WorldWideScience

Sample records for cadarache dismantling projects

  1. Taking Human and organizational factors into account in AREVA NC Cadarache dismantling projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA NC Cadarache fabricated MOX fuel (fuel assemblies made with a mixture of uranium and plutonium oxides) and FBR fuel (fast breeder reactor) for 40 years. In 2003, commercial fuel fabrication was stopped and the plant began implementing a plan to remove the nuclear material and clean up its two production buildings and laboratory. The objective is to reduce the radiological activity in the process facilities to IAEA level 2 and transferred them back to the owner French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). The type of facilities to be dismantled (glove boxes, tanks, etc.) and the products involved (uranium and plutonium), in the form of powder, require a high degree of manual operation. Human and Organizational Factors (HOF) therefore play a key role in the depth defense concept. (author)

  2. Intensive post operation clean out (Poco) in AREVA NC Cadarache dismantling projects: economic value and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After fabricating plutonium fuels for 40 years (Fast Breeder Reactor, MOX), commercial operations at the AREVA NC Cadarache plant ended in 2003 and post operation clean out of its production buildings and laboratory started. AREVA objective is to achieve IAEA level 2 cleanup of the process facilities and transfer them to their owner, the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). There are two main opposite dismantling scenarios: very limited cleanup to optimize man power, or intensive cleanup of the facilities to optimize the quantity of long lived level waste as much as possible. Economic and environmental considerations lead the choice between these two options. (author)

  3. Meeting of the ITER CTA Project Board at Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting of the ITER CTA Project Board took place on the occasion of the N4 Meeting at Cadarache, France on 3-4 June 2002. The Project Board members and experts from Canada, EU, Japan and Russian Federation and the International Team attended the meeting. The parts informed each other of the latest developments concerning the ITER project in their respective countries, among them, offers for ITER potential site from the EU and Japan

  4. Definition of a dismantling project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shutdown of the fuel reprocessing plant of Eurochemic having been decided, a study for defining the facilities to be dismantled and how to do it, was conducted by Belgoprocess. The cost of the operation was estimated by an accurate investigation and by a pilot project on the dismantling of the wastes storage building. The work carried out up to now and the problems to be solved are summarized

  5. Enriched uranium workshops towards decommissioning CEA Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author presents the post operational clean-out following the shut down of the ATUE nuclear facility implemented in the Cadarache research Center (France) and preceding the dismantling operations. ATUE was constructed in 1965, in the support of the fuel cycle industry, to develop the dry process of UF6 to UO2 conversion and the wet process with step of nitric acid solution, solvent purification by exchange columns, ammonium precipitation and hydrogen reduction. The dismantling organization, methods and technology are also presented and discussed. In a last part the author highlights some important points of the project. (A.L.B.)

  6. ITER at Cadarache; ITER a Cadarache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-06-15

    This public information document presents the ITER project (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), the definition of the fusion, the international cooperation and the advantages of the project. It presents also the site of Cadarache, an appropriate scientifical and economical environment. The last part of the documentation recalls the historical aspect of the project and the today mobilization of all partners. (A.L.B.)

  7. ITER at Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This public information document presents the ITER project (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), the definition of the fusion, the international cooperation and the advantages of the project. It presents also the site of Cadarache, an appropriate scientifical and economical environment. The last part of the documentation recalls the historical aspect of the project and the today mobilization of all partners. (A.L.B.)

  8. Lessons learned from CEA experience with dismantling project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the late 1980s the CEA has been actively implementing methods to benefit from its experience in dismantling nuclear facilities. Capitalizing on prior experience - originally to address safety requirements - has now acquired greater importance in the CEA with the implementation of project management knowledge bases that require better control of performance and cost from initial estimates to completion. Changing regulations (waste, radiological protection, safety, etc.) and decommissioning policies in major organizations (objectives, funding, deadlines, organization, etc.) significantly influence dismantling projects. Experience with knowledge management has shown that the approach consisting in exhaustive project data collection often produces large, unwieldy information bases that are difficult to apply to subsequent projects. Principles and recommendations can nevertheless be derived, but require detailed analysis of all the aspects of dismantling (waste, dosimetry, conventional and nuclear safety, cost, deadlines, physical and radiological environment, regulatory provisions, etc.). The wide range of CEA facilities, the different stages in the course of a project that often lasts for several decades, changing operators and supervisors, all imply that a given situation can be assessed and reconsidered differently depending on the project organization, participants and background. Past results can be considered technically satisfactory, but poorly rated in terms of cost or scheduling. The current approach consists in focusing more on the relevance of the information conserved, favoring common practices emanating from a dedicated center of expertise, and applying suitable processes after discriminating between the lessons learned directly from experience and from consolidation of professional knowledge bases. (author)

  9. The Dismantling Project for the Large Electron Positron (LEP) Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, John

    2002-01-01

    The LEP accelerator was installed in a circular tunnel 27 km in length with nine access points distributed around the circumference in the countryside and villages which surround CERN's sites. The dismantling project involved the removal in less than 15 months of around 29000 tonnes of equipment from the accelerator itself and a further 10000 tonnes from the four experiments - all of which were located at an average depth of 100 m below ground level. There was no contamination risk in the project and less than 3% of the materials removed were classified as radioactive. However, the materials which were classified as radioactive have to be temporarily stored and they consume considerable resources. The major difficulties for the project were in the establishment of the theoretical radiological zoning, implementation of the traceability systems and making appropriate radiation measurements to confirm the zoning. The absence of detailed guidelines from the French authorities, having no threshold levels for relea...

  10. Mission report on the implementation of the ITER project in Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having recalled some important aspects of the ITER project and its implications for the concerned ministry (the former equipment and land planning ministry), the author addresses the issue of land constructability, and the application of the law on transparency and safety in the nuclear sector. He evokes the issues of land property and housing in the neighbouring communities. He comments legal, administrative, financial, expropriation, and environmental aspects of the construction of roads for the transport of components of exceptional dimensions. He also evokes planning aspects for the harbour area

  11. Dismantling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the dismantling techniques used in a Decontamination and Dismantlement (D and D) project are taken from conventional demolition practices. Some modifications to the techniques are made to limit exposure to the workers or to lessen the spread of contamination to the work area. When working on a D and D project, it is best to keep the dismantling techniques and tools as simple as possible. The workers will be more efficient and safer using techniques that are familiar to them. Prior experience with the technique or use of mock-ups is the best way to keep workers safe and to keep the project on schedule

  12. Radiation protection at the Cadarache research center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article recalls the French law about radiation protection and its evolution due to the implementation of the 2013/59-EURATOM directive that separates the missions of counsel from the more operative missions of the person appointed as 'competent in radiation protection'. The organisation of the radiation protection of the Cadarache research center is presented. The issue of sub-contracting and the respect of an adequate standard of radioprotection is detailed since 2 facilities operated by AREVA are being dismantled on the site. (A.C.)

  13. First steps of remote dismantling at WAK, a green meadow project in progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Karlsruhe reprocessing pilot plant, WAK, in operation since 1971, was shut down in 1990. Since then, the project Organization, funding and development of remote dismantling concepts and technologies took place. The project task is the ''green meadow''. One step of plant preparation for decommissioning is to improve the offgas cleaning system by exchanging major parts of the existing offgas cleaning process equipment, which has been in operation for more than 20 years. Because of the high dose rate of the process equipment (located in two cells) it was decided to dismantle the cells by remote technologies. For testing the equipment, staff training and optimizing the remote dismantling schedule a mock-up of one cell was erected and the total mock-up remotely dismantled. The most important remote tools were a Manipulator Carrier System (MCS), a power manipulator, TV cameras, together with special tools for cutting and grinding. One cell was dismantled in 80 working days. The these rate of the staff, especially for repair and dismantling support, was 30 manmSv. The remote equipment performed very well, only the TV systems must be improved

  14. Methodology applied to the waste management study for the dismantling project of APM (Reprocessing power plant)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dismantling of a nuclear installation consists in transforming an industrial process into production lines of nuclear waste. This objective is common to all the projects of dismantling. So, the production of nuclear waste is comparable to a line of manufactured products as in the car production, the food-processing industry, the avionics, in the specific statutory context of nuclear energy. This definition has been applied to the project studies of a reprocessing plant dismantling on the site of Marcoule. In practice, the studies of the waste production ways began with the analysis of the waste management during the industrial operation phase of the plant. This work allowed at first to divide the plant following various standard spectra areas; in a second step, the performances of the various systems of production control are analyzed. The modification from a management model in the operation phase to a dismantling model articulates around the increase of the quantity and the modification of the quality of the nuclear waste. Because, if in the operation phase, the number of drums and their activity level may be low, during the dismantling operation, the waste activity is significant and all the radionuclides which have been processed in the plant are present in the nuclear waste. The drum radiological characterization is based on analysis techniques among which the performances and the possibilities are strongly dependent on the standard spectra. So, to find how to manage each component, the classic method consists in coupling physical information dependent on the Radiotracer with standard spectra. An estimation of the activity for every radioelement is possible and can be applied to all the components. The main radiotracers for the reprocessing plants are the 137Cs and 240Pu. The analysis of the waste flow is based on a physical inventory and of a schedule of the reference scenario. After having evaluated the waste flow, an analysis of the waste control

  15. Project management for the decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decommissioning of nuclear power plants is executed in a classic project manner as it is known from other construction projects. It is obvious to use the known portfolio of project management tools. The complexity that is created by the large size of the project in combination with safety requirements of the nuclear industry has to be handled. Complexity can only be managed addressing two main drivers: Prioritization and speed (agility) in project execution. Prioritization can be realized by applying tools like Earned Value Management. A high speed of project execution is established by applying Agile Management like SCRUM-methods. This method is adopted in the context of the cooperation ''Complex Projects'' to the needs of nuclear industry.

  16. Project planning and supervisory functions in decommissioning and dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Greifswald (and Rheinsberg) nuclear power sations serve as examples to explain the procedure and the required methods and instruments and the variety of their characteristic features and purposes. These are on the one hand common project management methods, and on the other hand the specific variants thereof depending on the individual case, as for instance with the examples chosen, conversion of the organisational structure of a power generation plant into a project management organisation. All aspects of staff employment are a priority issue in the process. Illustrative figures explain the organisation of project planning and supervisory tasks. (orig./DG)

  17. CULTURAL ISSUES IN FINNISH AND CHINESE PRACTICAL BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS : Case: Varkaus Paper Machine Dismantling Project

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yuanyuan

    2012-01-01

    This thesis report is compiled to investigate the cultural issues in modern Finnish and Chinese practical business transactions and aims to figure out some viable suggestions for the business people involved in or thinking about Finnish-Chinese business. In order to do so, business culture theories were carefully studied and a case study, called the Varkaus Dismantling Project, which was an intercultural cooperation between Umacon Oy and Nine Dragons Industries Co., Ltd., was observed. ...

  18. Decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East. Project final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) was completed in October 1997. Descriptions and evaluations of the activities performed and analyses of the results obtained during the JANUS D and D Project are provided in this Final Report. The following information is included: objective of the JANUS D and D Project; history of the JANUS Reactor facility; description of the ANL-E site and the JANUS Reactor facility; overview of the D and D activities performed; description of the project planning and engineering; description of the D and D operations; summary of the final status of the JANUS Reactor facility based upon the final survey results; description of the health and safety aspects of the project, including personnel exposure and OSHA reporting; summary of the waste minimization techniques utilized and total waste generated by the project; and summary of the final cost and schedule for the JANUS D and D Project

  19. The Dismantling of Nuclear Submarines in North-West Russia An Overview of two projects and the end products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper explains the background to the projects, and the setting up of the contracts to dismantle two Oscar-I submarines and one Victor-III submarine. As a pre -cursor to the dismantling, Russian documentation covering environmental, safety, operational and technical issues had to be prepared and submitted to the Russian regulatory bodies for approval, including a full Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) of the projects. In addition to the dismantling projects, funds were also made available for shipyard infrastructure improvement projects necessary to ensure the safe and efficient completion of the projects. The paper describes these aspects as well as the submarines themselves and gives an overview of the dismantling process. It also describes the nature of the wastes produced, including handling and processing together with the safety and environmental issues. Project Management and monitoring contracted to RWE NUKEM by the U.K. Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) is described emphasizing the importance of strong working relationships between British and Russian teams. Finally the paper discusses the 'end products' of the Oscar-I and Victor-III dismantling and how the projects have provided a useful, high-profile platform on which to demonstrate the success of the DTI and their contractors in helping the U.K. meet its commitments under the Global Partnership Initiative. (authors)

  20. Licensing documentation and licensing process for dismantling and decontamination projects in Lithuania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uspuras, Eugenijus; Rimkevicius, Sigitas; Babilas, Egidijus [Lithuanian Energy Institute (LEI), Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2013-07-01

    One of the main tasks of any decommissioning project is the licensing process which allows implementation of developed strategies in real NPP. The Lithuanian laws on nuclear energy and on radioactive waste management require that the dismantling and decontamination (D and D) projects shall be licensed by the Lithuanian State Nuclear Power Safety Inspectorate (VATESI) and other Authorities. Licensing is an inseparable part of the Lithuania regulatory and supervisory system for safety of nuclear facilities. The licensing process starts when NPP submits the first licensing document(s) to the Authorities. It is completed when all the licensing documents are approved by the Authorities and authorization to start D and D works is received by NPP. Current paper will discuss one of the main steps in D and D projects implementation process - Licensing and will provide information about D and D licensing approach used in Lithuania. (orig.)

  1. Licensing documentation and licensing process for dismantling and decontamination projects in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main tasks of any decommissioning project is the licensing process which allows implementation of developed strategies in real NPP. The Lithuanian laws on nuclear energy and on radioactive waste management require that the dismantling and decontamination (D and D) projects shall be licensed by the Lithuanian State Nuclear Power Safety Inspectorate (VATESI) and other Authorities. Licensing is an inseparable part of the Lithuania regulatory and supervisory system for safety of nuclear facilities. The licensing process starts when NPP submits the first licensing document(s) to the Authorities. It is completed when all the licensing documents are approved by the Authorities and authorization to start D and D works is received by NPP. Current paper will discuss one of the main steps in D and D projects implementation process - Licensing and will provide information about D and D licensing approach used in Lithuania. (orig.)

  2. Robotic dismantlement systems at the CP-5 reactor D and D project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chicago Pile 5 (CP-5) Research Reactor Facility is currently undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Illinois site. CP-5 was the principle nuclear reactor used to produce neutrons for scientific research at Argonne from 1954 to 1979. The CP-5 reactor was a heavy-water cooled and moderated, enriched uranium-fueled reactor with a graphite reflector. The CP-5 D and D project includes the disassembly, segmentation and removal of all the radioactive components, equipment and structures associated with the CP-5 facility. The Department of Energy's Robotics Technology Development Program and the Federal Energy Technology Center, Morgantown Office provided teleoperated, remote systems for use in the dismantlement of the CP-5 reactor assembly for tasks requiring remote dismantlement as part of the EM-50 Large-Scale Demonstration Program (LSDP). The teleoperated systems provided were the Dual Arm Work Platform (DAWP), the Rosie Mobile Teleoperated Robot Work System (ROSIE), and a remotely-operated crane control system with installed swing-reduction control system. Another remotely operated apparatus, a Brokk BM250, was loaned to ANL by the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). This machine is not teleoperated and was not part of the LSDP, but deserves some mention in this discussion. The DAWP is a robotic dismantlement system that includes a pair of Schilling Robotic Systems Titan III hydraulic manipulator arms mounted to a specially designed support platform: a hydraulic power unit (HPU) and a remote operator console. The DAWP is designed to be crane-suspended for remote positioning. ROSIE, developed by RedZone Robotics, Inc. is a mobile, electro-hydraulic, omnidirectional platform with a heavy-duty telescoping boom mounted to the platform's deck. The work system includes the mobile platform (locomotor), a power distribution unit (PDU) and a remote operator console. ROSIE moves about the reactor building

  3. National School of Dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Institut of Nuclear Sciences and Techniques founded of 2001 a National School of Dismantling, NSD, at the end, which was validated by CEA, COGEMA, EDF and ANDRA. This school addresses four major issues: Decontamination; Dismantling; Demolition and waste Disposal (4D). Dedicated for instructing scientific and technical knowledge and know-how, needed in dismantling the nuclear installations, NSD has as targets: - personnel at engineering and operational level; - personnel occupied with involved trades from conception through intervention; - students and employees on leave; - employees while training on the job. Initial basic education for students in collaboration with schools and universities concerns: - master degree in radioactive waste management; - master degree in dismantling; - professional license in 3 D; - pro 4 D graduation. NSD is also engaged in continual formation for employees qualified, or not, adapted to the needs generated by the following tasks and personnel: - introduction in dismantling; - project team; - specialist engineer; - team head; - agent for remedial action; - agent for dismantling. The National School of Dismantling joins a network of human and technological capabilities confined within the 4 D frame, namely: - scientific and technical competencies (experts, instructors working in the nuclear field and dismantling); - pedagogical competence (professionals from basic and continual education); - specific material means such as those used by construction site schools, mock-ups, rooms for practical training etc

  4. Network dismantling

    CERN Document Server

    Braunstein, Alfredo; Semerjian, Guilhem; Zdeborová, Lenka

    2016-01-01

    We study the problem of network dismantling, that is of finding a minimal set of vertices whose removal leaves the network broken in connected components of sub-extensive size. For a large class of random graphs this problem is tightly connected to the decycling problem (the removal of vertices leaving the graph acyclic). Exploiting this connection and recent works on epidemic spreading we present precise predictions for the minimal size of a dismantling set in a large random graph with a prescribed (light-tailed) degree distribution. Building on the statistical mechanics perspective we propose a three-stage Min-Sum algorithm for efficiently dismantling networks, including heavy-tailed ones for which the dismantling and decycling problems are not equivalent. We also provide insight into the dismantling problem concluding that it is an intrinsically collective problem and optimal dismantling sets cannot be viewed as a collection of individually well performing nodes.

  5. The ITER management advisory committee (MAC) meeting in Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER management advisory committee meeting was held on 8 March in Cadarache, France. The main topics were the ITER EDA Status Report in the period between the ITER Meeting in Yokohama (October 1990) and February 1999. In particular, the management advisory committee shares the director's concern about the uncertainties against which the whole project operates at present. They also noted that the definition of an appropriate framework for continued US involvement in on-going projects is a very important issue

  6. Robots in dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of personnel radiologic hazards, dismantling of most nuclear installations cannot be considered without robots use. Robot solutions have been used for fifteen years by the Nuclear Installation Dismantling Unit of the CEA to carry out projects of level 3 (i.e. removal of all radioactivity from the installations). PIADE and ATENA carriers and MA23 and RD500 manipulators have largely contributed to the success of ELAN IIB and AT1 projects. The experience benefits of these projects has led the CEA to propose new research programs to test a new hydraulic arm and more changeable and lighter carriers. In future projects, the use of computerized simulation and more powerful remote viewing equipments for tool control and irradiation points locating will improve the training and comfort of operators. The use of modeling in connection with new control systems, such as TAO2000, will allow more complete automatic cutting and handling operations. (J.S.). 7 figs., 1 tab

  7. The challenges of dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gathers Power Point presentations which address the contexts and challenges of dismantling (legal framework, safety and radiation protection challenges, waste processing industry), and propose illustrations of dismantling challenges (example of operations to prepare EURODIF dismantling and CLIGEET work-group on EURODIF dismantling, examples of dismantling of EDF installations and CLIs' opinion on the dismantling of EDF installations, Brennilis dismantling follow-up performed by the CLI, examples of dismantling of CEA installations and opinion of a CLI on the dismantling of CEA installations)

  8. Remote Participation at JET from DRFC Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DRFC at the CEA/Cadarache has participated in the EFDA-JET Programme via the Task Agreement for Profile Control Studies in 1999 and via the EFDA-JET agreement in 2000. Several physicists have been seconded to Culham to work JET and many others have participated in the program 'at distance'. This task has necessitated careful consideration of working methods, often with 'ad-hoc' remote working solutions, but has led to a clear identification of the technical needs for Remote Participation (RP) for the new European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA). We have contributed substantial input into the working groups evaluating the technical needs of RP

  9. Cadarache - 20 years of plutonium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The qualitative and quantitative evolution of plutonium used is reviewed; more particularly, the isotopic composition of plutonium handled at the plutonium fuel fabrication plant of Cadarache has been considerably changing during these 20 last years. The evolution of fast neutron reactor fuel assemblies explains why the fabrication unit has to. The installations have been modified, as also the fuel assembly fabrication process. Changes can be classified in 3 categories: the transformations related to mass evolution, those related more particularly to the plutonium isotopic composition, finally those related to the waste treatment process. These transformations concerned workshops, apparatus and equipments, the reinforcement of protections, criticality accident prevention, and safeguards

  10. Processing of radioactive effluents in Cadarache research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French Atomic Energy Commission (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique - CEA) is studying the design of a new plant for processing liquid aqueous radioactive effluents produced on Cadarache Research Centre. Effluents to be processed are low and medium activity effluents, with, for some of them, important concentrations of actinides, and which lead to the production of A and B category solid wastes, according to the French legislation, and suitable for final disposal. The objectives in terms of minimization of discharge's activity level and solid waste production have guided a selection of processes and their arrangement, in order to optimise decontamination and volume concentration factors. Seeded-ultrafiltration and vitrification with cold crucible melter are part of the selected processes for which developments are in progress in CEA for application to the characteristics of the project. (authors)

  11. The Cadarache 1 MV porcelain SINGAP bushing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1 MV bushing is considered as one of the most technically challenging components of the ITER neutral beam injectors, necessitating the design and manufacture of large ceramic insulators beyond the range of current industrial production. The ITER radiation environment and the fact that the bushing forms part of the tritium barrier demand a component of great reliability and safety. An R and D task has been launched for the fabrication of a prototype bushing based on the SINgle GAP, SINGle APerture (SINGAP) 1 MeV accelerator being developed in the EU. We present the design of this prototype, which is to be tested at Cadarache, and compare it with the SINGAP bushing proposed for the ITER injectors

  12. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project approach to building dismantlement and demolition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When remediation began at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP), there were 41 buildings on site. Twenty-nine of these buildings were ancillary structures and were not used for processing radioactive material. Most of these have been torn down. The remaining 12 buildings were used for uranium and thorium processing or were major support structures, such as the laboratory. Two of the buildings were major processing operations occurred were successfully demolished in February of this year. Demolition of all structures will be complete in September of this year. To give an understanding of the magnitude of the work, the following is a description of the physical characteristics of the green salt building. This building was used to convert brown oxide (UO3) to green salt (UF4), which is the last intermediate step in purifying the mostly yellow cake feed material into uranium metal

  13. Report transparency and nuclear safety 2007 CEA Cadarache; Rapport transparence et securite nucleaire 2007 CEA Cadarache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This report presents the activities of the CEA Center of Cadarache for the year 2007. The actions concerning the safety, the radiation protection, the significant events, the release control and the environmental impacts and the wastes stored on the center are discussed. More especially the report discusses the beginning of the RJH reactor construction, the fourth generation reactors research programs, the implementing of la Rotonde the new radioactive wastes management installation, the renovation of the LECA. (A.L.B.)

  14. Dismantling technologies trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work dismantling technologies trends realized by the CEA are reviewed. There following technologies are presented: Data acquisition from facilities; Scenario studies; Remote handling and carriers; Dismantling techniques; Decontamination.

  15. Tenth ITER negotiations and related meetings [Cadarache, France, September 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the issue of ITER siting settled at the Ministerial Meeting for ITER in Moscow of 28 June 2005, detailed joint work towards all the other aspects of the agreement on the implementation of the ITER international fusion energy research project resumed as delegations from China, the European Union, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation and the United States of America met at the agreed site of Cadarache in the period 7-15 September 2005 for intensive working sessions culminating in the tenth official meeting of the ITER Negotiators. The major advances made were reported to the Tenth Official Meeting of the Negotiators on 12 September at which all delegations reiterated their intention to proceed together with the construction of ITER at the earliest date, and expressed their satisfaction on progress made in defining the process for designation of top ITER officials. In particular, the delegations expressed the wish to see Japan identify suitably qualified candidate(s) to be designated as Nominee Director General. In a separate meeting, the ITER delegates had an informal exchange with a delegation from India on India's interest in the possibility of participating in ITER. The Committee took a number of organizational decisions aimed at preparing for the start of construction. In particular it was agreed to establish, under the Transitional Arrangements, an ITER Joint Work Site at Cadarache. This now provides the institutional frame to start assembling international personnel and to undertake joint technical work at the ITER Site. In addition, the CEA was mandated to represent ITER, in collaboration with the International Team, in the public debate now in progress in France and in the regulatory and licensing process until the ITER Organization itself will be in a position to take the role over

  16. Management system information of characterization of the dismantling project of Jose Cabrera; Sistema de Gestion de la informacion de caracterizacion del proyecto de desmantelamiento de la CN Jose Cabrera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimeno Blesa, M. E.; Martin Palomo, N.; Gomez Rodriguez, C. A.

    2011-07-01

    In the proposed dismantling and decommissioning of the Jose Cabrera NPP is designed and implemented a database of physical and radiological inventory, which provides a powerful tool to optimize the storage, monitoring and control of the characterization data. The database is a useful and reliable management system characterization information that facilitates access and information processing, and ensures their integrity and traceability along of the dismantling project.

  17. Nuclear and non-nuclear safety aspects in nuclear facilities dismantling. The example of a PWR pilot decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dismantling of nuclear facilities, and in particular of nuclear power plants, involves new challenges for the nuclear industry. Although the dismantling of various activated and contaminated components is nowadays considered as almost industrial practice, the safety aspects of decommissioning bring some specific features which are not always taken into account in the operation of the plants. Moreover, most of the plants and facilities currently decommissioned are rather old and were never foreseen to be decommissioned. The operations involved in dismantling and decontamination, often imply new or unforeseen situations. On the nuclear, or radiological side, the radioprotection optimisation of the operations involved often requires to model the environment and to analyse different scenarios to tackle the operation. Recent 3-D software (like the Visiplan software) allowing representation of the actual environment and the influence of the various sources present, is really needed to be able to minimise the radiological impact on the operators. The risk of contamination spread, by opening loops and components or by the dismantling process itself, is also an important aspect of the radiological protection study. Nevertheless, the radiological aspects of the safety approach are not the only ones to be dealt with when decommissioning nuclear facilities. Indeed, classical industrial safety aspects are also important: the dismantling can bring handling and transporting risk (heavy loads, difficult ways, uneasy access, etc.) but also the handling of toxic or hazardous materials. For instance, the removal of asbestos in contaminated areas can lead to additional hazard; the presence of alkali metals (like Na or NaK), of toxic metals (like e.g. Beryllium) or of corrosive fluids (acid,...) have to be tackled often in unstructured environment, and sometimes with limited knowledge of the actual situation. This leads to approach the operations following the ASARA principle (As

  18. TJ-II operation tracking from Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TJ-II remote participation system was designed to follow the TJ-II discharge production, even allowing the physicist in charge of operation to be in a remote location. The system has been based on both web servers and Java technology. These elements were chosen due to its open character, security properties, platform independence and technological maturity. Web pages and Java applications permit users to access experimental systems, data servers and the operation logbook. Security resources are provided by the PAPI system, a distributed authentication and authorization system. The TJ-II remote participation tools have allowed us to command and follow the stellarator operation from Cadarache. Over 1,000 digitizer channels and more than 20 diagnostic control systems were remotely available from web pages for monitoring/programming purposes. One Java application provided on-line information about the acquisition status of channels and acquisition cards. A second Java application showed temporal evolution signals that were refreshed in an automated way on the screen after each shot. A third Java application provided access to the operation logbook. In addition to these tools, we used the VRVS video conferencing system (FUSION community, X-Point room) and the EFDA Messenger Service for instant messaging (Jabber client). (Author)

  19. TJ-II operation tracking from Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TJ-II remote participation system was designed to follow the TJ-II discharge production, even allowing the physicist in charge of operation to be in a remote location. The system has been based on both web servers and Java technology. These elements were chosen due to its open character, security properties, platform independency and technological maturity. Web pages and Java applications permit users to access experimental systems, data servers and the operation logbook. Security resources are provided by the PAPI system, a distributed authentication and authorization system. The TJ-II remote participation tools have allowed us to command and follow the stellarator operation from Cadarache. Over 1,000 digitizer channels and more than 20 diagnostic control systems were remotely available from web pages for monitoring/programming purposes. One Java application provided on-line information about the acquisition status of channels and acquisition cards. A second Java application showed temporal evolution signals that were refreshed in an automated way on the screen after each shot. A third Java application provided access to the operation logbook. In addition to these tools, we used the VRVS videoconferencing system (FUSION community, X-Point room) and the EFDA Messenger Service for instant messaging (Jabber client). (author)

  20. Dismantling of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear facilities have a long estimable lifetime but necessarily limited in time. At the end of their operation period, basic nuclear installations are the object of cleansing operations and transformations that will lead to their definitive decommissioning and then to their dismantling. Because each facility is somewhere unique, cleansing and dismantling require specific techniques. The dismantlement consists in the disassembly and disposing off of big equipments, in the elimination of radioactivity in all rooms of the facility, in the demolition of buildings and eventually in the reconversion of all or part of the facility. This article describes these different steps: 1 - dismantling strategy: main de-construction guidelines, expected final state; 2 - industries and sites: cleansing and dismantling at the CEA, EDF's sites under de-construction; 3 - de-construction: main steps, definitive shutdown, preparation of dismantling, electromechanical dismantling, cleansing/decommissioning, demolition, dismantling taken into account at the design stage, management of polluted soils; 4 - waste management: dismantlement wastes, national policy of radioactive waste management, management of dismantlement wastes; 5 - mastery of risks: risk analysis, conformability of risk management with reference documents, main risks encountered at de-construction works; 6 - regulatory procedures; 7 - international overview; 8 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  1. Melter Dismantlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, BS

    2000-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been utilizing vitrification processes to convert high-level radioactive waste forms into a stable glass for disposal in waste repositories. Vitrification facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) are converting liquid high level waste (HLW) by combining it with a glass-forming media to form a borosilicate glass, which will ensure safe long-term storage. Large, slurry fed melters, which are utilized for this process, were anticipated to have a finite life, on the order of two to three years, at which time they would have to be replaced using remote methods, due to the high radiation fields. In actuality the melters useable life span has, to date, have exceeded original life span estimates. Initial plans called for the removal of failed melters by placing the melter assembly into a container and storing in a concrete vault on the vitrification plant site pending size reduction, segregation, containerization, and shipment to appropriate storage facilities. Separate facilities for the processing of the failed melters currently do not exist. Options for handling these melters include (1) locating a facility to conduct the size reduction, characterization, and containerization as originally planned; (2) long-term storage or disposal of the complete melter assembly; and (3) attempting to refurbish the melter and to reuse the melter assembly. The focus of this report is to look at methods and issues pertinent to size reduction and/or melter refurbishment. In particular, removal of glass as a part of a refurbishment or for the purposes of reducing contamination levels (allowing for disposal of a greater proportion of the melter as low level waste) will be addressed.

  2. The nuclear submarines dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The replacement of the first French nuclear submarines by these ones of new generation has led to put in place the dismantling and decommissioning of nuclear boilers on board. Technicatome is in charge of shutdown, decommissioning and dismantling studies of nuclear submarines. (N.C.)

  3. Dismantling of nuclear submarines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1993, as French new SSBN Le Triomphant was to be commissioned, decommissioning and dismantling of the first French submarines class Le Redoutable has been scheduled. The DGA (MoD) asked DCNS, the shipyard in charge of submarines and nuclear reactors repair, to organize the dismantling operations. (author)

  4. Challenges of dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is made up of short articles whose issue is reactor dismantling. The first article presents the French strategy that can be featured by immediate dismantling (the dismantling process is prepared a long time before decommissioning and begins as soon as the reactor is shut down) and massive dismantling (a lot of nuclear facilities will be decommissioned in a near future). The following 4 articles give the viewpoints of ASN (Nuclear Safety Authority), EDF (for its fleet of PWRs), CEA (for its experimental reactors and nuclear facilities) and AREVA (for the EURODIF George Besse plant). Costs and financing are dealt with in an article that says that the cost is greatly dependent on the final state: a complete nuclear-free area or an area whose radioactivity is below safe standards and that law implies to constitute provisions all along the operating life of the facility to cover dismantling costs. Dismantling generates a huge amount of very low-level radioactive wastes particularly metal scraps that might be recycled and get out of nuclear industry, an article details the feasibility of such recycling. Another article shows the impact of massive dismantling on the management of radioactive wastes. In an article Westinghouse presents its experience in the cutting of internal equipment of the reactor core. The last 2 articles presents the dismantling strategies in Spain and in the UK. (A.C.)

  5. Advanced systems for dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the author shows the approach used by the UDIN (Unite Centrale de Declassement des Installations Nucleaires) for dismantling. With respect of costs for dismantling, it is necessary to take in account the specificity of dismantling work site and to protect the environment and the workers. Some examples show these points. The protections are made by a good study of the work site, by a preliminary decontamination if possible by containment of contamination and by utilization of robots and technics to reduce radioactive wastes

  6. Innovations in dismantling robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the beginning of the 1970s, CEA has developed innovative systems for remote operation in nuclear fields. This paper presents the main developments achieved for dismantling applications of robotic systems (manipulators, carriers, controllers, simulation). (orig.)

  7. The direct-Mat Project: Dismantling and Recycling Techniques for road Materials. Sharing Knowledge and Practices; El proyecto DIRECT-MAT: Tecnicas de demolicion y reciclado de materiales para la carretera-Compartiendo conocimientos y practicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinis Fernandez, F.; Rubio guzman, B.; Gonzalez Abadias, A. I.

    2011-07-01

    This article describes the content of the DIRECT-MAT (Dismantling and Recycling for road Materials) project. the DIRECT MAT project objectives consist of sharing and disseminating, at the European scale, national knowledge and field practices regarding the dismantling and recycling of road and road related materials, for the benefit of all European countries. Road material recycling processes have previously been studied in national research projects in the last years; unfortunately, the results of those projects almost never benefit other European countries. This is especially true for the newer Member States. The DIRECT-MAT project, within 7{sup t}h Framework Programme, is a three year project starting in 2009, and is comparised of 20 partners from 15 participating countries. to reach the aims of the project, a WEB database will be created to compile and display the extensive and already validated research and job site data and a set of Best Practices Guides on dismantling and recycling of different types of materials will be issued. Finally, guidelines will be proposed to ensure database updating, including the results of future researches. (Author) 6 refs.

  8. Project management for the decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities; Projektmanagement fuer Stilllegung und Rueckbau kerntechnischer Anlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasen, Joerg; Wilhelm, Oliver [ENBW Kernkraft GmbH, Neckarwestheim (Germany); Seizer, Burkhard; Schuetz, Tobias [Drees und Sommer, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    The decommissioning of nuclear power plants is executed in a classic project manner as it is known from other construction projects. It is obvious to use the known portfolio of project management tools. The complexity that is created by the large size of the project in combination with safety requirements of the nuclear industry has to be handled. Complexity can only be managed addressing two main drivers: Prioritization and speed (agility) in project execution. Prioritization can be realized by applying tools like Earned Value Management. A high speed of project execution is established by applying Agile Management like SCRUM-methods. This method is adopted in the context of the cooperation ''Complex Projects'' to the needs of nuclear industry.

  9. Elk River Reactor dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dismantling program was carried out in three overlapping phases: the planning phase which included the preliminary planning and selection of the dismantling approach, the dismantling phase which included all work performed to remove the reactor facility and restore the site to its pre-reactor condition, and the closeout phase which included the final site survey and efforts necessary to terminate the AEC license and contract. Of particular interest was the use of a remotely operated plasma cutting torch to section the pressure vessel internals, the pressure vessel and the outer thermal shield, the use of explosives in removal of the biological shield and the method of establishment of the criteria for material disposal

  10. Report transparency and nuclear safety 2007 CEA Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the activities of the CEA Center of Cadarache for the year 2007. The actions concerning the safety, the radiation protection, the significant events, the release control and the environmental impacts and the wastes stored on the center are discussed. More especially the report discusses the beginning of the RJH reactor construction, the fourth generation reactors research programs, the implementing of la Rotonde the new radioactive wastes management installation, the renovation of the LECA. (A.L.B.)

  11. The dismantling of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    for nuclear installations, the dismantling is an important part of their exploitation. The technology of dismantling is existing and to get a benefit from the radioactive decay, it seems more easy for operating company such E.D.F. to wait for fifty years before dismantling. But in order to get the knowledge of this operation, the Safety Authority wanted to devote this issue of 'Controle'to the dismantling method. This issue includes: the legal aspects, the risks assessment, the dismantling policy at E.D.F., the site of Brennilis (first French experience of dismantling), the dismantling techniques, the first dismantling of a fuel reprocessing plant, comparison with classical installations, economic aspect, some German experiences, the cleansing of the american site of Handford. (N.C.)

  12. A close-up of the ALEPH Time Projection Chamber (TPC) after the detector was dismantled, with a slice removed for the exhibition at the Musée International d'Horlogerie.

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On the occasion of CERN's 50th anniversary, starting 2 December at the Musée International d'Horlogerie in La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland, a new exhibition will pay tribute to physics, from the cosmic to the subatomic scales. The exhibition, which run for several years, includes a slice of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) from ALEPH, one of the LEP detectors, which CERN donated to the museum when the detector was dismantled.

  13. LEP dismantling starts

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Since the end of November, various teams have been getting stuck into dismantling the LEP accelerator and its four experiments. After making the installations safe, the dismantling and removal of 40,000 tonnes of equipment is underway. Down in the tunnel, it is a solemn moment. It is 10 o'clock on 13 December and Daniel Regin, one of those heading the dismantling work, moves in on a magnet, armed with a hydraulic machine. Surrounded by teams gathered there for a course in dismantling, he makes the first cut into LEP. The great deconstruction has begun. In little over than a year, the accelerator will have been cleared away to make room for its successor, the LHC. The start of the operation goes back to 27 November. Because before setting about the machine with hydraulic shears and monkey wrenches, LEP had first to be made safe - it was important to make sure the machine could be taken apart without risk. All the SPS beam injection systems to LEP were cut off. The fluids used for cooling the magnets and superc...

  14. Decontamination and dismantlement of the building 594 waste ion exchange facility at Argonne National Laboratory-East project final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiese, E. C.

    1998-11-23

    The Building 594 D&D Project was directed toward the following goals: Removal of any radioactive and hazardous materials associated with the Waste Ion Exchange Facility; Decontamination of the Waste Ion Exchange Facility to unrestricted use levels; Demolition of Building 594; and Documentation of all project activities affecting quality (i.e., waste packaging, instrument calibration, audit results, and personnel exposure) These goals had been set in order to eliminate the radiological and hazardous safety concerns inherent in the Waste Ion Exchange Facility and to allow, upon completion of the project, unescorted and unmonitored access to the area. The ion exchange system and the resin contained in the system were the primary areas of concern, while the condition of the building which housed the system was of secondary concern. ANL-E health physics technicians characterized the Building 594 Waste Ion Exchange Facility in September 1996. The characterization identified a total of three radionuclides present in the Waste Ion Exchange Facility with a total activity of less than 5 {micro}Ci (175 kBq). The radionuclides of concern were Co{sup 60}, Cs{sup 137}, and Am{sup 241}. The highest dose rates observed during the project were associated with the resin in the exchange vessels. DOE Order 5480.2A establishes the maximum whole body exposure for occupational workers at 5 rem (50 mSv)/yr; the administrative limit at ANL-E is 1 rem/yr (10 mSv/yr).

  15. National experience in dismantling; La experiencia nacional en desmantelamiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, A.; Perez Estevez, C.

    2013-07-01

    This paper summarizes the Spanish experience in dismantling activities, briefly describing the three cases where these activities have been or are being carried out in Spain by ENRESA: Vandellos 1 NPP, Jose Cabrera NPP and CIEMAT. The dismantling of the Vandellos 1NPP was organized in three phases, two of which have already been implemented. The facility is currently in a waiting period which will allow the decay of radioactivity of the reactor box internal structures to levels that make feasible the dismantling process at a minimum radiological cost. The dismantling activities of the Jose Cabrera NPP, started in February 2010, take part of the first NPP full decommissioning process in Spain. following a set preparatory activities performed during the first two years, the project has just finished one of its major milestones, the real differential factor of this project: the reactor internals segmentation. CIEMAT launched in January 2000 and Integrated Plan for the Improvement of CIEMAT Facilities (PIMIC), one of whose projects, the called PIMIC Dismantling Project, assigned the ENRESA. is aimed at the dismantling, presently completed, of two nuclear and two radioactive facilities and to the decontamination of land in two areas known as Lenteja and Montecillo. Due to their specificity against the dismantling activities in the two NPPs mentioned above, the work done to achieve the full restoration of the area called Lenteja, which was contaminated in the 70s, as a result of an occidental release, is summarized in this paper. (Author)

  16. Cadarache, January 17, 2012. A nuclear crisis exercise with a seismic dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As France is a region with a moderate seismicity, the new French seismic zoning indicates that the Cadarache CEA centre and the surrounding communities are located in a region exhibiting a seismicity which is greater than the metropolitan average. Therefore, a project of organizing a nuclear crisis exercise emerged with taking this seismic risk into account. This exercise took place on the 17 January 2012. This article presents its objectives which addressed the ability of public authorities and of the operator to manage a nuclear accident caused by an earthquake and its consequences in terms of civilian security and nuclear safety. The article also briefly presents the Cadarache centre within its seismic environment, and how the seismic risk had been taken into account when designing and dimensioning some of its installations. It also evokes the ASN prescriptions made after the decennial safety inspections. Several actors, institutions and organizations have been involved in the exercise and in its preparation, and this preparation had some consequences on the awareness of local authorities on the seismic risk. The adopted scenario is briefly presented as well as the performance of simulations. The main lessons learned are briefly discussed

  17. Dismantling of nuclear facilities. From a structural engineering perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper summarizes some important aspects, requirements and technical boundary conditions that need to be considered in dismantling projects in the nuclear sector from a structural engineering perspective. Besides general requirements regarding radiation protection, occupational safety, efficiency and cost effectiveness it is important to take into account other conditions which have a direct impact on technical details and the structural assessment of the dismantling project. These are the main aspects highlighted in this paper: - The structural assessment of dismantling projects has to be based on the as-built situation. - The limitations in terms of available equipment and space have to be taken into account. - The structural assessments are often non-standardized engineering evaluations. A selection of five dismantling projects illustrates the various structural aspects. (orig.)

  18. Technical Aspect of Shielded SIMS Installation in CEA Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A shielded IMS 6f has been installed in the LECA facility, CEA Cadarache France. The nuclearization was performed by CAMECA Company, which sells the standard IMS 6f. Working on nuclear materials requires in depth modifications of the apparatus itself. Despite these modifications, the shielded SIMS has the same level of performance as the standard apparatus. The design of the modified apparatus is presented and the safety aspects are emphasised. The shielded SIMS should be allowed to handle irradiated samples at the end of 2001. (Author)

  19. Robot for reactor dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable to attain the operation on a cylindrical coordinate system thereby performing dismantling operation exactly and at a high reliability. Constitution: A reactor dismantling robot is suspended by ropes by an elevating device to the inside of reactor shielding walls. The robot has a fixed portion having a plurality of legs abutting against the inner surface of the shieling walls while extending and shrinking radially in the horizontal direction and an arm portion having an operation arm disposed with a shielding wall breaking operation device. The arm portion is disposed with a mechanism for vertically moving the operation arm and a mechanism for forwarding and backwarding the operation arm in the horizontal direction and the arm portion itself is constituted so as to be rotatable around a vertical axis. (Seki, T.)

  20. Dismantling cost and strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the shutdown of nuclear facilities the strategie includes decontamination and dismantling steps. Those steps are well established in a theoretical level and by the responsible international organizations. The deployment of such a strategy at national level for radiochemical facilities is just beginning. An example of such kind of operation is presented. The shutdown of the waste processing plant, in 1974, was performed by the Eurochemic Society

  1. Realisation and dismantlability

    CERN Document Server

    Hensel, Sebastian; Przytycki, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    We study dismantling properties of the arc, disc and sphere graphs. We prove that any finite subgroup H of the mapping class group of a surface with punctures, the handlebody group, or Out(F_n) fixes a filling (resp. simple) clique in the appropriate graph. We deduce realisation theorems, in particular the Nielsen Realisation Problem in the case of a nonempty set of punctures. We also prove that infinite H have either empty or contractible fixed point sets in the corresponding complexes. Furthermore, we show that their spines are classifying spaces for proper actions for mapping class groups and Out(F_n).

  2. LEP Dismantling: Wagons Roll!

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The first trucks transporting material from LEP and its four experiments left CERN on 31 January. Since the LEP dismantling operation began, the material had been waiting to be removed from the sites of the four experiments and the special transit area on the Prévessin site. On the evening of 30 January, the French customs authorities gave the green light for the transport operation to begin. So first thing the next day, the two companies in charge of recycling the material, Jaeger & Bosshard (Switzerland) and Excoffier (France), set to work. Only 1500 truckloads to go before everything has been removed!

  3. Report on transparency and nuclear safety 2014 - Cadarache CEA centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document proposes, first, a presentation of the Cadarache CEA centre, of its activities and installations, gives a rather detailed overview of measures related to safety and to radiation protection within these activities and installations. Then it reports significant events related to safety and to radiation protection which occurred in 2014 and have been declared to the ASN. Next, it discusses the results of release measurements (liquid and gaseous effluents, radiological assessment, and chemical assessment for various installations) and the control of the chemical and radiological impact of these gaseous and liquid effluents on the environment. Finally, it addresses the issue of radioactive wastes which are stored in the different nuclear base installations of the Centre, indicates the different measures aimed at limiting the volume of these warehoused wastes and addresses their impact on health and on the environment. Nature and quantities of warehoused wastes are specified. Remarks and recommendations of the CHSCT are given

  4. Conclusions of the DIRECT-MAT project: Dismantling and recycling techniques for road materials; Conclusiones del proyecto DIRECT-MAT: Tecnicas de demolicion y reciclado de materiales para la carretera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Abadias, A. I.; Ruiz-Aucar Berlinches, E.; Sinis Fernandez, F.

    2012-07-01

    DIRECT-MAT (Dismantling and Recycling Techniques for road Materials) is a research project included in the 7{sup t}h Framework Programme of the EU, which counted with the participation of 20 partners from 15 different European countries. The Transport Research Centre of CEDEX (Spain) has been part of this project that began in January 2009. The aim of the DIRECT-MAT project has been to enable that national experience in the field of demolition and recycling of materials related to roads can be shared and disseminated among European countries for the benefit of all of them. In 2011 the paper the Direct-Mat Project: Dismantling and recycling techniques for road materials. Sharing knowledge and practices was published in the number 161 of Ingenieria Civil magazine. That paper consisted of an extensive description of the project, explaining in detail its structure, the status of the work in early 2011 and the conclusions drawn from the milestones (review of existing national documents). This paper is a continuation of the one previously published. This this article describes the work carried out since then and the collisions of the project. During this time, the main activities have been the compilation of several case studies and the developing of best practice guides. Regarding the results of the project, it is important to mention the database in which all the information gathered during the project is being uploads. Soon, it will have free online access. This database in perhaps the most remarkable results of the project, as it represents an invaluable reference tool for all the stake holders interested in the wide variety of recycling techniques that are being carried out today in Europe. (Author) 8 refs.

  5. Dismantling of nuclear facilities and related problems - Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oldest French nuclear facilities, built for some of them in the 1950's for research or power generation purposes, have reached more or less the end of their life. More than 30 facilities have entered the shutdown or dismantling phase, among which 8 reactors of the very first generations of Electricite de France (EdF) reactors. The aim of this two-days conference is to take stock of the present day status and perspectives of the dismantling activity, to approach the question of the management of the wastes produced, and to share experience about large scale operations already carried out. This document gathers the available presentations given during this conference: 1 - the 'Passage' project (F. Tournebize); 2 - CEA-Grenoble: from Louis Neel to key enabling technologies (D. Bordet); 3 - Dismantling actions in France (L. Evrard); 4 - Securing control of long-term charges funding (T. Furois); 5 - Waste disposal projects and their contribution to the management of dismantling wastes (M. Butez); 6 - Specificities linked with dismantling activities (Y. Billarand); 7 - Dismantling safety: the ASN's point of view (L. Evrad); 8 - Labor Ministry viewpoint about the dismantling related questions (T. Lahaye); 9 - Consideration of organizational and human factors in dismantling operations: a new deal in the operators-service providers relation (L. Menuet); 10 - Diploma and training experience (A. Pin); 11 - Glove-boxes dismantling at La Hague plant - status and experience feedback (P. Mougnard); 12 - Dismantling of Siloe reactor (CEA-Grenoble): application of the ALARA approach (P. Charlety); 13 - BR3 - a complex dismantling: the neutron shield tank (NST) in remote operation and indirect vision (L. Denissen); 14 - Cleansing and dismantling of the Phebus PF containment (S. Charavy); 15 - Integration of dismantling at the design and exploitation stages of nuclear facilities (P. Poncet); 16 - Consideration during the design and exploitation stages of dispositions aiming at

  6. Dismantling technology of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of nuclear power plants include very high radioactive inventories in their components, both a large scale steel and a massive reinforced concrete at the end of the plant lifetime, these radioactivities make it difficult to dismantle them. To attack these problems the state-of-the-art dismantling technologies of these components were surveyed and reviewed, and a case study of immediate dismantling and safe storage on a small scale BWR power station was carried out and disscussed. Immediate dismantling and safe storage on a large scale BWR power station was also surveyed and reviewed. In-site entombment applied to a small and a large scale BWR power stations was also discussed. The results surveyed and discussed were described in this report as the third year activity of dismantling technology subcommittee of the Committee on study of Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities. (author)

  7. Study on dismantling scenario for large equipment in decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Utilization of validation result of applicability of project management data evaluation code to decommissioning project of FUGEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the first step of inspection of the applicability of the PRODIA Code for dismantling activities in the decommissioning of FUGEN, manpower needs for dismantling activities in FUGEN conducted in 2008 were calculated with conventional calculation formulas developed from the data obtained from the JPDR decommissioning program. In this inspection, it was found that the actual data for the dismantling of feedwater heaters show the following two characteristic profiles: 1) the actual data were significantly smaller than the results of the conventional calculation formulas and 2) the actual data for the dismantling of the 3rd feedwater heater were two times larger than those for the dismantling of the 4th one, although both data were almost of the same weight. In order to use the PRODIA Code for further dismantling activities in the decommissioning of FUGEN, the origin of these results was investigated. This investigation showed that both of the differences in the work description between FUGEN and JPDR and between the 3rd feedwater heater of FUGEN and the 4th one produce these characteristic profiles. Since this means that the conventional calculation formula for the dismantling of feedwater heaters has no applicability, it was considered necessary to construct a new calculation formula reflecting the work description of the dismantling of feedwater heaters in FUGEN. It was found that the calculation results with this new formula showed good agreement with the actual data of both the 3rd and 4th feedwater heaters. Based on these findings, some case studies for the dismantling of feedwater heaters were conducted. (author)

  8. The giant superconducting magnet system of 10,000 tons mass for fusion experiment at Cadarache, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) being built at Cadarache, France has many unique features and is one of the biggest scientific adventures in the history of science and technology. Seven partners (India, EU, US, China, Japan, Korea and Russia) have made an International Organization situated at Cadarache, France to provide direction and co-ordination for R and D and construction of this project. The R and D labs and manufacturing industries are spread in these seven partner countries. Components manufactured in these countries will be transported to Cadarache in France for assembly. Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat is coordinating this project activities on behalf of India. The magnet system, required for confinement and control of plasma leading to fusion reaction in ITER is one of the key systems of this project. There are 18 TF (Toroidal Field) Coils, 6 PF (Poloidal Field) coils, 6 CS (Central Solenoid) coils and 18 correction coils (CC), all of which are of superconducting type. All TF and CS coils have Nb3Sn superconductor and all PF and CC coils have NbTi superconductor. Each TF coil has height 15 m and width 9 m and 330 tons mass. The biggest PF coil has diameter 24 m and 300 tons mass. The total mass of these superconducting magnet systems is about 10000 tons. Use of Nb3Sn superconductor for manufacturing superconducting cables for successful use had not reached a matured stage earlier and this project gave a thrust for significant R and D activities worldwide and now due to this project, it is a matured and reliable technology. The jacketing and manufacturing of long cables need up to about 760 m long special infrastructure at Industry. The special building built for PF coil winding at ITER, Cadarache site is of size 250 m X 45 m. All these coils are made using cable-in-conduit conductors (CICC). These long CICCs have to carry current as high as 68 kA in case of TF coils. Due to this high current and

  9. CRITICALITY CONTROL DURING THE DISMANTLING OF A URANIUM CONVERSION PLANT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, in the Cadarache Research Center in southern France, the production at the Enriched Uranium Treatment Workshops started in 1965 and ended in 1995. The dismantling is in progress and will last until 2006. The decommissioning is planned in 2007. Since the authorized enrichment in 235U was 10% in some parts of the plant, and unlimited in others, the equipment and procedures were designed for criticality control during the operating period. Despite the best previous removing of the uranium in the inner parts of the equipment, evaluation of the mass of remaining fissile material by in site gamma spectrometry measurement shows that the safety of the ''clean up'' operations requires specific criticality control procedures, this mass being higher than the safe mass. The chosen method is therefore based on the mapping of fissile material in the contaminated parts of the equipment and on the respect of particular rules set for meeting the criticality control standards through mass control. The process equipment is partitioned in separated campaign, and for each campaign the equipment dismantling is conducted with a precise traceability of the pieces, from the equipment to the drum of waste, and the best final evaluation of the mass of fissile material in the drum. The first results show that the mass of uranium found in the dismantled equipment is less than the previous evaluation, and they enable us to confirm that the criticality was safely controlled during the operations. The mass of fissile material remaining in the equipment can be then carefully calculated, when it is lower than the minimal critical mass, and on the basis of a safety analysis, we will be free of any constraints regarding criticality control, this allowing to make procedures easier, and to speed up the operations

  10. TRIGA Mark-III reactor dismantling program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activation assessment of the main parts of the TRIGA Mark-III (KRR-2) was estimated to effectively dismantle the activated and contaminated areas. All of the method and the order for decommissioning the KRR-2 have been chosen as a result of the examination of the physical structure and radiological conditions of the reactor component. These decommissioning methods and orders were reviewed as part of the Hazard and Operability (HAZOP) studies for the project. Radiological assessment is also done to protect the workers and the environment from the dismantling work. License documents were submitted to the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) at the end of 1998. Practical work of the D and D will start at the end of 1999 once the government issues the license. Radiation protection plan was also set up to control the workers and environment. This paper summarized the main lines of those studies. (author)

  11. LEP Dismantling Reaches Half-Way Stage

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    LEP's last superconducting module leaves its home port... Just seven months into the operation, LEP dismantling is forging ahead. Two of the eight arcs which form the tunnel have already been emptied and the last of the accelerator's radiofrequency (RF) cavities has just been raised to the surface. The 160 people working on LEP dismantling have reason to feel pleased with their progress. All of the accelerator's 72 superconducting RF modules have already been brought to the surface, with the last one being extracted on 2nd May. This represents an important step in the dismantling process, as head of the project, John Poole, explains. 'This was the most delicate part of the project, because the modules are very big and they could only come out at one place', he says. The shaft at point 1.8 through which the RF cavity modules pass is 18 metres in diameter, while each module is 11.5 metres long. Some modules had to travel more than 10 kilometres to reach the shaft. ... is lifted up the PM 1.8 shaft, after a m...

  12. Report on transparency and nuclear safety - Cadarache CEA centre - 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A first volume proposes a presentation of the Cadarache CEA centre, of its activities and installations, gives a rather detailed overview of measures related to safety and to radiation protection within these activities and installations. It also reports significant events related to safety and to radiation protection which occurred in 2012 and have been declared to the ASN. It discusses the results of release measurements (liquid and gaseous effluents, radiological assessment, and chemical assessment for various installations) and the control of the chemical and radiological impact of these gaseous and liquid effluents on the environment. It addresses the issue of radioactive wastes which are stored in the different nuclear base installations of the Centre, indicates the different measures aimed at limiting the volume of these warehoused wastes and addresses their impact on health and on the environment. Nature and quantities of warehoused wastes are specified. The second volume concerns some specific installations (INB 32 or ATPu, and INB 54 or LPC) which belong to AREVA NC. The same topics are addressed: presentation of the facilities, arrangements regarding safety and radiation protection, significant events related to safety and radiation protection, measurements of effluents and their impact on the environment, warehoused wastes. Remarks and recommendations of the CHSCT are given

  13. Failure prevention during dismantling of nuclear facilities by stress measuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the dismantling of nuclear facilities, various cutting techniques are in use or in an advanced state of development [1, 2]. The practice in decommissioning shows, that significant failures occur during dismantling caused by release of stress. In this case cutting parts or cutting tools get jammed if mechanical cutting techniques are used. The aim of the project is to develop and adapt measuring techniques to characterize the stress state of components. With the help of these basic elements a dismantling strategy, based on FEM simulation, could be worked out. The aims is to guarantee a troublefree dismantling, to save dismantling time and therefore to minimize costs and radiation exposure of personnel. For the remote-controlled determination of stress state in components, which should be dismantled in atmosphere and under water, the new developed methods are as follows: (-) nondestructive electromagnetic technique for the determination of surface stress inside ferromagnetic steel components (-) innovative destructive Water-Abrasive-Suspension-Jet strain control technique for the determination of stress in ferromagnetic and austenitic steel components. (orig.)

  14. Remote tool development for nuclear dismantling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remote tool systems to undertake nuclear dismantling operations require careful design and development not only to perform their given duty but to perform it safely within the constraints imposed by harsh environmental conditions. Framatome ANP NUCLEAR SERVICES has for a long time developed and qualified equipment to undertake specific maintenance operations of nuclear reactors. The tool development methodology from this activity has since been adapted to resolve some very challenging reactor dismantling operations which are demonstrated in this paper. Each nuclear decommissioning project is a unique case, technical characterisation data is generally incomplete. The development of the dismantling methodology and associated equipment is by and large an iterative process combining design and simulation with feasibility and validation testing. The first stage of the development process involves feasibility testing of industrial tools and examining adaptations necessary to control and deploy the tool remotely with respect to the chosen methodology and environmental constraints. This results in a prototype tool and deployment system to validate the basic process. The second stage involves detailed design which integrates any remaining technical and environmental constraints. At the end of this stage, tools and deployment systems, operators and operating procedures are qualified on full scale mock ups. (authors)

  15. Nuclear safety training program (NSTP) for dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    European Control Services (GDF Suez) has developed and is still developing specific training programs for the dismantling and decontamination of nuclear installations. The main topic in these programs is nuclear safety culture. We therefore do not focus on technical training but on developing the right human behavior to work in a 'safety culture' environment. The vision and techniques behind these programs have already been tested in different environments: for example the dismantling of the BN MOX Plant in Dessel (Belgium), Nuclear Safety Culture Training for Electrabel NPP Doel..., but also in the non-nuclear industry. The expertise to do so was found in combining the know-how of the Training and the Nuclear Department of ECS. In training, ECS is one of the main providers of education in risky tasks, like elevation and manipulation of charges, working in confined spaces... but it does also develop training on demand to improve safety in a certain topic. Radiation Protection is the core business in the Nuclear Department with a presence on most of the nuclear sites in Belgium. Combining these two domains in a nuclear safety training program, NSTP, is an important stage in a dismantling project due to specific contamination, technical and other risks. It increases the level of safety and leads to a harmonization of different working cultures. The modular training program makes it possible to evaluate constantly as well as in group or individually. (authors)

  16. Experience of dismantling in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the ENRESA Spanish Company activities in reactors and uranium mill dismantling. Dismantling costs are evaluated taking into account the equipment, structures and components required, the radiological plant zone inventory, the inventory of macro components and the management of wastes. The calculated cost does not include activities performed prior to dismantling, shutdown and fuel removal operations (for reactors), transport and disposal of radioactive wastes, insurance, taxes etc.. A description of the dismantling of Vandellos 1 Nuclear Power Plant, JEN-1, ARGOS and ARBI research reactors is given with a description of the legal framework, the options proposed and the approved alternative, the basic design and licensing phase, the environmental radiological surveillance, the inventory and classification of dismantling waste materials. The closeout of an uranium mill site and the site rehabilitation remedial action plan carried out to ensure the long-term stability of tailing piles, to contain the dismantling wastes and to reduce the radon flux and water infiltrations is also described. (J.S.). 1 fig., 2 tabs

  17. The IRSN Institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety Cadarache Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research programs of the IRSN in the Cadarache Center concern the nuclear safety (reactor safety, nuclear fuels behavior during accidents, fires in nuclear installations), the protection and the control of radioactive materials, the human and the environment protection. The programs are presented and discussed. This presentation includes also the regional impact of the Institute at Cadarache (economical impact, relations with the universities and international meetings). (A.L.B.)

  18. Earning people's trust: Dismantling and decommissioning nuclear power plants, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main actions at different levels that need to be carried out in order to gain people's confidence include the following: (a) In the institutional framework, to carry out public information, social and economic impact assessment, and EIA of the decommissioning and dismantling project. (b) To create a follow-up commission, composed of the local administration, state representative, regional government, nuclear companies, ENRESA, and social and economic representatives. The objectives of this commission are the knowledge and monitoring of the evolution of the decommissioning and dismantling project, the creation of an alternative economy and institutional coordination. (c) To plan sustainable development in several areas such as communications and infrastructures, technical training, and encouragement of private initiatives in all economic sectors as well as of public investment. The lessons that have been learned from the experience at Vandellos will be taken into account in the decommissioning and dismantling of Jose Cabrera NPP

  19. The good wealth of dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Civil engineering, mechanical and waste conditioning companies are working hard on the market of nuclear facilities dismantling. This market has a great future ahead of it in the ten years to come. According to the European Commission, 50 to 60 reactors among the 157 actually in service in the European Union should be dismantled by 2025. The cost per reactor is estimated to 10-15% of the initial investment, which represents an enormous amount of money, estimated to 20-39 billion euros for the only French nuclear park. In France, this market is shared by a core of about 20 companies, like Spie Nucleaire, Onet, Vinci (Nuvia) and Areva. Some dismantling sites require a specific skill, in particular those in relation with the research activity of the CEA (the French atomic energy commission) or involving specific technologies (research reactors, spent fuel reprocessing plants, sodium-cooled rectors..). (J.S.)

  20. Optimized phases for reactor dismantling – an efficient and sustainable concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D&D projects are driven by costs, to implement an optimization process from the very beginning is key. Optimized strategy and sequencing of the dismantling (hot to cold) will provide serious economical savings . Larger dismantling packages will reduce interfaces and ease the coordination efforts on site. Early usage of mobile systems will ease the large-scale release for dismantling Social transition has to be addressed with priority and to be planned at an early phase in the D&D planning Concept, Planning & Project Management will influence the success of the project much more than the used technique

  1. Dismantling College Opportunity in California

    OpenAIRE

    The Civil Rights Project/ Proyecto Derechos Civiles

    2011-01-01

    These studies released today call attention to the fact that cuts to higher education impact students, their families, CSU faculty, and staff well beyond the classroom. Reduction in access, retention, and increase in cost are disproportionately impacting traditionally underrepresented students, and are being felt within their personal lives. Related Documents Dismantling College Opportunity in California These three reports constitute Part Four of The ...

  2. Dismantling products management on the Mounts Arree site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a quick presentation of the historical aspect of the site, of works and organisation for these ones, we detail the different actions of radiological characterization implemented at the different steps of the project to guarantee the preparation of dismantling works and organize the waste management. (N.C.)

  3. Seismic risk and safety of nuclear installations. A look at the Cadarache Centre; Risque sismique et surete des installations nucleaires. Regards sur le Centre de Cadarache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verrhiest-Leblanc, G.; Chevallier, A. [Autorite de Surete Nucleaire 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-11-15

    After a brief recall of some important seismic events which occurred in the past in the south-eastern part of France, the authors indicate the nuclear installations present in this region. They outline the difference between requirements for a usual building and for basic nuclear installations. They indicate laws and regulations which are to be applied to these installations like to any hazardous industrial installation. They describe the seismic risk as it has been determined for the Cadarache area, and evoke the para-seismic design of new nuclear installations which are to be built in Cadarache and actions for a para-seismic reinforcement of existing constructions. Finally, they evoke organisational aspects (emergency plans) and the approach for a better information and transparency about the seismic risk

  4. Radioactive waste storage at the CEA Centre in Cadarache; transfer from the -storage yard- to the CEDRA facility: an illustration of changes in the safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A lot of changes have been made to the nuclear waste storage and disposal strategy over the last few years thanks to technological progress and changes in the requirements applicable in the sector. In this article, the authors present a concrete example of the actions undertaken, at the request of the French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN), by the CEA Centre at Cadarache, regarding the Cadarache Centre waste storage facility (BNI 56), a facility which was originally intended as a permanent repository for solid waste. Commissioned in 1969, BNI 56 is made up of various trenches and pits which no longer meet current ASN requirements. To clean up these trenches, a legacy from the past, now requires considerable resources and involves many problems, especially due to uncertainty surrounding the nature, activity levels, packaging and volume of this waste. ASN ensures that the CEA will fully assume its overriding responsibility in the matter and implement safe, rigorous and transparent management solutions for all the waste. The BNI 56 trenches are an ongoing and concrete example of the difficulties inherent in recovering waste from storage and dismantling former facilities the design of which failed to take such aspects into account. This waste is now being repackaged so that it can be stored at a new basic nuclear installation called CEDRA (packaging and storage of radioactive waste) which complies with the safety requirements currently in force. This facility, commissioned in 2006, is intended for the storage of Type B solid radioactive waste for a period of 50 years pending construction of a deep geological repository or long-term storage facility. (authors)

  5. Stade NPP. Dismantling of the reactor pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharf, Daniel; Dziwis, Joachim [E.ON Anlagenservice GmbH Nukleartechnik, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Kemp, Lutz-Hagen [KKW Stade GmbH und Co. oHG, Stade (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Within the scope of the 4{sup th} partial decommissioning permission of Stade NPP the activated and contaminated structures of the reactor pool had to be dismantled in order to gain a completely non-radioactive reactor pool area for the subsequent clearance measurement of the reactor building. In order to achieve the aim it was intended to remove the activated pool liner sheets, its activated framework and several contaminated ventilation channels made of stainless steel, the concrete walls of the reactor pool entirely or in parts depending on their activation level, as well as the remaining activated carbon steel structures of the reactor pool bottom. Embedded in the concrete walls there were several highly contaminated excore tubes and the contaminated pool top edge, which were intended to be removed to its full extent. The contract of the Stade NPP initiated reactor pool dismantling project had been awarded to E.ON Anlagenservice GmbH (EAS) and its subsupplier sat. Kerntechnik GmbH for the concrete dismantling works and was performed as follows. In order to minimize the radiation level in the main working area in accordance with the ALARA principle, the liner sheets and middle parts of its framework were removed by means of angle grinders first, as they were the most dose rate relevant parts. As a result the primary average radiation level in the reactor pool (measured in a distance of 500 mm from the walls) was lowered from 40 {mu}Sv/h to less than 2 {mu}Sv/h. After the minimization of the radiation level in the working area the main dismantling step started with the cutting of the reactor pool walls in blocks by means of diamond rope cutters. Once a concrete block was cut out, it was transported into the fuel pool by means of a crane and crane fork, examined radiologically, marked area by area and segmented to debris by means of an electrical excavator with a hydraulic chisel. Afterwards the debris and carbon steel parts were fractioned and packed for further

  6. Stade NPP. Dismantling of the reactor pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the scope of the 4th partial decommissioning permission of Stade NPP the activated and contaminated structures of the reactor pool had to be dismantled in order to gain a completely non-radioactive reactor pool area for the subsequent clearance measurement of the reactor building. In order to achieve the aim it was intended to remove the activated pool liner sheets, its activated framework and several contaminated ventilation channels made of stainless steel, the concrete walls of the reactor pool entirely or in parts depending on their activation level, as well as the remaining activated carbon steel structures of the reactor pool bottom. Embedded in the concrete walls there were several highly contaminated excore tubes and the contaminated pool top edge, which were intended to be removed to its full extent. The contract of the Stade NPP initiated reactor pool dismantling project had been awarded to E.ON Anlagenservice GmbH (EAS) and its subsupplier sat. Kerntechnik GmbH for the concrete dismantling works and was performed as follows. In order to minimize the radiation level in the main working area in accordance with the ALARA principle, the liner sheets and middle parts of its framework were removed by means of angle grinders first, as they were the most dose rate relevant parts. As a result the primary average radiation level in the reactor pool (measured in a distance of 500 mm from the walls) was lowered from 40 μSv/h to less than 2 μSv/h. After the minimization of the radiation level in the working area the main dismantling step started with the cutting of the reactor pool walls in blocks by means of diamond rope cutters. Once a concrete block was cut out, it was transported into the fuel pool by means of a crane and crane fork, examined radiologically, marked area by area and segmented to debris by means of an electrical excavator with a hydraulic chisel. Afterwards the debris and carbon steel parts were fractioned and packed for further treatment

  7. Environmental monitoring in the area of the Cadarache Nuclear Studies Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cadarache Centre is part of the French nuclear programme providing for extensive development of research and hence of personnel and installations. It is essentially a centre for testing prototype reactors intended for use in power stations or for ship propulsion. In addition, experimental studies are carried out in connection with reactor structural materials and fuel elements. Various studies related to reactor physics, radiation protection, plant biology, etc. are also undertaken. This article describes the Cadarache site and the monitoring programme to assess the levels of radioactivity released from it.

  8. Stockpile Dismantlement Database Training Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    This document, the Stockpile Dismantlement Database (SDDB) training materials is designed to familiarize the user with the SDDB windowing system and the data entry steps for Component Characterization for Disposition. The foundation of information required for every part is depicted by using numbered graphic and text steps. The individual entering data is lead step by step through generic and specific examples. These training materials are intended to be supplements to individual on-the-job training.

  9. Enforcement of control decree for radiation protection devices on the Cadarache center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the Cadarache center there are nearly 1800 mobile devices and 800 fixed. The periodic calibration checks are performed by type with the same sources on every installation of the Center. A commune methodology was developed by type of device. It is presented in the form of cards with a phasing of operations as a picture. (N.C.)

  10. An Information Building on Radioactivity and Nuclear Energy for the French CEA Cadarache Research Center - 13492

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CEA Cadarache research center is one of the 10 research centers of the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). Distributed throughout various research platforms, it focuses on nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, new energy technologies (hydrogen, solar, biomass) and fundamental research in the field of vegetal biology. It is the most important technological research and development centers for energy in Europe. Considering the sensitive nature of nuclear activities, the questions surrounding the issue of radioactive waste, the nuclear energy and the social, economic and environmental concerns for present and future generations, the French Government asked nuclear actors to open communication and to give all the information asked by the Local Information Commission (CLI) and the public [1]. In this context, the CEA Cadarache has decided to better show and explain its expertise and experience in the area of nuclear energy and nuclear power plant design, and to make it available to stakeholders and to the public. CEA Cadarache receives each year more than 9000 visitors. To complete technical visits of the research facilities and laboratories, a scientific cultural center has been built in 2011 to inform the public on CEA Cadarache research activities and to facilitate the acceptance of nuclear energy in a way suited to the level of knowledge of the visitors. A modern interactive exhibition of 150 m2 allows visitors to find out more about energy, CEA Cadarache research programs, radioactive waste management and radiological impact on the research center activities. It also offers an auditorium for group discussions and for school groups to discover science through enjoyment. This communication center has received several thousand visitors since its opening on October 2011; the initial results of this experience are now available. It's possible to explain the design of this exhibition, to give some statistics on the number of the visitors, their

  11. LEP Dismantling - a first Step into New Era

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the project is to remove the LEP machine and most of the services from the underground areas in order to install the LHC within the time constraints of its civil engineering and installation programmes The dismantling of LEP will be the first project to be executed under the new INB (Installation Nucléaire de Base) convention for the LHC. This talk will give an overview of the LEP Dismantling project covering traceability, planning, infrastructure and execution. It will explain what it means for our accelerators to be classified as INB's and will introduce the changes in working and safety procedures, which will be enforced from the beginning of October. Note: The presentation will be made in French with the transparencies in English.

  12. Partial dismantling of research reactor-Sofia prior its refurbishment into low power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strategy for the Research Reactor IRT-Sofia, after decision of the Government for its refurbishment, is a partial dismantling of the old systems and equipment. Removal of the reactor core and replacement of old equipment will not pose any significant problems for dismantling. For most efficient use of resources there is a need for implementation of the engineering project, 'Plan for partial dismantling of equipment of the IRT-Sofia as a part of its refurbishment and conversion into low power RR', which has been already prepared. (author)

  13. Literature survey 'Impact of the Cadarache Centre activity on the environment'. Survey performed by the CRIIRAD laboratory for the Cadarache's CLI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a presentation of the Cadarache Centre installations and activities, this document reports a literature survey based on the documents provided by the Centre and related to dismissals and incidents since the beginning of the Centre activity, and to environment control during some critical periods. Several issues are discussed: the radioactive atmospheric effluents and their impact, the control of underground waters, the control of surface water environment (impact of liquid radioactive effluents and monitoring of run-off waters), soil and food chain monitoring. For each of these themes, control and monitoring data are analysed

  14. Continuously tritium monitoring of the pipe of liquid effluents at the Cea Cadarache; Controle en continu du tritium de la conduite des effluents liquides du CEA Cadarache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pira, Y

    2004-07-01

    This report is oriented toward the radiation protection of environment that is an essential component of radiation protection. It is necessary to detect any solid, liquid or gaseous abnormal release and to find its origin. The present study bears on a detection instrument in continuously to find tritium in liquid effluents of the Cea Cadarache. After having study the functioning principle of this device, an evaluation of its performances has been realised ( back noise, yield, detection limit) and to a checking in real conditions of utilization. (N.C.)

  15. Temperature buffer test. Dismantling operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakesson, Mattias [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2010-12-15

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modelling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aespoe HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by bentonite in the usual way, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a ring of sand. The test was dismantled and sampled during a period from the end of October 2009 to the end of April 2010, and this report describes this operation. Different types of samples have been obtained during this operation. A large number of diameter 50 mm bentonite cores have been taken for analysis of water content and density. Large pieces, so-called big sectors, have been taken for hydro-mechanical and chemical characterizations. Finally, there has been an interest to obtain different types of interface samples in which bentonite were in contact with sand, iron or concrete. One goal has been to investigate the retrievability of the upper heater, given the possibility to remove the surrounding sand shield, and a retrieval test has therefore been performed. The sand in the shield was first removed with an industrial vacuum cleaner after loosening the material through mechanical means (with hammer drill and core machine). A front loader was subsequently used for applying a sufficient lifting force to release the heater from the bentonite underneath. The experiment has been documented in different aspects: measurements of the coordinate (height or radius) of different interfaces (between bentonite blocks and between bentonite and sand); verification of sensor positions and retrieval of sensors for subsequent

  16. Decontamination and dismantlement of the building 200/205 pneumatic transfer tube at Argonne National Laboratory-East project final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiese, E. C.

    1998-12-11

    The Building 200/205 Pneumatic Transfer Tube D&D Project was directed toward the following goals: Remove any radioactive and hazardous materials associated with the transfer tube; Survey the transfer tube to identify any external contamination; Remove the transfer tube and package for disposal; Survey the soil and sand surrounding the transfer tube for any contamination; and Backfill the trench in which the tube sat and restore the area to its original condition. These goals had been set in order to eliminate the radiological and hazardous safety concerns inherent in the buried transfer tube and to allow, upon completion of the project, the removal of this project from the ANL-E action item list. The physical condition of the transfer tube and possible nuclear fuel samples lost in the tube were the primary areas of concern, while the exact location of the transfer tube was of secondary concern. ANL-E health physics technicians collected characterization data from the ends of the Building 200/205 pneumatic transfer tube in January 1998. The characterization surveys identified contamination to a level of 67,000 dpm (1,117 Bq) ({beta}/{gamma}) and 20,000 dpm (333 Bq) {alpha} smearable at the opening.

  17. Restoration of contaminated sites in the project PIMIC dismantling. The case of lentil; Restauracion de terrenos contaminados en el Proyecto PIMIC desmantelamiento. El caso de la lenteja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medinilla, G.; Naranjo, V.; Vidaechea, S.

    2011-07-01

    The contaminated ground area called Lenteja (lentil), located in Ciemat and caused by a liquid leakage in 1970, is being decontaminated within PIMIC decommissioning project. Most remarkable aspects of this task are: -Initial radiological characterization (25 boreholes, 277 sample analyses). -Management of more than 2000 m{sup 3} of materials. Pile walls for excavation, and ventilated tent confinement. -Excavation of more than 6 m depth in an area of approx. 120 m{sup 2}. -Development of Sr-90 in field measuring techniques for soil pre classification. (Author)

  18. Decontamination and dismantling at the CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the dismantling policy at the CEA (French Research Center on the atomic energy), the financing of the decontamination and the dismantling, the regulatory framework, the knowledge and the technology developed at the CEA, the radiation protection, the environment monitoring and the installations. (A.L.B.)

  19. Lessons learned by dismantling two German BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning of the first generation of nuclear reactors (2 boiling water reactors with different sizes and construction) in Germany has increased knowledge of not only dismantling work but also of costs, effective decontamination techniques and scrap recycling. Topics covered include material flow and decontamination, recycling of concrete and cables, dismantling techniques, conclusions. 11 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Integral needs for MOX powders: state of the art at Cea Cadarache on MOX fuel experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several experimental programmes have been conducted at CEA connected with the use of MOX in commercial PWR or innovative concepts, such as high conversion light water reactors (HCLWRs) and at various moderation ratios. Measurements of integral parameters of interest were performed using fission chambers and gamma-scanning techniques, or by oscillation techniques. This paper presents an overview of the experimental programmes performed at the EOLE and MINERVE facilities located at CEA Cadarache. (author)

  1. 2006 transparency and nuclear safety report. CEA Cadarache. Volumes 1 + 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a general presentation of the Cadarache site and of its nuclear installations, the first volume of this report describes the various measures concerning the site safety: safety organisation, general measures, measures related to various risks, control of emergency situations, inspections, audits and second level control, measures in basic nuclear installations. It describes the measures concerning the radioprotection on this site: organisation, significant facts, and dose measurement results. It describes significant events which occurred in relationship with nuclear safety and radioprotection, presents results of release measurements and of radiological and chemical assessments of the impact these releases on the environment. The report then describes measures implemented to limit the volume of stored radioactive wastes and also their impact on health and on the environment. It proposes a series of tables indicating the nature and quantities of wastes which are stored in the different basic nuclear installations of Cadarache. The second volume proposes the same information for two specific nuclear installations belonging to Areva and located in Cadarache, the INB 32 and 54 (INB stands for basic nuclear installation), for which the significant events occurred on the 19. of January and on the 6. of November 2006. For these installations, release measurements concern gaseous and liquid releases

  2. 2008 transparency and nuclear safety report. CEA Cadarache. Volumes 1 + 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a general presentation of the Cadarache site and of its nuclear installations, the first volume of this report describes the various measures concerning the site safety: safety organisation, general measures, measures related to various risks, control of emergency situations, inspections, audits and second level control, measures in basic nuclear installations. It describes the measures concerning the radioprotection on this site: organisation, significant facts, and dose measurement results. It describes significant events which occurred in relationship with nuclear safety and radioprotection, presents results of release measurements and of radiological and chemical assessments of the impact these releases on the environment. The report then describes measures implemented to limit the volume of stored radioactive wastes and also their impact on health and on the environment. It proposes a series of tables indicating the nature and quantities of wastes which are stored in the different basic nuclear installations of Cadarache. The second volume proposes the same information for two specific nuclear installations belonging to Areva and located in Cadarache, the INB 32 and 54 (INB stands for basic nuclear installation) for which significant events occurred on the 18. and on the 21. of November 2008. For these installations, release measurements concern gaseous and liquid releases

  3. 2007 transparency and nuclear safety report. CEA Cadarache. Volumes 1 + 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a general presentation of the Cadarache site and of its nuclear installations, the first volume of this report describes the various measures concerning the site safety: safety organisation, general measures, measures related to various risks, control of emergency situations, inspections, audits and second level control, measures in basic nuclear installations. It describes the measures concerning the radioprotection on this site: organisation, significant facts, and dose measurement results. It describes significant events which occurred in relationship with nuclear safety and radioprotection, presents results of release measurements and of radiological and chemical assessments of the impact these releases on the environment. The report then describes measures implemented to limit the volume of stored radioactive wastes and also their impact on health and on the environment. It provides a series of tables indicating the nature and quantities of wastes which are stored in the different basic nuclear installations of Cadarache. It reports the recommendations expressed by the CHSCT (committee on hygiene, security and working conditions) after the 2006 report. The second volume proposes the same information for two specific nuclear installations belonging to Areva and located in Cadarache, the INB 32 and 54 (INB stands for basic nuclear installation), for which the significant events occurred on the 13. of March and on the 25. of May 2007. For these installations, release measurements concern gaseous and liquid releases

  4. 2009 transparency and nuclear safety report. CEA Cadarache. Volumes 1 + 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a general presentation of the Cadarache site and of its nuclear installations, the first volume of this report describes the various measures concerning the site safety (safety organisation, general measures, measures related to various risks, inspections, control of emergency situations, audits and second level control, measures in basic nuclear installations) and radioprotection (organisation, significant facts, dosimeter results). It describes significant events which occurred in relationship with nuclear safety and radioprotection, presents results of measurements of releases and of their impact on the environment (chemical and radiological assessment). Then after a description of measures to limit the volume of stored radioactive wastes and their impact on health and on the environment, tables indicate the nature and quantities of wastes which are stored in the different basic nuclear installations of Cadarache. The second volume proposes the same information for two specific nuclear installations belonging to Areva and located in Cadarache, the INB 32 and 54 (INB stands for basic nuclear installation) for which a significant event occurred on the 6 October 2009. For these installations, release measurements concern gaseous and liquid releases

  5. Influence of high-permeability discs in an axisymmetric model of the Cadarache dynamo experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesecke, A.; Nore, C.; Stefani, F.; Gerbeth, G.; Léorat, J.; Herreman, W.; Luddens, F.; Guermond, J.-L.

    2012-05-01

    Numerical simulations of the kinematic induction equation are performed on a model configuration of the Cadarache von-Kármán-sodium dynamo experiment. The effect of a localized axisymmetric distribution of relative permeability μr that represents soft iron material within the conducting fluid flow is investigated. The critical magnetic Reynolds number Rmc for dynamo action of the first non-axisymmetric mode roughly scales like Rmcμr - Rmc∞∝μ-1/2r, i.e. the threshold decreases as μr increases. This scaling law suggests a skin effect mechanism in the soft iron discs. More important with regard to the Cadarache dynamo experiment, we observe a purely toroidal axisymmetric mode localized in the high-permeability discs which becomes dominant for large μr. In this limit, the toroidal mode is close to the onset of dynamo action with a (negative) growth rate that is rather independent of the magnetic Reynolds number. We qualitatively explain this effect by paramagnetic pumping at the fluid/disc interface and propose a simplified model that quantitatively reproduces numerical results. The crucial role of the high-permeability discs in the mode selection in the Cadarache dynamo experiment cannot be inferred from computations using idealized pseudo-vacuum boundary conditions (H × n = 0).

  6. Laser dismantling of a glovebox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 5 kW laser has been used to cut up a 2.6 x 1 x 1 m glove box made of 5 mm mild steel with 12.5 mm perspex windows and 3 mm neoprene gaskets. The laser cut all components including the sandwich of perspex, neoprene and steel with ease. The production of fibrous filaments of perspex during the cutting process has been almost avoided by modifying the cutting variables. The combustion of material beyond that being cut has also been prevented by adopting the correct level of laser power. The problems encountered with loss of glove box rigidity with progressive dismantling are discussed, together with the relevance these problems have to possible cutting methods other than lasers. (author)

  7. Procedures on implementation of the research reactor IRT-Sofia partial dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IRT-Sofia Research Reactor is in a reconstruction in view of a Government resolution for its refurbishment into a Low Power Reactor. In order realize the reconstruction project it is necessary to fulfill a partial dismantling of the Research reactor IRT-Sofia. Therefore it was developed and sent to the Regulatory body for approval a 'General Plan for partial dismantling of the Research reactor IRT-Sofia'. In the General Plan are described dismantling and all waste processing activities (characterization, conditioning, decontamination, transport, storage and final disposal); the value of decontamination (cost-benefit) for the internal or external surfaces of components, systems and instruments; appropriate mechanization; technological process for the dismantling of parts and equipment of the IRT-Sofia reactor; management organization structure which is appropriate for the partial decommissioning works; Safety assessment and Quality assurance Program. Prior the commencement of the partial dismantling of the IRT-Sofia it is necessary to develop a detailed work-schedule for implementation of the General Plan for partial dismantling. As well it is necessary to provide safe and secure spent nuclear fuel (EK-10 and C-36 type) transportation from IRT-Sofia site to Russia. With regard to this activities of the international project RRRFR are implementing at the present time. (author)

  8. Fuel racks dismantling workshop at Centraco facility - 59365

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: - Initial context: EDF aims to replace all the ancient storage racks to gain place in the fuel ponds. This project represents about 450 units up to 4 m x 4, 4 m x 2, 9 m, weight 6,4 te to dismantle, during 5 years The average density of the racks is very low (∼ 0.15). Due to this low density, final repository route is not adapted. By its knowledge and capabilities, CENTRACO route was chosen to reduce volume, restore density, decontaminate and secure the elimination of the racks. With those data, CENTRACO has defined the ATG workshop to dismantle racks but also wide components as steam generators. It was designed with as much automated devices and skills as possible, in order to avoid dose rate and contamination and to save time. It is currently under construction and will be put in operation in the early 2012. (authors)

  9. Cost effective decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As for any large and complex project, the basis for cost effective decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear power plants is established with the development of the project. Just as its construction, dismantling of a nuclear power plant is similarly demanding. Daily changing situations due to the progress of construction - in the present case progress of dismantling - result in significant logistical challenges for project managers and site supervisors. This will be aggravated by the fact that a considerable amount of the removed parts are contaminated or even activated. Hence, not only occupational health, safety and environmental protection is to be assured, employees, public and environment are to be adequately protected against the adverse effect of radioactive radiation as well. Work progress and not least expenses involved with the undertaking depend on adherence to the planned course of actions. Probably the most frequent cause of deviation from originally planned durations and costs of a project are disruptions in the flow of work. For being enabled to counteract in a timely and efficient manner, all required activities are to be comprehensively captured with the initial planning. The effect initial activities may have on subsequent works until completion must particularly be investigated. This is the more important the larger and more complex the project actually are. Comprehensive knowledge of all the matters which may affect the progress of the works is required in order to set up a suitable work break-down structure; such work break-down structure being indispensable for successful control and monitoring of the project. In building the related organizational structure of the project, all such stakeholders not being direct part of the project team but which may potentially affect the progress of the project are to be considered as well. Cost effective and lost time injury free dismantling of decommissioned nuclear power plants is based on implementing

  10. Weapons dismantlement issues in independent Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zack, N.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kirk, E.J. [American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The American Association for the Advancement of Science sponsored a seminar during September 1993, in Kiev, Ukraine, entitled ``Toward a Nuclear Free Future -- Barriers and Problems.`` It brought together Ukrainians, Belarusians, and Americans to discuss the legal, political, safeguards and security, economic, and technical dimensions of nuclear weapons dismantlement and destruction. US representatives initiated discussions on legal and treaty requirements and constraints, safeguards and security issues surrounding dismantlement, storage and disposition of nuclear materials, warhead transportation, and economic considerations. Ukrainians gave presentations on arguments for and against the Ukraine keeping nuclear weapons, Ukrainian Parliament non-approval of START I, alternative strategies for dismantling silos and launchers, and economic and security implications of nuclear weapons removal from the Ukraine. Participants from Belarus discussed proliferation and control regime issues, This paper will highlight and detail the issues, concerns, and possible impacts of the Ukraine`s dismantlement of its nuclear weapons.

  11. Parameters of Dismantling Techniques Related to Costs for Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliable cost estimating is one of the most important elements of decommissioning operation. Reliable cost estimating is one of the most important elements of decommissioning planning. Alternative technologies may be evaluated and compared on their efficiency and effectiveness, and measured against a baseline cost as to the feasibility and benefit derived from the technology. This principle ensures that the cost consideration is economically sound and practical for funding. This paper provides a list with basic review of cutting and dismantling techniques, including some typical characteristics if available, as well as aspects of implementation, parameters of cutting and dismantling techniques in decommissioning costing. This paper gives an overview of the principles of the unit factor approach and its implementation in costing in relation to dismantling activities. In general, proper evaluation of decommissioning costs is important for following issues and relevant measures for achieving the listed aspects are: · Selection of a decommissioning strategy and activities: several decommissioning options should be evaluated: · Support to a cost-benefit analysis to ensure that the principle of optimization and reasonably practicable measures are applied: the extent of evaluated decommissioning options should cover all possible scenarios for dismantling activities; · Estimate of required financial resources for the selected strategy: the selected option should involve the dismantling activities in a structure and extent relevant to real procedure of dismantling activities; · Preparation of the project schedule, workforce requirements and phased funding needs: dismantling activities should be structured according to the tasks of the decommissioning schedule; · Definition of measures for proper management and maintenance of resources for safe and timely decommissioning: the time distribution and safety related parameters of dismantling activities should be known

  12. Dismantling of Biological Agricultural Reactor Netherlands (BARN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Biological Agricultural Reactor (BARN) was built in 1962 by government order through the Institute for Atomic Science in Agriculture (ITAL) in the Netherlands. The idea to build this nuclear reactor especially for biological research purposes was grown out of the first international conference about peaceful application of atomic energy hold in 1955. The construction composed of a basin reactor with light water as moderator and cooling medium. Up to 90% enriched Uranium was used as fuel. The maximal power was 100 kW. The reactor was used for research in the field of plant reproduction and other biological research. Mainly because of disappointing scientific results in 1978, 15 years after the start, the decision was made to terminate the reactor process following by dismantling. Alternative techniques proved to give comparative results at lower costs. In the decision making process political considerations played an important role. Prior to dismantling the reactor the 26 fuel elements were removed. Beside the uranium-235 each element contains about 1.3 TBq of fission and activation products. In 1982 the elements were shipped tot the Savannah River Plant in United States. An extensive analyze was carried out to map out the activation products on basis of neutron flux data, radiation history and composition of the materials. Results of this study was used to predict the dose rate of the different activated items and consequently to reduce risks of handling the items. For several reasons (e.g. control of building, knowledge of the plant) in 1996 a project has been initiated to remove all the active materials form the building and to recover the place to the original state, i.e. forest. High radioactive items with large dimensions were transferred to the so-called 'hot cells' of the ECN and were cut into small pieces. Finally all the activated material was brought to the COVRA for end storage. Parts of the basin construction were highly activated and were removed

  13. Results of a large scale neutron spectrometry and dosimetry comparison exercise at the Cadarache moderator assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eurados Working Group 7 recently organised a large-scale comparison of neutron spectrometry and dosimetry measurements at the IPSN/SDOS laboratory of the CEA Cadarache Research Centre in France. A large number of participants took part with a range of instruments including spectrometers, tissue-equivalent proportional counters, personal dosemeters, and survey instruments. The neutron field used for the exercise was a primarily low energy neutron spectrum similar to those which have been measured recently around nuclear facilities. This paper presents the results of the measurements and attempts to draw conclusions about the accuracy attainable with the various devices, their advantages and drawbacks, and potential problems. (author)

  14. Influence of high permeability disks in an axisymmetric model of the Cadarache dynamo experiment

    OpenAIRE

    A. Giesecke; Nore, C.; Stefani, F.; Gerbeth, G.; Léorat, J.; Herreman, W; Luddens, F.; Guermond, J.-L

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the kinematic induction equation are performed on a model configuration of the Cadarache von-K\\'arm\\'an-Sodium dynamo experiment. The effect of a localized axisymmetric distribution of relative permeability {\\mu} that represents soft iron material within the conducting fluid flow is investigated. The critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm^c for dynamo action of the first non-axisymmetric mode roughly scales like Rm^c({\\mu})-Rm^c({\\mu}->infinity) ~ {\\mu}^(-1/2) i.e. the ...

  15. French fission products experiments performed in Cadarache and Valduc. Results comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cofunded by Cogema, two complementary experimental programmes on burn up credit (BUC) related to fission products (FPs) are performed by CEA and IRSN at Cadarache and Valduc. After shortly recalling the main characteristics of each experiment, a first comparison of some results is presented, especially the energy range in which most part of cross section absorption are qualified. Both experiments exhibit great quality and accurate results, giving a high degree of confidence to the whole experimental French process of qualification devoted to BUC. (author)

  16. Influence of high permeability disks in an axisymmetric model of the Cadarache dynamo experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Giesecke, A; Stefani, F; Gerbeth, G; Léorat, J; Herreman, W; Luddens, F; Guermond, J -L

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the kinematic induction equation are performed on a model configuration of the Cadarache von-K\\'arm\\'an-Sodium dynamo experiment. The effect of a localized axisymmetric distribution of relative permeability {\\mu} that represents soft iron material within the conducting fluid flow is investigated. The critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm^c for dynamo action of the first non-axisymmetric mode roughly scales like Rm^c({\\mu})-Rm^c({\\mu}->infinity) ~ {\\mu}^(-1/2) i.e. the threshold decreases as {\\mu} increases. This scaling law suggests a skin effect mechanism in the soft iron disks. More important with regard to the Cadarache dynamo experiment, we observe a purely toroidal axisymmetric mode localized in the high permeability disks which becomes dominant for large {\\mu}. In this limit, the toroidal mode is close to the onset of dynamo action with a (negative) growth-rate that is rather independent of the magnetic Reynolds number. We qualitatively explain this effect by paramagnetic pumping...

  17. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities: COGEMA expertise devoted to UP1 reprocessing plant dismantling programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last past decades, the French nuclear industry has acquired a great experience and know-how in the field of dismantling. Today this experience amounts to more than 200,000 hours. The fundamental aims within dismantling strategy are the same as for all nuclear facilities: minimising doses received by workers, minimising waste volume and adapting waste management to radioactivity levels, minimising costs. French experience is based on technologies which are currently used in nuclear maintenance facilities. Dismantling is a dynamic process especially in the field of decontamination (chemical and mechanical), cleaning, robotics and remote control operations. The strategy for the dismantling of former UP1 reprocessing plant is based on the feedback of experience gained through the dismantling of other facilities such as the AT1 workshop at La Hague. This workshop, a pilot plant for reprocessing of fast-breeder reactor fuels (Rapsodie and Phenix) has to be dismantled to IAEA level 3 (unrestricted site use), excluding civil works structures. Currently conducted by trained shifts, this dismantling project should end in 1999. The experience already acquired proves that chemical rinsings with the use of specific reagents is sufficient to decontaminate the hot cells and that the use of remote operations or robotics is not as important as previously envisaged. The UP1 reprocessing plant of Marcoule operated from 1958 to 1997. End of the operation was pronounced on the 31st of December 1997. 20,000 tons of spent fuels were reprocessed at UP1. The cleaning and dismantling operations at the Marcoule site depend upon the CEA, EDF and COGEMA. The Defence and Industry Ministries asked for a specific structure to be set up. An economic interest group called CODEM was created in May 1996. CODEM decides, finances and supervises dismantling operations, while respecting the constraints of nuclear safety, environmental protection and cost-effectiveness. The cleaning operations of

  18. Supervision of execution of dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enresa create and organizational structure that covers various areas involved in effective control of Decommissioning Project. One area is the Technical Supervision of Works Decommissioning Project, as Execution Department dependent Technical Management. In the structure, Execution Department acts as liaison between the project, disciplines involved in developing and specialized companies contracted work to achieve your intended target. Equally important is to ensure that such activities are carried out correctly, according to the project documentation. (Author)

  19. Superphenix - Creys Malville strategy for dismantling the reactor block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the operations to be performed to dismantle the SPX reactor vessel. The first studies for dismantling the Superphenix power station reactor block have defined the broad outlines of the dismantling strategy and proposed a certain number of orientations. The period covers SPX reactor block dismantling, from the end of fuel unloading until complete dismantling of the installations. Two dismantling methods have been considered: Underwater dismantling (reference scenario); Dismantling with the structures covered with sodium carbonate (alternative scenario). In both cases, dismantling will be carried out 'from the top' through the reactor slab and will be preceded by a preliminary phase of sodium retention reduction followed by a phase of vessel internals carbonation. The dismantling studies are undertaken with a view to the work lasting eight years maximum. The work prior to reactor dismantling will last from the end of 2011, after sodium draining from the reactor, until the end of 2013. At present, the Superphenix dismantling work is planned to begin in 2014 and continue for a period of eight years. All the installations should have been dismantled by 2025. (author)

  20. Development of dismantling technology for spent melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author's company has planned to employ the joule-heated ceramic melter in the Tokai vitrification facility (TVF). In the plant operation, the lifetime of the ceramic melter is estimated to be about 5 years because of the corrosion of materials by molten glass. This ceramic melter becomes large size solid waste with high radioactivty after its lifetime. The author's company has developed the dismantling technology for the ceramic melter since 1984. Technology development described in this paper, includes cutting technique of the metallic casing and the refractories, dismantling test for the mock-up melter using remotely operated power-manipulator, in-cell cranes and various tools. The mock-up tests using PNC selected systems provided their satisfactory performance for use on spent melter dismantling

  1. Nuclear reactor dismantling method and device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor dismantling device according to the present invention comprises an elevator lift extending from the lower portion in a biological-shielding walls of the reactor to an operation floor thereabove and a scaffolding for cutting operation vertically disposed at the periphery thereof. The scaffolding is rotated around a cutting mast by remote control to displace a cutting position for a drilling device. Then, pieces of the biological-shielding walls are cut out and automatically transported from the inside of the biological-shielding walls to an operation chamber by a recovery device, a truck and an elevator lift. This makes the dismantling operation highly efficient, to shorten the term of works. Further, operators' exposure dose can be mitigated, thereby enabling to improve safety of the dismantling operation. (T.M.)

  2. The sciences of nuclear facilities dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As about 75 nuclear reactors are to be definitely stopped between now and 2050 in Europe (29 in the US), nuclear facility dismantling is a growing issue which raises specific problems notably related to radiation protection. Specific techniques, means and processes have been developed by specialized operators, and French teams have developed a widely recognized know-how in this field. In October 2014, the French Academy of Sciences (Academie des Sciences) held a seminar on the nuclear facilities dismantling sciences and technologies, during which all the aspects of these disciplines have been discussed: characterization of radioactivity sources, radiation protection, logistics, physical chemistry, mechanics of continuous media, calculation codes, robotics, returns of experience, education and training, perspectives, accident management... A panorama is given of the dismantling needs and conditions, the key scientific phenomena, the on going research programs and the required researches for the future

  3. Transport and the dismantling of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transport is not a real limiting constraint for the dismantling of nuclear facility if transport is taking into account very early in the dismantling process since numerous packages in various sizes already exist. For instance the TN-Gemini package allows the constitution of B-type packages for high radioactive level wastes, its volume capacity of about 16 m3 can store up to 5.8 tones of wastes, its external dimensions make it look like a sea container. One difficulty would be to find the adequate waste classification for a package containing heterogeneous wastes. (A.C.)

  4. The use of non-destructive passive neutron measurement methods in dismantling and radioactive waste characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cleaning up and dismantling of nuclear facilities lead to a great volume of technological radioactive wastes which need to be characterized in order to be sent to the adequate final disposal or interim storage. The control and characterization can be performed with non-destructive nuclear measurements such as gamma-ray spectrometry. Passive neutron counting is an alternative when the alpha-gamma emitters cannot be detected due to the presence of a high gamma emission resulting from fission or activation products, or when the waste matrix is too absorbing for the gamma rays of interest (too dense and/or made of high atomic number elements). It can also be a complement to gamma-ray spectrometry when two measurement results must be confronted to improve the confidence in the activity assessment. Passive neutron assays involve the detection of spontaneous fission neutrons emitted by even nuclides (238Pu, 240Pu, 242Pu, 242Cm, 244Cm...) and neutrons resulting from (α, n) reactions with light nuclides (O, F, Be...). The latter is conditioned by the presence of high α-activity radionuclides (234U, 238Pu, 240Pu, 241Am...) and low-Z elements, which depends on the chemical form (metallic, oxide or fluorine) of the plutonium or uranium contaminant. This paper presents the recent application of passive neutron methods to the cleaning up of a nuclear facility located at CEA Cadarache (France), which concerns the Pu mass assessment of 2714 historic, 100 litre radioactive waste drums produced between 1980 and 1997. Another application is the dismantling and decommissioning of an uranium enrichment facility for military purposes, which involves the 235U and total uranium quantifications in about a thousand, large compressors employed in the gaseous diffusion enrichment process. (authors)

  5. Underwater plasma cutting when multipurpose research reactor (MZFR) dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concept of multipurpose research reactor (MZFR) dismantling in The Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center is discussed. Completed dismantling of the unit is handled by eight stages. Eight stage - dismantling of cover of pressure vessel with intravessel equipment is described. Plasma cutting is used as fundamental procedure for the MZFR dismantling. System for the registration of operation parameters is developed. Bench-scale experiments were conducted in sheet form at full-size mockups

  6. Environmental impacts of ship dismantling : screening for sustainable ways

    OpenAIRE

    Vuori, Juho

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to study how ocean-going vessels are permanently withdrawn from operation by dismantling. The intention was to gain an understanding on how the ship dismantling has developed into the current state and what the near future holds for the industry. This thesis concentrates particularly on the impacts that ship dismantling has on the environment – nature and the human. The purpose was to find ways to reduce the environmental impacts. The dismantling of a ship in...

  7. Web software for the control and management of radiation protection devices in the Cadarache site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This series of slides presents how to use a new software dedicated to the management of the periodical controls that have to be performed on the equipment involved in radiation protection. This software is ready to be dispatched on the CEA site of Cadarache. This software gives information on: the device to be controlled, the controls that have to be performed, the procedures to follow to make the test, the equipment necessary for the test particularly the need for radioactive sources, the maintenance of the device, the previous measurements and in the end the device's conformity. An evaluation of the conformity of all the devices present in a building or an area or of a particular type can be easily obtained. (A.C.)

  8. Evolution of ITER Tritium Confinement strategy and adaptation to Cadarache site conditions and French regulatory requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER Nuclear Buildings include the Tokamak, Tritium and Diagnostic Buildings (Tokamak Complex) and the Hot Cell and Low Level Radioactive Waste Buildings (Hot Cell Complex). The Tritium Confinement strategy of the Nuclear Buildings comprises key features of the atmosphere and vent detritiation systems and the heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. The designs developed during the ITER EDA (engineering design activities) for these systems need to be adapted to the specific conditions of the Cadarache site and modified to conform with the regulatory requirements applicable to installations nucleaires de base (INB) - basic nuclear installations - in France. The highest priority for such adaptation has been identified as the Tritium Confinement of the Tokamak Complex and the progress in development of a robust, coherent design concept compliant with French practice is described in the paper

  9. NOCHAR Polymers: An Aqueous and Organic Liquid Solidification Process for Cadarache LOR (Liquides Organiques Radioactifs) - 13195

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To handle the Very Low Level Waste (VLLW) and the Low Level Waste (LLW) in France, two options can be considered: the incineration at CENTRACO facility and the disposal facility on ANDRA sites. The waste acceptance in these radwaste routes is dependent upon the adequacy between the waste characteristics (physical chemistry and radiological) and the radwaste route specifications. If the waste characteristics are incompatible with the radwaste route specifications (presence of significant quantities of chlorine, fluorine, organic component etc or/and high activity limits), it is necessary to find an alternative solution that consists of a waste pre-treatment process. In the context of the problematic Cadarache LOR (Liquides Organiques Radioactifs) waste streams, two radioactive scintillation cocktails have to be treated. The first one is composed of organic liquids at 13.1 % (diphenyloxazol, mesitylene, TBP, xylene) and water at 86.9 %. The second one is composed of TBP at 8.6 % and water at 91.4 %. They contain chlorine, fluorine and sulphate and have got alpha/beta/gamma spectra with mass activities equal to some kBq.g-1. Therefore, tritium is present and creates the second problematic waste stream. As a consequence, in order for disposal acceptance at the ANDRA site, it is necessary to pre-treat the waste. The NOCHAR polymers as an aqueous and organic liquid solidification process seem to be an adequate solution. Indeed, these polymers constitute an important variety of products applied to the treatment of radioactive aqueous and organic liquids (solvent, oil, solvent/oil mixing etc) and sludge through a mechanical and chemical solidification process. For Cadarache LOR, N910 and N960 respectively dedicated to the organic and aqueous liquids solidification are considered. With the N910, the organic waste solidification occurs in two steps. As the organic liquid travels moves through the polymer strands, the strands swell and immobilise the liquid. Then as the

  10. Corium behaviour research at CEA Cadarache. The PLINIUS prototypic corium experimental platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the hypothetical case of a Light Water Reactor severe accident, the reactor core could melt and form with structure materials, and eventually concrete, a complex mixture called corium. The knowledge of corium behaviour is one of the key to increase the safety of the nuclear reactors. In the framework of severe accident studies, CEA has undertaken for many years a large RandD program devoted to this topic. At CEA-Cadarache, a specific platform, called PLINIUS, has been developed and is dedicated to studies of prototypic corium (i.e. with uranium dioxide). In this paper, the PLINIUS platform four facilities and the experiments on corium behaviour are described.(author)

  11. Dismantling of alpha contaminated obsolete installations and glove boxes on the IRMM site in Geel (Belgium)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (European commission, Joint Research Centre, IRMM) a dismantling campaign of obsolete installations and glove boxes has been carried out in 2005. There were various reasons for their removal. Some large installations did not meet modern safety standards, other installations were worn out and expected to cause a radioactive contamination risk in the future. The main goal was to create as less waste as possible by extensive contamination checks and by decontamination if necessary. For the glove boxes, decontamination was not possible. A controlled area was set up around the installation to be dismantled in order to prevent spreading of contamination from dust and dirt. This was only possible for the 'minor' contaminated installations. The dismantling campaign of the glove boxes was carried out by using tents of two types depending the contamination inside the glove boxes. The most common glove boxes were dismantled in a tent constructed with hard surfaced polycarbonate plates (ventilated cell). For glove boxes with higher contamination, the same principle was used but with a second 'glove box tent' inside (ventilated glove tent). The purpose of this project was to learn from the experience of this campaign which gave the ability to make estimates of future radioactive waste or classic waste that could be expected from dismantled installations. (authors)

  12. DECISION ANALYSIS SCIENCE MODELING FOR APPLICATION AND FIELDING SELECTION APPLIED TO EQUIPMENT DISMANTLEMENT TECHNOLOGIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dismantlement of radioactively contaminated process equipment is a major concern during the D and D process. There are an estimated 1,200 buildings in the DOE-EM complex that will require the dismantlement of equipment and various metal structures. As buildings undergo the D and D process, this metallic equipment contaminated with radionuclides such as uranium and plutonium must be size-reduced before final disposal. A single information source comparing dismantlement technologies in the areas of safety, cost, and performance is needed by DOE managers and is not currently available. The selection of the appropriate technologies to meet the dismantlement objectives for a given site is a difficult process in the absence of comprehensive and comparable data. Choosing the wrong technology could result in increased exposure of personnel to contaminants and an increase in D and D project costs. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate commercially available and innovative technologies for equipment dismantlement and provide a comprehensive source of information to the D and D community in the areas of technology performance, cost, and health and safety

  13. General plan for the partial dismantling of the IRT-Sofia research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the decision of the Bulgarian Government to reconstruct it, the strategy concerning the IRT-Sofia Research Reactor is to partially dismantle the old systems and equipment. The removal of the reactor core and replacement of old equipment will not pose any significant problems. For a more efficient use of existing resources, there is a need for an engineering project which has been already prepared under the title 'General Plan for the Partial Dismantling of Equipment at the IRT-Sofia as a Part of the Reconstruction into a Low Power RR'. (author)

  14. Implementation of the partial dismantling of research reactor IRT-Sofia prior to its refurbishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2001, the Bulgarian Government decided to refurbish and convert the research reactor in Sofia into a low-power reactor. Due to this, a partial dismantling of IRT-Sofia's old systems and equipment was carried out with the intention of reusing the concrete bioshield in the construction of the new low-power research reactor. For a more efficient use of available resources, an engineering project known as 'The plan for the partial dismantling of IRT-Sofia equipment as a part of its refurbishment into a low-power research reactor' was drawn up and has since been successfully implemented. (author)

  15. General plan for the partial dismantling of the IRT-Sofia research reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolov Tihomir G.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available After the decision of the Bulgarian Government to reconstruct it, the strategy concerning the IRT-Sofia Research Reactor is to partially dismantle the old systems and equipment. The removal of the reactor core and replacement of old equipment will not pose any significant problems. For a more efficient use of existing resources, there is a need for an engineering project which has been already prepared under the title "General Plan for the Partial Dismantling of Equipment at the IRT-Sofia as a Part of the Reconstruction into a Low Power RR".

  16. Partial dismantling activities prior to the refurbishment of the IRT research reactor in Sofia, Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2001 the Bulgarian Government took a decision for refurbishment and conversion of the research reactor in Sofia in low power reactor. By reason of this decision it has been performed a partial dismantling of the IRT-Sofia old systems and equipment, with an intention to re-use the concrete bio shield for the new low power research reactor. For most efficient use of resources there was a need for implementation of the engineering project, 'Plan for partial dismantling of equipment of the IRT-Sofia as a part of the refurbishment into low power research reactor' which has been already accomplished. (author)

  17. Implementation of the partial dismantling of research reactor IRT-Sofia prior to its refurbishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolov Tihomir G.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2001, the Bulgarian Government decided to refurbish and convert the research reactor in Sofia into a low-power reactor. Due to this, a partial dismantling of IRT-Sofia’s old systems and equipment was carried out with the intention of reusing the concrete bioshield in the construction of the new low-power research reactor. For a more efficient use of available resources, an engineering project known as “The plan for the partial dismantling of IRT-Sofia equipment as a part of its refurbishment into a low-power research reactor” was drawn up and has since been successfully implemented.

  18. Dismantling id the reactor pressure vessel insulation and dissecting of the MZFR reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MZFR reactor was decommissioned in 1984. The authors describe the dismantling of the reactor pressure vessel insulation that consists of asbestos containing mineral fiber wool. The appropriate remote handling and cutting tools had to be adapted with respect to the restrained space in the containment. The dismantling of the reactor pressure vessel has been completed, the dissected parts have been packaged into 200 containers for the final repository Konrad. During the total project time no reportable events and no damage to persons occurred.

  19. Dismantling of Loop-Type Channel Equipment of MR Reactor in NRC 'Kurchatov Institute' - 13040

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2009 the project of decommissioning of MR and RTF reactors was developed and approved by the Expert Authority of the Russian Federation (Gosexpertiza). The main objective of the decommissioning works identified in this project: - complete dismantling of reactor equipment and systems; - decontamination of reactor premises and site in accordance with the established sanitary and hygienic standards. At the preparatory stage (2008-2010) of the project the following works were executed: loop-type channels' dismantling in the storage pool; experimental fuel assemblies' removal from spent fuel repositories in the central hall; spent fuel assembly removal from the liquid-metal-cooled loop-type channel of the reactor core and its placement into the SNF repository; and reconstruction of engineering support systems to the extent necessary for reactor decommissioning. The project assumes three main phases of dismantling and decontamination: - dismantling of equipment/pipelines of cooling circuits and loop-type channels, and auxiliary reactor equipment (2011-2012); - dismantling of equipment in underground reactor premises and of both MR and RTF in-vessel devices (2013-2014); - decontamination of reactor premises; rehabilitation of the reactor site; final radiation survey of reactor premises, loop-type channels and site; and issuance of the regulatory authorities' de-registration statement (2015). In 2011 the decommissioning license for the two reactors was received and direct MR decommissioning activities started. MR primary pipelines and loop-type facilities situated in the underground reactor hall were dismantled. Works were also launched to dismantle the loop-type channels' equipment in underground reactor premises; reactor buildings were reconstructed to allow removal of dismantled equipment; and the MR/RTF decommissioning sequence was identified. In autumn 2011 - spring 2012 results of dismantling activities performed are: - equipment from underground rooms (No. 66, 66

  20. Reactor vessel dismantling at the high flux materials testing reactor Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project of replacing the reactor vessel of the high flux materials testing reactor (HFR) originated in 1974 when results of several research programs confirmed severe neutron embrittlement of aluminium alloys suggesting a limited life of the existing facility. This report describes the dismantling philosophy and organisation, the design of special underwater equipment, the dismantling of the reactor vessel and thermal column, and the conditioning and shielding activities resulting in a working area for the installation of the new vessel with no access limitations due to radiation. Finally an overview of the segmentation, waste disposal and radiation exposure is given. The total dismantling, segmentation and conditioning activities resulted in a total collective radiation dose of 300 mSv. (orig.)

  1. Dismantling and decommissioning of an Uranium processing plant at Andujar (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dismantling and decommissioning of the Uranium Processing Plant at Andujar is the first experience of such a kind in Spain. The factory houses almost 1 million cubic meters of uranium esterile ores concentrated in two different landfills covering 94,000 square meters, as a results of mining activities between 1959 and 1981. The project will stabilize both landfill containers ''in situ'' by using the products obtained after dismantling factory buildings and installation of processing. Decommissioning will take place at the end of 1993. Before dismantling works started, a number of geological, geotechnical, sysmologic, environmental, migration parameters of radionuclides from the landfill and socio-economical studies were conducted. The different phases of wastes conditioning and the updated situation of work plan are described

  2. Glovebox dismantling activities and decommissioning plan for plutonium fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gloveboxes and process equipment used at plutonium fuel handling facilities have had to be replaced due to deterioration or the need to make changes. So far, their removal and replacement has taken place more than 30 times in Plutonium Fuel Center, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). In most recent dismantling activities, we removed four giant gloveboxes (total size, 110 cubic meters) which possessed equipment to recover plutonium from mixed oxide (MOX) fuel scraps. We have implemented a number of procedural improvements in dismantling activities and collected various kinds of data, including type and amount of primary and secondary waste from dismantling, relation between waste volume and work force, etc. Plutonium Fuel Fabricating Facility (PFFF) is one of the three plutonium fuel handling facilities in Plutonium Fuel Center, JNC. Its final mission to produce MOX fuels for the advanced thermal reactor 'Fugen' Nuclear Power Station was successfully finished in 2002. Then, we started preparatory activities to draw up a Deactivation and Decommissioning (DD) plan for this facility and to construct a database with the experimental data of glovebox dismantling activities acquired in the past thirty years. The DD schedule for this facility can be broken down into three phases. Phase 1 (to 2010): Stabilization of all the special nuclear materials in the facility and remove them from the facility. Establish new and effective decontamination and volume reduction technologies in order to improve existing methods. Phase 2 (2010-2015): Applying the above-mentioned technologies to some of the glovebox dismantling activities and confirm their adaptability for the project. Draw up a detailed DD plan which meets to various regulations. Phase 3 (2015-2020): Dismantling of all the remaining gloveboxes in the facility and promote research and development of DD technologies for future projects. Decontamination of inner surfaces of the building in order to reuse the

  3. Decision Analysis Science Modeling for Application and Fielding Selection Applied to Equipment Dismantlement Technologies. Topical Report January 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dismantlement of radioactively contaminated process equipment is a major concern during the D and D process. As buildings undergo the D and D process, metallic equipment contaminated with radionuclides such as uranium and plutonium must be dismantled before final disposal.The primary objective for equipment dismantlement is to reduce the potential for personnel and environmental exposure to contaminants during the decommissioning of the nuclear facility. The selection of the appropriate technologies to meet the dismantlement objectives for a given site is a difficult process in the absence of comprehensive and comparable data. Choosing the wrong technology could result in increased exposure of personnel to contaminants and an increase in D and D project costs. Innovative technologies are being developed with the goal of providing safer and more cost-effective alternatives that generate less secondary waste, thereby decreasing the operating costs for dismantlement. During the development and implementation process, performance indicators for the success of these technologies must be reviewed to ensure that these aims are being met. This project provides a mechanism for the assessment of innovative and commercially available nuclear and non-nuclear technologies for equipment dismantlement

  4. Dismantling operations by SGN : the WAGR and PIVER examples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destrait, Laurent [D and D Programme Manager, SGN (France)

    1999-07-01

    By around september next year decommissioning work at WAGR should be getting into its stride. Among the most difficult operations, the dismantling of the pressure vessel and insulation will be carried out by ENTECH : a consortium of Strachan and Henshaw and SGN. The three year contract, recognised as one of the project's most technically demanding, is : 1. to primarily provide methodology and manufacture of tooling to dismantle the pressure vessel and to package it together with the debris arising, safely and effectively for disposal, 2. To provide operator training and support to the dismantling operations. The vessel is 13.1-m high, 6.5-m diameter and, clad with insulation, results in total weight of 118te. It consists of a rather combination asbestos, cement, metadextramite, chicken wire and aluminium sheeting mounted onto a carbon steel and mild steel. Based on the respective advantages and weaknesses of all of the existing cutting methods and the criteria as : risk, safety, robustness, efficiency, speed and optional use of the remote dismantling machine (already in ;lace), the final method chosen was oriented toward the process combining mechanical and thermal cutting. The dismantling of the reactor pressure vessel will be carried out using the existing RDM and a combination of a disc cutter for the insulation on the outside and an Oxy/propane flame cutting torch for the steel from the inside. The pressure vessel and insulation will be cut in five stages to a size which can be carried from the reactor vault to the sentencing cell for processing into baskets before being transferred into boxes in the waste packaging building and dispatched as ILW or LLW. The decision to decommission PIVER(Pilot Vitrification facility) was made in 1984, after some 5 million curies had been vitrified. The objective was to thoroughly clean up the process cell in order to allow installation of a new research and development facility. The decommissioning program lasted from

  5. Dismantling operations by SGN : the WAGR and PIVER examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By around september next year decommissioning work at WAGR should be getting into its stride. Among the most difficult operations, the dismantling of the pressure vessel and insulation will be carried out by ENTECH : a consortium of Strachan and Henshaw and SGN. The three year contract, recognised as one of the project's most technically demanding, is : 1. to primarily provide methodology and manufacture of tooling to dismantle the pressure vessel and to package it together with the debris arising, safely and effectively for disposal, 2. To provide operator training and support to the dismantling operations. The vessel is 13.1-m high, 6.5-m diameter and, clad with insulation, results in total weight of 118te. It consists of a rather combination asbestos, cement, metadextramite, chicken wire and aluminium sheeting mounted onto a carbon steel and mild steel. Based on the respective advantages and weaknesses of all of the existing cutting methods and the criteria as : risk, safety, robustness, efficiency, speed and optional use of the remote dismantling machine (already in ;lace), the final method chosen was oriented toward the process combining mechanical and thermal cutting. The dismantling of the reactor pressure vessel will be carried out using the existing RDM and a combination of a disc cutter for the insulation on the outside and an Oxy/propane flame cutting torch for the steel from the inside. The pressure vessel and insulation will be cut in five stages to a size which can be carried from the reactor vault to the sentencing cell for processing into baskets before being transferred into boxes in the waste packaging building and dispatched as ILW or LLW. The decision to decommission PIVER(Pilot Vitrification facility) was made in 1984, after some 5 million curies had been vitrified. The objective was to thoroughly clean up the process cell in order to allow installation of a new research and development facility. The decommissioning program lasted from 1984 to

  6. Superphenix - Strategy and orientations for dismantling the reactor block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first studies for dismantling the Superphenix power station reactor block are currently progressing. They have defined the broad outlines of the dismantling strategy and proposed a certain number of orientations. Two dismantling methods have been considered: dismantling with the structures covered with sodium carbonate; and underwater dismantling. In both cases, dismantling will be carried out 'from the top' through the reactor slab and will be preceded by a preliminary phase of sodium retention reduction followed by a phase of vessel internals carbonation. The parameters contributing to the efficiency of the carbonation operation have been determined in the laboratory. A demonstration on a semi-industrial scale is planned on one sodium loop. The dismantling studies are undertaken with a view to the work lasting eight years maximum. (author)

  7. Monitoring indicators in a dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowing yourself know the processes (Manual process), knows as the more quantitative possible, as are things (table of indicators), document and manage incidents and finds (integrated system of improvements), will allow us to carry to term two important tasks: the tracking and the continuous improvement of the project.

  8. A Study on Dismantling of Westinghouse Type Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Woo-Tae; Lee, Sang-Guk [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    KHNP started a research project this year to develop a methodology to dismantle nuclear reactors and internals. In this paper, we reviewed 3D design model of the reactor and suggested feasible cutting scheme.. Using 3-D CAD model of Westinghouse type nuclear reactor and its internals, we reviewed possible options for disposal. Among various options of dismantling the nuclear reactor, plasma cutting was selected to be the best feasible and economical method. The upper internals could be segmented by using a band saw. It is relatively fast, and easily maintained. For cutting the lower internals, plasma torch was chosen to be the best efficient tool. Disassembling the baffle and the former plate by removing the baffle former bolts was also recommended for minimizing storage volume. When using plasma torch for cutting the reactor vessel and its internal, installation of a ventilation system for preventing pollution of atmosphere was recommended. For minimizing radiation exposure during the cutting operation, remotely controlled robotic tool was recommended to be used.

  9. KROTOS FCI experimental programme at CEA Cadarache: new features and status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnet, J.M.; Bullado, Y.; Journeau, C.; Fouquart, P.; Piluso, P.; Sergeant, C.; Magallon, D. [CEA-Cadarache, DTN/STRI/LMA, Bat 708, BP1, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance cedex (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: KROTOS facility has been operated by the European Commission at JRC-Ispra for many years until 1999 as part of the FARO/KROTOS programme. The programme had to be stopped at JRC due to new EC priorities, and an agreement was concluded with CEA to transfer the KROTOS facility and know-how to Cadarache to continue investigating the pending FCI issues. By this agreement, CEA became owner of the facility. The main objective of the KROTOS programme at CEA Cadarache is understanding the role of melt properties in steam explosion propagation and energetics and, in particular, steam explosion behaviour of prototypical corium melts. Possible influence of physicochemical processes on explosiveness will also be explored. Actually, analysis of alumina debris produced at Ispra have shown that formation of metastable phases and chemical reaction with water at high temperature may play a significant role in enhancing heat transfer to water in the explosion phase. In order to reach the objective, steam explosion experiments are performed in well characterised conditions for a large spectrum of conditions and melt compositions of interest for both in- and ex-vessel situations. A trigger is applied as a rule. Advanced technology and instrumentation is used to reduce uncertainties on initial conditions and characterise the various phases of an explosion, with emphasis on high energy X-ray cinematography to qualify pre-mixing. This advanced instrumentation will enable the measurement of detailed variables to consolidate the qualification of the FCI codes. The use of high energy X-rays made it necessary to construct a new building to house the facility and its components. The facility should newly become operative early 2005. Main improvements with respect to Ispra concern melt delivery, hydrogen measurement and X-ray imaging. Preliminary studies have demonstrated that identification of the pre-mixture-water interface and coherent melt jet core, and

  10. NPP bulk equipment dismantling problems and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NPP bulk equipment dismantling problems and experience are summarized. 'ECOMET-S' JSC is shown as one of the companies which are able to make NPPs industrial sites free from stored bulk equipment with its further utilization. 'ECOMET-S' JSC is the Russian Federation sole specialized metallic LLW (MLLW) treatment and utilization facility. Company's main objectives are waste predisposal volume reduction and treatment for the unrestricted release as a scrap. Leningrad NPP decommissioned main pumps and moisture separators/steam super heaters dismantling results are presented. Prospective fragmentation technologies (diamond and electro-erosive cutting) testing results are described. The electro-erosive cutting machine designed by 'ECOMET-S' JSC is presented. The fragmentation technologies implementation plans for nuclear industry are presented too. (author)

  11. Testing and Commissioning of a Multifunctional Tool for the Dismantling of the Activated Internals of the KNK Reactor Shaft - 13524

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compact Sodium Cooled Reactor Facility Karlsruhe (KNK), a prototype reactor to demonstrate the Fast Breeder Reactor Technology in Germany, was in operation from 1971 to 1991. The dismantling activities started in 1991. The project aim is the green field in 2020. Most of the reactor internals as well as the primary and secondary cooling loops are already dismantled. The total contaminated sodium inventory has already been disposed of. Only the high activated reactor vessel shielding structures are remaining. Due to the high dose rates these structures must be dismantled remotely. For the dismantling of the primary shielding of the reactor vessel, 12 stacked cast iron blocks with a total mass of 90 Mg and single masses up to 15.5 Mg, a remote-controlled multifunctional dismantling device (HWZ) was designed, manufactured and tested in a mock-up. After successful approval of the test sequences by the authorities, the HWZ was implemented into the reactor building containment for final assembling of the auxiliary equipment and subsequent hot commissioning in 2012. Dismantling of the primary shielding blocks is scheduled for early 2013. (authors)

  12. Testing and Commissioning of a Multifunctional Tool for the Dismantling of the Activated Internals of the KNK Reactor Shaft - 13524

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothschmitt, Stefan; Graf, Anja [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O.Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bauer, Stefan; Klute, Stefan; Koselowski, Eiko [Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH, Am Taubenfeld 25/1, 69123 Heidelberg (Germany); Hendrich, Klaus [Ingenieurbuero Hendrich, Moerikeweg 14, 75015 Bretten (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The Compact Sodium Cooled Reactor Facility Karlsruhe (KNK), a prototype reactor to demonstrate the Fast Breeder Reactor Technology in Germany, was in operation from 1971 to 1991. The dismantling activities started in 1991. The project aim is the green field in 2020. Most of the reactor internals as well as the primary and secondary cooling loops are already dismantled. The total contaminated sodium inventory has already been disposed of. Only the high activated reactor vessel shielding structures are remaining. Due to the high dose rates these structures must be dismantled remotely. For the dismantling of the primary shielding of the reactor vessel, 12 stacked cast iron blocks with a total mass of 90 Mg and single masses up to 15.5 Mg, a remote-controlled multifunctional dismantling device (HWZ) was designed, manufactured and tested in a mock-up. After successful approval of the test sequences by the authorities, the HWZ was implemented into the reactor building containment for final assembling of the auxiliary equipment and subsequent hot commissioning in 2012. Dismantling of the primary shielding blocks is scheduled for early 2013. (authors)

  13. Brennilis - first deployment of industrial robots for the dismantling of a french nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since its founding in 1960, NUKEM Technologies has developed into one of Europe's leading engineering design and plant construction companies in the nuclear sector. For more than 25 years NUKEM has also been a specialist in the fields of RAW management and decommissioning consultancy. Today, we are proud on showing our extensive international track-record, to the growing needs for RAW facilities and decommissioning around the world. Together with our shareholder Atomstroyexport, NUKEM is embedded in a strong and strategically oriented group. NUKEM is now applying its skills and experience to the dismantling projects of French's 'First Generation' nuclear reactors, which are currently underway and have a pilot nature in terms of the entire future French dismantling program. In particular, one of these projects, the dismantling of EDF's CO2-cooled heavy-water reactor (EL 4) at BRENNILIS in Brittany is being performed by a Franco-German consortium, consisting of ONET Technologies Grands Projects (France) and NUKEM Technologies (Germany). The chosen dismantling strategy is based on the use of standard industrial (remote-controlled) robot systems, which not only carry out the dismantling activities, but also perform step-by-step the construction of their own infrastructure in the reactor core, as dismantling progresses. These standard robots, are of course enhanced by NUKEM in the BRENNILIS project with adaptations for the radiological environment, adjustments to the geometric requirements regarding compactness of the robots, whilst maximising the necessary reach distance and load-bearing capability. The biggest advantage of the chosen concept is that it allows for a combination of individual joy-stick-control and installed base program as well as a high level of flexibility of use and high handling speed. An integrated accident control system ensures in parallel, that no human error can lead to damage of the robot systems. The equipment and process design and the sum

  14. Advanced robotics for decontamination and dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decontamination and dismantlement (D ampersand D) robotics technology application area of the US Department of Energy's Robotics Technology Development Program is explained and described. D ampersand D robotic systems show real promise for the reduction of human exposure to hazards, for improvement of productivity, and for the reduction of secondary waste generation. Current research and development pertaining to automated floor characterization, robotic equipment removal, and special inspection is summarized. Future research directions for these and emerging activities is given

  15. Flow modelling in fractured aquifers, development of multi-continua model (direct and inverse problems) and application to the CEA/Cadarache site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis concerns the modelling of aquifer flows under the CEA/Cadarache site. The author reports the implementation of a numerical simulation tool adapted to large scale flows in fractured media, and its application to the Cadarache nuclear site. After a description of the site geological and hydrogeological characteristics, the author presents the conceptual model on which the modelling is based, presents the inverse model which allows a better definition of parameters, reports the validation of the inverse approach by means of synthetic and semi-synthetic cases. Then, he reports experiments and simulation of the Cadarache site

  16. Decontamination and partial dismantling of the Eurochemic plant. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of the partial dismantling of the dissolver used for fuel elements of up to 1.6 wt % 235U enrichment, and of the total dismantling of the dissolver for highly enriched fuel elements. The corresponding head-end cells have been decontaminated, allowing prolonged interventions, either in view of refurbishing or complete dismantling. An assessment of required manpower, dose commitments, material consumption, and waste production for all operations is given. (author)

  17. Achievements and prospects of robotics in dismantling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a definition of 'robotic systems' (poly functionality is the main concept), the nuclear facilities that have used robotic systems for their dismantling are reviewed; the various robot intervention domains in dismantling, the different types of machines and the work carried out by robots are presented. Difficulties arising from robot utilization for reactor dismantling, robot design considerations, reliability, personnel training needs, tooling and costs are discussed. Applicability criteria are derived concerning radio protection, hard working conditions, task complexity, multiplicity and quality, and costs

  18. The AIDA-MOX 1 program: Results of the French-Russian study on peaceful use of plutonium from dismantled Russian Nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Intergovernmental Agreement signed on November 12, 1992, between the governments of France and the Russian Federation instituted cooperation between the two countries for the safe elimination of the excess Russian nuclear weapons. France has allocated 400 million francs to this program, covering transportation and dismantling of nuclear weapons, interim storage and subsequent commercial use of the nuclear materials from the dismantled weapons, nuclear materials accountancy and safeguards, and scientific research. The concept of loading commercial Russian reactors with fuel fabricated from the plutonium recovered from dismantled nuclear weapons of the former Soviet Union is gaining widespread acceptance, and is at the heart of the French-Russian AIDA/MOX project

  19. LWR Fuel Gas Characterization at CEA Cadarache LECA-STAR Hot Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim to improve LWR fuel behaviour led CEA to improve its PIE capacities in term of test devices and characterization techniques in the shielded hot cells of the LECA-STAR facility, located in Cadarache. A presentation of these capacities is made, focusing on gas characterization : - annealing test devices used for transient simulations. These devices are test facilities allowing to simulate a very large range of conditions (temperature, atmosphere, pressure etc); - characterization techniques : optical microscopy, for microstructure characterizations on polished samples; scanning electron microscopy (SEM) used both on polished samples and on fractographs; Electron Probe Micro-Analyzer (EPMA) for quantitative elementary analysis and elementary mappings; Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (SIMS), for isotopic analysis, mapping depth profiles and gas measurements. It shows an overview of their main applications for the study of fuel behaviour under nominal operating conditions but also under simulated accidental conditions and storage conditions. Two detailed examples of the use of these techniques working together on the same samples, are then presented, focusing on fission gas characterizations. The first one is a 72 GW.d.t-1 high burnup UO2 PWR fuel for which detailed characterizations have been performed before and after a LOCA type condition annealing test. The second one is a 35 GW.d.t-1 UO2 PWR fuel for which these characterizations have been done before and after a ramp test at 100 W.cm-1.min-1 up to a 90 s maximum power hold time at 520 W.cm-1. In both cases, the complementarities of these various techniques show the interest of such detailed characterizations. (author)

  20. Capacitive tool standoff sensor for dismantlement tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A capacitive sensing technology has been applied to develop a Standoff Sensor System for control of robotically deployed tools utilized in Decontamination and Dismantlement (D and D) activities. The system combines four individual sensor elements to provide non-contact, multiple degree-of-freedom control of tools at distances up to five inches from a surface. The Standoff Sensor has been successfully integrated to a metal cutting router and a pyrometer, and utilized for real-time control of each of these tools. Experiments demonstrate that the system can locate stationary surfaces with a repeatability of 0.034 millimeters

  1. Method of dismantling and disposing nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To decrease the space for waste disposal by reducing the volume of dismantled scraps. Method: Pressure vessels or the likes used up to their life limits are roughly divided in the primary cutting step, finely divided in the secondary cutting step and then finally crushed into scraps of small granule pieces in the final cutting step. Thereafter, the granule scraps are subjected to briquetting by way of pressing or the like and then the solid scraps subjected to the briquetting are covered with concretes into a block. Since the scraps are finely crushed into granules and thereafter pressed, the volume thereof can be reduced. (Ikeda, J.)

  2. Capacitive tool standoff sensor for dismantlement tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, D.J.; Weber, T.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Liu, J.C. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A capacitive sensing technology has been applied to develop a Standoff Sensor System for control of robotically deployed tools utilized in Decontamination and Dismantlement (D and D) activities. The system combines four individual sensor elements to provide non-contact, multiple degree-of-freedom control of tools at distances up to five inches from a surface. The Standoff Sensor has been successfully integrated to a metal cutting router and a pyrometer, and utilized for real-time control of each of these tools. Experiments demonstrate that the system can locate stationary surfaces with a repeatability of 0.034 millimeters.

  3. Process cells dismantling of EUREX pant: previous activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the '98-'99 period some process cells of the EUREX pant will be dismantled, in order to place there the liquid wastes conditioning plant 'CORA'. This report resumes the previous activities (plant rinsing campaigns and inactive Cell 014 dismantling), run in the past three years and the drawn experience

  4. Dismantling of Highly Contaminated Process Installations of the German Reprocessing Facility (WAK) - Status of New Remote Handling Technology - 13287

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning and dismantling of the former German Pilot Reprocessing Plant Karlsruhe (WAK) including the Vitrification Facility (VEK) is being executed in different Project steps related to the reprocessing, HLLW storage and vitrification complexes /1/. While inside the reprocessing building the total inventory of process equipment has already been dismantled and disposed of, the HLLW storage and vitrification complex has been placed out of operation since vitrification and tank rinsing procedures where finalized in year 2010. This paper describes the progress made in dismantling of the shielded boxes of the highly contaminated laboratory as a precondition to get access to the hot cells of the HLLW storage. The major challenges of the dismantling of this laboratory were the high dose rates up to 700 mSv/h and the locking technology for the removal of the hot cell installations. In parallel extensive prototype testing of different carrier systems and power manipulators to be applied to dismantle the HLLW-tanks and other hot cell equipment is ongoing. First experiences with the new manipulator carrier system and a new master slave manipulator with force reflection will be reported. (authors)

  5. Dismantling of Highly Contaminated Process Installations of the German Reprocessing Facility (WAK) - Status of New Remote Handling Technology - 13287

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dux, Joachim; Friedrich, Daniel; Lutz, Werner; Ripholz, Martina [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O. Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Decommissioning and dismantling of the former German Pilot Reprocessing Plant Karlsruhe (WAK) including the Vitrification Facility (VEK) is being executed in different Project steps related to the reprocessing, HLLW storage and vitrification complexes /1/. While inside the reprocessing building the total inventory of process equipment has already been dismantled and disposed of, the HLLW storage and vitrification complex has been placed out of operation since vitrification and tank rinsing procedures where finalized in year 2010. This paper describes the progress made in dismantling of the shielded boxes of the highly contaminated laboratory as a precondition to get access to the hot cells of the HLLW storage. The major challenges of the dismantling of this laboratory were the high dose rates up to 700 mSv/h and the locking technology for the removal of the hot cell installations. In parallel extensive prototype testing of different carrier systems and power manipulators to be applied to dismantle the HLLW-tanks and other hot cell equipment is ongoing. First experiences with the new manipulator carrier system and a new master slave manipulator with force reflection will be reported. (authors)

  6. The radioprotection challenges associated with the dismantling of nuclear facilities; Les enjeux de radioprotection associes au demantelement des installations nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2011-01-15

    This document proposes an overview of the different studies performed by the CEPN (the French Centre of investigation on protection assessment in the nuclear sector) to develop principles and good practices in the field of radiation protection in the case of dismantling activities. These issues are addressed with respect to the characteristics of these dismantling activities, i.e. the evolution of radiological conditions under which workers are intervening, the production and handling of very important volumes of radioactive and conventional wastes, and the possible existence of a site rehabilitation project

  7. Report on transparency and nuclear safety, Cadarache 2011, Volume 1 + Volume 2 INB 32 and 54 Areva NC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For respectively different sites all situated in Cadarache, the CEA Centre on the one hand, and the AREVA nuclear base installation INB 32 and 54 on the other hand, these volumes propose a presentation of their activities and installations, a description of measures regarding safety and radiation protection, a description of significant events regarding nuclear safety and radiation protection, a presentation and discussion of results of measurements of releases and of their impact on the environment, and a description of the different radioactive wastes stored on the concerned site

  8. Rapport d'étude : La perception des risques majeurs par les riverains du CEA de Cadarache

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Alexia; Régner, Isabelle; Schleyer-Lindenmann, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Ce rapport d'étude vient répondre aux interrogations de son commanditaire, la CLI (Commission Local d'Information) du CEA (Commissariat à l'énergie Atomique) de Cadarache. Il s'organise en trois partie : une première partie établit un état des lieux des connaissances des risques majeurs par les habitants. Les risques majeurs officiellement recensés sont : le risque feu de forêt, le risque inondation, le risque sismique, le risque de mouvement de terrain, le risque de rupture de barrage, et le...

  9. I.Care.fire. EDP-supported dynamic fire-protection concept adaptation in the course of dismantling nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through the political resolution to terminate the use of nuclear energy, the number of dismantling projects in the nuclear area will significantly increase in the years to come. In the course of dismantling, the buildings and plant measures for fire protection will change constantly, this means that the existing fire-protection concept of the plant must be subjected to ongoing adaptation. This adaptation is based on preparation of fire load lists and execution of safety analyses. Previously this adaptation was executed manually, this was both time-intensive and personnel-intensive. The transition to EDP-supported fire protection should occur with the aid of adaptive fire-protection design to optimise adaptation of the fire protection. This adaptive fire protection design, with the aid of a software tool, enables electronic recording of the fire load lists, automatic execution of safety analyses and facilitation of dismantling steps relative to fire protection.

  10. An Evaluation of Dismantling Scenarios Using a Computer Simulation Technology for KRR-1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A graphic simulation has been used to design and verify new equipment and has also been expanded to virtual prototyping technology [1∼5]. In the nuclear decommissioning field, this technology has been utilized to validate the design of dismantling processes and to check the interferences and collisions in dismantling scenarios. However, a graphic simulation only provides us with visible result it just provides us with illustrative information of the decommissioning process. A scenario evaluation program has been developed using the computer simulation technology to create an efficient decommissioning plan. In the D and D planning stage, it is important that the scenarios are evaluated from a engineering point of view because the decommissioning work has to be executed economically and safely following the best scenarios. Therefore, we need several modules to evaluate scenarios. We composed the systems like this: 1. Decommissioning DB module for managing the decommissioning activity information (nuclear facility data, worker's data, radioactive inventory date, etc.). Dismantling process evaluation module 3. Visualization module for a radioactive inventory and a dismantling process using 3D CAD and virtual reality technology. 4. Analysis module for the evaluation results of a dismantling process. The evaluation module's capabilities produce a dismantling schedule, quantify radioactive waste, visualize a radioactive inventory, estimate a decommissioning cost, estimate a worker's exposure, and check for interference/collisions. After using the simulation results, the expert ranking system to evaluate scenarios for economics and worker's safety are implemented. The expert ranking system is a powerful and flexible decision making process to help set priorities and make the best decisions when both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of a decision need to be considered. By reducing complex decisions to a series of one-on-one comparisons, then synthesizing the

  11. The Grenoble CEA Center: dismantled and rehabilitated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The denuclearization program of the CEA center in Grenoble was launched in 2001. It involves 6 nuclear facilities (3 research reactors: Melusine, Siloette, and Siloe, and 1 laboratory (LAMA) and 2 units for processing wastes). The dismantling works were finished at the end of 2012 and the 2013 program concerns: the demolition of the buildings homing Melusine and Siloe reactors, the final rehabilitation of the Siloe raft, and the final rehabilitation of the laboratory and of the waste processing units. The budget is 117*106 euros for Siloe, 28*106 euros for Melusine, 6*106 euros for Siloette, 70*106 euros for the LAMA, and 90*106 euros for the 2 waste processing units. (A.C.)

  12. Prefiltration of gaseous effluents in plant dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dismantling techniques and mainly the thermal cutting tools can create large amounts of airbone dust, possibly contaminated in the case of the cutting of radioactive materials. Among the secondary solid emissions, the aerosols constitute the most mobile part which can disseminate contamination in the cell where the cutting operation takes place and in the ventilation ducts up to the HEPA filters. An optimised prefiltration coupled with a captation device at the aerosol generating source allows to avoid the dissemination of the contamination, to increase the life of HEPA filters and thus to reduce the amount of solid wastes. The object in this work was to select one or several cleaning devices, selection that can be done from the knowledge of the physico-chemical characteristics of the gas and aerosols to deal with, the available cleaning devices and the implied facility

  13. The application of mechanical and thermal cutting tools for the dismantling of activated internals of the reactor pressure vessels in the Versuchsatomkraftwerk, Kahl and the Gundremmingen Unit A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eickelpasch, N. [Versuchsatomkraftwerk GmbH, Kahl am Main (Germany); Kalwa, H. [Versuchsatomkraftwerk GmbH, Kahl am Main (Germany); Steiner, H. [Kernkraftwerke Gundremmingen Betriebsgesellschaft mbH, D-89355 Gundremmingen (Germany); Priesmeyer, U. [Kernkraftwerke Gundremmingen Betriebsgesellschaft mbH, D-89355 Gundremmingen (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    The Gundremmingen Unit A plant (KRB A) and the Versuchsatomkraftwerk Kahl (VAK) plant represent the first generation of nuclear reactors in Germany. The 250 MW{sub e} reactor KRB A was the first commercial reactor in Germany and the 16 MW{sub e} reactor VAK was the pilot nuclear power plant, which had to serve mainly scientific purposes. KRB A is under dismantling since 1983, VAK since 1988. Although they are both of the boiling water type, they are rather different to each other, referring to their size and construction. The actual work is the dismantling of high contaminated components inside the reactor buildings and the underwater cutting of activated internals of the reactor pressure vessels. Several cutting techniques have been developed, tested and applied to respective dismantling tasks in the meantime. The experiences made in both projects are not limited to dismantling work only, but also include know-how on effective decontamination and scrap recycling. (orig.)

  14. Determining the cost of nuclear technology dismantling - software to quantify the costs of clean dismantling of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Division ENERGOPROJEKT PRAHA processes within the group UJV Rez, a.s. complex pre-project and project preparation works in the nuclear field. Division prepares studies and documentation necessary for the customer's decision making (feasibility studies, business plans, building plans, etc.), preparatory, conceptual and project documentation), including related engineering services. Further safety documentation processes at all levels and documentation of the evaluation of environmental impact (EIA). In the area of a decommissioning process complete alternate design studies and design documentations of a decommissioning of NPPs in order to choose suitable variant of solution. An important area is the financing of the decommissioning process, creation of financial reserves, the input data to create a cost estimate and methodology for cost estimate. Quantifying the cost demands of the decommissioning process throughout the life cycle is composed of individual cost items for individual decommissioning activities. These also include determining the amount of costs necessary for removing uncontaminated or decontaminated process equipment. In the division ENERGOPROJEKT PRAHA was created software DEMONDEC for the estimation of these costs, which is based on the assumption that the costs to be incurred for dismantling of the above technological nuclear installation, it can be derived from the performance indicators when removing analogue equipment and systems that are part of common industrial buildings. (authors)

  15. Dismantlement and Radioactive Waste Management of DPRK Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One critical aspect of any denuclearization of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) involves dismantlement of its nuclear facilities and management of their associated radioactive wastes. The decommissioning problem for its two principal operational plutonium facilities at Yongbyun, the 5MWe nuclear reactor and the Radiochemical Laboratory reprocessing facility, alone present a formidable challenge. Dismantling those facilities will create radioactive waste in addition to existing inventories of spent fuel and reprocessing wastes. Negotiations with the DPRK, such as the Six Party Talks, need to appreciate the enormous scale of the radioactive waste management problem resulting from dismantlement. The two operating plutonium facilities, along with their legacy wastes, will result in anywhere from 50 to 100 metric tons of uranium spent fuel, as much as 500,000 liters of liquid high-level waste, as well as miscellaneous high-level waste sources from the Radiochemical Laboratory. A substantial quantity of intermediate-level waste will result from disposing 600 metric tons of graphite from the reactor, an undetermined quantity of chemical decladding liquid waste from reprocessing, and hundreds of tons of contaminated concrete and metal from facility dismantlement. Various facilities for dismantlement, decontamination, waste treatment and packaging, and storage will be needed. The shipment of spent fuel and liquid high level waste out of the DPRK is also likely to be required. Nuclear facility dismantlement and radioactive waste management in the DPRK are all the more difficult because of nuclear nonproliferation constraints, including the call by the United States for 'complete, verifiable and irreversible dismantlement,' or 'CVID.' It is desirable to accomplish dismantlement quickly, but many aspects of the radioactive waste management cannot be achieved without careful assessment, planning and preparation, sustained commitment, and long completion times

  16. Nuclab Marcoule: a dedicated waste management and dismantling support laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formerly dedicated to plutonium production support, NucLab was renovated to perform a wide range of analyses for dismantling, plant operation and process development activities mainly at Marcoule but also for external clients. The laboratory is a CEA entity in the Nuclear Energy Division. It provides services to several industrial operators (nuclear processes and power plants) in the fields of analytical chemistry, radioactivity measurements, in situ nuclear measurements, decontamination processes, industrial chemistry processes, and waste treatment. NucLab supports research, production, and dismantling activities in all areas of dismantling operations (authors)

  17. Environmental Assessment for decontamination and dismantlement, Pinellas Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1092) of the proposed decontamination and dismantlement of the Pinellas Plant in Largo, Florida. Under the Decontamination and Dismantlement EA, the DOE proposes to clean up facilities, structures, and utilities; dismantle specific structures; and mitigate or eliminate any environmental impacts associated with the cleanup, dismantlement, and related activities. Related activities include utilization of specific areas by new tenants prior to full-scale cleanup. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI)

  18. Environmental Assessment for decontamination and dismantlement, Pinellas Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1092) of the proposed decontamination and dismantlement of the Pinellas Plant in Largo, Florida. Under the Decontamination and Dismantlement EA, the DOE proposes to clean up facilities, structures, and utilities; dismantle specific structures; and mitigate or eliminate any environmental impacts associated with the cleanup, dismantlement, and related activities. Related activities include utilization of specific areas by new tenants prior to full-scale cleanup. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  19. Pollution from EOLV dismantling and the corresponding countermeasures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hu

    2016-05-15

    There are problems associated with dismantling vessels that have reached the end of their life, when pollution problems associated with the process need to be addressed. The first problem in "end-of-life vessels" (EOLV) is to define their legal frameworks. The second problem is their dismantlement for recycling of ships. In order to reduce the effects of pollution caused by EOLV dismantling, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) adopted the Hong Kong Convention on 15 May 2009. While preparing for implementing the obligations under the Hong Kong Convention, China shall make effort on five aspects: (i) establish an ISRT for the safe and environmentally sound recycling of ships, (ii) improve the competitiveness of ship dismantling plants, (iii) strengthen international exchanges, (iv) amend the domestic laws and regulations, and (v) support from the China Classification Society. PMID:27039959

  20. Deterministic Assessment of Future Costs for Dismantling (FA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasko, Marek [DECOM, Trnava (Slovakia)

    2012-11-01

    The main objective of the report is to provide an re-evaluation of cost calculations by OMEGA code for the Intermediate Storage for Spent Fuel in Studsvik (FA facility) using up-to-date Swedish labour cost unit factors and available up-to-date Swedish (or international) cost unit factors for consumables, materials and substances. Furthermore, evolution of other OMEGA database parameters concerning cost calculations e.g. manpower unit factors and workgroups parameters are taken into account. This report follows up former project which introduced tentative calculations of main decommissioning parameters such as costs, manpower and exposure of personnel for activities of older nuclear facility decommissioning in Sweden represented by FA Facility in Studsvik by means of calculation code OMEGA. The project demonstrated an implementation of advanced costing methodology based on PSL structure format to achieve transparent, traceable and comparable estimates even for older nuclear facilities like FA Facility in Studsvik. This former project used Slovak origin labour costs unit factors and other cost unit factors. After successful completion of this project, there was an intent of SSM to reevaluate calculations using an up-to-date Swedish labour cost data and also available Swedish consumables and materials cost data if available. Within this report re-calculations of main decommissioning parameters using available Swedish data are presented in structure according to Proposed Standardized List of Items for Costing Purposes. Calculations are made for decommissioning scenario with post-dismantling decontamination and steel radwaste melting technologies available at the site. All parameters are documented and summed up in both table and graphic forms in text and Annexes. Further, comparison of calculated results with previous calculations together with discussion is provided.

  1. MOSH - Development and optimization of modular jet cutting and materials handling systems for low-cost dismantling of nuclear facilities. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective pursued with the bmb+f-sponsored research project (project No. 02 S 7818) for 'development and optimization of modular jet cutting tools for low-cost dismantling of nuclear facilities' was to develop, test and optimize modular jet cutting tools for the dismantling of nuclear facilities, applicable for various radiological conditions and exposure levels, and in addition, designed so as to offer free combination with various handling systems in order to open up a wide variety of applications. The publication presents an in-depth report of the project work and the achievements. (orig./CB)

  2. Comparison of thorough decontamination techniques on dismantled pieces of a PWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decontamination experience gained during the BR3 dismantling project is developed. This started with the full system decontamination of the primary loop and was followed by R and D on thorough decontamination projects. First, a wet abrasive installation has been installed and is now in operation for the thorough cleaning of metallic pieces of simple geometry. Afterwards, the chemical cerium process has been developed. The results of the regeneration with ozone and with electrochemistry are presented in detail. The ozone regeneration process has been selected for the industrial installation of which the construction is foreseen in 1998. (author)

  3. DISMANTLING OF THE FUEL CELL LABORATORY AT RESEARCH CENTRE JUELICH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel cell laboratory was constructed in three phases and taken into operation in the years 1962 to 1966. The last experimental work was carried out in 1996. After all cell internals had been disassembled, the fuel cell laboratory was transferred to shutdown operation in 1997. Three cell complexes, which differed, in particular, by the type of shielding (lead, cast steel, concrete), were available until then for activities at nuclear components. After approval by the regulatory authority, the actual dismantling of the fuel cell laboratory started in March 2000. The BZ I laboratory area consisted of 7 cells with lead shieldings of 100 to 250 mm thickness. This area was dismantled from April to September 2000. Among other things, approx. 30,000 lead bricks with a total weight of approx. 300 Mg were dismantled and disposed of. The BZ III laboratory area essentially consisted of cells with concrete shieldings of 1200 to 1400 mm thickness. The dismantling of this area started in the fir st half of 2001 and was completed in November 2002. Among other things, approx. 900 Mg of concrete was dismantled and disposed of. Since more than 90 % of the dismantled materials was measurable for clearance, various clearance measurement devices were used during dismantling. The BZ II laboratory area essentially consists of cells with cast steel shieldings of 400 to 460 mm thickness. In September 2002 it was decided to continue using this laboratory area for future tasks. The dismantling of the fuel cell laboratory was thus completed. After appropriate refurbishment, the fuel cell laboratory will probably take up operation again in late 2003

  4. Technology and costs for dismantling a Swedish nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various estimates concerning the costs of decommissioning a redundant nuclear power reactor to the green fields state are given in the literature. The purpose of this study is to provide background material for the Swedish nuclear power utilities to estimate the costs and time required to dismantle an ASEA-ATOM Boiling Water Reactor. The units Oskarshamn II and Barsebeck 1, both with an installed capacity of approximately 600 MW, serve as reference plants. The time of operation before final shutdown is assumed to be 40 years. Dismantling operations are initiated one year after shutdown. When the dismantling of the plant is finished, the site is to be released for unrestricted use. The costs for dismantling and subsequent final disposal of the radioactive waste are estimated at approximately SEK 500 million (approximately US dollars 120 million) in terms of 1979 prices. The sum includes 25% contingency. The dismantling cost is equivalent to 10-15% of the installation cost of an equivalent new nuclear power plant. The exact percentage is dependent on the interest rate during the construction period. It is shown in the study that a total dismantling can be accomplished in less than five years. This report is a compilation of studies performed by ASEA-ATOM and VBB based on premises given by KBS. The reports from these studies are presented in appendices. (Auth.)

  5. Mobile worksystems for decontamination and dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many DOE nuclear facilities have aged beyond their useful lifetimes. They need to be decommissioned in order to be safe for human presence in the short term, to eventually recover valuable materials they contain, and ultimately to be transitioned to alternative uses or green field conditions. Decontamination and dismantlement are broad classes of activities that will enable these changes to occur. Most of these facilities - uranium enrichment plants, weapons assembly plants, research and production reactors, and fuel recycling facilities - are dormant, though periodic inspection, surveillance and maintenance activities within them are on-going. DOE estimates that there are over 5000 buildings that require deactivation to reduce the costs of performing such work with manual labor. In the long term, 1200 buildings will be decommissioned, and millions of metric tons of metal and concrete will have to be recycled or disposed of The magnitude of the problem calls for new approaches that are far more cost effective than currently available techniques. This paper describes two technologies that are viable solutions for facility D ampersand D

  6. Dismantling and decommissioning experience of commercial PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regarding the relatively youthness of FRAMATOME PWR's in operation none of these reactor needs to be decommissioned before 1992. However feasibility studies have been carried out by FRAMATOME for an on site entombment of active components and heavy equipments. In the past, partial dismantling of the reactor internals of the CHOOZ reactor: PWR of 320 MWe and a complete removal of the thermal shield protecting the reactor vessel were conducted successfully. After repair, the reactor power output has been upgraded of 10% and the reactor operates satisfactorily since 1970. More recently the discovery of scarce defects affecting centering pins of control guide tube located in the upper reactor internals of 900 MWe plants has initiated the construction of several ''Hot stand equipments'' for the systematic replacement of these centering pins. FRAMATOME is presently actively studying possible options consisting either to extend the plant life beyond its initial licence life, or to convert classical PWR into an advanced reactor more economical in terms of uranium consumption

  7. Mobile worksystems for decontamination and dismantlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, J. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bares, L.C.; Thompson, B.R. [RedZone Robotics, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Many DOE nuclear facilities have aged beyond their useful lifetimes. They need to be decommissioned in order to be safe for human presence in the short term, to eventually recover valuable materials they contain, and ultimately to be transitioned to alternative uses or green field conditions. Decontamination and dismantlement are broad classes of activities that will enable these changes to occur. Most of these facilities - uranium enrichment plants, weapons assembly plants, research and production reactors, and fuel recycling facilities - are dormant, though periodic inspection, surveillance and maintenance activities within them are on-going. DOE estimates that there are over 5000 buildings that require deactivation to reduce the costs of performing such work with manual labor. In the long term, 1200 buildings will be decommissioned, and millions of metric tons of metal and concrete will have to be recycled or disposed of. The magnitude of the problem calls for new approaches that are far more cost effective than currently available techniques. This paper describes a mobile workstation termed ROSIE, which provides remote work capabilities for D&D activities.

  8. Mobile worksystems for decontamination and dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many DOE nuclear facilities have aged beyond their useful lifetimes. They need to be decommissioned in order to be safe for human presence in the short term, to eventually recover valuable materials they contain, and ultimately to be transitioned to alternative uses or green field conditions. Decontamination and dismantlement are broad classes of activities that will enable these changes to occur. Most of these facilities - uranium enrichment plants, weapons assembly plants, research and production reactors, and fuel recycling facilities - are dormant, though periodic inspection, surveillance and maintenance activities within them are on-going. DOE estimates that there are over 5000 buildings that require deactivation to reduce the costs of performing such work with manual labor. In the long term, 1200 buildings will be decommissioned, and millions of metric tons of metal and concrete will have to be recycled or disposed of. The magnitude of the problem calls for new approaches that are far more cost effective than currently available techniques. This paper describes a mobile workstation termed ROSIE, which provides remote work capabilities for D ampersand D activities

  9. Disposal of fissionable material from dismantled nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reduction in tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union has improved the prospects for nuclear disarmament, making it more likely that significant numbers of nuclear warheads will be dismantled by the United States and USSR in the foreseeable future. Thus, the question becomes more urgent as to the disposition of the weapons materials, highly enriched uranium and plutonium. It is timely, therefore, to develop specific plans for such disposal. The overall process for disposal of weapons materials by the burnup option involves the following steps: (1) removing the weapons material from the warheads, (2) converting the material to a fuel form suitable for power reactors, (3) burning it up as a power reactor fuel, and (4) removing the spent fuel and placing it in a permanent repository. This paper examines these four steps with the purpose of answering the following questions. What facilities would be appropriate for the disposal process? Do they need to be dedicated facilities, or could industrial facilities be used? What is the present projection of the economics of the burnup process, both the capital investment and the operating costs? How does one assure that fissionable materials will not be diverted to military use during the disposal process? Is the spent fuel remaining from the burnup process proliferation resistant? Would the disposal of spent fuel add an additional burden to the spent fuel permanent repository? The suggested answers are those of the author and do not represent a position by the Electric Power Research Institute

  10. Determination of actinides in samples obtained during dismantling activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, some of the nuclear and radioactive facilities from CIEMAT employed in the past to perform activities related to the production of nuclear energy have been decommissioned as part of a more global on-going dismantling project. During the radiological characterization of a former laboratory a significant contamination of actinide elements in the old liquid effluents system was found. Samples obtained from two different locations (pipes and deposit) were measured by gamma- and alpha-spectrometry to quantify the contamination of the system. A quick and simple method using Actinide resin coupled with liquid scintillation counting (LSC) was employed for the determination of gross-alpha activity. The samples were also analyzed using a sequential leaching procedure to obtain information about the actinide association to certain geochemical phases with different solubilities such as carbonates, oxides, organic matter, etc., and thus, to choose the most appropriate clean-up method. Finally, the results obtained by the different techniques mentioned are compared and discussed. (author)

  11. Experience Review on Dismantling Procedure for American Decommissioned NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to IAEA, the number of shutdown NPPs is totally 150 globally. In Korea, there are 23 operating NPPs and 5 NPPs under construction. But Korea has no shutdown NPP and has no experience on decommissioning commercial reactor so far except for decommissioning research reactor, TRIGA MARK-3. Based on the NPP lifetime as a 45 years, it is expected that 440 NPPs in the world and 16 NPPs in Korea will come to an end of their lifetime until 2060. In this study, decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) procedure of shutdown NPPs in US concentrated on dismantling of reactor vessel and its internals is investigated. Detailed activation analysis on primary system should be followed for safe D and D activities. However many US decommissioning projects encountered that collection and removal of irradiated small and scattered debris from segmentation were challenging issues. That's why cutting enclosure was implemented to restrict the spread of debris to other area of refueling cavity. Furthermore lifting of total weight (apx. 1,000,000 kg) on primary system including RPV, RVI and interior low-density concrete was extremely heavy

  12. Rosie: A mobile workstation for decontamination and dismantlement operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RedZone Robotics, Inc. and Carnegie Mellon University's Field Robotics Center have undertaken a contract to develop a next-generation worksystem for decommissioning and dismantlement tasks in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Currently, the authors are in the second phase of this three phase effort and are completing the design of the worksystem. Within this project RedZone is designing and fabricating a worksystem: Rosie. Rosie will include a locomotor, heavy manipulator, control center, and control system for robot operation. The locomotor is an omni-directional platform with tether management and hydraulic power capabilities. The heavy manipulator is a high-payload, long-reach system to deploy tools into the work area. The heavy manipulator will be capable of deploying systems such as the Dual-Arm Work Module--a five degree-of-freedom platform supporting two highly dexterous manipulators--or a single manipulator for performing simpler, less dexterous tasks. Rosie will be telerobotic to the point of having servo-controlled motions which can be operated and coordinated through the control center. This report describes the design of the systems. In phase three Rosie will be radiation-hardened and perform a demonstration in a contaminated facility

  13. Experience Review on Dismantling Procedure for American Decommissioned NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyosub; Son, Daesun; Lee, Jaeyong; Kim, Kyungmin; Kim, Yong-soo [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    According to IAEA, the number of shutdown NPPs is totally 150 globally. In Korea, there are 23 operating NPPs and 5 NPPs under construction. But Korea has no shutdown NPP and has no experience on decommissioning commercial reactor so far except for decommissioning research reactor, TRIGA MARK-3. Based on the NPP lifetime as a 45 years, it is expected that 440 NPPs in the world and 16 NPPs in Korea will come to an end of their lifetime until 2060. In this study, decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) procedure of shutdown NPPs in US concentrated on dismantling of reactor vessel and its internals is investigated. Detailed activation analysis on primary system should be followed for safe D and D activities. However many US decommissioning projects encountered that collection and removal of irradiated small and scattered debris from segmentation were challenging issues. That's why cutting enclosure was implemented to restrict the spread of debris to other area of refueling cavity. Furthermore lifting of total weight (apx. 1,000,000 kg) on primary system including RPV, RVI and interior low-density concrete was extremely heavy.

  14. Radiological survey techniques for decontamination and dismantlement applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy's Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) is engaged in an aggressive Program to remove all above ground structures as part of the Fernald sites final remediation remedy. Through the complete removal of major facilities such as Plant 7, Plant 4, and Plant 1, the FEMP has developed radiological survey approaches that are effective for the different phases of the Decontamination and Dismantlement (D ampersand D) process. Some of the most pressing challenges facing the FEMP are implementing effective, low cost methods for the D ampersand D of former process buildings while minimizing environmental effects. One of the key components to ensure minimal impact on the environment is the collection of radiological contamination information during the D ampersand D process to facilitate the decision making process. Prior to the final demolition of any structure, radiological surveys of floors, walls, and ceilings must take place. These surveys must demonstrate that contamination levels am below 5000 dpm removable beta/gamma for non-porous surfaces and below 1000 dpm removable-beta/gamma for all porous surfaces. Technique which can perform these activities in a safe, effective, and cost efficient manner are greatly desired. The FEMP has investigated new approaches to address this need. These techniques include sampling approaches using standard baseline methodology as well as innovative approaches to accelerate final radiological clearance processes. To further improve upon this process, the FEMP has investigated several new technologies through the Fernald Plant 1 Large Scale Technology Demonstration Project. One of the most promising of these new technologies, Laser Induced Fluorescence, may significantly improve the radiological clearance survey process. This paper will present real world experiences in applying radiological control limits to D ampersand D projects as well as relate potential productivity and cost improvements with the

  15. Prediction of Long Term Corrosion Behaviour in Nuclear Waste Systems. Proceedings of an International Workshop, Cadarache, France, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This 36. book of the European Federation of Corrosion series contains the proceedings of the International Workshop on 'Prediction of Long Term Corrosion Behaviour in Nuclear Waste Systems' that took place in Cadarache, France in November 2001. The EFC Working Party on Nuclear Corrosion, which sponsored this Workshop, had already considered in 1991 that the long term integrity of Radioactive Waste storage was a crucial problem in the development of nuclear energy for electricity production. At that time, it was realized that public opinion on Nuclear Energy, was concerned not only with the risk of a nuclear accidents but also with the safety of long term storage of high level nuclear wastes. The nuclear community and the public demanded that any technical barrier for preventing long term radionuclides from entering the biosphere should be effective and guaranteed for 10,000 or more. The integrity of the waste containers, particularly their resistance to possible internal and external corrosion, is the most important aspect of this requirement. For the last ten years, the importance of programmes on long term corrosion on nuclear waste canisters has become of major significance to the international community. The Cadarache Workshop included reports on these programmes from eight countries. These approached the long term corrosion tests, but also by the development of the necessary deterministic and empirical models for extrapolating the behaviour of the selected materials. The difficulties involved in developing such models of corrosion behaviour and in demonstrating their validity has been underlined many times. The Proceedings contains in all an Introduction by Professor G. Beranger and 33 papers grouped in four parts as follows: 1 - R and D corrosion programmes (5 papers); 2 - Laboratory and in situ testing (11 papers); 3 - Historical and archaeological analogues (5 papers); and 4 - Fundamental issues, models and prediction

  16. Implementation of the environmental management plan for the dismantling of nuclear powered submarines at Zvezdochka shipyard, Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada is funding the dismantling of twelve nuclear powered submarines (NPS) from the Russian Federation's Northern Fleet as part of the Global Partnership Initiative against weapons and materials of mass destruction. In this paper, work performed by Nuclear Safety Solutions Ltd. and its collaborators in support of these activities is described. First, an environmental impact assessment of towing and dismantling NPS in the Kola Peninsula, and the Barents and White Seas was performed. The assessed activities included: towing of NPS from Naval Bases in Murmansk Region to the Zvezdochka shipyard (Severodvinsk); defuelling of onboard reactors; dismantling of NPS at Zvezdochka; and waste management. The assessment helped identify mitigation measures that could prevent the occurrence of adverse effects. Next, the project team defined and implemented an environmental management plan (EMP) based on the shipyard's existing environmental policy and the mitigating measures identified during the environmental assessment. Specific targets were defined to track the progress of the EMP implementation, and are described in this paper. During the study period, three Victor Class NPS were dismantled at Zvezdochka. The major benefits realized include: removal of spent nuclear fuel assemblies; treatment/ decontamination of liquid and solid radioactive waste; and the cultivation of collaboration between Russian and Western expertise. (author)

  17. Implementation of the environmental management plan for the dismantling of nuclear powered submarines at Zvezdochka Shipyard, Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada is funding the dismantling of twelve nuclear powered submarines (NPS) from the Russian Federation's Northern Fleet as part of the Global Partnership Initiative against weapons and materials of mass destruction. In this paper, work performed by Nuclear Safety Solutions Ltd. and its collaborators in support of these activities is described. First, an environmental impact assessment of towing and dismantling NPS in the Kola Peninsula, and the Barents and White Seas was performed. The assessed activities included: towing of NPS from Naval Bases in Murmansk Region to the Zvezdochka shipyard (Severodvinsk); defuelling of onboard reactors; dismantling of NPS at Zvezdochka; and waste management. The assessment helped identify mitigation measures that could prevent the occurrence of adverse effects. Next, the project team defined and implemented an environmental management plan (EMP) based on the shipyard's existing environmental policy and the mitigating measures identified during the environmental assessment. Specific targets were defined to track the progress of the EMP implementation, and are described in this paper. During the study period, three Victor Class NPS were dismantled at Zvezdochka. The major benefits realized include: removal and spent nuclear fuel assemblies; treatment/decontamination of liquid and solid radioactive waste; and the cultivation of collaboration between Russian and Western expertise. (author)

  18. Dismantlement and Radioactive Waste Management of DPRK Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jooho, W.; Baldwin, G. T.

    2005-04-01

    One critical aspect of any denuclearization of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) involves dismantlement of its nuclear facilities and management of their associated radioactive wastes. The decommissioning problem for its two principal operational plutonium facilities at Yongbyun, the 5MWe nuclear reactor and the Radiochemical Laboratory reprocessing facility, alone present a formidable challenge. Dismantling those facilities will create radioactive waste in addition to existing inventories of spent fuel and reprocessing wastes. Negotiations with the DPRK, such as the Six Party Talks, need to appreciate the enormous scale of the radioactive waste management problem resulting from dismantlement. The two operating plutonium facilities, along with their legacy wastes, will result in anywhere from 50 to 100 metric tons of uranium spent fuel, as much as 500,000 liters of liquid high-level waste, as well as miscellaneous high-level waste sources from the Radiochemical Laboratory. A substantial quantity of intermediate-level waste will result from disposing 600 metric tons of graphite from the reactor, an undetermined quantity of chemical decladding liquid waste from reprocessing, and hundreds of tons of contaminated concrete and metal from facility dismantlement. Various facilities for dismantlement, decontamination, waste treatment and packaging, and storage will be needed. The shipment of spent fuel and liquid high level waste out of the DPRK is also likely to be required. Nuclear facility dismantlement and radioactive waste management in the DPRK are all the more difficult because of nuclear nonproliferation constraints, including the call by the United States for “complete, verifiable and irreversible dismantlement,” or “CVID.” It is desirable to accomplish dismantlement quickly, but many aspects of the radioactive waste management cannot be achieved without careful assessment, planning and preparation, sustained commitment, and long

  19. Development of multi-functional telerobotic systems for reactor dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes technological features of advanced telerobotic systems for reactor dismantling application developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Taking into consideration the special environmental conditions in reactor dismantling, major effort was made to develop multifunctional telerobotic system of high reliability which can be used to perform various complex tasks in an unstructured environment and operated in an easy and flexible manner. The system development was carried out through constructing three systems in seccession; a light-duty and a heavy-duty system as a prototype system for engineering test in cold environment, and a demonstration system for practical on-site application to dismantling highly radioactive reactor internals of an experimental boiling water reactor JPDR (Japan Power Demonstration Reactor). Each system was equipped with one or two amphibious manipulators which can be operated in either a push-button manual, a bilateral master-slave, a teach-and-playback or a programmed control mode. Different scheme was adopted in each system at designing the manipulator, transporter and man-machine interface so as to compare their advantages and disadvantages. According to the JPDR decommissioning program, the demonstration system was successfully operated to dismantle a portion of the radioactive reactor internals of the JPDR, which used underwater plasma arc cutting method and proved the usefulness of the multi-functional telerobotic system for reducing the occupational hazards and enhancing the work efficiency in the course of dismantling highly radioactive reactor components. (author)

  20. Radiochemistry Lab Decommissioning and Dismantlement. AECL, Chalk River Labs, Ontario, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) was originally founded in the mid 1940's to perform research in radiation and nuclear areas under the Canadian Defense Department. In the mid 50's The Canadian government embarked on several research and development programs for the development of the Candu Reactor. AECL was initially built as a temporary site and is now faced with many redundant buildings. Prior to 2004 small amounts of Decommissioning work was in progress. Many reasons for deferring decommissioning activities were used with the predominant ones being: 1. Reduction in radiation doses to workers during the final dismantlement, 2. Development of a long-term solution for the management of radioactive wastes in Canada, 3. Financial constraints presented by the number of facilities shutdown that would require decommissioning funds and the absence of an approved funding strategy. This has led to the development of a comprehensive decommissioning plan that is all inclusive of AECL's current and legacy liabilities. Canada does not have a long-term disposal site; therefore waste minimization becomes the driving factor behind decontamination for decommissioning before and during dismantlement. This decommissioning job was a great learning experience for decommissioning and the associated contractors who worked on this project. Throughout the life of the project there was a constant focus on waste minimization. This focus was constantly in conflict with regulatory compliance primarily with respect to fire regulations and protecting the facility along with adjacent facilities during the decommissioning activities. Discrepancies in historical documents forced the project to treat every space as a contaminated space until proven differently. Decommissioning and dismantlement within an operating site adds to the complexity of the tasks especially when it is being conducted in the heart of the plant. This project was very successful with no lost time accidents in over one hundred

  1. Decommissioning, Dismantling and Disarming: a Unique Information Showroom Inside the G2 Reactor at Marcoule Centre (France) - 12068

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper aims at presenting the new information showroom called 'Escom G2' (for 'Espace Communication') inaugurated by the French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission (CEA) in spring 2011. This showroom is settled directly inside the main building of the G2 nuclear reactor: a facility formerly dedicated to weapon-grade plutonium production since the late 1950's at the Marcoule nuclear centre, in south of France. After its shutdown, and reprocessing of the last spent fuels, a first dismantling step was successfully completed from 1986 to 1996. Unique in France and in Europe, Escom G2 is focused on France dismantling expertise and its action for disarmament. This showroom comprises of a 300-square meters permanent exhibition, organized around four themes: France strategy for disarmament, decommissioning and dismantling technical aspects, uranium and plutonium production cycles. Each of these topics is illustrated with posters, photos, models and technical pieces from the dismantled plants. It is now used to present France's action in disarmament to highly ranked audiences such as: state representatives, diplomats, journalists... The paper explains the background story of this original project. As a matter of fact, in 1996 France was the first nuclear state to decide to shut down and dismantle its fissile material production facilities for nuclear weapons. First, the paper presents the history of the G2 reactor in the early ages of Marcoule site, its operating highlights as well as its main dismantling operations, are presented. In Marcoule, where the three industrial-scale reactors G1, G2 and G3 used to be operated for plutonium production (to be then reprocessed in the nearby UP1 plant), the initial dismantling phase has now been completed (in 1980's for G1 and in 1996 for G2 and G3). The second phase, aimed at completely dismantling these three reactors, will restart in 2020, and is directly linked to the opening of a future national storage facility

  2. Decommissioning, Dismantling and Disarming: a Unique Information Showroom Inside the G2 Reactor at Marcoule Centre (France) - 12068

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volant, Emmanuelle [CEA DAM, Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Garnier, Cedric [CEA DEN, Marcoule (France)

    2012-07-01

    The paper aims at presenting the new information showroom called 'Escom G2' (for 'Espace Communication') inaugurated by the French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission (CEA) in spring 2011. This showroom is settled directly inside the main building of the G2 nuclear reactor: a facility formerly dedicated to weapon-grade plutonium production since the late 1950's at the Marcoule nuclear centre, in south of France. After its shutdown, and reprocessing of the last spent fuels, a first dismantling step was successfully completed from 1986 to 1996. Unique in France and in Europe, Escom G2 is focused on France dismantling expertise and its action for disarmament. This showroom comprises of a 300-square meters permanent exhibition, organized around four themes: France strategy for disarmament, decommissioning and dismantling technical aspects, uranium and plutonium production cycles. Each of these topics is illustrated with posters, photos, models and technical pieces from the dismantled plants. It is now used to present France's action in disarmament to highly ranked audiences such as: state representatives, diplomats, journalists... The paper explains the background story of this original project. As a matter of fact, in 1996 France was the first nuclear state to decide to shut down and dismantle its fissile material production facilities for nuclear weapons. First, the paper presents the history of the G2 reactor in the early ages of Marcoule site, its operating highlights as well as its main dismantling operations, are presented. In Marcoule, where the three industrial-scale reactors G1, G2 and G3 used to be operated for plutonium production (to be then reprocessed in the nearby UP1 plant), the initial dismantling phase has now been completed (in 1980's for G1 and in 1996 for G2 and G3). The second phase, aimed at completely dismantling these three reactors, will restart in 2020, and is directly linked to the opening of

  3. REUSE OF AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS FROM DISMANTLED END OF LIFE VEHICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr NOWAKOWSKI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of recycling end of life automotive vehicles is serious worldwide. It is one of the most important streams of waste in developed countries. It has big importance as recycling potential of raw materials content in automotive vehicles is valuable. Different parts and assemblies after dismantling can also be reused in vehicles where replacement of specific component is necessary. Reuse of the components should be taken into consideration in selecting the vehicles dismantling strategy. It also complies with European Union policy concerning end of life vehicles (ELV. In the paper it is presented systematic approach to dismantling strategies including disassembly oriented on further reuse of components. It is focused on decision making and possible benefits calculation from economic and environmental point of view.

  4. Topical Session on the Decommissioning and Dismantling Safety Case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Set up by the Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC), the WPDD brings together senior representatives of national organisations who have a broad overview of Decommissioning and Dismantling (D and D) issues through their work as regulators, implementers, R and D experts or policy makers. These include representatives from regulatory authorities, industrial decommissioners from the NEA Cooperative Programme on Exchange of Scientific and Technical Information on Nuclear Installation Decommissioning Projects (CPD), and cross-representation from the NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities, the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health, and the RWMC. The EC is a member of the WPDD and the IAEA also participates. This ensures co-ordination amongst activities in these international programmes. Participation from civil society organisations is considered on a case by case basis, and has already taken place through the active involvement of the Group of Municipalities with Nuclear Installations at the first meeting of the WPDD At its second meeting, in Paris, 5-7 December 2001, the WPDD held two topical sessions on the D and D Safety Case and on the Management of Materials from D and D, respectively. This report documents the topical session on the safety case. The topical session was meant to provide an exchange of information and experience on the following issues: What topics should be included in a safety case? Of what should it consist? Is there sufficient and complete guidance nationally and internationally? How do practices differ internationally? Main boundary condition to this session was that it would deal with plants where spent fuel has been removed. Also the topical sessions was kept at a level that makes the most of the varied constituency of the WPDD. Namely, interface issues are important, and issue-identification and discussion was the immediate goal. There was less interest in examining areas where variability amongst national

  5. Waste Management Strategy for Dismantling Waste to Reduce Costs for Power Plant Decommissioning - 13543

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -necks in the process causes increased space requirements and will have negative impact on the project schedule, which increases not only the cost but also the dose exposure to personnel. For these reasons it is critical to create a process that transfers material into conditioned waste ready for disposal as quickly as possible. To a certain extent the decommissioning program should be led by the waste management process. With the objective to reduce time for handling of dismantled material at site and to efficiently and environmental-friendly use waste management methods (clearance for re-use followed by clearance for recycling), the costs for the plant decommissioning could be reduced as well as time needed for performing the decommissioning project. Also, risks for delays would be reduced with a well-defined handling scheme which limits surprises. Delays are a major cost driver for decommissioning projects. (authors)

  6. Remote dismantlement activities for the Argonne CP-5 Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP) is participating in the dismantlement of a mothballed research reactor, Chicago Pile Number 5 (CP-5), at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to demonstrate technology developed by the program while assisting Argonne with their remote system needs. Equipment deployed for CP-5 activities includes the dual-arm work platform (DAWP), which will handle disassembly of reactor internals, and the RedZone Robotics-developed 'Rosie' remote work vehicle, which will perform size reduction of shield plugs, demolition of the biological shield, and waste packaging. Remote dismantlement tasks are scheduled to begin in February of 1997 and to continue through 1997 and beyond

  7. The total dismantlement of the Niederaichbach nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Niederaichbach Nuclear Power Plant was shut down for good in 1974 and brought into the state of safe enclosure. The follow up decommissioning plan is divided into five steps: 1. Manual in-place dismantling of the non-radioactive systems within the safety containment. 2. Manual removal of the contaminated material. 3. Remote controlled dismantling of the activated material. 4. Removal of concrete of the biological shielding by explosives. 5. Conventional demolishing of the buildings. The steel will be reused after melting or decontamination by scrap dealers or conditioned for final disposal. The rubbish can be reused for road building or disposed of on conventional storage areas. (author)

  8. 49 CFR 1242.42 - Administration, repair and maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administration, repair and maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits, other casualties and insurance... maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits,...

  9. Radiation protection aspects of dismantling and decommissioning of Uranium Mining of Andujar (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study analyzes the radiation protection aspects during the decommissioning and dismantling of uranium mining in Andujar (Spain). The application during dismantling's mining, the transfer factor of natural radioactive isotopes and the application during the sterile movements are presented

  10. Decommissioning of the ASTRA research reactor: Dismantling the auxiliary systems and clearance and reuse of the buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Franz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents work performed in the last phase of the decommissioning of the ASTRA research reactor at the Austrian Research Centers Seibersdorf. Dismantling the pump room installations and the ventilation system, as well as the clearance of the buildings is described. Some conclusions and summary data regarding the timetable, material management, and the cost of the entire project are also presented.

  11. Place of the final disposal of short lived dismantling waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deals with the short-lived low and intermediate level radioactive waste, which will mainly arise from the dismantling of the Swedish nuclear power plants, but also the dismantling of other nuclear facilities. For these installations to be dismantled, there must be the capacity to receive and dispose of dismantling waste. SKB plans to expand the existing final repository for short-lived radioactive waste (SFR) in Forsmark for this purpose. The legislation requires alternatives to the chosen location. The alternate location for the disposal of decommissioning waste SKB has chosen to compare with is a location in the Simpevarp area outside Oskarshamn. There are currently Oskarshamn nuclear power plant and SKB between stock 'CLAB'. The choice of Simpevarp as alternative location is based on that it's one of the places in the country where data on the bedrock is available to an extent that allows an assessment of the prospects for long-term security, such an assessment is actually showing good potential, and that the location provide realistic opportunities to put into practice the disposal of decommissioning waste. At a comparison between the disposal of short-lived decommissioning waste in an extension of SFR with the option to build a separate repository for short-lived decommissioning waste in Simpevarp, the conclusion is that both options offer potentially good prospects for long-term security. The differences still indicated speaks to the Forsmark advantage. Similar conclusions were obtained when comparing the factors of environment, health and social aspects

  12. Advanced robotic remote handling system for reactor dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced robotic remote handling system equipped with a multi-functional amphibious manipulator has been developed and used to dismantle a portion of radioactive reactor internals of an experimental boiling water reactor in the program of reactor decommissioning technology development carried out by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. (author)

  13. Chemical Decontamination of Metallic Waste from Uranium Conversion Plant Dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) started a decommissioning program of the uranium conversion plant. Pre-work was carried as follows; installation of the access control facility, installation of a changing room and shower room, designation of an emergency exit way and indicating signs, installation of a radiation management facility, preparation of a storage area for tools and equipments, inspection and load test of crane, distribution and packaging of existing waste, and pre-decontamination of the equipment surface and the interior. First, decommissioning work was performed in kiln room, which will be used for temporary radioactive waste storage room. Kiln room housed hydro fluorination rotary kiln for production of uranium tetra-fluoride. The kiln is about 0.8 m in diameter and 5.5 m long. The total dismantled waste was 6,690 kg, 73 % of which was metallic waste and 27 % the others such as cable, asbestos, concrete, secondary waste, etc. And effluent treatment room and filtration room were dismantled for installation of decontamination equipment and lagoon sludge treatment equipment. There were tanks and square mixer in these rooms. The total dismantled waste was 17,250 kg, 67% of which was metallic waste and 33% the others. These dismantled metallic wastes consist of stainless and carbon steel. In this paper, the stainless steel plate and pipe were decontaminated by the chemical decontamination with ultrasonic

  14. Decontamination and dismantling of large plutonium-contamined glove boxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the work performed in the frame of two C.E.C. - Contracts FI1D-002400-B Decommissioning of very large glove boxes and FI1D-0058 Decommissioning of a complex glove box structure to be dismounted partially on place. Detailed information is given about each glove box. The selection of the solution Transportation of the glove boxes to a specialized dismantling plant is justified. The necessary contacts inside the BELGONUCLEAIRE MOX plant and between the latter and other organizations are explained. The problems of manipulating large gloves are listed and the retained solution of building a so called Stiffening frame around each glove box is described. Furthermore information is given concerning required operators time for cleaning, manipulating, packing and dismantling together with received doses and quantities of waste produced. Concerning the glove box unit partially to be dismounted on place, detailed information is given about the way the glove boxes have been treated prior to this partial dismantling on place and about the way this partial dismantling has been performed. From these results one can conclude that such a delicate task can be performed without major difficulties. Finally information is given of the decontamination test of a highly Pu contaminated glove box with freon with rather poor results and of the preliminary CO2 blasting tests on non active samples

  15. A system for automated, dismantlement of plutonium weapons components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of advanced dismantlement technologies will play an integral part on the changing role of the DOE. As an important component to this effort, the ARIES (Automated Retirement and Integrated Extraction System) System is designed to provide a test bed for the development of technology for the dismantlement of the primaries of nuclear weapons (pits). The ARIES system will integrate and automate the processes of pit disassembly, plutonium, plutonium removal, preparation of oxide from plutonium metal, decontamination of non-plutonium parts, and in-line measurement of the products and wastes by state-of-the-art non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. No integrated method now exists for the dismantlement and recovery of nuclear material from many weapons designs. Even those assemblies for which recovery techniques have been established require extensive manual handling (with associated personnel exposure to radiation) and result in considerable waste generation during dismantlement. The disposition of excess plutonium will require a facility to disassemble and remove plutonium from the pits. ARIES will provide the methods to satisfy this goal while at the same time reducing waste generation, lowering personnel radiation exposures, and operating to the highest standards of safety and security. A description of the ARIES system is given

  16. Waste management concept during dismantling of KKS NPP in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This paper gives an overview on the waste management of NPP Stade during dismantling. The general idea is to reduce the radioactive waste to about three percentage of the complete dismantling mass. The NPP Stade in Germany was shut down in November 2003. After a transient phase the license for dismantling was given in 2005. In the following 8 years about 20.000 tones of steel and 120.000 tones of concrete will be put out by the dismantling. The yearly output of steel will by about 100 times higher than during the running time of the NNP. For this a new processes for waste management had to be installed. The waste management during dismantling focus on free release (about 97%). Beside some minor exception, the rest is deemed to be radioactive waste. This will be collected in 1000 packages, which are ready to be sent to a final storage. As until now in Germany no final storage is open (and sending of radioactive waste to another country is forbidden), the NNP Stade build an intermediate storage, where the packages may by saved for longest 40 years. The clearance procedure in Germany is regulated in the radiation protection ordinances. It is based on a nuclide specific set of clearance levels. To fulfil these demands the NNP Stade chose a semi automated system for characterization and documentation, which we develop in accordance to our release license. It guaranties a most accurate determination of the relevant nuclides for a set of dismantling material (some 10 to 100 tones). After the characterization only the gamma-activity of the material is measured in boxes of about 500 kg. A short comparison of the chosen procedure with other options, possible in Germany will be given and the decision from the collaboration with the NPP in Barsebaeck, Sweden, will be withdrawn. Beside the free release different options are used for waste management, like incineration, sending to landfill or reuse in nuclear industry. The waste management of the NNP Stade take

  17. Log of refining and conversion facility dismantling. Progress in 2009FY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Refining and Conversion Facility located in the Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center had the natural uranium conversion process and reprocessed uranium conversion process. The construction of this facility was started in 1979 and completed in October 1981. Dismantling of equipments in radiation controlled area of this facility was started from 2008, and all equipments in radiation controlled area will be dismantled by 2011 fiscal year. This report is a record of the dismantlement situation of the Refining and Conversion Facility in 2009 fiscal years. Concretely, dismantlement logs, dismantlement material, and secondary waste are published. (author)

  18. Dismantling of civilian nuclear powered fleet technical support vessels. engineering solutions - 59386

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present time six nuclear technical support vessels are operated and maintained by Atomflot. Two of them (Volodarsky FTB (floating technical base) and Lepse FTB) were taken out of service for decommissioning and are stored afloat. One more vessel Lotta FTB should be decommissioned during next two years. The nuclear technological support ships carrying spent nuclear fuel (SNF), liquid and solid radioactive wastes (LRW and SRW) appear to be a possible radiation contamination of Murmansk region and Kola Bay because the Ship long-term storage afloat has the negative effect on hull's structures technical condition. As a result of this in the context of the Federal Program 'Nuclear and Radiation Safety' (2008-2015) NIPTB Onega OAO was engaged by state corporation Rosatom to develop the dismantling procedure for Volodarsky FTB and Lotta FTB. Before developing of nuclear technological support ships decommissioning projects the technical and economic assessment of decommissioning/dismantling was carried out. The following options were examined: - formation of module as one-piece Ship's hull for long-term storage at Saida Bay; - formation of separated modules for long-term storage at Saida Bay; - complete dismantling of hull's structures, systems and equipment with packing all generated SRW into certified long-term storage containers. This paper contains description of options, research procedure, comparative analysis of options of decommissioning and dismantling (D and D) of nuclear technological support ships and its difference with dismantling of nuclear submarine. On the basis of the technical and economic assessment of FTB D and D options the least expensive on the first D and D stage and the least duration option is the option 1 (Formation of module as one-piece Ship's hull for long-term storage at Saida Bay). By the implementation of the given option there will be the need of large areas for modules storage at Saida Bay. It was not considered while working out

  19. Underwater-manipulation system for measuring- and cutting tasks in dismantling decommissioned nuclear facilities. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1. Status of technology: Besides fixed manipulators, additional flexible underwater-vehicles are needed for dismantling and inspection tasks during the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Free-diving underwater-vehicles for inspection and dismantling tasks are not yet developed and tested. 2. Objectives: Target of the project is the development of a cable-controlled small sized underwater-vehicle which is suitable for sensorguided inspection, survey and cutting tasks. 3. Method: Development of a modular constructed vehicle as a testing system for bouyancy tanks, mechanics, motors, tools, sensors and controlling components. Construction of a prototype vehicle based on the results. Testing and optimization of the handling-system. 4. Result: A flexible autonomous underwater-vehicle was developed, which performs sufficiantly inspection and cutting tasks, guided by sensors and integrated videocameras. The high flexibility of the handling-system guarantees precise operation at horizontal and vertical structures as well as in overhead position. The gripping device is able to pick up smaller parts with a visual process control using the integrated videocameras. 5. Applications: Using the free-diving underwater-handling-system inspection and cutting tasks can be done effectively not only in nuclear facilities but also inside tanks, locks and port installations. Easy adaptability allows specific missions without larger expense. (orig.)

  20. Stimulation of innovation in the course of decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the last 30 years, national and international projects have been performed for development and testing of dismantling and cutting technology, covering theoretical experiments as well as laboratory work and applications in pilot projects. An aspect of major interest of the scientific and technical studies was the adjustment of conventional thermal, mechanical, hydraulic and (electro)chemical cutting processes to the specific requirements posed by nuclear facilities. At first sight, one would not expect much innovative potential in the field of cutting technology alone, except for, perhaps, process optimizations such as extensions of dwell times or process stability. However, the intelligent application of available cutting techniques and tools or instruments, leading in their proper combinations to novel techniques and experience, is an interesting challenge to scientists and engineers and hold a wide range of innovative potential. The paper presents some cutting techniques of particular interest in this context. (orig./DG)

  1. Hot-cell for dismantling of nuclear gauges

    CERN Document Server

    Reis, L C A

    2000-01-01

    This work objectives the design of a hot-cell that will be used for dismantling of nuclear gauges. In the hot-cell, nuclear gauges received as radioactive waste at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN will be dismantled, in order to decrease the volume of radioactive waste to be stored at the Center. Sources originally conditioned as special form radioactive material will be tested and in case do not present leakage, the respective gauges will be disposable for reusing by radioisotope users. The remaining sources will be taken off the original shielding and conditioned in special packages adequate for storage and disposal. All steps of work, the hot-cell design and methodology for conditioning are also described.

  2. Dismantled weapons fuel burning in molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages of burning fissile material from dismantled weapons in molten salt reactors (MSRs) are described. The fluid fuel MSRs with some, or full, processing are nondedicated reactors that generate energy and completely burn the fissile material on a continuous basis. No fuel fabrication is needed, and the entire dismantling can be done in a secure facility. Shipments are made in small, safe, and secure quantities. Denaturing, spiking, or mixing can be done at the source for added safety. MSRs are very safe reactors that help close the fuel cycle and simplify waste treatment, thereby contributing to acceptability. Additionally, MSRs are expected to be economically competitive as electric power stations. The safety, security, simplicity, economy, and proliferation resistant properties support the deployment in countries that have the need

  3. Dismantling of large components from Phénix reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PHENIX reactor was definitively shut down in 2009. The cleaning and dismantling preparation operations are under way. These operations include dealing with large removable components such as primary coolant pumps, intermediate heat exchanger and heat exchanger blanking device (DOTE). This presentation describes the waste transformation operations performed on a DOTE, from its extraction from the reactor core until transformation to waste for disposal. Before 2009, all the large components were dismantled and packaged in metal containers according to Low Level and Intermediate Level Short Lived 5LIL-SL) waste specifications. These operations induced several cuttings and thus consumed exposition of the operators. In order to reduce the dose and the cost due to the treatment of the component, the objective is now to send the DOTE in one single part to the CSTFA (Very Low Level waste repository). (author)

  4. Dismantling Russia's Northern Fleet Nuclear Submarines: environmental and proliferation risks

    OpenAIRE

    Snell, Benjamin Aaron.

    2000-01-01

    This thesis examines the 1986 Chernobyl accident and its consequences as the basis for an analysis of the possible dimensions of the nuclear catastrophes that could occur during the dismantlement process of Russia's Northern Fleet nuclear submarines. It assesses the potential demographic, ecological, and economic consequences of a nuclear accident. Given the systemic problems at Russian nuclear facilities, the risks of a catastrophic event in the poorly maintained and operated submarine yards...

  5. Process concepts for semi-automatic dismantling of LCD televisions

    OpenAIRE

    Elo, Kristofer; Sundin, Erik

    2014-01-01

    There is a large variety of electrical and electronic equipment products, for example liquid crystal display television sets (LCD TVs), in the waste stream today. Many LCD TVs contain mercury, which is a challenge to treat at the recycling plants. Two current used processes to recycle LCD TVs are automated shredding and manual disassembly. This paper aims to present concepts for semi-automated dismantling processes for LCD TVs in order to achieve higher productivity and flexibility, and in tu...

  6. The development of thermal and mechanical cutting technology for the dismantlement of the internal core of Fukushima Daiichi NPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cutting technologies for removing the fuel debris and the internal core structure in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant are needed in consideration of the situation in the core and so on. On the other hand, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), which has been carrying out the decommissioning of the nuclear facilities ending the R and D, has several technologies and knowledge to dismantle the nuclear facilities. In particular, the cutting technologies of the plasma arc, the laser, and the abrasive water jet (AWJ) – which are used for dismantling the reactor of N.P.S. (FUGEN), a heavy water-moderated, light water cooled, pressure-tube-type reactor – and the plasma jet for dismantling the nuclear fuel facilities have been developed. Therefore, based on the above, JAEA has carried out the cutting test for investigating the applicability of those cutting technologies to propose the method for removing the fuel debris and the internal core structure to the national project. This paper outlines the test results of the plasma arc and the AWJ cutting technologies, and the future plan of the test of those technologies and the plasma jet cutting technology. (author)

  7. Development of decommissioning engineering support system for fugen. Development of support system during actual dismantlement works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Thermal Reactor, Fugen Nuclear Power Station was permanently shut down in March 2003, and is now preparing for decommissioning. We have been developing Decommissioning Engineering Support System (DEXUS) aimed at planning optimal dismantlement process and carrying out dismantlement work safely and precisely. DEXUS consists of 'decommissioning planning support system' and 'dismantling support system'. The dismantling support system is developed aiming at using during actual dismantling work. It consists of three subsystems such as 'Worksite Visualization System', 'Dismantling Data Collection System' and 'Generated Waste Management System'. 'Worksite Visualization System' is a support system designed to provide the necessary information to workers during actual dismantlement works. And this system adopts AR (Augmented Reality) technology, overlapping calculation information into real world. 'Dismantling Data Collection System' is to collect necessary data for improving accuracy of decommissioning planning by evaluating work content and worker equipage, work time for dismantlement works. 'Generated Waste Management system' is a system recording necessary information by attaching the barcode to dismantled wastes or the containers. We can get the information of generated waste by recording generation place, generated time, treatment method and the contents. These subsystems enable to carry out reasonable and safe decommissioning of Fugen. In addition, we expect that those systems will be used for decommissioning of other nuclear facilities in the future. (authors)

  8. Dismantling of the 50 MW steam generator test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have been dismantling the 50MW Steam Generator Test Facility (50MWSGTF). The objectives of the dismantling are reuse of sodium components to a planned large scale thermal hydraulics sodium test facility and the material examination of component that have been operated for long time in sodium. The facility consisted of primary sodium loop with sodium heater by gas burner as heat source instead of reactor, secondary sodium loop with auxiliary cooling system (ACS) and water/steam system with steam temperature and pressure reducer instead of turbine. It simulated the 1 loop of the Monju cooling system. The rated power of the facility was 50MWt and it was about 1/5 of the Monju power plant. Several sodium removal methods are applied. As for the components to be dismantled such as piping, intermediate heat exchanger (IHX), air cooled heat exchangers (AC), sodium is removed by steam with nitrogen gas in the air or sodium is burned in the air. As for steam generators which material tests are planned, sodium is removed by steam injection with nitrogen gas to the steam generator. The steam generator vessel is filled with nitrogen and no air in the steam generator during sodium removal. As for sodium pumps, pump internal structure is pulled out from the casing and installed into the tank. After the installation, sodium is removed by the same method of steam generator. As for relatively small reuse components such as sodium valves, electromagnet flow meters (EMFs) etc., sodium is removed by alcohol process. (author)

  9. Dismantling and decontamination of Piver prototype vitrification plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PIVER prototype was targeted for dismantling in order to install a new pilot facility for the french continuous vitrification process. Most of the work involved the vitrification cell containing the process equipments, which had to be cleared out and thoroughly decontaminated; this implied disassembling, cutting up, conditioning and removing all the equipment installed in the cell. Remote manipulation, handling and cutting devices were used and some prior modifications were implemented in the cell environment. The dismantling procedure was conducted under a detailed programme defining the methodology for each operation. After equipment items and active zones were identified, the waste materials were removed, and several liquid decontamination operations were implemented. Removed activity, levels of irradiation in the cell and doses integrated by personnel were monitored to control progress and to adapt procedures to the conditions encountered. At the end of December 1989, the PIVER cleanup programme was at 87% complete and the total activity removed was 2.11 X 1014 Bq (5712 Ci). The objective now is to obtain suitable working conditions in order to allow operators to enter the cell to remove items that are inaccessible or which cannot be dismantled by remote manipulators and to complete the decontamination procedure

  10. Pilot study dismantlement of 20 lead-lined shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a pilot study conducted at the INEL to dismantle lead-lined casks and shielding devices, separate the radiologically contaminated and hazardous materials, and recycle resultant scrap lead. The facility areas where the work was performed, dismantlement methods, and process equipment are described. Issues and results associated with recycling the lead as a free-released scrap metal are presented and discussed. Data and results from the pilot study are summarized and presented. The study concluded that cask dismantlement at the INEL can be performed as a legitimate recycling activity for scrap lead. Ninety-one percent of the lead recovered passed free-release criteria. The value of the 50,375 lb of recovered lead is approximately $0.45/lb. Resultant waste streams can be satisfactorily treated and disposed. Only very low levels of bulk radiological contamination (47 picocuries/gram of 137 Cs and 3.2 picocuries/gram of 6OCo) were detected in the lead rejected for free release

  11. Development of cutting tools for the dismantling of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study, carried cut by the Atomic Energy Commission - Nuclear Installations Dismantling Unit (CEA-UDIN), is to test cutting apparatuses and tools suitable for use in dismantling operations on CEA sites and to do such development work as is necessary to make these apparatus and tools more efficient and better adapted to remote control operation. The work, carried out over the last three years, can be split into two categories: comparative trials of five tools carried out in standardized inactive conditions: (hacksaw) recuperating saw, grinder, plasma torch, arc air and arc saw. Comparisons have been made of performances and the production of secondary wastes (in mass and grain sizes). Improvements envisaged concern, mainly, the plasma torch and the arc saw. Development of two tools for concrete cutting: a diamond saw used in the stage 3 dismantling of the ATI installation at La Hague for the remote controlled cutting of a 200 mm thick reinforced concrete wall. The work completed with good results. A shot blasting machine intended for the decontamination of plain or resin coated concrete walls and of stainless steel cladding of rooms in the AT1 installation. The active trials have proved positive. 17 figs, 9 tabs

  12. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Material Verification in Dismantlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Glen A.; Detwiler, Rebecca S.

    2011-10-01

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) is a well-established physical process that provides an isotope-specific signature that can be exploited for isotopic detection and characterization of samples. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been investigating possible applications of NRF for national security. Of the investigated applications, the verification of material in the dismantlement process is the most promising. Through a combination of benchmarking measurements and radiation transport modeling, we have shown that NRF techniques with existing bremsstrahlung photon sources and a modest detection system can be used to detect highly enriched uranium in the quantities and time limits relevant to the dismantlement process. Issues such as orientation, placement and material geometry do not significantly impact the sensitivity of the technique. We have also investigated how shielding of the uranium would be observed through non-NRF processes to enable the accurate assay of the material. This paper will discuss our findings on how NRF and photon-interrogation techniques may be applied to the material verification in the dismantlement process.

  13. Dismantlement and destruction of chemical, nuclear and conventional weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safe destruction and dismantling of chemical, nuclear and conventional weapons is of fundamental importance to the security of all countries represented in this volume. Expertise in the field is not confined to one country or organisation: all can benefit from each other. There is an ever present danger of proliferation of weapons of mass destruction: approximately two dozen countries have ongoing programmes to develop or acquire such weapons, and many are also gaining the capability to build air-surface delivery systems. But much can be done to prevent proliferation by reducing leakage of materials and know-how and by solving the problems of the destruction of surplus weapons systems, which has now come to be a key issue. In 13 sessions of the workshop attention was paid to (1) Dismantlement and Destruction of Chemical, Nuclear and Conventional Weapons; (2) Status of Implementation of Arms Control Treaties and Voluntary Commitments; (3) National Perspectives on Cooperation in Disarmament; (4) Stocktaking of National and Bilateral Disposal/Destruction Programmes: Chemical Weapons; (5) Stocktaking of National and Bilateral Disposal/Destruction Programmes: Nuclear Weapons; (6) Stocktaking of National and Bilateral Disposal/Destruction Programmes: Conventional Weapons. Session; (7) Experience with Currently Employed Chemical Destruction Technologies; (8) Alternative Chemical Destruction Technologies; (9) Deactivation, Dismantlement and Destruction of Delivery Systems and Infrastructure for Nuclear Weapons; (10) Storage, Safeguarding and Disposition of Fissile Materials; (11) Technologies for Conversion and Civil Use of Demilitarized Materials; (12) International Organizations; and (13) Environmental Challenges Posed by Chemical and Nuclear Disarmament

  14. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Material Verification in Dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) is a well-established physical process that provides an isotope-specific signature that can be exploited for isotopic detection and characterization of samples. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been investigating possible applications of NRF for national security. Of the investigated applications, the verification of material in the dismantlement process is the most promising. Through a combination of benchmarking measurements and radiation transport modeling, we have shown that NRF techniques with existing bremsstrahlung photon sources and a modest detection system can be used to detect highly enriched uranium in the quantities and time limits relevant to the dismantlement process. Issues such as orientation, placement and material geometry do not significantly impact the sensitivity of the technique. We have also investigated how shielding of the uranium would be observed through non-NRF processes to enable the accurate assay of the material. This paper will discuss our findings on how NRF and photon-interrogation techniques may be applied to the material verification in the dismantlement process.

  15. Contaminated Metal Components in Dismantling by Hot Cutting Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the preparatory dismantling activities of Caorso's Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), an experimental campaign using plasma and oxyacetylene metal cutting processes has been performed and applied to plates and tubes exposed to the coolant steam of the reactor. The plant (Boiling Water Reactor, 870 MWe) was designed and built in the 70's, and it was fully operating by 1981 to 1986 being shut down after 1987 Italy's poll that abrogated nuclear power based on U235 fission. The campaign concerns no activated materials, even if the analyses have been performed of by use contaminated components under the free release level, not yet taking into account radioactivity. In this paper, the parameters related to inhalable aerosol, solid and volatile residuals production have been, studied during hot processes which applies the same characteristics of the cutting in field for the dismantling programs of Caorso NPP. The technical parameters such as cutting time and cutting rate vs. pipe diameter/thickness/schedule or plate thickness for ferritic alloys and the emissions composition coming from the sectioning are also reported. The results underline the sort of trouble that can emerge in the cutting processes, in particular focusing on the effects comparison between the two cutting processes and the chemical composition of powders captured by filtering the gaseous emission. Some preliminary considerations on methodology to be used during the dismantling have been presented. (authors)

  16. Public inquiry related to the request by EDF of a definitive stopping and complete dismantling of the hardware storage installation of the Monts d'Arree nuclear power plant (INB n.162). Opinion and conclusions of the inquiry commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a recall of the project of stopping and dismantling of the hardware storage installation (INB n.162) which had been created after the stopping and dismantling of the Monts d'Arree heavy water nuclear reactor (INB n.28), this report analyzes the results of the public inquiry, and highlights the arguments of those in favour of this project and those opposed to it. Then, it states the Inquiry Commission's opinion which addresses the request for a national public debate, the project justification, the inquiry file, the site radiological status, the site radiological control during works, the impacts of dismantling, the various risks (for the population and the workers, in terms of fire risks), the issue of radioactive wastes, economic aspects (costs, jobs, local economy, tourism and site image), and site reconversion

  17. Recent developments in post-irradiation examination techniques for water reactor fuel. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting held in Cadarache, France, 17-21 October 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the invitation of the Government of France, following a proposal of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT) the IAEA convened a Technical Committee meeting from 14 to 21 October 1994 in Cadarache to discuss recent technical advances and improvements in the field of post-irradiation examination (PIE) of fuel used in nuclear power plants. Fifty participants representing 14 countries attended the meeting and 30 papers were presented and discussed during five technical sessions. Working Groups composed of the session chairmen and authors of papers prepared summaries of each session including conclusions and recommendations for future work. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. The key role of critical mock-up facilities for neutronic physics assessment of advanced reactors: an overview of Cea Cadarache tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Experimental Physics section of CEA Cadarache operates three critical facilities devoted to neutronic studies of advanced reactors (EOLE, MINERVE and MASURCA) covering a large scope of interests. These include 100% MOX core in ABWR qualification, knowledge improvement of basic nuclear data for heavy nuclides for new options of the fuel cycle - especially the multi-recycling of plutonium - and accelerator-driven systems neutronic behaviour for transmutation studies. The paper describes these facilities, the scientific programmes associated and the progressive improvement of experimental techniques, the aim being to significantly reduce the uncertainties regarding the evaluation of the physical parameters. (authors)

  19. Data Assimilation and Dismantling Waste: A Methodology Customised for Radioactive Inventory Assessment Purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data assimilation is a versatile methodology which is widely used nowadays for estimating complex system variables. The estimation of a given quantity by data assimilation involves taking into account both the observational data and the underlying physical principles governing the system under observation. Let us consider two assumptions, (1) the observational information consists of radioactivity measurements of numerous samples of graphite (or other material) from known points and (2) the physical principles are those of activation under neutron flux during nuclear power plant operation. With these two assumptions, a data-assimilation-like methodology is ready to be applied to radioactive inventory computation for dismantling graphite (or other material). The paper is written for a planned graphite disposal project in France, for the purposes of its inventory forecasting. It introduces specific concepts for activation laws, presents the beginning of the application to Bugey 1 plant pile and proposes an original method for overall error quantification. (authors)

  20. Building dismantlement and site remediation at the Apollo Fuel Plant: When is technology the answer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Apollo fuel plant was located in Pennsylvania on a site known to have been used continuously for stell production from before the Civil War until after World War II. Then the site became a nuclear fuel chemical processing plants. Finally it was used to convert uranium hexafluoride to various oxide fuel forms. After the fuel manufacturing operations were teminated, the processing equipment was partially decontaminated, removed, packaged and shipped to a licensed low-level radioactive waste burial site. The work was completed in 1984. In 1990 a detailed site characterization was initiated to establishe the extent of contamination and to plan the building dismantlement and soil remediation efforts. This article discusses the site characterization and remedial action at the site in the following subsections: characterization; criticality control; mobile containment; soil washing; in-process measurements; and the final outcome of the project

  1. Comparison of radiometry and mass spectroscopy for radioactivity analysis with regard to their suitability for exemption of building materials from nuclear facility dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1994, the Institute of Radiochemistry of Munich Technical University (RCM/TUM) has been carrying out the project of 'Dismantling of Nuclear Facilities: Comparison of Measuring and Analytical Processes for Examining Residual Material and Waste Arising in the Dismantling of Nuclear Facilities', a project supported by the German Ministry of Education, Science, Research and Technology (BMBF). This project's goals is to carry out comparative studies to establish measuring and analytical methods qualified in terms of detection sensitivity, accuracy, and time requirements for evaluating radionuclides which are difficult to detect but which are relevant in terms of verification, or which could at least serve as a reference for validation processes. Focus is on nuclides which are typical of the Karlsruhe Fuel Reprocessing Facility (WAK): fission products which are pure beta radiation emitters (90Sr, 99Tc and 241Pu) and actinides which emit alpha particles (selected isotopes of thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium). (orig./DG)

  2. The Blue Lady Case and the International Issue of Ship Dismantling - Comment

    OpenAIRE

    Florent Pelsy

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on the decision of the Supreme Court of India to allow the dismantling of the Blue Lady (ex France) in Alang. The first part underlines that the Supreme Court of India is prioritising the commercial interest of the dismantling companies over the social and environmental concerns of the workers and the communities living in Alang. It argues that such decision goes against its 2003 judgement on ship-dismantling. It then demonstrates that the Supreme Court of India is distorti...

  3. Analysis of dismantling possibility and unloading efforts of fuel assemblies from core of WWER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computation methods of optimal dismantling sequence of fuel assemblies (FA) from core of WWER after different operating periods and accident conditions are considered. The algorithms of fuel dismantling sequence are constructed both on the basis of analysis of mutual spacer grid overlaps of adjacent fuel assemblies and numerical structure analysis of efforts required for FA removal as FA heaving from the core. Computation results for core dismantling sequence after 3-year operating period and LB LOCA are presented in the paper

  4. Reserves for shutdown/dismantling and disposal in nuclear technology. Theses and recommendations on reform options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study on reserves for shutdown, dismantling and disposal of nuclear facilities covers the following topics: cost for shutdown, dismantling and disposal and amount and transparency of nuclear reserves, solution by y stock regulated by public law for long-term liabilities, and improvement of the protection in the event of insolvency for the remaining EVU reserves for short- and intermediate-term liabilities. The appendix includes estimations and empirical values for the cost of shutdown and dismantling, estimation of disposal costs, and a summary of Swiss studies on dismantling and disposal and transfer to Germany.

  5. Progress in the development of tooling and dismantling methodologies for the Windscale advanced gas cooled reactor (WAGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (WAGR) is a major UK reactor decommissioning project co-funded by the UK Government, the European Commission and Magnox Electric. WAGR was a CO2 cooled, graphite moderated reactor which served as a test bed for the development of Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor technology in the UK. It operated from 1963 until shutdown in 1981. AEA Technology plc are currently the Managing Agents on behalf of UKAEA for the WAGR decommissioning project and are responsible for the co-ordination of the project up to the point when the contents of the reactor core and associated radioactive materials are removed and either disposed of or packaged for disposal at some time in the future. Decommissioning has progressed to the point where the reactor has been dismantled down to the level of the hot gas collection manifold with the removal of the top biological shield, the refuelling standpipes and the top section of the reactor pressure vessel. The 4 heat exchangers have also been removed and committed to shallow land burial. This paper describes the work carried out by AEA Technology under separate contracts of UKAEA in developing some of the equipment and deployment methods for the next phase of active operations required in preparation for the dismantling of the core structure. Most recent work has concentrated on the development of specialist tooling for removal of items of operational waste stored within the reactor core, equipment for cutting and removal of the highly radioactive stainless steel 'loop' pressure tubes, diamond wire cutting equipment for sectioning large diameter pipework, and equipment for dismantling the reactor neutron shield. The paper emphasises the process of adaptation and extension of existing technologies for cost-effective application in the decommissioning environment, the need for adequate forward planning of decommissioning methodologies together with large-scale 'mock-up' testing of equipment to

  6. Stade. Decommissioning and dismantling of the nuclear power plant - from the nuclear power plant to the green lawn. 3. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power plant Stade (KKS) was shutdown in 2003 and is being dismantled since 2005. The contribution covers the following issues: What means decommissioning and dismantling? What was the reason for decommissioning? What experiences on the dismantling of nuclear power plants are available? What is the dismantling procedure? What challenges for the power plant personal result from dismantling? What happens with the deconstruction material? What happens with the resulting free area (the ''green lawn'')? What is the legal frame work for dismantling?

  7. Radiation environment account before dismantling the conversion facilities. Evaluation of the uranium inventory and air dose rate in the dismantling facilities 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the reprocessed uranium conversion facilities, Hydration and Conversion room-1,2,3, Dehydration and Conversion room-1,2, Dry process filter room have been dismantled according to the schedule, in 2009 fiscal year. The gamma-ray measurement had been carried out before dismantlement to evaluate the radioactivity inventory. As a result, the uranium recovery work was forecasted for reasonable dismantlement. In addition, the feature nuclide affecting the results of the measurement on the air dose was evaluated. Additionally, as the waste data, gamma-ray analysis results are shown. (author)

  8. Recycling of concrete generated from Nuclear Power Plant dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor decommissioning required various technologies such as dismantling of facilities, decontamination, radioactivity measurement and recycling of dismantling wastes. This article discussed recycling of demolished concrete wastes. Dismantling of reactor building of large one unit of nuclear power plants would generate about 500 K tons of concrete wastes, about 98% of which was non-radioactive and could be used as base course material or backfill material after crushed to specified particle size. Since later part of 1990s, high quality recycled aggregate with specified limit of bone-dry density, water absorptivity and amount of fine aggregate had been developed from demolished concrete with 'Heat and rubbing method', 'Eccentric rotor method' and 'Screw grinding method' so as to separate cements attached to aggregate. Recycled aggregates were made from concrete debris with 'Jaw crusher' to particle size less than 40 mm and then particle size control or grinded by various grinding machines. Recycled fine aggregates made from crushing would have fragile site with cracks, air voids and bubbles. The author proposed quality improvement method to selectively separate fragile defects from recycled aggregates using weak grinding force, leaving attached pastes much and preventing fine particle generation as byproducts. This article outlined experiments to improve quality of recycled fine aggregates and their experimental results confirmed improvement of flow ability and compressive strength of mortal using recycled fine aggregates using 'Particle size selector' and 'Ball mill' so as to remove their fragile parts less than 2%. Mortal made from recycled fine aggregate could also prevent permeation of chloride ion. Recycled aggregate could be used for concrete instead of natural aggregate. (T. Tanaka)

  9. Implementing robotics in the Department of Energy Dismantlement Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the end of the cold war, as our nuclear stockpile has decreased, the Department of Energy (DOE) has been working rapidly to safely dismantle weapons returned by the military. In order to be retired, weapons must be returned to the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas. There they are reduced to their component parts. Although many of these parts are not hazardous, some, including certain explosive assemblies and radioactive materials, are sufficiently hazardous so that special handling systems are necessary. This paper will describe several of these systems developed by Sandia for Pantex and their technical basis

  10. Remote dismantling of the pressure tube reactor from NPP Niederaichbach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pressure tube reactor of NPP Niederaichbach will be dismantled, segmented and packaged by remote operation, using a rotary manipulator, a cutting manipulator and a crane manipulator. With help from a number of remote controlled tools the rotary manipulator disassembles and lifts the reactor parts to a hot cell installed upon the upper reactor floor. Handling, crushing and packaging of those parts is performed with help from the crane manipulator. The cutting manipulator serves for segmenting of the moderator tank and the neutron shield tank

  11. Foam decontamination of large nuclear components before dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following some simple theoretical considerations, the authors show that foam compositions can be advantageously circulated them for a few hours in components requiring decontamination before dismantling. The technique is illustrated on six large ferritic steel valves, then on austenitic steel heat exchangers for which the Ce(III)/Ce(IV) redox pair was used to dissolve the chromium; Ce(III) was reoxidized by ozone injection into the foam vector gas. Biodegradable surfactants are sued in the process; tests have shown that the foaming power disappears after a few days, provided the final radioactive liquid waste is adjusted to neutral pH, allowing subsequent coprecipitation of concentration treatment. (author)

  12. Metal Radioactive Waste Recycling from the Dismantling of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the dismantling process of nuclear power plants a large amount of metal residues are generated. The residues of interest are stainless steel, copper and aluminium and can be reprocessed either for restricted or unrestricted use. Although there are many questions about the further use of these materials it should be convenient to recycle them. This paper discusses the complexity of the management of these metals. The radiation protection requirements are the most important principles. For these purposes great efforts in the decontamination have to be made. Regulatory aspects, clearance levels as well as characteristic of steel recycling industry, radiological impact and new developments are discussed. (author)

  13. Evaluating and planning the radioactive waste options for dismantling the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rule, K.; Scott, J.; Larson, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a kind tritium fusion research reactor, and is planned to be decommissioned within the next several years. This is the largest fusion reactor in the world and as a result of deuterium-tritum reactions is tritium contaminated and activated from 14 Mev neutrons. This presents many unusual challenges when dismantling, packaging and disposing its components and ancillary systems. Special containers are being designed to accommodate the vacuum vessel, neutral beams, and tritium delivery and processing systems. A team of experienced professionals performed a detailed field study to evaluate the requirements and appropriate methods for packaging the radioactive materials. This team focused on several current and innovative methods for waste minimization that provides the oppurtunmost cost effective manner to package and dispose of the waste. This study also produces a functional time-phased schedule which conjoins the waste volume, weight, costs and container requirements with the detailed project activity schedule for the entire project scope. This study and project will be the first demonstration of the decommissioning of a tritium fusion test reactor. The radioactive waste disposal aspects of this project are instrumental in demonstrating the viability of a fusion power reactor with regard to its environmental impact and ultimate success.

  14. Conceptual Study on Dismantling of CANDU Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Woo-Tae; Lee, Sang-Guk [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we reviewed 3D design model of the CANDU type reactor and suggested feasible cutting scheme. The structure of CANDU nuclear reactor, the calandria assembly was reviewed using 3-D CAD model for future decommissioning. Through the schematic diagram of CANDU nuclear power plant, we identified the differences between PWR and CANDU reactor assembly. Method of dismantling the fuel channels from the calandria assembly was suggested. Custom made cutter is recommended to cut all the fuel channels. The calandria vessel is recommended to be cut by band saw or plasma torch. After removal of the fuel channels, it was assumed that radiation level near the calandria vessel is not very high. For cutting of the end shields, various methods such as band saw, plasma torch, CAMC could be used. The choice of a specific method is largely dependent on radiological environment. Finally, method of cutting the embedment rings is considered. As we assume that operators could cut the rings without much radiation exposure, various industrial cutting methods are suggested to be applied. From the above reviews, we could conclude that decommissioning of CANDU reactor is relatively easy compared to that of PWR reactor. Technologies developed from PWR reactor decommissioning could be applied to CANDU reactor dismantling.

  15. The Dismantling of the Japanese Model in Consumer Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøslev Christensen, Jens; Holm Olesen, Michael; Kjær, Jonas

    This paper addresses an issue of great importance for the future organization of the consumerelectronics industry: the "battle" of control over component-based digitization. We are now witnessing the dismantling of the Japanese Model that has prevailed in consumer electronicsover the past 30 year...... technology. Aframework is developed to explain the reluctance of most of the large consumer electronicsgiants in developing/adopting this new technology.Key words: Consumer electronics, Industrial dynamics, Open InnovationJEL Codes: L6, L68, O32......This paper addresses an issue of great importance for the future organization of the consumerelectronics industry: the "battle" of control over component-based digitization. We are now witnessing the dismantling of the Japanese Model that has prevailed in consumer electronicsover the past 30 years....... Specialized and large-scale component suppliers have taken the lead inmost component-based innovations and have obtained increasingly powerful positions in thevalue chain of consumer electronics. This paper provides an in-depth study of the strategic andstructural ramifications of one such component...

  16. The decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities. Status, approaches, challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As nuclear facilities around the world continue to age, many countries will be increasingly faced with the task of taking them out of service (decommissioning) and dismantling them. In particular, they will also have to address the related issues of the release and/or reuse of materials, buildings and sites, and of radioactive waste management. Appropriate provisions will have to be made in terms of policy, financing and management. Depending on the path chosen, decommissioning and dismantling (D and D) of nuclear facilities may take a few years or several decades, especially for the larger ones. This range of possible timescales entails specific issues for decision making, and also has a wider impact by way of such issues as the sustainability of nuclear power and preservation of the well-being of local communities. This report is intended to provide, in non-specialist terminology, a concise overview of the status of D and D of nuclear facilities and associated issues in NEA Member countries. The report draws upon a database of fact sheets produced to a standard format by individual Member countries that can be accessed online from the NEA web site. In the context of this report, the term 'nuclear facility' includes all facilities associated with the production of nuclear power, from mining of uranium, through fabrication of nuclear fuel, nuclear power plant operation, fuel reprocessing and waste management, including related R and D facilities, and research and demonstration reactors. (authors)

  17. Remote Fiber Laser Cutting System for Dismantling Glass Melter - 13071

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 2008, the equipment for dismantling the used glass melter has been developed in High-level Liquid Waste (HLW) Vitrification Facility in the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP). Due to the high radioactivity of the glass melter, the equipment requires a fully-remote operation in the vitrification cell. The remote fiber laser cutting system was adopted as one of the major pieces of equipment. An output power of fiber laser is typically higher than other types of laser and so can provide high-cutting performance. The fiber laser can cut thick stainless steel and Inconel, which are parts of the glass melter such as casings, electrodes and nozzles. As a result, it can make the whole of the dismantling work efficiently done for a shorter period. Various conditions of the cutting test have been evaluated in the process of developing the remote fiber cutting system. In addition, the expected remote operations of the power manipulator with the laser torch have been fully verified and optimized using 3D simulations. (authors)

  18. Decontamination of dismantled parts from phosphate rock fertilizer plant decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning of the Uranium Recovery Section at the Phosphate Rock Fertilizer Plant in Gresik, East Java, Indonesia requires decontamination activity be applied to dismantled parts. The decontamination study has categorized the dismantled parts into three types, type A, type B and type C parts. Type A parts were the equipment having very low surface activity or below the clearance level. Type B parts were the equipment having surface activity beyond the clearance level, containing radioactive scale, which is easily removed by in situ decontamination to become parts that are useable unrestrictedly. Type C parts were the equipment having surface activity beyond the clearance level whose nature is very difficult to remove. In situ decontamination of the type B parts have been studied. Mechanical surface cleaning methods and strippable coating methods can be applied for in situ decontamination. The application of strippable coating methods with a composition of 10.0% phosphoric acid, 1.0% HEDPA, 3.0% tartaric acid, 12.0% polyvinyl alcohol and 4.3% absorbent clynoptilolyte was considered to be very effective. (author)

  19. Planning the procedure for dismantling the TRIGA Reactor at the Medical University of Hannover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this contribution is to provide an overview of the procedure for dismantling the TRIGA reactor at the Medical University of Hannover (MHH). In particular, the dismantling concept and techniques, the amount and the handling of radioactive material, the measurements for release, radiation protection for persons and the environment are presented. (author)

  20. Dismantling of an alpha contaminated hot cell at the Marcoule Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the remodeling of Marcoule Pilot Plant, the cell 82: old unit for plutonium solution purification by extraction, was dismantled. About 42 tons of wastes were evacuated. Some wastes wen decontaminated by mechanical means other wastes with higher residual activity were stored for subsequent processing. The operation shows that dismantling of a hot cell is possible even if incorporated in an operating plant

  1. 19 CFR 4.40 - Equipment, etc., from wrecked or dismantled vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment, etc., from wrecked or dismantled vessels. 4.40 Section 4.40 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... § 4.40 Equipment, etc., from wrecked or dismantled vessels. Ship's or sea stores, supplies,...

  2. Dismantling of the research reactor RTS-1 Galileo Galilei in Pisa (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is about the most relevant aspects of the first phase of the dismantling, removal of the water in the pool, prior treatment through evaporation, the dismantling of all the submerged activated elements and other activated or contaminated elements that have been part of the nuclear facility. (Author)

  3. Decontamination and dismantling at the CEA; L'assainissement et le demantelement au CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This document presents the dismantling policy at the CEA (French Research Center on the atomic energy), the financing of the decontamination and the dismantling, the regulatory framework, the knowledge and the technology developed at the CEA, the radiation protection, the environment monitoring and the installations. (A.L.B.)

  4. A treaty more alarming than efficient. The dismantled warheads will not be destroyed. Danger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This political analysis presents the new treaty of nuclear weapons dismantling between Russia and Usa. In fact the warheads will not be completely dismantling but only stocked, leading to a possible recovery by terrorists. It underlines the real interests of this agreement which are more economic than peaceful. (A.L.B.)

  5. Dismantling and sodium removal of the large sodium equipment for FBR. Dismantling and sodium removal of the intermediate heat exchanger of the 50 MW steam generator facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast breeder reactors use metallic sodium as a coolant, therefore, sodium removal is necessary in the dismantling. An intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) exchanges heat between primary and secondary sodium. The dismantling and sodium removal of IHX is difficult because of the future of IHX such as residing of sodium on both primary and secondary surface, existing of the cover gas region, large amount of bulk residual sodium. In the dismantling and sodium removal of the 50 MWt IHX, the effective and safe procedure of dismantling and sodium removal was carefully examined to prevent of sodium ignition and large sodium water reaction and to store safely during the dismantling. Sodium carbonation had been carried out by introducing carbon dioxide in the IHX at the 50 MW Steam Generator Test Facility (50MWSGTF) to prevent sodium ignition. After separation to inner shroud and outer shell, each part was transported to the sodium processing facility where each part was dismantled and sodium was removed by steam cleaning device in the atmosphere. (J.P.N.)

  6. Development of an augmented reality based simulation system for cooperative plant dismantling work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An augmented reality-based simulation system for cooperative plant dismantling work has been developed and evaluated. In the system, behaviors of virtual objects such as the dismantling target, chain blocks, and trolleys are physically simulated. Their appearance is superimposed on camera images captured with cameras on users' tablet devices. The users can manipulate virtual objects cooperatively via touch operation. They can cut the dismantling targets, lift them on the trolleys using chain blocks, and convey them through narrow passages to ascertain whether the dismantling targets can be conducted without colliding with the passages. During the simulation, collisions between the virtual objects and real work environment are detected based on their three-dimensional shape data measured in advance. The collided parts are visualized using augmented reality superimposition. Four evaluators assessed the simulation system. Results show that the simulation system can be useful for prior examination of dismantling works, but some points were also found to need improvement. (author)

  7. Experience of partial dismantling and large component removal of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Not any of the French PWR reactors need to be decommissioned before the next decade or early 2000. However, feasibility studies of decommissioning have been undertaken and several dismantling scenarios have been considered including the dismantling of four PWR units and the on-site entombment of the active components into a reactor building for interim disposal. In addition to theoretical evaluation of radwaste volume and activity, several operations of partial dismantling of active components and decontamination activities have been conducted in view of dismantling for both PWR and BWR units. By analyzing the concept of both 900 and 1300 MWe PWR's, it appears that the design improvements taken into account for reducing occupational dose exposure of maintenance personnel and the development of automated tools for performing maintenance and repairs of major components, contribute to facilitate future dismantling and decommissioning operations

  8. Decommissioning and dismantling: how to manage risks to protect workers and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives the point of view from the French CFDT syndicate about the management of radiation risks for workers and environment during nuclear installations dismantling. The paper focusses on the lack of regulations about radiation protection during some dismantling and recycling operations and after the closeout of some feed materials plants, on the lack of training for the contractor personnel and on the lack of liability from contractors and operators during dismantling works. A dismantling operation managed with success requires a strategy of quality and implies an optimization of workmen and environment radioprotection and of waste management. This discussion is illustrated with several examples of faults, accidents and errors that occurred during dismantling operations in French facilities (J.S.). 1 append

  9. The CEA Cadarache site. Additional safety assessment with respect to the accident which occurred in the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a presentation of some characteristics of the CEA Cadarache site (internal and external industrial environment, crisis management organization at the CEA level and at the local level), this document reports the identification of structures and equipment concerned by crisis management (site support functions, critical structures and equipment concerned by additional safety assessments). Then, it addresses the different risks: earthquake (sizing of critical structures and equipment, margin assessment), flooding (possible origins, alarm measures), other extreme natural events (extreme meteorological conditions, extreme earthquake with induced flooding, forest fire), and loss of electric supplies and of cooling systems. The last parts address the organization of accident management in situation typically related to additional safety management), and subcontracting conditions and practices

  10. Remote laser machining for nuclear site under dismantling (ROLD Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the design, development and manufacturing of a power laser cutting tool remotely-operated, adapted to nuclear installations dismantling. The technological choices adopted for the conception of the laser robot ROLD are presented, as well as the coupling to a power laser in a real but not radioactive environment. A series of tests on sample cutting performances are presented. A complementary working program with respect to the initial one was intended for the development of an automatic cutting trajectory teaching system. A three dimensional laser camera, assisted by a proximity sensor by optical triangulation would allow to create a picture of the cutting scene which would have been used for the trajectory calculation. The trials have not yet been successful, but the results are presented in the report

  11. Fast and simple decycling and dismantling of networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zdeborová, Lenka; Zhou, Hai-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Decycling and dismantling of complex networks are underlying many important applications in network science. Recently these two closely related problems were tackled by several heuristic algorithms, simple and considerably sub-optimal, on the one hand, and time-consuming message-passing ones that evaluate single-node marginal probabilities, on the other hand. In this paper we propose a simple and extremely fast algorithm, CoreHD, which recursively removes nodes of the highest degree from the $2$-core of the network. CoreHD performs much better than all existing simple algorithms. When applied on real-world networks, it achieves equally good solutions as those obtained by the state-of-art iterative message-passing algorithms at greatly reduced computational cost, suggesting that CoreHD should be the algorithm of choice for many practical purposes.

  12. Outsourcing and "dismantling" of steady jobs at hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helton Saragor de Souza

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To relate hospitals' organizational structure as the core of a web of outsourced services and flexible employment bonds among healthcare professionals in the context of finance capitalism, analyzing work arrangements based mainly on the type of employment bond. METHOD Qualitative research through ethnography, interviews, data analysis, and case studies. The case studies were concentrated in 3 hospitals located in the São Paulo metropolitan region under different management types: public administration; outsourced administration via a healthcare social organization (HSO; and private administration. RESULTS This study highlights a trend in outsourcing, dismantling of steady jobs, and shaping working relations asymmetrically in terms of healthcare professions. CONCLUSION These aspects are characteristic of contemporary capitalism and post-Fordist work organization. In this context, the state under sponsorship cripples the very existence of an effective human resources policy, creating a favorable environment for outsourcing and flexibility of employment bonds among healthcare workers.

  13. Method and apparatus for dismantling and disposing of fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to apparatus and a method for dismantling, shearing, and compacting a fuel assembly frame skeleton. It uses an apparatus capable of hanging or being supported in the transfer canal of the spent fuel pit of the fuel handling building. This apparatus includes a bottom nozzle shear which is held under water to shear off the bottom nozzle and convey it to a scrap transfer bin. Then the remaining portion is brought to a skeleton compactor and shear, also held under water. The compacted skeleton is sheared into a number of smaller portions. After compacting and shearing, the individual portions are fed to the scrap transfer bin. The compacted and sheared skeleton assembly may be placed into a container that is adapted to hold four skeletons for off-site removal

  14. Design earthquakes for ITER in Europe at Cadarache. Comparison of the semi-empirical methods used according to the French regulation and the seismic probabilistic assessment of the site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Input requirements and assumptions for ITER consider that an infrequent, severe earthquake (called SL-2) which, although unlikely to occur during the lifetime of the facility, is assessed to demonstrate adequate protection of the public. This earthquake is assumed to have a return period of 10,000 years. An investment protection level or inspection level (where all Structures, Systems and Components are safe) with a peak ground acceleration (pga) at 0.5 m/s2 is also considered. As a basis, orders of magnitude of consequences, if no countermeasures were taken, are given. The European site proposed for ITER is situated in the South of France, 40 km North-East of Aix-en-Provence, in a low to moderate seismic area according to the Global Seismic Hazard Map (GSHAP Group 1999). The-tokamak building would be implemented on good bedrock made of limestone with a shear wave velocity of over 1,300 m/s. Four aspects are discussed: regulation, implementation of this regulation for the proposed site (site geology, tectonic, seismo-tectonic), a probabilistic seismic hazard assessment of the site has been performed using a methodology which considers uncertainties (this work has been developed by the team which had contributed to large parts of the GSHAP map study), finally the fulfillment of the requirements and assumptions are discussed, according to IAEA guides for instance. As a conclusion of the studies the main characteristics of the Cadarache European site are discussed: as a reference the standardized 475 year mean return period hazard (i.e. 10 % of chance to occur in 50 years); 10,000 year return period in accordance with the ITER assumption. Preliminary studies have shown that the European site proposal will ensure a low level of project risk with respect to the seismic hazard. (authors)

  15. NucLab Marcoule. A laboratory facility dedicated to support dismantling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formerly dedicated to plutonium production support, NucLab was renovated to perform a wide range of analyses for dismantling, plant operation and process development activities mainly on Marcoule site but also outside (Veurey, Fontenay aux Roses). The Laboratory is under a CEA AREVA partnership as a CEA entity operated by AREVA employees. It provides services to several industrial operators (nuclear process and power plant) in the fields of analytical chemistry, radioactivity measurements, in situ nuclear measurements, decontamination processes and industrial chemistry processes, waste treatments to meet the following analysis requirements. NucLab today is able to support research, production and dismantling activities in all part of dismantling operations. (authors)

  16. NucLab Marcoule: A dedicated waste management and dismantling support laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formerly dedicated to plutonium production support, NucLab was renovated to perform a wide range of analyses for dismantling, plant operation and process development activities mainly at Marcoule but also for external clients. The laboratory is a CEA entity in the Nuclear Energy Division. It provides services to several industrial operators (nuclear processes and power plants) in the fields of analytical chemistry, radioactivity measurements, in situ nuclear measurements, decontamination processes, industrial chemistry processes, and waste treatment. NucLab supports research, production, and dismantling activities in all areas of dismantling operations.

  17. Progress in dismantling of the WAK Pilot Reprocessing Plant: Vitrification of the HLLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In the past international nuclear safeguards was focused on operating facilities and in these facilities namely on the product streams. The amount of nuclear material in waste was regularly measured or estimated by the plant operator but normally accepted by the IAEA without verification, if certain limits were observed. With the additional protocol in force, safeguards measures are applied on (in a technical sense) decommissioned plants and it seems that the conditioning of waste will be safeguarded by the IAEA to a higher degree than in the past. This paper will describe in detail the situation at the Wiederaufarbeitungsanlage Karlsruhe (WAK). The German pilot reprocessing plant was commissioned in 1971 and finally shut down at the end of 1990. During 31 campaigns 210 Mg of uranium and 1100 kg of plutonium originating from different German reactors were reprocessed. All separated plutonium and uranium were shipped off site. Starting in 1996, the process building has been totally dismantled and all liquid and solid wastes of low and medium level activity were shipped to the waste treatment and intermediate storage facility at the Research Centre Karlsruhe (FZK). In a separate building (LAVA) approximately 60 m3 of high level liquid waste (HLLW) with a total radioactivity of nearly 8E17 Bq are stored as 'retained waste' to be conditioned on site. This vitrification project also has been established in 1996 and a new building for the Verglasungseinrichtung Karlsruhe (VEK) is finished and equipped, now waiting for the licence of hot operation in the beginning of 2007. An overview of the WAK dismantling project has been given. The vitrification of the HLLW is an essential step for the total dismantling and demolition of WAK. The VEK facility is only planned, constructed and licensed for this specific task that should be terminated within two years. Looking at the vitrification, it is straight forward process: receiving a volume of 1.6 m3 HLLW from LAVA, the

  18. Multiparameter optimisation of dismantling activities and waste management at a research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) is a multi-disciplinary research centre for natural sciences and technology. The institute is active in solid-state physics, materials sciences, elementary particle physics, life sciences, nuclear and non-nuclear energy research, and energy-related ecology. PSI develops and operates complex research installations such as nuclear reactors and particle accelerators. These produce ionising radiation and major quantities of radioactive materials. The optimal handling of decommissioning and dismantling projects and radioactive waste treatment at PSI represents a complex management task, and is determined by many parameters that are only partially identical to those in the energy producing industry. Some of the major issues are addressed below. Management: The research community often requires rapid changes of experimental equipment. This necessitates that the four steps of decommissioning, removal, dismantling and conditioning of waste are spatially and temporally separated. The availability of a great scientific knowledge pool is instrumental for innovative solutions for the complex problems encountered. The accessibility of a modem hardware park (instruments, workshops etc.), sophisticated computer systems and modelling know how can facilitate the work considerably. The lack of a dedicated pool of decommissioning funds and the need for rapid response (see above) necessitate flexibility of the decommissioning crew and constant coordination and optimisation of the work packages with the institute's top management. The product of a research centre in general is not a tradable commodity and does not result in a direct return of money. Financial mechanisms such as the accumulation of funds for future liabilities are not an option. Since PSI - as probably most research institutes - is funded on a yearly basis, long term cost optimisations processes are in competition with legitimate short-term research needs. The benefits of

  19. Systems analysis of radiation safety during dismantling of power-plant equipment at a nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systems analysis of the radiation safety makes possible an ad hoc determination of the elements forming the system, as well as the establishment of the characteristics of their interaction with radiation-effect factors. Here the authors will present part of the hierarchical analysis procedure, consisting in general of four separate procedures. The purpose is to investigate and analyze the mean and stable (on the average) indices of radiation safety, within the framework of alternative mathematical models of dismantling the power-plant equipment of a nuclear power station. The following three of the four procedures are discussed: (1) simulated projection, of the processing of radioactive waste; (2) analysis of the redistribution of radionuclides during the industrial cycle of waste treatment; (3) planning the collective dose load during the dismantling operation. Within the framework of the first of these procedures, the solutions to the problem of simulating a waste-treatment operation of maximum efficiency are analyzed. This analysis is based on the use of a data base for the parameters of the installations, assemblies, and equipment, enabling the integration of these in a simulation of a complex automated facility. The results were visualized in an AUTOCAD-10 medium using a graphical data base containing an explanation of the rooms

  20. Process for dismantling large steel parts from the nuclear range of applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The steel parts to be dismantled are subcooled in the areas where they are to be separated, so that they break because of the brittleness produced due to stresses introduced by explosive charges. (orig.)

  1. LEAR, shown here dismantled, will live to see another golden era as LEIR starting in 2005.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) experiment has now been dismantled. Only the dipoles remain for use in the future LEIR (Low Energy Ion Ring) experiment, the new ring which will supply lead ions to the LHC experiments.

  2. Cutting Method of the CAD model of the Nuclear facility for Dismantling Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current methods for process simulation cannot simulate the cutting operation flexibly. As is, to simulate a cutting operation, user needs to prepare the result models of cutting operation based on pre-define cutting path, depth and thickness with respect to a dismantle scenario in advance. And those preparations should be built again as scenario changes. To be, user can change parameters and scenarios dynamically within a simulation configuration process so that the user saves time and efforts to simulate cutting operations. This study presents the methodology of cutting operation which can be applied to all the procedure in the simulation of dismantling of nuclear facilities. We developed the cutting simulation module for cutting operation in the dismantling of the nuclear facilities based on proposed cutting methodology. We defined the requirement of model cutting methodology based on the requirement of the dismantling of nuclear facilities. And we implemented cutting simulation module based on API of the commercial CAD system

  3. Adapting Dismantling and Decommissioning Strategies to a Variety of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities - 12237

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA has accumulated over 20 years of experience in managing and operating fuel cycle facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) projects of many different types and a variety of scales, both as facility owner (at La Hague for example) and as prime contractor to external customers such as the French Atomic Energy Commission (at Marcoule). A specific Business Unit was created in 2008 to capitalize on this experience and to concentrate - in one division - the specific skills required to be successful and cost effective in decommissioning projects. Indeed one of the key lessons learned in the past decades is that decommissioning is a significantly different business as compared to normal operations of a nuclear facility. Almost all the functions of a project need to be viewed from a different angle, challenged and adapted consequently in order to optimize costs and schedule. Three examples follow to illustrate the point: Safety management needs to take into account the ever changing configuration of a plant under D and D (a quite new situation for the authorities). Production of waste is significantly different in term of volume, activities, conditioning and disposal path. Technology is important but technical issues are often less critical than good management and planning. Further examples and lessons learned are developed through reviewing the projects experience basis. AREVA has a long and vast experience in the cleanup and dismantling of a number of very large and complex nuclear facilities. This effort focused initially on AREVA's own plants and is expanding now to other customers. The setup of a specific Business Unit in 2008 to takeover this business allowed concentration of the skills and the lessons learned in a dedicated division so as to provide the best means to optimize safety, performance, costs and schedules. Indeed transitioning from operations to D and D of a nuclear facility is a quantum leap. The assistance from specialized teams can

  4. Decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities. Experiences and perspectives. 3. new rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report on decommissioning and dismantling of German nuclear facilities includes nuclear power plants (Niederaichbach, Lingen, Greifswald, Rheinsberg, Gundremmingen-A, Kahl, Wuergassen, Stade, Obrigheim, Muehlheim-Kaerlich), test reactors, research reactors, and fuel cycle facilities. The following issues are discussed with respect to experiences and perspectives: waste management, legal frame work for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, research funding and exchange of experiences, technologies for the dismantling of nuclear facilities, decommissioning challenges in an international context.

  5. The Blue Lady Case and the International Issue of Ship Dismantling - Comment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Pelsy

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the decision of the Supreme Court of India to allow the dismantling of the Blue Lady (ex France in Alang. The first part underlines that the Supreme Court of India is prioritising the commercial interest of the dismantling companies over the social and environmental concerns of the workers and the communities living in Alang. It argues that such decision goes against its 2003 judgement on ship-dismantling. It then demonstrates that the Supreme Court of India is distorting the concept of sustainable development. The second part analyses the Blue Lady case from an international perspective since most of the ships that are dismantled in India come from developed countries. It provides an overview of the Basel Convention on ship dismantling issues and a study of the Clemenceau case before the French Conseil d'Etat. It then concludes that a better control of end-of-life ships in OECD countries and a new international convention on ship-dismantling would be necessary in order to prevent environmental and social disasters in Alang.

  6. Design and trial fabrication of a dismantling apparatus for irradiation capsules of solid tritium breeder materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Blanket Irradiation and Analysis Group, Fusion Research and Development Directorate, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki-ken 311-1393 (Japan)], E-mail: hayashi.kimio@jaea.go.jp; Nakagawa, T.; Onose, S.; Ishida, T.; Nakamichi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Blanket Irradiation and Analysis Group, Fusion Research and Development Directorate, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki-ken 311-1393 (Japan); Takatsu, H. [Fusion Energy and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka-shi, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan); Nakamura, M.; Noguchi, T. [Kaken, Inc., 873-3 Shikada, Hokota-shi, Ibaraki-ken, 311-1416 (Japan)

    2009-04-30

    Irradiation experiments of solid breeder materials including Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} have been being carried out in preparation for a test blanket module (TBM) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The present paper deals with design and trial-fabrication works for developing a dismantling apparatus for the irradiation capsules. The dismantling process leads to release of tritium which is left in free volumes of the capsule or in the breeder specimens. In the design of the dismantling apparatus, the released tritium is recovered safely by a purge-gas system during the cutting of the irradiation capsule by a band saw, and then the tritium is consolidated into a radioactive waste. Furthermore, an inner-box enclosing the dismantling apparatus works as a countermeasure of possible release of tritium in accidental events. Good performance of a trial fabrication model of the dismantling apparatus has been demonstrated by preliminary cutting runs using some mockups simulating the irradiation capsules. Thus, the present design of the apparatus, together with the trial mock-up runs, will contribute to the design of the TBM structure and to the planning of the dismantling process of the TBM.

  7. Design and trial fabrication of a dismantling apparatus for irradiation capsules of solid tritium breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation experiments of solid breeder materials including Li2TiO3 have been being carried out in preparation for a test blanket module (TBM) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The present paper deals with design and trial-fabrication works for developing a dismantling apparatus for the irradiation capsules. The dismantling process leads to release of tritium which is left in free volumes of the capsule or in the breeder specimens. In the design of the dismantling apparatus, the released tritium is recovered safely by a purge-gas system during the cutting of the irradiation capsule by a band saw, and then the tritium is consolidated into a radioactive waste. Furthermore, an inner-box enclosing the dismantling apparatus works as a countermeasure of possible release of tritium in accidental events. Good performance of a trial fabrication model of the dismantling apparatus has been demonstrated by preliminary cutting runs using some mockups simulating the irradiation capsules. Thus, the present design of the apparatus, together with the trial mock-up runs, will contribute to the design of the TBM structure and to the planning of the dismantling process of the TBM.

  8. Treatment of concrete bars from the dismantling of hot cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Central Decontamination Operations Department (HDB) of the Karlsruhe Research Center operates facilities for the disposal of radioactive waste. In general, their objective is to decontaminate radioactive residues for unrestricted release in order to minimize the volume of waste products suitable for repository storage. In the case of about 120 concrete bars from the dismantling of hot cells, we reduce the volume of radioactive waste by sawing off the most contaminated parts of the bar. If there are no insertions such as cables or ventilation systems, the rest of the bar is sandblasted and its activity manually measured to ensure compliance with the release criteria. Otherwise, the bar is minced into small pieces by a power shovel. Afterwards, the rubble is filled into drums and its activity is measured by the clearance measurement facility. If the rubble and the sandblasted bars do not exceed the activity limit specified by the release criteria, the material is disposed of without further regulations for unrestricted use. Those parts of the bars which can not be released must be stored in special containers suitable for the KONRAD final disposal. Using this method, about 70 % of the total mass can be released. (author)

  9. Rosie: A mobile worksystem for decontamination and dismantlement operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RedZone Robotics, Inc. and Carnegie Mellon University's Field Robotics Center have undertaken a contract to develop a next-generation worksystem for decommissioning and dismantlement tasks in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Currently, the authors are closing the second phase of this three phase effort and have completed the design and fabrication of the worksystem: Rosie. Rosie includes a locomotor, heavy manipulator, control center, and control system for robot operation. The locomotor is an omni-directional platform with tether management and hydraulic power capabilities. The heavy manipulator is a high-payload, long-reach system intended to deploy tools into the work area. The heavy manipulator is capable of deploying systems such as the Dual-Arm Work Module--a five degree-of-freedom platform supporting two highly dexterous manipulators--or a single manipulator for performing simpler, less dexterous tasks. Rosie is telerobotic to the point of having servo-controlled motions which can be operated and coordinated through the control center

  10. Dismantling, conditioning and repatriation of disused sealed radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Bolivia sealed radioactive sources for medical, industrial and research applications are used; radioactive sources containing a wide range of radionuclides and have different levels of activity and half-lives, they generated a problem when they stop being used. At the end of its useful life these sources are considered obsolete. However, residual levels of radioactivity, which have these sources can be high constituting a potential hazard to personnel and applies to those who benefit from its use and the general public. The aim of this work has been focused mainly on safety issues in the safe handling and management of disused sealed sources. Assignments listed below: 1. Dismantling; 2. Packaging; 3. Return of disused sealed radioactive sources. The actions taken were carried out by the technical teams of the Bolivian Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (IBTEN) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANS) which supports the program 'Global Threat Reduction Initiative's' (GTRI) in the implementation of 'Off -site Source Recovery Program' (OSRP).

  11. Management of wastes from dismantled nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems associated with the management of radioactive wastes encountered in the dismantling of a 1200MWe PWR reactor are considered. It is possible to extend all the conclusions reached in these studies to BWR's or other reactors of the same type using light water as a coolant and moderator. The studies performed established the specific characteristics of these wastes: a gamma activity due essentially to 60Co (after some fifty years this radioisotope will have decayed sufficiently to enable it to be stored without shielding); the presence of 63Ni and 59Ni (these long half-life beta emitting radioisotopes need to be stored over a long or even indefinite period of time); contaminated components (60% of the overall wastes), the reselling of these components involving costly decontamination processes. Extensive studies have been conducted on the management and handling of these wastes: packaging, transport, processing, storage and a great many techniques have been developed. However, further developments in concentration methods (fusion, crushing, cryogenics etc) and the selection of storage sites for this type of waste are necessary. Depending on the solutions chosen, the global cost of the wastes coming from a 1200 MW PWR reactor can vary between 10 and 20 million BFR

  12. Proceedings of the workshop on transite decontamination dismantlement and recycle/disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On February 3--4, 1993, a workshop was conducted to examine issues associated with the decontamination, dismantlement, and recycle/disposal of transite located at the US Department of Energy Fernald site near Cincinnati, OH. The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) is a Superfund Site currently undergoing remediation. A major objective of the workshop was to assess the state-of-the-art of transite remediation, and generate concepts that could be useful to the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Co. (FERMCO) for remediation of transite. Transite is a building material consisting of asbestos fiber and cement and may be radioactively contaminated as a result of past uranium processing operations at the FEMP. Many of the 100 buildings within the former uranium production area were constructed of transite siding and roofing and consequently, over 180,000 m2 of transite must be disposed or recycled. Thirty-six participants representing industry, academia, and government institutions such as the EPA and DOE assembled at the workshop to present their experience with transite, describe work in progress, and address the issues involved in remediating transite

  13. Progress of JPDR decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR) decommissioning project is progressively achieving its final goal; the project will be finished by March 1996 to release the JPDR's site into unrestricted use in a green field condition. The new techniques which developed or improved in R and D, the first phase of this program, have been successfully applied to the actual dismantling activities. Some decommissioning wastes have been managed as the first case of onsite shallow land burial based on the new regulatory frame of radioactive waste management. The experiences and the data obtained from the JPDR dismantling activities are expected to contribute to future decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants. (author)

  14. Report on transparency and nuclear safety 2013 - Cadarache CEA centre - Tome 1. INB 32 (ATPu) et 54 (LCP) AREVA NC - Tome 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A first volume proposes a presentation of the Cadarache CEA centre, of its activities and installations, gives a rather detailed overview of measures related to safety and to radiation protection within these activities and installations. It also reports significant events related to safety and to radiation protection which occurred in 2013 and have been declared to the ASN. It discusses the results of release measurements (liquid and gaseous effluents, radiological assessment, and chemical assessment for various installations) and the control of the chemical and radiological impact of these gaseous and liquid effluents on the environment. It addresses the issue of radioactive wastes which are stored in the different nuclear base installations of the Centre, indicates the different measures aimed at limiting the volume of these warehoused wastes and addresses their impact on health and on the environment. Nature and quantities of warehoused wastes are specified. The second volume concerns some specific installations (INB 32 or ATPu, and INB 54 or LPC) which belong to AREVA NC. The same topics are addressed: presentation of the facilities, arrangements regarding safety and radiation protection, significant events related to safety and radiation protection, measurements of effluents and their impact on the environment, warehoused wastes. Remarks and recommendations of the CHSCT are given

  15. FEBEX-DP. Dismantling the ''full-scale engineered barrier experiment'' after 18 years of operation at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kober, Florian; Gaus, Irina [Nagra, Wettingen (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    dismantling project (FEBEX-DP) are: - Characterization of the key physical properties (e.g., density, water content) of the barrier and their distribution, - Characterization of corrosion and microbiological processes on instruments and coupons resulting from evolving redox conditions and saturation states, including gas analysis, - Characterization macro- and micro level studies of mineralogical interactions at material interfaces (e.g., cement-bentonite or iron-bentonite, rock-bentonite), - Assessment of sensor performance, - Further increasing understanding of the thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) and thermo-hydro-chemical (THC) processes through integration of monitoring and dismantling results. An intensive laboratory program will be conducted in 2015/2016 in order to achieve the outlined main objectives. It includes extensive mineralogical, chemical and biological investigations of the buffer and the related interfaces. It will be accompanied by pre- and post dismantling modeling efforts. Unique data are expected after completing one of the longest running 1:1 in-situ EBS experiment under continued heating and natural saturation conditions. It will further consolidate the EBS knowledge and will act as a benchmark for major coupled modeling codes. The dismantling project is set-up as an international project with partners from Europe, Asia and North America. Further information can are under http://www.grimsel.com/gts-phase-vi/febex-dp/febex-dp-introduction.

  16. FEBEX-DP. Dismantling the ''full-scale engineered barrier experiment'' after 18 years of operation at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    dismantling project (FEBEX-DP) are: - Characterization of the key physical properties (e.g., density, water content) of the barrier and their distribution, - Characterization of corrosion and microbiological processes on instruments and coupons resulting from evolving redox conditions and saturation states, including gas analysis, - Characterization macro- and micro level studies of mineralogical interactions at material interfaces (e.g., cement-bentonite or iron-bentonite, rock-bentonite), - Assessment of sensor performance, - Further increasing understanding of the thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) and thermo-hydro-chemical (THC) processes through integration of monitoring and dismantling results. An intensive laboratory program will be conducted in 2015/2016 in order to achieve the outlined main objectives. It includes extensive mineralogical, chemical and biological investigations of the buffer and the related interfaces. It will be accompanied by pre- and post dismantling modeling efforts. Unique data are expected after completing one of the longest running 1:1 in-situ EBS experiment under continued heating and natural saturation conditions. It will further consolidate the EBS knowledge and will act as a benchmark for major coupled modeling codes. The dismantling project is set-up as an international project with partners from Europe, Asia and North America. Further information can are under http://www.grimsel.com/gts-phase-vi/febex-dp/febex-dp-introduction.

  17. Experience of NaK flow and heat transfer test loop dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NaK (an alloy of sodium and potassium) Flow and Heat Transfer Test Loop was dismantled from January to February 2001. This report shows experience and results obtained in the dismantling. NaK has a low melting point, -12.6degC and has high chemical activity even comparing to sodium because of containing potassium of 78wt%. In addition, the dismantling of the NaK loop was the first experience in OEC. Therefore before dismantling NaK loop, evaluation of dismantling method, trainings of NaK handling and experiments of NaK reaction were carried out by all concerned to ensure the safety. As a result, the test loop was safely dismantled and NaK handling method was obtained. Followings are major results of this experience: (1) Followings were confirmed by experiments. 1) When NaK was exposed in atmosphere, NaK super oxide was produced by exothermal reaction with oxygen. However, the effect of thermal diffusion to NaK and a metal tray scarcely leads the ignition. 2) Exposing NaK alternately in low and high oxygen atmosphere increases the possibility of ignition. 3) As nitrogen gas may react exothermally with burning NaK and formulate KNO3, nitrogen gas does not have instant extinguish capability. (2) Cutting NaK pipe in the vinyl-bag filled with argon gas was effective to avoid NaK ignition. (3) Because there were no solidified crevice in components like sodium at the room temperature, NaK equipments were more easily dismantled than sodium equipments. (author)

  18. Dismantlement and removal of Old Hydrofracture Facility bulk storage bins and water tank, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF), located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was constructed in 1963 to allow experimentation and operations with an integrated solid storage, mixing, and grout injection facility. During its operation, OHF blended liquid low-level waste with grout and used a hydrofracture process to pump the waste into a deep low-permeable shale formation. Since the OHF Facility was taken out of service in 1980, the four bulk storage bins located adjacent to Building 7852 had deteriorated to the point that they were a serious safety hazard. The ORNL Surveillance and Maintenance Program requested and received permission from the US Department of Energy to dismantle the bins as a maintenance action and send the free-released metal to an approved scrap metal vendor. A 25,000-gal stainless steel water tank located at the OHF site was included in the scope. A fixed-price subcontract was signed with Allied Technology Group, Inc., to remove the four bulk storage bins and water tank to a staging area where certified Health Physics personnel could survey, segregate, package, and send the radiologically clean scrap metal to an approved scrap metal vendor. All radiologically contaminated metal and metal that could not be surveyed was packaged and staged for later disposal. Permissible personnel exposure limits were not exceeded, no injuries were incurred, and no health and safety violations occurred throughout the duration of the project. Upon completion of the dismantlement, the project had generated 53,660 lb of clean scrap metal (see Appendix D). This resulted in $3,410 of revenue generated and a cost avoidance of an estimated $100,000 in waste disposal fees.

  19. Dismantlement and removal of Old Hydrofracture Facility bulk storage bins and water tank, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF), located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was constructed in 1963 to allow experimentation and operations with an integrated solid storage, mixing, and grout injection facility. During its operation, OHF blended liquid low-level waste with grout and used a hydrofracture process to pump the waste into a deep low-permeable shale formation. Since the OHF Facility was taken out of service in 1980, the four bulk storage bins located adjacent to Building 7852 had deteriorated to the point that they were a serious safety hazard. The ORNL Surveillance and Maintenance Program requested and received permission from the US Department of Energy to dismantle the bins as a maintenance action and send the free-released metal to an approved scrap metal vendor. A 25,000-gal stainless steel water tank located at the OHF site was included in the scope. A fixed-price subcontract was signed with Allied Technology Group, Inc., to remove the four bulk storage bins and water tank to a staging area where certified Health Physics personnel could survey, segregate, package, and send the radiologically clean scrap metal to an approved scrap metal vendor. All radiologically contaminated metal and metal that could not be surveyed was packaged and staged for later disposal. Permissible personnel exposure limits were not exceeded, no injuries were incurred, and no health and safety violations occurred throughout the duration of the project. Upon completion of the dismantlement, the project had generated 53,660 lb of clean scrap metal (see Appendix D). This resulted in $3,410 of revenue generated and a cost avoidance of an estimated $100,000 in waste disposal fees

  20. State of dismantling of reactor facilities (JPDR) in Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (fiscal year 1986)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As to this dismantling work, the contents of the notice on the dismantling and the policy of administration offices to deal with it were reported to the Nuclear Safety Commission beforehand, and after the approval was obtained, it has been executed. Based on the talk of the chairman of Nuclear Safety Commission on January 6, 1983, the state of dismantling is reported. In fiscal year 1986, the second stage dismantling was begun in December, and it was confirmed that the works were carried out safety. In order to ensure the place required for dismantling and removing in-core structures and the pressure vessel, the pressure vessel upper cover and its heat insulator were removed from the third story of the containment vessel. A part of the facilities installed on the second and third stories of the containment vessel was also dismantled and removed. In order to utilize as the place for the temporary preservation and decontamination of dismantled things, a part of the facilities installed in the dump condenser building was dismantled and removed. The control building was reconstructed for smoothly carrying out the entrance control of workers. 36 spent fuel assemblies were carried away for reprocessing. The exposure dose of workers was below the detectable limit of film badges. The dismantled wastes were about 171 t of metals and 34 t of concrete. (Kako, I.)

  1. Expertise of the Oeko-Institute on the application to obtain permission to partially dismantle the Niederaichbach nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This expertise gives an overview on the problems associated with the decommissioning and dismantling of the Niederaichbach nuclear power plant, considering technical and legal aspects. It wants to prove that the dismantling of this reactor cannot serve as evidence to prove the general feasibility of reactor dismantling. Much space is dedicated to the discussion about where the borderline should be drawn between radioactive and non-radioactive materials according to the ordinance on radiation protection. The reasons for rejecting the partial dismantling application are given. (DG)

  2. Specific application for Oak Ridge National Laboratory dismantlement of Building 3004. Appendix A - Quality assurance plan; Appendix B - Records management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This quality assurance (QA) plan defines the QA requirements for the dismantlement and removal of Building 3004 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The building is a four-story wooden trained structure with wooden siding, which resides approximately 150 ft west of the Bulk Shielding Reactor, and only several feet away from the visitors entrance to the Graphite Reactor museum. Complete descriptions and sketches are in the Performance Specification document for this project. This project is being conducted as a non-CERCLA maintenance action. This plan is an appendix to the QA plan for the ORNL Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. ORNL/ER-225, which is the source of the project QA requirements, tailors those QA requirements to the specific needs of this project as defined in ORNL/ER-225. Project-specific description and organization are also provided in this plan. Appendix B, Records Management Plan, is included

  3. Problem-oriented system of design of technology of equipment dismantling at NPP units decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles for construction of the problem-oriented system for designing the NPP equipment dismantling technology during power unit decommissioning are considered. The rules of the design space organization and use basing on application of the information and expert methods taking into account the action of the factors characterizing the technology functioning medium effects are applied as initial elements for the system construction. The general scheme for building the models used when developing the equipment dismantling technology is described in details. It is shown that the technological principles of conducting the works connected with the equipment dismantling are mostly determined by the work volumes. The basic variant of NPP power unit decommissioning under modern conditions in Russia involves safe monitored storage with final reactor dismantling after long time period (for 30-100 years) in order to provide its components activity decreasing due to natural radioactive nuclide decays. At that the main condition for dismantling technology functioning is following the radiation safety requirements for personnel, population and environment

  4. Implementation of an Architecture for the Dismantling Digital Mock-up System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is necessary to forecast the various dismantling activities prior to dismantling nuclear facilities by using various software instead of a physical mock-up system because the dismantling in a contaminated with radioactivity cause the results of an unexpected situation. The component that needs to develop a dismantling mock-up system was examined. There are many component systems such as a decommissioning database system, 3D dosimetric mapping that represents a distribution of a radionuclide contamination, a component of modeling for nuclear facility and devices include the decontamination and decommissioning. The research of software architecture about these components was carried out because these component systems that have been independently doesn't describe not only to visual an activities of Decontamination and Decommissioning(D and D) but also to evaluate it. The result was established an architecture that consist of an visualization module which could be visualized an D and D activities and a simulation module which can be evaluated a dismantling schedule and decommissioning cost.

  5. Conversion of the turbine building of the Rheinsberg NPP into a transport assembly hall, synthesis of dismantling, new building and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceptual planning of the conversion of the turbine building into a transport assembly hall is complete, and work on the project has started. At the same time available studies on the state of contamination of the systems and plants in the turbine building and on technical details are continued. In conformity with the licencing concept for the decommissioning of the Rheinsberg NPP, the ''licence for decommissioning and partial dismantling'' has been applied for. A safety report and supplementary reports have been presented to the competent licencing authority. At present demands made by that authority on the basis of the documents submitted are worked off. (ORIG.)

  6. Remote dismantlement tasks for the CP5 reactor: Implementation, operations, and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a developer's perspective on lessons learned from one example of the integration of new prototype technology into a traditional operations environment. The dual arm work module was developed by the Robotics Technology Development Program as a research and development activity to examine manipulator controller modes and deployment options. It was later reconfigured for the dismantlement of the Argonne National Laboratory Chicago Pile number-sign 5 reactor vessel as the crane-deployed dual arm work platform. Development staff worked along side operations staff during a significant part of the deployment to provide training, maintenance, and tooling support. Operations staff completed all actual remote dismantlement tasks. At the end of available development support funding, the Dual Arm Work Platform was turned over to the operations staff, who is still using it to complete their dismantlement tasks

  7. Drafting of the dismantling operations of the MAR 200 workshop with the help of virtual reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to optimize future dismantling operations of nuclear installations virtual reality allows the validation of predefined scenarios and their adequacy with the environment. CEA uses an immersion and interactive room to validate maintenance and dismantling operations. The equipment of this room is composed of a video wall that gives a 3-dimensional view of the virtual environment, and of a system for motion capture. For the simulation of handling operations a haptic interface has been designed, it allows the user to receive a tactic and effort-feeling feed back. The immersion is completed by a phonic ambience that creates sounds for virtual operations. The use of the immersion room for optimizing the dismantling of a spent fuel dissolver (MAR 200) used in hot cell is presented. (A.C.)

  8. Rockwell International Hot Laboratory decontamination and dismantlement interim progress report 1987-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OAK A271 Rockwell International Hot Laboratory decontamination and dismantlement interim progress report 1987-1996. The Rockwell International Hot Laboratory (RIHL) is one of a number of former nuclear facilities undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The RIHL facility is in the later stages of dismantlement, with the final objective of returning the site location to its original natural state. This report documents the decontamination and dismantlement activities performed at the facility over the time period 1988 through 1996. At this time, the support buildings, all equipment associated with the facility, and the entire above-ground structure of the primary facility building (Building 020) have been removed. The basement portion of this building and the outside yard areas (primarily asphalt and soil) are scheduled for D and D activities beginning in 1997

  9. Manually-Operated Crate Dismantlement System for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory currently possesses between 500 and 800 fiberglass-reinforced plywood crates that contain hazardous materials that need to be decontaminated. To access the hazardous material, a system is needed to dismantle the crate. Currently, crates are dismantled by workers using hand-held tools. This technique has numerous disadvantages. One disadvantage is that it is difficult for a worker to hold the tool for an extended period of time in the awkward angles and positions necessary to fully size-reduce the crate. Other disadvantages of using hand tools include managing power cords and vacuum hoses, which become entangled or can act as tripping hazards. In order to improve the crate opening and size-reduction task, Florida International University's Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) is developing a manually operated crate dismantlement system. This versatile system is expected to greatly increase worker efficiency while decreasing fatigue and the possibility of accidents. (authors)

  10. Decommissioning and dismantling of the national medical cyclotron - a radiation protection perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Medical Cyclotron at Camperdown Sydney ceased operations in October 2009 after producing medical isotopes for application in nuclear medicine for approximately 19 years. ANSTO commenced the decommissioning and dismantling of the cyclotron in January 2011 after approval was given by ARPANSA following a detailed submission process. The radiation protection aspects of the decommissioning and dismantling of the 30 Mev National Medical Cyclotron by ANSTO and external contractors are described in this paper. This includes the preparation of a radiation protection plan, activation analysis of the cyclotron and its components and estimating individual and collective doses from available radiological data. The paper will also look at the planning and risk assessment of various work tasks performed, health physics monitoring and controls (both physical and administrative) and a review of individual and collective doses received during the dismantling process. Finally we will go through the challenges, issues and a review of the outcomes.

  11. Decommissioning: dismantling of thickwalled steel structures using the contact-arc-metal-drilling technique. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1. Status of the technology: Today austenitic steel components with a material thickness of more than 200 mm cannot be cut surely by using conventional thermal cutting techniques. A reduction of the wall thickness, by using an effective cutting technique with low restoring forces, is necessary but not available, now. 2. Objectives: Target of the project was the qualification of the thermal contact-arc-metal-drilling technique, based on the contact-arc-metal-cutting technique for the reduction of the wall thickness of steel components in preparation for other cutting techniques to finish the dismantling task if necessary. 3. Methode: Development of the contact-arc-metal-drilling technique for the production of deep (>200 mm) blind holes with non-circular cross sections. Optimization of the drilling parameters and quantification of the released emissions under a radiological aspect. Development of a monitoring system for the electrode wear and a device for changing weared electrodes automatically. 4. Result: The contact-arc-metal-drilling technique was qualified by producing blind holes with a depth of 230 mm. The aerosols, hydrosols and gas emissions of the process were quantified and various monitoring techniques for the wear of the electrode were tested. A pneumatically aided clamping and changing device for electrodes was designed and tested. 5. Applications: The designed clamping device with its integrated pneumatically aided electrode release can be adapted directly to a tool guiding machine. Using this cutting technique steel components with a material thickness of 230 mm can be reduced to a remaining wall thickness and the released emissions can be estimated. (orig.)

  12. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the frame of the dismantling of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During construction and maintenance of nuclear facilities PCB (polychlorinated biphenyls) containing paints were used in a large extent in the past. The WAK dismantling and disposal Company has dismantles such facilities and identified the PCB in the buildings. Besides the radionuclides the conventional hazardous material group of the PCBs has also to be disposed. The respective legal regulations have to be considered. In the frame of the contribution the radiological release of building structures with respect to re-use or demolition and residual PCB containing materials is discussed. The radiological disposal in final repositories and the conventional disposal regulations for releasable residual wastes are reported.

  13. Transport and the dismantling of nuclear facilities; Les transports lies a la deconstruction des installations nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartenstein, M.

    2011-11-15

    Transport is not a real limiting constraint for the dismantling of nuclear facility if transport is taking into account very early in the dismantling process since numerous packages in various sizes already exist. For instance the TN-Gemini package allows the constitution of B-type packages for high radioactive level wastes, its volume capacity of about 16 m{sup 3} can store up to 5.8 tones of wastes, its external dimensions make it look like a sea container. One difficulty would be to find the adequate waste classification for a package containing heterogeneous wastes. (A.C.)

  14. Demontage and dismantling of radioactive lightning rods and storage of sup 6 sup 0 Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive lightning rods containing radioactive sources of 60 Co are still situated on different objects. In this paper the procedure for their elimination is described. Given are some details regarding the demontage, dismantling and storage of the radioactive sources. The whole procedure should be taken for the protection of the safety and radiation protection. Special care should be taken for the protection of the personnel engaged as well as the mode of the storage of the sources. Given are the constructions of the equipment for the dismantling and of the container for their temporary storage. (author)

  15. Days of dismantling activities of installations and rehabilitation of contaminated sites in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of these days, organized by the section environment of the French society of radiation protection, is to present a panorama of the activities of nuclear installations dismantling and contaminated sites rehabilitation in France, by leaning in the same time on practical cases and by stating the French rule and the national and international recommendations on the subject. These days have also for object to approach the stakes associated with the sectors of waste management and the materials generated by these activities and in a more general way, the stakes to come for the different actors of the dismantling and the rehabilitation. (N.C.)

  16. Health and Safety Considerations Associated with Sodium-Cooled Experimental Nuclear Fuel Dismantlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvo, Alan E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Between the mid-1970s and the mid-1980s Sandia National Laboratory constructed eleven experimental assemblies to simulate debris beds formed in a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. All but one of the assemblies were irradiated. The experimental assemblies were transferred to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in 2007 and 2008 for storage, dismantlement, recovery of the uranium for reuse in the nuclear fuel cycle, and disposal of unneeded materials. This paper addresses the effort to dismantle the assemblies down to the primary containment vessel and repackage them for temporary storage until such time as equipment necessary for sodium separation is in place.

  17. U P1, an example for advanced techniques applied to high level activity dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U P1 plant on the CEA Marcoule site was dedicated to the processing of spend fuels from the G1, G2 and G3 plutonium-producing reactors. This plant represents 20.000 m2 of workshops housing about 1000 hot cells. In 1998, a huge program for the dismantling and cleaning-up of the UP1 plant was launched. CEA has developed new techniques to face the complexity of the dismantling operations. These techniques include immersive virtual reality, laser cutting, a specific manipulator arm called MAESTRO and remote handling. (A.C.)

  18. The PCR (Prévessin Control Room), scene of some of the greatest moments in CERN's history, is being dismantled to prepare for a complete overhaul.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Removal manager Claes Frisk (right on picture 02) in the almost entirely dismantled PCR, together with René Ballet, who installed the racks in the 1970s and today is responsible for dismantling them.

  19. Investigation and design of the dismantling process of irradiation capsules containing tritium. 2. Detailed design and trial fabrication of capsule dismantling apparatus and investigation of glove box facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-pile functional tests of breeding blankets have been planned by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), using a test blanket module (TBM) which will be loaded in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). In preparation for the in-pile functional tests, JAEA has been performing irradiation experiments of lithium titanate (Li2TiO3), which is the first candidate of solid breeder materials for the blanket of the demonstration reactor (DEMO) under designing in Japan. The present report describes 1) results of a detailed design and trial fabrication tests of a dismantling apparatus for irradiation capsules which were used in irradiation experiments by the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) of JAEA, and 2) results of a preliminary investigation of a glove box facility for post-irradiation examinations (PIEs). In the detailed design of the dismantling apparatus, detailed specifications and the installation methods were examined, based on results of a conceptual design and basic design which were carried out before the present work. In the trial fabrication, cutting tests were curried out by making a mockup of a cutting component, which is a key component of the dismantling apparatus, as well as some simulated JMTR irradiation capsules. Good cutting performance was attained by optimizing the cutting speed, through repeated reviews of the results of the trial fabrication tests. In addition, improvement of the capsule clamping mechanism brought a prospect for feasibility of the apparatus in terms of operational convenience such as setting and removal, respectively, of the capsule before and after the cutting. Furthermore, a preliminary investigation of a glove box facility was carried out in order to secure a facility for PIE work after the capsule dismantling, which revealed a technical feasibility. (author)

  20. A state-of-the art on the dismantling techniques for the KRR-1 and 2 decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of the dismantling technology of such countries with decommissioning experience as Germany, Japan, USA and Belgium, was investigated on the appropriate selection for the dismantling method on the Korean Research Reactors 1 and 2(KRR- 1 and 2) decommissioning program. Especially, the cutting technology and its application were inspected for effective dismantling of the metal and concrete in the nuclear facilities. The cutting technology was largely divided into thermal, mechanical and electrical method and the status of its development was studied by each nations. And the status of the remote controlled dismantling technology by using a robot manipulation system in USA was investigated, and this technology also was compared with the manual work about the effect on the reduction of the worker exposure and saving the cost. In addition, the applicability of the dismantling technology to Korean Research Reactor 1 and 2

  1. Zambia : The Enterprise Development Project

    OpenAIRE

    P. C. Mohan

    2007-01-01

    The Enterprise Development Project (EDP) - 1998-2003 - was designed to support, with a credit of US$ 45 million, Zambia's Economic Reform Program that began in 1991. One of the key aspects of this reform program was to dismantle traditional state-supported enterprise development mechanisms and replace these with market-determined enterprise development structures. Three specific objectives...

  2. Visualization of a dismantling environment for an evaluation of a worker's dose during the decommissioning of KRR-1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a basis for an optimization of a dismantling process of a research reactor and nuclear facility. An optimization of a dismantling process should be at the beginning of a study for an evaluation of the radioactivity inventory and the safety of the workers. Many countries have conducted an optimization to achieve a shortened dismantling schedule, a reduction of the amount of waste, and cut down on the decommissioning by using computer graphics such as animation, simulation, and virtual reality. In the present study, we propose methods for identifying the existence of radioactivity which is contained in the dismantled objects and for evaluating a worker's dose through a simulation. To evaluate a worker's external dose under a virtual dismantling environment generated by computer graphics, the shape of the thermal column horizontal door was created by 3D CAD and the radiation dose surrounding the door was calculated by using MCNP-4C. An animation that can demonstrate a dismantling procedure according to a dismantling scenario was produced. For matching the radiation dose, which was calculated by MCNP-4C with an area where workers are dismantling a door, a simulation module was developed which could show a worker's external dose in real-time. The result from the distribution of the radioactivity enables us to specify where the most contaminated part of the dismantling objects is. In the animation, a virtual worker demonstrated a dismantling activity procedure as a chosen scenario. In the simulation, a worker's exposure dose rate in real-time has been evaluated

  3. Decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear installations - The perspective from the OECD/NEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Member countries of the OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency are among those that were involved in the earliest developments of nuclear technology in the 1940's and 1950's. They thus have a range of plants and equipment that has now served its purpose and needs to be decommissioned and dismantled. Decommissioning of all types of nuclear fuel cycle facilities can and has been done. The decommissioning and dismantling (D and D) work done on earlier facilities has provided a substantial body of knowledge and experience over a wide range of complex technical issues, but the requirement now is to apply the available techniques to the D and D of the larger commercial facilities. A new range of challenges opens up as the more modern nuclear power programmes mature and large commercial nuclear power plants approach the end of their useful life by reason of age, economics or change of policy on the use of nuclear power. The scale of such challenges may be judged from the fact that over 400 nuclear power plants have been constructed and operated world-wide, most of them in NEA member countries. Given an average planned operating life span of 30 to 40 years and given that the average age of nuclear power plants is, at present, about 15 years, the rate of withdrawal from service will peak some time after 2015. The peak will, however, be sometime later if the tendency to extend operating lifetimes continues. The statistical distribution is wide, anyhow, with some countries having already retired certain commercial nuclear power plants from service, and having even decommissioned and dismantled them in some cases, whilst in other countries it will be some years before any plants are retired. We have some time to prepare, but not indefinite time and it can be expected that a decommissioning industry will grow even stronger than what it is today. In addition to technical issues, plans and procedures will need to address other major issues associated with impacts on society and the

  4. Installation dismantling system, working process and hood utilizable in this system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The system for dismantling an installation under a controlled atmosphere is made by a tool polluting the atmosphere, a gas blanket creating a continement zone around the tool, an extractor removing polluted gas from the zone, a purifier for the extracted gas and a controller regulating the flow of gas in the blanket and keeping the installation at constant pressure

  5. The radiological consequences of delaying the final dismantling of a Magnox nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The timing of the final dismantling process after shutdown and decommissioning of Magnox power stations will depend on balancing the need to reuse the site against the advantages of allowing residual radioactivity to decay. A delay of 130 years would reduce the dose commitment to dismantling staff as far as practicable and remove the need to depend on robotic systems. This in turn would lead to cost savings of about Pound 800M, at 1986 prices, totalled over all the CEGB's Magnox power. If final dismantling were to be delayed, it is intended that the residual reactor building would be maintained in a sealed, weathertight condition, and it is confidently expected that this will be achieved. This report investigates the consequences of any failure in this containment using, as a demonstration of the robustness of the radiological case for delay, some extreme scenarios in which the nuclear island is presumed to have collapsed. To demonstrate the robustness of the case for delay, the radiological consequences over a time period, which is roughly one order of magnitude both greater and smaller than the 130 y optimum are considered. The radiological consequences which might result, over a 1500 year period, from the leakage of radioactive materials from the reactor structure in the event that final dismantling were to be delayed are determined. Any engineering constraints which these radiological consequences might impose are discussed. (author)

  6. Dismantling of JPDR reactor internals by underwater plasma arc cutting technique using robotic manipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The actual dismantling of JPDR started on December 4, 1986. As of now, equipment that surrounds the reactor has mostly been removed to provide working space in reactor containment prior to the dismantling of reactor internals. Some reactor internals have been successfully dismantled using the underwater arc cutting system with a robotic manipulator during the period of January to March 1988. The cutting system is composed of an underwater plasma arc cutting device and a robotic manipulator. The cut off reactor internals were core spray block, feedwater sparger and stabilizers for fuel upper grid tube. The plasma arc cutting device was developed to dismantle the reactor internals underwater. It mainly consists of a plasma torch, power and gas supply systems for the torch, and by-product treatment systems. It has the cutting ability of 130 mm thickness stainless steel underwater. The robotic manipulator has seven degrees of freedom of movement, enabling it to move in almost the same way as the arm of a human being. The arm of the robot is mounted on a supporting device which is suspended by three chains from the support structure set on a service floor. A plasma torch is griped by the robotic hand; its position to the structure to be cut is controlled from a remote control room, about 100 meters outside the reactor containment

  7. Dismantling of nuclear power plants: the audit office calls EdF to order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The audit office has questioned Electricite de France (EdF) about its capacity to finance the dismantling operation of its nuclear power plants and the long-term management of radioactive wastes. The French government, who is the last responsible parties, must clarify this situation in particular in the prospect of a partial privatization of EdF. Short paper. (J.S.)

  8. Value estimation of end of life vehicles as a source of competitive advantage for dismantling station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Kosacka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available   Background: End of Life vehicles become an emerging problem because of the type of waste which they are. Each country is creating own recycling network where ELVs are well secured and recycled. Poland is a country where the system is not working correct because of a high absorption of ELVs by illegal dismantling entities which are more competitive than legal elements of recycling network. The problem is well known but there is still lack of solution. The purpose of this article is to present the concept of tools for the valuation of ELVs in order to improve the competitiveness of disassembly stations. Methods: The research methodology consists of a literature review as well as observations, surveys, BPMN and UML diagrams. On the basis of literature review and observations the problem was identified. The surveys were elaborated in order to identify requirements for the concept of the tool. BPMN and UML diagrams were used to model the processes in dismantling station and the information flow between the user and the tool. Results: There was established a concept of the tool - ELV's Calculator which support decisions of ELV's value estimation. Conclusions: Improving competitiveness of legal dismantling station is extremely important issue in order to provide safe for Environment and People and economically justified ELVs' management. Legal entities have to follow the law what makes their business cost higher. This paper provides a solution of encouraging people to return ELVs to legal dismantlers by offering them price adequate to market demand.    

  9. Design approach of irradiated sample/capsule dismantling machine for use in hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main job of designing a machine for purpose boils down to a selection process from the available tools/techniques satisfactory to the five issues noted above. The paper deals with the dismantling of a typical irradiated capsule of 50R/hr

  10. Deny, Distance, or Dismantle? How White Americans Manage a Privileged Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Eric D; Lowery, Brian S; Chow, Rosalind M; Unzueta, Miguel M

    2014-11-01

    Social scientists have traditionally argued that whiteness-the attribute of being recognized and treated as a White person in society-is powerful because it is invisible. On this view, members of the racially dominant group have the unique luxury of rarely noticing their race or the privileges it confers. This article challenges this "invisibility thesis," arguing that Whites frequently regard themselves as racial actors. We further argue that whiteness defines a problematic social identity that confronts Whites with 2 psychological threats: the possibility that their accomplishments in life were not fully earned (meritocratic threat) and the association with a group that benefits from unfair social advantages (group-image threat). We theorize that Whites manage their racial identity to dispel these threats. According to our deny, distance, or dismantle (3D) model of White identity management, dominant-group members have three strategies at their disposal: deny the existence of privilege, distance their own self-concepts from the White category, or strive to dismantle systems of privilege. Whereas denial and distancing promote insensitivity and inaction with respect to racial inequality, dismantling reduces threat by relinquishing privileges. We suggest that interventions aimed at reducing inequality should attempt to leverage dismantling as a strategy of White identity management. PMID:26186110

  11. Adaptation of high pressure water jets with abrasives for nuclear installations dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the work realized for adjust the cutting technology with high pressure water jet with abrasives for nuclear installation dismantling. It has necessited the conception and the adjustement of a remote tool and the realization of cutting tests with waste produce analysis. This technic can be ameliorated with better viewing systems and better fog suction systems

  12. Process for dismantling of burnt-up nuclear reactor fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to dismantle burnt-up fuel elements made from zirconium alloys, these are hydrated in a hydrogen atmosphere at 300-4000C and after cooling are broken up in a breaking machine, making use of their brittleness. This scrap is then taken for reprocessing. (orig.)

  13. Sustainable design for automotive products: dismantling and recycling of end-of-life vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jin; Chen, Ming

    2014-02-01

    The growth in automotive production has increased the number of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) annually. The traditional approach ELV processing involves dismantling, shredding, and landfill disposal. The "3R" (i.e., reduce, reuse, and recycle) principle has been increasingly employed in processing ELVs, particularly ELV parts, to promote sustainable development. The first step in processing ELVs is dismantling. However, certain parts of the vehicle are difficult to disassemble and use in practice. The extended producer responsibility policy requires carmakers to contribute in the processing of scrap cars either for their own developmental needs or for social responsibility. The design for dismantling approach can be an effective solution to the existing difficulties in dismantling ELVs. This approach can also provide guidelines in the design of automotive products. This paper illustrates the difficulty of handling polymers in dashboards. The physical properties of polymers prevent easy separation and recycling by using mechanical methods. Thus, dealers have to rely on chemical methods such as pyrolysis. Therefore, car designers should use a single material to benefit dealers. The use of materials for effective end-of-life processing without sacrificing the original performance requirements of the vehicle should be explored. PMID:24326159

  14. Remotely-Controlled Shear for Dismantling Highly Radioactive Tools In Rokkasho Vitrification Facility - 12204

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-level liquid waste vitrification facility in the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) is right in the middle of hot commissioning tests toward starting operation in fall of 2012. In these tests, various tools were applied to address issues occurring in the vitrification cell. Because of these tools' unplanned placement in the cell it has been necessary to dismantle and dispose of them promptly. One of the tools requiring removal is a rod used in the glass melter to improve glass pouring. It is composed of a long rod made of Inconel 601 or 625 and has been highly contaminated. In order to dismantle these tools and to remotely put them in a designated waste basket, a custom electric shear machine was developed. It was installed in a dismantling area of the vitrification cell by remote cranes and manipulators and has been successfully operated. It can be remotely dismantled and placed in a waste basket for interim storage. This is a very good example of a successful deployment of a specialty remote tool in a hot cell environment. This paper also highlights how commissioning and operations are done in the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant. (authors)

  15. ''1995/2010: site drainage and nuclear facilities dismantling program'' result 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A drainage and dismantling planing with the corresponding wastes management, has been decided for the CEA of Fontenay aux roses, in 1995. It will end in 2010. This document presents the main evolutions occurred since october 2000. (A.L.B.)

  16. Education and research when dismantling nuclear plants at the Technical University Dresden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the decision by the German government in 2011 to revoke the operating permission from 8 of the existing 17 German nuclear power plants, the responsibility of decommissioning and dismantling these plants has moved back into the focus of public awareness. Under the current legal conditions, the last nuclear plant will be disconnected from the grid on 31.12.2022 and this will create an enormous challenge for all the involved approving authorities, expert organisations, as well as companies involved in dismantling the plants. The development of new and efficient dismantling technologies and strategies is required to perform these highly responsible tasks. On the other hand, the nuclear competence and knowhow, as well as the promotion of young talents in the relevant scientific fields must be preserved. Technological and economic solutions are in demand for the various plants due to the different specifics of nuclear power plants. This will still require e.g. in the field of radiation protection highly qualified and well trained staff in future. The training of these skilled employees will require expanding the subject matter taught at universities, colleges and polytechnics to suit the changed parameters. The chair for hydrogen and nuclear energy technology at the TU Dresden will in future offer lectures as part of a new teaching discipline with the focus on dismantling and disposal. The course 'Dismantling nuclear power plants' took place for the first time in the summer semester 2013. It is organised as a three-day block seminar with an excursion to the company NIS Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH in Alzenau. The company NIS is a subsidiary of the Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH. This article intends to provide an overview of the contents of the courses and the impressions of the participants. In this way the TU Dresden is making a further contribution to preserving nuclear competence and inter-disciplinary dialogue. (orig.)

  17. Radiological impact of very slightly radioactive copper and aluminium recovered from dismantled nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is in keeping with a large evaluation of doses likely to be received by public and non nuclear workers when dismantling nuclear installations. A bibliographic study and inquiries are realized, in the nuclear field to evaluate quantities of very slightly radioactive materials, in the conventional copper and aluminium recovery fields: waste recovery, metal refinery and processing, occupational or domestic uses of the metals or their alloys. In fact copper and aluminium waste arising from the dismantling of nuclear installations are mainly electrical cables constituents including insulation material which is mainly polyvinyle chloride (PVC). Estimated quantities are relatively low compared to steel quantities arising from dismantling. The study is based on the hypothesis of two PWRs dismantled per year, estimated quantities are 200 tonnes of copper, 40 tonnes of aluminium and 500 tonnes of PVC. A special case is also studied, which is the dismantling of low and medium uranium enrichment plant in Pierrelatte (France); the plant pipework is mainly made of an aluminium and magnesium alloy: AG3. From these informations, one can define exposure scenarios which may occur with a non negligible probability. The doses likely to be received under the foreseen conditions are calculated. Reference doses are established from recommendations of international organisations as ICRP, IAEA, NEA. Comparing the calculated doses and the reference doses, the activity level of the initial waste can be deduced as to follow the recommendations. The mean specific activity of main beta-gamma emitters in copper, aluminium and PVC are of the same order of magnitude, 10Bq.g-1. In the case of alpha emitters specific activity levels depend on the material and on the radionuclide, from 2 Bq.g-1 to 10 Bq.g-1 in copper, from 10 Bq.g-1 to 50 Bq.g-1 in aluminium

  18. D and D projects trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This series of slides presents: 1 - the Various types of needs and types of operations in any D and D project, 2 - the strong variety of nuclear units to dismantle, 3 - the D and D dependence on nuclear operators' strategy (Immediate/Deferred dismantling), 4 - the demand for D and D services with respect to the ageing of the nuclear fleet, 5 - the impacts to come on the D and D environment due to the Fukushima accident, 6 - the geographical dependence of D and D demands, 7 - the different D and D choices from nuclear operators in the supply chain management, 8 - the key levers in a D and D project performance, 9 - Some key competencies in D and D, 10 - Risk management for both clients and suppliers in a D and D project, 11 - AREVA involvement in Fukushima project as a key demonstration of a critical D and D project management

  19. A study of a decommissioning activities classification structure for decommissioning of the project management of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning activities and requirements that was established in the planning stage should be organized systematically in the course of dismantling the NPP. The work breakdown structure is essential to ensuring that all the project scope is identified, estimated and executed. The project manager needs to ensure that a WBS is established early in the project and maintained throughout the project life cycle. A project management system is ongoing under the circumstance of having no experience dismantling the NPP. The system related to the NPP decommissioning should have technical criteria as well as regulatory requirements in the full scale of decommissioning stage. In the dismantling stage, decommissioning plan document should include the results of radiation/radioactivity characterization, evaluation of the amount of dismantled waste, calculation of the expose dose rate, evaluation of decommissioning cost and schedule after shutdown

  20. A study of a decommissioning activities classification structure for decommissioning of the project management of a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Seong; Park, Seung Kook; Jin, Hyung Gon; Song, Chan Ho; Ha, Jei Hyun; Moon, Jei kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Decommissioning activities and requirements that was established in the planning stage should be organized systematically in the course of dismantling the NPP. The work breakdown structure is essential to ensuring that all the project scope is identified, estimated and executed. The project manager needs to ensure that a WBS is established early in the project and maintained throughout the project life cycle. A project management system is ongoing under the circumstance of having no experience dismantling the NPP. The system related to the NPP decommissioning should have technical criteria as well as regulatory requirements in the full scale of decommissioning stage. In the dismantling stage, decommissioning plan document should include the results of radiation/radioactivity characterization, evaluation of the amount of dismantled waste, calculation of the expose dose rate, evaluation of decommissioning cost and schedule after shutdown.

  1. Dismantlement and decontamination of a plutonium-238 facility at SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been very little, documented decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) experience on which to project cleanup costs and schedules for plutonium facilities at SRS and other DOE sites. A portion of the HB-Line, a plutonium-238 processing facility at SRS, has been undergoing D ampersand D intermittently since 1984. Although this cleanup effort was not originally intended to quantify results, some key data have been project has demonstrated effective methods of accumulated, and the performing D ampersand D work, and has demonstrated cleanup equipment and techniques under conditions of high contamination. Plutonium facilities where D ampersand D is already underway provide an opportunity for' timely field testing of characterization, size reduction, and decontamination techniques. Some data are presented here; however, more specific tests and data may be obtained during the remainder of this project. This project has been recommended as a candidate test facility for a DOE planned ''Integrated D ampersand D Demonstration'' managed by EM-50 to develop and demonstrate technology for D ampersand D and surplus facilities deactivation. Both the remainder of this project and the Integrated D ampersand D Demonstration Program can benefit from a joint effort, and the, overall costs should be reduced

  2. Project Feedback Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the financial responsibility of the Karlsruhe Research Center 5 reactors and 1 reprocessing plant are being decommissioned with these activities reaching a total volume of 2 billion Euros. Three reactor projects have already been completed: The FR 2 research reactor is in the state of safe enclosure i.e., only the reactor pressure vessel and its internals are in place. Apart from that the reactor building is empty. The reactors KKN and HDR have been dismantled completely and the sites have been re-cultivated (green field) again. The state of the other projects are as follows: - Multi Purpose Research Reactor (MZFR): remote controlled dismantling of the reactor vessel and internals; - Compact Sodium Cooled Reactor (KNK): installation of the equipment for the remote controlled dismantling of the reactor tank and its internals; - Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant (WAK): decontamination of the process cells, construction of a vitrification facility for the treatment of the high-active waste concentrate (HAWC) and commission of the equipment for the segmentation of the HAWC storage tanks. The experience gained so far with regard to the technology applied and the licensing procedure will be described and discussed in the paper. The decommissioning progress is decisively determined by the direct treatment and disposal of the generated radioactive wastes. The FZK facilities and processing units available for this purpose will be also presented. Furthermore, the consequences of establishing specific organizational units as well as of a consistent project management will be outlined. (author)

  3. Laser dismantling of PHWR spent fuel bundles and decladding of fuel pins in the highly radioactive hot cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: For reprocessing of PHWR fuel, fuel bundles are at present chopped mechanically into small pieces of pins using high tonnage mechanical press before dissolution. The existing method of bundle dismantling is purely mechanical using very high force for chopping. A laser based automated bundle dismantling system is developed. In the system, end-plates of bundle, which holds the fuel pins together, are cut using Nd-YAG laser to separate the bundles into pins. In addition to pin separation, the pins are to be chopped into small pieces using a small mechanical chopper. Since the spent fuel is highly radioactive, all these operations are performed remotely in hot cells. Post irradiation examination also requires dismantling of bundles into pins so that they can select the pins for the further examinations. In both these applications laser dismantling remains the most. important step and this system has been developed and tested. This paper describes the experience gained during the development efforts

  4. Discussions on JNC roles and issues on management and disposition of surplus plutonium from the dismantlement of nuclear warhead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) and Russian Federation are now promoting the collaborative project to use the fast breeder reactor of BN-600 for the Russian surplus plutonium under the framework of the bilateral agreement on peaceful use of atomic energy. Based upon this background, JNC organized a study group to survey the world aspect on surplus plutonium resulting in START (Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty). The study group, including technical experts and also experts on international affairs, made a report after their survey and gave wide range discussion on various issues. The surplus plutonium of Russian Federation was estimated to be 102 - 136 tones. There were shortages of back end technologies in Russian infrastructures for dismantling, reprocessing and disposition of the surplus plutonium. A supporting leadership of USA to Russian Federation met some difficulties due to the strategic gap between both countries. One of the examples is the temporal evolution of USA attitude toward the CANDU (thermal power reactors of Canadian design characterized by heavy water moderator, pressure tube construction, and on-power refuelling) option to use surplus plutonium as MOX (Mixed OXide) fuels. Additional supports from the G8 (Group of eight) countries except USA and Russian Federation came up to their expectation. For examples, the joint group of French, German and Russian is promoting DEMOX (Demonstration of MOX fuel) project but is on the way to discussion depending on various thoughts about mutual benefits. Many issues remained in joint project with CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States), such as safeguard, nonproliferation, energy supply and demand, and environmental impacts. In addition, public opinions will give some impacts to policy makers, especially in USA. This report had analyzed many viewpoints for technical and political issues on surplus plutonium in the world, and pointed out consequences, merits and demerits after possible many

  5. Radiation protection aspects of established dismantling and decontamination technologies. Information and experiences from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities; Strahlenschutzaspekte gaengiger Abbau- und Dekontaminationstechniken. Informationen und Erfahrungen aus der Stilllegung kerntechnischer Anlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaulard, Joerg; Brendebach, Boris; Strub, Erik

    2010-12-15

    The report covers the following topics: the concept of an idealized dismantling technology selection process, examples on aspects of the dismantling strategy,features of dismantling and decontamination technologies in the frame of radiation protection aspects, examples of dismantling technologies based on the features of the German decommissioning practice (NPPs Greifswald, Wuergassen, Stade, Gundremmingen, research reactors Kahl, KNK and MZFR) experiences on radiation protection aspects with decontamination and dismantling technologies.

  6. Strategies for the disposition of high explosives resulting from dismantlement of nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many thousands of pounds of high quality main-charge explosives will result as surplus from the dismantlement of returns from the US nuclear weapons stockpile. The method most often employed for dealing with this surplus explosive is destruction by open burning. However, open burning as a means of treating excess explosives is losing favor because of environmental concerns associated with such an uncontrolled thermal destruction process. Thus, alternative processes for treatment of excess explosives from weapon dismantlement is discussed. These alternatives include: reformulation, crystalline component recovery, chemical conversion of the crystalline component to higher value products which may have civilian or military applications and, when necessary, treatment as waste in an environmentally benign fashion

  7. Radiation monitoring during the last stage of the dismantling of the system in the CIEMAT-04

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various operations which include the removal of irradiated fuel storage ten wells have been during this final stage. The SPR has established since the start of these operations a radiological surveillance program of workers that includes the use of official external dosimetry and direct-reading, and the control of internal contamination (direct and indirect measurements), in addition to daily monitoring of environmental pollution and external contamination. After decontamination and dismantling operations, there are plans to tackle the final characterisation of the installation and the declassification of the material generated as declassificable. As stage one of these processes has been developed an isotope-type from the analytical results of samples operational s taken from the Home of this last stage of dismantling. (Author)

  8. Regulatory supervision of the radiation protection and release during the dismantling of the German NPP Wuergassen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NPP Wuergassen (KWW) is a commercial, single unit boiling water reactor with a capacity of 670 MWel. It was commissioned by PreussenElektra and constructed by AEG/KWU between 1968 and 1971. This NPP was finally shut down in 1994. The decommissioning, started in April 1997, is still under progress. Up to now, approx. 9,500 Mg of various materials (e.g. metal scrap, cable, concrete) have been deconstructed and released from the site. In this paper we describe the contribution from the authority and the independent expert during the radiological characterisation, the dismantling work, and the material flow up to the release. Special focus will be on the necessary control steps and the documentation regarding the dismantling work and the procedure of release. There is always a close fit between the radiation protection and the release of material on the basis of the radiological characterisation. (authors)

  9. Decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear reactors and nuclear spent fuel interim storage in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors visited Germany in April 2013 to investigate state of reactor decommissioning and dismantling and interim storage of spent fuels reflecting nuclear power phaseout policy after the Fukushima accident. They visited interim storage facilities of radioactive wastes (ZLN, Zwischenlanger Nord) and central active workshop (ZAW, Zentrale Aktive Werkstatt) at Greifswald, and interim storage facilities of spent fuels at Philippsburg. CASTOR (Cask for Storage and Transport of Radioactive Material) was used for interim storage of spent fuels and high-level wastes for 40 years. Amount of wastes produced by decommissioning and dismantling was estimated 1800 ktons consisting of 1200 ktons non-radioactive and 600 ktons radioactive wastes, 500 ktons of which could be decontaminated less than clearance level and 100 ktons of which were obliged to be stored as radioactive wastes. New geological repository site for high level radioactive wastes should be found and developed. (T. Tanaka)

  10. EDV supported dynamic fire protection concept adaptation during dismantling of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fire protection concepts are supposed to be a decision guide for the definition of measures and priorities in fire fighting and fire prevention. In case of reactor dismantling a fire protection concept for the actual status is required. Following the fuel removal from the reactor the protection goals are reduced to the safe confinement of radioactive materials and the restriction of radiation exposure. A dynamic fire protection concept was developed to allow the compliance with the required protection measures with respect to the protection targets. The implementation of the dynamic fire protection concept simplifies the planning of the dismantling steps and to adjust the fire protection measured in the frame of changes in the plant.

  11. Back to the green field - Niederaichbach nuclear power plant faces total dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following its shut-down in 1974, the Niederaichbach 100 MW nuclear power plant was placed in a state of 'Safe Containment'. Continuation of this heavy-water plant in this state was licensed by authorities in 1981. Safe containment as the first decommissioning step was effected with a view to cost minimization in order to maintain the plant in the licensed state as well as to have sufficient time for planning its complete dismantling and removal. Planning activities were concluded by now. Dismantling license may be expected to be issued at the beginning of 1986. Complete disassembly of the plant will furnish proof for safe technical control of nuclear power plants from 'the cradle to the grave'. (orig.)

  12. Review of dismantling activities in Europe and worldwide: Current state and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This analysis adopts deliberately the point of view of 'dismantling companies' and aims to draw up a coherent overview of the presentations made per country or major contractors. Aside from the programs, or intentions, that may have been published, its goal is to take stock of the actions undertaken in the last few years and the significant changes that have been observed. In view of the diversity of the 'business models', depending on whether research institutes, major electrical power companies or industrial companies in charge of fuel-related activities are involved, the objective of this presentation is also to assess the solutions retained on both a technical and industrial level for the entire 'de-construction sector'. In conclusion, this presentation seeks to highlight the major challenges that open dismantling industry will have to meet. (author)

  13. Development and evaluation of a dismantling planning support system based on augmented reality technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For this study, a Dismantling Planning Support System (DPSS) based on Augmented Reality technology was developed. Its effectiveness and applicability to a real working field were evaluated using a subjective experiment. The DPSS operators can simulate how to locate scaffolding and temporary enclosures (greenhouses) in a real dismantling field in order to decide their layout and to predict the amounts of necessary parts. An interview and questionnaire survey were conducted with Fugen Decommissioning Engineering Center (DEC) staff and a human interface expert, who used DPSS along with a scenario in which scaffolding and greenhouses were located in a turbine cooling water room of Fugen DEC. The experimental results show that the operation for locating the virtual scaffolding and greenhouses using marker boards is intuitive and comprehensive. However, additional research needs to be undertaken in order to improve the DPSS, particularly with respect to its graphical user interface. (author)

  14. Study on Evaluation of Project Management Data for Decommissioning of Uranium Refining and Conversion Plant - 12234

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of nuclear facilities that would no longer be required have been decommissioned in JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency). A lot of nuclear facilities have to be decommissioned in JAEA in near future. To implement decommissioning of nuclear facilities, it was important to make a rational decommissioning plan. Therefore, project management data evaluation system for dismantling activities (PRODIA code) has been developed, and will be useful for making a detailed decommissioning plan for an object facility. Dismantling of dry conversion facility in the uranium refining and conversion plant (URCP) at Ningyo-toge began in 2008. During dismantling activities, project management data such as manpower and amount of waste generation have been collected. Such collected project management data has been evaluated and used to establish a calculation formula to calculate manpower for dismantling equipment of chemical process and calculate manpower for using a green house (GH) which was a temporary structure for preventing the spread of contaminants during dismantling. In the calculation formula to calculate project management data related to dismantling of equipment, the relation of dismantling manpower to each piece of equipment was evaluated. Furthermore, the relation of dismantling manpower to each chemical process was evaluated. The results showed promise for evaluating dismantling manpower with respect to each chemical process. In the calculation formula to calculate project management data related to use of the GH, relations of GH installation manpower and removal manpower to GH footprint were evaluated. Furthermore, the calculation formula for secondary waste generation was established. In this study, project management data related to dismantling of equipment and use of the GH were evaluated and analyzed. The project management data, manpower for dismantling of equipment, manpower for installation and removal of GH, and secondary waste generation from GH were considered

  15. Closing down and dismantling of research - material testing - and teaching reactors. Stillegung und Beseitigung von Forschungs-, Materialpruef- und Unterrichtsreaktoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrasch, P.; Seidler, M.; Stasch, W.

    1983-02-01

    This study is subdivided in six topics: - determination of mass and radioactivity of the parts to be dismantled, - identification of future tasks of research and development, - estimation of radiation exposure for workers charged with dismantling, - determination of cost for closing-down and dismantling of research reactors. In total, 22 research-, materials testing- and traning reactors are taken into consideration here. Only those component that belong directly to the reactor proper plus the auxiliary - and service plants are dismantled. The reactor buildings will only be dismantled if the are a direct reactor component serving for example as a biological shield. The waste quantity created by closing-down and dismantling of all research reactors comes up to about 25200 Mg out of that 720 Mg are radioactive wastes. Planning and carrying out of closing-down and dismantling of all research reactors need about 4870 man-months the total cost will be about 86,4 Mio DM. There are vast differences between the individual research reactors. On 10 Mg will have to be disposed in the case of the Siemens training-reactor 100 (SUR-100) of which a very small share consists of radioactive waste; in the case of the research reactor Neuherberg (FRN) there are about 3500 Mg, about 94 Mg out of it is radioactive waste. The work needed per reactor varies between 26 man-months (SUR-100) and about 740 man-months (FRN). Costs for dosing-down and dismantling range between 0,4 Mio DM (SUR-100) and about 13 Mio DM (FRN).

  16. A working class critique to the bourgeois policies of dismantling the full tenure and perpetuating renewable contracts affecting library workers

    OpenAIRE

    Muela-Meza, Zapopan Martín

    2014-01-01

    This paper, “A working class critique to the bourgeois policies of dismantling the full tenure and perpetuating renewable contracts affecting library workers” analyses this research problem: What are some of the most adverse effects of the burgeois policies of their labor flexibility and precariousness by dismantling the lack of labor tenure and promotion, and by perpetuating the renewal of contracts affecting social and labor stability and thus their humane living conditions, health, and hap...

  17. Mobile Work Platform - A Fluor Fernald innovative dismantlement technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Decontamination and Decommissioning (D andD) Focus Area, led by the National Energy Technology Laboratory, has been charged with finding new and innovative D and D technologies and then validating through field demonstration that the technologies are safer, faster and/or more cost-effective. The D and D Focus Area's approach to verifying the benefits of the improved D and D technologies is to use them at DOE sites in large-scale demonstration and deployment (LSDD) projects. The DOE's Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), near Cincinnati Ohio, was host for a LSDD Project overseen by the D and D Focus Area. The FEMP was formerly engaged in the production of high quality uranium metal; and is now currently undergoing active environmental restoration, including removal of major process facilities. As observed during the D and D of Fernald's Plant 1, the baseline method for removing piping required laborers to work above the floor on ladders, scaffolding, ardor man-lifts with hand-held power tools. The pipe must first be rigged to prevent falling when cut. After cutting, the pipe is manually lowered to the ground and placed in a storage/disposal container. The Mobile Work Platform (MWP) consists of a mobile chassis, telescoping arm and a dual crimper/shear ''end-effecter''. It has the capability to grab and hold a pipe, crimp and shear the pipe (up to a ten-foot section) on either side of where it is being held and then lower and place the pipe section into a storage/disposal container. The MWP can crimp/shear up to a 6-inch diameter, schedule 401, carbon steel pipe. A single operator using a radio remote control operates the MWP. The paper will describe the results (productivity, safety advantages and lessons learned) during the Mobile Work Platform demonstration at Fernald

  18. Place of the final disposal of short lived dismantling waste; Plats foer slutfoervaring av kortlivat rivningsavfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-01-15

    This report deals with the short-lived low and intermediate level radioactive waste, which will mainly arise from the dismantling of the Swedish nuclear power plants, but also the dismantling of other nuclear facilities. For these installations to be dismantled, there must be the capacity to receive and dispose of dismantling waste. SKB plans to expand the existing final repository for short-lived radioactive waste (SFR) in Forsmark for this purpose. The legislation requires alternatives to the chosen location. The alternate location for the disposal of decommissioning waste SKB has chosen to compare with is a location in the Simpevarp area outside Oskarshamn. There are currently Oskarshamn nuclear power plant and SKB between stock 'CLAB'. The choice of Simpevarp as alternative location is based on that it's one of the places in the country where data on the bedrock is available to an extent that allows an assessment of the prospects for long-term security, such an assessment is actually showing good potential, and that the location provide realistic opportunities to put into practice the disposal of decommissioning waste. At a comparison between the disposal of short-lived decommissioning waste in an extension of SFR with the option to build a separate repository for short-lived decommissioning waste in Simpevarp, the conclusion is that both options offer potentially good prospects for long-term security. The differences still indicated speaks to the Forsmark advantage. Similar conclusions were obtained when comparing the factors of environment, health and social aspects.

  19. Radiological protection during the dismantling of Vandellos I nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spanish Nuclear Power Plant Vandellos I was a gas-cooled natural uranium reactor, located in Tarragona, which was stopped on 1989 after 17 years of operation. Furthermore, the Spanish National Radioactive Waste Management Company (ENRESA) was en charged of its dismantling. The plan proposed by ENRESA consisted of disassembling and demolishing the plant buildings and systems, with the exception of the concrete reactor shroud, which remained confined. From the radiological point of view the dismantling of any installation has several important characteristics as for example, the continue variations of the kind and level of the radiological and conventional risks or the interventions on equipment and systems on which the workers have never worked before. In addition, some of the protection systems, available during the operations are put out of service, and some of the workers are not accustomed to work on dismantling tasks. In this case, it was very important the presence of alpha emitters in air, more restrictive than beta-gamma emitters, that obliged to increase the protective measures and to implement specifics controls to detect, as soon as possible, internal contamination. In this paper the radiological programme implemented during the dismantling of Vandellos I is described, together the organization need to carried out the radiation protection activities. The ALARA techniques implemented to reduce the internal contamination of workers and to avoid the spread of contamination are analysed. The results obtained in terms of doses are also presented. The individual and collective doses were very low and very few positives results in alpha bio-analyses were obtained. (author)

  20. SGDES: Management system dismantling of ENRESA; SGDES: Sistema de gestion de desmantelamiento de ENRESA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julian, A. de; Fernandez, M.; Vidaechea, S.

    2013-07-01

    ENRESA, the Spanish public company responsible for managing radioactive waste and nuclear facilities decommissioning, has developed a management information system (SGDES) for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Dismantling activities require a rigorous operations control within highly specialized, process systematization and safety framework, both under human and technological point of view. SGDES system is capable of responding to the mentioned operational needs, efficiently and safely.

  1. Further retardation could lead to a hold-up of nuclear reactor dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following issues concerning the consequences of the German nuclear power phaseout are discussed: the cost of reactor dismantling could increase; the complete deconstruction of a nuclear power plant including environmental revitalization take a time of 10-15 years; the largest challenge is the still unsolved problem of final disposal; further retardations could trigger a complete deadlock of the deconstruction due to completely filled interim storage facilities. A further problem is the knowledge preservation due to the lack of students.

  2. Decommissioning and dismantling of 305-M test pile at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 305-M Test Pile was started up at the Savannah River Plant in 1952 and operated until 1981. The pile was used to measure the uranium content of reactor fuel. In 1984 work began to decommission and dismantle the pile. Extensive procedures were used that included a detailed description of the radiological controls and safety measures. These controls allowed the job to be completed with radiation doses as low as reasonably achievable

  3. Status of decommissioning of the Plutonium Fuel Fabrication Facility and R and Ds of dismantling technologies for gloveboxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Plutonium Fuel Fabrication Facility (PFFF) of the Plutonium Fuel Development Center in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency is now in its decommissioning phase. In the PFFF, development of MOX fuel fabrication technologies had been conduced through MOX fuel fabrication for reactors. Now, terminated gloveboxes have been dismantled. Gloveboxes to be dismantled are surrounded by a plastic enclosure to prevent from spreading contamination into process room. In this plastic enclosure, dismantling operations for gloveboxes are performed manually by workers, each wearing an air-feed suit. This dismantling methodology is technically well-established and relatively easy to implement. However, the mental and physical loads placed on workers wearing the air-feed suits are intensively high. Therefore, R and Ds on new dismantling technologies including utilization of heavy machines covered with plastic enclosure for anti-contamination have been started to reduce the potential risks associated with workers and decommissioning costs. This paper describes the status of decommissioning of the PFFF and the overview of developed dismantling technologies for α-tight gloveboxes. (author)

  4. Development of dismantling method for liquid waste tanks lined with rubber in 'Joyo' waste treatment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dismantling methods of liquid waste tanks lined with flammable natural rubber for decommissioning of Joyo Waste Treatment Facility. In this development, we researched common mechanical and heat cutting methods and chose appropriate one that was effective to decrease exposure and had no risk to fire the natural rubber lining. We next carried out dismantling tests using the chosen method with rubber lined mock-ups of the tanks to obtain cutting conditions and removal conditions of the lining to minimize secondary wastes. Results are follows. 1. We chose abrasive water jet that has an ability to remove the rubber lining and to be controllable remotely with ease as a cutting method for the natural rubber lined tanks. 2. As a result of cutting tests under parameters of a cutting nozzle speed and a abrasive feed rate, cutting conditions minimizing secondary wastes are 0.4 kg/min abrasive feed rate and 300 mm/min nozzle speed. 3. As a result of a removing test under a parameter of a removing nozzle speed, a removing condition minimizing secondary wastes is 60 mm/min nozzle speed, thus removing speed is 3720 mm2/min. 4. Improving the removing method, especially decreasing waster feed, and general design of a dismantling system including treatment with secondly waste are required. (author)

  5. Measures for minimizing residual operating costs and simultaneous optimization of the dismantling strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The end of power operation of a nuclear power plant is followed either by safe enclosure and later demolition, or immediate dismantling and demolition. In the latter case, measures should be taken at the onset of the decommissioning phase to minimize the costs of operation of the infrastructure required during the disassembly phase (residual operation), thus allowing speedy disassembly over large areas of systems and components no longer required. Once a nuclear power plant has been decommissioned, the main systems determining costs of residual operation are those auxiliary systems whose economic performance had been of secondary importance during power operation, such as auxiliary cooling water, auxiliary steam, demineralized water supply, waste water treatment, ventilation, heating, air conditioning, etc. They are vastly overdimensioned for the requirements of residual operation, and even when the often highly diversified systems have been trimmed down, many pipe systems are bound to remain in operation in many parts of the building which upset the dismantling process. The case of the decommissioned Muelheim-Kaerlich nuclear power station now being dismantled is used to show that often it is not conversion and downsizing of former plant operation systems which constitute the best solution in terms of overall economics, but rather the installation, at an early point in time, of new systems and components adapted to the requirements of demolition and representing the current state of the art. (orig.)

  6. Management of activated parts generated during the dismantling of linear accelerators for medical uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During years 2006-2008 have been carried out to the dismantling of several linear accelerators of medical use in Spain. The two first were in the Hospital of 'La Princesa' in Madrid and in the Hospital 'Santa Creu y Sant Pau' in Barcelona. The disassembling of such was made by technicians of the providing company and of the own hospital, with the advising of experts of the Radiological Protection and Radiophysics Service of such. Technicians of the Radiological Protection Technical Unit (RPU) of ENRESA collaborated in these dismantlings with the objective to determine that pieces could be evacuated conventionally as metallic scraps and which had to be managed as radioactive waste. In the following dismantling the classification of the pieces were carried out by the technicians of the providing company. After that the technicians of the RPU of ENRESA verified this classification and characterized, in detail, the pieces classified as radioactive wasted before their removal. In this paper the activities carried out to classify the pieces and the legal bases in which it leans on, as well as the measures made for the characterization of the materials considered as radioactive waste are described. (author)

  7. What is the status of the dismantling of old French SNLE submarines?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dismantling of nuclear submarines is composed of 3 steps. The first step sees the landing of some equipment from the reactor unit and the implementation of supplementary monitoring systems. In the second step the reactor unit is completely contained and the part of the submarine enclosing it is cut and separated from the rest of the submarine. The front and the rear parts of the hulk are welded together and the submarine is returned to water and moored along a quay. The section of the submarine enclosing the reactor is stored on a slab of concrete designed to sustain earthquakes and is protected from adverse weather. This storage period can last several decades and when the radioactivity has sufficiently decreased, the last step of the dismantling will begin. In this step the reactor will be cut and all the waste packaged in drums. 4 submarines are in the second step of the dismantling process and no one in the last step. The last step is the purpose of feasibility studies. (A.C.)

  8. Taking into account dismantling and decommissioning waste management in conception and operation phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Managing waste during the Dismantling and Decommissioning (D and D) phase is quite specific and different from what it was during the operation phase. Indeed, waste generated during dismantling could present some analogy especially with regards to the radionuclides spectrum and contents. However waste from dismantling and cleanup could actually presents a lower level of radiologic activity but produced in much larger quantities, which requires new solutions. Moreover the characteristics and quantities of waste to be managed during D and D are highly depending on the way the facility was designed and also how it was actually operated during its life time. Taking future D and D into consideration in the early design as well as during the operation of new facilities is becoming more and more mandatory. It is now an explicit requirement set by safety authorities, to provide - in the license application for news plants - a description of design provisions and future plans for D and D as well as anticipated technical and financial impacts,. Two major aspects are driving the cost and complexity of future D and D operations: waste volumes by categories and occupational exposure while performing the work. To reduce such impacts, key approaches are to maintain areas clean, segregate the waste types and provide appropriate provisions in the design. The paper's first part describes the related design and operation concepts derived from lessons learned, and illustrations by examples are presented in a second part. (author)

  9. New-type air-line suits for in-situ glove box dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dismantling of glove boxes has been performed in greenhouses by workers wearing air-line suits. But it was found that the use of air-line suits was generally accompanied by the generation of a large quantity of secondary wastes. Hence, a new type air-line suit was developed to reduce the amount of secondary wastes. The specification of the new-type air-line suit, and the method of wearing and undressing the new-type air-line suit are described in detail. The dismantling of glove boxes by wearing the new-type suit has been carried out seven times in the course of dismantling plutonium-contaminated glove boxes. The time required for wearing and undressing the new-type suit seems slightly longer than that in the case of conventional type. However, it was proved that the amount of secondary wastes was able to be reduced by using the new-type air-line suit to one fourth of the weight of secondary wastes of conventional type air-line suits. Moreover, the new-type suit requires less greenhouses and assistant workers as compared with conventional type suits. (Yoshitake, I.)

  10. Dismantling of the reactor block of the FRJ-1 research reactor (MERLIN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By the end of 1998 the complete secondary cooling system and the major part of the primary cooling system were dismantled. Furthermore, the experimental devices, including a rabbit system conceived as an in-core irradiation device, were disassembled and disposed of. In total, approx. 65 t of contaminated and/or activated material as well as approx. 70 t of clearance-measured material were disposed of within the framework of these activities. The dismantling of the coolant loops and experimental devices was followed in 2000 by the removal of the reactor tank internals and the subsequent draining of the reactor tank water. The reactor tank internals were essentially the core support plate, the core box, the flow channel and the neutron flux bridges (s. Fig. 2, detailed reactor core). All components consisted of aluminium, the connecting elements such as bolts and nuts, however, of stainless steel. Due to the high activation of the core internals, disassembly had to be remotely controlled under water. All removal work was carried out from a tank intermediate floor (s. Fig. 2). These activities, which served for preparing the dismantling of the reactor block, were completed in summer 2001. The waste parts arising were transferred to the Service Department for Decontamination of the Research Centre. This included approx. 2.5 t of waste parts with a total activity of approx. 8 x 1011 Bq. (orig.)

  11. Cleanup and Dismantling of Highly Contaminated Ventilation Systems Using Robotic Tools - 13162

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UP1 plant reprocessed nearly 20,000 tons of used natural uranium gas cooled reactor fuel coming from the first generation of civil nuclear reactors in France. Following operating incidents in the eighties, the ventilation system of the continuous dissolution line facility was shut down and replaced. Two types of remote controlled tool carriers were developed to perform the decontamination and dismantling operations of the highly contaminated ventilation duct network. The first one, a dedicated small robot, was designed from scratch to retrieve a thick powder deposit within a duct. The robot, managed and confined by two dedicated glove boxes, was equipped for intervention inside the ventilation duct and used for carrying various cleanup and inspection tools. The second type, consisting of robotic tools developed on the base of an industrial platform, was used for the clean-up and dismantling of the ventilation duct system. Depending on the type of work to be performed, on the shape constraints of the rooms and any equipment to be dismantled, different kinds of robotic tools were developed and installed on a Brokk 40 carrier. After more than ten years of ventilation duct D and D operations at the UP1 plant, a lot of experience was acquired about remote operations. The three main important lessons learned in terms of remote controlled operation are: characterizing the initial conditions as much as reasonably possible, performing non-radioactive full scale testing and making it as simple and modular as possible. (authors)

  12. Plant Decontamination as a Precondition of the Remote Dismantling Concept of the Karlsruhe Vitrification Plant VEK - 12206

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification of the high-active liquid waste concentrates (HAWC) was a major milestone in the WAK decommissioning project (StiWAK). From September 2009 to June 2010, about 56 m3 of HAWC were vitrified at the Karlsruhe vitrification facility (VEK) and filled into 123 canisters. HAWC vitrification was followed by an extensive rinsing and shutdown program, in the course of which both the VEK process installations and the facilities for the storage and evaporation of high-active fission product solutions (LAVA) are prepared specifically for dismantling. Finally the rinsing programme leads to an overall reduction of the remaining contamination in the installations by a factor of approx. 5 - 10. The amount of liquids arisen from this program has been vitrified and another 17 canisters have been filled. In total, 140 canisters were packed into 5 CASTOR casks that were already transported to the Zwischenlager Nord (interim store North) of EWN GmbH (ZLN) in the mid of February 2011. The melter of the VEK was already shut down in the late November 2010. (authors)

  13. Existing status of uranium refining and conversion plant decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This technical report shows the situation of the dismantling of the main equipment in the radiation-controlled area of a uranium refining and conversion plant. The dismantling was carried out at the beginning of the uranium refining and conversion plant decommissioning project. We started the dismantling in April 2008 and finished it in 29 September 2011. The dismantled waste and equipment were stored in 200 small drums. All the contaminated devices were sealed and kept in this stage. The radioactivity inventory of the uranium refining and conversion plant did not change in this stage. However, the risk of contamination due to the deterioration of this facility with time became remarkably small. Moreover, we were able to get many information and experience about dismantling. Then, we began decommissioning. We were in a new stage from April 2012. We are going to dismantle or tightly close the fluidization media storage underground tank, the neutralization and precipitation system of a waste fluid with fluorine, and the uranium and ventilation system in about three years from now on. (author)

  14. Dismantling and disposal of the Chisobox experimental irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chisobox experimental irradiator was installed at the Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove, Radioisotope Laboratories and Vivarium, for the purposes of the scientific research of ionizing radiation effects on the living organisms. The irradiator was put into operation in 1977. After 1989, its use has been - significantly reduced and it was only employed for the sterilization of medical materials and aids as well as for the radiation treatment of antique and museum things having wood-worm. In January 2001, its next operation was determined by the SUJB decision (i.e. The State Office for Nuclear Safety) in which the constancy tests for all individual ionizing radiation sources being part of the system were required. As the f constancy tests were not performed at that time, the Faculty Management decided for the -- decommissioning of the irradiator in June 2001. In 2003, the Faculty of Medicine announced a tender for the category III workplace disposal. Primarily, the VF, a.s. in cooperation with the SURAO Prague (i.e. the Radioactive Waste Repository Authority) were to have disposed this workplace, and a hot cell designed to be built in Litomerice by the SURAO was to have been used for this project. However, the Faculty of Medicine got a grant for the irradiator disposal in 2004 providing that the disposal had to be finished in the same year. For this reason, the complete project has been assigned to the VF, a.s. Company, which put its hot cell into operation in 2004. The VF, a.s. Company finished the disposal of the irradiator in October/November 2004. After the agreement with the SURAO in April 2005, the sealed sources placed in the storage baskets were put into a newly manufactured container -a non-standard storage unit -and transported to be stored in the URAO Richard in Litomerice. (authors)

  15. Stationary low power reactor No. 1 (SL-1) accident site decontamination ampersand dismantlement project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Army Reactor Area (ARA) II was constructed in the late 1950s as a test site for the Stationary Low Power Reactor No. 1 (SL-1). The SL-1 was a prototype power and heat source developed for use at remote military bases using a direct cycle, boiling water, natural circulation reactor designed to operate at a thermal power of 3,000 kW. The ARA II compound encompassed 3 acres and was comprised of (a) the SL-1 Reactor Building, (b) eight support facilities, (c) 50,000-gallon raw water storage tank, (d) electrical substation, (e) aboveground 1,400-gallon heating oil tank, (f) underground 1,000-gallon hazardous waste storage tank, and (g) belowground power, sewer, and water systems. The reactor building was a cylindrical, aboveground facility, 39 ft in diameter and 48 ft high. The lower portion of the building contained the reactor pressure vessel surrounded by gravel shielding. Above the pressure vessel, in the center portion of the building, was a turbine generator and plant support equipment. The upper section of the building contained an air cooled condenser and its circulation fan. The major support facilities included a 2,500 ft2 two story, cinder block administrative building; two 4,000 ft2 single story, steel frame office buildings; a 850 ft2 steel framed, metal sided PL condenser building, and a 550 ft2 steel framed decontamination and laydown building

  16. SPS WANF Dismantling: A Large Scale-Decommissioning Project at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Evrard, S; Conan, N; De Paoli, D; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fumey, S; Gaillard, H; Grenard, J L; Grenier, D; Pardons, A; Paulat, E; Seraphin, Y; Tavlet, M; Theis, C; Vincke, H

    2011-01-01

    The operation of the SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) West Area Neutrino Facility (WANF) was halted in 1998. In 2010 a large scale-decommissioning of this facility was conducted. Besides CERN’s commitment to remove non-operational facilities, the additional motivation was the use of the installation (underground tunnels and available infrastructure) for the new HiRadMat facility, which is designed to study the impact of high-intensity pulsed beams on accelerator components and materials. The removal of 800 tons of radioactive equipment and the waste management according to the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principles were two major challenges. This paper describes the solutions implemented and the lessons learnt confirming that the decommissioning phase of a particle accelerator must be carefully studied as from the design stage.

  17. Decommissioning and dismantling. Research project: Optimisation of recycling of metals (FORM II). Further investigations. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactively contaminated steel scrap is already being recycled into cast iron casks for transport and storage of low and medium active waste. An important criteria in the cask design is the safety against crack initiation under the high stresses resulting from accident loading. In order to provide sufficient fracture toughness the use of cast iron with predominantly ferritic microstructure is required. Increasing the content of steel scrap containing Mn, Cu and Mo (structural steels) and Cr and Ni (stainless steels) in the melt increases the pearlite content in the cast iron microstructure. Successful ferritizing of as-cast pearlite microstructures by heat treatment requires tight limits on recycling quantities. This renders the recycling of sizable fractions of steel scraps impossible which therefore have to go into final storage if no other recycling application can be found. The goal of the R and D program FORM II (as of the preceeding FORM) is the substantial increase in the amount of recycling of steel scraps into cast iron casks for low and medium active wastes thus saving costs for their final storage. The pursuit of this goal requires systematic material testing. Test blocks were cast with synthetic compositions (i.e. inactive materials). The influence of the elements leading to pearlitic microstructure and to carbides on the material properties was investigated in test block specimens. This ultimately resulted in design values for the fracture toughness under dynamic loading at low temperatures. The chemical composition of the melt need not be fixed. Rather, regression equations will be used in planning the economically optimized compositions that meet the material specifications. Parallel to the material testing the structural designs of box shaped containers and MOSAIK trademark II casks was optimized, thereby reducing the maximum stresses resulting from accident loading by about half. One prototype cask each was manufactured and several artificial flaws were machined at the highest stressed locations. The materials had microstructures with pearlite contents of 75% and 95% (plus 5% carbides) respectively. They were successfully tested under conditions for final storage with instrumented drop tests from heights of 5 m resp. 0.8 m at a temperature of -20 C. It can be concluded that nodular graphite cast iron with pearlitic microstructure (rather than the predominantly ferritic microstructure presently mandated) can meet the requirements on casks for final storage. This permits an increase in the amount of recycling of steel scrap. This saves the cost for final storage of steel scrap while also saving the cost for ferritising heat treatment. (orig.)

  18. Cost calculations for decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear research facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, I. (Studsvik Nuclear AB (Sweden)); Backe, S. (Institute for Energy Technology (Norway)); Cato, A.; Lindskog, S. (Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (Sweden)); Efraimsson, H. (Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (Sweden)); Iversen, Klaus (Danish Decommissioning (Denmark)); Salmenhaara, S. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland)); Sjoeblom, R. (Tekedo AB, (Sweden))

    2008-07-15

    . Examples are provided for each of the countries of relevant projects. They are as follows: 5) Research reactor DR1 in Denmark 6) The TRIGA research reactor in Finland 7) The uranium reprocessing plant in Norway 8) Research reactor R1 in Sweden The following conclusions were made: 9) IAEA and OECD/NEA documents provide invaluable advice for pertinent approaches. 10) Adequate radiological surveying is needed before precise cost calculations can be made. 11) The same can be said about technical planning including selection of techniques to be used. 12) It is proposed that separate analyses be made regarding the probabilities for conceivable features and events which could lead to significantly higher costs than expected. 13) It is expected that the need for precise cost estimates will dictate the pace of the radiological surveying and technical planning, at least in the early stages. 14) It is important that the validity structure for early cost estimates with regard to type of facility be fully appreciated. E g, the precision is usually less for research facilities. 15) The summation method is treacherous and leads to systematical underestimations in early stages unless compensation is made for the fact that not all items are included. 16) Comparison between different facilities can be made when there is access to information from plants at different stages of planning and when accommodation can be made with regard to differences in features. 17) A simple approach is presented for 'calibration' of a cost estimate against one or more completed projects. 18) Information exchange and co-operations between different plant owners is highly desirable. (au)

  19. Cost calculations for decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    . Examples are provided for each of the countries of relevant projects. They are as follows: 5) Research reactor DR1 in Denmark 6) The TRIGA research reactor in Finland 7) The uranium reprocessing plant in Norway 8) Research reactor R1 in Sweden The following conclusions were made: 9) IAEA and OECD/NEA documents provide invaluable advice for pertinent approaches. 10) Adequate radiological surveying is needed before precise cost calculations can be made. 11) The same can be said about technical planning including selection of techniques to be used. 12) It is proposed that separate analyses be made regarding the probabilities for conceivable features and events which could lead to significantly higher costs than expected. 13) It is expected that the need for precise cost estimates will dictate the pace of the radiological surveying and technical planning, at least in the early stages. 14) It is important that the validity structure for early cost estimates with regard to type of facility be fully appreciated. E g, the precision is usually less for research facilities. 15) The summation method is treacherous and leads to systematical underestimations in early stages unless compensation is made for the fact that not all items are included. 16) Comparison between different facilities can be made when there is access to information from plants at different stages of planning and when accommodation can be made with regard to differences in features. 17) A simple approach is presented for 'calibration' of a cost estimate against one or more completed projects. 18) Information exchange and co-operations between different plant owners is highly desirable. (au)

  20. The dismantling of nuclear installations and the radioactive wastes management. Report of the President of the Republic followed by the answers of concerned administrations and organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discussed subjects concerns the situation and the challenges of the nuclear installations dismantling and the radioactive wastes management (main intervenors, panorama of the situation, rules applied to the dismantling and the radioactive wastes), the first experiences of dismantling and radioactive wastes disposal (experiences at the CEA and EDF, implementing of solutions for the disposal), interrogations and certainties (provision for future expenses, public information). (A.L.B.)

  1. The nuclear installations dismantling and the management of radioactive wastes; Le demantelement des installations nucleaires et la gestion des dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-01-15

    As other industrial activities, the nuclear industry causes risks. The risks bound to the dismantling operations are known and controlled. After a presentation of the dismantling and radioactive wastes challenge, this document proposes recommendations based on the first experiences of dismantling and wastes storage. It aims then to answer to the questions relative to the cost and the financing of the operations. Finally it wonders on the public information modalities. (A.L.B.)

  2. Comments on conceptual questions concerning the clearance of wastes for disposal on a dump site during the decommissioning and dismantling of the nuclear power plant Obrigheim (KWO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comments on conceptual questions concerning the clearance of wastes for disposal on a dump site during the decommissioning and dismantling of the nuclear power plant Obrigheim (KWO) cover the following issues: fundamentals of the 10 micro-Sv concept for clearance; specific regulations for the clearance of wastes from the dismantling of KWO for disposal on a dump site; disposal concept at shutdown and dismantling of KWO; measurements and control during clearance for disposal during shutdown and dismantling of KWO; documentation and reports.

  3. Modeling of the radiation doses during dismantling of RBMK-1500 reactor emergency core cooling system large diameter pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • To propose the optimal dismantling approach, the alternatives are analyzed. • The method used of external and internal radiation assessment. • The uncertainty of collective dose and used radiation types is analyzed. • Application of the method can be extended for other types of radiation. - Abstract: Personnel radiation safety is one of the most important issues during the dismantling of nuclear installations. In this paper, results of modeling radiation doses during the dismantling of the large diameter pipes from the emergency core cooling system of RBMK-1500 reactor at Ignalina NPP are presented. The effective doses to the workers are modeled for four dismantling alternatives in order to propose the optimal dismantling approach. The impacts of the cutting technology and individual respiration protection on effective doses are analyzed. The total effective personnel doses are obtained by summing the effective personnel doses from various sources of exposure, i.e., direct radiation from radioactive equipment, internal radiation due to inhalation and ingestion of radioactive aerosols, and direct radiation from radioactive aerosols arising during hot cutting. The collective effective doses and their uncertainties are analyzed using VISIPLAN and MATLAB codes

  4. Investigation of specific applications of laser cutting for dismantling of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work, performed on an experimental basis in a frame of strict collaboration between industry (Fiat-CIEI and Fiat-CRF in Turin) and public research laboratories (ENEA-PAS-FIBI in Bologna, ENEA-PAS-ISP and ENEA-TIB-TECNLAS in Rome) and supported by a CEC contract, was to bring out the items for better evaluation of the laser beam application possibilities in dismantling nuclear power plants. The main topics of the research have been: (i) study and definition of the relevant basic parameters ruling the aerosol generation rate and behaviour in terms of physical and chemical characteristics. This work has been performed in a facility specifically designed for aerosol measurements and equipped with a 2kW laser source; (ii) study of the feasibility of local abatement of the aerosols produced and of the pressure drop in the HEPA filters; (iii) study of long-distance transmission of the laser beam power performed with a 5KW laser source with an evaluation of the power loss and beam characteristic modifications; (iv) study of laser beam technique application for dismantling the Garigliano power plant steam drum in order to better demonstrate the feasibility of the use of this technique. The research resulted in the conclusion that the laser beam is actually appropriate for long-distance dismantling of metal components. Although the main aspects of the laser cutting process have been examined, some problems remain to be investigated. This could be performed, after proper cost-benefit evaluation, during a future decommissioning programme

  5. Dismantling techniques for plutonium-contaminated gloveboxes: experience from first year of decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the mixed-oxide (MOX) processing facility formerly operated by ALKEM GmbH in Hanau, Germany - which was taken over to Siemens in 1988 and renamed Siemens' Hanau Fuel Fabrication Plant, MOX facility - around 8500 kg of plutonium were processed to make MOX fuel rods and fuel assemblies since production started in 1965. After shutdown of the facility by the authorities in mid-1991 for political reasons, the remaining nuclear fuel materials were processed during the subsequent ''cleanout'' phase starting in 1997 into rods and assemblies suitable for long-term storage. The last step in cleanout consisted of ''flushing'' the production equipment with depleted uranium and thoroughly cleaning the gloveboxes. During cleanout around 700 kg of plutonium were processed in the form of mixed oxides. The cleanout phase including the subsequent cleaning and flushing operations ended on schedule in September 2001 without any significant problems. Starting in mid-1999, the various glovebox dismantling techniques were tested using uncontaminated components while cleanout was still in progress and then, once these trials had been successfully completed, further qualified through use on actual components. The pilot-phase trials required four separate licenses under Section 7, Subsection (3) of the German Atomic Energy Act. Thanks to detailed advance planning and experience from the pilot trials the individual dismantling steps could be described in sufficient detail for the highly complex German licensing procedure. The first partial license for decommissioning the MOX facility under Sec. 7, Subsec. (3) of the Atomic Energy Act was issued on May 28, 2001. It mainly covers dismantling of the interior equipment inside the gloveboxes a well as the gloveboxes themselves. Actual decommissioning work inside the former production areas of the MOX facility started on a large scale in early September 2001. (orig.)

  6. Investigation of specific applications of laser cutting for dismantling of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work, performed on an experimental basis in a frame of strict collaboration between industry (FIAT-CIEI and FIAT-CRF in Turin) and public research laboratories (ENEA-PAS-FIBI in Bologna, ENEA-PAS-ISP and ENEA-TIB-TECNLAS in Rome) and supported by a CEC contract, was to bring out the items for better evaluation of the laser beam application possibilities in dismantling nuclear power plants. The main topics of the research have been: 1) study and definition of the relevant basic parameters ruling the aerosol generation rate and behaviour in terms of physical and chemical characteristics. This work has been performed in a facility specifically designed for aerosol measurements and equipped with a 2kW laser source; 2) study of the feasibility of local abatement of the aerosols produced and of the pressure drop in the HEPA filters; 3) study of long distance transmission of the laser beam power performed with a 5kW laser source with an evaluation of the power loss and beam characteristic modifications; 4) study of laser beam technique application for dismantling the Garigliano power plant steam drum in order to better demonstrate the feasibility of the use of this technique. The research resulted in the conclusion that the laser beam is actually appropriate for long distance dismantling of metal components. Although the main aspects of the laser cutting process have been examined, some problems remain to be investigated. This could be performed, after proper cost-benefit evaluation, during a future decommissioning programme. (author)

  7. Activities of the OECD/Nea in the area of decommissioning and dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The member countries of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency are among those that were involved in the earliest developments of nuclear technology in the 1940's and 1950's. They thus have a range of plants and equipment that has now served its purpose and needs to be decommissioned and dismantled. A new range of challenges opens up as the more modern nuclear power programmes mature and large commercial nuclear power plants approach the end of their useful life by reason of age, economics or change of policy on the use of nuclear power. The scale of such challenges may be judged from the fact that over 400 nuclear power plants have been constructed and operated worldwide, most of them in NEA member countries. Given an average planned operating life span of 30 to 40 years and given that the average age of nuclear power plants is, at present, about 15 years, the rate of withdrawal from service will peak some time after 2015. The peak will, however, be sometime later if the tendency to extend operating lifetimes continues. The statistical distribution is wide, anyhow, with some countries having already retired certain commercial nuclear power plants from service, and having even decommissioned and dismantled them in some cases, whilst in other countries it will be some years before any plants are retired. The decommissioning and dismantling (D and D) work done on earlier facilities has provided a substantial body of knowledge and experience over a wide range of complex technical issues, but the requirement now is to apply the available techniques to the D and D of the larger commercial facilities. Iii addition to technical issues, plans and procedures will need to address other major issues associated with impacts on society and the environment, regulatory arrangements and funding at the respective time scale. In other words, although much has already been accomplished, much also remains to be done. (author)

  8. Decontamination and dismantling of the Piver prototype vitrification facility at Marcoule (France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1984 decision to decommission the PIVER pilot vitrification facility was followed by over three years of preparation during which the necessary administrative and operational structures were set up, safety permits and waste conditioning arrangements were secured, and additional technical means were designed and installed. The operational phase began in 1988 with dismantling of the process equipment, followed by preliminary cell decontamination. System pipes were then cut up, first using telemanipulators and subsequently by human operators when the ambient dose rate dropped sufficiently to allow workers to enter the cell. PIVER has now been fully decommissioned, and the main process cell is available for installation of a new research and development facility

  9. Decontamination and dismantlement of the old hot laundry, CFA-669. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This final report describes the decontamination and dismantlement (D ampersand D) of the old hot laundry, located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Central Facilities Area (CFA). The report describes the site before and after D ampersand D, processes used, cost and duration, and waste volume generated. In addition, lessons learned are presented. Pre-D ampersand D characterization indicated gross alpha concentrations in the building ranged from 6 to 310 pCi/g and gross beta measurements from 6 to 15,000 pCi/g. Gamma spectrum analysis identified cobalt-60, cesium-137, antimony-125, europium-152, europium-154, and niobium-94

  10. Evolution of radiation protection of overall decommissioning and Dismantling of a Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the point of view of Radiological Protection, the overall Decommissioning and Dismantling (D and D) Plan of a Nuclear Power Plant cannot be considered in isolation without considering the evolution of the radiological characteristics of the installation and the site itself from previous, during and final states. This experience of D and D is the first in Spain and in other European countries due to several aspects: 1) the reference reactor technology, 2) total grass power, and 3) management of a great amount of materials to be released. Three decommissioning alternatives were studied: Indefinite maintenance in shutdown state, Stage 1. Stage 2 for the defuelled reactor vessel and contents, with decontamination of most of the rest of the site. Immediate dismantling to Stage 3. Stage 2 was the alternative selected with the release of 80% of the site, keeping the remaining 20% of the site as a regulated area, housing the reactor vessel in a new structure and removing the radioactive waste. The above, along with the fact that this is a specific type of natural uranium-graphite-gas plant (NUGG) and that ownership of the facility has been transferred for dismantling (from HIFRENSA to ENRESA), implies a series of preliminary considerations that, for the purposes of this article, are compiled in the following aspects: a) Preliminary phase prior to transfer, b) Preparatory phase, and c) Dismantling phase. This paper describes aspects under the D and D experiences at CN-V1 NPP, now in progress, from the point of view of the radiological aspects in relation with the continuous updating of the source term. Operative Radiological nuclide vectors, applicable in the Radiation Protection tasks, are also commented to prevent and evaluate several risks during the execution of the works. Finally, there is a description of the results obtained from the work performed to decay the three actual nuclide vectors, to evaluate and obtain activity calculations for the release of the

  11. CP-5 reactor remote dismantlement activities: Lessons learned in the integration of new technology in an operations environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the developer's perspective on lessons learned from one example of the integration of new prototype technology into a traditional operations environment. The dual arm work module was developed by the Robotics Technology Development Program as a research and development activity to examine manipulator controller modes and deployment options. It was later reconfigured for the dismantlement of the Argonne National Laboratory Chicago Pile No. 5 reactor vessel as the crane-deployed dual arm work platform. Development staff worked along side operations staff during a significant part of the deployment to provide training, maintenance, and tooling support. Operations staff completed all actual remote dismantlement tasks. At the end of available development support funding, the Dual Arm Work Platform was turned over to the operations staff, who are still using it to complete their dismantlement tasks

  12. Interim storage of dismantled nuclear weapon components at the U.S. Department of Energy Pantex Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the events of 1989 and the subsequent cessation of production of new nuclear weapons by the US, the mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Weapons Complex has shifted from production to dismantlement of retired weapons. The sole site in the US for accomplishing the dismantlement mission is the DOE Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. Pending a national decision on the ultimate storage and disposition of nuclear components form the dismantled weapons, the storage magazines within the Pantex Plant are serving as the interim storage site for pits--the weapon plutonium-bearing component. The DOE has stipulated that Pantex will provide storage for up to 12,000 pits pending a Record of Decision on a comprehensive site-wide Environmental Impact Statement in November 1996

  13. Investigation and design of the dismantling process for irradiation capsules containing tritium. 1. Conceptual investigation and basic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-pile functional tests of tritium breeding blankets for fusion reactors have been planned by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), using a test blanket module (TBM) which will be loaded in ITER. In preparation for the in-pile functional tests, JAEA has been being performed irradiation experiments of solid breeder materials including Li2TiO3, which is the first candidate of tritium breeder materials for the blanket of the demonstration reactor (DEMO) in a water-cooled solid-breeder design concept in Japan. The present report describes conceptual investigation and basic design of the dismantling process for irradiation capsules which were used in irradiation experiments by the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) of JAEA. An irradiation capsule to be dismantled is comprised of a cylindrical outer-container (65mm in outer diameter) and an inner-container which is loaded with Li2TiO3 pebbles. In the present design, the irradiation capsule is cut by a band saw; the released tritium is recovered safely by a purge-gas system, and is consolidated into a radioactive waste form. Furthermore, an inner-box enclosing the dismantling apparatus has been designed as a safety countermeasure of possible tritium release from the dismantling apparatus in accidental events. The adoption of the inner-box has brought a prospect to be able to utilize an existing hot cell (β γ cell) equipped with usual wall material permeable to tritium, without extensive refurbishing of the cell. Thus, the present study has indicated the feasibility of the dismantling process for the irradiated JMTR capsules containing tritium. The results of the present investigation and design will contribute to the design of the TBM structure and to the planning of the dismantling process of the TBM. (author)

  14. Electrolytic decontamination of the dismantled metallic wastes contaminated with uranium compounds in neutral salt solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Wang Kyu; Lee, Sung Yeal; Kim, Kye Nam; Won, Hee Jun; Jung, Jong Heon; Oh, Won Zin [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Electrolytic dissolution study was carried out to evaluate the applicability of electrochemical decontamination process using a neutral salt electrolyte as a decontamination technology for the recycle or self disposal with authorization of large amount of metallic wastes contaminated with uranium compounds generated by dismantling a retired uranium conversion plant using SUS-304 and Inconel-600 specimen as the main materials of internal system components of the plant. The effects of type of neutral salt as an electrolyte, current density, and concentration of electrolyte on the dissolution of the materials were evaluated. On the basis of the results obtained through the basic inactive experiments, electrochemical decontamination tests using the specimens contaminated with uranium compounds such as UO{sub 2}, AUC (ammonium uranyl carbonate) and ADU (ammonium diuranate) taken from an uranium conversion plant were performed in Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaNO{sub 3} solution. It was verified that the electrochemical decontamination of the dismantled metallic wastes was quite successful in Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaNO{sub 3} neutral salt electrolyte by reducing {beta} radioactivities below the level of self disposal with authorization within 10 minutes regardless of the type of contaminants and the degree of contamination.

  15. Progress toward mutual reciprocal inspections of fissile materials from dismantled nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In March 1994, the United States and the Russian Federation announced their intention to conduct mutual reciprocal inspections (MRI) to confirm inventories of fissile materials from dismantled nuclear weapons. Subsequent interactions between the two countries have established the basis for an MRI regime, covering instrumentation, candidate sites for MRI, and protection of information deemed sensitive by the countries. This paper discusses progress made toward MRI, stressing measurement technologies and observables, as well as prospects for MRI implementation. An analysis is presented of observables that might be exploited to provide assurance that the material being measured could have come from a dismantled weapon rather than other sources. Instrumentation to exploit these observables will also be discussed, as will joint US/Russian efforts to demonstrate such instrumentation. Progress toward a so-called ''program of cooperation'' between the two countries in protecting each other's sensitive information will be reviewed. All of these steps are essential components of an eventual comprehensive regime for controlling fissile materials from weapons

  16. Proposed radiation hardened mobile vehicle for Chernobyl dismantlement and nuclear accident response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researchers are developing a radiation hardened, Telerobotic Dismantling System (TDS) to remediate the Chernobyl facility. To withstand the severe radiation fields, the robotic system, will rely on electrical motors, actuators, and relays proven in the Chernobyl power station. Due to its dust suppression characteristics and ability to cut arbitrary materials the authors propose using a water knife as the principle tool to slice up the large fuel containing masses. The front end of the robot will use a minimum number of moving parts by locating most of the susceptible and bulky components outside the work area. Hardened and shielded video cameras will be designed for remote control and viewing of the robotic functions. Operators will supervise and control robot movements based on feedback from a suite of sensory systems that would include vision systems, radiation detection and measurement systems and force reflection systems. A gripper will be instrumented with a variety of sensors (e.g. force, torque, or tactile), allowing varying debris surface properties to be grasped. The gripper will allow the operator to manipulate and segregate debris items without entering the radiologically and physically dangerous dismantlement operations area. The robots will initially size reduce the FCM's to reduce the primary sources of the airborne radionuclides. The robot will then remove the high level waste for packaging or decontamination, and storage nearby

  17. Life cycle assessment of hybrid vehicles recycling: Comparison of three business lines of dismantling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belboom, Sandra; Lewis, Grégory; Bareel, Pierre-François; Léonard, Angélique

    2016-04-01

    This paper undertakes an environmental evaluation of hybrid vehicles recycling, using industrial data from Comet Traitement SA in Belgium. Three business lines have been modelled and analysed. The first one is relative to the business as usual with a dismantling to recover batteries and engines followed by shredding and post shredding treatments. The second one considers, in addition, the removal of electronic control units (ECU) before shredding followed by same steps than in the first line and the last one is relative to the additional removal of big plastic parts before shredding and business as usual post shredding treatments. Results show non-significant environmental benefits when ECU or large parts of plastics are recovered before shredding. Improvements in terms of environmental benefits are lower than the uncertainty of the results. Indeed, the performing usual process for end-of-life vehicles (ELV) treatment reaches 97% of the ELV which is valorised in terms of metal and energy recoveries. Post shredding treatment units include metals, plastics and energy recovery of residues. Comet business as usual route for ELV valorisation is in accordance with the requirements of the European directive and recommendations for further improvement with dismantling of other parts (ECU or plastics) before shredding are non-relevant in this case. PMID:26898478

  18. Characterization and impact of incandescent particles in the ventilation networks during dismantling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fire hazards while metal cutting on dismantling operations led IRSN to focus a study on incandescent particles emitted by these cutting tools and their impact on air filter. If micronic particles (≤ 10 μm) have been studied for their negative impact on human health, few studies are dealing with incandescent particles, despite their strong thermal energy. These particles are mainly made of iron, coming from the metal cutting, and the exothermic oxidation reaction coupled to a high temperature emission causes them to molt. An experimental system was designed, representative of dismantling operations with instrumentations adapted for in-flight particles measurement, such as size, velocity and temperature. The particles are characterized from the emission source (automated cut-off grinder) and all along their path into the ventilation duct to their impact on a filter. An analytical approach of the impact of these particles on the filter shows that the temperature of the particles, greater than 430 C damages the filter medium, and may reduce the filter thickness or perforate it, which leads to a decrease of its filtration efficiency determined according to the French standard. Comparison between the characteristics of the particles and the filtration efficiency has permitted to establish empirical correlations in order to predict the loss of filtration efficiency versus the cutting parameters and some good practices have been proposed to protect the filter. (author)

  19. Electrolytic decontamination of the dismantled metallic wastes contaminated with uranium compounds in neutral salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrolytic dissolution study was carried out to evaluate the applicability of electrochemical decontamination process using a neutral salt electrolyte as a decontamination technology for the recycle or self disposal with authorization of large amount of metallic wastes contaminated with uranium compounds generated by dismantling a retired uranium conversion plant using SUS-304 and Inconel-600 specimen as the main materials of internal system components of the plant. The effects of type of neutral salt as an electrolyte, current density, and concentration of electrolyte on the dissolution of the materials were evaluated. On the basis of the results obtained through the basic inactive experiments, electrochemical decontamination tests using the specimens contaminated with uranium compounds such as UO2, AUC (ammonium uranyl carbonate) and ADU (ammonium diuranate) taken from an uranium conversion plant were performed in Na2SO4 and NaNO3 solution. It was verified that the electrochemical decontamination of the dismantled metallic wastes was quite successful in Na2SO4 and NaNO3 neutral salt electrolyte by reducing β radioactivities below the level of self disposal with authorization within 10 minutes regardless of the type of contaminants and the degree of contamination

  20. Progress toward mutual reciprocal inspections of fissile materials from dismantled nuclear weapons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, M.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Gosnell, T.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    In March 1994, the United States and the Russian Federation announced their intention to conduct mutual reciprocal inspections (MRI) to confirm inventories of fissile materials from dismantled nuclear weapons. Subsequent interactions between the two countries have established the basis for an MRI regime, covering instrumentation, candidate sites for MRI, and protection of information deemed sensitive by the countries. This paper discusses progress made toward MRI, stressing measurement technologies and observables, as well as prospects for MRI implementation. An analysis is presented of observables that might be exploited to provide assurance that the material being measured could have come from a dismantled weapon rather than other sources. Instrumentation to exploit these observables will also be discussed, as will joint US/Russian efforts to demonstrate such instrumentation. Progress toward a so-called ``program of cooperation`` between the two countries in protecting each other`s sensitive information will be reviewed. All of these steps are essential components of an eventual comprehensive regime for controlling fissile materials from weapons.

  1. Rosie - mobile robot worksystem for decommissioning and dismantling operations. Final report, April 1, 1996 - January 31, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RedZone Robotics, Inc. has undertaken development of an advanced remote worksystem - Rosie - specifically designed to meet the challenges of performing a wide range of decontamination and dismantlement (D ampersand D) operations in nuclear environments. The Rosie worksystem includes a locomotor, heavy manipulator, operator console, and control system for remote operations. The locomotor is a highly mobile platform with tether management and hydraulic power onboard. The heavy manipulator is a high-payload, long-reach boom used to deploy a wide variety of tools and/or sensors into the work area. Rosie's advanced control system, broad work capabilities, and hardening/reliability for hazardous duty make it a new and unique capability that facilitates completion of significant cleanup projects throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) and private sector. Endurance testing of the first Rosie system from September 1995 to March 1996 has proven its capabilities and appropriateness for D ampersand D applications. Design enhancements were incorporated into the second Rosie system to improve and add features necessary for deployment at a DOE facility decommissioning. This second Rosie unit was deployed to the Argonne National Laboratory's CP-5 reactor facility in early December 1996, and it is currently being used in the decommissioning of the reactor there. This report will overview this second Rosie system and the design enhancements made to it based on the lessons learned during the design, fabrication, and testing of the first Rosie system. The Rosie system has been designed to be a versatile and adaptable tool that can be used in many different applications in D ampersand D work at nuclear facilities. It can carry a wide variety of tooling, sensors, and other robotic equipment at the tip of its heavy manipulator, and it can deploy those items to many different hazardous work areas. Rosie's capabilities and system design address the need for durability and reliability in

  2. Rosie - mobile robot worksystem for decommissioning and dismantling operations. Final report, April 1, 1996--January 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    RedZone Robotics, Inc. has undertaken development of an advanced remote worksystem - Rosie - specifically designed to meet the challenges of performing a wide range of decontamination and dismantlement (D&D) operations in nuclear environments. The Rosie worksystem includes a locomotor, heavy manipulator, operator console, and control system for remote operations. The locomotor is a highly mobile platform with tether management and hydraulic power onboard. The heavy manipulator is a high-payload, long-reach boom used to deploy a wide variety of tools and/or sensors into the work area. Rosie`s advanced control system, broad work capabilities, and hardening/reliability for hazardous duty make it a new and unique capability that facilitates completion of significant cleanup projects throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) and private sector. Endurance testing of the first Rosie system from September 1995 to March 1996 has proven its capabilities and appropriateness for D&D applications. Design enhancements were incorporated into the second Rosie system to improve and add features necessary for deployment at a DOE facility decommissioning. This second Rosie unit was deployed to the Argonne National Laboratory`s CP-5 reactor facility in early December 1996, and it is currently being used in the decommissioning of the reactor there. This report will overview this second Rosie system and the design enhancements made to it based on the lessons learned during the design, fabrication, and testing of the first Rosie system. The Rosie system has been designed to be a versatile and adaptable tool that can be used in many different applications in D&D work at nuclear facilities. It can carry a wide variety of tooling, sensors, and other robotic equipment at the tip of its heavy manipulator, and it can deploy those items to many different hazardous work areas. Rosie`s capabilities and system design address the need for durability and reliability in these environments.

  3. High pressure water abrasive suspension JET cutting - An innovative cutting technology for the dismantling of reactor core components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalwa, H. [VAK, Kahl (Germany); Schwarz, T. [RWE NUKEM Limited, B7 Windscale, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PF (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    In the frame of decommissioning of nuclear facilities the dismantling of reactor pressure vessels and their internals represent one special challenge. Due to their high activation, associated high dose rate levels, and to some extent the complex geometry and high material thickness of the components, there are particular demands for dismantling techniques. The task is to safely and economically work in every respect and therefore employ techniques with a wide area of application. As a proven technique, RWE NUKEM offers High Pressure Water Abrasive Suspension Jet Cutting. High pressure Water Abrasive Suspension Jet cutting (WASJ), well established in non-nuclear applications, has now been upgraded to meet the demands of decommissioning in the nuclear industry. The application at the Nuclear Power Plant in Kahl (VAK) was one of the first industrial scale applications. Based on several tests and parametric studies, High Water Abrasive Suspension Jet Cutting was tested against other cutting technologies. Because the overall performance in terms of fast and easy cutting operations, ability for remote handling, production of secondary waste WASJ was chosen at VAK Kahl for the dismantling of the lower core shroud and the reactor pressure vessel itself. The dismantling of the core shroud and the reactor vessel took place in-situ (component in its built-in position) using the WASJ technology. As example of application the core shroud of VAK is given. The total mass of the VAK lower shroud was about 3 tons and the wall thickness varied from 30 to 135 mm. The shroud was cut into segments in its in-vessel position, each segment being 500 x 900 mm and having a mass of about 0.25 tons. Cutting was performed in such a way that the separated pieces could be loaded directly into standard waste containers. All secondary waste (abrasives and dross) was collected in two 200 liter drums and, after drying, the drums were sent directly to waste storage. Reactor Pressure Vessel of VAK

  4. Dismantling of the research reactor RTS-1 Galileo Galilei in Pisa (Italy); Desmantelamiento del reactor de investigacion RTS-1 Galileo Galilei en Pisa (Italia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Martinez, J. t.; Farella, G.; Cimini, E.; Russo, M.

    2014-07-01

    This paper is about the most relevant aspects of the first phase of the dismantling, removal of the water in the pool, prior treatment through evaporation, the dismantling of all the submerged activated elements and other activated or contaminated elements that have been part of the nuclear facility. (Author)

  5. Shippingport station decommissioning project technology transfer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP) decontaminated and dismantled the world's first nuclear-fueled, commercial-size electric power plant. The SSDP programmatic goal direction for technology transfer is documentation of project management and operations experience. The objective is to provide future nuclear facility decommissioning projects with pertinent SSDP performance data for project assessment, planning, and operational implementation. This paper sets out access and availability directions for SSDP technology acquisition. Discusses are technology transfer definition; technology transfer products including topical and other project reports, professional-technical society presentations, other project liaison and media relations, visual documentation, and technology transfer data base; and retrieving SSDP information

  6. Project: Decommissioning and Reuse of Licensed Nuclear Facilities at the CEA Centre, Fontenay-aux-Roses, (CEA-FAR) France. Annex A.I-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    installations NLF 58 and 59. The glove boxes in NLF 58 and 59 were transferred to another facility at the CEA Centre at Cadarache or dismantled in the CEA's waste treatment installations on-site. Following removal of the equipment, the interiors of the buildings were cleaned up and the premises thus became reusable as offices for conventional work. NLF 59 (RM1 and RM2) underwent phased dismantling. After cleanup, the RM1 premises were reused as offices, a conference facility, a lecture room and an amphitheatre

  7. Dismantling nuclear power plant with new industrial cw ND:YAG high power lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dismantling is a great challenge for nuclear companies which are facing with the cleaning of former nuclear sites. Among the available cutting processes is the multi-kilowatts laser whose power is transmitted through optical fibers. Unlike other cutting processes such as the plasma arc cutting process or the oxy-fuel cutting process, the laser process can be easily implemented by robotic equipments. The mechanised robotic arm carries a laser cutting head to perform, with remote-controlled equipments, the cutting operation. In order to insure the civil and defense clean up program, the CEA dismantling division support an R and D program for industrialize the laser process for their applications with their specific conditions of used, and risk management. The present study deals with the performances which can be reached with high power cw ND:YAG lasers. The cutting tests were carried out up to 8 kW. The laser power was delivered through a specific power supply chain: a 0,4 mm fiber was transporting the power from the laser to a first interface (coupler) then a second 0,6 mm fiber was bringing the laser power to the cutting head. This solution allowed a power delivery chain whose length could be as high as 100 + 20/50 m. Another advantage of this kind of power supply is that the first fiber can be set in a non contaminated environment whereas the second fiber lies in the contaminated area. The cutting head used for these tests was a specific tool developed for this laser dismantling work: it is a laser cutting head cooled by pressurized air. This tool was developed with the requirement to be able to sustain a laser power of 14 kW. The pressurized air used to cool the head is also used as cutting gas. The cutting capability was about 10 mm by kW, we have achieved cutting an austenitic steel plate of thickness 100 mm. These performances were reached with the cut started on the plate's edge. If the cut started in the middle of the plate, the cutting performances were

  8. Dismantling nuclear power plant with new industrial cw ND:YAG high power lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chagnot, Christophe; Dinechin, Guillaume de; Canneau, Gaetan [CEA, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, LTA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Idasiak, Jean-Marc [CEA, DEN, SDTC, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2009-06-15

    Dismantling is a great challenge for nuclear companies which are facing with the cleaning of former nuclear sites. Among the available cutting processes is the multi-kilowatts laser whose power is transmitted through optical fibers. Unlike other cutting processes such as the plasma arc cutting process or the oxy-fuel cutting process, the laser process can be easily implemented by robotic equipments. The mechanised robotic arm carries a laser cutting head to perform, with remote-controlled equipments, the cutting operation. In order to insure the civil and defense clean up program, the CEA dismantling division support an R and D program for industrialize the laser process for their applications with their specific conditions of used, and risk management. The present study deals with the performances which can be reached with high power cw ND:YAG lasers. The cutting tests were carried out up to 8 kW. The laser power was delivered through a specific power supply chain: a 0,4 mm fiber was transporting the power from the laser to a first interface (coupler) then a second 0,6 mm fiber was bringing the laser power to the cutting head. This solution allowed a power delivery chain whose length could be as high as 100 + 20/50 m. Another advantage of this kind of power supply is that the first fiber can be set in a non contaminated environment whereas the second fiber lies in the contaminated area. The cutting head used for these tests was a specific tool developed for this laser dismantling work: it is a laser cutting head cooled by pressurized air. This tool was developed with the requirement to be able to sustain a laser power of 14 kW. The pressurized air used to cool the head is also used as cutting gas. The cutting capability was about 10 mm by kW, we have achieved cutting an austenitic steel plate of thickness 100 mm. These performances were reached with the cut started on the plate's edge. If the cut started in the middle of the plate, the cutting performances

  9. Flow analysis of heavy metals in a pilot-scale incinerator for residues from waste electrical and electronic equipment dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Cu, Zn, Pb, and Ni are enriched in bottom ash from WEEE dismantling residues. • The heavy metal residual fraction restricts transfer in the incinerator. • Pre-treatment to remove heavy metals from WEEE residues would reduce emissions. -- Abstract: The large amount of residues generated from dismantling waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) results in a considerable environmental burden. We used material flow analysis to investigate heavy metal behavior in an incineration plant in China used exclusively to incinerate residues from WEEE dismantling. The heavy metals tested were enriched in the bottom and fly ashes after incineration. However, the contents of heavy metals in the bottom ash, fly ash and exhaust gas do not have a significant correlation with that of the input waste. The evaporation and recondensation behavior of heavy metals caused their contents to differ with air pollution control equipment because of the temperature difference during gas venting. Among the heavy metals tested, Cd had the strongest tendency to transfer during incineration (TCd = 69.5%) because it had the lowest melting point, followed by Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. The exchangeable and residual fractions of heavy metals increased substantially in the incineration products compared with that of the input residues. Although the mass of residues from WEEE dismantling can be reduced by 70% by incineration, the safe disposal of the metal-enriched bottom and fly ashes is still required

  10. Dismantling the School Sport Partnership Infrastructure: Findings from a Survey of Physical Education and School Sport Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackintosh, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the perceptions of education practitioners to the proposed changes to the school sport partnership (SSP) programme in England and in particular its implications for primary school physical education. It aims to explore insights into the dismantling of this partnership programme. The SSP system developed club links, increased…

  11. Skills management medical labor in the plan of dismantling and decommissioning of the nuclear power plant Jose Cabrera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The model adopted for managing the skills of workers in the various contracts present in the dismantling in order to minimize, on the one hand, workplace accidents attributable to previous health status of the worker and the other the effects on the health could have a possible exposure to ionizing radiation. This model is based on the close coordination between the departments directly involved.

  12. 49 CFR 1242.51 - Dismantling retired property and depreciation (accounts XX-27-39 and 62-27-00).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dismantling retired property and depreciation (accounts XX-27-39 and 62-27-00). 1242.51 Section 1242.51 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (accounts XX-27-39 and 62-27-00). Separate common expenses in proportion to the separation of common...

  13. 49 CFR 1242.37 - Dismantling retired property and depreciation (accounts XX-26-39 and 62-26-00).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dismantling retired property and depreciation (accounts XX-26-39 and 62-26-00). 1242.37 Section 1242.37 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (accounts XX-26-39 and 62-26-00). Separate common expenses in each account in proportion to the...

  14. Characterization of radioactive graphite and concrete of the reactor ULYSSE/INSTN at CEA/Saclay to be dismantled

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Lauwe, Aymeric; Ridikas, Danas; Damoy, Francois; Blideanu, Valentin; Fajardo, Christophe [CEA Saclay, DSM/DAPNIA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Aubert, Marie-Cecile [CEA Saclay, DSM/SAC/CQSE, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Foulon, Francois [CEA Saclay, INSTN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2006-07-01

    Decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear installations after their service life are connected with the necessity of the disassembling, handling and disposing of a large amount of radioactive material. In order to optimize the disassembling operations, to reduce the undesirable volume to the minimum and to successfully plan the dismantling and disposal of radioactive materials to storage facilities, the radiological characterisation of the material present in the reactor and around its environment should be accurately evaluated. The present work has been done in the framework of the decommissioning and dismantling of the experimental reactor ULYSSE that is presently operating in INSTN/Saclay and will be closed in the middle of 2006. A methodology, already successfully used for another research reactor, is proposed for determining accurately the long-term induced activity of the materials present in the active reactor core and its surroundings. The comparison of theoretical predictions, based on Monte Carlo technique, with experimental values validated the approach and the methodology used in the present study. The goal is to plan efficiently the disassembling and dismantling of the system and to optimise the mass flow going to different waste repositories. We show that this approach might reduce substantially the total cost of decommissioning. (authors)

  15. Dose reduction through automation of nuclear weapons dismantlement and storage procedures at the Department of Energy's Pantex Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the end of the Cold War and the subsequent break up of the Soviet Union, the number of weapons in the nuclear stockpile now greatly exceeds any foreseeable future need. To compensate for this excess an estimated 20,000 nuclear warheads have been earmarked for dismantlement and storage at the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. It is anticipated that the majority of these warheads will arrive at the Pantex facility by the year 2000. At that time, it is estimated that current dismantlement and inventory procedures will not be adequate to control worker radiation exposure within administrative and federal dose limits. To control these exposures alternate approaches to dismantlement and inventory must be developed. One attractive approach is to automate as many activities as possible, thus reducing worker exposure. To facilitate automation of dismantlement and storage procedures, current procedures were investigated in terms of collective dose to workers, time to completion, ease of completion, and cost of automation for each task. A cost-benefit comparison was then performed in order to determine which procedures would be most cost-effective to automate

  16. New neutron detector based on Micromegas technology for ADS projects

    CERN Document Server

    Andriamonje, Samuel A; Aune, Stephan; Ban, Gilles; Breaud, Stephane; Blandin, Christophe; Ferrer, Esther; Geslot, Benoit; Giganon, Arnaud; Giomataris, Ioannis; Jammes, Christian; Kadi, Yacine; Laborie, Philippe; Lecolley, Jean Francois; Pancin, Julien; Riallot, Marc; Rosa, Roberto; Sarchiapone, Lucia; Steckmeyer, Jean Claude; Tillier, Joel

    2006-01-01

    A new neutron detector based on Micromegas technology has been developed for the measurement of the simulated neutron spectrum in the ADS project. After the presentation of simulated neutron spectra obtained in the interaction of 140 MeV protons with the spallation target inside the TRIGA core, a full description of the new detector configuration is given. The advantage of this detector compared to conventional neutron flux detectors and the results obtained with the first prototype at the CELINA 14 MeV neutron source facility at CEA-Cadarache are presented. The future developments of operational Piccolo-Micromegas for fast neutron reactors are also described.

  17. Feedback from dismantling operations (level 2) on EDF's first generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDF's policy as regards the dismantling of the reactors that have ceased commercial operation, namely the eight power plants of the first generation and the Creys-Malville power plant, is explained. Generally speaking, prior to the year 2001, EDF had opted for the de-construction of these power plants to comply with a 'long wait' scenario, which consisted of waiting for a period of 5 to 10 years to achieve IAEA level 2 (partial release of the site), then postponing the total de-construction of the facilities for 25 to 50 years. Today, EDF has decided to undertake the total de-construction of these reactors, which have ceased commercial operation, over a period of 25 years. The purpose of this document is to present: - The reactors concerned, their background and their 'regulatory' situation, - The main operations performed and/or currently in progress, - The main elements of feedback from such operations, shedding light on the approach adopted in 2001. The installations concerned by the de-construction programme are as follows: - The 8 power plants of the first generation, which were built during the fifties and sixties and ceased commercial operation between 1973 and 1994, namely: Brennilis (industrial prototype using heavy water technology, jointly operated by EDF and CEA), the 6 power units of the NUGG type (natural uranium gas graphite) at Chinon, Saint-Laurent des Eaux and Bugey and the PWR reactor at Chooz A, - The storage silos at Saint-Laurent, where the sleeves for the fuel assemblies of reactors SLA1 and SLA2 are stored, corresponding to approximately 2000 tonnes of graphite, - The Creys-Malville reactor, FBR (fast breeder reactor) shut down in accordance with a government decision, which is currently undergoing decommissioning. At the current stage, our feedback from the dismantling operations carried out on nuclear facilities is based on (i) the work carried out or in progress that will make it possible to achieve the equivalent of IAEA level 2 in the

  18. Study of aerosol diffusion behaviors in dismantling nuclear facilities. Contract research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate aerosol diffusion behaviors under dismantling of nuclear facilities, plasma arc cuttings were conducted in the enclosure. The flow of air and high temperature gas in the enclosure were visualized, and the temperature distributions in the enclosure and the number density and size distribution of aerosol and the temperature in air of outlet flow were measured in the experiments. As a result, it was confirmed that ascending high temperature gas flow produced by the plasma arc is corresponded with aerosol diffusion behavior during cutting. It was also confirmed that after completing the cuttings the aerosol tends to fall due to decreasing of flow velocity of high temperature gas and the aerosol which reaches near the floor is resuspended by relatively high velocity exhaust flow. (author)

  19. Conditioning of graphite bricks from dismantled gas cooled reactors for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dismantling of gas-cooled reactors to decommissioning involves tens of thousands of low-level radioactive graphite bricks containing less than 400 GBq of tritium per metric ton, less than 20 GBq.t-1 of 14C and less than 2 GBq of 36C1. The long half-life of the last two nuclides may require long-term conditioning. Core impregnation is one way to minimize leaching under these conditions. The authors show that core impregnation is possible using extremely durable pitches or bitumens, that inspection is possible by porosity monitoring and X-ray examination, and that satisfactory leach test results have been obtained on actual graphite samples from a reactor operated for 20 years. The very simple technology required for industrial implementation is discussed

  20. Automatic Estimation of the Radiological Inventory for the Dismantling of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The estimation of the radiological inventory of Nuclear Facilities to be dismantled is a process that included information related with the physical inventory of all the plant and radiological survey. Estimation of the radiological inventory for all the components and civil structure of the plant could be obtained with mathematical models with statistical approach. A computer application has been developed in order to obtain the radiological inventory in an automatic way. Results: A computer application that is able to estimate the radiological inventory from the radiological measurements or the characterization program has been developed. In this computer applications has been included the statistical functions needed for the estimation of the central tendency and variability, e.g. mean, median, variance, confidence intervals, variance coefficients, etc. This computer application is a necessary tool in order to be able to estimate the radiological inventory of a nuclear facility and it is a powerful tool for decision taken in future sampling surveys

  1. Recognition method for three-dimensional image in dismantling of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention constitutes three-dimensional images of structures, in a short period of time, at a place where a man can hardly access upon dismantling of a large scaled nuclear power facilities contaminated by radioactive materials. That is, a television set is disposed on a movable rack. Images of structures as an objective are taken and compared with previously inputted data, to constitute rough images. The television set is moved to an evaluated position where a view angle changes sufficiently based on the rough images. Images of the objective structures are taken at the position after movement. A plurality of thus obtained images and previously stored information concerning the structures are compared, examined and corrected if required, and the three-dimensional images of the objective structures are recognized. According to the present invention, the three-dimensional images of the structures in the nuclear power plant can be recognized automatically at high accuracy by one television set. (I.S.)

  2. Recovery and recycling of aluminum, copper, and precious metals from dismantled weapon components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is tasked to support The Department of Energy in the dismantlement and disposal of SNL designed weapon components. These components are sealed in a potting compound, and contain heavy metals, explosive, radioactive, and toxic materials. SNL developed a process to identify and remove the hazardous sub-components utilizing real-time radiography and abrasive water-jet cutting. The components were then crushed, granulated, screened, and separated into an aluminum and a precious-and-base-metals fraction using air-tables. Plastics were further cleaned for disposal as non-hazardous waste. New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources assisted SNL in investigation of size-reduction and separation technologies

  3. Decommissioning of the ASTRA research reactor: Dismantling of the biological shield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Franz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the dismantling of the inactive and activated areas of the biological shield of the ASTRA research reactor at the Austrian Research Center in Seibersdorf. The calculation of the parameters determining the activated areas at the shield (reference nuclide, nuclide vector in the barite concrete and horizontal and vertical reduction behaviors of activity concentration and the activation profiles within the biological shield for unrestricted release, release restricted to permanent deposit and radioactive waste are presented. Considerations of located activation anomalies in the shield, e.g. in the vicinities of the beam-tubes, were made according to the reactor's operational history. Finally, an overview of the materials removed from the biological shield is given.

  4. Decommissioning of the ASTRA research reactor - dismantling of the biological shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the dismantling of the inactive and activated areas of the biological shield of the ASTRA research reactor at the Austrian Research Center in Seibersdorf. The calculation of the parameters determining the activated areas at the shield (reference nuclide, nuclide vector in the barite concrete and horizontal and vertical reduction behaviors of activity concentration) and the activation profiles within the biological shield for unrestricted release, release restricted to permanent deposit and radioactive waste are presented. Considerations of located activation anomalies in the shield, e. g. in the vicinities of the beam-tubes, were made according to the reactor's operational history. Finally, an overview of the materials removed from the biological shield is given. (author)

  5. Criticality aspects of BNFL irradiated fuel storage for dismantled CAGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive criticality survey calculations have been carried out to investigate the nuclear safety of dismantled CAGR fuel storage. The surveys considered fuel enrichment, storage can diameter, number and configuration of pins within each can, and configuration of storage cans within the fuel storage SKIP. The SKIP itself is contained within a secure outer container, which is stored in an array of similar units in a storage pond. The surveys were required to establish the criticality controls necessary for safe operation of the storage pond. Calculations were carried out using deterministic and Monte Carlo analysis techniques, and have been backed up by critical and sub-critical experiments carried out by the UKAEA in its DIMPLE facility

  6. Evaluation of the secondary radiation impact on personnel during the dismantling of contaminated nuclear equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stankunas Gediminas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article contains a numerical analysis of the secondary radiation contribution to the total radiation affecting the operational personnel during the dismantling activities of the contaminated equipment at a nuclear power plant. This study considers a widely applicable Monte Carlo particle transport code MCNPX and real Ignalina nuclear power plant records. A simplified albedo method is investigated in order to analyze the selected geometrical design cases. Additionally, the impact of the secondary radiation on the personnel dose was analyzed. The numerical MCNPX simulation allowed ascertaining the optimal distance between the source and the wall for the working personnel in closed rooms with contaminated equipment. The developed dose rate maps of the secondary radiation showed cross-sectional distribution of the dose rate inside the enclosed area.

  7. Decontamination and decommissioning project for the nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2004, the dismantling of the reactor pool, including the equipment in the pool, was started. The radioactivity of the equipment, caused by activation was much higher than the expected activity and 7 remotely operated devices were developed to dismantle them. Project management including man power control, quality control was carried out and radiation protection programs and environmental surveillance was also conducted. The waste from dismantling sites was classified according to the physco-chemical properties and radioactivity level, each was further treated or stored according to the relevant procedures. The issues from the safety evaluation by KINS was analyzed and answered. Some preparative works, such as a supply of new electric source and installation of a new ventilation system, were conducted. A process for the treatment of the sludge waste in lagoon was developed and the basic requirements for the process were established

  8. Taking samples from the reactor components in preparation for dismantling the TRIGA reactor at the Medical University of Hannover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After shutting down the facility at the end of 1996 the spent TRIGA fuel elements from the research reactor at the Medical University of Hanover (MHH) were returned to the United States in the summer of 1999 and thus disposed of for the MHH. Consequently one of the main prerequisites for dismantling the TRIGA reactor as planned has been fulfilled. In preparation for dismantling the facility a number of samples were taken from the various reactor components in 2000. The aim of the samples being taken was to establish the radiological condition of the facility in more detail, in particular the condition of the activated components in the reactor tank and the biological shield in the core area. Up to now the calculated estimates for these components had been based mainly on the details provided in the facility documentation when operation started at the beginning of the 1970s, showing that the evaluation of the activity and dose rates was too high. This was confirmed in 1998 in the course of measuring contamination and dose rates when samples were taken from some reactor components before the fuel elements were removed. For example, drill samples were taken from the bottom part of a graphite blind element and from the central radiation beam tube in the core area and then analyzed by the U.R.A. Laboratory of the University of Regensburg. As it is planned to dismantle the reactor facility completely by hand, it is necessary to have realistic radiological data in order to prepare for the dismantling procedure. Furthermore, both the release of radioactive materials into the environment and the costs for external disposal of the radioactive waste from the dismantling of the reactor are to be kept to a minimum. (orig.)

  9. ICP0 dismantles microtubule networks in herpes simplex virus-infected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyu Liu

    Full Text Available Infected-cell protein 0 (ICP0 is a RING finger E3 ligase that regulates herpes simplex virus (HSV mRNA synthesis, and strongly influences the balance between latency and replication of HSV. For 25 years, the nuclear functions of ICP0 have been the subject of intense scrutiny. To obtain new clues about ICP0's mechanism of action, we constructed HSV-1 viruses that expressed GFP-tagged ICP0. To our surprise, both GFP-tagged and wild-type ICP0 were predominantly observed in the cytoplasm of HSV-infected cells. Although ICP0 is exclusively nuclear during the immediate-early phase of HSV infection, further analysis revealed that ICP0 translocated to the cytoplasm during the early phase where it triggered a previously unrecognized process; ICP0 dismantled the microtubule network of the host cell. A RING finger mutant of ICP0 efficiently bundled microtubules, but failed to disperse microtubule bundles. Synthesis of ICP0 proved to be necessary and sufficient to disrupt microtubule networks in HSV-infected and transfected cells. Plant and animal viruses encode many proteins that reorganize microtubules. However, this is the first report of a viral E3 ligase that regulates microtubule stability. Intriguingly, several cellular E3 ligases orchestrate microtubule disassembly and reassembly during mitosis. Our results suggest that ICP0 serves a dual role in the HSV life cycle, acting first as a nuclear regulator of viral mRNA synthesis and acting later, in the cytoplasm, to dismantle the host cell's microtubule network in preparation for virion synthesis and/or egress.

  10. Plutonium gamma-ray measurements for mutual reciprocal inspections of dismantled nuclear weapons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Z.M.; Carlson, J.B.; Clark, D.; Gosnell, T.B.

    1995-07-01

    The O`Leary-Mikhailov agreement of March 1994 stated that the U.S. and the Russian Federation would engage in mutual reciprocal inspections (MRI) of fissile materials removed from dismantled nuclear weapons. It was decided to begin with the plutonium (Pu) removed from dismantled weapons and held in storage containers. Later discussions between U.S. and Russian technical experts led to the conclusion that, to achieve the O`Leary-Mikhailov objectives, Pu MRI would need to determine that the material in the containers has properties consistent with a nuclear-weapon component. Such a property is a {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu ratio consistent with weapons-grade material. One of the candidate inspection techniques under consideration for Pu MRI is to use a narrow region (630-670 keV) of the plutonium gamma-ray spectrum, taken with a high-purity germanium detector, to determine that it is weapons-grade plutonium as well as to estimate the minimum mass necessary to produce the observed gamma-ray intensity. We developed software (the Pu600 code) for instrument control and analysis especially for this purpose. In November 1994, U.S. and Russian scientists met at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for joint experiments to evaluate candidate Pu MRI inspection techniques. In one of these experiments, gamma-ray intensities were measured from three unclassified weapons-grade plutonium source standards and one reactor-grade standard (21% {sup 240}pu). Using our software, we determined the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu ratio of these standards to accuracies within {+-}10%, which is adequate for Pu MRI. The minimum mass estimates varied, as expected, directly with the exposed surface area of the standards.

  11. The 'Room within a Room' Concept for Monitored Warhead Dismantlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, Jennifer E.; Benz, Jacob M.; White, Helen; McOmish, Sarah; Allen, Keir; Tolk, Keith; Weeks, George E.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past 10 years, US and UK experts have engaged in a technical collaboration with the aim of improving scientific and technological abilities in support of potential future nuclear arms control and non-proliferation agreements. In 2011 a monitored dismantlement exercise provided an opportunity to develop and test potential monitoring technologies and approaches. The exercise followed a simulated nuclear object through a dismantlement process and looked to explore, with a level of realism, issues surrounding device and material monitoring, chain of custody, authentication and certification of equipment, data management and managed access. This paper focuses on the development and deployment of the ‘room-within-a-room’ system, which was designed to maintain chain of custody during disassembly operations. A key challenge for any verification regime operating within a nuclear weapon complex is to provide the monitoring party with the opportunity to gather sufficient evidence, whilst protecting sensitive or proliferative information held by the host. The requirement to address both monitoring and host party concerns led to a dual function design which: • Created a controlled boundary around the disassembly process area which could provide evidence of unauthorised diversion activities. • Shielded sensitive disassembly operations from monitoring party observation. The deployed room-within-a-room was an integrated system which combined a number of chain of custody technologies (i.e. cameras, tamper indicating panels and enclosures, seals, unique identifiers and radiation portals) and supporting deployment procedures. This paper discusses the bounding aims and constraints identified by the monitoring and host parties with respect to the disassembly phase, the design of the room-within-a-room system, lessons learned during deployment, conclusions and potential areas of future work. Overall it was agreed that the room-within-a-room approach was effective but

  12. Decontamination and Decommissioning Project for the Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The final goal of this project is to complete safely and successfully the decommissioning of the Korean Research Reactor no.1 (KRR-1) and the Korean Research Reactor no.2 (KRR-2), and uranium conversion plant (UCP). The dismantling of the reactor hall of the KRR-2 was planned to complete till the end of 2004, but it was delayed because of a few unexpected factors such as the development of a remotely operated equipment for dismantling of the highly radioactive parts of the beam port tubes. In 2005, the dismantling of the bio-shielding concrete structure of the KRR-2 was finished and the hall can be used as a temporary storage space for the radioactive waste generated during the decommissioning of the KRR-1 and KRR-2. The cutting experience of the shielding concrete by diamond wire saw and the drilling experience by a core boring machine will be applied to another nuclear facility dismantling. An effective management tool of the decommissioning projects, named DECOMIS, was developed and the data from the decommissioning projects were gathered. This system provided many information on the daily D and D works, waste generation, radiation dose, etc., so an effective management of the decommissioning projects is expected from next year. The operation experience of the uranium conversion plant as a nuclear fuel cycle facility was much contributed to the localization of nuclear fuels for both HWR and PWR. It was shut down in 1993 and a program for its decontamination and dismantling was launched in 2001 to remove all the contaminated equipment and to achieve the environment restoration. The decommissioning project is expected to contribute to the development of the D and D technologies for the other domestic fuel cycle facilities and the settlement of the new criteria for decommissioning of the fuel cycle related facilities

  13. The management of waste originating from the dismantling of nuclear power stations, a growth business that has yet to be optimized

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dismantling of a nuclear power plant consists of all the operations undertaken by the operator after the definitive shutdown, until such time that risks to humanity and the environment on the site are strictly limited or totally removed. Thus, the dismantling process may necessitate stripping and decontaminating a building which will be reusable, or it can go as far as the total demolition of machinery, equipment and structures. Cleaning up the land is an integral part of the dismantling brief. In France, dismantling requires prior authorization by government decree, after approval by the Nuclear Safety Authority. The decree stipulates the terms and nature of all the operations to be undertaken and the final state to be obtained by the operator. (author)

  14. Sandia National Laboratories support of the Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, John Russell; Danneels, Jeffrey John

    2009-03-01

    Because of past military operations, lack of upkeep and looting there are now enormous radioactive waste problems in Iraq. These waste problems include destroyed nuclear facilities, uncharacterized radioactive wastes, liquid radioactive waste in underground tanks, wastes related to the production of yellow cake, sealed radioactive sources, activated metals and contaminated metals that must be constantly guarded. Iraq currently lacks the trained personnel, regulatory and physical infrastructure to safely and securely manage these facilities and wastes. In 2005 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) agreed to organize an international cooperative program to assist Iraq with these issues. Soon after, the Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program (the NDs Program) was initiated by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to support the IAEA and assist the Government of Iraq (GOI) in eliminating the threats from poorly controlled radioactive materials. The Iraq NDs Program is providing support for the IAEA plus training, consultation and limited equipment to the GOI. The GOI owns the problems and will be responsible for implementation of the Iraq NDs Program. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is a part of the DOS's team implementing the Iraq NDs Program. This report documents Sandia's support of the Iraq NDs Program, which has developed into three principal work streams: (1) training and technical consultation; (2) introducing Iraqis to modern decommissioning and waste management practices; and (3) supporting the IAEA, as they assist the GOI. Examples of each of these work streams include: (1) presentation of a three-day training workshop on 'Practical Concepts for Safe Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste in Arid Settings;' (2) leading GOI representatives on a tour of two operating low level radioactive waste disposal facilities in the U.S.; and (3) supporting the IAEA's Technical Meeting with the GOI from April 21

  15. Design of the Iris reactor to simplify dismantling of concrete structures during decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IRIS is an advanced PWR of integral type and 335 MWe power. Its compact containment (spherical, 25 m diameter) enables integrating it inside the reactor/auxiliary building to improve safety, security and economics. Moreover, IRIS has instituted aggressive radiation reduction objectives. One of them is related to decommissioning and dismantling of concrete structures. Specifically, the concrete wall of the reactor vessel cavity in loop PWRs becomes activated. Hence, when the time for decommissioning comes, it must be dismantled/cut with all the necessary precautions, and then disposed of as radioactive waste (even if low-level), at high cost. The IRIS objective is that after 100 years of operation the reactor cavity structure (concrete walls) would remain below the free release level, i.e., would not be treated as radioactive waste. That would significantly simplify returning the site to green field status and reduce the cost of decommissioning. A coordinated analysis was performed by several groups within the IRIS team; this paper describes the analysis performed by Georgia Institute of Technology using the SCALE6/MAVRIC methodology. The activation of the concrete in the reactor vessel cavity wall is driven by its impurities, primarily cobalt and europium. The neutron flux reaching the walls is significantly attenuated (more than ten orders of magnitude) in IRIS due to the inherent shielding provided by the wide downcomer, but the free release limit based on the IAEA guidelines is relatively low for the considered isotopes, 0.1 Bq/g. As a result, activation in the baseline case (reference design) exceeds the limit over the surface layer of a significant portion of the cavity wall. A design solution was developed in which the concrete wall is borated. This modified design reduced the activation anywhere in the cavity concrete wall to below the clearance limit. Thus, after removing the reactor vessel, decommissioning could proceed as with any other industrial

  16. Long term dismantling of a basaltic volcano (Piton des Neiges, La Réunion hotspot).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, Marie; Famin, Vincent; Michon, Laurent; Catry, Thibault

    2010-05-01

    We present a structural investigation of destabilization processes at the Piton des Neiges, the extinct volcano of La Reunion Island. We focus on the Cirque of Cilaos (a large erosional depression south of the volcano summit), where the exposed internal structure of Piton des Neiges is made of pahoehoe lava flows of the shield building stage (unknown thickness) and breccias (~1 km thick), covered by volcanic products of the differentiated stage (~1 km thick). The breccias contain only basic elements and consist in debris flows and debris avalanches deposits. Beddings in the debris flows and shear structures in the avalanche deposits indicate a runout in the direction 300°. We suggest that these breccias may represent the upper part of the Cap La Houssaye mass wasting events observed onshore and offshore on the western side of la Réunion (Bachèlery et al., 2003). The breccias display many indicators of brittle deformation, such as faults (normal and strike slip) and intrusions (dykes and sills). Fault data inversion allows to recognize two episodes of deformation. The first, older step of deformation is consistent with a minimum principal stress oriented N120. Intrusions related to this deformation are basic magmas of the shield building stage. The second, later stage of extension oriented N-S crosscuts the N120 deformation with intrusion compositions of the differentiated stage. These results show that the dismantling of Piton des Neiges proceeded in two ways: catastrophic episodic destabilization and slow internal deformation. During the shield-building stage, slow and rapid dismantling was occurring in the 300° direction in the studied area, whereas it evolved toward a N-S slow collapse during the differentiated stage of magmatic activity. This result fully agrees with a recent study carried out within debris avalanches deposits in the cirque of Salazie (north of Piton des Neiges summit) which attests that the northern flank of the Piton des Neiges has also

  17. Melting of the metallic wastes generated by dismantling retired nuclear research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decommissioning of nuclear installations results in considerably large amounts of radioactive metallic wastes such as stainless steel, carbon steel, aluminum, copper etc. It is known that the reference 1,000 MWe PWR and 881 MWe PHWR will generate metal wastes of 24,800 ton and 26,500 ton, respectively. In Korea, the D and D of KRR-2 and a UCP at KAERI have been performed. The amount of metallic wastes from the KRR-1 and UCP was about 160 ton and 45 ton, respectively, up to now. These radioactive metallic wastes will induce problems of handling and storing these materials from environmental and economical aspects. For this reason, prompt countermeasures should be taken to deal with the metal wastes generated by dismantling retired nuclear facilities. The most interesting materials among the radioactive metal wastes are stainless steel (SUS), carbon steel (CS) and aluminum wastes because they are the largest portions of the metallic wastes generated by dismantling retired nuclear research facilities. As most of these steels are slightly contaminated, if they are properly treated they are able to be recycled and reused in the nuclear field. In general, the technology of a metal melting is regarded as one of the most effective methods to treat metallic wastes from nuclear facilities. In conclusion: The melting of metal wastes (Al, SUS, carbon steel) from a decommissioning of research reactor facilities was carried out with the use of a radioisotope such as cobalt and cesium in an electric arc furnace. In the aluminum melting tests, the cobalt was captured at up to 75% into the slag phase. Most of the cesium was completely eliminated from the aluminum ingot phase and moved into the slag and dust phases. In the melting of the stainless steel wastes, the 60Co could almost be retained uniformly in the ingot phase. However, we found that significant amounts of 60Co remained in the slag at up to 15%. However the removal of the cobalt from the ingot phase was improved by

  18. Melting of contaminated steel scrap from the dismantling of the CO2 systems of gas cooled, graphite moderated nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G2 and G3 are the natural Uranium cooled reactors Graphite/Gas. The two reactors were designed for both plutonium and electricity production (45 MWe). The dismantling of the reactors at stage 2 has produced more than 4 000 tonnes of contaminated scrap. Because of their large mass and low residual contamination level, the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) considered various possibilities for the processing of these metallic products in order to reduce the volume of waste going to be stored. After different studies and tests of several processes and the evaluation of their results, the choice to melt the dismantled pipeworks was taken. It was decided to build the Nuclear Steel Melting Facility known as INFANTE, in cooperation with a steelmaker (AHL). The realization time schedule for the INFANTE lasted 20 months. It included studies, construction and the licensing procedure. (authors). 2 tabs., 3 figs

  19. The digital mock-up system to simulate and evaluate the dismantling scenarios for decommissioning of a NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This paper is to develop the DMU system to simulate the dismantling scenarios for decommissioning of a NPP. • Features of the DMU system are kinematic simulation and human simulation of decommissioning scenarios of a NPP. • The DMU system could evaluate and optimize the decommissioning scenarios of a NPP. - Abstract: This paper is to develop the digital mock-up system to simulate the dismantling scenarios for decommissioning of a NPP. Features of the digital mock-up system are kinematic simulation and human simulation of decommissioning scenarios of a NPP. The digital mock-up consists of major components, internals, support facilities, and equipments. The digital mock-up system could evaluate and optimize the decommissioning scenarios of a NPP

  20. Pilot tests for dismantling by blasting of the biological shield of a shut down nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following free-field tests on concrete blocks the feasibility of explosive dismantling of the biological shield of nuclear power stations has been succesfully tested at the former hotsteam reaction in Karlstein/Main Germany. For this purpose a model shield of scale 1:2 was embedded into the reactor structure at which bore-hole blasting tests employing up to about 15 kg of explosive were performed. An elaborate measurement system allowed to receive detailed information on the blast side-effects: Special emphasis was focussed on the quantitative registration of the dynamic blast loads; data for the transfer of the dismantling method to the removal of real ractor structures were obtained. (orig.)

  1. Dismantling of a furnace and gloveboxes of a U3O8 with 20% enrichment production line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Uranium Powder Manufacturing Plant at CAC, U3O8 with 20% enrichment is manufactured for fuel plates to be used in test reactors. This plant is in full operation since 1986, producing uranium oxide for Peru, Algeria, Iran, Egypt and the RA-3-CAE reactors. Some of the equipment of the Plant have finished their life time and one of the furnaces of the processing line had to be replaced. This work implied the dismantling not only of the furnace, but also of the gloveboxes connected to the furnace and the dismantling of the extraction lines and air injection of the gloveboxes. The work had to be performed with the necessary care in order to minimize risks and effects on personnel, installations and environment involved. (author)

  2. Pollution characterization and diurnal variation of PBDEs in the atmosphere of an E-waste dismantling region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diurnal air samples were collected from the E-waste dismantling region Guiyu and the underwear industry region Chendian. This was the first report to present the diurnal variation of PBDEs in the atmosphere. The average concentrations of 11 PBDE congeners were 11,742 pg m-3 in the daytime, and 4830 pg m-3 at night in Guiyu, while the concentrations were lower in Chendian with 376 pg m-3 in the daytime, and 237 pg m-3 at night. BDE-209 accounted for 22% and 31.3% of the total PBDEs in Guiyu and Chendian, respectively. The diurnal variation trends of BDE-47, -99, -153, -183, and -209 were also analyzed in detail in the two regions. - A survey of atmospheric PBDE concentrations at day and night will help identify the short time variability of PBDEs in an E-waste dismantling region of South China

  3. 49 CFR 1242.30 - Dismantling retired road property and depreciation (accounts XX-17-39, XX-18-39, XX-19-39, 62-17...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dismantling retired road property and depreciation (accounts XX-17-39, XX-18-39, XX-19-39, 62-17-00, 62-18-00, and 62-19-00). 1242.30 Section 1242.30....30 Dismantling retired road property and depreciation (accounts XX-17-39, XX-18-39, XX-19-39,...

  4. Reintegration of areas of the IPEN's dismantled nuclear fuel cycle pilot plants as new laboratories of the CQMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IPEN has faced the problem of the dismantling of their Nuclear Fuel Cycle old facilities. Those facilities already played their roles of technological development and personnel's training, with transfer of the technology for institutions entrusted of the 'scale up' of the units. Most of the pilot plants interrupted the activities more than ten years ago, due to the lack of resources for the continuity of the research. The appropriate facilities maintenance has been also harmed by the lack of resources, with evident signs of deterioration in structures and equipment. The existence of these facilities also implicates in the need of constant surveillance, representing additional obligations, costs and problems. The reasons to promote as soon as possible the dismantling of the IPEN's Nuclear Fuel Cycle Pilot Plants elapse mainly from the need of physical space for new activities, since the R and D in the nuclear fuel cycle area were interrupted and from the loss of personnel that set up and operated the referred units, one of the most concerning aspects in case of the postponement of the dismantling process. One of these new activities is the IPEN's Environmental Program. In the building where there was the Uranium Dissolution and Purification Pilot Plant, already dismantled, it was decided to settle the Laboratory of Chemical and Environmental Analyses, being necessary its total liberation from the point of view of radioactive contamination. This paper describes the procedures, problems faced and results related to the reintegration of the former pilot plant areas as new laboratories of the Chemical and Environmental Technology Center - CQMA - of the IPEN. (author)

  5. The Harper Government's New Right Neoliberal Agenda and the Dismantling of Status of Women Canada and the Family Violence Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Ruth M Mann

    2016-01-01

    This paper situates the Harper government’s 2006 restructuring and effective dismantling of Status of Women Canada and its 2011 take down of the approximate 12,000 volume online library of the federal Family Violence Initiative in relation to two developments. These are the ascendant influence of men’s rights and other antifeminist activism in Canada and globally; and the concurrent rise of a Hayekian-animated New Right neoliberal agenda intent on subordinating civil society and democratic ru...

  6. EDF decommissioning and dismantling policy a global commitment to safety, environment and cost efficiency of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until recently, EDF's policy regarding the dismantling of its decommissioned nuclear power plants was to reach 'level 2' (release of non-nuclear facilities) and to postpone final dismantling for another 30-40 years. Today, some studies suggest that a full deconstruction program of the first generation NPPs (9 units) could be optimized over the period 2000 - 2025. EDF has acquired during the last ten years an unique experience, both as an operator and as an engineering company, in the frame of the decommissioning programme of its own NPPs. Many types of reactors, including graphite moderated one, PWR, are at varying stages of the dismantling process.Plant operation quality is at the core of a satisfactory control of releases. Over the last decade, as a result of the efforts of all operating sites associated with good in-house operating practice feedback, the overall release volume has been divided by two, and the release activity by one hundred. Another issue given increased attention is radiological cleanliness. EDF-DPN launched a 'radiological cleanliness' action plan revolving around two main themes: increased monitoring of nuclear-related transportations, site entrance and access to controlled areas, along with on-site radiological cleanliness, particularly during maintenance work tasks. Progress is already apparent in several points at issue and the overall objective of the action plan should be attained. (author)

  7. Techniques for CAD reconstruction of 'as-built' environments and application to preparing for dismantling of plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electricite de France is using CAD-generated numeric geometrical models to simulate maintenance operations and enable optimizing maintenance procedures. These models are also used to program the machines or robots for certain servicing procedures. They are used in the operator interfaces for robot control, and provide the operator with virtual cameras or enable generating specific information (such as virtual force feedback). Even more recently, CAD models have been integrated in what is known as 'virtual reality' software, giving the operators a sensation of 'immersion' in a virtual universe. Depending on the need and on the type of results expected from the simulations, one needs more or less precise models of the environment in which work will be performed. EDF is using several techniques to get 'as-built' models of the environments. This article describes the SOISIC system, which is a 3D laser sensor widely used for environment data acquisition, associated with 3Dipsos software, for CAD model reconstruction. These techniques, and the applications subsequently developed formaintenance applications, can be used in preparing and carrying out dismantling operations: 'as-built' CAD modeling of the installation can be used in the preparatory phase, providing plans, simulating the varioussteps, calculating waste volumes, helping in optimization of waste management, etc. These models can also be used during the actual dismantling process, to program the machines or robots used, or in the robot or machinesupervisory system. Some of the presented techniques have been used in a room in the Brennilis plant, which is currently being dismantled. (orig.)

  8. Decommissioning optimization of the Loviisa nuclear power station dismantling the pressure vessel and decontamination of primary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes radioactivities and radiation levels in decommissioning situation at the Loviisa Nuclear Power Station and optimization of plant decommissioning in view of costs and radiation doses. In calculation of the activity inventory, the existing activity calculations, the literature data and the measuring results and experiences gained at the Loviisa plant have been used as basic data. The radiation levels have been calculated with a computer program based on the point kernel method. A technique for dismantling the reactor pressure vessel and internals as large parts has been developed. As compared with segmenting into small parts, the developed dismantling technique saves FIM 12.3 million of immediate costs and 0.7 manSv of collective radiation doses, if the plant is decommissioned two years after the final reactor shutdown. Saving in total decommissioning costs and doses is 3-4%. Costs of primary circuit chemical decontamination of one plant unit are FIM 1.7 million. Major part of the costs is caused by solidification and final disposal of active waste produced in decontamination. The primary circuit decontamination saves 0.36 manSv in collective radiation doses caused by dismantling operations, if the plant is decommissioned two years after the final reactor shutdown. Price of a saved manSv is FIM 4.8 million. (author)

  9. Dismantling of the 904 Cell at the HAO/Sud Facility - 13466

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaudey, C.E.; Crosnier, S. [AREVA Clean-Up BU, 1 route de la Noue 91196 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Renouf, M.; Gaspard, N. [AREVA Clean-Up BU, Site de La Hague - BV 35 - 50444 Beaumont Hague (France); Pinot, L. [AREVA D and D BU, Site de La Hague - 50444 Beaumont Hague (France)

    2013-07-01

    La Hague facility, in France, is the spent fuel recycling plant wherein a part of the fuel coming from some of the French, German, Belgian, Swiss, Dutch and Japanese nuclear reactors is reprocessed before being recycled in order to separate certain radioactive elements. The facility has been successively handled by the CEA (1962-1978), Cogema (1978-2006), and AREVA NC (since 2006). La Hague facility is composed of 3 production units: The UP2-400 production unit started to be operated in 1966 for the reprocessing of UNGG metal fuel. In 1976, following the dropout of the graphite-gas technology by EDF, an HAO workshop to reprocess the fuel from the light water reactors is affiliated and then stopped in 2003. - UP2-400 is partially stopped in 2002 and then definitely the 1 January 2004 and is being dismantled - UP2-800, with the same capacity than UP3, started to be operated in 1994 and is still in operation. And UP3 - UP3 was implemented in 1990 with an annual reprocessing capacity of 800 tons of fuel and is still in operation The combined licensed capacity of UP2-800 and UP3 is 1,700 tons of used fuel. (authors)

  10. An analysis of influence of input parameters on the external exposure during dismantling of steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decommissioning of nuclear installations represents an essential phase of facility's lifecycle. The main goal of this process is to achieve partial or complete release from radiation control. This can be successfully done only when all activities are planned and optimized according to the ALARA principle. The presence of radioactivity (whether induced activity or contamination) makes the process of dismantling of large components more difficult, because beside their large dimensions and masses, also the level of activity (several orders higher than natural background) has to be taken into account. The subject of analysis is steam generator used in NPPs with VVER 440 type reactor after about 30 years of standard operation. The results of calculation show the big influence of studied input parameters on the external exposure. After comparison of scenarios it is obvious that the decontamination with decontamination factor of 100 causes about 50-times greater decrease of the dose load than the decay time of 5 years (related to the Scenario 0). The more detailed description of model of steam generator, tasks, scenarios and results analysis will be given in the full paper. (authors)

  11. Local information committee and social repercussions of the closure and dismantling of Vandellos-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandellos-I is a 497 MW gas graphite type nuclear power plant located in the Province of Tarragona. Its construction began in 1967 and it started operating in 1972. Its design was very similar to the French plant at St. Laurent des Eaux. In 1989 a fire in the turbine house led to the final shutdown of the reactor in 1990 by Ministerial Order. Responsibility for the site was transferred from the utility to ENRESA in February 1998. Since then, main decommissioning activities of Vandellos-I have been undertaken, following post operational clean out, conditioning of spent fuel and treatment of operational wastes including the graphite components from fuel elements. Stage 2 decommissioning activities have been extended up to 2003. As it is known, when a new nuclear installation is commissioned, exists a change in the Socioeconomic activity in the local area. This new activity usually begins with an increase of employment and population until the finalization of the commissioning contracts when the NPP starts up. At tile same time during the operational stage, municipal incomes are increased. During the decommissioning of a nuclear installation, some socio-economic impacts in the surrounded area are produced, strongly dependent on the activity of the decommissioned facility. For a complete evaluation of the impact of the dismantling phase, the overall process of decommissioning of a nuclear installation should be considered, including the following three phases: - permanent shutdown; - decommissioning period; - post-closure. (author)

  12. What are become Moruroa and Fangataufa? The dismantling of tests sites did not happen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Officially, the nuclear test sites of French polynesia have been dismantled. It would be more correct to say that the installations build on the Moruroa atolls have been destroyed. From the end of nuclear tests, the Cea constructions and installations, the most susceptible to be contaminated have been ruined without exterior witness. Nobody knows if the usual procedures of decontamination have been observed. About 15% of materials from he Moruroa base have been distributed as gifts to the local communities in french Polynesia. other materials have been transferred or sold. The observatory of French nuclear weapons estimates the cost of the closing of the French Polynesia test sites to about 15 milliards of Francs, including the compensations paid to the Polynesian government during 10 yeas, so be it hundred times the cost announced by the militaries in 1998. The observatory of French nuclear weapons estimates that the real assessment of radioactive waste being on Moruroa and Fangataufa atolls has not been completely made by the experts of IAEA. This assessment is still to make. The observatory of French nuclear weapons notices that the Moruroa and Fangataufa atolls stay under military status. It recommends that these atolls be reintegrated to the Polynesian land patrimony in order to allow independent expertise. (N.C.)

  13. Dismantling and decontamination of the tube bundle of a feedwater preheater of the Garigliano BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report deals with dismantling and decontamination of the tube bundle of a feedwater preheater of Garigliano-BWR. Decontamination is a common practice in decommissioning works and it can be used both for reducing radiation exposures, in order to save manrem, and for the unrestricted release of materials. In this latter field the decontamination of tube bundle is a particular case because of their large contaminated surfaces and relatively low weight; at the moment no decon technique was available on the market to decontaminate up to the unrestricted release the materials of tube bundles. In this context an innovative decon technique using aggressive chemicals together with ultrasounds in a tank, was developed by several laboratories and assessed with in-scale testings. A decon procedure considering two phases: first with ultrasounds applied in water at 600C, and second with ultrasounds applied in a solution of HF/HNO3 acids at 60-700C, was qualified. The demonstration of the performances of the new technique under real conditions was made by performing ten full-scale demo tests, each one on an assembly of 100 straight tubes, 1 m long each, for a total of 1000 meters

  14. Expanding to teleoperation of a tight modular workshop for dismantling radioactive components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CEA (French Nuclear Energy Commission) in connection with TECHNICATOME developed a tight modular workshop for the dismantling of AT1 plant facilities in LA HAGUE. This workshop constructed of reusable stainless steel panels assembled by bolting provides a tight and decontaminable working zone compatible with any building configuration. This being the case, the operators bearing ventilated suits may work under the best safety conditions on alpha-contaminated materials. For the purpose of expanding the working capacities of this workshop it was decided to develop special components for teleoperation from the outside as in a conventional cell. To meet this objective which is within the scope of the contract signed with the CEC, the following components were developed and constructed: - manipulator holder panel, - swivelling hatch panel, - wall equipment sealed transfer device and, - modular biological protection. The design, construction and tests of these new components led to their qualification and further incorporation in the list of components of the modular workshop liable to be used for teleoperation procedures

  15. Explosive cutting techniques for dismantling of concrete structures in a nuclear power station following decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the work that has been jointly carried out, based on a common and complementary research programme, by the Battelle Institut e.V., Frankfurt and Taylor Woodrow Construction Ltd., Southall, on the controlled use of explosives for the cutting and safe removal of activated and contaminated parts of nuclear facilities without impairing the overall structural integrity. Previous work had demonstrated the feasibility of using explosive techniques for the stripping off of an equivalent thickness of concrete, for radiation protection, from the inside walls of nuclear facilities. The present research work aims at complementing, improving and optimizing the foregoing work. Extensive investigations have been executed on the adjustment of blasting parameters, material and structural effects, drilling techniques, particle distribution and on procedures for remote handling. The report presents the results obtained from field trials and theoretical analysis undertaken to augment the development programme. It concludes that the controlled use of explosives offers a safe and favourable dismantling technique for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

  16. Anticipated assessment of the amount of radioactive wastes arising from pool LMBFR dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a part of the studies of nuclear installation decommissioning, which relates to fast breeder reactors of the European type. More precisely, it deals with the assessment of the amount of radioactive wastes arising from decommissioning. Activities are produced through neutronic captures in materials. In the following pages, radioactive wastes arising from the Super Phenix 1 reactor structure and component dismantling are described. The following assumptions have been used; the reactor has been run at full power for 30 years and results assume a 2 year decay time after ultimate reactor shut down. The more active structures and components are situated on the core axis (core cover plug, diagrid, diagrid-support....). Radially beyond the core are the lateral neutron shielding assemblies which reduce primary pump and intermediate heat exchanger activation. Main contributors arise from the following isotopes 59Co, 54Fe, 62Ni. Stellite (about 50% of 59Co) coating of spherical seats on the props which the subassemblies are stuck in, and stellite coatings on diagrid-diagrid/support seats, have a high maximum local volumic activity (about 1012 and 109 Bq/cm3). While 85% of the analysed 3000 tons of steel, have an activity lower than 100 Bq/g. Above the roof slab and outside the safety tank, structures and components are not active. (author)

  17. Decontamination and dismantling of Cendrillon transfer systems for radioactive liquid solutions - 59336

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The CENDRILLON system was studied and developed by the CEA at the end of the 1950's and early of the 1960's to transfer and transport the radioactive liquid solutions to waste treatment facilities. This system has been manufactured in several versions in three different sizes and for each different volumes of capacity. For each size, the biological shielding thickness is based on the volume capacity. Whatever the size and volume, the CENDRILLON connection system remains identical. All liquid transfers, filling and sucking out, of the CENDRILLON are carried under vacuum. The CENDRILLON D and D works are carried out during the facilities POCO (post clean out operations) and decommissioning or into a dedicated waste treatment plant. The parer will show CEA's procedure to carry out these CENDRILLON D and D works. It consists of tasks sequences: CENDRILLON emptiness assessment, capacity flushing and decontamination, pumping out, drying and finally CENDRILLON dismantling by mechanical disassembly (taking apart) and the capacity cutting. Control of nuclear risk is essential for all these tasks: radiolysis, contamination and irradiation. (authors)

  18. Post-decontamination and dismantlement (D ampersand D) characterization report for CFA-669 site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents results of post-decontamination and dismantling (D ampersand D) characterization surveys performed by EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. (EG ampersand G Idaho), at Central Facilities Area (CFA)-669, which was the Hot Laundry Facility. The site was characterized to determine and document the radiological and chemical conditions of the site following D ampersand D and to determine if the site satisfies the release criteria. Constructed in 1950, CFA-669 served as the ''hot'' and ''cold'' laundry for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site contractors until the boiler exploded in 1981. The building was shut down at that time. Before D ampersand D activities began in 1992, the facility was characterized and the results documented. D ampersand D activities were completed in July 1994. The post-D ampersand D radiological characterization consisted of radiation measurements and analyses of soil samples to identify man-made radionuclides and determine the specific activity of each sample. The chemical characterization consisted of toxicity characterization leaching procedure (TCLP) analysis for metals and for volatile and semivolatile organic contamination

  19. Characterisation and materials flow management for waste electrical and electronic equipment plastics from German dismantling centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arends, Dagmar; Schlummer, Martin; Mäurer, Andreas; Markowski, Jens; Wagenknecht, Udo

    2015-09-01

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment is a complex waste stream and treatment options that work for one waste category or product may not be appropriate for others. A comprehensive case study has been performed for plastic-rich fractions that are treated in German dismantling centres. Plastics from TVs, monitors and printers and small household appliances have been characterised extensively. Based on the characterisation results, state-of-the-art treatment technologies have been combined to design an optimised recycling and upgrade process for each input fraction. High-impact polystyrene from TV casings that complies with the European directive on the restriction of hazardous substances (RoHS) was produced by applying continuous density separation with yields of about 60%. Valuable acrylonitrile butadiene styrene/polycarbonate can be extracted from monitor and printer casings by near-infrared-based sorting. Polyolefins and/or a halogen-free fraction of mixed styrenics can be sorted out by density separation from monitors and printers and small household appliances. Emerging separation technologies are discussed to improve recycling results. PMID:26111535

  20. The management routes for materials produced by the dismantling of the BR3-PWR reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, M.; Demeulemeester, Y.; Ponnet, M.; Emond, M.; Emond, O.; Dadoumont, J.; Massaut, V. [SCK. CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Mol (Belgium)

    2000-07-01

    The dismantling of the BR3 reactor produces quite large masses of contaminated materials, mainly metals or concrete. The main management routes are: conditioning of the radioactive wastes and disposal, recycling of radioactive materials in the nuclear sector and the recycling of free released materials in the industrial sector or their evacuation as industrial waste. The conditioning of the radioactive wastes is essentially performed in the installations of Belgoprocess and must follow the specifications imposed by the national radwaste management agency ONDRAF/NIRAS. The conditioning of the pieces produced during the cutting of the reactor pressure vessel is given as example. The recycling of radioactive materials in the nuclear sector is possible for metals and for concrete. For metals, SCK.CEN has an agreement with a nuclear foundry which reuses these materials for the fabrication of shieldings. For concrete, an R and D programme is going on with the objective to demonstrate the possible reuse of baryte concrete as raw materials for the production of mortar used in the conditioning of radioactive wastes. The free release of radioactive materials and their reuse or evacuation as radioactive wastes requires the strict respect of procedures and the use of low level measurement techniques. Various decontamination techniques are used at SCK.CEN to reach this objective. For the metals, we use mainly simple washing, abrasive decontamination and hard chemical decontamination. For concrete, we use mainly scabbling or shaving techniques. (authors)

  1. The management routes for materials produced by the dismantling of the BR3-PWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dismantling of the BR3 reactor produces quite large masses of contaminated materials, mainly metals or concrete. The main management routes are: conditioning of the radioactive wastes and disposal, recycling of radioactive materials in the nuclear sector and the recycling of free released materials in the industrial sector or their evacuation as industrial waste. The conditioning of the radioactive wastes is essentially performed in the installations of Belgoprocess and must follow the specifications imposed by the national radwaste management agency ONDRAF/NIRAS. The conditioning of the pieces produced during the cutting of the reactor pressure vessel is given as example. The recycling of radioactive materials in the nuclear sector is possible for metals and for concrete. For metals, SCK.CEN has an agreement with a nuclear foundry which reuses these materials for the fabrication of shieldings. For concrete, an R and D programme is going on with the objective to demonstrate the possible reuse of baryte concrete as raw materials for the production of mortar used in the conditioning of radioactive wastes. The free release of radioactive materials and their reuse or evacuation as radioactive wastes requires the strict respect of procedures and the use of low level measurement techniques. Various decontamination techniques are used at SCK.CEN to reach this objective. For the metals, we use mainly simple washing, abrasive decontamination and hard chemical decontamination. For concrete, we use mainly scabbling or shaving techniques. (authors)

  2. Radiation exposure estimates on production and utilization of recycled items using dismantling waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation exposure was estimated on production and utilization of recycled items using dismantling wastes by assuming that their usage are restricted to nuclear facilities. The radiation exposure attributed to production of a steel-plate cast iron waste container, a receptacle for slag, and a drum reinforcement was calculated to be in the range of several μSv to several tens of μSv even in recycling contaminated metal waste of which radioactivity concentration of Co-60 is higher than the clearance level by a factor of two figures. It is also elucidated that casting of a multiple casting waste package meets the standards of dose equivalent rate for the transport of a radioactive package and the weight of the package will be able to kept around 20 tons for the convenience of the handling, in case of disposal of metal waste less than 37 MBq/g with the steel-plate cast iron waste container. As the results, from the radiological exposure's point of view, it should be possible to use slightly contaminated metal for recycled items in waste management. (author)

  3. Y-12 Plant decontamination and decommissioning technology logic diagram for Building 9201-4. Volume 3: Technology evaluation data sheets; Part A: Characterization, dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) problems at Bldg. 9201-4 to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD uses information from the Strategic Roadmap for the Oak Ridge Reservation, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram, and a previous Hanford logic diagram. This TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to D and D and waste management (WM) activities. It is essential that follow-on engineering studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in the TLD and by finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk. This report consists of the characterization and dismantlement data sheets

  4. Venezuelan Experience and Challenges on Partial Dismantling and Conversion of the Venezuelan RV-1 Nuclear Research Reactor into an Industrial Irradiation Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RV-1 nuclear research reactor of the Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research is a pool type reactor of 3 MW of thermal power that was operated from 1961 to 1991 despite having a high level of obsolescence. Since 1991, IVIC has studied different options in spite of its obsolescence to upgrade, decommission or convert the reactor facility into an industrial irradiation plant. The option to convert the RV-1 into an industrial irradiation plant prevailed politically. In December 2003, the reactor conversion activities had been completed at a cost of US $3 million. The RV-1 conversion project consisted mainly of the characterization of the radioactive contamination of structures, systems and equipment in preparation of their dismantling and removal from the reactor building, waste classification and disposal. Structural modifications were made, e.g. new ventilation and water systems for treatment of the reactor pool and the 60Co source pool, concluding finally with the installation and commissioning of a new irradiator with a maximum rack capacity of 1 MCi. Currently, the RV-1 remains permanently shutdown, and the industrial irradiation plant is operating 22.5 hours per day, 365 days a year. All of these activities carried out have represented a challenge for our country. (author)

  5. Y-12 Plant decontamination and decommissioning technology logic diagram for Building 9201-4. Volume 3: Technology evaluation data sheets; Part A: Characterization, dismantlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) problems at Bldg. 9201-4 to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD uses information from the Strategic Roadmap for the Oak Ridge Reservation, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram, and a previous Hanford logic diagram. This TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to D and D and waste management (WM) activities. It is essential that follow-on engineering studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in the TLD and by finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk. This report consists of the characterization and dismantlement data sheets.

  6. Projection-based curve clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on unsupervised curve classification in the context of nuclear industry. At the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), Cadarache (France), the thermal-hydraulic computer code CATHARE is used to study the reliability of reactor vessels. The code inputs are physical parameters and the outputs are time evolution curves of a few other physical quantities. As the CATHARE code is quite complex and CPU time-consuming, it has to be approximated by a regression model. This regression process involves a clustering step. In the present paper, the CATHARE output curves are clustered using a k-means scheme, with a projection onto a lower dimensional space. We study the properties of the empirically optimal cluster centres found by the clustering method based on projections, compared with the 'true' ones. The choice of the projection basis is discussed, and an algorithm is implemented to select the best projection basis among a library of orthonormal bases. The approach is illustrated on a simulated example and then applied to the industrial problem. (authors)

  7. Funding of future dismantling and decommissioning costs in the Finnish State Nuclear Waste Management Fund

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The financial provisions for all nuclear waste management, including dismantling and decommissioning (D and D), in Finland have been arranged through the State Nuclear Waste Management Fund, which was founded in 1988. A producer of nuclear waste is fully responsible for its nuclear waste management, including D and D.The main objectives of the system, created through the legislation, are: (a) at any time there shall be sufficient funds available to take care of the nuclear waste management measures caused by the waste produced up to that time; and (b) the financial burden caused by the production of wastes shall, in a timely manner, be reflected in the cost of electricity produced through the activity giving rise to those wastes.The part of liability that is not covered by money in the Fund must always be fully guaranteed. The State Nuclear Waste Management Fund is a special purpose fund, segregated from the State budget. The licence holders are entitled to borrow back 75% of the capital of the Fund against the provision of full guarantees and at current interest rates. In addition, the State has the right to borrow the rest of the capital. Plans and cost estimates for the remaining nuclear waste management measures are updated yearly by the nuclear power companies and approved by the authorities. The assessed liability and fees to be paid into the Fund by the companies are then confirmed. No discounting is used.The funding system in Finland seems to work well and so far no serious problems have arisen as regards the future availability of sufficient capital for nuclear power plant D and D. (author)

  8. Treatment for dismantled radioactive solid waste from the TRIGA Mark-2 and 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung Kook; Jung, Kyung Hwan

    1999-06-01

    Radioactive wastes are generally classified into 3 type depending on their physical property: liquid, solid and gaseous type. State-of -the art concerning liquid waste treatment has already been published; KAERI/TR-1315/99. Solid wastes classification package and treatment method will be studied to effectively manage them during the practical decommissioning work. All of the spent fuel produced during the operation of the TRIGA Mark-2 and 3 have been transported to the US last year, 1998, according to the spent fuel management strategy set-up by the US government for the non-proliferation of nuclear energy. Solid wastes are mainly all equipment existing inside of the reactors, activated concrete among the bio-shielded concrete, pipes, pimps, resin filter and it's housings, heat-exchangers, liquid waste storage tanks, to radioactive waste storage treatment facilities and so on. Solid wastes are generally low-level. They are classified according to the national regulation and nuclear law and IAEA Safety Standard Series ST-1(1996). Medium level radioactive wastes from reactor structures, mainly stainless steel component from the Rotary Specimen Rack(RSR) will be properly dismantled and stored in a shield container such as TIF(TRIGA Irradiated Fuel) container. While, low-level solid waste will be treated and packed in a ISO container(4m{sup 3} ISO container for example) according to the IAEA recommendation. And combustible solid waste such as cloths, gloves, paper etc. will be packed in a 200 liters drum. This state-of-the art shows a general feature of the solid radioactive waste management which will be produced during the decommissioning of the TRIGA Mark-2 and 3 research reactors. (author). 17 refs., 17 tabs., 2 figs.

  9. A microstructural analysis of solder joints from the electronic assemblies of dismantled nuclear weapons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianco, P.T.; Rejent, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials Joining Dept.

    1997-05-01

    MC1814 Interconnection Boxes from dismantled B57 bombs, and MC2839 firing Sets from retired W70-1 warheads were obtained from the Pantex facility. Printed circuit boards were selected from these components for microstructural analysis of their solder joints. The analysis included a qualitative examination of the solder joints and quantitative assessments of (1) the thickness of the intermetallic compound layer that formed between the solder and circuit board Cu features, and (2) the Pb-rich phase particle distribution within the solder joint microstructure. The MC2839 solder joints had very good workmanship qualities. The intermetallic compound layer stoichiometry was determined to be that of Cu6Sn5. The mean intermetallic compound layer thickness for all solder joints was 0.885 mm. The magnitude of these values did not indicate significant growth over the weapon lifetime. The size distribution of the Pb-rich phase particles for each of the joints were represented by the mean of 9.85 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} mm{sup 2}. Assuming a spherical geometry, the mean particle diameter would be 3.54 mm. The joint-to-joint difference of intermetallic compound layer thickness and Pb-rich particle size distribution was not caused by varying thermal environments, but rather, was a result of natural variations in the joint microstructure that probably existed at the time of manufacture. The microstructural evaluation of the through-hole solder joints form the MC2839 and MC1814 components indicated that the environmental conditions to which these electronic units were exposed in the stockpile, were benign regarding solder joint aging. There was an absence of thermal fatigue damage in MC2839 circuit board, through-hole solder joints. The damage to the eyelet solder joints of the MC1814 more likely represented infant mortality failures at or very near the time of manufacture, resulting from a marginal design status of this type of solder joint design.

  10. Reserves for shutdown/dismantling and disposal in nuclear technology. Theses and recommendations on reform options; Rueckstellungen fuer Stilllegung/Rueckbau und Entsorgung im Atombereich. Thesen und Empfehlungen zu Reformoptionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Bettina [Forum Oekologisch-Soziale Marktwirtschaft e.V. (FOeS), Berlin (Germany). Green Budget Germany (GBG)

    2012-04-11

    The study on reserves for shutdown, dismantling and disposal of nuclear facilities covers the following topics: cost for shutdown, dismantling and disposal and amount and transparency of nuclear reserves, solution by y stock regulated by public law for long-term liabilities, and improvement of the protection in the event of insolvency for the remaining EVU reserves for short- and intermediate-term liabilities. The appendix includes estimations and empirical values for the cost of shutdown and dismantling, estimation of disposal costs, and a summary of Swiss studies on dismantling and disposal and transfer to Germany.

  11. Status of decommissioning activities at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) was formally closed and the mission of the facility was officially redirected toward environmental restoration in August 1991. Many of the production facilities and equipment still contained quantities of raw, intermediate, and finished production-related materials. The safe Shutdown program was initiated to remove and properly disposition all nuclear product and in process residue materials, supplies, chemicals, and associated process equipment that was abandoned in place when FEMP stopped production in 1989. As part of the remedial design of the interim remedial action, a schedule for building dismantlement was submitted in June 1995. A 31-year schedule was developed, based on anticipation of reduced funding levels. However, recent cleanup successes at Fernald led to DOE endorsement of greater funding for the final cleanup, accelerating the schedule for Operable Unit 3 dismantlement, reducing the schedule to ten years. Under the accelerated schedule, several plants will be dismantled, starting in 1996

  12. Concepts and Tests for the Remote-Controlled Dismantling of the Biological Shield and Form work of the KNK Reactor - 13425

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, Sylvia; Graf, Anja; Petrick, Holger; Rothschmitt, Stefan [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O.Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein- Leopoldshafen (Germany); Klute, Stefan [Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH, Am Taubenfeld 25/1, 69123 Heidelberg (Germany); Stanke, Dieter [Siempelkamp NIS Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH, Industriestrasse 13, 63755 Alzenau (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The compact sodium-cooled nuclear reactor facility Karlsruhe (KNK), a prototype Fast Breeder, is currently in an advanced stage of dismantling. Complete dismantling is based on 10 partial licensing steps. In the frame of the 9. decommissioning permit, which is currently ongoing, the dismantling of the biological shield is foreseen. The biological shield consists of heavy reinforced concrete with built-in steel fitments, such as form-work of the reactor tank, pipe sleeves, ventilation channels, and measuring devices. Due to the activation of the inner part of the biological shield, dismantling has to be done remote-controlled. During a comprehensive basic design phase a practical dismantling strategy was developed. Necessary equipment and tools were defined. Preliminary tests revealed that hot wire plasma cutting is the most favorable cutting technology due to the geometrical boundary conditions, the varying distance between cutter and material, and the heavy concrete behind the steel form-work. The cutting devices will be operated remotely via a carrier system with an industrial manipulator. The carrier system has expandable claws to adjust to the varying diameter of the reactor shaft during dismantling progress. For design approval of this prototype development, interaction between manipulator and hot wire plasma cutting was tested in a real configuration. For the demolition of the concrete structure, an excavator with appropriate tools, such as a hydraulic hammer, was selected. Other mechanical cutting devices, such as a grinder or rope saw, were eliminated because of concrete containing steel spheres added to increase the shielding factor of the heavy concrete. Dismantling of the biological shield will be done in a ring-wise manner due to static reasons. During the demolition process, the excavator is positioned on its tripod in three concrete recesses made prior to the dismantling of the separate concrete rings. The excavator and the manipulator carrier system

  13. Concepts and Tests for the Remote-Controlled Dismantling of the Biological Shield and Form work of the KNK Reactor - 13425

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The compact sodium-cooled nuclear reactor facility Karlsruhe (KNK), a prototype Fast Breeder, is currently in an advanced stage of dismantling. Complete dismantling is based on 10 partial licensing steps. In the frame of the 9. decommissioning permit, which is currently ongoing, the dismantling of the biological shield is foreseen. The biological shield consists of heavy reinforced concrete with built-in steel fitments, such as form-work of the reactor tank, pipe sleeves, ventilation channels, and measuring devices. Due to the activation of the inner part of the biological shield, dismantling has to be done remote-controlled. During a comprehensive basic design phase a practical dismantling strategy was developed. Necessary equipment and tools were defined. Preliminary tests revealed that hot wire plasma cutting is the most favorable cutting technology due to the geometrical boundary conditions, the varying distance between cutter and material, and the heavy concrete behind the steel form-work. The cutting devices will be operated remotely via a carrier system with an industrial manipulator. The carrier system has expandable claws to adjust to the varying diameter of the reactor shaft during dismantling progress. For design approval of this prototype development, interaction between manipulator and hot wire plasma cutting was tested in a real configuration. For the demolition of the concrete structure, an excavator with appropriate tools, such as a hydraulic hammer, was selected. Other mechanical cutting devices, such as a grinder or rope saw, were eliminated because of concrete containing steel spheres added to increase the shielding factor of the heavy concrete. Dismantling of the biological shield will be done in a ring-wise manner due to static reasons. During the demolition process, the excavator is positioned on its tripod in three concrete recesses made prior to the dismantling of the separate concrete rings. The excavator and the manipulator carrier system

  14. Provision of capital for shutdown, dismantling and disposal. Cost risks and proposals for reform for a responsibility related financing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Germany the latest discussion on the cost of nuclear phase-out, dismantling and waste disposal has shown that the provision of capital by the concerned companies for these challenges and the actual regulations are not sufficient for a long-term financing security. The study presents a reform concept including the need of improved transparency on the provision of capital, a differentiated financial statement, the introduction of a stock under public law for insolvency protection including a financing responsibility for the companies and subsequent payments in case of cost increase, and an increase of protection in case of insolvency.

  15. Options for disposal of radioactive wastes arising from steam generator dismantling. Assessment from the external exposure aspect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper focuses on steam generator dismantling at the Jaslovske Bohunice V1 nuclear power plant with VVER-440/230 reactors. The VISIPLAN 3D ALARA computer code was used to calculate external exposure arising from radiation existing on the waste package surface. The dependence of the external exposure on the internal configuration of the waste was investigated. The effect of the waste storage time (before packaging and disposal) and on personnel exposure was also examined and the suitability of the various decontamination techniques was assessed. (orig.)

  16. Dismantling of a Clinac 2100C and analysis of the induced activity in relationship with its clinic utilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the occasion of the renewal of a medical accelerator, the authors carefully analysed the management of the activated components of the dismantled apparatus. More than 200 components have been isolated, identified and measured. The activated parts are different from those expected according to previous experiences. They are classified in four groups: soft steel parts (magnetic), steel parts with nickel surface treatment, tungsten parts, and protections in lead. Beside some peculiar parts, most of the parts seem to have a sufficiently half-life to allow their elimination after a one-year storage. Short communication

  17. ''Rueckbau 2014''. KWS Congress regarding decommissioning and dismantling at Zwentendorf nuclear training power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From September 24 to 25, 2014, KRAFTWERKS-SCHULE E.V. (KWS) held the congress ''Rueckbau 2014''.This first congress about nuclear power plant decommissioning was combined with an exhibition in the fully equipped Zwentendorf nuclear training power plant. The exhibitors had the opportunity to present and test their products in the ambience of a real nuclear power plant, close to original plant components. The visitors got a general overview of the on-site conditions. During the lectures the process of decommissioning and dismantling of a nuclear power plant were described, problems within this process were discussed, and possible solutions were recommended.

  18. Decommissioning and dismantling of the Rossendorf Isotope Production; Stilllegung und Rueckbau der Rossendorfer Isotopenproduktion. T. 1. Betriebshistorie, Genehmigungsverfahren und Planungskonzept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grahnert, Thomas [VKTA - Strahlenschutz Analytik und Entsorgung Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Reststoffbehandlung und Qualitaetswesen; Jansen, Sven [VKTA - Strahlenschutz Analytik und Entsorgung Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Betrieblicher Strahlenschutz; Boessert, Wolfgang [VKTA - Strahlenschutz Analytik und Entsorgung Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Bereich Rueckbau und Entsorgung; Kniest, Steffen [Siempelkamp NIS Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    After just over 40 years of production operation 2000, the operation of the Rossendorf Isotope Production was finally stopped. In the last few years of production already sections of the Rossendorf Isotope Production have been decommissioned. With the end of the isotope production the decommissioning of the entire complex started. In the two-part report, the decommissioning and dismantling of the Rossendorf Isotope production is presented. In part 1 (atw 5/2016) mainly the authorisation procedures and the realised decommissioning concept are presented. Part 2 (atw 6/2016) deals with special selected aspects of the implementation of the decommissioning programme.

  19. Decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities. An assessment of the current legal situation relating to standard setting and licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introductory survey presents the framework conditions set by the nuclear technical codes, the law, and the nuclear licensing provisions. The first contribution (by A.Kurz) analyses the legal position referring to the points of law and to the problems encountered in connection with activities for the decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities. The second contribution (by W.H. Junker) shows the regulatory situation by presenting a synopsis of licences, discussing their legal background and in particular their effects in practice. (HP)

  20. DOWNSIZING TO CORPORATE ANOREXIA WHILE DISMANTLING THE MIDDLE CLASS: ARE WE IN DANGER OF RECREATING THE 1920S?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R. Winpenny

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Corporate downsizing has run rampant on the American scene during the 1990s. Indeed, Business Week claimed it had become a fad. Ironically, the new “lean and mean” look did not apply to CEO compensation packages. More critically, corporate downsizing hurt middle class purchasing power. The Big Lie that emerged from this was that America could dismantle the middle class and have a booming economy. Much of this reasoning sounds, sadly enough, like the thinking so prevalent in the 1920s.

  1. Apollo Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Artists used paintbrushes and airbrushes to recreate the lunar surface on each of the four models comprising the LOLA simulator. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White described the simulator as follows: 'Model 1 is a 20-foot-diameter sphere mounted on a rotating base and is scaled 1 in. = 9 miles. Models 2,3, and 4 are approximately 15x40 feet scaled sections of model 1. Model 4 is a scaled-up section of the Crater Alphonsus and the scale is 1 in. = 200 feet. All models are in full relief except the sphere.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 379; Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  2. Rationalization design on large equipment dismantling facility. The cell fire-extinguishing examination. 1. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to rationalize for Large Equipment Dismantling Facility (LEDF), the plan of removing vaporizer belong to Cell-fire-extinguishing-system was investigated. In this test, in order to study the behavior of pressure in cell, when the liquefaction carbon dioxide (liq-CO2) is emitted, and the performance of extinguishing fires, the test of behavior. of pressure and the extinguishing fires take effect. Also the extinguishing fires test used water-mist take effect for complement liq-CO2. The results as follows; (1) In the test of behavior of pressure, Liq-CO2 was emitted test room under -40 mmAq negative pressure. Room pressure was increase about 0.8 mmAq/sec at first. After 20 sec, the pressure was increase slowly about 0.1 mmAq/sec. After 120 sec,the increase was drastic about 1.5 mmAq/s. (2) In the test of extinguishing fires by liq-CO2, under -40 mmAq, Polyethylene and wooden chips + cotton (crib) was burn. Polyethylene was extinguished perfectly, but the embers remained in cribs. While the room pressure was increase about 1.3 mmAq/sec for 10 sec at first. After 30 sec, the pressure was increase about 1 mmAq/sec. On the other hand, the drastic increase of pressure disappeared between 100 sec to 120 sec by change the nozzle size from 14 mm2 to 10 mm2. (3) In the test of extinguishing fires by water-mist, Cribs was extinguished perfectly, but Polyethylene was extinguished difficulty under the same condition of liq-CO2 test. (4) Therefore the results, It's coped with the fire extinguishing and the keeping negative 2 pressure for LEDF cells. Therefore nozzle size is fitted cell volume as changing 14 mm2 to 10 mm2 (5) As the performance of extinguishing fires by liq-CO2, It is necessity the concentration of above 50% CO2 for combustibles as cribs, remaining the embers. (6) On the other hand, It is necessity most study for the adoption of water-mist. Therefore water-mist was not effective for polyethylene, and it needed water for fire in great volume. (author)

  3. Dismantling of a hot cell-block and the treatment of the produced concrete bars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A building with hot cells had been operated in Karlstein/Main from 1968 to 1989 in order to perform check-ups at radiated fuel rods and nuclear components. The operation of the system was stopped after an operation period of approximately 20 years. The core part of the building to be disassembled is a U-shaped hot cell-block with nine individual cells, partly consisting of heavy reinforced concrete, located in the ground floor (fig. 1 and fig. 2). The major part of the cells was covered with 10 mm steel plate and provided with approx. 1,400 openings of all different kinds. The wall thickness of the cells was between 0.90 m and 1.10 m. Under these conditions a successful decontamination at the ''existing building structure'' was not possible. Therefore, the non-supporting structures of the hot cell-block were removed in individual blocks by means of sawing and the remaining walls and floors were peeled by using the diamond rope sawing technique. The dismantling took 17 months. A re-treatment of the produced concrete blocks (235 blocks, approx. 970 Mg) to reduce the radioactive waste to a minimum was performed at the Research Centre Karlsruhe, Central Decontamination Department (HDB). The Target of the concrete bar treatment at HDB is to reduce the volume of radioactive waste to a minimum and to add the major part of the concrete bars to harmless utilisation. To achieve the same, initially the more contaminated parts of the bars without openings, such as tubes, cable or ventilating shafts, are removed by means of wire cutting and packed into a KONRAD-Container as radioactive waste. The remaining bar is decontaminated by means of sandblasting and afterwards, following successful release measurement, released from the scope of the regulations under the Atomic Energy. Bars with openings are crushed into small pieces by means of the remote-controlled chisel excavator, in order to separate the individual kinds of material. The rubble is packed into drums and measured by

  4. Phenix Decommissioning Project - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first heading of your manuscript must be 'Introduction'. Phenix is the only remaining French fast breeder reactor after the shutdown of Superphenix (1999) and Rapsodie (1983). Phenix is located inside the Marcoule nuclear site along the Rhone river near Bagnols-sur-Ceze in southeastern France. Phenix is one of the facilities belonging the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) on the Marcoule site. It is a fast breeder reactor (FBR) developed at the end of the 1960's. that has been in operation since 1973 and was connected to the power grid in 1974. It is a second generation prototype developed while the first generation FBR, Rapsodie, was still in operation. Phenix is a 250 electrical MW power plant. During the first 20 years of operation, its main aim was to demonstrate the viability of sodium-cooled FBRs. Since the 1991 radioactive waste management act, Phenix has become an irradiation tool for the actinide transmutation program. To extend its operating life for 6 additional cycles, it was necessary to refurbish the plant; this involved major work performed from 1999 to 2003 at a total cost of about 250 M??. Today, with a realistic expectation, the final shutdown is planned for the beginning of 2009. The main objective of the Phenix dismantling project is to eliminate all the process equipment and clean all the building to remove all the radioactive zones. To reach this objective, three main hazards must be eliminated: Fuel (criticality hazard), Sodium, Radioactive equipment. The complexity of decommissioning a facility such as Phenix is increased by: - the lack of storage facility for high radioactive material, - the decision to treat all the radioactive sodium and sodium waste inside the plant, - the very high irradiation of the core structures due to the presence of cobalt alloys. On the other hand, Phenix plant is still under operating with a qualified staff and the radioactivity coming from structural activation is well known. After the final shutdown

  5. Human and organisational factors as key levers of performance in D and D project management - 59323

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: In a number pf D and D projects, the type of installations to be dismantled and the variety of their equipments (glove-boxes, tanks..) and the products present on site (plutonium, uranium) in the form of powder are making many operations manual ones. Key phases in HR and organisation management: - The first D and D experience, the learning curve ramp-up - To begin any project, you usually try to benefit from benchmark of similar projects to be able to build up the first scenario, by using the best practices. The first experimental team consisted of operators who already had experienced dismantling at least once in the course of their career. This first dismantling operation is preferably to be conducted on an installation relatively poorly contaminated. This was to implement the correct techniques thus reducing the consequences of a possible unforeseen event. The capitalisation on the return on experience The success of this first dismantling site operation allowed us to implement a process of experience feedback to build the scenarios and the operating procedures of the following sites. In particular, targeted safety-security stop points are positioned for validation on the operations by people responsible for safety and security

  6. Analysis of Alternatives for Dismantling of the Equipment in Building 117/1 at Ignalina NPP - 13278

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poskas, Povilas; Simonis, Audrius [Lithuanian Energy Institute, Kaunas (Lithuania); Poskas, Gintautas [Lithuanian Energy Institute, Kaunas (Lithuania); Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2013-07-01

    Ignalina NPP was operating two RBMK-1500 reactors which are under decommissioning now. In this paper dismantling alternatives of the equipment in Building 117/1 are analyzed. After situation analysis and collection of the primary information related to components' physical and radiological characteristics, location and other data, two different alternatives for dismantling of the equipment are formulated - the first (A1), when major components (vessels and pipes of Emergency Core Cooling System - ECCS) are segmented/halved in situ using flame cutting (oxy-acetylene) and the second one (A2), when these components are segmented/halved at the workshop using CAMC (Contact Arc Metal Cutting) technique. To select the preferable alternative MCDA method - AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) is applied. Hierarchical list of decision criteria, necessary for assessment of alternatives performance, are formulated. Quantitative decision criteria values for these alternatives are calculated using software DECRAD, which was developed by Lithuanian Energy Institute Nuclear engineering laboratory. While qualitative decision criteria are evaluated using expert judgment. Analysis results show that alternative A1 is better than alternative A2. (authors)

  7. [Pollution Characteristics and Ecological Risk of PBDEs in Water and Sediment from an Electronic Waste Dismantling Area in Taizhou].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang-ping; Peng, Bao-qi; Lü, Su-ping; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Yong; Huang, Chang-jiang; Dong, Qiao-xiang

    2016-05-15

    An e-waste dismantling industrial park of Taizhou was selected as the sampling center, within a radius of 16 km, and a total of 30 sampling sites were designed in three circles as follows: C (3 km), S (5-10 km) and R (10-16 km). Pollution characteristics and ecological risk of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in water and sediments were investigated. The concentrations of PBDEs in water ranged from 9.4 to 57.2 ng · L⁻¹, with a mean value of 25.9 ng · L⁻¹; and 3.7 to 38,775 ng · g⁻¹, with an average of 2 779 ng · g⁻¹ in sediments. BDE-209 was the predominant congener. The spatial distribution patterns of PBDE levels in water and sediment were both in the following order: C > S > R. Furthermore, the concentrations of PBDEs in sediments showed significant negative correlation against the distance from the industrial park (P industrial activities in last 40 years. A preliminary ecological risk assessment for PBDEs in water and sediments was conducted by hazard quotient method. The results demonstrated that the Penta-BDEs in the center of e-waste dismantling area ( a radius of 1.5 km) was at particularly high risk level and could cause serious influence on the ecological safety and human health. PMID:27506030

  8. The Results of the Assessment for Clearance of Dismantling the Concrete Waste from the Research Reactor Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. H.; Hong, S. B.; Kim, G. H.; Seo, B. K.; Park, S. K.; Chung, U. S.; Chung, K. W

    2006-03-15

    In order to estimate the exposure dose to apply a clearance concept for the large amount of very low level concrete wastes generated by dismantling of the accessory building of KRR-2. The external dose was calculated by using MCNP-4C code and internal(inhalation/ingestion) dose was calculated by using a mathematical calculation methods suggested in the international technical criterion and recommendation which were IAEA Safety-Series 111-p-1.1 and NUREG-1640 for each scenario. In case of landfill disposal scenario, the expected dose was estimated by using RESRAD codes. The final results of assessment were satisfied with the clearance level of the AEA(Atomic Energy Act) in Korea. the concrete waste was disposed at the general landfill disposal site after receiving the authorization from the regulation body. These assessment results will contribute to establish a technical bases of the clearance levels for the concrete wastes from dismantling a nuclear facilities the inside and outside of the country.

  9. Days of dismantling activities of installations and rehabilitation of contaminated sites in France; Demantelement des installations et rehabilitation de sites contamines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    The objective of these days, organized by the section environment of the French society of radiation protection, is to present a panorama of the activities of nuclear installations dismantling and contaminated sites rehabilitation in France, by leaning in the same time on practical cases and by stating the French rule and the national and international recommendations on the subject. These days have also for object to approach the stakes associated with the sectors of waste management and the materials generated by these activities and in a more general way, the stakes to come for the different actors of the dismantling and the rehabilitation. (N.C.)

  10. A treaty more alarming than efficient. The dismantled warheads will not be destroyed. Danger; Un traite plus inquietant qu'efficace. Les ogives demantelees ne seront pas detruites. Risque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riche, P.; Despic-Popovic, H.; Nougayrede, N

    2002-07-01

    This political analysis presents the new treaty of nuclear weapons dismantling between Russia and Usa. In fact the warheads will not be completely dismantling but only stocked, leading to a possible recovery by terrorists. It underlines the real interests of this agreement which are more economic than peaceful. (A.L.B.)

  11. ITER project starring - new step of R and D of fusion researches in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ITER is an international tokamak research/engineering proposal which intended to be an experimental project between today's studies of plasma physics and future electricity-producing fusion power plants. The seven participants (EU, USA, Russia, Japan, Korea, China and India) formally agreed to fund the project in November, 2006. It is based in Cadarache, France. This feature articles consist of six reports such as ITER system starting-hope for Japanese leadership by Kaname IKEDA, outline of ITER and BA project and realization of fusion power by Hiroki MATSUO, hope for development of fusion by Humitaka SATO, ITER projects details by Masahiro MORI, broader approach (BA) projects details by Takeo NISHITANI, and trends of development by each country by Hidetoshi YOSHIDA. (S.Y.)

  12. Decree no. 2005-79 from January 26, 2005, authorizing the Atomic Energy Commission to proceed to the definitive shutdown and dismantling operations of the nuclear facility no.21, named Siloette research reactor, in the Grenoble city territory (Isere); Decret no. 2005-79 du 26 janvier 2005, autorisant le Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique a proceder aux operations de mise a l'arret definitif et de demantelement de l'installation nucleaire de base no.21 denommee reacteur de recherche Siloette sur le territoire de la commune de Grenoble (Isere)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-02-15

    On May 26, 2003, the French atomic energy commission (CEA) addressed an authorization demand for the definitive shutdown and dismantling of the Siloette research reactor. After a technical and administrative instruction of this demand by the French nuclear safety authority (ASN), a project of decree has been presented on July 6, 2004 at the permanent section of the inter-ministry commission of basic nuclear facilities. The commission gave its favourable judgment which is the object of this decree. (J.S.)

  13. Decree no. 2005-78 from January 26, 2005, authorizing the Atomic Energy Commission to proceed to the definitive shutdown and dismantling operations of the nuclear facility no.20, named Siloe reactor, in the Grenoble city territory (Isere); Decret no. 2005-78 du 26 janvier 2005, autorisant le Commissariat a l'energie atomique a proceder aux operations de mise a l'arret definitif et de demantelement de l'installation nucleaire de base no.20 denommee reacteur Siloe sur le territoire de la commune de Grenoble (Isere)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-02-15

    On March 19, 2003, the French atomic energy commission (CEA) addressed an authorization demand for the definitive shutdown and dismantling of the Siloe reactor. After a technical and administrative instruction of this demand by the French nuclear safety authority (ASN), a project of decree has been presented on July 6, 2004 at the permanent section of the inter-ministry commission of basic nuclear facilities. The commission gave its favourable judgment which is the object of this decree. (J.S.)

  14. Development of a handling system for the remote controlled dismantling of the steamdryer housing of KRB/A Gundremmingen -ODIN 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the first generation of civil nuclear power plants reaches the end of their service life, decommissioning of these facilities becomes more and more important to the highly industrialized nations, opening a wide field for investigations on dismantling and handling techniques. Several nuclear installations are being dismantled in Europe and all over the world. One of these is Block A of KRB Gundremminger in Germany. The first component from the reactor core to be segmented is the steamdryer housing of DRB A. It will be cut in the deplaning pool of the reactor, i.e. under water, with the use of plasma arc and consumable electrode waterjet, both thermal cutting techniques. With this dismantling task, experience and know how will be gained concerning cutting and handling techniques, especially in nuclear environments. This paper outlines the dismantling task and describes briefly the design of the tool guiding device ODIN I, which was developed at the Institut fur Werkstoffkunde, University of Hanover, Germany, for this particular cutting problem. (Author)

  15. From the dismantling operation, the importance of continuous training Jose Cabrera NPP is the first nuclear power ended its life in an orderly and planned manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of transfer of ownership has become a reference for the future. During the stopping phase and early stages of decommissioning numerous changes were made at the facility; not only in the systems, but in the organizational part and in the licensing process. Given the novelty and the nature of the dismantling work and responsibilities, has been required extensive training plan.

  16. Development of the graphic design and control system based on a graphic simulator for the spent fuel dismantling equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the graphic design system is developed for designing the spent fuel rod consolidation and the dismantling processes. This system is used throughout the design stages from the conceptual design to the motion analysis. Also, the real-time control system of the rod extracting equipment is developed. This system utilizes the graphic simulator which simulates the motion of the equipment in real time by synchronously connecting the control PC with the graphic server through the TCP/IP network. The developed system is expected to be used as an effective tool in designing the process equipment for the spent fuel management. And the real-time graphic control system can be effectively used to enhance the reliability and safety of the spent fuel handling process by providing the remote monitoring function of the process

  17. Development of the graphic design and control system based on a graphic simulator for the spent fuel dismantling equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Song, T. G.; Yoon, J. S

    2000-06-01

    In this study, the graphic design system is developed for designing the spent fuel rod consolidation and the dismantling processes. This system is used throughout the design stages from the conceptual design to the motion analysis. Also, the real-time control system of the rod extracting equipment is developed. This system utilizes the graphic simulator which simulates the motion of the equipment in real time by synchronously connecting the control PC with the graphic server through the TCP/IP network. The developed system is expected to be used as an effective tool in designing the process equipment for the spent fuel management. And the real-time graphic control system can be effectively used to enhance the reliability and safety of the spent fuel handling process by providing the remote monitoring function of the process.

  18. Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets; Part A, Characterization, decontamination, dismantlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellows, R.L. [ed.

    1993-02-26

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Technology Logic Diagram (TLD), a decision support tool for the K-25 Site, was developed to provide a planning document that relates environmental restoration and waste management problems at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD technique identifies the research necessary to develop these technologies to a state that allows for technology transfer and application to waste management, remedial action, and decontamination and decommissioning activities. The TLD consists of four separate volumes-Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3A, and Vol. 3B. Volume 1 provides introductory and overview information about the TLD. Volume 2 contains logic diagrams. Volume 3 has been divided into two separate volumes to facilitate handling and use. This report is part A of Volume 3 concerning characterization, decontamination, and dismantlement.

  19. Dismantling and decommissioning: The interest of passive neutron measurement to control and characterise radioactive wastes containing uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallu, F.; Reneleau, A.; Soyer, P.; Loridon, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the evacuation of the wastes resulting from the dismantling of an 235U enrichment facility. Gamma-ray spectrometry is usually used to quantify the 235U residual mass and the activity of those wastes. In the present case, the waste internal content made of aluminium prevents gamma-rays from reaching the detector. We show here how neutron passive measurement has been used as an alternative to gamma-ray spectrometry. The controlled objects are about 1000 compressors of masses up to 2000 kg employed in a gaseous diffusion enrichment process. A dedicated neutron-based setup has been designed using Monte Carlo modelling, and a Detection Limit Mass (DLM) of about 4-6 g of 235U is reached. For one of the compressors, the 235U measured mass has been compared to the same mass determined by destructive methods. The comparison shows a very good agreement.

  20. Reuse of solid waste from repair and dismantling work - administrative aspects of the practice adopted in the FRG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the transitional process of radioactive waste, or replaced or dismantled components from nuclear facilities, becoming non-active or decontaminated material is a process varying in time and many other parameters, there should be applied standard administrative, legal procedures of treating such material leaving the scope of atomic energy law due to loss of radioactivity. Regulatory control of the decontaminated material for reuse relies on dose calculations which in future should also take into account the exposure pathway of radioactive solid waste material in addition to pathways of water and air. The proposed value for the individual dose limit, about 0.1 mSv/a, is regarded to be appropriate and feasible. (orig./RB)