHPTR) is described in the context of applications as a dual-mode nuclear power source for satellites. The SEHPTR is a thermionic power system based on a reactor with modular fuel elements around cylindrical thermionic heat-pipe modules with diodes for heat rejection. The SEHPTR concept is theorized to be suitable for directly heating hydrogen gas in the core to increase propulsion and reduce orbit-transfer times. The advantages of dual-mode operation of the SEHPTR are listed including enhanced mission safety and performance at relatively low costs. The SEHPTR could provide direct thermal thrust and an integrated stage that symbiotically utilizes electric power, direct thrust, and hydrogen arcjets. The system is argued to be more effective than a nuclear power system designed solely for electrical power production.

  12. Molybdenum-99-producing 37-element fuel bundle neutronically and thermal-hydraulically equivalent to a standard CANDU fuel bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichita, E., E-mail: Eleodor.Nichita@uoit.ca; Haroon, J., E-mail: Jawad.Haroon@uoit.ca

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • A 37-element fuel bundle modified for {sup 99}Mo production in CANDU reactors is presented. • The modified bundle is neutronically and thermal-hydraulically equivalent to the standard bundle. • The modified bundle satisfies all safety criteria satisfied by the standard bundle. - Abstract: {sup 99m}Tc, the most commonly used radioisotope in diagnostic nuclear medicine, results from the radioactive decay of {sup 99}Mo which is currently being produced at various research reactors around the globe. In this study, the potential use of CANDU power reactors for the production of {sup 99}Mo is investigated. A modified 37-element fuel bundle, suitable for the production of {sup 99}Mo in existing CANDU-type reactors is proposed. The new bundle is specifically designed to be neutronically and thermal-hydraulically equivalent to the standard 37-element CANDU fuel bundle in normal, steady-state operation and, at the same time, be able to produce significant quantities of {sup 99}Mo when irradiated in a CANDU reactor. The proposed bundle design uses fuel pins consisting of a depleted-uranium centre surrounded by a thin layer of low-enriched uranium. The new molybdenum-producing bundle is analyzed using the lattice transport code DRAGON and the diffusion code DONJON. The proposed design is shown to produce 4081 six-day Curies of {sup 99}Mo activity per bundle when irradiated in the peak-power channel of a CANDU core, while maintaining the necessary reactivity and power rating limits. The calculated {sup 99}Mo yield corresponds to approximately one third of the world weekly demand. A production rate of ∼3 bundles per week can meet the global demand of {sup 99}Mo.

  13. Feasibility study on the transient fuel test loop installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. Y.; Lee, C. Y.

    1997-02-01

    The design and installation of the irradiation test facility for verification test of the fuel performance are very important in connection with maximization of the utilization of HANARO. The objective of this study is to investigate and analyze the test capsules and loops in research reactors of the other countries and to design preliminarily the eligible transient fuel test facility to be installed in HANARO. The principle subjects of this study are to analyze the contents, kinds and scopes of the irradiation test facilities for nuclear technology development. The guidances for the basic and detail design of the transient fuel test facility in the future are presented. The investigation and analysis of various kinds of test facilities that are now in operation at the research reactors of nuclear advanced countries are carried out. Based on the design data of HANARO the design materials for an eligible transient fuel test facility comprises two pacts : namely, in pile test fuel in reactor core site, and out of pile system regulates the experimental conditions in the in pile test section. Especially for power ramping and cycling selection of the eligible power variation equipment in HANARO is carried out. (author). 13 refs., 4 tabs., 46 figs.

  14. Improving fuel cycle design and safety characteristics of a gas cooled fast reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooijen, W.F.G.

    2006-01-01

    This research concerns the fuel cycle and safety aspects of a Gas Cooled Fast Reactor, one of the so-called "Generation IV" nuclear reactor designs. The Generation IV Gas Cooled Fast Reactor uses helium as coolant at high temperature. The goal of the GCFR is to obtain a "closed nuclear fuel cycle",

  15. 78 FR 31821 - Physical Protection of Shipments of Irradiated Reactor Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 73 RIN 3150-AI64 Physical Protection of Shipments of Irradiated Reactor Fuel AGENCY... (NRC) is issuing Revision 2 of NUREG-0561, ``Physical Protection of Shipments of Irradiated Reactor... regulations for the transport of irradiated reactor fuel at Sec. 73.37 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal...

  16. 78 FR 50313 - Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... 3150-AI64 Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... Transportation Orders to certain NRC power plant licensees, non-power reactor licensees, special nuclear material... Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit'' (RIN 3150-AI64; NRC-2009-0163). The final rule...

  17. Modelling of pellet-cladding interaction in thermal reactor fuel pins using the Sleuth computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatham, N.; Hughes, H.; Ellis, W.E.; Shaw, T.L. (AEA Technology, Windscale (UK))

    1990-04-01

    This Paper describes the modelling of pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCI) in thermal reactor fuel pins using the Sleuth Computer code. The code is based on the fundamental physical mechanisms causing PCI (differential thermal expansion, fuel swelling, cladding creep-down, etc.) coupled with an estimate of strain concentrations over fuel cracks. It uses the classical 1 1/2 dimensional method which subdivides the fuel both axially and radially. While Sleuth was originally developed to predict PCI failure/survival, it has evolved into a general fuel performance code. The latest version, Sleuth 86, which is a modular form with mnemonic variable names, has proved to be an ideal vehicle for testing new sub-models which have been required as the experimental data base has been expanded. (author).

  18. Nuclear fuel element with axially aligned fuel pellets and fuel microspheres therein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sease, J.D.; Harrington, F.E.

    1973-12-11

    Elongated single- and multi-region fuel elements are prepared by replacing within a cladding container a coarse fraction of fuel material which includes plutonium and uranium in the appropriate regions of the fuel element and then infiltrating with vibration a fine-sized fraction of uranium-containing microspheres throughout all interstices in the coarse material in a single loading. The fine, rigid material defines a thin annular layer between the coarse fraction and the cladding to reduce adverse mechanical and chemical interactions. (Official Gazette)

  19. HANARO fuel irradiation test(I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Dong Sung; Jeon, Byung Jin; Kim, Hak No; Kang, Byung Wee; Lee, Jong Tak; Kim, Bong Ku; Lim, In Chul; Chae, Hee Taek; Park, Cheol; Lee, Byung Cheol; Oh, Yeon Wo; Ahn, Sang Bok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-07-01

    Various types of test fuel has been reviewed and a 36 element hexagonal bundle design, with only 6 fuel elements at the corners of the peripheral positions and with A1 dummy rods or hollow elements at the remained 30 positions, was selected. The design enables the assembly to get local power boosting and to achieve higher power and faster burnup accumulation than other driver fuel in the core. For the three central positions (CT, IR 1 and IR 2) with maximum neutron flux, three different target burnup levels of {approx} 40, {approx} 65 and 85 {approx} 90 a/o have been chosen for the three test assemblies. One test assembly will be instrumented with thermocouples, neutron and gamma detectors to verify the irradiation condition. The instrumented test assembly has been fabricated in KAERI and other two test assemblies without any instruments were supplied by AECL. Two un-instrumented assemblies was inserted into HANARO at the end of December 1995 and has been under irradiation at IR 1 and IR 2 core positions without any problem. The measured data in the first cycle was conformed well to the predicted results. In the first cycle irradiation, the best estimated maximum power was 100.5 kw/m (MCNP) and the conservative maximum power was 117.7 kw/m. The instrumented test assembly will be irradiated from the second cycle. 5 tabs., 11 figs., 8 refs. (Author).

  20. Very high flux research reactors based on particle fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, J.R.; Takahashi, H.

    1985-01-01

    A new approach to high flux research reactors is described, the VHFR (Very High Flux Reactor). The VHFR fuel region(s) are packed beds of HTGR-type fuel particles through which coolant (e.g., D/sub 2/O) flows directly. The small particle diameter (typically on the order of 500 microns) results in very large surface areas for heat transfer (approx. 100 cm/sup 2//cm/sup 3/ of bed), high power densities (approx. 10 megawatts per liter), and minimal ..delta..T between fuel and coolant (approx. 10 K) VHFR designs are presented which achieve steady-state fluxes of approx. 2x10/sup 16/ n/cm/sup 2/sec. Deuterium/beryllium combinations give the highest flux levels. Critical mass is low, approx. 2 kg /sup 235/U for 20% enriched fuel. Refueling can be carried out continuously on-line, or in a batch process with a short daily shutdown. Fission product inventory is very low, approx. 100 to 300 grams, depending on design.

  1. Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ulta-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells Budget Period 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; Siv Aasland; Kjersti Kleveland; Ann Hooper; Leo Bonnell; John Hemmings; Jack Chen; Bart A. Van Hassel

    2004-12-31

    This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from January 1, 2003 through December 31,2004 in the following task areas: Task 1--Materials Development; Task 2--Composite Development; Task 4--Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8--Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; and Task IO: Program Management. Most of the key technical objectives for this budget period were achieved. Only partial success was achieved relative to cycle testing under pressure Major improvements in material performance and element reliability have been achieved. A breakthrough material system has driven the development of a compact planar reactor design capable of producing either hydrogen or syngas. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and costs compared to either steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery or autothermal reforming. The fuel and engine testing program is complete The single cylinder test engine evaluation of UCTF fuels begun in Budget Period 2 was finished this budget period. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCl engine was completed.

  2. Analysis on the post-irradiation examination of the HANARO miniplate-1 irradiation test for kijang research reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Man Park

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The construction project of the Kijang research reactor (KJRR, which is the second research reactor in Korea, has been launched. The KJRR was designed to use, for the first time, U–Mo fuel. Plate-type U–7 wt.% Mo/Al–5 wt.% Si, referred to as U–7Mo/Al–5Si, dispersion fuel with a uranium loading of 8.0 gU/cm3, was selected to achieve higher fuel efficiency and performance than are possible when using U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel. To qualify the U–Mo fuel in terms of plate geometry, the first miniplates [HANARO Miniplate (HAMP-1], containing U–7Mo/Al–5Si dispersion fuel (8 gU/cm3, were fabricated at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute and recently irradiated at HANARO. The PIE (Post-irradiation Examination results of the HAMP-1 irradiation test were analyzed in depth in order to verify the safe in-pile performance of the U–7Mo/Al–5Si dispersion fuel under the KJRR irradiation conditions. Nondestructive analyses included visual inspection, gamma spectrometric mapping, and two-dimensional measurements of the plate thickness and oxide thickness. Destructive PIE work was also carried out, focusing on characterization of the microstructural behavior using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Electron probe microanalysis was also used to measure the elemental concentrations in the interaction layer formed between the U–Mo kernels and the matrix. A blistering threshold test and a bending test were performed on the irradiated HAMP-1 miniplates that were saved from the destructive tests. Swelling evaluation of the U–Mo fuel was also conducted using two methods: plate thickness measurement and meat thickness measurement.

  3. Analysis on the post-irradiation examination of the HANARO miniplate-1 irradiation test for Kijang research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Man; Tahk, Young Wook; Jeong, Yong Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-08-15

    The construction project of the Kijang research reactor (KJRR), which is the second research reactor in Korea, has been launched. The KJRR was designed to use, for the first time, U–Mo fuel. Plate-type U–7 wt.% Mo/Al–5 wt.% Si, referred to as U–7Mo/Al–5Si, dispersion fuel with a uranium loading of 8.0 gU/cm{sup 3}, was selected to achieve higher fuel efficiency and performance than are possible when using U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}/Al dispersion fuel. To qualify the U–Mo fuel in terms of plate geometry, the first miniplates [HANARO Miniplate (HAMP-1)], containing U–7Mo/Al–5Si dispersion fuel (8 gU/cm{sup 3}), were fabricated at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute and recently irradiated at HANARO. The PIE (Post-irradiation Examination) results of the HAMP-1 irradiation test were analyzed in depth in order to verify the safe in-pile performance of the U–7Mo/Al–5Si dispersion fuel under the KJRR irradiation conditions. Nondestructive analyses included visual inspection, gamma spectrometric mapping, and two-dimensional measurements of the plate thickness and oxide thickness. Destructive PIE work was also carried out, focusing on characterization of the microstructural behavior using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Electron probe microanalysis was also used to measure the elemental concentrations in the interaction layer formed between the U–Mo kernels and the matrix. A blistering threshold test and a bending test were performed on the irradiated HAMP-1 miniplates that were saved from the destructive tests. Swelling evaluation of the U–Mo fuel was also conducted using two methods: plate thickness measurement and meat thickness measurement.

  4. Nuclear fuel management in JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naka, Michihiro; Miyazawa, Masataka; Sato, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Fusao; Ito, Haruhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1999-08-01

    The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) is the largest scale materials (author)ted the fission gas release compared with the steady state opkW/l in Japan. JMTR as a multi-purpose reactor has been contributing to research and development on nuclear field with a wide variety of irradiation for performing engineering tests and safety research on fuel and component for light water reactor as well as fast breeder reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor etc., for research and development on blanket material for fusion reactor, for fundamental research, and for radio-isotope (RI) production. The driver nuclear fuel used in JMTR is aluminum based MTR type fuel. According to the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program, the JMTR fuel elements had been converted from 93% high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to 45% medium enriched uranium (MEU) fuel in 1986, and then to 20% low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel in 1994. The cumulative operation cycles until March 1999 reached to 127 cycles since the first criticality in 1968. JMTR has used 1,628 HEU, 688 MEU and 308 LEU fuel elements for these operation cycles. After these spent fuel elements were cooled in the JMTR water canal more than one year after discharged from the JMTR core, they had been transported to reprocessing plants in Europe, and then to plants in USA in order to extract the uranium remaining in the spent fuel. The JMTR spent fuel transportation for reprocessing had been continued until the end of 1988. However, USA had ceased spent fuel reprocessing in 1989, while USDOE committed to prepare an environmental review of the impacts of accepting spent fuels from foreign research reactors. After that, USDOE decided to implement a new acceptance policy in 1996, the spent fuel transportation from JMTR to Savannah River Site was commenced in 1997. It was the first transportation not only in Japan but in Asia also. Until resuming the transportation, the spent fuel elements stored in JMTR

  5. Multiple recycling of fuel in prototype fast breeder reactor in a closed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A fast breeder reactor (FBR) closed fuel cycle involves recycling of the discharged fuel, after reprocessing and refabrication, in order to utilize the unburnt fuel and the bred fissile material. Our previous study in this regard for the prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR) indicated the possibility of multiple recycling with ...

  6. Multiple recycling of fuel in prototype fast breeder reactor in a closed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A fast breeder reactor (FBR) closed fuel cycle involves recycling of the discharged fuel, after reprocessing and refabrication, in order to utilize the unburnt fuel and the bred fissile material. Our previous study in this regard for the prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR) indicated the possibility of multiple recycling with ...

  7. Development of a Robust Tri-Carbide Fueled Reactor for Multimegawatt Space Power and Propulsion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samim Anghaie; Travis W. Knight; Johann Plancher; Reza Gouw

    2004-08-11

    An innovative reactor core design based on advanced, mixed carbide fuels was analyzed for nuclear space power applications. Solid solution, mixed carbide fuels such as (U,Zr,Nb)c and (U,Zr, Ta)C offer great promise as an advanced high temperature fuel for space power reactors.

  8. 75 FR 61139 - Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, Reactor and Fuel Cycle Technology Subcommittee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-04

    ... advantages and disadvantages of adopting new fuel cycle technologies and the associated waste management... Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, Reactor and Fuel Cycle Technology Subcommittee AGENCY... announces an open meeting of the Reactor and Fuel Cycle Technology (RFCT) Subcommittee. The RFCT...

  9. UNIFRAME interim design report. [Fuel element size reduction plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, J.B.; Baer, J.W.; Cook, E.J.

    1977-12-01

    A fuel element size reduction system has been designed for the ''cold'' pilot-scale plant for an HTGR Fuel Reference Recycle Facility. This report describes in detail the present design.

  10. Mechanical behavior of fast reactor fuel pin cladding subjected to simulated overpower transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.D.; Hunter, C.W.

    1978-06-01

    Cladding mechanical property data for analysis and prediction of fuel pin transient behavior were obtained under experimental conditions in which the temperature ramps of reactor transients were simulated. All cladding specimens were 20% CW Type 316 stainless steel and were cut from EBR-II irradiated fuel pins. It was determined that irradiation degraded the cladding ductility and failure strength. Specimens that had been adjacent to the fuel exhibited the poorest properties. Correlations were developed to describe the effect of neutron fluence on the mechanical behavior of the cladding. Metallographic examinations were conducted to characterize the failure mode and to establish the nature of internal and external surface corrosion. Various mechanisms for the fuel adjacency effect were examined and results for helium concentration profiles were presented. Results from the simulated transient tests were compared with TREAT test results.

  11. Results from the DOE Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Petti

    2014-06-01

    Modular HTGR designs were developed to provide natural safety, which prevents core damage under all design basis accidents and presently envisioned severe accidents. The principle that guides their design concepts is to passively maintain core temperatures below fission product release thresholds under all accident scenarios. This level of fuel performance and fission product retention reduces the radioactive source term by many orders of magnitude and allows potential elimination of the need for evacuation and sheltering beyond a small exclusion area. This level, however, is predicated on exceptionally high fuel fabrication quality and performance under normal operation and accident conditions. Germany produced and demonstrated high quality fuel for their pebble bed HTGRs in the 1980s, but no U.S. manufactured fuel had exhibited equivalent performance prior to the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The design goal of the modular HTGRs is to allow elimination of an exclusion zone and an emergency planning zone outside the plant boundary fence, typically interpreted as being about 400 meters from the reactor. To achieve this, the reactor design concepts require a level of fuel integrity that is better than that claimed for all prior US manufactured TRISO fuel, by a few orders of magnitude. The improved performance level is about a factor of three better than qualified for German TRISO fuel in the 1980’s. At the start of the AGR program, without a reactor design concept selected, the AGR fuel program selected to qualify fuel to an operating envelope that would bound both pebble bed and prismatic options. This resulted in needing a fuel form that could survive at peak fuel temperatures of 1250°C on a time-averaged basis and high burnups in the range of 150 to 200 GWd/MTHM (metric tons of heavy metal) or 16.4 to 21.8% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). Although Germany has demonstrated excellent performance of TRISO-coated UO

  12. Reducing the fuel temperature for pressure-tube supercritical-water-cooled reactors and the effect of fuel burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichita, E., E-mail: eleodor.nichita@uoit.ca; Kovaltchouk, V., E-mail: vitali.kovaltchouk@uoit.ca

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Typical PT-SCWR fuel uses single-region pins consisting of a homogeneous mixture of ThO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2}. • Using two regions (central for the ThO{sub 2} and peripheral for the PuO{sub 2}) reduces the fuel temperature. • Single-region-pin melting-to-average power ratio is 2.5 at 0.0 MW d/kg and 2.3 at 40 MW d/kg. • Two-region-pin melting-to-average power ratio is 36 at 0.0 MW d/kg and 10.5 at 40 MW d/kg. • Two-region-pin performance drops with burnup due to fissile-element buildup in the ThO{sub 2} region. - Abstract: The Pressure-Tube Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor (PT-SCWR) is one of the concepts under investigation by the Generation IV International Forum for its promise to deliver higher thermal efficiency than nuclear reactors currently in operation. The high coolant temperature (>625 K) and high linear power density employed by the PT-SCWR cause the fuel temperature to be fairly high, leading to a reduced margin to fuel melting, thus increasing the risk of actual melting during accident scenarios. It is therefore desirable to come up with a fuel design that lowers the fuel temperature while preserving the high linear power ratio and high coolant temperature. One possible solution is to separate the fertile (ThO{sub 2}) and fissile (PuO{sub 2}) fuel materials into different radial regions in each fuel pin. Previously-reported work found that by locating the fertile material at the centre and the fissile material at the periphery of the fuel pin, the fuel centreline temperature can be reduced by ∼650 K for fresh fuel compared to the case of a homogeneous (Th–Pu)O{sub 2} mixture for the same coolant temperature and linear power density. This work provides a justification for the observed reduction in fuel centreline temperature and suggests a systematic approach to lower the fuel temperature. It also extends the analysis to the dependence of the radial temperature profile on fuel burnup. The radial temperature profile is

  13. Technology of the light water reactor fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wymer, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    This essay presents elements of the processes used in the fuel cycle steps and gives an indication of the types of equipment used. The amounts of radioactivity released in normal operation of the processes are indicated and related to radiation doses. Types and costs of equipment or processes required to lower these radioactivity releases are in some cases suggested. Mining and milling, conversion of uranium concentrate to UF/sub 6/, uranium isotope separation, LWR fuel fabrication, fuel reprocessing, transportation, and waste management are covered in this essay. 40 figures, 34 tables. (DLC)

  14. Proceedings: 1991 EEI/UWASTE-EPRI workshop on at-reactor spent-fuel storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supko, E. M. [Energy Resources International, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-05-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Edison Electric Institute sponsored their first Workshop on At-Reactor Spent Fuel Storage (Workshop) on October 15--17, 1991. The Workshop provided a forum for the exchange of practical operational experiences as they relate to At-reactor spent fuel storage. The proceedings of the first Workshop on At-Reactor Spent Fuel Storage addressed the following pertinent issues: The DOE Waste Management System; Utility Spent Fuel Storage Project Management; NRC Licensing under 10CFR72; Fuel Handling Issues; Consolidation and NFBC Compaction and Storage; Criticality Issues; Public Relations, and State Involvement in Spent Fuel Storage Expansion. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  15. Preparation of U–Zr–Mn, a Surrogate Alloy for Recycling Fast Reactor Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Hwan Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallic fuel slugs of U–10Zr–5Mn (wt%, a surrogate alloy for the U–TRU–Zr (TRU: a transuranic element alloys proposed for sodium-cooled fast reactors, were prepared by injection casting in a laboratory-scale furnace, and their characteristics were evaluated. As-cast U–Zr–Mn fuel rods were generally sound, without cracks or thin sections. Approximately 68% of the original Mn content was lost under dynamic vacuum and the resulting slug was denser than those prepared under Ar pressure. The concentration of volatile Mn was as per the target composition along the entire length of the rods prepared under 400 and 600 Torr. Impurities, namely, oxygen, carbon, silicon, and nitrogen, totaled less than 2,000 ppm, satisfying fuel criteria.

  16. Thermohydraulic study of a MTR fuel element aimed at the construction of an irradiation facility; Estudo termohidraulico de um elemento combustivel tipo MTR visando a construcao de um dispositivo de irradiacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coragem, Helio Boemer de Oliveira

    1980-07-01

    A thermohydraulic study of MTR fuel element is presented as a basic requirement for the development of an irradiation facility for testing fuel elements. A computer code named 'Thermo' has been developed for this purpose, which can stimulate different working conditions, such as, cooling, power elements and neutron flux, performing all pertinent thermohydraulic calculations. Thermocouples were used to measure the temperature gradients of the cooling fluid throughout the IEAR-1 reactor core. All experimental data are in good agreement with the theoretical model applied in this work. Finally, a draft of the proposed facility and its safety system is presented. (author)

  17. Freeze-casting as a Novel Manufacturing Process for Fast Reactor Fuels. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegst, Ulrike G.K. [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States). Thayer School of Engineering; Allen, Todd [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-04-07

    Advanced burner reactors are designed to reduce the amount of long-lived radioactive isotopes that need to be disposed of as waste. The input feedstock for creating advanced fuel forms comes from either recycle of used light water reactor fuel or recycle of fuel from a fast burner reactor. Fuel for burner reactors requires novel fuel types based on new materials and designs that can achieve higher performance requirements (higher burn up, higher power, and greater margins to fuel melting) then yet achieved. One promising strategy to improved fuel performance is the manufacture of metal or ceramic scaffolds which are designed to allow for a well-defined placement of the fuel into the host, and this in a manner that permits greater control than that possible in the production of typical CERMET fuels.

  18. Distribution of fission products in Peach Bottom HTGR fuel element E11-07

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichner, R.P.; Dyer, F.F.; Martin, W.J.; Bate, L.C.

    1977-04-01

    This is the second in a projected series of six post-irradiation examinations of Peach Bottom High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor driver fuel elements. Element E11-07, the subject of this report, received an equivalent of 701 full-power days of irradiation prior to scheduled withdrawal. The examination procedures emphasized the determination of fission product distributions in the graphite portions of the fuel element. Continuous axial scans indicated a /sup 137/Cs inventory of 17 Ci in the graphite sleeve and 8.3 Ci in the spine at the time of element withdrawal from the core. In addition, the nuclides /sup 134/Cs, /sup 110m/Ag, /sup 60/Co, and /sup 154/Eu were found in the graphite portions of the fuel element in significant amounts. Radial distributions of these nuclides plus the distribution of the beta emitters /sup 3/H, /sup 14/C, and /sup 90/Sr were obtained at six axial locations, four within the fueled region and one each above and below. The radial dissection was accomplished by use of a manipulator-operated lathe in a hot cell. These profiles reveal an increased degree of penetration of /sup 134/Cs, relative to /sup 137/Cs, evidently due to a longer time spent as xenon precursor. In addition to fission product distribution, the appearance of the element components was recorded photographically, fuel compact and graphite dimensions were recorded at numerous locations, and metallographic examinations of the fuel were performed.

  19. Control rod system useable for fuel handling in a gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurrier, Francis R.

    1976-11-30

    A control rod and its associated drive are used to elevate a complete stack of fuel blocks to a position above the core of a gas-cooled nuclear reactor. A fuel-handling machine grasps the control rod and the drive is unlatched from the rod. The stack and rod are transferred out of the reactor, or to a new location in the reactor, by the fuel-handling machine.

  20. Metallography and fuel cladding chemical interaction in fast flux test facility irradiated metallic U-10Zr MFF-3 and MFF-5 fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, W.J., E-mail: jon.carmack@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Chichester, H.M., E-mail: heather.chichester@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Porter, D.L., E-mail: douglas.porter@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Wootan, D.W., E-mail: david.wootan@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The Mechanistic Fuel Failure (MFF) series of metal fuel irradiations conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) provides an important comparison between data generated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) and that expected in a larger-scale fast reactor. The MFF fuel operated with a peak cladding temperature at the top of the fuel column, but developed peak burnup at the centerline of the core. This places the peak fuel temperature midway between the core center and the top of fuel, lower in the fuel column than in EBR-II experiments. Data from the MFF-3 and MFF-5 assemblies are most comparable to the data obtained from the EBR-II X447 experiment. The two X447 pin breaches were strongly influenced by fuel/cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) at the top of the fuel column. Post irradiation examination data from MFF-3 and MFF-5 are presented and compared to historical EBR-II data. - Highlights: • Irradiation and post irradiation examination of full-length metallic fast reactor fuel. • Fuel cladding chemical interaction formation in full-length metallic fast reactor fuel. • Correlation of FCCI with temperature and burnup. • Comparison of full-length reactor fuel performance with test reactor fuel performance.

  1. Measurements of Thermal Power at the TRIGA Mark II Reactor in Ljubljana Using Multiple Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žerovnik, Gašper; Snoj, Luka; Trkov, Andrej; Barbot, Loïc; Fourmentel, Damien; Villard, Jean-François

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the current bilateral project between CEA Cadarache and JSI is to improve the accuracy of the online thermal power monitoring at the JSI TRIGA reactor. Simultaneously, a new wide range multichannel acquisition system for fission chambers, recently developed by CEA, is tested. In the paper, calculational and experimental power calibration methods are described. The focus is on use of multiple detectors in combination with pre-calculated and pre-measured control-rod-position-dependent correction factors to improve the reactor power reading. The system will be implemented and tested at the JSI TRIGA reactor in 2014.

  2. Radiochemical analyses of several spent fuel Approved Testing Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Wildung, N.J.

    1994-09-01

    Radiochemical characterization data are described for UO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} plus 3 wt% Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} commercial spent nuclear fuel taken from a series of Approved Testing Materials (ATMs). These full-length nuclear fuel rods include MLA091 of ATM-103, MKP070 of ATM-104, NBD095 and NBD131 of ATM-106, and ADN0206 of ATM-108. ATMs 103, 104, and 106 were all irradiated in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (Reactor No.1), a pressurized-water reactor that used fuel fabricated by Combustion Engineering. ATM-108 was part of the same fuel bundle designed as ATM-105 and came from boiling-water reactor fuel fabricated by General Electric and irradiated in the Cooper Nuclear Power Plant. Rod average burnups and expected fission gas releases ranged from 2,400 to 3,700 GJ/kgM. (25 to 40 Mwd/kgM) and from less than 1% to greater than 10%, respectively, depending on the specific ATM. The radiochemical analyses included uranium and plutonium isotopes in the fuel, selected fission products in the fuel, fuel burnup, cesium and iodine on the inner surfaces of the cladding, {sup 14}C in the fuel and cladding, and analyses of the gases released to the rod plenum. Supporting examinations such as fuel rod design and material descriptions, power histories, and gamma scans used for sectioning diagrams are also included. These ATMs were examined as part of the Materials Characterization Center Program conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program.

  3. ANALYSIS OF GAMMA HEATING AT TRIGA MARK REACTOR CORE BANDUNG USING PLATE TYPE FUEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setiyanto Setiyanto

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In accordance with the discontinuation of TRIGA fuel element production by its producer, the operation of all TRIGA type reactor of at all over the word will be disturbed, as well as TRIGA reactor in Bandung. In order to support the continuous operation of Bandung TRIGA reactor, a study on utilization of fuel plate mode, as used at RSG-GAS reactor, to replace the cylindrical model has been done. Various assessments have been done, including core design calculation and its safety aspects. Based on the neutronic calculation, utilization of fuel plate shows that Bandung TRIGA reactor can be operated by 20 fuel elements only. Compared with the original core, the new reactor core configuration is smaller and it results in some empty space that can be used for in-core irradiation facilities. Due to the existing of in-core irradiation facilities, the gamma heating value became a new factor that should be evaluated for safety analysis. For this reason, the gamma heating for TRIGA Bandung reactor using fuel plate was calculated by Gamset computer code. The calculations based on linear attenuation equations, line sources and gamma propagation on space. Calculations were also done for reflector positions (Lazy Susan irradiation facilities and central irradiation position (CIP, especially for any material samples. The calculation results show that gamma heating for CIP is significantly important (0,87 W/g, but very low value for Lazy Susan position (lest then 0,11 W/g. Based on this results, it can be concluded that the utilization of CIP as irradiation facilities need to consider of gamma heating as data for safety analysis report. Keywords: gamma heating, nuclear reactor, research reactor, reactor safety.   ABSTRAK Dengan dihentikannya produksi elemen bakar reaktor jenis Triga oleh produsen, maka semua reaktor TRIGA di dunia terganggu operasinya, termasuk juga reaktor TRIGA 2000 di Bandung. Untuk mendukung pengoperasian reaktor TRIGA Bandung

  4. An Analysis of the Thermal and Structure Behaviour of the UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2}-Fuel in the Irradiation Experiment of the UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2}-Fuel in the Irradiation Experiment FR2 Capsule Test Series 5a; Analisis termico y estructural del combustible UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} irradiado en el reactor FR2 dentro del experimento KVE-Vg.5a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Jimenez, J.; Helmut, E.

    1981-07-01

    In the Karlsruhe research reactor FR2 nine fuel pins were irradiated within three irradiation capsules in the course of the test series 5a. The pins contained UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} fuel pellets. They reached bump values of about 6, 17 and 47 Mwd/Kg Me with linear rod powers of 400 to 600 W/cm and clad surface temperature between 500 and 700 degree centigree. A detailed analysis of the fuel structuration data (columnar-grain and equiaxed- -grain growth regions) have allowed to determine, with the help of physic-mathematical models, the radii of these regions and the heat transfer through the contact zone between fuel and clad depending on the bump. The results of the analysis showed that the fuel surface temperature rose with increasing burnup. (Author) 16 refs.

  5. Preliminary Studies of New Water Removal Element in Purification Applications of Diesel Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijun Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To effectively and efficiently remove water contamination dispersed in petrodiesel fuels, a new water removal element with both coalescence and separation features is studied in this paper. The unique droplet coalescence and separation mechanism occurring in the new water removal element is proposed. The conceptual design of this filter element is presented and the basic features of FCP filtration systems are briefly introduced. A laboratory test stand and fuel analysis procedure are described. The results from preliminary water removal tests with number 2 petrodiesel fuel demonstrate the filtration performance of the new water removal element. For example, within one single fuel flow pass through FCP filtration system equipped with the new water removal element and running at 2 GPM flow rate, the water content in 80°F, number 2 petrodiesel fuel stream can be reduced from up to 40,000 ppm upstream to 64.8 ppm or less downstream.

  6. Recovery of Information from the Fast Flux Test Facility for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Deborah L.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Wootan, David W.; Butner, R. Scott; Omberg, Ronald P.

    2009-09-30

    The Fast Flux Test Facility is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor to operate in the United States. Information from the design, construction, and operation of this reactor was at risk as the facilities associated with the reactor are being shut down. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative is a program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy with a mission to develop new fuel cycle technologies to support both current and advanced reactors. Securing and preserving the knowledge gained from operation and testing in the Fast Flux Test Facility is an important part of the Knowledge Preservation activity in this program.

  7. Accident Analysis for the NIST Research Reactor Before and After Fuel Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek J.; Diamond D.; Cuadra, A.; Hanson, A.L.; Cheng, L-Y.; Brown, N.R.

    2012-09-30

    Postulated accidents have been analyzed for the 20 MW D2O-moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analysis has been carried out for the present core, which contains high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel and for a proposed equilibrium core with low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations were performed with the MCNPX code to determine homogenized fuel compositions in the lower and upper halves of each fuel element and to determine the resulting neutronic properties of the core. The accident analysis employed a model of the primary loop with the RELAP5 code. The model includes the primary pumps, shutdown pumps outlet valves, heat exchanger, fuel elements, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow accident resulting from loss of electrical power with an assumption of failure of shutdown cooling pumps, (4) loss-of-flow accident resulting from a primary pump seizure, and (5) loss-of-flow accident resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve. In addition, natural circulation cooling at low power operation was analyzed. The analysis shows that the conversion will not lead to significant changes in the safety analysis and the calculated minimum critical heat flux ratio and maximum clad temperature assure that there is adequate margin to fuel failure.

  8. Beryllium irradiation element analysis in the IEA-R1m reactor; Analise do elemento de irradiacao de berilio no reator IEA-R1m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricci Filho, Walter

    1998-07-01

    The IEA-R1 reactor at IPEN-Sao Paulo has undergone a modernization to increase its operating power to 5 MW, in order to allow a more efficient production of the {sup 99} Mo radioisotope. An irradiation element made of Be was acquired for the reactor and studies have been carried out to determine its performance when compared to other irradiators available in the reactor namely, the water and graphite irradiation elements. The results obtained showed some advantages of the Beryllium irradiation element for producing {sup 99} Mo: the epithermal neutron flux in the Be irradiation element is approximately 22% greater than that in the graphite irradiation element and 12% greater than that of the water irradiation element; the neutron reaction rate in molybdenum wires inside in irradiation capsule filled with Mo O{sub 3} 10,6% greater them that in the water irradiation element in the same conditions; the negative reactivity introduced in the reactor by the Be irradiation element it substantially smaller than the those introduced by the other elements: -1636 pcm for the Be irradiator, -2977 for the water irradiator and -2568 pcm for the graphite irradiator. It is possible to conclude that the production of the {sup 99} Mo radioisotope with the Be irradiation element can be increased by 12 to 15% in the IEA-R1m reactor. It also requires less fuel for the reactor operation due to the smaller negative reactivity introduced in the reactor core. (author)

  9. Optimal Protection of Reactor Hall Under Nuclear Fuel Container Drop Using Simulation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Králik Juraj

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents of the optimal design of the damping devices cover of reactor hall under impact of nuclear fuel container drop of type TK C30. The finite element idealization of nuclear power plant structure is used in software ANSYS. The steel pipe damper system is proposed for dissipation of the kinetic energy of the container free fall in comparison with the experimental results. The probabilistic and sensitivity analysis of the damping devices was considered on the base of the simulation methods in program AntHill using the Monte Carlo method.

  10. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    November 9--10, 1978, marked the first of what has become an annual event--the International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR). The meeting brought together for the first time many people who became major program participants in later years. This first meeting emphasized fuel development, and it established the basis for all later meetings. Believing that the proceedings of this first meeting are important as a historical record of the beginning of the international RERTR effort. This report provides presentations and discussions of this original meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  11. LWRS Fuels Pathway: Engineering Design and Fuels Pathway Initial Testing of the Hot Water Corrosion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. John Garnier; Dr. Kevin McHugh

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development R&D pathway performs strategic research focused on cladding designs leading to improved reactor core economics and safety margins. The research performed is to demonstrate the nuclear fuel technology advancements while satisfying safety and regulatory limits. These goals are met through rigorous testing and analysis. The nuclear fuel technology developed will assist in moving existing nuclear fuel technology to an improved level that would not be practical by industry acting independently. Strategic mission goals are to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental nuclear fuel and cladding performance in nuclear power plants, and to apply this information in the development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels. These will result in improved safety, cladding, integrity, and nuclear fuel cycle economics. To achieve these goals various methods for non-irradiated characterization testing of advanced cladding systems are needed. One such new test system is the Hot Water Corrosion System (HWCS) designed to develop new data for cladding performance assessment and material behavior under simulated off-normal reactor conditions. The HWCS is capable of exposing prototype rodlets to heated, high velocity water at elevated pressure for long periods of time (days, weeks, months). Water chemistry (dissolved oxygen, conductivity and pH) is continuously monitored. In addition, internal rodlet heaters inserted into cladding tubes are used to evaluate repeated thermal stressing and heat transfer characteristics of the prototype rodlets. In summary, the HWCS provides rapid ex-reactor evaluation of cladding designs in normal (flowing hot water) and off-normal (induced cladding stress), enabling engineering and manufacturing improvements to cladding designs before initiation of the more expensive and time consuming in-reactor irradiation testing.

  12. Fabrication of uranium dioxide fuel pellets in support of a SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor HEU to LEU core conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeron, A. [Aomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences (ICENS) at the University of the West Indies in Jamaica operates a SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor that is currently fuelled with highly-enriched uranium (HEU). As part of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. has been subcontracted to fabricate low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for the ICENS SLOWPOKE-2. The low enriched uranium core consists of a fuel cage containing uranium dioxide fuelled elements. This paper describes the fabrication of the low-enriched uranium dioxide fuel pellets for the SLOWPOKE-2 core conversion. (author)

  13. RERTR Fuel Developmemt and Qualification Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Wachs

    2007-01-01

    detailing very-high density fuel behavior will be submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Assuming acceptable fuel behavior, it is anticipated that NRC will issue a Safety Evaluation Report granting generic approval of the developed fuels based on the qualification report. It is anticipated that Phase I of fuel qualification will be completed prior to the end of FY10. Phase II of the fuel qualification requires development of fuels with density greater than 8.5 g-U/cm3. This fuel is required to convert the remaining few reactors that have been identified for conversion. The second phase of the fuel qualification effort includes both dispersion fuels with fuel particle volume loading on the order of 65 percent, and monolithic fuels. Phase II presents a larger set of technical unknowns and schedule uncertainties than phase I. The final step in the fuel qualification process involves insertion of lead test elements into the converting reactors. Each reactor that plans to convert using the developed high-density fuels will develop a reactor specific conversion plan based upon the reactor safety basis and operating requirements. For some reactors (FRM-II, High-Flux Isotope Reactor [HFIR], and RHF) conversion will be a one-step process. In addition to the U.S. fuel development effort, a Russian fuel development strategy has been developed. Contracts with Russian Federation institutes in support of fuel development for Russian are in place.

  14. KROTOS FCI experimental programme at CEA Cadarache: new features and status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnet, J.M.; Bullado, Y.; Journeau, C.; Fouquart, P.; Piluso, P.; Sergeant, C.; Magallon, D. [CEA-Cadarache, DTN/STRI/LMA, Bat 708, BP1, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance cedex (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: KROTOS facility has been operated by the European Commission at JRC-Ispra for many years until 1999 as part of the FARO/KROTOS programme. The programme had to be stopped at JRC due to new EC priorities, and an agreement was concluded with CEA to transfer the KROTOS facility and know-how to Cadarache to continue investigating the pending FCI issues. By this agreement, CEA became owner of the facility. The main objective of the KROTOS programme at CEA Cadarache is understanding the role of melt properties in steam explosion propagation and energetics and, in particular, steam explosion behaviour of prototypical corium melts. Possible influence of physicochemical processes on explosiveness will also be explored. Actually, analysis of alumina debris produced at Ispra have shown that formation of metastable phases and chemical reaction with water at high temperature may play a significant role in enhancing heat transfer to water in the explosion phase. In order to reach the objective, steam explosion experiments are performed in well characterised conditions for a large spectrum of conditions and melt compositions of interest for both in- and ex-vessel situations. A trigger is applied as a rule. Advanced technology and instrumentation is used to reduce uncertainties on initial conditions and characterise the various phases of an explosion, with emphasis on high energy X-ray cinematography to qualify pre-mixing. This advanced instrumentation will enable the measurement of detailed variables to consolidate the qualification of the FCI codes. The use of high energy X-rays made it necessary to construct a new building to house the facility and its components. The facility should newly become operative early 2005. Main improvements with respect to Ispra concern melt delivery, hydrogen measurement and X-ray imaging. Preliminary studies have demonstrated that identification of the pre-mixture-water interface and coherent melt jet core, and

  15. Preliminary safety evaluation of the advanced burner test reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, F. E.; Fanning, T. H.; Cahalan, J. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-09-15

    Results of a preliminary safety evaluation of the Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) pre-conceptual design are reported. The ABTR safety design approach is described. Traditional defense-in-depth design features are supplemented with passive safety performance characteristics that include natural circulation emergency decay heat removal and reactor power reduction by inherent reactivity feedbacks in accidents. ABTR safety performance in design-basis and beyond-design-basis accident sequences is estimated based on analyses. Modeling assumptions and input data for safety analyses are presented. Analysis results for simulation of simultaneous loss of coolant pumping power and normal heat rejection are presented and discussed, both for the case with reactor scram and the case without reactor scram. The analysis results indicate that the ABTR pre-conceptual design is capable of undergoing bounding design-basis and beyond-design-basis accidents without fuel cladding failures. The first line of defense for protection of the public against release of radioactivity in accidents remains intact with significant margin. A comparison and evaluation of general safety design criteria for the ABTR conceptual design phase are presented in an appendix. A second appendix presents SASSYS-1 computer code capabilities and modeling enhancements implemented for ABTR analyses.

  16. Development of the advanced PHWR technology -Verification tests for CANDU advanced fuel-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jang Hwan; Suk, Hoh Chun; Jung, Moon Kee; Oh, Duk Joo; Park, Joo Hwan; Shim, Kee Sub; Jang, Suk Kyoo; Jung, Heung Joon; Park, Jin Suk; Jung, Seung Hoh; Jun, Ji Soo; Lee, Yung Wook; Jung, Chang Joon; Byun, Taek Sang; Park, Kwang Suk; Kim, Bok Deuk; Min, Kyung Hoh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    This is the `94 annual report of the CANDU advanced fuel verification test project. This report describes the out-of pile hydraulic tests at CANDU-hot test loop for verification of CANFLEX fuel bundle. It is also describes the reactor thermal-hydraulic analysis for thermal margin and flow stability. The contents in this report are as follows; (1) Out-of pile hydraulic tests for verification of CANFLEX fuel bundle. (a) Pressure drop tests at reactor operation condition (b) Strength test during reload at static condition (c) Impact test during reload at impact load condition (d) Endurance test for verification of fuel integrity during life time (2) Reactor thermal-hydraulic analysis with CANFLEX fuel bundle. (a) Critical channel power sensitivity analysis (b) CANDU-6 channel flow analysis (c) Flow instability analysis. 61 figs, 29 tabs, 21 refs. (Author).

  17. Analysis of LOCA Scenarios in the NIST Research Reactor Before and After Fuel Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cheng, L. Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Diamond, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-08-30

    An analysis has been done of hypothetical loss-of-coolant-accidents (LOCAs) in the research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The purpose of the analysis is to determine if the peak clad temperature remains below the Safety Limit, which is the blister temperature for the fuel. The configuration of the NBSR considered in the analysis is that projected for the future when changes will be made so that shutdown pumps do not operate when a LOCA signal is detected. The analysis was done for the present core with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel and with the proposed low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel that would be used when the NBSR is converted from one to the other. The analysis consists of two parts. The first examines how the water would drain from the primary system following a break and the possibility for the loss of coolant from within the fuel element flow channels. This work is performed using the TRACE system thermal-hydraulic code. The second looks at the fuel clad temperature as a function of time given that the water may have drained from many of the flow channels and the water in the vessel is in a quasi-equilibrium state. The temperature behavior is investigated using the three-dimensional heat conduction code HEATING7.3. The results in all scenarios considered for both HEU and LEU fuel show that the peak clad temperature remains below the blister temperature.

  18. Fuel cell elements with improved water handling capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Lee, Albany (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    New fuel cell components for use in liquid feed fuel cell systems are provided. The components include biplates and endplates, having a hydrophilic surface and allow high efficiency operation. Conductive elements and a wicking device also form a part of the fuel cell components of the invention.

  19. Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells Test and Evaluation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Unger, Robert J; Kenner, Scott; Binder, Michael J; Holcomb, Franklin H

    2004-01-01

    ...) Fuel Cell Technology Program facilitates the development of Fuel Cell Technology. This work provided testing and evaluations of fuel cells in support of life-cycle-cost reduction and performance improvement goals...

  20. Study on the high-precision laser welding technology of nuclear fuel elements processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Sung; Yang, M. S.; Kim, W. K.; Lee, D. Y

    2001-01-01

    The proper welding method for appendage of bearing pads and spacers of PHWR nuclear fuel elements is considered important in respect to the soundness of weldments and the improvement of the performance of nuclear fuels during the operation in reactor. The probability of welding defects of the appendage parts is mostly apt to occur and it is connected directly with the safty and life prediction of the nuclear reactor in operation. Recently there has been studied all over the world to develope welding technology by laser in nuclear fuel processing, and the appendage of bearing pads and spacers of PHWR nuclear fuel elements. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the characteristics of the laser welded specimens and make some samples for the appendage of bearing pads of PHWR nuclear fuel elements. This study will be also provide the basic data for the fabrications of the appendage of bearing pads and spacers. Especially the laser welding is supposed to be used in the practical application such as precise materials manufacturing fields. In this respect this technology is not only a basic advanced technology with wide applications but also likely to be used for the development of directly applicable technologies for industries, with high potential benefits derived in the view point of economy and industry.

  1. A FAST BREEDER REACTOR SPENT FUEL MEASUREMENTS PROGRAM FOR BN-350 REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. STAPLES; J. HALBIG; ET AL

    1999-04-01

    A project to verify the fissile content of fast breeder reactor spent nuclear fuel is underway in the Republic of Kasakhstan. There are a variety of assembly types with different irradiation histories and profiles in the reactor that require a variety of measurement and analysis procedures. These procedures will be discussed and compared as will the general process that has been designed to resolve any potential measurement discrepancies. The underwater counter is part of a system that is designed to assist the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in maintaining continuity of knowledge from the time of measurement until the measured item is placed in a welded container with a unique identification. In addition to satisfying IAEA requirements for the spent nuclear fuel, this measurement program is able to satisfy some of the measurement requirements for the Kasakhstan Atomic Energy Agency concerning the repackaging of the spent nuclear fuel into a standard canister. The project is currently operational in a mode requiring the IAEA's continuous presence.

  2. INVENTORY AND DESCRIPTION OF COMMERCIAL REACTOR FUELS WITHIN THE UNITED STATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinson, D.

    2011-03-31

    There are currently 104 nuclear reactors in 31 states, operated by 51 different utilities. Operation of these reactors generates used fuel assemblies that require storage prior to final disposition. The regulatory framework within the United States (U.S.) allows for the licensing of used nuclear fuel storage facilities for an initial licensing period of up to 40 years with potential for license extensions in 40 years increments. Extended storage, for periods of up to 300 years, is being considered within the U.S. Therefore, there is an emerging need to develop the technical bases to support the licensing for long-term storage. In support of the Research and Development (R&D) activities required to support the technical bases, a comprehensive assessment of the current inventory of used nuclear fuel based upon publicly available resources has been completed that includes the most current projections of used fuel discharges from operating reactors. Negotiations with the nuclear power industry are ongoing concerning the willingness of individual utilities to provide information and material needed to complete the R&D activities required to develop the technical bases for used fuel storage for up to 300 years. This report includes a status of negotiations between DOE and industry in these regards. These negotiations are expected to result in a framework for cooperation between the Department and industry in which industry will provide and specific information on used fuel inventory and the Department will compensate industry for the material required for Research and Development and Testing and Evaluation Facility activities.

  3. Target fuels for plutonium and minor actinide transmutation in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, J., E-mail: jwashing@gmail.com [Nuclear Science and Engineering Program, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); King, J., E-mail: kingjc@mines.edu [Nuclear Science and Engineering Program, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Shayer, Z., E-mail: zshayer@mines.edu [Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • We evaluate transmutation fuels for plutonium and minor actinide destruction in LWRs. • We model a modified AP1000 fuel assembly in SCALE6.1. • We evaluate spectral shift absorber coatings to improve transmutation performance. - Abstract: The average nuclear power plant produces twenty metric tons of used nuclear fuel per year, containing approximately 95 wt% uranium, 1 wt% plutonium, and 4 wt% fission products and transuranic elements. Fast reactors are a preferred option for the transmutation of plutonium and minor actinides; however, an optimistic deployment time of at least 20 years indicates a need for a nearer-term solution. This study considers a method for plutonium and minor actinide transmutation in existing light water reactors and evaluates a variety of transmutation fuels to provide a common basis for comparison and to determine if any single target fuel provides superior transmutation properties. A model developed using the NEWT module in the SCALE 6.1 code package provided performance data for the burnup of the target fuel rods in the present study. The target fuels (MOX, PuO{sub 2}, Pu{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, PuN, PuUZrH, PuZrH, PuZrHTh, and PuZrO{sub 2}) are evaluated over a 1400 Effective Full Power Days (EFPD) interval to ensure each assembly remained critical over the entire burnup period. The MOX (5 wt% PuO{sub 2}), Pu{sub 0.31}ZrH{sub 1.6}Th{sub 1.08}, and PuZrO{sub 2}MgO (8 wt% Pu) fuels result in the highest rate of plutonium transmutation with the lowest rate of curium-244 production. This study selected eleven different burnable absorbers (B{sub 4}C, CdO, Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, HfO{sub 2}, In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and TaC) for evaluation as spectral shift absorber coatings on the outside of the fuel pellets to determine if an absorber coating can improve the transmutation properties of the target fuels. The PuZrO{sub 2}MgO (8 wt% Pu) target

  4. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; J. E. Daw; S. C. Taylor

    2009-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  5. Remote fabrication and irradiation test of recycled nuclear fuel prepared by the oxidation and reduction of spent oxide fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin Ryu, Ho; Chan Song, Kee; Il Park, Geun; Won Lee, Jung; Seung Yang, Myung

    2005-02-01

    A direct dry recycling process was developed in order to reuse spent pressurized light water reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel in CANDU reactors without the separation of sensitive nuclear materials such as plutonium. The benefits of the dry recycling process are the saving of uranium resources and the reduction of spent fuel accumulation as well as a higher proliferation resistance. In the process of direct dry recycling, fuel pellets separated from spent LWR fuel rods are oxidized from UO2 to U3O8 at 500 °C in an air atmosphere and reduced into UO2 at 700 °C in a hydrogen atmosphere, which is called OREOX (oxidation and reduction of oxide fuel). The pellets are pulverized during the oxidation and reduction processes due to the phase transformation between cubic UO2 and orthorhombic U3O8. Using the oxide powder prepared from the OREOX process, the compaction and sintering processes are performed in a remote manner in a shielded hot cell due to the high radioactivity of the spent fuel. Most of the fission gas and volatile fission products are removed during the OREOX and sintering processes. The mini-elements fabricated by the direct dry recycling process are irradiated in the HANARO research reactor for the performance evaluation of the recycled fuel pellets. Post-irradiation examination of the irradiated fuel showed that microstructural evolution and fission gas release behavior of the dry-recycled fuel were similar to high burnup UO2 fuel.

  6. Supplemental Reactor Physics Calculations and Analysis of ELF Mk 1A Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, Michael A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    These calculations supplement previous the reactor physics work evaluating the Enhanced Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Fuel (ELF) Mk 1A element. This includes various additional comparisons between the current Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and LEU along with further characterization of the performance of the ELF fuel. The excess reactivity to be held down at BOC for ELF Mk 1A fuel is estimated to be approximately $2.75 greater than with HEU for a typical cycle. This is a combined effect of the absence of burnable poison in the ELF fuel and the reduced neck shim worth in LEU fuel compared to HEU. Burnable poison rods were conceptualized for use in the small B positions containing Gd2O3 absorber. These were shown to provide $2.37 of negative reactivity at BOC and to burn out in less than half of a cycle. The worth of OSCCs is approximately the same between HEU and ELF Mk 1A (LEU) fuels in the representative loading evaluated. This was evaluated by rotating all banks simultaneously. The safety rod worth is relatively unchanged between HEU and ELF Mk 1A (LEU) fuels in the representative loading evaluated. However, this should be reevaluated with different loadings. Neutron flux, both total and fast (>1 MeV), is either the same or reduced upon changing from HEU to ELF Mk 1A (LEU) fuels in the representative loading evaluated. This is consistent with the well-established trend of lower neutron fluxes for a given power in LEU than HEU.The IPT loop void reactivity is approximately the same or less positive with ELF Mk 1A (LEU) fuel than HEU in the representative loading evaluated.

  7. ON feasibility of using nitride and metallic fuel in the MBIR reactor core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Eliseev

    2016-09-01

    Studies on the MBIR reactor, involving advanced dense fuel types, have shown that nitride fuel does not make it possible to achieve the required neutron flux value, while metallic fuel provides for the required neutron flux (practically the same as MOX fuel and a high dpa rate but requires modified temperature conditions of irradiation. The specific neutronic properties of these fuel types, as compared to the standard MOX fuel, have also been identified.

  8. Strategy for analysis of coatings and subsurface sludge recovered during hot cell examinations of N Reactor elements from Hanford K Basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makenas, B.J. [Duke Engineering and Services Hanford, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-09-22

    Subsurface sludge and/or surface coating material have been collected for four N Reactor fuel elements from K West Basin and one element from K East Basin. It is proposed that examinations of the fairly small volumes of recovered material proceed in order to identify the constituents and their potential impacts on fuel and sludge processing. Lists of potential examination techniques and material allocations are given in this report.

  9. Thermomechanical evaluation of BWR fuel elements for procedures of preconditioned with FEMAXI-V; Evaluacion termomecanica de elementos combustible BWR para procedimientos de preacondicionado con FEMAXI-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez L, H.; Lucatero, M.A.; Ortiz V, J. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km 36.5, La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: hhl@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    The limitations in the burnt of the nuclear fuel usually are fixed by the one limit in the efforts to that undergo them the components of a nuclear fuel assembly. The limits defined its provide the direction to the fuel designer to reduce to the minimum the fuel failure during the operation, and they also prevent against some thermomechanical phenomena that could happen during the evolution of transitory events. Particularly, a limit value of LHGR is fixed to consider those physical phenomena that could lead to the interaction of the pellet-shirt (Pellet Cladding Interaction, PCI). This limit value it is related directly with an PCI limit that can be fixed based on experimental tests of power ramps. This way, to avoid to violate the PCI limit, the conditioning procedures of the fuel are still required for fuel elements with and without barrier. Those simulation procedures of the power ramp are carried out for the reactor operator during the starting maneuvers or of power increase like preventive measure of possible consequences in the thermomechanical behavior of the fuel. In this work, the thermomechanical behavior of two different types of fuel rods of the boiling water reactor is analyzed during the pursuit of the procedures of fuel preconditioning. Five diverse preconditioning calculations were carried out, each one with three diverse linear ramps of power increments. The starting point of the ramps was taken of the data of the cycle 8 of the unit 1 of the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central. The superior limit superior of the ramps it was the threshold of the lineal power in which a fuel failure could be presented by PCI, in function of the fuel burnt. The analysis was carried out with the FEMAXI-V code. (Author)

  10. Design and construction of the SIPPING for fuels of the TRIGA Mark III reactor; Diseno y construccion del SIPPING para combustibles del reactor TRIGA Mark III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda J, G.; Delfin L, A.; Alvarado P, R.; Mazon R, R.; Ortega V, B. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: adl@nuclear.inin.mx

    2003-07-01

    The sipping technique, it has been used by several possessors of nuclear research reactors in its irradiated nuclear fuels, likewise in some fuel storage sites, with the objective of to determine the quantity of radioactivity that the fuel liberates in the means in that it is. The irradiated fuel in storage of some nuclear research reactors, its can have cracks that cross the cladding of the same one, generating the liberation of fission products that its need to determine to maintain safety measures appropriate as much as the fuel as of the facilities where they are. It doesn't exist until now, some method published for the non destructive sipping test technique. Based on that described, the Reactor Department of the National Institute of Nuclear Research, it has designed and built an inspection system of irradiated fuel that it will allow the detection of gassy fission products in site, and solids by means of the measurement of the activity of the Cs-137 contained in water samples. (Author)

  11. Operation of CANDU power reactor in thorium self-sufficient fuel cycle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents the results of calculations for CANDU reactor operation in thorium fuel cycle. Calculations are performed to estimate the feasibility of operation of heavy-water thermal neutron power reactor in self-sufficient thorium cycle. Parameters of active core and scheme of fuel reloading were considered to be the ...

  12. Technology Implementation Plan. Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Commercial Light Water Reactor Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, Lance Lewis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Snead, Mary A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This report is an overview of the implementation plan for ORNL's fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) light water reactor fuel. The fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel consists of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles embedded inside a fully dense SiC matrix and is intended for utilization in commercial light water reactor application.

  13. Operation of N Reactor and Fuels Fabrication Facilities, Hanford Reservation, Richland, Benton County, Washington: Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    Environmental data, calculations and analyses show no significant adverse radiological or nonradiological impacts from current or projected future operations resulting from N Reactor, Fuels Fabrication and Spent Fuel Storage Facilities. Nonoccupational radiation exposures resulting from 1978 N Reactor operations are summarized and compared to allowable exposure limits.

  14. Reforming results of a novel radial reactor for a solid oxide fuel cell system with anode off-gas recirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Timo; Carré, Maxime; Heinzel, Angelika; Steffen, Michael; Lapicque, François

    2017-12-01

    A novel reactor of a natural gas (NG) fueled, 1 kW net power solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system with anode off-gas recirculation (AOGR) is experimentally investigated. The reactor operates as pre-reformer, is of the type radial reactor with centrifugal z-flow, has the shape of a hollow cylinder with a volume of approximately 1 L and is equipped with two different precious metal wire-mesh catalyst packages as well as with an internal electric heater. Reforming investigations of the reactor are done stand-alone but as if the reactor would operate within the total SOFC system with AOGR. For the tests presented here it is assumed that the SOFC system runs on pure CH4 instead of NG. The manuscript focuses on the various phases of reactor operation during the startup process of the SOFC system. Startup process reforming experiments cover reactor operation points at which it runs on an oxygen to carbon ratio at the reactor inlet (ϕRI) of 1.2 with air supplied, up to a ϕRI of 2.4 without air supplied. As confirmed by a Monte Carlo simulation, most of the measured outlet gas concentrations are in or close to equilibrium.

  15. Closing nuclear fuel cycle with fast reactors: problems and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadrin, A.; Dvoeglazov, K.; Ivanov, V. [Bochvar Institute - VNIINM, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    The closed nuclear fuel cycle (CNFC) with fast reactors (FR) is the most promising way of nuclear energetics development because it prevents spent nuclear fuel (SNF) accumulation and minimizes radwaste volume due to minor actinides (MA) transmutation. CNFC with FR requires the elaboration of safety, environmentally acceptable and economically effective methods of treatment of SNF with high burn-up and low cooling time. The up-to-date industrially implemented SNF reprocessing technologies based on hydrometallurgical methods are not suitable for the reprocessing of SNF with high burn-up and low cooling time. The alternative dry methods (such as electrorefining in molten salts or fluoride technologies) applicable for such SNF reprocessing have not found implementation at industrial scale. So the cost of SNF reprocessing by means of dry technologies can hardly be estimated. Another problem of dry technologies is the recovery of fissionable materials pure enough for dense fuel fabrication. A combination of technical solutions performed with hydrometallurgical and dry technologies (pyro-technology) is proposed and it appears to be a promising way for the elaboration of economically, ecologically and socially accepted technology of FR SNF management. This paper deals with discussion of main principle of dry and aqueous operations combination that probably would provide safety and economic efficiency of the FR SNF reprocessing. (authors)

  16. Experiment Needs and Facilities Study Appendix A Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-09-01

    The TREAT Upgrade effort is designed to provide significant new capabilities to satisfy experiment requirements associated with key LMFBR Safety Issues. The upgrade consists of reactor-core modifications to supply the physics performance needed for the new experiments, an Advanced TREAT loop with size and thermal-hydraulics capabilities needed for the experiments, associated interface equipment for loop operations and handling, and facility modifications necessary to accommodate operations with the Loop. The costs and schedules of the tasks to be accomplished under the TREAT Upgrade project are summarized. Cost, including contingency, is about 10 million dollars (1976 dollars). A schedule for execution of 36 months has been established to provide the new capabilities in order to provide timely support of the LMFBR national effort. A key requirement for the facility modifications is that the reactor availability will not be interrupted for more than 12 weeks during the upgrade. The Advanced TREAT loop is the prototype for the STF small-bundle package loop. Modified TREAT fuel elements contain segments of graphite-matrix fuel with graded uranium loadings similar to those of STF. In addition, the TREAT upgrade provides for use of STF-like stainless steel-UO{sub 2} TREAT fuel for tests of fully enriched fuel bundles. This report will introduce the Upgrade study by presenting a brief description of the scope, performance capability, safety considerations, cost schedule, and development requirements. This work is followed by a "Design Description". Because greatly upgraded loop performance is central to the upgrade, a description is given of Advanced TREAT loop requirements prior to description of the loop concept. Performance requirements of the upgraded reactor system are given. An extensive discussion of the reactor physics calculations performed for the Upgrade concept study is provided. Adequate physics performance is essential for performance of experiments with

  17. Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; C. Gentile; R. Parsells; K. Rule; R. Strykowsky; M. Viola

    2003-10-28

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D&D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D&D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget.

  18. Determination of Light Water Reactor Fuel Burnup with the Isotope Ratio Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, David C.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.

    2007-11-01

    For the current project to demonstrate that isotope ratio measurements can be extended to zirconium alloys used in LWR fuel assemblies we report new analyses on irradiated samples obtained from a reactor. Zirconium alloys are used for structural elements of fuel assemblies and for the fuel element cladding. This report covers new measurements done on irradiated and unirradiated zirconium alloys, Unirradiated zircaloy samples serve as reference samples and indicate starting values or natural values for the Ti isotope ratio measured. New measurements of irradiated samples include results for 3 samples provided by AREVA. New results indicate: 1. Titanium isotope ratios were measured again in unirradiated samples to obtain reference or starting values at the same time irradiated samples were analyzed. In particular, 49Ti/48Ti ratios were indistinguishably close to values determined several months earlier and to expected natural values. 2. 49Ti/48Ti ratios were measured in 3 irradiated samples thus far, and demonstrate marked departures from natural or initial ratios, well beyond analytical uncertainty, and the ratios vary with reported fluence values. The irradiated samples appear to have significant surface contamination or radiation damage which required more time for SIMS analyses. 3. Other activated impurity elements still limit the sample size for SIMS analysis of irradiated samples. The sub-samples chosen for SIMS analysis, although smaller than optimal, were still analyzed successfully without violating the conditions of the applicable Radiological Work Permit

  19. Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material---ATM-105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Campbell, T.K.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1991-12-01

    The characterization data obtained to data are described for Approved Testing Material 105 (ATM-105), which is spent fuel from Bundles CZ346 and CZ348 of the Cooper Nuclear Power Plant, a boiling-water reactor. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program. ATM-105 consists of 88 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 2400 GJ/kgM (28 MWd/kgM) and expected fission gas release of about 1%. Characterization data include (1) descriptions of as-fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) special fuel studies involving analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM); (6) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (7) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding. Additional analyses of the fuel are being conducted and will be included in planned revisions of this report.

  20. Hybrid fusion–fission reactor with a thorium blanket: Its potential in the fuel cycle of nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmelev, A. N., E-mail: shmelan@mail.ru; Kulikov, G. G., E-mail: ggkulikov@mephi.ru; Kurnaev, V. A., E-mail: kurnaev@yandex.ru; Salahutdinov, G. H., E-mail: saip07@mail.ru; Kulikov, E. G., E-mail: egkulikov@mephi.ru; Apse, V. A., E-mail: apseva@mail.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Discussions are currently going on as to whether it is suitable to employ thorium in the nuclear fuel cycle. This work demonstrates that the {sup 231}Pa–{sup 232}U–{sup 233}U–Th composition to be produced in the thorium blanket of a hybrid thermonuclear reactor (HTR) as a fuel for light-water reactors opens up the possibility of achieving high, up to 30% of heavy metals (HM), or even ultrahigh fuel burnup. This is because the above fuel composition is able to stabilize its neutron-multiplying properties in the process of high fuel burnup. In addition, it allows the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) to be better protected against unauthorized proliferation of fissile materials owing to an unprecedentedly large fraction of {sup 232}U (several percent!) in the uranium bred from the Th blanket, which will substantially hamper the use of fissile materials in a closed NFC for purposes other than power production.

  1. Natural convection heat transfer analysis of ATR fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langerman, M.A.

    1992-05-01

    Natural convection air cooling of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel assemblies is analyzed to determine the level of decay heat that can be removed without exceeding the melting temperature of the fuel. The study was conducted to assist in the level 2 PRA analysis of a hypothetical ATR water canal draining accident. The heat transfer process is characterized by a very low Rayleigh number (Ra {approx} 10{sup {minus}5}) and a high temperature ratio. Since neither data nor analytical models were available for Ra < 0.1, an analytical approach is presented based upon the integral boundary layer equations. All assumptions and simplifications are presented and assessed and two models are developed from similar foundations. In one model, the well-known Boussinesq approximations are employed, the results from which are used to assess the modeling philosophy through comparison to existing data and published analytical results. In the other model, the Boussinesq approximations are not used, thus making the model more general and applicable to the ATR analysis.

  2. Neutron analysis of the fuel of high temperature nuclear reactors; Analisis neutronico del combustible de reactores nucleares de alta temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastida O, G. E.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: gbo729@yahoo.com.mx [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this work a neutron analysis of the fuel of some high temperature nuclear reactors is presented, studying its main features, besides some alternatives of compound fuel by uranium and plutonium, and of coolant: sodium and helium. For this study was necessary the use of a code able to carry out a reliable calculation of the main parameters of the fuel. The use of the Monte Carlo method was convenient to simulate the neutrons transport in the reactor core, which is the base of the Serpent code, with which the calculations will be made for the analysis. (Author)

  3. Comparative assessment of nuclear fuel cycles. Light-water reactor once-through, classical fast breeder reactor, and symbiotic fast breeder reactor cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardie, R.W.; Barrett, R.J.; Freiwald, J.G.

    1980-06-01

    The object of the Alternative Nuclear Fuel Cycle Study is to perform comparative assessments of nuclear power systems. There are two important features of this study. First, this evaluation attempts to encompass the complete, integrated fuel cycle from mining of uranium ore to disposal of waste rather than isolated components. Second, it compares several aspects of each cycle - energy use, economics, technological status, proliferation, public safety, and commercial potential - instead of concentrating on one or two assessment areas. This report presents assessment results for three fuel cycles. These are the light-water reactor once-through cycle, the fast breeder reactor on the classical plutonium cycle, and the fast breeder reactor on a symbiotic cycle using plutonium and /sup 233/U as fissile fuels. The report also contains a description of the methodology used in this assessment. Subsequent reports will present results for additional fuel cycles.

  4. Thermal breeder fuel enrichment zoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capossela, Harry J.; Dwyer, Joseph R.; Luce, Robert G.; McCoy, Daniel F.; Merriman, Floyd C.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the performance of a thermal breeder reactor having regions of higher than average moderator concentration are disclosed. The fuel modules of the reactor core contain at least two different types of fuel elements, a high enrichment fuel element and a low enrichment fuel element. The two types of fuel elements are arranged in the fuel module with the low enrichment fuel elements located between the high moderator regions and the high enrichment fuel elements. Preferably, shim rods made of a fertile material are provided in selective regions for controlling the reactivity of the reactor by movement of the shim rods into and out of the reactor core. The moderation of neutrons adjacent the high enrichment fuel elements is preferably minimized as by reducing the spacing of the high enrichment fuel elements and/or using a moderator having a reduced moderating effect.

  5. Powder Metallurgy of Uranium Alloy Fuels for TRU-Burning Reactors Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, Sean M

    2011-04-29

    Overview Fast reactors were evaluated to enable the transmutation of transuranic isotopes generated by nuclear energy systems. The motivation for this was that TRU isotopes have high radiotoxicity and relatively long half-lives, making them unattractive for disposal in a long-term geologic repository. Fast reactors provide an efficient means to utilize the energy content of the TRUs while destroying them. An enabling technology that requires research and development is the fabrication metallic fuel containing TRU isotopes using powder metallurgy methods. This project focused upon developing a powder metallurgical fabrication method to produce U-Zr-transuranic (TRU) alloys at relatively low processing temperatures (500ºC to 600ºC) using either hot extrusion or alpha-phase sintering for charecterization. Researchers quantified the fundamental aspects of both processing methods using surrogate metals to simulate the TRU elements. The process produced novel solutions to some of the issues relating to metallic fuels, such as fuel-cladding chemical interactions, fuel swelling, volatility losses during casting, and casting mold material losses. Workscope There were two primary tasks associated with this project: 1. Hot working fabrication using mechanical alloying and extrusion • Design, fabricate, and assemble extrusion equipment • Extrusion database on DU metal • Extrusion database on U-10Zr alloys • Extrusion database on U-20xx-10Zr alloys • Evaluation and testing of tube sheath metals 2. Low-temperature sintering of U alloys • Design, fabricate, and assemble equipment • Sintering database on DU metal • Sintering database on U-10Zr alloys • Liquid assisted phase sintering on U-20xx-10Zr alloys Appendices Outline Appendix A contains a Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCR&D) poster and contact presentation where TAMU made primary contributions. Appendix B contains MSNE theses and final defense presentations by David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich

  6. Evaluation of isotopic composition of fast reactor core in closed nuclear fuel cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirov, Georgy; Ternovykh, Mikhail; Saldikov, Ivan; Fomichenko, Peter; Gerasimov, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    The strategy of the development of nuclear power in Russia provides for use of fast power reactors in closed nuclear fuel cycle. The PRORYV (i.e. «Breakthrough» in Russian) project is currently under development. Within the framework of this project, fast reactors BN-1200 and BREST-OD-300 should be built to, inter alia, demonstrate possibility of the closed nuclear fuel cycle technologies with plutonium as a main source of energy. Russia has a large inventory of plutonium which was accumulated in the result of reprocessing of spent fuel of thermal power reactors and conversion of nuclear weapons. This kind of plutonium will be used for development of initial fuel assemblies for fast reactors. The closed nuclear fuel cycle concept of the PRORYV assumes self-supplied mode of operation with fuel regeneration by neutron capture reaction in non-enriched uranium, which is used as a raw material. Operating modes of reactors and its characteristics should be chosen so as to provide the self-sufficient mode by using of fissile isotopes while refueling by depleted uranium and to support this state during the entire period of reactor operation. Thus, the actual issue is modeling fuel handling processes. To solve these problems, the code REPRORYV (Recycle for PRORYV) has been developed. It simulates nuclide streams in non-reactor stages of the closed fuel cycle. At the same time various verified codes can be used to evaluate in-core characteristics of a reactor. By using this approach various options for nuclide streams and assess the impact of different plutonium content in the fuel, fuel processing conditions, losses during fuel processing, as well as the impact of initial uncertainties on neutron-physical characteristics of reactor are considered in this study.

  7. Fission product release assessment for end fitting failure in Candu reactor loaded with CANFLEX-NU fuel bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dirk Joo; Jeong, Chang Joon; Lee, Kang Moon; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Fission product release (FPR) assessment for End Fitting Failure (EFF) in CANDU reactor loaded with CANFLEX-natural uranium (NU) fuel bundles has been performed. The predicted results are compared with those for the reactor loaded with standard 37-element bundles. The total channel I-131 release at the end of transient for EFF accident is calculated to be 380.8 TBq and 602.9 TBq for the CANFLEX bundle and standard bundle channel cases, respectively. They are 4.9% and 7.9% of total inventory, respectively. The lower total releases of the CANFLEX bundle O6 channel are attributed to the lower initial fuel temperatures caused by the lower linear element power of the CANFLEX bundle compared with the standard bundle. 4 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs. (Author)

  8. Thermal Hydraulic Tests for Reactor Core Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S. K.; Baek, W. P.; Chun, S. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The main objectives of the present project are to resolve the current issues of reactor core thermal hydraulics, to develop an advanced measurement and analytical techniques, and to perform reactor core safety verification tests. 6x6 reflood experiments, various heat transfer experiments using Freon, and experiments on the spacer grids effects on the post-dryout are carried out using spacer grids developed in Korea in order to resolve the current issues of the reactor core thermal hydraulics. In order to develop a reflood heat transfer model, the detailed reflood phenomena are visualized and measured using round tube and 2x2 rod bundle. A detailed turbulent mixing phenomenon for subchannels is measured using advanced measurement techniques such as LDV and PIV. MARS and MATRA codes developed in Korea are assessed, verified and improved using the obtained experimental data. Finally, a systematic quality assurance program and experimental data generation system has been constructed in order to increase the reliability of the experimental data.

  9. Reactors as a Source of Antineutrinos: Effects of Fuel Loading and Burnup for Mixed-Oxide Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel S.; Erickson, Anna S.

    2018-01-01

    In a conventional light-water reactor loaded with a range of uranium and plutonium-based fuel mixtures, the variation in antineutrino production over the cycle reflects both the initial core fissile inventory and its evolution. Under an assumption of constant thermal power, we calculate the rate at which antineutrinos are emitted from variously fueled cores, and the evolution of that rate as measured by a representative ton-scale antineutrino detector. We find that antineutrino flux decreases with burnup for low-enriched uranium cores, increases for full mixed-oxide (MOX) cores, and does not appreciably change for cores with a MOX fraction of approximately 75%. Accounting for uncertainties in the fission yields in the emitted antineutrino spectra and the detector response function, we show that the difference in corewide MOX fractions at least as small as 8% can be distinguished using a hypothesis test. The test compares the evolution of the antineutrino rate relative to an initial value over part or all of the cycle. The use of relative rates reduces the sensitivity of the test to an independent thermal power measurement, making the result more robust against possible countermeasures. This rate-only approach also offers the potential advantage of reducing the cost and complexity of the antineutrino detectors used to verify the diversion, compared to methods that depend on the use of the antineutrino spectrum. A possible application is the verification of the disposition of surplus plutonium in nuclear reactors.

  10. Analysis of high burnup pressurized water reactor fuel using uranium, plutonium, neodymium, and cesium isotope correlations with burnup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Suk Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The correlation of the isotopic composition of uranium, plutonium, neodymium, and cesium with the burnup for high burnup pressurized water reactor fuels irradiated in nuclear power reactors has been experimentally investigated. The total burnup was determined by Nd-148 and the fractional 235U burnup was determined by U and Pu mass spectrometric methods. The isotopic compositions of U, Pu, Nd, and Cs after their separation from the irradiated fuel samples were measured using thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The contents of these elements in the irradiated fuel were determined through an isotope dilution mass spectrometric method using 233U, 242Pu, 150Nd, and 133Cs as spikes. The activity ratios of Cs isotopes in the fuel samples were determined using gamma-ray spectrometry. The content of each element and its isotopic compositions in the irradiated fuel were expressed by their correlation with the total and fractional burnup, burnup parameters, and the isotopic compositions of different elements. The results obtained from the experimental methods were compared with those calculated using the ORIGEN-S code.

  11. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 73 - Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit, Training Program Subject Schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit... Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit, Training Program Subject Schedule Pursuant to the provision of § 73.37 of... reactor fuel is required to assure that individuals used as shipment escorts have completed a training...

  12. Global nuclear energy partnership fuels transient testing at the Sandia National Laboratories nuclear facilities : planning and facility infrastructure options.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, John E.; Wright, Steven Alan; Tikare, Veena; MacLean, Heather J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Peters, Curtis D.; Vernon, Milton E.; Pickard, Paul S.

    2007-10-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership fuels development program is currently developing metallic, oxide, and nitride fuel forms as candidate fuels for an Advanced Burner Reactor. The Advance Burner Reactor is being designed to fission actinides efficiently, thereby reducing the long-term storage requirements for spent fuel repositories. Small fuel samples are being fabricated and evaluated with different transuranic loadings and with extensive burnup using the Advanced Test Reactor. During the next several years, numerous fuel samples will be fabricated, evaluated, and tested, with the eventual goal of developing a transmuter fuel database that supports the down selection to the most suitable fuel type. To provide a comparative database of safety margins for the range of potential transmuter fuels, this report describes a plan to conduct a set of early transient tests in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories. The Annular Core Research Reactor is uniquely qualified to perform these types of tests because of its wide range of operating capabilities and large dry central cavity which extents through the center of the core. The goal of the fuels testing program is to demonstrate that the design and fabrication processes are of sufficient quality that the fuel will not fail at its design limit--up to a specified burnup, power density, and operating temperature. Transient testing is required to determine the fuel pin failure thresholds and to demonstrate that adequate fuel failure margins exist during the postulated design basis accidents.

  13. Study on the Use of Hydride Fuel in High-Performance Light Water Reactor Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Haileyesus Tsige-Tamirat; Luca Ammirabile

    2015-01-01

    Hydride fuels have features which could make their use attractive in future advanced power reactors. The potential benefit of use of hydride fuel in HPLWR without introducing significant modification in the current core design concept of the high-performance light water reactor (HPLWR) has been evaluated. Neutronics and thermal hydraulic analyses were performed for a single assembly model of HPLWR with oxide and hydride fuels. The hydride assembly shows higher moderation with softer neutron s...

  14. Web software for the control and management of radiation protection devices in the Cadarache site; Application WEB pour le controle et la gestion des appareils de radioprotection sur le centre de Cadarache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltritti, F. [CEA Cadarache 13108 St Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2010-07-01

    This series of slides presents how to use a new software dedicated to the management of the periodical controls that have to be performed on the equipment involved in radiation protection. This software is ready to be dispatched on the CEA site of Cadarache. This software gives information on: the device to be controlled, the controls that have to be performed, the procedures to follow to make the test, the equipment necessary for the test particularly the need for radioactive sources, the maintenance of the device, the previous measurements and in the end the device's conformity. An evaluation of the conformity of all the devices present in a building or an area or of a particular type can be easily obtained. (A.C.)

  15. Compatibility analysis of DUPIC fuel (Part II) - Reactor physics design and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Choi, Hang Bok; Rhee, Bo Wook; Roh, Gyu Hong; Kim, Do Hun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The compatibility analysis of the DUPIC fuel in a CANDU reactor has been assessed. This study includes the fuel composition adjustment, comparison of lattice properties, performance analysis of reactivity devices, determination of regional over-power (ROP) trip setpoint, and uncertainty estimation of core performance parameters. For the DUPIC fuel composition adjustment, three options have been proposed, which can produce uniform neutronic characteristics of the DUPIC fuel. The lattice analysis has shown that the characteristics of the DUPIC fuel is compatible with those of natural uranium fuel. The reactivity devices of the CANDU-6 reactor maintain their functional requirements even for the DUPIC fuel system. The ROP analysis has shown that the trip setpoint is not sacrificed for the DUPIC fuel system owing to the power shape that enhances more thermal margin. The uncertainty analysis of the core performance parameter has shown that the uncertainty associated with the fuel composition variation is reduced appreciably, which is primarily due to the fuel composition adjustment and secondly the on-power refueling feature and spatial control function of the CANDU reactor. The reactor physics calculation has also shown that it is feasible to use spent PWR fuel directly in CANDU reactors without deteriorating the CANDU-6 core physics design requirements. 29 refs., 67 figs., 60 tabs. (Author)

  16. Pre-conceptual Development and characterization of an extruded graphite composite fuel for the TREAT Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luther, Erik; Rooyen, Isabella van; Leckie, Rafael; Papin, Pallas; Nelson, Andrew; Hunter, James

    2015-03-01

    In an effort to explore fuel systems that are more robust under accident scenarios, the DOE-NE has identified the need to resume transient testing. The Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility has been identified as the preferred option for the resumption of transient testing of nuclear fuel in the United States. In parallel, NNSA’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Convert program is exploring the needs to replace the existing highly enriched uranium (HEU) core with low enriched uranium (LEU) core. In order to construct a new LEU core, materials and fabrication processes similar to those used in the initial core fabrication must be identified, developed and characterized. In this research, graphite matrix fuel blocks were extruded and materials properties of were measured. Initially the extrusion process followed the historic route; however, the project was expanded to explore methods to increase the graphite content of the fuel blocks and explore modern resins. Materials properties relevant to fuel performance including density, heat capacity and thermal diffusivity were measured. The relationship between process defects and materials properties will be discussed.

  17. Pyrolysis of biomass and refuse-derived fuel performance in laboratory scale batch reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kluska Jacek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of pyrolysis of pine chips and refuse derived fuel fractions are presented. The experiments were carried out in a pilot pyrolysis reactor. The feedstock was analyzed by an elemental analyzer and the X-ray fluorescence spectrometer to determine the elemental composition. To find out optimum conditions for pyrolysis and mass loss as a function of temperature the thermogravimetric analysis was applied. Gases from the thermogravimetric analysis were directed to the infrared spectrometer using gas-flow cuvette to online analysis of gas composition. Chemical composition of the produced gas was measured using gas chromatography with a thermal conductivity detector and a flame ionization detector. The product analysis also took into account the mass balance of individual products.

  18. Comparison of Material Behavior of Matrix Graphite for HTGR Fuel Elements upon Irradiation: A literature Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Cho, Moon Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The fuel elements for the HTGRs (i.e., spherical fuel element in pebble-bed type core design and fuel compact in prismatic core design) consists of coated fuel particles dispersed and bonded in a closely packed array within a carbonaceous matrix. This matrix is generally made by mixing fully graphitized natural and needle- or pitchcoke originated powders admixed with a binder material (pitch or phenolic resin), The resulting resinated graphite powder mixture, when compacted, may influence a number of material properties as well as its behavior under neutron irradiation during reactor operation. In the fabrication routes of these two different fuel element forms, different consolidation methods are employed; a quasi-isostatic pressing method is generally adopted to make pebbles while fuel compacts are fabricated by uni-axial pressing mode. The result showed that the hardness values obtained from the two directions showed an anisotropic behavior: The values obtained from the perpendicular section showed much higher micro hardness (176.6±10.5MPa in average) than from the parallel section ((125.6±MPa in average). This anisotropic behavior was concluded to be related to the microstructure of the matrix graphite. This may imply that the uni-axial pressing method to make compacts influence the microstructure of the matrix and hence the material properties of the matrix graphite.

  19. Production test-080, physics testing at D reactor deactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, G.F.

    1967-06-15

    The purpose of this test is to provide a set of experimental data to test a compute code frequently used in nuclear safety analyses and to explore certain experimental techniques which may prove extremely valuable in the future. In addition, some basic physics parameters which will be measured may be used in an assessment of the feasibility of using a deactivated Hanford reactor for space-dependent transient tests.

  20. Examination of fast reactor fuels, FBR analytical quality assurance standards and methods, and analytical methods development: irradiation tests. Progress report, April 1--June 30, 1976, and FY 1976. [UO/sub 2/; PuO/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.D. (comp.)

    1976-08-01

    Characterization of unirradiated and irradiated LMFBR fuels by analytical chemistry methods will continue, and additional methods will be modified and mechanized for hot cell application. Macro- and microexaminations will be made on fuel and cladding using the shielded electron microprobe, emission spectrograph, radiochemistry, gamma scanner, mass spectrometers, and other analytical facilities. New capabilities will be developed in gamma scanning, analyses to assess spatial distributions of fuel and fission products, mass spectrometric measurements of burnup and fission gas constituents and other chemical analyses. Microstructural analyses of unirradiated and irradiated materials will continue using optical and electron microscopy and autoradiographic and x-ray techniques. Analytical quality assurance standards tasks are designed to assure the quality of the chemical characterizations necessary to evaluate reactor components relative to specifications. Tasks include: (1) the preparation and distribution of calibration materials and quality control samples for use in quality assurance surveillance programs, (2) the development of and the guidance in the use of quality assurance programs for sampling and analysis, (3) the development of improved methods of analysis, and (4) the preparation of continuously updated analytical method manuals. Reliable analytical methods development for the measurement of burnup, oxygen-to-metal (O/M) ratio, and various gases in irradiated fuels is described.