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Sample records for cactorum lepidoptera pyralidae

  1. Reproduction, longevity and survival of the cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screened potted cactus plants (Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Mill.) containing pairs of adult male and female cactus moths, Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), were placed in a cactus field in St. Marks, Florida to measure oviposition patterns under field-realistic conditions. Results...

  2. Revealing the elusive sex pheromone of the renowned cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera:Pyralidae): A tribute to Robert Heath

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    The South American cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg.) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), became famous as a biocontrol agent during campaigns in Australia and South Africa to control exotic weedy Opuntia spp. During these campaigns, monitoring the impact and success of the cactus moth did not requir...

  3. Performance improvement through quality evaluations of sterile cactus moths, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), mass-reared at two insectaries

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    A bi-national program was established by Mexico and the United States to mitigate the threat of Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), an invasive herbivore from South America, to native Opuntia spp. biodiversity and Opuntia-based industries. Mass-rearing, sterilization, and transpo...

  4. Field host range of Apanteles opuntiarum (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) in Argentina, a potential biocontrol agent of Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in North America

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    Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg) (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae) was successfully used for biological control of Opuntia spp. (Cactaceae) in Australia and South Africa, where no native cacti occur. Since 1989, this South American moth has been invading the southeastern United States, threatening the unique ca...

  5. Phenology and egg production of the cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum(Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): comparison of field census data and life stage development in the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural phenology and development of the cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) was studied under field conditions in St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, St. Marks, FL. from July 2006 to September 2007. Cactus pads (Opuntia stricta Haw. [Cactaceae]) were visually surveyed...

  6. Predation of Opuntia monacantha (Willd. Haw. (Cactaceae by Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae in a sand bank area of Santa Catarina island, south Brazil

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    Afonso Inácio Orth

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The genus Opuntia is worldwide known for its ecological, ornamental and agronomic importance. Some species became pests in the countries in which they where introduced, and as biological control, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae larvae, originary from Argentina, were used. However, the effect of the attack of this piralid on native cactus has yet not been elucidated. The objective of this study was to detect and to quantify the predation of C. cactorum on Opuntia monacantha. The study was carried out from September to November of 2004, along pre-defined tracks, on a sand bank vegetation area, between the Mole and Galheta beaches in the Santa Catarina island (27º35’83.1’’S e 48º25’70.6’’W. All the studied plants (n = 20 presented some damage caused by C. cactorum. The proportion of unpredated cladodes (68% and fruits (85% was higher than the predated ones. Terminal cladodes were highly predated structures and presented the highest number of larvae inside. Seed loss in the predated fruits was high. The remaining areole of the predated cladodes and fruits differentiated into sprouts and routs and formed new plants. O. monacantha, despite of being predated by C. cactorum larvae, apparently possess defense mechanisms which assure the maintenance of its populations.

  7. Collectively Facilitated Behavior of the Neonate Caterpillars of Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

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    Terrence D. Fitzgerald

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The behavioral biology of the first instar larva of Cactoblastis cactorum was studied from the time of eclosion until the colony penetrated and initiated excavation of the host plant. Hatching from an egg stick was asynchronous, requiring 20 h for the entire cohort to eclose at 50%–70% RH and significantly longer at a lower range of RHs. On eclosion, neonates aggregated in an arena at the base of their egg stick and did not attempt to excavate the cladode until an average of 25 caterpillars had collected, approximately 15 h after the onset of egg hatch. Typically only a single entrance hole was formed, limiting the active process of excavating to one or a few individuals at-a-time until the host was fully penetrated and enlarged internally. Olfactometer tests showed that the neonates are strongly attracted to volatile chemicals released when caterpillars chewed into the cladode, accounting for the strong fidelity of the whole cohort to the initial site of penetration. In one instance, the caterpillars were observed to deal with an explosive release of mucilage by imbibing the liquid until the flooded zone was drained and the caterpillars could reenter the plant through the original entrance hole. Once inside the cladode, marked individuals adopted a regular cycle of defecating at the surface at a mean interval of approximately 10 min when followed for 35 successive cycles. Blanket spraying cladodes with a mandibular gland extract prior to hatching led to the independent dispersal of neonates and a failure to form an arena. When the cladode was impenetrable at the site of eclosion, the active cohort of unfed neonates set off together in search of a new site, marking and following a persistent trail that allowed late-to-eclose caterpillars to join their departed siblings. The adaptive significance of these observations is discussed in the context of the life history of the caterpillar.

  8. Targets of an invasive species: oviposition preference and larval performance of Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) on 14 North American opuntioid cacti.

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    Jezorek, Heather A; Stiling, Peter D; Carpenter, James E

    2010-12-01

    Cactoblastis cactorum Berg (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), the cactus moth, is a well-known biological control agent of prickly pear cactus (Cactaceae: Opuntia Miller). The arrival of the moth in Florida and its subsequent spread through the southeastern United States poses a threat to opuntioid diversity in North America. Of particular concern are the ecological and economic impacts the moth could have in the southwestern United States and Mexico, where both native and cultivated Opuntia species are important resources. It is unknown which species would best support larval development if the moth were to spread further westward in North America. This study aimed to determine if ovipositing females demonstrate preferences for any of 14 common opuntioids native to or naturalized in Mexico and the southwestern United States; which of these opuntioids best support larval development; and if oviposition preference correlates with larval performance, as predicted by simple adaptive models. Results from a field experiment showed that female moths preferred O. engelmannii Salm-Dyck ex Engelmann variety linguiformis (Griffiths) Parfitt and Pinkava and O. engelmannii variety engelmannii for oviposition. A generalized linear model showed number of cladodes and degree of spininess to be significant predictors of oviposition activity. Results from a no-choice larval survival experiment showed Consolea rubescens (Salm-Dyck ex de Candolle.) Lemaire and O. streptacantha Lemaire to be the best hosts. Epidermal toughness was a significant predictor of most larval fitness parameters. In general, oviposition preference was not correlated with larval performance. A lack of co-evolutionary history between C. cactorum and North American opuntioid species may help explain this disconnect.

  9. External morphology of the egg of the native (Melitara prodenialis) and exotic (Cactoblastis cactorum) cactus moths (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

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    Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the morphology of the chorionic surface of two pyralids that feed on Opuntia cactus. The chorionic surface of Cactoblastis cactorum has a reticulate pattern due to the ridges on the surface and aeropyles. The surface has a granular appearance at low m...

  10. Extended geographical distribution and host range of the cactus moth Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera Pyralidae)in Argentina

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    A field exploration was conducted to confirm the southernmost distribution of Cactoblastis cactorum in Argentina. The distribution of the moth was extended to the south (40° 10´S) and west (66° 56´W). The native Opuntia penicilligera was recorded as a host for the first time. These findings should ...

  11. Development of cell lines from the cactophagous insect: Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and their susceptibility to three baculoviruses.

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    Grasela, James J; McIntosh, Arthur H; Ringbauer, Joseph; Goodman, Cynthia L; Carpenter, James E; Popham, Holly J R

    2012-05-01

    The unintentional introduction of the cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum, a successful biological control agent formerly employed in the control of invasive prickly pear cactus species (Opuntia spp.) in Australia, Hawaii, South Africa, and various Caribbean islands, has posed great concern as to the possible threat to native, endangered species of cactus in the southeastern USA as well as with the potential to cause a major infestation of commercial and agricultural cactus crops in Mexico. A number of control measures have been investigated with varying degrees of success including, field exploration for cactus moth-specific parasitoids, insecticides, fungal, bacterial, and nematode agents. Current tactics used by the USA-Mexico binational program to eradicate cactus moth from Mexico and mitigate its westward movement in the USA include host plant removal, the manual removal and destruction of egg sticks and infected cacti stems, and the Sterile Insect Technique. One other approach not taken until now is the development of a cactus moth cell line as a tool to facilitate the investigation of baculoviruses as an alternative biocontrol method for the cactus moth. Consequently, we established C. cactorum cell lines derived from adult ovarian tissue designated as BCIRL-Cc-AM and BCIRL-Cc-JG. The mean cell population doubling time was 204.3 and 112 h for BCIRL-Cc-AM and BCIRL-Cc-JG, respectively, with weekly medium change, while the doubling time was 176.6 and 192.6 h for BCIRL-Cc-AM and BCIRL-Cc-JG, respectively, with a daily change of medium. In addition, the daily versus weekly change in medium was reflected in the percentage viability with both cell lines showing higher levels with a daily medium change. Of the three baculoviruses tested, only the recombinant AcMNPV-hsp70Red and GmMNPV at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1.0 were able to demonstrate significant production of extracellular virus (ECV) in each of the cell lines, whereas both cell lines were

  12. Phenology of blue cactus moth Melitara prodenialis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

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    Native cactus plants (Opuntia stricta Haw. [Cactaceae]) were sampled weekly at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, St. Marks, Florida (30.16 - 30° 1' N, -84.21 - 84° 1' W) from September 2006 to September 2007 for the native blue cactus moth, Melitara prodenialis Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) Meli...

  13. Trail marking by the larvae of the cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum

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    Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) spends most of its larval life feeding within the cladodes of Opuntia cactuses, but the gregarious caterpillars begin their life outside the plant, and in the later instars make intermittent excursions over plant surfaces to access new cladodes and to t...

  14. Targets of an invasive species: Oviposition preference and larval performance of Cactoblastis cactorum on 14 North American Opuntioid cacti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), the cactus moth, is a well-known biological control agent for cactus species of the genus Opuntia. The arrival of the moth in Florida and its subsequent spread through the southeastern United States poses a threat to opuntioid diversity in North Americ...

  15. Current management efforts against Cactoblastis cactorum as a pest of North American prickly pear cactus, Opuntia spp.

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    The unintentional arrival of Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) to Florida changed the scope of this celebrated weed biological control agent from savior to pest. Based on this insects’ substantial control of non-native Opuntia spp. (prickly pear cactus) in Australia and other parts of ...

  16. Oviposition site selection in Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera): constraints and compromises.

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    Robertson, H G

    1987-10-01

    Oviposition by Cactoblastis cactorum on Opuntia ficus-indica and O. aurantiaca was assessed from the positioning of egg sticks on plants in the field. The number of egg sticks laid on O. ficus-indica plants was affected by: (1) plant size; (2) moth emergence near the plant; (3) cladode condition; and (4) plant conspicuousness. These factors contributed towards the clumping of egg sticks on plants. There was no apparent oviposition preference for one of the two host plant species despite the fact that egg predation was higher and fecundity lower on O. aurantiaca. The selection of a site for oviposition on the host plants was influenced by: (1) cladode condition; (2) height above ground; and (3) shelter from wind during oviposition. Succulent cladodes were the favoured sites for oviposition. The evidence suggests that in C. cactorum, oviposition site selection is largely the net result of a compromise between oviposition behaviour selected for increasing the probability of juvenile survival and oviposition behaviour selected for increasing the probability of laying the full complement of eggs. In addition, environmental and physiological factors such as wind and wing-loading, are thought to place constraints on the range of sites available for oviposition.

  17. Combination phenyl propionate/pheromone traps for monitoring navel orangeworm (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in almonds in the vicinity of mating disruption

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    Aerosol mating disruption is used for management of navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), in an increasing portion of California almonds and pistachios. This formulation suppresses pheromone monitoring traps far beyond the treatment block, potentially complicating...

  18. A computer model for simulating population development of the Indianmeal Moth (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in stored corn

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    The Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is a common pest of stored corn, Zea mays L. We developed a computer model to simulate population development of the Indianmeal moth in stored corn using previously published data describing immature development times and ...

  19. Ecology and control of an invasive pest, the cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera)

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    The cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum, was one of the success stories in classical biological control. In the 1920s, the prickly pear cactus was a serious pest in Australia. The cactus moth was imported from its native habitat in South America and proved so successful in controlling cactus that it ...

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome of Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and comparison with other Pyraloidea insects.

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    Liu, Qiu-Ning; Chai, Xin-Yue; Bian, Dan-Dan; Zhou, Chun-Lin; Tang, Bo-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial (mt) genome can provide important information for the understanding of phylogenetic relationships. The complete mt genome of Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) has been sequenced. The circular genome is 15 287 bp in size, encoding 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, and a control region. The AT skew of this mt genome is slightly negative, and the nucleotide composition is biased toward A+T nucleotides (80.15%). All PCGs start with the typical ATN (ATA, ATC, ATG, and ATT) codons, except for the cox1 gene which may start with the CGA codon. Four of the 13 PCGs harbor the incomplete termination codon T or TA. All the tRNA genes are folded into the typical clover-leaf structure of mitochondrial tRNA, except for trnS1 (AGN) in which the DHU arm fails to form a stable stem-loop structure. The overlapping sequences are 35 bp in total and are found in seven different locations. A total of 240 bp of intergenic spacers are scattered in 16 regions. The control region of the mt genome is 327 bp in length and consisted of several features common to the sequenced lepidopteran insects. Phylogenetic analysis based on 13 PCGs using the Maximum Likelihood method shows that the placement of P. interpunctella was within the Pyralidae.

  1. Deleterious activity of natural products on postures of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Diatraea saccharalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

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    Tavares, Wagner S; Cruz, Ivan; Fonseca, Felipe G; Gouveia, Natalia L; Serrão, José E; Zanuncio, José C

    2010-01-01

    The control of Lepidoptera pests should be carried out before hatching of their caterpillars to avoid damage to the crops. The aim of this work was to assess the activity of neem (trade name: Natuneem, producer: Base Fértil, Chapadão do Sul, Brazil) and pyroligneous extracts (trade name: Biopirol 7M, producer: Biocarbo, Itabirito, Brazil) at 10 mL/L (1%) and 20 mL/L (2%) contents on egg masses of different ages of Spodoptera frugiperda Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and of Diatraea saccharalis F. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) at Embrapa Corn and Sorghum in Sete Lagoas, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The tests took place in an unbiased casualized design with 12 treatments and four replications. The insecticides were diluted in water, and 0.04 mL of the solution was applied to recently laid and one- and two-day-old eggs of S. frugiperda and D. saccharalis. Caterpillars hatching from recently laid egg masses of S. frugiperda was lower with 2% pyroligneous extract [(0.02 +/- 0.00)%]. Recently laid eggs and one- or two-day-old eggs of D. saccharalis presented lower caterpillar hatching with 1% neem extract [(0.00 +/- 0.00)%, (0.00 +/- 0.00)%, and (1.00 +/- 0.01)%] and 2% neem extract [(0.00 +/- 0.00)%], compared to 1% pyroligneous extract [(27.30 +/- 3.22)%, (28.40 +/- 3.32)%, and (37.80 +/- 4.14)%] and 2% pyroligneous extract [(42.20 +/- 4.49)%, (48.70 +/- 4.97)%, and (56.60 +/- 5.52)%], respectively. Neem and pyroligneous extracts had impact on hatching of S. frugiperda and D. saccharalis caterpillars.

  2. Demonstration and Characterization of a Persistent Pheromone Lure for the Navel Orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

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    Bradley S. Higbee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The lack of an effective pheromone lure has made it difficult to monitor and manage the navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae, in the economically important crops in which it is the primary insect pest. A series of experiments was conducted to demonstrate and characterize a practical synthetic pheromone lure for capturing navel orangeworm males. Traps baited with lures prepared with 1 or 2 mg of a three- or four-component formulation captured similar numbers of males. The fluctuation over time in the number of males captured in traps baited with the pheromone lure correlated significantly with males captured in female-baited traps. Traps baited with the pheromone lure usually did not capture as many males as traps baited with unmated females, and the ratio of males trapped with pheromone to males trapped with females varied between crops and with abundance. The pheromone lure described improves the ability of pest managers to detect and monitor navel orangeworm efficiently and may improve management and decrease insecticide treatments applied as a precaution against damage. Awareness of differences between male interaction with the pheromone lure and calling females, as shown in these data, will be important as further studies and experience determine how best to use this lure for pest management.

  3. Phagodeterrence by Quassia amara (Simaroubaceae) wood extract fractions on Hypsipyla grandella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) larvae.

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    Soto, Francisco; Hilje, Luko; Mora, Gerardo A; Carballo, Manuel

    2011-03-01

    In Latin America and the Caribbean, precious wood species like mahoganies (Swietenia spp.) and cedars (Cedrela spp.) are seriously injured by the mahogany shootborer, Hypsipyla grandella (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) larva, which bores into the main shoot of trees. In previous experiments focused on searching for a preventive method for managing this pest, a wood extract of bitterwood, Quassia amara L. ex Blom (Simaroubaceae) had been shown to cause phagodeterrence to larvae. Therefore, three fractions (water, methanol and diethyl ether) of a wood extract were tested for their phagodeterrence to larvae, by means of laboratory and greenhouse trials. Phagodeterrence was assessed by determining their effect on foliage consumption, mortality and signs of damage (number of orifices, sawdust piles, fallen shoots, number of tunnels and tunnel length) caused by larvae on Spanish cedar (C. odorata). Both the methanol and diethyl ether fractions caused phagodeterrence, by strongly reducing foliage consumption and signs of damage, while not causing larval mortality. The lowest concentration at which phagodeterrence was detected for the methanol fraction corresponded to 0.0625%, which is equivalent to a 1.0% of the bitterwood crude extract. However, results with the diethyl ether fraction were unsatisfactory, as none of the treatments differed from the solvent, possibly because of an adverse effect of the solvent on foliar tissues. Phagodeterrent principles from Q. amara derivatives may play an important role in dealing with H. grandella if they are complemented with other integrated pest management preventative tactics.

  4. Characterization of the complete mitochondrial genomes of Cnaphalocrocis medinalis and Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

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    Chai, Huan-Na; Du, Yu-Zhou; Zhai, Bao-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) of Cnaphalocrocis medinalis and Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) were determined and analyzed. The circular genomes were 15,388 bp long for C. medinalis and 15,395 bp long for C. suppressalis. Both mitogenomes contained 37 genes, with gene order similar to that of other lepidopterans. Notably, 12 protein-coding genes (PCGs) utilized the standard ATN, but the cox1 gene used CGA as the initiation codon; the cox1, cox2, and nad4 genes in the two mitogenomes had the truncated termination codons T, T, and TA, respectively, but the nad5 gene was found to use T as the termination codon only in the C. medinalis mitogenome. Additionally, the codon distribution and Relative Synonymous Codon Usage of the 13 PCGs in the C. medinalis mitogenome were very different from those in other pyralid moth mitogenomes. Most of the tRNA genes had typical cloverleaf secondary structures. However, the dihydrouridine (DHU) arm of the trnS1(AGN) gene did not form a stable stem-loop structure. Forty-nine helices in six domains, and 33 helices in three domains were present in the secondary structures of the rrnL and rrnS genes of the two mitogenomes, respectively. There were four major intergenic spacers, except for the A+T-rich region, spanning at least 12 bp in the two mitogenomes. The A+T-rich region contained an 'ATAGT(A)'-like motif followed by a poly-T stretch in the two mitogenomes. In addition, there were a potential stem-loop structure, a duplicated 25-bp repeat element, and a microsatellite '(TA)(13)' observed in the A+T-rich region of the C. medinalis mitogenome. A poly-T motif, a duplicated 31-bp repeat element, and a 19-bp triplication were found in the C. suppressalis mitogenome. However, there are many differences in the A+T-rich regions between the C. suppressalis mitogenome sequence in the present study and previous reports. Finally, the phylogenetic relationships of these insects were reconstructed based on amino acid

  5. Characterization of the Complete Mitochondrial Genomes of Cnaphalocrocis medinalis and Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

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    Huan-Na Chai, Yu-Zhou Du, Bao-Ping Zhai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The complete mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes of Cnaphalocrocis medinalis and Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae were determined and analyzed. The circular genomes were 15,388 bp long for C. medinalis and 15,395 bp long for C. suppressalis. Both mitogenomes contained 37 genes, with gene order similar to that of other lepidopterans. Notably, 12 protein-coding genes (PCGs utilized the standard ATN, but the cox1 gene used CGA as the initiation codon; the cox1, cox2, and nad4 genes in the two mitogenomes had the truncated termination codons T, T, and TA, respectively, but the nad5 gene was found to use T as the termination codon only in the C. medinalis mitogenome. Additionally, the codon distribution and Relative Synonymous Codon Usage of the 13 PCGs in the C. medinalis mitogenome were very different from those in other pyralid moth mitogenomes. Most of the tRNA genes had typical cloverleaf secondary structures. However, the dihydrouridine (DHU arm of the trnS1(AGN gene did not form a stable stem-loop structure. Forty-nine helices in six domains, and 33 helices in three domains were present in the secondary structures of the rrnL and rrnS genes of the two mitogenomes, respectively. There were four major intergenic spacers, except for the A+T-rich region, spanning at least 12 bp in the two mitogenomes. The A+T-rich region contained an 'ATAGT(A'-like motif followed by a poly-T stretch in the two mitogenomes. In addition, there were a potential stem-loop structure, a duplicated 25-bp repeat element, and a microsatellite '(TA13' observed in the A+T-rich region of the C. medinalis mitogenome. A poly-T motif, a duplicated 31-bp repeat element, and a 19-bp triplication were found in the C. suppressalis mitogenome. However, there are many differences in the A+T-rich regions between the C. suppressalis mitogenome sequence in the present study and previous reports. Finally, the phylogenetic relationships of these insects were reconstructed based on

  6. Effects of croton urucurana extracts and crude resin on Anagasta kuehniella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

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    Luciana Barboza Silva

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Hundreds of plant species have been studied in order to find out the active ingredient responsible for their insecticidal activity against the pests of economic importance. To verify the insecticidal activity in the husk of stem of Croton urucurana Baillon 1864 (Euphorbiaceae against Anagasta kuehniella Zeller 1879 (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae, the methanolic (EMeOH extract, dichloromethane fraction (FDM, ethyl acetate fraction (FAE and crude resin, incorporated into an artificial diet were evaluated. EMeOH (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0% and crude resin (2.0% interfered with neither the weight nor the survival of fourth instar larvae and other analyzed parameters. FDM (2.0% fraction caused mortality of 65%, and the artificial diet containing 2.0, 1.0 and 0.5% FAE caused 100, 55 and 68% mortality respectively when compared with the control, confirming the least efficiency rates of food conversion for FDM(2.0% and FAE(1.0%. The tryptic analysis performed with the midgut fluid of fourth-instar larvae demonstrated that tryptic and chymiotryptic activities for the larvae fed artificial diet containing EMeOH and crude resin were not different.Atualmente centenas de plantas são investigadas para se conhecer os princípios ativos responsáveis pela atividade inseticida contra as diversas pragas de importância econômica. Com o objetivo de verificar a atividade inseticida das cascas do caule de Croton urucurana Baillon 1864 (Euphorbiaceae em relação a Anagasta kuehniella Zeller 1879 (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae, avaliou-se o extrato metanólico (EMeOH, fração diclorometano (FDM, a fração acetato de etila (FAE e a resina in natura, os quais foram adicionados à dieta artificial. O EMeOH (0,5, 1,0 e 20,% e a resina in natura (2,0%, não interferiram no peso, sobrevivência das larvas de 4ª ínstar, bem como nos demais parâmetros analisados. A fração FDM (2,0% causou mortalidade de 65%, e a dieta artificial contendo 2,0, 1,0, e 0,5% de FAE causou 100, 55 e 68% de

  7. Effects of nitrogen fertilizer and magnesium manipulation on the Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

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    Ge, Lin-Quan; Wan, Don-Ju; Xu, Jie; Jiang, Li-Ben; Wu, Jin-Cai

    2013-02-01

    The rice leaffolder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis Guenee (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is a rice pest that is prone to outbreaks when high levels of nitrogen (N) fertilizer are applied to rice. The larvae feed by scraping the mesophyll cells of leaves, which are mainly composed of chloroplasts containing significant levels of elemental magnesium (Mg). To determine the cause of N fertilizer-induced rice leaffolder outbreaks and the effects of Mg and Mg uptake on the rice leaffolder, the changes in the life history traits and biochemistry of C. medinalis larvae feeding on rice leaves treated with different Mg and N concentrations were investigated in this study. The results showed that foliar treatment using different Mg concentrations under hydroponic culture conditions significantly decreased the developmental duration (days) (DD) of the larvae and pupae but did not influence the pupation rate or adult emergence rate. The number of eggs laid by adult females and the protein content and total sugar content in the larvae and pupae significantly increased with increasing Mg concentrations. Under soil culture conditions, the DD for the larvae and number of eggs laid by adult females significantly increased with increasing nitrogen fertilizer levels, but the applied fertilizer did not influence the DD in the pupae, pupation rate, or adult emergence rate. In contrast, the DD for adults decreased with increased fertilizer levels. In hydroponic culture, Mg in the culture solution and Mg foliar sprays significantly increased the Mg content in rice leaves. In soil cultures, the use of N fertilizer and Mg foliar spray did not significantly increase the leaf Mg content, except at a concentration of 12.5 g/L, indicating that the leaf Mg content may be related to the root uptake of Mg.

  8. Ionizing irradiation of adults of Angoumois grain moth (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) and Indianmeal moth (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) to prevent reproduction, and implications for a generic irradiation treatment for insects.

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    Hallman, Guy J; Phillips, Thomas W

    2008-08-01

    Ionizing irradiation is used as a phytosanitary treatment against quarantine pests. A generic treatment of 400 Gy has been approved for commodities entering the United States against all insects except pupae and adults of Lepidoptera because some literature citations indicate that a few insects, namely, the Angoumois grain moth, Sitotroga cerealella (Olivier) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), and the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), are not completely controlled at that dose. Radiotolerance in insects increases as the insects develop, so the minimum absorbed dose to prevent F1 egg hatch for these two species when irradiated as adults was examined. Also, because hypoxia is known to increase radiotolerance in insects, Angoumois grain moth radiotolerance was tested in a hypoxic atmosphere. A dose range of 336-388 Gy prevented F1 egg hatch from a total of 22,083 adult Indianmeal moths. Dose ranges of 443-505 and 590-674 Gy, respectively, prevented F1 egg hatch from a total of 15,264 and 13,677 adult Angoumois grain moths irradiated in ambient and hypoxic atmospheres. A generic dose of 600 Gy for all insects in ambient atmospheres might be efficacious, although many fresh commodities may not tolerate it when applied on a commercial scale.

  9. The adult population dynamics of the Carob moth[Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zell. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)] in citrus orchards in Adana and Mersin provinces

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZTÜRK, Naim; ÖLÇÜLÜ, Murat; ULUSOY, M. Rıfat

    2011-01-01

    This study was carried out in the period including 2009-2010 years on citrus varieties on cv. Washington in orchards settled in the plains of Adana (Yüreğir, Kozan) and Mersin (Tarsus) provinces. It is aimed to determine the first adult emergence time, adult population fluctuations and the highest population periods and the adults activation time of the Carob moth [Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zell. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)] . The result indicated that even the adult ofE. ceratoniae ...

  10. The adult population dynamics of the Carob moth [Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zell., 1839 (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)] in pomegranate orchards in the Eastern Mediterranean Region

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZTÜRK, Naim; Ulusoy, M. Rifat

    2011-01-01

    This study was carried out in pomegranate orchards in the plains of Adana, Mersin and Osmaniye, the provinces of The East Mediterranean Region in 2008-2009. In this study, some criteria for the management strategy against Carob moth [Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zell., 1839 (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)], such as the first adult emergence, adult population dynamics, the periods the highest population densities and the determination of the duration when the adults are active were aimed. The adult populat...

  11. First report and spore ultrastructure of Vairimorpha plodiae (Opisthokonta: Microspora) from Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Mustafa; Pınar Güngör, F; Gonca Güner, Beyza; Radek, Renate; Linde, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The present study describes the first isolation and characterization of Vairimorpha plodiae, a microsporidian pathogen of Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), from Turkey. We present characteristic light and electron microscopical features of the spores. Fresh binucleate spores are oval and measure 4.48 ± 0.23 (4.01-4.84) µm in length and 2.21 ± 0.15 (1.91-2.48) µm in width. Ultrastructural studies showed that the spore wall measures 150 to 200 nm and consists of a clear endospore (125-150 nm) and an electron-dense, uniform, thin exospore (30-50 nm). The polar filament is isofilar and with 10-12 coils. The well-developed polaroplast consists of two parts with thin lamellae anteriorly and thick, irregularly arranged lamellae posteriorly. The identity of our isolate is discussed.

  12. Some Brain Peptides Regulating the Secretion of Digestive Enzymes in the Indian Meal Moth, Plodia Interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjadian Seyede Minoo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae is a destructive polyphagous pest of many stored products. To interfere with the physiological processes, especially digestion, of the larval pest, more information on the regulatory mechanisms is needed. The brain extract from 1-day-old last instar larvae of P. interpunctella was examined. In the bioassays, the midguts were treated with the brain extract, and the carbohydrase and protease activities were measured. The brain extract showed increasing dose-dependent effects on α-amylase, α-glucosidase, β-glucosidase, α-galactosidase, β-galactosidase, and trypsin secretion in the larval midgut. The extract was further characterised and partially purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Several peptides were determined in the brain extract regulating hydrolase activities in the larval midgut of the pest.

  13. Evaluation of monitoring traps with novel bait for navel orangeworm (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in California almond and pistachio orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nay, Justin E; Peterson, Elonce M; Boyd, Elizabeth A

    2012-08-01

    Experiments conducted in three almond, Prunus dulcis (Rosales: Rosaceae), orchards and three pistachio, Pistacia vera (Sapindales: Anicardiaceae), orchards in 2009 and 2010, and determined that sticky bottom wing traps baited with ground pistachio mummies, or a combination of ground pistachio plus ground almond mummies, trapped more adult female navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), than did traps baited with ground almond mummies alone. During both years of this study, 2.9 and 1.8 more moths were caught in traps baited with pistachio mummies compared with traps baited with almond mummies in almond orchards and pistachio orchards, respectively. Also, traps located in pistachio orchards caught 5.9 and 8.3 times more navel orangeworm than were trapped from almond orchards in 2009 and 2010, respectively. Implications for use of this novel baited trap in almond and pistachio orchard integrated pest management programs are discussed.

  14. Reinvestigation of Cactoblastis Captorum (LEPIDOPTERA: PYRALIDAE) sex pheromone for improved attractiveness and greater specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg.) is recognized as an invasive species in the Caribbean, United States, and Mexico with potential to adversely impact native cactus population. Prior work using hexane extracts of sex glands showed that the sex pheromone of this species has 54% of (Z, E) -9.12 tetradecadi...

  15. Evaluation of Metarhizium anisopliae, Beauveria bassiana and Paecilomyces fumosoroseus as entomopathogens of the cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera:Pyralidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fungal pathogens Metarhizium anisopliae (Metchnikoff) Sorokin (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae), Paecilomyces fumosoroseus (Wize) Brown & Smith (Deuteromycotina: Hyphomycetes), and Beauveria bassiana (Bals.-Criv.) Vuill. (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) were evaluated as potential biological control ...

  16. Gamma radiation effects on phases of evolutional cycle of Plodia interpunctella (Huebner, 1813) (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae) on artificial diet; Efeitos da radiacao gama nas fases do ciclo evolutivo da Plodia interpunctella (Huebner, 1813) (Lepidoptera - Pyralidae) em dieta artificial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamborlin, Maria Julia

    1988-10-01

    The effects of increased gamma radiation ({sup 60} Co) doses on different phases of the evolutional cycle of Plodia interpunctella (Hubner,1813) (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae) have bean studied under laboratory conditions in the Laboratory of Radioentomology of the Nuclear Energy for Agriculture Center (CENA) in Piracicaba, Sao Paulo State, Brazil. For all treatments with gamma radiation a Cobalt-60 source type Gamma bean-650 has been used and the activity was of approximately 2.93 x 10{sup 14} Bq (7,925 Ci), with a dose rate of 2.80 KGy per hour and the insects were kept in a climatic chamber with the temperature adjusted to 27 {+-} 2{sup 0} C and a relative humidity of 70 {+-} 10%. The LD{sub 50} and LD{sub 100} of gamma radiation for eggs of in artificial diet were respectively 51 Gy and 125 Gy. The sterilizing doses in adults which were irradiated at immature phases (larvae and pupae) were 160 Gy and 250 Gy respectively. The sterilizing doses for adults females and males were respectively 250 Gy and 300 Gy. The LD{sub 100} for adult males was 4,750 Gy, 4,500 Gy for females and 4,750 Gy for insects at random. (author). 70 refs., 10 figs., 19 tabs.

  17. Transgenic Bt rice does not challenge host preference of the target pest of rice leaffolder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transgenic Bt rice line T2A-1 expresses a synthesized cry2A gene that shows high resistance to Lepidoptera pests, including Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae. Plant volatile orientation cues and the physical characteristics of the leaf surface play key roles in host location or host-plant acceptance of phytophagous insects. These volatile compounds and physical traits may become altered in Bt rice and it is not known whether this influences the behavior of C. medinalis when searching for oviposition sites. RESULTS: The results of electronic nose analysis showed that the Radar map of Bt rice cultivars was analogous to the non- Bt rice cultivars at each growing stage. PCA analysis was able to partly discriminate between some of the Bt vs. non-Bt rice sensors, but could not to separate Bt cultivars from non-Bt cultivars. The total ion chromatogram between Bt and non-Bt rice cultivars at the seedling, booting and tillering stages were similar and 25 main compounds were identified by GC-MS. For most compounds, there was no significant difference in compound quantities between Bt and non-Bt rice cultivars at equivalent growth stages. The densities of the tubercle papicles and the trichomes on the upper and lower surfaces were statistically equal in Bt and non-Bt rice. The target pest, C. medinalis, was attracted to host rice plants, but it could not distinguish between the transgenic and the isogenic rice lines. CONCLUSIONS: There were no significant differences between the Bt rice line, T2A-1 and the non-Bt rice for volatiles produced or in its physical characteristics and there were no negative impacts on C. medinalis oviposition behavior. These results add to the mounting evidence that Bt rice has no negative impact on the target insect oviposition behavior.

  18. Degree-day Modeling of Carob moth [Apomyelois (=Ectomyelois) ceratoniae Zell. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)] in pomegranate orchards in Şanlıurfa province

    OpenAIRE

    mamay, mehmet; ÜNLÜ, Levent; Yanık, Ertan; İkinci, Ali

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine degree-day modeling of carob moth [Apomyelois (=Ectomyelois) ceratoniae Zell. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)] under field conditions in pomegranate orchards in Şanlıurfa province during the years 2011 and 2012. Delta pheromone traps were used to determine population development of carob moth in Şanlıurfa Central and Siverek counties. HOBO data logger was used to record temperature hourly in order to calculate degree-day values of the pest in Şanliurfa Central a...

  19. Oviposition by Female Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): Description and Time Budget Analysis of Behaviors in Laboratory Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambaraju, Kishan R.; Donelson, Sarah L.; Bozic, Janko; Phillips, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    The oviposition behavior of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), a major insect pest of durable stored foods, was studied in small experimental arenas under laboratory conditions using videography, and a time budget analysis of its behaviors was documented. Resting gravid females typically became active shortly after the start of the scotophase. The characteristic behaviors exhibited by mated females prior to oviposition included antennal movement, grooming of antennae and mouth parts using the forelegs, walking or flying, and abdomen bending and dragging. Pre-oviposition behaviors such as antennal grooming and walking or flying were observed to alternate several times before females commenced the abdominal dragging behavior that preceded egg laying. Eggs were laid singly or sometimes in groups, either freely or stuck to food material. Gravid females showed little or no movement during the photophase; however, they actively flew and oviposited during the scotophase. Females allocated only a small portion of their time to oviposition while the rest of the time was spent away from food. Females oviposited on food material by making repeated visits, predominantly during the first four hours of the scotophase. Visits and time spent on food declined as the scotophase advanced. PMID:26805893

  20. Oviposition by Female Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae: Description and Time Budget Analysis of Behaviors in Laboratory Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishan R. Sambaraju

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The oviposition behavior of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae, a major insect pest of durable stored foods, was studied in small experimental arenas under laboratory conditions using videography, and a time budget analysis of its behaviors was documented. Resting gravid females typically became active shortly after the start of the scotophase. The characteristic behaviors exhibited by mated females prior to oviposition included antennal movement, grooming of antennae and mouth parts using the forelegs, walking or flying, and abdomen bending and dragging. Pre-oviposition behaviors such as antennal grooming and walking or flying were observed to alternate several times before females commenced the abdominal dragging behavior that preceded egg laying. Eggs were laid singly or sometimes in groups, either freely or stuck to food material. Gravid females showed little or no movement during the photophase; however, they actively flew and oviposited during the scotophase. Females allocated only a small portion of their time to oviposition while the rest of the time was spent away from food. Females oviposited on food material by making repeated visits, predominantly during the first four hours of the scotophase. Visits and time spent on food declined as the scotophase advanced.

  1. Oviposition by Female Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): Description and Time Budget Analysis of Behaviors in Laboratory Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambaraju, Kishan R; Donelson, Sarah L; Bozic, Janko; Phillips, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    The oviposition behavior of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), a major insect pest of durable stored foods, was studied in small experimental arenas under laboratory conditions using videography, and a time budget analysis of its behaviors was documented. Resting gravid females typically became active shortly after the start of the scotophase. The characteristic behaviors exhibited by mated females prior to oviposition included antennal movement, grooming of antennae and mouth parts using the forelegs, walking or flying, and abdomen bending and dragging. Pre-oviposition behaviors such as antennal grooming and walking or flying were observed to alternate several times before females commenced the abdominal dragging behavior that preceded egg laying. Eggs were laid singly or sometimes in groups, either freely or stuck to food material. Gravid females showed little or no movement during the photophase; however, they actively flew and oviposited during the scotophase. Females allocated only a small portion of their time to oviposition while the rest of the time was spent away from food. Females oviposited on food material by making repeated visits, predominantly during the first four hours of the scotophase. Visits and time spent on food declined as the scotophase advanced.

  2. Development of a binomial sampling plan for the carob moth (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), a pest of California dates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Joon; Perring, Thomas M

    2010-08-01

    The seasonal density fluctuations of the carob moth, Ectomyelois ceratoniae (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), were determined in a commercial date, Phoenix dactylifera L. garden. Four fruit categories (axil, ground, abscised green, and abscised brown) were sampled, and two carob moth life stages, eggs and immatures (larvae and pupae combined), were evaluated on these fruits. Based on the relative consistency of these eight sampling units (four fruit categories and two carob moth stages), four were used for the development of a binomial sampling plan. The average number of carob moth eggs and immatures on ground and abscised brown fruit was estimated from the proportion of infested fruit, and these binomial models were evaluated for model fitness and precision. These analyses suggested that the best sampling plan should consist of abscised brown dates and carob moth immatures by using a sample size of 100 dates. The performance of this binomial plan was evaluated further using a resampling protocol with 25 independent data sets at action thresholds of 7, 10, and 15% to represent light, medium and severe infestations, respectively. Results from the resampling program suggested that increasing sample size from 100 to 150 dates improved the precision of the binomial sampling plan. Use of this sampling plan will be the cornerstone of an integrated pest management program for carob moth in dates.

  3. Macrocentrus sylvestrellae spec. nov. (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Macrocentrinae), a parasitoid of Dioryctria sylvestrella (Ratzeburg) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, van C.

    2001-01-01

    A new species of the genus Macrocentrus Curtis, 1833 (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Macrocentrinae) described and illustrated: M. sylvestrellae spec. nov. from France and Italy. It is a gregarious koinobiont endoparasitoid of the pine stem borer Dioryctria sylvestrella (Ratzeburg, 1840) (Lepidoptera; Pyr

  4. Individual and Combined Effects of Bacillus Thuringiensis and Azadirachtin on Plodia Interpunctella Hübner (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri-Ganbalani, Gadir; Borzoui, Ehsan; Abdolmaleki, Arman; Abedi, Zahra; George Kamita, Shizuo

    2016-01-01

    The Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella Hübner (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is a major stored product pest that is found throughout the world. In this study, the effect of oral exposure to Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner) subsp. kurstaki (Bacillales: Bacillaceae) and azadirachtin was evaluated in third instar P. interpunctella under laboratory conditions. The median lethal concentration (LC50) of Bt and azadirachtin on third instars was 490 and 241 μg a.i./ml, respectively. The median lethal time (LT50) of these insecticides was the same (4.5 d following exposure to 750 or 400 μg a.i./ml of Bt or azadirachtin, respectively). When the larvae fed on diet containing LC30 concentrations of both Bt and azadirachtin an additive interaction in terms of mortality was found. A synergistic interaction was found when the larvae fed on diet containing LC50 concentrations of both insecticides. Larvae that fed on insecticide-containing diet (either Bt or azadirachtin at an LC30 concentration, or both insecticides at LC30 or LC50 concentrations) showed lower glycogen and lipid levels, and generally lower protein content in comparison to control larvae. Larvae that fed on diet containing both Bt and azadirachtin showed reduced weight gain and nutritional indices in comparison to control larvae or larvae fed on the diet containing only one of the insecticides. Finally, exposure to both insecticides, either individually or in combination, reduced the level of digestive enzymes found in the midgut. Our findings indicate that both Bt and azadirachtin, either individually or in combination have significant potential for use in controlling of P. interpunctella.

  5. Herbicide toxicity, selectivity and hormesis of nicosulfuron on 10 Trichogrammatidae (Hymenoptera) species parasitizing Anagasta ( = Ephestia) kuehniella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Germano L D; de Paulo, Paula D; Zanuncio, José C; Tavares, Wagner De S; Alvarenga, Anarelly C; Dourado, Luan R; Bispo, Edilson P R; Soares, Marcus A

    2017-01-02

    Selective agrochemicals including herbicides that do not affect non-target organisms such as natural enemies are important in the integrated pest management (IPM) programs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the herbicide toxicity, selectivity and hormesis of nicosulfuron, recommended for the corn Zea mays L. (Poaceae) crop, on 10 Trichogrammatidae (Hymenoptera) species. A female of each Trichogramma spp. or Trichogrammatoidea annulata De Santis, 1972 was individually placed in plastic test tubes (no choice) with a cardboard containing 45 flour moth Anagasta ( = Ephestia) kuehniella Zeller, 1879 (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) eggs. Parasitism by these natural enemies was allowed for 48 h and the cardboards were sprayed with the herbicide nicosulfuron at 1.50 L.ha(-1), along with the control (only distilled water). Nicosulfuron reduced the emergence rate of Trichogramma bruni Nagaraja, 1983 females, but increased that of Trichogramma pretiosum Riley, 1879, Trichogramma acacioi Brun, Moraes and Smith, 1984 and T. annulata females. Conversely, this herbicide increased the emergence rate of Trichogramma brasiliensis Ashmead, 1904, T. bruni, Trichogramma galloi Zucchi, 1988 and Trichogramma soaresi Nagaraja, 1983 males and decreased those of T. acacioi, Trichogramma atopovilia Oatman and Platner, 1983 and T. pretiosum males. In addition, nicosulfuron reduced the sex ratio of T. galloi, Trichogramma bennetti Nagaraja and Nagarkatti, 1973 and T. pretiosum and increased that of T. acacioi, T. bruni, T. annulata, Trichogramma demoraesi Nagaraja, 1983, T. soaresi and T. brasiliensis. The herbicide nicosulfuron was "harmless" (class 1, <30% reduction) for females and the sex ratio of all Trichogrammatidae species based on the International Organization for Biological Control (IOBC) classification. The possible hormesis effect of nicosulfuron on Trichogrammatidae species and on the bacterium Wolbachia sp. (Rickettsiales: Rickettsiaceae) was also discussed.

  6. Life tables of Habrobracon hebetor (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) parasitizing Anagasta kuehniella and Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): effect of host density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliopoulos, P A; Stathas, G J

    2008-06-01

    The reproductive performance of the parasitoid Habrobracon hebetor (Say) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) against the moths Anagasta kuehniella Zeller and Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) was studied in the laboratory. The analysis was based on the comparison of parasitoid's life table parameters related to those of its hosts at various conditions of host density (daily supply of 1, 5, 15, and 30 full-grown host larvae). The estimated parameters were the intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm), the net reproductive rate (R0), the mean generation time (G), the finite capacity of increase (lambda), the gross reproductive rate (GRR), the doubling time (DT), the reproductive value (Vx), and the life expectancy (ex). The rm of H. hebetor proved to be significantly higher than those of its hosts at all host densities. When only one host per day was supplied, the wasp had the lowest reproductive potential, whereas it was maximized when 15 hosts per day were exposed. Maximum values of R0 and GRR were obtained at densities > or =15 host larvae per day. Any increase in host supply above this threshold did not cause significant changes in life table parameters. Variation of rm as a function of host density can be described by the linear regression. Sex ratio of wasp progeny (females/total) ranged from 0.36 to 0.42, irrespective of host density or species. Newly emerged adults recorded maximum ex and Vx. The results of this study can be used to improve mass rearing programs and inoculative release applications of H. hebetor against moth pests of stored products.

  7. Effect of Piperonyl Butoxide on the Toxicity of Four Classes of Insecticides to Navel Orangeworm (Amyelois transitella) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demkovich, Mark; Dana, Catherine E; Siegel, Joel P; Berenbaum, May R

    2015-12-01

    Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), the navel orangeworm, is a highly polyphagous economic pest of almond, pistachio, and walnut crops in California. Increasing demand for these crops and their rising economic value has resulted in substantial increases of insecticide applications to reduce damage to acceptable levels. The effects of piperonyl butoxide (PBO), a methylenedioxyphenyl compound that can act as a synergist by inhibiting cytochrome P450-mediated detoxification on insecticide metabolism by A. transitella, were examined in a series of feeding bioassays with first-instar A. transitella larvae from a laboratory strain. PBO, however, can have a variety of effects on metabolism, including inhibition of glutathione-S-transferases and esterases and induction of P450s. In our study, PBO synergized the toxicity of acetamiprid, λ-cyhalothrin, and spinosad, suggesting possible involvement of P450s in their detoxification. In contrast, PBO interacted antagonistically with the organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos, reducing its toxicity, an effect consistent with inhibition of P450-mediated bioactivation of this pesticide. The toxicity of the anthranilic diamide insecticide chlorantraniliprole was not altered by PBO, suggestive of little or no involvement of P450-mediated metabolism in its detoxification. Because a population of navel orangeworm in Kern County, CA, has already acquired resistance to the pyrethroid insecticide bifenthrin through enhanced P450 activity, determining the effect of adding a synergist such as PBO on detoxification of all insecticide classes registered for use in navel orangeworm management can help to develop rotation practices that may delay resistance acquisition or to implement alternative management practices where resistance is likely to evolve.

  8. Low Temperature Storage of Telenomus remus (Nixon) (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) and its Factitious Host Corcyra cephalonica (Stainton) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, A P; Bueno, A F; Pomari-Fernandes, A; Grande, M L M; Bortolotto, O C; Silva, D M

    2016-09-15

    We conducted three bioassays to evaluate the effect of low-temperature storage of eggs (host) and pupae and adults (parasitoid) on the biology and parasitism capacity of the egg parasitoid Telenomus remus (Nixon) (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae). Viable stored Corcyra cephalonica (Stainton) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) eggs were parasitized to the same degree or even higher than fresh eggs when stored until 14 days at 5°C or until 21 days at 10°C. In contrast, the percentage of parasitized sterilized eggs was equal to the control only when stored for 7 and 14 days. Survival of T. remus pupae declined with storage time at both studied temperatures (5 and 10°C). However, after 7 days of storage, survival of pupae was still 86.3 and 64.9% at 10 and 5°C, respectively. The number of adult male survivors remained similar until the fourth storage day at both 5 and 10°C. In contrast, female survival did not differ until day 8 at 10°C or day 6 at 5°C. Parasitism capacity of stored adults was not altered by storage compared with the control. Therefore, we conclude that the maximal storage time at 10°C is 21 days for viable C. cephalonica eggs and 7 days for T. remus pupae, while parasitoid adults should not be stored for more than 4 days at either 5 or 10°C.

  9. Harnup güvesi [Apomyelois (=Ectomyelois) ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)]'nin farklı nar çeşitlerindeki bulaşıklık oranı ve konukçu tercihi

    OpenAIRE

    mamay, mehmet; İKİNCİ, Ali; ÜNLÜ, Levent; DOĞAN, Ergün

    2014-01-01

    This research was conducted in order to determine the infestation rate and host preference of Carob Moth [Apomyelois (=Ectomyelois) ceratoniae Zell. ( Lepidoptera.: Pyralidae)] on 24 years old 13 different pomegranate cultivars under field conditions in 2010 and 2011. In the research, 13 pomegranate cultivars including 3 sour, 5 tartish and 5 sweet planted in 4 x 4 m distance were used. The research was carried out on 2 trees of each cultivar from each of 3 replications according to randomize...

  10. Rearing a native cactus moth, Melitara prodenialis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), on artificial diet and Opuntia cladodes: Preliminary comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study compared several biological parameters of native cactus moth, Melitara prodenialis, reared on an artificial versus the natural diet of Opuntia spp. cladodes. Results suggest that the current artificial diet developed for mass rearing C. cactorum can provide nutritional value for the rear...

  11. Activity of broad-spectrum and reduced-risk insecticides on various life stages of cranberry fruitworm (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in highbush blueberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, John C; Jenkins, Paul E; Poppen, Ryan Vander; Isaacs, Rufus

    2010-10-01

    Laboratory and semifield bioassays were conducted to determine the life-stage activity of insecticides for controlling cranberry fruitworm, Acrobasis vaccinii Riley (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), a key lepidopteran pest of highbush blueberry, Vaccinium corymbosum L. The organophosphates azinphosmethyl and phosmet, the pyrethroid esfenvalerate, and the carbamate methomyl were lethal to all life stages. The neonicotinoids thiacloprid and acetamiprid demonstrated strong larvicidal and ovicidal activity but were somewhat weaker adulticides than the conventional broad-spectrum compounds. Bacillus thuringiensis, indoxacarb, and emamectin benzoate were shown to control A. vacinii primarily through their larvicidal activity. Spinosad was toxic to all life stages, including eggs laid on top of residues and those that were treated topically, but larvicidal activity was short lived. The growth regulators pyriproxyfen and novaluron had strong ovicidal activity when eggs were laid on top of residues but had limited larvicidal activity. Tebufenozide was not directly toxic to eggs, but demonstrated larvicidal activity, and ovilarvicidal activity when topically applied to eggs. Azinphosmethyl, phosmet, indoxacarb, thiacloprid, and acetamiprid were all toxic to the egg parasitoid Trichogramma minutum Riley. In contrast pyriproxyfen, emamectin benzoate, methomyl, novaluron, and spinosad did not negatively affect the survival of T. minutum within Acrobasis vacinii eggs. These results help inform the ongoing development of integrated strategies for insect management in blueberry.

  12. Effects of shelf architecture and parasitoid release height on biological control of Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) eggs by Trichogramma deion (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieshop, Matthew J; Flinn, Paul W; Nechols, James R; Campbell, James F

    2006-12-01

    The effects of shelving type, packaging, and release height on success of Trichogramma deion Pinto & Oatman (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) parasitizing Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) eggs was studied under laboratory conditions. In trials on multipletiered gondola-type or open shelving units, with or without packaging, foraging success was evaluated by comparing parasitism and total mortality rates of sentinel egg disks among shelves after a single point-release of T. deion. Results showed that T. deion parasitized more egg disks and killed more total eggs on open shelves than on gondola shelving. The presence of packaging had no effect on parasitoid foraging on open shelves; however, packaging did interfere with parasitism of P. interpunctella eggs on gondola shelving. Egg parasitism and mortality patterns among shelves were not as evenly distributed on gondola-type shelving compared with open shelving. On gondola shelves without packages, changing the release point of T. deion from the middle to the lowest shelf shifted the distribution of parasitism toward the floor. Gondola shelving, especially in the presence of packaging, reduced foraging efficiency of T. deion for P. interpunctella eggs. Thus, to attain adequate control of P. interpunctella, it may be necessary to use two release heights on gondola shelving.

  13. Determination of host-associated variability in the shape of the mandible of white rice stem borer Scirpophaga innotata (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma L. I. Alegre

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Host-plant modifications are known to promote high taxonomic diversity andecomorphological disparity among its insect-herbivores. Studies on mouthpart morphology specificallythe mandible are central to understanding these adaptive modifications as they are used as majorfeeding apparatus. In this study, mandible shape of a monophagous white rice stem borer, Scirpophagainnotata Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae which were obtained from different host-plant rice cultivarswere assessed using image analysis and Elliptic Fourier techniques. Contours of the mandibles wereextracted via chain-coding and principal component analyses were performed to determine patterns ofshape differences. Observed variation ranges from the arrangement and length of its teeth, from thebasal and external margins and the contour of the side of attachment from the body. The greatestvariations accounted by the first two principal components (PC’s are on the arrangement, length andnumber of its teeth which is attributable to continuous wear of the individual mandible in effect of thebiochemical properties of the plant. Intra-population variation is associated with the influence of riceplant morphological characteristics associated with resistance or susceptibility to white stem borer.

  14. Effects of a naturally occurring and a synthetic synergist on toxicity of three insecticides and a phytochemical to navel orangeworm (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Guodong; Pollock, Henry S; Lawrance, Allen; Siegel, Joel P; Berenbaum, May R

    2012-04-01

    The navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is the most destructive lepidopteran pest of almonds [Prunus dulcis (Mill.) D.A.Webb] and pistachios (Pistacia vera L.) in California and is a serious problem in figs (Ficus carica L.) and walnuts (Juglans spp.). In addition to direct damage, larval feeding leaves nuts vulnerable to infection by Aspergillus spp., fungi that produce toxic aflatoxins. A potentially safe and sustainable approach for managing navel orangeworm in orchards may be to use natural essential oil synergists to interfere with this insect's ability to detoxify insecticides and phytochemicals. We tested the effects of a naturally occurring plant-derived chemical, myristicin, and a synthetic inhibitor of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), piperonyl butoxide, on the toxicity of three insecticides (alpha-cypermethrin, tau-fluvalinate, and methoxyfenozide [Intrepid]) and a phytochemical (xanthotoxin) to A. transitella. Piperonyl butoxide significantly synergized alpha-cypermethrin and tau-fluvalinate, whereas myristicin synergized only alpha-cypermethrin. Piperonyl butoxide synergized the toxicity of xanthotoxin as early as 72 h after exposure, whereas myristicin synergized xanthotoxin after 120 h. In view of these findings and the limited availability of environmentally safe synthetic insecticides for sustainable management, particularly in organic orchards, myristicin is a potential field treatment in combination with insecticides to reduce both navel orangeworm survival and aflatoxin contamination of nuts. In addition, this study demonstrates that in A. transitella the insect growth regulator methoxyfenozide is not detoxified by P450s.

  15. Anoxia-conditioning hormesis alters the relationship between irradiation doses for survival and sterility in the cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the most important components of a Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) program is appropriate irradiation dose. Knowing the organismal dose-response enables the selection of a dose that induces the highest level of sterility while preserving the sexual competitiveness and quality of the sterile in...

  16. Aspectos biológicos e dano de Diatraea saccharalis (fabr., 1794 (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae em sorgo cultivado sob diferentes doses de nitrogênio e potássio Biological aspects and damage of Diatraea saccharalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae in sorghum, under different doses of nitrogen and potassium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Antônio de Bortoli

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a influência da adubação da cultura do sorgo Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench, na biologia da broca da cana-de-açúcar Diatraea saccharalis (Fabr., 1794 (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae. Para isso foi utilizado sorgo da cultivar Rubi-Asgrow, plantado em vasos utilizando-se diferentes doses de fertilizantes e mantidos em casa-de-vegetação. Os tratamentos utilizados (doses de NK foram: N1 = 0-200 ppm; N2 = 50-200 ppm; N3 = 100-200 ppm; N4 = 200-200 ppm; N5 = 400-200 ppm; K1 = 200-0 ppm; K2 = 200-50 ppm; K3 = 200-100 ppm; K4 = 200-200 ppm; e K5 = 200-400 ppm. De modo geral, pode-se concluir que doses de 50 a 200 ppm de N promoveram o desenvolvimento normal das larvas de D. saccharalis, sendo que as menores porcentagens de dano foram verificadas nas menores doses; para o potássio, quanto maior a dose, menor foi o dano causado pelas lagartas, apesar de favorecer o desenvolvimento da mesma.This work was carried out to evaluate the influence of the fertilization of sorghum, Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench, on the stem borer Diatraea saccharalis (Fabr., 1794 (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae biology. It was used the variety Rubi-Asgrow. The treatments were (NK doses: N1 = 0-200 ppm; N2 = 50-200 ppm; N3 = 100-200 ppm; N4 = 200-200 ppm; N5 = 400-200 ppm; K1 = 200-0 ppm; K2 = 200-50 ppm; K3 = 200-100 ppm; K4 = 200-200 ppm and K5 = 200-400 ppm. It was possible to conclude that nitrogen doses from 50 to 200 ppm provide a normal development for D. saccharalis larvae, although the lowest percentage of damage was verified with the lowest dose; while for the potassium, the highest dose favoured the caterpillars development, but less damage was observed on the plants.

  17. Lipase and invertase activities in midgut and salivary glands of Chilo suppressalis (Walker (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae, rice striped stem borer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zibaee

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The rice striped stem borer, Chilo supprressalis, was introduced to Iran in 1973 where it is now widely distributed and causes severe damages. Lipases, which catalyses the hydrolysis of fatty acid ester bonds, are widely distributed among animals, plants and microorganisms. Invertases (β-fructofuranosidase are glycosidehydrolases that catalyze the cleavage of sucrose (β-D-glucopyranosyl-S-D-fructofuranoside into the monosaccharides glucose and fructose. Laboratory-reared 4th instar larvae were randomly selected, their midgut and salivary glands were removed by dissection under a light microscope and lipase and invertase activities were assayed. The activity of lipase/invertase in the midgut and salivary gland were 0.49/0.27 and 0.35/0.23 μmol/min/mg protein, respectively. The optimum pH and temperature for both the two enzymes were determined to be 10-11 and 37-40 °C, which is consistent with pH and temperature values already observed in Lepidoptera. The enzyme activity was reduced by addition of NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, SDS, urea and plant extracts from Artemisia annua, but not by CaCl2 which enhanced enzyme activity. Pest control with usage of resistant varieties of plants is one of the most important practices that are dependant on inhibitors already present in nature. Hence, characterization of insect digestive enzymes, especially examination of inhibition effects on enzyme activity, could be useful in developing new strategies for pest control.

  18. Leucine transport is affected by Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 toxins in brush border membrane vesicles from Ostrinia nubilalis Hb (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and Sesamia nonagrioides Lefebvre (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) midgut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, M Giovanna; Caccia, Silvia; González-Cabrera, Joel; Ferré, Juan; Giordana, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    The pore-forming activity of Cry1Ab, Cry1Fa and Cry1Ca toxins and their interaction with leucine transport mediated by the K(+)/leucine cotransporter were studied in brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) isolated from the midgut of Ostrinia nubilalis and Sesamia nonagrioides. In both species, as in other Lepidoptera, leucine uptake by BBMVs can take place in the absence of cations, but it can also be driven by a K(+) gradient. Experiments with the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye 3,3'-diethylthiacarbocyanine iodide proved that Cry1Ab, a Bacillus thuringiensis toxin active in vivo, enhanced the membrane permeability to potassium in O. nubilalis BBMVs. This result is in agreement with similar effects observed in S. nonagrioides BBMV incubated with various Cry1 toxins active in vivo. The effect of the above toxins was tested on the initial rate of 0.1 mM: leucine influx. Instead of an increase in leucine influx, a reduction was observed with the Cry1 toxins active in vivo. Cry1Ab and Cry1Fa, but not the inactive toxin Cry1Da, inhibited in a dose-dependent manner leucine uptake both in the absence and in the presence of a K(+) gradient, a clear indication that their effect is independent of the channel formed by the toxins and that this effect is exerted directly on the amino acid transport system.

  19. Larval Preference and Performance of Amyelois transitella (Navel Orangeworm, Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in Relation to the Fungus Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampt, Eline A; Bush, Daniel S; Siegel, Joel P; Berenbaum, May R

    2016-02-01

    The navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker), is a polyphagous pest of California nut crops and is responsible for extensive losses in the United States. It directly damages crops by feeding and contaminating nuts with frass and webbing and vectors saprophytic fungi that infect crops. The navel orangeworm is commonly associated with Aspergillus species, including the toxigenic Aspergillus flavus, which causes crop loss by producing carcinogens, including aflatoxin B1. This lepidopteran-fungus association is the most economically serious pest complex in Central Valley orchards, and evidence indicates that this relationship is mutualistic. We assessed preference and performance of navel orangeworm larvae associated with A. flavus in behavioral bioassays in which neonates were allowed to orient within arenas to media with or without fungal tissue, and performance bioassays in which larvae were reared with and without A. flavus on potato dextrose agar (PDA) and a semidefined almond PDA diet to evaluate effects on development and pupal weight. Navel orangeworm larvae were attracted to A. flavus and developed faster in its presence, indicating a nutritional benefit to the caterpillars. Larvae reached pupation ∼33% faster on diet containing A. flavus, and pupal weights were ∼18% higher for males and ∼13% higher for females on this diet. Our findings indicate that A. flavus plays an important role in larval orientation and development on infected hosts. The preference-performance relationship between navel orangeworms and Aspergillus flavus is consistent with a facultative mutualism that has broad implications for pest management efforts and basic understanding of Lepidoptera-plant interactions.

  20. Lepidoptera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aguiar, António M. Franquinho; Karsholt, Ole

    2009-01-01

      Being the first of a series dealing with the entomofauna of the Madeira and Selvagens Islands, this catalogue is a list of all Lepidoptera recorded from this region of Macaronesia, with references to the relevant literature. The checklist includes 37 families, 211 genera and 331 species. 31...... species are recorded from Madeira for the first time, and exact data and locality are given for these in the notes. 32 species, which had previously been recorded from Madeira, are removed from the list of Lepidoptera found in the Madeira Islands being misidentifications, doubtful and unconfirmed records......, undetermined species requiring further study and accidentally introduced species which have not established themselves in Madeira. No genus of Lepidoptera is endemic to Madeira, but 81 species are endemic to the Madeira Archipelago, and a further 36 species are considered Macaronesian endemics. One species...

  1. Construction and analysis of antennal cDNA library from rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), and expression profiles of putative odorant-binding protein and chemosensory protein genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhong-Jun; Liu, Su; Jiang, Yan-Dong; Zhou, Wen-Wu; Liang, Qing-Mei; Cheng, Jiaan; Zhang, Chuan-Xi; Zhu, Zeng-Rong; Gurr, Geoff M

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we constructed a high-quality cDNA library from the antennae of the Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). A total of 1,235 colonies with inserts greater than 0.7 kb were sequenced and analyzed. Homology searching coupled with bioinformatics analysis identified 15 and 7 cDNA sequences, respectively, encoding putative odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and chemosensory proteins (CSPs). A phylogenetic tree of CsupCSPs showed that each CsupCSP has orthologs in Manduca sexta and Bombyx mori with strong bootstrapping support. One CSP was either very specific or more related to the CSPs of another species than to conspecific CSP. The expression profiles of the OBPs and CSPs in different tissues were measured by real-time quantitative PCR. The results revealed that of the 11 OBP genes, the transcript levels of CsupOBP1, CsupOBP5, and CsupOBP7 were higher in both male and female antennae than those in other tissues. And CsupCSP7 was highly expressed in both male and female antennae. Based on these results, the possible physiological functions of CsupOBPs and CsupCSPs were discussed.

  2. Lepidoptera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aguiar, António M. Franquinho; Karsholt, Ole

    2009-01-01

    , undetermined species requiring further study and accidentally introduced species which have not established themselves in Madeira. No genus of Lepidoptera is endemic to Madeira, but 81 species are endemic to the Madeira Archipelago, and a further 36 species are considered Macaronesian endemics. One species...

  3. Lepidoptera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez-Vaamonde, Carlos; Agassiz, David; Augustin, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    for hundreds of years, 74% have established during the 20th century and arrivals are accelerating, with an average of 1.9 alien Lepidoptera newly established per year between 2000–2007. For 78 aliens with a known area of origin, Asia has contributed 28.9%, Africa (including Macaronesian islands, Canaries...

  4. Phenoloxidase in larvae of Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): molecular cloning of the proenzyme cDNA and enzyme activity in larvae paralyzed and parasitized by Habrobracon hebetor (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzer, Kris L; Zhu, Kun Yan; Baker, James E

    2005-06-01

    Phenoloxidase (PO) is a major component of the insect immune system. The enzyme is involved in encapsulation and melanization processes as well as wound healing and cuticle sclerotization. PO is present as an inactive proenzyme, prophenoloxidase (PPO), which is activated via a protease cascade. In this study, we have cloned a full-length PPO1 cDNA and a partial PPO2 cDNA from the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hubner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and documented changes in PO activity in larvae paralyzed and parasitized by the ectoparasitoid Habrobracon hebetor (Say) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). The cDNA for PPO1 is 2,748 bp and encodes a protein of 681 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 78,328 and pI of 6.41 containing a conserved proteolytic cleavage site found in other PPOs. P. interpunctella PPO1 ranges from 71-78% identical to other known lepidopteran PPO-1 sequences. Percent identity decreases as comparisons are made to PPO-1 of more divergent species in the orders Diptera (Aa-48; As-49; and Sb-60%) and Coleoptera (Tm-58; Hd-50%). Paralyzation of host larvae of P. interpunctella by the idiobiont H. hebetor results in an increase in phenoloxidase activity in host hemolymph, a process that may protect the host from microbial infection during self-provisioning by this wasp. Subsequent parasitization by H. hebetor larvae causes a decrease in hemolymph PO activity, which suggests that the larval parasitoid may be secreting an immunosuppressant into the host larva during feeding.

  5. Evaluation of long-term mating disruption of Ephestia kuehniella and Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in indoor storage facilities by pheromone traps and monitoring of relative aerial concentrations of pheromone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryne, Camilla; Svensson, Glenn P; Anderbrant, Olle; Löfstedt, Christer

    2007-06-01

    The potential for pheromone-based mating disruption (MD) of Ephestia kuehniella (Walker) and Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) was investigated in two flour mills and a pet food distributor. Plastic sachets emitting 2-3 mg per d (Z,E)-9,12-tetradecadienyl acetate, the major pheromone component of both moth species, were used as MD dispensers, which were applied in grid systems resulting in one dispenser per 100 m(3) of air volume. Pheromone traps with sticky inserts were used to monitor moth population fluctuations. To monitor pheromone levels in the air before, during, and after the treatment, electroantennographic (EAG) measurements were performed using a portable device. All localities showed decreased trap catches after application of MD. In two localities with low initial population densities, trap catches were reduced immediately after application of MD and remained very low, even several months after the MD treatment was terminated. In contrast, in a locality with a higher initial population density the reduction in trap catches was slower, and trap catches increased again soon after the termination of the MD treatment. Electrophysiological data showed not only increased aerial levels of pheromone during the treatment period but also levels that were higher than during pretreatment, even 12 mo after removal of MD dispensers. The localities had good ventilation, and the memory effect observed indicates that the pheromone adhered to surfaces that subsequently functioned as secondary dispensers. Customer complaints registered by one of the mills were 49% less in 2004, after 2 yr of MD compared with 2002, the year before the treatments began.

  6. Fund af småsommerfugle fra Danmark i 2009 (Lepidoptera)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Otto; Falck, Per; Karsholt, Ole

    2010-01-01

    ; Coleophoridae 118; Tortricidae 383 and of Pyralidae 196; this results in a total of 1560 species of Microlepidoptera (families Micropterigidae-Pyralidae) found in Denmark. The total amount of Macrolepidoptera mentioned from Denmark is now 962, bringing the number of Danish Lepidoptera to a total of 2522 species....

  7. Fund af småsommerfugle fra Danmark i 2010 (Lepidoptera)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Otto; Falck, Per; Karsholt, Ole

    2011-01-01

    ; Tortricidae 384; Epermeniidae 7; Pterophoridae 46 and Pyralidae 197; this results in a total of 1574 species of Microlepidoptera (families Micropterigidae-Pyralidae) found in Denmark. The total amount of Macrolepidoptera mentioned from Denmark is now 965, bringing the number of Danish Lepidoptera to a total...

  8. Estimating index of population trend by re-sampling techniques (jackknife and bootstrap) and its application to the life table study of rice leaf roller, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis(Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang-Ling Tao; Shi-Fan Min; Wei-Jian Wu; Guang-Wen Liang; Ling Zeng

    2008-01-01

    Taking a published natural population life table office leaf roller, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), as an example, we estimated the population trend index,I, via re-sampling methods (jackknife and bootstrap), determined its statistical properties and illustrated the application of these methods in determining the control effectiveness of bio-agents and chemical insecticides. Depending on the simulation outputs, the smoothed distribution pattern of the estimates of I by delete-1 jackknife is visually distinguishable from the normal density, but the smoothed pattern produced by delete-d jackknife, and logarithm-transformed smoothed patterns produced by both empirical and parametric bootstraps,matched well the corresponding normal density. Thus, the estimates of I produced by delete-1 jackknife were not used to determine the suppressive effect of wasps and insecticides. The 95% percent confidence intervals or the narrowest 95 percentiles and Z-test criterion were employed to compare the effectiveness of Trichogrammajaponicum Ashmead and insecti-cides (powder, 1.5% mevinphos + 3% alpha-hexachloro cyclohexane) against the rice leaf roller based on the estimates of I produced by delete-d jackknife and bootstrap techniques.At α= 0.05 level, there were statistical differences between wasp treatment and control, and between wasp and insecticide treatments, if the normality is ensured, or by the narrowest 95 percentiles. However, there is still no difference between insecticide treatment and control.By Z-test criterion, wasp treatment is better than control and insecticide treatment with P-value<0.01. Insecticide treatment is similar to control with P-value > 0.2 indicating that 95% confidence intervals procedure is more conservative. Although similar conclusions may be drawn by re-sampling techniques, such as the delta method, about the suppressive effect of trichogramma and insecticides, the normality of the estimates can be checked and guaranteed

  9. Primeiro registro de Accinctapubes albifasciata (Druce, 1902 (Pyralidae, Epipaschiinae em frutos de Ocotea catharinensis Mez-Lauraceae. First record of Accinctapubes albifasciata (Druce 1902 (Pyralidae, Epipaschiinae feed on fruits of Ocotea catharinensis Mez-Lauraceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Édson Possidônio TEIXEIRA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available É registrada pela primeira vez a ocorrência de Accinctapubes albifasciata (Druce, 1902 (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae, atacando frutos de Ocotea catharinensis Mez (Lauraceae, canela-preta, desde o início do desenvolvimento até a sua dispersão, no Parque Estadual da Cantareira (23º22’S e 46º36’W, localizado nos municípios de Caieiras, Guarulhos, Mairiporã e São Paulo, Estado de São Paulo, Brasil.It is registered for the first time the occurrence of Accinctapubes albifasciata (Druce, 1902 (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae attacking fruits of Ocotea catharinensis Mez (Lauraceae, canela-preta, since the beginning of development until its dispersion, at Parque Estadual da Cantareira (23º22’S and 46º36’W, located in the Caieiras, Guarulhos, Mairiporã and São Paulo counties, State of São Paulo, Brazil.

  10. Biology and population dynamics of the cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum, was a successful biological control agent against prickly pear cacti in Australia in the 1920’s. Since then, it was introduced to other countries including the Carribean islands. In 1989, the cactus moth was reported in Florida and has continued to spread nort...

  11. Genetic variation between Phytophthora cactorum isolates differing in their ability to cause crown rot in strawberry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikemo, H.; Klemsdal, S.S.; Riisberg, I.; Bonants, P.J.M.; Stensvand, A.; Tronsmo, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of 44 isolates of Phytophthora cactorum, isolated from strawberry and other hosts, by AFLP showed that the crown rot pathotype is different from leather rot isolates and from P. cactorum isolated from other hosts. 16 of 23 crown rot isolates, including isolates from Europe, Japan, Australia

  12. The complete mitochondrial genome of Lista haraldusalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; Yu, Hai-Li; Li, Peng-Fei; You, Ping

    2015-01-01

    We have determined the complete mitochondrial genome of Lista haraldusalis Walker, 1859. The mitochondrial genome of L. haraldusalis is 15,213 bp in size with 81.5% A+T content. It consists of 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA (tRNA), 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and an A+T-rich region. All PCGs start with ATN codon, except for COI, which begins with TTAG. Eleven PCGs stop with typical stop codon TAA and TAG. But ND6 and COII use incomplete stop codon T. All of the 22 tRNAs have the typical cloverleaf structure except for tRNASer(AGN) lacking of the dihydrouridine (DHU) stem. The conserved motif ATACTA, poly-T stretch, ATAGA, ATTTA and microsatellite-like (AT)11 were found in the intergenic region between tRNASer(UCN) and ND1 and the A+T-rich region of L. haraldusalis, respectively.

  13. Temperature-mediated growth thresholds of Acrobasis vaccinii (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degree-day models link ambient temperature to the development of insects, making such models valuable tools in integrated pest management. Phenology models increase management efficacy by quantifying and predicting pest phenology. In Wisconsin, the top pest of cranberry production is the cranberry f...

  14. Two Species of Phycitinae (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae New to Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi, Mujie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two species of Phycitinae, Rabiria rufimaculella (Yamanaka, 1993 and Copamyntis martimella Kirpichnikova & Yamanaka, 2002, are reported for the first time from Korea. Rabiria rufimaculella can be recognized by having two reddish-yellow and short bands near the postmedial and antemedial line, and by the bifurcate gnathos and the cornutus which is formed by numerous thorn-shaped sclerites in male genitalia. Copamyntis martimella can be distinguished with the congeners by the uniformly distributed setae on the sacculus and the curved aedeagus in male genitalia and the peanut-shaped signum near the middle of the corpus bursae in female genitalia. The adults and genitalia of the species are redescribed and illustrated.

  15. Phytophthora cactorum and Colletotrichum acutatum: Survival and Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arja T. Lilja

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Phytophthora cactorum and Colletotrichum acutatum are pathogens which are transported with plant material as latent infections and can also survive in soil and plant debris. Since the beginning of 1990’s P. cactorum caused losses in strawberries in Finland and increased culling of silver birch seedlings in forest nurseries because of stem lesions. In this study primers specific for the pathogen were designed, and in a simple PCR they gave an amplification product from pure cultures only when P. cactorum was used as a template. No cross reactions were found with other Phytophthoras in group I or other microbes. Inoculated strawberry plants gave also a clear band in PCR-analyses when the template concentration was diluted. However, amplification was not always reproducible with birch seedlings. With soil samples the best result was gained by a combination of baiting and isolation. C. acutatum is a quarantine pathogen on strawberry in the European Union and thus the infected plants are destroyed in Finland to avoid further spread of the pathogen. The pathogen has earlier been found to survive over one winter in infected plant debris and soil. In the survival test (2003-2005 done in this study, specific amplification products were obtained from test plants inoculated with artificially infected plant residues after 20 months of storage outdoors on soil surface. More positive results were achieved from bait plants grown in soil collected from the field where infected plants had been destroyed two years before, than from samples collected a year after the plant destruction.

  16. Edible Lepidoptera in Mexico: Geographic distribution, ethnicity, economic and nutritional importance for rural people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Elorduy, Julieta; Moreno, José M P; Vázquez, Adolfo I; Landero, Ivonne; Oliva-Rivera, Héctor; Camacho, Víctor H M

    2011-01-06

    In this paper, we reported the butterflies and moths that are consumed in Mexico. We identified 67 species of Lepidoptera that are eaten principally in their larval stage in 17 states of Mexico. These species belong to 16 families: Arctiidae, Bombycidae, Castniidae, Cossidae, Geometridae, Hepialidae, Hesperiidae, Lasiocampidae, Noctuidae, Nymphalidae, Papilionidae, Pieridae, Pyralidae, Saturniidae, Sesiidae, and Sphingidae.Saturniidae, Pieridae, Noctuidae and Nymphalidae were the more species consumed with 16, 11, 9, and 8 species, respectively. The genera with the largest numbers of species were: Phassus, Phoebis, Hylesia and Spodoptera, with three species.Their local distribution, corresponding to each state of Mexico, is also presented.

  17. Expression of resistance gene analogs in woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) during infection with Phytophthora cactorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Ren; Brurberg, May Bente; Elameen, Abdelhameed; Klemsdal, Sonja Sletner; Martinussen, Inger

    2016-10-01

    Important losses in strawberry production are often caused by the oomycete Phytophthora cactorum, the causal agent of crown rot. However, very limited studies at molecular levels exist of the mechanisms related to strawberry resistance against this pathogen. To begin to rectify this situation, a PCR-based approach (NBS profiling) was used to isolate strawberry resistance gene analogs (RGAs) with altered expression in response to P. cactorum during a time course (2, 4, 6, 24, 48, 96 and 192 h post-infection). Twenty-three distinct RGA fragments of the NB-LRR type were identified from a resistance genotype (Bukammen) of the wild species Fragaria vesca. The gene transcriptional profiles after infection showed that the response of most RGAs was quicker and stronger in the resistance genotype (Bukammen) than in the susceptible one (FDP821) during the early infection stage. The transcriptional patterns of one RGA (RGA109) were further monitored and compared during the P. cactorum infection of two pairs of resistant and susceptible genotype combinations (Bukammen/FDP821 and FDR1218/1603). The 5' end sequence was cloned, and its putative protein was characteristic of NBS-LRR R protein. Our results yielded a first insight into the strawberry RGAs responding to P. cactorum infection at molecular level.

  18. [Effect of pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB) on the ultrastructure of Mucor mucedo and Phytophthora cactorum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casperson, G; Lyr, H

    1982-01-01

    The effect of PCNB in various concentrations on the ultrastructure of Mucor mucedo and phytophthora cactorum was analyzed after an incubation period of 2 hours. The most striking effect in both fungi was a diffuse lysis of the internal structure of the mitochondria which differs markedly from the lysis induced by etridiazol (terrazol). Moreover an enlargement of the perinuclear space and an increased formation of vacuoles was observed. In Mucor mucedo, but not in Phytophthora cactorum a pathological thickening of the cell wall was observed. Although after 2 hours incubation with PCNB Phytophthora gave similar ultrastructural reactions in the mitochondria as Mucor, in growth experiments on agar dishes this species was 5-10 times less sensitive to PCNB compared to Mucor.

  19. Reprogramming of Strawberry (Fragaria vesca) Root Transcriptome in Response to Phytophthora cactorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toljamo, Anna; Blande, Daniel; Kärenlampi, Sirpa; Kokko, Harri

    2016-01-01

    Crown rot (Phytophthora cactorum) causes significant economic losses in strawberry production. The best control strategy would be to use resistant cultivars, but polygenically inherited resistance makes the breeding of the garden strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) challenging. The diploid wild strawberry Fragaria vesca Hawaii 4 genotype was shown previously to have resistance against crown rot. To explore the resistance mechanisms, we inoculated the roots of Hawaii 4 with P. cactorum in a novel in vitro hydroponic system to minimize interference caused by other microbes. Major reprogramming of the root transcriptome occurred, involving 30% of the genes. The surveillance system of the plant shifted from the development mode to the defense mode. Furthermore, the immune responses as well as many genes involved in the biosynthesis of the defense hormones jasmonic acid, ethylene and salicylic acid were up-regulated. Several major allergen-like genes encoding PR-10 proteins were highly expressed in the inoculated plants, suggesting that they also have a crucial role in the defense responses against P. cactorum. Additionally, flavonoids and terpenoids may be of vital importance, as several genes involved in their biosynthesis were up-regulated. The cell wall biosynthesis and developmental processes were down-regulated, possibly as a result of the down-regulation of the key genes involved in the biosynthesis of growth-promoting hormones brassinosteroids and auxin. Of particular interest was the expression of potential resistance genes in the recently identified P. cactorum resistance locus RPc-1. These new findings help to target the breeding efforts aiming at more resistant strawberry cultivars.

  20. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and tissue expression of immulectin gene from the Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis (Lepidoptera:Pyralidae)%亚洲玉米螟免疫凝集素基因的克隆、序列分析及组织表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘佳; 刘洋; 赵华福; 张文庆; 胡建

    2014-01-01

    C-type lectin, a kind of pattern recognition molecule, recognizes the lipid A portion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and participates the cellular defense reaction in insects. In this paper, an immulectin (OfIML), C-type lectin with two carbohydrate-recognition domains, was cloned by reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and 3′/5′RACE from the larval hemocytes of corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis. The cDNA of OfIML is 1 241 base pairs in length, and contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 924 nucleotides, which encoding a protein of 307 amino acids with a predicted molecularmass of approximately 34.65 ku. Alignment of OfIML with C-type lectins of other insects indicates that OfIML is a member of Lepidoptera immulectins. OfIML possesses two carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs), an amino-terminal domain, CRD1 (residues 1-135), and a carboxyl-terminal domain, CRD2 (residues 136-287). RT-PCR analyses shows that OfIML is expressed in cuticle, fat body, midgut, tracheae, and malpighian tubules, especially in hemocytes. The cDNA sequence has been deposited with GenBank under accession No. ABZ81710. OfIML is a kind of insect immunlectin, which contains two carbohydrate-recognition domains, and it possibly plays an important role during the immune reaction of O. furnaclis depending on its molecular structure and expression in tissues.%C 型凝集素作为模式识别分子可以识别部分脂多糖(LPS),进而参与昆虫细胞的防御反应。本文通过RT-PCR和3′/5′RACE技术从亚洲玉米螟Ostrinia furnacalis 5龄幼虫血细胞中克隆得到免疫凝集素基因(OfIML)。OfIML mRNA全长为1241 bp,其中开放读码框(ORF)为924 bp,编码307个氨基酸(aa),分子量约为34.65 ku。与其它昆虫的C型凝集素比对分析结果显示,OfIML属于鳞翅目免疫凝集素,并且含有一个独特的结构特征,即一前一后2个糖识别域,氨基末端(CRD1,aa#1-135)和羧基末端(CRD2, aa#136-287)。RT-PCR

  1. Thermal requirements of Galleria mellonella L. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) immature stages; Exigencias termicas de estagios imaturos de Galleria mellonella L. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Aline C.; Prezoto, Fabio [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Biologicas]. E-mail: ac-bio@bol.com.br; fprezoto@icb.ufjf.br; Prata, Marcia C. de A.; Furlong, John [EMBRAPA Gado de Leite, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: mprata@cnpgl.embrapa.br, john@cnpgl.embrapa.br

    2007-09-15

    The rearing of Galleria mellonella L. in laboratory is important for multiplication of entomopathogenic nematodes, mandatory for biological control studies. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of three thermal profiles on development stages of this insect, allowing synchronization of cycle production. Two distinct rearing phases were done: firstly, using nucleous of incubation for development of eggs and, secondly, using circular-aluminum manifolds for development of larvae and pupae. The time necessary for development of the immature stages decreased with higher temperatures. Incubation periods lasted 13.4 days at 22 deg C, 8.3 at 27 deg C and 6.8 days at 32 deg C, while periods for larvae development lasted 40.4, 27.2, and 23.4 days, respectively, for the same temperatures. Development to pupal stage was observed 18.2, 15.0, and 12.2 days, respectively, for the same temperatures. Larval survival was higher at 32 deg C, however embryonic stages and pupae survival were higher at 27 deg C and 22 deg C, respectively. The threshold temperature was 11.209167 deg C for the embryonic development stage, 7.695869 deg C for larval stage, and 1.943050 deg C for pupal stage of G. mellonella. Thermal constants were 138.380533 DG (degree day) for egg, 554.968830 DG for larvae, and 369.054080 DG for pupae. (author)

  2. Braconinae parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Braconidae) emerged from larvae of Lobesia botrana (Denis & Schiffermüller) (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae) feeding on Daphne gnidium L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loni, Augusto; Samartsev, Konstantin G; Scaramozzino, Pier Luigi; Belokobylskij, Sergey A; Lucchi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Bracon admotus Papp, 2000, and three species of the genus Habrobracon Ashmead, 1895, Habrobracon concolorans (Marshall, 1900), Habrobracon hebetor (Say, 1836) and Habrobracon pillerianae Fischer, 1980, were obtained from the larvae of Lobesia botrana (Denis & Schiffermüller, 1775) (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae) feeding on Daphne gnidium Linnaeus, 1753 (Thymelaeaceae) in the natural reserve of Migliarino-San Rossore-Massaciuccoli (Pisa-Central Italy). Bracon admotus, Habrobracon concolorans and Habrobracon pillerianae were found for the first time to be associated with Lobesia botrana, while Habrobracon hebetor was reared for the first time from the larvae of Cryptoblabes gnidiella (Millière, 1867) (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae, Phycitinae) that was found on the same host plant. Bracon admotus and Habrobracon pillerianae are new to the fauna of Italy and Western Europe. A key is proposed for the determination of Habrobracon species reared from Lobesia botrana and related Palaearctic species of this genus. Habrobracon lineatellae Fisher, 1968 is considered as a valid species.

  3. Braconinae parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Braconidae) emerged from larvae of Lobesia botrana (Denis & Schiffermüller) (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae) feeding on Daphne gnidium L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loni, Augusto; Samartsev, Konstantin G.; Scaramozzino, Pier Luigi; Belokobylskij, Sergey A.; Lucchi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bracon admotus Papp, 2000, and three species of the genus Habrobracon Ashmead, 1895, Habrobracon concolorans (Marshall, 1900), Habrobracon hebetor (Say, 1836) and Habrobracon pillerianae Fischer, 1980, were obtained from the larvae of Lobesia botrana (Denis & Schiffermüller, 1775) (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae) feeding on Daphne gnidium Linnaeus, 1753 (Thymelaeaceae) in the natural reserve of Migliarino-San Rossore-Massaciuccoli (Pisa-Central Italy). Bracon admotus, Habrobracon concolorans and Habrobracon pillerianae were found for the first time to be associated with Lobesia botrana, while Habrobracon hebetor was reared for the first time from the larvae of Cryptoblabes gnidiella (Millière, 1867) (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae, Phycitinae) that was found on the same host plant. Bracon admotus and Habrobracon pillerianae are new to the fauna of Italy and Western Europe. A key is proposed for the determination of Habrobracon species reared from Lobesia botrana and related Palaearctic species of this genus. Habrobracon lineatellae Fisher, 1968 is considered as a valid species. PMID:27408529

  4. Simultaneous detection and quantification of Phytophthora nicotianae and P. cactorum, and distribution analyses in strawberry greenhouses by duplex real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingzhu; Inada, Minoru; Watanabe, Hideki; Suga, Haruhisa; Kageyama, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora nicotianae and P. cactorum cause Phytophthora rot of strawberry. A duplex real-time PCR technique for simultaneous detection and quantification of the two pathogens was developed. Species-specific primers for P. nicotianae and P. cactorum were designed based on the internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) of rDNA and the ras-related protein gene Ypt1, respectively. TaqMan probes were labeled with FAM for P. nicotianae and HEX for P. cactorum. Specificities were demonstrated using 52 isolates, including various soil-borne pathogens. Sensitivities for P. nicotianae and P. cactorum DNAs were 10 fg and 1 pg, respectively. The technique was applied to naturally infested soil and root samples; the two pathogens were detected and the target DNA concentrations were quantified. Significant correlations of DNA quantities in roots and the surrounding soils were found. The minimum soil DNA concentration predicting the development of disease symptoms was estimated as 20 pg (g soil)(-1). In three strawberry greenhouses examined, the target DNA concentrations ranged from 1 to 1,655 pg (g soil)(-1) for P. nicotianae and from 13 to 233 pg (g soil)(-1) for P. cactorum. The method proved fast and reliable, and provides a useful tool to monitor P. nicotianae and P. cactorum in plants or soils.

  5. Taxonomic Review on the Genus Sciota (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae, Phycitinae in Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi, Mu-Jie

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Three species of the genus Sciota Hulst, 1888 are recognized from Northeast China: Sciota cynicella (Christoph, 1881, Sciota fumella (Eversmann, 1844, and Sciota adelphella (Fischer von R$\\ddot{o} $ 수식 이미지slerstamm, 1836, of which Sciota cynicella (Christoph, 1881 is reported for the first time from China. This species can be distinguished from congeners by the gray color of basal area, the straight antemedial line and the distinct postmedial line on the forewing; by the stout aedeagus in male genitalia. In this study, a key to Northeastern Chinese species of genus Sciota is presented, and the illustrations of adults and genitalia are also provided.

  6. Identification and conformational analysis of putative microRNAs in Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shruthi Sureshan, C; Habeeb, S K M

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small RNAs, evolutionarily conserved endogenous non-coding RNAs that regulate their target mRNA expression by either inactivating or degrading mRNA genes; thus playing an important role in the growth and development of an organism. Maruca vitrata is an insect pest of leguminous plants like pigeon pea, cowpea and mung bean and is pantropical. In this study, we perform BLAST on all known miRNAs against the transcriptome data of M. vitrata and thirteen miRNAs were identified. These miRNAs were characterised and their target genes were identified using TargetScan and were functionally annotated using FlyBase. The importance of the structure of pre-miRNA in the Drosha activity led to study the backbone torsion angles of predicted pre-miRNAs (mvi-miR-9751, mvi-miR-649-3p, mvi-miR-4057 and mvi-miR-1271) to identify various nucleotide triplets that contribute to the variation of torsion angle values at various structural motifs of a pre-miRNA.

  7. Identification and conformational analysis of putative microRNAs in Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Shruthi Sureshan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small RNAs, evolutionarily conserved endogenous non-coding RNAs that regulate their target mRNA expression by either inactivating or degrading mRNA genes; thus playing an important role in the growth and development of an organism. Maruca vitrata is an insect pest of leguminous plants like pigeon pea, cowpea and mung bean and is pantropical. In this study, we perform BLAST on all known miRNAs against the transcriptome data of M. vitrata and thirteen miRNAs were identified. These miRNAs were characterised and their target genes were identified using TargetScan and were functionally annotated using FlyBase. The importance of the structure of pre-miRNA in the Drosha activity led to study the backbone torsion angles of predicted pre-miRNAs (mvi-miR-9751, mvi-miR-649-3p, mvi-miR-4057 and mvi-miR-1271 to identify various nucleotide triplets that contribute to the variation of torsion angle values at various structural motifs of a pre-miRNA.

  8. Ocorrência de Hypsipyla grandella Zeller (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae no Sul do Estado de Roraima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Dionisio

    2016-08-01

    Abstract. The study aimed to record the occurrence of Hypsipyla grandella (Zeller attacking andiroba (Carapa guianensis Aubl seed, in native forest of Roraima southern region, Brazil. Among the species of economic interest in the Amazon, stands out C. guianensis, by to be native and of multiple uses, having wood and the oil extracted from seeds as the most important products. The Meliaceae family plants, as C. guianensis and Swietenia macrophylla (King, have as a major forest pest, H. grandella. The C. guianensis seeds samplings were held in February and March 2012. The seeds were selected on the ground beneath the canopy of trees, and those which had damage (holes presence, or with insects attack trace (exudation. The seeds were brought to the Agricultural Entomology laboratory, of Federal University of Roraima - UFRR, which were separated into batches of 50 seeds per municipality, totaling 200 seeds. It was observed the presence of 450 Hypsipyla larvae in the seeds, which yielded 392 (87% adults of Hypsipyla ferrealis (Hampson and 58 (13% of H. grandella. This is the first occurrence of H. grandella damaging andiroba seeds in Roraima.

  9. Impact of Pesticide Resistance on Toxicity and Tolerance of Hostplant Phytochemicals in Amyelois Transitella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagchi, Vikram A; Siegel, Joel P; Demkovich, Mark R; Zehr, Luke N; Berenbaum, May R

    2016-01-01

    For some polyphagous insects, adaptation to phytochemically novel plants can enhance resistance to certain pesticides, but whether pesticide resistance expands tolerance to phytochemicals has not been examined. Amyelois transitella Walker (navel orangeworm) is an important polyphagous pest of nut and fruit tree crops in California. Bifenthrin resistance, partially attributable to enhanced cytochrome P450 (P450)-mediated detoxification, has been reported in an almond-infesting population exposed to intense pesticide selection. We compared the toxicity of bifenthrin and three phytochemicals-chlorogenic acid, and the furanocoumarins xanthotoxin and bergapten-to three strains of A. transitella: pyrethroid-resistant R347 (maintained in the laboratory for ∼10 generations), fig-derived FIG (in the laboratory for ∼25 generations), and CPQ-a laboratory strain derived from almonds ∼40 years ago). Whereas both Ficus carica (fig) and Prunus dulcis (almond) contain chlorogenic acid, furanocoumarins occur only in figs. Both R347 and FIG exhibited 2-fold greater resistance to the three phytochemicals compared with CPQ; surprisingly, bifenthrin resistance was highest in FIG. Piperonyl butoxide, a P450 synergist, increased toxicity of all three phytochemicals only in CPQ, implicating alternate tolerance mechanisms in R347 and FIG. To test the ability of the strains to utilize novel hostplants directly, we compared survival on diets containing seeds of Wisteria sinensis and Prosopis pallida, two non-host Fabaceae species; survival of FIG was highest and survival of R347 was lowest. Our results suggest that, while P450-mediated pesticide resistance enhances tolerance of certain phytochemicals in this species, it is only one of multiple biochemical adaptations associated with acquiring novel hostplants.

  10. Monitoring of Insecticide Resistance and Genetic Analysis of Triazophos Resistance in Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera:Pyralidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ze-wen; CAO Ming-zhang; HAN Zhao-jun; SHEN Jin-liang; ZHANG Ling-chun; ZHANG Jin-zhen; LU Mei; LIU Xiao-yu; ZHOU Wei-jun

    2004-01-01

    During 2001 and 2002, insecticide resistance in the fourth instar larvae of striped stem borer (Chilo suppressalis), which were collected from Zhejiang, Jiangsu, Anhui and Jiangxi provinces in China, was monitored using topical application method. Low level of resistance to fipronil (6.5-fold) was detected for the first time in RA (Rui'an) population from southeast Zhejiang, but the other six populations tested remained susceptible to this recently introduced insecticide. No resistance to abamectin had been found after examining six populations from Zhejiang, Jiangsu and Anhui provinces. Resistance to triazophos was monitored in ten populations from the four Provinces, and very high level resistance(163.1-fold) was found in RA population, moderate (18.2-fold) in WZ (Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province) population, and low (6.7- to 9.7-fold) in populations of CS (Changshu), XS (Xishan) and JT (Jintan) from south Jiangsu, whereas the other five populations were susceptible. All the nine populations monitored were resistant to monosultap with varying degree, i.e. high level (113.7- and 57.6-fold, respectively) of resistance in RA and YF (Yifeng, Jiangxi Province) populations, moderate (11.0- to 29.7-fold) in WZ, CS, JT and TH (Taihu, Anhui Province) populations, low (6.7- and 7.5-fold, respectively) in XY (Xinyang, Jiangsu Province) and XS populations, and the lowest (3.7-fold) in GY (Guanyun, Jiangsu Province) population. Inheritance of resistance in triazophos selected strain Rts was studied through reciprocal cross and backcross experiments. The preliminary results indicated that inheritance of triazophos resistance in Rts strain was incompletely dominant, with degrees of dominance being 0.46 and 0.68 for reciprocal crosses, and that the resistance was controlled by a major gene, though minor modifying gene(s) might be involved.

  11. Transition and Transversion Mutations Are Biased towards GC in Transposons of Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Hua Luo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Transposons are often regulated by their hosts, and as a result, there are transposons with several mutations within their host organisms. To gain insight into the patterns of the variations, nucleotide substitutions and indels of transposons were analysed in Chilo suppressalis Walker. The CsuPLE1.1 is a member of the piggyBac-like element (PLE family, which belongs to the DNA transposons, and the Csu-Ty3 is a member of the Ty3/gypsy family, which belongs to the RNA transposons. Copies of CsuPLE1.1 and Csu-Ty3 were cloned separately from different C. suppressalis individuals, and then multiple sequence alignments were performed. There were numerous single-base substitutions in CsuPLE1.1 and Csu-Ty3, but only a few insertion and deletion mutations. Similarly, in both transposons, the occurring frequencies of transitions were significantly higher than transversions (p ≤ 0.01. In the single-base substitutions, the most frequently occurring base changes were A→G and T→C in both types of transposons. Additionally, single-base substitution frequencies occurring at positions 1, 2 or 3 (pos1, pos2 or pos3 of a given codon in the element transposase were not significantly different. Both in CsuPLE1.1 and Csu-Ty3, the patterns of nucleotide substitution had the same characteristics and nucleotide mutations were biased toward GC. This research provides a perspective on the understanding of transposon mutation patterns.

  12. Study on the optimum pheromone release rate for attraction of Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacas, Sandra; Alfaro, Cristina; Navarro-Llopis, Vicente; Zarzo, Manuel; Primo, Jaime

    2009-06-01

    Traditional chemical control against Chilo suppressalis Walker is currently being replaced in Spain by new methods based on pheromones. A key step to improve the efficacy of these methods is the determination of the optimum pheromone release rate, which is still uncertain for this pest. In this work, the pheromone release profile and the field performance of a new mesoporous dispenser was compared with a standard commercial dispenser. For this purpose, pheromone loads were extracted from field-aged dispensers and quantified by gas chromatography with flame ionization detector. In addition, a field trial was carried out with traps baited with one, two, or three mesoporous dispensers per trap, as well as with traps containing one standard dispenser. We found that the highest number of field catches did not correspond to the highest pheromone emission rate, which suggests a repellent effect of the insect if the emission is excessive. The results suggest that the attractant activity was maximized by emitting approximately 34 microg/d. The efficacy of the mesoporous dispenser and its possible improvements are discussed.

  13. Impact of pesticide resistance on toxicity and tolerance of hostplant phytochemicals in Amyelois transitella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    For some polyphagous insects adaptation to phytochemically novel plants confers enhanced resistance to insecticides, but whether insecticide resistance enhances tolerance to novel phytochemicals has not been assessed. We used Amyelois transitella Walker (navel orangeworm), an economically important ...

  14. Age-stage, two-sex life table of Parapoynx crisonalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Li, Ni; Wang, Xing; Ma, Li; Huang, Jian-Bin; Huang, Guo-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Parapoynx crisonalis is an important pest of many aquatic vegetables including water chestnuts. Understanding the relationship between temperature variations and the population growth rates of P. crisonalis is essential to predicting its population dynamics in water chestnuts ponds. These relationships were examined in this study based on the age-stage, two-sex life table of P. crisonalis developed in the laboratory at 21, 24, 27, 30, 33 and 36°C. The results showed that the values of Sxj (age-stage–specific survival rate), fxj (age-stage-specific fecundity), lx (age specific survival rate) and mx (age-specific fecundity) increased as the temperature rose from 21 to 27°C, then decreased from 30 to 36°C. Temperature also had a significant effect on the net reproductive rate (R0), gross reproductive rate (GRR), intrinsic rate of increase (r) and finite rate of increase (λ). The value of these parameters were at low levels at 21, 33, and 36°C. Further, the r value decreased as the temperature rose from 24 to 30°C, while the GRR reached its highest level at 27°C. The results indicated that optimal growth and development of P. crisonalis occurred at temperatures between 24°C to 30°C when compared to the lowest temperature (21°C) and higher temperatures of 33°C and 36°C. PMID:28264022

  15. Characterization of the mitochondrial genome of the cabbage webworm, Hellula undalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wan-Wei; Feng, Xiao-Jing; Huang, Guo-Hua; Jiang, Guo-Fang

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced mitochondrial genome of the cabbage webworm Hellula undalis includes 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs) (nad1-6, cox1-3, atp6, atp8, nad4L and cob), two ribosomal RNAs (12S and 16S) and 19 transfer RNAs, which is 14,678 bp in length. Its gene order and orientation are identical to the common types found in most of the other completely sequenced lepidopteran mitogenomes. Thirteen PCGs start with a typical ATN codon, while cox1 uses CGA as its start codon. Some PCGs use the standard TAA as their termination codon, while others use the incomplete termination codon T (cox1, cox2 and nad4).

  16. Taxonomic Review on the Genus Sciota (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae, Phycitinae in Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu-jie Qi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Three species of the genus Sciota Hulst, 1888 are recognized from Northeast China: Sciota cynicella (Christoph, 1881, Sciota fumella (Eversmann, 1844, and Sciota adelphella (Fischer von Röslerstamm, 1836, of which Sciota cynicella (Christoph, 1881 is reported for the first time from China. This species can be distinguished from congeners by the gray color of basal area, the straight antemedial line and the distinct postmedial line on the forewing; by the stout aedeagus in male genitalia. In this study, a key to Northeastern Chinese species of genus Sciota is presented, and the illustrations of adults and genitalia are also provided.

  17. Proteolytic activity in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), Pomegranate carob moth

    OpenAIRE

    M. Ranjbar; JJ Sendi; A Zibaee

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the proteolytic activity in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae as the major pest of pomegranate was investigated to find nature of specific proteases and their properties for adopting possible pest management procedure. It was found that fourth and fifth instar larvae had the highest proteolytic activity as well as specific proteinases including, elastase, trypsin-like, chymotrypsin-like and two exopeptidases. The optimal pH of general protease was 10 and 9 for azocasein, cas...

  18. A new Sigelgaita Heinrich (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae, Phycitinae feeding on cacti in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo F. Monteiro

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Description and biological aspects of a new species of Sigelgaita Heinrich, 1939, the first known to occur east of the Andes, S. cerei Becker, are presented. S. cerei larvae were collected on "restinga" ecosystems feeding on Pilosocereus arrabidae (Lem. Byles & Rowl. (Parque Nacional da Restinga de Jurubatiba-Macaé and Área de Proteção Ambiental de Barra de Marica, Rio de Janeiro and rarely on Cereus obtusus Haw. (PNRJ. Life cycle and behavior of larvae are presented. Larvae are found singly on flower buds, on fruit or more frequently on stem of the plants. They build chambers in the cladodium where they complete their larval development, then droping to the ground in order to pupate. Trichogramma sp. was parasitizing 72% of eggs and a species of braconid was parasitizing half out of ten larvae collected from fruits of Cereus obtusus. S. cerei larvae develop a special role in the colonization and establishment of a diverse fauna associates with the hosts such as insects, spiders and yeasts. Ants, such as Camponotus crassus Mayr, 1862 and C. cingulatus Mayr, 1862 are among the insects which most frequently nest in the chambers abandoned by the larvae of this moth species.

  19. Identity and relative importance of egg predators of rice leaffolders (Lepidoptera:Pyralidae.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraker, de J.; Huis, van A.; Lenteren, van J.C.; Heong, K.L.; Rabbinge, R.

    2000-01-01

    Field andlaboratory studies on predation of rice leaffolder eggs (i.e., Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée) and Marasmia patnalis Bradley) were conducted to identify major predator species. Direct observations of predation on field-exposed eggs showed that in two seasons Metioche vittaticollis (Stål)

  20. Relative abundance and flight phenology of two pheromone types of Acrobasis nuxvorella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartfield, E A; Harris, M K; Medina, R F

    2011-08-01

    Two synthetic sex pheromones have been developed and are currently used to detect the flight of the pecan nut casebearer, Acrobasis nuxvorella Neunzig, the most damaging pest of pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch]. One pheromone (referred to as standard) is attractive to moths in the southern United States, but not in Mexico. The other pheromone (referred to as Mexican) is attractive to moths in the southern United States and in Mexico. These two pheromones have been implemented by producers as an important tool in monitoring the activity of this pest and have allowed for more efficient pesticide use. In the future, these pheromones could be used as a means of population reduction through pheromone based control methods. Trapping data taken over a 3-yr period were used to determine if phenological differences exist between pheromone types of pecan nut casebearer. The relative abundance of each pheromone type at several locations in the United States also was evaluated. Results of this study indicate that no phenological differences exist between the two pheromone types studied in the United States and that significantly more males are attracted to field-deployed pheromone traps baited with the standard pheromone than to traps baited with the Mexican pheromone.

  1. Use of grafting to prevent Hypsipyla grandella (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) damage to new world Meliaceae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Julian; Eigenbrode, Sanford D; Hilje, Luko; Tripepi, Robert R; Aguilar, Maria E; Mesen, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    The susceptible species Cedrela odorata and Swietenia macrophylla to attack by Hypsipyla grandella (Zeller) larvae were grafted onto the resistant species Khaya senegalensis and Toona ciliata. Six-month-old grafted plants were then compared to their reciprocal grafts and to both intact (non-grafted) and autografted plants for damage due to H. grandella larvae and for their effects on larval performance. Two experiments were conducted: one in which the apical bud of the main plant shoot was inoculated with H. grandella eggs, and the other in which the bud was inoculated with third instars. Damage in each experiment was assessed by the number of frass piles, number and length of tunnels, number of damaged leaves, and damage to the apical bud. Larval performance was evaluated in terms of time to reach pupation and pupal weight and length. In both experiments, plant damage differed significantly among treatments (P grandella larvae. Scions of autografted susceptible species had similar resistance to susceptible scions grafted on resistant rootstocks. Few larvae reached pupation, and their pupal weight and length were similar.

  2. Improving control of duponchelia fovealis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) by rooting media related strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, C.; Messelink, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    Soil-dwelling predatory mites can be very effective as biological control agents against larvae of the lepidopteral pest Duponchelia fovealis. Some growing media were reported to have natural high level and stable populations of predatory mite. The objective of this experiment was to define conditio

  3. Thermal death kinetics of fifth-instar Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J A; Wang, S; Tang, J

    2003-04-01

    Heat treatments have been suggested as alternatives to chemical fumigants for control of postharvest insects in dried fruits and nuts. Conventional forced hot air treatments heat product too slowly to be practical, but radio frequency treatments are capable of more rapid product heating. While developing radio frequency heat treatments for dried fruits and nuts, the heat tolerance of nondiapausing and diapausing fifth-instar larvae of the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner), was determined using a heating block system developed by Washington State University. Both a 0.5th order kinetic model and a classical empirical model were used to estimate lethal exposure times for temperatures of 44-52 degrees C for nondiapausing fifth-instar larvae. We obtained 95% mortality at exposures suitable for practical radio frequency treatments (< or = 5 min) with temperatures of 50 and 52 degrees C. Diapausing larvae were significantly more tolerant than nondiapausing larvae at the lowest treatment temperature and shortest exposure, but differences were not significant at more extreme temperature-time combinations. Previous studies showed that fifth-instar larvae of the navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker), were more heat tolerant than either diapausing or nondiapausing Indianmeal moth larvae. Consequently, efficacious treatments for navel orangeworm would also control Indianmeal moth.

  4. Effects of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis maize grain on B. thuringiensis-susceptible Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, K L; Hellmich, R L; Iverson, C T; Lewis, L C

    2000-06-01

    Percentage survivorship, developmental time, adult body length, and sex ratio of Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) reared on field-produced grain from sixteen cultivars of maize, Zea mays L., including several transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Berliner hybrids and selected non-Bt isolines, were evaluated under laboratory conditions. Compared with isolines, development was delayed and survivorship reduced for P. interpunctella reared on grain from transgenic hybrids with the CaMV/35s promoter that express Cry1Ab protein. Similarly, compared with non-Bt hybrids, a transgenic hybrid with the CaMV/35s promoter that expresses Cry9C protein delayed development, decreased survivorship, and caused reductions in adult body length of P. interpunctella. In contrast, no significant differences in P. interpunctella developmental times or survivorship were observed between transgenic hybrids with the PEPC promoter expressing Cry1Ab and their isolines. Additionally, developmental time, survivorship, and adult body length were similar between P. interpunctella reared on a transgenic hybrid with the CaMV/35s promoter expressing Cry1Ac and non-Bt hybrids. Our data demonstrate that transgenic Bt maize grain, especially grain from hybrids with the CaMV/35s promoter expressing Cry1Ab or Cry9C, can significantly affect B. thuringiensis-susceptible P. interpunctella populations up to 4 or 5 mo after harvest.

  5. Activity of Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in and around flour mills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doud, C W; Phillips, T W

    2000-12-01

    Studies were conducted at two flour mills where male Indian meal moths, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner), were captured using pheromone-baited traps. Objectives were to determine the distribution of male P. interpunctella at different locations in and around the mills throughout the season, and to monitor moth activity before and after one of the mills was fumigated with methyl bromide to assess efficacy of treatment. Commercially available sticky traps baited with the P. interpunctella sex pheromone were placed at various locations outside and within the larger of the two mills (mill 1). Moths were captured inside mill 1 after methyl bromide fumigations. The highest numbers of P. interpunctella were caught outside the facility and at ground floor locations near outside openings. Additional traps placed in the rooms above the concrete stored-wheat silos at mill 1 during the second year captured more moths than did traps within the mill's production and warehouse areas. In another study, moths were trapped at various distances from a smaller flour mill (mill 2) to determine the distribution of moths outdoors relative to the mill. There was a negative correlation between moth capture and distance from the facility, which suggested that moth activity was concentrated at or near the flour mill. The effectiveness of the methyl bromide fumigations in suppressing moth populations could not be assessed with certainty because moths captured after fumigation may have immigrated from outside through opened loading bay warehouse doors. This study documents high levels of P. interpunctella outdoors relative to those recorded inside a food processing facility. Potential for immigration of P. interpunctella into flour mills and other stored product facilities from other sources may be greater than previously recognized. Moth entry into a food processing facility after fumigation is a problem that should be addressed by pest managers.

  6. Attractancy and toxicity of an attracticide for Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nansen, Christian; Phillips, Thomas W

    2004-04-01

    Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) is a serious and widespread postharvest pest on cereal products, dried fruits, candy, and pet food. Due to the strong positive anemotactic flight response of P. interpunctella males to the main component of the female-produced pheromone [(Z,E)-9,12-tetradecadienyl acetate, herein referred to as ZETA], we evaluated the potential of an attracticide for this pest, in which ZETA as attractant was combined with permethrin as the killing agent. Two concentrations of ZETA [0.16 and 0.32% (wt:wt)] and five concentrations of permethrin [0, 3, 6, 12, and 18% (wt:wt)] were incorporated into Last Call gel (10 different permethrin:ZETA combinations). All attracticide gels were evaluated in a toxicity test, in which either the tip of a leg or an antenna of a virgin P. interpunctella male was touched interpunctella males with attracticide gel containing 3-18% permethrin caused a significant reduction in mating and killed males moths within 24 h. A wind tunnel test was conducted to evaluate the flight responses of P. interpunctella males to the same 10 attracticide gels. Male moths displayed significantly higher levels of positive anemotactic flight and more males made contact with the attracticide gel when the ZETA concentration was 0.16% compared with 0.32%. P. interpunctella males showed no signs of repellency to permethrin concentrations within a range of 0-18% in the attracticide gel. Three densities of P. interpunctella pairs were released into small warehouse rooms, and we found that the attracticide gel suppressed oviposition when the moth density was at a low level, but it was ineffective when the moth density exceeded one male-female pair per 11.3 m3.

  7. Susceptibility of Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) developmental stages to high temperatures used during structural heat treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahroof, R; Subramanyam, B

    2006-12-01

    Heating the ambient air of a whole, or a portion of a food-processing facility to 50 to 60 degrees C and maintaining these elevated temperatures for 24 to 36 h, is an old technology, referred to as heat treatment. There is renewed interest in adopting heat treatments around the world as a viable insect control alternative to fumigation with methyl bromide. There is limited published information on responses of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner), exposed to elevated temperatures typically used during heat treatments. Time-mortality relationships were determined for eggs, fifth-instars (wandering-phase larvae), pupae, and adults of P. interpunctella exposed to five constant temperatures between 44 and 52 degrees C. Mortality of each stage increased with increasing temperature and exposure time. In general, fifth-instars were the most heat-tolerant stage at all temperatures tested. Exposure for a minimum of 34 min at 50 degrees C was required to kill 99% of the fifth-instars. It is proposed that heat treatments aimed at controlling fifth-instars should be able to control all other stages of P. interpunctella.

  8. Major digestive carbohydrase during larval development of meal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sales, M P; Alcazar, Alonso; Lima, L M; Amorim, Ticiana M L; Pitanga, J C M; Pereira, R A; Macedo, L L P; Macedo, F P; Oliveira, A S; Uchôa, Adriana F

    2008-01-01

    The digestive system of P. interpunctella was characterized during its larval development to determination of carbohydrases using disaccharides (sucrose and maltose) and polysaccharides (starch and inulin) as substrate. At 6(th) instar larval, Invertase>alpha-amylase> maltase activities peaks were observed. Invertase was fractionated with acetone and isolated. The Invertase was 485.5 fold purified by Sephacryl S-200 and DEAE-Sephadex. Its kinetic parameters were K(m) of 6.6 mM, V(max) of 0.48, pH optimum of 5.5 and temperature optimum of 30 degrees C. This enzyme was activated by CaCl(2) and inhibited by EDTA. When analyzed by SDS-PAGE it showed one band of M(r) 34 kDa. The understanding of the digestive system of P. interpunctella could be a key step in the design of bioinsecticides.

  9. Infestation of a bird and two cats by larvae of Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinckney, R D; Kanton, K; Foster, C N; Steinberg, H; Pellitteri, P

    2001-09-01

    The larvae of Plodia interpunctella (Hübner), commonly known as the Indian meal moth, often cause enormous losses in stored food supplies. We present three clinical case reports of accidental infestation by P. interpunctella larvae in two domestic cats and one parakeet. A larva gained entry into the avian host and subsequently migrated to the brain. It was alive, covered with "silk-like" fibers and confirmed to be a fourth instar. Plodia interpunctella larvae were excised with forceps from the subcutaneous tissues of the ear and neck of two cats in a different household. Previous reports of infestation by P. interpunctella larvae in vertebrates are unknown.

  10. Mating disruption for control of Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in dried beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    We compared the impact of mating disruption and aerosol space treatment using synergized pyrethrins on Indianmeal moth Plodia interpunctella in 2200 to 2900 m3 structures at a dried bean storage and processing facility in Stanislaus County, CA USA. Mating disruption was applied using a high volume a...

  11. Evaluation of acetone vapors toxicity on Plodia interpunctella (Hubner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmirza, Ali Asghr; Nasab, Fershteh Sadeghi; Zadeh, Abas Hossein

    2007-08-01

    The efficacy of acetone vapors against carefully aged eggs of Plodia interpunctella (Hubner) at 17+/-1 and 27+/-1 degrees C at different dosage levels of acetone over various exposure times was determined. Acetone was found to be toxic to Indian meal moth eggs. Considerable variation in the susceptibility of different age groups of eggs was apparent in the fiducial limits of the LD50 values. An inverse relationship between LD50 values and exposure times was observed in age groups of tested eggs. At 27+/-1 degrees C and 24 h exposure period, eggs aged 1-2 day-old were more tolerant to acetone than other age groups, followed by 0-1 day-old, 2-3 day-old and 3-4 day-old eggs. A similar pattern of susceptibility of eggs was observed at 72 h exposure. In all bioassays, eggs exposed to higher dosages of acetone developed at smaller rate. This was significant for the eggs, which were exposed to the highest dosage for 24 h. Increasing the temperature from 17+/-1 to 27+/-1 degrees C greatly increased the efficacy of acetone. At 27+/-1 degrees C eggs of P. interpunctella were killed by less than one-third of the dosage required for control at 17+/-1 degrees C. Acetone achieved 50% mortality with a dosage of 82.76 mg L(-1) in 1-2 day-old eggs at 27+/-1 degrees C. At this temperature hatching was retarded and greatly diminished when eggs aged 1-2 day-old were exposed to 80 mg L(-1) of acetone for the 24 h exposure period. There was no evidence of a hatch delay longer than the time spent under vapors for eggs exposed at 17+/-1 or 27+/-1 degrees C, indicating that some development must have occurred under fumigation.

  12. Survival of Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella, and navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella, (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concerns over insect resistance, regulatory action and the needs of organic processors have generated renewed interest in developing non-chemical alternative postharvest treatments to fumigants used on dried fruits and nuts. Storage at low temperatures has been identified as one such alternative for...

  13. Virulence and mycotoxic effects of Metarhizium anisopliae on Mahogany shoot borer, Hypsipyla robusta (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Balachander; O.K.Remadevi; T.O.Sasidharan; N.Sapna Bai

    2012-01-01

    Developing appropriate control measures for the Mahogany shoot borer,Hypsipyla robusta Moore has become increasingly important due to the severe damaging effect of the pest on the establishment of the saplings of Swietenia mahagoni Jacq (Sapindales:Meliaceae).Existing management methods are largely limited to silvicultural practices and spraying of chemical insecticides.To identify a potential fungal biocontrol agent,we compared the virulence of six native and two standard ARSEF isolates of Metarhizium anisopliae Metsch.against this pest.The average survival time and conidial yield of IWST-Ma7 was higher (6.2 to 7.3 days and 4.9 to 4.7 × 105 conidia/ml) than the standards.Significant difference in sporulation on the cadavers between isolates,doses and incubation periods were substantiated for the selection of potential strain.The mycotoxic effects of crude soluble protein extract when incorporated in the artificial diet,the ARSEF 2596 and ARSEF 3603showed LD50 value of 3.7% and 5.6%.However,IWST-Ma7 was highly lethal with significant lowest LD50 value of 2.6%.The enzyme activity of IWST-Ma7 was highest for chitinase,CDA,protease and lipase viz.,1.90 U/mg,1.80 U/mg,0.98 U/mg and 0.80 U/mg respectively.However the enzyme activity of chitinase and Chitin deacetylase assay for all the isolates was significantly higher than protease and lipase activity.The ITS regions (5.8S rDNA and 28S rDNA) of seven isolates of M.anisopliae were amplified using the ITS1 and ITS4 primers which was a unique fragment of approximately 550 bp.Based on ITS regions,phylogenetic tree have been constructed and the isolates have been grouped in to 5 clades.The virulence and mycotoxic effects of different isolates could rationally be used to employ them for the management of the mahogany borer.

  14. Control of the wax moth Galleria mellonella L. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae by the male sterile technique (MST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari Reza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examined the control of wax moth using the male sterile technique (MST with gamma-rays. To determine the safe and effective dosage of gamma-rays capable of sterilizing male pupae of the wax moth, male pupae were exposed to increasing single doses of gamma-rays (250, 300, 350 and 400 Gy. The release ratio of sterile to normal males was also studied in a similar experiment. Treatments included sterile males, normal males and virgin females at the following ratios: 1:1:1, 2:1:1, 3:1:1, 4:1:1 and 5:1:1. Possible parthenogenetic reproduction of this pest was also examined. The results showed that 350 Gy was the most effective dose capable of sterilizing the male pupae of the wax moth. The best release ratio was established at four sterile males, one normal male for each normal female (4:1:1. Also females were incapable of producing offspring without males.

  15. The effect of Tween 80 on eggshell permeabilization in Galleria mellonella (L.) (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosi, E; Abidalla, M T; Roversi, P F

    2010-01-01

    The development of a species-specific protocol for dechorionation and permeabilization of insect eggs is a necessary prerequisite to cryopreserve the embryos. Here we tested different procedures based on heptane or the surfactant Tween 80 as an alternative to alkane, evaluating their efficacy and toxicity on the early (24 h post-oviposition) and late (75 h post-oviposition) stage embryos. Heptane efficiently permeabilized the eggs of G. mellonella but the hatching rate ranged from 0.1 to 4.2 percent in the early stage and from 4.3 to 11.2 percent in the late stage. The embryos treated with 1.25 percent NaOCl + 0.08 percent Tween 80 for 2 min showed the same shrinkage and reswelling percentages as eggs exposed to heptane for 10 sec, with a significantly higher hatching percentage in the early (68.2 +/- 1.5 percent) and late stages (22.4 +/- 3.7 percent). Thus, 0.08 percent Tween 80 allows sufficient permeabilization of G. mellonella embryos without the high toxicity of alkane.

  16. Age-stage, two-sex life table of Parapoynx crisonalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Li, Ni; Wang, Xing; Ma, Li; Huang, Jian-Bin; Huang, Guo-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Parapoynx crisonalis is an important pest of many aquatic vegetables including water chestnuts. Understanding the relationship between temperature variations and the population growth rates of P. crisonalis is essential to predicting its population dynamics in water chestnuts ponds. These relationships were examined in this study based on the age-stage, two-sex life table of P. crisonalis developed in the laboratory at 21, 24, 27, 30, 33 and 36°C. The results showed that the values of Sxj (age-stage-specific survival rate), fxj (age-stage-specific fecundity), lx (age specific survival rate) and mx (age-specific fecundity) increased as the temperature rose from 21 to 27°C, then decreased from 30 to 36°C. Temperature also had a significant effect on the net reproductive rate (R0), gross reproductive rate (GRR), intrinsic rate of increase (r) and finite rate of increase (λ). The value of these parameters were at low levels at 21, 33, and 36°C. Further, the r value decreased as the temperature rose from 24 to 30°C, while the GRR reached its highest level at 27°C. The results indicated that optimal growth and development of P. crisonalis occurred at temperatures between 24°C to 30°C when compared to the lowest temperature (21°C) and higher temperatures of 33°C and 36°C.

  17. Some aspects of feeding responses in the stem borer Chilo partellus swinhoe (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokro, P G; Saxena, K N

    1991-01-01

    Feeding responses of Chilo partellus larvae to different food sources, were studied. Maize and sorghum were more preferred to artificial diet by the larvae irrespective of their rearing media. Larvae fed on maize and sorghum leaves as well as maize and sorghum stems. The rearing medium did not have any effect on the feeding preference; it could only improve but not induce the feeding behaviour.

  18. Tolerance of Bt corn (MON 810) to maize stem borer, Chilo partellus (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ramkumar; Channappa, Ravi K; Deeba, Farah; Nagaraj, Nandi J; Sukavaneaswaran, Mohan K; Manjunath, T M

    2005-11-01

    Transgenic corn (MON 810), expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) protein, Cry1Ab, was evaluated under greenhouse conditions for its tolerance to the maize stem borer, Chilo partellus. Bt corn (MON 810) provided effective protection against the stem borer even under a high level of larval infestation in the greenhouse. The observed tolerance is examined and discussed in the light of the susceptibility of C. partellus to the Cry1Ab protein in laboratory bioassays. The implications of the tissue concentrations of Cry1Ab in MON 810, and baseline susceptibility recorded in the current study, for insect-resistance management are discussed.

  19. Proteolytic activity in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae, Pomegranate carob moth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ranjbar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the proteolytic activity in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae as the major pest of pomegranate was investigated to find nature of specific proteases and their properties for adopting possible pest management procedure. It was found that fourth and fifth instar larvae had the highest proteolytic activity as well as specific proteinases including, elastase, trypsin-like, chymotrypsin-like and two exopeptidases. The optimal pH of general protease was 10 and 9 for azocasein, casein and hemoglobin as substrate. The optimal temperature of the total proteolytic activity in the midgut of E. ceratoniae was found 30 and 35 °C by using azocasein and casein as substrates, respectively. In case of hemoglobin, the enzyme showed the highest enzymatic activity at temperatures from 15 to 35 °C. There was no enhancement in the proteolytic activity by using different cations but SDS, citric acid and mercaptoetahnol significantly decreased the proteolytic activity in the midgut of E. ceratoniae. Using specific proteolytic inhibitors including PMSF, TLCK, TPCK, E-64, DTT and phenanthroline revealed presence of serine proteases as the major proteases in the midgut of E. ceratoniae.

  20. Effects of snowdrop lectin on Mexican rice borer (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) life history parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sétamou, M; Bernal, J S; Mirkov, T E; Legaspi, J C

    2003-06-01

    The effects of the snowdrop lectin, Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), delivered through an artificial diet, on growth, development, and life history parameters of the Mexican rice borer, Eoreuma loftini (Dyar), were evaluated in the laboratory. Incorporation of GNA at three treatment levels, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0% of total dietary protein, in the larval diet significantly decreased larval survivorship and percentage of adults emerging relative to a control diet lacking GNA, whereas differences were not observed among the three treatment levels. Both larvae and pupae in the control were 8-25% larger than those in the GNA treatments, but differences were not observed between larvae in the GNA treatments. Furthermore, presence of GNA did not affect larval and pupal developmental periods, longevities, and fecundities compared with the control. Mexican rice borer life history parameters, such as net reproductive rate and intrinsic rate of increase, were substantially reduced by the presence of GNA in the diet, but differences were not evident among the three GNA treatment levels.

  1. Distribución de Phytophthora cactorum en el perfil de un suelo cultivado con frutilla (Fragaria x ananassa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Josefina Iribarren

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Phytophthora cactorum es el agente causal de la podredumbre seca que produce importantes pérdidas en los cultivos de frutilla (Fragaria x ananassa. Este patógeno persiste como oosporas formadas principalmente en los frutos afectados, los que quedan en la superficie del suelo. En un lote representativo de los cultivos de frutillas de la zona noreste de la provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina, y después de haberse levantado la plantación y labrado el suelo, se buscó establecer la distribución espacial de las oosporas de P. cactorum remanentes. El muestreo se realizó en tres bloques ubicados a lo largo de una transecta diagonal al terreno y a dos profundidades en el perfil del suelo. También se caracterizó la topografía del terreno y parámetros físicos del suelo de interés. La detección de P. cactorum se realizó mediante el empleo de cebos. No se encontraron diferencias significativas en cuanto a la presencia del patógeno en los distintos puntos muestreados sobre el terreno, a la escala de análisis. Sólo se observó una pequeña tendencia a la disminución del inóculo en profundidad. El número de recuentos positivos en las profundidades A y AB/BA fueron respectivamente 30 y 22 en un total de 72 muestras. Tampoco hubo diferencias significativas en densidad aparente, humedad equivalente y macroporosidad del suelo. Si bien la distribución en superficie de P. cactorum pudo deberse fundamentalmente a procesos naturales, la labranza del suelo posibilitó la dispersión de oosporas viables en profundidad.

  2. Anholts sommerfugle (Lepidoptera)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karsholt, Ole; Bygebjerg, Rune; Meedom, Peter

    2008-01-01

      The Lepidoptera fauna of the Danish island of Anholt is surveyed, and 1160 species are recorded. Anholt is situated in Kattegat 44 km from Denmark and 47 km from Sweden. The history and environment of the island are briefly discussed, with special focus on the flora, and earlier studies...... of the Lepidopterera fauna of Anholt are dealt with. The present study is in first hand based on material collected by the late Ebbe Schmidt Nielsen and the authors, partly in the 1970's and partly in more recent years. The material do not permit a general comparison between the status of the Lepidoptera fauna...

  3. SCR96, a small cysteine-rich secretory protein of Phytophthora cactorum, can trigger cell death in the Solanaceae and is important for pathogenicity and oxidative stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Ren; Li, Yan-Peng; Li, Qi-Yuan; Xing, Yu-Ping; Liu, Bei-Bei; Tong, Yun-Hui; Xu, Jing-You

    2016-05-01

    Peptides and small molecules produced by both the plant pathogen Phytophthora and host plants in the apoplastic space mediate the relationship between the interplaying organisms. Various Phytophthora apoplastic effectors, including small cysteine-rich (SCR) secretory proteins, have been identified, but their roles during interaction remain to be determined. Here, we identified an SCR effector encoded by scr96, one of three novel genes encoding SCR proteins in P. cactorum with similarity to the P. cactorum phytotoxic protein PcF. Together with the other two genes, scr96 was transcriptionally induced throughout the developmental and infection stages of the pathogen. These genes triggered plant cell death (PCD) in the Solanaceae, including Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato. The scr96 gene did not show single nucleotide polymorphisms in a collection of P. cactorum isolates from different countries and host plants, suggesting that its role is essential and non-redundant during infection. Homologues of SCR96 were identified only in oomycetes, but not in fungi and other organisms. A stable protoplast transformation protocol was adapted for P. cactorum using green fluorescent protein as a marker. The silencing of scr96 in P. cactorum caused gene-silenced transformants to lose their pathogenicity on host plants and these transformants were significantly more sensitive to oxidative stress. Transient expression of scr96 partially recovered the virulence of gene-silenced transformants on plants. Overall, our results indicate that the P. cactorum scr96 gene encodes an important virulence factor that not only causes PCD in host plants, but is also important for pathogenicity and oxidative stress tolerance.

  4. Effects of Kaolin on Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and Its Compatibility With the Natural Enemy, Trichogramma cacoeciae (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, Christina E; López-Olguín, Jesús F; Pérez-Moreno, Ignacio; Marco-Mancebón, Vicente

    2016-04-01

    Lobesia botrana (Denis and Schiffermüller) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) is an important grapevine pest in Europe recently encountered in America. Trichogramma cacoeciae Marchal (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) is amongst the most effective parasitoids for Lepidopteran species. Studies to evaluate the effect of kaolin, an inert, nontoxic mineral, on oviposition, egg hatch, and neonate mortality of these species were carried out. Efficacy on L. botrana neonate larvae, oviposition, and egg hatch was evaluated. Effects of kaolin on parasitism and emergence of T. cacoeciae from L. botrana and Ephestia kuehniella (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) eggs were also evaluated. Lobesia botrana egg hatch and oviposition rates were reduced, and neonate larvae mortality was significantly greater in kaolin-treated arenas and when included in synthetic neonate larvae diet. Kaolin had no effect on T. cacoeciae parasitism in both hosts. There was only a slight but statistically insignificant effect on T. cacoeciae progeny emergence from L. botrana eggs and no effect from E. kuehniella. The results involving reductions in L. botrana oviposition and egg hatch and increase in larval mortality with kaolin suggest this compound may contribute to reduction in population densities and can be considered in rational integrated pest management strategies for L. botrana. Due to the laboratory results presented on parasitoid emergence, even though field bioassays would give a more exhaustive evaluation, it appears kaolin can be compatible with T. cacoeciae in L. botrana management.

  5. RNA interference in Lepidoptera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terenius, Ole; Papanicolaou, Alexie; Garbutt, Jennie S.

    2011-01-01

    Gene silencing through RNA interference (RNAi) has revolutionized the study of gene function, particularly in non-model insects. However, in Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) RNAi has many times proven to be difficult to achieve. Most of the negative results have been anecdotal and the positive...... is particularly successful in the family Saturniidae and in genes involved in immunity. On the contrary, gene expression in epidermal tissues seems to be most difficult to silence. In addition, gene silencing by feeding dsRNA requires high concentrations for success. Possible causes for the variability of success...

  6. Effect of CO2 enhancement on beech (Fagus sylvatica L. seedling root rot due to Phytophthora plurivora and Phytophthora cactorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkaczyk Miłosz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Global climate change is associated with higher concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2. The ongoing changes are likely to have significant, direct or indirect effects on plant diseases caused by many biotic agents such as phytopathogenic fungi. This study results showed that increased CO2 concentration did not stimulate the growth of 1-year-old beech Fagus sylvatica L seedlings but it activated pathogenic Phytophthora species (P. plurivora and P. cactorum which caused significant reduction in the total number of fine roots as well as their length and area. The results of the greenhouse experiment indicated that pathogens once introduced into soil survived in pot soil, became periodically active (in sufficient water conditions and were able to damage beech fine roots. However, the trees mortality was not observed during the first year of experiment. DNA analyses performed on soil and beech tissue proved persistence of introduced Phytophthora isolates.

  7. Analysis of evolution in the lower Lepidoptera (Proceedings of the First International Workshop on Lower Lepidoptera)

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    The evolutionary mechanism in Lepidoptera is discussed. As a result of the comparison of evolution between the Microptergidae and the typical Lepidoptera, two different kinds of evolution are recognized. ・・・

  8. Preferência da broca-das-cucurbitáceas [Diaphania nitidalis Cramer, 1782 (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae] por cultivares de pepineiro em ambiente protegido Pickleworm [Diaphania nitidalis Cramer, 1782 (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae]preference for cucumber cultivars in greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovani Greigh de Brito

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A broca-das-cucurbitáceas (Diaphania nitidalis é uma praga de grande importância em diversas culturas, principalmente do pepineiro. Esta espécie pode apresentar preferência em relação a determinadas cultivares quanto à sua alimentação e até mesmo oviposição. Nesse sentido, o presente estudo objetivou avaliar a ocorrência desta praga em frutos de seis cultivares de pepineiro, em ambiente protegido. As cultivares Patton, Victoria, Premier, Vlaspik e Napoleon apresentaram, respectivamente, 50%, 43,75%, 37,50%, 34,37% e 25,87% dos frutos brocados. A cultivar Marinda apresentou resultado promissor, com apenas 10,37% dos frutos com presença de larvas de D. nitidalis.The pickleworm (Diaphania nitidalis is a major pest on different crops, particulary on cucumber. This species has shown a preference for determined cultivars to its feeding and oviposition habits. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the occurence of D. nitidalis larvae in fruits of six cucumber cultivars in greenhouse. The cultivars Patton, Victoria, Premier, Vlaspik and Napoleon showed, respectively, 50%, 43.75%, 37.50%, 34.37% and 25.87% of bored fruits. Promising results were obtained with the cultivar Marinda, which showed only 10.37% of bored fruits.

  9. Variability in development of the striped rice borer, Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), due to instar number and last instar duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Guang-Hua; Yao, Jing; Yang, Qiong; Zhang, Zhi-Chun; Hoffmann, Ary A.; Fang, Ji-Chao

    2016-01-01

    The striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker), is an important insect pest of rice which shows substantial variation in developmental duration among individuals. This variation is currently poorly characterized but it is important from a control perspective because pesticides can only target early sensitive instars. It is unclear whether there are key stages that determine the length of developmental duration of individuals and/or whether variation in instar number contributes to this variation. In this study, a laboratory population and a population recently established from the field were used to test variation in development time across instar stages. The duration of developmental time of C. suppressalis started to diverge from the 5th instar onward. Individuals pupated at the 5th, 6th, 7th or even 8th instar stage. In both populations, both the instar at which the larva pupated and the duration of the last larval instar stage determined total developmental time of an individual. There was little impact of the developmental time of early instars on total developmental duration or on instar number prior to pupation. Sex influenced the number of instars but not development time within this number. The biological and applied significance of uneven development in C. suppressalis are discussed. PMID:27731388

  10. Silicon-mediated resistance in a susceptible rice variety to the rice leaf folder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis Guenee (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqiang Han

    Full Text Available The rice leaf folder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée, is one of the most destructive rice pests in Asian countries. Rice varieties resistant to the rice leaf folder are generally characterized by high silicon content. In this study, silicon amendment, at 0.16 and 0.32 g Si/kg soil, enhanced resistance of a susceptible rice variety to the rice leaf folder. Silicon addition to rice plants at both the low and high rates significantly extended larval development and reduced larval survival rate and pupation rate in the rice leaf folder. When applied at the high rate, silicon amendment reduced third-instars' weight gain and pupal weight. Altogether, intrinsic rate of increase, finite rate of increase and net reproduction rate of the rice leaf folder population were all reduced at both the low and high silicon addition rates. Although the third instars consumed more in silicon-amended treatments, C:N ratio in rice leaves was significantly increased and food conversion efficiencies were reduced due to increased silicon concentration in rice leaves. Our results indicate that reduced food quality and food conversion efficiencies resulted from silicon addition account for the enhanced resistance in the susceptible rice variety to the rice leaf folder.

  11. A cell line (NTU-MV) established from Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): Characterization, viral susceptibility, and polyhedra production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Shih-Chia; Lee, Song-Tay; Wu, Chih-Yu; Wang, Chung-Hsiung

    2007-10-01

    Here we describe the establishment of a new cell line, NTU-MV, derived from pupal tissues of an economically important pest, the legume pod borer Maruca vitrata. This cell line contained four major cell types: polymorphic cells, round cells, spindle-shaped cells, and comma cells. The doubling time of MV cells in TNM-FH medium supplemented with 8% FBS at 28 degrees C was 27h. The chromosome numbers of MV cells varied widely from 16 to 268. Compared to other insect cell lines, the MV cell line produced distinct isozyme patterns with esterase, malate dehydrogenase (MDH), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Confirmation that NTU-MV was derived from M. vitrata was demonstrated by showing that the sequence of the internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) of the MV cells was 98% identical to that of M. vitrata larvae. Two NTU-MV cell strains, NTU-MV1 and NTU-MV56, were selected based on susceptibility to MaviMNPV (M. vitrata multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus). NTU-MV, MV1, and MV56 cells showed a high susceptibility to MaviMNPV and produced high yields of polyhedra (47-50OBs/cell, 4x10(7)-5.96x10(7)OBs/ml) after 2 weeks of MaviMNPV infection. We conclude that the NTU-MV cell line will be a useful tool for studying MaviMNPV as well as for the mass production of MaviMNPV polyhedra for the biocontrol of M. vitrata.

  12. The spatial genetic differentiation of the legume pod borer, Maruca vitrata F. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) populations in West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    The legume pod borer, Maruca vitrata, is an endemic insect pest that causes significant yield loss to the cowpea crop in West Africa, and contributes to food shortages and malnutrition in native human populations. The genetic structure of Maruca vitrata was investigated among five sites from Burkin...

  13. Tissue Distribution and Purification of Prophenoloxidase in Larvae of Asian Corn Borer, Ostriniafurnacalis Guenée (Lepidoptera:Pyralidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cong-Jing FENG; Wen-Jun FU

    2004-01-01

    Using ammonium sulphate precipitation, Blue-Sepharose CL-6B, Phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B, prophenoloxidase (PPO) was isolated and purified from hemolymph of Ostriniafurnacalis larvae. This zy- mogen was a heterodimer, and composed of two subunits with the relative molecular mass ranging from 66.2 kD to 97.4 kD determined by SDS-PAGE. Western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence test showed that PPO was present in integument, hemolymph plasma and cell membrane of granular hemocytes and oenocytoids of O. furnacalis larvae.

  14. Effect of center cut strand thinning on fruit abscission and Ectomyelois ceratoniae (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) infestation in California date gardens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nay, Justin E; Perring, Thomas M

    2009-06-01

    The carob moth, Ectomyelois ceratoniae (Zeller), infests different date, Phoenix dactylifera L., fruit stages during the summer months in southern California. Abscised fruit in the kimri stage become heavily infested when they get stuck in tight date bunches and do not fall to the ground. Previous work on date palm horticulture found that the percentage of fruit abscission could be reduced by thinning fruit out of the bunch. Our objective in this study was to determine whether center cut strand thinning reduced fruit abscission and, if so, to determine any concurrent effect on carob moth summer population densities. We found that the center cut treatment did not alter fruit abscission at any of the four date gardens used in the study. However, thinning in May reduced July carob moth densities at the four date gardens by 54-97%. The percentage reduction was apparent into September, ranging from 30 to 81%. This reduction was significant in two of the four fields, and we believe that center cut thinning in these fields altered the bunch architecture, allowing abscised fruit to fall to the ground. Implications for field management of the carob moth are discussed.

  15. Effect of bunch sanitation on spatial distributions of abscised fruit and phycitine moths (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in California date gardens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nay, Justin E; Park, Yong-Lak; Perring, Thomas M

    2007-12-01

    Phycitine moths are an economic impediment to California date, Phoenix dactylifera L., production. Summer populations build to damaging levels on abscised dates that get trapped in fruit bunches. This study was conducted to determine the relationship between abscised fruit and moth infestation, and to evaluate changes in the spatial distribution of abscised fruit and moth-infested fruit after a bunch-sanitation treatment. Over the 9 wk of this study, there was a 69.9% reduction in the number of moth-infested fruit after a single sanitation treatment. Linear regression analysis showed a significant relationship between abscised fruit and phycitine moth-infested fruit; 42 and 76.6% of the variation in the number of infested fruit was explained by the number of abscised fruit in noncleaned and cleaned plots, respectively. The pattern of reinfestation by moths over the 9 wk posttreatment period was analyzed with spatial analysis with distance indices. Significant spatial associations were found between abscised fruit and moth-infested fruit, supporting the regression analysis. The sanitation treatments caused significant gaps in both abscised fruit and moth-infested fruit. Over time, gap sizes became smaller, indicating a nonrandom pattern of reinfestation that likely was caused by the movement of moths from nontreated areas into treated areas. This study, the first spatial analysis conducted in dates, suggests that in-season bunch sanitation could be effective at reducing summer moth densities if applied on a large regional scale.

  16. Juvenile hormone changes associated with diapause induction, maintenance, and termination in the beet webworm, Loxostege sticticalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xingfu; Huang, Shaohong; Luo, Lizhi

    2011-07-01

    At 22°C and under a long-day photoperiod of L:D 16:8, all the last fifth instar Loxostege sticticalis larvae undergo prepupal stage and pupate without diapause. Under a short-day photoperiod of L:D 12:12, in contrast, they all enter diapause with approximately 36 days diapause maintenance and then terminate diapause spontaneously, although only 44% of the larvae terminated diapause successfully. Changes in hemolymph juvenile hormone (JH I) titers of diapause-destined larvae across diapause induction, maintenance and termination were examined using HPLC, and were compared with those of non-diapause-destined larvae from the fifth instar through pupation. JH I titer of the earliest fifth instar diapause-destined larvae remained at a high level with a peak of 220.4 ng/ml, though it decreased continuously to a minimum of 69.0 ng/ml on day 5 in the fifth instar when the larvae stopped feeding to enter diapause. During the diapause maintenance, JH I titer of the mature larvae increased significantly and maintained a high level until day 31 in prepupae. JH I titer declined and fluctuated at low level from 5 days before pupation. In contrast, JH I titer of both the fifth instar non-diapause-destined larvae and prepupae remained and fluctuated at low level consistently, as well as decreased before pupation. These results indicate that diapause induction and maintenance in this species might be a consequence of high JH, whereas diapause termination can be attributed to low JH titer, which was in agreement with the hormonal regulation observed in many other larval-diapausing insects.

  17. [Phagodeterrence by a crude extract of common rue (Ruta chalepensis, Rutaceae) and its partitions on Hypsipyla grandella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) larvae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, Javier; Hilje, Luko; Durón, Julio; Cartín, Víctor; Calvo, Marco

    2010-03-01

    Hypsipyla grandella (Zeller) larva is maybe the main forest pest in Latin America and the Caribbean, as it bores into the main shoot of trees providing precious woods, such as mahoganies (Swietenia spp.) and cedars (Cedrela spp.). In the search for a preventative method for managing it, the crude leaf extract of common rue (Ruta chalepensis L.), as well as four partitions thereof (water, hexane, dichlorometane, and ethyl acetate), were tested for phagodeterrence. Laboratory bioassays involved increasing concentrations of the crude extract (0.1, 0.32, 1.0, 3.20 and 10.0%w/v) as well as each one of the partitions (in accordance to the yield obtained from the partitioning process), plus rutin, a flavone glycosid. A randomized complete block design, with four replicates, was used. H. grandella instar III larvae were exposed for 24 h to cedar (Cedrela odorata) leaf discs dipped into the respective treatment, after which disc consumption was measured. Strong phagodeterrence was detected at concentrations as low as 0.32 and 0.074%w/v for the crude extract and the hexane partitions, respectively; the ethyl acetate (0.24%w/v) and the water partition (for all of its concentrations), as well as the rutin (starting at 0.064%w/v), caused phagodeterrence, too. Moreover, the crude extract was submitted to a phytochemical screening by means of a number of qualitative tests, to determine possible metabolites causing phagodeterrence, the most important being alkaloids, triterpenes, coumarins and rutin. A particular phytochemical screening was carried out for the hexane partition, which was the most active.

  18. Efficacy of eco-smart insecticides against certain biological stages of jasmine moth, Palpita unionalis Hb.(Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Farag Mahmoud

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of six eco-smart insecticides, Dipel 2x 6.4% WP (Bacillus thuringensis AI, Biofly 100% WP (Beauvaria bessiana AI, Radiant 12% SC (Saccharopolyspora spinosa AI, Mectin 1.8% EC (Streptomyces avermitilis AI, Nimbecidine 0.03% EC (Azadirachtin AI and Bio-Power 50% EC (Beauvaria bessiana AI, were tested against eggs, larvae and pupae of the jasmine moth, Palpita unionalis Hb. and its parasitoid Apanteles syleptae under laboratory conditions. Data indicated that all tested insecticides had ovicidal activity against P. unionalis. Mectin was the most toxic among the tested insecticides against the egg stage, followed by Radiant or Dipel 2x, and their respective values of LC50 were 0.005 cm/l, 0.006 cm/l and 0.055 g/l. Dipel 2x was the most toxic insecticide to the 1st instar larvae of P. unionalis, whereas Mectin was the most toxic to both the 3rd and 5th instar larvae. Also, the results revealed that Mectin was the most effective against the pupal stage, followed descendingly by Radiant and Dipel 2x. The toxicity index values showed a superior efficiency of Mectin at LC50 (100% against eggs, 3rd and 5th instar larvae, and pupal stage, whereas Dipel 2x showed such superior efficiency at LC50 (100% only against 1st instar larvae. The results showed that the percents of pupation and emergence of moths were significantly different in all treatments compared to control, while deformed pupae and malformed adults were insignificantly different when fifth instar larvae were treated with the tested insecticides. Moreover, the rate of P. unionalis adult emergence from treated pupae was concentration-dependent and significant differences were found between insecticide treatments and control. Generally, Mectin, Radiant and Dipel 2x caused the highest impacts on adult emergence and malformed adults percentages. Regarding the toxicity of insecticides to the endoparasitoid A. syleptae, the treated cocoons developed to adult stages with no significant differences compared to control. Meanwhile, the longevity of the emerged parasitoid adults did not differ among the insecticides treatments and control.

  19. Review of the genus Merulempista Roesler, 1967 (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae from China, with description of two new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingdang Ren

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Merulempista Roesler, 1967 is reviewed for China. Of the four species treated in this paper, Merulempista rubriptera Li & Ren, sp. n. and M. digitata Li & Ren, sp. n. are described as new; M. cyclogramma (Hampson, 1896 is newly recorded for China, and its taxonomic position is briefly discussed. Photographs of the adults and genitalia are provided, along with a key to the known Chinese species.

  20. Interactions of two odorant-binding proteins from Cnaphalocrocis medinalis Güenée (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is well known that the odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) play important roles in insect olfactory systems. However, little attention has been paid to interactions among different OBPs within the same insect antennal sensilla. To explore the interactions of OBPs in olfactory coding in the rice leaff...

  1. A lectin extracted from Citrullus colocynthis L. (Cucurbitaceae inhibits digestive α-amylase of Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ramzi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A lectin was extracted from seeds of Citrullus colocynthis (Cucurbitaceae by column chromatography using Sepharose 4BGalactose and DEAE-Cellulose fast flow. The inhibitory effects of the extracted lectin on digestive α-amylase of Ectomyelois ceratoniae larvae were studied using pH, temperature, time of incubation and kinetic parameters. Different concentrations of extracted lectin, Citrullus colocynthis agglutinin (CCA, inhibited digestive amylolytic activity by 22-49%. The highest inhibition was obtained at pH 8 and 9, which corresponds with the highest enzymatic activity in the control. The highest inhibition of E. ceratoniae α-amylase was found at 40°C, which corresponds with the optimal temperature for enzymatic activity. Timecourse experiments revealed the highest amylolytic activity at 20-40 min post-incubation, while the highest inhibition was found after 20- 30 min. Kinetic analysis showed that incubation of α-amylase with CCA significantly decreased Vmax, indicating non-competitive inhibition, but no statistical difference was found in the Km value. Our results indicated that CCA significantly inhibited activity of digestive α-amylase in E. ceratoniae larvae, suggesting its possible application as a potential alternative control method against this pest.

  2. A lectin extracted from Citrullus colocynthis L. (Cucurbitaceae) inhibits digestive α-amylase of Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    OpenAIRE

    S. Ramzi; A. Sahragard

    2013-01-01

    A lectin was extracted from seeds of Citrullus colocynthis (Cucurbitaceae) by column chromatography using Sepharose 4BGalactose and DEAE-Cellulose fast flow. The inhibitory effects of the extracted lectin on digestive α-amylase of Ectomyelois ceratoniae larvae were studied using pH, temperature, time of incubation and kinetic parameters. Different concentrations of extracted lectin, Citrullus colocynthis agglutinin (CCA), inhibited digestive amylolytic activity by 22-49%. The highest inhibiti...

  3. Essential oils as biological alternatives to protect date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) against Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail Amri; Lamia Hamrouni; Mohsen Hanana; Bassem Jamoussi; Kaouthar Lebdi

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this research were to determine the chemical composition of the essential oil of three Tunisian plants and to evaluate their biological activity against eggs, larvae, and adult insects of Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller. The essential oils extracted from leaves of Thymus capitatus (L.) Hoffmanns. & Link, Rosmarinus officinalis L. and needles of Pinus halepensis Mill. were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; 34, 16, and 56 constituents were identified, respectively. The...

  4. Effects of age and temperature on calling behavior of carob moth, Ectomyelois ceratoniae, zell. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soofbaf, M; Nouri, G; Goldansaz, S H; Asghari-Zakaria, R

    2007-09-01

    The sexual calling behaviour of Ectomyelois ceratoniae, (zell.) was observed in the laboratory under 16L: 8D photoperiodic regime and three different constant temperatures, 20, 25 and 30 degrees C. E. ceratoniae, females showed a broad late-scotophase peak of calling activity without any calling throughout the photophase. Most females started calling during the eclosion day on, regardless of the temperature. With increasing age, moths initiated calling significantly earlier at night and the mean time spent calling increased significantly on successive days of calling. There was an inverse relationship between mean time spent calling and mean onset time of calling (r = -0.8079, p < 0.0001) and these parameters significantly affected by age and square of temperature.

  5. A trypsin-like proteinase in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): purification, characterization, and host plant inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Mina; Zibaee, Arash; Sendi, Jalal Jalali

    2014-01-01

    A trypsin-like proteinase was purified and characterized in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae. A purification process that used Sepharyl G-100 and DEAE-cellulose fast flow chromatographies revealed a proteinase with specific activity of 66.7 μmol/min/mg protein, recovery of 27.04 and purification fold of 23.35. Molecular weight of the purified protein was found to be 35.8 kDa. Optimal pH and temperature were obtained 9 and 20°C for the purified trypsin proteinase, respectively. The purified enzyme was significantly inhibited by PMSF, TLCK, and SBTI as specific inhibitors of trypsins in which TLCK showed the highest inhibitory effect. Trypsin proteinase inhibitors were extracted from four varieties of pomegranate including Brait, Torsh-Sabz, May-Khosh, and Shirin by ion exchange chromatography. It was found that fractions 17-20 of Brait; fractions 18 and 21-26 of Torsh-Sabz; fractions 1-7, 11-17, and 19-21 of May-Khosh and fraction 8 for Shirin showed presence of trypsin inhibitor in these host. Comparison of their inhibitory effects on the purified trypsin proteinase of E. ceratoniae demonstrated that fractions from May-khosh variety had the highest effect on the enzyme among other extracted fractions. Characterization of serine proteinases of insects mainly trypsins is one of the promising methods to decrease population and damages via extracting their inhibitors and providing resistant varieties.

  6. Mating compatibility and competitiveness between wild and laboratory strains of Eldana saccharina (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) after radiation treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The efficacy of the sterile insect technique (SIT) applied as part of area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programmes depends on the efficient transfer of sperm carrying dominant lethal mutations from sterile males to wild females. The success or failure of this strategy is therefore critic...

  7. Response of larval Ephestia kuehniella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) to individual Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki toxins mixed with Xenorhabdus nematophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenFarhat, Dalel; Dammak, Mariam; Khedher, Saoussen Ben; Mahfoudh, Salima; Kammoun, Schema; Tounsi, Slim

    2013-09-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki strain BNS3 produces parasporal crystals formed by Cry1Aa, Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa delta-endotoxins. In a previous work, we showed that the latter exhibited individually, a weak insecticidal activity against Ephestia kuehniella. In order to improve their toxicities, we studied the combined effect of each delta-endotoxin with X. nematophila cells on E. kuehniella larvae growth. Xenorhabdus cells were used in combination with spore crystal mixture of the wild strain BNS3, known to be active against E. kuehniella, but no improvement in toxicity was observed. This could be due to the high efficiency of BNS3 crystals against this insect. However, when X. nematophila was combined with each of Cry1Aa, Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa, improvement of toxicity was noticed. The best improvements were obtained with Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa, which are more toxic to E. kuehniella than Cry1Aa. The difference in toxicity improvement was attributed to the low affinity of Cry1Aa to BBMV receptors, compared to those of Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa. This synergism between Cry toxins and Xenorhabdus cells could be exploited on control target insect, particularly in case of resistance to Cry toxins.

  8. Functional analysis of general odorant binding protein 2 from the meadow moth, Loxostege sticticalis L. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Yin

    Full Text Available Odorant binding proteins play a crucial role in transporting semiochemicals across the sensillum lymph to olfactory receptors within the insect antennal sensilla. In this study, the general odorant binding protein 2 gene was cloned from the antennae of Loxostege sticticalis, using reverse transcription PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Recombinant LstiGOBP2 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by Ni ion affinity chromatography. Real-time PCR assays indicated that LstiGOBP2 mRNA is expressed mainly in adult antennae, with expression levels differing with developmental age. Ligand-binding experiments using N-phenyl-naphthylamine (1-NPN as a fluorescent probe demonstrated that the LstiGOBP2 protein has binding affinity to a broad range of odorants. Most importantly, trans-11-tetradecen-1-yl acetate, the pheromone component of Loxostege sticticalis, and trans-2-hexenal and cis-3-hexen-1-ol, the most abundant plant volatiles in essential oils extracted from host plants, had high binding affinities to LstiGOBP2 and elicited strong electrophysiological responses from the antennae of adults.

  9. Water stress augments silicon-mediated resistance of susceptible sugarcane cultivars to the stalk borer Eldana saccharina (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvedaras, O L; Keeping, M G; Goebel, F-R; Byrne, M J

    2007-04-01

    Silicon (Si) can improve resistance of plants to insect attack and may also enhance tolerance of water stress. This study tested if Si-mediated host plant resistance to insect attack was augmented by water stress. Four sugarcane cultivars, two resistant (N21, N33) and two susceptible (N26, N11) to Eldana saccharina Walker were grown in a pot trial in Si-deficient river sand, with (Si+) and without (Si-) calcium silicate. To induce water stress, irrigation to half the trial was reduced after 8.5 months. The trial was artificially infested with E. saccharina eggs after water reduction and harvested 66 days later. Silicon treated, stressed and non-stressed plants of the same cultivar did not differ appreciably in Si content. Decreases in numbers of borers recovered and stalk damage were not associated with comparable increases in rind hardness in Si+ cane, particularly in water-stressed susceptible cultivars. Overall, Si+ plants displayed increased resistance to E. saccharina attack compared with Si- plants. Borer recoveries were significantly lower in stressed Si+ cane compared with either stressed Si- or non-stressed Si- and Si+ cane. Generally, fewer borers were recovered from resistant cultivars than susceptible cultivars. Stalk damage was significantly lower in Si+ cane than in Si- cane, for N21, N11 and N26. Stalk damage was significantly less in Si+ combined susceptible cultivars than in Si- combined susceptible cultivars under non-stressed and especially stressed conditions. In general, the reduction in borer numbers and stalk damage in Si+ plants was greater for water-stressed cane than non-stressed cane, particularly for susceptible sugarcane cultivars. The hypothesis that Si affords greater protection against E. saccharina borer attack in water-stressed sugarcane than in non-stressed cane and that this benefit is greatly enhanced in susceptible cultivars is supported. A possible active role for soluble Si in defence against E. saccharina is proposed.

  10. Silk Gland Gene Expression during Larval-Pupal Transition in the Cotton Leaf Roller Sylepta derogata (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Honghua; Cheng, Yuming; Wang, Zhongyang; Li, Zhong; Stanley, David; Yang, Yizhong

    2015-01-01

    The cotton leaf roller, Sylepta derogata, is a silk-producing insect pest. While young larvae feed on the underside of leaves, the older ones roll cotton leaves and feed on the leaf edges, which defoliates cotton plants. The larvae produce silk to stabilize the rolled leaf and to balloon from used to new leaves. Despite the significance of silk in the biology of pest insect species, there is virtually no information on the genes involved in their silk production. This is a substantial knowledge gap because some of these genes may be valuable targets for developing molecular pest management technologies. We addressed the gap by posing the hypothesis that silk gland gene expression changes during the transition from larvae to pupae. We tested our hypothesis using RNA-seq to investigate changes in silk gland gene expression at three developmental stages, 5th instar larvae (silk producing; 15,445,926 clean reads), prepupae (reduced silk producing; 13,758,154) and pupae (beyond silk producing; 16,787,792). We recorded 60,298 unigenes and mapped 50,158 (larvae), 48,415 (prepupae) and 46,623 (pupae) of them to the NCBI database. Most differentially expressed genes in the 5th instar larvae/prepupae libraries were relevant to nucleotide synthesis and maintenance of silk gland function. We identified down-regulated transcriptional factors and several genes involved in silk formation in the three libraries and verified the expression pattern of eight genes by qPCR. The developmental- and tissue-specific expression patterns of the fibroin light chain gene showed it was highly expressed during the larval silk-producing stage. We recorded highest expression of this gene in the larval silk gland, compared to other tissues, including midgut, hindgut, epidermis, Malpighian tubes, hemolymph and fat body. These data are a genetic resource to guide selection of key genes that may be targeted for in planta and other gene-silencing technologies for sustainable cotton agriculture.

  11. Methoprene and synergized pyrethrins as an aerosol treatment to control Plodia interpunctella (Hubner), the Indian meal moth (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerosol insecticides (also known as ULV or fogging treatments) delivered through an ultra-low volume application system, are available commercially to control insect pests such as Plodia interpunctella Hübner, the Indianmeal moth. However, little is known about the susceptibility of eggs of P. inter...

  12. Compatibility of Heterorhabditis indica (Rhabditida: Heterorhabditidae) and Hebrobracon hebetor (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) in biological control of Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential for integrating the application of Heterorhabditis indica and release of Hebrobracon hebetor (in the management of Plodia interpunctella) was investigated. A combination of the nematode and the parasitoid was observed to increase the mortality of Indianmeal moth larvae but the increas...

  13. Pheromone traps for monitoring Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in the presence of mating disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-dose pheromone lures have proved useful for monitoring some lepidopteran pests in the presence of mating disruption, but not others. We performed experiments in commercial and pilot scale facilities to examine the effect of pheromone dose on detection of Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (...

  14. Comparative mortality of diapausing and nondiapausing larvae of Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) exposed to monoterpenoids and low pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbata, George N; Pascual-Villalobos, Marie J; Payton, Mark E

    2012-04-01

    Monoterpenoids and low pressure have each been demonstrated to cause mortality of stored-product insect pests. The current report investigated the prospects of integrating the two methods in the management of diapausing and nondiapausing larvae of Plodia interpunctella (Hübner). In a separate experiment, the larvae were exposed to 35.5 mmHg in Erlenmeyer flasks at 19 and 28 degrees C for times ranging from 30 min to 96 h. Another set of experiments was conducted to investigate the toxicity of exposing P. interpunctella larvae to monoterpenoids including E-anethole, estragole, S-carvone, linalool, L-fenchone, geraniol, gamma-terpinene, and DL-camphor alone or in combination with low pressure (50 mmHg). Lethal times (LT) determined by subjecting time-mortality data to probit analyses were shortened to half when both diapausing and nondiapausing larvae were exposed to low pressure at 28 degrees C compared with 19 degrees C. Exposure of diapausing larvae to a monoterpenoid alone, with the exception of DL-camphor and estragole, at a concentration of 66.7 microl/1L of volume required > 30 h to generate 99% mortality at 19.0 +/- 0.8 degrees C. However, the LT99 values for diapausing and nondiapausing larvae exposed to combinations of DL-camphor or estragole and low pressure were considerably shortened. Combinations involving the rest of the monoterpenoids investigated and low pressure did not generate LT99 that were shorter than those of the control, which was low pressure only. These results suggest that integrating low pressure with DL-camphor or estragole could be a new method for the control of diapausing larvae of P. interpunctella at cooler temperatures.

  15. Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): spatial relationship between trap catch and distance from a source of emerging adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbogast, Richard T; Chini, Shahpar R; McGovern, Jeffrey E

    2005-04-01

    The Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner), was selected as a representative stored-product moth to test the validity of contour mapping of trap catch for pest monitoring in warehouses and retail stores. Three experiments, each replicated five times, were conducted in a 3.2 by 9.0-m aluminum shed. Each experiment involved placing pupae at a single release point (source) and recording the numbers of emerging adult males captured after 24, 48, and 72 h in each of four pheromone-baited sticky traps. The experiments differed only with respect to the point of release. Distribution of trap catch reflected the general distribution of moths in the shed; and consecutive contour maps tracked their dispersal from the source. As emergence and dispersal progressed, cumulative trap catch increased throughout the shed, but it remained highest near the source. The observed spatial patterns of trap catch relative to sources of infestation and the inverse relationship of trap catch to distance from a source support the validity of contour mapping as a means of monitoring stored-product moths and locating foci of infestation. The relationship between trap catch and distance from a source of infestation was well described by two-parameter exponential decay, both in P. interpunctella and in the previously studied Lasioderma serricorne (F.). Analysis of data from retail pet stores also showed exponential decline in trap catch of P. interpunctella with distance from centers of infestation.

  16. Silk gland gene expression during larval-pupal transitionin the cotton leaf roller Sylepta derogate (Lepidoptera: pyralidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cotton leaf roller, Sylepta derogata, is a silk-producing insect pest. While young larvae feed on the underside of leaves, the older ones roll cotton leaves and feed on the leaf edges, which defoliates cotton plants. The larvae produce silk to stabilize the rolled leaf and to balloon from used t...

  17. Honeydew Moth Cryptoblabes gnidiella (MILLIÈRE, 1867 (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae: an adventive species frequently imported with fruit to Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawidowicz Łukasz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cryptoblabes gnidiella is an opportunistic species native to the Mediterranean region. This species has been reported from several dozen host plants, including many cultivated plants, especially fruit (e.g. grapes, lemons or pomegranates. It is considered a serious pest together with accompanying insects such as mealybugs. It is also suspected of being a vector of certain pathogens. The Honeydew Moth constitutes a threat not only to crops in the Mediterranean basin but is also becoming a problem in other parts of the world with a suitable climate, where this species has been accidentally imported. The records given here are from the time of year when pomegranates are commonly available on supermarket shelves. These data show that the import of this species is quite common and that the lack of such information hitherto may be due to its having been overlooked. This paper presents the first records of Cryptoblabes gnidiella in Poland.

  18. Diapause initiation and incidence in the millet stem borer, Coniesta ignefusalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): the role of the host plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzubil, P B; Mensah, G W; McCaffery, A R

    2000-08-01

    The role of the host plant in the development of larval diapause in the millet stem borer, Coniesta ignefusalis (Hampson) was investigated in northern Ghana in 1996 and 1997. Surveys conducted in farmers' fields in the Guinea and Sudan savannah revealed that of all the upland cereals grown, the insect survived the dry season only in stalks and stubble of pearl millet, Pennisetum glaucum and late sorghum, Sorghum bicolor. This observation was confirmed by results from field trials conducted at the Manga Research Station. In these studies, C. ignefusalis larvae entered diapause only in late millet and late sorghum, with a higher incidence in the former. The insect neither attacked nor entered diapause in maize planted during the same period as the other crops. Results from controlled experiments showed that diapause incidence in the preferred host, millet, was higher in older than in younger plants, suggesting that host plant maturation is a key factor influencing the development of larval diapause in C. ignefusalis.

  19. Identification and analysis of host plant resistance in leading maize genotypes against spotted stem borer, Chilo partellus (Swinhoe) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabjafari, K H; Jalali, S K

    2007-06-01

    Twenty six popular varieties of maize in Karnataka state (India) were screened for resistance to Chilo partellus (Swinhoe). In field trial, varieties CM132, CM137 and PMZ103 showed the highest level of resistance, respectively. While the varieties GK3014, HY4642 and DK984 had the lowest level of resistance, respectively. In glasshouse trial, the varieties CM137 and HY4642 had the highest and lowest level of resistance. A positive correlation equal to +0.111 (in field) and +0.521 (in glasshouse) was found between the Leaf Injury Score (LIS) and Stem Diameter (SD). Meanwhile, negative correlation equal to -0.432 (in field) and -0.896 (in glasshouse) was found between Leaf Injury Score (LIS) and Internodal Distance (InD). Results of the studies on major nutritional elements on resistant variety CM137 and susceptible variety HY4642 indicated higher percentage of P, K, Fe and Si in stem tissues of the variety CM137, while the variety HY4642 had higher percentage of N and Sugar, highlighting the role of these elements in conferring resistance and susceptibility to C. partellus. Studies on the impact of resistance factors on biological events of C. partellus revealed significant differences between percentage survival of larvae, percentage of pupation, pupal weight and pupal period (females only) on two varieties CM137 and HY4642. But there was no significant difference in the percentage of moth emergence on two varieties.

  20. Aprostocetus (Ootetrastichus) theioneurus (Masi) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae): a hyperparasitoid on the cereal stem borer Chilo partellus (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salle, J.La

    1993-01-01

    Aprostocetus (Ootetrastichus) theioneurus (Masi) is recorded from Kenya as a hyperparasitoid on Chilo partellus through the braconid Cotesia sesamiae. This is the first known species of the subgenus Ootetrastichus which is not a primary endoparasitoid of eggs. Diagnostic characters are given for thi

  1. A study on biochemical differences among five different groups of rice striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zibaee

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Identification of biodiversity in different rice striped stem borer (Chilo supprressalis populations is very important to adopt suitable integrated pest management procedures. Larvae were collected from five different regions in north of Iran including Gourabzarmikh (Go, Sheikhmahaleh (Sh, Rasht (Ra, Amol (Am and Babol (Ba. Activity levels of five enzymes including alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase and alpha-amylase were evaluated in 4th instar larvae. In addition, five non-enzymatic compounds such as glucose, cholesterol, total protein, uric acid and urea were also measured. Amount of measured compounds showed significant differences in all groups except for alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase. Hierarchical agglomerative clustering under UPGMA model demonstrated that Ba population had the most genetic distance and was separated from other groups. In the second group, Go population had the most genetic distance from others and two groups of Ra and Sh had the least genetic distances.

  2. Essential oils as biological alternatives to protect date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L. against Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Amri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this research were to determine the chemical composition of the essential oil of three Tunisian plants and to evaluate their biological activity against eggs, larvae, and adult insects of Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller. The essential oils extracted from leaves of Thymus capitatus (L. Hoffmanns. & Link, Rosmarinus officinalis L. and needles of Pinus halepensis Mill. were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; 34, 16, and 56 constituents were identified, respectively. The major constituents were (Z-caryophyllene (23.8%, β-myrcene (20.5% and α-pinene (13.3% in P. halepensis oil, carvacrol (66.9%, p-cymene (9.1%, and δ-terpinene (6.2% in T. capitatus oil and 1,8-cineole (47.5%, camphor (14.9%, α-pinene (14.1%, and borneol (13.1% in R. officinalis oil. The insecticidal effects of essential oils on eggs, larvae, and adults of E. ceratoniae were investigated. Ovicidal activity of oils was studied by spray on eggs while larvicidal and adulticidal activities were assessed by fumigation and spray. Number of hatched eggs was verified after 10 d, larva and adult mortalities were observed after 6, 12, and 24 h. Globally, eggs and larvae were the most resistant to the three different oils, needing higher doses to obtain a higher mortality. The spray method was most effective than fumigation. Essential oil extracted from T. capitatus proved to be very toxic towards E. ceratoniae on all three phases at the dose of 20 μL mL-1 (100% inhibition, followed by the oil from R. officinalis (90-100% inhibition, nevertheless, weak activity was obtained with P. halepensis oil (68.3-85% inhibition. Results obtained may suggest that the essential oils of T. capitatus and R. officinalis possess high insecticidal activity and therefore, can be used in biotechnological application as natural preservative in stored dates and could be useful in managing populations of E. ceratoniae in field.

  3. Structural characteristics and phylogenetic analysis of the mitochondrial genome of the rice leafroller, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yonghua; Qu, Fujuan; Yang, Zhongwu; Zhang, Xiuyue; Yue, Bisong

    2014-02-01

    The rice leafroller, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis, is one of the most important pests on rice and possesses striking flight ability. We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the 15,377 bp of a C. medinalis mitochondrial genome (mtDNA). The mtDNA encodes 37 genes and shows a unique lepidopteran CR-M-I-Q arrangement. Three possible substructures were detected in C. medinalis and some other lepidopteran insects' control region. The findings might be relevant to the regulation of mtDNA replication and transcription. Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed among 19 families in Lepidoptera so far. Cnaphalocrocis medinalis forms a reciprocal monophyletic group with Ostrinia in clade Crambidae instead of Pyralidae. The topology between Papilionoidea and other superfamilies showed an apparent contradiction with traditional Lepidopteran classification. As a well-known migratory insect, the molecular information contained in C. medinalis mtDNA may provide a further insight into the evolution of mitochondria genes and insect species, and may help to better understanding the energy metabolism of invertebrates.

  4. Color, iridescence, and thermoregulation in Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, Stephen G; Hayes, Jacqueline; Large, Maryanne C J; Poladian, Leon

    2008-10-10

    This paper examines evidence for the hypothesized connection between solar thermal properties of butterfly and moth (Lepidoptera) wings, iridescence/structural color, and thermoregulation. Specimens of 64 species of Lepidoptera were measured spectrophotometrically, their solar absorptances calculated, and their habitat temperatures determined. No correlation was found between habitat temperature and the solar absorptance of the wings. It was found, however, that the iridescent specimens exhibited, on average, substantially higher solar absorptance than noniridescent ones.

  5. Hearing in hooktip moths (Drepanidae: Lepidoptera)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Surlykke, Annemarie; Yack, Jayne E; Spence, Andrew J

    2003-01-01

    This study presents anatomical and physiological evidence for a sense of hearing in hooktip moths (Drepanoidea). Two example species, Drepana arcuata and Watsonalla uncinula, were examined. The abdominal ears of drepanids are structurally unique compared to those of other Lepidoptera and other...

  6. Evolution of sexual dimorphism in the Lepidoptera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, C.E.; Zwaan, B.J.; Brakefield, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Among the animals, the Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) are second only to beetles in number of described species and are known for their striking intra- and interspecific diversity. Within species, sexual dimorphism is a source of variation in life history (e.g., sexual size dimorphism and prota

  7. Interactions between isolates of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae and the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora JPM4 during infection of the sugar cane borer Diatraea saccharalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Juan Pablo Molina; Samuels, Richard Ian; Machado, Inês Ribeiro; Dolinski, Claudia

    2007-10-01

    Interactions between the nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora isolate JPM4 and the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae, isolates LPP45 and LPP39, were studied during dual infections of Diatraea saccharalis. Mortality, production of infective juveniles (IJs) and production of conidia were evaluated. A positive effect was demonstrated for host mortality in duel infections of JPM4 and LPP39, causing 100% mortality with LT(50) and LT(95) values of 1.8 and 2.8 days, respectively. Higher values were seen when using the nematode or fungi individually. However, a combination of JPM4+LPP39 caused a significant reduction in IJ production. The results show that faster time to death, a moderately virulent fungal isolate could be combined with the nematode, however at the expense of IJ production.

  8. New ideas about genetic differentiation of Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) populations in China based on the mtDNA cytochrome b gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiao-Tian; Zheng, Fu-Shan; Lu, Ming-Xing; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker), is an important pest of rice in China and other parts of the world. To further explore the population genetic structure and genetic differentiation of C. suppressalis populations found on rice in China, we amplified 432 bp fragments of the cytochrome b (cyt b) gene for 44 C. suppressalis populations. Nineteen variable sites in the mtDNA gene were observed, and 16 haplotypes were identified. Nucleotide diversity (π) and haplotype diversity (h) ranged from 0.00274 to 0.00786 and 0.72297 to 0.87604, respectively, while genetic structure analysis found significant genetic differentiation to be present among the five regions in China - northern China (NC), northeastern China (NEC), central China (CC), southern China (SC) and southwestern China (SWC) - where C. suppresalis was collected. In addition, molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that a relatively high proportion (57.6%) of the total genetic variance was attributable to variation within the populations. N(m) and F(ST) analyses suggested that the differentiation was not significantly different between NEC and NC, CC and SC, and SC and SWC regions, but was significant between NEC and CC, SC and SWC regions, corresponding well with the geographical distribution of the sampled populations. Phylogenetic analysis divided the populations into two indistinct clades: a NEC-NC-CC clade and a CC-SC-SWC clade, while CC region acted as a transition zone between north and south China, a finding different from previous work.

  9. [Phagodeterrent and systemic activity of a fomulation derived from an extract of common rue (Ruta chalepensis, Rutaceae) on Hypsipyla grandella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) larvae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, Javier; Hilje, Luko; Durón, Julio; Cartín, Víctor; Calvo, Marco A

    2010-03-01

    A key neotropical pest of mahoganies (Swietenia spp.) and cedars (Cedrela spp.), the larva of Hypsipyla grandella (Zeller) commonly bores into the main shoot of these valuable timber species, causing forking of the stems. Therefore, it would be desirable to count upon a phagodeterrent and systemic product which could readily protect young tissues. Since crude extracts of common rue foliage (Ruta chalepensis L.) have phagodeterrent activity on H. grandella larva, a product was formulated by combining such an extract with a number of coadjuvants, and was assessed on 75-100 cm tall Spanish cedar (Cedrela odorata L.) trees, inside a greenhouse. A completely randomized design was used, with 10 trees per each one of the following treatments: the formulated product, an absolute control (distilled water), a relative control (carbofuran, 1%m/v in water), and the relative control without the crude extract. Number of attacks to the main shoot, fallen leaves and frass piles were recorded, as well as tunnel length. Regarding these variables, the formulated product provided excellent protection to treated trees, with only 0.1 attacks to the main shoot, on the average, at the end of the evaluation period. Likewise, when the systemic activity of the crude extract was assessed, substances present in it were able to translocate and get assimilated by the trees, thereafter causing phagodeterrence to larvae. Finally, an espectrophotometry analysis (performed at a wavelength of 355 nm) allowed us to determine the concentration (403+/-1 mg/l) and percentage (0.40%) of the flavonoid rutin in the crude extract, which eventually may be used as an analytical marker compound, should an industrial formulation be developed.

  10. The effect of leaf biopesticide (Mirabilis jalapa) and entomopathogenic fungi (Beauveria bassiana) combinations to some physiological characters and histology of Crocidolomia pavonana (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirajuddin, Nur Tasmiah; Anggraeni, Tjandra

    2014-03-01

    Crocidolomia pavonana is one of the most prominent pest that cause damage to vegetables especially Brassicaceae such us cabbage, broccoli, mustard greens and turnips, these vegetable have been widely consumed and cultivated in Indonesia. The invation of this pest might created high risk of cultivated failure. Enviromentally pest control efforts by utilizing biological control agents such us biopesticides of plants and entomopathogenic fungi have been carried out, but the work was relatively long and strongly influenced by environmental factors. The purpose of this study was to combine biopesticide of Mirabilis jalapa and entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana to look at mortality of C. pavonana larvae observing by histological incision and scanning electron microscope. Concentration treatments of extracts M. jalapa was (control; 0,1; 0,2; 0,4 and 0,8 gr/ml) and the result showed that the effective concentration was 0,8 g/ml which affect significantly (P<0,05) in reduce pupa weight, improve pupasi time, lowering percentage of emergence imago and improve the long phase of pupa which differ significantly with control. The combination of biopesticides proved to accelerate the mortality of larvae. Histological incision observed at hour 24, 48, 72 and 96, where the biggest damage occurred at hour 96. Observation by scanning electron microscope showed fungus spores that attach to the body surface of larvae subsequently penetrate into the body. Thus the combination use of biopesticides M. jalapa and fungi B. bassiana, can be used as an alternative pest control C. pavonana.

  11. The effect of leaf biopesticide (Mirabilis jalapa) and entomopathogenic fungi (Beauveria bassiana) combinations to some physiological characters and histology of Crocidolomia pavonana (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirajuddin, Nur Tasmiah, E-mail: nurtasmiah@yahoo.com; Anggraeni, Tjandra, E-mail: nurtasmiah@yahoo.com [Sekolah Ilmu dan Teknologi Hayati - ITB, Jalan Ganesa 10 Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    Crocidolomia pavonana is one of the most prominent pest that cause damage to vegetables especially Brassicaceae such us cabbage, broccoli, mustard greens and turnips, these vegetable have been widely consumed and cultivated in Indonesia. The invation of this pest might created high risk of cultivated failure. Enviromentally pest control efforts by utilizing biological control agents such us biopesticides of plants and entomopathogenic fungi have been carried out, but the work was relatively long and strongly influenced by environmental factors. The purpose of this study was to combine biopesticide of Mirabilis jalapa and entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana to look at mortality of C. pavonana larvae observing by histological incision and scanning electron microscope. Concentration treatments of extracts M. jalapa was (control; 0,1; 0,2; 0,4 and 0,8 gr/ml) and the result showed that the effective concentration was 0,8 g/ml which affect significantly (P<0,05) in reduce pupa weight, improve pupasi time, lowering percentage of emergence imago and improve the long phase of pupa which differ significantly with control. The combination of biopesticides proved to accelerate the mortality of larvae. Histological incision observed at hour 24, 48, 72 and 96, where the biggest damage occurred at hour 96. Observation by scanning electron microscope showed fungus spores that attach to the body surface of larvae subsequently penetrate into the body. Thus the combination use of biopesticides M. jalapa and fungi B. bassiana, can be used as an alternative pest control C. pavonana.

  12. Effects of an extracted lectin from Citrullus colocynthis L. (Cucurbitaceae) on survival, digestion and energy reserves of Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzi, Samar; Sahragard, Ahad; Sendi, Jalal J; Aalami, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are the heterogeneous proteins in plants that serve as storage proteins via defensive mechanisms against herbivores. In the current study, a lectin was extracted and purified from seeds of Citrullus colocynthis by Sepharose 4B-Galactose and DEAE-cellulose fast flow chromatographies. Different concentrations of the lectin were added to artificial diet of Ectomyelois ceratoniae larvae finding out its effect on some biological parameters, digestive physiology and amount of storage macromolecules. It was found that CCA (C. colocynthis Agglutinin) increased life span from 23.44 days in control to 28.59 days in the treated individuals. Survival of larvae on control and CCA diets were 93.3 and 66.6%, respectively. Different concentrations of CCA significantly affected α-amylase and general proteolytic activities except for TAG-lipase activity. Activities of all specific proteases decreased when larvae were fed on different concentrations of CCA except for aminopeptidase. Meanwhile, amount of storage macromolecules in the larvae fed on different concentrations of CCA statistically decreased vs. control. These results demonstrated that CCA could intervene in physiology of E. ceratoniae and survival of larvae. Therefore, it can be taken into consideration in IPM of the pest through plant breeding programs.

  13. Purification of a Kunitz-type inhibitor from Acacia polyphyllaDC seeds: characterization and insecticidal properties against Anagasta kuehniella Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Suzy Wider; de Oliveira, Caio Fernando Ramalho; Bezerra, Cezar da Silva; Freire, Maria das Graças Machado; Regina Kill, Marta; Machado, Olga Lima Tavares; Marangoni, Sergio; Macedo, Maria Ligia Rodrigues

    2013-03-13

    Anagasta kuehniella is a polyphagous pest that causes economic losses worldwide. This species produces serine proteases as its major enzymes for protein digestion. In this study, a new serine-protease inhibitor was isolated from Acacia polyphylla seeds (AcKI).Further analysis revealed that AcKI is formed by two polypeptide chains with a relative molecular mass of ∼20 kDa. The effects of AcKI on the development, survival, and enzymatic activity of Anagasta kuehniella larvae were evaluated, by incorporating AcKI in an artificial diet. Bioassays revealed a reduction in larval weight of ∼50% with the lower concentration of AcKI used in the study (0.5%). Although additionalassays showed an increase in endogenous trypsin and chymotrypsin activities, with a degree of AcKI-insensivity, AcKI produces an anti nutritional effect on A. kuehniella, indicating AcKI as a promising bioinsecticide protein for engineering plants that are resistant to insect pests.

  14. Isolation and characterization of a new Bacillus thuringiensis strain Lip harboring a new cry1Aa gene highly toxic to Ephestia kuehniella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khoury, Micheline; Azzouz, Hichem; Chavanieu, Alain; Abdelmalak, Nouha; Chopineau, Joël; Awad, Mireille Kallassy

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize new Bacillus thuringiensis strains that have a potent insecticidal activity against Ephestia kuehniella larvae. Strains harboring cry1A genes were tested for their toxicity, and the Lip strain showed a higher insecticidal activity compared to that of the reference strain HD1 (LC50 of Lip and HD1 were 33.27 and 128.61 μg toxin/g semolina, respectively). B. thuringiensis Lip harbors and expresses cry1Aa, cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1Ad and cry2A. DNA sequencing revealed several polymorphisms in Lip Cry1Aa and Cry1Ac compared to the corresponding proteins of HD1. The activation process using Ephestia kuehniella midgut juice showed that Lip Cry1A proteins were more stable in the presence of larval proteases. Moreover, LipCry1A proteins exhibited higher insecticidal activity against these larvae. These results indicate that Lip is an interesting strain that could be used as an alternative to the worldwide used strain HD1.

  15. Biologia de Geocoris punctipes (Say, 1832) (Hemiptera: Geocoridae) sobre ovos de Anagasta kuehniella (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) em regimes de temperatura alternantes e constantes

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Ana Maria Calixto

    2014-01-01

    Regimes de temperatura alternantes e constantes podem influenciar os parâmetros biológicos de inimigos naturais, assim, consequentemente o sucesso de programas de controle biológico. Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar os efeitos de diferentes regimes de temperatura alternantes (21/11ºC, 30/26ºC) e constantes (16,8ºC, 28,3ºC), no desenvolvimento, sobrevivência, reprodução e no crescimento populacional do predador Geocoris punctipes (Say, 1832). As ninfas de G. punctipes apresentaram cinc...

  16. Development and thermal requirements of the Nearctic predator Geocoris punctipes (Hemiptera: Geocoridae) reared at constant and alternating temperatures and fed on Anagasta kuehniella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) eggs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calixto, A.M.; Bueno, V.H.P.; Montes, F.C.; Lenteren, van J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the optimal temperatures for development and survival of biological control agents is essential for efficient mass-rearing and introduction of natural enemies in augmentative biological control programs. We studied the effect of constant and alternating temperatures on development and s

  17. Effects of an extracted lectin from Citrullus colocynthis L. (Cucurbitaceae) on survival, digestion and energy reserves of Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Samar eRamzi

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are the heterogeneous proteins in plants that serve as storage proteins via defensive mechanisms against herbivores. In the current study, a lectin was extracted and purified from seeds of Citrullus colocynthis by Sepharose 4B-Galactose and DEAE-cellulose fast flow chromatographies. Different concentrations of the lectin were added to artificial diet of Ectomyelois ceratoniae larvae finding out its effect on some biological parameters, digestive physiology and amount of storage macrom...

  18. Effects of an extracted lectin from Citrullus colocynthis L. (Cucurbitaceae on survival, digestion and energy reserves of Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar eRamzi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Lectins are the widespread and heterogeneous proteins of plants that serve as storage proteins in defensive mechanisms against herbivores. A lectin was extracted and purified from seeds of Citrullus colocynthis by Sepharose 4B-Galactose and DEAE-cellulose fast flow chromatographies. Different concentrations of the lectin were added to artificial diet of Ectomyelois ceratoniae to find out its effect on some biological parameters, digestive physiology and amount of storage macromolecules. It was found that CCA increased life span from 23.44 days in control to 28.59 days in the individuals fed on 2% of CCA. Larval survivals on control and CCA diets were 93.3 and 66.6%, respectively. Different concentrations of CCA significantly affected α-amylase and general proteolytic activities in larvae but TAG-lipase activity had no significant changes. Activities of all specific proteases decreased when larvae were fed on different concentrations of CCA except for aminopeptidase. Meanwhile, amount of storage macromolecules in the larvae fed on different concentrations of CCA statistically decreased versus control. These results demonstrated that CCA could intervene in physiology of E. ceratoniae and survival of larvae. Therefore, it can be taken into consideration in IPM of the pest through plant breeding programs.

  19. Silicon-mediated resistance in a susceptible rice variety to the rice leaf folder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis Guenée (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yongqiang; Lei, Wenbin; Wen, Lizhang; Hou, Maolin

    2015-01-01

    The rice leaf folder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée), is one of the most destructive rice pests in Asian countries. Rice varieties resistant to the rice leaf folder are generally characterized by high silicon content. In this study, silicon amendment, at 0.16 and 0.32 g Si/kg soil, enhanced resistance of a susceptible rice variety to the rice leaf folder. Silicon addition to rice plants at both the low and high rates significantly extended larval development and reduced larval survival rate and pupation rate in the rice leaf folder. When applied at the high rate, silicon amendment reduced third-instars' weight gain and pupal weight. Altogether, intrinsic rate of increase, finite rate of increase and net reproduction rate of the rice leaf folder population were all reduced at both the low and high silicon addition rates. Although the third instars consumed more in silicon-amended treatments, C:N ratio in rice leaves was significantly increased and food conversion efficiencies were reduced due to increased silicon concentration in rice leaves. Our results indicate that reduced food quality and food conversion efficiencies resulted from silicon addition account for the enhanced resistance in the susceptible rice variety to the rice leaf folder.

  20. Efforts to Support Sustainable Agriculture with The Understanding of Invasion and Colonization Egg Parasitoid of Yellow Rice Stemborer, Scirphopaga Incertulas Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae in Bali

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    Ni Made Delly Resiani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The arrangement of sustainable agriculture in Bali which appropriate with Bali government’s mission: Bali Clean and Green "Go to Organic". The concept of modern agriculture looks like contradiction with the aspects of sustainable agriculture. The aspects of rice cultivation have been done by local agriculture community in Bali (call it SUBAK for many years, but the attack of yellow rice stemborer still happen, which adverse farmer’s side, persist. The efforts control which has been done, still rely on insecticides because it can give quick effect, but it is not appropriate for sustainable agriculture. The other solution to solve that issue is with the integrated pest management (IPM, as the main component of which is the role of parasitoids. Therefore needed research to investigate the invasion and colonization of yellow rice stemborer parasitoids in Bali. The research was conducted in three districts centers of rice stemborer (Badung, Tabanan, Jembrana, since December 2013 to March 2014. This research using survey method with the rule is collecting the group of egg with purposive random sampling at 10 - 66 days after planting (dap, as many as 70 groups of eggs per week. The observed of variables include the percentage of infected eggs, diversity, dominance, similarity, abundance, attack level and ratio of female parasitoids. The result showed that invasion and colonization of the egg parasitoid of yellow rice stemborer in Bali vary in diversity, dominance, abundance, the percentage of infected eggs and attack level. Three types of parasitoids associated with rice plants, they are Trichogramma japonicum, Telenomus rowani and Tetrastichus schoenobii. The percentage of infected eggs, diversity, dominance of T. japonicum, T. rowani and T. schoenobii, similarity, abundance of T. japonicum, T. rowani and T. schoenobii, attack level of T. japonicum, T. rowani and T. schoenobii and ratio of female of T. japonicum, T. rowani and T. schoenobii found in Tabanan regency, were (90.14%; 0.32; 0.00; 0.06; 0.49; 100%; 96.16; 424.09; 1.193,54 tail; 1.30; 11.98; 85.13%; 77.36; 84.67; 79.51%, in Badung regency were found (83.68%; 0.42; 0.02; 0.12; 0.26; 100%; 199.94; 471.14; 708.83 tail; 5,22; 20,61; 64,25%; 76.48; 83.44; 77.63% and at Jembrana regency were found (78.61%;0.39;0.02;0.35;0.07;100%;144,76;635,97; 293,15 tail; 4.79;39.43;50.20%;75.83;80.77; 75.30%. The above data’s  as a basis for determining the measures to support sustainable agriculture.

  1. Effects of Low Ozone Concentrations and Short Exposure Times on the Mortality of Immature Stages of the Indian Meal Moth, Plodia Interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

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    Keivanloo Ensieh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In Iran, the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner, is one of the most important pests of such stored products as date fruits and pistachio nuts. Ozone was applied as a gas at four concentrations (0, 2, 3, and 5 ppm for four different periods (30, 60, 90, and 120 min on the immature stages of P. interpunctella. The results indicated that by increasing the concentration and exposure time, the rate of mortality increased for all tested stages. This study showed that 12-day-old larvae were more susceptible than other stages when exposed to 5 ppm ozone for 120 min. The next in order of susceptibility were pupae, then 5-day-old larvae, and 17-dayold larvae had the highest sensitivity to ozonation. At the highest concentration of ozone, for the longest time, the least mortality rate was recorded for one-day-old eggs. According to the results, a reduction in the population density of P. interpunctella in laboratory experiments is promising. However, validation studies will be necessary to fully determine the potential of ozone as a replacement for the current post harvest chemical control of P. interpunctella on either pistachio nuts or date fruits.

  2. Efficacy of an Esfenvalerate plus Methoprene Aerosol for the Control of Eggs and Fifth Instars of the Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerosol insecticides may provide an alternative to fumigants for control of the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner), a major insect pest of stored processed food. In this study, eggs and larvae (5th instars) of P. interpunctella were exposed to aerosol applications of the pyrethroid esf...

  3. Dietary effects of harmine, a β-carboline alkaloid, on development, energy reserves and α-amylase activity of Plodia interpunctella Hübner (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouayad, Noureddin; Rharrabe, Kacem; Lamhamdi, Mostafa; Nourouti, Naima Ghailani; Sayah, Fouad

    2012-01-01

    The physiological and developmental effects of harmine, a β-carboline alkaloid, on the insect pest Plodia interpunctella have been analyzed. When added at the larval diet, harmine induced a strong reduction of larvae weight, cannibalism between larvae, in addition to significant mortality. On the other hand, it caused a remarkable development disruption, manifested by both delay and reduction of pupation and adult emergence. Using spectrophotometric assays, we have shown that harmine ingestion provoked a severe reduction in protein, glycogen and lipid contents. Beside, when larvae fed harmine, the activity of the digestive enzyme α-amylase was strongly reduced. In conclusion, our experiments clearly show the susceptibility of P. interpunctella to harmine ingestion revealing the potent bioinsecticidal effect of harmine.

  4. Influência do Fotoperíodo Sobre Aspectos Biológicos e Parasitismo de Ovos de Anagasta kuenhiella (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae por Trichogramma pretiosum (Hymenoptera, Trichogrammatidae

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    Marcelo Zart

    2012-06-01

    Abstract. In this work we studied the influence of photoperiod and density of Anagasta kuehniella (Zeller on the biological aspects of Trichogramma pretiosum Riley. Cards containing 40 unviable eggs of A. kuehniella were daily exposed to parasitism in a controlled environment (25 ± 1 º C, 70 ± 10% RH and in different photoperiod: scotophase (F: S: 0:24, 10:14, 12:12, 24:0 and 14:10 hours. We evaluated the number of emerged parasitoids for determining the cumulative percentage of parasitism and sex ratio. With the exception of 24:0 photoperiod condition, there was a linear decrease in sex ratio of progenies throughout the days of survival of the female, with 80% of eggs parasitized by 8-day old females. There was an increase in the number of parasitized eggs/day/female with increasing densities of eggs exposed to parasitism. The effect of eggs density of the alternative host on parasitism by T. pretiosum was studied in the 12:12 hour photoperiod, through daily exposure of 10, 20, 30 and 40 eggs of A. kuehniella to the parasitoid. Daily parasitism decreased linearly after the emergence of female densities of 20, 30 and 40 eggs/parasitoid, except the density of 10 eggs in which the number of eggs parasitized/day increased quadratically until the sixth day after the emergence of female, then reduced. The best condition for creation of T. pretiosum is 12:12 hours photoperiod, compared with 30 eggs of A. kueniella for each parasitoid female.

  5. Effect of olfactory and visual stimuli on the orientation of the 4th instar larvae of the stem borer Chilo partellus swinhoe (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokro, P G; Saxena, K N

    1991-01-01

    The orientational responses of 4th instar larvae of Chilo partellus to different sources of stimuli being artificial diet, leaves and stems of maize and sorghum were tested, under free choice and no-choice situations. Larvae were attracted to maize and sorghum in a moderate to high degree dependent on what choice they were given. The orientational preference of the larvae, offered a choice between the visual and the odour sources, depended upon their stimulating capacities which were represented by the percentages of individuals responding to the sources of stimuli. Odour played a greater role than visual stimuli in this close range attraction when the two competed with each other.

  6. Cloning, functional characterization, and expression profiles of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase gene from the Asiatic rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su; Liang, Qing-Mei; Huang, Yuan-Jie; Yuan, Xin; Zhou, Wen-Wu; Qiao, Fei; Cheng, Jiaan; Gurr, Geoff M; Zhu, Zeng-Rong

    2013-01-01

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) is one of the most important components of the cytochrome P450 enzyme system. It catalyzes electron transfer from NADPH to all known P450s, thus plays central roles not only in the metabolism of exogenous xenobiotics but also in the regulation of endogenous hormones in insects. In this study, a full-length cDNA encoding of a CPR (named CsCPR) was isolated from the Asiatic rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis, by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) methods. The cDNA contains a 2061 bp open reading frame, which encodes an enzyme of 686 amino acid residues, with a calculated molecular mass of 77.6 kDa. The deduced peptide has hallmarks of typical CPR, including an N-terminal membrane anchor and the FMN, FAD and NADPH binding domains. The N-terminal-truncated protein fused with a 6 × His·tag was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3) cells and purified, specific activity and the Km values of the recombinant enzyme were determined. Tissue- and developmental stage-dependent expression of CsCPR mRNA was investigated by real-time quantitative PCR. The CsCPR mRNA was noticeably expressed in the digestive, metabolic, and olfactory organs of the larvae and adults of C. suppressalis. Our initial results would provide valuable information for further study on the interactions between CPR and cytochrome P450 enzyme systems.

  7. Efficiency of Mentha piperita L. and Mentha pulegium L. essential oils on nutritional indices of Plodia interpunctella Hübner (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

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    K. Saeidi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Antifeedant activity of plant extracts from Mentha piperita L. and Mentha pulegium L. were tested against the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner. The nutritional indices: relative growth rate (RGR, relative consumption rate (RCR, efficiency of conversion of ingested food (ECI and feeding deterrence index (FDI were measured for first-instar larvae (15-d old. Treatments were evaluated using a flour disk bioassay in the dark, at 25±1°C and 60±5% R.H. Concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.5 and 2 mL/disk were prepared from each essential oil. After 72 h, nutritional indices were calculated. M. piperita oils were more effective than M. pulegium oils, by significantly decreasing the RGR, RCR and FDI. At the highest concentration tested (2 mL/disk, the ECI (9% was significantly reduced.

  8. Saniba nom. nov. para Sabina Evans (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae, Hesperiinae

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    Mielke Olaf H. H.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Saniba nom. nov. for Sabina Evans, 1955 (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae, Hesperiinae. Sabina Evans, 1955 is preoccupied by Williams (1851 (Annelida, Polychaeta; a new replacement name is proposed: Saniba Mielke & Casagrande.

  9. A molecular view of autophagy in Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanelli, Davide; Casati, Barbara; Franzetti, Eleonora; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Metamorphosis represents a critical phase in the development of holometabolous insects, during which the larval body is completely reorganized: in fact, most of the larval organs undergo remodeling or completely degenerate before the final structure of the adult insect is rebuilt. In the past, increasing evidence emerged concerning the intervention of autophagy and apoptosis in the cell death processes that occur in larval organs of Lepidoptera during metamorphosis, but a molecular characterization of these pathways was undertaken only in recent years. In addition to developmentally programmed autophagy, there is growing interest in starvation-induced autophagy. Therefore we are now entering a new era of research on autophagy that foreshadows clarification of the role and regulatory mechanisms underlying this self-digesting process in Lepidoptera. Given that some of the most important lepidopteran species of high economic importance, such as the silkworm, Bombyx mori, belong to this insect order, we expect that this information on autophagy will be fully exploited not only in basic research but also for practical applications.

  10. Eficiência do Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki (Berliner, 1915 no controle da traça da cera Galleria mellonella (Linnaeus, 1758 (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae Efficiency of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki (Berliner, 1915 for control of the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella (Linnaeus, 1758 (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

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    Deodoro Magno Brighenti

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar a eficiência do Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki (Berliner no controle de Galleria mellonella (Linnaeus. Os experimentos foram realizados no Laboratório de Biologia de Insetos do Departamento de Entomologia da Universidade Federal de Lavras - UFLA, Lavras, MG, a 28±2ºC, UR 70±10% e fotofase de 12 horas. Aplicou-se formulação comercial de B. thuringiensis var. kurstaki por meio de pulverização, imersão dos favos e também foi incorporada à dieta artificial fornecida às lagartas de terceiro ínstar da traça da cera. A aplicação do produto fitossanitário por meio da pulverização dos favos mostrou-se eficiente no controle de lagartas, atingindo níveis iguais ou superiores a 85% de mortalidade quando foram utilizados 5 g/100 mL de água. Na aplicação por imersão dos favos, todas as dosagens testadas foram eficientes atingindo até 100% de mortalidade. Adicionada à dieta artificial, a concentração com maior porcentagem de mortalidade foi de 10g/60g de dieta. Sintomas de infecção pelo B. thuringiensis foram identificados nas lagartas e o isolamento da bactéria, por meio de uma cultura de Bacillus, comprovou a causa da morte desses insetos em todas as dosagens da formulação comercial do B. thuringiensis var. kurstaki utilizadas.This research aim at evaluating the efficiency of Bacillus thruringiensis var. kurstaki (Berliner in the control of Galleria mellonella (Linnaeus.The experiments were conducted in the Insect Biology Laboratory of the Entomology Department of the Universidade Federal de Lavras - UFLA, Lavras, MG, Brazil, at 28±2ºC, RH 70±10% and 12-hour photophase. Commercial formulation of B. thuringiensis. var. kurstaki was applied through spraying, comb soaking and also incorporated into the artificial diet fed to third instar caterpillars of the greater wax moth. Application of B. thuringiensis var. kurstaki through the spraying of the combs was efficient for control, reaching levels equal or larger than 85% of mortality when 5 g/100 mL of water were utilized. In the application by soaking of the combs all the dosages tested were efficient reaching up to 100% of mortality. Added to the artificial diet, the concentration with the greatest percentage of mortality was of 10 g/60 g of diet. Symptoms of infection by B. thruringiensis were identified both in the caterpillars and the isolation of the bacterium through a culture of Bacillus, proved to be the responsible of mortality of those insects at all the dosages of commercial formulation of B. thuringiensis var. kurstaki utilized.

  11. Eficiência do nim (Azadirachta indica A. Juss como barreira natural ao ataque de Hypsipyla grandella (Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae sobre o mogno (Swietenia macrophylla King The efficiency of neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss as natural barrier to attack by Hypsipyla grandella (Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae on the Brazilian mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla King

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Clese Alves Silva

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A eficiência da espécie Azadirachta indica como barreira natural ao ataque da Hypsipyla grandella sobre o mogno em diferentes arranjos e densidades de plantio foi, avaliada. O estudo foi realizado numa área de pastagem degradada em Vigia, PA. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi em blocos ao acaso em esquema de parcelas subdivididas no tempo, com cinco repetições, sendo as formas de cultivo do mogno as parcelas, e as épocas de avaliação (meses as subparcelas. A barreira natural formada pelo nim não evitou o ataque de H. grandella sobre o mogno, mas retardou e minimizou o ataque em plantios mistos. Para o maior controle do ataque de H. grandella, o mogno não deve ser plantado simultaneamente com o nim, mas um ano após o plantio do nim, quando este apresenta mais de três metros de altura, formando uma barreira natural mais eficaz ao ataque desta praga.The efficiency of Azadirachta indica as natural barrier against the attack by Hypsipyla grandellaon mahogany in different arrangements and planting densities was evaluated. The study was carried out in degraded pasture in Vigia, Pará. The experimental design was a randomized block in split plot in time with five replications, the forms of cultivation of mahogany as plots and the evaluation periods (months as the subplots. The natural barrier formed by neem did not prevent the attack of H. grandella on mahogany, but delayed and minimized the attack in mixed plantings. It is recommended that mahogany should not be planted simultaneously with the neem, but a year after planting the neem, when it has more than three meters in height, forming a natural barrier more effective to pest attack.

  12. Capacidade reprodutiva de fêmeas de Apanteles galleriae (Hymenoptera, Braconidae em lagartas de Galleria mellonella e Achroia grisella (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae criadas com dietas diferentes Reproductive capacity of Apanteles galleriae females (Hymenoptera, Braconidae in Galleria mellonella and Achroia grisella larvae (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae reared on different diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Grici Zacarin

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The reproductive capacity of females of Apanteles galleriae (Wilkinson, 1932 was evaluated in fifth instar caterpillars of Galleria mellonella (Linnaeus, 1758 and Achroia grisella (Fabricius, 1754 fed on standard diet and diets enriched with protein. The reproductive capacity of parasitoid females on fifth instar caterpillars of G. mellonella and A. grisella with variable weight was also evaluated. The host weight interfered in the sex ratio of the obtained parasitoids. In heavier caterpillars, the investment in female descendants was greater than in males, and in lighter caterpillars the inverse occurred.

  13. PERDAS DE PRODUÇÃO PELA BROCA-DO-COLMO (Diatraea saccharalis Fabr. 1794 (LEPIDOPTERA: PYRALIDAE EM GENÓTIPOS DE ARROZ DE TERRAS ALTAS YIELD LOSSES BY STEM BORER (Diatraea saccharalis Fab. 1794 (LEPIDOPTERA: PYRALIDAE IN UPLAND RICE GENOTYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alexandre Freitas Barrigossi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Estudou-se o efeito da infestação natural de Diatraea saccharalis na produção de espiguetas de 24 genótipos de arroz de terras altas, em um experimento de campo. O efeito de colmos infestados pelas lagartas D. saccharalis na massa de espiguetas de amostras e da área útil das parcelas foi estimado por um índice de perda e por análise de regressão. O índice utilizado quantifica a perda de massa de espiguetas por colmo brocado em relação à massa de espiguetas de colmo não brocado. As estimativas obtidas pelos dois métodos foram discrepantes. Menos de 10% dos genótipos manifestaram relação linear ou quadrática entre a infestação e o dano da broca-do-colmo. Perdas calculadas por esse índice mostraram-se mais adequadas às condições do experimento. A infestação de D. saccharalis aparentemente não afetou a massa de espiguetas em cinco dos genótipos, causou pequenas reduções em dois genótipos e, na maioria deles (17 genótipos, causou reduções de importância econômica. O genótipo CNAs9023 teve a menor infestação e a maior massa de espiguetas, demonstrando maior resistência em comparação à linhagem CNAs9028, que foi o genótipo mais infestado e com menor produção.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Arroz de terras altas; broca do colmo; amostragem; avaliação de genótipos.

    The impact of the Diatraea saccharalis natural infestation on yield of 24 genotypes of upland rice was studied in an experiment carried out in field conditions. The attack of D. saccharalis on stems and its effect on spikelet weight was determined using a yield loss index and by regression analysis. The index used quantifies the spikelet mass loss per bored stem in relation to spikelet mass no bored stem. The estimates obtained with these two methods were different. Less than 10% of genotypes showed a linear relationship between the infestation and stem borer damage. Estimated yield losses based on the index seemed more appropriate to the conditions of the experiment. Infestations by D. saccharalis did not visibly affect the weight of spikelets of five genotypes, caused a small reduction in two genotypes, and caused economic losses in the most of them (17 genotypes. The CNAs9023 genotype was the least infested and presented the highest weight of spikelets, and showed more resistance than CNAs9028, which was more infested and produced less.

    KEY-WORDS: Upland rice; stem borer; sampling; genotype evaluation.

  14. Blood, sweat, and tears: a review of the hematophagous, sudophagous, and lachryphagous Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, David; Goddard, Jerome

    2013-12-01

    Although adult Lepidoptera are not often considered medically relevant, some butterflies and moths are notorious for their consumption of mammalian body fluids. These Lepidoptera can be blood-feeding (hematophagous), tear-feeding (lachryphagous), or sweat-feeding (we use the term "sudophagous"). Blood-feeding Lepidoptera have been observed piercing the skin of their hosts during feeding, while tear-feeding Lepidoptera have been observed frequenting the eyes of hosts in order to directly obtain lachrymal fluid. These behaviors have negative human health implications and some potential for disease transmission. In this study, articles concerning feeding behavior of blood, sweat, and tear-feeding Lepidoptera were reviewed, with emphasis on correlations between morphological characters and feeding behaviors. Harmful effects and vector potential of these Lepidoptera are presented and discussed.

  15. Lepidoptera (Insecta) associated with soybean in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Uruguay.

    OpenAIRE

    Aline Carraro Formentini; Daniel Ricardo Sosa-Gómez; Silvana Vieira de Paula-Moraes; Neiva Monteiro Barros; Alexandre Specht

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The present research updates the systematic position and nomenclature of Lepidoptera associated with soybean crops in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Uruguay. Scientific literature lists 69 species of Lepidoptera feeding on soybean plants. These species are representatives of the Superfamilies Noctuoidea (31), Pyraloidea (13), Hesperioidea (12), Tortricoidea (5), Geometroidea (5), and Bombycoidea (3). Diversity of Lepidoptera associated to crop, injury in different parts of the plant, ...

  16. RNA interference in Lepidoptera: An overview of successful and unsuccessful

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terenius, O.; Papanicolaou, A.; Garbutt, J.S.; Eleftherianos, I.; Huvenne, H.; Kanginakudru, S.; Albrechtsen, M.; An, Chunju; Aymeric, J.L.; Barthel, A.; Bebas, P.; Bitra, K.; Bravo, A.; Chevalier, F.; Collinge, D.P.; Crava, C.M.; Maagd, de R.A.; Duvic, B.; Erlandson, M.; Faye, I.; Felfoldi, G.; Fujiwara, H.; Futahashi, R.; Gandhe, A.S.; Gatehouse, H.S.; Gatehouse, L.N.; Giebultowicz, J.M.; Gomez, I.; Grimmelikhuijzen, C.J.P.; Groot, A.T.; Hauser, F.; Heckel, D.G.; Hegedus, D.D.; Hrycaj, S.; Huang, L.; Hull, J.J.; Iatrou, K.; Iga, M.; Kanost, M.R.; Kotwica, J.; Li, Changyou; Li, Jianghong; Liu, Jisheng; Lundmark, M.; Matsumoto, S.; Meyering-Vos, M.; Millichap, P.J.; Monteiro, A.; Mrinal, N.; Niimi, T.; Nowara, D.; Ohnishi, A.; Oostra, V.; Ozaki, K.; Papakonstantinou, M.; Popadic, A.; Rajam, M.V.; Saenko, S.; Simpson, R.M.; Soberon, M.; Strand, M.R.; Tomita, S.; Toprak, U.; Wang, Ping; Wee, Choon Wei; Whyard, S.; Zhang, Wenqing; Nagaraju, J.; Ffrench-Constant, R.H.; Herrero, S.; Gordon, K.; Swevers, L.; Smagghe, G.

    2011-01-01

    Gene silencing through RNA interference (RNAi) has revolutionized the study of gene function, particularly in non-model insects. However, in Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) RNAi has many times proven to be difficult to achieve. Most of the negative results have been anecdotal and the positive ex

  17. A new species of Isopsestis (Lepidoptera: Thyatiridae) from Yunnan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Hailing; Owada, Mamoru; Wang, Min

    2015-08-19

    A new species of genus Isopsestis Werny, 1968 (Lepidoptera: Thyatiridae), Isopsestis poculiformis sp. nov., is described from the locality 2660m elevation in Northeast Yunnan, China, and compared with its closest ally. Male adult and genitalia of the new species are illustrated and a distribution map of the genus Isopsestis Werny, 1968 is provided.

  18. COMPARISON OF SAMPLING TECHNIQUES USED IN STUDYING LEPIDOPTERA POPULATION DYNAMICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four methods (light traps, foliage samples, canvas bands, and gypsy moth egg mass surveys) that are used to study the population dynamics of foliage-feeding Lepidoptera were compared for 10 species, including gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar L. Samples were collected weekly at 12 sit...

  19. Two new Gelechiidae for the Iberian Peninsula (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karsholt, Ole; Vives Moreno, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Two new species of Gelechiidae, Chrysoesthia hispanica Karsholt & Vives, sp. n. from Spain and Neofriseria hitadoella Karsholt & Vives, sp. n. from Spain and Portugal are described. The adults and male and female genitalia are illustrated. The generic assignment of C. hispanica is discussed. KEY ...... WORD: Lepidoptera, Gelechiidae, new species, Iberian peninsula....

  20. The Tortricidae described by J. C. Fabricius (Lepidoptera)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baixeras, Joaquin; Karsholt, Ole

    2011-01-01

    The identity and nomenclature of the 88 species of Tortricidae (Lepidoptera) described by J. C. Fabricius are reviewed. Type material deposited in the Natural History Museum Denmark is illustrated. Lectotypes for Tinea compositella (Fabricius, 1775), Pyralis rivellana (Fabricius, 1775) and P...

  1. Molecular analysis of the muscle protein projectin in Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayme-Southgate, A J; Turner, L; Southgate, R J

    2013-01-01

    Striated muscles of both vertebrates and insects contain a third filament composed of the giant proteins, namely kettin and projectin (insects) and titin (vertebrates). All three proteins have been shown to contain several domains implicated in conferring elasticity, in particular a PEVK segment. In this study, the characterization of the projectin protein in the silkmoth, Bombyx mori L. (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae), and the monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus L. (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae), as well as a partial characterization in the Carolina sphinx, Manduca sexta L. (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae), are presented. This study showed that, similar to other insects, projectin's overall modular organization was conserved, but in contrast, the PEVK region had a highly divergent sequence. The analysis of alternative splicing in the PEVK region revealed a small number of possible isoforms and the lack of a flight-muscle specific variant, both characteristics being in sharp contrast with findings from other insects. The possible correlation with difference in flight muscle stiffness and physiology between Lepidoptera and other insect orders is discussed.

  2. A provisional annotated list of the Lepidoptera of Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    A biodiversity inventory of the Lepidoptera of Pico Bonito National Park and vicinity, in the Department of Atlantida of northern Honduras, has been initiated and will be conducted to obtain baseline data. We present a revised checklist of Honduran butterfly species (updated from the initial 1967 l...

  3. Biogeography and ecology of southern Portuguese butterflies and burnets (Lepidoptera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, T.

    2003-01-01

    Biogeography and ecology of southern Portuguese butterflies and burnets (Lepidoptera) During several visits to the western part of the Algarve (southern Portugal), the author mapped the butterflies and burnets of this region. In total, I observed 58 butterfly species (51 Papilionoidea, 7 Hesperiidae

  4. Towards a mitogenomic phylogeny of Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Martijn J T N; Lees, David C; Simonsen, Thomas J

    2014-10-01

    The backbone phylogeny of Lepidoptera remains unresolved, despite strenuous recent morphological and molecular efforts. Molecular studies have focused on nuclear protein coding genes, sometimes adding a single mitochondrial gene. Recent advances in sequencing technology have, however, made acquisition of entire mitochondrial genomes both practical and economically viable. Prior phylogenetic studies utilised just eight of 43 currently recognised lepidopteran superfamilies. Here, we add 23 full and six partial mitochondrial genomes (comprising 22 superfamilies of which 16 are newly represented) to those publically available for a total of 24 superfamilies and ask whether such a sample can resolve deeper lepidopteran phylogeny. Using recoded datasets we obtain topologies that are highly congruent with prior nuclear and/or morphological studies. Our study shows support for an expanded Obtectomera including Gelechioidea, Thyridoidea, plume moths (Alucitoidea and Pterophoroidea; possibly along with Epermenioidea), Papilionoidea, Pyraloidea, Mimallonoidea and Macroheterocera. Regarding other controversially positioned higher taxa, Doidae is supported within the new concept of Drepanoidea and Mimallonidae sister to (or part of) Macroheterocera, while among Nymphalidae butterflies, Danainae and not Libytheinae are sister to the remainder of the family. At the deepest level, we suggest that a tRNA rearrangement occurred at a node between Adeloidea and Ditrysia+Palaephatidae+Tischeriidae.

  5. Lonomia obliqua Walker (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae: hemostasis implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silviane Maggi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary In southern Brazil, since 1989, several cases of accidents produced by unwilling contact with the body of poisonous caterpillars of the moth species Lonomia obliqua Walker, 1855 (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae, were described. L. obliqua caterpillars have gregarious behavior and feed on leaves of host trees during the night, staying grouped in the trunk during the day, which favors the occurrence of accidents with the species. This caterpillar has the body covered with bristles that on contact with the skin of individuals, breaks and release their contents, inoculating the venom into the victim. The basic constitution of the venom is protein and its components produce physiological changes in the victim, which include disturbances in hemostasis. Hemorrhagic syndrome associated with consumption coagulopathy, intravascular hemolysis and acute renal failure are some of the possible clinical manifestations related to poisoning by L. obliqua. Specific laboratory tests for diagnosis of poisoning have not been described previously. The diagnosis of poisoning is made based on the patient's medical history, clinical manifestations, erythrocyte levels, and, primarily, parameters that evaluate blood coagulation. Treatment is performed with the use of supportive care and the administration of specific hyperimmune antivenom. Poisoning can be serious and even fatal.

  6. Taxonomic review of the superfamily Pyraloidea in Bhutan (Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatishwor Singh Irungbam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The result of an investigation of the lepidopteran fauna of Central and Southern Bhutan (Bumthang, Dagana, Trongsa, Tsirang, and Sarpang districts is presented in this study. The investigation was the part of the Invertebrate Documentation Project of Bhutan initiated by the National Biodiversity Center, Thimphu, funded by the Bhutan Trust Fund for Environmental Conservation, Thimphu. The checklist was based on the systematic collections by light trapping at nine locations and the occasional collections from native forest and gardens within the five districts of Central and Southern Bhutan. The specimens were photographed and collected as specimens for future identification and reference. A list of 182 species belonging to families Crambidae and Pyralidae is presented, including 92 species as new records for the country. All the studied specimens are deposited at “Invertebrate Referral Collection Center” at the National Biodiversity Center, Thimphu.

  7. Micropropagação do porta-enxerto de macieira 'Seleção 69' tolerante à podridão do colo (Phytophthora cactorum Micropropagation of 'Seleção 69' apple rootstock tolerant the rotting (Phytophthora cactorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudete Santa-Catarina

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available A utilização de porta-enxertos anões, tolerantes a problemas fitossanitários da cultura da macieira, como a podridão do colo (Phytophthora cactorum, pode aumentar o rendimento e reduzir os custos de produção. Com o presente trabalho, objetivou-se estabelecer um protocolo de micropropagação do porta-enxerto 'Seleção 69', tolerante à podridão do colo. Ápices meristemáticos foram cultivados in vitro em meio de cultura MS, suplementado com 4,4mM de 6-Benzilaminopurina (BAP, 2,5mM de Ácido indolbutírico (AIB, 0,3mM de Ácido giberélico (GA3, 3% de sacarose e 0,6% de ágar. Foram testados o efeito da concentração de BAP (2,2 e 4,4mM e o efeito dos meios de cultura (MS, Cheng e Quoirin & Lepoivre na multiplicação das brotações. No alongamento das brotações, foram testados os efeitos do GA3 (0; 0,5; 1,0 e 1,5mM e AIB (0; 0,5 e 1,0mM. Para a fase de enraizamento ex vitro e aclimatização, foram testadas diferentes concentrações de AIB (0; 1 e 2g L-1. A taxa de desenvolvimento dos ápices meristemáticos cultivados in vitro foi de 30%. Para estimular a brotação, a melhor concentração de BAP foi 2,2mM, a qual proporcionou 2,6 brotações por explante. O meio MS proporcionou o maior número de brotações por explante (2,5, porém não diferiu estatisticamente do meio Cheng (2,0 brotações por explante. Para a fase de alongamento, o meio MS suplementado com 2,2mM de BAP e 1,0mM de AIB, proporcionou a maior altura das brotações (23mm. Na fase de enraizamento ex vitro e aclimatização, as concentrações de 0, 1 e 2g L-1 de AIB possibilitaram em média, 77,3% de enraizamento das microestacas.The use of tolerant apple rootstocks to phytossanitary problems as the rotting (Phytophthora cactorum is able to increase the production with cost reduction. The objective of the present study is to establish in vitro micropropagation protocol of the '69 Selection' rootstocks tolerant to the rotting. Meristems was cultivated in vitro

  8. Ithomiini butterflies (Lepidoptera: Hymphalidae) of Antioquia, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, C E; Willmott, K R; Vila, R; Uribe, S I

    2013-04-01

    Colombia is one of the most biodiverse countries on the planet. However, economic and scientific investment in completing inventories of its biodiversity has been relatively poor in comparison with other Neotropical countries. Butterflies are the best studied group of invertebrates, with the highest proportion of known to expected species. More than 3,200 species of butterflies have been recorded in Colombia, although the study of the still many unexplored areas will presumably increase this number. This work provides a list of Ithomiini butterflies collected in the department of Antioquia and estimates the total number of species present, based on revision of entomological collections, records in the literature and field work performed between 2003 and 2011. The list includes 99 species and 32 genera, representing 27% of all Ithomiini species. We report 50 species of Ithomiini not formerly listed from Antioquia, and found the highest diversity of ithomiine species to be at middle elevations (900-1,800 m). The mean value of the Chao2 estimator for number of species in Antioquia is 115 species, which is close to a predicted total of 109 based on known distributions of other Ithomiini not yet recorded from the department. Nine species are potentially of particular conservation importance because of their restricted distributions, and we present range maps for each species. We also highlight areas in Antioquia with a lack of biodiversity knowledge to be targeted in future studies. This paper contributes to mapping the distribution of the Lepidoptera of Antioquia department in particular and of Colombia in general.

  9. Brachymeria pandora (Crawford (Hymenoptera, Chalcididae: a new parasitoid of Historis odius (Fabricius (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélcio R. Gil-Santana

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The first record of parasitism of Brachymeria pandora (Crawford, 1914 (Hymenoptera, Chalcididae on Historis odius (Fabricius, 1775 (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil is presented.Apresenta-se o primeiro registro de parasitismo de Brachymeria pandora (Crawford, 1914 (Hymenoptera, Chalcididae em Historis odius (Fabricius, 1775 (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, no estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil.

  10. Strepsicrates smithiana Walsingham (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae: first record from Chile and a newly documented host plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor A. Vargas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Strepsicrates smithiana Walsingham (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae: first record from Chile and a newly documented host plant. Strepsicrates smithiana Walsingham, 1892 (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae is recorded for the first time from Chile. Male and female adults were reared from leaf-tying larvae collected on Myrica pavonis (Myricaceae, which is a new host plant record for S. smithiana.

  11. The mitochondrial genome of Prays oleae (Insecta: Lepidoptera: Praydidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asch, Barbara; Blibech, Imen; Pereira-Castro, Isabel; Rei, Fernando Trindade; da Costa, Luís Teixeira

    2016-05-01

    Prays oleae is one of the most important olive tree pests and a species of interest in evolutionary studies, as it belongs to one of the oldest extant superfamilies of Ditrysian Lepidoptera. We determined its mitogenome sequence, and found it has common features for Lepidoptera, e.g. an >80% A + T content, an apparent CGA start codon for COX1 and an ATAGA(T)n motif in the control region, which also contains several copies of a 163-164 bp repeat. Importantly, the mitogenome displays the Met-Ile-Gln tRNA gene order typical of Ditrysia, consistent with the hypothesis that this is a synapomorphy of that clade.

  12. Distribution patterns of riodinid butterflies (Lepidoptera: Riodinidae) from southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Siewert, Ricardo Russo; Iserhard,Cristiano Agra; Romanowski, Helena Piccoli; Callaghan,Curtis J.; Moser, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to synthesize the knowledge of Riodinidae butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea) in Rio Grande do Sul state (RS), southern Brazil, evaluating the role of climatic, topographic, and vegetational variables on the observed patterns of occurrence and distribution of these butterflies in the Pampa and Atlantic Forest biomes. The records of riodinid butterflies in RS were collected from published studies and the examination of museum collections in Brazil. Re...

  13. Engineered female-specific lethality for control of pest Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Li; Walker, Adam S; Fu, Guoliang; Harvey-Samuel, Timothy; Dafa'alla, Tarig; Miles, Andrea; Marubbi, Thea; Granville, Deborah; Humphrey-Jones, Nerys; O'Connell, Sinead; Morrison, Neil I; Alphey, Luke

    2013-03-15

    The sterile insect technique (SIT) is a pest control strategy involving the mass release of radiation-sterilized insects, which reduce the target population through nonviable matings. In Lepidoptera, SIT could be more broadly applicable if the deleterious effects of sterilization by irradiation could be avoided. Moreover, male-only release can improve the efficacy of SIT. Adequate methods of male-only production in Lepidoptera are currently lacking, in contrast to some Diptera. We describe a synthetic genetic system that allows male-only moth production for SIT and also replaces radiation sterilization with inherited female-specific lethality. We sequenced and characterized the doublesex (dsx) gene from the pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella). Sex-alternate splicing from dsx was used to develop a conditional lethal genetic sexing system in two pest moths: the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) and pink bollworm. This system shows promise for enhancing existing pink bollworm SIT, as well as broadening SIT-type control to diamondback moth and other Lepidoptera.

  14. Lepidoptera (Insecta associated with soybean in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Carraro Formentini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The present research updates the systematic position and nomenclature of Lepidoptera associated with soybean crops in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Uruguay. Scientific literature lists 69 species of Lepidoptera feeding on soybean plants. These species are representatives of the Superfamilies Noctuoidea (31, Pyraloidea (13, Hesperioidea (12, Tortricoidea (5, Geometroidea (5, and Bombycoidea (3. Diversity of Lepidoptera associated to crop, injury in different parts of the plant, and changes in species composition are discussed considering the changes in plant disease management, introduction of plants expressing Bt proteins, and the recent introduction of Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner as a new crop pest.

  15. PCR primers for 30 novel gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera

    OpenAIRE

    Wahlberg, Niklas; Peña, Carlos; Ahola, Milla; Wheat, Christopher W.; Rota, Jadranka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report primer pairs for 30 new gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera that can be amplified using a standard PCR protocol. The new primers were tested across diverse Lepidoptera , including nonditrysians and a wide selection of ditrysians. These new gene regions give a total of 11,043 bp of DNA sequence data and they show similar variability to traditionally used nuclear gene regions in studies of Lepidoptera . We feel that a PCR-based approach still has its place in m...

  16. Using RNA interference technique to silence chitin synthase A Gene in the rice leaf folder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Lepidoptera:Pyralidae)%利用RNA干扰技术沉默稻纵卷叶螟几丁质合成酶A基因

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李娇; 杜娟; 李尚伟

    2016-01-01

    稻纵卷叶螟(Cnaphalocrocis medinalis)是一种主要的水稻害虫,几丁质合成酶是昆虫体内几丁质合成通路中的一个关键酶,在昆虫生长发育中具有重要作用,是控制害虫的理想靶标。本文采用 RNA 干扰(RNAi)技术,以稻纵卷叶螟几丁质合成酶 A 基因(CmCHSA)为靶标,设计两个靶位点 CmCHSA-I 和 CmCHSA-II,在体外分别合成其双链 RNA(dsRNA),用显微注射法导入3龄幼虫体内,然后通过表型观察和荧光定量 PCR(RT-qPCR)检测干扰效应。结果表明,注射两种 dsRNA 后纵卷叶螟对水稻的取食明显下降,生长发育阻滞,虫体变小变黑和畸形,有的出现死亡。 RT-qPCR 表明,注射 CmCHSA-I 和 CmCHSA-II 两种 dsRNA 在96 h 后,CmCHSA 的表达量相比对照分别下降了59%和64%。注射 CmCHSA-I 和 CmCHSA-II 两种 dsRNA 7 d 后,稻纵卷叶螟的死亡率分别为80%和83.33%,与对照组相比,分别增加了66.67%和70%。本研究用注射法 RNAi 技术成功实现了对稻纵卷叶螟几丁质合成酶 A 基因的沉默,为利用该技术研究昆虫基因的功能,以及通过转基因 RNAi 技术防治稻纵卷叶螟奠定了基础。%The rice leaf folder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) is a chief pest of rice. Chitin synthase is a key enzyme in the pathway of insect chitin synthesis and plays an important role in insect growth and development. Thus, it is believed that this enzyme is an ideal target for pest control. In this study, we designed two target sites (CmCHSA-I and CmCHSA-II) specific to chitin synthase A (CmCHSA) in C. medinalis for RNA interference (RNAi) . CmCHSA-I and CmCHSA-II double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) were synthesized in vitro and were separately intro-duced into the 3rd instar larvae through microinjection. RNAi effects were detected by phenotype observation and real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). After injection of dsRNA, the larvae developed loss of appetite, growth retardation

  17. Electrophysiological responses of male and female Amyelois transitella antennae to pistachio and almond host plant volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    The polyphagous navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is a major insect pest of California tree nuts. The larvae of A. transitella feed on kernels inflicting damage and lowering nut kernel quality. Moreover, larvae vector aflatoxigenic aspergilli resulting in internationa...

  18. Insect-attracting and antimicrobial properties of antifreeze for monitoring insect pests and natural enemies in stored corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insect infestations in stored grain cause extensive damage worldwide. Storage insect pests including the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), Sitophilus spp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and their natural enemies [e.g., Cephalonomia tarsalis (Ashmead) (Hymenopter...

  19. Complete mitochondrial genomes of five skippers (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae) and phylogenetic reconstruction of Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jee; Wang, Ah Rha; Park, Jeong Sun; Kim, Iksoo

    2014-10-01

    We sequenced mitogenomes of five skippers (family Hesperiidae, Lepidoptera) to obtain further insight into the characteristics of butterfly mitogenomes and performed phylogenetic reconstruction using all available gene sequences (PCGs, rRNAs, and tRNAs) from 85 species (20 families in eight superfamilies). The general genomic features found in the butterflies also were found in the five skippers: a high A+T composition (79.3%-80.9%), dominant usage of TAA stop codon, similar skewness pattern in both strands, consistently length intergenic spacer sequence between tRNA(Gln) and ND2 (64-87 bp), conserved ATACTAA motif between tRNA(Ser (UCN)) and ND1, and characteristic features of the A+T-rich region (the ATAGA motif, varying length of poly-T stretch, and poly-A stretch). The start codon for COI was CGA in four skippers as typical, but Lobocla bifasciatus evidently possessed canonical ATG as start codon. All species had the ancestral arrangement tRNA(Asn)/tRNA(Ser (AGN)), instead of the rearrangement tRNA(Ser (AGN))/tRNA(Asn), found in another skipper species (Erynnis). Phylogenetic analyses using all available genes (PCGs, rRNAS, and tRNAs) yielded the consensus superfamilial relationships ((((((Bombycoidea+Noctuoidea+Geometroidea)+Pyraloidea)+Papilionoidea)+Tortricoidea)+Yponomeutoidea)+Hepialoidea), confirming the validity of Macroheterocera (Bombycoidea, Noctuoidea, and Geometroidea in this study) and its sister relationship to Pyraloidea. Within Rhopalocera (butterflies and skippers) the familial relationships (Papilionidae+(Hesperiidae+(Pieridae+((Lycaenidae+Riodinidae)+Nymphalidae)))) were strongly supported in all analyses (0.98-1 by BI and 96-100 by ML methods), rendering invalid the superfamily status for Hesperioidea. On the other hand, current mitogenome-based phylogeny did not find consistent superfamilial relationships among Noctuoidea, Geometroidea, and Bombycoidea and the familial relationships within Bombycoidea between analyses, requiring further

  20. A new species of the genus Arcoptilia Arenberger (Lepidoptera, Pterophoridae) from Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustjuzhanin, P; Kovtunovich, V

    2015-08-21

    The new species Arcoptilia naumanni sp. nov. (Lepidoptera, Pterophoridae) is described and illustrated from males found in Angola. Platyptilia rufamaculata Gielis, 2011, syn. nov. is established as a junior synonym of Arcoptilia pongola Ustjuzhanin & Kovtunovich, 2010.

  1. Fund af småsommerfugle fra Danmark i 2012 (Lepidoptera)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Otto; Falck, Per; Karsholt, Ole

    2013-01-01

    traps in Born holm. We more over trans fer Caloptilia azaleella (Brants, 1913) (Gra cil lariidae) from the ob ser va tion list to the main list of Dan ish Lepidoptera. The to tal num ber of Dan ish Gracillariidae is now 88, Gelechiidae 178 and of Tortricidae 389. This re sults in a to tal of 1587 spe...... cies of Microlepidoptera found in Den mark. The to tal amount of Macro - lepidoptera re corded from Den mark is now 969, bring ing the num ber of Dan ish Lepidoptera to a to tal of 2556 species. With the new Dan ish check list the so-called ob ser va tion list has been ex tended to in clude both spe...... cies of un cer tain faunistic sta tus in Den - mark and spe cies of un cer tain tax o nomic sta tus. There are 13 spe cies of Lepidoptera on the for mer and 11 spe cies on the latter....

  2. Two species of Gelechioidea (Lepidoptera) from Southeast Asia associated with downy rose myrtle, Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Myrtaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two species of Gelechioidea (Lepidoptera), Metharmostis multilineata Adamski, n. sp. (Cosmopterigidae), and Idiophantis soreuta Meyrick, 1906 (Gelechiidae), were collected in southeastern Asia for evaluation as potential biocontrol agents against downy rose myrtle, Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Aiton) Hass...

  3. POPULATION SYNCHRONY WITHIN AND AMONG LEPIDOPTERA SPECIES IN RELATION TO WEATHER, PHYLOGENY, AND LARVEL PHENOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. The population dynamics of native herbivore species in central Appalachian deciduous forests were studied by analysing patterns of synchrony among intra- and interspecific populations and weather. 2. Spatial synchrony of 10 Lepidoptera species and three weather variables (min...

  4. De valkruidmineervlinder Digitivalva arnicella in Nederland: herontdekking en behoud (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae: Acrolepiinae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieukerken, van E.J.; Koster, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    The occurrence of Digitivalva arnicella in the Netherlands: rediscovery and conservation (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae: Acrolepiinae) Digitivalva arnicella (Heyden, 1863), previously only known from two localities before 1902, has been rediscovered in eight localities in the northern part of the Netherl

  5. Alternative techniques to study characters of the genitalia in Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Fernando M S; Casagrande, Mirna M; Mielke, Olaf H H

    2010-01-01

    The present note aims to describe two alternative methods for observing genitalia in Lepidoptera. The first one provides means to examine both male and female genitalia without spoiling the scales of the abdomen, preserving it attached to the thorax and aesthetically similar to an unexamined specimen. The second one provides ways of observing certain characters on the male genitalia in a non-destructive way, and does not depend on time-consuming removing and dissection of the abdomen. It is expected that the presented techniques will help on morphological studies and on identifying similar species which consistently differ in genitalic armatures.

  6. Materiały do znajomości Gelechiidae (Lepidoptera) Wielkopolskiego Parku Narodowego

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baraniak, Edward; Walczak, Urszula; Karsholt, Ole

    2014-01-01

    A faunistic list of 48 species of gelechiid moths (Lepidoptera: Gele-chiidae) collected in the Wielkopolski National Park is given. Syncopacma larseniella GOZMANY, 1957 is new to the fauna of Poland.......A faunistic list of 48 species of gelechiid moths (Lepidoptera: Gele-chiidae) collected in the Wielkopolski National Park is given. Syncopacma larseniella GOZMANY, 1957 is new to the fauna of Poland....

  7. Population dynamic of the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio polytes (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) in dry and wet seasons

    OpenAIRE

    SUWARNO

    2010-01-01

    Suwarno (2010) Population dynamic of the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio polytes (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) in dry and wet seasons. Biodiversitas 11: 19-23. The population dynamic of Papilio polytes L. (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) in dry and wet seasons was investigated in the citrus orchard in Tasek Gelugor, Pulau Pinang, Malaysia. Population of immature stages of P. polytes was observed alternate day from January to March 2006 (dry season, DS), from April to July 2006 (secondary wet season, ...

  8. Extinction cascades partially estimate herbivore losses in a complete Lepidoptera--plant food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearse, Ian S; Altermatt, Florian

    2013-08-01

    The loss of species from an ecological community can have cascading effects leading to the extinction of other species. Specialist herbivores are highly diverse and may be particularly susceptible to extinction due to host plant loss. We used a bipartite food web of 900 Lepidoptera (butterfly and moth) herbivores and 2403 plant species from Central Europe to simulate the cascading effect of plant extinctions on Lepidoptera extinctions. Realistic extinction sequences of plants, incorporating red-list status, range size, and native status, altered subsequent Lepidoptera extinctions. We compared simulated Lepidoptera extinctions to the number of actual regional Lepidoptera extinctions and found that all predicted scenarios underestimated total observed extinctions but accurately predicted observed extinctions attributed to host loss (n = 8, 14%). Likely, many regional Lepidoptera extinctions occurred for reasons other than loss of host plant alone, such as climate change and habitat loss. Ecological networks can be useful in assessing a component of extinction risk to herbivores based on host loss, but further factors may be equally important.

  9. The Lepidoptera associated with forestry crop species in Brazil: a historical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczuck, Manoela; Carneiro, E; Casagrande, M M; Mielke, O H H

    2012-10-01

    Despite the long history of forestry activity in Brazil and its importance to the national economy, there is still much disorder in the information regarding pests of forestry species. Considering the importance of the entomological knowledge for the viability of silvicultural management, this work aimed to gather information on the species of Lepidoptera associated with forestry crops within Brazil using a historical approach. Through a literature review, all registered species of Lepidoptera related to forestry crops in Brazil from 1896 to 2010 were identified. The historical evaluation was based on the comparison of the number of published articles, species richness, and community similarities of the Lepidoptera and their associated forest crops, grouped in 10-year samples. A total of 417 occurrences of Lepidoptera associated with forestry species were recorded, from which 84 species are related with 40 different forestry crops. The nocturnal Lepidoptera were dominant on the records, with Eacles imperialis magnifica Walker as the most frequent pest species cited. Myrtaceae was the most frequent plant family, with Cedrela fissilis as the most cited forestry crop species. A successional change in both Lepidoptera species and their host plants was observed over the decades. The richness of lepidopteran pest species increased over the years, unlike the richness of forestry crop species. This increase could be related to the inefficient enforcement of sanitary barriers, to the increase of monoculture areas, and to the adaptability of native pests to exotic forestry species used in monoculture stands.

  10. Contact and Systemic Activities of Three Diacylhydrazine Ecdysone Agonists to Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)%双酰肼类蜕皮促进剂对水稻二化螟的触杀与内吸作用比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹明章; 沈晋良

    2003-01-01

    采用点滴法和盆栽土壤处理法分别测定了双酰肼类杀虫剂虫酰肼、JS118和抑食肼(RH5849)对二化螟的触杀与内吸作用,并与氟虫腈和杀虫单进行了比较.结果表明,虫酰肼和JS118对二化螟4龄幼虫的触杀毒力相当,LD50分别为0.0252、0.0310μg/头,约是氟虫腈的十分之一、杀虫单的11~13倍;抑食肼的触杀毒力(LD50为0.2720μg/头)约是虫酰肼和JS118的十分之一.然而,抑食肼20、40g a.i./667m2处理盆栽土壤后3、7d,对二化螟、蚁螟的内吸杀虫效果分别达66.9%~89.0%和84.4%~96.7%,与氟虫腈(2 g a.i./667m2)、杀虫单(40g a.i./667m2)接近或相当,而虫酰肼和JS118(5、10 g a.i./667m2)无明显内吸杀虫作用.

  11. 薇甘菊提取物对红脉穗螟的产卵忌避及杀卵作用%Oviposition deterrence and ovicidal activity of Mikania micrantha extracts on Tirathaba rufivena (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟宝珠; 吕朝军; 钱军; 覃伟权; 苟志辉

    2014-01-01

    [Aim] This study aims to explore the repellent effect of Mikania micrantha on the palm pest Tirathaba rufivena.[Methods] The oviposition deterrence and ovicidal activity of M.micrantha extracts with different solvents against T.rufivena were studied with bioassay methods in the laboratory.[Results] Among different solvent extracts,the M.micrantha extracts from hexane and chloroform had the highest oviposition deterrent activities against T.rufivena,with the deterrent rates of 43.64% and 44.20% in choice test,and 51.60% and 59.20% in non-choice test,respectively.All extracts showed ovicidal activities against T.rufivena,while the chloroform extract showed the strongest impact on hatchability with the lowest corrected egg hatching rate (53.39%) and caused the highest corrected mortality (42.64%) to the 1st instar larvae.Among the different solvent extracts of M.micrantha by chloroform extraction,the butanol extract showed the highest oviposition deterrent and ovicidal activity against T.rufivena.[Conclusion] M.micrantha extracts show a great application potential in ecological control of T.rufivena based on the oviposition deterrence and ovicidal activity.%[目的]探讨入侵杂草薇甘菊Mikania micrantha对棕榈害虫红脉穗螟Tirathaba rufivena的产卵忌避活性.[方法]采用室内生物测定法,研究薇甘菊不同溶剂提取物对红脉穗螟的产卵忌避作用和杀卵活性.[结果]产卵忌避试验结果表明,薇甘菊各提取物中,以正己烷和三氯甲烷提取物对红脉穗螟的产卵忌避效果最好,两者的选择性忌避率分别为43.64%和44.20%,非选择性忌避率分别为51.60%和59.20%.对卵孵化率的影响显示,各溶剂提取物均对红脉穗螟具有一定的杀卵活性,其中三氯甲烷提取物对卵孵化率的影响最大,校正孵化率最低,仅为53.39%,而且三氯甲烷提取物引起的1龄幼虫的死亡率最高,可达42.64%.在薇甘菊三氯甲烷提取物的不同溶剂萃取物中,正丁醇萃取物对红脉穗螟的产卵忌避和杀卵活性均显著高于其他溶剂萃取物.[结论]薇甘菊提取物具有一定的产卵忌避和杀卵活性,具有用于红脉穗螟的生态防控的潜力.

  12. 拟峰斑螟属一新种记述(鳞翅目,螟蛾科,斑螟亚科)%A NEW SPECIES OF THE GENUS ANABASIS HEINRICH FROM CHINA ( LEPIDOPTERA, PYRALIDAE, PHYCITINAE)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莉霞; 李后魂

    2011-01-01

    Anabasis zhengi sp. Nov. Is described in this paper. Images of the adult and male genitalia are provided, along with a key to all the described species of the genus Anabasis. The type specimen is deposited in the Insect Collection, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University.Anabasis zhengi sp. Nov. (Figs 1-4)Diagnosis. This new species is similar to Anabasis medogia Li et Ren, 2010, but can be distinguished by the antemedia ridge of forewing boarded by a broad fascia along both outer and inner edges; the lateral margin of uncus concave at middle portion; the valva protruded in sector at about 3/4 ventrally, the sacculus with willow-shaped scales distally (Fig. 3 ); and the eighth sternite board and protruded on end (Fig. 4 ).In Anabasis medogia, the antemedia ridge of forewing is boarded by a broad fascia along inner edge only; the uncus is not concave laterally; the valva is not protruded ventrally, the sacculus bears some distally expanded scales (Fig. 5); and the eighth sternite is narrow, not protruded on end (Fig. 6).Female. Unknown.Holotype ♂ , Yunnan, Hani and Yi Autonomous Prefecture (23°21'N, 103° 22'E), 7 Nov. 2010, collected by HU Bing-Bing, ZHANG Jing and CAI Yan-Peng.Etymology. This species is named after Professor ZHENG Zhe-Min for celebrating his sixtieth anniversary of teaching activities.%记述采自云南的拟峰斑螟属Anabasis Heinrich 1新种,即郑氏拟峰斑螟Anabasis zhengi sp.nov..文中附有成虫和外生殖器特征图,提供了拟峰斑螟属包括新种在内的分种检索表.

  13. Descriptions of three species larvae of genus Diaphania (Lepidoptera,Pyralidae,Pyraustinae) from China%中国绢野螟属3种幼虫记述(鳞翅目螟蛾科野螟亚科)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朴美花; 刘水志; 李灿镛

    2008-01-01

    The last-instar larval external morphologies of Diaphania pyloalis(Walker),Diaphania indica(Saunders)and Diaphania perspectalis(Walker)aye described and illustrated.All specimens examined aredeposited in the larva Collection of Department of Plant Protection,Zhejiang University,China.%详细记述了中国绢野螟属Diaphania桑绢野螟D.tryloalis(Walker),瓜绢野螟D.indica(Saunders)和黄杨绢野螟D.perspectalis(Walker)幼虫的形态特征,并提供了形态特征图.所有标本均保存在浙江大学植物保护系幼虫标本室.

  14. Toxicity of Essential Oils Isolated from Achillea millefolium L., Artemisia dracunculus L. and Heracleum persicum Desf. Against Adults of Plodia interpunctella (Hübner (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae in Islamic Republic of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgar Ebadollahi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The environmental problems caused by overuse of synthetic insecticide have been the matter of concern in recent years. Essential oils from aromatic plants are recognized as proper alternatives to conventional insecticides. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the Fumigant toxicity of essential oils from Achillea millefolium, Artemisia dracunculus and Heracleum persicum against adults of Plodia interpunctella under laboratory conditions and mortality was determined after 12, 24, 36 and 48 h from beginning of exposure. The essential oils were extracted from seeds of H. persicum and aerial parts from 1.5 cm of top of A. millefolium, A. dracunculus by hydrodistillation method using a Clevenger apparatus. All essential oil were highly effective against P. interpunctella and the mortality values reached 100% when the adults were exposed to 50, 65 and 80 µl/ l concentrations of A. dracunculus, A. millefolium and H. persicum essential oil, respectively. The LC50 (lethal concentration to kill 50% of the population values of essential oils from A. dracunculus, A. millefolium and H. persicum were 22.24, 34.80 and 36.96 µl/ l after 24 h fumigation, respectively. On the other hand, A. dracunculus oil was more effective than the other essential oils against P. interpunctella adults. The LC50 values decreased with increasing of exposure times. In all cases, considerable differences in the mortality of insect to essential oils were observed with different concentrations and exposure times. These results suggest that the essential oils of A. millefolium, A. dracunculus and H. persicum have merit further studies as potential fumigants for the management of P. interpunctella or probably other stored-product insects.

  15. Influence of temperature on functional response of Habrobracon hebetor(Say) (Hymenoptera:Braconidae) attacking larvae of Plodia interpunctella(Hübner)(Lepidoptera:Pyralidae)%温度对麦蛾柔茧蜂功能反应的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟宝珠; 许再福; 覃伟权

    2009-01-01

    为明确温度变化在麦蛾柔茧蜂Habrobracon hebetor对印度谷螟Plodia interpunctella寄生作用中的影响,研究了室内17,20,23,26,29,32和35℃条件下,麦蛾柔茧蜂对不同密度的印度谷螟5龄幼虫的麻痹和寄生作用.结果表明:在17~29℃范围内,寄生蜂的寄主处理时间与温度成反比,从17℃的0.341 d到29℃的0.068 d,但温度再升高时,处理时间又延长.寄主搜索率也随温度的改变而变化,17℃时最低,为0.056;29℃时最高,为1.895;当温度升高到32~35℃时,寄主搜索率又下降.温度调节的功能反应模型表明,在26~29℃范围内,寄生率较高.可见,在26~29℃时,麦蛾柔茧蜂对印度谷螟有较好的寄生效果,对寄生蜂繁殖后代有利.

  16. 气候变化对水稻三化螟物候及多度的影响%Phenology and Abundance of Yellow Rice Borer, Tryporyza incertulas Walker(Lepidoptera:Pyralidae) in Relation to Climatic Variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张立敏; 陈斌; 李正跃; 杨仕生; 孙文

    2012-01-01

    以云南省建水县稻区1986~1997年连续24年同黑光灯下监测诱集的水稻三化螟种群数量及越冬代虫口基数为依据,结合当地1986~1997年最高温度、最低温度、平均温度及相对湿度等主要气象资料,采用多元回归法分析了三化螟物候和多度与气象条件间的相互关系.结果表明,三化螟成虫种群数量在年际闻变化明显,从1986~1997年连续24年间,灯下三化螟成虫的始见期与1~2月的平均温度显著相关,当年11月到次年2月,灯下未诱集到三化螟成虫,从7月到9月,灯下虫量迅速增加,于9月灯下虫量达高蜂.灯下三化螟成虫种群与最高温度、最低温度和平均温度间具有显著相关性,瞳着温度的升高,灯下虫量逐渐增加,但随着相对湿度的增加而降低,降雨量对灯下虫量无明显影响.灯下虫量与气象因素间的多元回归分析及逐步回归分析后获得逐步回归方程Y=-546.67 +10.52X2 -0.52X4 +6.25X5,相关系数R=0.38(F=12.95,P<0.01).灯下虫量与气象因素闻的总体多元回归方程为Y=-723.17 -3.81X1 +26.00X2 - 10.82X3 -0.48X4 +7.67X5 (F=12.39,P<0.01),其中X1为最高温度;X2为平均温度;X3为最低温度;X4为降雨量;X5为相对湿度.越冬代幼虫的虫口密度与次年3月和4月灯下成虫数量具有显著的相关性,且越冬代幼虫的虫口密度是影响灯下虫量的关键因子.%Phenology and abundance of yellow fice borer,Tryporyza incertulas (Walker),were examined throughout 24 consecutive years from the population under the black-light trap and stalk checking in Jianshui county,Yunnan Province,China.The population of moth of T.incertulas varied significanfly between years.The onset of the flight period of the moth from the 1st of March was signilicantly correlated with mean temperature of January and February,whereas the population density of the moth under the light was significautly correlated with mean temperature.No moth was trapped between November and February,the most rapid increaae being from July to September,with peak trapping in September.The population was significantly correlated with all three temperature parameter-maximum,mean,and minimum-relative humidity,and rainfall.The higher the temperatune,the higher was the pest population but the higher the relative humidity,the lower was the pest population.Raiofall did not have consistent significant effect on the number pest pest adults trapped.The multiple correlation between the number of yellow rice borer adults trapped and weather parameters using step by atep regression was as follows:Y =-546.67 + 10.52X2-0.52X4 + 6.25X5,and the relative coefficient was R =0.38( F =12.95,P < 0.01 ).The total multiple correlation between the number of yellow rice borer adults trapped (Y) and weather parameters was the following:Y=-723.17 -3.81X1 + 26.00X2 - 10.82X3 -0.48X4+7.67X5 (F =12.39,P<0.01),where x1 =Maximum temperature; x2 =Mean temperature; x3 =Minimum temperature;x4 =Rainfall; and x5 =RH.The fluctuation of the overwintering population was consistent with the change of the population of moth in March and April trapped by light,and it showed that the overwintering population is a key factor affecting the moth number.

  17. Morphological observation on all stages of Herpetogramma fuscescens ( Warren, 1892) ( Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)%空心莲子草野螟各虫态的形态学观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高诗淇; 周红春; 周方杰; 王星

    2011-01-01

    采用室内观察的方法,使用万能视频成像装置( LY-WN-HP SUPERCCD),对空心莲草野螟Herpetogramma fuscescens(Warren,1892)各虫态的形态学特征进行了系统观察.结果发现:成虫体小型,灰褐色.卵椭圆形,初产时乳白色,块状,外被腊质层.孵化前,部分卵壳分离为白色蜡质外层和棕黄色内层两层.幼虫共5龄,前胸背板骨化,中、后胸背部各具4个圆形斑,排成一列,两侧各具2个圆形斑;腹部各节背部具4个圆形斑,两侧各具3个小圆黑斑,黑斑上均具细长刚毛,气门明显.蛹棕红色,臀刺近锥形,其末端具1分叉短刺.%Morphology of all stages of Herpetogramma fuscescens was observed in details in the laboratory using Universal video imaging device (LY - WN - HP SUPERCCD) . The results showed that; Adult small, grayish brown. Eggs oval, arranged in egg massive, creamy white when first laid, outside with the waxy layer. Before hatching, white and waxen outer layer and yelow inner layer were derived from the chorion. The larvae of H. fuscescens had 5 instars, pronotum sclerotized, mesothoracic and metathoracic dorsum with four round spots that in a row, respectively, each side with two round spots; every abdominal segment dorsum with 4 round spots, and each side with 3 small round dark spots that covered with slender setae, spiracle conspicuous. Pupae reddish brown, anal spines nearly conical with a fork short splinter at the apex.

  18. Cloning and Characterization of Ty3/gypsy Retrotransposon in Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera:Pyralidae)%二化螟 Ty3/gypsy 反转座子的克隆与序列分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓欢; 罗光华; 张志春; 刘宝生; 方继朝

    2014-01-01

    Transposable elements constitute a substantial fraction of host genomes.Ty3/gypsy retrotransposon,one group of LTR retrotransposons,is widespread in different species.By inverse-PCR and genome walking,a novel member of Ty3/gypsy retrotransposons was cloned from Chilo suppressalis .This new member of Ty3/gypsy retrotransposons was named Csu-Ty3 (GenBank accession No.KJ1 9 126 1 ).The sequence is 4 934 bp in length and integrated into the “AACGT”target site duplications (TSDs)of the genome.There is a pair of non-completely identical long terminal repeats (LTRs)in the Csu-Ty3 retrotransposon.The 5′LTR is 1 6 1 bp in length and the 3′LTR is 1 68 bp,sharing 93•5 % similarities.A polypurine tract (PPT),1 5 bp in length,is adjacent to the 3′LTR.There are three independent open reading frames (ORFs)in Csu-Ty3.The first ORF encodes a protein which is related to viral structural protein,termed GAG.The second encodes aspartic protease (AP).The third encodes a polyprotein including a reverse transcriptase (RT)which produces a cDNA copy of the transposon′s RNA,an RNase H (RH)which splits the DNA-RNA hybrid and an integrase (IN ) which inserts the cDNA into the host′s genome.The southern hybridization indicated that there were many Csu-Ty3 copies in different C .suppressalis populations.Flanking PCR results showed that the Csu-Ty3 copy was inserted at the same locus in different populations.At this locus,all the individuals have the Csu-Ty3 copy insertion except some individuals from Deyang and Jiangjin populations.The Csu-Ty3 insertion ratio varied with field populations.%转座子是宿主基因组的重要组成部分.Ty3/gypsy 反转座子是广泛存在于生物体内的一类反转座子.通过反向PCR(inverse PCR)和基因组步移方法成功地从二化螟体内获得一个具有完整结构的 Ty3/gypsy 反转座子拷贝,命名为Csu-Ty3(GenBank 登录号:KJ191261).该反转座子拷贝全长4934 bp,在基因组上插入的靶位点(target sit duplications, TSDs)是“AACGT”,两端的长末端重复序列(long terminal repeat,LTR)不完全相同,5′端 LTR 长161 bp,3′端 LTR 长168 bp,两者的一致度为93.5%;在靠近3′端 LTR 处有一段长15 bp 的嘌呤尾(polypurine tract,PPT)序列.经 ORF Finder 分析,Csu-Ty3中包含三个独立的 ORF,从左至右第一个 ORF 编码类似病毒的结构蛋白,称为 GAG 蛋白;第二个 ORF 编码天冬氨酰蛋白酶(aspartic protease,AP)蛋白;第三个 ORF 编码一个多聚蛋白,包含反转录酶(reverse transcriptase,RT)、RNA酶 H(RNase H,RH)以及整合酶(integrase,IN).Southern 杂交显示二化螟不同地理种群中均有较多的 Csu-Ty3拷贝.在特定基因座位上,对 Csu-Ty3拷贝插入与否的检测结果显示,二化螟不同地理种群中在该位点上均含有 Csu-Ty3拷贝的插入,但在德阳和江津种群中有些个体在该位点上没有检测到 Csu-Ty3拷贝的插入.

  19. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the wsp gene of Wolbachia in Corcyra cephalonica (Stainton) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)%米蛾体内Wolbachia的wsp基因序列测定与系统发育分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丛斌; 付海滨; 王翠敏; 戴秋慧

    2005-01-01

    Wolbachia是广泛分布于节肢动物体内的一类共生菌,它们参与多种调控寄主的生殖活动机制.通过对wsp基因的特异性扩增和测序,发现了Wolbachia在米蛾Corcyra cephalonica(Stainton)体内的感染.利用所测序列和其他已发表的序列建立系统树,结果表明米蛾体内Wolbachia属于B大组的Pip类群,与其寄生物茧蜂及赤眼蜂中的Wolbachia各株系遗传距离相差较远.据此推测米蛾体内感染的Wolbachia不是由寄生物(茧蜂、赤眼蜂)水平传播所致.

  20. ENSAIO PARA O CONTROLE QUÍMICO DA BROCA PEQUENA Neoleucinodes elegantalis (Guennée 1854 (Pyralidae Lepidoptera DO TOMATE CHEMICAL ESSAY ON TOMATO FRUIT BORER Neoleucinodes elegantalis (Guennée, 1854

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sandre Júnior

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Para controle da broca pequena do fruto do tomate Neoleucinodes elegantalis (Guennée, 1854, foi realizado no campo experimental da Escola de Agronomia da Universidade Federal de Goiás, um experimento em tomateiro, cultivar Kadá, visando a avaliar em campo a eficiência dos inseticidas: cypermethrin (Polydial 20 CE – 130 g. i.a./ha; diclorvos (Nuvan 1000 CE - 312,5 g. i.a./ha; diazinon (Diazinon 40 PM 250 g. i.a,/ha; diazinon (Diazinon 600 CE 300 g. i.a/ha, comparados com cartap (Cartap BR 500 - 312,5 g. i.a. e uma testemunha. O delineamento experimental foi de blocos ao acaso com quatro repetições. Cada parcela foi constituída de duas linhas com dez plantas. Foram realizadas quatro aplicações, sendo uma a cada semana, a partir do surgimento dos primeiros frutos. A avaliação dos resultados foi realizada por ocasião da primeira produção, quando todos os frutos das parcelas foram colhidos para se detectar quantos estavam brocados. Os resultados obtidos no presente experimento mostraram que houve diferença estatística significativa entre os produtos utilizados e que todos diferiram significativamente da testemunha. Os produtos mostraram as seguintes eficiências no controle da praga: Cartap BR 500, 90,9%; Polydial 20 CE, 88,2%; Nuvan 100 CE, 80,0%; Diazinon 600 CE, 77,3%, e Diazinon 40 PM, 70,9%.

    A trial was carried out in Goiânia-Go, Brazil, to verify the effect of several insecticides on tomato fruit borer Neoleucinodes elegantalis (Guenné, 1854. The treatments and active ingredient per hectare were: 1-cypermethrin, 130 g; 2-diclorvos, 312.5 g; 3- diazinon 250 g; 4- diazinon 30 g and 5- cartap 312.5 g. The experimental design used was randomized blocks, with four replications being each plot constituted of two rows with 10 plants. The insecticides were applied four times at seven days intervals. The results showed that all the treatments were efficient to control the tomato fruit borer. The best results were obtained with cartap, 90.9% of the control, followed by cypermethrin with 88.2% of control.

  1. Utilisation of gamma radiation of Cobalt-60 as quarantine treatment of medicinal plant, aromatic and seasoning plants dehydrated infested by Lasioderma serricorne (Fabricius, 1792) (Coleoptera, Anobiidae) and Plodia interpunctella (Hubner, 1813) (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae); Utilizacao da radiacao gama do Cobalto-60 como tratamento quarentenario de plantas medicinais, aromaticas e condimentares desidratadas infestadas por Lasioderma serricorne (Fabricius, 1792) (Coleoptera, Anobiidae) e Plodia interpunctella (Hubner, 1813) (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Juliana Nazare

    2007-07-01

    The research had as objective the use of the gamma radiation of the Cobalto-60 as quarantine treatment of the medicinal plant, aromatic and seasoning plants dehydrated infested by Lasioderma serricorne and Plodia interpunctella determining the disinfestation doses to attend the criterion in the not emergency of adults of the species in study and analysing through the Chromatography of Thin Layer the effect of the gamma radiation of the cobalto-60 on the active principle of extract dehydrated of Chamomilla recutita, Pimpinella anisum, Origanum vulgare, Cymbopogon citratus, Ocimum basilicum and Thymus vulgaris. The work was developed in the Laboratorio de Inseticidas in the Instituto Biologico in Sao Paulo in the period of August of 2005 the June of 2007. The radiation source used gamma was an experimental irradiator of Cobalto-60, model Gamacell 220, located in the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN, located in Sao Paulo. In the period of 30 days after the irradiation of the samples evaluated the number of adults emerged of Lasioderma serricorne and Plodia interpunctella, using the data of mortality for the analysis of Probit. Obtained 100% of not emergency of adults in the Lasioderma serricorne with the dose of 2,00 kGy and 100% of not emergency of adults in the Plodia interpunctella with the dose of 2,25 kGy. The Chromatographic Analysis of Thin Layer was to evaluate did not show chemical differences in the extracts analysed. (author)

  2. Biology and ecology of Pleuroptya silicalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) and Urbanus esmeraldus (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae): defence tactics and interactions with ants on shrubs of Urera baccifera (Urticaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Alice Ramos de Moraes

    2006-01-01

    Resumo: 1. O presente trabalho investiga aspectos comportamentais e de história natural de duas espécies de lepidópteros que se alimentam de Urera baccifera (Urticaceae), uma planta visitada por 22 espécies de formigas. Ambas as espécies, Pleuroptya silicalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) e Urbanus esmeraldus (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae), constróem abrigos foliares e apresentam diferentes mecanismos de defesa contra predação. Por exemplo, quando perturbadas, larvas de P. silicalis sacodem o corpo vi...

  3. LEPIDOPTERA (INSECTA OF PROPOSED SPECIALLY PROTECTED NATURAL AREA ‘BELOKURIKHA NATURE PARK’ (NORTHERN ALTAI. FIRST RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Vasilenko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available 149 Lepidoptera species from 16 families were reported for the territory of the proposed protected area "Belokurikha Natural Park". This list is the primary data on the fauna of Lepidoptera in the region. Most of the species belongs to Euro-Siberian and Transpalaearctic groups.

  4. 三七疫霉病拮抗根际土壤细菌的筛选及初步鉴定%Screening and Preliminarily Identification of Rhizosphere Soil bacterial ControllingPhytophthora Cactorum ofPanax Notoginsing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨丽芬; 杨建; 高玲玲; 郭建伟; 洪亮; 程加省; 孔琼; 田学军

    2016-01-01

    为了筛选对环境友好的生防细菌防治三七疫霉病,通过高温处理、稀释涂布法分别从三七健康及患病植株根际土壤分离了21和16株可培养细菌,并以对峙培养法分别筛选到6和7株拮抗菌株,上述13株拮抗菌株经生理生化特征鉴定为芽孢杆菌属。结果表明,健康植株根际土壤有较丰富的可培养细菌,而患病植株根际土壤可培养细菌中的拮抗菌株较丰富,表明健康植株与患病植株根际土壤的拮抗细菌丰度发生了变化。解淀粉芽孢杆菌B1的抑菌带宽达8.5mm,具有一定的潜在生防价值。%To screen eco-friendly bio-control bacteria controlling Phytophthora cactorum of Panax notoginsing, 21 and 16 strains rhizobacteria were separated respectively from healthy and infected Panax notoginsing by thermal processing, tissue crashing method, dilution coating method, additionally 6 and 7 strains antagonistic bacteria among them were respectively selected by confrontation culture method, then total of antagonistic bacteria above were identified as Bacillium spp. through physiological and biochemical characteristics. The results suggested that there were richer cultural bacteria in rhizosphere soil of healthy plants, in contrast that there were relatively richer antagonistic bacteria in rhizosphere soil of infected plants. In another word, the richness of antagonistic bacteria changed in rhizosphere soil of healthy and infected plants. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens B1 identified by physiological and biochemical characteristics, which had a certain potential bio-control value because of inhibition zone width up to 8.5 mm.

  5. Morfologia comparada do abdome das espécies sulbrasileiras de Morphinae (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae Compared abdomen morphology of South brazilian Morphinae species (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Gavassi Bilotta

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed study of the morphology of abdomen and genitalia of adults, males and females, of the following south Brazilian Morphinae species (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae is presented: Morpho helenor violacetis Fruhstorfer. 1912. Iphimedeia hercules (Daiman, 1823. Iphixibia anaxibia (Esper, 1801. Cytheritis portis thamyris (C. Felder & R. Felder, 1867, Cytheritis aega (Huebner, 1822, Pessonia catenaria (Perry, 1811, Grasseia menelaus nestira (Huebner, 1821.

  6. The Lepidoptera of White Sands National Monument, Otero County, New Mexico, USA 4. A new species of Schinia Hübner, 1818 (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Heliothinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Metzler

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2006 the U.S. National Park Service initiated a long term study of the Lepidoptera at White Sands National Monument, Otero County, New Mexico. Schinia poguei sp. n., described here, was discovered in 2007, the second year of the study. The male and female adult moths and genitalia are illustrated.

  7. Annotated check list of the Pyraloidea (Lepidoptera) of America North of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtens, Brian G; Solis, M Alma

    2015-01-01

    An annotated check list of Pyraloidea of North America north of Mexico is presented, including 861 Crambidae and 681 Pyralidae with 1542 total species. It includes all new species described, tropical species with new records in the United States, and species introduced from Europe and Asia since 1983. The Notes section provides the seminal citations, data and/or commentary to all changes since 1983 for easy and future reference. In addition, this list proposes seven new generic combinations, the transfer of a phycitine species, Salebria nigricans (Hulst), to Epipaschiinae and its syn. n. with Pococera fuscolotella (Ragonot), and three new records for the United States. Purposefully, no new taxa are described here, but we found a gradual increase of 10% in the number of species described since 1983. Finally, we also include a list of thirteen species not included or removed from the MONA list. Many higher-level changes have occurred since 1983 and the classification is updated to reflect research over the last 30 years, including exclusion of Thyrididae and Hyblaeidae from the superfamily and recognition of Crambidae and Pyralidae as separate families. The list includes multiple changes to subfamilies based on morphology such as the synonymization of the Dichogamini with the Glaphyriinae, but also incorporating recent molecular phylogenetic results such as the synonymization of the Evergestinae with the Glaphyriinae.

  8. Mortality Dynamics of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Immatures in Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varella, Andrea Corrêa; Menezes-Netto, Alexandre Carlos; Alonso, Juliana Duarte de Souza; Caixeta, Daniel Ferreira; Peterson, Robert K. D.; Fernandes, Odair Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the dynamics of mortality factors affecting immature developmental stages of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Multiple decrement life tables for egg and early larval stages of S. frugiperda in maize (Zea mays L.) fields were developed with and without augmentative releases of Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) from 2009 to 2011. Total egg mortality ranged from 73 to 81% and the greatest egg mortality was due to inviability, dislodgement, and predation. Parasitoids did not cause significant mortality in egg or early larval stages and the releases of T. remus did not increase egg mortality. Greater than 95% of early larvae died from predation, drowning, and dislodgment by rainfall. Total mortality due to these factors was largely irreplaceable. Results indicate that a greater effect in reducing generational survival may be achieved by adding mortality to the early larval stage of S. frugiperda. PMID:26098422

  9. Hyperspectral optical imaging of two different species of lepidoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José Manuel; Nascimento, Sérgio Miguel Cardoso; Vukusic, Pete

    2011-05-01

    In this article, we report a hyperspectral optical imaging application for measurement of the reflectance spectra of photonic structures that produce structural colors with high spatial resolution. The measurement of the spectral reflectance function is exemplified in the butterfly wings of two different species of Lepidoptera: the blue iridescence reflected by the nymphalid Morpho didius and the green iridescence of the papilionid Papilio palinurus. Color coordinates from reflectance spectra were calculated taking into account human spectral sensitivity. For each butterfly wing, the observed color is described by a characteristic color map in the chromaticity diagram and spreads over a limited volume in the color space. The results suggest that variability in the reflectance spectra is correlated with different random arrangements in the spatial distribution of the scales that cover the wing membranes. Hyperspectral optical imaging opens new ways for the non-invasive study and classification of different forms of irregularity in structural colors.

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of Gonepteryx mahaguru (Lepidoptera: Pieridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianing; Xu, Chang; Li, Jialian; Lei, Ying; Fan, Cheng; Gao, Yuan; Xu, Chongren; Wang, Rongjiang

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Gonepteryx mahaguru (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) is 15,221 bp in length, containing 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA genes (tRNAs), 2 ribosomal RNA genes (LrRNA and SrRNA) and 1 non-coding A + T-rich region. The nucleotide composition is significantly biased toward A + T (80.9%). All PCGs are initiated by classical ATN codon, with the exception of COI, which begins with TTA codon. Nine PCGs harbor the complete stop codon TAA, whereas COI, COII, ND4 and ND5 stop with incomplete codons, single T or TA. All tRNAs can be folded into the typical cloverleaf secondary structure, except for tRNA(Ser)(AGN). The A + T content of AT-rich region is 95.2%, same to the highest one in the known species in Pieridae.

  11. New Records of Seven Eupithecia (Lepidoptera: Geometridae from Korea

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    Choi, Sei-Woong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The genus Eupithecia Curtis is the largest taxon in Lepidoptera (more than 1,500 species worldwide and the adults of the genus are characterized by small in size, cryptically colored grayish and brownish forewing, and indistinct basal, ante- and postmedial transverse lines mostly with a definite discal spot on the forewing. Forty-four species have been reported so far in Korea. Herein, we present the first report on seven species of Eupithecia: Eupithecia rufescens Butler (1878, Eupithecia costiconvexa Inoue (1979, Eupithecia daemionata Dietze (1904, Eupithecia persuastrix Mironov (1990, Eupithecia actaeata Walderdorff (1869, Eupithecia suboxydata Staudinger (1897 and Eupithecia costimacularia Leech (1897. Diagnosis, descriptions and figures of the available species are provided.

  12. A historical review of the classification of Erebinae (Lepidoptera: Erebidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homziak, Nicholas T; Breinholt, Jesse W; Kawahara, Akito Y

    2016-11-10

    Erebidae is one of the most diverse families within the order Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths), with nearly 25,000 described species. The nominal subfamily Erebinae is among the most species rich and taxonomically complex. It reaches its highest diversity in the tropics, where much of the fauna remains undescribed. Species in this subfamily feed on a broad range of host plants, with associated radiations on grasses and legumes, and some species are pests of agriculture and forestry. The Erebinae, as defined today, comprises a large portion of the former noctuid subfamily Catocalinae. However, many lineages have tenuous or uncertain systematic placement. Here, we review the complex historical classification of Erebinae, and discuss the possible placement of some of these lineages in light of traditional morphological groupings and recent molecular phylogenetic analyses. We present an updated list of named erebine tribes and their relationships, and identify morphological traits from literature used to group genera within these tribes.

  13. Mortality Dynamics of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Immatures in Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varella, Andrea Corrêa; Menezes-Netto, Alexandre Carlos; Alonso, Juliana Duarte de Souza; Caixeta, Daniel Ferreira; Peterson, Robert K D; Fernandes, Odair Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the dynamics of mortality factors affecting immature developmental stages of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Multiple decrement life tables for egg and early larval stages of S. frugiperda in maize (Zea mays L.) fields were developed with and without augmentative releases of Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) from 2009 to 2011. Total egg mortality ranged from 73 to 81% and the greatest egg mortality was due to inviability, dislodgement, and predation. Parasitoids did not cause significant mortality in egg or early larval stages and the releases of T. remus did not increase egg mortality. Greater than 95% of early larvae died from predation, drowning, and dislodgment by rainfall. Total mortality due to these factors was largely irreplaceable. Results indicate that a greater effect in reducing generational survival may be achieved by adding mortality to the early larval stage of S. frugiperda.

  14. Hyperspectral optical imaging of two different species of lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukusic Pete

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, we report a hyperspectral optical imaging application for measurement of the reflectance spectra of photonic structures that produce structural colors with high spatial resolution. The measurement of the spectral reflectance function is exemplified in the butterfly wings of two different species of Lepidoptera: the blue iridescence reflected by the nymphalid Morpho didius and the green iridescence of the papilionid Papilio palinurus. Color coordinates from reflectance spectra were calculated taking into account human spectral sensitivity. For each butterfly wing, the observed color is described by a characteristic color map in the chromaticity diagram and spreads over a limited volume in the color space. The results suggest that variability in the reflectance spectra is correlated with different random arrangements in the spatial distribution of the scales that cover the wing membranes. Hyperspectral optical imaging opens new ways for the non-invasive study and classification of different forms of irregularity in structural colors.

  15. A New Family of Moths from the Middle Jurassic(Insecta:Lepidoptera)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Diying; André NEL; Jo(e)l MINET

    2010-01-01

    Three lepidopteran species,from the Middle Jurassic Daohugou beds(inner Mongolia,China),are described in a new family,Mesokristeuseniidae,and new genus,Mesokristensenia,which could represent the sister group of the Micropterigidae.Mesokristensenia differs from all extant Lepidoptera,but one genus(Agathiphaga,Agathiphagidae),in retaining four median veins in the forewing,a plesiomorphy also present in many Trichoptera.Evidence for placing Mesokristensenia in the Lepidoptera includes four traits,notably a previously unrecorded autapomorphy of this insect order:beyond stem M1+2,vein M1 is bent and connected to cross-vein r-m(in both wing pairs).Among 24 characters taken into account to assess the systematic position of Mesokristensenia,12 are considered informative for a cladistic analysis involving this fossil taxon and the four suborders recognized in present-day Lepidoptera(Zeugloptera,Aglossata,Heterobathmiina,and Glossata).

  16. Dalechampii oak (Quercus dalechampii Ten., an important host plant for folivorous lepidoptera larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulfan, M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a structured analysis of lepidoptera larvae taxocenoses living in leaf bearing crowns of Dalechampii oak (Quercus dalechampii Ten. in nine study plots in the Malé Karpaty Mountains (Central Europe. The differences between lepidoptera taxocenoses in individual oak stands were analyzed. A total of 96 species and 2,140 individuals were found. Species abundance peaked in May, while number of species and species diversity reached the highest values from April to May and from April to June, respectively. Abundance showed two notable peaks in flush feeders and in late summer feeders. Lepidoptera taxocenosis in the study plot Horný háj (isolated forest, high density of ants differed significantly from all other taxocenoses according to Sörensen’s index of species similarity, species diversity, analysis of similarity on the basis of permutation and pairwise tests (ANOSIM, seasonal variability of species composition, and NMDS ordination.

  17. Large-Scale Evolutionary Patterns of Host Plant Associations in the Lepidoptera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menken, S.B.J.; Boomsma, J.J.; van Nieukerken, E.J.

    2010-01-01

    We characterized evolutionary patterns of host plant use across about 2500 species of British Lepidoptera, using character optimization and independent phylogenetic contrasts among 95 operational taxa, and evaluated the extent to which caterpillars are monophagous, use woody host plants, and feed...... concealed. We also analyzed the use of different Angiosperm superorders and related these associations to other key variables. The Nepticulidae, Pterophoridae, and Gracillariidae allowed explicit comparisons between the British fauna and the Lepidoptera worldwide, which indicated that our broad...... categorizations for Britain are accurate predictors for the global fauna. The first (lower glossatan) radiation of the Lepidoptera started with monophagous, internal feeding on woody Eurosids I. Polyphagy on nonwoody Eurosids I evolved together with the ability to feed externally, but did initially not produce...

  18. Foliage chemistry and the distribution of Lepidoptera larvae on broad-leaved trees in southern Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklefs, Robert E

    2008-08-01

    This study addresses the influence of foliage chemistry on the distribution of Lepidoptera larvae across species of trees. I used ordination and analysis of principal coordinates to describe the partitioning of the larvae of 24 species of Lepidoptera over 23 species of host trees taking into account 13 chemical properties of the foliage. Canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) revealed two significant axes linking the two datasets. The first constrained axis (r(2)=0.83) was associated with increasing amounts of soluble carbohydrates and decreasing amounts of hemicellulose, polyphenols, and potassium per cm(2) leaf area. The second constrained axis (r(2)=0.68) was associated with increasing amounts of soluble carbohydrates and decreasing magnesium. Variation in nitrogen and phosphorus, which are major factors in larval nutrition, were not associated with turnover of Lepidoptera species between species of host tree. Of the total variance in the positions of tree species on the first four constrained CAP axes, 44% was correlated with positions determined by foliage chemistry, 32% on the first two constrained axes. Within the space described by the first two canonical axes, congeneric species of tree clustered together, with the exception that Acer negundo was removed from other species of Acer, which grouped in a tight cluster with species in the order Fagales, as well as with Tilia and Ulmus. Alnus and Prunus also grouped together. No species of tree with a negative score on constrained axis 2 exhibited high Lepidoptera species richness, but the average number of individuals per collection tended to be high. These tree species also contain triterpenes in their leaves and harbored disproportionately more tent- and web-making species of Lepidoptera. These analyses show that patterns of distribution across host tree species within an assemblage of Lepidoptera species can be understood, at least in part, in terms of the qualities of the resources upon which

  19. A molecular analysis of the Gelechiidae (Lepidoptera, Gelechioidea) with an interpretative grouping of its taxa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karsholt, Ole; Mutanen, Marko; Lee, Sangmi

    2013-01-01

    We re-examine the higher level phylogeny and evolutionary affinities of the family Gelechiidae (Lepidoptera: Gelechioidea) based on DNA sequence data for one mitochondrial gene (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I ) and seven nuclear genes (Elongation Factor-1α, wingless, Ribosomal protein S5, Isocitr......We re-examine the higher level phylogeny and evolutionary affinities of the family Gelechiidae (Lepidoptera: Gelechioidea) based on DNA sequence data for one mitochondrial gene (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I ) and seven nuclear genes (Elongation Factor-1α, wingless, Ribosomal protein S5...

  20. Butterfly (Lepidoptera: Insecta Diversity from Different Sites of Jhagadia, Ankleshwar, District-Bharuch, Gujarat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lepidoptera is a large order of insects that includes moths and butterflies. Lepidoptera is the second largest order in the class Insecta. Some of the butterfly species were identified as indicators of disturbance in any area. The present study conducted in three sites of taluka Jhagadia, Ankleshwar, District-Bharuch, Gujarat. In the present study a total of 484 individuals belonging to 58 species of 9 families were identified. Among which Pieridae was found to be the most dominant family. The area of study having rich diversity of butterflies, therefore it should be of great importance for conservation.

  1. Taksonomsko-faunistička studija leptira (Insecta : Lepidoptera) Fruške Gore

    OpenAIRE

    Stojanović, Dejan V.

    2012-01-01

    U studiji je dat prikaz jedanaestogodišnjih istraţivanja insekata iz reda Lepidoptera na Fruškoj gori. Registrovane su 934 vrste leptira i moljaca. Za 382 vrste Lepidoptera ili 40,89% od ukupnog broja vrsta izvršena je taksonomska verifikacija analizom hitinskih armatura genitalnih aparata. U periodu od 2001. do 2011. godine sakupljani su leptiri i moljci uglavnom uz pomoć svetlosne klopke (ţivine sijalice TEŢ WTF od 250 W, “Philips Ml“ od 100, 160, 250 i 400 W i petromaks lampe o...

  2. Effect of Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) host plants on life-history parameters of the parasitoid Apanteles taragamae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dannon, A.E.; Tamo, M.; Agboton, C.; Huis, van A.; Dicke, M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of four host plant species of the herbivore Maruca vitrata Fabricius (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) on development time, longevity, fecundity and sex ratio of the parasitoid Apanteles taragamae Viereck (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) was investigated under laboratory conditions. The larvae were paras

  3. The effects of strawberry cropping practices on the strawberry tortricid (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), its naturel enemies, and the presences of nematodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigsgaard, Lene; Naulin, Cyril; Haukeland, Solveig

    2014-01-01

    Cropping practice can affect pests and natural enemies. A three-year study of the strawberry tortricid, Acleris comariana (Lienig and Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), its parasitoid Copidosoma aretas Walker (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), and its entomopathogenic fungi was conducted in seven pairs...

  4. Records of mining Lepidoptera in Belgium with nine species new to the country (Nepticulidae, Opostegidae, Tischeriidae, Lyonetiidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieukerken, van E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Records of 56 species of mining Lepidoptera are given, mostly for Wallonia. Stigmella thuringiaca (Namur: Nismes, on Potentilla tabernaemontani), Ectoedemia arcuatella (Luxembourg, Namur, on Fragaria vesca) and Leucoptera lustratella (Luxembourg, Namur, on Hypericum perforatum) are reported new for

  5. A new species of Lioptilodes Zimmerman (Lepidoptera, Pterophoridae from northern Chile Uma nova espécie de Lioptilodes Zimmerman (Lepidoptera, Pterophoridae do norte do Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor A. Vargas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Male and female adults of a new species of Lioptilodes Zimmerman (Lepidoptera, Pterophoridae are described and illustrated. Immature stages are associated with Baccharis scandens (Ruiz & Pav. Pers. (Asteraceae. The species was collected in two localities of northern Chile: near sea level in the Azapa valley, in the coastal desert of Arica Province and at 3000 m elevation in Socoroma, Parinacota Province.Os adultos macho e fêmea de uma nova espécie de Lioptilodes Zimmerman (Lepidoptera, Pterophoridae são descritos e ilustrados. Os estágios imaturos estão associados com Baccharis scandens (Ruiz & Pav. Pers. (Asteraceae. A espécie foi coletada em duas localidades do norte do Chile: vale de Azapa, perto do nível do mar, no deserto litoral da Província de Arica, e aos 3000 m de altitude em Socoroma, na Província de Parinacota.

  6. Sighting of Elymnias panthera (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae in West Bengal, eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. Roy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Tawny Palmfly butterfly, Elymnias panthera (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae, is a Malayan species that is also known from the Nicobar Islands. Here we report sighting of E. panthera from the Bethuadahari Wildlife Sanctuary in West Bengal, eastern India. This is the first sighting of the species from mainland India, and is a possible range extension of the species into northeastern India.

  7. Before harvest survival of codling moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in artificially infested sweet cherries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to the 2009 season, sweet cherries, Prunus avium (L.) L., from North America were required to be fumigated with methyl bromide before being exported to Japan to eliminate possible infestation by codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). However, based on recent biological...

  8. RNA interference in Lepidoptera: an overview of successful and unsuccessful studies and implications for experimental design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terenius, O.; Papanicolaou, A.; Garbutt, J.S.; Eleftherianos, I.; Huvenne, H.; Kanginakudru, S.; Albrechtsen, M.; An, C.; Aymeric, J.L.; Barthel, A.; Bebas, P.; Bitra, K.; Bravo, A.; Chevalier, F.; Collinge, D.P.; Crava, C.M.; de Maagd, R.A.; Duvic, B.; Erlandson, M.; Faye, I.; Felföldi, G.; Fujiwara, H.; Futahashi, R.; Gandhe, A.S.; Gatehouse, H.S.; Gatehouse, L.N.; Giebultowicz, J.M.; Gómez, I.; Grimmelikhuijzen, C.J.P.; Groot, A.T.; Hauser, F.; Heckel, D.G.; Hegedus, D.D.; Hrycaj, S.; Huang, L.; Hull, J.J.; Iatrou, G.; Iga, M.; Kanost, M.R.; Kotwica, J.; Li, C.; Li, J.H.; Liu, J.S.; Lundmark, M.; Matsumoto, S.; Meyering-Vos, M.; Millichap, P.J.; Monteiro, A.; Mrinal, N.; Niimi, T; Nowara, D.; Ohnishi, A.; Oostra, V.; Ozaki, K.; Papakonstantinou, M.; Popadic, A.; Rajam, M.V.; Saenko, S.; Simpson, R.M.; Soberón, M.; Strand, M.R.; Tomita, S.; Toprak, U.; Wang, P.; Wee, C.W.; Whyard, S.; Zhang, W.; Nagaraju, J.; Ffrench-Constant, R.H.; Herrero, S.; Gordon, K.; Smagghe, G.

    2012-01-01

    Gene silencing through RNA interference (RNAi) has revolutionized the study of gene function, particularly in non-model insects. However, in Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) RNAi has many times proven to be difficult to achieve. Most of the negative results have been anecdotal and the positive ex

  9. Review of Lepidoptera with trophic relationships to Picea abies (L. in the conditions of Czechia

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    Modlinger Roman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Trophic relationships of Lepidoptera (Insecta occurring in the territory of Czechia to the Norway spruce (Picea abies L. was evaluated on the basis of the excerption and critical evaluation of literature. Each species was classified into the following categories – spruce as the host plant, regular development on spruce, narrow trophic relationship, indirect relationship and episodical occurrence. The particular taxa were also characterized according to their distribution and the form of larval life was specified. The development on spruce was documented in 96 species of Lepidoptera, which represented less than 3% of taxa belonging to this group and being reported from Czechia. Of that, spruce was a common host plant for 67 species, 23 species were polyphagous and might develop on spruce, and 6 species belonged to soil species damaging spruce roots, mainly in forest nurseries. Among the species of Lepidoptera, which regularly develop on spruce in the Czech conditions, 55 species were classified. As narrow specialists with special trophic relationship to spruce, 33 taxa could be considered. There were 15 spruce species with forestry importance, which were able to outbreak their populations regularly or irregularly. Among spruce species it was possible to classify 16 taxa as rare. The provided information on Lepidoptera with trophic relationship to spruce is applicable also for other Central European areas. Besides the species with importance for forest pest management, also rare taxa, which can become endangered by climate change or by forest management, were indicated.

  10. Aggregation and foraging behavior of imported cabbageworm (Lepidoptera: pieridae) adults on blue vervain flowers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The imported cabbageworm [Pieris rapae (L.) (Lepidoptera: Pieridae)], also known as the cabbage white butterfly, is an important specialized pest on cruciferous plants (Brassicales: Brassicaceae) worldwide. an unusual aggregation of the cabbage white butterflies was observed on a patch of flowering...

  11. Digestive peptidase evolution in holometabolous insects led to a divergent group of enzymes in Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Renata O; Via, Allegra; Brandão, Marcelo M; Tramontano, Anna; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2015-03-01

    Trypsins and chymotrypsins are well-studied serine peptidases that cleave peptide bonds at the carboxyl side of basic and hydrophobic L-amino acids, respectively. These enzymes are largely responsible for the digestion of proteins. Three primary processes regulate the activity of these peptidases: secretion, precursor (zymogen) activation and substrate-binding site recognition. Here, we present a detailed phylogenetic analysis of trypsins and chymotrypsins in three orders of holometabolous insects and reveal divergent characteristics of Lepidoptera enzymes in comparison with those of Coleoptera and Diptera. In particular, trypsin subsite S1 was more hydrophilic in Lepidoptera than in Coleoptera and Diptera, whereas subsites S2-S4 were more hydrophobic, suggesting different substrate preferences. Furthermore, Lepidoptera displayed a lineage-specific trypsin group belonging only to the Noctuidae family. Evidence for facilitated trypsin auto-activation events were also observed in all the insect orders studied, with the characteristic zymogen activation motif complementary to the trypsin active site. In contrast, insect chymotrypsins did not seem to have a peculiar evolutionary history with respect to their mammal counterparts. Overall, our findings suggest that the need for fast digestion allowed holometabolous insects to evolve divergent groups of peptidases with high auto-activation rates, and highlight that the evolution of trypsins led to a most diverse group of enzymes in Lepidoptera.

  12. Host range of Caloptilia triadicae (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae): an adventive herbivore of Chinese tallowtree (Malpighiales: Euphorbiaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In its native range the invasive weed, Rhodomyrtus tomentosa is host to a suite of herbivores. One, Strepsicrates sp. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) was collected in China in 2014, introduced under quarantine in Florida, USA and tested against related species to determine its host range and suitability ...

  13. Host plant associated genetic divergence of two Diatraea spp. (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) stemborers on novel crop plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diatraea lineolata and Diatraea saccharalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) are moths with stemboring larvae that feed and develop on economically important grasses. This study investigated whether these moths have diverged from a native host plant, corn, onto introduced crop plants including sorghum, suga...

  14. Post-glacial dispersal strategies of Orthoptera and Lepidoptera in Europe and in the Carpathian basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varga, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Post-glacial dispersal strategies of Orthoptera and Lepidoptera in Europe and in the Carpathian basin Ecologically transitional regions are characterised by high species diversity due to the overlap of species with different geographical origins caused by dispersal processes along gradients, e.g. th

  15. Modeling evolution of resistance of sugarcane borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) to transgenic Bt corn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kang, J.; Huang, F.; Onstad, D. W.

    2014-01-01

    Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) is a target pest of transgenic corn expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) protein, and the first evidence of resistance by D. saccharalis to Cry1Ab corn was detected in a field population in northeast Louisiana in 2004. We used a model of populatio

  16. A new species of the genus Acria Stephens, 1834 (Lepidoptera: Depressariidae: Acriinae) from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashank, P R; Saravanan, L; Kalidas, P; Phanikumar, T; Ramamurthy, V V; Chandra Bose, N S

    2015-05-14

    A new species, Acria meyricki sp. nov. (Lepidoptera: Depressariidae: Acriinae) occurring on oil palm, is described from India. The status and nomenclature of the genus is reviewed and an annotated checklist of species is given. A key to the seven species known so far from the Indian subcontinent is provided.

  17. Timing and patterns in the taxonomic diversification of Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Wahlberg

    Full Text Available The macroevolutionary history of the megadiverse insect order Lepidoptera remains little-known, yet coevolutionary dynamics with their angiospermous host plants are thought to have influenced their diversification significantly. We estimate the divergence times of all higher-level lineages of Lepidoptera, including most extant families. We find that the diversification of major lineages in Lepidoptera are approximately equal in age to the crown group of angiosperms and that there appear to have been three significant increases in diversification rates among Lepidoptera over evolutionary time: 1 at the origin of the crown group of Ditrysia about 150 million years ago (mya, 2 at the origin of the stem group of Apoditrysia about 120 mya and finally 3 a spectacular increase at the origin of the stem group of the quadrifid noctuoids about 70 mya. In addition, there appears to be a significant increase in diversification rate in multiple lineages around 90 mya, which is concordant with the radiation of angiosperms. Almost all extant families appear to have begun diversifying soon after the Cretaceous/Paleogene event 65.51 mya.

  18. Extrafloral nectar feeding by Strymon jacqueline Nicolay & Robbins, 2005 (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae: Eumaeini

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    Roger Vila

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Adults of the dry area specialist Strymon jacqueline Nicolay & Robbins, 2005 (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae: Eumaeini are here recorded feeding on extrafloral nectar of the large cactus Neoraimondia arequipensis var. gigantea (Werdermann & Backeberg Ritter. The significance of these observations is discussed in relation to lycaenid survival in a xeric environment, pollination and mate location.

  19. The first record of the butterfly Memphis d. dia(Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae, Charaxinae in Costa Rica

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    Jim Córdoba-Alfaro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of Memphis diain Costa Rica (Godman & Salvin, 1884 (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae, Charaxinae is reported herein, based on a specimen collected El Rodeo (09 ° 54’ 76.6”N; 84 ° 16’ 89.5”W on April 4, 2012.

  20. Seasonal infestations of two stem borers (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) in noncrop grasses of Gulf Coast rice agroecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infestations of two stem borers, the Mexican rice borer, Eoreuma loftini (Dyar) and the sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), were compared in non-crop grasses adjacent to rice, Oryza sativa L., fields. Three farms in the Texas Gulf Coast rice production area were sur...

  1. THYMELICUS LINEOLA IN SARDEGNA, SPECIE INDIGENA MISCONOSCIUTA O RECENTE INTRODUZIONE ANTROPICA? (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Doneddu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Si riporta la presenza di Thymelicus lineola (Ochsenheimer, 1808 (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae in Sardegna e si discute della sua possibile appartenenza alla fauna autoctona o in alternativa delle modalità con le quali abbia raggiunto l’isola.

  2. Digestive peptidase evolution in holometabolous insects led to a divergent group of enzymes in Lepidoptera

    KAUST Repository

    Dias, Renata O.

    2015-03-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Trypsins and chymotrypsins are well-studied serine peptidases that cleave peptide bonds at the carboxyl side of basic and hydrophobic l-amino acids, respectively. These enzymes are largely responsible for the digestion of proteins. Three primary processes regulate the activity of these peptidases: secretion, precursor (zymogen) activation and substrate-binding site recognition. Here, we present a detailed phylogenetic analysis of trypsins and chymotrypsins in three orders of holometabolous insects and reveal divergent characteristics of Lepidoptera enzymes in comparison with those of Coleoptera and Diptera. In particular, trypsin subsite S1 was more hydrophilic in Lepidoptera than in Coleoptera and Diptera, whereas subsites S2-S4 were more hydrophobic, suggesting different substrate preferences. Furthermore, Lepidoptera displayed a lineage-specific trypsin group belonging only to the Noctuidae family. Evidence for facilitated trypsin auto-activation events were also observed in all the insect orders studied, with the characteristic zymogen activation motif complementary to the trypsin active site. In contrast, insect chymotrypsins did not seem to have a peculiar evolutionary history with respect to their mammal counterparts. Overall, our findings suggest that the need for fast digestion allowed holometabolous insects to evolve divergent groups of peptidases with high auto-activation rates, and highlight that the evolution of trypsins led to a most diverse group of enzymes in Lepidoptera.

  3. Chemical ecology and management of Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioriatti, C; Anfora, G; Tasin, M; De Cristofaro, A; Witzgall, P; Lucchi, A

    2011-08-01

    The moth Lobesia botrana (Denis & Schiffermüller) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) feeds on grapes (Vitis vinifera L.), reducing yield and increasing susceptibility to fungal infections. L. botrana is among the most economically important insects in Europe and has recently been found in vineyards in Chile, Argentina, and California. Here, we review L. botrana biology and behavior in relation to its larval host (the grapevine) and its natural enemies. We also discuss current and future control strategies in light of our knowledge of chemical ecology, with an emphasis on the use of the sex pheromone-based strategies as an environmentally safe management approach. Pheromone-mediated mating disruption is the most promising technique available on grapes and is currently implemented on approximately 140,000 ha in Europe. Experience from several growing areas confirms the importance of collaboration between research, extension, growers, and pheromone-supply companies for the successful implementation of the mating disruption technique. In the vineyards where mating disruption has been successfully applied as an areawide strategy, the reduction in insecticide use has improved the quality of life for growers, consumers, as well as the public living near wine-growing areas and has thereby reduced the conflict between agricultural and urban communities.

  4. [Origin of Lepidoptera fauna of the Southern Transural region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkin, N A

    2000-01-01

    The butterfly fauna of the Southern Transural region began mainly through the migration of insects from the Urals and Kazakhstan, since the end of the Cretaceous Period to the end of Paleogen, the Transural region was covered by an epiplatform sea. As this sea was retreating, the first regions of dry land appeared, which had boundaries with Kazakhstan and the Urals. They were the first to be populated by Lepidoptera. During the Pleocene and then after the Pleistocene cooling events, insects settled generally along the valley of the Tobol River and the Turgai depression, because these territories belong to intrazonal elements. At the present time, the greatest species diversity among insects in the southern Transural area is observed specifically in the Turgai depression and in areas directly adjacent to it. This territory is mainly occupied by populations unique to the Transural regions and belonging to the following species: Mantis religiosa (praying mantis), Saga pedo, Parnassius apollo (apollo), Neolycaena rhymnus, Hyponephele lupina (oriental meadow brown), Chazara persephone (dark rockbrown), Epicallia villica (cream-spot tiger), etc.

  5. DNA barcodes identify Central Asian Colias butterflies (Lepidoptera, Pieridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiho, Juha; Ståhls, Gunilla

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A majority of the known Colias species (Lepidoptera: Pieridae, Coliadinae) occur in the mountainous regions of Central-Asia, vast areas that are hard to access, rendering the knowledge of many species limited due to the lack of extensive sampling. Two gene regions, the mitochondrial COI ‘barcode’ region and the nuclear ribosomal protein RpS2 gene region were used for exploring the utility of these DNA markers for species identification. A comprehensive sampling of COI barcodes for Central Asian Colias butterflies showed that the barcodes facilitated identification of most of the included species. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on parsimony and Neighbour-Joining recovered most species as monophyletic entities. For the RpS2 gene region species-specific sequences were registered for some of the included Colias spp. Nevertheless, this gene region was not deemed useful as additional molecular ‘barcode’. A parsimony analysis of the combined COI and RpS2 data did not support the current subgeneric classification based on morphological characteristics. PMID:24453557

  6. Influence of killing method on Lepidoptera DNA barcode recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willows-Munro, Sandi; Schoeman, M Corrie

    2015-05-01

    The global DNA barcoding initiative has revolutionized the field of biodiversity research. Such large-scale sequencing projects require the collection of large numbers of specimens, which need to be killed and preserved in a way that is both DNA-friendly and which will keep voucher specimens in good condition for later study. Factors such as time since collection, correct storage (exposure to free water and heat) and DNA extraction protocol are known to play a role in the success of downstream molecular applications. Limited data are available on the most efficient, DNA-friendly protocol for killing. In this study, we evaluate the quality of DNA barcode (cytochrome oxidase I) sequences amplified from DNA extracted from specimens collected using three different killing methods (ethyl acetate, cyanide and freezing). Previous studies have suggested that chemicals, such as ethyl acetate and formaldehyde, degraded DNA and as such may not be appropriate for the collection of insects for DNA-based research. All Lepidoptera collected produced DNA barcodes of good quality, and our study found no clear difference in nucleotide signal strength, probability of incorrect base calling and phylogenetic utility among the three different treatment groups. Our findings suggest that ethyl acetate, cyanide and freezing can all be used to collect specimens for DNA analysis.

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome of Triphysa phryne (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Gan, Shanshan; Zuo, Ni; Chen, Chunhui; Wang, Ying; Hao, Jiasheng

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequence of Triphysa phryne (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae) was determined in this study. The mitogenome is 15,143 bp in length, containing 37 typical animal mitochondrial genes: 13 putative protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs and a non-coding AT-rich region. Its gene content and order are identical to those of other lepidopteran mitogenomes. All protein-coding genes (PCGs) are initiated by ATN codons, except for COI gene which uses CGA as its start codon. Nine PCGs terminate in the common stop TAA, whereas the COI, COII, ND5 and ND4 genes end with single T. All tRNA genes showed typical secondary cloverleaf structures except for the tRNA(Ser)(AGN), which has a simple loop with the absence of its DHU stem. The 316 bp AT-rich region contains several features common to the other lepidopterans, such as the motif ATAGA followed by an 19-bp poly-T stretch and two microsatellite-like (TA)8(AT) and (TA)4 elements preceded by the ATTTA motif.

  8. Enzymatic properties of phenoloxidase from Pieris rapae (Lepidoptera) larvae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAO-BIN XUE; WAN-CHUN LUO; QING-XI CHEN; QIN WANG; LI-NA KE

    2006-01-01

    The kinetic parameters of partially purified phenoloxidase (PO, EC. 1.14.18.1) from the 5th instar larvae of Pieris rapae (Lepidoptera) were determined, using L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) as substrate. The optimal pH and temperature of the enzyme for the oxidation of L-DOPA were determined to be at pH 7.0 and at 42℃,respectively. The enzyme was stable between pH 6.5 and 7.4 and at temperatures lower than 37℃. At pH 6.8 and 37℃, the Michaelis constant (Km) and maximal velocity (Vm) of the enzyme for the oxidation of L-DOPA were determined to be 0.80 mmol/L and 1.84 μmol/ L/min, respectively. Tetra-hexylresorcinol and 4-dodecylresorcinol effectively inhibited activity of phenoloxidase and this inhibition was reversible and competitive, with the IC50 of 1.50 and 1.12μmol/L, respectively. The inhibition constants were estimated to be 0.50 and 0.47μmol/L, respectively.

  9. Micropyle number is associated with elevated female promiscuity in Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iossa, Graziella; Gage, Matthew J G; Eady, Paul E

    2016-12-01

    In the majority of insects, sperm fertilize the egg via a narrow canal through the outer chorion called the micropyle. Despite having this one primary function, there is considerable unexplained variation in the location, arrangement and number of micropyles within and between species. Here, we examined the relationship between micropyle number and female mating pattern through a comparative analysis across Lepidoptera. Three functional hypotheses could explain profound micropylar variation: (i) increasing micropyle number reduces the risk of infertility through sperm limitation in species that mate infrequently; (ii) decreasing micropyle number reduces the risk of pathological polyspermy in species that mate more frequently; and (iii) increasing micropyle number allows females to exert greater control over fertilization within the context of post-copulatory sexual selection, which will be more intense in promiscuous species. Micropyle number was positively related to the degree of female promiscuity as measured by spermatophore count, regardless of phylogenetic signal, supporting the hypothesis that micropyle number is shaped by post-copulatory sexual selection. We discuss this finding in the context of cryptic female choice, sperm limitation and physiological polyspermy.

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of Callerebia suroia (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qinghui; Zhang, Wei; Hao, Jiasheng

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Callerebia suroia (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae) was determined and analyzed in this paper. The circular genome is 15,208 bp long, including 37 typical mitochondrial genes and one non-coding AT-rich region. All protein-coding genes (PCGs) started with ATN, except for COI gene with CGA(R), which is often found in other butterflies; nine PCGs harbor the typical stop codon TAA, whereas COI, COII, ND5 and ND4 end with a single T. All tRNA genes display typical secondary clover-leaf structures, except for tRNA(Ser)(AGN), whose dihydrouridine (DHU) arm is replaced by a simple loop. The lrRNA and srRNA genes are 1,347 bp and 753 bp in length, with their AT contents of 84.4% and 85.4%, respectively. The 417 bp AT-rich region contains non repetitive sequences, but harbor several features common to the lepidopterans, including the motif ATAGA followed by a 19-bp poly-T stretch and a microsatellite-like (TA)8 element preceded by the ATTTA motif.

  11. Geographic differences and sexual dimorphism in Greta cubana (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Marrero

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Greta cubana (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae presents populations in central and Eastern mountainous regions of Cuba, which are stables habitats that have been isolated for a long period of time. This study evaluates the geographic variation and the sexual dimorphism of this species using geometric morphometric tools,with 91 individuals of four populations: Topes de Collantes (n=5, Pico Turquino (n=26, Loma del Gato (n=27 and Gran Piedra (n=33. For each specimen was calculated its centroid size, wing´s total area and white spots´s relative areas. These variables were compared between sex and populations using Mann-Whitney´s U and Kruskal-Wallis tests, respectively. Discriminant and relative warps analyses were applied to weight matrices to separate between sex and populations. There were not significant differences between males and females wing size, but we found differences in spots size. The analyses applied to weight matrices separated males and females successfully. When analysing geographic variation of forewing area, only significant differences among females from Topes de Collantes and Pico Turquino populations were found. Centroid size and white spots didn’t have significant difference between populations. Both males and females show differences in shape wings between populations. We found clear evidences of sexual dimorphism, nevertheless not geographic differences exist. We are still supporting G. cubana as a monotypic species.

  12. First host plant records for Iridopsis hausmanni Vargas (Lepidoptera, Geometridae in the coastal valleys of northern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor A. Vargas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available First host plant records for Iridopsis hausmanni Vargas (Lepidoptera, Geometridae in the coastal valleys of northern Chile. The trees Haplorhus peruviana Engl. and Schinus molle L. (Anacardiaceae are mentioned as the first host plant records for the little known native moth Iridopsis hausmanni Vargas, 2007 (Lepidoptera, Geometridae, Ennominae in the coastal valleys of the northern Chilean Atacama Desert. This is also the first record of Anacardiaceae as host plant for a Neotropical species of Iridopsis Warren, 1894.

  13. Moth Fauna of Gageodo Island in the Southwestern Sea, Korean Peninsula, including Seven Unrecorded Species (Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi, Sei-Woong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We surveyed moths on Gageodo island in the southwestern sea of the Korean Peninsula over three years (2009, 2012, 2013 and found a total of 253 species in 18 families. Geometridae had the greatest species richness, with 63 species, followed by Noctuidae, Erebidae, Crambidae and Sphingidae. The annual changes in species richness and abundance were not different and seasonal occurrence of species showed a unimodal pattern in which the numbers of species and individuals increased from April and May, peaked in June and decreased to September and October. Seven moth species (Pyralidae: Herculia drabicilialis Yamanaka, Didia striatella (Inoue; Crambidae: Clupeosoma pryeri (Butler, Demobotys pervulgalis (Hampson, Yezobotys dissimilis (Yamanaka, Syllepte cissalis Yamanaka; Erebidae: Hypena sinuosa (Wileman are reported for the first time in Korea.

  14. Existence of lungs in caterpillars of Leucania separata (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Sylepta derogata (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and confirmation of their functions%粘虫和棉大卷叶螟幼虫体内肺结构的存在与功能验证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李怡萍; 刘惠霞; 袁锋; 黄晓锋; 袁向群

    2009-01-01

    加拿大昆虫学家Locke提出鳞翅目幼虫体内有一个适应血细胞进行气体交换的肺结构.本文以Locke的研究为依据,运用电镜及其他化学方法,观察和研究了粘虫 Leucania separata 及棉大卷叶螟 Sylepta derogata 幼虫的肺结构和功能.结果表明:肺存在于第8腹节的气管处,该气管分支细短而丰富,形成气管簇.亚甲基蓝标记血液发现,血流方向为由前向侧后方向,流经第8腹节和臀腔,最后流同心脏.第8腹节气管簇的管壁比其他各节都薄,且管壁内膜具有更多适合运动的细管,这有利于气体的通透.正常情况下,气管簇处有各种各样的血细胞聚集,当缺氧胁迫时有大量的血细胞从组织巾释放,通过变形而紧贴气管簇,以利于气体的交换.这些特征都与高等动物的肺功能相似,因而判断此结构存在肺的功能.

  15. Mitochondrial genome of the sweet potato hornworm, Agrius convolvuli (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae), and comparison with other Lepidoptera species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Li-Shang; Li, Sheng; Yu, Hui-Min; Wei, Guo-Qing; Wang, Lei; Qian, Cen; Zhang, Cong-Fen; Li, Jun; Sun, Yu; Zhao, Yue; Zhu, Bao-Jian; Liu, Chao-Liang

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Agrius convolvuli (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae) and compared it with previously sequenced mitogenomes of lepidopteran species. The mitogenome was a circular molecule, 15 349 base pairs (bp) long, containing 37 genes. The order and orientation of genes in the A. convolvuli mitogenome were similar to those in sequenced mitogenomes of other lepidopterans. All 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs) were initiated by ATN codons, except for the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene, which seemed to be initiated by the codon CGA, as observed in other lepidopterans. Three of the 13 PCGs had the incomplete termination codon T, while the remainder terminated with TAA. Additionally, the codon distributions of the 13 PCGs revealed that Asn, Ile, Leu2, Lys, Phe, and Tyr were the most frequently used codon families. All transfer RNAs were folded into the expected cloverleaf structure except for tRNA(Ser)(AGN), which lacked a stable dihydrouridine arm. The length of the adenine (A) + thymine (T)-rich region was 331 bp. This region included the motif ATAGA followed by a 19-bp poly-T stretch and a microsatellite-like (TA)8 element next to the motif ATTTA. Phylogenetic analyses (maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods) showed that A. convolvuli belongs to the family Sphingidae.

  16. The complete mitochondrial genome of the mountainous duskywing, Erynnis montanus (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae): a new gene arrangement in Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ah Rha; Jeong, Heon Cheon; Han, Yeon Soo; Kim, Iksoo

    2014-04-01

    The mountainous duskywing, Erynnis montanus, belongs to a lepidopteran family Hesperiidae. The 15,530-bp long complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of the species has the typical gene content of animals (13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and one major non-coding A+T-rich region). As typical in lepidopteran mitogenome E. montanus mitogenome also contained a high A/T content in the whole genome (81.7%) and the CGA (arginine) as the start codon for the COI gene. Unlike other lepidopteran species, including two sequenced skippers, the E. montanus mitogenome has a unique arrangement tRNA(Ser)-tRNA(Asn), instead of the tRNA(Asn)-tRNA(Ser) found unanimously in other lepidopteran species, providing a new gene arrangement in Lepidoptera. Such rearrangement probably was likely caused by duplication of gene block tRNA(Ser)-tRNA(Asn) and subsequent random loss of tRNA(Asn) in the first copy and tRNA(Ser) in the second copy, resulting in the arrangement tRNA(Ser)-tRNA(Asn).

  17. Review of the Blastobasinae of Costa Rica (Lepidoptera: Gelechioidea: Blastobasidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamski, David

    2013-02-25

    The Blastobasinae (Lepidoptera: Gelechioidea: Blastobasidae) of Costa Rica are reviewed. Five new genera, Barbaloba, Hallicis, Koleps, Pheos, and Pseudokoleps, and 101 new species are described. They include: Barbaloba jubae, B. meleagrisellae, Hallicis bisetosellus, H. calvicula, Koleps angulatus, Pheos aculeatus, Pseudokoleps akainae, Blastobasis abollae, B. achaea, B. aedes, B. babae, B. balucis, B. beo, B. caetrae, B. chanes, B. custodis, B. dapis, B. deae, B. deliciolarum, B. dicionis, B. echus, B. erae, B. fax, B. furtivus, B. iuanae, B. lex, B. litis, B. lygdi, B. manto, B. neniae, B. nivis, B. orithyia, B. paludis, B. phaedra, B. rotae, B. rotullae, B. tapetae, B. thyone, B. usurae, B. vesta, B. xiphiae, Hypatopa actes, H. acus, H. agnae, H. arxcis, H. bilobata, H. caedis, H. caepae, H. cladis, H. cotis, H. cotytto, H. crux, H. cyane, H. dicax, H. dolo, H. dux, H. edax, H. eos, H. erato, H. fio, H. gena, H. hecate, H. hera, H. hora, H. io, H. ira, H. leda, H. limae, H. lucina, H. joniella, H. juno, H. manus, H. mora, H. musa, H. nex, H. nox, H. phoebe, H. pica, H. plebis, H. rabio, H. rea, H. rego, H. rudis, H. sais, H. scobis, H. semela, H. solea, H. styga, H. texla, H. texo, H. umbra, H. verax, H. vitis, H. vox, Pigritia dido, P. faux, P. gruis, P. haha, P. sedis, P. stips, and P. ululae. Diagnoses, descriptions, and type data are provided for each species. Photographs of imagos, illustrations of wing venation for selected species, male and female genitalia, and distribution maps are furnished. Keys to all genera in Blastobasinae and keys to all species within each genus are provided to assist with identifications. In addition, scanning electron micrographs of the inner surface of the dilated first antennal flagellomere and associated sex scales for all Blastobasis are provided. Blastobasis coffeaella (Busck, 1925), B. graminea Adamski, 1999, Hypatopa tapadulcea Adamski, 1999, and Pigritia marjoriella Adamski, 1998 are redescribed.

  18. Evaluating trap crops for diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenes-Perez, Francisco R; Shelton, Anthony M; Nault, Brian A

    2004-08-01

    Potential trap crops for the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), were evaluated through a series of ovipositional preference and larval survival experiments in outdoor screenhouses in 2002 and 2003. Hosts examined as trap crops were glossy and waxy collards, Brassica oleracea L. variety acephala; Indian mustard, Brassica juncea (L.) Czern; and yellow rocket, Barbarea vulgaris (R. Br.) variety arcuata. More eggs were laid on the potential trap crops, with the exception of waxy collards, than on cabbage. When P. xylostella was offered multiple hosts at the same time, numbers of eggs laid on glossy collards, Indian mustard, and yellow rocket were 3, 18, and 12 times greater than on cabbage, respectively. Similarly, when P. xylostella was offered a single trap crop host and cabbage, numbers of eggs laid on glossy collards, Indian mustard, and yellow rocket were 300, 19, and 110 times greater than on cabbage, respectively. Our studies suggest differences in oviposition between the potential trap crops and cabbage were likely due to host volatiles, leaf morphology and color, or a combination of these factors, rather than to total leaf areas, leaf shape, or plant architecture. Two-choice tests with a Y-tube olfactometer indicated that plant volatiles were major factors in P. xylostella host preference. The percentage larval survival from egg to pupation was 22.2% on cabbage, 18.9% on waxy collards, and 24.4% on Indian mustard, whereas survival was significantly lower on glossy collards (6.7%) and yellow rocket (0%). Based on our tests, it seems that yellow rocket may be the best candidate for use as a trap crop for P. xylostella because it is highly attractive for oviposition, but larvae do not survive on it.

  19. Thracides phidon (Cramer (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae: Hesperiinae: Novo registro em plantios comerciais de Heliconia spp. na região Amazônica do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Ribeiro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Lepidoptera desfolhadores podem danificar cultivos de flores tropicais, mas existem poucos relatos desses insetos em plantas de Heliconia spp. O objetivo dessa pesquisa foi registrar uma nova ocorrência de Thracides phidon (Cramer (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae, Hesperiinae como desfolhadora de Heliconia spp. em plantios comerciais na região Amazônica do Brasil.

  20. Thracides phidon (Cramer) (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae: Hesperiinae): Novo registro em plantios comerciais de Heliconia spp. na região Amazônica do Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael Ribeiro; Isabela Carvalho; Gabriely Souza; Hany Fouad; Walkymário Lemos

    2012-01-01

    Lepidoptera desfolhadores podem danificar cultivos de flores tropicais, mas existem poucos relatos desses insetos em plantas de Heliconia spp. O objetivo dessa pesquisa foi registrar uma nova ocorrência de Thracides phidon (Cramer) (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae, Hesperiinae) como desfolhadora de Heliconia spp. em plantios comerciais na região Amazônica do Brasil.

  1. Biologia de Dichomeris famulata Meyrick, 1914 (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae em milho Biology of Dichomeris famulata Meyrick, 1914 (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique da Silva Fagundes Marques

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dichomeris famulata Meyrick, 1914 (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae é uma nova praga da espiga de milho no Brasil, sendo seu estudo importante em áreas de produção de sementes porque os grãos atacados pelas lagartas não germinam. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar a sua biologia em condições de laboratório (25±2°C, UR de 65±10% e fotofase de 14 horas. O ciclo biológico (ovo-adulto foi de 35,2 dias. O período de incubação foi de 4,1 dias. A duração média da fase larval foi de 21,1 dias, sendo observados cinco ínstares larvais. A fase pupal durou 8,4 dias e o peso de pupa de machos e fêmeas foi de 12,4 e 11,3mg, respectivamente. As fêmeas colocaram, em média, 118 ovos, apresentando um período de pré-oviposição de 10,7 dias e de oviposição de 14,0 dias. A longevidade média de machos e fêmeas foi de 37,02 e 44,16 dias, respectivamente, e a razão sexual de 0,48. As lagartas danificam os estilo-estigmas e os grãos em estado leitoso por meio de pequenos orifícios de entrada, prejudicando o endosperma e principalmente a região do embrião, inutilizando-os para sementes. Os resultados obtidos neste trabalho fornecem subsídios para o estabelecimento de estratégias de manejo do inseto, especialmente em áreas de produção de sementes.The caterpillar Dichomeris famulata Meyrick, 1914 (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae is a new pest of corn ear in Brazil, and its study is important in seed fields. The aim of this was to study the biology of this pest under laboratory conditions (25±2°C, 65±10% of RH and 14-hours of photophase. The biological cycle (egg-adult was of 35.2 days. The incubation period was of 4.1 days. The average larval development time was of 21.1 days, and 5 instars were observed. The pupal period was of 8.4 days and the pupae weight was of 12.4 and 11.3 mg for males and females, respectively. The females laid an average of 118 eggs with a pre-oviposition period of 10.7 days and an oviposition time of 14.0 days. The

  2. Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Responses to Sorghum bicolor (Poales: Poaceae) Tissues From Lowered Lignin Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, Patrick F; Sattler, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    The presence of lignin within biomass impedes the production of liquid fuels. Plants with altered lignin content and composition are more amenable to lignocellulosic conversion to ethanol and other biofuels but may be more susceptible to insect damage where lignin is an important resistance factor. However, reduced lignin lines of switchgrasses still retained insect resistance in prior studies. Therefore, we hypothesized that sorghum lines with lowered lignin content will also retain insect resistance. Sorghum excised leaves and stalk pith Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench (Poales: Poaceae) from near isogenic brown midrib (bmr) 6 and 12 mutants lines, which have lowered lignin content and increased lignocellulosic ethanol conversion efficiency, were examined for insect resistance relative to wild-type (normal BTx623). Greenhouse and growth chamber grown plant tissues were fed to first-instar larvae of corn earworms, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) and fall armyworms Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), two sorghum major pests. Younger bmr leaves had significantly greater feeding damage in some assays than wild-type leaves, but older bmr6 leaves generally had significantly less damage than wild-type leaves. Caterpillars feeding on the bmr6 leaves often weighed significantly less than those feeding on wild-type leaves, especially in the S. frugiperda assays. Larvae fed the pith from bmr stalks had significantly higher mortality compared with those larvae fed on wild-type pith, which suggested that bmr pith was more toxic. Thus, reducing lignin content or changing subunit composition of bioenergy grasses does not necessarily increase their susceptibility to insects and may result in increased resistance, which would contribute to sustainable production.

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome of the codling moth Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bao-Cai; Liu, Wei; Wei, Shu-Jun

    2013-02-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the codling moth Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) was determined. The genome is 15,253 bp long with 37 typical animal mitochondrial genes and an A+T-rich region. All genes are arranged in their conserved positions compared with the pupative ancestral arrangement of insects except for trnM, which was translocated to the upstream of the transfer RNA cluster trnI-trnQ as in all previously reported lepidopteran mitochondiral genomes. Seven portein-coding genes use ATG start codon and five use ATT. However, the cox1 gene uses the CGA start codon as it is found in all previous reported mitochondrial genomes of Lepidoptera. Nine protein-coding genes stop with termination codon TAA. Four protein-coding genes use incomplete stop codons TA or T. The A+T region is located between rrnS and trnM with a length of 331 bp.

  4. The taxonomic placement and provenance of Hypopyra inconspicua Herrich-Schäffer (Lepidoptera, Thyrididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor O. Becker

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomic placement and provenance of Hypopyra inconspicua Herrich-Schäffer (Lepidoptera, Thyrididae. Tanyodes inconspicua (Herrich-Schäffer comb. nov. is transferred from Spirama Guenée (Noctuidae, Catocalinae to Striglininae (Thyrididae, as a senior synonym of Ortogramma rufitibia R. Felder & Rogenhofer syn. nov. and Tanyodes ochracea Möschler syn. nov., and from the African to the Neotropical fauna.

  5. Uji Efektifitas Ekstrak Daun Mengkudu Terhadap Hama Kubis Plutella xylostella L. (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) di Laboratorium

    OpenAIRE

    Purba, Sardes

    2009-01-01

    Uji Efektifitas Ekstrak Daun Mengkudu Terhadap Hama Kubis Plutella xylostella L. (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) di Laboratorium dibimbing oleh Ir. Marheni MP., dan Ir. Erwin Maa’aruf, MS. Selaku ketua dan anggota. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui efektifitas instektisida botanis Mengkudu terhadap hama kubis P.xylostella di Laboratorium. Penelitian dilaksanakan di Laboratorium PHP BPTPH Medan Johor, Sumatera Utara yang dimulai pada bulan April 2007 sampai Juli 2007. Penelitian meng...

  6. Fund af småsommerfugle fra Danmark i 2011 (Lepidoptera)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Otto; Falck, Per; Karsholt, Ole

    2012-01-01

    This article reports and comments on interesting Danish Microlepidoptera collected in 2011 and include remarkable findings from previous years. The classification and nomenclature follow the new Danish checklist (Karsholt & Stadel Nielsen, in press). Ten species are reported as new to the Danish ...... the number of Danish Lepidoptera to a total of 2551 species. There are moreover 10 species on the so-called observation list, containing species of uncertain status, which was erected in 2009....

  7. Sexual differences in weight loss upon eclosion are related to life history strategy in Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molleman, Freerk; Javoiš, Juhan; Esperk, Toomas; Teder, Tiit; Davis, Robert B; Tammaru, Toomas

    2011-06-01

    Given that immature and adult insects have different life styles, different target body compositions can be expected. For adults, such targets will also differ depending on life history strategy, and thus vary among the sexes, and in females depend on the degree of capital versus income breeding and ovigeny. Since these targets may in part be approximated by loss of substances upon eclosion, comparing sexual differences in such losses upon eclosion among species that differ in life history would provide insights into insect functional ecology. We studied weight loss in eclosing insects using original data on pupal and adult live weights of 38 species of Lepidoptera (mainly Geometridae) and further literature data on 15 species of Lepidoptera and six representatives of other insect orders, and applied the phylogenetic independent contrasts approach. In addition, data on live and dry weights of pupae of four species of Lepidoptera are presented. We documented that Lepidoptera typically lose a large proportion (20-80%) of their pupal weight upon adult eclosion. Sexual differences in weight loss varied between absent and strongly male biased. Most of the weight loss was water loss, and sexual differences in adult water content correlate strongly with differences in weight loss. Using feeding habits (feeds or does not feed as an adult) and female biased sexual size dimorphism as measures of degree of capital breeding, we found that the difference among the sexes in weight loss tends to be more pronounced in capital breeding species. Additionally, females of more pro-ovigenic species (large proportion of eggs mature upon emergence) tend to have higher water contents. Our results suggests that metamorphosis is generally facilitated by a high water content, while adults excrete water upon eclosion to benefit flight unless water has been allocated to eggs, or is treated as a capital resource for adult survival or future allocation to eggs.

  8. The complete mitochondrial genome of the fall webworm, Hyphantria cunea (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Fang; Wang, Lin; Wu, Song; Li, Yu-Ping; Zhao, Lei; Huang, Guo-Ming; Niu, Chun-Jing; Liu, Yan-Qun; Li, Ming-Gang

    2010-03-29

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of the fall webworm, Hyphantria cunea (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) was determined. The genome is a circular molecule 15 481 bp long. It presents a typical gene organization and order for completely sequenced lepidopteran mitogenomes, but differs from the insect ancestral type for the placement of tRNA(Met). The nucleotide composition of the genome is also highly A + T biased, accounting for 80.38%, with a slightly positive AT skewness (0.010), indicating the occurrence of more As than Ts, as found in the Noctuoidea species. All protein-coding genes (PCGs) are initiated by ATN codons, except for COI, which is tentatively designated by the CGA codon as observed in other lepidopterans. Four of 13 PCGs harbor the incomplete termination codon, T or TA. All tRNAs have a typical clover-leaf structure of mitochondrial tRNAs, except for tRNA(Ser)(AGN), the DHU arm of which could not form a stable stem-loop structure. The intergenic spacer sequence between tRNA(Ser)(AGN) and ND1 also contains the ATACTAA motif, which is conserved across the Lepidoptera order. The H. cunea A+T-rich region of 357 bp is comprised of non-repetitive sequences, but harbors several features common to the Lepidoptera insects, including the motif ATAGA followed by an 18 bp poly-T stretch, a microsatellite-like (AT)(8) element preceded by the ATTTA motif, an 11 bp poly-A present immediately upstream tRNA(Met). The phylogenetic analyses support the view that the H. cunea is closerly related to the Lymantria dispar than Ochrogaster lunifer, and support the hypothesis that Noctuoidea (H. cunea, L. dispar, and O. lunifer) and Geometroidea (Phthonandria atrilineata) are monophyletic. However, in the phylogenetic trees based on mitogenome sequences among the lepidopteran superfamilies, Papillonoidea (Artogeia melete, Acraea issoria, and Coreana raphaelis) joined basally within the monophyly of Lepidoptera, which is different to the traditional classification.

  9. The 'taygetis Ypthima Species Group' (lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Satyrinae): Taxonomy, Variation And Description Of A New Species.

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Siewert; Thamara Zacca; Fernando Dias; André Freitas; Olaf Mielke; Mirna Casagrande

    2013-01-01

    A new species of Taygetis Hübner, [1819] (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Satyrinae) from southeastern Brazil is described: Taygetis drogoni sp. n. In addition, T. servius Weymer, 1910 and T. fulginia d’Almeida, 1922 are resurrected from synonymy and a taxonomic discussion on the species T. ypthima Hübner, [1821] and T. rectifascia Weymer, 1907 is provided. A dichotomous key for the species is also provided.

  10. An updated and annotated checklist of the Hedylidae and Hesperiidae (Lepidoptera) of Trinidad, West Indies

    OpenAIRE

    COCK, Matthew J. W.

    2014-01-01

    A revised checklist for the butterfl y families Hedylidae and Hesperiidae (Lepidoptera) of Trinidad (Trinidad and Tobago) is presented, bringing nomenclature in line with modern usage, and indicating synonyms from earlier lists and papers. The following are new records for Trinidad: Thessia athesis (Hewitson), Bungalotis clusia Evans, Sarmientoia eriopis (Hewitson), Pellicia tyana toza Evans, Quadrus contubernalis contubernalis (Mabille) and Decinea decinea derisor (Mabille). The checklist in...

  11. Lepidoptera and associated parasitoids attacking Hass and non-Hass avocados in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoddle, Mark S; Hoddle, Christina D

    2008-08-01

    A 5-mo survey for fruit feeding Lepidoptera attacking Hass and non-Hass avocados (Persea americana Miller [Lauraceae]) was conducted in Guatemala from 1 November 2006 to 1 April 2007. In total, 6,740 fruit were collected from 22 different areas in Guatemala. Eight species of Lepidoptera, of which at least two are species new to science, were reared from avocado fruit. Reared Lepidoptera were Amorbia santamaria Phillips and Powell, Cryptaspasma sp. nr. lugubris, Euxoa sorella Schaus, Histura n. sp., Holcocera n. sp., Micrathetis triplex Walker, Netechma pyrrhodelta (Meyrick), and Stenoma catenifer Walsingham. Hymenopteran parasitoids were reared from larvae of C. sp. nr. lugubris and S. catenifer. One species of parasitoid, Pseudophanerotoma sp., was reared from field collected C. sp. nr. lugubris larvae. The dominant parasitoid reared from S. catenifer was a gregarious Apanteles sp. Other parasitoid species reared from S. catenifer larvae were Brachycyrtus sp., Macrocentrus sp., and Pristomerus sp. The oviposition preference of C. sp. nr. lugubris for avocado fruit hanging in trees, dropped fruit on the ground, or exposed avocado seeds was investigated by studying the oviposition preferences of adult female moths and determining egg hatch times in the laboratory, and by investigating the longevity of avocado fruit on the ground under prevailing field conditions. Together, data from these studies suggested that C. sp. nr. lugubris may be an unrecognized pest of avocados that causes hanging fruit to drop to the ground prematurely. The influence of season and altitude on the phenology and distribution of avocado feeding Lepidoptera in Guatemala is discussed.

  12. Imaturos de Sarsina violascens (Herrich-Schäffer (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Lymantriinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Moraes C.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaturos de Sarsina violascens (Herrich-Schäffer (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Lymantriinae. Sarsina violascens é uma espécie polífaga que eventualmente se alimenta de P. cattleianum Sabine (Myrtaceae durante sua fase larval. Neste estudo são descritas a morfologia e o comportamento dos imaturos, com ilustrações, fotografias e imagens de microscopia eletrônica de varredura.

  13. Taxonomic review of the tribe Junoniini (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Nymphalinae from Myanmar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zarchi Win

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides keys to the genera and species for the butterfly species belonging to the tribe Junoniini (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae from Myanmar. Species accounts include taxonomic description, synonymic lists, distributional ranges, and adult illustrations of nine species: Junonia hierta (Fabricius, Junonia orithya (Linnaeus, Junonia almana (Linnaeus, Junonia lemonias (Linnaeus, Junonia atlites (Linnaeus, Junonia iphita (Cramer, Yoma sabina (Cramer, Hypolimnas bolina (Linnaeus, and Hypolimnas misippus (Linnaeus.

  14. Low host specificity and abundance of frugivorous lepidoptera in the lowland rain forests of Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ctvrtecka, Richard; Miller, Scott E.; Rosati, Margaret E.; Molem, Kenneth; Damas, Kipiro; Gewa, Bradley; Novotny, Vojtech

    2017-01-01

    We studied a community of frugivorous Lepidoptera in the lowland rainforest of Papua New Guinea. Rearing revealed 122 species represented by 1,720 individuals from 326 woody plant species. Only fruits from 52% (171) of the plant species sampled were attacked. On average, Lepidoptera were reared from 1 in 89 fruits and a kilogram of fruit was attacked by 1.01 individuals. Host specificity of Lepidoptera was notably low: 69% (33) of species attacked plants from >1 family, 8% (4) fed on single family, 6% (3) on single genus and 17% (8) were monophagous. The average kilogram of fruits was infested by 0.81 individual from generalist species (defined here as feeding on >1 plant genus) and 0.07 individual from specialist species (feeding on a single host or congeneric hosts). Lepidoptera preferred smaller fruits with both smaller mesocarp and seeds. Large-seeded fruits with thin mesocarp tended to host specialist species whereas those with thick, fleshy mesocarp were often infested with both specialist and generalist species. The very low incidence of seed damage suggests that pre-dispersal seed predation by Lepidoptera does not play a major role in regulating plant populations via density-dependent mortality processes outlined by the Janzen-Connell hypothesis. PMID:28231249

  15. The case for a generic phytosanitary irradiation dose of 250 Gy for Lepidoptera eggs and larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, Guy J.; Arthur, Valter; Blackburn, Carl M.; Parker, Andrew G.

    2013-08-01

    The literature on ionizing irradiation of Lepidoptera is critically examined for a dose that could serve as a generic phytosanitary treatment for all eggs and larvae of that order, which contains many quarantine pests that inhibit trade in fresh agricultural commodities. The measure of efficacy used in deriving this dose is the prevention of emergence of normal-looking adults that are assumed not able to fly. A dose of 250 Gy is supported by many studies comprising 34 species in 11 lepidopteran families, including those of significant quarantine importance. Two studies with two different species found that doses >250 Gy were necessary, but both of these are contradicted by other studies showing that 10,000 individuals) testing for families other than Tortricidae (the most important quarantine family in the Lepidoptera). Because several large-scale studies have been done with tortricids a dose of 250 Gy could be justifiable for Tortricidae if it is not acceptable for the entire Lepidoptera at this time.

  16. Recurrent Domestication by Lepidoptera of Genes from Their Parasites Mediated by Bracoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasmi, Laila; Boulain, Helene; Gauthier, Jeremy; Hua-Van, Aurelie; Musset, Karine; Jakubowska, Agata K; Aury, Jean-Marc; Volkoff, Anne-Nathalie; Huguet, Elisabeth; Herrero, Salvador; Drezen, Jean-Michel

    2015-09-01

    Bracoviruses are symbiotic viruses associated with tens of thousands of species of parasitic wasps that develop within the body of lepidopteran hosts and that collectively parasitize caterpillars of virtually every lepidopteran species. Viral particles are produced in the wasp ovaries and injected into host larvae with the wasp eggs. Once in the host body, the viral DNA circles enclosed in the particles integrate into lepidopteran host cell DNA. Here we show that bracovirus DNA sequences have been inserted repeatedly into lepidopteran genomes, indicating this viral DNA can also enter germline cells. The original mode of Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) unveiled here is based on the integrative properties of an endogenous virus that has evolved as a gene transfer agent within parasitic wasp genomes for ≈100 million years. Among the bracovirus genes thus transferred, a phylogenetic analysis indicated that those encoding C-type-lectins most likely originated from the wasp gene set, showing that a bracovirus-mediated gene flux exists between the 2 insect orders Hymenoptera and Lepidoptera. Furthermore, the acquisition of bracovirus sequences that can be expressed by Lepidoptera has resulted in the domestication of several genes that could result in adaptive advantages for the host. Indeed, functional analyses suggest that two of the acquired genes could have a protective role against a common pathogen in the field, baculovirus. From these results, we hypothesize that bracovirus-mediated HGT has played an important role in the evolutionary arms race between Lepidoptera and their pathogens.

  17. RNA interference in Lepidoptera: an overview of successful and unsuccessful studies and implications for experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terenius, Olle; Papanicolaou, Alexie; Garbutt, Jennie S; Eleftherianos, Ioannis; Huvenne, Hanneke; Kanginakudru, Sriramana; Albrechtsen, Merete; An, Chunju; Aymeric, Jean-Luc; Barthel, Andrea; Bebas, Piotr; Bitra, Kavita; Bravo, Alejandra; Chevalier, François; Collinge, Derek P; Crava, Cristina M; de Maagd, Ruud A; Duvic, Bernard; Erlandson, Martin; Faye, Ingrid; Felföldi, Gabriella; Fujiwara, Haruhiko; Futahashi, Ryo; Gandhe, Archana S; Gatehouse, Heather S; Gatehouse, Laurence N; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M; Gómez, Isabel; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P; Groot, Astrid T; Hauser, Frank; Heckel, David G; Hegedus, Dwayne D; Hrycaj, Steven; Huang, Lihua; Hull, J Joe; Iatrou, Kostas; Iga, Masatoshi; Kanost, Michael R; Kotwica, Joanna; Li, Changyou; Li, Jianghong; Liu, Jisheng; Lundmark, Magnus; Matsumoto, Shogo; Meyering-Vos, Martina; Millichap, Peter J; Monteiro, Antónia; Mrinal, Nirotpal; Niimi, Teruyuki; Nowara, Daniela; Ohnishi, Atsushi; Oostra, Vicencio; Ozaki, Katsuhisa; Papakonstantinou, Maria; Popadic, Aleksandar; Rajam, Manchikatla V; Saenko, Suzanne; Simpson, Robert M; Soberón, Mario; Strand, Michael R; Tomita, Shuichiro; Toprak, Umut; Wang, Ping; Wee, Choon Wei; Whyard, Steven; Zhang, Wenqing; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Ffrench-Constant, Richard H; Herrero, Salvador; Gordon, Karl; Swevers, Luc; Smagghe, Guy

    2011-02-01

    Gene silencing through RNA interference (RNAi) has revolutionized the study of gene function, particularly in non-model insects. However, in Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) RNAi has many times proven to be difficult to achieve. Most of the negative results have been anecdotal and the positive experiments have not been collected in such a way that they are possible to analyze. In this review, we have collected detailed data from more than 150 experiments including all to date published and many unpublished experiments. Despite a large variation in the data, trends that are found are that RNAi is particularly successful in the family Saturniidae and in genes involved in immunity. On the contrary, gene expression in epidermal tissues seems to be most difficult to silence. In addition, gene silencing by feeding dsRNA requires high concentrations for success. Possible causes for the variability of success in RNAi experiments in Lepidoptera are discussed. The review also points to a need to further investigate the mechanism of RNAi in lepidopteran insects and its possible connection to the innate immune response. Our general understanding of RNAi in Lepidoptera will be further aided in the future as our public database at http://insectacentral.org/RNAi will continue to gather information on RNAi experiments.

  18. MORPHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF Azochis gripusalis WALKER, 1859 (PYRAUSTIDAE - LEPIDOPTERA ASPECTOS MORFOLÓGICOS DA Azochis gripusalis Walker, 1859 (PYRAUSTIDAE - LEPIDOPTERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Henrique Garcia

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    For the purpose of understanding the external morphology of the adult of the Azochis gripusalis Walker, 1859 (Pyraustidae - Lepidoptera, a study was made of the head in dorsal, ventral, front, back and lateral views, of the thorax in dorsal, ventral and lateral views, of the front and back wings, of the prothoracic, mesothoracic and metathoracic legs, and of the abdomen in lateral view. The Azochis gripusalis is known by its large, dark ocelli; the sucking pump is well developed. The maxillary palps (feelers are small; the labial ones along with the middle segment are larger than the other segments. The thorax is straw-yellow with groups of shiny, light gray scales. The prothorax is very restricted in size. The mesothorax is larger than the prothorax and the metathorax put together. The front wings are triangular, shiny straw-yellow, with groups of dark brown scales arranged obliquely, forming isolated dark spots, measuring from 13 to 16 mm in length and having 13 veins all of which, with the exception of 3A, touch the edge of the wing.  The veins R¹, R² and R5 emerge directly from the discoidal cavity. R³ and R4 at the vertex of the wing are slightly bent downward. R², R³ and R4 form a trident (crotch. The back wings are semi-elliptcal, shiny straw-yellow, with groups of dark, irregular scales, and have 10 veins, all of which touch the edge of the wing. R², R³, R4 and R5 are fused. The discoidal cavity is open. Cu¹ emerges from the back angle of the discoidal cavity. 1A and 2A are fused at the base. The anal veins touch the edge of the wing. The wings, when resting, remain partially open. The legs display tibial spurs arranged according to the formula 0-2-4, respectively. The abdomen, dorsally, is shiny straw-yel1ow, with groups of slightly darkened scales between the segments. Eight segments are clearly distinguished. The sixth segment is slightly bent upward; nine and

  19. A new genus and species of leaf miner (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae for Chile associated to the native tree Lithraea caustica

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    Enrique A. Mundaca

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A new genus and species of leaf miner (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae for Chile associated to the native tree Lithraea caustica. We propose the new genus and species of Gracillariidae (Lepidoptera Hualpenia lithraeophaga Mundaca, Parra &Vargas gen. nov., sp. nov., leaf miner of Lithraea caustica (Mol. H. et Arn (Anacardiaceae occurring in southern central Chile. Aspects of the life cycle, adult and larval morphology, development and feeding habits of the new genus and species are also presented. We emphasise the uniqueness and importance of this new species for broadening the current knowledge on the Chilean fauna of Gracillariidae.

  20. Nomenclatural Changes in the Neotropical Eumaeini (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae, Theclinae

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    Robert K. Robbins

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Nomenclatural actions are taken in the Neotropical Eumaeini in advance of publication of the Atlas of Neotropical Lepidoptera Checklist. Lectotypes are designated for eleven species group names: Lycaena astiocha Prittwitz, 1865; Thecla azia Hewitson, 1873; Thecla beroea Hewitson, 1868; Thecla cupa Druce, 1907; Thecla daraba Hewitson, 1867; Thecla duma Hewitson, 1878; Thecla erenea Hewitson, 1867; Thecla galliena Hewitson, 1867; Thecla guacanagari Wallengren, 1860; Thecla stagira Hewitson, 1867; and Thecla thoria Hewitson, 1867. Thecla duma Hewitson, 1878 and Thecla columbinia Strand, 1916 are transferred from Eumaeini to Deudorigini (Theclinae. Lycaena vanessoides Prittwitz, 1865 is transferred from Polyommatinae to Theclinae (Eumaeini. Six type localities are changed: Colombia to Africa for Thecla columbinia Strand, 1916; Amazon to Guayaquil for Thecla daraba Hewitson, 1867; Colombia to Southeast Asia for Thecla duma Hewitson, 1878; Bolivia to Westem North America for Ignata illepida K. Johnson, 1992; Argentina to the United States for Strymon nivnix K. Johnson, Eisele & MacPherson, 1990; and Dominican Republic to mainland Central and South America for Tmolus victoria K. Johnson & Matusik, 1989. Seven new synonyms are: Lycaena vanessoides Prittwitz, 1865 = Thecla hygela Hewitson, 1868 syn. nov.; Thecla saepium Boisduval, 1852 = Ignata illepida K. Johnson, 1992 syn. nov.; Thecla tyriam H.H. Druce, 1907 = Zigirina minutia K. Johnson & Adams, 1997 syn. nov.; Thecla halciones Butler & H. Druce, 1872 = Decussata colombiana K. Johnson, Austin, Le Crom & Sal azar, 1997 syn. nov.; Papilio celmus Cramer, 1775 = Tmolus victoria K. Johnson & Matusik, 1989 syn. nov.; Thecla daraba Hewitson, 1867 = Thecla tyleri Dyar, 1913 syn. nov.; and Thecla galliena Hewitson, 1877 = Thecla iopas Godman & Salvin, 1887 syn. nov. The generic name Decussata K. Johnson, Austin, Le Crom & Salazar, 1997 is a new junior synonym of Ostrinotes K. Johnson, Austin, Le Crom

  1. The influence of vegetation and landscape structural connectivity on butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperiidae), Carabids (Coleoptera: Carabidae), Syrphids (Diptera: Syrphidae), and sawflies (Hymenoptera: Symphyta) in Northern Italy farmland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgio, G.; Sommaggio, D.; Marini, M.; Chiarucci, A.; Landi, S.; Fabbri, R.; Pesarini, F.; Genghini, M.; Ferrari, R.; Muzzi, E.; Lenteren, van J.C.; Masetti, A.

    2015-01-01

    Landscape structure as well as local vegetation influence biodiversity in agroecosystems. A study was performed to evaluate the effect of floristic diversity, vegetation patterns, and landscape structural connectivity on butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperiidae), carabids (Coleoptera:

  2. Characterization of the mitochondrial genome of the diamondback moth Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) and phylogenetic analysis of advanced moths and butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shu-Jun; Shi, Bao-Cai; Gong, Ya-Jun; Li, Qian; Chen, Xue-Xin

    2013-04-01

    Here we determined the mitochondrial genome sequence of a notorious pest, the diamondback moth Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutoidea: Plutellidae). The mitochondrial genome contains 37 typical animal mitochondrial genes and an A+T-rich region. The gene arrangement is identical to that of other ditrysian lepidopteran mitochondrial genomes, but different from the ancestral gene arrangement in the non-ditrysian Hepialidae of Lepidoptera. The start codon of the cox1 gene is CGA, which is dissimilar to its homologs in most other insects. In Lepidoptera, cox1 and cox2 have low nucleotide diversities, while the nad6, nad2, and nad3 genes are highly variable. Phylogenetic analyses uncovered the reciprocal monophyly of Ditrysia, Apoditrysia, Obtectomera, and Macrolepidoptera, and the placement of the Hesperiidae within Papilionoidea. Our analyses suggest that the complete mitochondrial genome sequences are a promising marker toward fully resolving the phylogenetic relationships within Lepidoptera.

  3. First report of an egg parasitoid reared from Neomusotima conspurcatalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) a biological control agent of Lygodium microphyllum (Schizaeales: Lygodiaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neomusotima conspurcatalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) was first released in Florida as a biological control agent of Lygodium microphyllum (Polypodiales: Lygodiaceae), Old World climbing fern, in 2008. The first egg parasitoid, a Trichogramma sp. (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae), was reared from N. co...

  4. Comparative embryogenesis of Mecoptera and Lepidoptera with special reference to the abdominal prolegs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Li-Xuan; Hua, Bao-Zhen

    2016-05-01

    The eruciform larvae of holometabolous insects are primarily characterized by bearing a varying number of abdominal prolegs in addition to three pairs of thoracic legs. However, whether the prolegs are evolutionarily homologous among different insect orders is still a disputable issue. We examined the embryonic features and histological structure of the prolegs of the scorpionfly Panorpa byersi Hua and Huang (Mecoptera: Panorpidae) and the Oriental armyworm Mythimna separata (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) to investigate whether the prolegs are homologous between these two holometabolous insect orders. In the scorpionfly, paired lateral process primordia arise on abdominal segments I-VIII (A1-A8) in line with the thoracic legs in early embryonic stages, but degenerate into triangular protuberances in later stages, and paired medial processes appear along the midventral line before dorsal closure and eventually develop into unjointed, cone-shaped prolegs. Histological observation showed that the lumina of the prolegs are not continuous with the hemocoel, differing distinctly from that of the basic appendicular plan of thoracic legs. These results suggest that the prolegs are likely secondary outgrowths in Mecoptera. In the armyworm, lateral process primordia appear on A1-A10 in alignment with the thoracic legs in the early embryonic stages, although only the rudiments on A3-A6 and A10 develop into segmented prolegs with the lumina continuous with the hemocoel and others degenerate eventually, suggesting that the prolegs are true segmental appendages serially homologous with the thoracic legs in Lepidoptera. Therefore, we conclude that the larval prolegs are likely not evolutionarily homologous between Mecoptera and Lepidoptera.

  5. Flavin-dependent monooxygenases as a detoxification mechanism in insects: new insights from the arctiids (lepidoptera.

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    Sven Sehlmeyer

    Full Text Available Insects experience a wide array of chemical pressures from plant allelochemicals and pesticides and have developed several effective counterstrategies to cope with such toxins. Among these, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are crucial in plant-insect interactions. Flavin-dependent monooxygenases (FMOs seem not to play a central role in xenobiotic detoxification in insects, in contrast to mammals. However, the previously identified senecionine N-oxygenase of the arctiid moth Tyria jacobaeae (Lepidoptera indicates that FMOs have been recruited during the adaptation of this insect to plants that accumulate toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Identification of related FMO-like sequences of various arctiids and other Lepidoptera and their combination with expressed sequence tag (EST data and sequences emerging from the Bombyx mori genome project show that FMOs in Lepidoptera form a gene family with three members (FMO1 to FMO3. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that FMO3 is only distantly related to lepidopteran FMO1 and FMO2 that originated from a more recent gene duplication event. Within the FMO1 gene cluster, an additional gene duplication early in the arctiid lineage provided the basis for the evolution of the highly specific biochemical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations of these butterflies to pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-producing plants. The genes encoding pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-N-oxygenizing enzymes (PNOs are transcribed in the fat body and the head of the larvae. An N-terminal signal peptide mediates the transport of the soluble proteins into the hemolymph where PNOs efficiently convert pro-toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids into their non-toxic N-oxide derivatives. Heterologous expression of a PNO of the generalist arctiid Grammia geneura produced an N-oxygenizing enzyme that shows noticeably expanded substrate specificity compared with the related enzyme of the specialist Tyria jacobaeae. The data about the evolution of FMOs within lepidopteran insects

  6. A large-scale, higher-level, molecular phylogenetic study of the insect order Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher-level relationships within the Lepidoptera, and particularly within the species-rich subclade Ditrysia, are generally not well understood, although recent studies have yielded progress. 483 taxa spanning 115 of 124 families were sampled for 19 protein-coding nuclear genes. Their aligned nucle...

  7. Relative susceptibility of sunflower maintainer lines and resistance sources to natural infestations of the banded sunflower moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The banded sunflower moth, Cochylis hospes Walsingham (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is a significant seed-feeding pest of sunflowers in North America. Though some wild Helianthus spp., interspecific crosses, and H. annuus cultivars (that precede hybrid sunflower breeding) have low susceptibility to ba...

  8. Egg hatch and survival and development of beet webworm (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) larvae at different combinations of temperature and relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    To understand the role that temperature and humidity play in the population dynamics of the beet webworm, Loxostege sticticalis L. (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), egg hatchability, survival of 1st - 5th instars, survival of the complete larval stage, survival curves, and larval development rates were inve...

  9. Influence of holding temperature and irradiation on field performance of mass-reared Thaumatotibia leucotreta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) as an integral component to the area-wide integrated management of the false codling moth, Thaumatotibia leucotreta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), was successfully implemented in the Western Cape region of South Africa and subsequently expanded to citrus are...

  10. Use of benzimidazole agar plates to assess fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) feeding on excised maize and sorghum leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is an economically significant pest of sorghum and maize. To screen sorghum and maize germplasm for resistance to fall armyworm feeding, field, greenhouse, or lab bioassays are often utilized individually or in combinatio...

  11. Evaluation of whorl damage by fall armyworm (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) on field and greenhouse grown sweet sorghum plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)] is an economically important pest of sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L) Moench]. However, resistance to fall armyworm in sweet sorghum has not been extensively studied. A collection of primarily sweet sorghum accessions were evaluated in t...

  12. Global warming and the change of butterfly distributions: a new opportunity for species diversity or a severe threat (Lepidoptera)?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryrholm, N.

    2003-01-01

    Global warming and the change of butterfly distributions: a new opportunity for species diversity or a severe threat (Lepidoptera)? In order to assess the influence of climatic changes on the distribution of insects, the ranges of nonmigratory European butterfly species have been studied. This study

  13. Effect of learning on the oviposition preference of field-collected and laboratory-reared Chilo partellus (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glas, J.J.; Berg, van den J.; Potting, R.P.J.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies show that Vetiver grass, (Vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash), may have potential as a dead-end trap crop in an overall habitat management strategy for the spotted stem borer, Chilo partellus (Swinhoe) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae). Vetiver grass is highly preferred for oviposition, in spite

  14. Feeding stimulants for larvae of Graphium sarpedon nipponum (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) from Cinnamomum camphora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhan, Zhi-Hui; Tebayashi, Shin-Ichi; Kim, Chul-Sa; Li, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The feeding response of larvae of the swallowtail butterfly, Graphium sarpedon nipponum (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae), is elicited by a methanolic extract from camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora) leaves. Based on bioassay-guided fractionation, three compounds, isolated from the methanolic extract of fresh leaves of the camphor tree, were revealed to be involved in a multi-component system of feeding stimulants. Structures of these feeding stimulants were identified as sucrose, 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid and quercetin 3-O-β-glucopyranoside by NMR and LC-MS.

  15. The aquatic habit and host plants of Paracles klagesi (Rothschild (Lepidoptera, Erebidae, Arctiinae in Brazil

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    Aurélio R. Meneses

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aquatic habit and host plants of Paracles klagesi (Rothschild (Lepidoptera, Erebidae, Arctiinae in Brazil. The aquatic caterpillar Paracles klagesi (Rothschild, 1910 was collected from the headwaters of a stream in an ecotone between Cerrado and Babaçu forest in northeastern Brazil. The single caterpillar found was observed feeding on the macrophyte Tonina fluviatilis Aubl. (Eriocaulaceae and other aquatic plants of the family Nymphaeaceae present in the area, but also accepted as food Elodea canadensis Michx. (Hydrocharitaceae and Cabomba sp. (Cabombaceae under laboratory conditions.

  16. Discovery of a third species of Lamproptera Gray, 1832 (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shao-Ji; Zhang, Xin; Cotton, Adam M; Ye, Hui

    2014-04-11

    A newly discovered, third species of the genus Lamproptera (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) is described, 183 years after the second currently recognised species was first named. Lamproptera paracurius Hu, Zhang & Cotton sp. n., from N.E. Yunnan, China, is based on marked differences in external morphology and male genital structure. The species is confirmed as a member of the genus, and detailed comparisons are made with other taxa included in the genus. Keys to Lamproptera species based on external characters and male genitalia are included.

  17. Managing the forest for more than the trees: effects of experimental timber harvest on forest Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerville, Keith S

    2011-04-01

    Studies of the effects of timber harvest on forest insect communities have rarely considered how disturbance from a range of harvest levels interacts with temporal variation in species diversity to affect community resistance to change. Here I report the results of a landscape-scale, before-and-after, treatment-control experiment designed to test how communities of forest Lepidoptera experience (1) changes in species richness and composition and (2) shifts in species dominance one year after logging. I sampled Lepidoptera from 20 forest stands allocated to three harvest treatments (control, even-aged shelterwood or clearcuts, and uneven-aged group selection cuts) within three watersheds at Morgan-Monroe State Forest, Indiana, USA. Moths were sampled from all forest stands one year prior to harvest in 2007 and immediately post-harvest in 2009. Species composition was most significantly affected by temporal variation between years, although uneven-aged management also caused significant changes in lepidopteran community structure. Furthermore, species richness of Lepidoptera was higher in 2007 compared to 2009 across all watersheds and forest stands. The decrease in species richness between years, however, was much larger in even-aged and uneven-aged management units compared to the control. Furthermore, matrix stands within the even-aged management unit demonstrated the highest resistance to species loss within any management unit. Species dominance was highly resistant to effects of timber harvest, with pre- and post-harvest values for Simpson diversity nearly invariant. Counter to prediction, however, the suite of dominant taxa differed dramatically among the three management units post-harvest. My results suggest that temporal variation may have strong interactions with timber harvest, precipitating loss of nearly 50% species richness from managed stands regardless of harvest level. Even-aged management, however, appeared to leave the smallest "footprint" on moth

  18. Lepidoptera Larvae as an Indicator of Multi-trophic Level Responses to Changing Seasonality in an Arctic Tundra Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, K. M.; Steltzer, H.; Boelman, N.; Weintraub, M. N.; Darrouzet-Nardi, A.; Wallenstein, M. D.; Sullivan, P.; Gough, L.; Rich, M.; Hendrix, C.; Kielland, K.; Philip, K.; Doak, P.; Ferris, C.; Sikes, D.

    2011-12-01

    Earlier snowmelt and warming temperatures in the Arctic will impact multiple trophic levels through the timing and availability of food resources. Lepidoptera are a vital link within the ecosystem; their roles include pollinator, parasitized host for other pollinating insects, and essential food source for migrating birds and their fledglings. Multiple environmental cues including temperature initiate plant growth, and in turn, trigger the emergence of Lepidoptera and the migrations of birds. If snowmelt is accelerated and temperature is increased, it is expected that the Lepidoptera larvae will respond to early plant growth by increasing their abundance within areas that have accelerated snowmelt and warmer conditions. In May of 2011 in a moist acidic tussock tundra system, we accelerated snowmelt by 15 days through the use of radiation-absorbing fabric and warmed air and soil temperatures using open-top chambers, individually and in combination. Every 1-2 days from May 27th to July 8th, 2 minute searches were performed for Lepidoptera larvae in all treatments; when an animal was found, their micro-habitat, surface temperature, behavior, food source, and time of day were noted. The length, body and head width were measured, and the animals were examined for braconid wasp and tachinid fly parasites. Lepidoptera larvae collected in pitfall traps from May 26th to July 7th were also examined and measured. Total density of parasitized larvae accounted for 54% of observed specimens and 50% of pitfall specimens, indicating that Lepidoptera larvae serve an integral role as a host for other pollinators. Total larvae density was highest within the accelerated snowmelt plots compared to the control plots; 66% of observed live specimens and 63% of pitfall specimens were found within the accelerated snowmelt plots. Ninety percent of the total observed animals were found within the open-top warming chambers. Peak density of animals occurred at Solar Noon between 14:00 -15

  19. Effects of sex, host-plant deprivation and presence of conspecific immatures on the cannibalistic behavior of wild Ascia monuste orseis (Godart) (Lepidoptera, Pieridae)

    OpenAIRE

    SANTANA, Alessandra F. K.; Zago,Rosana C.; ZUCOLOTO, Fernando S.

    2011-01-01

    Effects of sex, host-plant deprivation and presence of conspecific immatures on the cannibalistic behavior of wild Ascia monuste orseis (Godart) (Lepidoptera, Pieridae). The specialist cabbage caterpillar Ascia monuste orseis (Lepidoptera, Pieridae) feeds on plants of the Brassicaceae family, but may eventually ingest conspecific eggs and larvae during the larval stage. The present study examines feeding behavior of 4th and 5th instar cabbage caterpillars in relation to sex, host-plant depriv...

  20. The Lepidoptera of White Sands National Monument, Otero County, New Mexico, USA 1. Two new species of Noctuidae (Lepidoptera, Noctuinae, Agrotini

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    Eric Metzler

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The white gypsum dune ecosystem in the Tularosa Basin in south central New Mexico is the largest gypsum dune field on earth, covering 712.25 km2. White Sands National Monument in Otero County, New Mexico, protects approximately 40%, 297.85 km2, of this dune field. In 2006 the US National Park Service initiated a long term study of the Lepidoptera at White Sands National Monument, resulting in the discovery of two new species, Euxoa lafontainei Metzler & Forbes, n. sp. and Protogygia whitesandsensis Metzler & Forbes, n. sp. described herein. Adult moths and male and female genitalia are illustrated for Euxoa lafontainei, and adults and male genitalia are illustrated for Protogygia whitesandsensis and its relatives.

  1. Complete mitochondrial genomes of two gelechioids, Mesophleps albilinella and Dichomeris ustalella (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), with a description of gene rearrangement in Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Sun; Kim, Min Jee; Jeong, Su Yeon; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Iksoo

    2016-11-01

    We sequenced the entire mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of two gelechioids, Mesophleps albilinella and Dichomeris ustalella, and compared their genome organization and sequence composition to those of available gelechioid mitogenomes for an enhanced understanding of Gelechioidea genomic characteristics. We compared all available lepidopteran mitogenome arrangements, including that of M. albilinella, which is unique in Gelechioidea, to comprehend the extensiveness and mechanisms of gene rearrangement in Lepidoptera. The genomes of M. albilinella and D. ustalella are 15,274 and 15,410 bp in size, respectively, with the typical sets of mitochondrial (mt) genes. The COI gene begins with CGA (arginine) in all sequenced gelechioids, including M. albilinella and D. ustalella, reinforcing the feature as a synapomorphic trait, at least in the Gelechioidea. Each 353- and 321-bp long A + T-rich region of M. albilinella and D. ustalella contains one (D. ustalella) or two (M. albilinella) tRNA-like structures. The M. albilinella mitogenome has a unique gene arrangement among the Gelechioidea: ARNESF (the underline signifies an inverted gene) at the ND3 and ND5 junction, as opposed to the ARNSEF that is found in ancestral insects. An extensive search of available lepidopteran mitogenomes, including that of M. albilinella, turned up six rearrangements that differ from those of ancestral insects. Most of the rearrangements can be explained by the tandem duplication-random loss model, but inversion, which requires recombination, is also found in two cases, including M. albilinella. Excluding the MIQ rearrangement at the A + T-rich region and ND2 junction, which is found in nearly all Ditrysia, most of the remaining rearrangements found in Lepidoptera appear to be independently derived in that they are automorphic at several taxonomic scales, although current mitogenomic data are limited, particularly for congeneric data.

  2. Estirpes de Bacillus thuringiensis efetivas contra insetos das ordens Lepidoptera, Coleoptera e Diptera Bacillus thuringiensis strains effective against insects of Lepidoptera, Coleoptera and Diptera orders

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    Lílian Botelho Praça

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi selecionar entre 300 estirpes de Bacillus thuringiensis as efetivas simultaneamente contra larvas de Spodoptera frugiperda J.E. Smith e Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, Anthonomus grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Aedes aegypti Linnaeus e Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae. Foram selecionadas duas estirpes de B. thuringiensis, denominadas S234 e S997, que apresentaram atividade contra as três ordens de insetos. As estirpes foram caracterizadas por métodos morfológicos, bioquímicos e moleculares. As mesmas apresentaram duas proteínas principais de 130 e 65 kDa, produtos de reação em cadeia da polimerase de tamanho esperado para a detecção dos genes cry1Aa, cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1B e cry2 e cristais bipiramidais, cubóides e esféricos.The aim of this work was to select among 300 strains of Bacillus thuringiensis those which are simultaneously effective against larvae of Spodoptera frugiperda J.E. Smith and Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, Anthonomus grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Aedes aegypti Linnaeus and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae. Two strains of B. thuringiensis were selected, S234 and S997, which presented activity against those three insect orders. Both strains were characterized by morphological, biochemical and molecular methods. They have presented two main proteins with 130 and 65 kDa, polimerase chain reaction products with expected sizes for detection of the genes cry1Aa, cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1B and cry2 and bipiramidal, cubical and spherical crystals.

  3. PARASITISMO SOBRE Eurysacca melanocampta Meyrick (LEPIDOPTERA: GELECHIIDAE EN DOS LOCALIDADES DE CUSCO, PERÚ PARASITISM ON Eurysacca melanocampta Meyrick (LEPIDOPTERA: GELECHIIDAE IN TWO LOCALITIES AT CUSCO, PERÚ

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    Juan F. Costa

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available El cultivo de quinua (Chenopodium quinoa es una importante actividad económica en Cusco. La polilla Eurysacca melanocampta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae es la principal plaga registrada en este cultivo y presenta varios controladores biológicos. Se registran parasitoides y porcentajes de larvas parasitadas de la polilla de la quinua provenientes de dos localidades de Cusco: Izcuchaca (3400 msnm y Quiquijana (3100 msnm. Las larvas colectadas se criaron en laboratorio hasta la emergencia de los parasitoides adultos. Phytomyptera sp (Diptera: Tachinidae fue la principal especie parasitoide con 19,8% de parasitismo de larvas provenientes de ambas localidades. Braconidae (Hymenoptera, incluyendo Apanteles sp y Earinus sp, representó el 27,8% y Diadegma spp (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae el 5,6%. Braconidae presentó mayor porcentaje de parasitismo en Quiquijana que en Izcuchaca. Se discute el efecto de la diversidad de plantas asociadas, cultivadas y silvestres, sobre las poblaciones de insectos parasitoides.Quinoa crop (Chenopodium quinoa is an important economic activity at Cusco. The quinoa moth: Eurysacca melanocampta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae is the main insect pest recorded from Cusco in quinoa fields and it has a complex of natural enemies. This research reports parasitoid insects and percentage of parasitized larvae of quinoa moth from two localities of Cusco: Izcuchaca (3400 masl and Quiquijana (3100 masl. Collected larvae were reared at room conditions up to emergence of adult parasitoids. Phytomyptera sp (Diptera: Tachinidae was the main parasitoid with 19,8% of parasitized larvae from both localities. Braconidae (Hymenoptera, including Apanteles sp y Earinus sp, accounted for 27,8% and Diadegma spp (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae the 5,6%. Braconidae showed a greater percentage of parasitism at Quiquijana than Izcuchaca. We discuss if diversity of associated plants, both cultivated and wild plants, influence parasitoid populations.

  4. Complete mitochondrial genome of an aquatic moth, Elophila interruptalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Sun; Kim, Min Jee; Kim, Sung-Soo; Kim, Iksoo

    2014-08-01

    The aquatic moth, Elophila interruptalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) belongs to the subfamily Nymphulinae, nearly all of which are aquatic in their entire larval and pupal stages. The 15,351-bp long complete mitogenome consisted of a typical set of genes (13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes and 22 tRNA genes) and one major non-coding A+T-rich region, with the typical arrangement found in the majority of Lepidoptera. One of the unusual features of the E. interruptalis mitogenome is the presence of a tRNA(Phe)-like sequence beyond the A+T-rich region. The sequence is encoded in the minor strand of the genome overlapping with the reversely encoded regular tRNA(Glu) by 65 bp. The sequence divergence of the tRNA(Phe)-like sequence to that of regular E. interruptalis tRNA(Phe) and other within-familial species was as low as 59% ∼ 71%, but has a proper folding structure with well-matched stems and identical anticodon sequences to the regular copy.

  5. Population dynamic of the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio polytes (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae in dry and wet seasons

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    SUWARNO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Suwarno (2010 Population dynamic of the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio polytes (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae in dry and wet seasons. Biodiversitas 11: 19-23. The population dynamic of Papilio polytes L. (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae in dry and wet seasons was investigated in the citrus orchard in Tasek Gelugor, Pulau Pinang, Malaysia. Population of immature stages of P. polytes was observed alternate day from January to March 2006 (dry season, DS, from April to July 2006 (secondary wet season, SWS, and from October to December 2006 (primary wet season, PWS. The population dynamics of the immature stages of P. polytes varied between seasons. The immature stages of P. polytes are more abundance and significantly different in the PWS than those of the DS and the SWS. The larval densities in all seasons decreased with progressive development of the instar stages. Predators and parasitoids are the main factor in regulating the population abundance of immature stages of P. polytes. There were positive correlations between the abundance of immature stages of P. polytes and their natural enemies abundance in each season. Ooencyrtus papilioni Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae is the most egg parasitoid. Oxyopes quadrifasciatus L. Koch. and O. elegans L. Koch. (Araneae: Oxyopidae are the main predators in the young larvae, meanwhile Sycanus dichotomus Stal. (Heteroptera: Reduviidae, Calotes versicolor Fitzinger (Squamata: Agamidae, birds and praying mantis attacked the older larvae.

  6. Eucalyptus cloeziana AS A NEW HOST TO Hylesia paulex (LEPIDOPTERA: SATURNIIDAE IN SOUTHEAST BRAZIL

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    Alexandre Igor Azevedo Pereira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An unidentified Lepidoptera species was found defoliating Eucalyptus cloeziana (Myrtaceae in a cerrado area of Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Pupae of this insect, collected in the area, were brought to the laboratory and maintained in Petri dishes (9.0 cm x 1.5 cm under 25 ± 2oC, relative humidity of 60 ± 10% and 12 hours photophase to obtain adults and eggs. This insect was identified as Hylesia paulex Dognin (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae, and, in that way, the objective of the present study was to register for the first time its herbivory in E. cloeziana plants. Newly-emerged caterpillars were reared in 10 plastic pots (500ml, with 30 caterpillars per pot and fed, daily, with fresh leaves of Eucalyptus cloeziana (Myrtaceae. The egg incubation period of H. paulex was 32.00 ± 1.19 days. The total duration of the seven instars of this insect was 67.83 ± 0.84 days. Hylesia paulex completed its life cycle with E. cloeziana plants, what proves its adaptability to this kind of exotic Myrtaceae in Brazil.

  7. Evolutionary diversification of aminopeptidase N in Lepidoptera by conserved clade-specific amino acid residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Austin L

    2014-07-01

    Members of the aminopepidase N (APN) gene family of the insect order Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) bind the naturally insecticidal Cry toxins produced by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences of seven lepidopteran APN classes provided strong support for the hypothesis that lepidopteran APN2 class arose by gene duplication prior to the most recent common ancestor of Lepidoptera and Diptera. The Cry toxin-binding region (BR) of lepidopteran and dipteran APNs was subject to stronger purifying selection within APN classes than was the remainder of the molecule, reflecting conservation of catalytic site and adjoining residues within the BR. Of lepidopteran APN classes, APN2, APN6, and APN8 showed the strongest evidence of functional specialization, both in expression patterns and in the occurrence of conserved derived amino acid residues. The latter three APN classes also shared a convergently evolved conserved residue close to the catalytic site. APN8 showed a particularly strong tendency towards class-specific conserved residues, including one of the catalytic site residues in the BR and ten others in close vicinity to the catalytic site residues. The occurrence of class-specific sequences along with the conservation of enzymatic function is consistent with the hypothesis that the presence of Cry toxins in the environment has been a factor shaping the evolution of this multi-gene family.

  8. Flight dynamics of some Lepidoptera species of sugar beet and possibilities their control (Transylvania-Romania

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    Muresanu Felicia

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors present the obtained results regarding the flight dynamics of some Lepidoptera species in sugar beet crops in Transylvania (the central part of Romania. In order to limit the appearance of mentioned pests to the economic threshold, Trichogramma spp. were obtained in laboratory conditions at ARDS Turda and SBRDS Brasov. The experiments were conducted in production areas on 0,5 ha minimum for each variant. The variants included four Trichogramma species: T. dendrolimi, T. evanescens, T. maidis, T. buesi that were manually released three times: the first release, 10.000 individuals/ha, the second, 120.000 individuals/ha and the third, 150.000 individuals/ha. The first release was performed at the beginning of the Lepidoptera flight, the second at the maximum flight and the third 5 days after the second. The efficiency of T. maidis was between 75-90%, of T. evanescens, it was between 73-88%, of T. dendrolimi, it was between 85-92% and of T. buesi 79-82%. Among the Trichogramma species utilized, T. dendrolimi and T. evanescens were very efficient in the reduction of mentioned pests. Root production was significantly higher compared to the untreated variant, 4,0-4,7 t/ha more were recorded after the application of biological treatments with T. evanescens and T. dendrolimi.

  9. Barcoding lepidoptera: current situation and perspectives on the usefulness of a contentious technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Brandão, Karina L; Lyra, Mariana L; Freitas, André V L

    2009-01-01

    Faced by a growing need of identification and delimitation of new and established cryptic species that are being lost at an increasing rate, taxonomists can now more than ever take advantage of an enormous variety of new molecular and computational tools. At this moment they should be open to all new available technologies in the so called 'technology-driven revolution' in systematics. The use of the 'DNA barcode' has been discussed by those applying successfully this approach to identify and diagnose species and by those who believe that the flaws in the use of this molecular marker are as many as to negate the worth of its employment. For insects of the order Lepidoptera neither side seems totally correct or wrong, and although many groups of lepidopterans have been taxonomically resolved by using exclusively or additionally this marker for diagnoses, for others the 'barcode' helped little to resolve taxonomic issues. Here we briefly present some pros and cons of using DNA barcode as a tool in taxonomic studies, with special attention to studies with groups of Lepidoptera developed in the last few years.

  10. The genus Erechthias Meyrick of Ascension Island, including discovery of a new brachypterous species (Lepidoptera, Tineidae

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    Donald Davis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available One previously named and two new species of the tineid genus Erechthias Meyrick are described and illustrated from the small, remote, mid-Atlantic Ascension Island. With these additions the Lepidoptera fauna of Ascension now totals 38 known species. Little is known regarding the biology of the two new species of Erechthias, and none of the species has been reared from larvae from Ascension. Erechthias minuscula (Walsingham is a widespread, largely pantropical species first described from the West Indies. Larvae of E. minuscula are known to be scavengers on a wide variety of dead plant material. Erechthias ascensionae, new species, is one of two species of Erechthias now known to be endemic to the island. The other endemic species, Erechthias grayi, new species, is further remarkable inwing reduction occurring in both sexes. It is one of the few species of Lepidoptera known where this extreme of brachyptery involving both sexes has evolved. The larvae of E. grayi are believed to be lichenivorous, and larval cases suspected to represent this species are illustrated.

  11. Adaptation of indigenous larval parasitoids to Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracini, Chiara; Ingegno, Barbara Letizia; Navone, Paolo; Ferrari, Ester; Mosti, Marco; Tavella, Luciana; Alma, Alberto

    2012-08-01

    Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) is a serious threat to tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) crops in South America. In Europe, after its first detection in Spain in 2006, it rapidly spread through the Mediterranean basin, reaching Italy 2 yr later. The aim of our work was to find indigenous effective biological control agents and to evaluate their potential role in the control of larval populations of T. absoluta in controlled conditions. Nine species of larval parasitoids emerged from field-collected tomato leaves infested by T. absoluta. The most abundant, Necremnus near artynes (Walker) and Necremnus near tidius (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), were tested in laboratory parasitism trials. Furthermore, because the species N. artynes and N. tidius are each reported in literature as an ectoparasitoid of Cosmopterix pulchrimella Chambers (Lepidoptera: Cosmopterigidae) on upright pellitory plants, olfactometer bioassays were performed to assess the response of our parasitoids to the odors of tomato and pellitory leaves infested by T absoluta and C. pulchrimella, respectively, compared with healthy ones. Both Necremnus species showed good adaptation to the invasive pest, and we observed a high larval mortality of T. absoluta because of host feeding and parasitism. Even olfactory responses highlighted a preference of both wasps for tomato plants infested by the exotic pest. These preliminary results demonstrated a high suitability of these indigenous natural enemies for controlling T. absoluta. Further investigations are needed to confirm their role as potential biological agents in commercial tomato plantations.

  12. The complete mitogenome of Bombyx mori strain Dazao (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae) and comparison with other lepidopteran insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiu-Ning; Zhu, Bao-Jian; Dai, Li-Shang; Liu, Chao-Liang

    2013-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Bombyx mori strain Dazao (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae) was determined to be 15,653bp, including 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), two rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and a A+T-rich region. It has the typical gene organization and order of mitogenomes from lepidopteran insects. The AT skew of this mitogenome was slightly positive and the nucleotide composition was also biased toward A+T nucleotides (81.31%). All PCGs were initiated by ATN codons, except for cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene which was initiated by CGA. The cox1 and cox2 genes had incomplete stop codons consisting of just a T. All the tRNA genes displayed a typical clover-leaf structure of mitochondrial tRNA. The A+T-rich region of the mitogenome was 495bp in length and consisted of several features common to the lepidopteras. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the B. mori Dazao was close to Bombycidae.

  13. The application and performance of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers for population genetic analyses of Lepidoptera

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    Brad S. Coates

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellite markers are difficult to apply within lepidopteran studies due to the lack of locus-specific PCR amplification and the high proportion of null alleles, such that erroneous estimations of population genetic parameters often result. Herein single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers are developed from Ostrinia nubilalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae using next-generation expressed sequence tag (EST data. A total of 2742 SNPs were predicted within a reference assembly of 7414 EST contigs, and a subset of 763 were incorporated into 24 multiplex PCR reactions. To validate this pipeline, 5 European and North American sample sites were genotyped at 178 SNP loci, which indicated 84 (47.2% were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Locus-by-locus FST, analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA, and STRUCTURE analyses indicate significant genetic differentiation may exist between European and North American O. nubilalis. The observed genetic diversity was significantly lower among European sites, which may be the result from genetic drift, natural selection, a genetic bottleneck, or ascertainment bias due to North American origin of EST sequence data. SNPs are an abundant mutation data molecular genetic marker development in non-model species with shared ancestral SNPs showing application within closely related species. These markers offer advantages over microsatellite markers for genetic and genomic analyses of Lepidoptera, but the source of mutation data may affect the estimation of population parameters and likely need be considered in the interpretation of empirical data.

  14. Food searching behaviour of a Lepidoptera pest species is modulated by the foraging gene polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardonnet, Floriane; Capdevielle-Dulac, Claire; Chouquet, Bastien; Joly, Nicolas; Harry, Myriam; Le Ru, Bruno; Silvain, Jean-François; Kaiser, Laure

    2014-10-01

    The extent of damage to crop plants from pest insects depends on the foraging behaviour of the insect's feeding stage. Little is known, however, about the genetic and molecular bases of foraging behaviour in phytophagous pest insects. The foraging gene (for), a candidate gene encoding a PKG-I, has an evolutionarily conserved function in feeding strategies. Until now, for had never been studied in Lepidoptera, which includes major pest species. The cereal stem borer Sesamia nonagrioides is therefore a relevant species within this order with which to study conservation of and polymorphism in the for gene, and its role in foraging - a behavioural trait that is directly associated with plant injuries. Full sequencing of for cDNA in S. nonagrioides revealed a high degree of conservation with other insect taxa. Activation of PKG by a cGMP analogue increased larval foraging activity, measured by how frequently larvae moved between food patches in an actimeter. We found one non-synonymous allelic variation in a natural population that defined two allelic variants. These variants presented significantly different levels of foraging activity, and the behaviour was positively correlated to gene expression levels. Our results show that for gene function is conserved in this species of Lepidoptera, and describe an original case of a single nucleotide polymorphism associated with foraging behaviour variation in a pest insect. By illustrating how variation in this single gene can predict phenotype, this work opens new perspectives into the evolutionary context of insect adaptation to plants, as well as pest management.

  15. Analysis on the Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Andraca theae (Lepidoptera: Bombycoidea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xing-Shi; Ma, Li; Wang, Xing; Huang, Guo-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The bombycid moth, Andraca theae (Matsumura) (Lepidoptera: Bombycoidea) is an important pest of tea in southeastern China. In the present study, the mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of A. theae was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The complete mitogenome of A. theae, encoding 37 genes, was 15,737 bp in length (Genbank no. KX365419), and consisted of 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 tRNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and an adenine (A) + thymine (T)-rich region (AT-rich region). The gene order of A. theae mitogenome was typical for Lepidoptera mitogenomes. Except for cox1, which started with CGA, all other 12 PCGs started with ATN. Eleven of the 13 PCGs ended with TAA, expect for cox1 and cox2, which ended with a single T. The maximum likelihood method and the Bayesian method were used to analyze the phylogenetic relationship among 22 representative bombycoid species with a matrix consisting of the 13 PCGs of the mitogenomes of the 22 species. The topological structures of the two phylogenetic trees we constructed were almost identical, with the results indicating that the bombycid species, including A. theae, clustered into a single clade with a bootstrap value of 58% and a posterior probability of 0.98. The phylogenetic relationship among the Bombycoidea species analyzed was Lasiocampidae + (Bombycidae + (Saturniidae + Sphingidae)) which was supported by a high bootstrap value of 100% and a posterior probability of 1.00.

  16. Seletividade de inseticidas a três Vespidae predadores de Dione juno juno (Lepidoptera: Heliconidae Selectivity of insecticides to three Vespidae predators of Dione juno juno (Lepidoptera: Heliconidae

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    MARCELO FIALHO DE MOURA

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Dentre os insetos que atacam o maracujazeiro, Dione juno juno (Lepidoptera: Heliconidae é considerada a praga-chave. Estudou-se a seletividade dos inseticidas fentiom, cartape, malatiom e deltametrina a Dione juno juno, em relação às vespas predadoras Polybia fastidiosuscula, Polybia scutellaris e Protonectarina sylveirae (Hymenoptera: Vespidae. Estimaram-se as curvas concentração-mortalidade e mediante o uso da concentração letal do inseticida em 90% dos indivíduos (CL90 calcularam-se os índices de seletividade diferencial e índices de tolerância. A deltametrina foi seletiva à P. scutellaris e P. fastidiosuscula e medianamente seletiva à P. sylveirae e o cartape foi medianamente seletivo às três espécies de vespas predadoras. O malatiom foi seletivo a P. sylveirae e medianamente seletivo a P. fastidiosuscula. As vespas predadoras P. fastidiosuscula eP. scutellaris foram mais tolerantes a deltametrina e ao fentiom do que P. sylveirae, enquanto o P. fastidiosuscula e P. sylveirae toleraram mais o cartape do que P. scutellaris. O malatiom foi mais tolerado pela espécie P. sylveirae do que por P. fastidiosuscula e P. scutellaris.Among insects that attack passion fruit, Dione juno juno (Lepidoptera: Heliconidae is considered the most dangerous plague. The selectivity of the insecticides fenthion, cartap, malathion and deltamethrin to the predatory wasps Polybia fastidiosuscula, Polybia scutellaris and Protonectarina sylveirae (Hymenoptera: Vespidae was studied based on these insecticide toxicities to their prey Dione juno juno. Concentration-mortality regression lines were obtained and the estimated lethal concentration of insecticide to 90% (LC90 of the individuals were used for the calculation of the differential selectivity index and tolerance index. Deltamethrin was selective in favor of P. scutellaris and P. fastidiosuscula and showed intermediate selectivity to P. sylveirae, while cartap showed intermediate selectivity to all

  17. Contributions of gut bacteria to Bacillus thuringiensis-induced mortality vary across a range of Lepidoptera

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    Holt Jonathan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gut microbiota contribute to the health of their hosts, and alterations in the composition of this microbiota can lead to disease. Previously, we demonstrated that indigenous gut bacteria were required for the insecticidal toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis to kill the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar. B. thuringiensis and its associated insecticidal toxins are commonly used for the control of lepidopteran pests. A variety of factors associated with the insect host, B. thuringiensis strain, and environment affect the wide range of susceptibilities among Lepidoptera, but the interaction of gut bacteria with these factors is not understood. To assess the contribution of gut bacteria to B. thuringiensis susceptibility across a range of Lepidoptera we examined larval mortality of six species in the presence and absence of their indigenous gut bacteria. We then assessed the effect of feeding an enteric bacterium isolated from L. dispar on larval mortality following ingestion of B. thuringiensis toxin. Results Oral administration of antibiotics reduced larval mortality due to B. thuringiensis in five of six species tested. These included Vanessa cardui (L., Manduca sexta (L., Pieris rapae (L. and Heliothis virescens (F. treated with a formulation composed of B. thuringiensis cells and toxins (DiPel, and Lymantria dispar (L. treated with a cell-free formulation of B. thuringiensis toxin (MVPII. Antibiotics eliminated populations of gut bacteria below detectable levels in each of the insects, with the exception of H. virescens, which did not have detectable gut bacteria prior to treatment. Oral administration of the Gram-negative Enterobacter sp. NAB3, an indigenous gut resident of L. dispar, restored larval mortality in all four of the species in which antibiotics both reduced susceptibility to B. thuringiensis and eliminated gut bacteria, but not in H. virescens. In contrast, ingestion of B. thuringiensis toxin (MVPII following antibiotic

  18. Lycaenid caterpillars (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae eating flowers of Dalea pennellii var. chilensis (Fabaceae in the northern Chilean Andes

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    Héctor A. Vargas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Lycaenid caterpillars (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae eating flowers of Dalea pennellii var. chilensis (Fabaceae in the northern Chilean Andes. The shrub Dalea pennellii var. chilensis (Fabaceae is reported for the first time as a host plant for three Neotropical Polyommatini (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae, Polyommatinae: Hemiargus ramon (Dognin, 1887, Leptotes trigemmatus (Butler, 1881 and Nabokovia faga (Dognin, 1895, based on two collections performed in the western slopes of the northern Chilean Andes in two consecutive summers. The relative abundance was always above 90% for N. faga while it was always less than 5% for H. ramon and L. trigemmatus. Furthermore, N. faga was not found on inflorescences of other native Fabaceae examined in the study site. This pattern suggests a close relationship between N. faga and D. pennellii var. chilensis, at least at a local scale.

  19. A new species of solitary Meteorus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) reared from caterpillars of toxic butterflies (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Scott R; Jones, Guinevere Z

    2009-01-01

    A new species of parasitoid wasp, Meteorus rugonasus Shaw and Jones (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), is described from the Yanayacu Biological Station, Napo Province, Ecuador. The new species is diagnosed and compared to other species in the genus. It was reared from larvae of Pteronymia zerlina (Hewitson, 1855) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae, Ithomiinae) found feeding on leaves of Solanum (Solanaceae). The parasitoid is solitary. This is the first record of a Meteorus species attacking ithomiine Nymphalidae. A new species of parasitoid wasp, Meteorus rugonasus Shaw and Jones (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), is described from the Yanayacu Biological Station, Napo Province, Ecuador. The new species is diagnosed and compared to other species in the genus. It was reared from larvae of Pteronymia zerlina (Hewitson, 1855) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae, Ithomiinae) found feeding on leaves of Solanum (Solanaceae). The parasitoid is solitary. This is the first record of a Meteorus species attacking ithomiine Nymphalidae.

  20. The “Taygetis ypthima species group” (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Satyrinae: taxonomy, variation and description of a new species

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    Ricardo Siewert

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Taygetis Hübner, [1819] (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Satyrinae from southeastern Brazil is described: Taygetis drogoni sp. n. In addition, T. servius Weymer, 1910 and T. fulginia d’Almeida, 1922 are resurrected from synonymy and a taxonomic discussion on the species T. ypthima Hübner, [1821] and T. rectifascia Weymer, 1907 is provided. A dichotomous key for the species is also provided.

  1. Maximum Entropy Niche-Based Modeling (Maxent) of Potential Geographical Distributions of Lobesia Botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in China

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Part 1: Simulation, Optimization, Monitoring and Control Technology; International audience; Lobesia botrana (Denis & Schiffermüller, 1775) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) is one of the most destructive pests of grape in the Palearctic region. The potential geographical distribution of this pest is important to agriculture security. In this study, Maxent and ArcGIS were used to project the potential geographical distribution of L. botrana in China under the current climate. The result indicated th...

  2. Comparison of haplotype frequencies differentiate fall armyworm (Lepidoptera : Noctuidae) corn-strain populations from Florida and Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Nagoshi, R. N.; Silvie, Pierre; Meagher, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a major economic pest throughout the Western Hemisphere. Populations can be subdivided into two morphologically identical but genetically distinct strains (corn-strain and rice-strain) that differ in their host plant preferences. These strains can be distinguished by using polymorphisms in the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene. Additional sequence analysis of this locus identified two sites that were highly p...

  3. Espécies de Adelpha Hübner, [1819] (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Limenitidinae ocorrentes no Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil

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    Rocco Alfredo Di Mare

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Species of Adelpha Hübner, [1819] (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Limenitidinae occurring in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Based on literature, collections and sampled butterflies, a list of twelve species of Adelpha Hübner occurring in Rio Grande do Sul State is presented, including host plants. Adelpha epizygis Fruhstorfer, [1916], Adelpha falcipennis Fruhstorfer, [1916], Adelpha goyama Schaus, 1902 and Adelpha isis (Drury, 1782 are new reports to Rio Grande do Sul. The species are illustrated and keyed.

  4. Effect of learning on the oviposition preference of field-collected and laboratory-reared Chilo partellus (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) populations

    OpenAIRE

    Glas, J. J.; Berg, van den, A.E.; Potting, R.P.J.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies show that Vetiver grass, (Vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash), may have potential as a dead-end trap crop in an overall habitat management strategy for the spotted stem borer, Chilo partellus (Swinhoe) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae). Vetiver grass is highly preferred for oviposition, in spite of the fact that larval survival is extremely low on this grass. The oviposition behaviour of female Chilo partellus moths was investigated by determining the amount and size of egg batches allocat...

  5. Türkiye’de mısırda yeni bir zararlı, Chilo partellus (Swinhoe) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Sertkaya, Erdal; AKMEŞE, Vahdettin; ATAY, Erol

    2014-01-01

    Spotted stem borer, Chilo partellus (Swinhoe) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) was recorded for the first time in Turkey, in Dörtyol district of Hatay province in the East Mediterranean region. Later it was also reported from Doğankent in Adana province. The species is native to Asia and distributed to southern and eastern Africa being a serious pest of maize and sorghum, also considered to be a potential risk for maize production of Turkey.

  6. Effect of silicon on the morphology of the midgut and mandible of tomato leafminer Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) larvae

    OpenAIRE

    MC dos Santos; AM Resende Junqueira; VG Mendes de Sá; JC Zanúncio; JE. Serrão

    2015-01-01

    Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) is an important insect pest causing serious losses to tomato plantations in Brazil. Some populations of T. absolute are reported to present insecticide resistance resulting in its control failure and the use of alternative control based on silicon, which is clean and sustainable, can reduce pesticide use, increasing fruit quality and protecting the environment. This study evaluated changes in the morphology of the midgut and the mandibles of ...

  7. Methodological comparison of DNA extraction from Holcocerrus hippophaecolus (Lepidoptera: Cossidae) for AFLP analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Min; ZHU Yang-yu; TAO Jing; Luo You-qing

    2008-01-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) is a powerful DNA fingerprinting technique for studying genetic rela-tionships and genetic diversity in insects. However, the crucial prerequisite for AFLP analysis is to extract DNA of high quality. In this study, we evaluate four different protocols (SDS method, improved SDS method, CTAB method and a complex method with SDS and CTAB) for isolating DNA from the seabuckthorn carpenter moth (Holcocerrus hippophaecolus (Lepidoptera: Cossidae)). The results indicate that the CTAB method does not produce DNA suitable for AFLP analysis. The SDS method and the complex method with SDS and CTAB are comparatively time-consuming and resulted in low yields of DNA and were therefore not used for AFLP assay. The improved SDS method is recommended for preparing DNA templates from H. hippophaecolus for AFLP analysis.

  8. Assessment of insecticide resistance of Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in Emilia-Romagna region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civolani, Stefano; Boselli, Mauro; Butturini, Alda; Chicca, Milvia; Fano, Elisa Anna; Cassanelli, Stefano

    2014-06-01

    The European grapevine moth, Lobesia botrana (Denis & Schiffermüller) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is the key pest of vineyard, Vitis vinifera L. In Italy, failures in field chemical pest control have been recently reported. The susceptibility to insecticides indoxacarb, methoxyfenozide, and emamectin benzoate was then evaluated in a L. botrana population collected from a vineyard in Emilia-Romagna (northeastern Italy) where pest management programs achieved unsatisfactory results. The field trial showed that the indoxacarb efficacy toward L. botrana was very low in the two timings of application (7.9 and -1.5%) in comparison with untreated control, while the efficacy of methoxyfenozide (76.1%) and emamectin benzoate (88.8%) was high. The decreased efficacy of indoxacarb was also supported by the results of the laboratory bioassay on neonate L. botrana larvae, in which the resistance ratio was 72-fold in comparison with that of the susceptible strain.

  9. Selection of active plant extracts against the coffee leaf miner Leucoptera coffeella (Lepidoptera: Lyonetiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Alves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to contribute to the development of alternative control methods of the coffee leaf miner, Leucoptera coffeella (Guérin-Mèneville & Perrottet, 1842 (Lepidoptera: Lyonetiidae, a search for plants able to produce active substances against this insect was carried out, with species collected during different periods of time in the Alto Rio Grande region, (Lavras, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Coffee leaves containing L. coffeella mines were joined with 106 extracts from 77 plant species and, after 48 hours, the dead and alive caterpillars were counted. The extracts from Achillea millefolium, Citrus limon, Glechoma hederacea, Malva sylvestris, Mangifera indica, Mentha spicata, Mirabilis jalapa, Musa sapientum, Ocimum basiculum, Petiveria alliaceae, Porophyllum ruderale, Psidium guajava, Rosmarinus officinalis, Roupala montana, Sambucus nigra and Tropaeolum majus showed the highest mortality rates.

  10. Effects of Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki on Malpighian tubule cells of Thaumetopoea pityocampa (Lepidoptera: Thaumetopoeidae) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogutchu, Ayşe; Suludere, Zekiye; Uzunhisarcikli, Meltem; Kalender, Yusuf

    2005-01-01

    In this study effects of Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki (Btk) on Malpighian tubule cells of Thaumetopoea pityocampa (Lepidoptera: Thaumetopoeidae) larvae was investigated by electron microscopy. 3 mg/l Btk was given with food. After Btk administration, the Malpighian tubule cells were investigated and compared with a control group. 3 and 6 hrs after Btk administration swelling in Malpighian tubule cells was observed. Swelling of mitochondria and separation of their cristae was seen after 12 hrs. After 24 hrs dissolution of the basal cytoplasm, swelling and vacuolization of all mitochondria, partial dissolution of the nucleoplasm, and swelling and separation ofmicrovilli was documented. A membrane-body in the nucleus was seen after 48 hrs. The nucleoplasm was completely dissolved after 72 hrs and after 96 hrs large vacuoles appeared in the cytoplasm and shortening of microvilli was observed.

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome of the common cutworm, Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidade).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiu-Ning; Zhu, Bao-Jian; Dai, Li-Shang; Wang, Lei; Qian, Cen; Wei, Guo-Qing; Liu, Chao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was determined to be 15,374 bp (GenBank accession No. KF543065), including 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), two rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and an A + T-rich region. It has the typical gene organization and order of mitogenomes from lepidopteran insects. The AT skew of this mitogenome was slightly positive and the nucleotide composition was also biased toward A + T nucleotides (81.03%). All PCGs were initiated by ATN codons, except for cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene which was initiated by CGA. Four of the 13 PCGs harbor the incomplete termination codon by T. All the tRNA genes displayed a typical clover-leaf structure of mitochondrial tRNA, with the exception of trnS1 (AGN). The A + T-rich region of the mitogenome was 326 bp in length.

  12. Four Newly Recorded Species of the Family Crambidae (Lepidoptera from Korea

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    Roh, Seung Jin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to report the newly recorded species of the family Crambidae, belonging to the order Lepidoptera. During the course of investigation on the family Crambidae in South Korea, the following four species are reported for the first time from Korea: Diplopseustis perieresalis (Walker, 1859, Dolicharthria bruguieralis (Duponchel, 1833, Herpetogramma ochrimaculale (South, 1901, and Omiodes diemenalis ($Guen{\\acute{e}}e$ 수식 이미지, 1854. Among them two genera, Diplopseustis Meyrick and Dolicharthria Stephens, are also newly reported from Korea. External and genital characteristics of adults were examined and illustrated. All of the newly recorded species were enumerated with their available information including the collecting localities, illustrations of adults, and genitalia.

  13. Infestation Level Influences Oviposition Site Selection in the Tomato Leafminer Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae

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    Thomas Bawin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae, is a devastating pest that develops principally on solanaceous plants throughout South and Central America and Europe. In this study, we tested the influence of three levels of T. absoluta infestations on the attraction and oviposition preference of adult T. absoluta. Three infestation levels (i.e., non-infested plants, plants infested with 10 T. absoluta larvae, and plants infested with 20 T. absoluta larvae were presented by pairs in a flying tunnel to groups of T. absoluta adults. We found no differences in terms of adult attraction for either level of infestations. However, female oviposition choice is influenced by larvae density on tomato plants. We discuss the underlying mechanisms and propose recommendations for further research.

  14. Activities of Apiaceae essential oils against armyworm, Pseudaletia unipuncta (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Rose Marie O F; Rosa, José S; Oliveira, Luisa; Cunha, Ana; Fernandes-Ferreira, Manuel

    2013-08-14

    Essential oils (EOs) from four Apiaceae species and 11 pure compounds were evaluated for their antifeedant, growth inhibitory, and insecticidal activities against Pseudaletia unipuncta (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) fourth-instar larvae. EOs from Foeniculum vulgare subsp. vulgare var. vulgare, Anethum graveolens , Petroselinum crispum , and Cuminum cyminum were characterized by gas-chromatography (GC) and mass spectrometry. Anti-insect activity varied according to plant specie/composition, type, and exposure period. EOs from P. crispum and A. graveolens fruits, trans-anethole and cuminaldehyde, exerted acute effects on larvae feeding and growth (FDI and GI > 70%). A. graveolens , C. cyminum , and F. vulgare EOs and some of their constituents were effective by fumigation (≥ 80%). Satisfactory contact toxicities (>70%) were observed for five compounds and all EOs, except F. vulgare EOs, when tested by the filter paper impregnation method. For the most active EOs/compounds, dose-dependent toxicity was determined and inverse relationships of LC50 with time were established.

  15. An unusual food plant for Cydia pomonella (Linnaeus (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Salinas-Castro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An unusual food plant for Cydia pomonella (Linnaeus (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae in Mexico. Larvae of Cydia pomonella (Linnaeus, 1758 were discovered on floral cones of Magnolia schiedeana (Schltdl, 1864 near the natural reserve of La Martinica, Veracruz, México. Magnolia represents an unusual host for this moth species, which is known throughout the world as the "codling moth", a serious pest of fruits of Rosaceae, especially apples. The larvae were identified using taxonomic keys, and identification was corroborated using molecular markers. Further sampling resulted in no additional larvae, hence, the observation was probably that of an ovipositional error by the female, and M. schiedeana is not at risk of attack by this important moth pest.

  16. Intraseasonal variation in a population of Fountainea ryphea (Cramer (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Caldas

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A different approach was used for the key-factor method in a population study of the tropical butterfly Fountainea ryphea (Cramer, [1776] (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, marking 20 artificial cohorts to identify the mortality levels and associated instars responsible for the variation in numbers within the season of occurrence, when generations overlap broadly. Highest mortality was detected during first instar in 13 cohorts; during second instar in three cohorts; third and fourth instars suffered highest mortality twice. Results showed that first instar mortality due to rainfall and predation, and parasitism on fourth instar could be the main factors promoting differences in number between cohorts throughout the season, although no density-dependent processes could be identified.

  17. The first complete mitochondrial genome for the subfamily Limacodidae and implications for the higher phylogeny of Lepidoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiu-Ning; Xin, Zhao-Zhe; Bian, Dan-Dan; Chai, Xin-Yue; Zhou, Chun-Lin; Tang, Bo-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) provides important information for understanding molecular evolution and phylogeny. To determine the systematic status of the family Limacodidae within Lepidoptera, we infer a phylogenetic hypothesis based on the complete mitogenome of Monema flavescens (Lepidoptera: Limacodidae). The mitogenome of M. flavescens is 15,396 base pairs (bp), and includes 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), two ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, and a control region (CR). The AT skew of this mitogenome is slightly negative and the nucleotide composition is also biased towards A + T nucleotides (80.5%). All PCGs are initiated by ATN codons, except for the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene, which is initiated by CGA. All tRNAs display the typical clover-leaf structure characteristic of mitochondrial tRNAs, with the exception of trnS1 (AGN). The mitogenome CR is 401 bp and consists of several features common to Lepidoptera. Phylogenetic analysis using Bayesian Inference (BI) and Maximum Likelihood (ML) based on nucleotide and amino acid sequences of 13 mitochondrial PCGs indicates that M. flavescens belongs to Zygaenoidea. We obtain a well-supported phylogenetic tree consisting of Yponomeutoidea + (Tortricoidea + Zygaenoidea + (Papilionoidea + (Pyraloidea + (Noctuoidea + (Geometroidea + Bombycoidea))))). PMID:27767191

  18. Lepidoptera (Insecta: Lepidoptera in the collection of Daniel Czekelius from Natural History Museum of Sibiu, collected from "Dumbrava Sibiului" forest, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina MOISE

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Currently, fauna and ecological analysis of the landscape in which the reserves and Forest "Dumbrava Sibiu" shows a great scientific interest and practical for biological research in Sibiu. The results can contribute substantially to assessing the state of the world of insects and their evolution in the ecosystem studied, but also to establish their quantitative and qualitative changes over time. In the present work was studied the Lepidoptera collection of Transylvania Dr. Daniel Czekelius, and the paper presents a systematic list of species collected Macrolepidoptere since 1888-1929 in Forest "Dumbrava Sibiu".This paper can be considered a tribute and memory of Dr.Daniel Czekelius entomologists, who through his collection has contributed substantially to the knowledge of this group of insects. The data obtained and to join the collections of personal data between 2000-2011 we intend to achieve a more comprehensive study, which will be subject to further research on the evolution Macrolepidoptera over more than 120 years of research in the area of Forest "Dumbrava Sibiu". For some species have been listed by the IUCN recommended levels of endangerment in 2000 and 2001 Rákosy L.: extinct, taxon vulnerable, near threatened.

  19. Attack behavior of Podisus rostralis (Heteroptera: Pentatomidade adults on caterpillars of Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walkymário Paulo Lemos

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Attack behavior of the predator Podisus rostralis (Stäl (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae adults on fourth instar Bombyx mori L. (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae caterpillars was studied in laboratory conditions. Ten 24 hours old adults of this predator were observed during two hours with the following attack behavior: (1 Predator: prey finding; prey observation; touching prey with antenna; attack behavior; prey paralysis; predator retreat after attack; attack cessation; successive attacks; and (2 Prey: defense. The predator P. rostralis found its prey before attacking and it approached it with slow circular movements. The attack was usually made in the posterior part of the prey to reduce defense reaction. Larger size of prey in relation to the predator resulted difficult prey paralysis but it occurred in less than two hours.Estudou-se, em laboratório, o comportamento de ataque de adultos do predador Podisus rostralis (Stäl (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae tendo como presa lagartas de quarto estádio de Bombyx mori L. (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae. Dez adultos do predador, com 24 horas de idade, foram observados durante duas horas acompanhando-se os seguintes comportamentos de ataque: (1 Predador: localização da presa; observação da presa; toque das presas com as antenas; comportamento de ataque; paralisação da presa; fuga do predador após ataque; finalização do ataque; ataques sucessivos; e (2 Presa: defesa. O predador P. rostralis localizou sua presa antes do ataque, aproximando-se dela através de lentos movimentos circulares. O ataque é, usualmente, realizado na parte posterior da presa para reduzir reação de defesa. O maior tamanho da presa em relação ao predador pode dificultar a paralisação, porém o predador consegue paralisá-la em menos de duas horas.

  20. A revised checklist of Nepticulidae fossils (Lepidoptera) indicates an Early Cretaceous origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorenweerd, Camiel; Nieukerken, Erik J Van; Sohn, Jae-Cheon; Labandeira, Conrad C

    2015-05-27

    With phylogenetic knowledge of Lepidoptera rapidly increasing, catalysed by increasingly powerful molecular techniques, the demand for fossil calibration points to estimate an evolutionary timeframe for the order is becoming an increasingly pressing issue. The family Nepticulidae is a species rich, basal branch within the phylogeny of the Lepidoptera, characterized by larval leaf-mining habits, and thereby represents a potentially important lineage whose evolutionary history can be established more thoroughly with the potential use of fossil calibration points. Using our experience with extant global Nepticulidae, we discuss a list of characters that may be used to assign fossil leaf mines to Nepticulidae, and suggest useful methods for classifying relevant fossil material. We present a checklist of 79 records of Nepticulidae representing adult and leaf-mine fossils mentioned in literature, often with multiple exemplars constituting a single record. We provide our interpretation of these fossils. Two species now are included in the collective generic name Stigmellites: Stigmellites resupinata (Krassilov, 2008) comb. nov. (from Ophiheliconoma) and Stigmellites almeidae (Martins-Neto, 1989) comb. nov. (from Nepticula). Eleven records are for the first time attributed to Nepticulidae. After discarding several dubious records, including one possibly placing the family at a latest Jurassic position, we conclude that the oldest fossils likely attributable to Nepticulidae are several exemplars representing a variety of species from the Dakota Formation (USA). The relevant strata containing these earliest fossils are now dated at 102 Ma (million years ago) in age, corresponding to the latest Albian Stage of the Early Cretaceous. Integration of all records in the checklist shows that a continuous presence of nepticulid-like leaf mines preserved as compression-impression fossils and by amber entombment of adults have a fossil record extending to the latest Early Cretaceous.

  1. The complete genome sequence of Plodia interpunctella granulovirus: Discovery of an unusual inhibitor-of-apoptosis gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is a common pest of stored goods with a worldwide distribution. The complete genome sequence for a larval pathogen of this moth, the baculovirus Plodia interpunctella granulovirus (PiGV), was determined by next-generation sequenci...

  2. Phenyl propionate and sex pheromone for monitoring navel orangeworm in the presence of mating disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent availability of sex pheromone lures for the navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), improves options for monitoring this key pest in conventionally-managed almonds. These lures are, however, minimally effective in the presence of mating disruption. Experi...

  3. Egg morphology and chorionic ultrastructure of key stored product insect pests of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggs of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) and Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) were imaged with scanning electron microscopy to explore how respiratory openings on the chorion surface may be related to the efficacy of fumigants. Each P. interpunctella eg...

  4. Determining host suitability of pecan for stored-product insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    A no-choice test was performed to determine survival and reproductive capacity of stored-product insect pests on pecan, Carya illinoensis (Wangenheim) Koch. Insects used were Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae); sawtoothed grain beetle, Oryzaephilus surinamensis...

  5. The potential of natural enemies to suppress rice leaffolder populations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraker, de J.

    1996-01-01

    Rice leaffolders Cnaphalocrocis medinalis and Marasmia spp. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) are considered major pests in many Asian countries. Insecticide use against leaffolders is wide-spread, but may not be justified due to tolerance of the rice crop to leaffolder injury and a high level of natural bi

  6. Response of reproductive traits and longevity of beet webworm to temperature, and implications for migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beet webworm, Loxostege sticticalis (Linnaeus) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is a facultative long-distance migratory insect pest of crops in many regions between latitudes 36-55°N. Reproductive performance of L. sticticalis is very sensitive to thermal conditions, such that outbreaks of larvae are clos...

  7. A new institution devoted to insect science: The Florida Museum of Natural History, McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akito Y.Kawahara; Thomas C.Emmel; Jacqueline Miller; Andrew D.Warren

    2012-01-01

    The Florida Museum of Natural History's McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity,on the University of Florida campus in Gainesville,Florida,has become one of the world's largest institutions for research on butterflies and moths,and an important research facility for insect science.The facility was constructed by combining the staff and merging the Lepidoptera holdings from the Allyn Museum of Entomology,the Florida State Collection of Arthropods and other University of Florida collections,and now includes over ten million specimens from all over the world,rivaling some of the largest Lepidoptera research collections globally.The facility includes a team of domestic and international researchers studying many areas of lepidopterology,including behavior,biodiversity,biogeography,ecology,genomics,physiology,systematics and taxonomy.In this paper,we introduce the McGuire Center,its staff,and the many research activities for researchers across entomological disciplines.

  8. The type-material of Arctiinae (Lepidoptera, Erebidae) described by Burmeister and Berg in the collection of the Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales Bernardino Rivadavia (Buenos Aires, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccacece, Hernán M.; Vincent, Benoit; Navarro, Fernando R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Carlos G. Burmeister and Carlos Berg were among the most important and influential naturalists and zoologists in Argentina and South America and described 241 species and 34 genera of Lepidoptera. The Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales Bernardino Rivadavia (MACN) housed some of the Lepidoptera type specimens of these authors. In this study we present a catalogue with complete information and photographs of 11 Burmeister type specimens and 10 Berg type specimens of Phaegopterina, Arctiina and Pericopina (Lepidoptera, Erebidae, Arctiinae, Arctiini) housed in the MACN. Lectotypes or holotypes were designated where primary type specimens could be recognized; in some cases we were not able to recognize types. The catalogue also proposes nomenclatural changes and new synonymies: Opharus picturata (Burmeister, 1878), comb. n.; Opharus brunnea Gaede, 1923: 7, syn. n.; Hypocrisias jonesi (Schaus, 1894), syn. n.; Leucanopsis infucata (Berg, 1882), stat. rev.; Paracles argentina (Berg, 1877), sp. rev.; Paracles uruguayensis (Berg, 1886), sp. rev. PMID:25061380

  9. The type-material of Arctiinae (Lepidoptera, Erebidae) described by Burmeister and Berg in the collection of the Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales Bernardino Rivadavia (Buenos Aires, Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccacece, Hernán M; Vincent, Benoit; Navarro, Fernando R

    2014-01-01

    Carlos G. Burmeister and Carlos Berg were among the most important and influential naturalists and zoologists in Argentina and South America and described 241 species and 34 genera of Lepidoptera. The Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales Bernardino Rivadavia (MACN) housed some of the Lepidoptera type specimens of these authors. In this study we present a catalogue with complete information and photographs of 11 Burmeister type specimens and 10 Berg type specimens of Phaegopterina, Arctiina and Pericopina (Lepidoptera, Erebidae, Arctiinae, Arctiini) housed in the MACN. Lectotypes or holotypes were designated where primary type specimens could be recognized; in some cases we were not able to recognize types. The catalogue also proposes nomenclatural changes and new synonymies: Opharus picturata (Burmeister, 1878), comb. n.; Opharus brunnea Gaede, 1923: 7, syn. n.; Hypocrisias jonesi (Schaus, 1894), syn. n.; Leucanopsis infucata (Berg, 1882), stat. rev.; Paracles argentina (Berg, 1877), sp. rev.; Paracles uruguayensis (Berg, 1886), sp. rev.

  10. Adult behavior and circadian rhythm of sex pheromone production and release 0f the legume pod borer,Maruca vitrata (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera:Pyralidae)%豆野螟成虫行为学特征及性信息素产生与释放节律

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆鹏飞; 乔海莉; 王小平; 周兴苗; 汪细桥; 雷朝亮

    2007-01-01

    豆野螟 Maruca vitrata(Fabricius)是一种严重的泛热带豆类蔬菜害虫.本文在(29±1)℃、相对湿度75%~80%、光周期14L:10D条件下研究了豆野螟成虫的羽化、交尾行为以及雌蛾性信息素的释放节律.结果表明:其羽化行为全天可见,在雌蛾中,86%于暗期羽化;在雄蛾中,73%于暗期羽化.雌雄蛾羽化行为在暗期第4、5和8 h差异达到显著(t>4;P<0.05).交尾活动发生在暗期19:00到5:00之间,交尾持续时间最短约为20 min,最长约为90 min,3日龄进入暗期第5 h具有最高的交尾率.1、6和7日龄成虫具有单个交尾高峰,2到5日龄成虫具有两个交尾高峰.同一日龄成虫交尾在暗期前半段平均花费的时间要明显高于在后半段花费的时间.低龄和高龄的成虫用于交尾的时间明显高于中龄的性成熟成虫.成虫的开始交尾时间随着日龄的增加逐渐前移.雄蛾对进入暗期后第5 h和第9 h处女雌蛾的性腺提取物和空气收集性信息素的触角电位反应最强,对3日龄处女雌蛾的性腺提取物和空气收集性信息素的触角电位反应最强.处女雌蛾田间诱蛾试验表明:23:00-01:00为诱蛾高峰期,3日龄处女雌蛾的诱蛾效果最好.该蛾的羽化、交尾及性信息素产生与释放均存在节律上的一致性.雌蛾的性信息素释放的时间较长,见于整个暗期,然而交尾行为发生时间较短,主要发生于两个交尾高峰之间.

  11. 亚洲玉米螟幼虫酚氧化酶原基因序列的生物信息学分析%Bioinformatical analysis of prophenoloxidase from larvae of the Asian corn borer,Ostrinia furnacalis Guenée(Lepidoptera:Pyralidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯从经; 陆剑锋; 黄建华; 郭晓丽; 桑守亮

    2009-01-01

    Prophenoloxidase (PPO) is a key enzyme of insect immunity. In this study, the nucleotide sequence and deduced amino acid sequence of PPO cloned from the larvae of Ostrinia furnacalis were analyzed and predicted by the tools of bioinformatics in the following aspects: the composition of nucleotide sequences and amino acid sequences, signal peptide, trans-membrane topological structure, hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity, secondary structure, tertiary structure, etc. The results showed that the full-length cDNA of 0. furnacalis PPO (Of-PPO) consisted of 2 686 bp, containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 2 079 bp. Based on the 693 deduced amino acid sequences of Of-PPO, a putative thiolester site and two distinct copper binding regions were found, which included six histidine residues. Of-PPO belongs to the PPO2 group, and there is no signal peptide in the N-terminal region of the polypeptide chain. No possible transmembrane protein model was found. There was no O-glycosylation site in Of-PPO predicted with DictyoGlyc. Forty-four phosphorylation sites were predicted in the whole peptide by NetPhos 2.0 Server. Two regions of Of-PPO could form coil structures, and five regions were found with significant hydrophobic characteristics. The proportions of α-helix and random coil in the secondary structure of Of-PPO were 22.54% and 56.79% , respectively. The comparative modeling method was used to calculate the tertiary structure of Of-PPO, and the result showed that it was the "roller" shape, which belongs to the α/β type. The catalytic activity may relate with a large vacant space in Of-PPO structure analyzed by the RasMol software. This study may provide valuable information for further research on Of-PPO.%酚氧化酶原PPO是昆虫免疫的关键酶,本文从牛物信息学角度对亚洲玉米螟Ostrinia furnacalis Guenee幼虫PPO进行分析,为进一步研究其高级结构与功能的关系提供理论依据.利用我们已提交到GenBank的数据,采用在线分析及MEGA4和RasMol软件对亚洲玉米螟酚氧化酶原(Of-PPO)的核苷酸和氨基酸序列、系统发生关系和蛋白质三级结构进行分析.结果表明:Of-PPO全长cDNA序列有2 686 bp,包含一个2 079 bp的开放阅读框,其推导的693个氨基酸序列中包含6个组氨酸残基构成的2个铜离子结合位点,以及保守的硫羟酸酯区域.Of-PPO属于PP为O2类群,其N端不含信号肽,无跨膜结构域区域,无糖基化位点,44个磷酸化位点均匀分布于整个多肽链中,有2段序列可能形成卷曲螺旋,有5个区域的氨基酸具较强疏水性,其二级结构中α-螺旋占22.54%,随机卷曲占56.79%.同源建模显示其三级结构为"α/β型"中的"滚筒结构",存在一个明显的空位,可能与该酶催化活性有关.本文可为Of-PPO的实验研究和应用开发提供有价值的信息.

  12. Effect of Paecilomyces fumosoroseus (Wise) Brown and Smith(Ascomycota: Hypocreales) alone or in combination with diatomaceous earth against Tribolium confusum Jacquelin du Val (Coleoptera:Tenebrionidae) and Ephestia kuehniella Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michalaki, M P; Athanassiou, C G; Steenberg, Tove;

    2007-01-01

    The insecticidal eVect of the entomopathogenic fungus Paecilomyces fumosoroseus (Wise) Brown and Smith (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) was evaluated against adults and larvae of the confused Xour beetle, Tribolium confusum Jacquelin du Val (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) and larvae of the Mediterranean Xou...

  13. CO2浓度升高对稻纵卷叶螟生长发育、繁殖和食物利用效率的影响%Effects of Elevated CO2 Concentration on Development, Reproduction and Food Utilization of the Cnaphalocrocis medinalis Guenée (Lepidoptera:Pyralidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李保平; 郭庆; 孟玲

    2013-01-01

    [目的]揭示CO 2浓度升高对稻纵卷叶螟个体生物学的影响,从而为预测气候变化下稻纵卷叶螟的发生趋势提供依据。[方法]利用CO 2人工智能气候箱设置当前(390μL·L-1)和升高CO 2浓度(780μL·L-1)处理,种植水稻苗饲养观察稻纵卷叶螟生长发育、繁殖和子代卵孵化,并测定4龄幼虫的取食和营养利用指数。[结果]CO2浓度加倍显著影响稻纵卷叶螟幼虫生长到5龄时的体重、蛹历期和蛹重,但对幼虫历期和化蛹率没有显著影响;加倍CO2浓度处理下的5龄幼虫体重比当前CO2浓度处理的轻16.1%、蛹历期缩短28.7%、蛹重降低9.9%。CO2浓度加倍对性比和生殖力没有显著影响,但对幼虫至成虫羽化的存活率和卵孵化率有显著影响,与当前CO 2浓度处理相比,加倍CO2浓度处理下幼虫至成虫羽化的存活率降低约44.0%,卵孵化率降低26.8%。对4龄幼虫的测定结果表明,CO 2浓度加倍对取食和食物利用效率具有显著影响,与当前CO 2浓度处理相比,加倍CO 2浓度处理下4龄幼虫取食量显著增大,但相对取食率没有变化,相对生长率显著提高21.2%,近似消化率提高15.7%,但摄食食物转化率降低24.8%、消化食物转化率降低37.1%。[结论]CO 2浓度升高可能对稻纵卷叶螟重要的生活史特性造成不良影响,推测未来大气CO 2浓度升高可能不利于稻纵卷叶螟的发生,但是种群动态变化需要考虑温度等其它环境条件的综合影响。%[Objective] This study was designed to reveal the potential influence of CO 2 enrichment on life history of the rice leaf-folder (Cnaphalocrocis medinalis), with the goal of providing data for projecting its trend under the climate change.[Method] Two levels of CO 2 concentration-ambient (390μL·L-1) and doubling (780μL·L-1) were manipulated in incubators, where rice plants were grown for feeding larvae. Developmental and reproductive performances were examined, and food consumption and nutritional utilization indices were measured for the 4th instar larva. [Result]The doubling CO 2 treatment significantly influenced body weight of larvae till 5th instar, pupal time and body weight, but did not influence larval time and pupation rate. The body weight of the final instar (5th) larva decreased by 16.1%, pupal duration by 28.7%, and pupal weight by 9.9%, under the elevated CO2 as opposed to the ambient CO2. The CO2 elevation did not affect sex ratio and fecundity, but significantly influenced the larva-to-adult emergence survival and egg hatching. The larva-to-adult emergence survival rate decreased by 44.0%and the egg hatching rate reduced by 26.8%under the elevated CO2 as compared to the ambient CO2. The trial of the 4th instar larva showed significant effects of elevated CO 2 on food consumption and utilization. The food consumption increased but the relative consumption rate was not changed by the elevated CO2. The relative growth rate increased by 21.2%and the approximate digestibility increased by 15.7%, but the efficiency of conversion of ingested food to body substance decreased by 24.8%and the efficiency of conversion of digested food to body substance decreased by 37.1%.[Conclusion]The CO2 enrichment may have negative effects on life history traits of C. medinalis, but the population dynamics of insect is complex and other effect such as temperature should be considered.

  14. 不同地理种群二化螟Ty3/gypsy反转座子天冬氨酰蛋白酶(AP)基因序列的克隆与分析%Molecular cloning and analysis of aspartic protease (AP) gene in Ty3/ gypsy retrotransposon in different geographical populations of Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓欢; 罗光华; 韩召军; 方继朝

    2014-01-01

    [目的]Ty3/gypsy反转座子是广泛存在于生物体内的一类反转座子.反转座子上的天冬氨酰蛋白酶(aspartic protease,AP)基因是反转座子发生转座所需的一个重要基因.但由于该基因家族成员间变异较大,较难利用简并引物克隆得到该基因,所以对该基因家族成员的研究很少.[方法]本研究采用PCR方法克隆了二化螟Ty3/gypsy反转座子的AP基因序列,并对其序列特征和地理种群变异进行了分析.[结果]克隆获得的二化螟Chilo suppressalis (Walker) Ty3/gypsy反转座子中的AP基因具有独立的开放阅读框(open reading frame,ORF),长528 bp,编码的蛋白含175个氨基酸残基(GenBank登录号:KF886014).Conserved Domain Search在线工具分析显示,该蛋白中含有一个特异的Asp_protease_2保守功能域.从7个二化螟不同地理种群中共克隆获得70份AP基因拷贝.对同一基因座位上的AP序列多重比对分析,发现共存在46处碱基替换,其中碱基转换(transition)有31处,碱基颠换(transversion)有 15处,70份拷贝中有69份拷贝是完整的ORF,能编码完整的蛋白.从碱基替换形式看,A→G的变异形式出现最多,有15处;其次是T→C的变异形式,有11处;其余的变异形式都很少.对比这7个不同地理种群,没有发现碱基的替换存在明显的地理区划差异.[结论]碱基的替换形式与二化螟所处的地理区域无明显相关性.本研究对于认识反转座子序列的变异特点有所帮助.

  15. Oviposition-repelling activity of synthetic polyacetylenes and electroantennogram responses in Ostrinia furnacalis (Lepidoptera:Pyralidae)%多炔类化合物对亚洲玉米螟产卵驱避作用及玉米螟的触角电位反应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万树青; 徐汉虹; 赵善欢; 尚稚珍; 蒋志胜; 刘准

    2004-01-01

    以茵陈二炔为结构母体,人工合成了11个多炔类化合物.采用蜡纸接卵法,测定了11个化合物对亚洲玉米螟Ostrtniafurnacalis的产卵驱避活性.结果表明:当处理浓度为20μg/cm2时,受试的化合物对亚洲玉米螟的产卵行为具有一定程度的驱避作用,其中化合物9(1-苯基-4-甲基-丁二炔)对亚洲玉米螟产卵驱避作用明显,调查处理后的3天、4天、5天和6天,其产卵驱避率分别为85.71%、80.00%、61.27%和62.51%.触角电位测定表明,受试的11个化合物对亚洲玉米螟成虫触角感受器具有刺激作用,其中化合物6和化合物9能强烈地刺激产生高振幅的动作电位.10 mg/mL浓度处理,测得化合物6触角电位相对值,雌、雄虫分别为68 22%和106.60%,化合物9分别为199.19%和220.60%.经回归分析所测11个化合物的产卵驱避活性与触角电位反应相对值,两者呈现一定程度上的相关性.还讨论了合成的多炔类化合物对亚洲玉米螟可能的作用靶标和结构与活性间的关系.%Oviposition-repelling activity of 11 synthetic polyacetylene compounds and electroantennograms (EAGs) responses in the Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis were assayed with the method of accepting egg on paper and EAG recording techniques.The results of bioassay indicated that the majority of tested compounds, except compound 1 and 10, could inhibit the oviposition behavior of O. furnacalis, and among these compounds compound 9 ( 1-phenyl-2,4-hexadiyne) was the most effective one. The inhibiting rate of compound 9 was from 61.27% to 85.71% at 20 μg/cm2 in 6 days of treatment. EAGs of the moths tested indicated that there were no obvious sexual differences to some tested compounds under concentration of 10 mg/mL, which could stimulate the receptors of antenna of the insect to produce action potential. Among these compounds, the most stimulating compounds were compound 6 ( 1- phenyl-4- ( 3- nitro) - phenyl- 1,3- butadiyne) and compound 9: both compounds were significantly stronger in average EAG amplitude than other tested compounds, and the males responded more sensitively than females to the two compounds. The relative EAGs (Sr) of female and male to compound 6 were 68.22% and 106.60%, and to compound 9 were 199.19% and 220.60% at 10 mg/mL respectively. The dosage-responses of compounds 6 and 9 on EAGs showed that they were dose-dependent. The regression analysis of the data of two series showed that the value of depolarization amplitude of antenna receptors induced by the tested compounds correlated in some degree with inhibiting activity in behavioral test. Finally,the action target and relationship between structure and activity of polyacetylenes to O. furnacalis are discussed.

  16. 稻纵卷叶螟感染Wolbachia的ftsZ基因和16S rDNA基因的序列分析%Sequence analysis of ftsZ and 16S rDNA genes of Wolbachia in Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée) ( Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴换娜; 杜予州; 吴海燕

    2011-01-01

    Wolbachia is a group of intracellular inherited endosymbiontic bacteria infecting a wide range of arthropods and other animals. The infection status of Wolbachia in the migratory pest Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée) was studied to provide the basis for revealing the reproductive manipulation mechanism and transmission mechanism of Wolbachia in this pest. In this study, specific primers derived fromftsZ and 16S rDNA genes were used to amplify DNA of Wolbachia from 20 populations of C. medinalis in China by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results indicated that the C. medinalis populations in China were widely infected by Wolbachia, the highest infection rate was 90% in Wenzhou of Zhejiang and Yangzhou of Jiangsu, and the lowest rate was 40% in Ya' an of Sichuan, Changsha of Hunan and Ninghe of Tianjin.The ftsZ sequences and 16S rDNA sequences were exactly the same in all positive samples from different regions. Wolbachia ftsZ sequences and 16S rDNA sequences in C. medinalis showed 99% - 100% and 98% -99% similarity with others belonging to Group B, respectively, suggesting that Wolbachia in C.medinalis belong to Group B. The results show that the infection type of Wolbachia in the C. medinalis is relatively ingle. This is the first report that Wolbachia is distributed in the populations of C. maedinalis in China.%Wolbachia是一类胞质遗传的内共生菌,广泛分布于节肢动物和其他动物中,与宿主的生殖调控密切相关.通过研究迁飞性害虫稻纵卷叶螟Cnaphalocrocis medinalis(Guen e)的Wolbachia感染情况,为探讨Wolbachia在迁飞性昆虫中的生殖调控和传递方式等提供基础资料.本研究应用Wolbachia的ftsZ基因和16S rDNA基因的特异性引物,通过PCR扩增的方法对我国20个地区的稻纵卷叶螟样本进行了检测.结果表明:中国不同地区的稻纵卷叶螟感染Wolbachia的现象较为普遍,其中浙江温州和江苏扬州样本的感染率最高(90%);四川雅安、湖南长沙和天津宁河样本的感染率最低(40%).不同地区稻纵卷叶螟的Wolbachia ftsZ基因序列完全一致,而且不同地区的Wolbachia 16SrDNA基因序列也完全相同.此外,稻纵卷叶螟感染的Wolbachiafuz基因和16S rDNA基因序列与其他物种感染的Wolbachia B群的ftsZ基因序列和16S rDNA基因序列相似性分别在99%~100%和98%~99%之间,说明我国稻纵卷叶螟感染的Wolbachia隶属B群.研究结果表明,稻纵卷叶螟感染的Wolbachia类型较为单一,这也是我国有关稻纵卷叶螟内共生菌Wolbachia的首次研究报道.

  17. Biologia de Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner, 1818 (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae na cultura da soja Biology of Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner, 1818 (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae in the soybean crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Aparecida Magrini

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se a biologia de Anticarsia gemmatalis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae em campos de soja. Os experimentos foram conduzidos durante os períodos agrícolas de 1992 a 1997. Em cada ano foram realizadas duas avaliações, com 20 repetições para cada fase do ciclo de A. gemmatalis. Os insetos levados ao campo foram criados por duas gerações, em laboratório, sobre folhas de soja da variedade hospedeira à temperatura de 27 ± 1 oC, fotofase de 14 horas e 60 ± 10 % UR até a fase de pupa. Foram determinados o número, viabilidade e período de incubação de ovos e viabilidade das fases larval e pupal, longevidade dos adultos, ritmo de postura e razão sexual. A viabilidade média para a fase de ovo variou de 43,0 % (1996 a 76,3 % (1997, sendo a duração média de 3,60 dias. O período larval dos indivíduos que originaram fêmeas variou de 8,95 (1993 a 16,75 dias (1997 e a viabilidade média foi de 17,2 %. O períCodo de pupas fêmeas e de machos foi praticamente o mesmo nos anos estudados (9,80 e 10,61 dias, respectivamente. A longevidade dos adultos fêmeas variou entre 9,10 (1997 a 12,90 dias (1996. A média de ovos colocados foi de 73,5, dos quais 42,3 % viáveis. A razão sexual média foi de 0,50. O período de postura, ocorreu até o 7o (1997 ou 13o dias (1996 com o acme no 2o dia. O ciclo médio de vida da fêmea (ovo - adulto foi de 26,51 dias.The biology of Anticarsia gemmatalis (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae was studied in soybean fields. The experiments were conducted during the seasons of 1992 through 1997. Two evaluations were performed each year with 20 replications for each phase of A. gemmatalis. The insects taken to the field were reared in laboratory for two generations on leaves of the host soybean variety, at 27 ± 1 oC, 14 - hour photophase, and 60 ± 10 % RH, up to the pupal phase. The number, viability and period of incubation of the eggs as well as the viability of the larval and pupal stages, longevity of adults, egg

  18. Hemocyte quantitative changes in Anticarsia gemmatalis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae larvae infected by AgMNPV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Goulart de Andrade

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The initial effects of the infection by AgMNPV in the total and differential counts of the hemocytes in Anticarsia gemmatalis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae larvae were studied. The total number of the hemocytes did not decrease in infected larvae, as it occurred in non infected larvae. In infected larvae, the hemocyte types showed the following frequencies: plasmatocytes - 47.8%, esferulocytes - 25.9%, granulocytes - 15.8%, oenocytoids - 7.2%, prohemocytes - 2.8%, vermicytes - 0,5%. Only the percentage of the granulocytes was different among infected and non infected larvae, indicating that these cells responded quickly to the initial viral infection. These results showed the effective role of the hemocytes in the response of the A. gemmatalis to the infection by AgMNPV. The comprehension of the immunological mechanisms of this insect is an important tool to understand its biological control.Os efeitos iniciais da infecção por AgMNPV nas contagens total e diferencial dos hemócitos em Anticarsia gemmatalis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae foram estudados. O número total de hemócitos não diminuiu nas larvas infectadas, como ocorreu nas larvas não infectadas. Nas larvas infectadas, os tipos de hemócitos apresentaram as seguintes freqüências: plasmatócitos - 47,8%, esferulócitos - 25,9%, granulócitos - 15,8%, oenocitóides - 7,2%, prohemócitos - 2,8%, vermiformes - 0,5%. Apenas a porcentagem de granulócitos foi diferente entre larvas infectadas e não infectadas, indicando que estas células responderam rapidamente à infecção viral inicial. Estes resultados mostraram o papel efetivo que dos hemócitos na resposta de A. gemmatalis à infecção por AgMNPV. A compreensão dos mecanismos imunológicos deste inseto é uma ferramenta importante para compreender seu controle biológico.

  19. SEARCHING AND PARASITISM OF Diatraea saccharalis (LEPIDOPTERA: CRAMBIDAE BY Trichospilus diatraeae (HYMENOPTERA: EULOPHIDAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizangela Leite Vargas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Trichospilus diatraeae Cherian and Margabandhu, 1942 (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae to search and parasitize Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius, 1794 (Lepidoptera: Crambidae pupae in sugarcane stalks was evaluated. To analyze the ability for search and parasitism were used stalks of sugarcane (20 cm where it was introduced a pupa of D. saccharalis (T1; a pupa and a caterpillar (T2 or a pupa and fecal matter (T3. Each stalk was placed in a transparent plastic bottle with 21 females of T. diatraeae. These pupae were isolated, after 72 h, in glass tubes at 25 ± 2 ºC, 70 ± 10 % relative humidity, 14:10 light/dark. The experiment was developed in an entirely casualized design with three treatments and 12 repetitions. Percentage of D. saccharalis pupa parasitized by T. diatraeae was 50.00 %, 83.33 % and 16.66 % in the T1, T2 and T3, respectively (c2 = 3.896, p=0.04. The presence of D. saccharalis caterpillars favored searching and parasitism of this host.La capacidad de Trichospilus diatraeae Cherian y Margabandhu, 1942 (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae para buscar y parasitar las pupas de Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius, 1794 (Lepidoptera: Crambidae en los tallos de la caña de azúcar fue estudiada. Para analizar la habilidad de búsqueda y parasitismo fueron utilizados tallos de la caña de azúcar (20 cm donde se introdujo una pupa de D. saccharalis (T1; pupas y orugas (T2 o pupa y residuos fecales (T3. Cada tallo fue colocado en una botella plástica transparente con 21 hembras de T. diatraeae. Esas pupas fueron individualizadas, luego de 72 h, en tubos de vidrio a 25 ± 1°C, 70 ± 10 % UR y 14 h de foto período. El experimento se desarrolló en un diseño completamente al azar, con tres tratamientos y 12 repeticiones. Los porcentajes de pupas de D. saccharalis parasitados por T. diatraeae fueron del 50,00 %, 83,33 % y 16,66 % en el T1, T2 y T3, respectivamente (c2 = 3.896, p = 0,04. La presencia de D. saccharalis en los tallos de ca

  20. Expression and evolution of hexamerins from the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta, and other Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmester, Thorsten

    2015-07-01

    Hexamerins are large hemolymph-proteins that accumulate during the late larval stages of insects. Hexamerins have emerged from hemocyanin, but have lost the ability to bind oxygen. Hexamerins are mainly considered as storage proteins for non-feeding stages, but may also have other functions, e.g. in cuticle formation, transport and immune response. The genome of the hornworm Manduca sexta harbors six hexamerin genes. Two of them code for arylphorins (Msex2.01690, Msex2.15504) and two genes correspond to a methionine-rich hexamerin (Msex2.10735) and a moderately methionine-rich hexamerin (Msex2.01694), respectively. Two other genes do not correspond to any known hexamerin and distantly resemble the arylphorins (Msex2.01691, Msex2.01693). Five of the six hexamerin genes are clustered within ∼45 kb on scaffold 00023, which shows conserved synteny in various lepidopteran genomes. The methionine-rich hexamerin gene is located at a distinct site. M. sexta and other Lepidoptera have lost the riboflavin-binding hexamerin. With the exception of Msex2.01691, which displays low mRNA levels throughout the life cycle, all hexamerins are most highly expressed during pre-wandering phase of the 5th larval instar of M. sexta, supporting their role as storage proteins. Notably, Msex2.01691 is most highly expressed in the brain, suggesting a divergent function. Phylogenetic analyses showed that hexamerin evolution basically follows insect systematics. Lepidoptera display an unparalleled diversity of hexamerins, which exceeds that of other hexapod orders. In contrast to previous analyses, the lepidopteran hexamerins were found monophyletic. Five distinct types of hexamerins have been identified in this order, which differ in terms of amino acid composition and evolutionary history: i. the arylphorins, which are rich in aromatic amino acids (∼20% phenylalanine and tyrosine), ii. the distantly related arylphorin-like hexamerins, iii. the methionine-rich hexamerins, iv. the

  1. Biological aspects of Eriopis connexa (Germar (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae fed on different insect pests of maize (Zea mays L. and sorghum [Sorghum bicolor L. (Moench.

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    RB Silva

    Full Text Available Eriopis connexa (Germar (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae occurs in several countries of South America and its mass rearing is important for biological control programmes. This work evaluated biological aspects of E. connexa larva fed on eggs of Anagasta kuehniella (Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae and Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae frozen for one day, fresh eggs of Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae, S. frugiperda newly-hatched caterpillars, nymphs of Rhopalosiphum maidis (Fitch and Schizaphis graminum (Rondani (Hemiptera: Aphididae. Duration of larva, pupa and larva to adult stages differed among prey offered, whereas the prepupa stage was similar. Larva, pupa, prepupa and larva to adult viabilities were equal or major of 87.5% in all prey, except for larva fed on newly-hatched larvae of S. frugiperda. Eriopis connexa has good adaptation to different prey corroborating its polyphagous feeding habit, which evidences the potential of this natural enemy for controlling corn and sorghum pests.

  2. Mechanitis polymnia casabranca and Ithomia lichyi lichyi (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae damaging tree of Solanum granuloso-leprosum (Solanaceae

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    Wagner de Souza Tavares

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Zona da Mata region is located in southeastern Minas Gerais State, Brazil with fauna and flora diversified, including herbivorous insects and Solanaceae plants. Ithomiinae caterpillars were observed damaging tree of Solanum granuloso-leprosum Dunal (Solanaceae, used for different purposes and abundant in secondary forest. The objective of this study was to identify defoliating caterpillars of S. granuloso-leprosum at the campus of Universidade Federal de Viçosa (UFV in Viçosa, Minas Gerais State, Brazil and review host plants of Mechanitis polymnia L., 1758 (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae. Thirteen caterpillars found damaging a tree of S. granuloso-leprosum at the campus of UFV were collected and maintained in the Laboratório de Controle Biológico de Insetos (LCBI from UFV until adult emergence. These caterpillars were of two species, being ten of the first and three of the second species. Adult specimens of the latter species were identified as Ithomia lichyi lichyi D'Almeida, 1939 (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae in the Departamento de Zoologia of Universidade Federal do Paraná (UFPR in Curitiba, Paraná State, Brazil and of the group of ten caterpillars as Mechanitis polymnia casabranca Haensch, 1905 (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae in the Museu de Zoologia of Universidade de São Paulo (USP in São Paulo State, Brazil. This is the first report of M. polymnia casabranca and I. lichyi lichyi together damaging plant of S. granuloso-leprosum in the Zona da Mata region of Minas Gerais State, Brazil and 57 plants are recorded as host of M. polymnia.

  3. Defensive behavior associated with secretions from the prosternal paired glands of the larvae of Heliconius erato phyllis Fabricius (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae

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    Eliane de Oliveira Borges

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Defensive behavior associated with secretions from the prosternal paired glands of the larvae of Heliconius erato phyllis Fabricius (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae. Our work presents for the first time, the defensive behavior associated with the release of the product of the prosternal paired glands of the larva of Heliconius erato phyllis Fabricius, 1775 (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Heliconiinae. The prosternal glands were first described for larvae of H. erato phyllis. They are formed by two types of glandular structures: the impair gland and the paired glands. The prosternal glands are located within the conical integumentary sac, which in turn is situated on the individual's prosternum. The main goal of this study is to analyze the existence of any secretion from the prosternal paired glands, and check the action mode of this secretion. The methodology used for chemical analysis of the glands included the aeration and, analysis in gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results show that the prosternal glands do not produce volatiles. Bioassays were conducted with simulated and natural attacks and revealed that the prosternal paired glands produce secretions of defense together with silk produced by labials glands as a defense strategy, described for the first time, against ants. The strategy consists in wrapping the ant with silk threads, the entire wrapped object moved to the end of the body, with the aid of the legs and prolegs, and possibly fixed in a nearby place. Evidence for the existence of a conical integumentary sac in larvae of other species and families of Lepidoptera allows us to propose the possibility of occurrence of prosternal paired glands with defensive function in these other groups as well.

  4. F2 screen for resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ab2-maize in field populations of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) from the southern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a target of transgenic maize and cotton expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins in both North and South America. In 2013 and 2014, a total of 215 F2 two-parent families of S. frugiperda were established usin...

  5. Three new species of Rectiostoma Becker, 1982 (Lepidoptera: Gelechioidea: Depressariidae) from Area de Conservación Guanacaste, northwestern Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    We describe three new species of Rectiostoma Becker, 1982 from Costa Rica: R. annemayae Heikkilä and Metz spec. nov., R. eowilsoni Heikkilä and Metz spec. nov. and R. philipmayi Heikkilä and Metz spec. nov. We used a data set of DNA COI-barcodes accumulated for Lepidoptera collected at Area de Conse...

  6. 植物学知识在鳞翅目昆虫系统学研究中的应用%Application of Botany in Lepidoptera Insect Systematics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵世林; 郝淑莲; 张志伟

    2013-01-01

    The relationships between Lepidoptera insect and plant are various,especially in selection of food and habitat of Lepidoptera to plant,and pollination of Lepidoptera to plant.The application of botany in Lepidoptera systematics was discussed:specimen collection,classification,identification,biology,systematics and coevolution etc.%鳞翅目昆虫与植物间的相互作用是多方面的,其中最重要的是鳞翅目昆虫选择植物做为其食物和栖息场所、鳞翅目成虫为植物传授花粉.分析了植物在鳞翅目系统学研究中的作用.在鳞翅目标本的采集、分类、鉴定和系统发育研究以及协同进化研究工作中,植物学知识都起着不可替代的重要作用.

  7. Comparative studies on the fecundity, egg survival, larval feeding, and development of Chilo partellus and Chilo orichalcociliellus (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) on five grasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ofomata, V.C.; Overholt, W.A.; Huis, van A.; Egwuatu, R.I.

    2000-01-01

    Chilo partellus (Swinhoe) and Chilo orichalcociliellus Strand (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) are gramineous stem borers that occur sympatrically in the southern coastal area of Kenya. Evidence over a 30-yr period indicates that the indigenous stem borer, C. orichalcociliellus, is being gradually displaced

  8. The leafmining Leurocephala schinusae (Lepidoptera Gracillariidae): Not suitable for the biological control of Schinus terebinthifolius (Sapindales Anacardiaceae)in continental USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leurocephala schinusae Davis & Mc Kay (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae) was studied to assess its suitability as a biological control agent of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae), a serious environmental weed in the USA and elsewhere in the world. The host range was determined by ...

  9. Impact of planting dates on a seed maggot, Neotephritis finalis (Diptera: Tephritidae), and sunflower bud moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) damage in cultivated sunflower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neotephritis finalis (Loew) (Diptera: Tephritidae), and sunflower bud moth, Suleima helianthana (Riley) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) are major head-infesting insect pests of cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Planting date was evaluated as a cultural pest management strategy for control of N...

  10. Development and survival of nymphs of Podisus nigrispinus (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae fed with caterpillars of Chlosyne lacinia saundersii (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae

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    Carlos Alberto Domingues da Silva

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The development and survival of Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae nymphs fed on larvae of Chlosyne lacinia saundersii Doubleday & Hewitson (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae was studied at 25 ± 1ºC, 68 ± 10% relative humidity and 12 h photo phase. P. nigrispinus developed until the adult stage when fed on C. lacinia saundersii caterpillars. However, the survival rate of P. nigrispinus during early instars allowed this predator to complement its diet with other preys and to maintain its populations in areas with the sunflower culture.

  11. The Ando-Patagonian Stigmella magnispinella group (Lepidoptera, Nepticulidae) with description of new species from Ecuador, Peru and Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonis, Jonas R; Remeikis, Andrius; Diškus, Arūnas; Gerulaitis, Virginijus

    2016-12-01

    On the basis of morphological studies of collection samples from the Andes (Ecuador, Peru and Argentina), we describe five new species of Stigmella Schrank (Lepidoptera: Nepticulidae): S. varispinella Diškus & Stonis, sp. nov. (Ecuador), S. olekarsholti Remeikis Diškus & Stonis, sp. nov., S. magnispinella Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov. (Peru), S. dolia Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov., and S. patagonica Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov. (Argentina). All treated taxa belong to the newly designated S. magnispinella group. Images of adults and genitalia, pictorial keys, a distribution map, and photographs of the leaf-mines of S. olekarsholti are included.

  12. Thaumetopoein: an urticating protein from the hairs and integument of the pine processionary caterpillar (Thaumetopoea pityocampa Schiff., Lepidoptera, Thaumetopoeidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, M; Pastureaud, M H; Novak, F; Ducombs, G; Vincendeau, P; Maleville, J; Texier, L

    1986-01-01

    Hairs of the Thaumetopoea pityocampa caterpillar (Lepidoptera) cause a cutaneous reaction in man and animals. The irritating fraction extracted from hairs contains soluble proteins which were separated by various electrophoretic and immunoelectrophoretic techniques. Some of these proteins are present also in cuticle and haemolymph. One protein of 28,000 mol. wt is hair specific and caused a reaction in pig skin identical to that produced by hair extract. It is therefore an urticating protein which we have named thaumetopoein. This protein is formed of two subunits of molecular weights 13,000 and 15,000. It is present in large quantities in the glands producing urticating hairs.

  13. The preimaginal stages of Pnigalio gyamiensis Myartseva & Kurashev, 1990 (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae, a parasitoid associated with Chrysoesthia sexguttella (Thunberg (Lepidoptera, Gelechiidae

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    Еkaterina Yegorenkova

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The larval instars of Pnigalio gyamiensis Myartseva and Kurashev are described in detail for the first time. This species is a larval-pupal ectoparasitoid of Chrysoesthia sexguttella (Thunberg (Lepidoptera, Gelechiidae, which forms leaf mines in the plant Chenopodium album L. (Caryophyllales: Amaranthaceae. The female of P. gyamiensis lays a single egg on the skin of the host larva or nearby it, without any significant preference for a particular variant. The presence of long hairs on its body provides the newly-hatched first larval instar with high mobility. Some peculiarities in this parasitoid-host relationship are described.

  14. External morphology of the immature stages of Neotropical heliconians: IX. Dione glycera (C. Felder & R. Felder (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Heliconiinae

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    Héctor A. Vargas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available External morphology of the immature stages of Neotropical heliconians: IX. Dione glycera (C. Felder & R. Felder (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Heliconiinae. The biology of the Andean silverspot butterfly Dione glycera (C. Felder & R. Felder, 1861 is still poorly known. This species is restricted to high elevations in the Andes, where the immature stages are found in close association with species of Passiflora belonging to the section Tacsonia (Juss. Harms, especially P. tripartida var. mollissima (Kunth, which is grown for subsistence by villagers. Herein we describe and illustrate the external features of the egg, larva and pupa of D. glycera, based on light and scanning electron microscopy.

  15. Contribution to the knowledge of the Lepidoptera Fauna of the lower Sangro valley in the Abruzzo region of Central Italy

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    Norbert Zahm

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of recording Lepidoptera in the lower Sangro valley during a period of 22 years. The investigations were devoted to Macroheterocera and were carried out in the two regional nature reserves Oasi di Serranella and Lecceta di Torino di Sangro. The listing also includes some Microlepidoptera as non-target species, as well as occasionally observed butterflies. The 401 recorded species are presented in a table indicating both the locality of the records and the observed flight times and periods of activity. Fifteen species are published for the Abruzzo region for the first time; 2 species are new for the Italian peninsula.

  16. Ecology of the African Maize Stalk Borer, Busseola fusca (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae with Special Reference to Insect-Plant Interactions

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    Paul-André Calatayud

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Busseola fusca (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae is an important pest of maize and sorghum in sub-Saharan Africa. One century after its first description by Fuller in 1901, inaccurate information based on earlier reports are still propagated on its distribution (e.g., absent from the lower altitudes in East Africa and host plant range (e.g., feeding on a large range of wild grass species. This review provides updated information on the biology, distribution and genetics of B. fusca with emphasis on insect-plant interactions. Related to this, new avenues of stem borer management are proposed.

  17. Ecology of the African Maize Stalk Borer, Busseola fusca (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) with Special Reference to Insect-Plant Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calatayud, Paul-André; Le Ru, Bruno P; van den Berg, Johnnie; Schulthess, Fritz

    2014-07-08

    Busseola fusca (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is an important pest of maize and sorghum in sub-Saharan Africa. One century after its first description by Fuller in 1901, inaccurate information based on earlier reports are still propagated on its distribution (e.g., absent from the lower altitudes in East Africa) and host plant range (e.g., feeding on a large range of wild grass species). This review provides updated information on the biology, distribution and genetics of B. fusca with emphasis on insect-plant interactions. Related to this, new avenues of stem borer management are proposed.

  18. Response of oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), eggs to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, W.D., E-mail: weliton.silva@usp.b [Department of Entomology and Acarology, Laboratory of Chemical Ecology and Insect Behavior, University of Sao Paulo, ' Luiz de Queiroz' College of Agriculture, Padua Dias Avenue, 11, 13418-900 Piracicaba (Brazil); Arthur, V.; Mastrangelo, T. [Food Irradiation and Radioentomology Laboratory, Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture (CENA/USP), Centenario Avenue 303, 13400-970 Piracicaba (Brazil)

    2010-10-15

    As insects increase in radiotolerance as they develop and usually several developmental stages of the pest may be present in the fresh shipped commodity, it is important to know the radiation susceptibility of the stages of the target insect before the establishment of ionizing radiation quarantine treatments. This study was performed to determine the radiotolerance of eggs of the oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), to gamma radiation. This species is considered as one of the most serious worldwide pests for temperate fruits, especially peaches. Eggs (12 h old) were exposed to 0 (control), 25, 35, 50, 75, 100, 125 and 150 Gy of gamma radiation. Surviving larvae were allowed to feed on an artificial diet. Three days after irradiation, it was verified that larvae's cephalic capsules were significantly affected by gamma radiation, and the estimated mean LD{sub 90} and LD{sub 99} were 66.3 Gy and 125.8 Gy, respectively. Oriental fruit moth eggs revealed to be quite radiosensitive and very low doses as 50 Gy were sufficient to disrupt G. molesta embryogenesis. At 25 Gy, only male adults originated from the surviving larvae and, after mating with untreated fertile females, shown to be sterile.

  19. Seasonal infestations of two stem borers (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) in noncrop grasses of Gulf Coast rice agroecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuzelin, J M; Mészáros, A; Reagan, T E; Wilson, L T; Way, M O; Blouin, D C; Showler, A T

    2011-10-01

    Infestations of two stem borers, Eoreuma loftini (Dyar) and Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), were compared in noncrop grasses adjacent to rice (Oryza sativa L.) fields. Three farms in the Texas rice Gulf Coast production area were surveyed every 6-8 wk between 2007 and 2009 using quadrat sampling along transects. Although D. saccharalis densities were relatively low, E. loftini average densities ranged from 0.3 to 5.7 immatures per m(2) throughout the 2-yr period. Early annual grasses including ryegrass, Lolium spp., and brome, Bromus spp., were infested during the spring, whereas the perennial johnsongrass, Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers., and Vasey's grass, Paspalum urvillei Steud., were infested throughout the year. Johnsongrass was the most prevalent host (41-78% relative abundance), but Vasey's grass (13-40% relative abundance) harbored as much as 62% of the recovered E. loftini immatures (during the winter). Young rice in newly planted fields did not host stem borers before June. April sampling in fallow rice fields showed that any available live grass material, volunteer rice or weed, can serve as a host during the spring. Our study suggests that noncrop grasses are year-round sources of E. loftini in Texas rice agroecosystems and may increase pest populations.

  20. Resistance allele frequency to bt cotton in field populations of helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fengyi; Xu, Zhiping; Chang, Juhua; Chen, Jin; Meng, Fengxia; Zhu, Yu Cheng; Shen, Jinliang

    2008-06-01

    Resistance evolution in target insects to Bacillus thurningiensis (Bt) cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., is a main threat to Bt cotton technology. An increasing trend of population density of Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) has been observed since 2001 in Qiuxian County (Hebei, China), where Bt cotton has been planted dominantly since 1998. This region was selected in 2006 and 2007 for estimating frequency of gene alleles conferring resistance to Bt cotton by screening the F1 progeny from single-pair cross between field-collected male and laboratory female of the Bt-resistant strain of H. armigera (F1 screen). F1 offspring from each single-pair line were screened for resistance alleles based on larval growth, development, and survival on Bt cotton leaves for 5 d. Two-year results indicated that approximately equal to 20% of field-collected males carried resistance alleles. The conservative estimate of the resistance allele frequency was 0.094 (95% CI, 0.044-0.145) for 2006 and 0.107 (95% CI, 0.055-0.159) for 2007. This is the first report of resistance allele frequency increase to such a high level in the field in China. Long-term adoption of Bt sprays, dominant planting of single-toxin-producing Bt cotton, and lack of conventional cotton refuge system might accelerate the resistance evolution in the region.

  1. Battle in the New World: Helicoverpa armigera versus Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The corn earworm Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) and the old world bollworm Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) are allopatric species and occur in important agricultural crops. In maize, both species tend to infest the ear. The introduction of H. armigera in Brazil has created a new scenario, where these Helicoverpa species might cohabit and interact with one another, affecting the prevalence of each species in the agroecosystem, integrated pest management, and insect resistance management. In this study, larval occurrence and proportion of these species in maize was assessed in three regions of Brazil during three crop seasons. Interaction between the species was evaluated in interspecific and intraspecific scenarios under laboratory and field conditions. Helicoverpa zea was predominant in Rio Grande do Sul and the Planaltina, DF (central Brazil). In western Bahia, H. zea was predominant in the first collection, but approximately equal in number to H armigera in the second crop season. Both species exhibit high cannibalism/predation rates, and larval size was the primary factor for larval survival in the interaction studies. Larva of H. zea had higher survival when interacting with H. armigera, indicating that H. zea has an advantage in intraguild interactions with H. armigera in maize. Overall, the results from this study indicate that maize might play a role as a source of infestation or a sink of insecticide or Bt protein unselected H. armigera populations, depending on the H. zea:H. armigera intraguild competition and adult movement in the landscape. PMID:27907051

  2. Effects of lufenuron on Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) egg, larval, and adult stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáenz-de-Cabezón, F J; Pérez-Moreno, I; Zalom, Frank G; Marco, V

    2006-04-01

    The effect of the chitin synthesis inhibitor lufenuron was evaluated against different developmental stages of Lobesia botrana Den. & Schiff. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). Lufenuron fed to adults at 10 ppm reduced their fecundity and fertility, but it did not affect adult longevity. High activity was observed against L. botrana eggs with greater effect on 1-d-old eggs than on the other age classes and on eggs treated by direct contact rather than those laid on a previously treated surface. Eggs laid by treated adults showed the same effects during development as eggs treated by contact or those laid on a treated surface. Larvae that emerged from treated eggs could not perforate grape berries. Administered into the diet, lufenuron had a larvicidal effect, resulting in similar LC50 values for different instars: 0.07 ppm for first instars, 0.08 ppm for third instars, and 0.11 ppm for fifth instars. None of the larvae treated with sublethal concentrations throughout their life emerged as adults at the highest concentration (0.08 ppm), and only 70% emerged at the lowest concentration (0.0025 ppm).

  3. Control of Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) by biodegradable ecodian sex pheromone dispensers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anfora, G; Baldessari, M; De Cristofaro, A; Germinara, G S; Ioriatti, C; Reggiori, F; Vitagliano, S; Angeli, G

    2008-04-01

    Mating disruption with a high density of sex pheromone dispensers is a new strategy recently developed for the control of the moth Lobesia botrana (Denis & Schiffermüller) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). Ecodian LB dispensers, made of low-cost biodegradable material, were formulated with 10 mg of (E,Z) -7,9-dodecadienyl acetate and placed at a rate of 1,600 dispensers per ha. Seasonal dispenser performances were studied using different methods. The female attractiveness disruption and the efficacy of the method were evaluated in the field. The release rates of field-aged Ecodian LB dispensers, measured directly by solid phase microextraction, was comparable with that of the standard monitoring lure after 50-60 d of field exposure and significantly lower beyond 60 d; however, at the end of the season, it was approximately 46 times higher than that of a calling L. botrana female. Electroantennographic recordings showed that dispensers of different field age strongly stimulated male antennae. In a wind tunnel test, dispensers elicited close-range approaches and direct source contacts irrespective of their age. In fields treated with Ecodian dispensers the attractiveness of traps lured with calling females and monitoring baits was significantly reduced. Our data suggest that Ecodian dispensers are active sources of pheromone throughout the season. The efficacy of Ecodian strategy for L. botrana control was comparable with standard mating disruption and curative insecticides.

  4. A multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assay to diagnose Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, N B; Ledezma, L A; Farris, R E; Epstein, M E; Gilligan, T M

    2011-10-01

    A molecular assay for diagnosis of light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), in North America is reported. The assay multiplexes two TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) probe systems that are designed to target DNA segments of the internal transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS2) and 18S rRNA gene. The RT-PCR probe designed for the 18S target recognizes a DNA sequence conserved in all of the moths included in the study and functions as a control in the assay. The second probe recognizes a segment of the ITS2 specifically found in E. postvittana and not found in the other moths included in the study, i.e., this segment is not conserved. Inclusion of the two markers in a single multiplex reaction did not affect assay performance. The assay was tested against 637 moths representing > 90 taxa in 15 tribes in all three subfamilies in the Tortricidae. The assay generated no false negatives based on analysis of 355 E. postvittana collected from California, Hawaii, England, New Zealand, and Australia. Analysis of a data set including 282 moths representing 41 genera generated no false positives. Only three inconclusive results were generated from the 637 samples. Spike experiments demonstrated that DNA contamination in the assay can affect samples differently. Contaminated samples analyzed with the ITS2 RT-PCR assay and DNA barcode methodology by using the cytochrome oxidase I gene can generate contradictory diagnoses.

  5. Patterns of mitochondrial haplotype diversity in the invasive pest Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooman, Leah K; Rose, Caroline J; Carraher, Colm; Suckling, D Max; Paquette, Sébastien Rioux; Ledezma, Lisa A; Gilligan, Todd M; Epstein, Marc; Barr, Norman B; Newcomb, Richard D

    2011-06-01

    The light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is a horticultural pest of Australia and New Zealand that has more recently invaded Hawaii, Europe, and California. A 2,216-bp region of the mitochondrial genome containing the cytochrome oxidase I and II genes was sequenced from 752 individuals. Haplotype network analyses revealed a major split between a predominantly Western Australian clade and all other samples, suggestive of either a deep genetic divergence or a cryptic species. Nucleotide and haplotype diversity were highest in the country of origin, Australia, and in New Zealand populations, with evidence of haplotype sharing between New Zealand and Tasmania. Nucleotide and haplotype diversity were higher in California than within the British Isles or Hawaii. From the total of 96 haplotypes, seven were found in California, of which four were private. Within California, there have been at least two introductions; based on genetic diversity we were unable to assign a likely source for a single moth found and eradicated in Los Angeles in 2007; however, our data suggest it is unlikely that Hawaii and the British Isles are sources of the major E. postvittana population found throughout the rest of the state since 2006.

  6. Various chemical strategies to deceive ants in three Arhopala species (lepidoptera: Lycaenidae exploiting Macaranga myrmecophytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Inui

    Full Text Available Macaranga myrmecophytes (ant-plants are generally well protected from herbivore attacks by their symbiotic ants (plant-ants. However, larvae of Arhopala (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae species survive and develop on specific Macaranga ant-plant species without being attacked by the plant-ants of their host species. We hypothesized that Arhopala larvae chemically mimic or camouflage themselves with the ants on their host plant so that the larvae are accepted by the plant-ant species of their host. Chemical analyses of cuticular hydrocarbons showed that chemical congruency varied among Arhopala species; A. dajagaka matched well the host plant-ants, A. amphimuta did not match, and unexpectedly, A. zylda lacked hydrocarbons. Behaviorally, the larvae and dummies coated with cuticular chemicals of A. dajagaka were well attended by the plant-ants, especially by those of the host. A. amphimuta was often attacked by all plant-ants except for the host plant-ants toward the larvae, and those of A. zylda were ignored by all plant-ants. Our results suggested that conspicuous variations exist in the chemical strategies used by the myrmecophilous butterflies that allow them to avoid ant attack and be accepted by the plant-ant colonies.

  7. Bioactivity of Piper extracts on Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Ferrari de Brito

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the bioactivity of ethanolic leaf extracts from four species of the genus Piper against the tomato leafminer Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae under laboratory conditions. The evaluated species were: P. amalago var. medium, P. glabratum, P. mikanianum, and P. mollicomum. In the initial screening assay (extract concentration of 2,000 mg L-1, all tested extracts caused significant larval mortality, particularly the extract of P. amalago var. medium; however, no extracts reduced the weight of the surviving larvae. The extract from P. amalago var. medium at the concentration of 1,011 mg L-1 caused a significant lengthening of the larval and pupal stages. The ethanolic leaf extract of P. amalago var. medium is promising for the control of T. absoluta larvae in tomato, since it exhibits acute toxicity toward these caterpillars at the concentration of 2,000 mg L-1 and affects the insect's development by reducing its survival and lengthening the larval and pupal stages.

  8. Evolution of Resistance by Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Infesting Insecticidal Crops in the Southern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zaiqi; Onstad, David; Crain, Philip; Crespo, Andre; Hutchison, William; Buntin, David; Porter, Pat; Catchot, Angus; Cook, Don; Pilcher, Clint; Flexner, Lindsey; Higgins, Laura

    2016-04-01

    We created a deterministic, frequency-based model of the evolution of resistance by corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), to insecticidal traits expressed in crops planted in the heterogeneous landscapes of the southern United States. The model accounts for four generations of selection by insecticidal traits each year. We used the model results to investigate the influence of three factors on insect resistance management (IRM): 1) how does adding a third insecticidal trait to both corn and cotton affect durability of the products, 2) how does unstructured corn refuge influence IRM, and 3) how do block refuges (50% compliance) and blended refuges compare with regard to IRM? When Bt cotton expresses the same number of insecticidal traits, Bt corn with three insecticidal traits provides longer durability than Bt corn with two pyramided traits. Blended refuge provides similar durability for corn products compared with the same level of required block refuge when the rate of refuge compliance by farmers is 50%. Results for Mississippi and Texas are similar, but durabilities for corn traits are surprisingly lower in Georgia, where unstructured corn refuge is the highest of the three states, but refuge for Bt cotton is the lowest of the three states. Thus, unstructured corn refuge can be valuable for IRM but its influence is determined by selection for resistance by Bt cotton.

  9. Bacillus thuringiensis isolates entomopathogenic for Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae and Anticarsia gemmatalis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gobatto

    Full Text Available Samples of the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt were collected from soil and insects. Eight isolates were selected from rural soil, 15 from urban soil and 11 from insects. These were evaluated for entomopathogenicity against larvae of Anticarsia gemmatalis and Culex quinquefasciatus. The pathogenicity tests showed that a higher percentage of isolates were active against A. gemmatalis (60% compared to C. quinquefasciatus (31%. Probit analysis (LC50 indicated that against A. gemmatalis four of the isolates presented values similar to the reference strain against A. gemmatalis, while against C. quinquefasciatus one isolate showed an LC50 similar to the reference strain (IPS-82. SDS-PAGE characterisation of two isolates showed a 27 kDa protein fraction related to the Bt subspecies israelensis cytolytic toxin (cyt gene. One 130 kDa protein, possibly related to the Bt crystal inclusions (cry1 gene, was identified in the other two isolates, which were more toxic for lepidoptera; another isolate presented a protein of 100 kDa. Some new local Bt isolates had similar LC50 probit values to the reference strains.

  10. Susceptibility of Choristoneura rosaceana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) to two new reduced-risk insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sial, Ashfaq A; Brunner, Jay F; Doerr, Michael D

    2010-02-01

    The response of field-collected populations of the obliquebanded leafroller, Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), to chlorantraniliprole, spinetoram, spinosad, and azinphosmethyl was assessed using a diet incorporation bioassay. Populations of obliquebanded leafroller were collected from nine orchards in Chelan, Douglas, Grant, and Okanogan counties of Washington. The neonates of the F1 or F2 generation were used in all assays. The parameters of probit regression lines were estimated and lethal concentration ratios were calculated for all populations compared with a susceptible laboratory population. Significant variation was detected in response to all four insecticides including chlorantraniliprole and spinetoram, which had never been used in the field, lethal concentration ratios were 3.9-39.7 for azinphosmethyl, 0.5-3.6 for spinosad, 1.2-5.3 for chlorantraniliprole, and 0.5-4.1 for spinetoram. Correlation analysis indicated possibility of cross-resistance between spinosad and spinetoram, which are both members of spinosyn class. The occurrence of low but significant levels of resistance against chlorantraniliprole and spinetoram in field-collected populations of C. rosaceana before their first field application indicates that the risk of resistance evolution against these two new reduced-risk insecticides exists. However, it is likely that these low levels of resistance can be managed if the insecticides are used judiciously in conjunction with sound resistance management programs. Implications of these results for developing and implementing resistance management strategies are discussed.

  11. Toxicity and residual efficacy of chlorantraniliprole, spinetoram, and emamectin benzoate to obliquebanded leafroller (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sial, Ashfaq A; Brunner, Jay F

    2010-08-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the residual toxicity of spinetoram, chlorantraniliprole, and emamectin benzoate to obliquebanded leafroller, Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). Larvae were exposed to apple (Malus spp.) foliage collected at different intervals after an airblast sprayer application at the manufacturer-recommended field rate and half the field rate. A mortality of 100% was recorded at field rate applications of spinetoram, chlorantraniliprole, and emamectin benzoate through 59, 38, and 10 d after treatment (DAT), respectively. Significantly less foliage was consumed by C. rosaceana larvae surviving in the emamectin, chlorantraniliprole, and spinetoram treatments compared with those exposed to untreated foliage. Third-instar C. rosaceana exposed to fresh residues on terminal foliage showed 100% mortality after 5-d exposure to spinetoram residues and after 10-d exposure to chlorantraniliprole and emamectin benzoate. The effects of larval movement from foliage with fresh residues was examined by transferring neonate larvae from foliage treated with spinetoram, chlorantraniliprole, or emamectin benzoate to untreated foliage after various exposure intervals. An exposure of 1, 3, and 6 d was required for spinetoram, chlorantraniliprole, and emamectin benzoate to cause 100% mortality at the field rate, respectively. The higher the concentration of chlorantraniliprole and emamectin benzoate, the less exposure time was necessary to cause high levels of mortality in C. rosaceana neonates. Our results indicate that these novel insecticides are highly toxic to C. rosaceana larvae. Implications of these results for C. rosaceana management programs are discussed.

  12. Lethal and sublethal effects of an insect growth regulator, pyriproxyfen, on obliquebanded leafroller (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sial, Ashfaq A; Brunner, Jay F

    2010-04-01

    The obliquebanded leafroller, Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is one of the most destructive pests of tree fruit in Washington. The development of insecticide resistance in C. rosaceana has led us to explore new management tactics. The use of very low doses of insecticides that have strong sublethal effects represents an environmentally friendly option to improve existing integrated pest management (IPM) strategies. We tested the insect growth regulator pyriproxyfen to determine its lethal and sublethal effects on growth and development of C. rosaceana. A leaf-disk bioassay was used to test seven concentrations of pyriproxyfen ranging from 0 to 30 ppm on fifth-instar C. rosaceana. Male and female larvae were assessed separately for mortality as well as other parameters of growth and development. The LC, values for males and females were 2.4 and 4.8 ppm, respectively. The response to pyriproxyfen was concentration-dependent: only 5-6% of the larvae treated with the highest concentration emerged as morphologically normal adults compared with 86% emergence in the controls. The pupation and adult emergence was significantly delayed at concentrations higher than 1 ppm. The weights of C. rosaceana pupae and adults were significantly increased, whereas fecundity and fertility were significantly reduced at a sublethal concentration of 0.3 ppm. We conclude that both lethal and sublethal effects might exhibit significant impacts on the population dynamics of C. rosaceana in tree fruit orchards treated with low concentrations of pyriproxyfen.

  13. Effects of gamma radiation on larvae of Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith, 1797) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) fall armyworm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B.; Silva, Lucia C.A.S.; Franco, Jose G.; Harder, Marcia N.C., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br, E-mail: mnharder@terra.com.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Franco, Suely S.H.; Machi, Andre R., E-mail: gilmita@uol.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    One of the most harmful insects the corn culture is the Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith, 1797) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), known commonly as fall armyworm, it is would originate of the tropical and subtropical areas of the American continent; its economical importance is due polyphagism, attacking countless grassy, such as corn, sorghum, wheat, barley, rice and pastures. One of the methods more used in the moment is the chemical control that during several applications the insect can turn resistant, then news researches has been made to the control of the insects. Due what was exposed the objective of the research was evaluated the effects of gamma radiation on larvae of S. frugiperda. Insects were rear in artificial diet. Each treatment had 5 repetitions with 20 larvae with 15-20 days of age in the total of 100 larvae per treatment. The larvae were irradiated with doses of gamma radiation of: 0 (control), 50, 100, 200 and 300 Gy, in source of Cobalt-60, type Gammacell-220, at dose rate of 0,508 kGy/hour. After irradiation the insects were keep in room with climatic conditions of 25 ± 5 dec C and 70 ± 5% R.H. Were evaluated the emergence of adults. The results showed that the dose of 300 Gy was the lethal dose to larvae irradiated, and 200 Gy the sterilizing dose to adults. (author)

  14. LIFE-CYCLE PARAMETERS OF Copitarsia uncilata (LEPIDOPTERA: NOCTUIDAE ON THREE NATURAL DIETS

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    Ana Milena Castro Marquez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the life cycle of Copitarsia uncilata Burgos & Leiva (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae under laboratory conditions without photophase and a second experiment with photophase of 12 hours on three natural diets. The life cycle of C. uncilata was significantly shorter for females (76.46 ± 1.01 days, p=0.033 reared on alstroemeria (Alstroemeria sp. diet without photophase, and for males (79.78 ± 0.36 days, p=0.046 reared on broccoli (Brassica oleracea italica, with photophase. The emergence of the adults was 100% and 80% from larvae fed on alstroemeria, 90.9% and 88.88% for individuals fed on broccoli, 86.2% and 50% for those fed on cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis, without and with photophase respectively. The sex ratio (male:female of individuals reared without photophase, evidenced a higher rate of females on alstroemeria (1:1.3, followed by cauliflower (1:0.6 and broccoli (1:0.5. In the experiment with photophase, the sex ratio was higher on alstroemeria (1:1.5, followed by cauliflower (1:0.9 and broccoli (1:0.6. As a conclusion, the most suitable diet for laboratory mass rearing in terms of life cycle parameters of C. uncilata is broccoli followed by alstroemeria and cauliflower.

  15. Brevibacterium pityocampae sp. nov., isolated from caterpillars of Thaumetopoea pityocampa (Lepidoptera, Thaumetopoeidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kati, Hatice; Ince, Ikbal Agah; Demir, Ismail; Demirbag, Zihni

    2010-02-01

    This work deals with the taxonomic study of a bacterium, strain Tp12(T), isolated from caterpillars of the pine processionary moth (Thaumetopoea pityocampa Denis & Schiffermüller, 1775; Lepidoptera, Thaumetopoeidae). The isolate was assigned to the genus Brevibacterium on the basis of a polyphasic taxonomic study, including morphological and biochemical characteristics, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, fatty acid analysis and DNA G+C content. The highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to this isolate was approximately 96 %, with the type strains of Brevibacterium album and Brevibacterium samyangense. Cellular fatty acids of the isolate are of the branched type, with the major components being anteiso-C(15 : 0) and anteiso-C(17 : 0). The DNA G+C content was 69.8 mol%. Although the strain was related to B. album and B. samyangense according to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, it differed from any known species of Brevibacterium. Based on this evidence, the novel species Brevibacterium pityocampae sp. nov. is proposed, with strain Tp12(T) (=DSM 21720(T) =NCCB 100255(T)) as the type strain.

  16. Studies on the codling moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) response to different codlemone release rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacas, S; Miñarro, M; Bosch, M D; Primo, J; Navarro-Llopis, V

    2013-12-01

    The response of the codling moth (Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)) to different emission values of its main pheromone component, 8E,10E-dodecadien-1-ol (codlemone), was investigated in three field trials conducted in plots without mating disruption treatments. Moth catches obtained in traps baited with pheromone dispensers were correlated with the corresponding codlemone release rates by multiple regression analysis. In a preliminary trial conducted in Lleida (NE Spain), a decreasing trend of captures was observed based on increasing pheromone levels. After this, the pheromone release profiles of the pheromone dispensers were studied, in parallel with the field trials, by residual codlemone extraction and gas chromatography quantification. In the trials carried out in Asturias (NW Spain), a correlation between trap catches and emission levels (within the range from 11 to 1,078 μg/d) was found and fitted a logarithmic model. Captures followed a decreasing linear trend in the range of emission rates from 11 to 134 μg/d. Given that release values comprised between 11 and 67 μg/d did not lead to significantly different catches in traps, this emission range could be considered to develop effective formulations for attraction purposes when mating disruption is not acting in the environment.

  17. Response of Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) to different pheromone emission levels in greenhouse tomato crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacas, Sandra; López, Jesús; Primo, Jaime; Navarro-Llopis, Vicente

    2013-10-01

    The response of Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) to different emission rates of its pheromone, (3E, 8Z, 11Z)-tetradecatrienyl acetate, was measured in two greenhouse trials with traps baited with mesoporous dispensers. For this purpose, weekly moth trap catches were correlated with increasing pheromone emission levels by multiple regression analysis. Pheromone release profiles of the dispensers were obtained by residual pheromone extraction and gas chromatography quantification. In the first trial carried out in summer 2010, effect of pheromone emission was significant as catches increased linearly with pheromone release rates up to the highest studied level of 46.8 μg/d. A new trial was carried out in spring 2011 to measure the effect of the emission factor when pheromone release rates were higher. Results demonstrated that trap catches and pheromone emission fitted to a quadratic model, with maximum catches obtained with a release level of 150.3 μg/d of (3E, 8Z, 11Z)-tetradecatrienyl acetate. This emission value should provide enhanced attraction of T. absoluta and improve mass trapping, attract-and-kill, or monitoring techniques under greenhouse conditions in the Mediterranean area.

  18. Systematics, phylogeny and biology of a new genus of Lithocolletinae (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae) associated with Cistaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Prins, Jurate; Davis, Donald R; De Coninck, Eliane; Sohn, Jae-Cheon; Triberti, Paolo

    2013-10-27

    The gracillariid genus Triberta gen. nov. (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae: Lithocolletinae Stainton, 1854) is described to accommodate two species formerly assigned to the genus Phyllonorycter Hübner, 1822: Triberta helianthemella (Herrich-Schäffer, 1861) comb. nov. and T. cistifoliella (Groschke, 1944) comb. nov. Triberta cistifoliella bona sp. is restored from synonymy based on morphological characters. The new genus is biologically associated with the plant family Cistaceae of the order Malvales and is endemic to the Palaearctics. Our molecular analysis of eleven nuclear genes failed to unambiguously place Triberta in the lithocolletine phylogeny, but revealed that this genus is distinct from either clade Phyllonorycter + Cremastobombycia and Cameraria. The distinctiveness of Triberta is also supported by inferred traits in wing venation, micro morphology of the last instar larva, pupa, genital morphology of the adult and life history. A key to the species of Triberta is provided. The interspecific homogeneity in external morphology, coupled with minor differences in genital traits, an apparent narrow specialization on Cistaceae host plants, restricted geographical range and molecular evidence based on multi-nuclear genes jointly suggest that the generic diversification of Triberta is a relatively old phenomenon and driven strongly by host selection.

  19. Response of oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), eggs to gamma radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, W. D.; Arthur, V.; Mastrangelo, T.

    2010-10-01

    As insects increase in radiotolerance as they develop and usually several developmental stages of the pest may be present in the fresh shipped commodity, it is important to know the radiation susceptibility of the stages of the target insect before the establishment of ionizing radiation quarantine treatments. This study was performed to determine the radiotolerance of eggs of the oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), to gamma radiation. This species is considered as one of the most serious worldwide pests for temperate fruits, especially peaches. Eggs (12 h old) were exposed to 0 (control), 25, 35, 50, 75, 100, 125 and 150 Gy of gamma radiation. Surviving larvae were allowed to feed on an artificial diet. Three days after irradiation, it was verified that larvae's cephalic capsules were significantly affected by gamma radiation, and the estimated mean LD 90 and LD 99 were 66.3 Gy and 125.8 Gy, respectively. Oriental fruit moth eggs revealed to be quite radiosensitive and very low doses as 50 Gy were sufficient to disrupt G. molesta embryogenesis. At 25 Gy, only male adults originated from the surviving larvae and, after mating with untreated fertile females, shown to be sterile.

  20. Estimate of Alabama argillacea (Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae development with nonlinear models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Medeiros

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate which nonlinear model [Davidson (1942, 1944, Stinner et al. (1974, Sharpe & DeMichele (1977, and Lactin et al. (1995] best describes the relationship between developmental rates of the different instars and stages of Alabama argillacea (Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, and temperature. A. argillacea larvae were fed with cotton leaves (Gossypium hirsutum L., race latifolium Hutch., cultivar CNPA 7H at constant temperatures of 20, 23, 25, 28, 30, 33, and 35ºC; relative humidity of 60 ± 10%; and photoperiod of 14:10 L:D. Low R² values obtained with Davidson (0.0001 to 0.1179 and Stinner et al. (0.0099 to 0.8296 models indicated a poor fit of their data for A. argillacea. However, high R² values of Sharpe & DeMichele (0.9677 to 0.9997 and Lactin et al. (0.9684 to 0.9997 models indicated a better fit for estimating A. argillacea development.

  1. The complete mitochondrial genome of Sasakia funebris (Leech) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) and comparison with other Apaturinae insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ju Ping; Cao, Tian Wen; Xuan, Shan Bin; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Min; Ma, En bo

    2013-09-10

    Sasakia funebris, a member of the lepidopteran family, Nymphalidae (superfamily Papilionoidea) is a rare species and is found only in some areas of South China. In this study, the 15,233 bp long complete mitochondrial genome of S. funebris was determined, and harbors the gene arrangement identical to all other sequenced lepidopteran insects. The nucleotide composition of the genome is highly A+T biased, accounting for 81.2%. All protein-coding genes (PCGs) start with typical ATN codons, except for COI which begins with the CGA codon. All tRNAs have a typical clover-leaf secondary structure, except for tRNASer(AGN), the dihydrouridine (DHU) arm of which forms a simple loop. The S. funebris A+T-rich region of 370 bp contains several features common to the Lepidoptera insects, including the motif ATAGA followed by a 19 bp poly-T stretch, and two tandem repeats consisting of 18 bp repeat units and 14 bp repeat units. The phylogenetic analyses of Apaturinae based on mitogenome sequences showed: (S. funebris+Sasakia charonda)+(Apatura metis+Apatura ilia). This result is consistent with the morphological classification.

  2. Foraging strategies in the greater horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum) on Lepidoptera in summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Longru; FENG Jiang; SUN Keping; LIU Ying; WU Lei; LI Zhenxin; ZHANG Xichen

    2005-01-01

    The diet of the bat Rhinolophus ferrumequinum was studied at the Zhi'an Village of Ji'an City in China, from June to August 2004. The bats were trained in a laboratory (volume: 9×4×4 m3). Foraging strategies of the bat were ob- served at night and prey remains were collected and identi- fied. The results showed that the diet consisted mainly of Lepidoptera in summer, including 11 families, more than 30 species of moths, such as Noctuidae (36.6% by number), Sphingidae (24.1%), Geometridae (13.4%) and Limacodidae (9.5%). The length of culled wings ranged from 10―40 mm (97.7%). Pearson correlation analysis showed that the bat R. ferrumequinum foraged their prey selectively, but not op- portunistically. From field studies, two ways were observed in which the bats retrieved their prey including aerial hawk- ing during peak active period of the insects and flycatching during the insects' non-peak activity period. The bats never gleaned prey from the ground, though they appeared to be well able to detect fluttering moths on the ground.

  3. A new gene superfamily of pathogen-response (repat) genes in Lepidoptera: classification and expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Cerrillo, G; Hernández-Martínez, P; Vogel, H; Ferré, J; Herrero, S

    2013-01-01

    Repat (REsponse to PAThogens) genes were first identified in the midgut of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in response to Bacillus thuringiensis and baculovirus exposure. Since then, additional repat gene homologs have been identified in different studies. In this study the comprehensive larval transcriptome from S. exigua was analyzed for the presence of novel repat-homolog sequences. These analyses revealed the presence of at least 46 repat genes in S. exigua, establishing a new gene superfamily in this species. Phylogenetic analysis and studies of conserved motifs in these hypothetical proteins have allowed their classification in two main classes, αREPAT and βREPAT. Studies on the transcriptional response of repat genes have shown that αREPAT and βREPAT differ in their sequence but also in the pattern of regulation. The αREPAT were mainly regulated in response to the Cry1Ca toxin from B. thuringiensis but not to the increase in the midgut microbiota load. In contrast, βREPAT were neither responding to Cry1Ca toxin nor to midgut microbiota. Differential expression between midgut stem cells and the whole midgut tissue was studied for the different repat genes revealing changes in the gene expression distribution between midgut stem cells and midgut tissue in response to midgut microbiota. This high diversity found in their sequence and in their expression profile suggests that REPAT proteins may be involved in multiple processes that could be of relevance for the understanding of the insect gut physiology.

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Byasa alcinous (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae: Papilioninae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanhong; Gan, Shanshan; Wang, Ying; Wang, Yunliang; Zuo, Ni; Hao, Jiasheng

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Byasa alcinous (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae: Papilioninae) is a circular molecule of 15,266 bp in length, containing 37 typical insect mitochondrial genes: 13 protein coding genes (PCGs), 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and a non-coding AT-rich region. Its gene order and arrangement are identical to all other available butterfly mitogenomes. All PCGs start with a typical ATN initiation codon, except for COI, which is initiated by the CGA codon as observed in other butterfly species. Ten PCGs terminate in the complete stop codon TAA or TAG, whereas the COI, COII and ND4 genes end with single T. Ten intergenic spacers (73 bp in total), and 12 overlapping regions (28 bp in total) are dispersed throughout the whole genome. The non-coding AT-rich region is 405 bp long and contains some conserved structures similar to those found in other butterfly mitogenomes, such as the motif ATAGA followed by a 12-bp poly-T stretch and a microsatellite-like (AT)14 element preceded by the ATTTA motif. Additionally, a 11-bp poly-T sequences and a microsatellite-like (AT)7 repeated elements are detected in this region.

  5. Effects of gamma radiation on pupae of oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck)(Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, Valter; Silva, Lucia C.A S.; Modolo, Deborah M.; Leandro, Rodrigo Sebastiao Rossi, E-mail: lsasilva@cena.usp.br, E-mail: dmmodolo@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Arthur, Paula B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    As insects increase in radio tolerance as they develop and usually several developmental stages of pest may present in fresh shipped commodity, it is important to know the radiation susceptibility of stages of the target insect before the establishment of ionizing radiation quarantine treatments. This study was performed to determine the radio tolerance of pupae of the oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidade), to gamma radiation. This specie is considered as on of the most serious worldwide pests for temperate fruits, especially peaches. Pupae of 3 days old were exposed to 0 (control), 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150, 175, 200, 250, 300 and 350 Gy of gamma radiation of source Cobalt-60, type Gammacell-220 at dose rate of 0,508 kGy/hour. Each treatment had 4 repetitions with 10 pupae in the total 40 pupae per treatment. Surviving pupae allowed to feed on an artificial diet. After irradiation the insects were keep in room with climatic conditions of 25 {+-}5 deg C and 70 {+-}5% RH. The results showed that the sterilizing dose to adults was 200Gy and that the dose of 350Gy was not sufficient to kill all pupae of insects. (author)

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Pazala timur (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae: Papilioninae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanhong; Gan, Shanshan; Shao, Lili; Cheng, Chunhui; Hao, Jiasheng

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Pazala timur (Lepidoptera: Papilionodae) is a circular molecule of 15,226 bp in length, containing 37 typical animal mitochondrial genes: 13 protein coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and a non-coding AT-rich region. Its gene order and arrangement are identical to all other available butterfly mitogenomes. All PCGs initiate with typical ATN codons, except for COI, which is initiated by the CGA codon. Ten PCGs use complete termination codon (TAA), whereas the COI, COII and ND5 genes end with single T. Twelve intergenic spacers (82 bp in total), and 11 overlapping regions (30 bp in total) are dispersed throughout the whole genome. The non-coding AT-rich region is 403 bp long and contains some conserved structures characteristic of the butterfly mitogenomes, such as the motif ATAGA followed by a 13-bp poly-T stretch and a microsatellite-like (AT)12 element preceded by the ATTTA motif.

  7. Complete mitochondrial genome of the mulberry white caterpillar Rondotia menciana (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jee; Jun, Jumin; Kim, Iksoo

    2016-01-01

    The mulberry white caterpillar, Rondotia menciana, belongs to the lepidopteran family Bombycidae, in which the domestic silkworm, Bombyx mori is included. In this study, we describe the complete mitochondrial genome of R. menciana in terms of general genomic features and characteristic features found in the A+T-rich region. The 15,364 bp long genome consisted of a typical set of genes (13 protein-coding genes [PCGs], 2 rRNA genes, and 22 tRNA genes) and 1 major non-coding A+T-rich region, with the typical arrangement found in Lepidoptera. Twelve of the 13 PCGs started with typical ATN codons, except for the COI, which began with CGA and twelve of 13 PCGs had complete stop codons, except for the COII, which ended with a single T. The 360 bp long A+T-rich region harbored the conserved sequence blocks typically found in lepidopteran insects. Additionally, the A+T-rich region of R. menciana contained one tRNA(Met)-like structure, which had a proper anticodon and secondary structure.

  8. The complete mitochondrial genome of the moon moth, Actias aliena (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Sun; Kim, Min Jee; Kim, Iksoo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we describe the complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequence of the Actias aliena belonging to the lepidopteran family Saturniidae in terms of general genomic features and composition. The 15,243 bp long genome consisted of a typical set of genes (13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes and 22 tRNA genes) and 1 major non-coding A+T-rich region. The A. aliena mitogenome harbored the gene order tRNA(Met), tRNA(Ile) and tRNA(Gln) between the A+T-rich region and ND2, as shown in most lepidopteran species. The COI gene possessed the CGA initiator, which is found in nearly all lepidopterans lacking a canonical ATN initiator. Twenty-one tRNAs formed the cloverleaf secondary structures but tRNA(Ser)(AGN) formed a simple loop in the DHU arm. The 328 bp long A+T-rich region, which was located between the S rRNA and tRNA(Met) genes, contained several Lepidoptera-specific sequences, such as the ATAGA motif, a poly-T stretch, an AT repeat, and a poly-A stretch, along with an unusual tRNA(Phe)-like structure.

  9. Temperature-dependent development of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) on two brassicaceous host plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ALI GOLIZADEH; KARIM KAMALI; YAGHOUB FATHIPOUR; HABIB ABBASIPOUR

    2007-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the development of the Plutella xylostella(Linnaeus) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), was evaluated at eight constant temperatures (10, 15,20, 25, 28, 30, 32.5 and 35℃), with relative humidity of 65% and a photoperiod of 14:10(L: D) hours on two host plants, cauliflower, Brassica oleracea var. botrytis and cabbage,Brassica oleracea var. capitata. The low temperature threshold was estimated to be 7.06℃and 7.84℃ and the thermal constant was 263.74 and 261.58 degree-days for P. xylostella on cauliflower and cabbage, respectively, using the linear model. Data were fitted to various nonlinear temperature-dependent models, and the low and high temperature thresholds, as well as the optimum temperature for development, has been estimated. Criteria of choice from the literature were used to evaluate models and to select the most suitable equation for P. xylostella development on each host plant. Conclusively, linear and Briere-2 models are recommended for the description of temperature-dependent development of P. xylostella on two host plants.

  10. Various chemical strategies to deceive ants in three Arhopala species (lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) exploiting Macaranga myrmecophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Yoko; Shimizu-Kaya, Usun; Okubo, Tadahiro; Yamsaki, Eri; Itioka, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Macaranga myrmecophytes (ant-plants) are generally well protected from herbivore attacks by their symbiotic ants (plant-ants). However, larvae of Arhopala (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) species survive and develop on specific Macaranga ant-plant species without being attacked by the plant-ants of their host species. We hypothesized that Arhopala larvae chemically mimic or camouflage themselves with the ants on their host plant so that the larvae are accepted by the plant-ant species of their host. Chemical analyses of cuticular hydrocarbons showed that chemical congruency varied among Arhopala species; A. dajagaka matched well the host plant-ants, A. amphimuta did not match, and unexpectedly, A. zylda lacked hydrocarbons. Behaviorally, the larvae and dummies coated with cuticular chemicals of A. dajagaka were well attended by the plant-ants, especially by those of the host. A. amphimuta was often attacked by all plant-ants except for the host plant-ants toward the larvae, and those of A. zylda were ignored by all plant-ants. Our results suggested that conspicuous variations exist in the chemical strategies used by the myrmecophilous butterflies that allow them to avoid ant attack and be accepted by the plant-ant colonies.

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Chinese oak silkmoth, Antheraea pernyi (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanqun Liu; Yuping Li; Minhui Pan; Fangyin Dai; Xuwei Zhu; Cheng Lu; Zhonghuai Xiang

    2008-01-01

    We determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the mitogenome from Chinese oak silkmoth, Antheraea pernyi (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae). The 15,566 bp circular genome contains a typical gene organization and order for lepidopteran mitogenomes.The mitogenome contains the lowest A+T content (80.16%)among the lnown lepidopteran mitogenome sequences.An unusual feature is the occurrence of more Ts than As,with a slightly negative AT skewness(-0.021),in the composition of the major genome strand.All protein-coding genes are initiated by ATN codons,except for cytochrome oxidase subunit I,which is proposed by the TTAG sequence as observed in other lepidopterans.All transfer RNAs(tRNAs)have a typical clover-leaf structure of mitochondrial tRNA,except for tRNASer(AGN),the DHU arm of which could not form a stable stem-loop structure.Two aligned sequence blocks with a length of more than 50 bp and 90% of the sequence identity were identified in the A+T-rich region of the Saturniidae and Bombycoidae species.

  12. Biological aspects of Tiracola grandirena (Herrich-Schäffer, 1868) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae): a polyphagous armyworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, A; Iltchenco, J; Fronza, E; Roque-Specht, V F; Luz, P C; Montezzano, D G

    2014-02-01

    We studied the biology of Tiracola grandirena (Herrich-Schäffer, 1868) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Hadeninae) at 25 ± 1 °C, 70 ± 10% RH and 14 hours of photo phase. Three experiments, using 150 larvae each, were conducted for the larval stage. In the first, used to assess the duration and survival of all stages, insects were reared individually and fed an artificial diet (Grenee). In the second, individuals were also reared separately, but were fed leaves of 10 plants from different families. In the third, the larvae were not individualised, the food plants were rotated such as to provide three plant species every 48 hours. In the first experiment, the viability of the eggs, larvae, pupae and prepupae was 91.9, 94.7, 32.49 and 43.5%, respectively. The average duration of the egg, larvae, prepupae, pupae and adult were 6.0, 25.3, 25.7, 21.4 and 12.7 days, respectively. The prolonged prepupal period indicates that T. grandirena can develop larval (prepupal) diapause. The results of the experiments with different host plants showed that T. grandirena is polyphagous at species, population and individual level.

  13. Characterization of the complete mitochondrial genome of the black cutworm Agrotis ipsilon (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiu-Ling; Cui, Wen-Xia; Wei, Shu-Jun

    2015-02-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the black cutworm Agrotis ipsilon (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was determined (GenBank accession No. KF163965). The length of this mitochondrial genome is 15,377 bp with an A + T content of 82.5%. There are 37 typical animal mitochondrial genes, that is, 13 protein-coding, 2 rRNA and 22 tRNA gene and an A + T-rich region. The tRNA gene trnM was rearranged to the upstream of the trnI-trnQ-trnM cluster compared with the pupative ancestral arrangement of insects. All protein-coding genes start with ATN start codon except for the gene cox1, which uses CGA as in other lepidopteran species. Ten protein-coding genes stop with termination codon TAA, whereas three protein-coding gene use incomplete stop codon T. The A + T-region is located between rrnS and trnM with a length of 332 bp and A + T content of 94.88%.

  14. Temperature effects on development and fecundity of Brachmia macroscopa (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Wang, Xing; Liu, Yan; Su, Ming-Zhu; Huang, Guo-Hua

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigated the impacts of temperature on the development and reproductivity of the sweet potato leaf folder, Brachmia macroscopa (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), in sweet potato leaves under laboratory conditions. We determined developmental time of B. macroscopa larval, pupal, and pre-adult stage at different temperatures. Male and female longevity, male and female lifespan, mortality of immature stages, oviposition period of B. macroscopa were also investigated under six constant temperatures (21°C, 24°C, 27°C, 30°C, 33°C, 36°C), based on age-stage, two-sex life tables. The results revealed that eggs in 36°C were unable to hatch. At temperatures between 21°C -33°C, the duration of the pre-adult period, as well as the adult lifespan both for males and females, were shortened by increasing temperatures. The lowest larval mortality rate (15.33%) occurred at 27°C. The age-stage-specific fecundity rates with the greatest number were, in order, 30°C, 27°C, 21°C, 24°C and 33°C. The results show that B. macroscopa population levels could reach highest at the temperature of 27℃. PMID:28253321

  15. Bioefficacy of Caesalpinia bonducella extracts against tobacco cutworm, Helicoverpa armigera (Hub. (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Backiyaraj Muthusamy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antifeedant, oviposition deterrent, ovicidal and larvicidal activities of benzene, dichloromethane, diethylether, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Indian medicinal plant, Caesalpinia bonducella (C. bonducella at different concentrations against Lepidopteran agricultural field pest Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae. Methods: Antifeedant activities of the selected plant extract were studied using leaf disc nochoice method and oviposition deterrent, ovicidal and larvicidal activities were also assessed by adapting the standard protocols. Results: The antifeedant activity of C. bonducella showed significant antifeedant activity in methanol extract. Oviposition deterrency is higher in methanol extract than the other solvent extracts. Similarly, maximum egg mortality was observed in methanol leaf extract of C. bonducella Lethal concentration, LC50 value of benzene, diethylether, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and methanol extract of C. bonducella were 470.02, 469.00, 465.47, 460.52 and 443.87 mg/L respectively. The Chi-square values are significant at P< 0.05 level. Among five solvent extracts, the methanol extract was responsible for strong lethal activity observed against selected pest species. Conclusions: Results of this study show that the selected Indian medicinal plant C. bonducella could be a potent source of natural antifeedant, oviposition deterrent, ovicidal and larvicidal agent against the field pest Helicoverpa armigera.

  16. Effects of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki and medicinal plants on Hyphantria cunea Drury (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Zibaee, AR Bandani, JJ Sendi, R Talaei-Hassanloei, B Kouchaki

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The fall armyworm, Hyphantria cunea Drury (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae is an insect native to NorthAmerica that was recently introduced into Iran resulting in severe damage to trees and agriculturalproduction. An experiment was conducted to examine potential effects of medicinal plants, Artemisiaannua and Lavandula stoechas and the insect pathogenic bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis var.kurstaki on activities of digestive enzymes (α-amylase, α- and β-glucosidase, lipase and proteasesand lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in H. cunea by using two hosts, mulberry and sycamore. Resultsshowed that B. thuringiensis var. kurstaki and plant extracts when administered orally, affected thedigestive enzyme profiles of H. cunea. Combined effect of B. thuringiensis, A. annua and L. stoechasextracts on mulberry decreased the activities of digestive enzymes in a dose-related manner, exceptfor β-glucosidase and lipase. When larvae were treated by different concentrations of the mentionedinsecticides, LDH activity increased i.e. the higher activity was obtained by B. thurengiensis alone andB. thurengiensis and L. stoechas extracts together. The least activity was observed in the case of L.stoechas extracts alone on both hosts. Physiological analysis would be particularly informative whenusing combination of biopesticides to enhance the efficiency of a safe management process.

  17. Effect of the flavonoid rutin on the biology of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae

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    Talita Roberta Ferreira Borges Silva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae is a major pest of maize crops in Brazil. The effects of plant metabolites on the biology and behavior of insects is little studied. The aim of the study was to evaluate the activity of rutin on the biology of the S. frugiperda by using artificial diets containing rutin. The study evaluated four treatments: regular diet (control group and diets containing 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 mg g-1 of rutin. The following biological variables parameters of the larvae were evaluated daily: development time (days, larval and pupal weight (g and viability (%, adult longevity and total life cycle (days. A completely randomized experimental design was used with 25 replication. The rutin flavonoid negatively affected the biology of S. frugiperda by prolonging the larval development time, reducing the weight of larvae and pupae and decreasing the viability of the pupae. The addition of different concentrations of rutin prolonged the S. frugiperda life cycle. The use of plant with insecticidal activity has the potential with strategy in IPM.

  18. Leaf consumption and duration of instars of the cassava defoliator Erinnyis ello (L., 1758 (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirceu Pratissoli

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research were to evaluate leaf consumption and the developmental time of the larvae of Erynnyis ello (L., 1758 (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae reared on cassava, in order to obtain information for the integrated management of this pest. The larvae were reared on excised cassava leaves in Petri dishes and later in gerbox, and kept in chambers at 24 ± 2 ºC and 75 ± 10% RH. The total leaf area consumed by the larva to complete its development was 589.67 cm²; each of the five instars consumed, respectively: 1.89 cm²; 5.74 cm²; 17.48 cm²; 76.66 cm²; and 487.90 cm². The consumption by the first three instars was insignificant, and did not reach 5% altogether; the 4th represented 13%; the 5th presented a consumption significantly higher, about 82.7%. The total time for the larval development was 22.61 days, and the duration for each of the five larval instar was, respectively: 4.35; 3.19; 3.32; 4.52; and 4.94 days. The pre-pupal period lasted 2.29 days. Since the highest consumption is by the 5th instar larva, the control should be applied before this age to avoid heavier damages to the cassava crop.

  19. Identification and Characterization of Pathogen-Response Genes (repat) in Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Vilmar; Serrano, Jose; Galián, Jose

    2016-01-01

    The fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda, Noctuidae, Lepidoptera) is one of the most important crop pests in the Americas, causing significant damage to maize, rice and sorghum. The mechanisms that determine its defences against pathogens are particularly relevant for the development of management and control strategies. We used an in silico approach to identify and characterize pathogen response genes (repat) present in different tissue libraries of S. fugiperda. The analyses revealed complete cDNA for nine repat genes; of these, repat15 and repat39 were found in libraries from a specific tissue--the midgut of larvae fed with xenobiotic substances. High expression levels of some genes were found in different libraries: 39 hits in repat30 in challenged hemocytes, 16 hits in repat31 in fat body, 10 hits in repat32 in fat body and 10 in challenged hemocytes, and 10 hits in repat38 in midgut of non-treated larvae and midgut of larvae fed with natural and xenobiotic substances. The genes corresponded to two ontology categories, stress response and immune response, and their phylogenetic relationships, nucleotide similarity, number of amino acid residues and molecular weights agree with what has been described for repat genes. It is noteworthy that proteins encoded by the repat genes of S. frugiperda have important defence functions in other tissues beyond midgut and that their functional categories are likely diverse, as they are related to cell envelope structure, energy metabolism, transport and binding.

  20. Development of Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) on leaves and fruit of orange trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jianhua; Glover, Michelle; Munro, Scott; Beattie, G Andrew C

    2006-08-01

    Development of Epipyas postvittna (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), on leaves and fruit of 'Valencia', 'Washington navel', and 'Navelina' orange trees was studied under constant and fluctuating temperatures. E. postvittna was able to complete its life cycle feeding exclusively on leaves or fruit of orange trees. However, larval survival rate was very low (types of orange tissues, young orange leaves and fruit afforded larvae higher survival rates than mature orange leaves and fruit. Fruit (young or mature) produced heavier pupae than leaves (young or mature). Larvae developed more slowly on mature orange fruit than on other orange materials and more slowly on orange leaves than on leaves of most noncitrus hosts. Degree-day accumulations based on the fastest developmental rates obtained in this study suggested that E. postvittna is capable of completing 4.4-4.7 generations per year in orange orchards in the Riverina region of New South Wales, Australia. Implications of the results in the management of the insect in citrus are discussed.

  1. Ecological Factors Affecting the Flight Phenology of the Endangered Coenonympha nipisiquit (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasson, Billie; Moreau, Gaétan

    2017-03-17

    Coenonympha nipisiquit McDunnough (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) is an endemic butterfly species that has been recorded only in 10 salt marshes of eastern Canada. Despite obtaining the endangered status and benefiting from a conservation program, the populations of this species appear to be declining. However, a lack of information about the ecology of the species and current demographics undermines potential in-situ conservation efforts. To identify the environmental factors affecting the emergence phenology and flight period of this species, daily visual counts of adult C. nipisiquit were carried out on a daily basis from 2011 to 2015 during the flight period along transects in four marshes where the butterfly maintains a continuous presence. A series of environmental parameters was collected during the monitoring. Additive modeling indicated that the accumulation of degree-days above 7 °C from mid-May contributed to the synchronization of adult emergence and flight in C. nipisiquit and identified a number of abiotic factors having an impact on the activity and monitoring of this insect. Data also indicated that some demographic aspects of this butterfly differ between sites and confirmed that C. nipisiquit has been declining from 2011 to 2015. In conclusion, this study not only generated information critical to the adjustment of the conservation program for C. nipisiquit, but also indicated that the extirpation of this species from its natural range should remain a concern.

  2. Mexican rice borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) oviposition site selection stimuli on sugarcane, and potential field applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showler, Allan T; Castro, Boris A

    2010-08-01

    The Mexican rice borer, Eoreuma loftini (Dyar) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), a key pest of sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) and rice, Oryza sativa L., in Texas, has not been controlled with chemical insecticides or biological agents, but some sugarcane varieties have shown degrees of resistance. Assessment of selected sugarcane leaf characteristics indicate that preference for oviposition sites is mostly determined by the presence of a leaf fold and secondarily by the availability of dry leaf tissue, both of which are antixenotic nonchemical stimuli. We suggest that breeding sugarcane lines bearing leaves that do not fold on drying could provide substantial antixenotic resistance against the Mexican rice borer. Previously identified antixenotic chemical stimuli, i.e., low quantities or absence of important nutrients in green leaf tissue, only become apparent when resistant and susceptible sugarcane varieties are compared. Varietal differences in oviposition preference, however, were not observed on excised dry leaf tissue, indicating that expression of resistance in terms of chemical stimuli requires detection of biochemicals in nearby living leaf tissue. Excised dry sugarcane leaves retain the two dominant nonchemical oviposition preference stimuli for Mexican rice borers, and the leaves effectively trapped eggs away from intact plants when dry leaves were used as "mulch" at the bottom of greenhouse cages. Under commercial sugarcane field conditions, bundled dry leaves also collected Mexican rice borer eggs. Possible applications of dry sugarcane leaf substrate for egg scouting and for trapping eggs are discussed.

  3. Mouthparts and associated sensilla of a South American moth, Synempora andesae (Lepidoptera: Neopseustidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel J. FAUCHEUX

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Las piezas bucales de Synempora andesae Davis & Nielsen fueron estudiadas con un microscopio electrónico de barrido. Se demuestra, por segunda vez, la existencia de sensilios estilocónicos gustativos uniporosos en la proboscis de Neopseustidae. Es en esta familia, y no en un estadio posterior dentro de Incurvaroidea, que aparecen estos sensilios durante la evolución de Lepidoptera. Contrario a lo que se cree, el órgano sensitivo labial u órgano de Von Rath, se encuentra en la extremidad distal del palpo labial de S. andesae. Está conformado por una docena de sensilios celocónicos multiporosos estriados, cuya función es percibir el dióxido de carbono. Por lo tanto, su supuesta ausencia ya no puede considerarse una autapomorfía de Neopseustidae. S. andesae posee otras características originales: sensilios tricodeos aporosos tanto cortos como largos en el labro, numerosos sensilios campaniformes en el primer segmento del palpo labial; así como también aquellas previamente descritas: la configuración en doble tubo de la proboscis y los sensilios basicónicos compuestos y polimórficos sobre las antenas. Además, se describen otros sensilios cefálicos: sensilios tricodeos aporosos bifurcados en el clípeo, sensilios aporosos campaniformes por encima de las mandíbulas y sobre la chaetosemata.

  4. Purification and characterization of phenoloxidase from the hemolymph of Hyphantria cunea (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae

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    M Ajamhassani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Phenoloxidase (PO is a key factor in insect immunity. On invasion of microorganisms and pathogens, prophenoloxidase changes to its active form to PO. This study investigated purification biochemical properties of PO from the hemolymph of 5th instar larvae of Hyphantria cunea (Lepidoptera. The purification fold was determined as 9.67 with a recovery of 0.12 and a specific activity of 23.28 U/mg protein identified. Kinetic parameters of purified PO from the insect H. cunea were determined. The Michaelis constant (Km and the maximal velocity (Vmax were 4.08 and 12.98 μmol/min/mg protein, respectively. The optimal pH and temperature of the enzyme for oxidation of L-DOPA were 10.0 and 35 ºC, respectively. The ions Zn2+, Cu2+, K+ and Na+ significantly increased the enzyme activity and synthetic inhibitors such as diethyldithiocarbamate (DETC significantly decreased it. Finally, it was found that purified PO had a molecular mass of 33 kDa. This study demonstrated some PO properties and its inhibitory effects demonstrating that it can be employed as useful methods for developing novel insecticides to replace traditionally used ones.

  5. Controlled atmosphere and temperature treatment system to disinfest fruit moth, Carposina sasakii (Lepidoptera: Carposinidae) on apples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Yerim; Chon, Ikjo; Neven, Lisa; Kim, Yonggyun

    2012-10-01

    Carposina sasakii Matsumura (Lepidoptera: Carposinidae) is a serious pest of apples and peaches in Korea and Japan. Because of its limited distribution, C. sasakii has been identified as a quarantine pest in several countries. The Controlled Atmosphere/Temperature Treatment System (CATTS) was tested as an alternative to methyl bromide fumigation to control C. sasakii in apples. The fifth instar was the most tolerant immature stage to a heat treatment of 44 degrees C for 20 min. When the apples infested with different stages of C. sasakii were treated under CATTS conditions (heating rate of 16 degrees C/h, chamber temperature of 46 degrees C, final core temperature of 44 degrees C under 1% O2/15% CO2 atmosphere), young larvae (first-fourth instars) did not survive after 40 min exposure, but the fifth instars required an exposure of at least 60 min to attain 100% mortality. A partial heat shock protein 90 (hsp90) was cloned and showed inducible expression in response to heat shock at 44 degrees C. CATTS suppressed transcription of the hsp90 gene. Apples did not show any appreciable loss of quality in relation to fruit firmness, sweetness, and decay after a 60 min CATTS treatment. These results suggest that CATTS can be applicable to control C. sasakii in apples.

  6. Evaluation of artificial diets for Attacus atlas (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) in Yogyakarta Special Region, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukirno, Sukirno; Situmorang, J; Sumarmi, S; Soesilohadi, R C Hidayat; Pratiwi, R; Sukirno, Sukirno; Situmorang, J; Sumarmi, S; Soesilohadi, R C Hidayat; Pratiwi, R

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate artificial diets that can be used to successfully culture the atlas silk moth, Attacus atlas L. (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) indoors. Four plant species were evaluated as the basic component of each diet, barringtonia (Barringtonia asiatica), cheesewood (Nauclea orientalis), soursop (Annona muricata), and mahogany (Swietenia mahagoni). Evaluation of the nutritional value of each diet was determined by an analysis of the hemolymph proteins of sixth instars using the Folin-Ciocalteu assay. Survivorship, cocoon quality, and hemolymph protein content of larvae fed the barringtonia diet were higher than those of larvae fed mahogany-, cheesewood-, and soursop-based artificial diets. The average adult emergence of those fed the barringtonia-based diet was 74.5%. The weights of the cocoon in this treatment with the pupa and the empty cocoons were 7.0 and 1.1 g, respectively. Hemolymph of the larvae fed the barringtonia-based artificial diet had the highest concentration of protein with an average of 28.06 mg/ml. The atlas moth reared on the barringtonia-based artificial diet was comparable with those reared only on barringtonia leaves. However, the weight of empty cocoons, adult wingspan, and amount of hemolymph protein were lower than in those reared on barringtonia leaves only. This may suggest that the artificial barringtonia-based diet requires additional protein for maximum efficiency.

  7. Host plant use among closely related Anaea butterfly species (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Charaxinae

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    J. M. QUEIROZ

    Full Text Available There is a great number of Charaxinae (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae species in the tropics whose larvae feed on several plant families. However the genus Anaea is almost always associated with Croton species (Euphorbiaceae. This work describes patterns of host plant use by immature and adult abundance on different vertical strata of sympatric Anaea species in a forest of Southeastern Brazil. Quantitative samples of leaves were taken in April/1999 and May/2000 to collect eggs and larvae of four Anaea species on C.alchorneicarpus, C. floribundus and C. salutaris in a semideciduous forest. Sampled leaves were divided into three classes of plant phenological stage: saplings, shrubs and trees. The results showed that the butterfly species are segregating in host plant use on two scales: host plant species and plant phenological stages. C. alchorneicarpus was used by only one Anaea species, whereas C. floribundus was used by three species and C. salutaris by four Anaea species. There was one Anaea species concentrated on sapling, another on sapling/shrub and two others on shrub/tree leaves. Adults of Anaea were more frequent at canopy traps but there were no differences among species caught in traps at different vertical positions. This work supplements early studies on host plant use among Charaxinae species and it describes how a guild of closely related butterfly species may be organized in a complex tropical habitat.

  8. Adaptation of an artificial diet for Spodoptera cosmioides (Walk.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) laboratory rearing

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    Bavaresco, Alvimar [EPAGRI, Estacao Experimetal de Canoinhas, SC (Brazil)]. E-mail: bavaresco@epagri.rct-sc.br; Garcia, Mauro S.; Gruetzmacher, Anderson D.; Ringenberg, Rudiney; Foresti, Josemar [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Fitossanidade

    2004-03-15

    The biology of Spodoptera cosmioides (Walk.) was studied on three artificial diets with different protein sources (d1 = white bean, yeast extract, soybean flour, powder milk and wheat germ; d2 = 'carioca' bean and yeast extract; d3 = corn flour, wheat germ and yeast extract). The objective of this research was to determine the most suitable diet for mass rearing S. cosmioides in laboratory. The species is highly polyphagous, and for this reason we hypothesized that diets that are suitable for other Lepidoptera can allow its development and fulfill the minimum requirements of biological quality, quantity and economy. Although S. cosmioides has completed the biological cycle on the three diets, the d1 was the most suitable for its rearing and produced the fastest development, higher total survival and pupae weight, as well as higher net reproduction rate (Ro), intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm) and finite rate of natural increase (l). The number of instars varied from six to seven, predominating six in d1 and d3; in d2, half the population presented six instars and half seven. Females presented pupae duration significantly lower that the males in all diets, thus emerging earlier. Adult longevity was not affected by the diets, while total fecundity was higher in d1 and d2. In conclusion, the diet 1 is recommended to mass rearing S. cosmioides in the laboratory. (author)

  9. Where does Grapholita molesta (Busck) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) overwinter in adjacent peach, pear and apple orchards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X-F; Fan, F; Wang, C; Wei, G-S

    2016-02-01

    The Oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is a major pest of tree fruits worldwide, and the diapausing larvae overwinter in cryptic habitats. Investigations of overwintering G. molesta were conducted in adjacent peach, pear and apple orchards in Northern China over three consecutive winters to determine the overwintering site and habitat preferences of the moth. Counts of overwintering larvae in the different orchards demonstrated that the late-maturing peach orchard ('Shenzhou honey peach') was the most preferred overwintering habitat with more than 90% of the collected larvae. Larvae were more abundant in host trees, and they very rarely overwintered in the soil. The overwintering site preferences on the host trees were significantly different; over 50% larvae were located in the tree trunks, and followed by main branches. Most of the G. molesta overwintered on the sunny side of the host trees at or below 60 cm from the ground; a few were cocooned on the shaded sides of the trees or greater than 60 cm from the ground. G. molesta began overwintering between August and October, mid- to late September was the peak period for entering winter diapause during 2011-2013 (77.78, 67.59 and 71.15%, respectively). Our findings improve understanding of the orchard habitat and overwintering site preferences of G. molesta and would be useful in the development of efficient forecasting and pest-management strategies for orchards during the winter and early spring.

  10. Geographic variation in photoperiodic diapause induction and diapause intensity in Sericinus montelus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ping Wang; Qiu-Sheng Yang; Peter Dalin; Xing-Miao Zhou; Zhi-Wen Luo; Chao-Liang Lei

    2012-01-01

    Due to the risk of extinction and ornamental value of the swallowtail butterfly,Sericinus montelus Gray (Lepidoptera:Papilionidae) in China,knowledge about local adaptations is important for the conservation and economical utilization of the species.In the present study,photoperiodic diapause induction and diapause intensity of S.montelus populations from Jiamusi (46°37′N),Beijing (40°15′N),Zibo (36°48′N),Fangxian (32°36′N),Wuhan (30°33′N) and Huaihua (27°33′N) were characterized at 25℃.Logistic regression analysis revealed a significant population × hours of light interaction,confirming that photoperiodic responses varied among populations.The critical photoperiod was positively correlated with latitude and increased toward the north at a rate of about 1 h for each 6.67 degrees of latitude.Survival analyses indicated that survival time of diapausing pupae before adult eclosion differed significantly among populations at 25℃ and 16:8L:D h.The mean duration of pupal diapause was also positively correlated with latitude.Our study reveals geographic variation in the critical photoperiod for diapause induction and in diapause intensity of S.montelus.These results provide useful information for our general understanding about seasonal adaptation in insects and may also be used to predict how geographic populations respond to climate warming.

  11. DNA diagnostics to identify internal feeders (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) of pome fruits of quarantine importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcenas, N M; Unruh, T R; Neven, L G

    2005-04-01

    A diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method is presented for differentiating among the North American internal apple-feeding pests codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.); oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck); lesser appleworm, Grapholita prunivora (Walsh); and cherry fruitworm, Grapholita packardi Zeller. An approximately 470-bp fragment of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) was sequenced in three to six specimens of each species. Consistent and diagnostic differences were observed among the species in two regions of COI from which forward and reverse primers were designed to amplify a 112-116-bp segment of the gene. The primer sets were used to selectively amplify DNA from specimens of diverse geographic origin for each corresponding target species. Protocols were adapted for conventional and quantitative PCR, the latter being substantially faster. The method was validated as a decision-making tool for quarantine identifications for Mexico by representatives of their phytosanitary agency (Sanidad Vegetal). The method can facilitate identification of intercepted internal feeding Lepidoptera in apple and pear for many other importing nations.

  12. An Evaluation of Butterfly Gardens for Restoring Habitat for the Monarch Butterfly (Lepidoptera: Danaidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, Brian T; Tallamy, Douglas W

    2015-10-01

    The eastern migratory monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus L.) population in North America hit record low numbers during the 2013-2014 overwintering season, prompting pleas by scientists and conservation groups to plant the butterfly's milkweed host plants (Asclepias spp.) in residential areas. While planting butterfly gardens with host plants seems like an intuitive action, no previous study has directly compared larval survival in gardens and natural areas to demonstrate that gardens are suitable habitats for Lepidoptera. In this study, milkweed was planted in residential gardens and natural areas. In 2009 and 2010, plants were monitored for oviposition by monarch butterflies and survival of monarch eggs and caterpillars. Monarchs oviposited significantly more frequently in gardens than in natural sites, with 2.0 and 6.2 times more eggs per plant per observation in 2009 and 2010, respectively. There were no significant differences in overall subadult survival between gardens and natural areas. Significant differences in survival were measured for egg and larval cohorts when analyzed separately, but these were not consistent between years. These results suggest that planting gardens with suitable larval host plants can be an effective tool for restoring habitat for monarch butterflies. If planted over a large area, garden plantings may be useful as a partial mitigation for dramatic loss of monarch habitat in agricultural settings.

  13. Chronic Sublethal Effects of Cantharidin on the Diamondback Moth Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae

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    Zhengyu Huang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae, is a major pest of cruciferous vegetables worldwide. Cantharidin, a natural toxin isolated from blister beetles, has been reported to be toxic to P. xylostella. However, little is known on the chronic sublethal effects of cantharidin on this species. In this study, we assessed the changes of susceptibility, development, reproduction and other demographic parameters in both the selected P. xylostella strain (Sub, selected by LC25 cantharidin for consecutive 12 generations and the revertant strain (SubR, derived from the Sub strain without being exposed to cantharidin for 12 generations. Results revealed that the two strains maintained a relatively high-level susceptibility to cantharidin. Severe adverse effects on the population dynamics and fitness in Sub strain were observed. In addition, repeated exposure of P. xylostella to sublethal concentration of cantharidin resulted in negative effects on adult performance and deformities in adults. Although morphologically normal for individuals, the SubR strain exhibited a disadvantage in population growth rate. Our results showed that sublethal concentration of cantharidin exhibited severe negative effects on population growth for longtime. These findings would be useful for assessing the potential effects and risk of cantharidin on P. xylostella and for developing effective integrated pest management.

  14. Development and Leaf Consumption by Spodoptera cosmioides (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Reared on Leaves of Agroenergy Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas, M F; Nava, D E; Geissler, L O; Melo, M; Garcia, M S; Krüger, R

    2013-12-01

    Spodoptera cosmioides (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is a polyphagous pest that threatens more than 24 species of crop plants including those used for biodiesel production such as Ricinus communis (castor bean), Jatropha curcas (Barbados nut), and Aleurites fordii (tung oil tree). The development and leaf consumption by S. cosmioides reared on leaves of these three species were studied under controlled laboratory conditions. The egg-to-adult development time of S. cosmioides was shortest when reared on castor bean leaves and longest when reared on tung oil tree leaves. Larvae reared on castor bean and Barbados nut leaves had seven instars, whereas those reared on tung oil tree leaves had eight. Females originating from larvae reared on castor bean and Barbados nut leaves showed greater fecundity than did females originating from larvae reared on tung oil tree leaves. Insects fed on castor bean leaves had shorter life spans than those fed on tung oil tree and Barbados nut leaves although the oviposition period did not differ significantly. The intrinsic and finite rates of increase were highest for females reared on castor bean leaves. Total leaf consumption was highest for larvae reared on tung oil tree leaves and lowest for those reared on Barbados nut leaves. We conclude that castor bean is a more appropriate host plant for the development of S. cosmioides than are Barbados nut and tung oil tree.

  15. Bioecology of Stenoma catenifer (Lepidoptera: Elachistidae) and associated larval parasitoids reared from Hass avocados in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoddle, Mark S; Hoddle, Christina D

    2008-06-01

    A 10-wk study of the avocado seed-feeding moth Stenoma catenifer Walsingham (Lepidoptera: Elachistidae), was conducted in a commercial 'Hass' avocado (Persea americana Miller [Lauraceae]) orchard in Guatemala. Up to 45% of fruit in the orchard were damaged by larval S. catenifer. Larval-to-adult survivorship for 1,881 S. catenifer larvae in Hass fruit was 37%, and adult sex ratio was 51% female. Four species of larval parasitoid were reared from field-collected S. catenifer larvae. The most common parasitoid reared was a gregarious Apanteles sp., which parasitized 53% of larvae and produced on average eight to nine cocoons per host. Apanteles sp. sex ratio was 47% female and 87% of parasitoids emerged successfully from cocoons. Apanteles sp. longevity was approximately equal to 1.5 d in the absence of food, and when provisioned with honey, parasitoids survived for 5-7 d. The mean number of cocoons produced by Apanteles sp. per host, and larval parasitism rates were not significantly affected by the number of S. catenifer larvae inhabiting seeds. Oviposition studies conducted with S. catenifer in the laboratory indicated that this moth lays significantly more eggs on the branch to which the fruit pedicel is attached than on avocado fruit. When given a choice between Hass and non-Hass avocados, S. catenifer lays up to 2.69 times more eggs on Hass.

  16. Developing a systems approach for Thaumatotibia leucotreta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) on 'Hass' avocado in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grové, T; De Beer, M S; Joubert, P H

    2010-08-01

    Thaumatotibia leucotreta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) is pest of the avocado, Persea americana (Mill.) (Lauraceae), in South Africa and is regarded as a phytosanitary threat. The objective of this study was to develop a systems approach for T. leucotreta on 'Hass' avocado that will mitigate the pest risk. T. leucotreta males were monitored with pheromone traps, and numbers declined during the winter. Field studies indicated that most of eggs were laid during January in the Deerpark area, and during harvest, only 0.029 lesions produced live larvae. Survival of larvae in fruit infested on the tree and left to develop after harvest varied and depended on the time of infestation before harvest. Fruit firmness was measured and fifth instars were only present in soft fruit. Fenpropathrin and a granulovirus were effective in reducing the infestation levels. Bags used to cover fruit also reduced infestation levels. Lesions caused by T. leucotreta were visible from two weeks after infestation and fruit with lesions can be sorted. The mean infestation rate per orchard was 0.003 lesions per fruit which makes T. leucotreta on Hass amenable to the alternative treatment efficacy approach and maximum pest limit. In the case of T. leucotreta on Hass, poor host status, production, preharvest and postharvest measures were studied and low infestation levels were observed; all these elements would make a systems approach an option. Furthermore, inspection and certification as well as shipping and distribution measures could be added.

  17. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Ctenoptilum vasava (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae: Pyrginae and Its Phylogenetic Implication

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    Jiasheng Hao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We here report the first complete mitochondrial (mt genome of a skipper, Ctenoptilum vasava Moore, 1865 (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae: Pyrginae. The mt genome of the skipper is a circular molecule of 15,468 bp, containing 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 24 putative transfer RNA (tRNA, genes including an extra copy of trnS (AGN and a tRNA-like insertion trnL (UUR, 13 protein-coding genes and an AT-rich region. All protein-coding genes (PCGs are initiated by ATN codons and terminated by the typical stop codon TAA or TAG, except for COII which ends with a single T. The intergenic spacer sequence between trnS (AGN and ND1 genes also contains the ATACTAA motif. The AT-rich region of 429 bp is comprised of nonrepetitive sequences, including the motif ATAGA followed by an 19 bp poly-T stretch, a microsatellite-like (AT3 (TA9 element next to the ATTTA motif, an 11 bp poly-A adjacent to tRNAs. Phylogenetic analyses (ML and BI methods showed that Papilionoidea is not a natural group, and Hesperioidea is placed within the Papilionoidea as a sister to ((Pieridae + Lycaenidae + Nymphalidae while Papilionoidae is paraphyletic to Hesperioidea. This result is remarkably different from the traditional view where Papilionoidea and Hesperioidea are considered as two distinct superfamilies.

  18. Immunochemical quantitation, size distribution, and cross-reactivity of lepidoptera (moth) aeroallergens in southeastern Minnesota

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    Wynn, S.R.; Swanson, M.C.; Reed, C.E.; Penny, N.D.; Showers, W.B.; Smith, J.M.

    1988-07-01

    With an immunochemical method, we analyzed outdoor air samples during a 3-year period for concentrations of the predominant local species of moth, Pseudaletia unipuncta (Haworth). Airborne particulates were collected on fiberglass filter sheets with an Accu-Vol sampler located 1.5 m above ground on the southeastern Minnesota prairie. Filter eluates analyzed by RIA inhibition contained concentrations of moth protein peaking in June and August to September of each year, with levels comparable to reported immunochemically measured levels of pollen and mold allergens. These peaks also corresponded with total numbers of moths captured in light traps. Moth-allergen activity was distributed in particle sizes ranging from 0.8 to greater than 4.1 micron when sized samples were obtained by use of an Andersen cascade impaction head. By RIA inhibition, there was cross-reactivity between P. unipuncta and insects of different genera, families, and orders, but not with pollens or molds. Forty-five percent of 257 patients with immediate positive skin tests to common aeroallergens had positive skin tests to one or more commercially available whole body insect extracts. Of 120 patients with allergic rhinitis believed to be primarily caused by ragweed sensitivity, 5% also had elevated specific IgE to moths. We conclude that airborne concentrations of Lepidoptera can be measured immunochemically and that moths may be a seasonal allergen in the United States.

  19. Three new species of Fancy Case caterpillars from threatened forests of Hawaii (Lepidoptera, Cosmopterigidae, Hyposmocoma

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    Akito Kawahara

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The endemic Hawaiian moth genus Hyposmocoma includes 348 described species and perhaps twice as many that remain undescribed. The genus is unusual within Lepidoptera in that its larvae create distinctive silk cases in which they perambulate while protected and camouflaged. An extraordinary diversity of case types exists, and to date more than ten different types have been identified, each corresponding roughly to a separate evolutionary lineage. In this study, we describe three new species of Hyposmocoma: H. ipohapuu sp. n. from Big Island, H. makawao sp. n. from Makawao Forest Reserve in Maui and H. tantala sp. n. from Mt. Tantalus, Oahu, all of which produce tubular purse cases during their larval stage. We also describe the female of H. inversella Walsingham, which was previously undescribed, and re-describe two closely related species, H. auropurpurea Walsingham and H. nebulifera Walsingham, neither which have been formally described in recent years. We present for the first time, the CAD primer sequences for Hyposmocoma and relatives. The molecular phylogeny based on mitochondrial and nuclear loci demonstrates that all are distinct species. The discovery of a new, endemic species from Mt. Tantalus, an area with many invasive species, suggests that even relatively degraded areas in Hawaii would be worthy of active conservation efforts.

  20. Ecological Genetics and Host Range Expansion by Busseola fusca (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assefa, Y; Conlong, D E; Van Den Berg, J; Martin, L A

    2015-08-01

    The host plant range of pests can have important consequences for its evolution, and plays a critical role in the emergence and spread of a new pest outbreak. This study addresses the ecological genetics of the indigenous African maize stem borer, Busseola fusca (Fuller) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), in an attempt to investigate the evolutionary forces that may be involved in the recent host range expansion and establishment of this species in Ethiopian and southern African sugarcane. We used populations from Ethiopia, Zimbabwe, and South Africa to examine whether the host range expansion patterns shared by the Ethiopian and the southern African populations of B. fusca have evolved independently. Base-pair differences in the cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene were used to characterize haplotype diversity and phylogenetic relationships. There were seven haplotypes among the 30 sequenced individuals collected on four host plant species from 17 localities in the four countries. Of the seven COI haplotypes identified, the two major ones occurred in both sugarcane and maize. Genetic analyses revealed no detectable genetic differentiation between southern African B. fusca populations from maize and sugarcane (FST = 0.019; P = 0.24). However, there was strong evidence of variation in genetic composition between populations of the pest from different geographic regions (FST = 0.948; P maize in southern Africa are more likely to shift to sugarcane, suggesting that ecological opportunity is an important factor in host plant range expansion by a pest.

  1. Flight attraction of Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae to cotton headspace and synthetic volatile blends

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    Felipe eBorrero-Echeverry

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The insect olfactory system discriminates odor signals of different biological relevance, which drive innate behavior. Identification of stimuli that trigger upwind flight attraction towards host plants is a current challenge, and is essential in developing new, sustainable plant protection methods, and for furthering our understanding of plant-insect interactions. Using behavioral, analytical and electrophysiological studies, we here show that both females and males of the Egyptian cotton leafworm, Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, use blends of volatile compounds to locate their host plant, cotton, Gossypium hirsutum (Malvales, Malvaceae. Female S. littoralis were engaged in upwind orientation flight in a wind tunnel when headspace collected from cotton plants was delivered through a piezoelectric sprayer. Although males took off towards cotton headspace significantly fewer males than females flew upwind towards the sprayed headspace. Subsequent assays with antennally active synthetic compounds revealed that a blend of nonanal, (Z-3 hexenyl acetate, (E-β-ocimene, and (R-(+-limonene was as attractive as cotton headspace to females and more attractive to males. DMNT and (R-(--linalool, both known plant defense compounds may have reduced the flight attraction of both females and males; more moths were attracted to blends without these two compounds. Our findings provide a platform for further investigations on host plant signals mediating innate behavior, and for the development of novel insect plant protection strategies against S. littoralis.

  2. Pollination of Habenaria pleiophylla Hoehne & Schlechter (Orchidaceae by Heliconius erato phyllis Fabricius (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae

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    Gilson R.P Moreira

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available For the first time the pollination of a poorly known, terrestrial orchid, Habenaria pleiophylla Hoehne & Schlechter, 1921 (Orchidaceae by a passion vine butterfly, Heliconius erato phyllis (Fabricius, 1775 (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae is reported. Number of pollinia-carrying individuals was determined on a population of H. erato phyllis in Horto Florestal Barba Negra, Barra do Ribeiro County, Rio Grande do Sul State. The pollination mechanism was described under laboratory conditions, in association with the butterfly feeding habit and the orchid flower morphology. Habenaria pleiophylla pollinia are cemented during nectar feeding on the ventral portion of the compound eyes near H. erato phyllis proboscis base. The pollinia are transferred to the stigma of other flowers during subsequent visits. Both males and females of H. eralo phyllis frequently visit H. pleiophylla flowers in the Barba Negra Forest. About forty percent of field collected adults had attached pollinia, ranging in number from one to 19 per individual. Thus, H. eralo phyllis may play an important role in the reproductive biology of this H. pleiophylla population.

  3. A contribution key for identification of butterflies (Lepidoptera of Tehsil Tangi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

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    Farzana Khan Perveen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The butterflies are the useful bio-indicators of an ecosystem, sensitive to any change in environment, such as temperature, microclimate and solar radiation etc, however, they utilize host plants for their oviposition and larval development. Therefore, the present study was conducted to prepare the contribution key for identification of butterflies of Tehsil Tangi during August, 2014-May, 2015. The specimens (ni = 506 were collected belong to 3 families with 18 genera and 23 species. However, the collected butterflies were comprised of families Nymphalidae 50%> Pieridae 43%> Papilionidae 7%. The family Nymphalidae were primarily, blue, pale brown or orange and antennae-tips with large conspicuous knobs, while, family Pieridae were mostly creamy, white, yellow or light orange, although, the family Papilionidae were multi-colours, i.e., yellow, blackish-brown, white or orange and antennae-tips with or without knobs. The largest butterfly was great black mormon, Papilio polytes Linnaeus (Family: Papilionidae with body length 26.0±0.0 (nP. polytes = 1; M±SD mm, while the smallest butterflies Indian little orange tip, Colotis etrida Boisduval (Family: Pieridae with body length 11.5±0.6 (nC. etrida = 4; M±SD mm. The key of butterflies (Lepidoptera of Tehsil Tangi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan has been established in this paper. It is recommended to evaluate the butterfly fauna of District Charsadda to educate and create awareness in the local community for conservation and protestation of their habitats.

  4. Latitudinal gradient effect on the wing geometry of Auca coctei (Guérin(Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae

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    María-José Sanzana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Latitudinal gradient effect on the wing geometry of Auca coctei (Guérin (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae. When the environmental conditions change locally, the organisms and populations may also change in response to the selection pressure, so that the development of individuals may become affected in different degrees. There have been only a few studies in which the patterns of wing morphology variation have been looked into along a latitudinal gradient by means of geometric morphometrics. The aim of this work was to assess the morphologic differentiation of wing among butterfly populations of the species Auca coctei. For this purpose, 9 sampling locations were used which are representative of the distribution range of the butterfly and cover a wide latitudinal range in Chile. The wing morphology was studied in a total of 202 specimens of A. coctei (150 males and 52 females, based on digitization of 17 morphologic landmarks. The results show variation of wing shape in both sexes; however, for the centroid size there was significant variation only in females. Females show smaller centroid size at higher latitudes, therefore in this study the Bergmann reverse rule is confirmed for females of A. coctei. Our study extends morphologic projections with latitude, suggesting that wing variation is an environmental response from diverse origins and may influence different characteristics of the life history of a butterfly.

  5. Changes in insecticide resistance of the rice striped stem borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jianya; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Wu, Min; Gao, Congfen

    2014-02-01

    Application of insecticides is the most important method to control Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), and continuous use of individual insecticides has driven the rapid development of insecticide resistance in C. suppressalis during the past 30 yr. Monitoring insecticide resistance provides information essential for integrated pest management. Insecticide resistance of field populations to monosultap, triazophos, chlorpyrifos, and abamectin in China was examined in 2010 and 2011. The results indicated that the resistance levels of 14 field populations to four insecticides were significantly different. Four populations showed moderate resistance, and other populations possessed low-level resistance or were susceptible to monosultap. Nine populations displayed an extremely high or a high level of resistance to triazophos, whereas four populations were sensitive to this agent. Five populations exhibited a low level of resistance to abamectin, while the others remained sensitive. When compared with historical data, resistance to monosultap and triazophos decreased significantly, and the percentage of populations with high-level or extremely high-level resistance was obviously reduced. By contrast, the resistance to abamectin increased slightly. The increasing and decreasing resistance levels reported in this study highlight the different evolutionary patterns of insecticide resistance in C. suppressalis. An overreliance on one or two insecticides may promote rapid development of resistance. Slow development of resistance to abamectin, which was used mainly in mixtures with other insecticides, implies that the use of insecticide mixtures may be an effective method to delay the evolution of resistance to insecticides.

  6. Toxicity of phosphine to Carposina niponensis (Lepidoptera: Carposinadae) at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Liu; Fanhua, Zhang; Yuejin, Wang

    2010-12-01

    Carposina niponensis Matsumura (Lepidoptera: Carposinadae), is widely distributed in pome fruit production areas in China and presents a problem in some export markets because it is considered a quarantine pest by some countries. Methyl bromide is the only fumigant used for fumigation of apples (Malus spp.) for export. However, phosphine is a candidate replacement that can be applied directly at low temperature. Here, laboratory tests showed that tolerance of different stages of C. niponensis to phosphine fumigation at 0 degrees C differed greatly; first-second-instar larvae were the least tolerant stage and the mature fifth instars were the most tolerant stage. In the mature larvae, fumigation tests, with a range of phosphine concentrations from 0.42 to 1.95 mg/liters and exposure periods of 24 h to 14 d at 0 degrees C indicated narcosis when phosphine concentration was > or = 1.67 mg/liter and that a 15.52-8.14-d fumigation period was required to achieve 99% mortality with different phosphine concentrations. The expression of C(0.7)T = k was obtained, which indicated that exposure time was much more important than concentration of phosphine in mortality of mature larvae of C. niponensis. All results suggested that phosphine fumigation at low temperature offers promising control of C. niponensis infestation in pome fruit.

  7. Host Selection, Growth, and Survival of Melonworm (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) on Four Cucurbit Crops Under Laboratory Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthi, B. R.; Seal, D. R.; Capinera, J. L.; Nuessly, G. S.; Martin, C. G.

    2016-01-01

    The melonworm, Diaphania hyalinata L. (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), is one of the most serious insect problems affecting cucurbit production. We evaluated the relative preference and suitability of yellow squash, zucchini, cucumber, and watermelon to melonworm by measuring its oviposition, larval feeding preference, survivorship, and developmental responses in the laboratory. Whole plants were used for oviposition study, whereas host leaf discs were used for all the other studies. Watermelon feeding resulted in the longest larval development period (14.3 d), greatest prepupal weights and survivals rates (92%; first instar to adult) among the four crops. However, for watermelon, adult oviposition preference (199.5 eggs/♀), egg survival (70%), and larval feeding (4.1% defoliation) were numerically or statistically lowest, and larval head capsule widths and whole-body lengths were smallest. When differences occurred among these variables, yellow squash, zucchini, and cucumber were each typically higher (or quicker to develop) than watermelon. So why do melonworm adults not prefer watermelon, or at least select it as frequently as squash and cucumber when ovipositing? The answer likely is that there might be some variation in the important chemical components among these cucurbits. We suggest that comparison of kairomones and allomones from watermelon and related cucurbits would be very useful for determining the combination resulting in the lowest risk of damage to the more susceptible cucurbits (assuming the levels can be modified without seriously affecting the crops). PMID:27400704

  8. The cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum: Lessons in Biological Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cactus moth was one of the success stories in classical biological control. In the 1920s, the prickly pear cactus was a serious pest in Australia. The cactus moth was imported from its native habitat in South America and proved so successful in controlling cactus that it was mass reared and exp...

  9. Plant odour processing in the antennal lobe of male and female grapevine moths, Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masante-Roca, I; Gadenne, C; Anton, S

    2002-12-01

    Moths of Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) are confronted with different volatiles emitted from the host plant during the different seasons. To test the hypothesis of plasticity of central plant odour processing in moths of different generations in the future, we first investigated the responses of antennal lobe (AL) interneurons of laboratory-reared virgin and mated males and females. We used intracellular recording and staining techniques while stimulating the antenna with a range of host and non-host plant odours. The AL structure of L. botrana is similar to that found in other Lepidoptera species studied. The most frequent physiological responses for all types of moths were obtained with (E)-2-hexenal, and with thujyl alcohol and beta-thujone, components of tansy, a behaviourally attractive non-host plant. Some broadly responding neurons were capable of distinguishing between different compounds through different response patterns (excitation/inhibition) and/or different dose-response characteristics. Response characteristics (response spectra, threshold and specificity) of neurons were similar, independent of sex or mating status of the moths. Significant differences between the groups were, however, found in the proportion of responding neurons for a few tested components.

  10. The complete genome of a baculovirus isolated from an insect of medical interest: Lonomia obliqua (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragão-Silva, C. W.; Andrade, M. S.; Ardisson-Araújo, D. M. P.; Fernandes, J. E. A.; Morgado, F. S.; Báo, S. N.; Moraes, R. H. P.; Wolff, J. L. C.; Melo, F. L.; Ribeiro, B. M.

    2016-01-01

    Lonomia obliqua (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) is a species of medical importance due to the severity of reactions caused by accidental contact with the caterpillar bristles. Several natural pathogens have been identified in L. obliqua, and among them the baculovirus Lonomia obliqua multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (LoobMNPV). The complete genome of LoobMNPV was sequenced and shown to have 120,022 bp long with 134 putative open reading frames (ORFs). Phylogenetic analysis of the LoobMNPV genome showed that it belongs to Alphabaculovirus group I (lepidopteran-infective NPV). A total of 12 unique ORFs were identified with no homologs in other sequenced baculovirus genomes. One of these, the predicted protein encoded by loob035, showed significant identity to an eukaryotic transcription terminator factor (TTF2) from the Lepidoptera Danaus plexippus, suggesting an independent acquisition through horizontal gene transfer. Homologs of cathepsin and chitinase genes, which are involved in host integument liquefaction and viral spread, were not found in this genome. As L. obliqua presents a gregarious behavior during the larvae stage the impact of this deletion might be neglectable. PMID:27282807

  11. Ancient expansion of the hox cluster in lepidoptera generated four homeobox genes implicated in extra-embryonic tissue formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Laura; Marlétaz, Ferdinand; Carter, Jean-Michel; Taylor, William R; Gibbs, Melanie; Breuker, Casper J; Holland, Peter W H

    2014-10-01

    Gene duplications within the conserved Hox cluster are rare in animal evolution, but in Lepidoptera an array of divergent Hox-related genes (Shx genes) has been reported between pb and zen. Here, we use genome sequencing of five lepidopteran species (Polygonia c-album, Pararge aegeria, Callimorpha dominula, Cameraria ohridella, Hepialus sylvina) plus a caddisfly outgroup (Glyphotaelius pellucidus) to trace the evolution of the lepidopteran Shx genes. We demonstrate that Shx genes originated by tandem duplication of zen early in the evolution of large clade Ditrysia; Shx are not found in a caddisfly and a member of the basally diverging Hepialidae (swift moths). Four distinct Shx genes were generated early in ditrysian evolution, and were stably retained in all descendent Lepidoptera except the silkmoth which has additional duplications. Despite extensive sequence divergence, molecular modelling indicates that all four Shx genes have the potential to encode stable homeodomains. The four Shx genes have distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns in early development of the Speckled Wood butterfly (Pararge aegeria), with ShxC demarcating the future sites of extraembryonic tissue formation via strikingly localised maternal RNA in the oocyte. All four genes are also expressed in presumptive serosal cells, prior to the onset of zen expression. Lepidopteran Shx genes represent an unusual example of Hox cluster expansion and integration of novel genes into ancient developmental regulatory networks.

  12. Testing DNA barcode performance in 1000 species of European lepidoptera: large geographic distances have small genetic impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huemer, Peter; Mutanen, Marko; Sefc, Kristina M; Hebert, Paul D N

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the performance of DNA barcodes (mt cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene) in the identification of 1004 species of Lepidoptera shared by two localities (Finland, Austria) that are 1600 km apart. Maximum intraspecific distances for the pooled data were less than 2% for 880 species (87.6%), while deeper divergence was detected in 124 species. Despite such variation, the overall DNA barcode library possessed diagnostic COI sequences for 98.8% of the taxa. Because a reference library based on Finnish specimens was highly effective in identifying specimens from Austria, we conclude that barcode libraries based on regional sampling can often be effective for a much larger area. Moreover, dispersal ability (poor, good) and distribution patterns (disjunct, fragmented, continuous, migratory) had little impact on levels of intraspecific geographic divergence. Furthermore, the present study revealed that, despite the intensity of past taxonomic work on European Lepidoptera, nearly 20% of the species shared by Austria and Finland require further work to clarify their status. Particularly discordant BIN (Barcode Index Number) cases should be checked to ascertain possible explanatory factors such as incorrect taxonomy, hybridization, introgression, and Wolbachia infections.

  13. Hymenopteran parasitoids associated with the banana-skipper Erionota thrax L. (Insecta: Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae in Java, Indonesia

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    ERNIWATI

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Erniwati, Ubaidillah R (2011 Hymenopteran parasitoids associated with the banana-skipper Erionota thrax L. (Insecta: Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae in Java, Indonesia. Biodiversitas 12: 76-85. Hymenopteran parasitoids of banana-skipper Erionota thrax L. (Insecta: Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae from Java, Indonesia are reviewed and an illustrated key to 12 species is presented to include Theronia zebra zebra, Xanthopimpla gamsura, Casinaria sp., Charops sp., Cotesia (Apanteles erionotae, Brachymeria lasus, B. thracis, Ooencyrtus pallidipes, Anastatus sp., Pediobius erionotae, Agiommatus sumatraensis and Sympiesis sp. The surveys of the natural enemies of the banana-skipper were conducted in 1990-2006 in several localities in Java. The aim of this study was to assess the native natural enemies of E. thrax, especially the parasitic Hymenoptera. Infested eggs, larvae and pupae of E. thrax were collected and reared in the laboratory. Emerging parasitoids were preserved in both dry mounting and in 80% alcohol for the species identification. Members of families Braconidae, Ichneumonidae, Encyrtidae, Pteromalidae, Chalcididae, Eupelmidae and Eulophidae were recorded as parasitoids of the banana skipper E. thrax from Java, Indonesia. Species distribution and alternative hosts of the parasitoids are presented.

  14. Structural and Mechanical Properties of Cocoons of Antherina suraka (Saturniidae, Lepidoptera), an Endemic Species Used for Silk Production in Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randrianandrasana, Maminirina; Wu, Wen-Yen; Carney, David A.; Wagoner Johnson, Amy J.; Berenbaum, May R.

    2017-01-01

    Antherina suraka Boisduval (Saturniidae, Lepidoptera) produces a silken cocoon that has been the focus of efforts to create a commercial wild silk industry in Madagascar. In this study, structural and mechanical properties of the cocoon of A. suraka from two sites were measured and compared to the cocoon of Bombyx mori L. (Bombycidae, Lepidoptera) the world's most common source for silk. Results of environmental scanning electron microscopy and mechanical testing showed that the silk sheet of A. suraka cocoon is less compact, with greater thickness and lower tensile strength and stiffness than that of B. mori. Confirming these results, stiffness and cell and thread density were found to be negatively correlated with thickness, and the cell and thread volumes were positively correlated with thickness. Antherina suraka showed no major differences between silk sheets from Kirindy and Isalo sites in either structural or mechanical properties, except for mean cell volume, which was greater in cocoons from Kirindy. Comparison between the two layers forming the cocoon showed that the inner layer has greater elastic modulus, denser silk distribution and lower porosity. Cocoons from both Kirindy and Isalo are suitable for sericulture. Although the inner layer of cocoon silk is of higher quality than the outer layer, the fact that both layers are of great but lower tensile strength than B. mori silk suggests that the current practice of sewing the two layers together for making one single layer fabric should be continued in efforts to produce a commercially viable product. PMID:28130459

  15. [A new subspecies of Heraclides androgeus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) and its biogeographical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Fernández, Isabel; Luis-Martínez, Armando; Llorente-Bousquets, Jorge

    2013-06-01

    A new subspecies of Heraclides androgeus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) and its biogeographical aspects. Heraclides androgeus epidaurus was described and illustrated by Godman & Salvin in 1890 based on specimens obtained in Veracruz, indicating that their distribution encompassed both the Pacific and Atlantic sides of Mexico. Later authors commented that there were morphological differences between the male wings from both populations. We analyzed, described and nominated Heraclides androgeus reyesorum ssp. nov. Vargas, Llorente & Luis distributed in the Mexican Pacific coast, based on 62 specimens, and compared it with H a. epidaurus from the Gulf of Mexico, based on more than 200 specimens housed at UNAM: Museo de Zoología, Facultad de Ciencias and the Colección Nacional de Insectos of the Instituto de Biologia, as well as some collections from the USA. The main characters were the width of the yellow and black bands on forewings in males, which had a significant difference between the populations of both sides of Mexico, although some characters were variable and showed partial overlap. In the hindwings, the differences were the extent of the subterminal lunules in dorsal and ventral view. We also analyzed the male genitalia, finding notorious differences in both sclerotic processes of the harpe. Subspecific differences between females refer to the brightness and extent of green spots on the hindwings and the extent of lunules in the ventral view. The greatest abundance of H. a. reyesorum ssp. nov. was in the tropical deciduous forest, with gallery forest and in the lower range of the cloud forest, present at altitudes of 500-800 m and 1000-1 750 m, respectively. We discussed the pattern of endemism due to historical vicariant processes and explain the presence of the new subspecies of H. androgeus and other taxa of specific level.

  16. Mitochondrial genome sequence and expression profiling for the legume pod borer Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Crambidae.

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    Venu M Margam

    Full Text Available We report the assembly of the 14,054 bp near complete sequencing of the mitochondrial genome of the legume pod borer (LPB, Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Crambidae, which we subsequently used to estimate divergence and relationships within the lepidopteran lineage. The arrangement and orientation of the 13 protein-coding, 2 rRNA, and 19 tRNA genes sequenced was typical of insect mitochondrial DNA sequences described to date. The sequence contained a high A+T content of 80.1% and a bias for the use of codons with A or T nucleotides in the 3rd position. Transcript mapping with midgut and salivary gland ESTs for mitochondrial genome annotation showed that translation from protein-coding genes initiates and terminates at standard mitochondrial codons, except for the coxI gene, which may start from an arginine CGA codon. The genomic copy of coxII terminates at a T nucleotide, and a proposed polyadenylation mechanism for completion of the TAA stop codon was confirmed by comparisons to EST data. EST contig data further showed that mature M. vitrata mitochondrial transcripts are monocistronic, except for bicistronic transcripts for overlapping genes nd4/nd4L and nd6/cytb, and a tricistronic transcript for atp8/atp6/coxIII. This processing of polycistronic mitochondrial transcripts adheres to the tRNA punctuated cleavage mechanism, whereby mature transcripts are cleaved only at intervening tRNA gene sequences. In contrast, the tricistronic atp8/atp6/coxIII in Drosophila is present as separate atp8/atp6 and coxIII transcripts despite the lack of an intervening tRNA. Our results indicate that mitochondrial processing mechanisms vary between arthropod species, and that it is crucial to use transcriptional information to obtain full annotation of mitochondrial genomes.

  17. Mitochondrial genome sequence and expression profiling for the legume pod borer Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margam, Venu M; Coates, Brad S; Hellmich, Richard L; Agunbiade, Tolulope; Seufferheld, Manfredo J; Sun, Weilin; Ba, Malick N; Sanon, Antoine; Binso-Dabire, Clementine L; Baoua, Ibrahim; Ishiyaku, Mohammad F; Covas, Fernando G; Srinivasan, Ramasamy; Armstrong, Joel; Murdock, Larry L; Pittendrigh, Barry R

    2011-01-01

    We report the assembly of the 14,054 bp near complete sequencing of the mitochondrial genome of the legume pod borer (LPB), Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), which we subsequently used to estimate divergence and relationships within the lepidopteran lineage. The arrangement and orientation of the 13 protein-coding, 2 rRNA, and 19 tRNA genes sequenced was typical of insect mitochondrial DNA sequences described to date. The sequence contained a high A+T content of 80.1% and a bias for the use of codons with A or T nucleotides in the 3rd position. Transcript mapping with midgut and salivary gland ESTs for mitochondrial genome annotation showed that translation from protein-coding genes initiates and terminates at standard mitochondrial codons, except for the coxI gene, which may start from an arginine CGA codon. The genomic copy of coxII terminates at a T nucleotide, and a proposed polyadenylation mechanism for completion of the TAA stop codon was confirmed by comparisons to EST data. EST contig data further showed that mature M. vitrata mitochondrial transcripts are monocistronic, except for bicistronic transcripts for overlapping genes nd4/nd4L and nd6/cytb, and a tricistronic transcript for atp8/atp6/coxIII. This processing of polycistronic mitochondrial transcripts adheres to the tRNA punctuated cleavage mechanism, whereby mature transcripts are cleaved only at intervening tRNA gene sequences. In contrast, the tricistronic atp8/atp6/coxIII in Drosophila is present as separate atp8/atp6 and coxIII transcripts despite the lack of an intervening tRNA. Our results indicate that mitochondrial processing mechanisms vary between arthropod species, and that it is crucial to use transcriptional information to obtain full annotation of mitochondrial genomes.

  18. Morphology and biology of the fruit piercing moth, Ophiusa corona (Fabricious (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae

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    Permkam, S.

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Morphology and biology of the fruit-piercing moth Ophiusa coronata (Fabricious (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae were studied in laboratory. Eggs were spherical and colored grayish green with an average diameter of 1.03±0.01 mm (mean±SEM. The larvae were looper caterpillars, possessing 2 white bands on the black head. The body was brown to blackish, marked with black spots and red longitudinal streaks. The pupa was black-brown. The adult moth had rufous and fuscous forewings tinged with a black spot in the middle. The hind wings were bright yellow in ground color with a dark band at the anterior and the posterior borders. Time required for egg to adult development averaged 40.35±0.59 days (mean±SEM. The average duration for egg, larval and pupal developments were 4.0±0.0, 23.20±0.49 and 13.15±0.22 days, respectively. Sexual maturity for female took 10.67±1.05 days. The average duration of egg laying, number of eggs and longevity of adult moths were 7.33±1.28 days, 333.0±171.82 egg/female and 22.83±2.45 days, respectively. Feeding preference and phototaxis of adult studies showed that adults likely preferred to feed ranking from slices of pineapple, banana, papaya and citrus, whereas sapodilla and rose apple were rarely fed on. Blue light and mercury vapor light were highly attractive, whereas violet light and fluorescent light were less attractive to this adult moth species.

  19. Biotic potential and reproductive parameters of Spodoptera eridania (Stoll (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae in the laboratory

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    Débora Goulart Montezano

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Biotic potential and reprodutcive parameters of Spodoptera eridania (Stoll (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae in the laboratory: This study aimed to evaluate the biotic potential and reproductive parameters of Spodoptera eridania (Stoll, 1782 under controlled conditions (25 ± 1ºC, 70 ± 10% RH and 14 hour photophase. The longevity, pre-, post- and oviposition periods, fecundity and fertility of 15 couples was evaluated. The longevity of females (10.80 days was not significantly higher than those of males (9.27 days. The mean durations of the pre, post and oviposition periods were 2.067, 0.600 and 8.133 days, respectively. The mean fecundity per female was 1,398 eggs and the mean fertility was 1,367.50 larvae. On average, females copulated 1.133 times. A strong positive correlation was observed between the number of mating and fecundity (r = 0.881, P <0.001. However a strong negative correlation was observed between the number of copulations and the duration of the pre-oviposition period (r = -0.826, P = 0.002 and longevity (r = -0.823, P = 0.001. The biotic potential of S. eridania was estimated at 1.894 x 10(25 individuals/female/year. The net reproductive rate (Ro was 560.531 times per generation and the mean generation time (T was 35.807 days. The intrinsic rate of increase (rm was 0.177, with a finite rate of increase (l of 1.193, per week

  20. Insecticide Effect of Zeolites on the Tomato Leafminer Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smedt, Caroline; Van Damme, Veerle; De Clercq, Patrick; Spanoghe, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: The tomato leafminer Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) is a key tomato insect pest. At present, it is considered to be a serious threat in various countries in Europe, North Africa, and Middle East. The extensive use and the developed resistance of T. absoluta to spinosad causes some concern, which leads to the need for alternative products. (2) Materials and Methods: Several laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the ovicidal properties of a zeolite particle film on T. absoluta. The toxicity of three different zeolites and six zeolite formulations to T. absoluta eggs and larvae was determined using different exposure methods. (3) Results: In general, the formulated zeolites yielded higher egg and larvae mortality values, especially when the zeolite particle film was residually applied. Notable differences in mortality rates from exposure to zeolites compared to other products, such as kaolin, its formulated product Surround, and the insecticide spinosad, were observed. Kaolin and Surround exhibited little or no effect for both application methods, while the hatch rate was reduced by 95% when spinosad was applied topically. Spinosad yielded egg and larvae mortality rates of 100% for both application methods. Additionally, increased oviposition activity was observed in adults exposed to the wettable powder (WP) formulations. These WP formulations increased egg deposition, while Surround and spinosad elicited a negative oviposition response. (4) Conclusions: It can be derived that the tested products, zeolites BEA (Beta polymorph A), FAU (Faujasite), LTA (Linde type A), and their formulations, had no real insecticidal activity against the eggs of T. absoluta. Nevertheless, egg exposure to zeolites seemed to affect the development process by weakening the first instar larvae and increasing their mortality. Subsequently, based on the choice test, no significant difference was observed between the number of eggs laid on the treated