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Sample records for cactaceae

  1. Cactaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffers, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    Stemsucculents, branched or unbranched, columnar, globose or with thick flattened stems or internodes, usually with very small scale-like and awl-shaped, rarely foliaceous leaves; stems and internodes often with warts or ribs, bearing areoles in the axils of the often absent leaves. Areoles mostly

  2. A Novel Method of Genomic DNA Extraction for Cactaceae

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    Shannon D. Fehlberg

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Genetic studies of Cactaceae can at times be impeded by difficult sampling logistics and/or high mucilage content in tissues. Simplifying sampling and DNA isolation through the use of cactus spines has not previously been investigated. Methods and Results: Several protocols for extracting DNA from spines were tested and modified to maximize yield, amplification, and sequencing. Sampling of and extraction from spines resulted in a simplified protocol overall and complete avoidance of mucilage as compared to typical tissue extractions. Sequences from one nuclear and three plastid regions were obtained across eight genera and 20 species of cacti using DNA extracted from spines. Conclusions: Genomic DNA useful for amplification and sequencing can be obtained from cactus spines. The protocols described here are valuable for any cactus species, but are particularly useful for investigators interested in sampling living collections, extensive field sampling, and/or conservation genetic studies.

  3. A novel method of genomic DNA extraction for Cactaceae1

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    Fehlberg, Shannon D.; Allen, Jessica M.; Church, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Genetic studies of Cactaceae can at times be impeded by difficult sampling logistics and/or high mucilage content in tissues. Simplifying sampling and DNA isolation through the use of cactus spines has not previously been investigated. • Methods and Results: Several protocols for extracting DNA from spines were tested and modified to maximize yield, amplification, and sequencing. Sampling of and extraction from spines resulted in a simplified protocol overall and complete avoidance of mucilage as compared to typical tissue extractions. Sequences from one nuclear and three plastid regions were obtained across eight genera and 20 species of cacti using DNA extracted from spines. • Conclusions: Genomic DNA useful for amplification and sequencing can be obtained from cactus spines. The protocols described here are valuable for any cactus species, but are particularly useful for investigators interested in sampling living collections, extensive field sampling, and/or conservation genetic studies. PMID:25202521

  4. Level of environmental threat posed by horticultural trade in Cactaceae.

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    Novoa, Ana; Le Roux, Johannes J; Richardson, David M; Wilson, John R U

    2017-10-01

    Ornamental horticulture has been identified as an important threat to plant biodiversity and is a major pathway for plant invasions worldwide. In this context, the family Cactaceae is particularly challenging because it is considered the fifth most threatened large taxonomic group in the world; several species are among the most widespread and damaging invasive species; and Cactaceae is one of the most popular horticultural plant groups. Based on the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna and the 11 largest online auction sites selling cacti, we documented the international cactus trade. To provide an in-depth look at the dynamics of the industry, we surveyed the businesses involved in the cactus trade in South Africa (a hotspot of cactus trade and invasions). We purchased seeds of every available species and used DNA barcoding to identify species to the genus level. Although <20% of this trade involved threatened species and <3% involved known invasive species, many species were identified by a common name. However, only 0.02% of the globally traded cacti were collected from wild populations. Despite a large commercial network, all South African imports (of which 15% and 1.5% were of species listed as threatened and invasive, respectively) came from the same source. With DNA barcoding, we identified 24% of the species to genus level. Based on our results, we believe that if trade restrictions are placed on the small proportion of cacti that are invasive and there is no major increase in harvesting of native populations, then the commercial trade in cactus poses a negligible environmental threat. However, there are currently no effective methods for easily identifying which cacti are traded, and both the illicit harvesting of cacti from the wild and the informal trade in invasive taxa pose on-going conservation challenges. © 2017 Society for Conservation Biology.

  5. Flower morpho-anatomy in Epiphyllum phyllanthus (Cactaceae Morfo-anatomía de la flor de Epiphyllum phyllanthus (Cactaceae

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    Odair José Garcia de Almeida

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this contribution was to analyze the morpho-anatomical floral structure of Epiphyllum phyllanthus (L. Haw., a widely distributed species across South America, occurring in humid forests as an epiphyte. Flowers and flower buds were collected in Maringá, Paraná State, Brazil, fixed, processed, and analyzed under light microscope and scanning electron microscope. The flower is sessile and epigynous with a well-developed hypanthium. All flower whorls have uniseriate epidermis. Secretory cavities containing mucilage and calcium oxalate crystals occur throughout the floral parenchymatous tissue. The androecium has many stamens with tetrasporangiate and bithecal anthers. The wall of the young anther is formed by epidermis, endothecium, a middle layer, and binucleate secretory tapetum that eventually becomes uninucleate. The gynoecium is syncarpous with 9-10 carpels, pluriovulate, and with parietal placentation. The ovary has inverted vascular bundles in a similar pattern as in Pereskia. The nectariferous region occurs on the inner surface of the hypanthium. The stigma has 9-10 lobes with a secretory epidermis. The ovules are circinotropous, bitegmic, crassinucelate, and have long funiculus as in many other Cactaceae.El objetivo de esta investigación fue analizar la morfo-anatomía de la flor de Epiphyllum phyllanthus (L. Haw, especie con distribución amplia en los bosques húmedos de América del Sur como epífita. Se recolectaron flores y botones en Maringá, PR, Brasil, fijados, procesados y analizados con microscopio de luz y con microscopio electrónico de barrido. La flor es sésil, epígina con hipanto desarrollado. Todos los verticilos florales presentan epidermis simple. Cavidades secretoras con mucilago y cristales de oxalato de calcio se encuentran en todo el tejido parenquimático de la flor. El androceo posee muchos estambres, con anteras bitecas y tetraesporangiadas. La pared de la antera joven está formada por epidermis

  6. Gynogenesis in the vine cacti Hylocereus and Selenicereus (Cactaceae).

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    Garcia, Reinerio Benega; Cisneros, Aroldo; Schneider, Bert; Tel-Zur, Noemi

    2009-05-01

    Gynogenesis was investigated on the allotetraploid Selenicereus megalanthus and the diploid Hylocereus polyrhizus and Hylocereus undatus vine cactus species. Unpollinated ovules from developing flower buds containing microspores at middle uninucleate developmental stage were cultured on MS basal medium containing 2,4-D/TDZ with different sucrose concentrations. Ovule size increased under dark culture conditions in all the three species and the level of response was species and sucrose concentration dependent. The best responses were achieved in the two S. megalanthus accessions, E-123 and J-80, at 0.18 and 0.26 M sucrose. Only ovule enlargement was obtained in H. undatus and both ovule enlargement and callus were obtained in H. polyrhizus. Development in both species ceased and embryoids were not formed. Plant regeneration was directly and indirectly obtained in both S. megalanthus accessions. Ploidy level was determined for a total of 29 S. megalanthus gynogenic plants using flow cytometry: 15 were found to be dihaploid (plants with the gametophytic chromosome number) and the other 14 were found to have higher ploidy levels. This is the first report of successful gynogenesis in Cactaceae. The dihaploids of S. megalanthus successfully produced by ovule culture techniques opens new perspectives in vine cacti breeding.

  7. Characterization of a methionine-rich protein from the seeds of Cereus jamacaru Mill. (Cactaceae

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    T.C.F.R. Aragão

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe here the isolation and characterization of a major albumin from the seeds of Cereus jamacaru (Cactaceae, to which we gave the trivial name of cactin. This protein has a molecular mass of 11.3 kDa and is formed by a light chain (3.67 kDa and a heavy chain (7.63 kDa. This protein was isolated using a combination of gel filtration chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. The amino acid composition of cactin was determined and found to resemble that of the 2S seed reserve protein from the Brazil nut, a protein remarkable for its high methionine content. The usefulness of cactin as a molecular marker in the taxonomy of the Cactaceae is discussed.

  8. Functional morphology of two Lepismium species (Rhipsalideae, Cactaceae Morfología funcional de dos especies de Lepismium (Rhipsalideae, Cactaceae

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    María Regina Torres-Boeger

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The morphology and anatomy of stem segments of 2 species of Lepismium (Cactaceae, which grow naturally in the Araucaria forest understory, in the state of Paraná, Brazil, are compared. The goal of this study was to identify morphological traits adapted to epiphytism and to the low light condition of the studied environment. Twenty-five segments of Lepismium cruciforme and L. lumbricoides were collected and various morphological and anatomical features were measured. Differences (p Se compara la morfología y la anatomía de los segmentos del tallo de 2 especies de Lepismium, que crecen naturalmente en el sotobosque del bosque de Araucaria, en el estado de Paraná. El objetivo de este estudio fue identificar rasgos morfológicos de adaptación para el epifitismo y para condiciones de poca luz del ambiente estudiado. Se recolectaron 25 ejemplares de L. cruciforme y de L. lumbricoides y se midieron rasgos tanto morfológicos como anatómicos de los tallos. Se encontraron diferencias (p < 0.05 entre las especies considerando los valores promedio del volumen total, del área total fotosintética, del grosor de la epidermis y de la hipodermis, del área del esclerénquima / área transversal total de los segmentos del tallo y del área del parénquima / área transversal total, caracteres que se correlacionan a sus diferencias en forma. Las características xeromórficas encontradas en Lepismium, la mayor parte de ellas típicas de cactáceas de zonas áridas, han favorecido el desarrollo del hábito epifítico y la ocupación de bosques húmedos. Como epífitas, están sujetas a un cierto grado de escasez de agua, aunque no a las condiciones tan severas como la mayoría de las cactáceas terrestres. Los valores promedio para el grosor de la hipodermis, el contenido de agua, la cantidad de esclerénquima y las densidad estomática son más similares a las plantas mesomórficas, y se pueden correlacionar al epifitismo, demostrando que estas especies

  9. Cancer preventive and curative attributes of plants of the Cactaceae family: a review.

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    Harlev, Eli; Nevo, Eviatar; Solowey, Elaine; Bishayee, Anupam

    2013-06-01

    The ever-increasing occurrence of cancer and the severe side effects and limited efficacy of current cancer chemotherapy based on chemical drugs shift the attention toward drugs of plant origin. The Cactaceae family comprises more than 1500 species, but until recently only a few of them have been tested for their chemopreventive and anticancer attributes, leaving a wide unexplored area still waiting for researchers to investigate. Considering this fact, and also the promising results obtained with the relatively few plants of this family already tested, it should justly be expected that some plants of the Cactaceae family yet unexplored might possess outstanding anticancer attributes, exceeding those displayed by the plants already tested. This review presents in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence on cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic potential of bioactive phytoconstituents and extracts derived from cactus plants. It also examines the underlying biochemical and molecular mechanisms involved in the antineoplastic effects of plants of the Cactaceae family. Current limitation and future directions of research towards effective use of cacti to develop efficient and side effect-free future cancer-preventive and anticancer drugs are also discussed. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Isolation and Characterisation of a Reserve Protein from the Seeds of Cereus jamacaru (Cactaceae

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    Itayguara Ribeiro da Costa

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe here the isolation and characterisation of a major reserve protein from the seeds of Cereus jamacaru. (Cactaceae. This protein has a molecular mass of 5319 kDa and was isolated by a combination of gel filtration chromatography and reverse phase HPLC. The amino acid composition of the protein was determined and it was shown to have similarities with the amino acid composition of several proteins from the 2S albumin storage protein family. The usefulness of this protein as a molecular marker in the Cactaceae is also discussed.A proteína de reserva mais abundante das sementes de Cereus jamacaru (Cactaceae foi isolada e caracterizada. Esta proteína tem uma massa molecular de 5319 kDa e foi isolada através de uma combinação de técnicas de filtração em gel e HPLC de fase reversa. A composição de aminoácidos da proteína foi determinada e possui similaridade com a composição de aminoácidos de diversas proteínas de reserva de sementes que pertencem à família das albuminas. A utilidade desta proteína como um marcador molecular para as cactáceas é também discutida.

  11. Isolation and characterization of a reserve protein from the seeds of Opuntia ficus-indica (Cactaceae

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    Uchoa A.F.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe here the isolation and characterization of a major albumin from the seeds of Opuntia ficus-indica (Cactaceae. This protein has a molecular mass of 6.5 kDa and was isolated by a combination of gel filtration chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. The amino acid composition of this protein was determined and it was shown to have similarities with the amino acid composition of several proteins from the 2S albumin storage protein family. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of this protein is Asp-Pro-Tyr-Trp-Glu-Gln-Arg.

  12. DNA barcodes for Mexican Cactaceae, plants under pressure from wild collecting.

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    Yesson, Chris; Bárcenas, Rolando T; Hernández, Héctor M; Ruiz-Maqueda, María de la Luz; Prado, Alberto; Rodríguez, Víctor M; Hawkins, Julie A

    2011-09-01

    DNA barcodes could be a useful tool for plant conservation. Of particular importance is the ability to identify unknown plant material, such as from customs seizures of illegally collected specimens. Mexican cacti are an example of a threatened group, under pressure because of wild collection for the xeriscaping trade and private collectors. Mexican cacti also provide a taxonomically and geographically coherent group with which to test DNA barcodes. Here, we sample the matK barcode for 528 species of Cactaceae including approximately 75% of Mexican species and test the utility of the matK region for species-level identification. We find that the matK DNA barcode can be used to identify uniquely 77% of species sampled, and 79-87% of species of particular conservation importance. However, this is far below the desired rate of 95% and there are significant issues for PCR amplification because of the variability of primer sites. Additionally, we test the nuclear ITS regions for the cactus subfamily Opuntioideae and for the genus Ariocarpus (subfamily Cactoideae). We observed higher rates of variation for ITS (86% unique for Opuntioideae sampled) but a much lower PCR success, encountering significant intra-individual polymorphism in Ariocarpus precluding the use of this marker in this taxon. We conclude that the matK region should provide useful information as a DNA barcode for Cactaceae if the problems with primers can be addressed, but matK alone is not sufficiently variable to achieve species-level identification. Additional complementary regions should be investigated as ITS is shown to be unsuitable. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Wood chemical composition in species of Cactaceae: the relationship between lignification and stem morphology.

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    Jorge Reyes-Rivera

    Full Text Available In Cactaceae, wood anatomy is related to stem morphology in terms of the conferred support. In species of cacti with dimorphic wood, a unique process occurs in which the cambium stops producing wide-band tracheids (WBTs and produces fibers; this is associated with the aging of individuals and increases in size. Stem support and lignification have only been studied in fibrous tree-like species, and studies in species with WBTs or dimorphic wood are lacking. In this study, we approach this process with a chemical focus, emphasizing the role of wood lignification. We hypothesized that the degree of wood lignification in Cactaceae increases with height of the species and that its chemical composition varies with wood anatomy. To test this, we studied the chemical composition (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin content in 13 species (2 WBTs wood, 3 dimorphic, and 8 fibrous with contrasting growth forms. We also analyzed lignification in dimorphic and fibrous species to determine the chemical features of WBTs and fibers and their relationship with stem support. The lignin contents were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. We found that 11 species have a higher percentage (>35% of lignin in their wood than other angiosperms or gymnosperms. The lignin chemical composition in fibrous species is similar to that of other dicots, but it is markedly heterogeneous in non-fibrous species where WBTs are abundant. The lignification in WBTs is associated with the resistance to high water pressure within cells rather than the contribution to mechanical support. Dimorphic wood species are usually richer in syringyl lignin, and tree-like species with lignified rays have more guaiacyl lignin. The results suggest that wood anatomy and lignin distribution play an important role in the chemical composition of wood, and further research is needed at the cellular level.

  14. Spatial variation in the community of insects associated with the flowers of Pachycereus weberi (Caryophyllales: Cactaceae).

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    Figueroa-Castro, Dulce María; Valverde, Pedro Luis; Vite, Fernando; Carrillo-Ruiz, Hortensia

    2014-08-01

    The positive relationship between productivity and species diversity is well-known. Insect communities associated with the flowers of Cactaceae species represent an interesting system to explore the productivity-diversity relationship because branches facing the equator receive more photosynthetically active radiation and have higher productivity. Thus, flowers with contrasting orientations within an individual, and even within a single branch, might differ in productivity. Therefore, higher abundance, species richness, and diversity are expected for the insect communities associated with south-facing flowers. This hypothesis was tested in Pachycereus weberi (J.M. Coulter) Backeberg (Cactaceae). Insects within flowers with contrasting orientations were collected and its abundance, richness, and diversity were estimated. We also asked if insects prefer big flowers. Thus, flower volume was estimated and regression analyses were conducted to test if there is a positive relationship between flower size and insect abundance. Flower orientation did not affect species richness. However, species abundance and diversity were different in flowers with contrasting orientations. In general, species abundance was higher in flowers facing southwards than in north-facing flowers. On the contrary, species diversity was higher in north-facing flowers. Abundance of Coleoptera was explained by flower volume in south-facing flowers. Contrary to our hypothesis, total diversity was greater in the less productive oriented flowers. Three possible explanations are discussed to explain the low diversity found in the highly productive, south-facing flowers. Our study provides evidence for the effects of productivity on the structure of insect communities at a very small-scale.

  15. Expression of the KNOTTED HOMEOBOX Genes in the Cactaceae Cambial Zone Suggests Their Involvement in Wood Development

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    Reyes-Rivera, Jorge; Rodríguez-Alonso, Gustavo; Petrone, Emilio; Vasco, Alejandra; Vergara-Silva, Francisco; Shishkova, Svetlana; Terrazas, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    The vascular cambium is a lateral meristem that produces secondary xylem (i.e., wood) and phloem. Different Cactaceae species develop different types of secondary xylem; however, little is known about the mechanisms underlying wood formation in the Cactaceae. The KNOTTED HOMEOBOX (KNOX) gene family encodes transcription factors that regulate plant development. The role of class I KNOX genes in the regulation of the shoot apical meristem, inflorescence architecture, and secondary growth is established in a few model species, while the functions of class II KNOX genes are less well understood, although the Arabidopsis thaliana class II KNOX protein KNAT7 is known to regulate secondary cell wall biosynthesis. To explore the involvement of the KNOX genes in the enormous variability of wood in Cactaceae, we identified orthologous genes expressed in species with fibrous (Pereskia lychnidiflora and Pilosocereus alensis), non-fibrous (Ariocarpus retusus), and dimorphic (Ferocactus pilosus) wood. Both class I and class II KNOX genes were expressed in the cactus cambial zone, including one or two class I paralogs of KNAT1, as well as one or two class II paralogs of KNAT3-KNAT4-KNAT5. While the KNOX gene SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM) and its ortholog ARK1 are expressed during secondary growth in the Arabidopsis and Populus stem, respectively, we did not find STM orthologs in the Cactaceae cambial zone, which suggests possible differences in the vascular cambium genetic regulatory network in these species. Importantly, while two class II KNOX paralogs from the KNAT7 clade were expressed in the cambial zone of A. retusus and F. pilosus, we did not detect KNAT7 ortholog expression in the cambial zone of P. lychnidiflora. Differences in the transcriptional repressor activity of secondary cell wall biosynthesis by the KNAT7 orthologs could therefore explain the differences in wood development in the cactus species. PMID:28316604

  16. Stem and root anatomy of two species of Echinopsis (Trichocereeae: Cactaceae Anatomía de la raíz y del tallo de dos especies de Echinopsis (Trichocereeae: Cactaceae

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    Joelma dos Santos Garcia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study characterizes and compares the stem and root anatomy of Echinopsis calochlora and E. rhodotricha (Cactaceae occurring in the Central-Western Region of Brazil, in Mato Grosso do Sul State. Three individuals of each species were collected, fixed, stored and prepared following usual anatomy techniques, for subsequent observation in light and scanning electronic microscopy. Echinopsis calochlora revealed uniseriated epidermis, while E. rhodotricha had patches of bisseriated epidermis; all species showed thick cuticle, parallelocytic stomata at the epidermis level, and a well-developed hypodermis. Cortical and medullary bundles are present in the studied species, as well as mucilage cells in the cortex region. The secondary phloem is composed by sieve tube elements, companion cells, axial and radial parenchyma. Sclereids were found at the outer regions of phloem in the roots. The secondary xylem is non fibrous in the stems of E. calochlora, and fibrous in the stems of E. rhodotricha and in the roots of both species. Many of these characteristics are commonly found in Cactaceae, and represent important adaptations for survival in xeric environments.Este estudio está enfocado a caracterizar y comparar la anatomía de tallos y raíces de Echinopsis calochlora y E. rhodotricha (Cactaceae que habitan en la región centro-oeste de Brasil, en el Estado de Mato Grosso do Sul. Se recolectaron 3 individuos de cada especie, los cuales fueron fijados, almacenados y preparados siguiendo las técnicas comunes de anatomía, para observarlos en microscopía de luz y electrónica de barrido. Echinopsis calochlora mostró epidermis uniseriada, mientras que la de E. rhodotricha fue biseriada; todas las especies presentaron cutícula gruesa, estomas paralelocíticos a nivel de la epidermis y una hipodermis bien desarrollada. Se presentaron haces vasculares corticales y medulares en las especies estudiadas, así como células mucilaginosas en la regi

  17. Ants interacting with fruits of Melocactus conoideus Buining & Brederoo (Cactaceae in southwestern Bahia, Brazil

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    Katielle Silva Brito-Kateivas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2012v25n3p153   Formigas que interagem com frutos de Melocactus conoideus Buining & Brederoo (Cactaceae no sudoeste da Bahia, Brasil. O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar quais espécies de formigas interagem com os frutos de Melocactus conoideus e se existe remoção. O estudo foi realizado no Parque Municipal Serra do Periperi, município de Vitória da Conquista, Bahia, área de ocorrência da espécie. Frutos de 30 indivíduos foram marcados e observados durante o dia para identificação do comportamento das formigas. Sete espécies de cinco subfamílias de formigas foram observadas interagindo com os frutos e os gêneros mais envolvidos em interações foram Camponotus e Pheidole. Três eventos de remoção foram observados e realizados apenas pela espécie Pheidole sp. 2. Apesar de M. conoideus não ser uma espécie mirmecocórica, formigas foram registradas como dispersoras oportunistas, atividade que pode ter importantes consequências para a dinâmica populacional da espécie.

  18. Acute Toxicity and Cytotoxicity of Pereskia aculeata, a Highly Nutritious Cactaceae Plant.

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    Silva, Debora O; Seifert, Mauricio; Nora, Fabiana R; Bobrowski, Vera L; Freitag, Rogerio A; Kucera, Heidi R; Nora, Leonardo; Gaikwad, Nilesh W

    2017-04-01

    Pereskia aculeata is a Cactaceae plant with valuable nutritional properties, including terrific amounts of protein, minerals, vitamins, and fiber. However, P. aculeata is reported to contain antinutrients and alkaloids in its leaves. In addition, in a study on growth and development, Wistar rats fed with P. aculeata and casein as protein source grew less than the control group (fed with casein only). Therefore, in this study, we evaluated, for the first time, the oral acute toxicity of P. aculeata in rats and also the cytotoxicity behavior of the plant on lettuce seeds. The acute toxicity research was carried out using dried P. aculeata ethanolic extract, in three different doses, administered by gavage to 24 female Wistar rats. The rats were then examined for signs of toxicity, food intake, body weight, and fecal excretion fluctuations, as well as histopathological alterations, using eight different body tissues. The acute toxicity study did not show any difference among the groups in either clinical evaluation or histopathological analyses. For the cytotoxicity study, dried P. aculeata ethanolic extract was applied on lettuce seeds in five different concentrations. These seeds were evaluated for germination, root and shoot length, and mitotic index. The results show that P. aculeata extract affects lettuce root and shoot growth, but not germination or mitotic index. In conclusion, the acute toxicity on rats and the cytogenotoxicity on lettuce of P. aculeata are neglectable, validating the potential of this plant to be used as a functional food.

  19. Morphological and anatomical features of regular and cristate forms of Echinocereus pectinatus (Scheidw. Eng. (Cactaceae A.L. Juss.

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    Valentina M. Maliarenko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Comparative morphological and anatomical investigations on the normal and cristate forms of Echinocereus pectinatus (Scheidw. Eng. stem (Cactaceae A.L Juss. from Fomin’s Botanical Garden collections have been conducted. There were found a few characters identical for the stem structure in both forms. But also were found morphological and anatomical differences between normal and cristate forms. The most obvious sign of fasciation is a change of cross stem sections from circular to elliptical shape. The plants are also distinguished by the size and the form of transversal projections of the parenchymatous cells and by shape and location of the inclusions.

  20. Patterns of growth and mortality in the endangered Nichol's Turk's Head Cactus (Echinocactus horizonthalonius var. nicholii L. Benson; Cactaceae) in Southeastern Arizona

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    M. E. McIntosh; L. A. McDade; A. E. Boyd; P. D. Jenkins

    2007-01-01

    Nichol’s Turk’s Head Cactus (Echinocactus horizonthalonius var. nicholii L. Benson; Cactaceae) occurs in a few isolated populations in the Sonoran desert of southcentral Arizona (Pima and Pinal counties). The populations of this variety are disjunct from the more widespread variety that occurs in the Chihuahuan desert of Texas and...

  1. Is in vitro micrografting a possible valid alternative to traditional micropropagation in Cactaceae? Pelecyphora aselliformis as a case study.

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    Badalamenti, Ornella; Carra, Angela; Oddo, Elisabetta; Carimi, Francesco; Sajeva, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Several taxa of Cactaceae are endangered by overcollection for commercial purposes, and most of the family is included in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Fauna and Flora (CITES). Micropropagation may play a key role to keep the pressure off wild populations and contribute to ex situ conservation of endangered taxa. One of the limits of micropropagation is the species-specific requirement of plant regulators for each taxon and sometimes even for different genotypes. With the micrografting technique the rootstock directly provides the scion with the necessary hormonal requirements. In this paper we present data on in vitro grafting of Pelecyphora aselliformis Ehrenberg, an Appendix I CITES listed species critically endangered and sought after by the horticultural trade, on micropropagated Opuntia ficus-indica Miller. Apical and sub-apical scions of P. aselliformis were used to perform micrografting with a successful rate of 97 and 81 % respectively. Survival rate after ex vivo transfer was 85 %. We hypothesize that this method could be applied to other endangered, slow growing taxa of Cactaceae thus contributing to the conservation of this endangered family.

  2. Estudo anatômico de folha e caule de Pereskia aculeata Mill. (Cactaceae

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    M.R. Duarte

    Full Text Available Pereskia aculeata Mill. (Cactaceae é uma trepadeira arbustiva conhecida comumente como ora-pro-nobis. Apresenta elevado teor de mucilagem e proteína, sendo empregada na indústria alimentícia e farmacêutica. Na medicina popular, é utilizada externamente como emoliente. Este trabalho teve por objetivo estudar a anatomia foliar e caulinar da planta, a fim de fornecer informações complementares à sua identificação e aplicáveis ao seu controle de qualidade. Folhas adultas e fragmentos de caules foram fixados, seccionados à mão livre e corados com azul de astra e fucsina básica ou com azul de toluidina. Testes histoquímicos e análise ultra-estrutural de superfície foram realizados. A folha é simples e elíptica. Possui epiderme uniestratificada, estômatos paracíticos em ambas as faces, mesofilo que tende a ser dorsiventral, contendo numerosas drusas de oxalato de cálcio e células isodiamétricas grandes com conteúdo mucilaginoso. A nervura central é percorrida por um feixe vascular colateral em arco aberto. O pecíolo tem secção plano-convexa e um feixe colateral em formato de arco fechado. O caule, em estrutura secundária incipiente, possui epiderme unisseriada, colênquima angular, parênquima cortical com muitos amiloplastos, calotas de fibras perivasculares e organização vascular colateral. No córtex e na medula, são observadas numerosas cavidades com conteúdo mucilaginoso e drusas de oxalato de cálcio, estas também presentes no floema.

  3. A proposed national strategic framework for the management of Cactaceae in South Africa

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    Haylee Kaplan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: South Africa has a long history of managing biological invasions. The rapid increase in the scale and complexity of problems associated with invasions calls for new, more strategic management approaches. This paper explores strategic management approaches for cactus invasions in South Africa. Cacti (Cactaceae have had a long history of socio-economic benefits, considerable negative environmental and socio-economic impacts, and a wide range of management interventions in South Africa. Objectives: To guide the future management of cactus invasions, a national strategic framework was developed by the South African Cactus Working Group. The overarching aim of this framework is to reduce the negative impacts of cacti to a point where their benefits significantly outweigh the losses. Method: Four strategic objectives were proposed: (1 all invasive and potentially invasive cactus species should be prevented from entering the country, (2 new incursions of cactus species must be rapidly detected and eradicated, (3 the impacts of invasive cacti must be reduced and contained and (4 socio-economically useful cacti (both invasive and non-invasive species must be utilised sustainably to minimise the risk of further negative impacts. Results: There are currently 35 listed invasive cactus species in the country; 10 species are targeted for eradication and 12 are under partial or complete biological control. We discuss approaches for the management of cactus species, their introduction and spread pathways and spatial prioritisation of control efforts. Conclusion: A thorough understanding of context-specific invasion processes and stakeholder support is needed when implementing strategies for a group of invasive species.

  4. Molecular characterisation of potexviruses isolated from three different genera in the family Cactaceae.

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    Koenig, R; Pleij, C W A; Loss, S; Burgermeister, W; Aust, H; Schiemann, J

    2004-05-01

    The genome properties of three potexviruses which previously had been isolated from different genera in the family Cactaceae and had been found to be only distantly related serologically have been studied. The sequence of the 3040 3' terminal nucleotides of the genomic RNA of isolate K11 from Schlumbergera bridgesii and the complete RNA sequences of isolates B1 and CC10 from Zygocactus sp. and Opuntia sp., respectively, were determined. Starting sequences were obtained by means of immunocapture reverse transcription PCR using primers derived from highly conserved sequences in other potexviral RNAs. The known parts of the sequences were extended by means of random-primed cDNAs and specific primers derived from the known parts of the sequences. The genome structure of the three viruses resembles that of other potexviruses. The conserved motifs typical for replication-associated proteins, triple gene block (TGB) proteins and coat proteins of potexviruses were readily identified in the translation products of the five open reading frames. The 3' untranslated regions of the three RNAs are folded into secondary structures containing three characteristic hairpins. Rather low percentages of amino acid sequence identities ranging from 62% to 76% for the coat proteins and 41% to 49% for TGB proteins 3 suggest that these viruses should be regarded as distinct virus species for which the names Zygocactus virus X, Schlumbergera virus X and Opuntia virus X are proposed. It is also suggested that the name Cactus virus X which originally was coined for all three virus isolates should no longer be used.

  5. Studies on the Biology of Hypogeococcus pungens (sensu stricto) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) in Argentina to Aid the Identification of the Mealybug Pest of Cactaceae in Puerto Rico.

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    Aguirre, M B; Diaz-Soltero, H; Claps, L E; Saracho Bottero, A; Triapitsyn, S; Hasson, E; Logarzo, G A

    2016-01-01

    Hypogeococcus pungens Granara de Willink, sensu stricto, is a serious pest of cacti in Puerto Rico threating many Caribbean islands. A classical biological control program for H. pungens was initiated for Puerto Rico in 2010 with a survey for natural enemies of H. pungens in its native range of Argentina. Biological differences were observed between populations of H. pungens sampled on Amaranthaceae and Cactaceae. Molecular studies suggested that H. pungens populations from different host plant families are likely a complex of species. Our objective was to study the biology of H. pungens sensu stricto on specimens collected in the same locality and host plant as the holotype [Tucumán Province, Argentina; Alternanthera pungens Kunth (Amaranthaceae)]. We were interested in the reproductive biology of females, longevity and survival of adults, the effect of temperature on the development, and nymph performance (survival and development) on five Cactaceae species. We found that H. pungens s.s showed marked biological differences from the populations collected on Cactaceae and exported to Australia for the biological control of the cactus Harrisia spp. The main differences were the presence of deuterotoky parthenogenesis and the fact that H. pungens did not attack Cactaceae in the laboratory. Our results provide biological evidence that H. pungens is a species complex. We propose that the population introduced to Australia is neither Hypogeococcus festerianus Lizer y Trelles nor H. pungens, but an undescribed species with three circuli, and that the Hypogeococcus pest of cacti in Puerto Rico is not H. pungens. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  6. Novel seed coat lignins in the Cactaceae: structure, distribution and implications for the evolution of lignin diversity.

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    Chen, Fang; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Jackson, Lisa; Nakashima, Jin; Ralph, John; Dixon, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    We have recently described a hitherto unsuspected catechyl lignin polymer (C-lignin) in the seed coats of Vanilla orchid and in cacti of one genus, Melocactus (Chen et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 2012, 109, 1772-1777.). We have now determined the lignin types in the seed coats of 130 different cactus species. Lignin in the vegetative tissues of cacti is of the normal guaiacyl/syringyl (G/S) type, but members of most genera within the subfamily Cactoidae possess seed coat lignin of the novel C-type only, which we show is a homopolymer formed by endwise β-O-4-coupling of caffeyl alcohol monomers onto the growing polymer resulting in benzodioxane units. However, the species examined within the genera Coryphantha, Cumarinia, Escobaria and Mammillaria (Cactoideae) mostly had normal G/S lignin in their seeds, as did all six species in the subfamily Opuntioidae that were examined. Seed coat lignin composition is still evolving in the Cactaceae, as seeds of one Mammillaria species (M. lasiacantha) possess only C-lignin, three Escobaria species (E. dasyacantha, E. lloydii and E. zilziana) contain an unusual lignin composed of 5-hydroxyguaiacyl units, the first report of such a polymer that occurs naturally in plants, and seeds of some species contain no lignin at all. We discuss the implications of these findings for the mechanisms that underlie the biosynthesis of these newly discovered lignin types. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. New Alcamide and Anti-oxidant Activity of Pilosocereus gounellei A. Weber ex K. Schum. Bly. ex Rowl. (Cactaceae

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    Jéssica K. S. Maciel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Cactaceae family is composed by 124 genera and about 1438 species. Pilosocereus gounellei, popularly known in Brazil as xique-xique, is used in folk medicine to treat prostate inflammation, gastrointestinal and urinary diseases. The pioneering phytochemical study of P. gounellei was performed using column chromatography and HPLC, resulting in the isolation of 10 substances: pinostrobin (1, β-sitosterol (2, a mixture of sitosterol 3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside/stigmasterol 3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (3a/3b, 132-hydroxyphaeophytin a (4, phaeophytin a (5, a mixture of β-sitosterol and stigmasterol (6a/6b, kaempferol (7, quercetin (8, 7′-ethoxy-trans-feruloyltyramine (mariannein, 9 and trans-feruloyl tyramine (10. Compound 9 is reported for the first time in the literature. The structural characterization of the compounds was performed by analyses of 1-D and 2-D NMR data. In addition, a phenolic and flavonol total content assay was carried out, and the anti-oxidant potential of P. gounellei was demonstrated.

  8. Populational characterization of Melocactus zehntneri (Britton & Rose Luetzelburg (Cactaceae present in an inselberg of the Paraiban Caatinga

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    Juliano Ricardo Fabricante

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Inselbergs are rocky outcrops that are characterized by the fact that they form isolated ecosystems with a high degree of endemism. However, these environments remain little studied. The present work aimed to characterize a population of Melocactus zehntneri (Britton & Rose Luetzelburg (Cactaceae occurring on an inselberg in the municipal district of Pocinhos, PB. Over the whole extension of the inselberg, 50 plots of 1m² were allocated. The sampled individuals were classified according to ontogenetic stadium, evaluating the number of individuals, the height, the diameter in the central section, and the number of dead. To evaluate the pattern of space distribution of the species, the Index of Dispersion of Morisita (Id was calculated, and to verify the influence of one ontogenetic stadium on another, the coefficient of linear correlation was applied (ρ. A total of 869 individuals were sampled, of which 635 were young and 234 were adults. The value of Id was 1.28, indicating that the population distribution was clumped. The value of ρ = -0.3872 demonstrated a negative linear correlation among the ontogenetic stadiums. The accumulation of rocky sediment on some points of the inselberg certainly favored the distribution of the species on it. The population demonstrated stability, with a great number of stock individuals.

  9. Seed vigor and germination of facheiro plants (Pilosocereus catingicola (Gurke Byles & Rowley Subsp. Salvadorensis (Werderm. Zappi (Cactaceae at different temperatures

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    Robson Luis Silva de Medeiros

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Several species of endemic Cactaceae are found in northeastern Brazil, which are important plants to the local fauna and flora; nevertheless, there are only a few studies assessing the germination of this plant genus. Understanding the germination of species native to the Caatinga is essential to subsidize conservation actions for such ecosystem. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of three localities and different temperatures on the vigor and germination of facheiro seeds. The experiment was conducted by evaluating seed vigor and germination in three distinct areas (Arara, Bananeiras, and Boa Vista at different temperatures (20, 25, 30, 35, 40, and 20-30 ºC. Quantitative data were submitted to polynomial regression analysis at 5% significance with four replicates of 50 seeds. In Arara, germination rates at 20 and 25 ºC reached 96% and, at 30 ºC, 86%. The temperatures of 25 and 30 ºC presented the best germination speed index. For the three studied areas, the highest germination rates were recorded at a constant temperature of 25 ºC and at the alternating temperature (20-30 ºC. Yet the highest germination speed was reached at 30 ºC. Based on its sexual propagation, the taxon in question is able to survive in environments with temperatures ranging from 20 to 30 ºC, as seen in the studied habitats.

  10. Reproductive biology of a highly endemic species: Cipocereus laniflorus N.P. Taylor & Zappi (Cactaceae Biologia reprodutiva de uma espécie altamente endêmica: Cipocereus laniflorus Taylor & Zappi (Cactaceae

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    Juliana Ordones Rego

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cipocereus laniflorus N.P. Taylor & Zappi is an endemic species from the Serra do Caraça, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. In order to propose conservation strategies for this species, its reproductive strategies were investigated, including reproductive phenology, floral biology, floral visitors and breeding system. The flowering and fruiting period extends from May to October. Few flowers per plant open each night, producing up to 0.4 ml nectar, but 30% of them are nectarless. Probably pollen is also offered as a resource. Fruiting efficiency of C. laniflorus (47% is close to that found in other Cactaceae species. Pollen of this species was detected in Anoura geoffroy, Soricina glossophaga and Pygoderma bilabiatum bats. Amongst the characteristics related to bat-pollination syndrome found in C. laniflorus, the cream-white colouring of the internal part of the flower, the numerous stamens and the nocturnal anthesis of short duration can be highlighted. Flowers of C. laniflorus are also visited by Nitidulidae beetles, Trigona fulviventris bees and hummingbirds, however bats are the main pollinators of this species. Finally, as a self-sterile species, C. laniflorus needs a pollinator and is more susceptible to the risk of extinction if local disturbances affect its pollination system.Cipocereus laniflorus N.P. Taylor & Zappi é uma espécie endêmica da Serra do Caraça, Minas Gerais, Brasil. A fim de se propor estratégias de conservação para esta espécie, estudos sobre sua biologia reprodutiva foram realizados, incluindo fenologia reprodutiva, biologia floral, visitantes florais e o sistema reprodutivo. O período de floração e frutificação ocorre de maio a outubro. Poucas flores abrem-se por planta a cada noite, podendo produzir até 0.4 ml de néctar, poré 30% destas não apresentam néctar. Cipocereus laniflorus provavelmente oferece também pólen como recurso. A eficiência de frutificação sob condições naturais de poliniza

  11. Influence of Pleistocene glacial/interglacial cycles on the genetic structure of the mistletoe cactus Rhipsalis baccifera (Cactaceae) in Mesoamerica.

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    Ornelas, Juan Francisco; Rodríguez-Gómez, Flor

    2015-01-01

    Phylogeographical work on cloud forest-adapted species provides inconsistent evidence on cloud forest dynamics during glacial cycles. A study of Rhipsalis baccifera (Cactaceae), a bird-dispersed epiphytic mistletoe cactus, was conducted to investigate genetic variation at sequence data from nuclear [internal transcribed spacer (ITS), 677 bp] and chloroplast (rpl32-trnL, 1092bp) DNA for 154 individuals across the species range in Mesoamerica to determine if such patterns are consistent with the expansion/contraction model of cloud forest during glacial cycles. We conducted population and spatial genetic analyses as well as gene flow and divergence time estimates between 24 populations comprising the distribution of R. baccifera in Mexico and Guatemala to gain insight of the evolutionary history of these populations, and a complementary species distribution modeling approach to frame information derived from the genetic analyses into an explicit paleoecological context. The results revealed a phylogeographical break at the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, and high levels of genetic diversity among populations and cloud forest areas. Despite the genetic differentiation of some R. baccifera populations, the widespread ITS ribotypes suggest effective nuclear gene flow via pollen and population differentiation shown by the rpl32-trnL suggests more restricted seed flow. Predictions of species distribution models under past last glacial maximum (LGM) climatic conditions and a significant signal of demographic expansion suggest that R. baccifera populations experienced a range expansion tracking the conditions of the cloud forest distribution and shifted to the lowlands with population connectivity during the LGM. © The American Genetic Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Pollination and seed dispersal of Melocactus ernestii Vaupel subsp. ernestii (Cactaceae) by lizards: an example of double mutualism.

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    Gomes, V G N; Quirino, Z G M; Machado, I C

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies show that the mutualistic role of lizards as pollinators and seed dispersers has been underestimated, with several ecological factors promoting such plant-animal interactions, especially on oceanic islands. Our aim is to provide a quantitative assessment of pollination and seed dispersal mutualisms with lizards in continental xeric habitats. We carried out focal observations of natural populations of Melocactus ernestii (Cactaceae) in the Caatinga, a Brazilian semiarid ecosystem, in order to record the frequency of visits, kind of resource searched and behaviour of visiting animals towards flowers and/or fruits. We made a new record of the lizard Tropidurus semitaeniatus foraging on flowers and fruits of M. ernestii. During the search for nectar, T. semitaeniatus contacted the reproductive structures of the flowers and transported pollen attached to its snout. Nectar production started at 14:00 h, with an average volume of 24.4 μl and an average concentration of solutes of 33%. Approximately 80% of the seeds of M. ernestii found in the faeces of T. semitaeniatus germinated under natural conditions. The roles of T. semitaeniatus as pollinator and seed disperser for M. ernestii show a clear relationship of double mutualism between two endemic species, which may result from the environmental conditions to which both species are subject. Seasonality, low water availability and arthropod supply in the environment, high local lizard densities, continuous nectar production by the flower and fruits with juicy pulp may be influencing the visits and, consequently, pollination and seed dispersal by lizards in this cactus. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  13. The adaptive value of cued seed dispersal in desert plants: Seed retention and release in Mammillaria pectinifera (Cactaceae), a small globose cactus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Edward M; Martorell, Carlos; Ezcurra, Exequiel

    2009-02-01

    Serotiny, or delayed seed dispersal, is common in fluctuating environments because it hedges the risks of establishment. Mammillaria pectinifera (Cactaceae) facultatively expels fruits in the year they are produced or retains them to disperse the seed over several years. We tested whether M. pectinifera increased fruit expulsion as a response to increased rainfall. While no fruit expulsion was observed in 1997, a dry year, in the wetter 1998 around 20% of all fruits formed were expelled from the maternal plant. A greenhouse experiment showed that high moisture results in the plants expelling all their fruits. Because in 1998 establishment was five times higher than in 1997, this response seems to be highly adaptive: Active fruit expulsion and consequent seed release increases the probability of establishment during pulses of high precipitation.

  14. Seed reserve composition and mobilization during germination and early seedling establishment of Cereus jamacaru D.C. ssp. jamacaru (Cactaceae

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    Nara L.M. Alencar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cereus jamacaru, a Cactaceae found throughout northeast Brazil, is widely used as cattle food and as an ornamental and medicinal plant. However, there has been little information about the physiological and biochemical aspects involved in its germination. The aim of this study was to investigate its reserve mobilization during germination and early seedling growth. For this, C. jamacaru seeds were germinated in a growth chamber and collected at 0, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 12 days after imbibition for morphological and biochemical analyses. Dry seeds had wrinkled seed coats and large, curved embryos. Lipids were the most abundant reserve, comprising approximately 55% and 65% of the dry mass for cotyledons and the hypocotylradicle axis, respectively. Soluble sugars and starch were the minor reserves, corresponding to approximately 2.2% of the cotyledons' dry mass, although their levels showed significant changes during germination. Soluble proteins corresponded to 40% of the cotyledons' dry mass, which was reduced by 81% at the final period of germination compared to dry seeds. C. jamacaru seed can be classified as an oil seed due to its high lipid content. Moreover, lipids were the main reserve mobilized during germination because their levels were strongly reduced after seed germination, while proteins were the second most utilized reserve in this process.Cereus jamacaru, uma cactácea encontrada comumente no nordeste brasileiro, é amplamente usada como planta forrageira e como ornamental e medicinal. No entanto, existem poucas informações sobre os aspectos fisiológicos e bioquímicos relacionados à sua germinação. O objetivo desse estudo foi avaliar a mobilização de reservas durante a germinação e o crescimento inicial de plântulas de C. jamacaru. Para isso, as sementes foram germinadas em câmaras de germinação e coletadas aos 0, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8 e 12 dias após a germinação para as análises fisiológicas e bioquímicas. As sementes

  15. Triatominae et Cactaceae : un risque pour la transmission de la Trypanosomose américaine dans le péridomicile (nord-est du Brésil

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    Emperaire L.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Les observations de terrain réalisées dans le nord-est du Brésil ont montré la fréquente association, dans l’espace péridomiciliaire, entre un cactus, le Cereus jamacaru, la présence de nids dans ses branches et celle de Rhodnius neglectus et de Triatoma pseudomaculata, espèces vectrices du parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, agent de la maladie de Chagas. L’analyse des variables architecturales de cette Cactaceae montre que la présence de nids, et donc d’insectes, est inféodée aux pratiques traditionnelles de gestion de ce cactus. Cette étude souligne l’intérêt d’une approche intégrée de l’écologie des Triatominae pour l’identification des variables indicatrices de risque.

  16. Anatomy of Brazilian Cereeae (subfamily Cactoideae, Cactaceae: Arrojadoa Britton & Rose, Stephanocereus A. Berger and Brasilicereus Backeberg Anatomia de espécies brasileiras pertencentes à tribo Cereeae (subfamília Cactoideae, Cactaceae: Arrojadoa Britton & Rose, Stephanocereus A. Berger and Brasilicereus Backeberg

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    Patricia Soffiatti

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available (Anatomy of Brazilian Cereeae (subfamily Cactoideae, Cactaceae: Arrojadoa Britton & Rose, Stephanocereus A. Berger wâBrasilicereus Backeberg. Arrojadoa, Stephanocereus and Brasilicereus are endemic Brazilian Cereeae, occurring along the Espinhaço Range, in the campos rupestres, cerrados and caatingas, from northern Minas Gerais to southern Bahia. The genera are columnar, erect to semi-erect cacti, except for one species, A bahiensis, which is globose. This study describes the anatomy of dermal, fundamental and vascular systems, aiming to find diagnostic characters for the genera and species. Basal portions of stems were sectioned transversely and longitudinally, and stained with Astrablue and Safranin. The species share a uniseriate epidermis, with thick cuticle; well developed collenchymatic hypodermis, containing prismatic crystals; cortex with numerous mucilage cells, druses and vascular bundles; outside cortex as a palisade parenchyma; periderm composed of lignified cork cells alternating with suberized cells; pheloderm consisting of a few layers of thin-walled cells; phloem composed of solitary or multiple of two to three sieve tube elements, companion cells, axial and radial parenchyma; secondary xylem with solitary to multiple vessels, with simple perforation plates and alternate bordered to semi-bordered pits; axial parenchyma scanty vasicentric to incomplete; libriform septate fibres; large rays. Unlignified parenchyma is seen in the secondary xylem, varying from a few cells to bands among axial and radial elements. The following are considered diagnostic characters: the shape of lignified phellem cells, cubic to radially elongate, which individualizes S. leucostele; an underdeveloped hypodermis and the occurrence of sclereids in the cortex are exclusive to Brasilicereus markgrqfii.(Anatomia de espécies brasileiras pertencentes à tribo Cereeae (subfamília Cactoideae, Cactaceae: Arrojadoa Britton & Rose, Stephanocereus A. Berger and

  17. Padrões de isozimas de malato desidrogenase em população clonal nos cladófilos de Opuntia ficus-indica Mill (Cactaceae - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v25i1.2093 Malate dehydrogenase isozyme patterns in cladophylls of a Opuntia ficus-indica Mill. (Cactaceae clonal population - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v25i1.2093

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    Alexandro Cezar Faleiro

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Isozimas de malato desidrogenase (MDH foram usadas como marcadores moleculares para discriminar e agrupar cladófilos de plantas de uma população clonal de cactus da espécie Opuntia ficus-indica (Cactaceae, conhecida como palma. O padrão eletroforético obtido revelou 8 isozimas MDH e 5 fenótipos eletroforéticos diferentes. A similaridade entre os cladófilos foi estimada usando o coeficiente de similaridade de Jaccard. Essa população clonal estudada foi fundada por somente um propágulo e, após 50 anos, parece ser formada por propágulos assexuais e sexuais. Uma vez que a expressão diferencial de isozimas MDH pode ter um papel significante no metabolismo das células da planta, sugerimos que os cladófilos de palma que foram agrupados com os mais altos valores de similaridade são os mais adequados para serem utilizados em procedimentos de extração industrial de compostos de interesse comercial, porque um mesmo protocolo de extração pode ser mais rapidamente e facilmente padronizado quando se utiliza material geneticamente uniforme. O padrão eletroforético das isozimas MDH pode ser usado como uma ferramenta efetiva para uma análise prévia da similaridade genética entre os cladófilos das plantas de O. ficus-indicaMalate dehydrogenase (MDH isozymes were used as biochemical markers to discriminate and cluster cladophylls of plants of one clonal population of the prickly pear, Opuntia ficus-indica (Cactaceae. The isozyme electrophoretic patterns obtained with MDH provided 8 isozymes and 5 different electrophoretic phenotypes. Similarity in cladophylls was estimated using Jaccard’s coefficient. This clonal population studied was founded by only one propagule, and after 50 years, it is likely to have been formed by asexual and sexual propagules. Since that differential expression of MDH isozymes could play a significant role in overall plant cell metabolism, we suggest that the cladophylls of prickly pear that were clustered

  18. Bone Mineral Density, Mechanical, Microstructural Properties and Mineral Content of the Femur in Growing Rats Fed with Cactus Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill. (Cactaceae) Cladodes as Calcium Source in Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Becerra, Ezequiel; Gutiérrez-Cortez, Elsa; Del Real, Alicia; Rojas-Molina, Alejandra; Rodríguez-García, Mario; Rubio, Efraín; Quintero-García, Michelle; Rojas-Molina, Isela

    2017-02-04

    Mechanical, microstructural properties, mineral content and bone mineral density (BMD) of the femur were evaluated in growing rats fed with Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill. (Cactaceae) cladodes at different maturity stages as calcium source. Male weanling rats were fed with cladodes at early maturity stage (25 and 60 days of age, belonging to groups N-60 and N-200, respectively) and cladodes at late maturity stage (100 and 135 days of age, belonging to groups N-400 and N-600, respectively) for 6 weeks. Additionally, a control group fed with calcium carbonate as calcium source was included for comparative purposes. All diets were fitted to the same calcium content (5 g/kg diet). The failure load of femurs was significantly lower (p ≤ 0.05) in groups N-60 and N-200 in comparison to N-400, N-600 and control groups. The cortical width (Ct.Wi) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) of the femurs in control and N-600 groups were significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) than Ct.Wi and Tb.Th of femurs in groups N-60 and N-200. Trabecular separation of the femurs in N-60 and N-200 groups showed the highest values compared with all experimental groups. The highest calcium content in the femurs were observed in control, N-600 and N-400 groups; whereas the lowest phosphorus content in the bones were detected in N-200, N-600 and N-400 groups. Finally, the BMD in all experimental groups increased with age; nevertheless, the highest values were observed in N-600 and control groups during pubertal and adolescence stages. The results derived from this research demonstrate, for the first time, that the calcium found in Opuntia ficus indica cladodes is actually bioavailable and capable of improving mineral density and mechanical and microstructural properties of the bones. These findings suggest that the consumption of cladodes at late maturity stage within the diet might have a beneficial impact on bone health.

  19. Bone Mineral Density, Mechanical, Microstructural Properties and Mineral Content of the Femur in Growing Rats Fed with Cactus Opuntia ficus indica (L. Mill. (Cactaceae Cladodes as Calcium Source in Diet

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    Ezequiel Hernández-Becerra

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical, microstructural properties, mineral content and bone mineral density (BMD of the femur were evaluated in growing rats fed with Opuntia ficus indica (L. Mill. (Cactaceae cladodes at different maturity stages as calcium source. Male weanling rats were fed with cladodes at early maturity stage (25 and 60 days of age, belonging to groups N-60 and N-200, respectively and cladodes at late maturity stage (100 and 135 days of age, belonging to groups N-400 and N-600, respectively for 6 weeks. Additionally, a control group fed with calcium carbonate as calcium source was included for comparative purposes. All diets were fitted to the same calcium content (5 g/kg diet. The failure load of femurs was significantly lower (p ≤ 0.05 in groups N-60 and N-200 in comparison to N-400, N-600 and control groups. The cortical width (Ct.Wi and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th of the femurs in control and N-600 groups were significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05 than Ct.Wi and Tb.Th of femurs in groups N-60 and N-200. Trabecular separation of the femurs in N-60 and N-200 groups showed the highest values compared with all experimental groups. The highest calcium content in the femurs were observed in control, N-600 and N-400 groups; whereas the lowest phosphorus content in the bones were detected in N-200, N-600 and N-400 groups. Finally, the BMD in all experimental groups increased with age; nevertheless, the highest values were observed in N-600 and control groups during pubertal and adolescence stages. The results derived from this research demonstrate, for the first time, that the calcium found in Opuntia ficus indica cladodes is actually bioavailable and capable of improving mineral density and mechanical and microstructural properties of the bones. These findings suggest that the consumption of cladodes at late maturity stage within the diet might have a beneficial impact on bone health.

  20. Bone Mineral Density, Mechanical, Microstructural Properties and Mineral Content of the Femur in Growing Rats Fed with Cactus Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill. (Cactaceae) Cladodes as Calcium Source in Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Becerra, Ezequiel; Gutiérrez-Cortez, Elsa; Del Real, Alicia; Rojas-Molina, Alejandra; Rodríguez-García, Mario; Rubio, Efraín; Quintero-García, Michelle; Rojas-Molina, Isela

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical, microstructural properties, mineral content and bone mineral density (BMD) of the femur were evaluated in growing rats fed with Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill. (Cactaceae) cladodes at different maturity stages as calcium source. Male weanling rats were fed with cladodes at early maturity stage (25 and 60 days of age, belonging to groups N-60 and N-200, respectively) and cladodes at late maturity stage (100 and 135 days of age, belonging to groups N-400 and N-600, respectively) for 6 weeks. Additionally, a control group fed with calcium carbonate as calcium source was included for comparative purposes. All diets were fitted to the same calcium content (5 g/kg diet). The failure load of femurs was significantly lower (p ≤ 0.05) in groups N-60 and N-200 in comparison to N-400, N-600 and control groups. The cortical width (Ct.Wi) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) of the femurs in control and N-600 groups were significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) than Ct.Wi and Tb.Th of femurs in groups N-60 and N-200. Trabecular separation of the femurs in N-60 and N-200 groups showed the highest values compared with all experimental groups. The highest calcium content in the femurs were observed in control, N-600 and N-400 groups; whereas the lowest phosphorus content in the bones were detected in N-200, N-600 and N-400 groups. Finally, the BMD in all experimental groups increased with age; nevertheless, the highest values were observed in N-600 and control groups during pubertal and adolescence stages. The results derived from this research demonstrate, for the first time, that the calcium found in Opuntia ficus indica cladodes is actually bioavailable and capable of improving mineral density and mechanical and microstructural properties of the bones. These findings suggest that the consumption of cladodes at late maturity stage within the diet might have a beneficial impact on bone health. PMID:28165410

  1. Atividade antibacteriana de Cereus jamacaru DC, Cactaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Davet

    Full Text Available A procura por novos agentes antimicrobianos a partir de plantas vem sendo intensificada e não existem estudos direcionados à avaliação da atividade antimicrobiana de C. jamacaru frente a microrganismos prejudiciais ao homem. Em vista disso, avaliou-se o efeito antimicrobiano do extrato bruto etanólico do lenho (EBLE e do córtex (EBCO desta espécie frente a colônias puras de oito microrganismos patogênicos. Neste estudo foram utilizados os métodos difusão em ágar (meio sólido e CIM (concentração inibitória mínima. Os resultados obtidos neste ensaio preliminar mostraram que EBCO apresentou atividade antimicrobiana mais pronunciada que EBCE e que os microrganismos cujo crescimento foi mais influenciado por EBCO foram Streptococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa e Escherichia coli.

  2. Atividade antibacteriana de Cereus jamacaru DC, Cactaceae

    OpenAIRE

    Davet, Aline; Virtuoso,Suzane; Josiane F. G. Dias; Marilis D. Miguel; Andressa B. Oliveira; Miguel, Obdúlio G.

    2009-01-01

    A procura por novos agentes antimicrobianos a partir de plantas vem sendo intensificada e não existem estudos direcionados à avaliação da atividade antimicrobiana de C. jamacaru frente a microrganismos prejudiciais ao homem. Em vista disso, avaliou-se o efeito antimicrobiano do extrato bruto etanólico do lenho (EBLE) e do córtex (EBCO) desta espécie frente a colônias puras de oito microrganismos patogênicos. Neste estudo foram utilizados os métodos difusão em ágar (meio sólido) e CIM (concent...

  3. Structure-function relationships in highly modified shoots of cactaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauseth, James D

    2006-11-01

    Cacti are extremely diverse structurally and ecologically, and so modified as to be intimidating to many biologists. Yet all have the same organization as most dicots, none differs fundamentally from Arabidopsis or other model plants. This review explains cactus shoot structure, discusses relationships between structure, ecology, development and evolution, and indicates areas where research on cacti is necessary to test general theories of morphogenesis. Cactus leaves are diverse; all cacti have foliage leaves; many intermediate stages in evolutionary reduction of leaves are still present; floral shoots often have large, complex leaves whereas vegetative shoots have microscopic leaves. Spines are modified bud scales, some secrete sugar as extra-floral nectaries. Many cacti have juvenile/adult phases in which the flowering adult phase (a cephalium) differs greatly from the juvenile; in some, one side of a shoot becomes adult, all other sides continue to grow as the juvenile phase. Flowers are inverted: the exterior of a cactus 'flower' is a hollow vegetative shoot with internodes, nodes, leaves and spines, whereas floral organs occur inside, with petals physically above stamens. Many cacti have cortical bundles vascularizing the cortex, however broad it evolves to be, thus keeping surface tissues alive. Great width results in great weight of weak parenchymatous shoots, correlated with reduced branching. Reduced numbers of shoot apices is compensated by great increases in number of meristematic cells within individual SAMs. Ribs and tubercles allow shoots to swell without tearing during wet seasons. Shoot epidermis and cortex cells live and function for decades then convert to cork cambium. Many modifications permit water storage within cactus wood itself, adjacent to vessels.

  4. Pereskia aculeata Muller (Cactaceae Leaves: Chemical Composition and Biological Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucèia Fàtima Souza

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this work were to study the chemical composition of the essential oil from the leaves of Pereskia aculeata and to evaluate some biological activities of three leaf extracts. The phenolic content, antioxidant activity, and in vitro antimicrobial and antifungal activities were determined. The methanol extract showed antioxidant activity (EC50 7.09 mg/mL and high polyphenols content (15.04 ± 0.31 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE/g. The petroleum ether extract exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, whereas the chloroform extract showed inhibitory activity against Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus. The petroleum ether and methanol extracts were more effective in inhibiting the growth of Aspergillus versicolor. The possible cytotoxicity of extracts on neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cancer cell line and the influence on adenylate cyclase (ADCY expression was also studied. P. aculeata chloroform extract showed antiproliferative activity with an IC50 value of 262.83 µg/mL. Treatments of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with 100 µg/mL of methanol extract significantly reduced ADCY1 expression.

  5. How specialised is bird pollination in the Cactaceae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorostiague, P; Ortega-Baes, P

    2016-01-01

    Many cactus species produce 'bird' flowers; however, the reproductive biology of the majority of these species has not been studied. Here, we report on a study of the pollination of two species from the Cleistocactus genus, cited as an ornithophilous genus, in the context of the different ways in which they are specialised to bird pollination. In addition, we re-evaluate the level of specialisation of previous studies of cacti with bird pollination and evaluate how common phenotypic specialisation to birds is in this family. Both Cleistocactus species exhibited ornithophilous floral traits. Cleistocactus baumannii was pollinated by hummingbirds, whereas Cleistocactus smaragdiflorus was pollinated by hummingbirds and bees. Pollination by birds has been recorded in 27 cactus species, many of which exhibit ornithophilous traits; however, they show generalised pollination systems with bees, bats or moths in addition to birds being their floral visitors. Of all cactus species, 27% have reddish flowers. This trait is associated with diurnal anthesis and a tubular shape. Phenotypic specialisation to bird pollination is recognised in many cactus species; however, it is not predictive of functional and ecological specialisation in this family. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  6. Compatibilidad sexual entre dos tipos de Hylocerus (Cactaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Castillo M

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Dos de los tipos de pitahaya mas cultivados en la Península de Yucatán, México, difieren principalmente por el color de su cáscara, el primero es de color rojo (Uqroo1, perteneciente a Hylocereus undatus, mientras que en el segundo es color amarillo claro (Uqroo2, hasta el momento también identificado como H. undatus; este último es mas dulce. En ambos tipos de pitahayas, se realizaron autopolinizaciones y polinizaciones cruzadas directas y recíprocas, con el propósito de evaluar el efecto en la cantidad de frutos que lograron su desarrollo. Se midieron algunas variables para detectar la influencia del progenitor paterno en algunas características del fruto. Los testigos se obtuvieron de flores polinizadas libremente. El diseño experimental utilizado fue completamente al azar, con 15 repeticiones por tratamiento. Se encontró que Uqroo1 es autocompatible, mientras que Uqroo2 es autoincompatible. Los testigos de ambos tipos alcanzaron el mismo peso, y los frutos de Uqroo2 logrados por polinización cruzada tuvieron un peso similar al de los testigos o fueron significativamente mas pesados. Algunas variables resultaron positivamente correlacionados; el coeficiente entre el número de semillas y el peso total del fruto fue de r = 0.84. La correlación mas alta (r = 0.97 resultó entre el peso total y el peso de la pulpa. En los frutos obtenidos por polinización cruzada prevalecieron las características del progenitor materno. Se recomienda cultivar la Pitahaya blanca con otro tipo de pitahaya, además de Uqroo1There are two types of pitahaya that are cultivated in Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. They differ mainly in the skin color of the fruit, one of them has a red skin (Uqroo1, while the other has a light yellow skin (Uqroo2 both belong to Hylocereus undatus (Haworth Britt. & Rose. The yellow skin pitahaya is the sweetest. The studies were conducted using the methods of self pollination and cross pollination, with direct crosses and reciprocal pollination in order to evaluate the effect related to the quantity of fruits that accomplish their growing process. Some characteristic parameters of fruits, thus obtained, were used to detect the possible xenic effect. The control samples were collected from naturally pollinated flowers. The experimental design used was completely random and the experiment was repeated fifteen times. The results revealed that the Uqroo1 turned out to be self-compatible, and their fruits reached one hundred percent of development. On the other hand, Uqroo2 was self-incompatible, that is, it did not accept self pollen. The control samples of both types reached the same weight, and the fruits of the Uqroo2 produced by cross pollination had the same or more weight than the control samples. Several parameters were positively correlated. The coefficient between the number of seeds and the fruit weight was r= 0.84. The highest correlation that was found (r = 0.97 in the fruit weight and the pulp weight within both types. The fruits obtained by cross-pollination maintained the characteristic of the female progenitor. It is suggest intercalate the yellow pitahaya plants with another types or species of pitahaya, other than the Uqroo1

  7. Taxonomic revalidation and potential distribution of Armatocereus brevispinus Madsen (Cactaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian R. Loaiza S.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the first confirmed record for northern Peru of Armatocereus brevispinus Madsen, a species of cactus regarded as endemic to the province of Loja, in the southern region of Ecuador. The record corresponds to a locality placed near the km 18 of the route to Ayabaca (04º42’21.0”S and 79º48’51.0”W, in the district of Ayabaca, within the province of Ayabaca, in the Department of Piura. This records represents an extension of the distributional range known for this species in Ecuador. We analyze its taxonomy and the distribution and conservation status and comments on its biogeography in the Andean region.

  8. Taxonomic revalidation and potential distribution of Armatocereus brevispinus Madsen (Cactaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Christian R. Loaiza S.; José Roque Gamarra

    2016-01-01

    Se reporta el primer registro confirmado para el norte de Perú de Armatocereus brevispinus Madsen, una especie de cactácea considerada como endémica de la provincia de Loja, en la región sur del Ecuador. El registro corresponde a una localidad situada en el km 18 de la vía a Ayabaca (04º 42’ 21.0” S y 79º 48’ 51.0” W), en el distrito de Ayabaca, dentro de la provincia de Ayabaca, en el Departamento de Piura. Este registro representa una ampliación del rango distributivo conocido para esta esp...

  9. Rhipsalis grandiflora Haw. (Cactaceae propagation by setem cuttings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stancato Giulio Cesare

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Rhipsalis is being cultivated as a potted plant since the view of the pendant branches with coloured flowers and fruit is very appreciated. Considering that there is no information about the production of rooted propagules of these species, the goal of this work was to evaluate the development of stem cuttings, stimulated by the application of plant growth regulators. The indolebutyric acid (IBA was tested at 0; 4.07; 5.81, and 11.63 mmol L-1 and the naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA at 0; 4.53; 6.47, and 12.94 mmol L-1 for their activity in promoting roots on apical stem segments of Rhipsalis grandiflora Raw. The base of stem cuttings was dipped into auxin solutions mixed with talc and each one was partially embedded in fir bark (Pinus sp and fern fiber (1:1 in polystyrene propagation flats, placed throughout the rooting period in a greenhouse (50% shading, at 60-90% of relative humidity and temperatures from 20 to 25ºC. The experimental design was a completely randomised with eight treatments (twelve replicates, with samplings at 0; 20; 50; 80, and 150 days. The results indicate no differences between IBA and NAA regarding the dry mass of roots, but an increase in for concentrations of 0 and 4.07 mmol L-1 of IBA and 0 and 4.53 mmol L-1 of NAA, in relation to treatments with auxins. Stem cuttings treated with 4.07 mmol L-1 of IBA and 4.53 mmol L-1 of NAA, had greater dry mass of shoot bud differentiation in relation to those treated with 0 mmol L-1.

  10. Assessing local scale impacts of Opuntia stricta (Cactaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigated the effect of O. stricta on beetle and spider species assemblages in the Skukuza region of Kruger National Park. We used unbaited pitfall traps over a 12-month period in four treatments of varying O. stricta density. Species richness, species density and abundance of beetles and spiders were compared.

  11. Micro-morphology and anatomy of Turbinicarpus (Cactaceae spines Micromorfología y anatomía de las espinas de Turbinicarpus (Cactaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Mosco

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Spines are a striking feature of cacti and display wide variation in size, number, shape, and texture. This study showed that Turbinicarpus species exhibit not only a high variability in the gross morphology of the spines, but also in their micro-morphology. Their surface can be smooth or ornamented with projections that can be low, conical, pinnate, or long trichomes. The epidermis can be continuous, broken up into single cell elements or transversely fissured, the fissures extending deeply into the underlying sclerenchyma. The mechanical properties of the spines are related to their anatomy, here documented for the first time. The woody rigid spines being made up of fibers with thick walls (> 3 µm, while papery or corky spines have a sclerenchyma made up of fibers with thin walls (Las espinas son una de las características más distintivas de las cactáceas y se distinguen por su variación en tamaño, número, forma y textura. Este estudio muestra que las especies de Turbinicarpus no sólo tienen variación en la morfología de sus espinas, sino también en su micro-morfología. Su superficie puede ser lisa u ornamentada con proyecciones bajas, cónicas, pinadas o bien con tricomas largos. En las espinas, la epidermis se mantiene continua, separada en sus células o transversalmente fisurada. Las fisuras de la epidermis pueden prolongarse hasta el esclerénquima más interno. Las propiedades mecánicas de las espinas están relacionadas con su anatomía, aquí documentada por primera vez. Las espinas rígidas están constituidas de fibras con paredes gruesas (> 3 µm, mientras que las espinas suaves o corchosas, también denominadas cerdas tienen esclerénquima de fibras con paredes delgadas (< 2 µm. Además, algunas espinas en su madurez tienen 2 tipos de fibras, las pobremente lignificadas en la parte externa y en la interna las de paredes gruesas y lignificadas. La taxonomía de Turbinicarpus se basa principalmente en las espinas y los datos aquí generados contribuyen a un mejor entendimiento de sus relaciones interespecíficas. El conocimiento de las características epidermales como los tricomas largos, la carencia de ornamentación o las modificaciones anatómicas de las espinas corchosas pueden interpretarse como caracteres apomórficos en el género.

  12. xPachebergia (Cactaceae, a nothogenus from western Mexico xPachebergia (Cactaceae, un notogénero del occidente de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Arias

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available xPachebergia (Backebergia x Pachycereus, a new nothogenus from western Mexico, is proposed. Stem and seed morphology of this poorly known taxon from dry to very dry deciduous tropical forest in the Balsas River Basin, Guerrero, are described and illustrated. Its diagnostic morphological characters and relationships with Pachycereus pecten-aboriginum and Backebergia militaris, its putative parental taxa, are discussed.Se propone un notogénero nuevo, xPachebergia (Backebergia x Pachycereus, del occidente de México. Se describen e ilustran los tallos y la morfología de la semilla de este taxón poco conocido de los bosques subhúmedos y deciduos de la cuenca del Balsas, Guerrero. Se discuten sus caracteres morfológicos diagnósticos y la relación con los supuestos taxones parentales, Pachycereus pecten-aboriginum y Backebergia militaris.

  13. Diurnal and nocturnal pollination of Marginatocereus marginatus (Pachycereeae: Cactaceae) in Central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Saleem; del Coro Arizmendi, Ma; Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso

    2006-03-01

    Chiropterophillous and ornithophillous characteristics can form part of a single reproductive strategy in plants that have flowers with diurnal and nocturnal anthesis. This broader pollination strategy can ensure seed set when pollinators are scarce or unpredictable. This appears to be true of hummingbirds, which presumably pollinate Marginatocereus marginatus, a columnar cactus with red nocturnal and diurnal flowers growing as part of dense bat-pollinated columnar cacti forests in arid regions of central Mexico. The aim of this study was to study the floral biology of M. marginatus, and evaluate the effectiveness of nocturnal vs. diurnal pollinators and the contribution of each pollinator group to overall plant fitness. Individual flower buds were marked and followed to evaluate flower phenology and anthesis time. Flowers and nectar production were measured. An exclusion experiment was conducted to measure the relative contribution of nocturnal and diurnal pollinators to seed set. Marginatocereus marginatus has red hermaphroditic flowers with nocturnal and diurnal anthesis. The plant cannot produce seeds by selfing and was pollinated during the day by hummingbirds and during the night by bats, demonstrating that both pollinator groups were important for plant reproduction. Strong pollen limitation was found in the absence of one of the pollinator guilds. Marginatocereus marginatus has an open pollination system in which both diurnal and nocturnal pollinators are needed to set seeds. This represents a fail-safe pollination system that can ensure both pollination, in a situation of low abundance of one of the pollinator groups (hummingbirds), and high competition for nocturnal pollinators with other columnar cacti that bloom synchronously with M. marginatus in the Tehuacan Valley, Mexico.

  14. Evolution of Polaskia chichipe (Cactaceae) under domestication in the Tehuacan Valley, central Mexico: reproductive biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-Arnaiz, Adriana; Casas, Alejandro; Bartolo, Carmen; Pérez-Negrón, Edgar; Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso

    2003-04-01

    Polaskia chichipe, a columnar cactus, is cultivated for its edible fruits in central Mexico. This study analyzed whether artificial selection has modified its reproduction patterns and caused barriers to pollen exchange between wild, managed in situ, and cultivated populations. Anthesis was diurnal (∼16 h in winter, ∼10 h in spring) as well as partly nocturnal (∼12 h in winter, ∼3 h in spring), and flowers were pollinated by bees, hummingbirds, and hawk moths. Manual cross-pollination was ∼37-49% effective in all populations. Self-pollination was ∼12% successful in the wild, but twice as successful (∼22-27%) in managed and cultivated populations. Diurnal pollination was ∼35-55% effective in winter and 100% in spring. Nocturnal pollination was successful only in winter (15%). Crosses among individuals were more effective within populations than among populations, including populations under a similar management regimen. The least successful crosses were between wild and cultivated populations. Flowers were produced in all populations from January to March, but flowering peaks differed by 1 mo among wild, managed, and cultivated populations and by 2 mo between wild and cultivated populations. The latter interrupted pollen exchange in May. Seeds from managed and cultivated populations germinated faster than those from wild individuals. Domestication has seemingly favored self-compatible P. chichipe plants with higher fruit yield, a longer period of fruit production, and faster seed germination, attributes that have resulted in partial reproductive barriers between wild and manipulated populations.

  15. [Floral biology and pollinators of Trichocereus pasacana (Cactaceae) in Parque Nacional Los Cardones, Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Viana, M L; Ortega Baes, P; Saravia, M; Badano, E I; Schlumpberger, B

    2001-03-01

    Many columnar cacti are bat pollinated. It has been suggested that this kind of pollination would be more important in tropical than in temperate regions where flowers are open only one night. Thrichocereus pasacana produces big and resistant white flowers. We analyzed flower characteristics, floral cycle, stigmatic receptivity, nectar production, pollen presence and floral visitors in a T. pasacana population at National Park Los Cardones (Salta, Argentina) in November 1997. Flower features were constant between individuals of the population. Flowers start opening at evening and anthesis time is from 18 to 40 hs. The estigma was receptive throughout the floral cycle. Anther dehiscence occurs with flower opening. Nectar production was highest between 18 to 24 hs. Although T. pasacana are open during the night, floral visitors are diurnal. The most frequent was Xylocopa sp. In the study area, nectarivorous bats were not detected. The morphological features of T. pasacana flowers were similar but bigger compared to other columnar cacti. Anthesis time was also longer while nectar production was lower. T. pasacana pollination at National Park Los Cardones is done by bees.

  16. Directional orientation of reproductive tissue of Eulychnia breviflora (Cactaceae) in the hyperarid Atacama Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven D. Warren; Lorgio E. Aguilera; Scott Baggett

    2016-01-01

    Our explanation of the phenomenon differs from other researchers. Inasmuch as reproductive tissue contains little or no chlorophyll, we suggest that the flowers emerge from areas of the stems that receive abundant PAR, not because the reproductive tissue itself requires exposure to PAR. Because the translocation of photosynthates in cacti is difficult and...

  17. Quantification Physicochemical in Melon Cactus [Melocactus zehntneri (Britton & Rose) Luetzelburg - Cactaceae].

    OpenAIRE

    NUNES, E. N.; LEMOS, D.M.; S. F. SILVA; ROCHA,A.P.T; LUCENA, C.M.; MEIADO,M.V.; LUCENA,R.F.P.

    2016-01-01

    RESUMO No Nordeste do Brasil é bastante comum e variado o uso da coroa-de-frade (Melocactus spp.). Assim, o objetivo deste estudo foi realizar diversas análises em cladódios de coroa-de-frade [Melocactus zehntneri (Britton & Rose) Luetzelburg], para que possamos compreender as razões estes usos. Os cladódios foram coletados na cidade de Campina Grande e levados ao Laboratório de Engenharia de Alimentos da Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, onde foram feitas as seguintes análises: peso, a...

  18. Ecological longevity of Polaskia chende (Cactaceae) seeds in the soil seed bank, seedling emergence and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordoñez-Salanueva, C A; Orozco-Segovia, A; Canales-Martínez, M; Seal, C E; Pritchard, H W; Flores-Ortiz, C M

    2017-11-01

    Soil seed banks are essential elements of plant population dynamics, enabling species to maintain genetic variability, withstand periods of adversity and persist over time, including for cactus species. However knowledge of the soil seed bank in cacti is scanty. In this study, over a 5-year period we studied the seed bank dynamics, seedling emergence and nurse plant facilitation of Polaskia chende, an endemic columnar cactus of central Mexico. P. chende seeds were collected for a wild population in Puebla, Mexico. Freshly collected seeds were sown at 25 °C and 12-h photoperiod under white light, far-red light and darkness. The collected seeds were divided in two lots, the first was stored in the laboratory and the second was use to bury seeds in open areas and beneath a shrub canopy. Seeds were exhumed periodically over 5 years. At the same time seeds were sown in open areas and beneath shrub canopies; seedling emergence and survival were recorded over different periods of time for 5 years. The species forms long-term persistent soil seed banks. The timing of seedling emergence via germination in the field was regulated by interaction between light, temperature and soil moisture. Seeds entered secondary dormancy at specific times according to the expression of environmental factors, demonstrating irregular dormancy cycling. Seedling survival of P. chende was improved under Acacia constricta nurse plants. Finally, plant facilitation affected the soil seed bank dynamics as it promoted the formation of a soil seed bank, but not its persistence. © 2017 German Society for Plant Sciences and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  19. Agrobiodiversity of cactus pear (Opuntia, Cactaceae in the Meridional Highlands Plateau of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Reyes-Agüero

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Mexico is characterized by a remarkable richness of Opuntia, mostly at the Meridional Highlands Plateau; it is also here where the greatest richness of Opuntia variants occurs. Most of these variants have been maintained in homegardens; however, the gathering process which originated these homegardens has been disrupted over the past decades, as a result of social change and the destruction of large wild nopaleras. If the variants still surviving in homegardens are lost, these will be hard to recover, that is, the millenary cultural heritage from the human groups that populated the Mexican Meridional Highland Plateau will be lost forever. This situation motivated the preparation of a catalogue that records the diversity of wild and cultivated Opuntia variants living in the meridional Highlands Plateau. To this end, 379 samples were obtained in 29 localities, between 1998 and 2003. The information was processed through Twinspan. All specimens were identified and preserved in herbaria. Botanical keys and descriptions were elaborated. The catalogue includes information on 126 variants comprising 18 species. There were species with only one variant (Opuntia atropes, O. cochinera, O. jaliscana, O. leucotricha, O. rzedowskii and O. velutina, two (O. durangensis, O. lindheimeri, O. phaeacantha and O. robusta, five (O. joconostle and O. lasiacantha, seven (O. chavena, 12 (O. hyptiacantha and O. streptacantha, 15 (O. ficus-indica, 22 (O. albicarpa, and up to 34 (O. megacantha. Additionally, 267 common cactus pear names were related to those variants.

  20. Development and Characterization of 10 Microsatellite Loci in the Giant Cardon Cactus, Pachycereus pringlei (Cactaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Gutiérrez Flores

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for the cardon, a giant columnar cactus (Pachycereus pringlei of the Sonoran Desert, to investigate intraspecific genetic patterns of diversity and population structure. Methods and Results: Using 454 GS-FLX technology and bioinformatics tools, microsatellite primers were successfully identified on 282 reads, including di-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexanucleotides. A set of 10 primers were characterized on 80 individuals collected in two areas of the Baja California peninsula, Mexico. All 10 loci were polymorphic, with a mean of 6.3 alleles per locus and overall levels of observed and expected heterozygosities ranging from 0.41 to 0.59 and from 0.40 to 0.57, respectively. Alleles per individual plant ranged from one to four, suggesting a polyploidal genome. Conclusions: These loci should be useful for future investigations of population structure, genetic diversity, and gene flow in the cardon cactus.

  1. Factors affecting establishment success of the endangered Caribbean cactus Harrisia portoricensis (Cactaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julissa Rojas-Sandoval

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Early plant stages may be the most vulnerable within the life cycle of plants especially in arid ecosystems. Interference from exotic species may exacerbate this condition. We evaluated germination, seedling survival and growth in the endangered Caribbean cactus Harrisia portoricensis, as a function of sunlight exposure (i.e., growing under open and shaded areas, different shade providers (i.e., growing under two native shrubs and one exotic grass species, two levels of predation (i.e., exclusion and non-exclusion and variable microenvironmental conditions (i.e., temperature, PAR, humidity. Field experiments demonstrated that suitable conditions for germination and establishment of H. portoricensis seedling are optimal in shaded areas beneath the canopy of established species, but experiments also demonstrated that the identity of the shade provider can have a significant influence on the outcome of these processes. Harrisia portoricensis seedlings had higher probabilities of survival and grew better (i.e., larger diameters when they were transplanted beneath the canopy of native shrubs, than beneath the exotic grass species, where temperature and solar radiation values were on average much higher than those obtained under the canopies of native shrubs. We also detected that exclusión from potential predators did not increase seedling survival. Our combined results for H. portoricensis suggested that the modification of microenvironmental conditions by the exotic grass may lower the probability of recruitment and establishment of this endangered cactus species. Rev. Biol. Trop. 60 (2: 867-879. Epub 2012 June 01.

  2. Development and characterization of 10 microsatellite loci in the giant cardon cactus, Pachycereus pringlei (Cactaceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Flores, Carina; Lozano Garza, O. Adrian; León de la Luz, José L.; García de León, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for the cardon, a giant columnar cactus (Pachycereus pringlei) of the Sonoran Desert, to investigate intraspecific genetic patterns of diversity and population structure. • Methods and Results: Using 454 GS-FLX technology and bioinformatics tools, microsatellite primers were successfully identified on 282 reads, including di-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexanucleotides. A set of 10 primers were characterized on 80 individuals collected in two areas of the Baja California peninsula, Mexico. All 10 loci were polymorphic, with a mean of 6.3 alleles per locus and overall levels of observed and expected heterozygosities ranging from 0.41 to 0.59 and from 0.40 to 0.57, respectively. Alleles per individual plant ranged from one to four, suggesting a polyploidal genome. • Conclusions: These loci should be useful for future investigations of population structure, genetic diversity, and gene flow in the cardon cactus. PMID:25202601

  3. Factors affecting establishment success of the endangered Caribbean cactus Harrisia portoricensis (Cactaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Sandoval, Julissa; Meléndez-Ackerman, Elvia

    2012-06-01

    Early plant stages may be the most vulnerable within the life cycle of plants especially in arid ecosystems. Interference from exotic species may exacerbate this condition. We evaluated germination, seedling survival and growth in the endangered Caribbean cactus Harrisia portoricensis, as a function of sunlight exposure (i.e., growing under open and shaded areas), different shade providers (i.e., growing under two native shrubs and one exotic grass species), two levels of predation (i.e., exclusion and non-exclusion) and variable microenvironmental conditions (i.e., temperature, PAR, humidity). Field experiments demonstrated that suitable conditions for germination and establishment of H. portoricensis seedling are optimal in shaded areas beneath the canopy of established species, but experiments also demonstrated that the identity of the shade provider can have a significant influence on the outcome of these processes. Harrisia portoricensis seedlings had higher probabilities of survival and grew better (i.e., larger diameters) when they were transplanted beneath the canopy of native shrubs, than beneath the exotic grass species, where temperature and solar radiation values were on average much higher than those obtained under the canopies of native shrubs. We also detected that exclusion from potential predators did not increase seedling survival. Our combined results for H. portoricensis suggested that the modification of microenvironmental conditions by the exotic grass may lower the probability of recruitment and establishment of this endangered cactus species.

  4. Development and characterization of 10 microsatellite loci in the giant cardon cactus, Pachycereus pringlei (Cactaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Flores, Carina; Lozano Garza, O Adrian; León de la Luz, José L; García de León, Francisco J

    2014-02-01

    Microsatellite primers were developed for the cardon, a giant columnar cactus (Pachycereus pringlei) of the Sonoran Desert, to investigate intraspecific genetic patterns of diversity and population structure. • Using 454 GS-FLX technology and bioinformatics tools, microsatellite primers were successfully identified on 282 reads, including di-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexanucleotides. A set of 10 primers were characterized on 80 individuals collected in two areas of the Baja California peninsula, Mexico. All 10 loci were polymorphic, with a mean of 6.3 alleles per locus and overall levels of observed and expected heterozygosities ranging from 0.41 to 0.59 and from 0.40 to 0.57, respectively. Alleles per individual plant ranged from one to four, suggesting a polyploidal genome. • These loci should be useful for future investigations of population structure, genetic diversity, and gene flow in the cardon cactus.

  5. Using Next Generation RAD Sequencing to Isolate Multispecies Microsatellites for Pilosocereus (Cactaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonatelli, Isabel A S; Carstens, Bryan C; Moraes, Evandro M

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite markers (also known as SSRs, Simple Sequence Repeats) are widely used in plant science and are among the most informative molecular markers for population genetic investigations, but the development of such markers presents substantial challenges. In this report, we discuss how next generation sequencing can replace the cloning, Sanger sequencing, identification of polymorphic loci, and testing cross-amplification that were previously required to develop microsatellites. We report the development of a large set of microsatellite markers for five species of the Neotropical cactus genus Pilosocereus using a restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) on a Roche 454 platform. We identified an average of 165 microsatellites per individual, with the absolute numbers across individuals proportional to the sequence reads obtained per individual. Frequency distribution of the repeat units was similar in the five species, with shorter motifs such as di- and trinucleotide being the most abundant repeats. In addition, we provide 72 microsatellites that could be potentially amplified in the sampled species and 22 polymorphic microsatellites validated in two populations of the species Pilosocereus machrisii. Although low coverage sequencing among individuals was observed for most of the loci, which we suggest to be more related to the nature of the microsatellite markers and the possible bias inserted by the restriction enzymes than to the genome size, our work demonstrates that an NGS approach is an efficient method to isolate multispecies microsatellites even in non-model organisms.

  6. Using Next Generation RAD Sequencing to Isolate Multispecies Microsatellites for Pilosocereus (Cactaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel A S Bonatelli

    Full Text Available Microsatellite markers (also known as SSRs, Simple Sequence Repeats are widely used in plant science and are among the most informative molecular markers for population genetic investigations, but the development of such markers presents substantial challenges. In this report, we discuss how next generation sequencing can replace the cloning, Sanger sequencing, identification of polymorphic loci, and testing cross-amplification that were previously required to develop microsatellites. We report the development of a large set of microsatellite markers for five species of the Neotropical cactus genus Pilosocereus using a restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq on a Roche 454 platform. We identified an average of 165 microsatellites per individual, with the absolute numbers across individuals proportional to the sequence reads obtained per individual. Frequency distribution of the repeat units was similar in the five species, with shorter motifs such as di- and trinucleotide being the most abundant repeats. In addition, we provide 72 microsatellites that could be potentially amplified in the sampled species and 22 polymorphic microsatellites validated in two populations of the species Pilosocereus machrisii. Although low coverage sequencing among individuals was observed for most of the loci, which we suggest to be more related to the nature of the microsatellite markers and the possible bias inserted by the restriction enzymes than to the genome size, our work demonstrates that an NGS approach is an efficient method to isolate multispecies microsatellites even in non-model organisms.

  7. Anatomical and morphological features of seedlings of some Cactoideae Eaton (Cactaceae Juss. species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halyna Kalashnyk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-month-old seedlings of 11 species of the subfamily Cactoideae (Melocactus bahiensis, Melocactus curvispinus, Echinopsis eyriesii, E. mirablis, E. peruviana, Oreocereus celsianus, Rebutia flavistyla, Rebutia minuscula, Astrophytum myriostigma, Mamillaria columbiana, and M. prolifera have been studied. These plants exhibit a uniseriate epidermis, covered by a thin cuticle. Except for E. peruviana and A. myriostigma, no hypodermis could be detected. The shoots of all studied specimens consist mainly of cortex parenchyma with large thin-walled cells. The pith parenchyma is composed of much smaller cells. Due to the fact that the cortex parenchyma comprises the largest portion of the cross-sectional area, it can be concluded that it is the main water-storing tissue. The extent of vascular tissue development varies. Collateral vascular bundles are present in the stele. The studied seedlings contain various ergastic substances, in particular inclusions of calcium oxalate (all studied species, starch (Mammillaria prolifera, E. mirabilis, and the genus Melocactus, inulin-like inclusions, and occasionally lipid drops (some Echinopsis species. Thus, it was found that all studied plants have a highly specialized anatomical and morphological structure. At the same time, the epidermis and hypodermis are poorly developed. Accordingly, the adaptation to arid conditions of the examined seedlings involves an increased growth of the water-storing tissue and the production of ergastic substances.

  8. Factors affecting establishment success of the endangered Caribbean cactus Harrisia portoricensis (Cactaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julissa Rojas-Sandoval

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Early plant stages may be the most vulnerable within the life cycle of plants especially in arid ecosystems. Interference from exotic species may exacerbate this condition. We evaluated germination, seedling survival and growth in the endangered Caribbean cactus Harrisia portoricensis, as a function of sunlight exposure (i.e., growing under open and shaded areas, different shade providers (i.e., growing under two native shrubs and one exotic grass species, two levels of predation (i.e., exclusion and non-exclusion and variable microenvironmental conditions (i.e., temperature, PAR, humidity. Field experiments demonstrated that suitable conditions for germination and establishment of H. portoricensis seedling are optimal in shaded areas beneath the canopy of established species, but experiments also demonstrated that the identity of the shade provider can have a significant influence on the outcome of these processes. Harrisia portoricensis seedlings had higher probabilities of survival and grew better (i.e., larger diameters when they were transplanted beneath the canopy of native shrubs, than beneath the exotic grass species, where temperature and solar radiation values were on average much higher than those obtained under the canopies of native shrubs. We also detected that exclusión from potential predators did not increase seedling survival. Our combined results for H. portoricensis suggested that the modification of microenvironmental conditions by the exotic grass may lower the probability of recruitment and establishment of this endangered cactus species. Rev. Biol. Trop. 60 (2: 867-879. Epub 2012 June 01.Las etapas iniciales de las plantas parecen ser las más vulnerables de su ciclo de vida, especialmente en ecosistemas áridos. Interferencias de especies exóticas pueden exacerbar esta condición. Evaluamos la germinación, supervivencia y crecimiento de plántulas del cactus en peligro de extinción Harrisia portoricensis, en función de la exposición a la luz solar, diferentes proveedores de sombra, exclusión de potenciales depredadores y condiciones micro-ambientales variables. Los experimentos demostraron que las condiciones adecuadas para la germinación y el establecimiento de plántulas de H. portoricensis son óptimas en áreas de sombra, bajo el dosel de especies establecidas, pero también demostraron que la identidad de los proveedores de sombra puede tener una influencia significativa sobre los resultados de estos procesos y que la exclusión de depredadores no aumentó la probabilidad de supervivencia de las plántulas. Las plántulas de H. portoricensis tuvieron mayores probabilidades de supervivencia y crecieron mejor cuando fueron transplantadas bajo la sombra de los arbustos nativos que bajo la sombra del pasto exótico, donde la temperatura y la radiación solar fueron en promedio mucho mayores que las obtenidas bajo la sombra de los arbustos nativos. Nuestros resultados sugieren que las modificaciones de las condiciones micro-ambientales por este pasto exótico pueden disminuir la probabilidad de reclutamiento y establecimiento de esta especie en peligro.

  9. Physical characterization of Rhipsalis (Cactaceae fruits and seeds germination in different temperatures and light regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Lone

    Full Text Available Abstract The germination characteristics of the native cactus species are poorly known, being the temperature and the light the factors that the most interferes in that process. Thus, the objective of the present work was to characterize the fruits and evaluate the influence of the temperature and the light in the seed germination of Rhipsalis floccosa, Rhipsalis pilocarpa and Rhipsalis teres. The tested constant temperatures were 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 °C and the alternate of 20-30 °C and 25-35 °C in a photoperiod of 10 hours, and with determination of the most appropriate temperature, the germination was tested in light absence. The germination percentage, the index of germination speed and medium time of germination were evaluated. For R. floccosa, the highest germination percentage was at 20 °C. For R. pilocarpa and R. teres, the highest germination percentages occurred in 15 °C and 20 °C. There was correlation to germination percentage between the three species, indicating that they had similar germination behavior. Total absence of germination was verified for the three species in condition of light absence. In conclusion, the temperature of 20 °C is the most suitable for the seed germination of R. floccosa. For the species R. pilocarpa and R. teres, the temperatures of 15 and 20 °C are the most suitable.

  10. Physical characterization of Rhipsalis (Cactaceae) fruits and seeds germination in different temperatures and light regimes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lone, A B; Colombo, R C; Andrade, B L G; Takahashi, L S A; Faria, R T

    2016-01-01

    .... Thus, the objective of the present work was to characterize the fruits and evaluate the influence of the temperature and the light in the seed germination of Rhipsalis floccosa, Rhipsalis pilocarpa and Rhipsalis teres...

  11. Generative period in development of Mammillaria Haw. (Cactaceae Juss. plants in greenhouse conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna Baglay

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomic composition of the collection of the genus Mammillariain O.V. Fomin Botanical Garden, as well as the peculiarities of blooming and seed germination have been considered. The list of the plants from the genus Mammillariain this collection which are included into IUCN Red List have been represented. The optimal conditions of seed conservation have been determined.

  12. Nonlinear models applied to seed germination of Rhipsalis cereuscula Haw (Cactaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terezinha Aparecida Guedes

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this analysis was to fit germination data of Rhipsalis cereuscula Haw seeds to the Weibull model with three parameters using Frequentist and Bayesian methods. Five parameterizations were compared using the Bayesian analysis to fit a prior distribution. The parameter estimates from the Frequentist method were similar to the Bayesian responses considering the following non-informative a priori distribution for the parameter vectors: gamma (10³, 10³ in the model M1, normal (0, 106 in the model M2, uniform (0, Lsup in the model M3, exp (μ in the model M4 and Lnormal (μ, 106 in the model M5. However, to achieve the convergence in the models M4 and M5, we applied the μ from the estimates of the Frequentist approach. The best models fitted by the Bayesian method were the M1 and M3. The adequacy of these models was based on the advantages over the Frequentist method such as the reduced computational efforts and the possibility of comparison.

  13. Reproductive ability and possibilities of restoration of the genus Parodia Speg. (Cactaceae Juss. in greenhouses conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna Baglay

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The collection of the genus Рarodia of the O.V. Fomin Botanical Garden of the Taras Shevchenko Kyiv National University covers 74 species and varieties. About 60% of representatives of the genus pass through the full development cycle (plants form flowers and fruits. The fruits are formed as a result of self-fertilization that is important moment in greenhouses conditions. The collection of the genus Рarodia was analyzed on presence of rare and endangered species, protected by Convention of International Trade of Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES and Red List of the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN. Their categorization by rarity has been done. The germination of fresh gathered seed was studied. The species, which biennial seedlings are recommended to the use in phytodesign have been selected.

  14. Effects of temperature and substrate on the germination of Hamatocactus setispinus (Cactaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Brites Xavier

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cacti are widely used as ornamental plants and seed germination is a major method for preserving genetic diversity. Thus, an experiment was carried out to evaluate the effects of different temperatures and substrates on seed germination of Hamatocactus setispinus. Seeds were sown in gerbox boxes containing either germination paper (S1, sand (S2 or vermiculite (S3. After placing the seeds on the substrates, the boxes were kept in germination chambers at 20, 25, 30 and 35° C for 30 days, under a photoperiod of 16 hours. The experiment was in a completely randomized design with four replicates. The speed germination index (SGI, mean germination time (MT and germination rates (% were evaluated. The best results were observed at 25º C. The highest SGI (3.94 was observed on seed germination paper, but MT values and germination rates on this substrate did not differ from those obtained on sand. Therefore, both substrates could be used for germination of this cactus species.

  15. Dynamic Analysis of the Evolution of Cereus peruvianus (Cactaceae Areas Attacked by Phoma sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyorgy FESZT

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Cereus Peruvianus (night blooming Cereus, or peruvian apple is one of the sensitive species to Phoma attack. Photographic images can intercept a certain phytopathology, at a certain moment. The computerized analysis of such an image turns into a value the spread which the phytopathological process has at that moment. The purpose of this study is to assimilate the technique of achieving successions of digital photos of Cereus peruvianus f. monstruosa attacked by Phoma sp. Parallely with recording the images, with the help of Rhythm digital temperature humidity controller, were recorded data about the green house microclimate (air humidity-minimum and maximum, temperature-minimum and maximum. In the first stage of the study, the attack presents small fluctuations, reaching a high level in days with low temperatures. So, the most significant growths were recorded in the periods: 10. 02. 2005-20. 02. 2005 with an affected area of 10.97-8.82 = 2.15 and 11. 03. 2005-22. 04. 2005 with growth differences of 14.67-13.32 = 1.35. Generally, the affected areas grow in days with low minimum temperatures. The great advantage of this technique is represented by the possibility of using in situ in home areas of species or crop plants in fields. Repeated images, achieved in time, then overlapped, can provide important data on the evolution of affected areas.

  16. An open door for illegal trade: online sale of Strombocactus disciformis (Cactaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vania R. Olmos-Lau

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Online trade of CITES listed species has become a persistent threat which is difficult to measure and control. The use of online markets is growing day by the day as technology becomes more available and familiar to people of all ages and interests. Species trade can now be propagated remotely hardly without any real human interaction. We develop a quick-easy method to assess the online availability of the genus Strombocactus, a highly collectible cactus, to understand the real magnitude of this new form of threat and the possible menace it could be for these Mexican cacti. We used the Google.com site to do an online search in four languages (Spanish, English, French and German for the offer of adult plants or seeds. We found specimens and seeds available in major online markets like ebay, amazon, cactusplaza.com and mercado libre. Plant price range from €10.00 to €30.00 plus shipping and handling. The plants were also offered in local online stores in countries like the USA, France, Germany, Australia, Czech Republic, the United Kingdom, and others; some sellers claim they have no obstacles for “shipping across countries” and others openly declare the natural localities where seeds were extracted. Only a minority of these online stores openly stated that the cacti were obtained from CITES registered nurseries or that the cacti were grown through propagules or seeds. Our method is easily transferable to estimate the illegal market for any species. There is an active online trade of Strombocactus species and other species listed in CITES without the necessary documentation. Compliance or other regulation mechanisms are needed in order to promote species conservation.

  17. Morphological variation and the process of domestication of Stenocereus stellatus (Cactaceae) in Central Mexico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Casas, Alejandro; Caballero, Javier; Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso; Soriano, Jose Antonio; Davila, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    ... • Stenocereus stellatus • Tehuacán Valley CiteULike     Complore     Connotea     Del.icio.us     Digg     Facebook     Reddit     Technorati     Twitter     What's this?

  18. Managing diversity: Domestication and gene flow in Stenocereus stellatus Riccob. (Cactaceae) in Mexico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cruse-Sanders, Jennifer M; Parker, Kathleen C; Friar, Elizabeth A; Huang, Daisie I; Mashayekhi, Saeideh; Prince, Linda M; Otero-Arnaiz, Adriana; Casas, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellite markers (N = 5) were developed for analysis of genetic variation in 15 populations of the columnar cactus Stenocereus stellatus, managed under traditional agriculture practices in central Mexico...

  19. Managing diversity: Domestication and gene flow in Stenocereus stellatus Riccob. (Cactaceae) in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruse-Sanders, Jennifer M; Parker, Kathleen C; Friar, Elizabeth A; Huang, Daisie I; Mashayekhi, Saeideh; Prince, Linda M; Otero-Arnaiz, Adriana; Casas, Alejandro

    2013-05-01

    Microsatellite markers (N = 5) were developed for analysis of genetic variation in 15 populations of the columnar cactus Stenocereus stellatus, managed under traditional agriculture practices in central Mexico. Microsatellite diversity was analyzed within and among populations, between geographic regions, and among population management types to provide detailed insight into historical gene flow rates and population dynamics associated with domestication. Our results corroborate a greater diversity in populations managed by farmers compared with wild ones (H E = 0.64 vs. 0.55), but with regional variation between populations among regions. Although farmers propagated S. stellatus vegetatively in home gardens to diversify their stock, asexual recruitment also occurred naturally in populations where more marginal conditions have limited sexual recruitment, resulting in lower genetic diversity. Therefore, a clear-cut relationship between the occurrence of asexual recruitment and genetic diversity was not evident. Two managed populations adjacent to towns were identified as major sources of gene movement in each sampled region, with significant migration to distant as well as nearby populations. Coupled with the absence of significant bottlenecks, this suggests a mechanism for promoting genetic diversity in managed populations through long distance gene exchange. Cultivation of S. stellatus in close proximity to wild populations has led to complex patterns of genetic variation across the landscape that reflects the interaction of natural and cultural processes. As molecular markers become available for nontraditional crops and novel analysis techniques allow us to detect and evaluate patterns of genetic diversity, genetic studies provide valuable insights into managing crop genetic resources into the future against a backdrop of global change. Traditional agriculture systems play an important role in maintaining genetic diversity for plant species.

  20. Managing diversity: Domestication and gene flow in Stenocereus stellatus Riccob. (Cactaceae) in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Cruse-Sanders, Jennifer M.; Parker, Kathleen C; Friar, Elizabeth A.; Huang, Daisie I; Mashayekhi, Saeideh; Prince, Linda M; Otero-Arnaiz, Adriana; Casas, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellite markers (N = 5) were developed for analysis of genetic variation in 15 populations of the columnar cactus Stenocereus stellatus, managed under traditional agriculture practices in central Mexico. Microsatellite diversity was analyzed within and among populations, between geographic regions, and among population management types to provide detailed insight into historical gene flow rates and population dynamics associated with domestication. Our results corroborate a greater div...

  1. Morphological variation and the process of domestication of Stenocereus stellatus (Cactaceae) in Central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, A; Caballero, J; Valiente-Banuet, A; Soriano, J A; Dávila, P

    1999-04-01

    Morphological variation was analyzed in wild, managed in situ, and cultivated populations of the columnar cactus Stenocereus stellatus in central Mexico. The purpose was to evaluate whether morphological divergence between manipulated and wild populations has resulted from domestication processes. Variation of 23 morphological characters was analyzed among 324 individuals from 19 populations of the Tehuacán Valley and La Mixteca Baja. Multivariate statistical analyses were used to group individuals and populations according to their morphological similarity. Individuals grouped according to the way of management and fruit characteristics were the most relevant for grouping. Within each region, sweet fruits with pulp colors other than red were more frequent in cultivated populations, where fruits were also larger, contained more and bigger seeds, and had thinner peel and fewer spines than fruits from wild individuals. Phenotypes common in managed in situ and cultivated populations generally occur in the wild but in lower frequencies. Artificial selection has thus operated by enhancing and maintaining desirable rare phenotypes in managed in situ and cultivated populations, causing divergent patterns of morphological variation from wild populations. Cultivation has caused the strongest level of divergence, but divergence has also been significant with management of wild populations in situ.

  2. High tolerance to high-light conditions for the protected species Ariocarpus kotschoubeyanus (Cactaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Arroyo-P?rez, Erika; Flores, Joel; Gonz?lez-Salvatierra, Claudia; Mat?as-Palafox, Mar?a L.; Jim?nez-Sierra, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We determined the seasonal ecophysiological performance under perennial plants and under high solar radiation for adult individuals from the ?living rock? cactus Ariocarpus kotschoubeyanus, which occurs equally under nurse plants and in open spaces. We evaluated the effective quantum yield of photosystem II (?PSII) and the dissipation of thermal energy [non-photochemical quenching (NPQ)] thorough the year. The maximum apparent electron transport rate (ETRmax) and the saturating photo...

  3. Phylogeny of Opuntia s.s. (Cactaceae): clade delineation, geographic origins, and reticulate evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majure, Lucas C; Puente, Raul; Griffith, M Patrick; Judd, Walter S; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E

    2012-05-01

    The opuntias (nopales, prickly pears) are not only culturally, ecologically, economically, and medicinally important, but are renowned for their taxonomic difficulty due to interspecific hybridization, polyploidy, and morphological variability. Evolutionary relationships in these stem succulents have been insufficiently studied; thus, delimitation of Opuntia s.s. and major subclades, as well as the biogeographic history of this enigmatic group, remain unresolved. We sequenced the plastid intergenic spacers atpB-rbcL, ndhF-rpl32, psbJ-petA, and trnL-trnF, the plastid genes matK and ycf1, the nuclear gene ppc, and ITS to reconstruct the phylogeny of tribe Opuntieae, including Opuntia s.s. We used phylogenetic hypotheses to infer the biogeographic history, divergence times, and potential reticulate evolution of Opuntieae. Within Opuntieae, a clade of Tacinga, Opuntia lilae, Brasiliopuntia, and O. schickendantzii is sister to a well-supported Opuntia s.s., which includes Nopalea. Opuntia s.s. originated in southwestern South America (SA) and then expanded to the Central Andean Valleys and the desert region of western North America (NA). Two major clades evolved in NA, which subsequently diversified into eight subclades. These expanded north to Canada and south to Central America and the Caribbean, eventually returning back to SA primarily via allopolyploid taxa. Dating approaches suggest that most of the major subclades in Opuntia s.s. originated during the Pliocene. Opuntia s.s. is a well-supported clade that includes Nopalea. The clade originated in southwestern SA, but the NA radiation was the most extensive, resulting in broad morphological diversity and frequent species formation through reticulate evolution and polyploidy.

  4. THE GENERATIVE REPRODUCTIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF RED DRAGON FRUIT (Hylocereus.polyrhizus (Web.) Britton & Rose, CACTACEAE)

    OpenAIRE

    Eniek Kriswiyanti

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the generative reproductive characteristics of red dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus (Web.) Britton & Rose), that is the characteristics and the development of male and female reproductive system and the embryo. The flowering morphology was observed through the gametogenesis process and the process of embryogenesis was observed using the methods of squash, cytolysis, and embedding of flower before anthesis, during and after anthesis. The results showed th...

  5. THE GENERATIVE REPRODUCTIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF RED DRAGON FRUIT (Hylocereus.polyrhizus (Web. Britton & Rose, CACTACEAE

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    Eniek Kriswiyanti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the generative reproductive characteristics of red dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus (Web. Britton & Rose, that is the characteristics and the development of male and female reproductive system and the embryo. The flowering morphology was observed through the gametogenesis process and the process of embryogenesis was observed using the methods of squash, cytolysis, and embedding of flower before anthesis, during and after anthesis. The results showed that the flower funnelled form with many calyxes, stamens and crowns. The pollen was circular, sulcus, trilate, reticulate, and spheroid. The development of microgametophyte was at the 2nd stages with three nucleuses and the pistil developed after anthesis.  Anthesis was taken place at night time, fertilization and pollen developed before anthesis and has not germinating. A single pistil, the head of pistil with many branches, the style longer than the stamen, open type.  Seeds anathrophus, endosperm and embryo with the globular shaped, developed 5 days after anthesis, the embryo torpedo likes and the differentiation of primer tissues seen in the seeds 7 days after anthesis, and arilus generated from development of megasporangium. Keywords: embedding, self incompatibility, sferoidal, anatrophus, arillus.

  6. Notes on the Cactaceae of Curaçao, Aruba, Bonaire and North Venezuela

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar Hummelinck, P.

    1938-01-01

    La flora de cactos de las islas situadas entre Trinidad y la península de La Goajira comprende trece especies silvestres, aparte del género Melocactus: Pereskia Guamacho, Opuntia caribaea, O. curassavica, O. Wentiana, O. elatior, Rhipsalis cassutha, Hylocereus Lemairei, Acanthocereus pentagonus,

  7. Propagación vegetativa natural de Opuntia boldinghii Britton y Rose (Cactaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Alberto Padrón Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Con miras a aportar información sobre el cactus Opuntia boldinghii, se condujo la propagación vegetativa natural de dos muestras de cladodios encontradas en condiciones precarias en un terreno frondoso en Valencia, Venezuela, de Marzo a Julio de 2012 en la Asociación RVCTA. Una muestra se plantó verticalmente (NodoOB) y la otra de forma horizontal (AréolaOB). Las muestras se propagaron vegetativamente de forma natural. El pequeño tamaño y las condiciones de los cladodios no afectaron el desar...

  8. Uso, manejo y conservacion de “yosú” Stenocereus griseus (Cactaceae,en la alta guajira colombiana Usage, Managment and Conservation of “yosú”, Stenocereus griseus (Cactaceae, in the Upper Guajira, Colombia

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    Melo Sandra

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se caracteriza el sistema de uso, manejo, demanda y oferta potencial de Stenocereus griseus, un cactus columnar muy utilizado por la comunidad indígena Wayúu en la Guajira, Caribe colombiano. Actualmente el uso de S. griseus se restringe a la recolección de madera seca ("yotojoro" para construcción de viviendas, la recolección de frutos para la alimentación, de tallos jóvenes para alimentos de cabras y para utilizarlos en cercas vivas. Una evaluación de los factores que afectan las poblaciones permitió determinar cinco categorías de daño: las ocasionadas por corte con machete (tipo I, insectos (tipo II, cabras (tipo III, aves (tipo IV y viento (tipo V. La demanda anual de "yotojoro" está sujeta a la necesidad de construcción de los habitantes del área, que es definida como ocasional. El método actual de cosecha y extracción del mismo no está generando desequilibrio local en el mantenimiento de la especie. La demanda de cardones para cercas vivas y pastoreo es constante durante todo el año y es la que genera el mayor impacto de daño. Finalmente, se discuten los principales problemas de conservación de la especie y se recomienda establecer alternativas de manejo para las actividades de pastoreo.The present paper characterizes the usage and handling system, demand and potential offer of Stenocereus griseus, a columnar cactus widely used by the "Wayúu", an indigenous community in the Colombian Caribbean region of "La Guajira". The current use of S. griseus is restricted to the collection of dry timber wood ("yotojoro" for house building; of the fruit, which is used for human consumption; and of the young stems, used as goat fodder, and as living fences. An evaluation of the factors that affect the populations allowed the detection of five different harm categories: those caused by cuttings with cutlass (type I; by insects (type II; goats (type III; birds
    (type IV; and wind (type V. The annual "yotojoro" demand is subject to the building needs of the people in the area, which is defined as occasional. The current cropping and extraction method was not found to be causing any local disequilibrium in the species population  maintenance. There is a steady cardon demand for fodder and living fences all year long; one which is causing the highest harm impact. Finally, the main conservation problems of the species are discussed, together with the suggestion of management alternatives for grazing activities.

  9. Características físicas, químicas e organolépticas de quipá (Tacinga inamoena, Cactaceae Physical chemical and chemicalcharacteristics of 'quipá' (Tacinga inamoena, Cactaceae

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    Andréa Carla Mendonça de Souza

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A Opuntia ficus-indica tem-se destacado como principal produtora de frutos e forragens, motivo pelo qual tem sido bastante pesquisada. Além desta espécie, no semi-árido do Nordeste é encontrada a Tacinga inamoena, planta nativa, cujo fruto, embora também utilizado pelo agricultor como alternativa alimentar, não foi objeto de nenhuma pesquisa até o momento, justificando este trabalho para avaliar seu potencial nutricional e industrial, por meio das características organolépticas, químicas e físicas, conteúdo nutricional e composição mineral. O quipá apresenta características organolépticas similares às de frutos de mesmo gênero, com rendimento da porção comestível, polpa e pericarpo carnoso de 62,87% do peso total do fruto. No que diz respeito à composição química, a polpa difere significativamente do pericarpo carnoso, com superioridade deste último, que apresenta maior teor de minerais, destacando-se dentre estes o cálcio, o magnésio e o potássio que apresentaram valores de 587,04mg, 257,02mg e 318,01mg, respectivamente. Os resultados evidenciam que o quipá é adequado para consumo in natura e apresenta potencial para aproveitamento industrial.Provided that the Opuntia fícus-indica is the main producer of fruit and forages, it has been the object of extensive research. Besides, another species Tacinga inamoena, native plant, which its fruit has been used as an alternative food source can also be found in the semi-arid northeastern region of Brazil. However, this native plant had not been the object of any research yet. The aim of this work is to evaluate its industrial and nutritional potential through the organoleptic, physical, chemical characteristics, nutritional content and mineral composition. The Quípa shows organoleptic characteristics similar to other fruit of the same gender. Its edible portion, pulp and fleshy pericarp, corresponds to 62, 8% of the total fruit weight. As regard to chemical composition, the pulp differs significantly from the fleshy pericarp, the latter showing higher content of minerals among them calcium, magnesium and potassium with values of 587,04mg, 257,02mg and 318,01mg, respectively. The results showed that Quípa is appropriate for consumption in natura and shows industrial potential.

  10. USO, MANEJO Y CONSERVACIÓN DE “yosú”, Stenocereus griseus (CACTACEAE, EN LA ALTA GUAJIRA COLOMBIANA Usage, Managment and Conservation of “yosú”, Stenocereus griseus (Cactaceae, in the Upper Guajira, Colombia

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    SORAYA VILLALOBOS

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se caracteriza el sistema de uso, manejo, demanda y oferta potencial de Stenocereus griseus, un cactus columnar muy utilizado por la comunidad indígena Wayúu en la Guajira , Caribe colombiano. Actualmente el uso de S. griseus se restringe a la recolección de madera seca (“yotojoro” para construcción de viviendas, la recolección de frutos para la alimentación, de tallos jóvenes para alimentos de cabras y para utilizarlos en cercas vivas. Una evaluación de los factores que afectan las poblaciones permitió determinar cinco categorías de daño: las ocasionadas por corte con machete (tipo I, insectos (tipo II, cabras (tipo III, aves (tipo IV y viento (tipo V. La demanda anual de “yotojoro” está sujeta a la necesidad de construcción de los habitantes del área, que es definida como ocasional. El método actual de cosecha y extracción del mismo no está generando desequilibrio local en el mantenimiento de la especie. La demanda de cardones para cercas vivas y pastoreo es constante durante todo el año y es la que genera el mayor impacto de daño. Finalmente, se discuten los principales problemas de conservación de la especie y se recomienda establecer alternativas de manejo para las actividades de pastoreo.The present paper characterizes the usage and handling system, demand and potential offer of Stenocereus griseus, a columnar cactus widely used by the “Wayúu”, an indigenous community in the Colombian Caribbean region of “ La Guajira ”. The current use of S. griseus is restricted to the collection of dry timber wood (“yotojoro” for house building; of the fruit, which is used for human consumption; and of the young stems, used as goat fodder, and as living fences. An evaluation of the factors that affect the populations allowed the detection of five different harm categories: those caused by cuttings with cutlass (type I; by insects (type II; goats (type III; birds (type IV; and wind (type V. The annual “yotojoro” demand is subject to the building needs of the people in the area, which is defined as occasional. The current cropping and extraction method was not found to be causing any local disequilibrium in the species population maintenance. There is a steady cardon demand for fodder and living fences all year long; one which is causing the highest harm impact. Finally, the main conservation problems of the species are discussed, together with the suggestion of management alternatives for grazing activities.

  11. Una especie nueva de Strombocactus (Cactaceae del río Moctezuma, Querétaro, México A new species of Strombocactus (Cactaceae from Moctezuma River, Querétaro, Mexico

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    Salvador Arias

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describe e ilustra Strombocactus corregidorae S. Arias et E. Sánchez, nueva especie del cañón del Infiernillo, en el río Moctezuma, en los límites del estado de Querétaro con Hidalgo. Difiere de S. disciformis por presentar cuerpos más prominentes, con espinas de mayor tamaño, rígidas, gruesas, persistentes y de color negro grisáceo, flores amarillas, así como semillas con células de paredes periclinales planas, microrrelieve finamente reticulado y la región hilo-micropilar no está cubierta por un estrofíolo. Se incluye una clave taxonómica para la identificación de las especies de Strombocactus , con base en caracteres del tallo, flor y la semilla.Strombocactus corregidorae S. Arias et E. Sanchez, from the Infiernillo Canyon, in the Moctezuma River, at the border between the Mexican states of Querétaro and Hidalgo, is described and illustrated. It differs from S. disciformis by its massive body, larger, strong, thick, persistent, black-gray spines, yellow flower, seeds with flat periclinal wall cells, finely reticulate micro-relief, and hilum-micropylar region not covered by a strophiole. An identification key to Strombocactus species, based on stem, flower, and seed characters is included.

  12. Caracterização citogenética em Schlumbergera truncata (Haworth Moran e Schlumbergera × buckleyi (T. Moore Tjaden (Cactaceae Cytogenetic characterization of Schlumbergera truncata (Haworth Moran and Schlumbergera × buckleyi (T. Moore Tjaden (Cactaceae

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    Flavia Aparecida Ortolani

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available O número cromossômico diplóide de Schlumbergera truncata e Schlumbergera x buckleyi, de indivíduos com diferentes tipos de coloração de pétalas, foi determinado usando-se pontas de raízes. A utilização de 8-hidroxiquinoleína 0,003 M à 36 °C por 3 horas possibilitou melhor separação cromossômica. Técnica de bandeamento C e de coloração Giemsa permitiram o estudo cariológico dessas espécies. O híbrido Schlumbergera × buckleyi (rósea apresenta 2n = 22 cromossomos com fórmula cariotípica 16 M + 6 SM. Schlumbergera truncata, apresentando pétalas nas cores vermelha, branca e pink, possui 2n = 22 cromossomos, formulação cariotípica idêntica à de Schlumbergera × buckleyi, enquanto a planta com flores de coloração amarelada mostrou 2n = 34 cromossomos. A classificação cromossômica foi baseada no índice centromérico. Nas plantas que apresentam coloração vermelha, branca, pink e rósea nas pétalas, o melhor período de obtenção de metáfases corresponde ao período de florescimento. Schlumbergera truncata com flores amareladas apresenta dois picos anuais de divisão mitótica. Esses resultados dão suporte à um melhor entendimento da biologia no gênero Schlumbergera e auxiliam na classificação taxonômica nos casos onde apenas as características fenotípicas não são suficientemente confiáveis para a classificação das plantas no mesmo táxon.The diploid chromosome number of Schlumbergera truncata and Schlumbergera × buckleyi, in individuals with different types of petal color, was determined using root tips. The use of 8-hydroxyquinolein 0.003 M at 36 ºC provided better chromosome separation. C-banding technique and Giemsa coloration allowed the karyological study of these species. Schlumbergera × buckleyi hybrid (light pink species has 2n = 22 chromosomes with karyotype formula 16M + 6SM. Schlumbergera truncata with red, white, and pink petals and 2n = 22 chromosomes has karyotype formula identical to Schlumbergera × buckleyi, while the plant with yellowish flowers has 2n = 34 chromosomes. Chromosome classification was based on the centromeric index. In plants with white, red, pink and light pink petal color, the best time to obtain metaphases is during flowering. Schlumbergera truncata with yellowish flowers has two annual peaks of mitotic division. These results give us a better understanding of the biology of the genus Schlumbergera and aid in taxonomic classification where phenotypic characteristics alone are not reliable enough to classify plants of the same taxon.

  13. Biologia reprodutiva de Opuntia monacantha (Willd.) Haw. (cactaceae) em restingas da iIha de Santa Catarina, Sul do Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Lenzi, Maurício

    2008-01-01

    Tese (doutorado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro de Ciências Agrárias. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Recursos Genéticos Vegetais. As cactáceas possuem adaptações evolutivas associadas à sua história de vida, apresentando modificações morfológicas e fisiológicas funcionais no seu corpo, biologia floral, sistema reprodutivo e nos mecanismos de perpetuaçãoe dispersão. Este estudo foi desenvolvido sobre vegetação de restinga, em duas praias de Florianópolis, SC, Brasil. O objet...

  14. Ecologia de Discocactus zehntneri subsp. boomianus (Cactaceae) em Afloramento Rochoso do Semi-Árido Baiano (Brasil)

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, João Paulo Loyola

    2013-01-01

    Os estudos de padrões espaciais se tornaram muito importantes em ecologia de populações nas duas últimas décadas, com desenvolvimento de ferramentas muito sofisticadas de análise. A organização espacial das interações e dos processos ecológicos se tornou, em si mesmo, um vasto campo de pesquisa teórica, em que se evidencia o papel central do próprio espaço. Algumas das principais abordagens tratam de efeitos do arranjo espacial de elementos de uma paisagem em mosaico sobre a conectividade fun...

  15. USO, MANEJO Y CONSERVACIÓN DE “yosú”, Stenocereus griseus (CACTACEAE, EN LA ALTA GUAJIRA COLOMBIANA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SORAYA VILLALOBOS

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se caracteriza el sistema de uso, manejo, demanda y oferta potencial de Stenocereus griseus, un cactus columnar muy utilizado por la comunidad indígena Wayúu en la Guajira, Caribe colombiano. Actualmente el uso de S. griseus se restringe a la recolección de madera seca (“yotojoro” para construcción de viviendas, la recolección de frutos para la alimentación, de tallos jóvenes para alimentos de cabras y para utilizarlos en cercas vivas. Una evaluación de los factores que afectan las pobla- ciones permitió determinar cinco categorías de daño: las ocasionadas por corte con machete (tipo I, insectos (tipo II, cabras (tipo III, aves (tipo IV y viento (tipo V. La demanda anual de “yotojoro” está sujeta a la necesidad de construcción de los habitantes del área, que es definida como ocasional. El método actual de cosecha y extracción del mismo no está generando desequilibrio local en el mantenimiento de la especie. La demanda de cardones para cercas vivas y pastoreo es constante durante todo el año y es la que genera el mayor impacto de daño. Finalmente, se discuten los principales problemas de conservación de la especie y se recomienda establecer alter- nativas de manejo para las actividades de pastoreo.

  16. Essential oils composition of two Sicilian cultivars of Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Mill. (Cactaceae) fruits (prickly pear).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Pietro; Sajeva, Maurizio; Bruno, Maurizio; Rosselli, Sergio; Maggio, Antonella; Senatore, Felice

    2013-01-01

    The essential oils composition of the skin, pulp and seeds from fruits of two Sicilian cultivars of Opuntia ficus-indica (cv. Sanguigna and cv. Surfarina) has been obtained by hydrodistillation and the possible antioxidant, antimicrobial and semiochemical roles have been investigated comparing the data with those reported in the literature. The presence of antioxidants and antimicrobials found in this study increases the spectrum of compounds that have beneficial properties in O. ficus-indica. In addition, several compounds identified in this study have been reported to influence the behaviour of Ceratitis capitata, a phytophagous pest which causes severe damages to several crops including O. ficus-indica and the kairomonal activity of the odour of the fruits seems provided by a blend of compounds found in the various matrices analysed.

  17. Richness of endophytic fungi isolated from Opuntia ficus-indica Mill. (Cactaceae) and preliminary screening for enzyme production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, J D P; Santos, M G S; Svedese, V M; Lima, D M M; Fernandes, M J S; Paiva, L M; Souza-Motta, C M

    2012-05-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica Mill. (forage cactus) is farmed with relative success in the semi-arid region of the Brazilian northeast for commercial purposes, particularly as forage and food. Endophytic microorganisms are those that can be isolated inside plant tissues and can be a new source to production of enzymes with different potentialities. The objective of this study was to describe the richness of endophytic fungi from O. ficus-indica and to detect the capacity of these species to produce extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. Forty-four endophytic fungi species were isolated. Among them, the most commonly found were Cladosporium cladosporioides (20.43%) and C. sphaerospermum (15.99%). Acremonium terricola, Monodictys castaneae, Penicillium glandicola, Phoma tropica and Tetraploa aristata are being reported for the first time as endophytic fungi for Brazil. The majority of isolated fungi exhibited enzymatic potential. Aspergillus japonicus and P. glandicola presented pectinolytic activity. Xylaria sp. was the most important among the other 14 species with positive cellulase activity. All 24 isolates analysed were xylanase-positive. Protease was best produced by isolate PF103. The results indicate that there is a significant richness of endophytic fungi in O. ficus-indica, and that these isolates indicate promising potential for deployment in biotechnological processes involving production of pectinases, cellulases, xylanases and proteases.

  18. Cuantificación fisicoquímica en gorro turco [Melocactus zehntneri (Britton & Rose Luetzelburg - Cactaceae

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    E.N. NUNES

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO No Nordeste do Brasil é bastante comum e variado o uso da coroa-de-frade (Melocactus spp.. Assim, o objetivo deste estudo foi realizar diversas análises em cladódios de coroa-de-frade [Melocactus zehntneri (Britton & Rose Luetzelburg], para que possamos compreender as razões estes usos. Os cladódios foram coletados na cidade de Campina Grande e levados ao Laboratório de Engenharia de Alimentos da Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, onde foram feitas as seguintes análises: peso, altura, diâmetro, cor, umidade, acidez, pH, ácido ascórbico, carotenoides, flavonoides e compostos fenólicos, tanto na epiderme quanto no parênquima aquífero. Os resultados mostraram que a epiderme tem uma acidez elevada e mais ácido ascórbico, e um pH mais baixo em comparação com o parênquima aquífero. O conteúdo de carotenoides, flavonoides e compostos fenólicos, foram diferentes nas partes estudadas. A epiderme apresentou sempre maiores quantidades de carotenoides, flavonoides e compostos fenólicos em relação ao parênquima aquífero, nas três plantas estudadas, indicando que a maior parte da defesa da planta acontece neste tecido. Mais estudos são necessários com técnicas mais precisas, para identificar os componentes bioativos desta espécie.

  19. Alternative glacial-interglacial refugia demographic hypotheses tested on Cephalocereus columna-trajani (Cactaceae in the intertropical Mexican drylands.

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    Amelia Cornejo-Romero

    Full Text Available Historic demography changes of plant species adapted to New World arid environments could be consistent with either the Glacial Refugium Hypothesis (GRH, which posits that populations contracted to refuges during the cold-dry glacial and expanded in warm-humid interglacial periods, or with the Interglacial Refugium Hypothesis (IRH, which suggests that populations contracted during interglacials and expanded in glacial times. These contrasting hypotheses are developed in the present study for the giant columnar cactus Cephalocereus columna-trajani in the intertropical Mexican drylands where the effects of Late Quaternary climatic changes on phylogeography of cacti remain largely unknown. In order to determine if the historic demography and phylogeographic structure of the species are consistent with either hypothesis, sequences of the chloroplast regions psbA-trnH and trnT-trnL from 110 individuals from 10 populations comprising the full distribution range of this species were analysed. Standard estimators of genetic diversity and structure were calculated. The historic demography was analysed using a Bayesian approach and the palaeodistribution was derived from ecological niche modelling to determine if, in the arid environments of south-central Mexico, glacial-interglacial cycles drove the genetic divergence and diversification of this species. Results reveal low but statistically significant population differentiation (FST = 0.124, P < 0.001, although very clear geographic clusters are not formed. Genetic diversity, haplotype network and Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC demographic analyses suggest a population expansion estimated to have taken place in the Last Interglacial (123.04 kya, 95% CI 115.3-130.03. The species palaeodistribution is consistent with the ABC analyses and indicates that the potential area of palaedistribution and climatic suitability were larger during the Last Interglacial and Holocene than in the Last Glacial Maximum. Overall, these results suggest that C. columna-trajani experienced an expansion following the warm conditions of interglacials, in accordance with the GRH.

  20. Frugivory and seed dispersal by birds in Cereus jamacaru DC. ssp. jamacaru (Cactaceae) in the Caatinga of Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, V G N; Quirino, Z G M; Araujo, H F P

    2014-02-01

    Studies of the dispersal modes of plants aid our understanding of the dynamics of resource and its availability for dispersal agents. The present work sought to characterize the fruiting patterns of the native Caatinga (dryland) cactus Cereus jamacaru, identify its principal dispersers, and evaluate the effects of seed passage through digestive tract of dispersers on its germination. Cereus jamacaru present an annual fruiting pattern and fruiting peaks occurred during June/2009 and February/2010. A total of 135 visits by nine species of resident Caatinga bird species were recorded. The most frequent visiting bird species were Paroaria dominicana and Euphonia chlorotica. Length of bird visits varied from 15 seconds to 4 minutes and seeds removed by birds travelled 10.6 ± 11.2 m until dispersers make the first landing perch, in some cases more than 40 meters away. Germination tests show birds had a high quantity of viable seeds of C. jamacaru in its feces. Seeds that passed through the digestive tract of birds showed a similar germinability of the seeds of the control group. However, the seeds dispersed by birds showed lowest mean germination time related to the control group seeds. This study highlights the potential role of birds as seed dispersers of C. jamacaru, swallowing the whole seeds and defecating intact seeds, accelerating the germination process and transporting seeds away from the mother plant.

  1. Aspectos de la Biología reproductiva de una población de Wigginsia vorwerckiana (Cactaceae

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    Amaya Márquez Marisol

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available RESUMENWigginsia vorwerckiana(Werdermann D.M. Porter es una especie que está distribuida porColombia, Argentina, Uruguay y Brasil. En Colombia se encuentra en las zonas secas, una deellas el enclave subxerifítico de la Sabana de Bogotá a 2.700m. Este es un ecosistema pocoestudiado y actualmente se encuentra amenazado por procesos antrópicos. Allí se encuentraWigginsia vorwerckiana, una cactácea de hábito globoso que crece enterrada en el suelo con unadistribución agregada. La floración duró todo el tiempo de estudio (diciembre 1998 enero2000. Las flores crecen en una estructura denominada cefalio y se producen de maneracentrípeta. Son de color amarillo, hermafroditas y 65.42% de la población presenta herco-gamia. La antesis de las flores es diurna, abriendo en la mañana y cerrando en la noche. Laduración media de las flores es dos días. Las flores no producen néctar y la recompensa queofrecen a sus polinizadores es polen el que no producen en gran cantidad. W. vorwerckianarecibe visitas de tres especies de Lepidópteros, una especie de Díptero y una especie deHimenóptero. Sólo esta última Lasioglossum sp. (Halictidae muestra una alta fidelidad floralsiendo responsable de 85% de las visitas que recibe este cacto y actúa como polinizadoreficiente. Por lo anterior podemos decir que W. vorwerckianaes una especie oligotrópica,mientras que Lasioglossumes oligoléctico pero polifílico, ya que además de polinizar a este cacto,visita otras especies de cactáceas y algunas especies de compuestas presentes en la zona. Lasvisitas de Lasioglossumocurren de las 10 a las 15 horas con la mayor frecuencia de visitación entrelas 12 y 13 horas, cuando la apertura de las flores es máxima, y la receptividad y disponibilidadde polen son mayores. Tanto la frecuencia de visitación como la apertura de las flores estáninfluenciadas por la luz y la temperatura, siendo mayores en las horas soleadas y con tem-peraturas superiores a los 20°C. Una vez las flores son polinizadas y fecundadas, requieren enpromedio de cuatro meses para su maduración. Los frutos son consumidos por hormigasdel género Solenopsis(Formicidae quienes hacen la dispersión de las semillas. W. vorwerckianaes una especie autocompatible ya que es capaz de formar frutos con semillas producto de laautopolinización y en ausencia de su polinizador; sin embargo, esta especie requiere de losservicios especializados de esta abeja para efectuar la polinización cruzada y mantener un buennivel de variabilidad genética en la población. Todo lo anterior muestra la importancia de conservar la zona de estudio, ya que es una zona no protegida en la que el disturbio pone enriesgo la existencia de esta población de cactos, de la abeja que funciona como su polinizador yde los animales que consumen sus frutos.

  2. Alternative glacial-interglacial refugia demographic hypotheses tested on Cephalocereus columna-trajani (Cactaceae) in the intertropical Mexican drylands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornejo-Romero, Amelia; Vargas-Mendoza, Carlos Fabián; Aguilar-Martínez, Gustavo F; Medina-Sánchez, Javier; Rendón-Aguilar, Beatriz; Valverde, Pedro Luis; Zavala-Hurtado, Jose Alejandro; Serrato, Alejandra; Rivas-Arancibia, Sombra; Pérez-Hernández, Marco Aurelio; López-Ortega, Gerardo; Jiménez-Sierra, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Historic demography changes of plant species adapted to New World arid environments could be consistent with either the Glacial Refugium Hypothesis (GRH), which posits that populations contracted to refuges during the cold-dry glacial and expanded in warm-humid interglacial periods, or with the Interglacial Refugium Hypothesis (IRH), which suggests that populations contracted during interglacials and expanded in glacial times. These contrasting hypotheses are developed in the present study for the giant columnar cactus Cephalocereus columna-trajani in the intertropical Mexican drylands where the effects of Late Quaternary climatic changes on phylogeography of cacti remain largely unknown. In order to determine if the historic demography and phylogeographic structure of the species are consistent with either hypothesis, sequences of the chloroplast regions psbA-trnH and trnT-trnL from 110 individuals from 10 populations comprising the full distribution range of this species were analysed. Standard estimators of genetic diversity and structure were calculated. The historic demography was analysed using a Bayesian approach and the palaeodistribution was derived from ecological niche modelling to determine if, in the arid environments of south-central Mexico, glacial-interglacial cycles drove the genetic divergence and diversification of this species. Results reveal low but statistically significant population differentiation (FST = 0.124, P columna-trajani experienced an expansion following the warm conditions of interglacials, in accordance with the GRH.

  3. Collection of plants of the genus Melocactus (Tourn. Link et Otto (Cactaceae Juss. and peculiarities of their reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna Baglay

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomic composition of Melocactus collection at O.V. Fomin Botanical Garden, as well as peculiarities of their reproduction under the conditions of introduction has been considered. Rare and threatened Melocactus species in the collection were identified.

  4. Frugivory and seed dispersal by birds in Cereus jamacaru DC. ssp. jamacaru (Cactaceae in the Caatinga of Northeastern Brazil

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    VGN Gomes

    Full Text Available Studies of the dispersal modes of plants aid our understanding of the dynamics of resource and its availability for dispersal agents. The present work sought to characterize the fruiting patterns of the native Caatinga (dryland cactus Cereus jamacaru, identify its principal dispersers, and evaluate the effects of seed passage through digestive tract of dispersers on its germination. Cereus jamacaru present an annual fruiting pattern and fruiting peaks occurred during June/2009 and February/2010. A total of 135 visits by nine species of resident Caatinga bird species were recorded. The most frequent visiting bird species were Paroaria dominicana and Euphonia chlorotica. Length of bird visits varied from 15 seconds to 4 minutes and seeds removed by birds travelled 10.6 ± 11.2 m until dispersers make the first landing perch, in some cases more than 40 meters away. Germination tests show birds had a high quantity of viable seeds of C. jamacaru in its feces. Seeds that passed through the digestive tract of birds showed a similar germinability of the seeds of the control group. However, the seeds dispersed by birds showed lowest mean germination time related to the control group seeds. This study highlights the potential role of birds as seed dispersers of C. jamacaru, swallowing the whole seeds and defecating intact seeds, accelerating the germination process and transporting seeds away from the mother plant.

  5. The epiphytic Cactaceae Hylocereus setaceus (Salm-Dick ex DC. ralf bauer seed germination is controlled by light and temperature

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    Edson Simão

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of light and temperature on seed germination in Hylocereus setaceus was analyzed by isothermic incubations under continuous white light and darkness. The minimum temperature for germination was between 5 to 10°C and the maximum between 45 to 50°C. The optimum temperaturewais between 25 and 30°C. The involvement of phytochrome, by very low fluence response, in controlled seed germination was attained by incubation in a gradient of photoequilibrium of phytochrome. The results indicated that seeds of H. setaceus germinated in a wide range of temperature, under canopy and in open areas, but in complete darkness they did not germinate.O efeito da luz e da temperatura sobre a germinação de sementes de Hylocereus setaceus foi analisado sob condições de incubações isotérmicas. Hylocereus setaceus é uma espécie ameaçada de extinção, que ocorre na Mata Atlântica e florestas estacionais semideciduais. A temperatura mínima para a germinação está entre 5 e 10°C e a máxima entre 45 e 50°C. A temperatura ótima está entre 25ºC e 30°C. A participação do fitocromo, através da resposta de fluência muito baixa, no controle da germinação de sementes foi determinada através de incubações das sementes em um gradiente de fotoequilíbrio do fitocromo. Os resultados apresentados no presente trabalho indicam que sementes de Hylocereus setaceus germinam em uma ampla faixa de temperatura, sob a sombra de vegetação e em áreas abertas, embora não germinem em condições de ausência completa de luz.

  6. An integrated management plan for the control of Opuntia stricta (Cactaceae in the Kruger National Park, South Africa

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    W.D. Lotter

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Opuntia stricta is the most problematic alien plant species in the Kruger National Park (KNP where 30000 ha around Skukuza have been invaded by the weed. Control of 0. stricta is expensive and time consuming and there are insufficient resources available for the task at present. Biological control using the moth Cactoblastis cactorum has only been partially successful and herbicidal control remains the main method for tackling the problem. In order to optimise the control operation against 0. stricta, a management plan has been developed for the KNP. The infested region of the park has been divided into 18 management units, each of which will be treated in turn. During the first three years the control operations will clear 0. stricta from the peripheral units, to prevent the spread of the weed into other areas of the KNP, after which the central units will be tackled. The objective is to destroy all mature fruiting plants and those nearing maturity to curb long-range (seed dispersal of the weed. The small juvenile plants, which are difficult to detect, will be suppressed by C. cactorum. After five years the problem should be contained to the extent that an ongoing 'holding' programme will be sufficient to keep the weed in check. The success of the plan will depend on increased resources being committed to alien plant control in the Kruger National Park.

  7. 7 CFR 318.13-16 - Regulated articles allowed interstate movement subject to specified conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...)(i) Puerto Rico Cactus Cactaceae Whole plant (b)(2)(iv), (b)(3)(ii) Okra Abelmoschus escuelentus.... Virgin Islands Cactus Cactaceae Whole plant (b)(2)(iv), (b)(3)(ii) Okra Abelmoschus escuelentus Fruit (b...

  8. Analysis of the factors that affect the distribution and abundance of three Neobuxbaumia species (Cactaceae) that differ in their degree of rarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedas, Marcela; Valverde, Teresa; Zavala-Hurtado, José Alejandro

    2006-03-01

    We studied three species of columnar cacti in the genus Neobuxbaumia which differ in their degree of rarity: Neobuxbaumia macrocephala (the rarest), Neobuxbaumia tetetzo (intermediate), and Neobuxbaumia mezcalaensis (the most common). To investigate the ecological factors that limit their distribution and abundance, we surveyed 80 localities within the region of Tehuacan-Cuicatlán, in Central Mexico. At each locality we measured several environmental variables, and the density of the Neobuxbaumia populations present. We used a principal component analysis (PCA) to identify the factors that are associated to the presence/absence of each species. Additionally, we carried out multiple regressions between environmental variables and population density to test whether the variation in these variables was related to changes in abundance. The results show that factors significantly affecting the distribution of these species are mean annual temperature, altitude, rainfall, and soil properties such as texture and organic matter content. N. mezcalaensis reaches maximum population densities of 14,740 plants per ha (average density = 3943 plants per ha) and is associated with localities with relatively abundant rainfall. N. tetetzo shows maximum population densities of 14,060 plants per ha (average = 3070 plants per ha), and is associated with sites located at high latitudes and with high phosphorous content in the soil. The rarest species, N. macrocephala, shows maximum densities of 1180 plants per ha (average = 607 plants per ha) and is associated with localities with high soil calcium content. The distribution of this species is limited to sites with specific values of the environmental variables recorded, conferring it a high habitat specificity which accounts for its rarity.

  9. Evolution under domestication: ongoing artificial selection and divergence of wild and managed Stenocereus pruinosus (Cactaceae) populations in the Tehuacan Valley, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Fabiola; Casas, Alejandro; Peñaloza-Ramírez, Juan Manuel; Cortés-Palomec, Aurea C; Rocha-Ramírez, Víctor; González-Rodríguez, Antonio

    2010-09-01

    The Tehuacán Valley in Mexico is a principal area of plant domestication in Mesoamerica. There, artificial selection is currently practised on nearly 120 native plant species with coexisting wild, silvicultural and cultivated populations, providing an excellent setting for studying ongoing mechanisms of evolution under domestication. One of these species is the columnar cactus Stenocereus pruinosus, in which we studied how artificial selection is operating through traditional management and whether it has determined morphological and genetic divergence between wild and managed populations. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 83 households of three villages to investigate motives and mechanisms of artificial selection. Management effects were studied by comparing variation patterns of 14 morphological characters and population genetics (four microsatellite loci) of 264 plants from nine wild, silvicultural and cultivated populations. Variation in fruit characters was recognized by most people, and was the principal target of artificial selection directed to favour larger and sweeter fruits with thinner or thicker peel, fewer spines and pulp colours other than red. Artificial selection operates in agroforestry systems favouring abundance (through not felling plants and planting branches) of the preferred phenotypes, and acts more intensely in household gardens. Significant morphological divergence between wild and managed populations was observed in fruit characters and plant vigour. On average, genetic diversity in silvicultural populations (H(E) = 0.743) was higher than in wild (H(E) = 0.726) and cultivated (H(E) = 0.700) populations. Most of the genetic variation (90.58 %) occurred within populations. High gene flow (Nm(FST) > 2) was identified among almost all populations studied, but was slightly limited by mountains among wild populations, and by artificial selection among wild and managed populations. Traditional management of S. pruinosus involves artificial selection, which, despite the high levels of gene flow, has promoted morphological divergence and moderate genetic structure between wild and managed populations, while conserving genetic diversity.

  10. An integrative approach to understanding the evolution and diversity of Copiapoa (Cactaceae), a threatened endemic Chilean genus from the Atacama Desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larridon, Isabel; Walter, Helmut E; Guerrero, Pablo C; Duarte, Milén; Cisternas, Mauricio A; Hernández, Carol Peña; Bauters, Kenneth; Asselman, Pieter; Goetghebeur, Paul; Samain, Marie-Stéphanie

    2015-09-01

    Species of the endemic Chilean cactus genus Copiapoa have cylindrical or (sub)globose stems that are solitary or form (large) clusters and typically yellow flowers. Many species are threatened with extinction. Despite being icons of the Atacama Desert and well loved by cactus enthusiasts, the evolution and diversity of Copiapoa has not yet been studied using a molecular approach. Sequence data of three plastid DNA markers (rpl32-trnL, trnH-psbA, ycf1) of 39 Copiapoa taxa were analyzed using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference approaches. Species distributions were modeled based on geo-referenced localities and climatic data. Evolution of character states of four characters (root morphology, stem branching, stem shape, and stem diameter) as well as ancestral areas were reconstructed using a Bayesian and maximum likelihood framework, respectively. Clades of species are revealed. Though 32 morphologically defined species can be recognized, genetic diversity between some species and infraspecific taxa is too low to delimit their boundaries using plastid DNA markers. Recovered relationships are often supported by morphological and biogeographical patterns. The origin of Copiapoa likely lies between southern Peru and the extreme north of Chile. The Copiapó Valley limited colonization between two biogeographical areas. Copiapoa is here defined to include 32 species and five heterotypic subspecies. Thirty species are classified into four sections and two subsections, while two species remain unplaced. A better understanding of evolution and diversity of Copiapoa will allow allocating conservation resources to the most threatened lineages and focusing conservation action on real biodiversity. © 2015 Botanical Society of America.

  11. Landscape genetics reveals inbreeding and genetic bottlenecks in the extremely rare short-globose cacti Mammillaria pectinifera (Cactaceae as a result of habitat fragmentation

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    Reyna Maya-García

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mammillaria pectinifera is an endemic, short-globose cactus species, included in the IUCN list as a threatened species with only 18 remaining populations in the Tehuacán-Cuicatlán Valley in central Mexico. We evaluated the population genetic diversity and structure, connectivity, recent bottlenecks and population size, using nuclear microsatellites. M. pectinifera showed high genetic diversity but some evidence of heterozygote deficiency (FIS, recent bottlenecks in some populations and reductions in population size. Also, we found low population genetic differentiation and high values of connectivity for M. pectinifera, as the result of historical events of gene flow through pollen and seed dispersal. M. pectinifera occurs in sites with some degree of disturbance leading to the isolation of its populations and decreasing the levels of gene flow among them. Excessive deforestation also changes the original vegetation damaging the natural habitats. This species will become extinct if it is not properly preserved. Furthermore, this species has some ecological features that make them more vulnerable to disturbance such as a very low growth rates and long life cycles. We suggest in situ conservation to prevent the decrease of population sizes and loss of genetic diversity in the natural protected areas such as the Tehuacán-Cuicatlán Biosphere Reserve. In addition, a long-term ex situ conservation program is need to construct seed banks, and optimize seed germination and plant establishment protocols that restore disturbed habitats. Furthermore, creating a supply of living plants for trade is critical to avoid further extraction of plants from nature.

  12. Genetic structure of Pilosocereus gounellei (Cactaceae) as revealed by AFLP marker to guide proposals for improvement and restoration of degraded areas in Caatinga biome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, E R; Strioto, D K; Meirelles, A C S; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S

    2015-12-15

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was used to evaluate DNA polymorphism in Pilosocereus gounellei with the aim of differentiating samples grown in different Brazilian semiarid regions. Seven primer pairs were used to amplify 703 AFLP markers, of which 700 (99.21%) markers were polymorphic. The percentage of polymorphic markers ranged from 95.3% for the primer combination E-AAG/M-CTT to 100% for E-ACC/M-CAT, E-ACC/M-CAA, E-AGC/M-CAG, E-ACT/M-CTA, and E-AGG/M-CTG. The largest number of informative markers (126) was detected using the primer combination E-AAC/M-CTA. Polymorphism of the amplified DNA fragments ranged from 72.55% (in sample from Piauí State) to 82.79% (in samples from Rio Grande Norte State), with an average of 75.39%. Despite the high genetic diversity of AFLP markers in xiquexique, analysis using the STRUCTURE software identified relatively homogeneous clusters of xiquexique from the same location, indicating a differentiation at the molecular level, among the plant samples from different regions of the Caatinga biome. The AFLP methodology identified genetically homogeneous and contrasting plants, as well as plants from different regions with common DNA markers. Seeds from such plants can be used for further propagation of plants for establishment of biodiversity conservation units and restoration of degraded areas of the Caatinga biome.

  13. Identificación de un compuesto alelopático de Baccharis boliviensis (Asteraceae) y su efecto en la germinación de Trichocereus pasacana (Cactaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Ada Cazón; Marta de Viana; Gianello, José C.

    2000-01-01

    El género Baccharis presenta una amplia distribución en regiones áridas del noroeste Argentino. Estudios realizados sobre la distribución espacial de T. pasacana con relación al espacio disponible, mostraron que a pesar de que las semillas del cardón son abundantes bajo la copa de B. boliviensis, no se detectan plantas de cardón creciendo en asociación, a pesar del requerimiento de plantas nodrizas para un establecimiento exitoso del cardón. Extractos acuosos del follaje de B. boliviensis par...

  14. Reproductive biology of Ferocactus recurvus (Mill.) Borg subsp. recurvus (Cactaceae) in the Tehuacán-Cuicatlán Valley, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Acosta, E; Zavala-Hurtado, J A; Golubov, J; Casas, A

    2017-09-01

    Mexico has one of the highest diversities of barrel cacti species worldwide; however, all are threatened and require conservation policies. Information on their reproductive biology is crucial, but few studies are available. Ferocactus recurvus subsp. recurvus is a barrel cactus endemic to the Tehuacán-Cuicatlán Valley. Our research aimed to characterise its floral and pollination biology. We hypothesised bee pollination, as suggested by its floral morphology and behaviour, and self-incompatibility, like most barrel cacti studied. Three study sites were selected in the semiarid Zapotitlán Valley, Mexico. We examined 190 flowers from 180 plants to determine: morphometry and behaviour of flowers, flower visitors and probable pollinators, and breeding system. Flowers showed diurnal anthesis, lasting 2-5 days, the stigma being receptive on day 2 or 3 after the start of anthesis. Flowers produced scarce/no nectar and main visitors were bees (Apidae), followed by flies (Muscidae), ants (Formicidae), thrips (Thripidae) and hummingbirds (Throchilidae); however, only native bees and occasionally wasps contacted the stigma and anthers. Pollination experiments revealed that this species is self-incompatible and xenogamous. In natural conditions, fruit set was 60% and cross-pollination fruit set was 100%. Percentage seed germination resulting from cross-pollination was higher than in the control treatment. Our results provide ecological information for conservation programmes to ensure a high probability of breeding and seed production in natural populations of F. recurvus. © 2017 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  15. Landscape management and domestication of Stenocereus pruinosus (Cactaceae) in the Tehuacán Valley: human guided selection and gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Fabiola; Blancas, José Juan; Casas, Alejandro

    2012-08-14

    Use of plant resources and ecosystems practiced by indigenous peoples of Mesoamerica commonly involves domestication of plant populations and landscapes. Our study analyzed interactions of coexisting wild and managed populations of the pitaya Stenocereus pruinosus, a columnar cactus used for its edible fruit occurring in natural forests, silviculturally managed in milpa agroforestry systems, and agriculturally managed in homegardens of the Tehuacán Valley, Mexico. We aimed at analyzing criteria of artificial selection and their consequences on phenotypic diversity and differentiation, as well as documenting management of propagules at landscape level and their possible contribution to gene flow among populations. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to 83 households of the region to document perception of variation, criteria of artificial selection, and patterns of moving propagules among wild and managed populations. Morphological variation of trees from nine wild, silviculturally and agriculturally managed populations was analyzed for 37 characters through univariate and multivariate statistical methods. In addition, indexes of morphological diversity (MD) per population and phenotypic differentiation (PD) among populations were calculated using character states and frequencies. People recognized 15 pitaya varieties based on their pulp color, fruit size, form, flavor, and thorniness. On average, in wild populations we recorded one variety per population, in silviculturally managed populations 1.58 ± 0.77 varieties per parcel, and in agriculturally managed populations 2.19 ± 1.12 varieties per homegarden. Farmers select in favor of sweet flavor (71% of households interviewed) and pulp color (46%) mainly red, orange and yellow. Artificial selection is practiced in homegardens and 65% of people interviewed also do it in agroforestry systems. People obtain fruit and branches from different population types and move propagules from one another. Multivariate analyses showed morphological differentiation of wild and agriculturally managed populations, mainly due to differences in reproductive characters; however, the phenotypic differentiation indexes were relatively low among all populations studied. Morphological diversity of S. pruinosus (average MD = 0.600) is higher than in other columnar cacti species previously analyzed. Artificial selection in favor of high quality fruit promotes morphological variation and divergence because of the continual replacement of plant material propagated and introduction of propagules from other villages and regions. This process is counteracted by high gene flow influenced by natural factors (pollinators and seed dispersers) but also by human management (movement of propagules among populations), all of which determines relatively low phenotypic differentiation among populations. Conservation of genetic resources of S. pruinosus should be based on the traditional forms of germplasm management by local people.

  16. Landscape management and domestication of Stenocereus pruinosus (Cactaceae in the Tehuacán Valley: human guided selection and gene flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parra Fabiola

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of plant resources and ecosystems practiced by indigenous peoples of Mesoamerica commonly involves domestication of plant populations and landscapes. Our study analyzed interactions of coexisting wild and managed populations of the pitaya Stenocereus pruinosus, a columnar cactus used for its edible fruit occurring in natural forests, silviculturally managed in milpa agroforestry systems, and agriculturally managed in homegardens of the Tehuacán Valley, Mexico. We aimed at analyzing criteria of artificial selection and their consequences on phenotypic diversity and differentiation, as well as documenting management of propagules at landscape level and their possible contribution to gene flow among populations. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted to 83 households of the region to document perception of variation, criteria of artificial selection, and patterns of moving propagules among wild and managed populations. Morphological variation of trees from nine wild, silviculturally and agriculturally managed populations was analyzed for 37 characters through univariate and multivariate statistical methods. In addition, indexes of morphological diversity (MD per population and phenotypic differentiation (PD among populations were calculated using character states and frequencies. Results People recognized 15 pitaya varieties based on their pulp color, fruit size, form, flavor, and thorniness. On average, in wild populations we recorded one variety per population, in silviculturally managed populations 1.58 ± 0.77 varieties per parcel, and in agriculturally managed populations 2.19 ± 1.12 varieties per homegarden. Farmers select in favor of sweet flavor (71% of households interviewed and pulp color (46% mainly red, orange and yellow. Artificial selection is practiced in homegardens and 65% of people interviewed also do it in agroforestry systems. People obtain fruit and branches from different population types and move propagules from one another. Multivariate analyses showed morphological differentiation of wild and agriculturally managed populations, mainly due to differences in reproductive characters; however, the phenotypic differentiation indexes were relatively low among all populations studied. Morphological diversity of S. pruinosus (average MD = 0.600 is higher than in other columnar cacti species previously analyzed. Conclusions Artificial selection in favor of high quality fruit promotes morphological variation and divergence because of the continual replacement of plant material propagated and introduction of propagules from other villages and regions. This process is counteracted by high gene flow influenced by natural factors (pollinators and seed dispersers but also by human management (movement of propagules among populations, all of which determines relatively low phenotypic differentiation among populations. Conservation of genetic resources of S. pruinosus should be based on the traditional forms of germplasm management by local people.

  17. Diversity and antifungal activity of the endophytic fungi associated with the native medicinal cactus Opuntia humifusa (Cactaceae) from the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Hughes, Alice F; Wedge, David E; Cantrell, Charles L; Carvalho, Camila R; Pan, Zhiqiang; Moraes, Rita M; Madoxx, Victor L; Rosa, Luiz H

    2015-06-01

    The endophytic fungal community associated with the native cactus Opuntia humifusa in the United States was investigated and its potential for providing antifungal compounds. A hundred-eight endophytic fungal isolates were obtained and identified by molecular methods into 17 different taxa of the genera Alternaria, Aureobasidium, Biscogniauxia, Cladosporium, Cryptococcus, Curvularia, Diaporthe, Epicoccum, Paraconiothyrium, Pestalotiopsis and Phoma. The most frequent species associated with O. humifusa were Alternaria sp. 3, Aureobasidium pullulans and Diaporthe sp. The fungal community of O. humifusa had a high richness and diversity; additionally, the species richness obtained indicates that the sample effort was enough to recover the diversity pattern obtained. Six extracts of endophytes showed antifungal properties and (1)H NMR analyses of the extracts of Alternaria sp. 5 Ohu 8B2, Alternaria sp. 3 Ohu 30A, Cladosporium funiculosum Ohu 17C1 and Paraconiothyrium sp. Ohu 17A indicated the presence of functional groups associated with unsaturated fatty-acid olefinic protons and fatty acid methylene and methyl protons. GC-FID analysis of these extracts confirmed the presence of a mixture of different fatty acids. The (1)H NMR analyses of Biscogniauxia mediterranea Ohu 19B extracts showed the presence of aromatic compounds. From the extract of B. mediterranea we isolated the compound 5-methylmellein that displayed moderate antifungal activity against the phytopathogenic fungi Phomopsis obscurans. Our results suggest that native medicinal cacti of the United States can live symbiotically with rich and diverse endophytic communities and may be a source of bioactive molecules, including those able to inhibit or control plant disease pathogens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Evolution under domestication: ongoing artificial selection and divergence of wild and managed Stenocereus pruinosus (Cactaceae) populations in the Tehuacán Valley, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Fabiola; Casas, Alejandro; Peñaloza-Ramírez, Juan Manuel; Cortés-Palomec, Aurea C.; Rocha-Ramírez, Víctor; González-Rodríguez, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The Tehuacán Valley in Mexico is a principal area of plant domestication in Mesoamerica. There, artificial selection is currently practised on nearly 120 native plant species with coexisting wild, silvicultural and cultivated populations, providing an excellent setting for studying ongoing mechanisms of evolution under domestication. One of these species is the columnar cactus Stenocereus pruinosus, in which we studied how artificial selection is operating through traditional management and whether it has determined morphological and genetic divergence between wild and managed populations. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 83 households of three villages to investigate motives and mechanisms of artificial selection. Management effects were studied by comparing variation patterns of 14 morphological characters and population genetics (four microsatellite loci) of 264 plants from nine wild, silvicultural and cultivated populations. Key Results Variation in fruit characters was recognized by most people, and was the principal target of artificial selection directed to favour larger and sweeter fruits with thinner or thicker peel, fewer spines and pulp colours others than red. Artificial selection operates in agroforestry systems favouring abundance (through not felling plants and planting branches) of the preferred phenotypes, and acts more intensely in household gardens. Significant morphological divergence between wild and managed populations was observed in fruit characters and plant vigour. On average, genetic diversity in silvicultural populations (HE = 0·743) was higher than in wild (HE = 0·726) and cultivated (HE = 0·700) populations. Most of the genetic variation (90·58 %) occurred within populations. High gene flow (NmFST > 2) was identified among almost all populations studied, but was slightly limited by mountains among wild populations, and by artificial selection among wild and managed populations. Conclusions Traditional management of S. pruinosus involves artificial selection, which, despite the high levels of gene flow, has promoted morphological divergence and moderate genetic structure between wild and managed populations, while conserving genetic diversity. PMID:20729372

  19. Predation of Opuntia monacantha (Willd. Haw. (Cactaceae by Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae in a sand bank area of Santa Catarina island, south Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonso Inácio Orth

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The genus Opuntia is worldwide known for its ecological, ornamental and agronomic importance. Some species became pests in the countries in which they where introduced, and as biological control, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae larvae, originary from Argentina, were used. However, the effect of the attack of this piralid on native cactus has yet not been elucidated. The objective of this study was to detect and to quantify the predation of C. cactorum on Opuntia monacantha. The study was carried out from September to November of 2004, along pre-defined tracks, on a sand bank vegetation area, between the Mole and Galheta beaches in the Santa Catarina island (27º35’83.1’’S e 48º25’70.6’’W. All the studied plants (n = 20 presented some damage caused by C. cactorum. The proportion of unpredated cladodes (68% and fruits (85% was higher than the predated ones. Terminal cladodes were highly predated structures and presented the highest number of larvae inside. Seed loss in the predated fruits was high. The remaining areole of the predated cladodes and fruits differentiated into sprouts and routs and formed new plants. O. monacantha, despite of being predated by C. cactorum larvae, apparently possess defense mechanisms which assure the maintenance of its populations.

  20. The effect of temperature on the germination of Melocactus violaceus Pfeiff. (Cactaceae, a threatened species in restinga sandy coastal plain of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUIZ R. ZAMITH

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Melocactus violaceus is an endangered species due to habitat destruction and the overcollection of this species for ornamental use. The aim of this study was to test the effect of different temperatures on the germination of M. violaceus. Three treatments were conducted: a constant temperature of 25ºC, a 20-35ºC alternating temperature, both inside germination chamber, and an alternating temperature under room temperature (mean temperature ranged from 25-37ºC. The final seed germination rates at the alternating temperature treatments were not significantly different (65% in the seed germinator and 62.5% at room condition. However, both treatments with alternating temperatures had significantly higher germination rates compared to the treatment kept at the constant temperature (8%. Our study showed that alternating temperatures between 20 and 37ºC provides satisfactory conditions to induce a high percentage of seed germination of M. violaceus, without the passage of seeds through the digestive tract of its natural disperser, the lizard Tropidurus torquatus. This condition contributes to efficiently producing seedlings that can be reintroduced into conservation areas or used as ornamentals that may help reduce the overcollection of the remaining native populations.

  1. Identificación de un compuesto alelopático de Baccharis boliviensis (Asteraceae y su efecto en la germinación de Trichocereus pasacana (Cactaceae

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    Ada Cazón

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available El género Baccharis presenta una amplia distribución en regiones áridas del noroeste Argentino. Estudios realizados sobre la distribución espacial de T. pasacana con relación al espacio disponible, mostraron que a pesar de que las semillas del cardón son abundantes bajo la copa de B. boliviensis, no se detectan plantas de cardón creciendo en asociación, a pesar del requerimiento de plantas nodrizas para un establecimiento exitoso del cardón. Extractos acuosos del follaje de B. boliviensis particionado en hexano, cloroformo y acetato de etilo, inhibieron la germinación de T. pasacana. El cloroformo fue el solvente más efectivo para la extracción del material fitotóxico. La estructura del ácido ferrúlico fue determinada por metodos espectroscópicos y TLC sobre gel de sílice.The genus Baccharis has a wide distribution in Northwestern arid regions of Argentina. Studies carried out on the spatial distribution of T. pasacana in relation to the available space, show that although beneath B. boliviensis canopy, cacti seeds are abundant, no adult plants are found growing in association to that species in spite of the requirement of a nurse plant for a successfull cacti establishment. Hexane, chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts from B. boliviensis folliage inhibited T. pasacana germination completely.The bioassays were carried out in a germination chamber following a random design, with four replicates by treatment. The chloroform extract was the most effective solvent for extracting the phytotoxic material from the aqueous extracts. The ferrulic acid structure was determined by 13C NMR, ¹HNMR spectra and TLC on silica gel.

  2. Effectiveness of bats as pollinators of Stenocereus stellatus (Cactaceae) in wild, managed in situ, and cultivated populations in La Mixteca Baja, central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Cóyotl, Ethel; Stoner, Kathryn E; Casas, Alejandro

    2006-11-01

    Stenocereus stellatus is an endemic, self-incompatible, columnar cactus found in central Mexico where many of its wild populations have been fragmented. As an economically important species of fruit-producing cactus, S. stellatus occurs in wild, managed in situ, and cultivated populations. The objectives of this study were to determine the effective pollinators of S. stellatus, to compare pollinator visits and reproductive parameters among the three types of populations, and to determine if nectar feeding-bats are moving among populations. Effective pollinators were the nectarivorous bats Choeronycteris mexicana, Leptonycteris curasoae, and L. nivalis. Fewer total visits per flower per night and fewer visits by Choeronycteris were observed in cultivated populations, while the opposite pattern was observed for Leptonycteris. One aggressive interaction was filmed in which Choeronycteris was physically displaced by Leptonycteris, and Choeronycteris visits were significantly affected by Leptonycteris visits. Cultivated populations received more pollen grains and had more fruit set. Variation in pollinator visits between different populations and the consequent effects on reproductive success were likely a result of competition between bat species, and differences in foraging and in sensitivity of bat species to human populations. Three marked L. curasoae traveled 15 km from their roosting site to their foraging area, and one visited cultivated and managed populations, suggesting that this species may be particularly important in moving pollen among populations.

  3. RELACIÓN ENTRE LA HORMIGA Camponotus sp. (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) Y UNA COMUNIDAD DE CACTUS (CACTACEAE) EN EL VALLE DEL RÍO CHILLÓN

    OpenAIRE

    Novoa S., Sidney; Laboratorio de Control Biológico y Ecología de Artrópodos. Departamento Académico de Biología. Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina (Perú).; Castro C., Viviana; Jardín Botánico “Octavio Velarde Núñez”. Departamento Académico de Biología. Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina (Perú).; Ceroni S., Aldo; Jardín Botánico “Octavio Velarde Núñez”. Departamento Académico de Biología. Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina (Perú).; Redolfi P., Inés; Laboratorio de Control Biológico y Ecología de Artrópodos. Departamento Académico de Biología. Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina (Perú).

    2016-01-01

    Las observaciones se realizaron en un ecosistema de zona árida en el Valle del Río Chillón, Lima-Perú, el mes de Julio de 2003. En 4 cuadrantes de 15 x 15 m cada uno, se determinó la relación de la hormiga Camponotus sp. con la comunidad de cactáceas. La riqueza de especies de cactus fue S = 8 y la hormiga forrajea únicamente en el exterior de los botones florales de la especie Neoraimondia arequipensis ssp. roseiflora. Los resultados sugieren que la hormiga es un bioindicador de nectarios ex...

  4. Morfo-anatomia do fruto (hipanto, pericarpo e semente em desenvolvimento de Pereskia aculeata Miller (Cactaceae - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v25i2.2046 Morphology and anatomy of the fruit (hypanthium, pericarp and seed development of Pereskia aculeate Miller (Cactaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maciel da Rosa

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available O desenvolvimento do fruto (hipanto, pericarpo e semente de Pereskia aculeata Miller é analisado desde a flor em antese até a maturidade. A flor é perígina e apresenta no hipanto bractéolas verdes e acúleos. O fruto é pomáceo, tipo cactídio e caracteriza-se por apresentar hipanto carnoso, pericarpo e massa gelatinosa, formada pela destruição parcial do pericarpo e columela, onde estão imersas as sementes. A semente é exotestal e origina-se do óvulo anfítropo, bitegumentado e crassinucelado. A semente apresenta reserva perispérmica e resíduos de endosperma. O embrião é curvo e tem eixo hipocótilo-radicular longo, dois cotilédones com mesofilo homogêneo e plúmula indiferenciadaThe development of Pereskia aculeate Miller fruit (hypanthium, pericarp and seed was analyzed. The flower is perigynous and presents a hypanthium with bracteoles and aculeus. The fruit is pomaceous, type cactídio, with succulent hypanthium, pericarp, and seeds immersed in a gelatinous mass. This gelatinous mass originates from the pericarp and the columella. The seed is exotestal and develops from an amphitropous, bitegmic and crassinucelate ovule. It has perisperm and an endosperm residue. The embryo is curved and is composed of elongated hypocotyl-radicle axis, two cotyledons with uniform mesophyll, and undifferentiated plumule

  5. Morphology and anatomy of Rhipsalis cereuscula, Rhipsalis floccosa subsp. hohenauensis and Lepismium cruciforme (Cactaceae seedlings Morfología y anatomía de las plántulas de Rhipsalis cereuscula, Rhipsalis floccosa subsp. hohenauensis y Lepismium cruciforme (Cactaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan C. Secorun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Rhipsalis cereuscula Haw., Rhipsalis floccosa subsp. hohenauensis (F. Ritter Barthlott et N. P. Taylor and Lepismium cruciforme (Vellozo Miquel are obligatory epiphytes that occur frequently on tree trunks of remnant forests in Maringa, Paraná state, Brazil. Morphological and anatomical analyses regarding the seedlings were carried out. The seedlings were prepared according to techniques of resin inclusions and histochemical tests. Seedlings were phanerocotyledonar and originated from seeds with operculum. The root was diarch and the hypocotyl presented transition root-stem structure. The cotyledons were sessile, reduced, with homogeneous mesophyll. The epicotyl (phylloclade presented a lot of parenchyma and reduced vascular cylinder. The 3 studied species showed anatomical characteristics similar to those described for species of Lepismium and Rhipsalis as well as other cacti.Rhipsalis cereuscula Haw., Rhipsalis floccosa subsp. hohenauensis (F. Ritter Barthlott et N. P. Taylor y Lepismium cruciforme (Vellozo Miquel son epífitos obligatorios que frecuentemente habitan en los troncos del árbol de matorrales secundarios de Maringá, Paraná, Brasil. Se analizaron la morfología y anatomía de las plántulas de estas especies. Las plántulas fueron procesadas según las técnicas de inclusión en resina y pruebas histoquímicas. Las plántulas se clasificaron como fanerocotiledonares y se originaron de semillas con opérculo. La raíz era diarca y el hipocótilo presentó estructura de transición raíz-tallo. Los cotiledones fueron sésiles, reducidos, con el mesófilo homogéneo. El epicótilo (filocladio presentó mucho parénquima y el cilindro vascular reducido. Las 3 especies presentaron características anatómicas similares a las descritas para especies de Lepismium y Rhipsalis, así como otras cactáceas.

  6. Dispersão de sementes de Melocactus glaucescens e M. paucispinus (Cactaceae, no Município de Morro do Chapéu, Chapada Diamantina - BA Dispersion of Melocactus glaucescens and M. paucispinus (Cactaceae in the municipality of Morro do Chapéu, Chapada Diamantina - BA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosineide Braz Santos Fonseca

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se identificar os dispersores de duas espécies de Melocactus, verificar o padrão de liberação dos frutos, correlacionando-o com a remoção por frugívoros e variação térmica do cefálio, bem como caracterizar a distribuição espacial. Para tanto, foram realizadas observações focais, testes de germinação, registros da emergência, extrusão e remoção de frutos, da temperatura do cefálio, de interações formigas-diásporos e distribuição espacial. Lagartos (2 espécies e formigas (3 espécies foram os dispersores das espécies estudadas. A dormência das sementes não foi quebrada pela passagem pelo trato digestivo dos lagartos. As maiores taxas de remoção dos frutos pelos lagartos ocorreram nas horas centrais do dia, coincidindo ou sendo posterior aos picos de extrusão. As taxas de emergência e extrusão foram mais intensas pela manhã, o que aumentou as chances de remoção dos frutos no dia da liberação, evitando dissecação e predação. Não houve correlação entre a liberação dos frutos e a variação térmica do cefálio. O desenvolvimento do fruto gera tensão nas fibras do cefálio que promove sua emergência ou expulsão. A expulsão de frutos emergidos pode ser auxiliada pela dilatação das fibras em resposta ao aquecimento, tensão da união das fibras na base e saída de outros frutos. A distribuição espacial dos indivíduos parece ser influenciada pelo comportamento dos dispersores.Objectives: identify the dispersers of two species of Melocactus; verify their patterns of fruit offering and correlate this with removal by frugivores and with temperature variations of the cephalium; and analyze the relationship between the spatial distribution of the Melocactus species and the behavior of their dispersers. Focal observations were made of fruit emergence, extrusion and removal, cephalium temperature, ant-diaspore interactions, and plant spatial distribution. Germination tests were also made. Two lizard and three ant species were dispersers of the two species of Melocactus. Seed dormancy was not broken in the digestive tracts of the lizards. The greatest rates of fruit removal by the lizards occurred during the mid hours of the day, coinciding with or following the extrusion peak. Fruit emergence and extrusion rates were highest in the morning, increasing their chances of being taken on the same day, thus avoiding desiccation and predation. No correlation was observed between fruit liberation and thermal variations of the cephalium. Fruit development generates tension within the fiber mass of the cephalium that provokes fruit emergence/expulsion. The expulsion of the fruits may also be aided by the dilation of the cephalium fibers as they warm, tension generated at the cephalium base where the fibers unite, and by the expulsion of other fruits. The spatial distribution of these cacti is influenced by disperser behavior.

  7. Germinação in vitro e desenvolvimento pós-seminal de plântulas de Pilosocereus aurisetus (Werderm. Byles & G.D. Rowley (Cactaceae In vitro germination and post-seminal development of plantlets of Pilosocereus aurisetus (Werderm. Byles & G.D. Rowley (Cactaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Valquíria dos Reis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pilosocereus aurisetus é uma espécie de cactos de importância econômica e ambiental que se encontra em risco de extinção. A propagação em áreas naturais ocorre, principalmente, de forma sexuada; entretanto, não há registro da germinação e viabilidade de sementes e morfologia pós-seminal de plântulas dessa espécie. Assim, objetivou-se avaliar a germinação de sementes e descrever a morfologia do desenvolvimento pós-seminal de plântulas de P. aurisetus. Para isso, sementes, armazenadas em condições ambientais por 19 meses, foram submetidas aos tratamentos: embebição em água por 24 horas; pré-resfriamento; imersão em solução de giberelina, nas concentrações de 250 mg L-1 e 500 mg L-1; e um tratamento controle. As sementes foram colocadas para germinar em meio de cultura MS, por 30 dias, quando se avaliou a percentagem de germinação. O delineamento estatístico foi o inteiramente casualizado, com cinco tratamentos e quatro repetições, sendo dispostas 25 sementes por parcela. A caracterização pós-seminal foi realizada por um período de 60 dias, utilizando-se microscópio binocular, com base nas Regras para Análise de Sementes. Maior percentagem da germinação de sementes ocorreu no controle, ou quando embebidas por 24 horas, sendo observados 90% e 83%, respectivamente. A morfologia do desenvolvimento pós-seminal indicou que a germinação é do tipo epígea, com hipocótilo de reserva; suas plântulas sofrem modificações na região do colo, para a emissão de raízes, e apresentam cerdas no ápice caulinar, mesmo na fase inicial da expansão cotiledonar. A diferenciação e início da formação das costelas iniciam-se aos 60 dias após a germinação, com o desenvolvimento do epicótilo.Pilosocereus aurisetus is a species of cactus of economic and environmental importance, but the predatory exploitation led the species to be listed as threatened with extinction. P. aurisetus propagation occurs mainly in natural environment by sexual reproduction, though there is no record of germination, viability and morphology of post-seminal seeds of this species. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the germination and describe the morphology of post-seminal development of seeds of P. aurisetus. For this purpose, seeds stored at ambient conditions for 19 months were treated as follows: soaking in water for 24 hours, pre-cooling, soaking in solution of gibberellin in concentrations of 250 mg L-1 and 500 mg L-1 and a control. The seeds were germinated on MS medium for 30 days, when the germination percentage was evaluated. The statistical design was completely randomized with five treatments and four replications with 25 seeds per plot. The post-seminal characterization was performed for a period of 60 days using a stereomicroscope based on the International Rules for Testing Seeds. A higher percentage of germination was observed in the control or when soaked for 24 hours, with 90% and 83% respectively. The morphology of the post-seminal seeds indicated that the P. aurisetus germination is epigeous with reservation hypocotyl, seedlings changes lap region to emit roots and bristles present in shoot apex even in early stages of cotyledon expansion. The early differentiation and the formation of the ribs begin 60 days after germination with the development of the epicotyl.

  8. Leaf and stem CO/sub 2/ uptake in the three subfamilies of the Cactaceae. [Pereskia aculeata; Pereskia grandifolia; Maihuenia poeppigii; Carnegiea gigantea; Ferocactus acanthodes; Coryphantha vivipara; Mammillaria dioica; Opuntia ficus-inidica; Pereskiopsis porteri; Quiabentia chacoensis; Austrocylindropuntia subulata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobel, P.S.; Hartsock, T.L.

    1986-04-01

    Net CO/sub 2/ uptake over 24-hour periods was examined for the leaves and for the stems of 11 species of cacti representing all three subfamilies. For Pereskia aculeata, Pereskia grandifolia, and Maihuenia poeppigii (subfamily Pereskioideae), all the net shoot CO/sub 2/ uptake was by the leaves and during the daytime. In contrast, for the leafless species Carnegiea gigantea, Ferocactus acanthodes, Coryphantha vivipara, and Mammillaria dioica (subfamily Cactoideae), all the shoot net CO/sub 2/ uptake was by the stems and at night. Similarly, for leafless Opuntia ficus-indica (subfamily Opuntioideae), all net CO/sub 2/ uptake occurred at night. For leafy members of the Opuntioideae (Pereskiopsis porteri, Quiabentia chacoensis, Austrocylindropuntia subulata), at least 88% of the shoot CO/sub 2/ uptake over 24 hours was by the leaves and some CO/sub 2/ uptake occurred at night. Leaves responded to the instantaneous level of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) during the daytime, as occurs for C/sub 3/ plants, whereas nocturnal CO/sub 2/ uptake by stems of O. ficus-indica and F. acanthodes responded to the total daily PAR, as occurs for Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants. Thus, under the well-watered conditions employed, the Pereskioideae behaved as C/sub 3/ plants, the Cactoideae behaved as CAM plants, and the Opuntioideae exhibited characteristics of both pathways.

  9. Germinação in vitro e desenvolvimento pós-seminal de plântulas de Pilosocereus aurisetus (Werderm. Byles & G.D. Rowley (Cactaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Valquíria dos Reis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pilosocereus aurisetus é uma espécie de cactos de importância econômica e ambiental que se encontra em risco de extinção. A propagação em áreas naturais ocorre, principalmente, de forma sexuada; entretanto, não há registro da germinação e viabilidade de sementes e morfologia pós-seminal de plântulas dessa espécie. Assim, objetivou-se avaliar a germinação de sementes e descrever a morfologia do desenvolvimento pós-seminal de plântulas de P. aurisetus. Para isso, sementes, armazenadas em condições ambientais por 19 meses, foram submetidas aos tratamentos: embebição em água por 24 horas; pré-resfriamento; imersão em solução de giberelina, nas concentrações de 250 mg L-1 e 500 mg L-1; e um tratamento controle. As sementes foram colocadas para germinar em meio de cultura MS, por 30 dias, quando se avaliou a percentagem de germinação. O delineamento estatístico foi o inteiramente casualizado, com cinco tratamentos e quatro repetições, sendo dispostas 25 sementes por parcela. A caracterização pós-seminal foi realizada por um período de 60 dias, utilizando-se microscópio binocular, com base nas Regras para Análise de Sementes. Maior percentagem da germinação de sementes ocorreu no controle, ou quando embebidas por 24 horas, sendo observados 90% e 83%, respectivamente. A morfologia do desenvolvimento pós-seminal indicou que a germinação é do tipo epígea, com hipocótilo de reserva; suas plântulas sofrem modificações na região do colo, para a emissão de raízes, e apresentam cerdas no ápice caulinar, mesmo na fase inicial da expansão cotiledonar. A diferenciação e início da formação das costelas iniciam-se aos 60 dias após a germinação, com o desenvolvimento do epicótilo.

  10. Diversidad de escarabajos necrofilos (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae, Silphidae, Staphylinidae y Trogidae) en una region semiarida del valle de Zapotitlan de las Salinas, Puebla, Mexico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jimenez-Sanchez, Esteban; Quezada-Garcia, Roberto; Padilla-Ramirez, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    .... Se realizaron muestreos mensuales durante un ano de abril de 1998 a marzo de 1999 empleando trampas tipo NTP-80 cebadas con calamar, distribuidas en un mezquital y matorral espinoso, en cactaceas...

  11. Environmental Impact Analysis Process. Environmental Assessment Proposed SMC Military Family Housing, San Pedro, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Ficus benjamina Ficus carica Ficus elastica Ficus macrophylla Ficus microcarpa Ficus rubiginosa Morus alba...Broussonetia papyrifera Ficus benjamina Ficus carica Ficus elastica Ficus microcarpa Ficus rubiginosa Morus alba paper mulberry weeping...BUXACEAE Buxus microphylla var. japonica Japanese boxwood CACTACEAE Opuntia ficus -indica Indian-fig CAMPANULACEAE Campanula spp.

  12. Morphological characterization and phylogenetic distance among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-10

    Oct 10, 2011 ... Four genera and 75 species belonging to Cactaceae family were investigated regarding their morphology and their molecular polymorphism. The botanical classification that described the phenotypic aspects of different characters, such as number of spines/areoles, length of spines and flower diameter ...

  13. Yield and fruit quality traits of dragon fruit lines and cultivars grown in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragon fruit or pitahaya (Hylocereus undatus and Selenicereus megalanthus) is a member of the Cactaceae family and native to the tropical forest regions of Mexico, Central, and South America. The fruit was practically unknown 15 years ago but it occupies a growing niche in Europe’s exotic fruit mar...

  14. Biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella spp. isolated from nopal stems and water and soil samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nopal is a native cactus specie [Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) MILL (Cactaceae)] of appreciable economic importance in Mexico. This plant or its by-products are typically ingested fresh as a salad or processed into juice or yogurt, but it can also be used as a dietary supplement or be formulated into co...

  15. Characterization of Salmonella spp. from nopal leaves and associated soil and water samples in Morelos, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Nopal is a native cactus specie [Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) MILL (Cactaceae)] of great economic importance in Mexico. It is grown in open fields and subsequently ingested fresh as a salad or processed as a juice or yogurt, but it may also be used as a dietary supplement and/or for cosme...

  16. Morphological characterization and phylogenetic distance among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four genera and 75 species belonging to Cactaceae family were investigated regarding their morphology and their molecular polymorphism. The botanical classification that described the phenotypic aspects of different characters, such as number of spines/areoles, length of spines and flower diameter, was used to ...

  17. Evaluation of antidiabetic properties of cactus pear seed oil in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Berraaouan, Ali; Ziyyat, Abderrahim; MEKHFI, Hassane; Legssyer, Abdelkhaleq; Sindic, Marianne; Aziz, Mohammed; Bnouham, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Cactus pear (Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Mill. (Cactaceae)) is a medicinal plant widely used to treat diabetes. This work investigates the hypoglycemic and antihyperglycemic effect of cactus pear seed oil (CPSO), its mechanism of action, and any toxic effects. Peer reviewed

  18. Seed cryopreservation of the native cacti Discocactus zehntneri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    2013-05-20

    May 20, 2013 ... The native cacti species from Bahia, Discocactus zehntneri, Pilosocereus gounellei and. Stephanocereus luetzelburgii, as other members of the Family Cactaceae, have been dramatically affected by illegal traffic, and with the destruction and fragmentation of their habitats. Considering the potential ...

  19. A preliminary floristic inventory in the Sierra de Mazatan, Municipios of Ures and Mazatan, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose Jesus Sanchez-Escalante; Manuel Espericueta-Betancourt; Reyna Amanda Castillo-Gamez

    2005-01-01

    Presently, the flora of the Sierra de Mazatán contains 357 species of vascular plants distributed in 248 genera and 80 families. The families with the most species are Asteraceae (48), Fabaceae (45), Poaceae (28), Euphorbiaceae (18), and Acanthaceae, Cactaceae, Scrophulariaceae, and Solanaceae (11 each). The results show that the flora of the Sierra de Mazat...

  20. Lignans from Opuntia ficus-indica seeds protect rat primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells against ethanol-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Wha; Yang, Heejung; Kim, Hyeon Woo; Kim, Hong Pyo; Sung, Sang Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Bioactivity-guided isolation of Opuntia ficus-indica (Cactaceae) seeds against ethanol-treated primary rat hepatocytes yielded six lignan compounds. Among the isolates, furofuran lignans 4-6, significantly protected rat hepatocytes against ethanol-induced oxidative stress by reducing intracellular reactive oxygen species levels, preserving antioxidative defense enzyme activities, and maintaining the glutathione content. Moreover, 4 dose-dependently induced the heme oxygenase-1 expression in HepG2 cells.

  1. Biology, Flowering and Fruiting of the Cactus Opuntia spp.: A Review and Some Observations on Three Varieties in Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Arba; André Falisse; Redouane Choukr-Allah; Marianne Sindic

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cactus is a succulent plant resistant to droughts. According to the recently reviewed classification, cacti belong to the family of Opuntiaceae Desv. (synon. Cactaceae Juss.) with Opuntia Mill. as the typical genus. This genus is economically the most important in the family, as it includes a group of cactus pear plants which play an important role in the agricultural systems of arid and semi-arid regions. Flowering of the cactus pear fruit is an important determinant of the frui...

  2. Vegetation Composition in Hugumbirda-Gratkhassu National Forest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10 Boraginaceae. 3. 2.94 35 Polygonaceae. 1. 0.98. 11 Cactaceae. 1. 0.98 36 Ranunculaceae. 2. 1.96. 12 Capparidiaceae 1. 0.98 37 Rhamnaceaae. 4. 3.92. 13 Celastraceae. 2. 1.96 38 Rhizophoraceae 1. 0.98. 14 Cupressaceae. 2. 1.96 39 Rosaceae. 3. 2.94. 15 Ebenaceae. 1. 0.98 40 Rubiaceae. 3. 2.94. 16 Ericaceae. 1.

  3. New distribution record of Cybocephalus kathrynae (Coleoptera, Cybocephalidae on Mona Island, Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Carlos Curbelo-Rodríguez

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available New distribution record of Cybocephalus Kathrynae (Coleoptera, Cybocephalidae on Mona Island, Puerto Rico. A new record of Cybocephalus kathrynae T.R. Smith (Cybocephalidae is reported for Puerto Rico. Adults were collected from the flowers of Mammillaria nivosa (Cactaceae on Mona Island Reserve. Prior to this study, this beetle species was only reported for Monroe and Miami-Dade Counties, Florida, USA.

  4. Flora cactológica y especies asociadas en el área natural protegida Sierra Corral de los Bandidos, Nuevo León, México Cactus list and asociated plants of the protected natural area Sierra Corral de Los Bandidos, Nuevo Leon, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Pilar Carmona-Lara

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El área natural protegida (ANP Sierra Corral de los Bandidos ubicada en la sierra Madre Oriental, al noroeste de Monterrey, sufre el impacto de actividades antropológicas asociadas al matorral submontano (ganadería, agricultura, colecta y urbanismo, disminuyendo sus recursos naturales y amenazando sus especies endémicas, principalmente cactáceas. El propósito del estudio fue conocer la diversidad de cactáceas y especies asociadas en zonas de amortiguamiento y núcleo. Para ello se determinaron índices de riqueza y similitud utilizando un muestreo estratificado con cuadrantes a lo largo de transectos orientados por gradientes altitudinales según su zonificación. En total se registraron 112 taxa (30 cactáceas, 87 (24 cactáceas en zona de amortiguamiento y 80 (19 cactáceas en zona núcleo. Por su densidad, frecuencia y abundancia sobresalieron Echinocereus stramineus (Engelm. Engelm. ex F. Seitz, Cylindropuntia leptocaulis F. M. Knuth in Backeb et F. M. Knuth, Mammillaria melanocentra Poselg., Neolloydia conoidea (DC Britton et Rose, (Cactaceae; Erioneuron avenaceum (H. B et K. Tateoka, (Poaceae; Viguiera stenoloba S. F. Blake; Zexmenia hispida (Kunth A. Gray, (Asteraceae y Agave lechuguilla Torr, (Agavaceae. Existe diferencia significativa entre las poblaciones de cactus de las zonas del ANP, según Jacquard (13%, Sörensen (38% y Morisita (0.44. Ocho cactáceas (7 endémicas están registradas en algún estatus de la NOM-ECOL-059, 2001.The Sierra Corral de los Bandidos is a natural protected area located in the Sierra Madre Oriental mountain range northwest of Monterrey city. This preserve suffers the impact of human activities in the form of cattle ranching, agriculture, harvest of wild plants, and urbanism, diminishing its natural resources and threatening its endemic species, especially from the cactaceae family. The purpose of this study was to obtain information on the diversity of cacti and associated species in the buffer and

  5. RESEARCH CONCERNING THE CHEMICAL CONTROL AGAINST PSEUDOCOCCUS ADONIDUM L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria ECOBICI

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudococcus adonidum is a polyphag pest, which attacks different species of plants belonging to many genus and families, as: Citrus, Ficus, Cactaceae, Cycas, Dracena, Phoenix, Mimoza, Asparagus, Camellia etc. It is localized in large colonies on leaves, stems, branches, offshoots, and roots. The experiments were performed in solarium conditions during 2001-2002. Testing the efficiency of an insecticide sort was the aim of our experiment. During 2 experimental years, 9 products were tested: Confidor 200 SL, Calypso 400 SC; Pyrinex 25 EC, Vydate 10 G, Fastac 10 CE – RV, Sumithion 50 EC, Mospilan 20 SP, Decis 2,5 EC, Actellic 50 EC.

  6. Compostos bioativos de Opuntia ficus indica

    OpenAIRE

    Semedo, Ana Catarina Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Tese de mestrado, Controlo da Qualidade e Toxicologia dos Alimentos, Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Farmácia, 2012 A espécie Opuntia, da família Cactaceae, originária das altas montanhas vulcânicas do México (Centro e Sul), tem vindo a ser cada vez mais, alvo de estudos. Pensa-se que os compostos fenólicos já identificados nesta espécie podem ser responsáveis pela atividade antioxidante, anti-inflamatória, hipoglicemiante, anticancerigena e neuroprotectiva, entre outras, atribuídas a...

  7. DIVERSIDAD, COMPOSICIÓN FLORÍSTICA Y ENDEMISMOS EN LOS BOSQUES ESTACIONALMENTE SECOS ALTERADOS DEL DISTRITO DE JAÉN, PERÚ

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo-Peña, José Luis; Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina (Perú).; Reynel-Rodríguez, Carlos; Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina (Perú).; Zevallos-Pollito, Percy; Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina (Perú).; Bulnes-Soriano, Fernando; Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina (Perú).; Pérez-Ojeda del Arco, Alonso; Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina (Perú).

    2007-01-01

    Mediante el establecimiento de 40 transectos siguiendo la metodología de Gentry, se realizó un análisis de la diversidad, endemismos, composición florística y complementariamente la estructura de la vegetación leñosa de bosques estacionalmente secos (BTES) alterados de cuatro sectores del distrito de Jaén. Las familias más abundantes son Boraginaceae, Leguminosae, Malvaceae y Cactaceae; los géneros más abundantes son Cordia, Tetrasida, Esenbeckia y Browningia. Las especies más importantes son...

  8. Application of a rule-based knowledge system using CLIPS for the taxonomy of selected Opuntia species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymans, Bart C.; Onema, Joel P.; Kuti, Joseph O.

    1991-01-01

    A rule based knowledge system was developed in CLIPS (C Language Integrated Production System) for identifying Opuntia species in the family Cactaceae, which contains approx. 1500 different species. This botanist expert tool system is capable of identifying selected Opuntia plants from the family level down to the species level when given some basic characteristics of the plants. Many plants are becoming of increasing importance because of their nutrition and human health potential, especially in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. The expert tool system described can be extremely useful in an unequivocal identification of many useful Opuntia species.

  9. CATÁLOGO COMENTADO DE LA FLORA VASCULAR DE LA FRANJA TROPICAL (500-1200m DEL CAÑÓN DEL RÍO CHICAMOCHA (BOYACÁ-SANTANDER, COLOMBIA. PRIMERA PARTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALBESIANO SOFÍA

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available La flora vascular de la región semiárida del cañón del río Chicamocha se encuentrarepresentada por 76 familias, 297 géneros y 429 especies, siendo las familias másdiversas: Poaceae (21géneros/34especies, Asteraceae (28/30, Fabaceae (19/29,Malvaceae (11/24, Euphorbiaceae (11/23 y Cactaceae (13/20. Los géneros másricos en especies son: Sida con 10, Lantana (6, Euphorbia y Solanum (5; noobstante, el 87,2% de los géneros presenta sólo 1-2 especies. El biotipo dominanteson las hierbas (176 spp., 41%, seguido de los arbustos (106, 25% y subarbustos(46, 11%. Un grupo importante son las plantas suculentas (54 spp., 12,9%, en sumayoría pertencientes a la familia Cactaceae (20 y Euphorbiaceae (8. Se incluyetambién información sobre las especies más características de los diferentes tipos dehábitat respresentados en la región y sobre las novedades taxonómicas y corológicasque resultaron del estudio de esta flora.

  10. Antioxidant and antitopoisomerase activities in plant extracts of some Colombian flora from La Marcada Natural Regional Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Niño

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Many plants have been used to treat some diseases and infections since time immemorial, and this potential has been exploited by the pharmaceutical industry in the search of new analgesic, anticarcinogenic and antimicrobial agents, among other active agents. in order to contribute with bioprospection studies on the Colombian flora, 35 extracts from 13 plant species belonging to seven families (Apocynaceae, Cactaceae, Costaceae, Eremolepidaceae, Passifloraceae, Solanaceae and Urticaceae were collected from La Marcada Natural Regional Park (LMNRP, Colombia. Dichloromethane, n-hexane and aqueous-methanol crude extracts were prepared and evaluated for their activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae RS322N, R52Y and RS321 strains in the yeast mutant assay and their antioxidant capacity through the DPPH test. The dichloromethane extract from Myriocarpa stipitata (Urticaceae showed moderate inhibitory activity against the three S. cerevisiae strains tested. The capacity of the dichloromethane extract from M. stipitata to inhibit the enzyme topoisomerase I and to cause DNA damage was inferred from these results. In the DPPH assay, the n-hexane crude extract from Costus sp. (Costaceae showed good antioxidant activity (48%; in addition, the crude dichloromethane and aqueous-methanol extracts from Rhipsalis micrantha (Cactaceae showed moderate antioxidant activity with percentage of 29 and 21%, respectively. Rev. Biol. Trop. 59 (3: 1089-1097. Epub 2011 September 01.Desde tiempos inmemoriales, muchas plantas han sido usadas para el tratamiento de varias enfermedades e infecciones, este potencial ha sido explotado por la industria farmacéutica en la búsqueda de nuevos agentes analgésicos, anticancerígenos y antimicrobianos, entre otros. Consientes con esto, se evaluó la actividad de 35 extractos de 13 especies de plantas recolectadas en el Parque Regional Natural La Marcada (PRNLM, Colombia contra las cepas mutadas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae RS322N, R

  11. Florística e fitogeografia da vegetação arbustiva subcaducifólia da Chapada de São José, Buíque, PE, Brasil Floristics and phytogeography of semideciduous vegetation on the São José plateau, Buíque, Pernambuco State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula de Souza Gomes

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizado o levantamento da flora angiospérmica de um trecho de vegetação arbustiva subcaducifólia na Chapada de São José, Buíque, Pernambuco, com a finalidade de ampliar o conhecimento sobre a flora daquela chapada, bem como compreender suas relações florísticas com outros conjuntos vegetacionais do Nordeste, especialmente no semi-árido. A flora angiospérmica foi composta por 192 táxons, distribuídos em 130 gêneros e 60 famílias. Euphorbiaceae, Caesalpiniaceae, Myrtaceae, Mimosaceae, Fabaceae e Cactaceae foram as mais representativas em número de espécies. A análise de agrupamento revelou que o tipo de substrato exerce uma forte influência na repartição espacial das espécies dentro do semi-árido e confirmou a existência de um conjunto de espécies indicadoras das áreas sedimentares, formado por Caesalpinia microphylla Mart. (Caesalpiniaceae, Bocoa mollis (Benth. R.S. Cowan (Fabaceae, Byrsonima gardneriana A. Juss. (Malpighiaceae e Zanthoxylum stelligerum Turic. (Rutaceae. A flora da área de estudo é relacionada com a da caatinga do cristalino, caatinga de áreas sedimentares e carrasco. Todavia, o alto número de espécies de Myrtaceae, raras na caatinga, o carácter subcaducifólio da vegetação e a presença de Cactaceae e Bromeliaceae, típicas da caatinga, sugerem que a área de estudo representa o final de um gradiente que se inicia em áreas sedimentares situadas em menores altitudes.A floristic survey was carried out in a semideciduous vegetation on São José plateau with the objective of amplifying the knowledge of its angiospermic flora and establishing its relationship with other vegetations types in the semi-arid region of Northeast Brazil. The flora was composed by 192 taxa belonging to 130 genera and 60 families. Euphorbiaceae, Caesalpiniaceae, Myrtaceae, Mimosaceae Fabaceae and Cactaceae were the families with the highest numbers of species. A cluster analysis indicated influence of the soil type

  12. Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Miller as a source of bioactivity compounds for health and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragona, M; Lauriano, E R; Pergolizzi, S; Faggio, C

    2017-08-14

    Plants with beneficial properties are known in traditional medicine. Nowadays, in spite of widespread availability of synthetic compounds, the search goes towards natural compounds to lower cost and few side effects. The increasing interest in preventive medicine encourages use of nutraceuticals, bioactive compounds of vegetable origin with important nutritional values. Among the medicinal plants, Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Miller (Family Cactaceae, subfamily Opuntiodeae, Genus Opuntia, subgenus Platyopuntia, species Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Miller) is widely known for its beneficial properties. The aim of the present review is to stress the major classes of Opuntia components and their medical interest through emphasis on some of their biological effects, particularly those having the most promising expected health benefits and therapeutic impacts on fish and mammals.

  13. Nopal cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica) as a source of bioactive compounds for nutrition, health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mostafa, Karym; El Kharrassi, Youssef; Badreddine, Asmaa; Andreoletti, Pierre; Vamecq, Joseph; El Kebbaj, M'Hammed Saïd; Latruffe, Norbert; Lizard, Gérard; Nasser, Boubker; Cherkaoui-Malki, Mustapha

    2014-09-17

    Opuntia ficus-indica, commonly referred to as prickly pear or nopal cactus, is a dicotyledonous angiosperm plant. It belongs to the Cactaceae family and is characterized by its remarkable adaptation to arid and semi-arid climates in tropical and subtropical regions of the globe. In the last decade, compelling evidence for the nutritional and health benefit potential of this cactus has been provided by academic scientists and private companies. Notably, its rich composition in polyphenols, vitamins, polyunsaturated fatty acids and amino acids has been highlighted through the use of a large panel of extraction methods. The identified natural cactus compounds and derivatives were shown to be endowed with biologically relevant activities including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, hypoglycemic, antimicrobial and neuroprotective properties. The present review is aimed at stressing the major classes of cactus components and their medical interest through emphasis on some of their biological effects, particularly those having the most promising expected health benefit and therapeutic impacts.

  14. Biology, Flowering and Fruiting of the Cactus Opuntia spp.: A Review and Some Observations on Three Varieties in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Arba

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The cactus is a succulent plant resistant to droughts. According to the recently reviewed classification, cacti belong to the family of Opuntiaceae Desv. (synon. Cactaceae Juss. with Opuntia Mill. as the typical genus. This genus is economically the most important in the family, as it includes a group of cactus pear plants which play an important role in the agricultural systems of arid and semi-arid regions. Flowering of the cactus pear fruit is an important determinant of the fruit harvesting period. The goal of this paper is to present the physiology of the cactus pear and to explain in detail the biology of its flowering and fruiting processes. This study is also enriched by our observations on the flowering and fruiting of three varieties of cactus pear that we followed for two successive years in southern Morocco.

  15. Ranking Tool Created for Medicinal Plants at Risk of Being Overharvested in the Wild

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Marie Castle

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We developed an adaptable, transparent tool that can be used to quantify and compare vulnerability to overharvest for wild collected medicinal plants. Subsequently, we are creating a list of the most threatened medicinal plants in temperate North America. The new tool scores species according to their life history, the effects of harvest, their abundance and range, habitat, and demand. The resulting rankings, based on explicit criteria rather than expert opinion, will make it easier to discuss areas of vulnerability and set conservation priorities. Here we present scores for 40 species assessed using the At-Risk Tool and discuss the traits that led to different scores for six example species: echinacea (Echinacea angustifolia DC. Asteraceae, peyote (Lophophora williamsii (Lem. ex Salm-Dyck J.M. Coult. Cactaceae, sandalwood (Santalum spp. L. Santalaceae, stinging nettle (Urtica dioica L. Urticaceae, American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L. Araliaceae and mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum L. Berberidaceae.

  16. Characterization of arabinogalactan-rich mucilage from Cereus triangularis cladodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petera, B; Delattre, C; Pierre, G; Wadouachi, A; Elboutachfaiti, R; Engel, E; Poughon, L; Michaud, P; Fenoradosoa, T A

    2015-01-01

    Cereus triangularis (Cactaceae) is a cactus used in food decoction as a traditional medicine in the North region of Madagascar to reduce stomach ache and intestinal diseases. Hydrocolloids were sequentially extracted from its cladodes with a yield of 24% (240 mg/g based on dried cladodes powder). Structural analyses has revealed that this polysaccharide with a molecular mass of 8430,000g/mol was mainly composed of a galactan backbone of a (1 → 4) linked β-d-Galp residues probably substituted at position 3 by L-arabinofuranosyl residues. In vitro antioxidant activity of this arabinogalactan-rich fraction was detected and quantified by radical DPPH scavenging, hydroxyl radical scavenging, radical anion superoxide scavenging and reducing power method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A cactus-derived toxin-like cystine knot Peptide with selective antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboye, Teshome L; Strömstedt, Adam A; Gunasekera, Sunithi; Bruhn, Jan G; El-Seedi, Hesham; Rosengren, K Johan; Göransson, Ulf

    2015-05-04

    Naturally occurring cystine knot peptides show a wide range of biological activity, and as they have inherent stability they represent potential scaffolds for peptide-based drug design and biomolecular engineering. Here we report the discovery, sequencing, chemical synthesis, three-dimensional solution structure determination and bioactivity of the first cystine knot peptide from Cactaceae (cactus) family: Ep-AMP1 from Echinopsis pachanoi. The structure of Ep-AMP1 (35 amino acids) conforms to that of the inhibitor cystine knot (or knottin) family but represents a novel diverse sequence; its activity was more than 500 times higher against bacterial than against eukaryotic cells. Rapid bactericidal action and liposome leakage implicate membrane permeabilisation as the mechanism of action. Sequence homology places Ec-AMP1 in the plant C6-type of antimicrobial peptides, but the three dimensional structure is highly similar to that of a spider neurotoxin. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Exploring the phytoremediation potential of cactus (Nopalea cochenillifera Salm. Dyck.) cell cultures for textile dye degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adki, Vinayak S; Jadhav, Jyoti P; Bapat, Vishwas A

    2012-07-01

    Cactaceae Nopalea cochenillifera cell cultures and intact plants (cladodes) transform various toxic textile dyes, including Red HE7B into less phytotoxic, non-hazardous metabolites. The [tentative] pathway analysis demonstrates that Red HE7B is transformed into 3-amino-5-imino-5,8-dihydronaphthalen-2-ol, 2-amino-6-(carboxycarbonyl)-3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 4-aminophenol, and phenoL The significant induction of the activities of intracellular laccase (687%), tyrosinase (219%), azoreductase (144%), and 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol reductase (167%) indicated the involvement of these enzymes in the transformation pathways of Red HE7B but these enzymes have not been definitively linked to the phytotransformation of this toxic dye. The present foundation work could add another plant candidate for phytoremediation of undesirable products from industry wastes and harmful chemicals.

  19. Protective role of cactus cladodes extract on sodium dichromate-induced testicular injury and oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hfaiedh, Mbarka; Brahmi, Dalel; Zourgui, Lazhar

    2014-06-01

    Cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica) is a xerophyte plant that belongs to the Cactaceae family. The present study was designed to investigate the possible protective effects of cactus cladodes extract (CCE) on sodium dichromate-induced testis damage in adult male Wistar rats. For this purpose, CCE at a dose of 100 mg/kg was orally administrated, followed by 10 mg/kg sodium dichromate (intraperitoneal injection). After 40 days of treatment, the rats were sacrificed, and the testes were excised for histological, lipid peroxidation (LPO), and antioxidant enzyme analyses. Sodium dichromate treatment significantly (PCactus cladodes supplementation minimized oxidative damage and reversed the impairment of spermatogenesis and testosterone production induced by sodium dichromate in the rat testis.

  20. Nopal Cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica as a Source of Bioactive Compounds for Nutrition, Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karym El-Mostafa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Opuntia ficus-indica, commonly referred to as prickly pear or nopal cactus, is a dicotyledonous angiosperm plant. It belongs to the Cactaceae family and is characterized by its remarkable adaptation to arid and semi-arid climates in tropical and subtropical regions of the globe. In the last decade, compelling evidence for the nutritional and health benefit potential of this cactus has been provided by academic scientists and private companies. Notably, its rich composition in polyphenols, vitamins, polyunsaturated fatty acids and amino acids has been highlighted through the use of a large panel of extraction methods. The identified natural cactus compounds and derivatives were shown to be endowed with biologically relevant activities including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, hypoglycemic, antimicrobial and neuroprotective properties. The present review is aimed at stressing the major classes of cactus components and their medical interest through emphasis on some of their biological effects, particularly those having the most promising expected health benefit and therapeutic impacts.

  1. Complex Biochemistry and Biotechnological Production of Betalains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijana Krsnik-Rasol

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The demand for natural food colourants is increasing because of public awareness of their health benefits. Betalains are nitrogen-containing plant pigments whose colours range from red-violet betacyanins to yellow betaxanthins. They are used for colouring dairy products, meat and frozen desserts. Betalains have attracted additional interest because of their antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic properties. The main source of commercially produced betalains is red beet root, but alternative sources are found in plants from the Amaranthaceae and Cactaceae families. Another alternative source is plant cell culture in bioreactors, although optimization of pigment production seems necessary. In this paper we synthesize the results of recent studies on betalain biosynthesis, chemical properties, sources, biotechnology and applications.

  2. CABO FRIO - AN ENCLAVE IN SEMI ARID COASTAL MOIST OF RIO DE JANEIRO STATE: INFLUENCES OF CLIMATE AND PRESENT PAST VEGETATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Helena Gomes Coe

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Located on the northeast coast of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Cabo Frio region has been considered a phytogeographical enclave, with a drier climate than the rest of this coast, a redoubt for the “caatinga” like vegetation, dominated by xeromorphic forests, Cactaceae and Bromeliaceae. In order to contribute to this discussion in a singular way, this work makes multivariate analysis of similarity of variables of the current climate, comparing Cabo Frio with its more humid surroundings and the “caatinga” of Brazilian northeast. We also analyze possible changes in regional palaeovegetation, using phytoliths as proxy. We conclude that Cabo Frio has a climate more similar to the “caatinga” than to its surrounding, and that the vegetation, from 13,000 years cal BP, did not present major changes.

  3. Plant hydrocarbon recovery process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzadzic, P.M.; Price, M.C.; Shih, C.J.; Weil, T.A.

    1982-01-26

    A process for production and recovery of hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing whole plants in a form suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon energy sources which process comprises: (A) pulverizing by grinding or chopping hydrocarbon-containing whole plants selected from the group consisting of euphorbiaceae, apocynaceae, asclepiadaceae, compositae, cactaceae and pinaceae families to a suitable particle size, (B) drying and preheating said particles in a reducing atmosphere under positive pressure (C) passing said particles through a thermal conversion zone containing a reducing atmosphere and with a residence time of 1 second to about 30 minutes at a temperature within the range of from about 200* C. To about 1000* C., (D) separately recovering the condensable vapors as liquids and the noncondensable gases in a condition suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon fuels.

  4. ANGIOSPERM FLAG SPECIES FOR MANGROVE CONSERVATION IN San AndrÉs Island (colombia ARE HIGHLY VULNERABLE AND locally rare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Andrea Murcia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available El concepto de especies bandera ha sido empleado en proyectos de conservación por 50 años. Se proponen aquí cinco especies nativas de la Isla de San Andrés como especies bandera para la conservación de los pocos remanentes de manglar en esta Isla: Bontia daphnoides (Myoporaceae, Canella winterana (Canellaceae, Eustoma exaltatum (Gentianaceae, Rhabdadenia biflora (Apocynaceae y Selenicereus grandiflorus (Cactaceae. Cuatro de estas especies son documentadas aquí por primera vez para el Archipiélago, y tres representan los primeros reportes para la Flora de Colombia, dos de ellos (Canellaceae y Myoporaceae a nivel de familia.

  5. Propagação por sementes de Schlumbergera truncata (Haw. Moran (flor-de-maio em diferentes substratos - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v29i3.480 Propagation by seeds of Schlumbergera truncata (Haw. Moran (florde- maio in different substrates - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v29i3.480

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Biondi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Schlumbergera truncata (Haw. Moran (Cactaceae, conhecida como flor-demaio, é uma espécie herbácea epífita, nativa no Brasil, muito apreciada como planta ornamental pela beleza de suas flores. Esta espécie multiplica-se por sementes, mas comercialmente é propagada por estacas e enxertia. Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a germinação de quatro variedades de cores desta espécie (rosa, vermelha, branca e amarela em cinco substratos (vermiculita de granulometria média, xaxim desfibrado, areia, substrato comercial Rendmax® Floreiras e mistura de 50% do substrato comercial Rendmax® Floreiras + 50% xaxim desfibrado. Os resultados mostraram que a espécie pode ser reproduzida com facilidade por sementes. O substrato comercial Rendmax® Floreiras proporcionou os melhores resultados.Schlumbergera truncata (Haw. Moran (Cactaceae, known as “flor-de-maio”, is a Brazilian endogenous herbaceous epiphytic species, much appreciated as ornamental for the beauty of its flowers. This species is multiplied by seeds, but commercially it is propagated by cuttings and grafting. The aim of this research was to evaluate the germination of four varieties of colors of this species (pink, red, white and yellow in five substrates (vermiculite, de-fibered tree ferns, sand, commercial substrate Rendmax® Floreiras and a mixture of 50% of the commercial substrate Rendmax® Floreiras + 50% tree ferns. The results showed that this species can be easily reproduced by seeds. The commercial substrate Rendmax® Floreiras provided the best germination result.

  6. Bleogens: Cactus-Derived Anti-Candida Cysteine-Rich Peptides with Three Different Precursor Arrangements

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    Shining Loo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs play important host-defense roles in plants. However, information concerning CRPs in the Cactaceae (cactus family is limited, with only a single cactus-derived CRP described to date. Here, we report the identification of 15 novel CRPs with three different precursor architectures, bleogens pB1-15 from Pereskia bleo of the Cactaceae family. By combining proteomic and transcriptomic methods, we showed that the prototype, bleogen pB1, contained 36 amino acid residues, a six-cysteine motif typical of the six-cysteine-hevein-like peptide (6C-HLP family, and a type I two-domain precursor consisting of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER and a mature domain. In contrast, the precursors of the other 14 bleogens contained a type II three-domain architecture with a propeptide domain inserted between the ER and the mature bleogen domain. Four of these 14 bleogens display a third type of architecture with a tandemly repeating bleogen domain. A search of the Onekp database revealed that <1% plant species possess three different precursor architectures for the biosynthesis of 6C-HLPs, including Lophophora williamsii, Pereskia aculeate, Portulaca cryptopetala, Portulaca oleracea, Portulaca suffruticosa, and Talinum sp. NMR analysis confirmed that bleogen pB1 has cystine-knot disulfide connectivity as well as a two-beta-sheet and a four-loop structural fold that is similar to other 6C-HLPs. Sequence analysis, structural studies, and in silico modeling revealed that bleogen pB1 has a cation-polar-cation motif, a signature heparin-binding motif that was confirmed by heparin affinity chromatography. Cell-based assays showed that bleogen pB1 is non-toxic to mammalian cells but functions as an anti-Candida peptide. Taken together, our findings provide insight into the occurrence, functions and precursor architectures of CRPs in the cactus family.

  7. Is geographical rarity frequent among the cacti of the Chihuahuan Desert? ¿Es la rareza geográfica frecuente entre las cactáceas del Desierto Chihuahuense?

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    Héctor M. Hernández

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of assessing the extent of geographical rarity of Mexican Cactaceae, we calculated the distribution size (area of occupancy of 142 species from the Chihuahuan Desert. In addition, using 2 variables (number of localities and range size, we preliminarily assessed their conservation status using the current IUCN Red List criteria. The results showed enormous variation in the areas of occupancy, although from the biogeographic and conservation perspective the most exceptional group comprises the extremely narrow endemics (42 species, whose range is restricted to areas smaller than 10 km2. Our results reinforce the reputation of this plant family as exceptionally rare geographically. We suggest that geographical rarity of Cactaceae in the Chihuahuan Desert is a natural phenomenon; however, we propose that the range of several species has been influenced by human activities. Regarding the conservation status of the species, 75 of them are categorized as Least concern. The remaining 67 species (47.2% fall in 1 of the 3 categories of threat (27 Vulnerable, 11 Endangered, and 29 Critically endangered. These figures confirm the critical conservation status of Mexican Cactaceae.Se calculó el tamaño de la distribución (área de ocupación de 142 especies de cactáceas del Desierto Chihuahuense, con el objeto de evaluar su grado de rareza geográfica. Además, mediante el uso de 2 variables (número de localidades y tamaño de distribución, se estimó de manera preliminar su estado de conservación usando los criterios actuales de la Lista Roja de la UICN. Los resultados mostraron gran variación en las áreas de ocupación. Sin embargo, desde una perspectiva biogeográfica y de la conservación, el grupo de especies más excepcional corresponde a las endémicas restringidas (42 spp., cuyas áreas de distribución son menores de 10 km². Los resultados fortalecen la reputación de las cactáceas de ser una familia de plantas excepcionalmente

  8. A mass collection of Triatoma ryckmani (Hemiptera:Reduviidaefrom Stenocereus eichlamii (Cactaceaein the semiarid region of Guatemala

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    Ricardo Marroquín M

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A population of 216 specimens of Stenocereus eichlamii (Cactaceae,Subfamily Cereoideae was surveyed for Triatoma ryckmani (vector of Chagas diseasein a one hectare plot of semiarid habitat in Guatemala. Out of 44 plants that had dead and dry sections,24 plants had a total of 103 specimens of T.ryckmani .In comparison with other areas of Guatemala,T.ryckmani is well established in the semiarid ecosystem (Infestation index 54.5,density =2.3 and crowding index 4.3.The insects were mainly found (52.4%in the dead portions of S.eichlamii 2.0 to 3.2 m above the ground (X² =26.0,PEn Guatemala,en una hectárea de la región semiárida,se encontraron 216 cactus de Stenocereus eichlamii (Cactaceae,44 de ellos tenían alguna parte del tallo en condiciones secas.103 Triatoma ryckmani fueron halladas en 24 de esos 44 S.eichlamii .Una comparación de los índices entomológicos con otros vectores domiciliares de la enfermedad de Chagas en Guatemala,da la idea que T. ryckmani está bien establecida en el ecosistema semiárido (índice de infestación de 54.5,índice de densidad de 2.3 e índice de hacinamiento de 4.3.Los triatominos fueron hallados preferentemente en las partes muertas de S.eichlamii entre 2.0 a 3.2 m sobre el nivel del suelo (52.4%de triatominos colectados,X ²=26.0,p<0.00001,el siguiente entre 3.2 a 5.0 m (35.9%y finalmente 0.2 a 2.0 m (11.6%. El 75.7 %estaba en condiciones de ayuno y 24.3 %estaban llenas de sangre.Para determinar la presencia de flagelados,43 T.ryckmani fueron disectadas, (primera evaluación de parasitemia en esta especie.Ningún flagelado fue hallado en estos triatominos.Este es el primer reporte de la dinámica poblacional de T.ryckmani en su hábitat silvestre.

  9. Análisis del comportamiento de mercado de la pitahaya (Hylocereus undatus en Costa Rica

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    Olman Quirós Madrigal

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available La pitahaya (Hylocereus undatus es una planta que pertenece a la familia de las cactaceae, que se puede consumir como fruta fresca o procesada como pulpa; sin embargo, en Costa Rica su uso no está muy difundido, por lo que el mercado meta es la población de origen nicaragüense residente en el país, quienes catalogan el producto como de consumo tradicional o masivo.Es por esto que resulta importante retomar el estudio de los componentes del mercado, en donde se destaca no sólo por ser una fruta con componentes nutricionales que aportan beneficios a la salud humana, sino tambien porque suple una demanda latente y su cultivo puede ser una actividad alternativa para productores de zonas con condiciones agroecológicas adversas. En relación con el abastecimiento del producto en el mercado nacional, se enfatiza que su procedencia es nacional pero principalmente se importa como fruta fresca y pulpa de Nicaragua y, en menor grado, de Colombia.El precio de la pitahaya en el mercado nacional está estrechamente relacionado con los precios de importación, ya que la oferta principal proviene del producto importado, por lo que ha tenido un comportamiento creciente al pasar, de US$0,574 en el año 2003, a US$1,18 por kg en el 2007.

  10. Convergence of a specialized root trait in plants from nutrient-impoverished soils: phosphorus-acquisition strategy in a nonmycorrhizal cactus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahão, A; Lambers, H; Sawaya, A C H F; Mazzafera, P; Oliveira, R S

    2014-10-01

    In old, phosphorus (P)-impoverished habitats, root specializations such as cluster roots efficiently mobilize and acquire P by releasing large amounts of carboxylates in the rhizosphere. These specialized roots are rarely mycorrhizal. We investigated whether Discocactus placentiformis (Cactaceae), a common species in nutrient-poor campos rupestres over white sands, operates in the same way as other root specializations. Discocactus placentiformis showed no mycorrhizal colonization, but exhibited a sand-binding root specialization with rhizosheath formation. We first provide circumstantial evidence for carboxylate exudation in field material, based on its very high shoot manganese (Mn) concentrations, and then firm evidence, based on exudate analysis. We identified predominantly oxalic acid, but also malic, citric, lactic, succinic, fumaric, and malonic acids. When grown in nutrient solution with P concentrations ranging from 0 to 100 μM, we observed an increase in total carboxylate exudation with decreasing P supply, showing that P deficiency stimulated carboxylate release. Additionally, we tested P solubilization by citric, malic and oxalic acids, and found that they solubilized P from the strongly P-sorbing soil in its native habitat, when the acids were added in combination and in relatively low concentrations. We conclude that the sand-binding root specialization in this nonmycorrhizal cactus functions similar to that of cluster roots, which efficiently enhance P acquisition in other habitats with very low P availability.

  11. Central Antinociceptive and Mechanism of Action of Pereskia bleo Kunth Leaves Crude Extract, Fractions, and Isolated Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilhon, Carolina Carvalho; Abdul Wahab, Ikarastika Rahayu; Boylan, Fabio; Fernandes, Patricia Dias

    2015-01-01

    Pereskia bleo (Kunth) DC. (Cactaceae) is a plant commonly used in popular medicine in Malaysia. In this work, we evaluate the antinociceptive effect of P. bleo leaf extracts and isolated compounds in central antinociceptive model. Ethanol extract (E), hexane (H), ethyl acetate (EA), or butanol (B) fractions (30, 50, or 100 mg/kg, p.o.), sitosterol (from hexane) and vitexin (from ethyl acetate), were administered to mice. Antinociceptive effect was evaluated in the hot plate and capsaicin- or glutamate-induced licking models. Morphine (1 mg/kg, p.o.) was used as reference drug. Naloxone (1 mg/kg, i.p.), atropine (1 mg/kg, i.p.), and L-nitro arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 3 mg/kg, i.p.) were administered 30 min earlier (100 mg/kg, p.o.) in order to evaluate the mechanism of the antinociceptive action. Higher dose of B developed an effect significantly superior to morphine-treated group. Naloxone prevented the antinociceptive effect of all fractions. L-NAME demonstrated effect against E, EA, and B. In all fractions, sitosterol and vitexin reduced the licking time after capsaicin injection. Glutamate-induced licking response was blocked by H, EA, and B. Our results indicate that Pereskia bleo fractions, sitosterol and vitexin, possessed a central antinociceptive effect. Part of this effect is mediated by opioid receptors and nitrergic pathway. PMID:26273315

  12. Thermoluminescence characterization of the irradiated minerals extracted from nopal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Zaragoza, E.; Furetta, C.; Kitis, G.; Gomez, B. T.; Polymeris, G. S.; Tsirliganis, N.; Loukou, Z.

    2006-05-01

    The mineral fraction from dehydrated nopal leaves (Opuntia ficus indica ) belonging to the Cactaceae family was extracted and selected by sizes of 10 and 74 mu m and exposed to 60 Co gamma radiation at different doses in the range 70 Gy-20 kGy. The glow-curves from these polyminerals show a thermoluminescence (TL) band with one very intense peak at a temperature around 150 degrees C and a second one emerging in the high temperature region, moving in a large zone of temperature values according to the preparation used and the level of irradiation. The XRD analysis shows a composition of both biominerals as whewellite and weddellite and a mineral fraction as anorthoclase and quartz. The main TL characteristics of the polymineral content of the nopal was analyzed, i.e . the TL response at different doses and fading during storage at room temperature. The activation energy of the traps responsible for the TL emission was also investigated and a possible continuous distribution of traps is discussed. A review of the scientific literature shows that this is the first time that a TL study on nopal ionized by irradiation has been carried out.

  13. The n-butanolic extract of Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten enhances long-term memory in the passive avoidance task in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Min; Kim, Dong Hyun; Park, Se Jin; Park, Dong Hyun; Jung, Seo Yun; Kim, Hyoung Ja; Lee, Yong Sup; Jin, Changbae; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2010-08-16

    Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten Makino (Cactaceae) is used to treat burns, edema, dyspepsia, and asthma in traditional medicine. The present study investigated the beneficial effects of the n-butanolic extract of O. ficus-indica var. saboten (BOF) on memory performance in mice and attempts to uncover the mechanisms underlying its action. Memory performance was assessed with the passive avoidance task, and western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to measure changes in protein expression and cell survival. After the oral administration of BOF for 7 days, the latency time in the passive avoidance task was significantly increased relative to vehicle-treated controls (P<0.05). Western blotting revealed that the expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), phosphorylated cAMP response element binding-protein (pCREB), and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) 1/2 were significantly increased in hippocampal tissue after 7 days of BOF administration (P<0.05). Doublecortin and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine immunostaining also revealed that BOF significantly enhanced the survival of immature neurons, but did not affect neuronal cell proliferation in the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. These results suggest that the subchronic administration of BOF enhances long-term memory, and that this effect is partially mediated by ERK-CREB-BDNF signaling and the survival of immature neurons. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ameliorative Effect of Cactus (Opuntia ficus indica Extract on Lithium-Induced Nephrocardiotoxicity: A Biochemical and Histopathological Study

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    Anouar ben Saad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Opuntia ficus indica (family Cactaceae is used in the treatment of a variety of conditions including metal-induced toxicity. The study reports the protective effects of Opuntia ficus indica (CCE against lithium carbonate-induced toxicity in rats. Nephrocardiotoxicity was induced in male Wistar rats by single dose of lithium carbonate (25 mg/kg b.w twice daily for 30 days. Aqueous extract of Opuntia ficus indica was administered at the dose of 100 mg/kg of b.w by gavage for 60 days. Obtained results revealed that administration of lithium carbonate caused a significant increase in serum creatinine, uric acid, and urea levels. Additionally, a significant decrease in the level of renal and cardiac SOD, CAT, and GPx activities was associated with a significant increase of MDA levels in lithium carbonate group more than those of the control. However, the treatment of experimental rats with CCE prevented these alterations and maintained the antioxidant status. The histopathological observations supported the biochemical evidences of nephrocardioprotection. CCE supplementation could protect against lithium carbonate-induced renal and cardiac injuries in rats, plausibly by the upregulation of antioxidant enzymes and inhibition of MDA to confer the protective effect.

  15. Reversing gastric mucosal alterations during ethanol-induced chronic gastritis in rats by oral administration of Opuntia ficus-indica mucilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Ramírez, Ricardo; Olguín-Martínez, Marisela; Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of mucilage obtained from cladodes of Opuntia ficus-indica (Cactaceae) on the healing of ethanol-induced gastritis in rats. METHODS: Chronic gastric mucosa injury was treated with mucilage (5 mg/kg per day) after it was induced by ethanol. Lipid composition, activity of 5’-nucleotidase (a membrane-associated ectoenzyme) and cytosolic activities of lactate and alcohol dehydrogenases in the plasma membrane of gastric mucosa were determined. Histological studies of gastric samples from the experimental groups were included. RESULTS: Ethanol elicited the histological profile of gastritis characterized by loss of the surface epithelium and infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) decreased and cholesterol content increased in plasma membranes of the gastric mucosa. In addition, cytosolic activity increased while the activity of alcohol dehydrogenases decreased. The administration of mucilage promptly corrected these enzymatic changes. In fact, mucilage readily accelerated restoration of the ethanol-induced histological alterations and the disturbances in plasma membranes of gastric mucosa, showing a univocal anti-inflammatory effect. The activity of 5’-nucleotidase correlated with the changes in lipid composition and the fluidity of gastric mucosal plasma membranes. CONCLUSION: The beneficial action of mucilage seems correlated with stabilization of plasma membranes of damaged gastric mucosa. Molecular interactions between mucilage monosaccharides and membrane phospholipids, mainly PC and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), may be the relevant features responsible for changing activities of membrane-attached proteins during the healing process after chronic gastric mucosal damage. PMID:16865772

  16. Peyote identification on the basis of differences in morphology, mescaline content, and trnL/trnF sequence between Lophophora williamsii and L. diffusa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragane, Masako; Sasaki, Yohei; Nakajima, Jun'ichi; Fukumori, Nobutaka; Yoshizawa, Masao; Suzuki, Yukiko; Kitagawa, Shigemi; Mori, Ken'ichiro; Ogino, Shuzo; Yasuda, Ichiro; Nagumo, Seiji

    2011-01-01

    Genus Lophophora (Cactaceae) has two species: Lophophora williamsii Coulter, which is called peyote, and L. diffusa Bravo. Although it was reported that L. williamsii contained mescaline and L. diffusa did not, we found L. williamsii specimens that did not contain mescaline. This finding indicated that the two species could not be differentiated in terms of mescaline content. Moreover, the relationship between mescaline content and morphology of the two species is also unknown. In this study, we attempted to clarify the difference in morphology, mescaline content, and DNA alignment of the chloroplast trnL/trnF region between L. williamsii and L. diffusa. As a result, L. williamsii specimens were classified into two groups. Group 1 had small protuberances on the epidermis, contained mescaline, and the analyzed region on the trnL/trnF sequence was 881 base pairs (bp) long in all except one (877 bp). Group 2 had large protuberances on the epidermis, did not contain mescaline, and the analyzed region was 893 bp long. On the other hand, L. diffusa had medium-sized protuberances on the epidermis, did not contain mescaline, and the analyzed region was 903 bp long. Also investigated was the potential application of the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method as a means of identification based on the trnL/trnF sequence. By applying the PCR-RFLP method, the two species could be distinguished and L. williamsii specimens could be differentiated into group 1 and group 2.

  17. Innovations from the “ivory tower”: Wilhelm Barthlott and the paradigm shift in surface science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This article is mainly about borders that have tremendous influence on our daily life, although many of them exist and act mostly unrecognized. In this article the first objective will be to address more generally the relation between university and society or industry, borders within universities, borders in thinking and the huge amount of misunderstandings and losses resulting from these obvious or hidden borders. In the second part and in more detail, the article will highlight the impact of the research conducted by Wilhelm Barthlott throughout his scientific career during which not only one border was removed, shifted or became more penetrable. Among the various fields of interest not mentioned here (e.g., systematics of Cactaceae, diversity and evolution of epiphytes, the unique natural history of isolated rocky outcrops called inselbergs, or the global distribution of biodiversity), plant surfaces and especially the tremendous diversity of minute structures on leaves, fruits, seeds and other parts of plants represent a common thread through 40 years of scientific career of Wilhelm Barthlott. Based on research that was regarded already old-fashioned in the 1970s and 1980s, systematic botany, results and knowledge were accumulated that, some 20 years later, initiated a fundamental turnover in how surfaces were recognized not only in biology, but even more evident in materials science. PMID:28326228

  18. Changes in sugars, acids, and volatiles during ripening of koubo [Cereus peruvianus (L.) Miller] fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninio, Racheli; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Mizrahi, Yosef; Sitrit, Yaron

    2003-01-29

    The columnar cactus Cereus peruvianus (L.) Miller, Cactaceae (koubo), is grown commercially in Israel. The unripe fruits are green, and the color changes to violet and then to red when the fruit is fully ripe. The content of soluble sugars was found to increase 5-fold during ripening. Glucose and fructose were the main sugars accumulated in the fruit pulp, and each increased from 0.5 to 5.5 g/100 g fresh weight during ripening. The polysaccharides content decreased during ripening from 1.4 to 0.4 g/100 g fresh weight. The titratable acidity decreased and the pH increased during ripening. The major organic acid found in the fruit was malic acid, which decreased from 0.75 g/100 g fresh weight at the mature green stage to 0.355 g/100 g fresh weight in ripe fruits. Citric, succinic, and oxalic acids were found in concentrations lower than 0.07 g/100 g fresh weight. Prominent accumulation of aroma volatiles occurred toward the end of the ripening process. The main volatile found in the ripe fruit was linalool, reaching concentrations of 1.5-3.5 microg/g fresh weight.

  19. Inventario taxonómico, fitogreográfico y etnobotánico de frutales nativos del norte del Perú

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    José Mostacero León

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available La megafitodiversidad del Perú presenta especies nativas de toda índole; entre ellas frutales, los que a pesar de ser consumidos desde hace cientos de años, aún no han sido atendidos por la investigación para validar su uso, con la seguridad de que estamos consumiendo recursos que pueden superar en cantidad y calidad de vitaminas, sales minerales y pigmentos antociánicos. Así, el objetivo del presente estudio fue realizar un Inventario Taxonómico, Fitogeográfico y Etnobotánico de los frutales nativos del Norte del Perú. Se realizaron colectas a través de exploraciones botánicas programadas a varias localidades del Norte del Perú. Luego se llevó a cabo una revisión crítica de la bibliografía especializada y reforzando esta información con la obtenida por la experiencia personal tanto de los investigadores como de los pobladores locales y regionales. Se reportan 45 especies, distribuidas en 18 familias; donde destacan por su número las: Ericaceae (7, Myrtaceae (6, Cactaceae (4, Solanaceae (4, Caricaceae (3, Passifloraceae (3 y Rosaceae (3. Así mismo 29 especies (64% son consumidas en estado fresco y/o natural, mientras que 16 especies (36% tanto al estado fresco como procesadas (jaleas, mermeladas, helados, vinos, jugos, natilla, mazamorra, etc..

  20. Innovations from the “ivory tower”: Wilhelm Barthlott and the paradigm shift in surface science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Neinhuis

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article is mainly about borders that have tremendous influence on our daily life, although many of them exist and act mostly unrecognized. In this article the first objective will be to address more generally the relation between university and society or industry, borders within universities, borders in thinking and the huge amount of misunderstandings and losses resulting from these obvious or hidden borders. In the second part and in more detail, the article will highlight the impact of the research conducted by Wilhelm Barthlott throughout his scientific career during which not only one border was removed, shifted or became more penetrable. Among the various fields of interest not mentioned here (e.g., systematics of Cactaceae, diversity and evolution of epiphytes, the unique natural history of isolated rocky outcrops called inselbergs, or the global distribution of biodiversity, plant surfaces and especially the tremendous diversity of minute structures on leaves, fruits, seeds and other parts of plants represent a common thread through 40 years of scientific career of Wilhelm Barthlott. Based on research that was regarded already old-fashioned in the 1970s and 1980s, systematic botany, results and knowledge were accumulated that, some 20 years later, initiated a fundamental turnover in how surfaces were recognized not only in biology, but even more evident in materials science.

  1. Central Antinociceptive and Mechanism of Action of Pereskia bleo Kunth Leaves Crude Extract, Fractions, and Isolated Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Carvalho Guilhon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pereskia bleo (Kunth DC. (Cactaceae is a plant commonly used in popular medicine in Malaysia. In this work, we evaluate the antinociceptive effect of P. bleo leaf extracts and isolated compounds in central antinociceptive model. Ethanol extract (E, hexane (H, ethyl acetate (EA, or butanol (B fractions (30, 50, or 100 mg/kg, p.o., sitosterol (from hexane and vitexin (from ethyl acetate, were administered to mice. Antinociceptive effect was evaluated in the hot plate and capsaicin- or glutamate-induced licking models. Morphine (1 mg/kg, p.o. was used as reference drug. Naloxone (1 mg/kg, i.p., atropine (1 mg/kg, i.p., and L-nitro arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 3 mg/kg, i.p. were administered 30 min earlier (100 mg/kg, p.o. in order to evaluate the mechanism of the antinociceptive action. Higher dose of B developed an effect significantly superior to morphine-treated group. Naloxone prevented the antinociceptive effect of all fractions. L-NAME demonstrated effect against E, EA, and B. In all fractions, sitosterol and vitexin reduced the licking time after capsaicin injection. Glutamate-induced licking response was blocked by H, EA, and B. Our results indicate that Pereskia bleo fractions, sitosterol and vitexin, possessed a central antinociceptive effect. Part of this effect is mediated by opioid receptors and nitrergic pathway.

  2. Assessing the geographic dichotomy hypothesis with cacti in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzabe, A A; Aguirre, L F; Baldelomar, M P; Molina-Montenegro, M A

    2017-11-20

    The Cactaceae is one of the most conspicuous and ecologically important plant families in the world. Its species may have specialist or generalist pollination systems that show geographic patterns, which are synthesised in the Geographic Dichotomy Hypothesis. Here, we assess this hypothesis in five countries in both tropical and extratropical regions, evaluating the pollinator visitation rate and pollinator identity and abundance. We calculate the Shannon diversity index (H') and evenness (J) and evaluate differences between latitude parameters with a Student t-test. Overall, we found more specialised pollination systems in all tropical sites; the richness, diversity and evenness of pollinators was reduced in comparison to extratropical regions, where the pollination system was generalised. Our results support the geographic dichotomy hypothesis in the cacti of South America, suggesting that environmental factors underlying the latitudinal patterns can help to explain differences in the pollination syndrome between tropical and extratropical regions. © 2017 German Society for Plant Sciences and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  3. Plant population and habitat characteristics of the endemic Sonoran Desert cactus Peniocereus striatus in Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Greta; Rutman, Sue; Munson, Seth M.

    2010-01-01

    Peniocereus striatus (Brandegee) Buxb. (Cactaceae) is an endemic Sonoran Desert cactus that reaches its northern range limit in southwestern Arizona. One U.S. population occupies a small area of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument near the U.S./Mexico international boundary, which has been monitored since 1939. An extensive survey conducted in 2002, covering 177 ha, resulted in the discovery of 88 new plants, in addition to the relocation of 57 plants found in previous surveys. Despite potential increases in population size and spatial distribution, mean plant height and number of basal stems has not significantly changed in recent years. Bud scars revealed that a majority of the population was sexually mature. Peniocereus striatus occurrence increased with decreasing slope, spanned every slope aspect, and was highest on rocky soils, but was noticeably low on west and northwest slopes and areas where severe land degradation had previously occurred. Over half of P. striatus plants were nursed by shrubs and subshrubs, while 40% occurred under leguminous trees. A severe frost in January 2002 top-killed 19% of the population, with the greatest damage in drainage bottoms. However, long-term (1944–2002) climate records show that there has been an overall increase in the number of frost free days in the region, which, coupled with land use change, has implications for the future health of this population.

  4. Seasonal variability of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity in prickly pear cladodes of Opuntia and Nopalea genres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Abel Lemos ALVES

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The prickly pear is a cactaceae that have chemical compounds that act as natural antioxidants. In addition, the prickly pear is a plant widely used in semiarid region as it’s considered very important forage for animal feed, especially in the dry season. The objectives of this research were to characterize the main classes of phytochemicals, determine the phenols content, flavonoids and anthocyanins and evaluate the antioxidant activity of the prickly pear cultivars Opuntia and Nopalea grown in the semiarid region of Pernambuco in two collection periods (dry and rainy. In the work crude ethanol extracts from cladodes of cultivars (IPA-20, Elephant Ear Mexican, F-08, V-19, Small palm, F-21 and IPA-Sertânia were used. As for the class of phytochemical compounds from ethanol extract only the flavonoids and steroids were detected in all prickly pear cultivars, in both periods analyzed. The content of phenolic compounds ranges from 1.24 to 5.41 mg GAE g-1 DM, flavonoids 0.90 to 3.43 mg QE g-1 DM, anthocyanins from 0.05 to 0.34 µg QE 100 g-1 DM and antioxidant activity 39.59 to 217.17 µM TEAC g-1 DM. The occurrence of chemical variability and antioxidant activity were observed, both among the botanical cultivars studied and among the collection periods.

  5. Phyllotactic pattern formation in early stages of cactus ontogeny

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    Edyta M. Gola

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Representatives of the family Cactaceae are characterized by a wide range of phyllotaxis. To assess the origin of this diversity, early stages of phyllotactic pattern formation were examined in seedlings. The analysis of the sequence of areole initiation revealed intertribal differences. In seedlings from the Trichocereeae (Gymnocalycium, Rebutia and Notocacteae (Parodia tribes, two opposite cotyledonal areoles developed as the first elements of a pattern. Usually, next pair of areoles was initiated perpendicularly to cotyledonal areoles, starting the decussate pattern. This pattern was subsequently transformed into bijugate or into simple spiral phyllotaxis. In seedlings from the Cacteae tribe (Mammillaria and Thelocactus, cotyledonal areoles were never observed and the first areoles always appeared in the space between cotyledons. It was either areole pair (mainly in Mammillaria, starting a decussate pattern, or a single areole (mainly in Thelocactus quickly followed by areoles spirally arranged, usually in accordance with the main Fibonacci phyllotaxis. Differences in the initial stages of pattern formation do not fully explain the phyllotaxis diversity in mature cacti. Only two, the most common phyllotactic patterns occurred in the early development of studied seedlings, i.e. the main Fibonacci and the decussate pattern. Discrepancy in the range of phyllotactic spectra in seedlings and in mature plants suggests that phyllotaxis diversity emerges during further plant growth. Initial phyllotactic transformations, occurring already in the very early stages, indicate great plasticity of cactus growth and seem to support the hypothesis of the ontogenetic increase of phyllotaxis diversity due to transformations.

  6. Phytochemical study of Pilosocereus pachycladus and antibiotic-resistance modifying activity of syringaldehyde

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    Severino Gonçalves de Brito-Filho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Pilosocereus pachycladus F. Ritter, Cactaceae, popularly known as "facheiro", is used as food and traditional medicine in Brazilian caatinga ecoregion. The plant is used to treat prostate inflammation and urinary infection. The present work reports the first secondary metabolites isolated from P. pachycladus. Therefore, the isolated compound 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy benzaldehyde (syringaldehyde was evaluated as modulator of Staphylococcus aureus pump efflux-mediated antibiotic resistance. The isolation of compounds was performed using chromatographic techniques and the structural elucidation was carried out by spectroscopic methods. In order to evaluate syringaldehyde ability to modulate S. aureus antibiotic resistance, its minimum inhibitory concentrations (µg/ml was first determinate, then, the tested antibiotics minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined in the presence of the syringaldehyde in a sub-inhibitory concentration. The chromatographic procedures led to isolation of twelve compounds from P. pachycladus including fatty acids, steroids, chlorophyll derivatives, phenolics and a lignan. The syringaldehyde did not show any antibacterial activity at 256 µg/ml against S. aureus. On the other hand the compound was able to reduce the antibiotic concentration (tetracycline, norfloxacin, ethidium bromide required to inhibit the growth of drug-resistant bacteria, showing the ability of syringaldehyde of inhibiting the efflux pump on these bacteria.

  7. Carotenoids profile and total polyphenols in fruits of Pereskia aculeata Miller

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    Tânia da Silveira Agostini-Costa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Pereskia aculeata Mill. (Ora-pro-nóbis is a native cactaceae from tropical America, whose leaves have high protein content. In Brazil it is found in all territorial extension between the states of Bahia and Rio Grande do Sul. Most studies have focused on chemical characterization of the leaves of this specie. The objective was to assess the carotenoids profile and the total polyphenols present in the fruits of P. aculeate. Carotenoids were determined by HPLC-PAD (high performance liquid chromatography - photodiode array detector, total polyphenols were determined by Folin-Ciocalteu and vanillin methods. Trans-β-carotene was the main carotenoid, followed by α-carotene, lutein and other minor carotenoids. It was found 64.9 ± 1.1 mg.100g-1 of gallic acid equivalent, 14.8 ± 0.2 mg.100g-1 of catechin equivalent. Carotenoid identification of P. aculeate fruits are presented here by the first time and indicate that these fruits can be researched as source of bioactive substances, especially antioxidant and provitamin A carotenoids.

  8. Effect of Opuntia humifusa Supplementation and Acute Exercise on Insulin Sensitivity and Associations with PPAR-γ and PGC-1α Protein Expression in Skeletal Muscle of Rats

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    Youngju Song

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined whether Opuntia humifusa (O. humifusa, which is a member of the Cactaceae family, supplementation and acute swimming exercise affect insulin sensitivity and associations with PPAR-γ and PGC-1α protein expression in rats. Thirty-two rats were randomly divided into four groups (HS: high fat diet sedentary group, n = 8; HE: high fat diet acute exercise group, n = 8; OS: 5% O. humifusa supplemented high fat diet sedentary group, n = 8; OE: 5% O. humifusa supplemented high fat diet acute exercise group, n = 8. Rats in the HE and OE swam for 120 min. before being sacrificed. Our results indicated that serum glucose level, fasting insulin level and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR in OS were significantly lower compared to those of the HS (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, p < 0.05. In addition, PPAR-γ protein expression in the OS and OE was significantly higher than that of the HS and HE, respectively (p < 0.05, p < 0.01. PGC-1α and GLUT-4 protein expressions in the OS were significantly higher compared to those of the HS (p < 0.05, p < 0.05. From these results, O. humifusa supplementation might play an important role for improving insulin sensitivity through elevation of PPAR-γ, PGC-1α, and GLUT-4 protein expression in rat skeletal muscle.

  9. Ecological aspects of the casque-headed frog Aparasphenodon brunoi (Anura, Hylidae in a Restinga habitat in southeastern Brazil

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    Daniel Oliveira Mesquita

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe some aspects of the ecology of Aparasphenodon brunoi, a species associated with bromeliads. We comment on the relationships of this species with bromeliad size, microhabitat use, diet and sexual dimorphism. This study was conducted on a Restinga habitat near Presidente Kennedy, state of Espírito Santo, southeastern coast of Brazil. When the animals were found inside the bromeliads, we measure bromeliad and head size of frogs. We analyzed stomach contents and determined the sex and reproductive condition. We found 17 individuals (58.6% in bromeliad leafs, six (20.7% in Cactaceae, three (10.3% in liana and three (10.3% on trunks. The correlation between head measurements and bromeliad size were high, indicating that animals apparently use bromeliads based on their size, which could be related to the minimization of water loss. The most common prey items were beetles, ants, and insect larvae, suggesting that the species is relatively generalist in prey consumption. Aparasphenodon brunoi showed significant sexual size and shape dimorphism with females having larger bodies than males (size and females having tibia, eye diameter and SVL larger than males (shape, but larger sample size and more detailed ecological and life history data are needed to elucidate the factors that have led to sexual size dimorphism.

  10. COMPOSIÇÃO FLORÍSTICA DE UM INSELBERGUE NO AGRESTE PARAIBANO, MUNICÍPIO DE ESPERANÇA, NORDESTE DO BRASIL

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    Paulinea Andreazza Ferreira Porto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to determinate the floristic check-list of a inselberg at the Fazenda Timbaúba (35o52'50.3", 7o1'0.8", municipality of Esperança/PB, Agreste da Borborema Microregion, were realized the present study. The inselberg flora comprise 127 species, 101 genera and 53 families of wich the Leguminosae family with 17 species showed the higher richness, followed by the Asteraceae (9 spp., Poaceae (7 spp., Euphorbiaceae and Orchidaceae (6 spp. families. Bromeliaceae and Cactaceae, despite of not be the higher richness, are covering extents areas, suggesting a higher importance for those families in inselbergs colonization. Comparing the families with other inselberg floras, 29 of them also were raising in Quixadá/CE, 28 in Pão de Açúcar and 24 in Serra do Mar/RJ inselbergs. The majority of species showed xenomorphic adaptations due hydric stress observed in the Southern and Northeastern Brazilian inselbergs. The differences in the floristic composition, especially at genus and species level seem to result of different speciation pressure what aid the taxa with better adaptation at these environments.

  11. The influence of baboon predation and time in water on germination and early establishment of Opuntia stricta (Australian pest pear in the Kruger National Park

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    W.D. Lotter

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The alien invader weed, Opuntia stricta Haw (family Cactaceae, is seriously threatening biodiversity in veld habitats of the Kruger National Park. Basic biological and ecological information on the establishment, growth and reproduction of the species is necessary for the development of effective strategies for its control. The rapid spread of the plant is apparently mainly due to seed dispersal by baboon (Papio ursinus. Sixty percent of seed taken from baboon faeces resulted in seedlings that established. Although palatability criteria for ripe fruit were more favourable than for unripe or medium-ripe fruit, seed from fruit at all three degrees of ripeness germinated equally well, and seedling establishment was similar. Despite their lower acidity, as well as higher total soluble sugar content and pH, cladodes are not subject to herbivory to near the extent that ripe fruit are. Freshly collected seed kept in Sabie River water showed significantly better germination/emergence after seven days submersion (83 than at 14 or 28 days (52 and 66 , respectively. Results suggest that seed dispersal of the species by animals, principally baboon, is an important cause of rapidly expanding infestations, and that dissipation in water will intensify the problem. Current findings should contribute toward the development of long-term weed management strategies aimed at con- tainment/eradication of the weed.

  12. Cereus jamacaru seed germination and initial seedling establishment as a function of light and temperature conditions

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    Nara Lídia Mendes Alencar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Cereus jamacaru is a widespread Cactaceae of northeast Brazil, largely used as cattle food, and as ornamental and medicinal plant. Despite its distinguished importance, until now, there has been little information about the physiological aspects involved on its germination. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of light and temperature interaction on the seed germination and seedling establishment of this plant. The evaluated variables were germination percentage at 7 (% G7 and at 14 days after imbibition (% G14, germination average time index (GSI, germination average time (GAT, germination accumulated frequency (GAF, seedling dry mass and height. The highest % G14 and GSI were at 25 ºC in white light, whereas the highest GAT values were in darkness for all evaluated temperatures. On the other hand, % G14, GSI and GAF had the lowest values in darkness. Seeds germinated even in darkness, being however stimulated by the presence of light. The combination of white light and temperature of 25 or 30 °C is the most appropriate condition for seed germination tests.

  13. MORPHOPHYSIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF SELENICEREUS MEGALANTHUS (K. SCHUM EX VAUPEL MORAN

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    M. Sorace

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Selenicereus megalanthus (K. Schumer Vaupel Moran is known as yellow Pitaya because of yellow peel color. Originated from Colombia, Peru, Ecuador and Bolivia, it belongs to the family Cactaceae and has climbing habit, besides being edible and currently grown. In Brazil the production of yellow pitaya is incipient. Pitaya propagates through cuttings, seed or grafting. Its seeds have sarcotesta mucilaginous, which may be a deterrent factor or decrease germination. This study aimed to study biometric aspects and germination of seeds with and without mucilage removal. The removal of mucilage was made by immersion in 25% sucrose solution and were evaluated biometric aspects of fruit and seed quality through tests of germination and tetrazolium, rate of germination speed and imbibition curve. Through biometrics establishes the relationship between the size of the fruit and seed number, where the number of seeds per unit mass is greater in smaller fruits. The continuous production of mucilage prevented the establishment of imbibition curve. The result obtained in the tetrazolium test was not consistent with the germination. Seeds with mucilage removal by pretreatment with sucrose solution showed better germination and IVG, producing stronger plants.

  14. Protein and Glycoprotein Patterns Related to Morphogenesis in Mammillaria gracillis Pfeiff. Tissue Culture

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    Biljana Balen

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available As plants with Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM, cacti are highly affected by artificial environmental conditions in tissue culture. Plants of Mammillaria gracillis Pfeiff. (Cactaceae propagated in vitro produced callus spontaneously. This habituated callus regenerated normal and hyperhydric shoots without the addition of growth regulators. In order to compare habituated callus with the tumorous one, cactus cells were transformed with two strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens: the wild strain B6S3 (tumour line TW and the rooty mutant GV3101 (tumour line TR. Gene expression in cactus plants, habituated callus, regenerated shoots and two tumour lines was analysed at the level of cellular and extracellular protein and glycoprotein profiles. Proteins were separated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 2-D PAGE electrophoresis and silver stained. Concavalin A-peroxidase staining detected glycoproteins with D-manose in their glycan component on protein blots. Developmentally specific protein patterns of Mammillaria gracillis tissue lines were detected. The 2-D PAGE electrophoresis revealed some tissue specific protein groups. The cellular glycoprotein of 42 kDa detected by ConA was highly expressed in undifferentiated tissues (habituated callus, TW and TR tumours and in hyperhydric regenerants. Tumours produced extracellular proteins of 33, 23 and 22 kDa. The N glycosylation of cellular and extracellular proteins was related to specific developmental stage of cactus tissue.

  15. Functional characterization of an acidic SK(3) dehydrin isolated from an Opuntia streptacantha cDNA library.

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    Ochoa-Alfaro, A E; Rodríguez-Kessler, M; Pérez-Morales, M B; Delgado-Sánchez, P; Cuevas-Velazquez, C L; Gómez-Anduro, G; Jiménez-Bremont, J F

    2012-03-01

    Cactus pears are succulent plants of the Cactaceae family adapted to extremely arid, hot and cold environments, making them excellent models for the study of molecular mechanisms underlying abiotic stress tolerance. Herein, we report a directional cDNA library from 12-month-old cladodes of Opuntia streptacantha plants subjected to abiotic stresses. A total of 442 clones were sequenced, representing 329 cactus pear unigenes, classified into eleven functional categories. The most abundant EST (unigen 33) was characterized under abiotic stress. This cDNA of 905 bp encodes a SK(3)-type acidic dehydrin of 248 amino acids. The OpsDHN1 gene contains an intron inserted within the sequence encoding the S-motif. qRT-PCR analysis shows that the OpsDHN1 transcript is specifically accumulated in response to cold stress, and induced by abscisic acid. Over-expression of the OpsDHN1 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana leads to enhanced tolerance to freezing treatment, suggesting that OpsDHN1 participates in freezing stress responsiveness. Generation of the first EST collection for the characterization of cactus pear genes constitutes a useful platform for the understanding of molecular mechanisms of stress tolerance in Opuntia and other CAM plants.

  16. Immunoprotective activity and antioxidant properties of cactus (Opuntia ficus indica) extract against chlorpyrifos toxicity in rats.

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    Smida, Amani; Ncibi, Saida; Taleb, Jihen; Ben Saad, Anouar; Ncib, Sana; Zourgui, Lazhar

    2017-04-01

    Opuntia ficus indica (family Cactaceae) is a typical Mediterranean plant, mainly used in food and traditional folk medicine. The present study was designed to evaluate the protective effect of Opuntia ficus indica extract against chlorpyrifos (CPF)-induced immunotoxicity in rats. The experimental animals consisted of four groups of Wistar rats (5-6 weeks old) of eight each: a control group, a group treated with CPF (10mg/kg), a group treated with Opuntia ficus indica extract (100mg/kg), and a group treated with cactus extract then treated with CPF. These components were daily administered by gavage for 30days. After treatment, immunotoxicity was estimated by a count of thymocytes, splenocytes, stem cells in the bone marrow, relative weights of thymus and spleen, DNA aspects, and oxidative stress status in these organs. Results showed that CPF could induce thymus atrophy, splenomegaly, and a decrease in the cell number in the bone marrow. It also increased the oxidative stress markers resulting in elevated levels of the lipid peroxidation with a concomitant decrease in the levels of enzymatic antioxidants (SOD, CAT, GPx) in both spleen and thymus, and also degradation of thymocyte and splenocyte DNA. Consistent histological changes were found in the spleen and thymus under CPF treatment. However, administration of Opuntia ficus indica extract was found to alleviate this CPF-induced damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. FLORÍSTICA E FITOSSOCIOLOGIA DE QUATRO REMANESCENTES VEGETACIONAIS EM ÁREAS DE SERRA NO CARIRI PARAIBANO

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    PEDRO THIAGO BARBOSA DE OLIVEIRA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It was studied vegetal remainders into four mountain areas: Serra de Bodopitá (Area1, Serra de Bodocongó (Area 2, Serra do Monte (Area 3 and Serra do Canoió (Area 4 located in paraiban Cariri. The study aimed at determines the phytossociolical parameters and for this was used the program Mata Nativa 2. It was also calculated the indexes of Shannon, Pielou equability, diversity of species and families. From the 2972 sampled individuals, 633 belonged to Area 1, 602 to Area 2, 908 to Area 3 and 829 to Area 4. All of them were distributed in 54 species belonged to 25 botanic families. It was observed that the families Fabaceae and Euphorbiaceae had the largest number of species and individuals and after them Cactaceae, Anacardiaceae and Apocynaceae. The Shannon indexes values in Areas 1, 2, 3 and 4 were respectively 2.65; 2.93; 2.35 e 2.59 nats.esp.-1 . The founded densities were 3165 individuals.ha-1 in Area 1, 3010 individuals.ha-1 in Area 2, 4540 individuals.ha-1 in Area 3 and 4145 individuals.ha-1 in Area 4. The four areas had the same species with the most importance values being them: Caesalpinia pyramidalis, Aspidosperma pyrifolium, Bauhinia cheilantha, Piptadenia stipulacea.

  18. Composição florística e estrutura da comunidade de epífitas vasculares em uma área de ecótono em Campo Mourão, PR, Brasil Floristic composition and structure of the vascular epiphyte community in a transition area at Campo Mourão, Paraná, Brazil

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    Henrique Cesar Lopes Geraldino

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo foi realizado em uma área de ecótono de aproximadamente 30 hectares entre Floresta Estacional Semidecidual e Floresta Ombrófila Mista, localizada na Capela do Calvário, município de Campo Mourão, PR. Para a análise fitossociológica foram selecionados 80 forófitos. No levantamento total foram encontradas 61 espécies, 39 gêneros e 13 famílias de epífitas (10 de Pteridófitas e 51 de Magnoliófitas. As famílias mais ricas foram: Orchidaceae (38%, Bromeliaceae e Polypodiaceae (13%, Cactaceae (11% e Piperaceae (8%, que juntas compõem 83% das espécies amostradas. Os gêneros Tillandsia (Bromeliaceae e Peperomia (Piperaceae foram os mais ricos, com cinco espécies. A anemocoria foi constatada em 67% das espécies e 86% foram classificadas como holoepífitas verdadeiras. Das 61 espécies inventariadas, 43 ocorreram nas áreas de amostragem, sendo cinco em maior freqüência: Microgramma squamulosa, Pleopeltis angusta, Tillandsia loliacea, Tillandsia recurvata e Pecluma sicca. O índice de Shannon (H’ registrado para a área foi de 3,175 e a equabilidade (J 0,863. Foram encontradas nove espécies epifíticas restritas a apenas um forófito. Microgramma squamulosa foi a espécie mais importante em toda área amostral. O trecho de vegetação em área de interflúvio, por apresentar estágio avançado de desenvolvimento, teve riqueza superior à área de vegetação ribeirinha.This study was conducted in a transition area of approximately 30 hectares between Semideciduous Forest and Araucaria Forest located in the Capela do Calvário, at Campo Mourão, Paraná. For the phytosociological analysis 80 phorophytes were selected. The survey found 61 species, 39 genera and 13 families of epiphytes (10 pteridophytes and 51 magnoliophytes. The richest families were: Orchidaceae (38%, Bromeliaceae and Polypodiaceae (13%, Cactaceae (11% and Piperaceae (8%, which together make up 83% of the sampled species. Tillandsia (Bromeliaceae

  19. Evaluación del riesgo de extinción de Mammillaria pectinifera, cactácea endémica de la región de Tehuacán-Cuicatlán Assessment of extinction risk of Mammillaria pectinifera, an endemic cactus of the Tehuacán-Cuicatlán region

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    Pedro Luis Valverde

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammillaria pectinifera (Cactaceae es una especie endémica de la Región de Tehuacán-Cuicatlán en los estados de Puebla y Oaxaca. Aunque en la Norma Oficial Mexicana NOM-059-ECOL-2001 está considerada como amenazada y está incluida en el Apéndice I de la CITES, la información derivada de los escasos estudios ecológicos sobre esta especie revela serios riesgos de extinción de sus poblaciones. En el presente estudio se registra una evaluación del riesgo de extinción de M. pectinifera, para la que se empleó el protocolo del Método de Evaluación del Riesgo de Extinción de las Especies Silvestres en México (MER del Anexo I de la NOM-059-ECOL-2001, el cual se basa en 4 criterios para evaluar cualitativamente el riesgo de extinción de cualquier especie silvestre en el territorio nacional. Dicha evaluación se apoya en datos de campo de 7 poblaciones e información procedente de diversas fuentes. De acuerdo con los 12 puntos obtenidos del MER, se propone que M. pectinifera se considere en la categoría de especie en peligro de extinción (P en la NOM-059-ECOL-2001 y sea incluida de nuevo en la Lista Roja de la UICN. Finalmente se plantea una propuesta para mejorar la valoración del Criterio D del MER.Mammillaria pectinifera (Cactaceae is an endemic species from the Tehuacán-Cuicatlán region at the Mexican States of Puebla and Oaxaca. Although it is considered as a threatened species under Mexican law NOM-059-ECOL-2001, and it is already included in the CITES Appendix I, ecological studies reveal serious vulnerability to extinction of its populations. In this study, we conducted an extinction risk assessment for M. pectinifera based on the protocol of the Method for Evaluation of Risk of Extinction for Mexican Wild Species (MER from Appendix I of NOM-059-ECOL-2001, which is based on a qualitative assessment of 4 criteria for evaluating extinction risk of any wild species in the Mexican territory. The present assessment relies on data

  20. A Rapid and Reliable Method for Total Protein Extraction from Succulent Plants for Proteomic Analysis.

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    Lledías, Fernando; Hernández, Felipe; Rivas, Viridiana; García-Mendoza, Abisaí; Cassab, Gladys I; Nieto-Sotelo, Jorge

    2017-08-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism plants have some morphological features, such as succulent and reduced leaves, thick cuticles, and sunken stomata that help them prevent excessive water loss and irradiation. As molecular constituents of these morphological adaptations to xeric environments, succulent plants produce a set of specific compounds such as complex polysaccharides, pigments, waxes, and terpenoids, to name a few, in addition to uncharacterized proteases. Since all these compounds interfere with the analysis of proteins by electrophoretic techniques, preparation of high quality samples from these sources represents a real challenge. The absence of adequate protocols for protein extraction has restrained the study of this class of plants at the molecular level. Here, we present a rapid and reliable protocol that could be accomplished in 1 h and applied to a broad range of plants with reproducible results. We were able to obtain well-resolved SDS/PAGE protein patterns in extracts from different members of the subfamilies Agavoideae (Agave, Yucca, Manfreda, and Furcraea), Nolinoideae (Dasylirion and Beucarnea), and the Cactaceae family. This method is based on the differential solubility of contaminants and proteins in the presence of acetone and pH-altered solutions. We speculate about the role of saponins and high molecular weight carbohydrates to produce electrophoretic-compatible samples. A modification of the basic protocol allowed the analysis of samples by bidimensional electrophoresis (2DE) for proteomic analysis. Furostanol glycoside 26-O-β-glucosidase (an enzyme involved in steroid saponin synthesis) was successfully identified by mass spectrometry analysis and de novo sequencing of a 2DE spot from an Agave attenuata sample.

  1. The ethnobotany of psychoactive plant use: a phylogenetic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Psychoactive plants contain chemicals that presumably evolved as allelochemicals but target certain neuronal receptors when consumed by humans, altering perception, emotion and cognition. These plants have been used since ancient times as medicines and in the context of religious rituals for their various psychoactive effects (e.g., as hallucinogens, stimulants, sedatives). The ubiquity of psychoactive plants in various cultures motivates investigation of the commonalities among these plants, in which a phylogenetic framework may be insightful. A phylogeny of culturally diverse psychoactive plant taxa was constructed with their psychotropic effects and affected neurotransmitter systems mapped on the phylogeny. The phylogenetic distribution shows multiple evolutionary origins of psychoactive families. The plant families Myristicaceae (e.g., nutmeg), Papaveraceae (opium poppy), Cactaceae (peyote), Convolvulaceae (morning glory), Solanaceae (tobacco), Lamiaceae (mints), Apocynaceae (dogbane) have a disproportionate number of psychoactive genera with various indigenous groups using geographically disparate members of these plant families for the same psychoactive effect, an example of cultural convergence. Pharmacological traits related to hallucinogenic and sedative potential are phylogenetically conserved within families. Unrelated families that exert similar psychoactive effects also modulate similar neurotransmitter systems (i.e., mechanistic convergence). However, pharmacological mechanisms for stimulant effects were varied even within families suggesting that stimulant chemicals may be more evolutionarily labile than those associated with hallucinogenic and sedative effects. Chemically similar psychoactive chemicals may also exist in phylogenetically unrelated lineages, suggesting convergent evolution or differential gene regulation of a common metabolic pathway. Our study has shown that phylogenetic analysis of traditionally used psychoactive plants suggests

  2. Antioxidant and Anticlastogenic Capacity of Prickly Pear Juice

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    Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo; García-Melo, Fernando; Morales-González, José A.; Vázquez-Alvarado, Patricia; Muñoz-Juárez, Sergio; Zuñiga-Pérez, Clara; Sumaya-Martínez, Maria Teresa; Madrigal-Bujaidar, Eduardo; Hernández-Ceruelos, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Plants belonging to the genus Opuntia spp. are the most abundant of the Cactaceae family, grown throughout America and the Mediterranean central area. Its fruit, known as cactus pear or prickly pear, is an oval berry grouped in different colors. Some studies have shown its antioxidant activities which may help in preventing chronic pathologies such as diabetes. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the antioxidant capacity of three varieties of prickly pear juice (red-purple, white-green and yellow-orange) in five different concentrations (100, 250, 500, 750, and 1000 mg/mL) by DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical) colorimetric method, selecting the best variety to determine its anticlastogenic potential against methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). The results indicate that the highest antioxidant was found in the juice of the prickly pear red-purple variety (PPRP), in all concentrations. Its anticlastogenic potential was therefore evaluated with a micronucleus assay. The experiment was run over two weeks. A negative control was included along with a positive control with MMS (40 mg/kg), a group of mice treated with PPRP (25 mL/kg), and three groups with PPRP (in doses of 25, 16.5 and 8.3 mL/kg) plus the mutagen. The PPRP was administered daily by oral gavage and the MMS was injected intraperitoneally five days prior to the end of the experiment. Blood samples were obtained at 0, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h in order to determine the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPE). The results indicated that PPRP is not a genotoxic agent, on the contrary, it may reduce the number of MNPE. In this regard, the PPRP showed an anticlastogenic effect directly proportional to its concentrations. Thus, the highest protection was obtained with a concentration of 25 mL/kg after 48 h of treatment. PMID:24145870

  3. Biolistic-mediated transient gene expression in shoot apical meristems of the prickly-pear (Opuntia ficus-indica

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    Romulo Marino Llamoca-Zárate

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated the transient expression of the GUS gene in cells of the meristematic apical dome of Opuntia ficus-indica. DNA delivery into the cells was achieved using a biolistic PDS-1000He instrument from Bio-Rad Laboratories. The transforming DNA was coated in tungsten particles with diameter of 1.3 m m and the distance between the flying disk and the target tissue was 7.5cm and the shooting pressure was adjusted to 1200 psi. This is the first demonstration that the biolistic transformation system can be used to express a transgene in a member of the Cactaceae.Nós demonstramos a expressão transiente do gene GUS nas células do meristema apical de Opuntia ficus-indica. A introdução do DNA nas células foi realizada através de um sistema de biolística PDS-1000He da Bio-Rad Laboratories. Para transformação, partículas de tungstenio com diâmetro de 1,3 µm foram cobertas com DNA e a distância entre o disco das partículas e o tecido alvo foi de 7,5cm, a pressão de tiro foi 1200 psi. Esta é a primeira demonstração que o sistema de biolística de transformação pode ser usado para a expressão de transgenes nas cactáceas.

  4. Identification of functional groups of Opuntia ficus-indica involved in coagulation process after its active part extraction.

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    Bouaouine, Omar; Bourven, Isabelle; Khalil, Fouad; Baudu, Michel

    2018-02-07

    Opuntia ficus-indica that belongs to the Cactaceae family and is a member of Opuntia kind has received increasing research interest for wastewater treatment by flocculation. The objectives of this study were (i) to provide more information regarding the active constituents of Opuntia spp. and (ii) to improve the extracting and using conditions of the flocculant molecules for water treatment. A classic approach by jar test experiments was used with raw and extracted material by solubilization and precipitation. The surface properties of solid material were characterized by FTIR, SEM, zeta potential measurement, and surface titration. The splitting based on the solubility of the material with pH and the titration of functional groups completed the method. The optimal pH value for a coagulation-flocculation process using cactus solid material (CSM) was 10.0 and a processing rate of 35 mg L-1. The alkaline pH of flocculation suggests an adsorption mechanism with bridging effect between particles by water-soluble extracted molecules. To validate this mechanism, an extraction water was carried out at pH = 10 (optimum of flocculation) and the solution was acidified (pH = 7) to allow precipitation of so considered active flocculant molecules. The strong flocculant property of this extract was verified, and titration of this solution showed at least one specific pKa of 9.0 ± 0.6. This pKa corresponds to phenol groups, which could be assigned to lignin and tannin.

  5. The ethnobotany of psychoactive plant use: a phylogenetic perspective.

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    Alrashedy, Nashmiah Aid; Molina, Jeanmaire

    2016-01-01

    Psychoactive plants contain chemicals that presumably evolved as allelochemicals but target certain neuronal receptors when consumed by humans, altering perception, emotion and cognition. These plants have been used since ancient times as medicines and in the context of religious rituals for their various psychoactive effects (e.g., as hallucinogens, stimulants, sedatives). The ubiquity of psychoactive plants in various cultures motivates investigation of the commonalities among these plants, in which a phylogenetic framework may be insightful. A phylogeny of culturally diverse psychoactive plant taxa was constructed with their psychotropic effects and affected neurotransmitter systems mapped on the phylogeny. The phylogenetic distribution shows multiple evolutionary origins of psychoactive families. The plant families Myristicaceae (e.g., nutmeg), Papaveraceae (opium poppy), Cactaceae (peyote), Convolvulaceae (morning glory), Solanaceae (tobacco), Lamiaceae (mints), Apocynaceae (dogbane) have a disproportionate number of psychoactive genera with various indigenous groups using geographically disparate members of these plant families for the same psychoactive effect, an example of cultural convergence. Pharmacological traits related to hallucinogenic and sedative potential are phylogenetically conserved within families. Unrelated families that exert similar psychoactive effects also modulate similar neurotransmitter systems (i.e., mechanistic convergence). However, pharmacological mechanisms for stimulant effects were varied even within families suggesting that stimulant chemicals may be more evolutionarily labile than those associated with hallucinogenic and sedative effects. Chemically similar psychoactive chemicals may also exist in phylogenetically unrelated lineages, suggesting convergent evolution or differential gene regulation of a common metabolic pathway. Our study has shown that phylogenetic analysis of traditionally used psychoactive plants suggests

  6. Ethnobotanical study of useful vegetal species in two rural communities in the semi-arid region of Paraíba state (Northeastern Brazil.

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    Cleilton Marques Alves

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Trying to understand the relationship between man/natural resources, from ethonobotanical studies, this study aimed to estimate the use value of vegetal species in two Caatinga areas in the Cariri of Paraíba state, besides knowing the multiple uses of plants by the residents of rural communities of Brito (Queimadas - PB and Lagoa Salgada (Montadas, Areial, Pocinhos - PB. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with local specialists and the community. It was used by the specialists the technique “snow ball” and the technique “guided tour”. It was identified 77 species, being 40 in Brito community and 37 in Lagoa Salgada community, all of them distributed into use categories, since food up to technological uses. Seven species had the higher use value: 1: Croton blanchetianus, Mimosa caesalpinefolia, Prosopis julifora, Mimosa tenuiflora, Opuntia ficus-indica, Aspidosperma pyrifolium and Myracrodruon urundeuva. The used categories were equal between the two communities and among the general informants and local specialists, which show great resemblance of use and their preference for certain species. The lowest cited species were those for food and domestic building purposes, and the most used were those ones for medicinal use. The most cited species are Cactaceae, Euphorbiaceae and Fabaceae. Regarding the species, the most valued in both communities were Croton blanchetianus, Pilosocereus gounellei, Mimosa tenuiflora and Prosopis julifora.  Although the current communities have a great dependence of the local flora for surviving, the extraction and the lack of conservation of species are notorious in both communities.

  7. The ethnobotany of psychoactive plant use: a phylogenetic perspective

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    Nashmiah Aid Alrashedy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Psychoactive plants contain chemicals that presumably evolved as allelochemicals but target certain neuronal receptors when consumed by humans, altering perception, emotion and cognition. These plants have been used since ancient times as medicines and in the context of religious rituals for their various psychoactive effects (e.g., as hallucinogens, stimulants, sedatives. The ubiquity of psychoactive plants in various cultures motivates investigation of the commonalities among these plants, in which a phylogenetic framework may be insightful. A phylogeny of culturally diverse psychoactive plant taxa was constructed with their psychotropic effects and affected neurotransmitter systems mapped on the phylogeny. The phylogenetic distribution shows multiple evolutionary origins of psychoactive families. The plant families Myristicaceae (e.g., nutmeg, Papaveraceae (opium poppy, Cactaceae (peyote, Convolvulaceae (morning glory, Solanaceae (tobacco, Lamiaceae (mints, Apocynaceae (dogbane have a disproportionate number of psychoactive genera with various indigenous groups using geographically disparate members of these plant families for the same psychoactive effect, an example of cultural convergence. Pharmacological traits related to hallucinogenic and sedative potential are phylogenetically conserved within families. Unrelated families that exert similar psychoactive effects also modulate similar neurotransmitter systems (i.e., mechanistic convergence. However, pharmacological mechanisms for stimulant effects were varied even within families suggesting that stimulant chemicals may be more evolutionarily labile than those associated with hallucinogenic and sedative effects. Chemically similar psychoactive chemicals may also exist in phylogenetically unrelated lineages, suggesting convergent evolution or differential gene regulation of a common metabolic pathway. Our study has shown that phylogenetic analysis of traditionally used psychoactive plants

  8. Tissue culture of ornamental cacti

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    Eugenio Pérez-Molphe-Balch

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cacti species are plants that are well adapted to growing in arid and semiarid regions where the main problem is water availability. Cacti have developed a series of adaptations to cope with water scarcity, such as reduced leaf surface via morphological modifications including spines, cereous cuticles, extended root systems and stem tissue modifications to increase water storage, and crassulacean acid metabolism to reduce transpiration and water loss. Furthermore, seeds of these plants very often exhibit dormancy, a phenomenon that helps to prevent germination when the availability of water is reduced. In general, cactus species exhibit a low growth rate that makes their rapid propagation difficult. Cacti are much appreciated as ornamental plants due to their great variety and diversity of forms and their beautiful short-life flowers; however, due to difficulties in propagating them rapidly to meet market demand, they are very often over-collected in their natural habitats, which leads to numerous species being threatened, endangered or becoming extinct. Therefore, plant tissue culture techniques may facilitate their propagation over a shorter time period than conventional techniques used for commercial purposes; or may help to recover populations of endangered or threatened species for their re-introduction in the wild; or may also be of value to the preservation and conservation of the genetic resources of this important family. Herein we present the state-of-the-art of tissue culture techniques used for ornamental cacti and selected suggestions for solving a number of the problems faced by members of the Cactaceae family.

  9. Exceptional reduction of the plastid genome of saguaro cactus (Carnegiea gigantea): Loss of the ndh gene suite and inverted repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Michael J; Copetti, Dario; Búrquez, Alberto; Bustamante, Enriquena; Charboneau, Joseph L M; Eguiarte, Luis E; Kumar, Sudhir; Lee, Hyun Oh; Lee, Junki; McMahon, Michelle; Steele, Kelly; Wing, Rod; Yang, Tae-Jin; Zwickl, Derrick; Wojciechowski, Martin F

    2015-07-01

    • Land-plant plastid genomes have only rarely undergone significant changes in gene content and order. Thus, discovery of additional examples adds power to tests for causes of such genome-scale structural changes.• Using next-generation sequence data, we assembled the plastid genome of saguaro cactus and probed the nuclear genome for transferred plastid genes and functionally related nuclear genes. We combined these results with available data across Cactaceae and seed plants more broadly to infer the history of gene loss and to assess the strength of phylogenetic association between gene loss and loss of the inverted repeat (IR).• The saguaro plastid genome is the smallest known for an obligately photosynthetic angiosperm (∼113 kb), having lost the IR and plastid ndh genes. This loss supports a statistically strong association across seed plants between the loss of ndh genes and the loss of the IR. Many nonplastid copies of plastid ndh genes were found in the nuclear genome, but none had intact reading frames; nor did three related nuclear-encoded subunits. However, nuclear pgr5, which functions in a partially redundant pathway, was intact.• The existence of an alternative pathway redundant with the function of the plastid NADH dehydrogenase-like complex (NDH) complex may permit loss of the plastid ndh gene suite in photoautotrophs like saguaro. Loss of these genes may be a recurring mechanism for overall plastid genome size reduction, especially in combination with loss of the IR. © 2015 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  10. Ecophysiological and anatomical mechanisms behind the nurse effect: which are more important? A multivariate approach for cactus seedlings.

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    Pablo Delgado-Sánchez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cacti establish mostly occurs under the canopy of nurse plants which provide a less stressful micro-environment, although mechanisms underlying this process are unknown. The impact of the combination of light and watering treatments on Opuntia streptacantha (Cactaceae seedlings was examined. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ecophysiological [titratable acidity, osmotic potential ('solute potential', Ψs , relative growth rate (RGR and their components (NAR, SLA, and LWR], anatomical (chloroplast density, chloroplast frequency, and cell area, and environmental [photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD and air temperature] sets of variables were analyzed, assessing relationships between them and measuring the intensity of the relationships. Three harvests were carried out at days 15, 30, and 45. Ψs and acidity content were the most important responses for seedling establishment. The main anatomical and environmental variables were chloroplast density and water availability, respectively. Opuntia streptacantha seedlings establish better in the shade-watering treatment, due to higher Ψs and acidity, unaffected chloroplasts, and lower PPFD. In addition, the chloroplasts of cells under high-light and non-watering treatment were clumped closer to the center of the cytosol than those under shade-drought, to avoid photoinhibition and/or to better distribute or utilize the penetrating light in the green plant tissue. CONCLUSIONS: Opuntia seedlings grow better under the shade, although they can tolerate drought in open spaces by increasing and moving chloroplasts and avoiding drastic decreases in their Ψs . This tolerance could have important implications for predicting the impact of climate change on natural desert regeneration, as well as for planning reforestation-afforestation practices, and rural land uses.

  11. Ecophysiological and anatomical mechanisms behind the nurse effect: which are more important? A multivariate approach for cactus seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Sánchez, Pablo; Yáñez-Espinosa, Laura; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan Francisco; Chapa-Vargas, Leonardo; Flores, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Cacti establish mostly occurs under the canopy of nurse plants which provide a less stressful micro-environment, although mechanisms underlying this process are unknown. The impact of the combination of light and watering treatments on Opuntia streptacantha (Cactaceae) seedlings was examined. Ecophysiological [titratable acidity, osmotic potential ('solute potential', Ψs ), relative growth rate (RGR) and their components (NAR, SLA, and LWR)], anatomical (chloroplast density, chloroplast frequency, and cell area), and environmental [photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and air temperature] sets of variables were analyzed, assessing relationships between them and measuring the intensity of the relationships. Three harvests were carried out at days 15, 30, and 45. Ψs and acidity content were the most important responses for seedling establishment. The main anatomical and environmental variables were chloroplast density and water availability, respectively. Opuntia streptacantha seedlings establish better in the shade-watering treatment, due to higher Ψs and acidity, unaffected chloroplasts, and lower PPFD. In addition, the chloroplasts of cells under high-light and non-watering treatment were clumped closer to the center of the cytosol than those under shade-drought, to avoid photoinhibition and/or to better distribute or utilize the penetrating light in the green plant tissue. Opuntia seedlings grow better under the shade, although they can tolerate drought in open spaces by increasing and moving chloroplasts and avoiding drastic decreases in their Ψs . This tolerance could have important implications for predicting the impact of climate change on natural desert regeneration, as well as for planning reforestation-afforestation practices, and rural land uses.

  12. Differences in tolerance to host cactus alkaloids in Drosophila koepferae and D. buzzatii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Ignacio M; Carreira, Valeria P; Corio, Cristian; Padró, Julián; Soto, Eduardo M; Hasson, Esteban

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of cactophily in the genus Drosophila was a major ecological transition involving over a hundred species in the Americas that acquired the capacity to cope with a variety of toxic metabolites evolved as feeding deterrents in Cactaceae. D. buzzatii and D. koepferae are sibling cactophilic species in the D. repleta group. The former is mainly associated with the relatively toxic-free habitat offered by prickly pears (Opuntia sulphurea) and the latter has evolved the ability to use columnar cacti of the genera Trichocereus and Cereus that contain an array of alkaloid secondary compounds. We assessed the effects of cactus alkaloids on fitness-related traits and evaluated the ability of D. buzzatii and D. koepferae to exploit an artificial novel toxic host. Larvae of both species were raised in laboratory culture media to which we added increasing doses of an alkaloid fraction extracted from the columnar cactus T. terschekii. In addition, we evaluated performance on an artificial novel host by rearing larvae in a seminatural medium that combined the nutritional quality of O. sulphurea plus amounts of alkaloids found in fresh T. terschekii. Performance scores in each rearing treatment were calculated using an index that took into account viability, developmental time, and adult body size. Only D. buzzatii suffered the effects of increasing doses of alkaloids and the artificial host impaired viability in D. koepferae, but did not affect performance in D. buzzatii. These results provide the first direct evidence that alkaloids are key determinants of host plant use in these species. However, the results regarding the artificial novel host suggest that the effects of alkaloids on performance are not straightforward as D. koepferae was heavily affected. We discuss these results in the light of patterns of host plan evolution in the Drosophila repleta group.

  13. Differences in tolerance to host cactus alkaloids in Drosophila koepferae and D. buzzatii.

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    Ignacio M Soto

    Full Text Available The evolution of cactophily in the genus Drosophila was a major ecological transition involving over a hundred species in the Americas that acquired the capacity to cope with a variety of toxic metabolites evolved as feeding deterrents in Cactaceae. D. buzzatii and D. koepferae are sibling cactophilic species in the D. repleta group. The former is mainly associated with the relatively toxic-free habitat offered by prickly pears (Opuntia sulphurea and the latter has evolved the ability to use columnar cacti of the genera Trichocereus and Cereus that contain an array of alkaloid secondary compounds. We assessed the effects of cactus alkaloids on fitness-related traits and evaluated the ability of D. buzzatii and D. koepferae to exploit an artificial novel toxic host. Larvae of both species were raised in laboratory culture media to which we added increasing doses of an alkaloid fraction extracted from the columnar cactus T. terschekii. In addition, we evaluated performance on an artificial novel host by rearing larvae in a seminatural medium that combined the nutritional quality of O. sulphurea plus amounts of alkaloids found in fresh T. terschekii. Performance scores in each rearing treatment were calculated using an index that took into account viability, developmental time, and adult body size. Only D. buzzatii suffered the effects of increasing doses of alkaloids and the artificial host impaired viability in D. koepferae, but did not affect performance in D. buzzatii. These results provide the first direct evidence that alkaloids are key determinants of host plant use in these species. However, the results regarding the artificial novel host suggest that the effects of alkaloids on performance are not straightforward as D. koepferae was heavily affected. We discuss these results in the light of patterns of host plan evolution in the Drosophila repleta group.

  14. Digestibility and performance of juvenile Nile tilapia fed with diets containing forage palm

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    Hannah Bandeira Thame Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Supplying the nutritional needs of animals in an economical way is essential to the success of any type of production. The forage palm is a cactaceae well-adapted to semiarid regions and commonly used in the feeding of ruminants. However, studies assessing its use in fishes are scarce. We aimed to evaluate the digestibility of bran from five different forage palm cultivars (Opuntia fícus in juvenile Nile tilapia and the development of juveniles when receiving increasing levels of the cultivar with the best apparent digestibility coefficient of crude protein (ADCCP (75.2%. We used 90 masculinized juvenile Nile tilapia (with an average weight of 6.02 ± 0.65 g in the digestibility experiment to determine the apparent digestibility coefficients of dry matter (ADCDM, crude energy (ADCCP, and crude protein of the cultivars (Orelha de onça, Miúda, Gigante, Comum, and IPA 20. The experimental design was completely randomized (CRD with five treatments and three repetitions. In the development experiment, 300 masculinized juvenile Nile tilapia (with average weight of 1.39 ± 0.12 g received feed with different inclusion levels (0, 72, 144, and 216 g Kg-1 of IPA 20 palm bran in a CRD with four treatments and five repetitions. We observed significant differences (P < 0.05 for ADCDM and ADCCP between the treatments. The cultivars that presented the highest ADCDM were IPA 20 (41.75%, Orelha de onça (36.41%, and Gigante (32.59%. For ADCCP, the best cultivar was IPA 20 with 75.2%, followed by Orelha de onça (61.5%, and Miúda (56.1%. As for the performance, the inclusion of IPA 20 palm bran at a rate of 113 g/kg-1 provided the best values in terms of weight gain and final weight in juvenile Nile tilapia.

  15. Phytochemical characterization and antioxidant activity of the cladodes of Opuntia macrorhiza (Engelm.) and Opuntia microdasys (Lehm.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahdoura, Hassiba; Barreira, João C M; Barros, Lillian; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Achour, Lotfi

    2014-09-01

    The genus Opuntia (Cactaceae) includes different plants well adapted to arid and semi-arid zones. These species are cultivated under restricted growth conditions, not suitable for the growth of other fruits/vegetables. The cactus pear is a well-known example inside Opuntia genus. Its young cladodes, also known as nopalitos, are frequently consumed and used in folk medicine due to their beneficial effects and phytochemical composition. Herein, hydrophilic and lipophilic extracts from cladodes of Opuntia microdasys and Opuntia macrorhiza were characterized. Furthermore, their antioxidant properties were compared to the corresponding phytochemical profile. Despite the phylogenetic proximity and similar geographical origin O. microdasys and O. macrorhiza showed significant differences in sugars, organic acids, phenolic compounds, fatty acids and tocopherols profiles. In particular, O. microdasys distinguished for having high contents in fructose, glucose, C6:0, C8:0, C12:0, C14:0, C14:1, C16:0, C18:3, C20:0, C22:0, C23:0, C24:0, SFA and tocopherols, and also for its higher DPPH EC50 values. O. microdasys by its side proved to have significantly higher amounts of trehalose, organic acids, C13:0, C16:1, C17:0, C18:0, C18:1, C20:1, C20:2 and MUFA. The obtained phytochemical profiles might be considered as useful information to select the best Opuntia species regarding a determined application of its natural extracts/isolated compounds.

  16. IN VITRO SEED GERMINATION OF MANDACARU (Cereus jamacaru DC.

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    MAILSON MONTEIRO DO RÊGO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O mandacaru (Cereus jamacaru P. DC. é uma cactaceae nativa da caatinga, possuindo grande importância para a sustentabilidade e conservação da biodiversidade deste bioma. Objetivou-se com este trabalho desinfestar e promover a germinação de sementes de mandacaru, variando os fatores concentração de hipoclorito de sódio e concentração de sacarose. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente casualizado, em esquema fatorial 5x5, com cinco repetições. Os tratamentos consistiram de cinco concentrações de hipoclorito de sódio (0,0; 0,5; 1,0; 1,5 e 2,0% de cloro ativo e cinco concentrações de sacarose (0,0; 2,5; 5,0; 7,5 e 10,0% . Foram avaliados o número de contaminações, germinações e tamanho da planta por semente cultivada. Houve interação significativa, apenas para a variável germinação, sendo a concentração de 2,5% de sacarose a mais eficiente dentro das quatro concentrações de cloro ativo. Verificou-se que a concentração de cloro ativo a partir de 0,5% é efetiva na desinfestação das sementes, sendo a concentração de 1,0% o melhor tratamento. Com relação à característica comprimento de plântula não houve diferenças significativas para os dois fatores analisados.

  17. The Cacti microbiome: interplay between habitat-filtering and host specificity

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    Citlali eFonseca-Garcia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cactaceae represents one of the most species-rich families of succulent plants native to arid and semi-arid ecosystems, yet the associations Cacti establish with microorganisms and the rules governing microbial community assembly remain poorly understood. We analyzed the composition, diversity and factors influencing above- and below-ground bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities associated with two native and sympatric Cacti species: Myrtillocactus geometrizans and Opuntia robusta. Phylogenetic profiling showed that the composition and assembly of microbial communities associated with Cacti were primarily influenced by the plant compartment; plant species, site and season played only a minor role. Remarkably, bacterial and archaeal diversity was higher in the phyllosphere than in the rhizosphere of Cacti, while the opposite was true for fungi. Semi-arid soils exhibited the highest levels of microbial diversity whereas the stem endosphere the lowest. Despite their taxonomic distance, M. geometrizans and O. robusta shared most microbial taxa in all analyzed compartments. Influence of the plant host did only play a larger role in the fungal communities of the stem endosphere. These results suggest that fungi establish specific interactions with their host plant inside the stem, whereas microbial communities in the other plant compartments may play similar functional roles in these two species.Biochemical and molecular characterization of seed-borne bacteria of Cacti supports the idea that these microbial symbionts may be vertically inherited and could promote plant growth and drought tolerance for the fitness of the Cacti holobiont. We envision this knowledge will help improve and sustain agriculture in arid and semi-arid regions of the world.

  18. Development and use of bioenergy feedstocks for semi-arid and arid lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, John C; Davis, Sarah C; Yang, Xiaohan; Borland, Anne M

    2015-07-01

    Global climate change is predicted to increase heat, drought, and soil-drying conditions, and thereby increase crop sensitivity to water vapour pressure deficit, resulting in productivity losses. Increasing competition between agricultural freshwater use and municipal or industrial uses suggest that crops with greater heat and drought durability and greater water-use efficiency will be crucial for sustainable biomass production systems in the future. Agave (Agavaceae) and Opuntia (Cactaceae) represent highly water-use efficient bioenergy crops that could diversify bioenergy feedstock supply yet preserve or expand feedstock production into semi-arid, abandoned, or degraded agricultural lands, and reclaim drylands. Agave and Opuntia are crassulacean acid metabolism species that can achieve high water-use efficiencies and grow in water-limited areas with insufficient precipitation to support traditional C3 or C4 bioenergy crops. Both Agave and Opuntia have the potential to produce above-ground biomass rivalling that of C3 and C4 crops under optimal growing conditions. The low lignin and high amorphous cellulose contents of Agave and Opuntia lignocellulosic biomass will be less recalcitrant to deconstruction than traditional feedstocks, as confirmed by pretreatments that improve saccharification of Agave. Refined environmental productivity indices and geographical information systems modelling have provided estimates of Agave and Opuntia biomass productivity and terrestrial sequestration of atmospheric CO2; however, the accuracy of such modelling efforts can be improved through the expansion of field trials in diverse geographical settings. Lastly, life cycle analysis indicates that Agave would have productivity, life cycle energy, and greenhouse gas balances comparable or superior to those of traditional bioenergy feedstocks, but would be far more water-use efficient. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental

  19. Presence of Multidrug-Resistant Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli, Enteropathogenic E. coli and Enterotoxigenic E. coli, on Raw Nopalitos (Opuntia ficus-indica L.) and in Nopalitos Salads from Local Retail Markets in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Cerna-Cortes, Jorge F; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Torres-Vitela, Mdel Refugio; Villarruel-López, Angelica; Gutiérrez-Alcántara, Eduardo J; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2016-05-01

    The presence of multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria in food is a significant public health concern. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes (DEPs) are foodborne bacteria. In Mexico, DEPs have been associated with diarrheal illness. There is no information about the presence of multidrug-resistant DEPs on fresh vegetables and in cooked vegetable salads in Mexico. "Nopalitos" (Opuntia ficus-indica L.) is a Cactacea extensively used as a fresh green vegetable throughout Mexico. The presence of generic E. coli and multidrug-resistant DEPs on raw whole and cut nopalitos and in nopalitos salad samples was determined. One hundred raw whole nopalitos (without prickles) samples, 100 raw nopalitos cut into small square samples, and 100 cooked nopalitos salad samples were collected from markets. Generic E. coli was determined using the most probable number procedures. DEPs were identified using two multiplex polymerase chain reaction procedures. Susceptibility to 16 antibiotics was tested for the isolated DEP strains by standard test. Of the 100 whole nopalitos samples, 100 cut nopalitos samples, and 100 nopalitos salad samples, generic E. coli and DEPs were identified, respectively, in 80% and 10%, 74% and 10%, and 64% and 8%. Eighty-two DEP strains were isolated from positive nopalitos samples. The identified DEPs included Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). All isolated strains exhibited resistance to at least six antibiotics. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence of multidrug-resistant and antibiotic resistance profiles of STEC, ETEC, and EPEC on raw nopalitos and in nopalitos salads in Mexico.

  20. Recursos florísticos de la cuenca baja del río mayo, Sonora

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    Julio César Duarte Ruiz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available En México se presentan prácticamente todos los grandes tipos de vegetación que existen en el mundo y su distribución a menudo es compleja. El objetivo del trabajo consistió en realizar un listado de la flora silvestre ribereña del Río Mayo, localizado en el sur del estado de Sonora, para conocer su composición. La recolección de especímenes se realizó mediante la técnica de intercepción o línea de Canfield (1941, en 15 sitios con dos repeticiones sumando 30 transectos. Se encontraron un total de 40 familias, 79 géneros y 99 especies. Las familias mejor representadas fueron: Leguminoseae, Cactaceae, Gramineae, Compositae, Chenopodiaceae, Salicaceae, Solanaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Amaranthaceae y Asteraceae. La dominante fue Leguminoseae con vegetación de bosque espinoso compuesta por Acacia cymbispina, Acacia farnesiana, Parkinsonia aculeata y Prosopis juliflora. Resulta perceptible la pérdida de flora debido al cambio de uso de suelo. Especies representativas de la zona riparia como Populus fremontii y Salix bonplandiana están desapareciendo por alteración del ecosistema. Poblaciones de mangle como Rhizophora mangle y Conocarpus erectus están disminuidas. El área estudiada es rica en especies a pesar de la perturbación. La diversidad varía de acuerdo al gradiente altitudinal y el número de especies guarda relación con los géneros y familias recolectadas. La agricultura, acuicultura, ganadería, la industria pesquera y la urbanización, son los giros que causan mayor afectación en los ecosistemas

  1. Antioxidant and Anticlastogenic Capacity of Prickly Pear Juice

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    Alejandra Hernández-Ceruelos

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants belonging to the genus Opuntia spp. are the most abundant of the Cactaceae family, grown throughout America and the Mediterranean central area. Its fruit, known as cactus pear or prickly pear, is an oval berry grouped in different colors. Some studies have shown its antioxidant activities which may help in preventing chronic pathologies such as diabetes. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the antioxidant capacity of three varieties of prickly pear juice (red-purple, white-green and yellow-orange in five different concentrations (100, 250, 500, 750, and 1000 mg/mL by DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical colorimetric method, selecting the best variety to determine its anticlastogenic potential against methyl methanesulfonate (MMS. The results indicate that the highest antioxidant was found in the juice of the prickly pear red-purple variety (PPRP, in all concentrations. Its anticlastogenic potential was therefore evaluated with a micronucleus assay. The experiment was run over two weeks. A negative control was included along with a positive control with MMS (40 mg/kg, a group of mice treated with PPRP (25 mL/kg, and three groups with PPRP (in doses of 25, 16.5 and 8.3 mL/kg plus the mutagen. The PPRP was administered daily by oral gavage and the MMS was injected intraperitoneally five days prior to the end of the experiment. Blood samples were obtained at 0, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h in order to determine the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPE. The results indicated that PPRP is not a genotoxic agent, on the contrary, it may reduce the number of MNPE. In this regard, the PPRP showed an anticlastogenic effect directly proportional to its concentrations. Thus, the highest protection was obtained with a concentration of 25 mL/kg after 48 h of treatment.

  2. LEVANTAMENTO FLORÍSTICO DO ESTRATO ARBUSTIVO-ARBÓREO EM ÁREAS CONTÍGUAS DE CAATINGA NO CARIRI PARAIBANO

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    KALLIANNA DANTAS ARAUJO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to make a floristic survey of the shrubby-arboreous stratum in three contiguous areas of Caatinga in the Cariri of Paraiba. The survey was accomplished in the "Estação Experimental Bacia Escola/UFPB", municipality of São João do Cariri, PB Brazilian Northeast. The experiment consisted of three areas of 3.2 ha, where three parallel transects had been established, in a distance of 20 m from each other, and there were marked ten parcels with equidistant systematic distribution (10 m x 10 m, having been sampled 30 parcels from each area. The floristic survey was carried through by the method of parcels. There was fulfilled a grouping analysis using the index of similarity of Jaccard. The number of parcels showed was enough to reflect the plantdiversity of the studied places; the families with highest number of species in the arboreous-shrubby stratum were Cactaceae and Euphorbiaceae; the species that had been common in the three areas, , were: Aspidosperma pyrifolium, Croton blanchetianus, Poincianella pyramidalis, Jatropha mollisssima, Malva sp., Pilosocereus gounellei, Spondias tuberosa and Opuntia palmadora. The arboreous habitat presented seven species, being higher to the shrubby component that was presented with five species. The more conspicuous arboreous elements had been: Poincianella pyramidalis (Caesalpiniaceae and Aspidosperma pyrifolium (Apocynaceae. The most important shrubs were: Croton blanchetianus and Jatropha mollisssima (Euphorbiaceae. The analysis made by the index of floristic similarity indicated that the similarity was considered high by the three area, because they presented a Jaccard index higher than 0.25.

  3. Baseline study of morphometric traits of wild Capsicum annuum growing near two biosphere reserves in the Peninsula of Baja California for future conservation management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo-Amador, Bernardo; Rueda-Puente, Edgar Omar; Troyo-Diéguez, Enrique; Córdoba-Matson, Miguel Víctor; Hernández-Montiel, Luis Guillermo; Nieto-Garibay, Alejandra

    2015-05-10

    Despite the ecological and socioeconomic importance of wild Capsicum annuum L., few investigations have been carried out to study basic characteristics. The peninsula of Baja California has a unique characteristic that it provides a high degree of isolation for the development of unique highly diverse endemic populations. The objective of this study was to evaluate for the first time the growth type, associated vegetation, morphometric traits in plants, in fruits and mineral content of roots, stems and leaves of three wild populations of Capsicum in Baja California, Mexico, near biosphere reserves. The results showed that the majority of plants of wild Capsicum annuum have a shrub growth type and were associated with communities consisting of 43 species of 20 families the most representative being Fabaceae, Cactaceae and Euphorbiaceae. Significant differences between populations were found in plant height, main stem diameter, beginning of canopy, leaf area, leaf average and maximum width, stems and roots dry weights. Coverage, leaf length and dry weight did not show differences. Potassium, sodium and zinc showed significant differences between populations in their roots, stems and leaves, while magnesium and manganese showed significant differences only in roots and stems, iron in stems and leaves, calcium in roots and leaves and phosphorus did not show differences. Average fruit weight, length, 100 fruits dry weight, 100 fruits pulp dry weight and pulp/seeds ratio showed significant differences between populations, while fruit number, average fruit fresh weight, peduncle length, fruit width, seeds per fruit and seed dry weight, did not show differences. We concluded that this study of traits of wild Capsicum, provides useful information of morphometric variation between wild populations that will be of value for future decision processes involved in the management and preservation of germplasm and genetic resources.

  4. Color, betalain pattern, and antioxidant properties of cactus pear (Opuntia spp.) clones.

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    Stintzing, Florian C; Herbach, Kirsten M; Mosshammer, Markus R; Carle, Reinhold; Yi, Weiguang; Sellappan, Subramani; Akoh, Casimir C; Bunch, Ron; Felker, Peter

    2005-01-26

    Total phenolics, ascorbic acid, and betalain contents of differently colored cactus pear clones (nine Opuntia ficus-indica [L.] Mill. clones and one O. robusta Wendl. clone) were investigated and related to their respective antioxidant potential assessed by Trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assays. TEAC and ORAC values were very highly correlated with each other and also with values for total phenolics, betalain contents, and ascorbic acid concentrations. Total phenolics had the greatest contribution to ORAC and TEAC values. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-diode array detector (DAD)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) measurements of cactus pear juices permitted the differentiation of the clones based on variations in pigment patterns and betalain concentrations. The red and yellow betalains were absent in lime green colored cactus fruits. The ratio and concentration of these pigments were responsible for the yellow, orange, red, and purple colors in the other clones. Progeny of purple and lime green colored parents were characterized by 12% and 88% of plants bearing lime green and purple fruit, respectively. This implies that the genes for betalain production were lacking in the lime green fruits but could be provided by a parent with a complete set of genes, that is, purple fruits. Besides known pigments typical of Cactaceae, two unexpected betalains were identified. Whereas gomphrenin I was found for the first time in tissues of cactus plants, methionine-betaxanthin has never been described before as a genuine betalain. In addition to their alleged health-promoting properties, various combinations of yellow betaxanthins and red-purple betacyanins may allow the development of new food products without using artificial colorants.

  5. ESTRUCTURA DE LA VEGETACIÓN DEL CANÓN DEL RÍO CHICAMOCHA, 500-1200 M; SANTANDERCOLOMBIA: UNA HERRAMIENTA PARA LA CONSERVACIÓN

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    ALBESIANO SOFÍA

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available En la vegetación de la cuenca media del cañón del río Chicamocha entre los 500y los 1170 m de altitud, en los municipios de Cepitá y Piedecuesta (Inspección dePolicía de Pescadero, en Santander-Colombia, el tipo fisionómico dominante es elmatorral, aunque se encuentran algunos tipos de vegetación boscosa cerca de loscursos de agua. La distribución en clases de frecuencia de los parámetros altura,cobertura y diámetro a la altura del pecho (DAP, muestra que la mayoría de losindividuos se agrupan en las clases inferiores. La mayor parte de los elementos delestrato herbáceo miden entre 60 cm y 1 m y los del estrato arbustivo entre 1,9 y2,1 m. La mayoría de los individuos del estrato arbustivo cubre entre 0,3 y 1,44m2. Son muy escasos los elementos con DAP superior a 8 cm. Las especies másimportantes en la vegetación regional según el Índice de Valor de Importancia (IVIson: Stenocereus griseus (79, Lippia origanoides (76 y Prosopis juliflora (75. Lariqueza florística del área está representada por 69 familias de plantas vasculares, con173 géneros y 220 especies. Las familias con mayor número de géneros y especiesson: Asteraceae (15 géneros/16 especies, Euphorbiaceae (9/16, Fabaceae (11/12,Poaceae (11/12 y Cactaceae (6/7. Entre el periodo de 1960-1990 se presentaroncambios en la cobertura vegetal debido principalmente al sobrepastoreo extensivoe incontrolado de ganado caprino y en menor proporción, a la extracción de leñay/o a la construcción de obras civiles como vías de comunicación y viviendas. ElÍndice de Deforestación durante los últimos 30 años en la cuenca media de la regiónsemiárida del cañón del río Chicamocha es del 7%.

  6. Antioxidant Phytochemicals of Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Mill. Cladodes with Potential Anti-spasmodic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanuzza, Francesco; Occhiuto, Francesco; Monforte, Maria Teresa; Tripodo, Maria Marcella; D'Angelo, Valeria; Galati, Enza Maria

    2017-10-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica (OFI) (L.) Mill. (Cactaceae), a plant widespread in dry regions of the world, shows interesting biological activities (cicatrizant, antiulcer, anti-inflammatory, and hypolipidemic) and is widely used in traditional medicine. Phytochemical analysis and antispasmodic effect of wild OFI cladodes were carried out. Polyphenols and Vitamin E occurrence, in antioxidant pool of OFI cladodes, were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. The antispasmodic effect of OFI cladodes was assessed in isolated rabbit smooth muscle tissues. The experiments were carried out with preparations of rabbit jejunum and uterus with the spontaneous contractile activity, to evaluate the effect of cumulative concentrations of the extract on basal tone, amplitude, and frequency of contractions. Catechin, quercetin, kaempferol, isorhamnetin and chlorogenic, ferulic, and p-coumaric acid were identified. α-, β-, and γ-tocopherols have been highlighted and α-tocopherol is the major component. OFI cladodes contain significant amount of polyphenols and tocopherols that are effective radical scavengers and inhibited ethanol 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl formation by 50%. OFI cladodes caused a light inhibition of amplitude and frequency of spontaneous contractions and a marked decrease in muscle basal tone of rabbit jejunum preparations. On spontaneously contracting uterus preparations, the addition of increasing concentrations of cladode extract caused uterine muscle relaxation. The contraction of smooth muscle preparations depends on an increase in cytoplasmic free calcium ion concentration, which activates the contractile elements. The flavonoids may suppress the contractility of smooth myocytes, by an inhibition of availability of Ca2+ for muscle contraction. Opuntia ficus-indica (OFI) cladodes contain significant amount of polyphenols and tocopherols that are effective radical scavengers and inhibited ethanol 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl formation by 50

  7. Introduced and invasive cactus species: a global review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Ana; Le Roux, Johannes J.; Robertson, Mark P.; Wilson, John R.U.; Richardson, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which species are introduced and become invasive, and why, are central questions in invasion science. Comparative studies on model taxa have provided important insights, but much more needs to be done to unravel the context dependencies of these findings. The cactus family (Cactaceae), one of the most popular horticultural plant groups, is an interesting case study. Hundreds of cactus species have been introduced outside their native ranges; a few of them are among the most damaging invasive plant species in the world. We reviewed the drivers of introductions and invasions in the family and seek insights that can be used to minimize future risks. We compiled a list of species in the family and determined which have been recorded as invasive. We also mapped current global distributions and modelled the potential global distributions based on distribution data of known invasive taxa. Finally, we identified whether invasiveness is phylogenetically clustered for cacti and whether particular traits are correlated with invasiveness. Only 57 of the 1922 cactus species recognized in this treatment have been recorded as invasive. There are three invasion hotspots: South Africa (35 invasive species recorded), Australia (26 species) and Spain (24 species). However, there are large areas of the world with climates suitable for cacti that are at risk of future invasion—in particular, parts of China, eastern Asia and central Africa. The invasive taxa represent an interesting subset of the total species pool. There is a significant phylogenetic signal: invasive species occur in 2 of the 3 major phylogenetic clades and in 13 of the 130 genera. This phylogenetic signal is not driven by human preference, i.e. horticultural trade, but all invasive species are from 5 of the 12 cactus growth forms. Finally, invasive species tend to have significantly larger native ranges than non-invasive species, and none of the invasive species are of conservation concern in their

  8. Morfoanatomia vegetativa de Opuntia brasiliensis (Willd Haw / Vegetative morphology and anatomy of Opuntia brasiliensis (Willd Haw

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    Camila Firmino de Azevedo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Opuntia brasiliensis (Willd Haw. é uma Cactaceae nativa do Brasil utilizada como ornamental, que apresenta caracteres morfológicos semelhantes a outras espécies do gênero, o que dificulta sua identificação. Dessa forma, foi realizado uma descrição morfoanatômica de O. brasiliensis com o objetivo de ampliar o conhecimento sobre a organização estrutural do gênero e fornecer subsídios para a identificação da espécie, bem como observar caracteres importantes na adaptação a ambientes xerófilos. Foram feitas secções transversais e paradérmicas da raiz, caule principal e cladódios com espécimes coletados na zona rural da cidade de Serra Branca (PB, localizada na região do cariri ocidental. O. brasiliensis apresenta raiz ramificada e caule clorofilado formando um eixo principal de onde partem inúmeros cladódios delgados. Observamse pelos e epiderme unisseriada irregular na raiz, que possui córtex formado por parênquima, seguido de endoderme multisseriada e periciclo. No cilindro central da raiz, ocorrem tecidos vasculares formando cinco pólos seguidos de medula. O caule e o cladódio apresentam epiderme com paredes sinuosas, em que encontram-se estômatos paralelocíticos que apresentam câmara subestomática; e na camada subsequente, hipoderme com grande quantidade de drusas de oxalato de cálcio. O córtex é formado por parênquimas clorofiliano e aquífero, onde observam-se feixes vasculares, com raios de floema voltados para o lado externo, seguido de xilema helicoidal. Porém, nos cladódios, o parênquima clorofiliano é bem mais denso e os feixes vasculares são dispostos irregularmente, enquanto no caule estão distribuídos no sentido radial. O. brasiliensis apresenta várias características importantes na sua identificação, bem como adaptações estruturais a ambientes xerófilos

  9. Componente epifítico vascular de um fragmento florestal urbano, município de Criciúma, Santa Catarina, Brasil

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    Vanilde Citadini-Zanette

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2013v26n2p33   Este estudo teve por objetivo realizar um levantamento florístico e fitossociológico, bem como analisar a distribuição espacial do componente epifítico vascular em um fragmento florestal em área urbana pertencente à floresta ombrófila densa submontana no município de Criciúma-SC. Adicionalmente, informações sobre os grupos ecológicos das espécies epifíticas e as estratégias de polinização e de dispersão também foram apresentadas. Foram amostradas 60 árvores como forófitos com DAP ≥ 10 cm, pelo método de pontos quadrantes centrados, e foi utilizado o método expedito por caminhamento para registrar as espécies epifíticas não amostradas nos forófitos pelo método fitossociológico. A frequência foi avaliada com base na ocorrência dos epífitos nos forófitos e nos segmentos fuste e copa. Foi registrada a presença dos epífitos nos forófitos nos segmentos fuste e copa. Foram encontradas 65 espécies distribuídas em 39 gêneros e em 14 famílias, das quais 49 foram amostradas no levantamento fitossociológico e as demais no levantamento por caminhamento. Bromeliaceae apresentou a maior riqueza, seguida de Orchidaceae e Cactaceae. Tillandsia recurvata (L. L. foi citada pela primeira vez no sul do estado. A diversidade específica foi estimada em H’ = 3,33 e a equabilidade (E foi igual a 0,86. O grupo ecológico dos holoepífitos foi o mais representativo na área de estudo. Entomofilia e anemocoria foram as estratégias predominantes para polinização e dispersão, respectivamente. No levantamento fitossociológico, o número de espécies epifíticas nos forófitos variou de 0 a 21. Os maiores valores de importância foram os relativos à Rhipsalis teres (Vell. Steud. e Microgramma vacciniifolia (Langsd. & Fisch. Copel.

  10. Differential distribution of amino acids in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinod; Sharma, Anket; Kaur, Ravdeep; Thukral, Ashwani Kumar; Bhardwaj, Renu; Ahmad, Parvaiz

    2017-05-01

    Plants are a rich source of amino acids and their individual abundance in plants is of great significance especially in terms of food. Therefore, it is of utmost necessity to create a database of the relative amino acid contents in plants as reported in literature. Since in most of the cases complete analysis of profiles of amino acids in plants was not reported, the units used and the methods applied and the plant parts used were different, amino acid contents were converted into relative units with respect to lysine for statistical analysis. The most abundant amino acids in plants are glutamic acid and aspartic acid. Pearson's correlation analysis among different amino acids showed that there were no negative correlations between the amino acids. Cluster analysis (CA) applied to relative amino acid contents of different families. Alismataceae, Cyperaceae, Capparaceae and Cactaceae families had close proximity with each other on the basis of their relative amino acid contents. First three components of principal component analysis (PCA) explained 79.5% of the total variance. Factor analysis (FA) explained four main underlying factors for amino acid analysis. Factor-1 accounted for 29.4% of the total variance and had maximum loadings on glycine, isoleucine, leucine, threonine and valine. Factor-2 explained 25.8% of the total variance and had maximum loadings on alanine, aspartic acid, serine and tyrosine. 14.2% of the total variance was explained by factor-3 and had maximum loadings on arginine and histidine. Factor-4 accounted 8.3% of the total variance and had maximum loading on the proline amino acid. The relative content of different amino acids presented in this paper is alanine (1.4), arginine (1.8), asparagine (0.7), aspartic acid (2.4), cysteine (0.5), glutamic acid (2.8), glutamine (0.6), glycine (1.0), histidine (0.5), isoleucine (0.9), leucine (1.7), lysine (1.0), methionine (0.4), phenylalanine (0.9), proline (1.1), serine (1.0), threonine (1

  11. Introduced and invasive cactus species: a global review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Ana; Le Roux, Johannes J; Robertson, Mark P; Wilson, John R U; Richardson, David M

    2014-12-03

    Understanding which species are introduced and become invasive, and why, are central questions in invasion science. Comparative studies on model taxa have provided important insights, but much more needs to be done to unravel the context dependencies of these findings. The cactus family (Cactaceae), one of the most popular horticultural plant groups, is an interesting case study. Hundreds of cactus species have been introduced outside their native ranges; a few of them are among the most damaging invasive plant species in the world. We reviewed the drivers of introductions and invasions in the family and seek insights that can be used to minimize future risks. We compiled a list of species in the family and determined which have been recorded as invasive. We also mapped current global distributions and modelled the potential global distributions based on distribution data of known invasive taxa. Finally, we identified whether invasiveness is phylogenetically clustered for cacti and whether particular traits are correlated with invasiveness. Only 57 of the 1922 cactus species recognized in this treatment have been recorded as invasive. There are three invasion hotspots: South Africa (35 invasive species recorded), Australia (26 species) and Spain (24 species). However, there are large areas of the world with climates suitable for cacti that are at risk of future invasion-in particular, parts of China, eastern Asia and central Africa. The invasive taxa represent an interesting subset of the total species pool. There is a significant phylogenetic signal: invasive species occur in 2 of the 3 major phylogenetic clades and in 13 of the 130 genera. This phylogenetic signal is not driven by human preference, i.e. horticultural trade, but all invasive species are from 5 of the 12 cactus growth forms. Finally, invasive species tend to have significantly larger native ranges than non-invasive species, and none of the invasive species are of conservation concern in their

  12. Separation of polar betalain pigments from cacti fruits of Hylocereus polyrhizus by ion-pair high-speed countercurrent chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wybraniec, Sławomir; Stalica, Paweł; Jerz, Gerold; Klose, Bettina; Gebers, Nadine; Winterhalter, Peter; Spórna, Aneta; Szaleniec, Maciej; Mizrahi, Yosef

    2009-10-09

    Polar betacyanin pigments together with betaxanthins from ripe cactus fruits of Hylocereus polyrhizus (Cactaceae) were fractionated by means of preparative ion-pair high-speed countercurrent chromatography (IP-HSCCC) also using the elution-extrusion (EE) approach for a complete pigment recovery. HSCCC separations were operated in the classical 'head-to-tail' mode with an aqueous mobile phase. Different CCC solvent systems were evaluated in respect of influence and effectiveness of fractionation capabilities to separate the occurring pigment profile of H. polyrhizus. For that reason, the additions of two different volatile ion-pair forming perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCA) were investigated. For a direct comparison, five samples of Hylocereus pigment extract were run on preparative scale (900 mg) in 1-butanol-acetonitrile-aqueous TFA 0.7% (5:1:6, v/v/v) and the modified systems tert.-butyl methyl ether-1-butanol-acetonitrile-aqueous PFCA (2:2:1:5, v/v/v/v) using 0.7% and 1.0% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) or heptafluorobutyric acid (HFBA) in the aqueous phase, respectively. The chemical affinity to the organic stationary CCC solvent phases and in consequence the retention of these highly polar betalain pigments was significantly increased by the use of the more lipophilic fluorinated ion-pair reagent HFBA instead of TFA. The HFBA additions separated more effectively the typical cacti pigments phyllocactin and hylocerenin from betanin as well as their iso-forms. Unfortunately, similar K(D) ratios and selectivity factors alpha around 1.0-1.1 in all tested solvent systems proved that the corresponding diastereomers, 15S-type pigments cannot be resolved from the 15R-epimers (iso-forms). Surprisingly, additions of the stronger ion-pair reagent (HFBA) resulted in a partial separation of hylocerenin from phyllocactin which were not resolved in the other solvent systems. The pigments were detected by means of HPLC-DAD and HPLC-electrospray ionization-MS using also

  13. Evaluation of the suspending properties of two local Opuntia spp. mucilages on paracetamol suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebresamuel, Naod; Gebre-Mariam, Tsige

    2013-01-01

    Some excipients are currently available for the formulation of pharmaceutical suspensions. The purpose of this study is to develop cheap and effective natural excipient that can be used as an effective alternative for the formulation of pharmaceutical suspensions. The suspending properties of Opuntia ficus-indica and Opuntia stricta mucilages (family Cactaceae) were evaluated comparatively with that of NaCMC at concentration range of 2-6% (w/v) in Paracetamol suspension. Sedimentation volume (%) (with and without electrolyte), rheology, redispersibility, and dissolution rate of the suspensions were employed as evaluation parameters. The values obtained were used as basis for comparison of the suspending agents. The apparent viscosities of the suspensions in all the suspending agents concentration levels and applied shear rates were in the order of NaCMC>OS>OFI with non-Newtonian flow and accordingly the flow rates of the suspensions were in the order of OFI > OS > NaCMC. The sedimentation volumes (%) of the suspensions in all the suspending agent concentration levels were higher for OS followed by OFI and then NaCMC. The high sedimentation volumes (%) of suspensions, in turn, were accompanied by ease of redispersibility of that order. The effect of electrolyte on sedimentation volume (%) had dual effect. It was only the suspensions that had NaCMC that showed increase in sedimentation volume (%) in all molar NaCl concentration. However, in suspensions that had mucilages of OS and OFI, an initial increase in sediment volumes (%) were accompanied by decrease after 1x10(-3)M and 1x10(-2)M of NaCl, respectively. Dissolution of the suspensions which had mucilages attained the acceptable ranges (> 80% drug release in 30 min) in 5 min. Similarly, except A6 formulations A2, A3, A4 and A5 have attained the limit but the release was not as quick as the previous formulations. Hence, it can be concluded that mucilages of Opuntia spp. (Opuntia ficus-indica and Opuntia stricta

  14. Composição florísitica e fitossociologia de uma área de caatinga em Contendas do Sincorá, Bahia, microrregião homogênea da Chapada Diamantina Floristic and fitosociological survey of a caatinga area at "Contendas do Sincorá", Bahia State, a homogeneous microregion of the Chapada Diamantina

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    Paulo César Fernandes Lima

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se levantar a cobertura vegetal de 11.034ha da Fazenda Extrema-Lapinha, 295 a 380m de altitude (13º46' a 14ºS e 41º3' a 41º10'W, Contendas do Sincorá, BA, na Chapada Diamantina. O clima é do tipo BSwh', estépico, semi-árido quente, com precipitação anual de 500-700mm, período chuvoso de novembro a janeiro, temperatura média de 23ºC e umidade relativa de 60-80%. Predominam os solos Podzólicos Vermelho-Amarelo Equivalente Eutrófico e solos Litólicos Eutróficos, em relevo levemente ondulado. Foram distribuídas aleatoriamente 100 parcelas de 20x5m, sendo inventariadas as plantas com DAP > a 5cm. Foram encontrados 2.897 indivíduos abrangendo 71 espécies, 51 gêneros e 23 famílias botânicas, não sendo identificados 3,59% dos mesmos. As famílias Euphorbiaceae (15,67%, Mimosaceae (13,80%, Bignoniaceae (12,35%, Caesalpiniaceae (7,14%, Boraginaceae (6,63%, Polygonaceae (6,63%, Anacardiaceae (6,04%, Burseraceae (4,93%, Apocynaceae (4,59% e Combretaceae (4,28% correspondem a 82,09% dos indivíduos inventariados. Para as classes de diâmetro inventariadas, as Cactaceae corresponderam a 0,48%, sugerindo ser esta vegetação de caatinga de caráter xerófilo pouco acentuado. As 10 espécies mais importantes, determinadas pelo índice de valor de importância, foram Commiphora leptophloeos (22,28, Croton zehntneri (19,39, Mimosa sp. (17,24, Tabebuia spongiosa (16,99, Myracrodruon urundeuva (15,38, Anadenanthera tnacrocarpa (14,25, Coccoloba termiflora (11,73, Caesalpinia sp. (11,17, Cordia sp. (10,79 e Tabebuia sp. (10,20.The aim of this work was to conduct a floristic and phytosociological survey on 11,034 hectares of the Extrema Lapinha Farm (13º46' to 14º S and 41º03' to 41º10' W, altitude from 295 to 380m, in the town of "Contendas do Sincorá", in Chapada Diamantina, Bahia State. The climate is of the BSwh' type, hot semi-arid, with an annual rainfall of 500-700mm, the rainy season being from November to January, with

  15. Twentieth century demographic changes in cirio and cardón in Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Stephen H.; Martijena, Nora E.; Webb, Robert H.; Turner, Raymond M.

    2005-01-01

    Aim  Our purpose was to discern long-term large-scale patterns of survivorship and recruitment of two dominant, charismatic and useful desert plants, cirio [Fouquieriaceae; Fouquieria columnaris (Kell.) Kell. ex Curran] and cardón [Cactaceae; Pachycereus pringlei(S.Watson) Britton & Rose], and to evaluate the effects of physical and human factors. Location  The study included 77 sites distributed over c. 13,200 km2 in the northern Vizcaíno Region of the Sonoran Desert, state of Baja California, México. Method  Censuses used identified individuals (n = 3780 cirio and 2246 cardón) and were based on repeat photography. Time intervals between censuses ranged from 29 to 96 years, ending in 1996–2002. Earlier repetition (1963) of old photographs at 14 sites allowed analysis of temporal variation. The effect of elapsed time was modelled with Weibull functions for survivorship and linear functions for recruitment. To explain the residual variations, we tested categorical and continuous variables related to substrate, geomorphology, climate and geography. Human impacts were weighed with historical and quantitative analysis. Results  Elapsed time accounted for 45% of the variation of survivorship in cirio but only 35% in cardón. The fitted Weibull curves were used to estimate longevity: all-size cohorts of 1000 individuals would die out in 388 (cirio) and 723 years (cardón). Recruitment in cirio was linearly related to time (r2 = 0.71) and averaged  0.005 year−1, was linearly related to time (r2 = 0.66) and was less than mortality at only 33% of the sites. Vital rates were not strongly correlated between mid- and late-century but were mostly similar to the long-term regional rates. Removing the factor of elapsed time, the residual variations showed that survivorship was greater on sites protected from winds for cirio and was less on very coarse soils for cardón. Recruitment increased with latitude in cirio and was greater on southern

  16. Descripción de los estados adultos e inmaduros y aspectos bioecológicos de Heterothrips cacti (Thysanoptera: Heterothripidae Description of adult and immature stages and bioecological aspects of Heterothrips cacti (Thysanoptera: Heterothripidae

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    María I. Zamar

    2011-06-01

    . hildmannii flowering season in 2006-2007. The sample consisted of five flowers of each condition of development collected randomly. In order to know the host plants and the distribution of H. cacti, periodic samplings of the wild vegetation were carried out in the Prepuna and Puna of Jujuy province. The biological studies were performed in laboratory placing flowers of O. sulphurea with eggs of H. cacti in rearing cages in order to control their life cycle evolution. Heterothrips cacti is an anthophilous, oligophagous species associated to cactaceae, widely distributed in the Prepuna and Puna of Jujuy province. The biology of H. cacti is correlated with the one of its host plant, O. sulphurea, presenting two generations per year. Likewise, its life cycle is associated with the evolution of the cactaceous flower. The time of development of the immature stages of the first and second generation was 45 ± 1.5 days and 287 ±3 days respectively. The stage of development through which the species undergoes the period between inflorescences is larva II quiescent wrapped in a silk thread cocoon on the floor. At 5 ºC and 0 hrs light the quiescent state of H. cacti is inhibited. The incidence of larvi-pupal parasitoid Ceranisus sp. during the second generation of H. cacti was recorded.

  17. "Oasis de neblina" en los cerros costeros del sur de Iquique, región de Tarapacá, Chile, durante el evento El Niño 1997-1998 Fog oases during the El Niño Southern Oscillation 1997-1998, in the coastal hills south of Iquique, Tarapacá region, Chile

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    MÉLICA MUÑOZ-SCHICK

    2001-06-01

    . A total of 72 vascular plant species were registered, contributing to the area´s floristic knowledge, where till now only about 20 species were registered. Three species are new records for the chilean flora: Nolana adansonii (Roem. et Schult. Johnst., Solanum cfr. montanum L. and Ophryosporus cfr. floribundus (D.C. King et Rob., and another one Alstroemeria lutea (Muñoz 2000 is a new species. This last one, together with Eulychnia aricensis Ritter, Pyrrhocactus saxifragus Ritter (both Cactaceae and Nolana intonsa Johnst. (Nolanaceae are local endemics. Of the total of registered species, 43 % are endemics, 52.7 % are non endemic natives and a low percentage (4.1 % are foreign species; 47.2 % share their distribution with Perú. The families Asteraceae, Nolanaceae and Solanaceae, are the best represented in the area, each one with more than seven species. Information about special climatic conditions due to El Niño 1997-1998 event is discussed in relationship to the development of the flora and vegetation. In spite of a non significant occurrence of rainfall events, an increase in temperature and in the fog's water content is detected. These conditions favor the development of more exuberant vegetation and the expansion of the distribution range of some floristic elements

  18. Guía ilustrada de la flora del “Desierto de la Tatacoa ”, Huila, Colombia

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    Galeano Gloria

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available El “desierto” de La Tatacoa comprende un área de unos 335 km2, que se extienden sobre la ribera oriental del río Magdalena, en el municipio de Villavieja y parte del municipio de Baraya, en el norte del departamento del Huila; presenta una elevación promedio de 440 m, una temperatura
    promedio de 28º C y una precipitación promedio anual cercana a 1.000 mm. Históricamente,la región ha sufrido un fuerte proceso de sabanización y desertificación, por lo cual la cobertura vegetal actual se encuentra representada principalmente por matorrales bajos, rastrojos y pastizales. En este estudio se presenta el inventario florístico preliminar de la región del “desierto” de la Tatacoa; además, se caracteriza la vegetación de la región de una forma general y se presenta una guía ilustrada con descripciones botánicas para 100 de las especies más representativas de la región. Se encontraron 227 especies, distribuidas en cerca de 170 géneros y 60 familias. La gran mayoría de las especies son dicotiledóneas (85%, mientras que las monocotiledóneas se encuentran representadas solo por el 14% de las especies, y un mínimo porcentaje (menos del 1% por helechos y afines. A nivel florístico, la familia Fabaceae (s.l. es la más destacada con 35 especies y 27 géneros, representando el 15,5% del total de las especies, discriminada en las subfamilias Faboideae con 18/16, Mimosoideae con 9/7 y Caesalpinioideae con 8/4. Otras de las familias que sobresalen por su riqueza son Poaceae con 20 especies y 15 géneros, Euphorbiaceae (13/7, Asteraceae (10/10, Malvaceae (9/4, Cactaceae (8/7, Asclepiadaceae (8/7 y Convolvulaceae (8/3. Como hallazgos importantes se presenta el primer registro para el país de Senna uniflora (Caesalpiniodeae y el reencuentro de Amoreuxia palmatifida (Cochlospermaceae, especie que era conocida para Colombia por un solo espécimen coleccionado antes de 1858 en cercanías al municipio del Espinal (Tolima. La gu

  19. Propagation in Schlumbergera truncata (Haw: alternatives to the use of xaxim = Propagação de Schlumbergera truncata (Haw: alternativas ao uso do xaxim

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    Rafael Fonseca Zanotti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The ornamental cactus, Schlumbergera truncata, is propagated by cuttings, with xaxim (Dicksonia sellowiana being one of the substrates used. However, xaxim is endangered, and it has become necessary to evaluate alternative substrates. The use of suitable substrates and of substances that promote organogenesis, such as auxins, aid in the process of plant propagation. The aim of this study therefore, was to evaluate the development of cuttings of S. truncata in different substrates, and the effect of IBA on organogenesis. Six treatments were carried out, consisting of a combination of three substrates (powdered xaxim, powdered coconut and a commercial substrate, and two rates of IBA (0 and 600 mg L-1. Twenty cuttings were used per treatment, distributed over five replications of four cuttings, in a completely randomised design and a 3 x 2 factorial (substrates x AIB. There was no significant interaction between the factors, which were evaluated separately. For the powdered xaxim substrate, the commercial substrate and the powdered coconut, the cuttings displayed 3.0, 3.7 and 1.3 shoots per plant respectively. After exposure to a solution of IBA of 0 or 600 mg L-1, the cuttings presented 2.2 and 3.1 shoots per plant respectively. The substrate of powdered xaxim and the commercial substrate are both effective in the propagation of S. truncata. As the xaxim, found in the Atlantic Forest, is an endangered species, the use of a commercial substrate is recommended, with IBA as a growth regulator to promote an increase in budding. = A Schlumbergera truncata é uma cactaceae ornamental, propagada por estacas, e o xaxim é um dos substratos utilizados. Devido à ameaça de extinção do xaxim, torna-se necessário avaliar substratos alternativos. A utilização de substratos adequados e o uso de substâncias promotoras de organogênese, como as auxinas, auxiliam no processo de propagação vegetativa. Dessa maneira, objetivou-se com este trabalho avaliar o

  20. Biomass equations for Brazilian semiarid caatinga plants Equações para estimar a biomassa de plantas da caatinga do semi-árido brasileiro

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    Everardo V.S.B. Sampaio

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Allometric equations to estimate total aboveground alive biomass (B or crown projection area (C of ten caatinga species based on plant height (H and/or stem diameter at ground level (DGL or at breast height (DBH were developed. Thirty plants of each species, covering the common range of stem diameters (3 to 50 cm, were measured (C, H, DGL, DBH, cut at the base, separated into parts, weighted and subsampled to determine dry biomass. Wood density (p of the stem and the largest branches was determined. B, C, H and p ranged from 1 to 500 kg, 0.2 to 112 m², 1.3 to 11.8 m, and 0.45 to 1.03 g cm-3. Biomass of all 10 species, separately or together (excluding one cactus species, could be estimated with high coefficients of determination (R² using the power equation (B = aDGLb and DGL, DBH, H or combinations of diameter, height and density. Improvement by multiplying H and/or p to DGL or DBH was small. The mixed-species equation based only on DBH (valid up to 30 cm had a = 0.173 and b = 2.295, similar to averages of these parameters found in the literature but slightly lower than most of those for humid tropical vegetation. Crown area was significantly related to diameter, height and biomass.Equações alométricas foram desenvolvidas para estimar a biomassa aérea viva (B e a área de projeção da copa (C de dez espécies da caatinga, com base na altura da planta (H e/ou do diâmetro do caule ao nível do solo (DNS ou à altura do peito (DAP. Trinta plantas de cada espécie, cobrindo a faixa usual de diâmetros (3 a 50 cm, foram medidas (C, H, DNS, DAP, cortadas na base, separadas em partes, pesadas e subamostradas para determinação da biomassa seca. A densidade (p da madeira dos caules e galhos maiores foi determinada. B, C, H e p variaram de 1 a 500 kg, 0,2 a 112 m², 1,3 a 11,8 m e 0,45 a 1,03 g cm-3. A biomassa das 10 espécies, separadamente ou em conjunto (exceto pela espécie de Cactaceae, foi estimada com alto coeficiente de determina

  1. Tissue localization of betacyanins in cactus stems Localización de betacianinas en tejido del tallo de cactus

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    Alessandro Mosco

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Betalains are soluble pigments found only in the suborder Chenopodiniae, while in all other Angiospermae they are replaced by anthocyanins. The convergent evolution of the presence of anthocyanins and betalains in vegetative tissues supports the hypothesis of a similar function, based on the absorption properties of these pigments. The screening effect of anthocyanins results in the reduction of the amount of photoinhibition. betalains, being the anthocyanin counterpart in most families of Caryophyllales, were also suggested to have a screening role. This study is aimed at identifying in which Cactaceae stem tissues betacyanins, reddish to violet betalain pigments, accumulate. Stem accumulation of betacyanins was observed in cacti both in their natural habitat and in cultivation. The localization of betacyanins was assessed by light microscope studies on tubercle transverse sections. During 2 field trips in distinct years to the Mexican plateau in March, many cactus species, belonging to different genera, were observed displaying a reddish stem. Light microscope studies on cultivated plants showed that betacyanins accumulate in the hypodermis and in the outer layers of the chlorenchyma, where they may act as a screen, thus protecting the photosystems present in the underlying chlorenchyma, and have a possible antioxidant function in the cortex.Las betalaínas son pigmentos solubles que se encuentran sólo en el suborden Chenopodiniae, mientras que en el resto de Angiospermae, lo que existe son antocianinas. La evolución convergente de la presencia de antocianinas y betalaínas en tejidos vegetativos apoya la hipótesis de una función similar, que se basa en las propiedades de absorción de estos pigmentos. El efecto pantalla de las antocianinas resulta en la reducción de fotoinhibición. Siendo las betalaínas la contraparte antocianítica en la mayoría de las familias de Caryophyllales, se sugirió también un papel de pantalla de estos

  2. Notas sobre la flora de Colombia y países vecinos, II

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    Dugand Armando

    1968-09-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo es el segundo de una serie iniciada hace dos años en Phytologia (Vol. 13, No 6: 379-400. Sept. 1966, relativa en su mayor parte a la flora xerófila y subxerófila de la llanura costera del Caribe en Colombia y regiones vecinas, particularmente el norte de Venezuela. En él se hacen observaciones taxonómicas, morfológicas, distribucionales y otras varias acerca de las siguientes plantas: A.   - Especies que se señalan por primer a vez en la flora de Colombia: Aizoaceae.                           Sesuvium. edmonstonei Hook. f.                                                Sesuvium microphyllum Willd. Amaranthaceae.                 Froelichia interrupta (L. Moq. Cactaceae.                           Borzicactus sepium. (Kth. Britt. & Rose. Chenopodiaceae.               Atriplex pentandra (Jacq. Standl.                                                Heterostachys ritteriana (Moq. Ung.-Sternb. Compositae.                        Oxycarpha suedifolia Blake. Cruciferae.                           Cakile lanceolata (Willd. Schulz. Cyperaceae.                        Cyperus uncinulatus Schrad. Euphorbiaceae.                   *Chamaesyce bahiensis (Kl. & Gke. Dugand & Burch.                                                            ∆Chamaesyce dioica (Kth. Millsp. Leguminosae-Faboideae. Aeschynomene viscidula Michx.                                                Alysicarpus vaginalis (L. DC.                                                Crotalaria pumila Gómez-Ortega.