WorldWideScience

Sample records for cabench-to-bedside administrative module

  1. Administrative gatekeeping - a third way between unrestricted patient advocacy and bedside rationing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Sigurd

    2009-01-01

    I shall argue that this dilemma is false, since a third intermediate alternative exists. This alternative, which I term 'administrative gatekeeping', makes it possible for physicians to be involved in rationing while at the same time being genuine advocates of their patients. According to this ideal......, physicians are required to follow fair rules of rationing adopted at higher organizational levels within healthcare systems. At the same time, however, they are prohibited from including considerations of cost in their clinical decisions.......The inevitable need for rationing of healthcare has apparently presented the medical profession with the dilemma of choosing the lesser of two evils. Physicians appear to be obliged to adopt either an implausible version of traditional professional ethics or an equally problematic ethics of bedside...

  2. "Back to Bedside": Residents' and Fellows' Perspectives on Finding Meaning in Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, Dustin M; Rialon, Kristy L; Nevel, Kathryn; Kothari, Anai N; Jardine, Lcdr Dinchen A

    2017-04-01

    Physician burnout is common and associated with significant consequences for physicians and patients. One mechanism to combat burnout is to enhance meaning in work. To provide a trainee perspective on how meaning in work can be enhanced in the clinical learning environment through individual, program, and institutional efforts. "Back to Bedside" resulted from an appreciative inquiry exercise by 37 resident and fellow members of the ACGME's Council of Review Committee Residents (CRCR), which was guided by the memoir When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi. The exercise was designed to (1) discover current best practices in existing learning environments; (2) dream of ideal ways to enhance meaning in work; (3) design solutions that move toward this optimal environment; and (4) support trainees in operationalizing innovative solutions. Back to Bedside consists of 5 themes for how the learning environment can enhance meaning in daily work: (1) more time at the bedside, engaged in direct patient care, dialogue with patients and families, and bedside clinical teaching; (2) a shared sense of teamwork and respect among multidisciplinary health professionals and trainees; (3) decreasing the time spent on nonclinical and administrative responsibilities; (4) a supportive, collegial work environment; and (5) a learning environment conducive to developing clinical mastery and progressive autonomy. Participants identified actions to achieve these goals. A national, multispecialty group of trainees developed actionable recommendations for how clinical learning environments can be improved to combat physician burnout by fostering meaning in work. These improvements can be championed by trainees.

  3. Nurses' Perceived Barriers to Bedside Handover and Their Implication for Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiano, Georgia; Whitty, Jennifer A; Bucknall, Tracey; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2017-10-01

    Bedside handover during the change of shift allows nurses to visualize patients and facilitate patient participation, both purported to improve patient safety. But, bedside handover does not always occur and when it does, it may not involve the patient. To explore and understand barriers nurses perceive in undertaking bedside handover. A cross-sectional survey was administered to 200 nurses working on medical wards, recruited from two Australian hospitals, one private and one public. As part of the survey, there was one open-ended question asking about perceived barriers to bedside handover. Content analysis was used to analyze data. Barriers were assessed using a determinant framework. The open-ended question was answered by 176 (88%) participants. Three categories were identified. First, censoring the message showed nurses were concerned about patients and third-parties hearing sensitive information. In the second category, disrupting the communication flow, nurses perceived patients, family members, other nurses and external sources, interrupted the flow of handover and increased its duration. Finally, inhibiting characteristics demonstrated that individual patient and nurse views or capabilities hindered bedside handover. Barriers to bedside handover were determined to relate to individual nurse factors, patient factors, social, political and legal factors, and guideline factors. Suggestions for enhancing bedside handover include debunking nurses' misconceptions, reflecting on nurses' viewpoints, using active educational approaches, and promotion of legal requirements to heighten nurses' confidence dealing with sensitive information. Regular patient rounding, and standardized handover may enable patient involvement in handover. Finally, reviewing the local context to ensure organizational processes support bedside handover is recommended. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  4. Bedside arterial blood gas monitoring system using fluorescent optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnik, Daniel J.; Rymut, Russell A.

    1995-05-01

    We describe a bedside arterial blood gas (ABG) monitoring system which uses fluorescent optical sensors in the measurement of blood pH, PCO2 and PO2. The Point-of-Care Arterial Blood Gas Monitoring System consists of the SensiCathTM optical sensor unit manufactured by Optical Sensors Incorporated and the TramTM Critical Care Monitoring System with ABG Module manufactured by Marquette Electronics Incorporated. Current blood gas measurement techniques require a blood sample to be removed from the patient and transported to an electrochemical analyzer for analysis. The ABG system does not require removal of blood from the patient or transport of the sample. The sensor is added to the patient's existing arterial line. ABG measurements are made by drawing a small blood sample from the arterial line in sufficient quantity to ensure an undiluted sample at the sensor. Measurements of pH, PCO2 and PO2 are made within 60 seconds. The blood is then returned to the patient, the line flushed and results appear on the bedside monitor. The ABG system offers several advantages over traditional electrochemical analyzers. Since the arterial line remains closed during the blood sampling procedure the patient's risk of infection is reduced and the caregiver's exposure to blood is eliminated. The single-use, disposable sensor can be measure 100 blood samples over 72 hours after a single two-point calibration. Quality Assurance checks are also available and provide the caregiver the ability to assess system performance even after the sensor is patient attached. The ABG module integrates with an existing bedside monitoring system. This allows ABG results to appear on the same display as ECG, respiration, blood pressure, cardiac output, SpO2, and other clinical information. The small module takes up little space in the crowded intensive care unit. Performance studies compare the ABG system with an electrochemical blood gas analyzer. Study results demonstrated accurate and precise blood

  5. Bedside teaching in medical education: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Max; Ten Cate, Olle

    2014-04-01

    Bedside teaching is seen as one of the most important modalities in teaching a variety of skills important for the medical profession, but its use is declining. A literature review was conducted to reveal its strengths, the causes of its decline and future perspectives, the evidence with regard to learning clinical skills and patient/student/teacher satisfaction. PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane library were systematically searched with regard to terms related to bedside teaching. Articles regarding the above-mentioned subjects were included. Bedside teaching has shown to improve certain clinical diagnostic skills in medical students and residents. Patients, students/residents and teachers all seem to favour bedside teaching, for varying reasons. Despite this, the practice of bedside teaching is declining. Reasons to explain this decline include the increased patient turnover in hospitals, the assumed violation of patients' privacy and an increased reliance on technology in the diagnostic process. Solutions vary from increasingly using residents and interns as bedside teachers to actively educating staff members regarding the importance of bedside teaching and providing them with practical essentials. Impediments to bedside teaching need to be overcome if this teaching modality is to remain a valuable educational method for durable clinical skills.

  6. Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: Bench to Bedside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Joel D.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2012-01-01

    The study of diabetic cardiomyopathy (diabetic CM) is an area of significant interest given the strong association between diabetes and the risk of heart failure. Many unanswered questions remain regarding the clinical definition and pathogenesis of this metabolic cardiomyopathy. This article reviews the current understanding of diabetic CM with a particular emphasis on the unresolved issues that have limited translation of scientific discovery to patient bedside. PMID:22999244

  7. Pathophysiology of septic shock: From bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Kevin W; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2016-04-01

    Our understanding of sepsis and its resultant outcomes remains a paradox. On the one hand, we know more about the pathophysiology of sepsis than ever before. However, this knowledge has not been successfully translated to the bedside, as the vast majority of clinical trials for sepsis have been negative. Yet even in the general absence of positive clinical trials, mortality from sepsis has fallen to its lowest point in history, in large part due to educational campaigns that stress timely antibiotics and hemodynamic support. While additional improvements in outcome will assuredly result from further compliance with evidence based practices, a deeper understanding of the science that underlies the host response in sepsis is critical to the development of novel therapeutics. In this review, we outline immunopathologic abnormalities in sepsis, and then look at potential approaches to therapeutically modulate them. Ultimately, an understanding of the science underlying sepsis should allow the critical care community to utilize precision medicine to combat this devastating disease on an individual basis leading to improved outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Improving nurse-physician teamwork through interprofessional bedside rounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkin, Stanislav; Chon, Tony Y; Christopherson, Marie L; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Worden, Lindsey M; Ratelle, John T

    2016-01-01

    Teamwork between physicians and nurses has a positive association with patient satisfaction and outcomes, but perceptions of physician-nurse teamwork are often suboptimal. To improve nurse-physician teamwork in a general medicine inpatient teaching unit by increasing face-to-face communication through interprofessional bedside rounds. From July 2013 through October 2013, physicians (attendings and residents) and nurses from four general medicine teams in a single nursing unit participated in bedside rounding, which involved the inclusion of nurses in morning rounds with the medicine teams at the patients' bedside. Based on stakeholder analysis and feedback, a checklist for key patient care issues was created and utilized during bedside rounds. To assess the effect of bedside rounding on nurse-physician teamwork, a survey of selected items from the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) was administered to participants before and after the implementation of bedside rounds. The number of pages to the general medicine teams was also measured as a marker of physician-nurse communication. Participation rate in bedside rounds across the four medicine teams was 58%. SAQ response rates for attendings, residents, and nurses were 36/36 (100%), 73/73 (100%), and 32/73 (44%) prior to implementation of bedside rounding and 36 attendings (100%), 72 residents (100%), and 14 (19%) nurses after the implementation of bedside rounding, respectively. Prior to bedside rounding, nurses provided lower teamwork ratings (percent agree) than residents and attendings on all SAQ items; but after the intervention, the difference remained significant only on SAQ item 2 ("In this clinical area, it is not difficult to speak up if I perceive a problem with patient care", 64% for nurses vs 79% for residents vs 94% for attendings, P=0.02). Also, resident responses improved on SAQ item 1 ("Nurse input is well received in this area", 62% vs 82%, P=0.01). Increasing face-to-face communication through

  9. Methodological Study to Develop Standard Operational Protocol on Oral Drug Administration for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijarania, Sunil Kumar; Saini, Sushma Kumari; Verma, Sanjay; Kaur, Sukhwinder

    2017-05-01

    To develop standard operational protocol (SOP) on oral drug administration and checklist to assess the implementation of the developed SOP. In this prospective methodological study, SOPs were developed in five phases. In the first phase, the preliminary draft of SOPs and checklists were prepared based on literature review, assessment of current practices and focus group discussion (FGD) with bedside working nurses. In the second phase, content validity was checked with the help of Delphi technique (12 experts). Total four drafts were prepared in stages and necessary modifications were made as per suggestions after each Delphi round. Fourth Delphi round was performed after conducting a pilot study. In the fourth phase, all bedside nurses were trained as per SOPs and asked to practice accordingly and observation of thirty oral drug administrations in children was done to check reliability of checklists for implementation of SOPs. In Phase-V, 7 FGDs were conducted with bedside nurses to assess the effectiveness of SOPs. The Content Validity Index (CVI) of SOP and checklists was 99.77%. Overall standardized Cronbach's alpha was calculated as 0.94. All the nurses felt that the SOP is useful. Valid and feasible SOP for drug administration to children through oral route along with valid and reliable checklist were developed. It is recommended to use this document for drug administration to children.

  10. Medical students' perceptions of bedside teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, David; Cozar, Octavian; Lefroy, Janet

    2017-06-01

    Bedside teaching is recognised as a valuable tool in medical education by both students and faculty members. Bedside teaching is frequently delivered by consultants; however, junior doctors are increasingly engaging in this form of clinical teaching, and their value in this respect is becoming more widely recognised. The aim of this study was to supplement work completed by previous authors who have begun to explore students' satisfaction with bedside teaching, and their perceptions of the relationship with the clinical teachers. Specifically, we aimed to identify how students perceive bedside teaching delivered by junior doctors compared with consultants. We aimed to identify how students perceived bedside teaching delivered by junior doctors compared with consultants METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to all third-year medical students at Keele University via e-mail. Responses were submitted anonymously. Forty-six students responded (37.4%), 73.3 per cent of whom said that they felt more comfortable having bedside teaching delivered by junior doctors than by consultants. Consultants were perceived as more challenging by 60 per cent of respondents. Students appeared to value feedback on their performance, trust the validity of taught information, and to value the overall educational experience equally, regardless of the clinical grade of the teacher. Student preference does not equate to the value that they place on their bedside teaching. Junior doctors are perceived as being more in touch with students and the curriculum, whereas consultants are perceived as having higher expectations and as being both stricter and more knowledgeable. The clinical teacher's approachable manner and enthusiasm for teaching are more important than clinical grade, as is the ability to deliver well-structured constructive feedback. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Time to Add a Fifth Pillar to Bedside Physical Examination: Inspection, Palpation, Percussion, Auscultation, and Insonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Jagat; Chandrashekhar, Y; Braunwald, Eugene

    2018-04-01

    Inspection, palpation, percussion, and auscultation have been the 4 pillars of clinical bedside medicine. Although these basic methods of physical examination have served us well, traditional bedside examination, for a number of reasons including diminishing interest and expertise, performs well less than what is required of a modern diagnostic strategy. Improving the performance of physical examination is vital given that it is crucial to guide diagnostic possibilities and further testing. Current efforts at improving physical examination skills during medical training have not been very successful, and incorporating appropriate technology at the bedside might improve its performance. Selective use of bedside ultrasound (or insonation) can be one such strategy that could be incorporated as the fifth component of the physical examination. Seeing pathology through imaging might improve interest in physical examination among trainees, and permit appropriate downstream testing and possibly superior decision making. Current ultrasound technology makes this feasible, and further miniaturization of ultrasound devices and reduced cost will allow for routine use at the bedside. It is time to have a wider debate and a possible consensus about updates required to enhance current paradigms of physical examination.

  12. Neurology at the bedside

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Waldemar, Gunhild

    This updated and expanded new edition takes neurology trainees by the hand and guides them through the whole patient encounter - from an efficient neurological history and bedside examination through to differential diagnosis, diagnostic procedures and treatment. At each step the expert authors......, as have new chapters including neurogenetics, neurorehabilitation, neurocritical care and heuristic neurological reasoning. In addition, this second edition now includes more than 100 unique case histories. Neurology at the Bedside, Second Edition is written for neurologists in all stages of training....... Medical students, general practitioners and others with an interest in neurology will also find invaluable information here....

  13. Bedside teaching-making it an effective instructional tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ishtiaq Ali

    2014-01-01

    Bedside teaching is defined as any teaching in the presence of patient and is the core teaching strategy during the clinical years of a medical student. Although it is considered the most effective method to teach clinical and communication skills but its quality is deteriorating with the passage of time. The objective of this study is to explore faculty's perceptions about bedside teaching. This study was conducted in clinical disciplines of Ayub Medical College and hospital Abbottabad, Pakistan from January 2012 to July 2012. Pragmatic paradigm was selected to gather both quantitative and qualitative information. Data was collected sequentially to validate findings. Perceptions of all professors of clinical subjects about bed side teaching were recorded on a close-ended structured questionnaire. Then in-depth interviews were taken from 5 professors using an open ended questionnaire. Quantitative data was analysed using, SPSS-16. Qualitative research data was analysed through content analysis. Out of 20 professors of clinical departments 18 agreed to respond to the questionnaire assessing their perceptions about bed side teaching. Non-existence of bedside teaching curriculum, lack of discipline in students and faculty, lack of accountability, poor job satisfaction and low salary were identified as major factors responsible for decline in quality of bedside teaching. Most of them advocated that curriculum development, planning bedside teaching, implementation of discipline and accountability, improved job satisfaction and performance based promotions will improve quality of clinical teaching. Curriculum development for bedside teaching, institutional discipline, application of best planning strategies, performance based appraisal of faculty and good job satisfaction can make bedside teaching an effective instructional tool.

  14. The evaluation of bedside teaching – an instrument for staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    teaching during their undergraduate training, while 100% thought that bedside ... or no attention has been given to the evaluation of bedside teaching. Problem ... of this pilot study was to determine the quality of bedside teaching in one group ...

  15. Stem Cell Transplantation from Bench to Bedside

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Stem Cell Transplantation from Bench to Bedside · Slide 2 · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Principles of an allogeneic stem cell transplant · Principle of an allogeneic stem cell transplant · Principle of an autologous Stem Cell Transplant · Slide 8 · Conditioning · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Stem Cell Transplantation · Slide 13.

  16. Recognizing Bedside Events Using Thermal and Ultrasonic Readings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielsen Asbjørn

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Falls in homes of the elderly, in residential care facilities and in hospitals commonly occur in close proximity to the bed. Most approaches for recognizing falls use cameras, which challenge privacy, or sensor devices attached to the bed or the body to recognize bedside events and bedside falls. We use data collected from a ceiling mounted 80 × 60 thermal array combined with an ultrasonic sensor device. This approach makes it possible to monitor activity while preserving privacy in a non-intrusive manner. We evaluate three different approaches towards recognizing location and posture of an individual. Bedside events are recognized using a 10-second floating image rule/filter-based approach, recognizing bedside falls with 98.62% accuracy. Bed-entry and exit events are recognized with 98.66% and 96.73% accuracy, respectively.

  17. Bedside Teaching: Is it Effective Methods in Clinical Nursing Students Learning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatikhu Yatuni Asmara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical learning is the centre of medical students education. Students not only learn about practical skills but also communication with patient and other health care givers which both competencies are useful for students when they come into working world (Spencer, 2003. There are variations of methods applied in clinical learning process; one of them is bedside teaching. The aim of this study was to observe the bedside teaching process which is held in group of students, teacher, and patient. Another aim was to know responses of students, teacher, and patients to the bedside teaching process. Method: The method which was applied in this study is observation in which bedside teaching process was observed related to the roles and function of each component of bedside teaching: students, teacher, and patient in each phase: preparation, process, and evaluation. Then it was continued by interview to know the responses of students, teacher, and patient related to bedside teaching process. Result: The result showed that both students and teacher felt that bedside teaching is an effective method since it helped students to achieve their competences in clinical setting and develop their communication skill. Furthermore teacher stated that bedside teaching facilitated her to be a good role model for students. As well as students and teacher, patient got advantage from the bedside teaching process that she got information related to her case; however the time to discuss was limited. During the observation, each component of bedside teaching did their roles and function, such as: during the preparation teacher asked inform consent from patient, and patient gave inform consent as well while students prepared the material. Discussions: Suggestion for next research is conducting a deeper study about perception of students, teacher, and patient about bedside teaching process and the strategies to develop it to be better method. Keywords: bedside

  18. Should bedside sonography be used first to diagnose pneumothorax secondary to blunt trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donmez, Halil; Tokmak, Turgut Tursem; Yildirim, Afra; Buyukoglan, Hakan; Ozturk, Mehmet; Yaşar Ayaz, Umit; Mavili, Ertugrul

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND.: Our purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of bedside sonography (US) in the detection of pneumothorax secondary to blunt thoracic trauma. METHODS.: In this prospective study, 240 hemithoraces of 120 consecutive patients with multiple trauma were evaluated with chest radiographs (CXR) and bedside thoracic US for the diagnosis of pneumothorax. CT examinations were performed in 68 patients. Fifty-two patients who did not undergo CT examinations were excluded from the study. US examinations were performed independently at bedside by two radiologists who were not informed about CXR and CT findings. CXRs were interpreted by two radiologists who were unaware of the US and CT results. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of CXR and US were calculated. RESULTS.: One hundred thirty-six hemithoraces were assessed in 68 patients. A total of 35 pneumothoraces were detected in 33 patients. On US, the diagnosis of pneumothorax was correct in 32 hemithoraces. In 98 hemithoraces without pneumothorax, US was normal. With US examination, there were three false-positive and three false-negative results. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and overall accuracy of US were 91.4%, 97%, 91.4%, 97%, and 97%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of CXR were 82.7%, 89.7%, 68.5%, 95%, and 89.5%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS.: Bedside thoracic US is an accurate method that can be used in trauma patients instead of CXR for the detection of pneumothorax. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Nurses' Perceived Skills and Attitudes About Updated Safety Concepts: Impact on Medication Administration Errors and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Gail E; Dietrich, Mary; Norman, Linda; Barnsteiner, Jane; Mion, Lorraine

    Approximately a quarter of medication errors in the hospital occur at the administration phase, which is solely under the purview of the bedside nurse. The purpose of this study was to assess bedside nurses' perceived skills and attitudes about updated safety concepts and examine their impact on medication administration errors and adherence to safe medication administration practices. Findings support the premise that medication administration errors result from an interplay among system-, unit-, and nurse-level factors.

  20. Factors influencing when intensive care unit nurses go to the bedside to investigate patient related alarms: A descriptive qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despins, Laurel A

    2017-12-01

    This study examines what prompts the intensive care unit (ICU) nurse to go to the patient's bedside to investigate an alarm and the influences on the nurse's determination regarding how quickly this needs to occur. A qualitative descriptive design guided data collection and analysis. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted. Thematic analysis guided by the Patient Risk Detection Theoretical Framework was applied to the data. Four specialty intensive care units in an academic medical center. ICU nurses go the patient's bedside in response to an alarm to catch patient deterioration and avert harm. Their determination of the immediacy of patient risk and their desire to prioritize their bedside investigations to true alarms influences how quickly they proceed to the bedside. Ready visual access to physiological data and waveform configurations, experience, teamwork, and false alarms are important determinants in the timing of ICU nurses' bedside alarm investigations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Bedside examination for vestibular screening in occupational medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Zamysłowska-Szmytke

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of bedside examination for screening of vestibular and balance system for occupational medicine purposes. Study group comprised 165 patients referred to Audiology and Phoniatric Clinic due to vestibular and/or balance problems. Caloric canal paresis of 19% was the cut off value to divide patients into 43 caloric-positive vestibular subjects and 122 caloric-negative patients. The latter group comprised 79 subjects revealing abnormalities of videonystagmographic (VNG oculomotor tests (central group and 43 subjects with normal VNG. Material and Methods: Vestibular and balance symptoms were collected. Five tests were included to bedside examination: Romberg and Unterberger tests, Head Impulse Test (HIT, Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA and gaze nystagmus assessment. Results: Vestibular and balance symptoms were reported by 82% of vestibular, 73% of central and 40% of VNG-normal patients. Thirteen out of 18 VNG-normal but symptomatic subjects (73% had abnormal tests in clinical assessment. The sensitivity of bedside test set for vestibular pathology was 88% as compared to caloric test and 68% for central pathology as compared to VNG oculomotor tests. Conclusions: The combination of 5 bedside tests reveal satisfactory sensitivity to detect vestibular abnormalities. Bedside examination abnormalities are highly correlated with vestibular/balance symptoms, regardless the normal results of VNG. Thus, this method should be recommended for occupational medicine purposes.

  2. Comparison of bedside inoculation of culture media with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The yield of bacterial cultures from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) is very low. Bedside inoculation of culture media with CSF may improve yields. Objective: To compare the culture yield of CSF inoculated onto culture medium at the bedside to that of CSF inoculated onto culture ...

  3. Bedside examination for vestibular screening in occupational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamysłowska-Szmytke, Ewa; Szostek-Rogula, Sylwia; Śliwińska-Kowalska, Mariola

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of bedside examination for screening of vestibular and balance system for occupational medicine purposes. Study group comprised 165 patients referred to Audiology and Phoniatric Clinic due to vestibular and/or balance problems. Caloric canal paresis of 19% was the cut off value to divide patients into 43 caloric-positive vestibular subjects and 122 caloric-negative patients. The latter group comprised 79 subjects revealing abnormalities of videonystagmographic (VNG) oculomotor tests (central group) and 43 subjects with normal VNG. Vestibular and balance symptoms were collected. Five tests were included to bedside examination: Romberg and Unterberger tests, Head Impulse Test (HIT), Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA) and gaze nystagmus assessment. Vestibular and balance symptoms were reported by 82% of vestibular, 73% of central and 40% of VNG-normal patients. Thirteen out of 18 VNG-normal but symptomatic subjects (73%) had abnormal tests in clinical assessment. The sensitivity of bedside test set for vestibular pathology was 88% as compared to caloric test and 68% for central pathology as compared to VNG oculomotor tests. The combination of 5 bedside tests reveal satisfactory sensitivity to detect vestibular abnormalities. Bedside examination abnormalities are highly correlated with vestibular/balance symptoms, regardless the normal results of VNG. Thus, this method should be recommended for occupational medicine purposes. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  4. PRESYNAPTIC DOPAMINE MODULATION BY STIMULANT SELF ADMINISTRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    España, Rodrigo A.; Jones, Sara R.

    2013-01-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine system is an essential participant in the initiation and modulation of various forms of goal-directed behavior, including drug reinforcement and addiction processes. Dopamine neurotransmission is increased by acute administration of all drugs of abuse, including the stimulants cocaine and amphetamine. Chronic exposure to these drugs via voluntary self-administration provides a model of stimulant abuse that is useful in evaluating potential behavioral and neurochemical adaptations that occur during addiction. This review describes commonly used methodologies to measure dopamine and baseline parameters of presynaptic dopamine regulation, including exocytotic release and reuptake through the dopamine transporter in the nucleus accumbens core, as well as dramatic adaptations in dopamine neurotransmission and drug sensitivity that occur with acute non-contingent and chronic, contingent self-administration of cocaine and amphetamine. PMID:23277050

  5. Shared decision making: empowering the bedside nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Stephanie M; Boguslawski, Jean M; Eickhoff, Rachel M; Klein, Kristi A; Pepin, Teresa M; Schrandt, Kevin; Wise, Carrie A; Zylstra, Jody A

    2005-12-01

    Shared decision making is a process that has empowered specialty nurses at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, to solve a practice concern. Staff nurses recognized a lack of concise, collated information available that described what nurses need to know when caring for patients receiving chemotherapy. Many aspects of the administration process were knowledge and experience based and not easily retrievable. The Hematology/Oncology/Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Practice Committee identified this as a significant practice issue. Ideas were brainstormed regarding how to make the information available to nursing colleagues. The Chemotherapy Yellow Pages is a resource that was developed to facilitate the rapid retrieval of pertinent information for bedside nurses. The content of this article outlines a'model of shared decision making and the processes used to address and resolve the practice concern.

  6. A Self-Instructional Course in Student Financial Aid Administration. Module 1--Student Financial Aid Administration: Course Study Guide & Introduction to the Field. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Consulting Group, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The first of a 17-module self-instructional course, this module provides neophyte financial aid administrators and other instructional personnel with a systematic introduction to the management of federal financial aid programs authorized by Title IV of the Higher Education Act. It is an introductory course that presents the major responsibilities…

  7. Peer-assisted bedside teaching rounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumouras, Aristithes; Rush, Raphael; Campbell, Anthony; Taylor, David

    2015-06-01

    Although postgraduate trainees play a well-accepted role in medical education, little consideration has traditionally been given to senior undergraduate trainees as teachers. Recently, research has shown senior medical students (SMS) can play an effective teaching role for junior medical students (JMS) in non-clinical medical settings. The purpose of our study was to understand the perceptions of SMSs as teachers in a clinical environment for JMS. All students who participated in our peer-led bedside teaching programme from September 2010 to May 2012 were invited to complete a questionnaire following their teaching session. Fifty-six of 70 JMS (80%) and 15 of 15 SMS (100%) participated. Survey questions addressed learning, bedside experiences, teacher effectiveness and the overall usefulness of these sessions. The data collected were analysed for significance of the perceptions reported. We found students reported positive and statistically significant results in all domains examined. JMS reported that sessions were highly valuable learning, improved confidence and comfort at the bedside, had excellent teaching and were a valuable addition to their clinical skills training. SMS reported getting highly valuable learning through preparation and developing improved comfort in a teaching role. Little consideration has traditionally been given to senior undergraduate trainees as teachers Our findings demonstrate that peer-directed learning in undergraduate medical education can be effectively implemented in the clinical arena. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Cardiac Limited Ultrasound Examination Techniques to Augment the Bedside Cardiac Physical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Bruce J; Shaw, David J; Amundson, Stan A; Phan, James N; Blanchard, Daniel G; DeMaria, Anthony N

    2015-09-01

    The current practice of physical diagnosis is dependent on physician skills and biases, inductive reasoning, and time efficiency. Although the clinical utility of echocardiography is well known, few data exist on how to integrate 2-dimensional screening "quick-look" ultrasound applications into a novel, modernized cardiac physical examination. We discuss the evidence basis behind ultrasound "signs" pertinent to the cardiovascular system and elemental in synthesis of bedside diagnoses and propose the application of a brief cardiac limited ultrasound examination based on these signs. An ultrasound-augmented cardiac physical examination can be taught in traditional medical education and has the potential to improve bedside diagnosis and patient care. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  9. Bedside Ultrasonography: A Useful Tool For Traumatic Pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumtaz, U.; Zahur, Z.; Chaudhry, M. A.; Warraich, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of bedside ultrasound and supine chest radiography for the diagnosis of traumatic pneumothorax. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: PIMS and PAEC General Hospital, Islamabad, from November 2014 to August 2015. Methodology: Patients coming to emergency departments of the study centres, who had sustained chest injuries, were inducted. Their portable bedside ultrasound and supine chest radiographs were taken for assessing pneumothorax and subsequently CT chest was done for confirmation as gold standard. Result: Based on CT findings, sensitivity for ultrasonography and chest radiography was found to be 83.33 percentage and 54.76 percentage, respectively and specificity of 100 percentage for both modalities. Conclusion: Ultrasound can be used as a useful and suitable adjunct to CT in trauma patients as it is easily available, non-invasive, bedside, easily examined with no radiation risk. (author)

  10. Neurology at the bedside

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Waldemar, Gunhild

    , as have new chapters including neurogenetics, neurorehabilitation, neurocritical care and heuristic neurological reasoning. In addition, this second edition now includes more than 100 unique case histories. Neurology at the Bedside, Second Edition is written for neurologists in all stages of training...

  11. Blind bedside insertion of small bowel feeding tubes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duggan, SN

    2009-12-01

    The use of Naso-Jejunal (NJ) feeding is limited by difficulty in feeding tube placement. Patients have traditionally required transfer to Endoscopy or Radiology for insertion of small bowel feeding tubes, with clear resource implications. We hypothesised that the adoption of a simple bedside procedure would be effective and reduce cost. Clinical nutrition and nurse specialist personnel were trained in the 10\\/10\\/10 method of blind bedside NJ insertion.

  12. Bedside teaching with unwell patients: Can it ever be appropriate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Nithish

    2017-03-01

    Bedside teaching has seen a decline in its popularity since the heady days of Boerhaave and Osler; a number of hurdles have been noted in the literature including time constraints on senior clinicians. While organizing a bedside teaching course for final-year medical students, it was apparent that the availability of suitable patients was also a limiting factor. Often, we would be turned away from patients with physical signs because they were deemed to be too unwell for an examination. However, the benefits to medical students of examining unwell patients with physical signs cannot be underestimated. Identifying the unwell patient, and the associated physical signs relevant to the underlying diagnosis, should be a priority; although simulation is increasingly being used in teaching, it cannot fully replicate the learning experience gained in bedside teaching. As long as the patient is not under duress, bedside teaching with unwell patients should be encouraged.

  13. Migraine patients consistently show abnormal vestibular bedside tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranhão, Eliana Teixeira; Maranhão-Filho, Péricles; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Vincent, Maurice Borges

    2016-01-01

    Migraine and vertigo are common disorders, with lifetime prevalences of 16% and 7% respectively, and co-morbidity around 3.2%. Vestibular syndromes and dizziness occur more frequently in migraine patients. We investigated bedside clinical signs indicative of vestibular dysfunction in migraineurs. To test the hypothesis that vestibulo-ocular reflex, vestibulo-spinal reflex and fall risk (FR) responses as measured by 14 bedside tests are abnormal in migraineurs without vertigo, as compared with controls. Cross-sectional study including sixty individuals - thirty migraineurs, 25 women, 19-60 y-o; and 30 gender/age healthy paired controls. Migraineurs showed a tendency to perform worse in almost all tests, albeit only the Romberg tandem test was statistically different from controls. A combination of four abnormal tests better discriminated the two groups (93.3% specificity). Migraine patients consistently showed abnormal vestibular bedside tests when compared with controls.

  14. A Self-Instructional Course in Student Financial Aid Administration. Module 13: Verification. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Consulting Group, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Module 13 of the 17-module self-instructional course on student financial aid administration (designed for novice financial aid administrators and other institutional personnel) focuses on the verification procedure for checking the accuracy of applicant data used in making financial aid awards. The full course provides an introduction to the…

  15. Developing an Implementation Plan. The Administration of Career Education: Module 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drier, Harry N., Jr., Ed.; Martinez, Nancy S., Ed.

    The module is one of a series of eight developed to provide inservice education training for administrators of career education programs. An examination of basic scientific planning approaches and procedures is presented to provide the administrator with a basic tool to implement career education. Various scientific management techniques and their…

  16. Between Bedside and Budget

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L.T. Blank; E. Eggink

    1998-01-01

    Original title: Tussen bed en budget. The report Between bedside and budget (Tussen bed en budget) describes an extensive empirical study of the efficiency of general and university hospitals in the Netherlands. A policy summary recaps the main findings of the study. Those findings

  17. Migraine patients consistently show abnormal vestibular bedside tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Teixeira Maranhão

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine and vertigo are common disorders, with lifetime prevalences of 16% and 7% respectively, and co-morbidity around 3.2%. Vestibular syndromes and dizziness occur more frequently in migraine patients. We investigated bedside clinical signs indicative of vestibular dysfunction in migraineurs.Objective To test the hypothesis that vestibulo-ocular reflex, vestibulo-spinal reflex and fall risk (FR responses as measured by 14 bedside tests are abnormal in migraineurs without vertigo, as compared with controls.Method Cross-sectional study including sixty individuals – thirty migraineurs, 25 women, 19-60 y-o; and 30 gender/age healthy paired controls.Results Migraineurs showed a tendency to perform worse in almost all tests, albeit only the Romberg tandem test was statistically different from controls. A combination of four abnormal tests better discriminated the two groups (93.3% specificity.Conclusion Migraine patients consistently showed abnormal vestibular bedside tests when compared with controls.

  18. Bedside Ultrasound in the Emergency Department to Detect Hydronephrosis for the Evaluation of Suspected Ureteric Colic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, R; Shakya, R M; Khan A, A

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal colic is a common emergency department presentation. Hydronephrosis is indirect sign of urinary obstruction which may be due to obstructing ureteric calculus and can be detected easily by bedside ultrasound with minimal training. Objective To compare the accuracy of detection of hydronephrosis performed by the emergency physician with that of radiologist's in suspected renal colic cases. Method This was a prospective observational study performed over a period of 6 months. Patients >8 years with provisional diagnosis of renal colic with both the bedside ultrasound and the formal ultrasound performed were included. Presence of hydronephrosis in both ultrasounds and size and location of ureteric stone if present in formal ultrasound was recorded. The accuracy of the emergency physician detection of hydronephrosis was determined using the scan reported by the radiologists as the "gold standard" as computed tomography was unavailable. Statistical analysis was executed using SPSS 17.0. Result Among the 111 included patients, 56.7% had ureteric stone detected in formal ultrasound. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of bedside ultrasound performed by emergency physician for detection of hydronephrosis with that of formal ultrasound performed by radiologist was 90.8%., 78.3%, 85.5% and 85.7% respectively. Bedside ultrasound and formal ultrasound both detected hydronephrosis more often in patients with larger stones and the difference was statistically significant (p=.000). Conclusion Bedside ultrasound can be potentially used as an important tool in detecting clinically significant hydronephrosis in emergency to evaluate suspected ureteric colic. Focused training in ultrasound could greatly improve the emergency management of these patients.

  19. Retrobulbar Hematoma from Warfarin Toxicity and the Limitations of Bedside Ocular Sonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    worldwide. Peer Reviewed Title: Retrobulbar Hematoma from Warfarin Toxicity and the Limitations of Bedside Ocular Sonography Journal Issue: Western...Preferred Citation: Thompson D, Stanescu C, Pryor P, Laselle B. Retrobulbar Hematoma from Warfarin Toxicity and the Limitations of Bedside Ocular...nontrauamtic retrobulbar hematoma associated with warfarin toxicity. The application and limitations of focused bedside ocular sonography for this

  20. Teaching at the Bedside. Maximal Impact in Minimal Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, William G; Kritek, Patricia A; Clay, Alison S; Luks, Andrew M; Thomson, Carey C

    2016-04-01

    Academic physicians encounter many demands on their time including patient care, quality and performance requirements, research, and education. In an era when patient volume is prioritized and competition for research funding is intense, there is a risk that medical education will become marginalized. Bedside teaching, a responsibility of academic physicians regardless of professional track, is challenged in particular out of concern that it generates inefficiency, and distractions from direct patient care, and can distort physician-patient relationships. At the same time, the bedside is a powerful location for teaching as learners more easily engage with educational content when they can directly see its practical relevance for patient care. Also, bedside teaching enables patients and family members to engage directly in the educational process. Successful bedside teaching can be aided by consideration of four factors: climate, attention, reasoning, and evaluation. Creating a safe environment for learning and patient care is essential. We recommend that educators set expectations about use of medical jargon and engagement of the patient and family before they enter the patient room with trainees. Keep learners focused by asking relevant questions of all members of the team and by maintaining a collective leadership style. Assess and model clinical reasoning through a hypothesis-driven approach that explores the rationale for clinical decisions. Focused, specific, real-time feedback is essential for the learner to modify behaviors for future patient encounters. Together, these strategies may alleviate challenges associated with bedside teaching and ensure it remains a part of physician practice in academic medicine.

  1. From bench to bedside: use of human adipose-derived stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feisst V

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Vaughan Feisst,1 Sarah Meidinger,1 Michelle B Locke2 1Dunbar Laboratory, School of Biological Sciences, 2Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand Abstract: Since the discovery of adipose-derived stem cells (ASC in human adipose tissue nearly 15 years ago, significant advances have been made in progressing this promising cell therapy tool from the laboratory bench to bedside usage. Standardization of nomenclature around the different cell types used is finally being adopted, which facilitates comparison of results between research groups. In vitro studies have assessed the ability of ASC to undergo mesenchymal differentiation as well as differentiation along alternate lineages (transdifferentiation. Recently, focus has shifted to the immune modulatory and paracrine effects of transplanted ASC, with growing interest in the ASC secretome as a source of clinical effect. Bedside use of ASC is advancing alongside basic research. An increasing number of safety-focused Phase I and Phase IIb trials have been published without identifying any significant risks or adverse events in the short term. Phase III trials to assess efficacy are currently underway. In many countries, regulatory frameworks are being developed to monitor their use and assure their safety. As many trials rely on ASC injected at a distant site from the area of clinical need, strategies to improve the homing and efficacy of transplanted cells are also being explored. This review highlights each of these aspects of the bench-to-bedside use of ASC and summarizes their clinical utility across a variety of medical specialties. Keywords: standardization, bystander effect, stromal cells, mesenchymal stem cells, stromal vascular fraction

  2. A Self-Instructional Course in Student Financial Aid Administration. Module 8: Need Analysis. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Consulting Group, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The eighth module in a 17-module self-instructional program on student financial aid administration (designed for novice student financial aid administrators and other personnel) focuses on need analysis. It provides an introduction to the management of federal financial aid programs authorized by the Higher Education Act Title IV. After…

  3. Learning mechanisms to limit medication administration errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drach-Zahavy, Anat; Pud, Dorit

    2010-04-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to identify and test the effectiveness of learning mechanisms applied by the nursing staff of hospital wards as a means of limiting medication administration errors. Since the influential report ;To Err Is Human', research has emphasized the role of team learning in reducing medication administration errors. Nevertheless, little is known about the mechanisms underlying team learning. Thirty-two hospital wards were randomly recruited. Data were collected during 2006 in Israel by a multi-method (observations, interviews and administrative data), multi-source (head nurses, bedside nurses) approach. Medication administration error was defined as any deviation from procedures, policies and/or best practices for medication administration, and was identified using semi-structured observations of nurses administering medication. Organizational learning was measured using semi-structured interviews with head nurses, and the previous year's reported medication administration errors were assessed using administrative data. The interview data revealed four learning mechanism patterns employed in an attempt to learn from medication administration errors: integrated, non-integrated, supervisory and patchy learning. Regression analysis results demonstrated that whereas the integrated pattern of learning mechanisms was associated with decreased errors, the non-integrated pattern was associated with increased errors. Supervisory and patchy learning mechanisms were not associated with errors. Superior learning mechanisms are those that represent the whole cycle of team learning, are enacted by nurses who administer medications to patients, and emphasize a system approach to data analysis instead of analysis of individual cases.

  4. Economic analysis of bedside ultrasonography (US) implementation in an Internal Medicine department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Americo; Francesconi, Andrea; Giannuzzi, Rosangela; Berardi, Silvia; Sbraccia, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    The economic crisis, the growing healthcare demand, and Defensive Medicine wastefulness, strongly recommend the restructuring of the entire medical network. New health technology, such as bedside ultrasonography, might successfully integrate the clinical approach optimizing the use of limited resources, especially in a person-oriented vision of medicine. Bedside ultrasonography is a safe and reliable technique, with worldwide expanding employment in various clinical settings, being considered as "the stethoscope of the 21st century". However, at present, bedside ultrasonography lacks economic analysis. We performed a Cost-Benefit Analysis "ex ante", with a break-even point computing, of bedside ultrasonography implementation in an Internal Medicine department in the mid-term. Number and kind estimation of bedside ultrasonographic studies were obtained by a retrospective study, whose data results were applied to the next 3-year period (foresight study). All 1980 foreseen bedside examinations, with prevailing multiorgan ultrasonographic studies, were considered to calculate direct and indirect costs, while specific and generic revenues were considered only after the first semester. Physician professional training, equipment purchase and working time represented the main fixed and variable cost items. DRG increase/appropriateness, hospitalization stay shortening and reduction of traditional ultrasonography examination requests mainly impacted on calculated revenues. The break-even point, i.e. the volume of activity at which revenues exactly equal total incurred costs, was calculated to be 734 US examinations, corresponding to € 81,998 and the time considered necessary to reach it resulting 406 days. Our economic analysis clearly shows that bedside ultrasonography implementation in clinical daily management of an Internal Medicine department can produce consistent savings, or economic profit according to managerial choices (i.e., considering public or private targets

  5. Measurement of irradiation doses secondary to bedside radiographs in a medical intensive care unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boles, J M; Boussert, F; Manens, J P; Le Cam, B; Bellet, M; Garre, M

    1987-01-01

    The authors prospectively studied the radiation doses to radio-sensitive organs secondary to bedside radiographs in intensive care patients and in a control phantom. Dosimeters were taped on different organs during each bedside X-ray. The mean radiation doses, expressed in 10(-5) Gy (m-rad), for an ''average patient'' who was hospitalized 9 days and had 6 chest X-rays were respectively: 292 to the sternal bone marrow; 239 to the thyroid gland; 3 to the testes; 1 to the ovaries; 605 to the eye for 2 maxillary sinus X-rays. No diffused irradiation was measured during a 2-month period in the intensive care unit nor on dosimeters worn by four nurses.

  6. Performance of Bedside Lung Ultrasound by a Pediatric Resident

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhan, Chen; Grundtvig, Natalia; Klug, Bent Helmuth

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Recent studies suggest that lung ultrasound is a good, radiation-free alternative to chest radiography in children with pneumonia. We investigated how bedside lung ultrasound performed by a pediatric resident compared with chest radiography in children with suspected pneumonia. METHODS......: This was a prospective study comparing bedside lung ultrasound to chest radiography as the reference standard. Children aged 0 to 15 years with suspected pneumonia at a pediatric emergency department were included and underwent chest radiography and lung ultrasound. A pediatric resident with minimal practical ultrasound...

  7. A Self-Instructional Course in Student Financial Aid Administration. Module 6: General Student Eligibility. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Consulting Group, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Module 6 of a 17-module self-instructional course on student financial aid administration (for novice aid administrators and other personnel) presents a systematic introduction to the management of federal financial aid programs authorized by Title IV of the Higher Education Act with an emphasis on general student eligibility. Identifying the…

  8. The clinical application of computed radiography in bedside photography of newborn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Sen; Guo Tianchang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the computed radiography in bedside photography of newborn, especially in chest radiography. Methods: Bedside CR images were selected in 100 cases randomly. The exposure parameters were optimized using the large latitude of CR. The details of images were post-processed and adjusted using spatial tuning technique. Then CR photography was compared with conventional X-ray photography. Results: The images acquired with CR had good contrast, high definition, and little distortion, in which the condemned image rate was 1%. While in conventional X-ray photography, the unsuccessful imaging rate is 9%. Conclusion: Bedside computed radiography of new-born, especially the chest imaging, is very helpful to improve image quality and positive rate of the diagnosis. (authors)

  9. A Self-Instructional Course in Student Financial Aid Administration. Module 3: The Legislative and Regulatory Processes. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Consulting Group, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The third of a 17-module self-instructional course on student financial aid administration, this module offers a systematic introduction to the management of federal financial aid programs authorized by Title IV of the Higher Education Act to novice financial aid administrators and other institutional personnel. It teaches the administrator to…

  10. Comparative study of bedside and laboratory measurements of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenzischek, D A; Tanseco, F V

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of variations in technique on measurements of hemoglobin level done at the bedside and to compare these results with laboratory measurements of hemoglobin. In accordance with hospital policy, procedure, and protocol, various techniques were used to obtain samples of capillary and venous blood and of blood from arterial and central venous catheters. Levels of hemoglobin were measured at the bedside and in the laboratory, and the results were compared. The Johns Hopkins Hospital adult postanesthesia care unit. A total of 187 blood samples were obtained from 62 adults who had undergone general surgery. Group I comprised 20 subjects with capillary and venous blood samples. Group II comprised 21 subjects with arterial blood samples. Group III comprised 21 subjects with central venous blood samples. The results showed that the amount of blood to be discarded before obtaining samples of arterial and central venous blood need not be any larger than double the dead space of the catheter, and that shaking the blood sample for 10 seconds was sufficient to mix the sample before measurement of hemoglobin levels. Results of bedside and laboratory measurements of hemoglobin level were comparable. Bedside measurement of hemoglobin increases efficiency in patient care, decreases risk of blood-transmitted infection for staff, and decreases cost to the patient. However, the persons who perform the assay must be responsible in adhering to the standard of practice to minimize errors in the measurements.

  11. Risks of Using Bedside Tests to Verify Nasogastric Tube Position in Adult Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody Ni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nasogastric (NG tubes are commonly used for enteral feeding. Complications of feeding tube misplacement include malnutrition, pulmonary aspiration, and even death. We built a Bayesian network (BN to analyse the risks associated with available bedside tests to verify tube position. Evidence on test validity (sensitivity and specificity was retrieved from a systematic review. Likelihood ratios were used to select the best tests for detecting tubes misplaced in the lung or oesophagus. Five bedside tests were analysed including magnetic guidance, aspirate pH, auscultation, aspirate appearance, and capnography/colourimetry. Among these, auscultation and appearance are non-diagnostic towards lung or oesophagus placements. Capnography/ colourimetry can confirm but cannot rule out lung placement. Magnetic guidance can rule out both lung and oesophageal placement. However, as a relatively new technology, further validation studies are needed. The pH test with a cut-off at 5.5 or lower can rule out lung intubation. Lowering the cut-off to 4 not only minimises oesophageal intubation but also provides extra safety as the sensitivity of pH measurement is reduced by feeding, antacid medication, or the use of less accurate pH paper. BN is an effective tool for representing and analysing multi-layered uncertainties in test validity and reliability for the verification of NG tube position. Aspirate pH with a cut-off of 4 is the safest bedside method to minimise lung and oesophageal misplacement.

  12. A Self-Instructional Course in Student Financial Aid Administration. Module 16: Forms and Publications. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Consulting Group, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Module 16 (in a 17-module self-instructional course on student financial aid administration for novice financial aid administrators and other institutional personnel) discusses forms and publications that should be developed and used by the financial aid office. The full course is an introduction to the management of federal financial aid programs…

  13. Effectiveness of two distinct web-based education tools for bedside nurses on medication administration practice for venous thromboembolism prevention: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Brandyn D; Shaffer, Dauryne L; Hobson, Deborah B; Yenokyan, Gayane; Wang, Jiangxia; Sugar, Elizabeth A; Canner, Joseph K; Bongiovanni, David; Kraus, Peggy S; Popoola, Victor O; Shihab, Hasan M; Farrow, Norma E; Aboagye, Jonathan K; Pronovost, Peter J; Streiff, Michael B; Haut, Elliott R

    2017-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common cause of preventable harm in hospitalized patients. While numerous successful interventions have been implemented to improve prescription of VTE prophylaxis, a substantial proportion of doses of prescribed preventive medications are not administered to hospitalized patients. The purpose of this trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of nurse education on medication administration practice. This was a double-blinded, cluster randomized trial in 21 medical or surgical floors of 933 nurses at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, an academic medical center, from April 1, 2014 -March 31, 2015. Nurses were cluster-randomized by hospital floor to receive either a linear static education (Static) module with voiceover or an interactive learner-centric dynamic scenario-based education (Dynamic) module. The primary and secondary outcomes were non-administration of prescribed VTE prophylaxis medication and nurse-reported satisfaction with education modules, respectively. Overall, non-administration improved significantly following education (12.4% vs. 11.1%, conditional OR: 0.87, 95% CI: 0.80-0.95, p = 0.002) achieving our primary objective. The reduction in non-administration was greater for those randomized to the Dynamic arm (10.8% vs. 9.2%, conditional OR: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.72-0.95) versus the Static arm (14.5% vs. 13.5%, conditional OR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.81-1.03), although the difference between arms was not statistically significant (p = 0.26). Satisfaction scores were significantly higher (p<0.05) for all survey items for nurses in the Dynamic arm. Education for nurses significantly improves medication administration practice. Dynamic learner-centered education is more effective at engaging nurses. These findings suggest that education should be tailored to the learner. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02301793.

  14. Cellular and Molecular Anesthesia: from Bench to Bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Dabbagh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellular and Molecular Anesthesia: from Bench to BedsideIn the current practice of anesthesia, each day, anesthesiologists deal with a great work: they use the cellular mechanisms of drug molecules to induce their desired effects for induction and maintenance of anesthesia to achieve appropriate tolerance of surgery and its pain, modulation of stress response, sedation needed for performing a variety of procedures, emergency anesthesia care, acute and chronic pain management or other everyday jobs of anesthesiologists during perioperative period.As a matter of fact, molecular anesthesia has been cited for more than 6 decades though in avery limited scale. In 1956, the molecular mechanisms of morphine and pethidine are described (1. Pauling in 1961 published an article in Science describing a molecular theorey for general anesthesia (2.In its report “the World in 2025”, Thomson Reuters has predicted clinical medicine would be the most active research front; while molecular biology has the 9th rank (3. But are we still practicing in clinic the same as today?In fact, the future trend of anesthesia is highly dependent on finding the novel cellular and molecular mechanisms and the possible interactions of the newly discovered molecules and inreraction mechanisms with organ systems. Today, we emphasize on the role of pharmacologists, physiologists, immunologists, anatomists, embryologists, geneticians, cellular medicine specialists, physicists and other basic science specialists; some very interesting examples are published in this volume of the Journal (4-7.However, changes that have well started now would “revolutionize” our daily practice during the next decade in such a way that it will change the basis of medicine: presumably we will have a new model medicine known as “personalized medicine” or “precision medicine”. In this approach, the content of each patient’s genes accompanied with his/her cellular and molecular analysis is

  15. A Self-Instructional Course in Student Financial Aid Administration. Module 7: Calculating Cost of Attendance. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Consulting Group, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The seventh module in a 17-module self-instructional course on student financial aid administration (designed for novice student financial aid administrators and other personnel) teaches how to calculate the cost of attendance. It provides a systematic introduction to the management of federal financial aid programs authorized by the Higher…

  16. Optimization of time distribution for studying the course modules on advanced training of health care administrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorovskaya A.l.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The research objective is rational (optimal time management in studying the course modules on Advanced Training of Health Care Administrators. Materials and methods. We conducted expert survey of 73 healthcare administrators from medical organizations of Saratov region. Branch-and-bound method was used for rescheduling the educational program. Results. Both direct and inverse problems have been solved. The direct one refers to time distribution for each module of the advanced Training of Healthcare Administrators course so that the total score is maximum and each module is marked not lower than "satisfactory". The inverse one resulted in achieving minimal time characteristics for varieties of average score. Conclusion. The offered approach allows to solve problems of managing time given for education.

  17. The status of bedside teaching in the United Kingdom: the student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones P

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Jones, Bhavan Prasad Rai Department of Surgery, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, UK Purpose: Bedside teaching holds a strong tradition as a key-learning platform for clinical examination in the basic medical clerkship. There is a growing body of literature expressing concern for its witnessed decline in medical school curricula. However, the views of students toward this patient-centered cornerstone in surgical education remain under-reported. The purpose of this study was to gain a nationwide perspective on bedside teaching according to medical students in the United Kingdom. Materials and methods: An adapted Delphi method was employed to formulate the question series as part of a multi-step process including a pilot study, which was used to construct this survey. The target population was medical undergraduates in the United Kingdom and participants were recruited via social media. Outcomes assessed included exposure to bedside teaching, perceived benefits of clinical simulation, and junior doctors as clinical teachers. Barriers to clinical examination were also evaluated. Results: Overall, 368 completed surveys were received (completion rate 98.9%. Final year students were significantly more likely to report receiving insufficient bedside teaching (P<0.01. Seventy-eight percent of the study group agreed that clinical simulation is a good learning tool for clinical examination. Seventy percent of students felt junior doctors were as able as senior doctors to teach. Lack of confidence was identified as the commonest barrier to overcome when examining patients and two-thirds of students felt they burdened patients during bedside teaching. Conclusion: This prospective study confirms the exposure deficit, which medical students experience in bedside teaching. The junior doctor represents a dynamic clinical teacher in the face of working time directives. Peer learning is a novel solution to such pressures. Work is needed to re-establish the

  18. Retained Products of Conception: An Atypical Presentation Diagnosed Immediately with Bedside Emergency Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Adkins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Retained products of conception is an important diagnosis to consider in patients presenting with postpartum complaints. Bedside ultrasound is a rapid, accurate, noninvasive modality to evaluate these patients. Objective. To report an atypical case of retained products of conception diagnosed with bedside ultrasound in the emergency department. Case Report. A 27-year-old female who was 1-month postpartum presented with vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain, and no fever. At the time of initial H&P, bedside ultrasound revealed echogenic material within the endometrial cavity with blood flow seen by color Doppler consistent with retained products of conception. The bedside ultrasound rapidly narrowed the differential and allowed a definitive diagnosis immediately. Ob/Gyn was consulted and dilation and curettage was performed in the operating room. Conclusions. Retained products of conception is an important diagnosis for the emergency physician to consider in at-risk patients. The sonographic findings are easily obtained and interpreted by emergency physicians. Earlier diagnosis of this disease process should lead to more focused patient evaluations and management.

  19. Bedside screening to detect oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with neurological disorders: an updated systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertscher, Berit; Speyer, Renée; Palmieri, Maria; Plant, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a highly prevalent comorbidity in neurological patients and presents a serious health threat, which may le to outcomes of aspiration pneumonia ranging from hospitalization to death. Therefore, an early identification of risk followed by an accurate diagnosis of oropharyngeal dysphagia is fundamental. This systematic review provides an update of currently available bedside screenings to identify oropharyngeal dysphagia in neurological patients. An electronic search was carried out in the databases PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PsychInfo (formerly PsychLit), and all hits from 2008 up to December 2012 were included in the review. Only studies with sufficient methodological quality were considered, after which the psychometric characteristics of the screening tools were determined. Two relevant bedside screenings were identified, with a minimum sensitivity and specificity of ≥70 and ≥60 %, respectively.

  20. Use of bedside ultrasound to assess degree of dehydration in children with gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Hsiao, Allen; Langhan, Melissa; Riera, Antonio; Santucci, Karen A

    2010-10-01

    Prospectively identifying children with significant dehydration from gastroenteritis is difficult in acute care settings. Previous work by our group has shown that bedside ultrasound (US) measurement of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and the aorta (Ao) diameter ratio is correlated with intravascular volume. This study was designed to validate the use of this method in the prospective identification of children with dehydration by investigating whether the IVC/Ao ratio correlated with dehydration in children with acute gastroenteritis. Another objective was to investigate the interrater reliability of the IVC/Ao measurements. A prospective observational study was carried out in a pediatric emergency department (PED) between November 2007 and June 2009. Children with acute gastroenteritis were enrolled as subjects. A pair of investigators obtained transverse images of the IVC and Ao using bedside US. The ratio of IVC and Ao diameters (IVC/Ao) was calculated. Subjects were asked to return after resolution of symptoms. The difference between the convalescent weight and ill weight was used to calculate the degree of dehydration. Greater than or equal to 5% difference was judged to be significant. Linear regression was performed with dehydration as the dependent variable and the IVC/Ao as the independent variable. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated to assess the degree of agreement between observers. A total of 112 subjects were enrolled. Seventy-one subjects (63%) completed follow-up. Twenty-eight subjects (39%) had significant dehydration. The linear regression model resulted in an R² value of 0.21 (p dehydration. Forty-eight paired measurements of IVC/Ao ratios were made. The Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.76.   In this pilot study the ratio of IVC to Ao diameters, as measured by bedside US, was a marginally accurate measurement of acute weight loss in children with dehydration from gastroenteritis. The technique demonstrated good interrater

  1. Bedside Ultrasonography versus Brain Natriuretic Peptide in Detecting Cardiogenic Causes of Acute Dyspnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keihan Golshani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute dyspnea is a common cause of hospitalization in emergency departments (ED.Distinguishing the cardiac causes of acute dyspnea from pulmonary ones is a major challenge for responsible physicians in EDs. This study compares the characteristics of bedside ultrasonography with serum level of blood natriuretic peptide (BNP in this regard. Methods: This diagnostic accuracy study compares bedside ultrasonography with serum BNP levels in differentiating cardiogenic causes of acute respiratory distress. Echocardiography was considered as the reference test. A checklist including demographic data (age and sex, vital signs, medical history, underlying diseases, serum level of BNP, as well as findings of chest radiography, chest ultrasonography, and echocardiography was filled for all patients with acute onset of dyspnea. Screening characteristics of the two studied methods were calculated and compared using SPSS software, version 20. Results: 48 patients with acute respiratory distress were evaluated (50% female. The mean age of participants was 66.94 ± 16.33 (28-94 years. Based on the results of echocardiography and final diagnosis, the cause of dyspnea was cardiogenic in 20 (41.6% cases. Bedside ultrasonography revealed the cardiogenic cause of acute dyspnea in 18 cases (0 false positive and BNP in 44 cases (24 false positives. The area under the ROC curve for bedside ultrasonography and BNP for differentiating the cardiogenic cause of dyspnea were 86.4 (95% CI: 74.6-98.3 and 66.3 (95% CI: 49.8-89.2, respectively (p = 0.0021. Conclusion: It seems that bedside ultrasonography could be considered as a helpful and accurate method in differentiating cardiogenic causes of acute dyspnea in emergency settings. Nevertheless, more study is needed to make a runaway algorithm to evaluate patients with respiratory distress using bedside ultrasonography, which leads to rapid therapeutic decisions in a short time.

  2. A Self-Instructional Course in Student Financial Aid Administration. Module 5: Title IV Institutional and Program Eligibility. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Consulting Group, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The fifth module in a 17-module self-instructional course on student financial aid administration teaches novice student financial aid administrators and other personnel about Title IV institutional and program eligibility. This introduction to management of federal financial aid programs authorized by the Higher Education Act Title IV, discusses…

  3. Bedside ultrasound education in Canadian medical schools: A national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Steinmetz

    2016-04-01

    Results:  Approximately half of the 13 responding medical schools had integrated bedside ultrasound teaching into their undergraduate curriculum. The most common trends in undergraduate ultrasound teaching related to duration (1-5 hours/year in 50% of schools, format (practical and theoretical in 67% of schools, and logistics (1:4 instructor to student ratio in 67% of schools. The majority of responding vice-deans indicated that bedside ultrasound education should be integrated into the medical school curriculum (77%, and cited a lack of ultrasound machines and infrastructure as barriers to integration. Conclusions: This study documents the current characteristics of undergraduate ultrasound education in Canada.

  4. Has Bedside Teaching Had Its Day?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Zeshan; Maxwell, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Though a diverse array of teaching methods is now available, bedside teaching is arguably the most favoured. Students like it because it is patient-centred, and it includes a high proportion of relevant skills. It is on the decline, coinciding with declining clinical skills of junior doctors. Several factors might account for this: busier…

  5. The study on quality control of bedside CR examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xufeng; Luo Xiaomei; Xu Qiaolan; Wu Tengfang; Wen Xingwei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the quality controll of bedside CR examination and improves the imaging quality. Methods: X-ray examination with CR system were performed on 3,300 patients. All CR cassettes were encoded. The imaging plate and cassettes were cleaned regularly. Results: With and without quality control, the percentage of first-rate film was 58.2% and 51%, the second-rate film was 40% and 45.5%, the third-rate film was 1.3% and 2%, respectively. Corxespondingly, the ratio of re-examination decreased from 1.5% to 0.5% after quality control, and imaging quality was stable. Conclusion: The quality control of bedside CR examination can improve the image quality as well as lighten the labor of radiographers. (authors)

  6. ICU Bedside Nurses' Involvement in Palliative Care Communication: A Multicenter Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Wendy G; Puntillo, Kathleen; Boyle, Deborah; Barbour, Susan; Turner, Kathleen; Cimino, Jenica; Moore, Eric; Noort, Janice; MacMillan, John; Pearson, Diana; Grywalski, Michelle; Liao, Solomon; Ferrell, Bruce; Meyer, Jeannette; O'Neil-Page, Edith; Cain, Julia; Herman, Heather; Mitchell, William; Pantilat, Steven

    2016-03-01

    Successful and sustained integration of palliative care into the intensive care unit (ICU) requires the active engagement of bedside nurses. To describe the perspectives of ICU bedside nurses on their involvement in palliative care communication. A survey was designed, based on prior work, to assess nurses' perspectives on palliative care communication, including the importance and frequency of their involvement, confidence, and barriers. The 46-item survey was distributed via e-mail in 2013 to bedside nurses working in ICUs across the five academic medical centers of the University of California, U.S. The survey was sent to 1791 nurses; 598 (33%) responded. Most participants (88%) reported that their engagement in discussions of prognosis, goals of care, and palliative care was very important to the quality of patient care. A minority reported often discussing palliative care consultations with physicians (31%) or families (33%); 45% reported rarely or never participating in family meeting discussions. Participating nurses most frequently cited the following barriers to their involvement in palliative care communication: need for more training (66%), physicians not asking their perspective (60%), and the emotional toll of discussions (43%). ICU bedside nurses see their involvement in discussions of prognosis, goals of care, and palliative care as a key element of overall quality of patient care. Based on the barriers participants identified regarding their engagement, interventions are needed to ensure that nurses have the education, opportunities, and support to actively participate in these discussions. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Leukocyte esterase reagent strip as a bedside tool to detect peritonitis in patients undergoing acute peritoneal dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Rathore

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Peritonitis is a common and life-threatening complication of acute peritoneal dialysis (PD. Diagnosis requires the presence of clinical signs of peritonitis which are nonspecific and laboratory investigations [total leukocyte count (TLC, Gram-stain, and culture of PD effluent fluid] which are time-consuming and not available at the bedside. In this study, we evaluated the use of leukocyte esterase reagent strip (LERS as a bedside test to diagnose peritonitis in patients undergoing acute PD. Patients who underwent acute PD were monitored for signs and symptoms of peritonitis. PD effluent fluid analysis included TLC, absolute neutrophil count, Gram-stain, and culture for the diagnosis of peritonitis. LERS (Multistix 10SG was simultaneously dipped in PD effluent fluid and read at two minutes. Reading of + was considered as indicative of peritonitis. Twenty-one out of 166 (12.6% patients undergoing acute PD developed peritonitis. LERS detected peritonitis in 20 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value (NPV of LERS were 95.2%, 95.2%, 74.1%, and 99.3%, respectively. LERS has very high sensitivity and NPV and can be used as a rapid bedside tool to exclude peritonitis in patients undergoing acute PD.

  8. Executive cognitive impairment detected by simple bedside testing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims. Cognitive impairment in people with type 2 diabetes is a barrier to successful disease management. We sought to determine whether impaired executive function as detected by a battery of simple bedside cognitive tests of executive function was associated with inadequate glycaemic control. Methods. People with ...

  9. A Self-Instructional Course in Student Financial Aid Administration. Module 2--Federal Student Financial Aid: History & Current Sources. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Consulting Group, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The second of 17 modules in a self-instructional course on student financial aid administration, this module offers novice financial aid administrators and other institutional personnel a systematic introduction to the management of federal financial aid programs authorized by the Higher Education Act Title IV. It traces the history of federal…

  10. An unanticipated diagnosis with bedside ultrasonography in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although abdominal pain is a common presentation in emergency departments, rectus sheath hematoma (RSH) is among the rarest diagnosis. Here we present 2 cases of RSH likely caused by coughing due to upper respiratory tract infection. The two described cases were diagnosed by bedside ultrasonography and ...

  11. [Rationalization and rationing at the bedside. A normative and empirical status quo analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strech, D

    2014-02-01

    The topic of bedside rationing is increasingly discussed in Germany. Further need for clarification exists for the question how bedside rationing (e.g., in the area of overcare) can be justified despite coexistent inefficiencies. This paper outlines and analyses the relationship of waste avoidance and rationing from an ethical perspective. Empirical findings regarding the status quo of bedside rationing and rationalization are presented. These normative and empirical explorations will then be further specified regarding opportunities for future physician-driven activities to tackle overuse. The self-government partners in Germany should communicate more explicitly within their communities and to the public how and with which benchmarks they aim to reduce inefficient health care (overuse) in an appropriate manner. Physician-driven activities such as the "Choosing Wisely®" initiative in the USA could provide a first step to raise the awareness for overuse among physicians as well as in the public.

  12. Bedside diagnosis of imported malaria using the Binax Now malaria antigen detection test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiese, Lothar; Bruun, Brita; Baek, Leif

    2006-01-01

    Malaria may be misdiagnosed in non-endemic countries when the necessary experience for rapid expert microscopy is lacking. Rapid diagnostic tests may improve the diagnosis and may play a role as a bedside diagnostic tool. In a multicentre study we recruited patients suspected of malaria over...... a period of 14 months. The Binax Now Malaria rapid test was used at the bedside and in the clinical microbiology laboratory. The training of clinical staff was monitored and their experience with the use of the test was recorded. 542 patients were included, 80 of whom had malaria diagnosed by microscopy...... be useful for the diagnosis of P. falciparum malaria when used by routine laboratory staff, but could lead to misdiagnoses when used at the bedside. Microscopy is still essential in order to identify the few missed diagnoses, to determine the degree of parasitaemia, and to ensure species diagnosis...

  13. Bedside ROP screening and telemedicine interpretation integrated to a neonatal transport system: Economic aspects and return on investment analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Gábor; Somogyvári, Zsolt; Maka, Erika; Nagyjánosi, László

    Peter Cerny Ambulance Service - Premature Eye Rescue Program (PCA-PERP) uses digital retinal imaging (DRI) with remote interpretation in bedside ROP screening, which has advantages over binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy (BIO) in screening of premature newborns. We aimed to demonstrate that PCA-PERP provides good value for the money and to model the cost ramifications of a similar newly launched system. As DRI was demonstrated to have high diagnostic performance, only the costs of bedside DRI-based screening were compared to those of traditional transport and BIO-based screening (cost-minimization analysis). The total costs of investment and maintenance were analyzed with micro-costing method. A ten-year analysis time-horizon and service provider's perspective were applied. From the launch of PCA-PERP up to the end of 2014, 3722 bedside examinations were performed in the PCA covered central region of Hungary. From 2009 to 2014, PCA-PERP saved 92,248km and 3633 staff working hours, with an annual nominal cost-savings ranging from 17,435 to 35,140 Euro. The net present value was 127,847 Euro at the end of 2014, with a payback period of 4.1years and an internal rate of return of 20.8%. Our model presented the NPVs of different scenarios with different initial investments, annual number of transports and average transport distances. PCA-PERP as bedside screening with remote interpretation, when compared to a transport-based screening with BIO, produced better cost-savings from the perspective of the service provider and provided a return on initial investment within five years after the project initiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The construction of power in family medicine bedside teaching: a video observation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Charlotte E; Ajjawi, Rola; Monrouxe, Lynn V

    2013-02-01

    Bedside teaching is essential for helping students develop skills, reasoning and professionalism, and involves the learning triad of student, patient and clinical teacher. Although current rhetoric espouses the sharing of power, the medical workplace is imbued with power asymmetries. Power is context-specific and although previous research has explored some elements of the enactment and resistance of power within bedside teaching, this exploration has been conducted within hospital rather than general practice settings. Furthermore, previous research has employed audio-recorded rather than video-recorded observation and has therefore focused on language and para-language at the expense of non-verbal communication and human-material interaction. A qualitative design was adopted employing video- and audio-recorded observations of seven bedside teaching encounters (BTEs), followed by short individual interviews with students, patients and clinical teachers. Thematic and discourse analyses of BTEs were conducted. Power is constructed by students, patients and clinical teachers throughout different BTE activities through the use of linguistic, para-linguistic and non-verbal communication. In terms of language, participants construct power through the use of questions, orders, advice, pronouns and medical/health belief talk. With reference to para-language, participants construct power through the use of interruption and laughter. In terms of non-verbal communication, participants construct power through physical positioning and the possession or control of medical materials such as the stethoscope. Using this paper as a trigger for discussion, we encourage students and clinical teachers to reflect critically on how their verbal and non-verbal communication constructs power in bedside teaching. Students and clinical teachers need to develop their awareness of what power is, how it can be constructed and shared, and what it means for the student

  15. Returning to the bedside: using the history and physical examination to identify rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litaker, D; Pioro, M; El Bilbeisi, H; Brems, J

    2000-12-01

    To determine the value of elements of the bedside history and physical examination in predicting arthrography results in older patients with suspected rotator cuff tear (RCT). Retrospective chart review Orthopedic practice limited to disorders of the shoulder 448 consecutive patients with suspected RCT referred for arthrography over a 4-year period Presence of partial or complete RCT on arthrogram 301 patients (67.2%) had evidence of complete or partial RCT. Clinical findings in the univariate analysis most closely associated with rotator cuff tear included infra- and supraspinatus atrophy (P or = 65 (AOR 4.05(2.47, 16.07)), and night pain (AOR 2.61 (1.004, 7.39)) best predicted the presence of RCT. A five-point scoring system developed from this model was applied in the remaining patient sample (n = 216) to test validity. No significant differences in performance were noted using ROC curve comparison. Using likelihood ratios, a clinical score = 4 was superior in predicting RCT to the diagnostic prediction of an expert clinician. This score had specificity equivalent to magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasonography in diagnosis of RCT. The presence of three simple features in the history and physical examination of the shoulder can identify RCT efficiently. This approach offers a valuable strategy to diagnosis at the bedside without compromising sensitivity or specificity.

  16. Mixed methods evaluation of a quality improvement and audit tool for nurse-to-nurse bedside clinical handover in ward settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redley, Bernice; Waugh, Rachael

    2018-04-01

    Nurse bedside handover quality is influenced by complex interactions related to the content, processes used and the work environment. Audit tools are seldom tested in 'real' settings. Examine the reliability, validity and usability of a quality improvement tool for audit of nurse bedside handover. Naturalistic, descriptive, mixed-methods. Six inpatient wards at a single large not-for-profit private health service in Victoria, Australia. Five nurse experts and 104 nurses involved in 199 change-of-shift bedside handovers. A focus group with experts and pilot test were used to examine content and face validity, and usability of the handover audit tool. The tool was examined for inter-rater reliability and usability using observation audits of handovers across six wards. Data were collected in 2013-2014. Two independent observers for 72 audits demonstrated acceptable inter-observer agreement for 27 (77%) items. Reliability was weak for items examining the handover environment. Seventeen items were not observed reflecting gaps in practices. Across 199 observation audits, gaps in nurse bedside handover practice most often related to process and environment, rather than content items. Usability was impacted by high observer burden, familiarity and non-specific illustrative behaviours. The reliability and validity of most items to audit handover content was acceptable. Gaps in practices for process and environment items were identified. Context specific exemplars and reducing the items used at each handover audit can enhance usability. Further research is needed to develop context specific exemplars and undertake additional reliability testing using a wide range of handover settings. CONTRIBUTION OF THE PAPER. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The bedside Sherlock Holmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, F T; Tierney, L M

    1982-08-01

    There are a multitude of diagnostic clues contained in clothing, jewelry, possessions and other extracorporeal attachments that each patient brings with him or her to a physician. Because of the emphasis of classic physical diagnosis on the body of a patient solely, and because of modern practices that may have patients stripped of these articles before the first encounter with their physician, these interesting and enlightening findings are often ignored or unavailable. Incorporation of these observations into the panoply of data obtained from the history and physical examination will enhance both the accuracy and adventure of differential diagnosis. Such exercises in observation, moreover, may increase general physical diagnostic skills as well as enliven bedside rounds.

  18. Bedside paediatric HIV testing in Malawi: Impact on testing rates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-25

    May 25, 2017 ... Malawi Integrated Guidelines on 'Clinical Management of ... referred by nursing staff to attend the HIV counsellor's ... Implementation of a bedside testing service at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital significantly increased HIV ...

  19. Development of a bedside viable ultrasound protocol to quantify appendicular lean tissue mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Michael T; Lafleur, Benoit; Dubin, Joel A; Mourtzakis, Marina

    2017-10-01

    Ultrasound is a non-invasive and readily available tool that can be prospectively applied at the bedside to assess muscle mass in clinical settings. The four-site protocol, which images two anatomical sites on each quadriceps, may be a viable bedside method, but its ability to predict musculature has not been compared against whole-body reference methods. Our primary objectives were to (i) compare the four-site protocol's ability to predict appendicular lean tissue mass from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; (ii) optimize the predictability of the four-site protocol with additional anatomical muscle thicknesses and easily obtained covariates; and (iii) assess the ability of the optimized protocol to identify individuals with low lean tissue mass. This observational cross-sectional study recruited 96 university and community dwelling adults. Participants underwent ultrasound scans for assessment of muscle thickness and whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans for assessment of appendicular lean tissue. Ultrasound protocols included (i) the nine-site protocol, which images nine anterior and posterior muscle groups in supine and prone positions, and (ii) the four-site protocol, which images two anterior sites on each quadriceps muscle group in a supine position. The four-site protocol was strongly associated (R 2  = 0.72) with appendicular lean tissue mass, but Bland-Altman analysis displayed wide limits of agreement (-5.67, 5.67 kg). Incorporating the anterior upper arm muscle thickness, and covariates age and sex, alongside the four-site protocol, improved the association (R 2  = 0.91) with appendicular lean tissue and displayed narrower limits of agreement (-3.18, 3.18 kg). The optimized protocol demonstrated a strong ability to identify low lean tissue mass (area under the curve = 0.89). The four-site protocol can be improved with the addition of the anterior upper arm muscle thickness, sex, and age when predicting appendicular lean tissue mass

  20. Bedside Teaching in Undergraduate Medical Education: Issues, Strategies, and New Models for Better Preparation of New Generation Doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdus Salam

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBedside teaching is a vital component of medical education. It isapplicable to any situation where teaching is imparted in thepresence of patients. In teaching in the patients’ presence, learnershave the opportunities to use all of their senses and learn thehumanistic aspect of medicine such as role modeling, which isvital but difficult to communicate in words. Unfortunately, bedsideteaching has been on the decline. To investigate the reasonsfor the decline in bedside teaching, its importance and its revival,a review of literature was carried out using PubMed and otherdata bases. The review revealed that the major concerns of bedsideteaching were time constraint, false preceptors’ concernabout patients’ comfort, short stay of patients in hospitals, learnerdistraction by technology, lack of experience and unrealistic facultyexpectation. Whatsoever the reasons, bedside teaching cannotbe replaced with anything else. There are newer approachesof effective bedside teaching, and the core focus of all such approachesis educational process. A bedside teacher must learnhow to involve patients and learners in the educational processes.Moreover, bedside teaching is the process through which learnersacquire the skills of communication by asking patients’ permission,establishing ground rules, setting time limit, introducing theteam, diagnosing learner, diagnosing patient, conducting focusedteaching, using simple language, asking patient if there is anyquestion, closing with encouraging thanks, and giving feedbackprivately. It is most important to ensure a comfortable environmentfor all participants, the learner, the patient and the bedsideteacher. Ongoing faculty development programs on educationalprocesses and realistic faculty expectations may overcome theproblems.

  1. Contamination of nebulisers and surrounding air at the bedside of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An air sampler was used to collect air samples from the surrounding bedside environment. .... individualised resealable plastic bags and stored upside down in a cooler .... conventional and mesh technology nebulisers used at home by adults.

  2. Integration of evidence-based practice in bedside teaching paediatrics supported by e-learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potomkova, Jarmila; Mihal, Vladimir; Zapletalova, Jirina; Subova, Dana

    2010-03-01

    Bedside teaching with evidence-based practice elements, supported by e-learning activities, can play an important role in modern medical education. Teachers have to incorporate evidence from the medical literature to increase student motivation and interactivity. An integral part of the medical curricula at Palacky University Olomouc (Czech Republic) are real paediatric scenarios supplemented with a review of current literature to enhance evidence-based bedside teaching & learning. Searching for evidence is taught through librarian-guided interactive hands-on sessions and/or web-based tutorials followed by clinical case presentations and feedback. Innovated EBM paediatric clerkship demonstrated students' preferences towards web-based interactive bedside teaching & learning. In two academic years (2007/2008, 2008/2009), learning-focused feedback from 106 and 131 students, resp. was obtained about their attitudes towards evidence-based bedside teaching. The assessment included among others the overall level of instruction, quality of practical evidence-based training, teacher willingness and impact of instruction on increased interest in the specialty. There was some criticism about excessive workload. A parallel survey was carried out on the perceived values of different forms of information skills training (i.e. demonstration, online tutorials, and librarian-guided interactive search sessions) and post-training self-reported level of search skills. The new teaching/learning paediatric portfolio is a challenge for further activities, including effective knowledge translation, continuing medical & professional development of teachers, and didactic, clinically integrated teaching approaches.

  3. Effects of "minimally invasive curricular surgery" - a pilot intervention study to improve the quality of bedside teaching in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raupach, Tobias; Anders, Sven; Pukrop, Tobias; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Harendza, Sigrid

    2009-09-01

    Bedside teaching is an important element of undergraduate medical education. However, the impact of curricular course structure on student outcome needs to be determined. This study assessed changes in fourth-year medical students' evaluations of clinical teaching sessions before and after the introduction of a new course format. The curricular structure of bedside teaching sessions in cardiology was modified without changing the amount of teaching time. Clinical teachers were instructed about the new teaching format and learning objectives. The new format implemented for adult but not paediatric cardiology sessions was piloted with 143 students in winter 2007/08. By computing effect sizes, evaluation results were compared to data obtained from 185 students before the intervention. Significant rating increases were observed for adult cardiology teaching sessions (Cohen's d = 0.66) but not paediatric cardiology sessions (d = 0.22). In addition to improving the structure and organization of the course, the intervention significantly impacted on students' perceptions of their learning outcome regarding practical skills (d = 0.69). Minimal curricular changes combined with basic faculty development measures significantly increase students' perception of learning outcome. Curricular structure needs to be considered when planning bedside teaching sessions in medical undergraduate training.

  4. Bedside Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography Using Portable X-Ray in Acute Severe Cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rushikesh Shah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with acute cholangitis require emergent biliary decompression. Those who are hemodynamically unstable on vasopressor support and mechanical ventilation are too critically ill to move outside of the intensive care unit. This prohibits performing Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP in the endoscopy unit. Fluoroscopic guidance is required to confirm deep biliary cannulation during ERCP. There are a few reported cases of bedside ERCP using portable C-arm fluoroscopy unit or ultrasound guided cannulation. We present a unique case of life-saving emergent bedside ERCP in a severely ill patient with cholangitis and septic shock, using simple portable X-ray to confirm biliary cannulation.

  5. A Self-Instructional Course in Student Financial Aid Administration. Module 14: Authorization, Fiscal Operations, & Reporting. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Consulting Group, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The 14th of 17 modules in a self-instructional course on student financial aid administration (geared toward novice financial aid administrators and other institutional personnel) focuses on Pell Grants and campus-based authorization, fiscal operations, and reporting. The full course provides an introduction to the management of federal financial…

  6. Family bedside orientations: An innovative peer support model to enhance a culture of family-centred care at the Stollery Children's Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodinski, Lindsay M; Mattson McCrady, Heather M; Oswald, Christie M; Lyste, Nicole J M; Forbes, Karen L L

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents family bedside orientations, an innovative bedside peer support model for families of paediatric patients piloted in one unit at the Stollery Children's Hospital in Edmonton, Alberta. The model invites family members of former patients back to the hospital as volunteer peer mentors responsible for meeting one-on-one with current inpatient families to provide a listening presence, discuss patient safety practices and encourage families to participate in their child's care. Using qualitative and quantitative data collection methods, the model was evaluated over 1 year (December 2014 to December 2015). Data sources included peer mentor field notes (from 163 visits) detailing the number of family bedside orientations completed by peer mentors and how they interacted with families, as well as post-visit family (n=35) surveys, Hospital-Child Inpatient Experience Survey data, peer mentor (n=6) questionnaires, focus groups with unit staff (n=10) and interviews with members of the project leadership team (n=5). Our findings indicated that family bedside orientations became an established practice in the pilot unit and positively impacted family care experiences. We attribute these successes to championing and support from unit staff and our multidisciplinary project leadership team. We discuss how our team addressed family privacy and confidentiality while introducing peer mentors in the unit. We also highlight strategies used to integrate peer mentors as part of the staff team and enhance peer support culture in the pilot unit. Practical considerations for implementing this model in other paediatric environments are provided.

  7. Acceptability of Bedside Resuscitation With Intact Umbilical Cord to Clinicians and Patients’ Families in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup C. Katheria

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWhile delayed umbilical cord clamping in preterm infants has shown to improve long-term neurological outcomes, infants who are thought to need resuscitation do not receive delayed cord clamping even though they may benefit the most. A mobile resuscitation platform allows infants to be resuscitated at the mother’s bedside with the cord intact. The newborn is supplied with placental blood during the resuscitation in view of the mother. The objective of the study is to assess the usability and acceptability of mobile resuscitation platform, LifeStart trolley, among the infants’ parents and perinatal providers.MethodsA resuscitation platform was present during every delivery that required advanced neonatal providers for high-risk deliveries. Perinatal providers and parents of the infants were given a questionnaire shortly after the delivery.Results60 neonatal subjects were placed on the trolley. The majority of deliveries were high risk for meconium-stained amniotic fluid (43%, and non-reassuring fetal heart rate (45%. About 50% of neonatal providers felt that there were some concerns regarding access to the baby. No parents were uncomfortable with the bedside neonatal interventions, and most parents perceived that communication was improved because of the proximity to the care team.ConclusionBedside resuscitation with umbilical cord intact through the use of a mobile resuscitation trolley is feasible, safe, and effective, but about half of the perinatal providers expressed concerns. Logistical issues such as improved space management and/or delivery setup should be considered in centers planning to perform neonatal resuscitation with an intact cord.

  8. Estrogen administration modulates hippocampal GABAergic subpopulations in the hippocampus of trimethyltin-treated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina eCorvino

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Given the well-documented involvement of estrogens in the modulation of hippocampal functions in both physiological and pathological conditions, the present study investigates the effects of 17-beta estradiol (E2 administration in the rat model of hippocampal neurodegeneration induced by trimethyltin (TMT administration (8mg/kg, characterized by loss of pyramidal neurons in CA1, CA3/hilus hippocampal subfields associated with astroglial and microglial activation, seizures and cognitive impairment. After TMT/saline treatment, ovariectomized animals received two doses of E2 (0.2 mg/kg i.p. or vehicle, and were sacrificed 48h or 7 days after TMT-treatment. Our results indicate that in TMT-treated animals E2 administration induces the early (48h upregulation of genes involved in neuroprotection and synaptogenesis, namely Bcl2, trkB, Cadherin and cyclin-dependent-kinase-5. Increased expression levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase (gad 67, neuropeptide Y (Npy, parvalbumin , Pgc-1α and Sirtuin 1genes, the latter involved in parvalbumin (PV synthesis, were also evident. Unbiased stereology performed on rats sacrificed 7 days after TMT treatment showed that although E2 does not significantly influence the extent of TMT-induced neuronal death, significantly enhances the TMT-induced modulation of GABAergic interneuron population size in selected hippocampal subfields. In particular, E2 administration causes, in TMT treated rats, a significant increase in the number of GAD67-expressing interneurons in CA1 stratum oriens, CA3 pyramidal layer, hilus and dentate gyrus, accompanied by a parallel increase in NPY-expressing cells, essentially in the same regions, and of PV-positive cells in CA1 pyramidal layer. The present results add information concerning the role of in vivo E2 administration on mechanisms involved in cellular plasticity in the adult brain.

  9. Bedside Ultrasonography as an Adjunct to Routine Evaluation of Acute Appendicitis in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Samuel H.F.; Grippo, Anthony; Kerwin, Chistopher; Konicki, P. John; Goodwine, Diana; Lambert, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Appendicitis is a common condition presenting to the emergency department (ED). Increasingly emergency physicians (EP) are using bedside ultrasound (BUS) as an adjunct diagnostic tool. Our objective is to investigate the test characteristics of BUS for the diagnosis of appendicitis and identify components of routine ED workup and BUS associated with the presence of appendicitis. Methods: Patients four years of age and older presenting to the ED with suspect...

  10. Bedside paediatric HIV testing in Malawi: Impact on testing rates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-25

    May 25, 2017 ... and timely ART initiation, one third of infants living with. HIV die before their first ... received reimbursement of their travel costs, but no salary. Bedside ... Study design. The design was a quality improvement process which.

  11. Between the bench, the bedside and the office: The need to build bridges between working neuroscientists and ethicists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Caragh; Cribb, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents findings from an empirical study that explored the meaning of ethics in the everyday work of neuroscientists. Observation and interviews were carried out in one neuroscience research group that was involved in bench-to-bedside translational research. We focus here specifically on the scientists' perceptions of bioethics. Interviewees were often unfamiliar with bioethics as a discipline, particularly the more junior members of the group. Those who were aware of its existence largely viewed it as something distant from them, and as either too abstract, not relevant or an alien imposition on their work. Some interviewees themselves pointed to the need for better 'bridge building' between ethical principles and real-world examples drawn from scientific practice, and we argue that this space is where a more empirically grounded ethics may be useful in terms of actually engaging scientists at both the bench and the bedside.

  12. Inserting ex vivo fluorescence confocal microscopy perioperatively in Mohs micrographic surgery expedites bedside assessment of excision margins in recurrent basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Caterina; Ragazzi, Moira; Castagnetti, Fabio; Gardini, Stefano; Palmieri, Tamara; Lallas, Aimilios; Moscarella, Elvira; Piana, Simonetta; Pellacani, Giovanni; Zalaudek, Iris; Argenziano, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Mohs micrographic surgery can be employed in recurrent basal cell carcinoma, although it is a time-consuming technique. Recently, ex vivo fluorescence confocal microscopy (FCM) has been employed to obtain a fast assessment of tumor margins at the bedside. In our case we successfully employed ex vivo FCM to assess the tumor margins and we treated the persistent tumor with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Our case demonstrates that a multidisciplinary approach is very efficient in managing complex and recurrent tumors and highlights the benefits of FCM as a new technique that can be used in the surgical theater to speed up the entire procedure.

  13. Rapid Bedside Inactivation of Ebola Virus for Safe Nucleic Acid Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstierne, Maiken Worsøe; Karlberg, Helen; Bragstad, Karoline

    2016-01-01

    Rapid bedside inactivation of Ebola virus would be a solution for the safety of medical and technical staff, risk containment, sample transport, and high-throughput or rapid diagnostic testing during an outbreak. We show that the commercially available Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer used...... for nucleic acid extraction inactivates Ebola virus. A rapid bedside inactivation method for nucleic acid tests is obtained by simply adding Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer directly into vacuum blood collection EDTA tubes using a thin needle and syringe prior to sampling. The ready-to-use inactivation vacuum...... tubes are stable for more than 4 months, and Ebola virus RNA is preserved in the Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer for at least 5 weeks independent of the storage temperature. We also show that Ebola virus RNA can be manually extracted from Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer-inactivated samples using...

  14. Assessing the implementation of a bedside service handoff on an academic hospitalist service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Charlie M; Arora, Vineet M; Hedeker, Donald; Meltzer, David O

    2018-06-01

    Inpatient service handoffs are a vulnerable transition during a patients' hospitalization. We hypothesized that performing the service handoff at the patients' bedside may be one mechanism to more efficiently transfer patient information between physicians, while further integrating the patient into their hospital care. We performed a 6-month prospective study of performing a bedside handoff (BHO) at the service transition on a non-teaching hospitalist service. On a weekly basis, transitioning hospitalists co-rounded at patient's bedsides. Post-handoff surveys assessed for completeness of handoff, communication, missed information, and adverse events. A control group who performed the handoff via email, phone or face-to-face was also surveyed. Chi-square and item-response theory (IRT) analysis assessed for differences between BHO and control groups. Narrative responses were elicited to qualitatively describe the BHO. In total, 21/31 (67%) scheduled BHOs were performed. On average, 4 out of 6 eligible patients experienced a BHO, with a total of 90 patients experiencing a BHO. Of those asked to perform the BHO, 52% stated the service transition took 31-60 min compared to 24% in the control group. Controlling for the nesting of observations within physicians, IRT analysis found that BHO respondents had statistically significant greater odds of: reporting increased patient awareness of the service handoff, more certainty in the plan for each patient, less discovery of missed information, and less time needed to learn about the patient on the first day compared to control methods. Narrative responses described a more patient-centered handoff with improved communication that was time-consuming and often logistically difficult to implement. Despite its time-intensive nature, performing the service handoff at the patient's bedside may lead to a more complete and efficient service transition. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Differential modulation of thresholds for intracranial self-stimulation by mGlu5 positive and negative allosteric modulators: implications for effects on drug self-administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Foster eOlive

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacological manipulation of the type 5 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu5 receptor alters various addiction related behaviors such as drug self-administration and the extinction and reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. However, the effects of pharmacological modulation of mGlu5 receptors on brain reward function have not been widely investigated. We examined the effects of acute administration of positive and negative allosteric modulators (PAMs and NAMs, respectively on brain reward function by assessing thresholds for intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS. In addition, when acute effects were observed, we examined potential changes in altered ICSS thresholds following repeated administration. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with bipolar electrodes into the medial forebrain bundle and trained to respond for ICSS, followed by assessment of effects of mGlu5 ligands on ICSS thresholds using a discrete trials current intensity threshold determination procedure. Acute administration of the selective mGlu5 NAMs MTEP (0, 0.3, 1 or 3 mg/kg and fenobam (0, 3, 10, or 30 mg/kg dose-dependently increased ICSS thresholds (~70% at the highest dose tested, suggesting a deficit in brain reward function. Acute administration of the mGlu5 PAMs CDPPB (0, 10, 30 and 60 mg/kg or ADX47273 (0, 10, 30 and 60 mg/kg was without effect at any dose tested. When administered once daily for 5 consecutive days, the development of tolerance to the ability of threshold-elevating doses of MTEP and fenobam to increase ICSS thresholds was observed. We conclude that mGlu5 PAMs and NAMs differentially affect brain reward function, and that tolerance to the ability of mGlu5 NAMs to reduce brain reward function develops with repeated administration. These brain reward deficits should be taken into consideration when interpreting acute effects of mGlu5 NAMs on drug self-administration, and repeated administration may be an effective method to reduce these deficits.

  16. The evaluation of bedside teaching – an instrument for staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bedside teaching is the core teaching strategy in the clinical study years of the medical undergraduate degree at the University of the Witwatersrand. ... evaluation questionnaire was developed, based on previously validated peer review questionnaires used in evaluating small group formal classroom-based lectures.

  17. The role of bedside ultrasound in the diagnosis of pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Goodman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This review article discusses two clinical cases of patients presenting to the emergency department with pericardial effusions. The role of bedside ultrasound in the detection of pericardial effusions is investigated, with special attention to the specific ultrasound features of cardiac tamponade. Through this review, clinicians caring for patients with pericardial effusions will learn to rapidly diagnose this condition directly at the bedside. Clinicians will also learn to differentiate between simple pericardial effusions in contrast to more complicated effusions causing cardiac tamponade. Indications for emergency pericardiocentesis are covered, so that clinicians can rapidly determine which group of patients will benefit from an emergency procedure to drain the effusion.

  18. Medical Education: Entrusting Faith in Bedside Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Globally, patient safety and quality of health care services are the predominant challenges faced by the health care industry. To produce competent doctors it is essential to inculcate skills such as clinical reasoning, critical thinking, and self-directed learning among the medical students. Bedside teaching is a common teaching format in medical education where students are taught in an interactive manner with real patients in hospital wards which help them in acquiring the medical skills and interpersonal behavior necessary for their daily practice as doctors.

  19. Explaining why nurses remain in or leave bedside nursing: a critical ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Paula; McPherson, Gladys

    2014-09-01

    To describe the application of critical ethnography to explain nurses' decisions to remain in or leave bedside nursing, and to describe researcher positioning and reflexivity. Enquiry into hospital nurses' decisions to remain in or leave bedside nursing positions has been conducted from a variety of theoretical perspectives by researchers adopting a range of methodological approaches. This research helps to explain how work environments can affect variables such as job satisfaction and turnover, but provides less insight into how personal and professional factors shape decisions to remain in or leave bedside nursing. A critical theoretical perspective was taken to examine the employment decisions made by nurses in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Data was collected from nurses (n=31) through semi-structured interviews and unobtrusive observation. The authors describe critical ethnography as a powerful research framework for enquiry that allowed them to challenge assumptions about why nurses remain in or leave their jobs, and to explore how issues of fairness and equity contribute to these decisions. Critical ethnography offers a powerful methodology for investigations into complex interactions, such as those between nurses in a PICU. In adopting this methodology, researchers should be sensitised to manifestations of power, attend to their stance and location, and reflexion. The greatest challenges from this research included how to make sense of the insider position, how to acknowledge assumptions and allow these to be challenged, and how to ensure that power relationships in the environment and in the research were attended to.

  20. Information technology for medication administration: assessing bedside readiness among nurses in Lebanon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marini, Sana Daya; Hasman, Arie; Huijer, Huda Abu-Saad

    2009-01-01

    Medication errors continue to be of great concern to hospitals. The use of Information technology (IT) for medication administration was recommended to assist nurses to administer medications safely, decrease the chance of medication errors, and contribute to patient safety. Such IT will be

  1. Effect of bedside teaching activities on patients' experiences at an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items where respondents scored less than the median of 67 (interquartile range 21) were categorised as displaying a negative attitude. Results. Patients (60%) did not favour the bedside teaching activities. No significant association was found with age, sex, occupation, literacy level, duration of hospital stay, and ward.

  2. Elective open bedside tracheostomy in the neurosurgical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niran Maharjan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available JCMSBackground and Objectives: Tracheostomy is electively performed in critically ill patients requiring prolonged respiratory support. The risk of transporting, the increasing associated cost and operative room schedule are some of the obstacles for wider acceptance of this procedure. The use of rigid selection criteria exclude many patients who would benefit of this approach. The present study was designed to determine the safety of open bedside tracheostomy (OBT as a routine intensive care units (ICU procedure without any selection criteria, considering its peri and postoperative complications.Materials & Methods: Retrospective medical chart review of all patients that underwent elective tracheostomy between June 2014 and January 2015.Results: The study group comprised 52 patients with a mean age of 40.4±15.1 years. The incidence of intra-procedure complications was 5.7% and post-procedure complications was 3.8%.Conclusions: Open bedside tracheostomy seems to be a safe and simple procedure, even when performed by a trained resident under controlled circumstances, and should be considered as an option for ICU patients.JCMS Nepal. 2015;11(1: 9-11

  3. Bedside Teaching in Australian Clinical Schools: A National Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen L. Indraratna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Bedside teaching (BST of medical students has become less common in recent years; however, there have been strong recommendations made in the literature to continue this teaching modality for the valued benefits it provides. The purpose of the present study is to explore the perceptions and opinions of bedside teaching among senior Australian medical students. Methods. Medical students at Australian universities were surveyed by means of an electronic questionnaire. The results were collected and analysed. Results. A total of 517 responses were received from students at 15 universities and 94 different clinical sites. The percentage of students who identified BST as very important ranged from 62.5% in psychiatry to 90.4% in internal medicine. The optimal class size was nominated as 3-4 students, and students favoured a style where one individual performs a complete examination, with the remainder allowed to elicit the key sign afterwards. Students felt 3-4 hours of BST per week to be ideal. Advantages identified to BST included provision of feedback and elicitation of clinical signs. Disadvantages included time constraints and excessive class sizes. Conclusions. The unique benefits of BST result in its high demand by students, regardless of the discipline being taught.

  4. Training auscultatory skills: computer simulated heart sounds or additional bedside training? A randomized trial on third-year medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The present study compares the value of additional use of computer simulated heart sounds, to conventional bedside auscultation training, on the cardiac auscultation skills of 3rd year medical students at Oslo University Medical School. Methods In addition to their usual curriculum courses, groups of seven students each were randomized to receive four hours of additional auscultation training either employing a computer simulator system or adding on more conventional bedside training. Cardiac auscultation skills were afterwards tested using live patients. Each student gave a written description of the auscultation findings in four selected patients, and was rewarded from 0-10 points for each patient. Differences between the two study groups were evaluated using student's t-test. Results At the auscultation test no significant difference in mean score was found between the students who had used additional computer based sound simulation compared to additional bedside training. Conclusions Students at an early stage of their cardiology training demonstrated equal performance of cardiac auscultation whether they had received an additional short auscultation course based on computer simulated training, or had had additional bedside training. PMID:20082701

  5. Prospective implementation of an algorithm for bedside intravascular ultrasound-guided filter placement in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingsworth, Christopher D; Taylor, Steven M; Patterson, Mark A; Weinberg, Jordan A; McGwin, Gerald; Melton, Sherry M; Reiff, Donald A; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Rue, Loring W; Jordan, William D; Passman, Marc A

    2010-05-01

    Although contrast venography is the standard imaging method for inferior vena cava (IVC) filter insertion, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging is a safe and effective option that allows for bedside filter placement and is especially advantageous for immobilized critically ill patients by limiting resource use, risk of transportation, and cost. This study reviewed the effectiveness of a prospectively implemented algorithm for IVUS-guided IVC filter placement in this high-risk population. Current evidence-based guidelines were used to create a clinical decision algorithm for IVUS-guided IVC filter placement in critically ill patients. After a defined lead-in phase to allow dissemination of techniques, the algorithm was prospectively implemented on January 1, 2008. Data were collected for 1 year using accepted reporting standards and a quality assurance review performed based on intent-to-treat at 6, 12, and 18 months. As defined in the prospectively implemented algorithm, 109 patients met criteria for IVUS-directed bedside IVC filter placement. Technical feasibility was 98.1%. Only 2 patients had inadequate IVUS visualization for bedside filter placement and required subsequent placement in the endovascular suite. Technical success, defined as proper deployment in an infrarenal position, was achieved in 104 of the remaining 107 patients (97.2%). The filter was permanent in 21 (19.6%) and retrievable in 86 (80.3%). The single-puncture technique was used in 101 (94.4%), with additional dual access required in 6 (5.6%). Periprocedural complications were rare but included malpositioning requiring retrieval and repositioning in three patients, filter tilt >/=15 degrees in two, and arteriovenous fistula in one. The 30-day mortality rate for the bedside group was 5.5%, with no filter-related deaths. Successful placement of IVC filters using IVUS-guided imaging at the bedside in critically ill patients can be established through an evidence-based prospectively

  6. A simple bedside test to assess the swallowing dysfunction in Parkinson′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Vinoth Kanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Swallowing changes are common in Parkinson′s disease (PD. Early identification is essential to avoid complications of aspiration. Objectives: To evaluate the swallowing ability of the PD patients and to correlate it with the indicators of disease progression. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 PD patients (70 males and 30 females aged between 50 years and 70 years with varying stage, duration, and severity were enrolled in a cross-sectional study carried out between January and May 2012. A simple bedside water swallowing test was performed using standard 150 ml of water. Swallowing process was assessed under three categories-swallowing speeds (ml/s, swallowing volume (ml/swallow and swallowing duration (s/swallow. Equal number of age and sex matched controls were also evaluated. Results: All of them completed the task of swallowing. A mean swallowing speed (27.48 ml/s, swallowing volume (28.5 ml/s, and swallowing duration (1.05 s/swallow was established by the control group. The PD patients showed decreased swallowing speed (7.15 ml/s in males and 6.61 ml/s in females, decreased swallowing volume (14.59 ml/swallow and 14 ml/swallow in females, and increased swallowing duration (2.37 s/swallow and 2.42 s/swallow which are statistically significant. There was a significant positive correlation between the severity, duration, and staging of the disease with the swallowing performance and a poor correlation between the subjective reports of dysphagia and the objective performance on water swallow test. Conclusion: The water swallowing test is a simple bedside test to identify the swallowing changes early in PD. It is recommended to do the test in all PD Patients to detect dysphagia early and to intervene appropriately.

  7. Art at the Bedside: Reflections on Use of Visual Imagery in Hospital Chaplaincy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge-Peters Daiss, Susan

    2016-03-01

    'Art at the Bedside' is the name given to a hospital visitation program during which works of art loaded onto a computer are used to start conversations with patients and their families. The article traces the genesis of the program that evolved from the author's dual training in art museum education and hospital chaplaincy through the evolution of the practice, now in its sixth year. Reflections on the practice itself are the focus of this article, from identifying the kinds of responses frequently elicited by the artwork to understanding how these works of art seem to forge immediate connections between the patient and the facilitator. Ultimately posed in this reflection is whether the 'Art at the Bedside' experience might suggest a future for the integration of the visual arts more broadly into hospital - and related - chaplaincy. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Mechanisms of Inflammation in Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy: From Bench to Bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros N. Moysidis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR is a vision-threatening disease and a common complication of surgery to correct rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD. Several models of the pathogenesis of this disease have been described with some of these models focusing on the role of inflammatory cells and other models focusing on the role of growth factors and cytokines in the vitreous which come into contact with intraretinal and retinal pigment epithelial cells. New experiments have shed light on the pathogenesis of PVR and offer promising avenues for clinical intervention before PVR develops. One such target is the indirect pathway of activation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGRα, which plays an important role in PVR. Clinical trials assessing the efficacy of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU and low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH, daunorubicin, and 13-cis-retinoic acid, among other therapies, have yielded mixed results. Here we review inflammatory and other mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of PVR, we highlight important clinical trials, and we discuss how findings at the bench have the potential to be translated to the bedside.

  9. A Self-Instructional Course in Student Financial Aid Administration. Module 15: Internal Aid Office Management and Institutional Quality Control. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Consulting Group, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The 15th in a 17-module self-instructional course on student financial aid administration (designed for novice financial aid administrators and other institutional personnel) focuses on internal aid office management and institutional quality control. The course provides a systematic introduction to the management of federal financial aid programs…

  10. Bedside Heart Type Fatty Acid Binding Protein (H-FABP): Is an Early Predictive Marker of Cardiac Syncope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonmez, B. M.; Yilmaz, F.; Durdu, T.; Hakbilir, O.; Ongar, M.; Ozturk, D.; Altinbilek, E.; Kavalci, C.; Turhan, T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the value of bedside heart-type fatty acid binding protein in diagnosis of cardiac syncope in patients presenting with syncope or presyncope. Methods: The prospective study was conducted at Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, between September 1, 2010, and January 1, 2011, and comprised patients aged over 18 years who presented with syncope or presyncope. Patients presenting to emergency department within 4 hours of syncope or presyncope underwent a bedside heart-type fatty acid binding protein test measurement. SPSS 16 was used for statistical analysis, Results: Of the 100 patients evaluated, 22(22 percent) were diagnosed with cardiac syncope. Of them, 13(59.1 percent) patients had a positive and 9(40.9 percent) had a negative heart-type fatty acid binding protein result. Consequently, the test result was 12.64 times more positive in patients with cardiac syncope compared to those without. Conclusions: Bedside heart-type fatty acid binding protein, particularly at early phase of myocardial injury, reduces diagnostic and therapeutic uncertainity of cardiac origin in syncope patients. (author)

  11. Surfactant from neonatal to pediatric ICU: bench and bedside evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boet, A; Brat, R; Aguilera, S S; Tissieres, P; De Luca, D

    2014-12-01

    Surfactant is a cornerstone of neonatal critical care for the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome of preterm babies. However, other indications have been studied for various clinical conditions both in term neonates and in children beyond neonatal age. A high degree of evidence is not yet available in some cases and this is due to the complex and not yet totally understood physiopathology of the different types of pediatric and neonatal lung injury. We here summarise the state of the art of the bench and bedside knowledge about surfactant use for the respiratory conditions usually cared for in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units. Future research direction will also be presented. On the whole, surfactant is able to improve oxygenation in infection related respiratory failure, pulmonary hemorrhage and meconium aspiration syndrome. Bronchoalveolar lavage with surfactant solution is currently the only means to reduce mortality or need for extracorporeal life support in neonates with meconium aspiration. While surfactant bolus or lavage only improves the oxygenation and ventilatory requirements in other types of postneonatal acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), there seems to be a reduction in the mortality of small infants with RSV-related ARDS.

  12. A Self-Instructional Course in Student Financial Aid Administration. Module 4: The Roles and Responsibilities of the Financial Aid Office. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Consulting Group, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The fourth module in a self-instructional course for student financial aid administrator neophytes provides an introduction to the management of federal financial aid programs authorized by the Higher Education Act Title IV with an emphasis on the role of the financial aid office. Areas covered in Module 4 include how to recognize the basic areas…

  13. Point-of-care cardiac ultrasound techniques in the physical examination: better at the bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Bruce J

    2017-07-01

    The development of hand-carried, battery-powered ultrasound devices has created a new practice in ultrasound diagnostic imaging, called 'point-of-care' ultrasound (POCUS). Capitalising on device portability, POCUS is marked by brief and limited ultrasound imaging performed by the physician at the bedside to increase diagnostic accuracy and expediency. The natural evolution of POCUS techniques in general medicine, particularly with pocket-sized devices, may be in the development of a basic ultrasound examination similar to the use of the binaural stethoscope. This paper will specifically review how POCUS improves the limited sensitivity of the current practice of traditional cardiac physical examination by both cardiologists and non-cardiologists. Signs of left ventricular systolic dysfunction, left atrial enlargement, lung congestion and elevated central venous pressures are often missed by physical techniques but can be easily detected by POCUS and have prognostic and treatment implications. Creating a general set of repetitive imaging skills for these entities for application on all patients during routine examination will standardise and reduce heterogeneity in cardiac bedside ultrasound applications, simplify teaching curricula, enhance learning and recollection, and unify competency thresholds and practice. The addition of POCUS to standard physical examination techniques in cardiovascular medicine will result in an ultrasound-augmented cardiac physical examination that reaffirms the value of bedside diagnosis. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Concomitant administration of fluoxetine and amantadine modulates the activity of peritoneal macrophages of rats subjected to a forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Adam; Rogóz, Zofia; Kubera, Marta; Nawrat, Dominika; Nalepa, Irena

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies show that administration of a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, amantadine (AMA), potentiates the action of antidepressant drugs. Since antidepressants may modulate functioning of the immune system and activation of a pro-inflammatory response in depressive disorders is frequently reported, the aim of the present study was to examine whether a combined administration of AMA and the antidepressant, fluoxetine (FLU), to rats subsequently subjected to a forced swimming test (FST) modifies the parameters of macrophage activity, directly related to their immunomodulatory functions, i.e., arginase (ARG) activity and synthesis of nitric oxide (NO). We found that 10 mg/kg AMA and 10 mg/kg FLU, ineffective in FST for antidepressant-like activity when administered alone, increased the ARG/NO ratio in macrophages when administered concomitantly. This effect was accompanied by a decrease of cellular adherence. Concurrently, the basal metabolic activity of the cells measured with reduction of resazurin, and intracellular host defense as assessed by a synthesis of superoxide anion, were not affected by such antidepressive treatment. Our data indicate that co-administration of AMA and FLU decreases the pro-inflammatory properties of macrophages and causes a redirection of immune response toward anti-inflammatory activity, as one can anticipate in the case of an effective antidepressive treatment.

  15. Estriol administration modulates luteinizing hormone secretion in women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genazzani, Alessandro D; Meczekalski, Blazej; Podfigurna-Stopa, Agnieszka; Santagni, Susanna; Rattighieri, Erica; Ricchieri, Federica; Chierchia, Elisa; Simoncini, Tommaso

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the influence of estriol administration on the hypothalamus-pituitary function and gonadotropins secretion in patients affected by functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA). Controlled clinical study. Patients with FHA in a clinical research environment. Twelve hypogonadotropic patients affected by FHA. Pulsatility study of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) test (10 μg in bolus) at baseline condition and after 8 weeks of therapy with 2 mg/day of estriol. Measurements of plasma LH, FSH, estradiol (E(2)), androstenedione (A), 17α-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP), cortisol, androstenedione (A), testosterone (T), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (fT(3)), free thyroxine (fT(4)), and insulin, and pulse detection. After treatment, the FHA patients showed a statistically significant increase of LH plasma levels (from 0.7 ± 0.1 mIU/mL to 3.5 ± 0.3 mIU/mL) and a statistically significant increase of LH pulse amplitude with no changes in LH pulse frequency. In addition, the LH response to the GnRH bolus was a statistically significant increase. Estriol administration induced the increase of LH plasma levels in FHA and improved GnRH-induced LH secretion. These findings suggest that estriol administration modulates the neuroendocrine control of the hypothalamus-pituitary unit and induces the recovery of LH synthesis and secretion in hypogonadotropic patients with FHA. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Transnasal endoscopic evaluation of swallowing: a bedside technique to evaluate ability to swallow pureed diets in elderly patients with dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Torao; Horiuchi, Akira; Nakayama, Yoshiko

    2013-08-01

    Endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (EES) is not commonly used by gastroenterologists to evaluate swallowing in patients with dysphagia. To use transnasal endoscopy to identify factors predicting successful or failed swallowing of pureed foods in elderly patients with dysphagia. EES of pureed foods was performed by a gastroenterologist using a small-calibre transnasal endoscope. Factors related to successful versus unsuccessful swallowing of pureed foods were analyzed with regard to age, comorbid diseases, swallowing activity, saliva pooling, vallecular residues, pharyngeal residues and airway penetration⁄aspiration. Unsuccessful swallowing was defined in patients who could not eat pureed foods at bedside during hospitalization. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictors of swallowing of pureed foods. During a six-year period, 458 consecutive patients (mean age 80 years [range 39 to 97 years]) were considered for the study, including 285 (62%) men. Saliva pooling, vallecular residues, pharyngeal residues and penetration⁄aspiration were found in 240 (52%), 73 (16%), 226 (49%) and 232 patients (51%), respectively. Overall, 247 patients (54%) failed to swallow pureed foods. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the presence of pharyngeal residues (OR 6.0) and saliva pooling (OR 4.6) occurred significantly more frequently in patients who failed to swallow pureed foods. Pharyngeal residues and saliva pooling predicted impaired swallowing of pureed foods. Transnasal EES performed by a gastroenterologist provided a unique bedside method of assessing the ability to swallow pureed foods in elderly patients with dysphagia.

  17. Technology-enhanced learning should be employed alongside – not instead of – bedside teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferguson Z

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Zachary FergusonSouth Thames Foundation School, London, UKI read with great interest the editorial by Al-jibury et al1 regarding the digitalization of medical education, particularly as I was part of the team that produced the YouTube video on heart murmurs which they reference in their paper.I agree wholeheartedly that digital resources cannot and must not replace bedside teaching. The video in question carries a disclaimer at the beginning, encouraging learners to use the resource as a companion to – not a substitute for – real-life patient contact. Convenient though YouTube might be, it cannot compare to the learning experience Al-jibury et al1 describes: listening to a live, beating heart. Bedside teaching has been around since the days of Hippocrates and it is not going anywhere anytime soon.Read the original article by Al-jibury et al.

  18. Utility of the electronic information resource UpToDate for clinical decision-making at bedside rounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, J; See, K C; Khalizah, H J; Low, S P; Lim, T K

    2012-02-01

    Clinical questions often arise at daily hospital bedside rounds. Yet, little information exists on how the search for answers may be facilitated. The aim of this prospective study was, therefore, to evaluate the overall utility, including the feasibility and usefulness of incorporating searches of UpToDate, a popular online information resource, into rounds. Doctors searched UpToDate for any unresolved clinical questions during rounds for patients in general medicine and respiratory wards, and in the medical intensive care unit of a tertiary teaching hospital. The nature of the questions and the results of the searches were recorded. Searches were deemed feasible if they were completed during the rounds and useful if they provided a satisfactory answer. A total of 157 UpToDate searches were performed during the study period. Questions were raised by all ranks of clinicians from junior doctors to consultants. The searches were feasible and performed immediately during rounds 44% of the time. Each search took a median of three minutes (first quartile: two minutes, third quartile: five minutes). UpToDate provided a useful and satisfactory answer 75% of the time, a partial answer 17% of the time and no answer 9% of the time. It led to a change in investigations, diagnosis or management 37% of the time, confirmed what was originally known or planned 38% of the time and had no effect 25% of the time. Incorporating UpToDate searches into daily bedside rounds was feasible and useful in clinical decision-making.

  19. Applicability of the Schwartz Equation and the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children Bedside Equation for Estimating Glomerular Filtration Rate in Overweight Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Teresa V; Harrison, Donald L; Gildon, Brooke L; Carter, Sandra M; Turman, Martin A

    2016-06-01

    To determine if significant correlations exist between glomerular filtration rate (GFR) prediction equation values, derived by using the original Schwartz equation and the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) bedside equation with a 24-hour urine creatinine clearance (Clcr ) value normalized to a body surface area of 1.73 m(2) in overweight and obese children. Prospective analysis (20 patients) and retrospective analysis (43 patients). Pediatric inpatient ward and pediatric nephrology clinic at a comprehensive academic medical center. Sixty-three pediatric patients (aged 5-17 years), of whom 27 were overweight (body mass index [BMI] at the 85th percentile or higher) and 36 were not overweight (BMI lower than the 85th percentile [controls]) between 2007 and 2012. Data from the overweight patients were compared with nonoverweight controls. GFR values were calculated by using the original Schwartz equation and the CKiD bedside equation. Each patient's 24-hour urine Clcr value normalized to a body surface area of 1.73 m(2) served as the index value. A Pearson correlation coefficient model was used to determine association between the 24-hour urine Clcr value (index value) with the Schwartz and CKiD GFR estimations. Significant correlation was found to exist between the Schwartz and CKiD bedside GFR estimations relative to the 24-hour urine Clcr in the control subjects (r = 0.85, poverweight subjects (r = 0.86, poverweight children with a kidney disorder. The CKiD bedside GFR estimations were not significantly different compared with 24-hour urine Clcr values for the overweight group with kidney disorder (p=0.85). The Schwartz and CKiD bedside estimations of GFR correlated with 24-hour urine Clcr values in both overweight and nonoverweight children. Compared with the Schwartz equation, which tended to overestimate renal function, the CKiD bedside equation appeared to approximate 24-hour urine Clcr more closely in overweight children with kidney disorder. © 2016

  20. Modulating NAD+ metabolism, from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsyuba, Elena; Auwerx, Johan

    2017-09-15

    Discovered in the beginning of the 20 th century, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ) has evolved from a simple oxidoreductase cofactor to being an essential cosubstrate for a wide range of regulatory proteins that include the sirtuin family of NAD + -dependent protein deacylases, widely recognized regulators of metabolic function and longevity. Altered NAD + metabolism is associated with aging and many pathological conditions, such as metabolic diseases and disorders of the muscular and neuronal systems. Conversely, increased NAD + levels have shown to be beneficial in a broad spectrum of diseases. Here, we review the fundamental aspects of NAD + biochemistry and metabolism and discuss how boosting NAD + content can help ameliorate mitochondrial homeostasis and as such improve healthspan and lifespan. © 2017 The Authors.

  1. Using a Bedside Video-assisted Test Tube Test to Assess Stoma Viability: A Report of 4 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sarwat; Turner, Keli; Shah, Paulesh; Diaz, Jose

    2016-07-01

    Mucosal discoloration of an intestinal stoma may indicate self-limited venous congestion or necrosis necessitating operative revision. A common bedside technique to assess stoma viability is the "test tube test". A clear tube is inserted into the stoma and a hand-held light is used to assess the color of the stoma. A technique (video-assisted test tube test [VATTT]) developed by the authors utilizes a standard video bronchoscope inserted into a clear plastic blood collection tube to visually inspect and assess the mucosa. This technique was evaluated in 4 patients (age range 49-72 years, all critically ill) with a discolored stoma after emergency surgery. In each case, physical exam revealed ischemic mucosa at the surface either immediately after surgery or after worsening hypotension weeks later. Serial test tube test assessments were ambiguous when trying to assess deeper mucosa. The VATTT assessment showed viable pink mucosa beneath the surface and until the fascia was revealed in 3 patients. One (1) patient had mucosal ischemia down to the fascia, which prompted operative revision of the stoma. The new stoma was assessed with a VATTT and was viable for the entire length of the stoma. VATTT provided an enhanced, magnified, and clearer way to visually assess stoma viability in the postoperative period that can be performed at the bedside with no adverse events. It may prevent unnecessary relaparotomy or enable earlier diagnosis of deep ostomy necrosis. Validity and reliability studies are warranted.

  2. The Staff Nurse Clinical Leader at the Bedside: Swedish Registered Nurses’ Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga E. Larsson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Registered nurses at the bedside are accountable for and oversee completion of patient care as well as directly leading and managing the provision of safe patient care. These nurses have an informal leadership role that is not associated with any given position. Leadership is a complex and multifaceted concept and its meaning is unclear, especially in the staff nurse context. The aim was to describe registered nurses’ perceptions of what it entails to be the leader at the bedside in inpatient physical care. A phenomenographic approach was employed. Interviews were performed with Swedish registered nurses (n=15. Five descriptive categories were identified: demonstrating clinical knowledge, establishing a good atmosphere of collaboration, consciously structuring the work in order to ensure patients’ best possible nursing care, customized presence in the practical work with patients according to predetermined prerequisites, and monitoring coworkers’ professional practice. Registered nurses informal role as leader necessitates a social process of deliberate effort to attain and maintain leader status and authority. Participants used deliberate communicative approaches and interactive procedures. Leader principles grounded in the core values of the nursing profession that ensure nursing values and person-centered attributes were a key aspect.

  3. The Usefulness of Intensivist-Performed Bedside Drainage of Pleural Effusion via Ultrasound-Guided Pigtail Catheter

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    Joo Won Min

    2014-08-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Intensivist-performed bedside drainage of pleural effusion via ultrasound (US-guided pigtail catheter is useful and safe and may be recommended in some patients in an intensive care unit.

  4. Portable bedside ultrasound: the visual stethoscope of the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillman Lawrence M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over the past decade technological advances in the realm of ultrasound have allowed what was once a cumbersome and large machine to become essentially hand-held. This coupled with a greater understanding of lung sonography has revolutionized our bedside assessment of patients. Using ultrasound not as a diagnostic test, but instead as a component of the physical exam, may allow it to become the stethoscope of the 21st century.

  5. Bedside ultrasound reliability in locating catheter and detecting complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payman Moharamzadeh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Central venous catheterization is one of the most common medical procedures and is associated with such complications as misplacement and pneumothorax. Chest X-ray is among good ways for evaluation of these complications. However, due to patient’s excessive exposure to radiation, time consumption and low diagnostic value in detecting pneumothorax in the supine patient, the present study intends to examine bedside ultrasound diagnostic value in locating tip of the catheter and pneumothorax. Materials and methods: In the present cross-sectional study, all referred patients requiring central venous catheterization were examined. Central venous catheterization was performed by a trained emergency medicine specialist, and the location of catheter and the presence of pneumothorax were examined and compared using two modalities of ultrasound and x-ray (as the reference standard. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predicting values were reported. Results: A total of 200 non-trauma patients were included in the study (58% men. Cohen’s Kappa consistency coefficients for catheterization and diagnosis of pneumothorax were found as 0.49 (95% CI: 0.43-0.55, 0.89 (P<0.001, (95% CI: 97.8-100, respectively. Also, ultrasound sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing pneumothorax were 75% (95% CI: 35.6-95.5, and 100% (95% CI: 97.6-100, respectively. Conclusion: The present study results showed low diagnostic value of ultrasound in determining catheter location and in detecting pneumothorax. With knowledge of previous studies, the search still on this field.   Keywords: Central venous catheterization; complications; bedside ultrasound; radiography;

  6. Efficacy of daily bedside chest radiography as visualized by digital luminescence radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, J.; Stueckle, C.A.; Schilling, E.M.; Peters, J.

    2001-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic impact of daily bedside chest radiography in comparison with digital luminescence technique (DLR; storage phosphor radiography) and conventional film screen radiography, a prospective randomized study was completed in 210 mechanically ventilated patients with a total of 420 analysed radiographs. The patients were allocated to two groups: 150 patients underwent DLR, and 60 patients underwent conventional film screen radiography. Radiological analysis was performed consensually and therapeutic efficacy was assessed by the clinicians. There was no statistical significant difference between the frequency of abnormal findings seen on DLR and conventional film screen radiography. In total, 448 abnormal findings were present in 249 of 300 DLR and 97 of 120 conventional film screen radiographs. The most common findings were signs of overhydration (41 %), pleural effusion (31%), partial collapse of the lung (11%) and pneumothorax (2%). One hundred and twenty-three of 448 (27%) of these abnormal findings were thought to have a considerable impact on patient management. The high rate of abnormal findings with significant impact on patient management suggests that the use of daily bedside chest radiography may be reasonable. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  7. Bedside immunochromatographic test for enterovirus 71 infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuan-Ying Arthur; Yang, Shuan; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Chen, Chih-Jung; Hsieh, Yu-Chia; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Hsieh, Juo-Yu; Yang, Jyh-Yuan; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2013-11-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) causes frequent outbreaks worldwide, particularly in the Asia-Pacific area. Its quick spread is a critical challenge for public health and timely preventive measures and clinical management therefore rely on early detection. There is a need for a rapid, easy-to-use, and reliable method for detecting EV71 infections. The study aimed to evaluate a bedside immunochromatography (ICT) kit for diagnosing acute EV71 infection in children. Pediatric patients with herpangina or hand-foot-mouth disease were randomly and prospectively enrolled from hospitals across Taiwan. Throat or rectal swabs were collected for viral culture and reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR). For the ICT kit, whole blood was obtained by ear piercing, finger-sticking, or venipuncture. The results of ICT, virus isolation and RTPCR in clinical samples were compared. Of the 156 patients enrolled, 91 (58%), 64 (41%) and 72 (46%) had positive results of the ICT kit, viral culture and RTPCR, respectively. Laboratory-confirmed infection with either positive EV71 culture or RTPCR was used as the diagnostic standard. The sensitivity and specificity of the ICT kit was 84% and 77%, respectively. The viral culture and RTPCR had relatively lower sensitivity but higher specificity. The patient's age did not affect the performance of the ICT, viral culture and RTPCR. However, a low sensitivity of ICT kit was noted before the second day of disease onset. The ICT kit may serve as a simple, quick and reliable method for the bedside diagnosis of acute EV71 infection in children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Bedside Ultrasound of Quadriceps to Predict Rehospitalization and Functional Decline in Hospitalized Elders

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    Ana Clara Guerreiro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo evaluate the capacity of total anterior thigh thickness, quadriceps muscle thickness, and quadriceps contractile index, all measured by bedside ultrasound, to predict rehospitalization, functional decline, and death in elderly patients 3 months after hospital discharge. To evaluate intra and interobserver reproducibility of the dominant thigh evaluation method by point of care ultrasound.MethodsCohort study of patients aged 65 years or more admitted to a medium complexity unit in a teaching hospital in southern Brazil. Comprehensive geriatric assessment and ultrasound evaluation of the dominant thigh of each participant were performed. After 3 months of hospital discharge, telephone contact was made to evaluate the outcomes of rehospitalization or death and functional decline—assessed by the 100 points Barthel scale and defined as a decrease of five or more points.Results100 participants were included. There was no statistically significant difference between intraobserver measurements in the GEE method analysis (p > 0.05, and the mean bias obtained in Bland–Altman plots was close to zero in all four analyses performed, suggesting good intra and interobserver agreement. There was a significant correlation between the echographic measurements (quadriceps thickness and contractile index and gait speed, timed up and go, and handgrip tests. There was a significant association between contractile index (quadriceps thickness over total anterior thigh thickness multiplied by 100 lower than 60% and functional decline (relative risk 1.35; CI 95% 1.10–1.65; p = 0.003 as well as between the thickness of the quadriceps and rehospitalization or death, in both individuals with preserved walking capacity and in bedridden elders (relative risk 1.34; CI 95% 1.02–1.75; p = 0.04.ConclusionThe ultrasonographic method to evaluate thigh thickness was easily applicable and reproducible. The thickness of the quadriceps could

  9. A bedside technique for the diagnosis of acute rejection in renal transplants using 111-In platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, S.T.; Buckels, J.A.C.; Drolc, Z.; Hawker, R.J.; Barnes, A.D.; McCollum, C.N.

    1982-01-01

    A total of 33 patients was studied with the aim of developing a bedside method for providing early diagnosis of acute rejection using 111-In labelled platelets. Platelet deposition was detected in all patients suffering acute rejection. A significant increase in kidney/aortic arch ratio, as measured by the portable bedside system, preceded the clinical diagnosis in 70% of patients. Using this system, it appeared possible not only to diagnose acute rejection at an earlier stage but also to predict irrecoverable transplant loss even in the presence of tubular necrosis. By labelling the platelets repeatedly for at least two weeks after transplantation, the period of highest risk for acute rejection and other complications. The gamma camera should still be employed in the event of markedly increased platelet deposition to differentiate between rejection and vascular complications

  10. [Value of bedside echocardiography in diagnosis and risk assessment of in-hospital death for patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H J; Xiao, Z Y; Gu, G R; Xue, Y; Shao, M; Deng, Z; Tao, Z G; Yao, C L; Tong, C Y

    2017-11-24

    Objective: To investigate the value of bedside echocardiography in diagnosis and risk assessment of in-hospital death of patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection. Methods: The clinical data of 229 patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection diagnosed by CT angiography in Zhongshan Hospital affiliated to Fudan University between January 2009 and January 2016 were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into survival group(191 cases)and non-survival group(38 cases)according to presence or absence of in-hospital death. The bedside echocardiography features were analyzed, and influence factors of in-hospital death were determined by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: (1) Compared with the survival group, the non-survival group had lower surgery rate (60.52%(23/38) vs. 85.34%(163/191), P 0.05). (2) The bedside echocardiography results showed that prevalence of aortic valve involvement(65.79%(25/38) vs.34.03%(65/191), P 0.05). (3) The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that aortic valve involvement( OR =3.275, 95% CI 1.290-8.313, P risk factors for in-hospital death in patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection. Conclusions: Bedside echocardiography has significant diagnostic value for Stanford type A aortic dissection. Aortic valve involvement, enlargement of aortic root diameter and without surgery are independent risk factors for patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection.

  11. Eating disorders: from bench to bedside and back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetani, Silvana; Romano, Adele; Provensi, Gustavo; Ricca, Valdo; Lutz, Thomas; Passani, Maria Beatrice

    2016-12-01

    The central nervous system and viscera constitute a functional ensemble, the gut-brain axis, that allows bidirectional information flow that contributes to the control of feeding behavior based not only on the homeostatic, but also on the hedonic aspects of food intake. The prevalence of eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa, binge eating and obesity, poses an enormous clinical burden, and involves an ever-growing percentage of the population worldwide. Clinical and preclinical research is constantly adding new information to the field and orienting further studies with the aim of providing a foundation for developing more specific and effective treatment approaches to pathological conditions. A recent symposium at the XVI Congress of the Societá Italiana di Neuroscienze (SINS, 2015) 'Eating disorders: from bench to bedside and back' brought together basic scientists and clinicians with the objective of presenting novel perspectives in the neurobiology of eating disorders. Clinical studies presented by V. Ricca illustrated some genetic aspects of the psychopathology of anorexia nervosa. Preclinical studies addressed different issues ranging from the description of animal models that mimic human pathologies such as anorexia nervosa, diet-induced obesity, and binge eating disorders (T. Lutz), to novel interactions between peripheral signals and central circuits that govern food intake, mood and stress (A. Romano and G. Provensi). The gut-brain axis has received increasing attention in the recent years as preclinical studies are demonstrating that the brain and visceral organs such as the liver and guts, but also the microbiota are constantly engaged in processes of reciprocal communication, with unexpected physiological and pathological implications. Eating is controlled by a plethora of factors; genetic predisposition, early life adverse conditions, peripheral gastrointestinal hormones that act directly or indirectly on the central nervous system, all are

  12. Innovative integrative bedside teaching model improves tutors' self-assessments of teaching skills and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gat, Itai; Pessach-Gelblum, Liat; Givati, Gili; Haim, Nadav; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Unterman, Avraham; Bar-Shavit, Yochay; Grabler, Galit; Sagi, Doron; Achiron, Anat; Ziv, Amitai

    2016-01-01

    Patient bedside is the ideal setting for teaching physical examination, medical interviewing, and interpersonal skills. Herein we describe a novel model for bedside teaching (BST) practiced during tutor training workshop and its resulting effect on practitioners' self assessment of teaching skills and perceptions. One-day tutor training workshop included theoretical knowledge supplementation regarding tutors' roles as well as implementing practical tools for clinical education, mainly BST model. The model, which emphasizes simultaneous clinical and communication teaching in a stepwise approach, was practiced by consecutive simulations with a gradual escalation of difficulty and adjusted instruction approaches. Pre- and post-workshop-adjusted questionnaires using a Likert scale of 1 to 4 were completed by participants and compared. Analysis was based on 25 out of 48 participants who completed both questionnaires. Significantly improved teaching skills were demonstrated upon workshop completion (mean 3.3, SD 0.5) compared with pre-training (mean 2.6, SD 0.6; pteaching skills in this challenging environment.

  13. A Self-Instructional Course in Student Financial Aid Administration. Module 17--Evaluation of Student Aid Management: Self-Evaluation, Audit, and Program Review. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Consulting Group, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The 17th module in the 17-module self-instructional course on student financial aid administration discusses the evaluation of student aid management in terms of self-evaluation, audit, and program review. The full course offers a systematic introduction to the management of federal financial aid programs authorized by Title IV of the Higher…

  14. In diagnosis of pleural effusion and pneumothorax in the intensive care unit patients: Can chest us replace bedside plain radiography?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ElShaimaa Mohamed Mohamed

    2018-06-01

    Conclusions: In evaluation of ICU patients with pleural effusion and pneumothorax, chest US is the first bedside tool with high diagnostic performance. These chest conditions are urgent especially in seriously ill patients, as both need US guided drainage. Chest US has many advantages, including non invasive examination in multiple planes, free of radiation hazard, less expensive, real-time, high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy in chest lesions detection. Lung ultrasound is being exclusive than bedside chest X-ray and equal to chest CT in diagnosing pleural effusion and pneumothorax.

  15. Web-Based Evidence Based Practice Educational Intervention to Improve EBP Competence among BSN-Prepared Pediatric Bedside Nurses: A Mixed Methods Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laibhen-Parkes, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    For pediatric nurses, their competence in EBP is critical for providing high-quality care and maximizing patient outcomes. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess and refine a Web-based EBP educational intervention focused on improving EBP beliefs and competence in BSN-prepared pediatric bedside nurses, and to examine the feasibility,…

  16. Billing and reimbursement for a bedside toxicology service at a tertiary care academic center during its first fiscal year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Timothy J; Crane, Peter W; Kamali, Michael; Reif, Marilynn; Wratni, Rose; Montante, Ronald; Loveland, Tracey

    2015-03-01

    A bedside toxicology consult service may improve clinical care, facilitate patient clearance and disposition, and result in potential cost savings for poisoning exposures. Despite this, there is scant data regarding economic feasibility for such a service. Previously published information suggests low hourly reimbursement at approximately $26.00/h at the bedside for toxicology consultations. A bedside toxicology consultant service was initiated in 2011. Coverage was available 24 h a day for 50 out of 52 weeks. Bedside rounding on toxicology consult patients was available 6/7 days per week. The practice is associated with >800 bed teaching institution in a large upstate NY region with elements of urban and suburban practice. Demographic and billing data was collected for all patients consulted upon from July 1, 2011 to June 31, 2012. In charges of $514,941 were generated during the period of data collection. Monthly average was $42,912. Net reimbursement of charges was 29 % of overall charges at $147,792. In terms of total encounters, net collection rate in which something was reimbursed or "paid" against charges for that encounter was 82.6 % of all encounters at 999/1,210. Average encounter time for inpatients, including critical care, was 1.05 h, and the average time spent for outpatients was 1.18 h. Reimbursement rates appear higher than previously reported. Revenue generated from reimbursement from toxicology consultation can result in recouping a substantial portion of a toxicologist's salary or potentially fund fellowship positions and salaries or toxicology division infrastructure.

  17. Transillumination test: A bedside aid for differentiating meningocele from myelomeningocele: Point of care testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakash Pandita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transillumination test is a bedside and simple technique to illuminate the body cavity by transmission of light through the cavity. Transillumination test is used in a variety of conditions like hydrocele, Hydrocephalus, pneumoperitonium and pneumothorax in neonatology. We describe use of transillumination for differentiating meningocele and myelomeningocele.

  18. A cost-effective peripheral venous port system placed at the bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, R; Albrink, M H; Hart, M B; Rosemurgy, A S

    1992-07-01

    High costs and a paucity of available operating time have led us to seek alternatives to operatively placed vascular access systems. This prospective study is the initial report of a peripheral port system (P.A.S. PORT System, Pharmacia Deltec, Inc.) placed at the bedside. Seventy-nine patients (52 male, 27 female), ages 3-92 years, had ports implanted by surgical residents with attending supervision. Sixty-eight (86%) received the P.A.S. PORT for long-term antibiotics, antifungal, or antiviral therapy; four (5%) for TPN infusion; three (4%) for blood products; two (3%) for chemotherapy; and two (3%) for iv narcotics. Ports were placed in 10 (13%) HIV(+) patients, three (4%) who were fully anticoagulated, and one who was a hemophiliac with a platelet count of zero. Eight patients (10%) developed superficial phlebitis, all of which resolved with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents within 48 hr without port removal. Seven patients (9%) had their port removed due to infection. The average hospital charge to place the P.A.S. PORT System was $1488.00 vs $2811.00 for a tunneled external chest catheter and $3729.00 for the placement of a chest port. Bedside insertion of vascular access devices can be safely performed with acceptable infection rates allowing more efficient use of hospital operating rooms and with substantial cost savings.

  19. Reliability and Validity of Bedside Version of Persian WAB (P-WAB-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilipour, Reza; Pourshahbaz, Abbas; Ghoreyshi, Zahra Sadat

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we reported the reliability and validity of Bedside version of Persian WAB (P-WAB-1) adapted from Western Aphasia Battery (WAB-R) (1,2). P-WAB-1 is a clinical linguistic measuring tool to determine severity and type of aphasia in brain damaged patients based on Aphasia Quotient (AQ) as a functional measure. For the purposes of a quick clinical screening of aphasia in Persian, we adapted the bedside version of WAB-R to assess the performance of Persian aphasic patients. The data we reported on adaptation, validity and reliability of P-WAB-1 are based on faithful translation and criterion validity ratio (CVR) taken from the expert panel and the performance of 60 consecutive brain damaged patients referred to different university clinics for rehabilitation and 30 healthy subjects as norms and 40 age-matched epileptic patients as the control group. Based on the results of this study, P-WAB-1 has internal consistency (a=0.71) and test-retest reliability (r=.65 PPersian speaking brain damaged patients. This study is the initial step on adaptation of different versions of WAB-R to measure the severity of aphasia using AQ, LQ and CQ as operational measures and to classify Persian speaking aphasic patients into different types.

  20. Bedside ketone determination in diabetic children with hyperglycemia and ketosis in the acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Melissa R; Okada, Pamela; White, Perrin C

    2004-03-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus marked by characteristic biochemical derangements. Diagnosis and management involve frequent evaluation of these biochemical parameters. Reliable bedside equivalents for these laboratory studies may help reduce the time to treatment and reduce costs. We evaluated the precision and bias of a bedside serum ketone meter in the acute care setting. Serum ketone results using the Precision Xtra glucometer/ketone meter (Abbott Laboratories, MediSense Products Inc., Bedford, MA, USA) correlated strongly with the Children's Medical Center of Dallas' laboratory values within the meter's value range. Meter ketone values steadily decreased during the treatment of DKA as pH and CO(2) levels increased and acidosis resolved. Therefore, the meter may be useful in monitoring therapy for DKA. This meter may also prove useful in identifying patients at risk for DKA in physicians' offices or at home.

  1. Short-term estriol administration modulates hypothalamo-pituitary function in patients with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genazzani, Alessandro D; Podfigurna-Stopa, Agnieszka; Czyzyk, Adam; Katulski, Krzysztof; Prati, Alessia; Despini, Giulia; Angioni, Stefano; Simoncini, Tommaso; Meczekalski, Blazej

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of short-term estriol administration (10 d) on the hypothalamus-pituitary function and gonadotropins secretion in patients affected by functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA). Controlled clinical study on patients with FHA (n = 12) in a clinical research environment. Hormonal determinations and gonadotropin (luteinizing hormone [LH] and FSH) response to a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) bolus (10 μg) at baseline condition and after 10 d of therapy with 2 mg/d of estriol per os. Measurements of plasma LH, FSH, prolactin, estradiol, androstenedione, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone, insulin, cortisol, thyroid-stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine, and free thyroxine. After treatment, the FHA patients showed a statistically significant increase of both LH and FSH plasma levels and the significant increase of their responses to the GnRH bolus. Estriol short-term therapy modulates within 10 d of administration the neuroendocrine control of the hypothalamus-pituitary unit and induces the recovery of both gonadotropins synthesis and secretion in hypogonadotropic patients with FHA.

  2. Poor sensitization of 50-kHz vocalization response to amphetamine predicts rat susceptibility to self-administration of the drug

    OpenAIRE

    Taracha, Ewa; Kaniuga, Ewelina; Wyszogrodzka, Edyta; P?a?nik, Adam; Stefa?ski, Roman; Chrapusta, Stanis?aw J.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Our previous studies showed promise for using sensitization of the frequency-modulated 50-kHz vocalization response to amphetamine (AMPH) as an index of rat vulnerability to AMPH addiction. Objective This study aimed to test the utility of sensitizing frequency-modulated (FM) 50-kHz vocalization in the AMPH self-administration paradigm as well as the ability of N-acetylcysteine to prevent self-administration relapse. Methods Rats were subjected to the so-called two-injection protoco...

  3. The content and meaning of administrative work: a qualitative study of nursing practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Lucie; Waelli, Mathias; Allen, Davina; Minvielle, Etienne

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the content and meaning of nurses' administrative work. Nurses often report that administrative work keeps them away from bedside care. The content and meaning of this work remains insufficiently explored. Comparative case studies. The investigation took place in 2014. It was based on 254 hours of observations and 27 interviews with nurses and staff in two contrasting units: intensive care and long-term care. A time and motion study was also performed over a period of 96 hours. Documentation and Organizational Activities is composed of six categories; documenting the patient record, coordination, management of patient flow, transmission of information, reporting quality indicators, ordering supplies- stock management Equal amounts of time were spent on these activities in each case. Nurses did not express complaints about documentation in intensive care, whereas they reported feeling frustrated by it in long-term care. These differences reflected the extent to which these activities could be integrated into nurses' clinical work and this is in turn was related to several factors: staff ratios, informatics, and relevance to nursing work. Documentation and Organizational Activities are a main component of care. The meaning nurses attribute to them is dependent on organizational context. These activities are often perceived as competing with bedside care, but this does not have to be the case. The challenge for managers is to fully integrate them into nursing practice. Results also suggest that nurses' Documentation and Organizational Activities should be incorporated into informatics strategies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. From the Heart: Interatrial Septal Aneurysm Identified on Bedside Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Butterfield

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 61 year-old man presented to the Emergency Department for one day of nonspecific chest pain. Bedside echocardiogram performed by the emergency physician revealed normal systolic cardiac function but also showed a large ( > 10mm bicornuate interatrial septal aneurysm (IASA projecting into the right atrium (Figure 1, Video 1. There was no evidence of intraatrial thrombus. A formal echocardiogram performed later that day confirmed the diagnosis and also detected a patent foramen ovale (PFO with a left-to-right shunt that reversed with Valsalva maneuver. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(6:719–720

  5. Validation of a new bedside echoscopic heart examination resulting in an improvement in echo-lab workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réant, Patricia; Dijos, Marina; Arsac, Florence; Mignot, Aude; Cadenaule, Fabienne; Aumiaux, Annette; Jimenez, Christine; Dufau, Marilyne; Prévost, Alain; Pillois, Xavier; Fort, Patrick; Roudaut, Raymond; Lafitte, Stéphane

    2011-03-01

    In daily cardiology practice, porters are usually required to transfer inpatients who need an echocardiogram to the echocardiographic department (echo-lab). To assess echo-lab personnel workflow and patient transfer delay by comparing the use of a new, ultraportable, echoscopic, pocket-sized device at the bedside with patient transfer to the echo-lab for conventional transthoracic echocardiography, in patients needing pericardial control after cardiac invasive procedures. After validation of echoscopic capabilities for pericardial effusion, left ventricular function and mitral regurgitation grade compared with conventional echocardiography, we evaluated echo-lab personnel workflow and time to perform bedside echoscopy for pericardial control evaluation after invasive cardiac procedures. This strategy was compared with conventional evaluation at the echo-lab, in terms of personnel workflow, and patients' transfer, waiting and examination times. Concordance between echoscopy and conventional echocardiography for evaluation of pericardial effusion was good (0.97; kappa value 0.86). For left ventricular systolic function and mitral regurgitation evaluations, concordances were 0.96 (kappa value 0.90) and 0.96 (kappa value 0.86), respectively. In the second part of the study, the mean total time required in the bedside echoscopy group was 20.3±5.4 mins vs. 66.0±16.4 mins in the conventional echo-lab group (pporters in 100% of cases; 69% of patients needed a wheelchair. The use of miniaturized echoscopic tools for pericardial control after invasive cardiac procedures was feasible and accurate, allowing improvement in echo-lab workflow and avoiding patient waiting time and transfer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Do Bedside Visual Tools Improve Patient and Caregiver Satisfaction? A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Anupama A; Tur, Komalpreet; Mann, Jason; Townsend, Whitney; Flanders, Scott A; Chopra, Vineet

    2017-11-01

    Although common, the impact of low-cost bedside visual tools, such as whiteboards, on patient care is unclear. To systematically review the literature and assess the influence of bedside visual tools on patient satisfaction. Medline, Embase, SCOPUS, Web of Science, CINAHL, and CENTRAL. Studies of adult or pediatric hospitalized patients reporting physician identification, understanding of provider roles, patient-provider communication, and satisfaction with care from the use of visual tools were included. Outcomes were categorized as positive, negative, or neutral based on survey responses for identification, communication, and satisfaction. Two reviewers screened studies, extracted data, and assessed the risk of study bias. Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Visual tools included whiteboards (n = 4), physician pictures (n = 7), whiteboard and picture (n = 1), electronic medical record-based patient portals (n = 3), and formatted notepads (n = 1). Tools improved patients' identification of providers (13/13 studies). The impact on understanding the providers' roles was largely positive (8/10 studies). Visual tools improved patient-provider communication (4/5 studies) and satisfaction (6/8 studies). In adults, satisfaction varied between positive with the use of whiteboards (2/5 studies) and neutral with pictures (1/5 studies). Satisfaction related to pictures in pediatric patients was either positive (1/3 studies) or neutral (1/3 studies). Differences in tool format (individual pictures vs handouts with pictures of all providers) and study design (randomized vs cohort) may explain variable outcomes. The use of bedside visual tools appears to improve patient recognition of providers and patient-provider communication. Future studies that include better design and outcome assessment are necessary before widespread use can be recommended. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine

  7. Nurse Project Consultant: Critical Care Nurses Move Beyond the Bedside to Affect Quality and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinson, Lynn G; Corey, Juliann; Kelly, Veronica; O'Reilly, Kristin P; Stevens, Jennifer P; Desanto-Madeya, Susan; Williams, Donna; O'Donoghue, Sharon C; Foley, Jane

    2018-06-01

    A nurse project consultant role empowered 3 critical care nurses to expand their scope of practice beyond the bedside and engage within complex health care delivery systems to reduce harms in the intensive care unit. As members of an interdisciplinary team, the nurse project consultants contributed their clinical expertise and systems knowledge to develop innovations that optimize care provided in the intensive care unit. This article discusses the formal development of and institutional support for the nurse project consultant role. The nurse project consultants' responsibilities within a group of quality improvement initiatives are described and their challenges and lessons learned discussed. The nurse project consultant role is a new model of engaging critical care nurses as leaders in health care redesign. ©2018 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  8. Review of the Modular Administrative Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grand Valley State Colleges, Allendale, MI. Office of Institutional Analysis.

    The modular administrative structure implemented at Grand Valley State Colleges in 1973 is described as a system in which administrative affairs are divided into functional self-contained units called modules, each of which has a head or acting head who is responsible for the management of the functions contained within the module. A long-range…

  9. Sikker brug af bedside_UL-vejledt pleuracentese og ascitesdrændge hos patienter med maligne sygdomme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damstrup, Camilla Vantore

    2014-01-01

    and investigated the patients' medical files with regard to complications. In 29 pleuracentesises and 43 laparocentesises only one pneumothorax was registered (3.4%). This is comparable to previous studies and may suggest that it is safe to perform these procedures bedside in cancer patients with no complications....

  10. From the Bench to the Bedside: The Role of Semantic Web and Translational Medicine for Enabling the Next Generation Healthcare Enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Vipul

    The success of new innovations and technologies are very often disruptive in nature. At the same time, they enable novel next generation infrastructures and solutions. These solutions introduce great efficiencies in the form of efficient processes and the ability to create, organize, share and manage knowledge effectively; and the same time provide crucial enablers for proposing and realizing new visions. In this paper, we propose a new vision of the next generation healthcare enterprise and discuss how Translational Medicine, which aims to improve communication between the basic and clinical sciences, is a key requirement for achieving this vision. This will lead therapeutic insights may be derived from new scientific ideas - and vice versa. Translation research goes from bench to bedside, where theories emerging from preclinical experimentation are tested on disease-affected human subjects, and from bedside to bench, where information obtained from preliminary human experimentation can be used to refine our understanding of the biological principles underpinning the heterogeneity of human disease and polymorphism(s). Informatics and semantic technologies in particular, has a big role to play in making this a reality. We identify critical requirements, viz., data integration, clinical decision support and knowledge maintenance and provenance; and illustrate semantics-based solutions wrt example scenarios and use cases.

  11. Does the use of bedside pelvic ultrasound decrease length of stay in the emergency department?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamburaj, Ravi; Sivitz, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostic ultrasounds by emergency medicine (EM) and pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) physicians have increased because of ultrasonography training during residency and fellowship. The availability of ultrasound in radiology departments is limited or difficult to obtain especially during nighttime hours. Studies have shown that EM physicians can accurately perform goal-directed ultrasound after appropriate training. The goal of this study was to compare the length of stay for patients receiving an ultrasound to confirm intrauterine pregnancies. The hypothesis of this study is that a bedside ultrasound by a trained EM/PEM physician can reduce length of stay in the emergency department (ED) by 1 hour. This was a case cohort retrospective review for patients aged 13 to 21 years who received pelvic ultrasounds in the ED during 2007. Each patient was placed into 1 of 2 groups. Group 1 received bedside ultrasounds done by institutionally credentialed EM/PEM attending physicians. Group 2 received radiology department ultrasound only. Each group had subanalysis done including chief complaint, time of presentation, time to completion of ultrasound, length of stay, diagnosis, and disposition. Daytime was defined as presentation between 7 AM and 9 PM when radiology ultrasound technologists were routinely available. We studied 330 patients, with 244 patients (74%) in the bedside ultrasound group. The demographics of both groups showed no difference in age, presenting complaints, discharge diagnoses, and ultimate disposition. Group 1 had a significant reduction (P ultrasound compared with group 2 (mean, 82 minutes [range, 1-901 minutes] vs 149 minutes [range, 7-506 minutes]) and length of stay (142 [16-2268] vs. 230 [16-844]). Of those presenting during the day (66%), group 1 showed a significant reduction in length of stay (P ultrasound by trained EM/PEM physicians produced a significant reduction in length of stay in the ED, regardless of radiology ultrasound technologist

  12. Exploration Augmentation Module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Exploration Augmentation Module (EAM) project goal is to design and deliver a flight module that is to be deployed to Earth-Lunar Distant Retrograde Orbit (DRO)....

  13. Pneumococcusuria: From bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, S; Sanjeevan, K V; Sudheer, A; Dinesh, K R; Kumar, A; Karim, S

    2012-01-01

    The present study highlights six cases of pneumococcusuria during the time period of May 2008 to May 2010. All the patients had a co-existing predisposing factor with the isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae in urine. Five of the six patients having signs and symptoms of urinary tract infections (UTI) were treated and cured of the same. It becomes essential to consider pneumococcal UTI in the presence of clinical signs and symptoms associated with urinary tract abnormalities like hydronephrosis and renal stones. S. pneumoniae may be regarded as an emerging pathogen in UTI. Precise microbiological diagnosis must correlate with the clinical signs and symptoms for the administration of appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  14. Bedside intravascular ultrasound-guided inferior vena cava filter placement in medical-surgical intensive care critically-ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Abusedera

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Bedside IVUS-guided filter placement in medical-surgical critically ill patient in intensive care unit is a feasible, safe and reliable technique for IVC interruption. IVUS may be the most appropriate tool to guide filter insertion in obese patient.

  15. Fast Doppler as a novel bedside measure of cerebral perfusion in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeples, Eric S; Mehic, Edin; Mourad, Pierre D; Juul, Sandra E

    2016-02-01

    Altered cerebral perfusion from impaired autoregulation may contribute to the morbidity and mortality associated with premature birth. We hypothesized that fast Doppler imaging could provide a reproducible bedside estimation of cerebral perfusion and autoregulation in preterm infants. This is a prospective pilot study using fast Doppler ultrasound to assess blood flow velocity in the basal ganglia of 19 subjects born at 26-32 wk gestation. Intraclass correlation provided a measure of test-retest reliability, and linear regression of cerebral blood flow velocity and heart rate or blood pressure allowed for estimations of autoregulatory ability. The intraclass correlation when imaging in the first 48 h of life was 0.634. We found significant and independent correlations between the systolic blood flow velocity and both systolic blood pressure and heart rate (P = 0.015 and 0.012 respectively) only in the 26-28 wk gestational age infants in the first 48 h of life. Our results suggest that fast Doppler provides reliable bedside measurements of cerebral blood flow velocity at the tissue level in premature infants, acting as a proxy for cerebral tissue perfusion. Additionally, autoregulation appears to be impaired in the extremely preterm infants, even within a normal range of blood pressures.

  16. Testing a bedside personal computer Clinical Care Classification System for nursing students using Microsoft Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeg, Veronica D; Saba, Virginia K; Feeg, Alan N

    2008-01-01

    This study tested a personal computer-based version of the Sabacare Clinical Care Classification System on students' performance of charting patient care plans. The application was designed as an inexpensive alternative to teach electronic charting for use on any laptop or personal computer with Windows and Microsoft Access. The data-based system was tested in a randomized trial with the control group using a type-in text-based-only system also mounted on a laptop at the bedside in the laboratory. Student care plans were more complete using the data-based system over the type-in text version. Students were more positive but not necessarily more efficient with the data-based system. The results demonstrate that the application is effective for improving student nursing care charting using the nursing process and capturing patient care information with a language that is standardized and ready for integration with other patient electronic health record data. It can be implemented on a bedside stand in the clinical laboratory or used to aggregate care planning over a student's clinical experience.

  17. Percutaneous catheter drainage of thoracic fluid: the usefulness and safety of bedside trocar placement under ultrasound guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Heon [Seoul Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-15

    The author wanted to evaluate the usefulness and safety of the trocar technique for US-guided bedside catheter placement into thoracic fluid collections, and this technique has generally been reserved for the larger or superficial fluid collections. 42 drainage procedures were performed in 38 patients at the bedside. The patients were positioned supine or semi-upright. A drainage catheter system with a stylet and cannula assembly was used and all of the catheters were inserted using the trocar technique. The procedures consisted of drainage of empyema (n=14), malignant effusion (n=13), lung abscess (n=3), massive transudate (n=8), hemothorax (n=2) and chest wall hematoma (n=2). The clinical results were classified as successful (complete and partially successful), failure or undetermined. The medical records and images were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate the success rate, the complications and the procedure time. Technical success was achieved in all of the 42 procedures. With using the trocar technique, all the catheters were placed into even the small collections without significant complications. Drainage was successful in 36 (85.7%) of the 42 procedures. The average volume of thoracic fluid that was aspirated manually at the time of catheter placement was 420 mL (range: 35 to 1470 mL). The procedure time was less than 10 minutes from US-localization to complete catheter placement in all of the procedures. The trocar technique under US guidance can be an efficient and safe alternative to the Seldinger or guide-wire exchange technique for bedside catheter placement in the critically ill or hemodynamically unstable patients.

  18. Medical immunology: two-way bridge connecting bench and bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkers, Ger T; Damoiseaux, Jan G M C; Hooijkaas, Herbert

    2014-12-01

    Medical immunology in The Netherlands is a laboratory specialism dealing with immunological analyses as well as pre- and post-analytical consultation to clinicians (clinical immunologists and other specialists) involved in patients with immune mediated diseases. The scope of medical immunology includes immunodeficiencies, autoimmune diseases, allergy, transfusion and transplantation immunology, and lymphoproliferative disorders plus the monitoring of these patients. The training, professional criteria, quality control of procedures and laboratories is well organized. As examples of the bridge function of medical immunology between laboratory (bench) and patient (bedside) the contribution of medical immunologists to diagnosis and treatment of primary immunodeficiency diseases (in particular: humoral immunodeficiencies) as well as autoantibodies (anti-citrullinated proteins in rheumatoid arthritis) are given. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Extinction Training Regulates Neuroadaptive Responses to Withdrawal from Chronic Cocaine Self-Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Self, David W.; Choi, Kwang-Ho; Simmons, Diana; Walker, John R.; Smagula, Cynthia S.

    2004-01-01

    Cocaine produces multiple neuroadaptations with chronic repeated use. Many of these neuroadaptations can be reversed or normalized by extinction training during withdrawal from chronic cocaine self-administration in rats. This article reviews our past and present studies on extinction-induced modulation of the neuroadaptive response to chronic cocaine in the mesolimbic dopamine system, and the role of this modulation in addictive behavior in rats. Extinction training normalizes tyrosine hydro...

  20. Relationship between Quality of Life and Nurse-led Bedside Symptom Evaluations in Patients with Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Sook Yoo, RN, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Collectively, our results indicate that nurse-led bedside evaluation is a noninvasive and useful method for detecting neurotoxicity and evaluating the patient’s QOL both during and after treatment.

  1. Feasibility of monomodal analgesia with IV alfentanil during burn dressing changes at bedside (in spontaneously breathing non-intubated patients).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Mathieu; Latarjet, Jacques; Payre, Jacqueline; Poupelin, Jean-Charles; Ravat, François

    2017-03-01

    The severe pain related to repeated burn dressing changes at bedside is often difficult to manage. However these dressings can be performed at bedside on spontaneously breathing non-intubated patients using powerful intravenous opioids with a quick onset and a short duration of action such as alfentanil. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of the protocol which is used in our burn unit for pain control during burn dressing changes. Cohort study began after favorable opinion from local ethic committee has been collected. Patient's informed consent was collected. No fasting was required. Vital signs for patients were continuously monitored (non-invasive blood pressure, ECG monitoring, cutaneous oxygen saturation, respiratory rate) all over the process. Boluses of 500 (±250) mcg IV alfentanil were administered. A continuous infusion was added in case of insufficient analgesia. Adverse reactions were collected and pain intensity was measured throughout the dressing using a ten step verbal rating scale (VRS) ranging from 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst pain conceivable). 100 dressings (35 patients) were analyzed. Median age was 45 years and median burned area 10%. We observed 3 blood pressure drops, 5 oxygen desaturations (treated with stimulation without the necessity of ventilatory support) and one episode of nausea. Most of the patients (87%) were totally conscious during the dressing and 13% were awakened by verbal stimulation. Median total dose of alfentanil used was 2000μg for a median duration of 35min. Pain scores during the procedure were low or moderate (VRS mean=2.0 and maximal VRS=5). Median satisfaction collected 2h after the dressing was 10 on a ten step scale. Pain control with intravenous alfentanil alone is efficient and appears safe for most burn bedside repeated dressings in hospitalized patients. It achieves satisfactory analgesia during and after the procedure. It is now our standard analgesic method to provide repeated

  2. Comparative study of Caspian roach (Rutilus rutilus caspicus fry gut microbiota modulation following administration of galacto- and fructooligosaccharide prebiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hossein Hoseinifar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Modulation of intestinal microbiota toward potentially beneficial communities (probiotics positively affects fish physiology and health status. Different prebiotics showed contradictory effects on intestinal microbiota. The present study investigates the effects of different levels of two prebiotics, galacto- and fructooligosaccharide on intestinal microbiota of Caspian roach fry which is a commercially valuable species of Caspian sea. Materials and methods: The study was performed as a randomized design with 5 treatments and 3 replications in which Caspian roach were fed different levels, 0, 1, and 2% of galacto- and fructooligosaccharide prebiotics for 6 weeks. At the end of the trial culture, analysis of intestinal microbiota include lactic acid bacteria levels, total bacteria as well as proportion of LAB were performed by using MRS agar, Plate count agar media. Results: Administration of different levels of galacto- and fructooligosaccharide had no significant effects on total bacteria of intestinal microbiota (P > 0.05. The lactic acid bacteria levels significantly increased compared to control group following prebiotics administration in diet (P > 0.05. LAB levels in galactooligosaccharide treatment were higher than those of fructooligosaccharide treatment. The highest LAB proportion in intestinal microbiota was observed in roach fed diet which contains 2% galactooligosaccharide (P > 0.05. Discussion and conclusion: The results of the present study revealed that prebiotics can be used for modulation of Caspian roach intestinal microbiota toward beneficial bacterial communities. Also, the results showed that galactooligosaccharide was more efficient than fructooligosaccharide in case of modulation of intestinal microbiota and elevation of LAB levels.

  3. From bench to bedside: successful translational nanomedicine: highlights of the Third Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chiming; Liu, Nanhai; Xu, Pingyi; Heller, Mike; Tomalia, Donald A; Haynie, Donald T; Chang, Esther H; Wang, Kuan; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Lyubchenko, Yuri L; Bawa, Raj; Tian, Ryan; Hanes, Justin; Pun, Suzie; Meiners, Jens-Christian; Guo, Peixuan

    2007-12-01

    The Third Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Nanomedicine (AANM) was held at the University of California San Diego, in San Diego, California during September 7-8, 2007. The meeting was focused on successful translational nanomedicine: from bench to bedside. There were four keynote lectures and eight scientific symposiums in this meeting. The researchers and investigators reported the results and process of current nanomedicine research and approaches to clinical applications. The meeting provided exciting information for nanomedicine clinical-related researches and strategy for further development of nanomedicine research which will be benefits to clinical practice.

  4. Hand-carried ultrasound performed at bedside in cardiology inpatient setting – a comparative study with comprehensive echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramires Jose F

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hand-carried ultrasound (HCU devices have been demonstrated to improve the diagnosis of cardiac diseases over physical examination, and have the potential to broaden the versatility in ultrasound application. The role of these devices in the assessment of hospitalized patients is not completely established. In this study we sought to perform a direct comparison between bedside evaluation using HCU and comprehensive echocardiography (CE, in cardiology inpatient setting. Methods We studied 44 consecutive patients (mean age 54 ± 18 years, 25 men who underwent bedside echocardiography using HCU and CE. HCU was performed by a cardiologist with level-2 training in the performance and interpretation of echocardiography, using two-dimensional imaging, color Doppler, and simple calliper measurements. CE was performed by an experienced echocardiographer (level-3 training and considered as the gold standard. Results There were no significant differences in cardiac chamber dimensions and left ventricular ejection fraction determined by the two techniques. The agreement between HCU and CE for the detection of segmental wall motion abnormalities was 83% (Kappa = 0.58. There was good agreement for detecting significant mitral valve regurgitation (Kappa = 0.85, aortic regurgitation (kappa = 0.89, and tricuspid regurgitation (Kappa = 0.74. A complete evaluation of patients with stenotic and prosthetic dysfunctional valves, as well as pulmonary hypertension, was not possible using HCU due to its technical limitations in determining hemodynamic parameters. Conclusion Bedside evaluation using HCU is helpful for assessing cardiac chamber dimensions, left ventricular global and segmental function, and significant valvular regurgitation. However, it has limitations regarding hemodynamic assessment, an important issue in the cardiology inpatient setting.

  5. Improving patient safety in transfusion medicine: contemporary challenges and the roles for bedside and laboratory biovigilance in addressing them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzejewski Jr C

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chester Andrzejewski Jr,1 Darlene Cloutier,1 David Unold,2 Richard C Friedberg1 1Transfusion Medicine Services, Department of Pathology, Baystate Medical Center, Baystate Health, Springfield, MA, 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: Throughout the history of hemotherapy (HT, various challenges and concerns have been encountered in its practical application. When viewed using a prismatic lens of history, recurrent themes regarding adverse HT sequelae separate and become apparent. These can be broadly classified into three categories: infectious, noninfectious, and administrative/logistical. Using the HT care map as a frame of reference along with its associated rites, we examine the contemporary spectrum of HT adverse events and concerns, and some approaches as to how these may be addressed from bedside and laboratory medicine biovigilance perspectives enhancing patient care and blood transfusion safety. Although our vantage point is from an academic community hospital venue, the issues and concerns identified are germane to many if not all transfusion-medicine practice environments. Included among the subjects we explore are patient/specimen identification issues, blood-management initiatives, unrecognized and/or unreported suspected transfusion reactions, transfusion-associated adverse pulmonary sequelae (including transfusion-related acute lung injury and transfusion-associated circulatory overload, expanded applications of electronic health records and issues regarding their “meaningful use” and interinstitutional “digital compatibilities”, biovigilance integration of electronic data networks within and between health care entities, and anticipated workforce contractions secondary to projected declines in the availability of qualified laboratory professionals. Cooperative initiatives between accreditation and regulatory entities, blood collectors and suppliers, hospital

  6. Inpatient satisfaction and usage patterns of personalized smart bedside station system for patient-centered service at a tertiary university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Borim; Kim, Seok; Lee, Kee-Hyuck; Hwang, Hee; Yoo, Sooyoung

    2016-11-01

    Bedside stations, also known as bedside terminals, are in place to enhance the quality and experience of a hospital's healthcare service delivery. The purpose of this study was to identify information needs and overall satisfaction with the personalized patient bedside system, called Smart Bedside Station (SBS) system, embedded in a tertiary general university hospital. End-user responses on the satisfaction survey and system usage logs of the SBS system were collected and analyzed. For the user opinion survey, 156 nurses and 1914 patients, their family members, or caregivers participated during the evaluation period of 2013 to 2014 in this study. All working nurses in the SBS-installed ward were answered the paper-based evaluation, for complete enumeration survey. Inpatients were voluntary participated to deliver the online questionnaire on the SBS menu. We also explored system log data including page calls and usage time from December 2013 to 2015. Regarding the relationship of overall satisfaction of the SBS with patient's characteristics, patient's education status and degree of familiarity with the smart device were statistically significant. From the analysis of system logs, Personalized My Menu(28.0%) was the most frequently used menu item (except for TV and Internet entertainment service use of 62.7%),it provides individual health information, such as laboratory test results, hospital fee check, message logs, daily medication information, and meal information. Next frequently used menus were information support(4.9%) which deliver hospital guide and health information and convenience service ordering(4.4%) such as meal order, bed sheet change. Satisfaction survey results and log data results show that the personalized service enhances the user satisfaction during hospital admission. Our post-implementation experience and subsequent assessment of SBS system is capable of providing insights into improving the hospital information system and service contents

  7. [Vertigo in the Emergency Department: new bedside tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamás, T László; Garai, Tibor; Tompos, Tamás; Szirmai, Ágnes

    2016-03-13

    According to international statistics, the first examination of 25% of patients with vertigo is carried out in Emergency Departments. The most important task of the examining physician is to diagnose life threatening pathologic processes. One of the most difficult otoneurological diagnostic challange in Emergency Departments is to differentiate between dangerous posterior scale stroke presenting with isolated vertigo and the benign vestibular neuritis.These two disorders can be safely differentiated using fast, non-invasive, evidence based bedside tests which have been introduced in the past few years. 35% of stroke cases mimicking vestibular neuritis (pseudoneuritis) are misdiagnosed at the Emergency Department, and 40% of these cases develop complications. During the first 48 hours, sensitivity for stroke of the new test that is based on the malfunction of the oculomotor system is better than the diffusion-weighted cranial magnetic resonance imaging. Using special test glasses each component of the new test can be made objective and repeatable.

  8. Implementation of a pharmacy automation system (robotics) to ensure medication safety at Norwalk hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bepko, Robert J; Moore, John R; Coleman, John R

    2009-01-01

    This article reports an intervention to improve the quality and safety of hospital patient care by introducing the use of pharmacy robotics into the medication distribution process. Medication safety is vitally important. The integration of pharmacy robotics with computerized practitioner order entry and bedside medication bar coding produces a significant reduction in medication errors. The creation of a safe medication-from initial ordering to bedside administration-provides enormous benefits to patients, to health care providers, and to the organization as well.

  9. Implementing interprofessional bedside rounding at the prequalification stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuite DR

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Daniel R Tuite,1 David Healy,1 Thomas S MacKinnon2 1Faculty of Medicine, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, 2School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UKWe read with great interest the paper by Henkin et al,1 demonstrating that the use of interprofessional bedside rounding (IBR significantly improved nurse–physician teamwork, particularly from the nurses’ point of view. This finding is relevant when one takes into account the importance of interdisciplinary teamwork; a review conducted by Epstein concluded that effective interprofessional teamwork both maximizes patient safety and increases job satisfaction and efficiency.2 We, as medical students, believe that inadequate emphasis is placed on interprofessional collaboration at the prequalification phase, and therefore, we suggest that implementing IBR at the university level could represent a method to improve teamwork between the nurses and doctors of the future.  View the original paper by Henkin et al.  

  10. Comparing diagnostic accuracy of bedside ultrasound and radiography for bone fracture screening in multiple trauma patients at the ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolandparvaz, Shahram; Moharamzadeh, Payman; Jamali, Kazem; Pouraghaei, Mahboob; Fadaie, Maryam; Sefidbakht, Sepideh; Shahsavari, Kavous

    2013-11-01

    Long bone fractures are currently diagnosed using radiography, but radiography has some disadvantages (radiation and being time consuming). The present study compared the diagnostic accuracy of bedside ultrasound and radiography in multiple trauma patients at the emergency department (ED). The study assessed 80 injured patients with multiple trauma from February 2011 to July 2012. The patients were older than 18 years and triaged to the cardiopulmonary resuscitation ward of the ED. Bedside ultrasound and radiography were conducted for them. The findings were separately and blindly assessed by 2 radiologists. Sensitivity, specificity, the positive and negative predictive value, and κ coefficient were measured to assess the accuracy and validity of ultrasound as compared with radiography. The sensitivity of ultrasound for diagnosis of limb bone fractures was not high enough and ranged between 55% and 75% depending on the fracture site. The specificity of this diagnostic method had an acceptable range of 62% to 84%. Ultrasound negative prediction value was higher than other indices under study and ranged between 73% and 83%, but its positive prediction value varied between 33.3% and 71%. The κ coefficient for diagnosis of long bone fractures of upper limb (κ = 0.58) and upper limb joints (κ = 0.47) and long bones of lower limb (κ = 0.52) was within the medium range. However, the value for diagnosing fractures of lower limb joints (κ = 0.47) was relatively low. Bedside ultrasound is not a reliable method for diagnosing fractures of upper and lower limb bones compared with radiography. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Lower incidence of unexpected in-hospital death after interprofessional implementation of a bedside track-and-trigger system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Gitte; Samuelson, Karin Samuelsonkarin; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    In-hospital patients may suffer unexpected death because of suboptimal monitoring. Early recognition of deviating physiological parameters may enable staff to prevent unexpected in-hospital death. The aim of this study was to evaluate short- and long-term effects of systematic interprofessional u...... of early warning scoring, structured observation charts, and clinical algorithms for bedside action....

  12. The American Geriatrics Society/National Institute on Aging Bedside-to-Bench Conference: Research Agenda on Delirium in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailovich, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The American Geriatrics Society, with support from the National Institute on Aging and the John A. Hartford Foundation, held its seventh Bedside-to-Bench research conference, entitled “Delirium in Older Adults: Finding Order in the Disorder” on February 9–11, 2014, to provide participants with opportunities to learn about cutting-edge research developments, draft recommendations for future research involving translational efforts, and opportunities to network with colleagues and leaders in the field. This meeting was the first of three conferences that will address delirium, sleep disorders, and voiding difficulties and urinary incontinence, emphasizing, whenever possible, the relationships and potentially shared clinical and pathophysiological features between these common geriatric syndromes. PMID:25834932

  13. Innovative integrative bedside teaching model improves tutors’ self-assessments of teaching skills and attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itai Gat

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient bedside is the ideal setting for teaching physical examination, medical interviewing, and interpersonal skills. Herein we describe a novel model for bedside teaching (BST practiced during tutor training workshop and its resulting effect on practitioners’ self assessment of teaching skills and perceptions. Methods: One-day tutor training workshop included theoretical knowledge supplementation regarding tutors’ roles as well as implementing practical tools for clinical education, mainly BST model. The model, which emphasizes simultaneous clinical and communication teaching in a stepwise approach, was practiced by consecutive simulations with a gradual escalation of difficulty and adjusted instruction approaches. Pre- and post-workshop-adjusted questionnaires using a Likert scale of 1 to 4 were completed by participants and compared. Results: Analysis was based on 25 out of 48 participants who completed both questionnaires. Significantly improved teaching skills were demonstrated upon workshop completion (mean 3.3, SD 0.5 compared with pre-training (mean 2.6, SD 0.6; p<0.001 with significant increase in most examined parameters. Significantly improved tutor's roles internalization was demonstrated after training completion (mean 3.7, SD 0.3 compared with pre-workshop (mean 3.5 SD 0.5; p=0.002. Discussion: Successful BST involves combination of clinical and communication skills. BST model practiced during the workshop may contribute to improved teaching skills in this challenging environment.

  14. Assessment of a new undergraduate module in musculoskeletal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queally, Joseph M; Cummins, Fionnan; Brennan, Stephen A; Shelly, Martin J; O'Byrne, John M

    2011-02-02

    Despite the high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders seen by primary care physicians, numerous studies have demonstrated deficiencies in the adequacy of musculoskeletal education at multiple stages of medical education. The aim of this study was to assess a newly developed module in musculoskeletal medicine for use at European undergraduate level (i.e., the medical-school level). A two-week module in musculoskeletal medicine was designed to cover common musculoskeletal disorders that are typically seen in primary care. The module incorporated an integrated approach, including core lectures, bedside clinical examination, and demonstration of basic practical procedures. A previously validated examination in musculoskeletal medicine was used to assess the cognitive knowledge of ninety-two students on completion of the module. A historical control group (seventy-two students) from a prior course was used for comparison. The new module group (2009) performed significantly better than the historical (2006) control group in terms of score (62.3% versus 54.3%, respectively; p pass rate (38.4% versus 12.5%, respectively; p = 0.0002). In a subgroup analysis of the new module group, students who enrolled in the graduate entry program (an accelerated four-year curriculum consisting of students who have already completed an undergraduate university degree) were more likely to perform better in terms of average score (72.2% versus 57%, respectively; p pass rates (70.9% versus 21.4%, respectively; p paper represents an educational advance at undergraduate (i.e., medical-school) level as demonstrated by the improvement in scores in a validated examination. As pressure on medical curricula grows to accommodate advancing medical knowledge, it is important to continue to improve, assess, and consolidate the position of musculoskeletal medicine in contemporary medical education.

  15. Faith-to-faith at the bedside: theological and ethical issues in ecumenical clinical chaplaincy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, Brad F

    2003-04-01

    Chaplains who serve in a clinical context often minister to patients representing a wide variety of faiths. In order to offer the best pastoral care possible, the chaplain should first possess a set of personal theological convictions as a foundation for ministry. Second, he or she needs to be sensitive to the beliefs and practices of the patients. Third, it is vital to develop a relationship of acceptance and trust not only with patients under their care, but also with family members and caregivers as well. At times, situations will arise that are purely religious or theological. In a clinical setting, however, the questions and problems that arise more often are both theological and ethical. It is beneficial for the chaplain to be involved in an ethics committee, where the specifics of each case can be discussed, and staff can offer counsel to patients and their families. This study examines issues that chaplains face at the bedside, such as terminal care, life-prolonging treatments, dementia, persistent vegetative state, and euthanasia-assisted suicide. We will discover that those who are involved in clinical pastoral ministry will be called upon to be a comforter, mediator, educator, ethicist, and counselor.

  16. Bedside Evaluation of Cerebral Energy Metabolism in Severe Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Schulz, Mette; Jacobsen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mortality and morbidity have remained high in bacterial meningitis. Impairment of cerebral energy metabolism probably contributes to unfavorable outcome. Intracerebral microdialysis is routinely used to monitor cerebral energy metabolism, and recent experimental studies indicate...... that this technique may separate ischemia and non-ischemic mitochondrial dysfunction. The present study is a retrospective interpretation of biochemical data obtained in a series of patients with severe community-acquired meningitis. METHODS: Cerebral energy metabolism was monitored in 15 patients with severe...... community-acquired meningitis utilizing intracerebral microdialysis and bedside biochemical analysis. According to previous studies, cerebral ischemia was defined as lactate/pyruvate (LP) ratio >30 with intracerebral pyruvate level

  17. Clinical Implications of Cluster Analysis-Based Classification of Acute Decompensated Heart Failure and Correlation with Bedside Hemodynamic Profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Ahmad

    Full Text Available Classification of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF is based on subjective criteria that crudely capture disease heterogeneity. Improved phenotyping of the syndrome may help improve therapeutic strategies.To derive cluster analysis-based groupings for patients hospitalized with ADHF, and compare their prognostic performance to hemodynamic classifications derived at the bedside.We performed a cluster analysis on baseline clinical variables and PAC measurements of 172 ADHF patients from the ESCAPE trial. Employing regression techniques, we examined associations between clusters and clinically determined hemodynamic profiles (warm/cold/wet/dry. We assessed association with clinical outcomes using Cox proportional hazards models. Likelihood ratio tests were used to compare the prognostic value of cluster data to that of hemodynamic data.We identified four advanced HF clusters: 1 male Caucasians with ischemic cardiomyopathy, multiple comorbidities, lowest B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP levels; 2 females with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, few comorbidities, most favorable hemodynamics; 3 young African American males with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, most adverse hemodynamics, advanced disease; and 4 older Caucasians with ischemic cardiomyopathy, concomitant renal insufficiency, highest BNP levels. There was no association between clusters and bedside-derived hemodynamic profiles (p = 0.70. For all adverse clinical outcomes, Cluster 4 had the highest risk, and Cluster 2, the lowest. Compared to Cluster 4, Clusters 1-3 had 45-70% lower risk of all-cause mortality. Clusters were significantly associated with clinical outcomes, whereas hemodynamic profiles were not.By clustering patients with similar objective variables, we identified four clinically relevant phenotypes of ADHF patients, with no discernable relationship to hemodynamic profiles, but distinct associations with adverse outcomes. Our analysis suggests that ADHF classification using

  18. "Booster" training: evaluation of instructor-led bedside cardiopulmonary resuscitation skill training and automated corrective feedback to improve cardiopulmonary resuscitation compliance of Pediatric Basic Life Support providers during simulated cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Robert M; Niles, Dana; Meaney, Peter A; Aplenc, Richard; French, Benjamin; Abella, Benjamin S; Lengetti, Evelyn L; Berg, Robert A; Helfaer, Mark A; Nadkarni, Vinay

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of brief bedside "booster" cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training to improve CPR guideline compliance of hospital-based pediatric providers. Prospective, randomized trial. General pediatric wards at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Sixty-nine Basic Life Support-certified hospital-based providers. CPR recording/feedback defibrillators were used to evaluate CPR quality during simulated pediatric arrest. After a 60-sec pretraining CPR evaluation, subjects were randomly assigned to one of three instructional/feedback methods to be used during CPR booster training sessions. All sessions (training/CPR manikin practice) were of equal duration (2 mins) and differed only in the method of corrective feedback given to participants during the session. The study arms were as follows: 1) instructor-only training; 2) automated defibrillator feedback only; and 3) instructor training combined with automated feedback. Before instruction, 57% of the care providers performed compressions within guideline rate recommendations (rate >90 min(-1) and 38 mm); and 36% met overall CPR compliance (rate and depth within targets). After instruction, guideline compliance improved (instructor-only training: rate 52% to 87% [p .01], and overall CPR compliance, 43% to 78% [p CPR compliance, 35% to 96% [p training combined with automated feedback: rate 48% to 100% [p CPR compliance, 30% to 100% [p CPR instruction, most certified Pediatric Basic Life Support providers did not perform guideline-compliant CPR. After a brief bedside training, CPR quality improved irrespective of training content (instructor vs. automated feedback). Future studies should investigate bedside training to improve CPR quality during actual pediatric cardiac arrests.

  19. Exploration of exposure conditions with a novel wireless detector for bedside digital radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, Hilde; Nens, Joris; Delzenne, Louis; Marshall, Nicholas; Pauwels, Herman; De Wever, Walter; Oyen, Raymond

    2012-03-01

    We propose, apply and validate an optimization scheme for a new wireless CsI based DR detector in combination with a regular mobile X-ray system for bedside imaging applications. Three different grids were tested in this combination. Signal-difference-to-noise was investigated in two ways, using a 1mm Cu piece in combination with different thicknesses of PMMA and by means of the CDRAD phantom using 10 images per condition and an automated evaluation method. A Figure of Merit (FOM), namely SDNR2/Imparted Energy, was calculated for a large range of exposure conditions, without and with grid in place. Misalignment of the grids was evaluated via the same FOMs. This optimization study was validated with comparative X-ray acquisitions performed on dead bodies. An experienced radiologist scored the quality of several specific aspects for all these exposures. Signal difference to noise ratios measured with the Cu method correlated well with the threshold contrasts from the CDRAD analysis (R2 > 0.9). The analysis showed optimal FOM with detector air kerma rates as typically used in clinical practice. Lower tube voltages provide higher FOM than the higher values but their practical use depends on the limitations of X-ray tubes, linked to patient motion artefacts. The use of high resolution grids should be encouraged, as the FOM increases with 47% at 75kV. These scores from the Visual grading study confirmed the results obtained with the FOM. The switch to (wireless) DR technology for bedside imaging could benefit from devices to improve grid positioning or any scatter reduction technique.

  20. Sexual orientation and gender identity: an administrative approach to diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Tara L

    2002-01-01

    Research indicates that gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (GLBTQ) teens in the care of a northeastern child welfare department do not receive adequate services due to the workers' homophobic attitudes. These teens are at high risk for alcohol and drug abuse, homelessness, prostitution, and suicide. A training module was developed for administrators. Pretest and posttest instruments measured their education and support of GLBTQ issues before and after the training.

  1. Acceptance of a Mobile Application Supporting Nurses Workflow at Patient Bedside: Results from a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrler, Frederic; Ducloux, Pascal; Wu, Danny T Y; Lovis, Christian; Blondon, Katherine

    2018-01-01

    Supporting caregivers' workflow with mobile applications (apps) is a growing trend. At the bedside, apps can provide new ways to support the documentation process rather than using a desktop computer in a nursing office. Although these applications show potential, few existing reports have studied the real impact of such solutions. At the University Hospitals of Geneva, we developed BEDside Mobility, a mobile application supporting nurses' daily workflow. In a pilot study, the app was trialed in two wards for a period of one month. We collected data of the actual usage of the app and asked the users to complete a tailored technology acceptance model questionnaire at the end of the study period. Results show that participation remain stable with time with participants using in average the tool for almost 29 minutes per day. The technology acceptance questionnaires revealed a high usability of the app and good promotion from the institution although users did not perceive any increase in productivity. Overall, intent of use was divergent between promoters and antagonist. Furthermore, some participants considered the tool as an addition to their workload. This evaluation underlines the importance of helping all end users perceive the benefits of a new intervention since coworkers strong influence each other.

  2. Bedside ultrasound training at Muhimbili National Hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania and Hospital San Carlos in Chiapas, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teri A. Reynolds

    2016-09-01

    Discussion: Introducing bedside ultrasound training in two distinct resource-limited settings was feasible and well-received. After a brief intensive period of training, participants successfully passed a comprehensive examination, including demonstration of standardised image acquisition and accurate interpretation of normal and abnormal studies.

  3. Bedside functional brain imaging in critically-ill children using high-density EEG source modeling and multi-modal sensory stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Eytan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute brain injury is a common cause of death and critical illness in children and young adults. Fundamental management focuses on early characterization of the extent of injury and optimizing recovery by preventing secondary damage during the days following the primary injury. Currently, bedside technology for measuring neurological function is mainly limited to using electroencephalography (EEG for detection of seizures and encephalopathic features, and evoked potentials. We present a proof of concept study in patients with acute brain injury in the intensive care setting, featuring a bedside functional imaging set-up designed to map cortical brain activation patterns by combining high density EEG recordings, multi-modal sensory stimulation (auditory, visual, and somatosensory, and EEG source modeling. Use of source-modeling allows for examination of spatiotemporal activation patterns at the cortical region level as opposed to the traditional scalp potential maps. The application of this system in both healthy and brain-injured participants is demonstrated with modality-specific source-reconstructed cortical activation patterns. By combining stimulation obtained with different modalities, most of the cortical surface can be monitored for changes in functional activation without having to physically transport the subject to an imaging suite. The results in patients in an intensive care setting with anatomically well-defined brain lesions suggest a topographic association between their injuries and activation patterns. Moreover, we report the reproducible application of a protocol examining a higher-level cortical processing with an auditory oddball paradigm involving presentation of the patient's own name. This study reports the first successful application of a bedside functional brain mapping tool in the intensive care setting. This application has the potential to provide clinicians with an additional dimension of information to manage

  4. Research: Designing interprofessional modules for undergraduate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... financial constraints, administrative support, logistical issues and resistance to change. The designing and implementing of new modules were intense and time consuming, and required commitment. The development of the modules was an excellent example of interprofessional teamwork that needs to be transferred to ...

  5. Bedside Echocardiography for Rapid Diagnosis of Malignant Cardiac Tamponade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaina Brinley

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 47-year-old female with metastatic breast cancer presented to the Emergency Department with chest pain and shortness of breath. She was hypotensive and her EKG showed sinus tachycardia with low voltage. A bedside ultrasound was performed that detected a pericardial effusion and evidence of cardiac tamponade. The patient’s vitals improved with a fluid bolus and she went emergently to the cardiac catheterization lab for fluoroscopy and echocardiography guided pericardiocentesis. A total of 770 mL of fluid was removed from her pericardial space. Significant findings: The video shows a subxiphoid view of the heart with evidence of a large pericardial effusion with tamponade – note the anechoic stripe in the pericardial sac (see red arrow. This video demonstrates paradoxical right ventricular collapse during diastole and right atrial collapse during systole which is indicative of tamponade.1,2 Figure 1 is from the same patient and shows sonographic pulsus paradoxus. This is an apical 4 chamber view of the heart with the sampling gate of the pulsed wave doppler placed over the mitral valve. The Vpeak max and Vpeak min are indicated. If there is more than a 25% difference with inspiration between these 2 values, this is highly suggestive of tamponade.1 In this case, there is a 32.4% difference between the Vpeak max 69.55 cm/s and Vpeak min 46.99 cm/s. Discussion: Cardiac tamponade is distinguished from pericardial effusion by right ventricular compression/collapse and hemodynamic instability. Findings can include hypotension, tachycardia, distant heart sounds, and jugular venous distension.3,4 One might also see a plethoric IVC without respiratory variation indicative of elevated right atrial pressures.1 Detection of right ventricular collapse for cardiac tamponade has sensitivities ranging from 48%-100% and specificities ranging from 33%-100%.5 A larger effusion is more likely to lead to cardiac tamponade. However

  6. Daytime Ayahuasca administration modulates REM and slow-wave sleep in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbanoj, Manel J; Riba, Jordi; Clos, S; Giménez, S; Grasa, E; Romero, S

    2008-02-01

    Ayahuasca is a traditional South American psychoactive beverage and the central sacrament of Brazilian-based religious groups, with followers in Europe and the United States. The tea contains the psychedelic indole N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and beta-carboline alkaloids with monoamine oxidase-inhibiting properties that render DMT orally active. DMT interacts with serotonergic neurotransmission acting as a partial agonist at 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor sites. Given the role played by serotonin in the regulation of the sleep/wake cycle, we investigated the effects of daytime ayahuasca consumption in sleep parameters. Subjective sleep quality, polysomnography (PSG), and spectral analysis were assessed in a group of 22 healthy male volunteers after the administration of a placebo, an ayahuasca dose equivalent to 1 mg DMT kg(-1) body weight, and 20 mg d-amphetamine, a proaminergic drug, as a positive control. Results show that ayahuasca did not induce any subjectively perceived deterioration of sleep quality or PSG-measured disruptions of sleep initiation or maintenance, in contrast with d-amphetamine, which delayed sleep initiation, disrupted sleep maintenance, induced a predominance of 'light' vs 'deep' sleep and significantly impaired subjective sleep quality. PSG analysis also showed that similarly to d-amphetamine, ayahuasca inhibits rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, decreasing its duration, both in absolute values and as a percentage of total sleep time, and shows a trend increase in its onset latency. Spectral analysis showed that d-amphetamine and ayahuasca increased power in the high frequency range, mainly during stage 2. Remarkably, whereas slow-wave sleep (SWS) power in the first night cycle, an indicator of sleep pressure, was decreased by d-amphetamine, ayahuasca enhanced power in this frequency band. Results show that daytime serotonergic psychedelic drug administration leads to measurable changes in PSG and sleep power spectrum and suggest an

  7. Positive modulation of mood and cognitive performance following administration of acute doses of Salvia lavandulaefolia essential oil to healthy young volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tildesley, N T J; Kennedy, D O; Perry, E K; Ballard, C G; Wesnes, K A; Scholey, A B

    2005-01-17

    Members of the Sage family, such as Salvia officinalis and Salvia lavandulaefolia, have a long history of use as memory-enhancing agents coupled with cholinergic properties that may potentially be relevant to the amelioration of the cognitive deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease. The current study utilised a placebo-controlled, double-blind, balanced, crossover design in order to comprehensively assess any mood and cognition modulation by S. lavandulaefolia. Twenty-four participants received single doses of placebo, 25 microl and 50 microl of a standardised essential oil of S. lavandulaefolia in an order dictated by a Latin square. Doses were separated by a 7-day washout period. Cognitive performance was assessed prior to the day's treatment and at 1, 2.5, 4 and 6 h thereafter using the Cognitive Drug Research (CDR) computerised test battery. Subjective mood ratings were measured using Bond-Lader visual analogue scales. The primary outcome measures were scores on the five cognitive factors that can be derived by factor analysis of the task outcomes from the CDR battery. The results showed that administration of S. lavandulaefolia resulted in a consistent improvement for both the 25- and 50-microl dose on the 'Speed of Memory' factor. There was also an improvement on the 'Secondary Memory' factor for the 25-microl dose. Mood was consistently enhanced, with increases in self-rated 'alertness', 'calmness' and 'contentedness' following the 50-microl dose and elevated 'calmness' following 25 microl. These results represent further evidence that Salvia is capable of acute modulation of mood and cognition in healthy young adults. The data also suggest that previous reports of memory enhancement by Salvia may be due to more efficient retrieval of target material.

  8. What happens to the pleural space affected by malignant effusion after bedside pleurodesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Pedro H X N; Terra, Ricardo M; da Silva Santos, Thiago; Chate, Rodrigo C; de Paiva, Antonio F L; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo M

    2018-03-24

    Evaluate radiological characteristics of postpleurodesis pleural space of patients with recurrent malignant pleural effusion(RMPE). Prospective cohort study including patients with RPME treated with bedside pleurodesis. We used CT scans to calculate pleural cavity volume immediately before pleurodesis(iCT) and 30 days after(CT30). Radiological evolution was calculated by the difference between pleural volumes on CT30 and iCT(Δvolume). We categorized initial pleural volume as small(space(≥500 mL) and Δvolume as positive(>254.49 mL), unchanged(≥-268.77-≤ 254.49 mL), or negative(space(62.06%) and 33 large(37.93%). Clinical failure occurred in 7.4% of small space group and in 24.6% of large(P = 0.051, OR4.0(CI:1.098-14.570)). In small space group, 27.77% evolved with positive, 66.66% with unchanged and 5.55% with negative Δvolume. In the large space group these numbers were respectively 21.21%, 27.27%, and 51.51%. There is significant variability on pleural space volume. However, pleural volume remains unchanged in many cases. Besides that, more than half patients with initial large space coursed with relevant reduction. Finally, patients with initial small space presented a greater chance of clinical success. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Five Apollo astronauts with Lunar Module at ASVC prior to grand opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Some of the former Apollo program astronauts observe a Lunar Module and Moon mockup during a tour the new Apollo/Saturn V Center (ASVC) at KSC prior to the gala grand opening ceremony for the facility that was held Jan. 8, 1997. The astronauts were invited to participate in the event, which also featured NASA Administrator Dan Goldin and KSC Director Jay Honeycutt. Some of the visiting astonauts were (from left): Apollo 10 Lunar Module Pilot and Apollo 17 Commander Eugene A. Cernan; Apollo 9 Lunar Module Pilot Russell L. Schweikart; Apollo 10 Command Module Pilot and Apollo 16 Commander John W. Young; Apollo 10 Commander Thomas P. Stafford; and Apollo 11 Lunar Module Pilot Edwin E. 'Buzz' Aldrin, Jr. The ASVC also features several other Apollo program spacecraft components, multimedia presentations and a simulated Apollo/Saturn V liftoff. The facility will be a part of the KSC bus tour that embarks from the KSC Visitor Center.

  10. Evaluation of the Diagnostic Role of Bedside Lung Ultrasonography in Patients with Suspected Pulmonary Embolism in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Acar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the existence of detailed consensus guidelines, challenges remain regarding efficient, appropriate, and safe imaging methods for the diagnosis of suspected pulmonary embolism. Aims: To investigate the role of the wedge sign, B-lines, and pleural effusion seen on bedside lung ultrasound in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Study Design: Diagnostic accuracy study. Methods: During the first evaluation of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism, bedside lung ultrasound was performed, and the B-lines, wedge sign, and pleural effusion were investigated. Computed tomography angiography was used as a confirmatory test and was compared with the lung ultrasound findings. Results: Pulmonary embolism was detected in 38 (38% patients. In the comparison of bedside lung ultrasound results, statistically significant differences were found between the groups in terms of the B-lines and wedge sign (p=0.005 and p<0.001, respectively. There were no significant differences in terms of effusion (p=0.234. Comparison of these findings with computed tomography angiography of the chest showed weak negative correlations between the groups in terms of B-lines (r=-0297 and a moderately positive correlation in terms of the wedge sign (r=0.523. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of lung ultrasound findings alone were low. In the logistic regression analysis, the wedge sign (p<0.01, OR=69.45, 95% CI=6.94-695.17 and B-line (p=0.033, OR=1.96, 95% CI=0.41-8.40 were found to be effective in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Conclusion: Although the role of lung ultrasound has been increasing in the management of critically ill patients, its value is limited and cannot replace the gold standard tests in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism

  11. “Booster” training: Evaluation of instructor-led bedside cardiopulmonary resuscitation skill training and automated corrective feedback to improve cardiopulmonary resuscitation compliance of Pediatric Basic Life Support providers during simulated cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Robert M.; Niles, Dana; Meaney, Peter A.; Aplenc, Richard; French, Benjamin; Abella, Benjamin S.; Lengetti, Evelyn L.; Berg, Robert A.; Helfaer, Mark A.; Nadkarni, Vinay

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effectiveness of brief bedside “booster” cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training to improve CPR guideline compliance of hospital-based pediatric providers. Design Prospective, randomized trial. Setting General pediatric wards at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Subjects Sixty-nine Basic Life Support–certified hospital-based providers. Intervention CPR recording/feedback defibrillators were used to evaluate CPR quality during simulated pediatric arrest. After a 60-sec pretraining CPR evaluation, subjects were randomly assigned to one of three instructional/feedback methods to be used during CPR booster training sessions. All sessions (training/CPR manikin practice) were of equal duration (2 mins) and differed only in the method of corrective feedback given to participants during the session. The study arms were as follows: 1) instructor-only training; 2) automated defibrillator feedback only; and 3) instructor training combined with automated feedback. Measurements and Main Results Before instruction, 57% of the care providers performed compressions within guideline rate recommendations (rate >90 min−1 and 38 mm); and 36% met overall CPR compliance (rate and depth within targets). After instruction, guideline compliance improved (instructor-only training: rate 52% to 87% [p .01], and overall CPR compliance, 43% to 78% [p CPR compliance, 35% to 96% [p training combined with automated feedback: rate 48% to 100% [p CPR compliance, 30% to 100% [p CPR instruction, most certified Pediatric Basic Life Support providers did not perform guideline-compliant CPR. After a brief bedside training, CPR quality improved irrespective of training content (instructor vs. automated feedback). Future studies should investigate bedside training to improve CPR quality during actual pediatric cardiac arrests. PMID:20625336

  12. Effect of probiotic-fermented milk administration on gastrointestinal survival of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 and modulation of intestinal microbial flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidira, Marianthi; Galanis, Alex; Ypsilantis, Petros; Karapetsas, Athanasios; Progaki, Zoi; Simopoulos, Constantinos; Kourkoutas, Yiannis

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the survival of free and immobilized Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 on apple pieces, contained in probiotic-fermented milk, after gastrointestinal (GI) transit and to investigate the potential regulation of intestinal microbial flora in a rat model. In in vitro GI stress tolerance tests, immobilized L. casei ATCC 393 exhibited significantly higher survival rates compared to free cells. At a second stage, probiotic-fermented milk produced by either free or immobilized cells was administered orally at a single dose or daily for 9 days in Wistar rats. By 12 h after single-dose administration, both free and immobilized cells were detected by microbiological and molecular analysis at levels ≥6 logCFU/g of feces. Moreover, daily administration led to significant reduction of staphylococci, enterobacteria, coliforms and streptococci counts. In conclusion, L. casei ATCC 393 contained in fermented milk survived GI transit and modulated intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. The administrative contract asimilated to administrative acts in administrative litigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia GORIUC

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available An administrative contract is the will between a public authority either a person empowe¬red by it, and one or more natural or legal persons, whether private or public, pursuing the realization of a public interest and to which a special scheme of administrative law applies. The typology of administrative contracts is very varied, depending on the evolution of the society’s needs. Thus, they are currently included in the category of administrative contracts: concession contracts and public procurement contracts, contracts for the use of public goods, public management contracts, public-private partnership contracts, public lending contracts and constitutive documents of the associative structures of public authorities.

  14. Sepsis: from bench to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliézer Silva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a syndrome related to severe infections. It is defined as the systemic host response to microorganisms in previously sterile tissues and is characterized by end-organ dysfunction away from the primary site of infection. The normal host response to infection is complex and aims to identify and control pathogen invasion, as well as to start immediate tissue repair. Both the cellular and humoral immune systems are activated, giving rise to both anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory responses. The chain of events that leads to sepsis is derived from the exacerbation of these mechanisms, promoting massive liberation of mediators and the progression of multiple organ dysfunction. Despite increasing knowledge about the pathophysiological pathways and processes involved in sepsis, morbidity and mortality remain unacceptably high. A large number of immunomodulatory agents have been studied in experimental and clinical settings in an attempt to find an efficacious anti-inflammatory drug that reduces mortality. Even though preclinical results had been promising, the vast majority of these trials actually showed little success in reducing the overwhelmingly high mortality rate of septic shock patients as compared with that of other critically ill intensive care unit patients. Clinical management usually begins with prompt recognition, determination of the probable infection site, early administration of antibiotics, and resuscitation protocols based on "early-goal" directed therapy. In this review, we address the research efforts that have been targeting risk factor identification, including genetics, pathophysiological mechanisms and strategies to recognize and treat these patients as early as possible.

  15. Fatigue, Work Schedules, and Perceived Performance in Bedside Care Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagherian, Knar; Clinton, Michael E; Abu-Saad Huijer, Huda; Geiger-Brown, Jeanne

    2017-07-01

    Hospital nurses are expected to maintain optimal work performance; yet, fatigue can threaten safe practice and result in unfavorable patient outcomes. This descriptive cross-sectional study explored the association between fatigue, work schedules, and perceived work performance among nurses. The study sample included 77 bedside nurses who were mostly female, single, and between 20 and 29 years of age. The majority worked 8-hour shifts and overtime. Nurses who worked during off days reported significantly higher chronic fatigue compared with those nurses who took time off. Nurses who reported feeling refreshed after sleep had significantly less chronic and acute fatigue and more intershift recovery. Nurses with acute and chronic fatigue perceived poorer physical performance. Also, nurses who reported chronic fatigue perceived they were less alert and less able to concentrate when providing patient care. Less effective communication was also associated with acute and chronic fatigue. In conclusion, fatigue has safety implications for nurses' practice that should be monitored by nursing management.

  16. Early bedside detection of ischemia and rejection in liver transplants by microdialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håugaa, Håkon; Thorgersen, Ebbe B; Pharo, Anne; Boberg, Kirsten M; Foss, Aksel; Line, Pål Dag; Sanengen, Truls; Almaas, Runar; Grindheim, Guro; Pischke, Soeren Erik; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Tønnessen, Tor Inge

    2012-07-01

    This study was performed to explore whether lactate, pyruvate, glucose, and glycerol levels sampled via microdialysis catheters in the transplanted liver could be used to detect ischemia and/or rejection. The metabolites were measured at the bedside every 1 to 2 hours after the operation for a median of 10 days. Twelve grafts with biopsy-proven rejection and 9 grafts with ischemia were compared to a reference group of 39 grafts with uneventful courses. The median lactate level was significantly higher in both the ischemia group [5.8 mM (interquartile range = 4.0-11.1 mM)] and the rejection group [2.1 mM (interquartile range = 1.9-2.4 mM)] versus the reference group [1.5 mM (interquartile range = 1.1-1.9 mM), P interquartile range = 155-206 μM)] versus the reference group [124 μM (interquartile range = 102-150 μM), P interquartile range = 23.9-156.7) and 138 μM (interquartile range = 26-260 μM)] versus the reference group [11.8 (interquartile range = 10.6-13.6), P interquartile range = 9-24 μM), P = 0.002]. Ischemia was detected with 100% sensitivity and greater than 90% specificity when a positive test was repeated after 1 hour. In 3 cases of hepatic artery thrombosis, ischemia was detected despite normal blood lactate levels. Consecutive pathological measurements for 6 hours were used to diagnose rejection with greater than 80% sensitivity and specificity at a median of 4 days before the activity of alanine aminotransferase, the concentration of bilirubin in serum, or both increased. In conclusion, bedside measurements of intrahepatic lactate and pyruvate levels were used to detect ischemia and rejection earlier than current standard methods could. Discrimination from an uneventful patient course was achieved. Consequently, intrahepatic graft monitoring with microdialysis may lead to the earlier initiation of graft-saving treatment. Copyright © 2012 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  17. Reduction by the positive allosteric modulator of the GABAB receptor, GS39783, of alcohol self-administration in Sardinian alcohol-preferring rats exposed to the “sipper” procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Maccioni

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate (a alcohol self-administration behavior of selectively bred, Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP rats exposed to the so-called “sipper” procedure (characterized by the temporal separation between alcohol-seeking and -taking phases, and (b the effect of the positive allosteric modulator of the GABAB receptor, GS39783, on alcohol self-administration in sP rats exposed to this procedure. To this end, sP rats were initially trained to lever-respond under a reinforcement requirement (RR 55 (RR55 for alcohol. Achievement of RR55 resulted in the 20-min presentation of the alcohol (15%, v/v-containing sipper bottle. Once stable levels of lever-responding and alcohol consumption were reached, rats were treated with 0, 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg GS39783 (i.g. 60 min before the self-administration session. Rats displayed robust alcohol-seeking (as suggested by relatively short latencies to the first lever-response and high frequencies of lever-responding and -taking (as suggested by alcohol intakes averaging approximately 1.5 g/kg behaviors. Pretreatment with GS39783 inhibited both alcohol-seeking (the number of rats achieving RR55 and the mean RR value were virtually halved and -taking (the amount of self-administered alcohol was reduced by approximately 60%. The results of the present study suggest the power of the “sipper” procedure in triggering high levels of alcohol-seeking and -taking behavior in sP rats. Further, these results extend to this additional procedure of alcohol self-administration the capacity of GS39783 to reduce the motivational properties of alcohol and alcohol consumption in sP rats.

  18. Reduction by the Positive Allosteric Modulator of the GABAB Receptor, GS39783, of Alcohol Self-Administration in Sardinian Alcohol-Preferring Rats Exposed to the “Sipper” Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccioni, Paola; Flore, Paolo; Carai, Mauro A. M.; Mugnaini, Claudia; Pasquini, Serena; Corelli, Federico; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Colombo, Giancarlo

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate (a) alcohol self-administration behavior of selectively bred, Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP) rats exposed to the so-called “sipper” procedure (characterized by the temporal separation between alcohol-seeking and -taking phases), and (b) the effect of the positive allosteric modulator of the GABAB receptor, GS39783, on alcohol self-administration in sP rats exposed to this procedure. To this end, sP rats were initially trained to lever-respond under a reinforcement requirement (RR) 55 (RR55) for alcohol. Achievement of RR55 resulted in the 20-min presentation of the alcohol (15%, v/v)-containing sipper bottle. Once stable levels of lever-responding and alcohol consumption were reached, rats were treated with 0, 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg GS39783 (i.g.) 60 min before the self-administration session. Rats displayed robust alcohol-seeking (as suggested by relatively short latencies to the first lever-response and high frequencies of lever-responding) and -taking (as suggested by alcohol intakes averaging approximately 1.5 g/kg) behaviors. Pretreatment with GS39783 inhibited both alcohol-seeking (the number of rats achieving RR55 and the mean RR value were virtually halved) and -taking (the amount of self-administered alcohol was reduced by approximately 60%). The results of the present study suggest the power of the “sipper” procedure in triggering high levels of alcohol-seeking and -taking behavior in sP rats. Further, these results extend to this additional procedure of alcohol self-administration the capacity of GS39783 to reduce the motivational properties of alcohol and alcohol consumption in sP rats. PMID:21423431

  19. Intramuscular administration of a synthetic CpG-oligodeoxynucleotide modulates functional responses of neutrophils of neonatal foals.

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    Noah D Cohen

    Full Text Available Neutrophils play an important role in protecting against infection. Foals have age-dependent deficiencies in neutrophil function that may contribute to their predisposition to infection. Thus, we investigated the ability of a CpG-ODN formulated with Emulsigen to modulate functional responses of neutrophils in neonatal foals. Eighteen foals were randomly assigned to receive either a CpG-ODN with Emulsigen (N = 9 or saline intramuscularly at ages 1 and 7 days. At ages 1, 3, 9, 14, and 28, blood was collected and neutrophils were isolated from each foal. Neutrophils were assessed for basal and Rhodococcus equi-stimulated mRNA expression of the cytokines interferon-γ (IFN-γ, interleukin (IL-4, IL-6, and IL-8 using real-time PCR, degranulation by quantifying the amount of β-D glucuronidase activity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation using flow cytometry. In vivo administration of the CpG-ODN formulation on days 1 and 7 resulted in significantly (P<0.05 increased IFN-γ mRNA expression by foal neutrophils on days 3, 9, and 14. Degranulation was significantly (P<0.05 lower for foals in the CpG-ODN-treated group than the control group at days 3 and 14, but not at other days. No effect of treatment on ROS generation was detected. These results indicate that CpG-ODN administration to foals might improve innate and adaptive immune responses that could protect foals against infectious diseases and possibly improve responses to vaccination.

  20. Efficient and Compact Semiconductor Laser Transmitter Modules, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Continue development of a Compact Transmitter Module (CTM). Modules will be voltage controlled to adjust wavlength using temperature and drive current settings. The...

  1. Bedside ultrasonography (US), Echoscopy and US point of care as a new kind of stethoscope for Internal Medicine Departments: the training program of the Italian Internal Medicine Society (SIMI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arienti, Vincenzo; Di Giulio, Rosella; Cogliati, Chiara; Accogli, Esterita; Aluigi, Leonardo; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, thanks to the development of miniaturized ultrasound devices, comparable to personal computers, tablets and even to smart phones, we have seen an increasing use of bedside ultrasound in internal medicine departments as a novel kind of ultrasound stethoscope. The clinical ultrasound-assisted approach has proved to be particularly useful in assessing patients with nodules of the neck, dyspnoea, abdominal pain, and with limb edema. In several cases, it has allowed a simple, rapid and precise diagnosis. Since 2005, the Italian Society of Internal Medicine and its Ultrasound Study Group has been holding a Summer School and training courses in ultrasound for residents in internal medicine. A national network of schools in bedside ultrasound was then organized for internal medicine specialists who want to learn this technique. Because bedside ultrasound is a user-dependent diagnostic method, it is important to define the limits and advantages of different new ultrasound devices, to classify them (i.e. Echoscopy and Point of Care Ultrasound), to establish appropriate different levels of competence and to ensure their specific training. In this review, we describe the point of view of the Italian Internal Medicine Society on these topics.

  2. Lateral/Basolateral Amygdala Serotonin Type-2 Receptors Modulate Operant Self-administration of a Sweetened Ethanol Solution via Inhibition of Principal Neuron Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian eMccool

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lateral/basolateral amygdala (BLA forms an integral part of the neural circuitry controlling innate anxiety and learned fear. More recently, BLA dependent modulation of self-administration behaviors suggests a much broader role in the regulation of reward evaluation. To test this, we employed a self-administration paradigm that procedurally segregates ‘seeking’ (exemplified as lever-press behaviors from consumption (drinking directed at a sweetened ethanol solution. Microinjection of the nonselective serotonin type-2 receptor agonist, alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine (-m5HT into the BLA reduced lever pressing behaviors in a dose-dependent fashion. This was associated with a significant reduction in the number of response-bouts expressed during non-reinforced sessions without altering the size of a bout or the rate of responding. Conversely, intra-BLA -m5HT only modestly effected consumption-related behaviors; the highest dose reduced the total time spent consuming a sweetened ethanol solution but did not inhibit the total number of licks, number of lick bouts, or amount of solution consumed during a session. In vitro neurophysiological characterization of BLA synaptic responses showed that -m5HT significantly reduced extracellular field potentials. This was blocked by the 5-HT2A/C antagonist ketanserin suggesting that 5-HT2-like receptors mediate the behavioral effect of -m5HT. During whole-cell patch current-clamp recordings, we subsequently found that -m5HT increased action potential threshold and hyperpolarized the resting membrane potential of BLA pyramidal neurons. Together, our findings show that the activation of BLA 5-HT2A/C receptors inhibits behaviors related to reward-seeking by suppressing BLA principal neuron activity. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the BLA modulates reward-related behaviors and provides specific insight into BLA contributions during operant self-administration of a

  3. Intratracheal Administration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modulates Tachykinin System, Suppresses Airway Remodeling and Reduces Airway Hyperresponsiveness in an Animal Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Urbanek

    Full Text Available The need for new options for chronic lung diseases promotes the research on stem cells for lung repair. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can modulate lung inflammation, but the data on cellular processes involved in early airway remodeling and the potential involvement of neuropeptides are scarce.To elucidate the mechanisms by which local administration of MSCs interferes with pathophysiological features of airway hyperresponsiveness in an animal model.GFP-tagged mouse MSCs were intratracheally delivered in the ovalbumin mouse model with subsequent functional tests, the analysis of cytokine levels, neuropeptide expression and histological evaluation of MSCs fate and airway pathology. Additionally, MSCs were exposed to pro-inflammatory factors in vitro.Functional improvement was observed after MSC administration. Although MSCs did not adopt lung cell phenotypes, cell therapy positively affected airway remodeling reducing the hyperplastic phase of the gain in bronchial smooth muscle mass, decreasing the proliferation of epithelium in which mucus metaplasia was also lowered. Decrease of interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-13 and increase of interleukin-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage was also observed. Exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines, MSCs upregulated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Moreover, asthma-related in vivo upregulation of pro-inflammatory neurokinin 1 and neurokinin 2 receptors was counteracted by MSCs that also determined a partial restoration of VIP, a neuropeptide with anti-inflammatory properties.Intratracheally administered MSCs positively modulate airway remodeling, reduce inflammation and improve function, demonstrating their ability to promote tissue homeostasis in the course of experimental allergic asthma. Because of a limited tissue retention, the functional impact of MSCs may be attributed to their immunomodulatory response combined with the interference of neuropeptide system activation and tissue

  4. Role of bedside index for severity of acute pancreatitis (bisap score in predicting outcome in acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnawaz Bashir Bhat

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the role of Bedside index for severity of acute pancreatitis (BISAP score in predicting the outcome of acute pancreatitis. Methods: This single hospital based prospective study included fifty patients of acute pancreatitis admitted within 48 hours of onset of symptoms, who were divided into two groups according to admission BISAP score. BISAP score 3 (severe acute pancreatitis. The ability of BISAP score to predict mortality, morbidity and hospital stay in acute pancreatitis patients was analyzed. Results: A BISAP score of >3 was associated with increased risk of development of transient organ failure, persistent organ failure and pancreatic necrosis (Statistically significant. Mortality in group with BISAP and #8805;3 was 23.5% (4 patients which was statistically higher than group with BISAP score and #706;3 (0 patients (p=0.019.The mean duration of hospital stay of patients in group with BISAP score < 3 was 7.58 +/- 4.04 days and in group with BISAP score and #8805;3 was 15.35 +/- 1.66.(p=0.02. Conclusion: Bedside index for severity in acute pancreatitis (BISAP score, at admission is an excellent score in predicting the mortality, morbidity and hospital stay and hence management protocol in patients admitted with acute pancreatitis. [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(4.000: 215-220

  5. Face and content validity of Xperience™ Team Trainer: bed-side assistant training simulator for robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, Luca; Perrenot, Cyril; Xu, Song; Hubert, Jacques; Bresler, Laurent; Brunaud, Laurent; Perez, Manuela

    2018-03-01

    In robotic surgery, the coordination between the console-side surgeon and bed-side assistant is crucial, more than in standard surgery or laparoscopy where the surgical team works in close contact. Xperience™ Team Trainer (XTT) is a new optional component for the dv-Trainer ® platform and simulates the patient-side working environment. We present preliminary results for face, content, and the workload imposed regarding the use of the XTT virtual reality platform for the psychomotor and communication skills training of the bed-side assistant in robot-assisted surgery. Participants were categorized into "Beginners" and "Experts". They tested a series of exercises (Pick & Place Laparoscopic Demo, Pick & Place 2 and Team Match Board 1) and completed face validity questionnaires. "Experts" assessed content validity on another questionnaire. All the participants completed a NASA Task Load Index questionnaire to assess the workload imposed by XTT. Twenty-one consenting participants were included (12 "Beginners" and 9 "Experts"). XTT was shown to possess face and content validity, as evidenced by the rankings given on the simulator's ease of use and realism parameters and on the simulator's usefulness for training. Eight out of nine "Experts" judged the visualization of metrics after the exercises useful. However, face validity has shown some weaknesses regarding interactions and instruments. Reasonable workload parameters were registered. XTT demonstrated excellent face and content validity with acceptable workload parameters. XTT could become a useful tool for robotic surgery team training.

  6. [Value of optimization of bedside Gram staining of sputum smear in the early diagnosis and treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xinyan; Ran, Yu; Bian, Shichang; Wang, Chao; Xu, Lei

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the significance of optimization of bedside Gram staining of sputum smear in the early diagnosis and antimicrobial treatment for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) patients. The data of patients with VAP undergoing mechanical ventilation over 48 hours in the Department of Critical Care Medicine of Tianjin Fourth Central Hospital from June 2009 to June 2014 were analyzed. The patients were divided into two groups according to whether or not bedside Gram staining of sputum smear was used or not. The sputum samples from lower respiratory tract of all VAP patients were collected daily with tracheal catheter. In empirical examination group (from June 2009 to December 2011, n=43), the patients received antibiotics at the time of onset of VAP, selection of antibiotics depended on the information of bacterial epidemiology of the intensive care unit (ICU), and also existence of high risk factors of multi-drug resistant bacteria. In target treatment group (from January 2012 to June 2014, n=43), the patients received antibiotics according to the results of bedside instant sputum smear examination and empirical antibiotic regime. The correlation between the results of sputum smear examination and culture result was analyzed. The levels of body temperature, white blood cell (WBC) count, procalcitonin (PCT) level,and high sensitivity C- reactive protein (hs-CRP) were measured on the 1st day and 3rd day. The length of antibiotics treatment, duration of mechanical ventilation, and the time of ICU stay were recorded for both groups. There were 512 qualified sputum specimens for culture, from which 336 pathogens were found, and 358 strains of pathogenic bacteria were found from microscopic examination of 512 qualified sputum smear. The coincidence rate of results of bedside examination of sputum smear and that of sputum culture was 78.32%(401/512). The diagnostic acumen of the former was 85.42% (287/336), specificity was 64.77% (114/176), positive predictive value

  7. Improving the Proficiency of Research Consent Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Elaine L.; Lally, Rachel; Foe, Gabriella; Joaquin, Gabriela; Meyer, Dodi D.; Cohn, Elizabeth G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe the development and testing of a module to improve consent administrators’ skills when obtaining research consent from culturally and linguistically diverse and low literacy populations. Design: Development and psychometric testing of video module including community vignettes. Methods: Following initial content, face, and construct validity testing by experts, a field trial was conducted with pre‐ and postknowledge tests and satisfaction surveys completed by 112 consent administrators. Results: Mean score out of a possible 10 on pretest was 8.6 (±standard deviation [SD], 1.55) and on posttest was 9.1 (±SD, 1.2; paired t‐test 95% confidence interval of difference: –0.18 to –0.88; two‐tailed p = 0.003). The average years of experience with obtaining consent was 6.42 years (range: 0–35), but years of experience was not significantly associated with either pre‐ or posttest scores (p = 0.82 and 0.44, respectively). Most user evaluations were positive, although suggestions for improvements were made. Conclusion: Although pretest scores were relatively high, training needs of research consent administrators for consenting diverse and low literacy populations may be unmet. We urge that institutional review boards, researchers, policymakers, educators, and bioethicists address the training needs of research consent administrators and we offer this training module as one potential resource and adjunct to such training. PMID:25676061

  8. NeuroDebian Virtual Machine Deployment Facilitates Trainee-Driven Bedside Neuroimaging Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Alexander; Kenney-Jung, Daniel; Botha, Hugo; Tillema, Jan-Mendelt

    2017-01-01

    Freely available software, derived from the past 2 decades of neuroimaging research, is significantly more flexible for research purposes than presently available clinical tools. Here, we describe and demonstrate the utility of rapidly deployable analysis software to facilitate trainee-driven translational neuroimaging research. A recipe and video tutorial were created to guide the creation of a NeuroDebian-based virtual computer that conforms to current neuroimaging research standards and can exist within a HIPAA-compliant system. This allows for retrieval of clinical imaging data, conversion to standard file formats, and rapid visualization and quantification of individual patients' cortical and subcortical anatomy. As an example, we apply this pipeline to a pediatric patient's data to illustrate the advantages of research-derived neuroimaging tools in asking quantitative questions "at the bedside." Our goal is to provide a path of entry for trainees to become familiar with common neuroimaging tools and foster an increased interest in translational research.

  9. Oxytocin modulates hemodynamic responses to monetary incentives in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Brian J.; Heffernan, Joseph; Heisel, Curtis; Peciña, Marta; Hsu, David T.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Love, Tiffany M.

    2016-01-01

    Oxytocin is a neuropeptide widely recognized for its role in regulating social and reproductive behavior. Increasing evidence from animal models suggests that oxytocin also modulates reward circuitry in non-social contexts, but evidence in humans is lacking. Here we examined the effects of oxytocin administration on reward circuit function in 18 healthy men as they performed a monetary incentive task. The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging in the context of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of intranasal oxytocin. We found that oxytocin increases the BOLD signal in the midbrain (substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area) during the late phase of the hemodynamic response to incentive stimuli. Oxytocin’s effects on midbrain responses correlated positively with its effects on positive emotional state. We did not detect an effect of oxytocin on responses in the nucleus accumbens. Whole-brain analyses revealed that oxytocin attenuated medial prefrontal cortical deactivation specifically during anticipation of loss. Our findings demonstrate that intranasal administration of oxytocin modulates human midbrain and medial prefrontal function during motivated behavior. These findings suggest that endogenous oxytocin is a neurochemical mediator of reward behaviors in humans – even in a non-social context – and that the oxytocinergic system is a potential target of pharmacotherapy for psychiatric disorders that involve dysfunction of reward circuitry. PMID:27614896

  10. Oxytocin modulates hemodynamic responses to monetary incentives in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Brian J; Heffernan, Joseph; Heisel, Curtis; Peciña, Marta; Hsu, David T; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Love, Tiffany M

    2016-12-01

    Oxytocin is a neuropeptide widely recognized for its role in regulating social and reproductive behavior. Increasing evidence from animal models suggests that oxytocin also modulates reward circuitry in non-social contexts, but evidence in humans is lacking. We examined the effects of oxytocin administration on reward circuit function in 18 healthy men as they performed a monetary incentive task. The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging in the context of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of intranasal oxytocin. We found that oxytocin increases the BOLD signal in the midbrain (substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area) during the late phase of the hemodynamic response to incentive stimuli. Oxytocin's effects on midbrain responses correlated positively with its effects on positive emotional state. We did not detect an effect of oxytocin on responses in the nucleus accumbens. Whole-brain analyses revealed that oxytocin attenuated medial prefrontal cortical deactivation specifically during anticipation of loss. Our findings demonstrate that intranasal administration of oxytocin modulates human midbrain and medial prefrontal function during motivated behavior. These findings suggest that endogenous oxytocin is a neurochemical mediator of reward behaviors in humans-even in a non-social context-and that the oxytocinergic system is a potential target of pharmacotherapy for psychiatric disorders that involve dysfunction of reward circuitry.

  11. Space Experiment Module (SEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodell, Charles L.

    1999-01-01

    The Space Experiment Module (SEM) Program is an education initiative sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Shuttle Small Payloads Project. The program provides nationwide educational access to space for Kindergarten through University level students. The SEM program focuses on the science of zero-gravity and microgravity. Within the program, NASA provides small containers or "modules" for students to fly experiments on the Space Shuttle. The experiments are created, designed, built, and implemented by students with teacher and/or mentor guidance. Student experiment modules are flown in a "carrier" which resides in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle. The carrier supplies power to, and the means to control and collect data from each experiment.

  12. Relative Importance Assigned to Health Care Rationing Principles at the Bedside: Evidence From a Portuguese and Bulgarian Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Micaela Moreira; Pinto Borges, Ana

    Activity was undertaken to develop a Prioritization Scoring Index for Portugal and Bulgaria that weights the importance given to ethical rationing principles that should guide decisions at the bedside. Data from two random samples of 355 Portuguese and 298 Bulgarian members of the public were collected from an online questionnaire. Questions asked about the level of importance given to specific issues related to patient's prioritization criteria. Responses were analyzed quantitatively with the SPSS. In the process of selecting the patient to treat, Portuguese and Bulgarian respondents seem unanimous in giving greater importance to (i) the treatment outcomes, (ii) the severity of illness, (iii) children, and (iv) patients' fragility. In general, Portuguese and Bulgarian respondents allocate more than 50% of the prioritization weight to equity considerations, approximately 35% to efficiency considerations, and 5% to lottery selection. Even so, Bulgarian respondents rate highly the equity and less the efficiency consideration than Portuguese respondents. Although the pursuit of efficiency seems to be valued by respondents, their major concern seems to be with the reduction of inequalities in health.

  13. Bedside resource stewardship in disasters: a provider's dilemma practicing in an ethical gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    During disasters, clinicians may be forced to play dual roles, as both a provider and an allocator of scarce resources. At present, a clear framework to govern resource stewardship at the bedside is lacking. Clinicians who find themselves practicing in this ethical gap between clinical and public health ethics can experience significant moral distress. One provider describes her experience allocating an oxygen tank in the intensive care unit at a hospital in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, immediately following the 2010 earthquake. Using a clinical vignette and reflective narrative she attempts to identify the factors that influenced her allocation decision, opening up the factors for commentary and debate by an ethicist. A better paradigm for the ethical care of patients during disasters is needed to better guide provider choices in the future.

  14. Role of bedside-focused ultrasonographic evaluation in the critical patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bruzzone

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the case report of an 80 years old woman with late posttraumatic (of low intensity without any immediate clinical alteration onset of dysphnoea, chest pain and hypotension, in which bedside ultrasonography has been a very useful tool in immediate diagnostic definition (acute respiratory distress syndrome – ARDS due to multiple pulmonary contusions, considering and excluding all possible alternative diagnosis with the same clinical presentation, but also providing a “real time” evaluation of therapeutic regimen (hypovolemia versus excessive fluid embalance and, last but not least, the chance to perform a close follow up of the ultrasonographic alterations (pleural effusion, signs of alveolar consolidation pointed out at initial diagnosis. Moreworthly, it has been possible to identify the previous mentioned lesion before they had become evident to standard X-Ray chest evaluation.

  15. [Conventional radiology, digital radiology with photostimulable phosphor, laser digitalization of thoracic radiographic films at the bedside. A comparative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli, M; Stamati, R; Burci, P; Guidarelli, G; Sartoni Galloni, S

    1992-10-01

    The bedside chest images obtained with conventional radiology and with "on line" and "off line" digital modalities were compared to evaluate the respective capabilities in visualizing chest anatomical structures. Seventy patients were submitted to bedside chest examinations with a portable unit; both a conventional film and a digital system (PCR Graphics 1, Philips) with photostimulable phosphor imaging plate were fitted in the radiographic cassette. The former was digitized using an "off line" laser beam unit (FD 2000, Dupont); the latter was subsequently postprocessed by modifying contrast, optical density and spatial frequencies. Thus, 4 different viewing modalities were obtained for each examination: a) conventional radiography; b) standard digital radiography; c) postprocessed digital radiography; d) digitized conventional radiography. Detectability rates of chest anatomical structures were analyzed by 4 independent radiologists on the different images and expressed by a score 1-4. The values were always higher with digital modalities than with the conventional one and the differences were statistically significant (Student's t-test modified by Bonferroni). In particular, the greatest difference was found between c) and a) in retrocardiac lung parenchyma and in skeletal structures, in favour of c). Concerning the comparative adequacy of the various digital modalities, higher detectability rates of chest anatomical structures were obtained with c), but also with b), than with d).

  16. Reduction of bioactive substances in stored donor blood: prestorage versus bedside leucofiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, J H; Mynster, T; Reimert, C M

    1999-01-01

    Leucocyte filtration has been suggested to improve transfusion products. We studied the effect of prestorage versus bedside leucofiltration on reduction of bioactive substances and leucocyte content in donor blood. Forty-five units of whole blood from healthy blood donors were studied....... Of these units, 9 were stored under standard conditions for 35 d, 9 were leucofiltered after donation and then stored for 35 d, and 3x9 units were stored for 7, 21 and 35 d, respectively, before leucofiltration. Samples were collected from blood units immediately after donation, and before and after...... leucofiltration, and analysed by ELISA and RIA methods for extracellular content of myeloperoxidase (MPO), eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), histamine (HIS) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Leucocyte content was counted in all samples. In non-filtered blood extracellular MPO, ECP, HIS and PAI-1...

  17. Use of Bedside Compression Ultrasonography for Diagnosis of Deep Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Moussa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 70-year-old female with a history of breast cancer and smoking for 50 years presented to the emergency department with left-lower extremity pain and swelling for two days. The patient denied recent long-distance travel, history of hypercoagulable disorder, or recent surgery. Physical examination revealed a warm, erythematous, 3+ edematous left-lower extremity with mild tenderness extending into the proximal thigh. Her D-dimer level was 2307ng/mL and vital signs were significant for a heart rate of 110bpm, oxygen saturation of 90% on 2 liters of oxygen, and blood pressure of 153/102. Significant findings: As shown in the still image of the performed ultrasound, a transverse view of the proximal-thigh revealed a visible thrombus (green shading occluding the lumen of the left common femoral vein (blue ring, which was non-compressible when direct pressure was applied to the probe. Also visible is a patent and compressible branch of the common femoral vein (purple ring and the femoral artery (red ring, highlighted by its thick vessel wall and pulsatile motion. Discussion: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT affects 1 per 1,000 individuals each year and may lead to complications such as recurrent DVT, pulmonary embolism, and death.1 The utilization of bedside compression ultrasonography allows for rapid diagnosis of DVT and has virtually replaced other diagnostic methods due to its non-invasive and inexpensive nature. When performing compression ultrasonography, the patient should be positioned to maximize distention of the leg veins. The extremity in question should be flexed at the knee and externally rotated at the hip (this fully exposes of the common, superficial, and deep femoral veins as well as the popliteal fossa and the head of the bed elevated at a 30-45 degree angle.2 In patients with an elevated D-dimer and low-to-moderate clinical probability, negative compression imaging of a single proximal location of the femoral

  18. Dosing of Appropriate Antibiotics and Time to Administration of First Doses in the Pediatric Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Abby M; Stephan, Maria; Weant, Kyle A; Justice, Stephanie Baker

    2015-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) providers are faced with the challenge of diagnosing and treating patients in a timely fashion given many obstacles including limited patient information, complex disease states, and high patient turnover. Time delays in administration or selection of appropriate drug therapies have been associated with negative outcomes in severe infections. This study was conducted to assess the impact of an emergency medicine pharmacist (EPh) on the selection of appropriate antibiotics and the timeliness of administration in pediatric patients in the ED. Patients younger than 18 years were evaluated who were admitted through the ED and received 1 dose of intravenous antibiotic for the following conditions: community-acquired pneumonia, complicated skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI), meningitis, and sepsis. To evaluate the impact of the presence of an EPh, patients with orders placed during the EPh's hours of 1 pm and 11 pm were compared to those with an order placed between 11 pm and 1 pm. A total of 142 patients were included in the study. Patients seen during EPh hours received an appropriate first antibiotic 93.4% of the time (p = 0.157) and second antibiotic 96.8% of the time (p = 0.023). Time from order to verification was significantly shorter for the first 2 antimicrobials in the EPh group (10.5 minutes [p = 0.003] and 11.4 minutes [p = 0.047], respectively). The days from discharge to return to readmission to the ED were also significantly different (17.5 days vs. 62.4 days, p = 0.008). The available data suggest that patients are more likely to receive appropriate doses of antimicrobials, and in a more timely fashion, whenever the EPh is present. Areas for future investigation include whether the presence of EPhs at the bedside has the potential to impact areas of patient care, including readmission rates, drug costs, and medication errors.

  19. Bigelow Expandable Activity Module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) project is a NASA-industry partnership with Bigelow Aerospace (BA) that has developing the first human-rated expandable...

  20. Roadmap to Wellness: Exploring Live Customized Music at the Bedside for Hospitalized Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, R Serene; Boyce, Maura; Byrtek, Megan C; Ellis, Regina C; Hill, Cindy; Fitzpatrick, Paul S; Demirel, Shaban

    2018-01-01

    Randomized trials on clinical outcomes of music are conflicting, with few performed in the postoperative pediatric population. We aimed to determine if there was a benefit of a live, customized bedside music delivery program (MyMusicRx ® ) for children hospitalized after pediatric surgery. We present our perspective on the utility of music medicine, review others' work in this area, and discuss future directions. All admitted postsurgical patients aged between 5 and 18 years were considered. One live, customized music session was delivered by a MyMusicRx ® music specialist to intervention participants, and compared with matched controls who did not receive music intervention. Pain, cumulative analgesia dosage, and vital signs within 12 h after unit arrival were compared between groups. Thirty-two participants (16 intervention, 16 controls; 8:8 females:males per group) were enrolled. No differences in age, surgery length, or duration of music intervention were found between groups. No differences in pain scores ( p  = 0.73), heart rate ( p  = 0.82), respirations ( p  = 84), narcotic ( p  = 0.92) or non-narcotic medication usage ( p  = 0.88, 0.86, 0.95; ibuprofen, acetaminophen, and ketorolac, respectively), or time to first narcotic dose ( p  = 0.64) were found. A single music intervention in the acute postoperative period did not appear to be adequate to augment traditional methods of pain and hemodynamic control. Prior studies have similar outcome measures but conflicting results. We did not evaluate psychological well-being, patient engagement, or family perception in this pilot study. Future directions include developing and validating a tool that explores the observable impact of music medicine on children's emotions and behaviors.

  1. Roadmap to Wellness: Exploring Live Customized Music at the Bedside for Hospitalized Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Serene Perkins

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRandomized trials on clinical outcomes of music are conflicting, with few performed in the postoperative pediatric population. We aimed to determine if there was a benefit of a live, customized bedside music delivery program (MyMusicRx® for children hospitalized after pediatric surgery. We present our perspective on the utility of music medicine, review others’ work in this area, and discuss future directions.MethodsAll admitted postsurgical patients aged between 5 and 18 years were considered. One live, customized music session was delivered by a MyMusicRx® music specialist to intervention participants, and compared with matched controls who did not receive music intervention. Pain, cumulative analgesia dosage, and vital signs within 12 h after unit arrival were compared between groups.ResultsThirty-two participants (16 intervention, 16 controls; 8:8 females:males per group were enrolled. No differences in age, surgery length, or duration of music intervention were found between groups. No differences in pain scores (p = 0.73, heart rate (p = 0.82, respirations (p = 84, narcotic (p = 0.92 or non-narcotic medication usage (p = 0.88, 0.86, 0.95; ibuprofen, acetaminophen, and ketorolac, respectively, or time to first narcotic dose (p = 0.64 were found.ConclusionA single music intervention in the acute postoperative period did not appear to be adequate to augment traditional methods of pain and hemodynamic control. Prior studies have similar outcome measures but conflicting results. We did not evaluate psychological well-being, patient engagement, or family perception in this pilot study. Future directions include developing and validating a tool that explores the observable impact of music medicine on children’s emotions and behaviors.

  2. Continuous bedside pressure mapping and rates of hospital-associated pressure ulcers in a medical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Robert; Ghaznavi, Amir M; Mahan, Meredith; Craft, Susan; Siddiqui, Aamir

    2014-03-01

    Critically ill patients are vulnerable to the development of hospital-associated pressure ulcers (HAPUs). Positioning of patients is an essential component of pressure ulcer prevention because it off-loads areas of high pressure. However, the effectiveness of such positioning is debatable. A continuous bedside pressure mapping (CBPM) device can provide real-time feedback of optimal body position though a pressure-sensing mat that displays pressure images at a patient's bedside, allowing off-loading of high-pressure areas and possibly preventing HAPU formation. A prospective controlled study was designed to determine if CBPM would reduce the number of HAPUs in patients treated in our medical intensive care unit. In 2 months, 422 patients were enrolled and assigned to beds equipped with or without a CBPM device. Patients' skin was assessed daily and weekly to determine the presence and progress of HAPUs. All patients were turned every 2 hours. CBPM patients were repositioned to off-load high-pressure points during turning, according to a graphic display. The number of newly formed HAPUs was the primary outcome measured. A χ(2) test was then used to compare the occurrence of HAPUs between groups. HAPUs developed in 2 of 213 patients in the CBPM group (0.9%; both stage II) compared with 10 of 209 in the control group (4.8%; all stage II; P = .02). Significantly fewer HAPUs occurred in the CBPM group than the control group, indicating the effectiveness of real-time visual feedback in repositioning of patients to prevent the formation of new HAPUs.

  3. OSHA. Training Module 4.330.3.77.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillenwarth, Lynn; Bonnstetter, Ron

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with the Federal and Iowa Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA). Included are objectives, instructor guides, and student handouts. This module includes an overview of OSHA administration, analysis of OSHA standards including…

  4. When families cannot "let go": ethical decision-making at the bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J E; Latimer, E J

    1989-09-01

    Shared decision-making at the bedside is now a regular feature of medical practice. When disagreements arise between a patient and family members caregivers sometimes find themselves caught in a complex tangle of human relationships that strains monochrome ethical thinking. The patient's expressed wishes are often compromised for the sake of the family's needs. Conversely, a unilateral appeal for patient autonomy may prove insensitive to the hurt and the needs of the family. We describe a relatively unsuccessful attempt by a patient's caregivers to buy time to maximize the interests of the patient and her family and discuss the way in which the family dynamics militated against the rather obvious solution of promoting the patient's right to refuse treatment. The purpose of this article is not to evoke sympathy for health care professionals in dealing with such conflicts but rather to heighten awareness of the issues at stake and to stimulate thinking about ways and means to bring about a more favourable outcome than the one described here.

  5. Transcriptome modulation by hydrocortisone in severe burn shock: ancillary analysis of a prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plassais, Jonathan; Venet, Fabienne; Cazalis, Marie-Angélique; Le Quang, Diane; Pachot, Alexandre; Monneret, Guillaume; Tissot, Sylvie; Textoris, Julien

    2017-06-16

    Despite shortening vasopressor use in shock, hydrocortisone administration remains controversial, with potential harm to the immune system. Few studies have assessed the impact of hydrocortisone on the transcriptional response in shock, and we are lacking data on burn shock. Our objective was to assess the hydrocortisone-induced transcriptional modulation in severe burn shock, particularly modulation of the immune response. We collected whole blood samples during a randomized controlled trial assessing the efficacy of hydrocortisone administration in burn shock. Using whole genome microarrays, we first compared burn patients (n = 32) from the placebo group to healthy volunteers to describe the transcriptional modulation induced by burn shock over the first week. Then we compared burn patients randomized for either hydrocortisone administration or placebo, to assess hydrocortisone-induced modulation. Study groups were similar in terms of severity and major outcomes, but shock duration was significantly reduced in the hydrocortisone group. Many genes (n = 1687) were differentially expressed between burn patients and healthy volunteers, with 85% of them exhibiting a profound and persistent modulation over seven days. Interestingly, we showed that hydrocortisone enhanced the shock-associated repression of adaptive, but also innate immunity. We found that the initial host response to burn shock encompasses wide and persistent modulation of gene expression, with profound modulation of pathways associated with metabolism and immunity. Importantly, hydrocortisone administration may worsen the immunosuppression associated with severe injury. These data should be taken into account in the risk ratio of hydrocortisone administration in patients with inflammatory shock. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00149123 . Registered on 6 September 2005.

  6. Computerized CAMAC and NIM module library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, G.F.; McDonald, R.J.

    1990-08-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory owns a large number of CAMAC and NIM modules which can be connected together to form data acquisition systems used in experiments. Many of these modules are contained in ''pools'' for common usage. This paper describes a system of storage and inventory control that allows easy check-out and check-in of the modules utilizing networked Macintosh computers, FoxBase+/Mac software, and bar-code technology. It also provides search capability for the user and tracking capability for the pool administrator. This inventory system has applications to any pool of items that are routinely loaned. 8 figs

  7. Quantitative study of controlled substance bedside wasting, disposal and evaluation of potential ecologic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankes, Russell F; Silver, Charles D

    2013-02-01

    Drugs in wastewater arise from many sources. For health care, these include excretion and direct disposal (bedside wasting). The present study reports on the dispensing and wasting of 15 controlled substances (CS) at two health care facilities in Albany, NY over a nearly two year period. The study considered measures of ecotoxicity, drug metabolism, excretion and disposal of these CS. Potential alternatives to flushing of CS into wastewaters from healthcare facilities are discussed. Drug medication and waste collection records (12,345) included: numbers of drugs dispensed, returned and wasted. Overall, 8528 g of 15 CS were wasted. Three (midazolam, acetaminophen-codeine and fentanyl) accounted for 87.5% of the total wasted. Wasting varied by hospital, 14 CS at the academic medical center hospital and 8 at the surgical care center were wasted. Liquids were more frequently wasted than tablets or pills. Some combination drugs (acetaminophen (APAP)-codeine) were frequently (50% of drug dispensed) wasted while others were less wasted (APAP-hydrocodone-6.3%; APAP-oxycodone-1.3%). The 8 CS judged more hazardous to aquatic life were: APAP-codeine, APAP-hydrocodone, APAP-oxycodone, alprazolam, diazepam, fentanyl, midazolam, and testosterone. Ketamine, morphine, oxycodone and zolpidem were of lesser acute toxicity based on available LC50 values. These CS might provide a therapeutically equivalent alternative to the more environmentally harmful drugs. In health care facilities, professionals dispose of CS by bedside wasting into water or other receptacles. This can be avoided by returning CS to the hospital's pharmacy department, thence to a licensed distributor. Study of this process of drug wasting can identify opportunities for process improvements. We found 3 CS (APAP-codeine, midazolam and testosterone) where ½ to 1/3 of the drug was wasted and 5 others with 30 to 13% wasted. Knowledge of the adverse impacts from the release of highly toxic drugs into the environment

  8. Rad-hard Location and Attitude Module (R-LAM), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — R-LAM (Rad-hard Location and Attitude Module), promises a new generation of both integrated navigation modules and stand-alone navigation subsystems including...

  9. Consideration of adding a commercial module to the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friefeld, J.; Fugleberg, D.; Patel, J.; Subbaraman, G.

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently assembling the International Space Station in Low Earth Orbit. One of NASA's program objectives is to encourage space commercialization. Through NASA's Engineering Research and Technology Development program, Boeing is conducting a study to ascertain the feasibility of adding a commercial module to the International Space Station. This module (facility) that can be added, following on-orbit assembly is described. The facility would have the capability to test large, engineering scale payloads in a space environment. It would also have the capability to provide services to co-orbiting space vehicles as well as gathering data for commercial terrestrial applications. The types of industries to be serviced are described as are some of the technical and business considerations that need to be addressed in order to achieve commercial viability.

  10. Clinical assessment of dysphagia in neurodegeneration (CADN): development, validity and reliability of a bedside tool for dysphagia assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Adam P; Rommel, Natalie; Sauer, Carina; Horger, Marius; Krumm, Patrick; Himmelbach, Marc; Synofzik, Matthis

    2017-06-01

    Screening assessments for dysphagia are essential in neurodegenerative disease. Yet there are no purpose-built tools to quantify swallowing deficits at bedside or in clinical trials. A quantifiable, brief, easy to administer assessment that measures the impact of dysphagia and predicts the presence or absence of aspiration is needed. The Clinical Assessment of Dysphagia in Neurodegeneration (CADN) was designed by a multidisciplinary team (neurology, neuropsychology, speech pathology) validated against strict methodological criteria in two neurodegenerative diseases, Parkinson's disease (PD) and degenerative ataxia (DA). CADN comprises two parts, an anamnesis (part one) and consumption (part two). Two-thirds of patients were assessed using reference tests, the SWAL-QOL symptoms subscale (part one) and videofluoroscopic assessment of swallowing (part two). CADN has 11 items and can be administered and scored in an average of 7 min. Test-retest reliability was established using correlation and Bland-Altman plots. 125 patients with a neurodegenerative disease were recruited; 60 PD and 65 DA. Validity was established using ROC graphs and correlations. CADN has sensitivity of 79 and 84% and specificity 71 and 69% for parts one and two, respectively. Significant correlations with disease severity were also observed (p dysphagia symptomatology and risk of aspiration. The CADN is a reliable, valid, brief, quantifiable, and easily deployed assessment of swallowing in neurodegenerative disease. It is thus ideally suited for both clinical bedside assessment and future multicentre clinical trials in neurodegenerative disease.

  11. Parental presence on neonatal intensive care unit clinical bedside rounds: randomised trial and focus group discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Danette; Broom, Margaret; Smith, Judith; Davis, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Background There are limited data to inform the choice between parental presence at clinical bedside rounds (PPCBR) and non-PPCBR in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Methods We performed a single-centre, survey-based, crossed-over randomised trial involving parents of all infants who were admitted to NICU and anticipated to stay >11 days. Parents were randomly assigned using a computer-generated stratified block randomisation protocol to start with PPCBR or non-PPCBR and then crossed over to the other arm after a wash-out period. At the conclusion of each arm, parents completed the ‘NICU Parental Stressor Scale’ (a validated tool) and a satisfaction survey. After completion of the trial, we surveyed all healthcare providers who participated at least in one PPCBR rounding episode. We also offered all participating parents and healthcare providers the opportunity to partake in a focus group discussion regarding PPCBR. Results A total of 72 parents were enrolled in this study, with 63 parents (87%) partially or fully completing the trial. Of the parents who completed the trial, 95% agreed that parents should be allowed to attend clinical bedside rounds. A total of 39 healthcare providers’ surveys were returned and 35 (90%) agreed that parents should be allowed to attend rounds. Nine healthcare providers and 8 parents participated in an interview or focus group, augmenting our understanding of the ways in which PPCBR was beneficial. Conclusions Parents and healthcare providers strongly support PPCBR. NICUs should develop policies allowing PPCBR while mitigating the downsides and concerns of parents and healthcare providers such as decreased education opportunity and confidentiality concerns. Trial registration number Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register number, ACTRN12612000506897. PMID:25711125

  12. The auditory oddball paradigm revised to improve bedside detection of consciousness in behaviorally unresponsive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlet, Dominique; Ruby, Perrine; André-Obadia, Nathalie; Fischer, Catherine

    2017-11-01

    Active paradigms requiring subjects to engage in a mental task on request have been developed to detect consciousness in behaviorally unresponsive patients. Using auditory ERPs, the active condition consists in orienting patient's attention toward oddball stimuli. In comparison with passive listening, larger P300 in the active condition identifies voluntary processes. However, contrast between these two conditions is usually too weak to be detected at the individual level. To improve test sensitivity, we propose as a control condition to actively divert the subject's attention from the auditory stimuli with a mental imagery task that has been demonstrated to be within the grasp of the targeted patients: navigate in one's home. Twenty healthy subjects were presented with a two-tone oddball paradigm in the three following condition: (a) passive listening, (b) mental imagery, (c) silent counting of deviant stimuli. Mental imagery proved to be more efficient than passive listening to lessen P300 response to deviant tones as compared with the active counting condition. An effect of attention manipulation (oriented vs. diverted) was observed in 19/20 subjects, of whom 18 showed the expected P300 effect and 1 showed an effect restricted to the N2 component. The only subject showing no effect also proved insufficient engagement in the tasks. Our study demonstrated the efficiency of diverting attention using mental imagery to improve the sensitivity of the active oddball paradigm. Using recorded instructions and requiring a small number of electrodes, the test was designed to be conveniently and economically used at the patient's bedside. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  13. The effect of helium on ventilator performance: study of five ventilators and a bedside Pitot tube spirometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim-Eden, A; Cohen, Y; Weissman, C; Pizov, R

    2001-08-01

    To assess in vitro the performance of five mechanical ventilators-Siemens 300 and 900C (Siemens-Elma; Solna, Sweden), Puritan Bennett 7200 (Nellcor Puritan Bennett; Pleasanton, CA), Evita 4 (Dragerwerk; Lubeck, Germany), and Bear 1000 (Bear Medical Systems; Riverside CA)-and a bedside sidestream spirometer (Datex CS3 Respiratory Module; Datex-Ohmeda; Helsinki, Finland) during ventilation with helium-oxygen mixtures. In vitro study. ICUs of two university-affiliated hospitals. Each ventilator was connected to 100% helium through compressed air inlets and then tested at three to six different tidal volume (VT) settings using various helium-oxygen concentrations (fraction of inspired oxygen [FIO(2)] of 0.2 to 1.0). FIO(2) and VT were measured with the Datex CS3 spirometer, and VT was validated with a water-displacement spirometer. The Puritan Bennett 7200 ventilator did not function with helium. With the other four ventilators, delivered FIO(2) was lower than the set FIO(2). For the Siemens 300 and 900C ventilators, this difference could be explained by the lack of 21% oxygen when helium was connected to the air supply port, while for the other two ventilators, a nonlinear relation was found. The VT of the Siemens 300 ventilator was independent of helium concentration, while for the other three ventilators, delivered VT was greater than the set VT and was dependent on helium concentration. During ventilation with 80% helium and 20% oxygen, VT increased to 125% of set VT for the Siemens 900C ventilator, and more than doubled for the Evita 4 and Bear 1000 ventilators. Under the same conditions, the Datex CS3 spirometer underestimated the delivered VT by about 33%. At present, no mechanical ventilator is calibrated for use with helium. This investigation offers correction factors for four ventilators for ventilation with helium.

  14. Loss of object recognition memory produced by extended access to methamphetamine self-administration is reversed by positive allosteric modulation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Carmela M; Schwendt, Marek; McGinty, Jacqueline F; Olive, M Foster; See, Ronald E

    2011-03-01

    Chronic methamphetamine (meth) abuse can lead to persisting cognitive deficits. Here, we utilized a long-access meth self-administration (SA) protocol to assess recognition memory and metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) expression, and the possible reversal of cognitive impairments with the mGluR5 allosteric modulator, 3-cyano-N-(1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl) benzamide (CDPPB). Male, Long-Evans rats self-administered i.v. meth (0.02 mg/infusion) on an FR1 schedule of reinforcement or received yoked-saline infusions. After seven daily 1-h sessions, rats were switched to 6-h daily sessions for 14 days, and then underwent drug abstinence. Rats were tested for object recognition memory at 1 week after meth SA at 90 min and 24 h retention intervals. In a separate experiment, rats underwent the same protocol, but received either vehicle or CDPPB (30 mg/kg) after familiarization. Rats were killed on day 8 or 14 post-SA and brain tissue was obtained. Meth intake escalated over the extended access period. Additionally, meth-experienced rats showed deficits in both short- and long-term recognition memory, demonstrated by a lack of novel object exploration. The deficit at 90 min was reversed by CDPPB treatment. On day 8, meth intake during SA negatively correlated with mGluR expression in the perirhinal and prefrontal cortex, and mGluR5 receptor expression was decreased 14 days after discontinuation of meth. This effect was specific to mGluR5 levels in the perirhinal cortex, as no differences were identified in the hippocampus or in mGluR2/3 receptors. These results from a clinically-relevant animal model of addiction suggest that mGluR5 receptor modulation may be a potential treatment of cognitive dysfunction in meth addiction.

  15. System administrator`s guide to CDPS. Version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didier, B.T.; Portwood, M.H.

    1994-05-01

    The System Administrator`s Guide to CDPS is intended for those responsible for setting up and maintaining the hardware and software of a Common Mapping Standard (CMS) Date Production System (CDPS) installation. This guide assists the system administrator in performing typical administrative functions. It is not intended to replace the Ultrix Documentation Set that should be available for a DCPS installation. The Ultrix Documentation Set will be required to provide details on referenced Ultrix commands as well as procedures for performing Ultrix maintenance functions. There are six major sections in this guide. Section 1 introduces the system administrator to CDPS and describes the assumptions that are made by this guide. Section 2 describes the CDPS platform configuration. Section 3 describes the platform preparation that is required to install the CDPS software. Section 4 describes the CPS software and its installation procedures. Section 5 describes the CDS software and its installation procedures. Section 6 describes various operation and maintenance procedures. Four appendices are also provided. Appendix A contains a list of used acronyms. Appendix B provides a terse description of common Ultrix commands that are used in administrative functions. Appendix C provides sample CPS and CDS configuration files. Appendix D provides a required list and a recommended list of Ultrix software subsets for installation on a CDPS platform.

  16. Compact energy conversion module, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR project delivers a compact vibration-based Energy Conversion Module (ECM) that powers sensors for purposes like structural health monitoring (SHM). NASA...

  17. Comparison of visual analogue and Likert scales in evaluation of an emergency department bedside teaching programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celenza, Antonio; Rogers, Ian R

    2011-02-01

    The present study compares visual analogue scale (VAS) to Likert-type scale (LTS) instruments in evaluating perceptions of an ED bedside clinical teaching programme. A prospective study was conducted in the ED of an urban, adult tertiary hospital. Prospective pairing occurred of a teaching consultant and registrar who were relatively quarantined from normal clinical duties. Registrars received 3 months of the teaching intervention, and 3 months without the intervention in a cross-over fashion. Evaluation questionnaires were completed using both the LTS and 100 mm horizontal VAS for each question. Correlation between VAS and LTS gave a measure of validity, and test-retest stability and internal consistency gave measures of reliability. Registrar perceptions of the teaching programme were positive, but no differences were found between the pre- and post-intervention groups. The test-retest reliabilities (intraclass correlation coefficient) for the questionnaires were 0.51 and 0.54 for the VAS, and 0.58 and 0.58 for the LTS. Cronbach's alpha varied between 0.79 and 0.91 for the VAS, and 0.79 and 0.81 for the LTS. Correlations between the two methods varied from 0.35 to 0.94 for each question. A linear regression equation describing the relationship approximated VAS = 19.5 × LTS-9 with overall r= 0.89. An ED bedside teaching programme is perceived to be a beneficial educational intervention. The VAS is a reliable and valid alternative to the LTS for educational evaluation and might provide advantages in educational measurement. Further research into the significance of extreme values and educationally important changes in scores is required. © 2011 The Authors. EMA © 2011 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  18. Lack of concordance between a rapid bedside and conventional laboratory method of cardiac troponin testing: impact on risk stratification of patients suspected of acute coronary syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cramer, G.E.; Kievit, P.C.; Brouwer, M.A.; Keijzer, M.H. de; Luijten, H.E.; Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to test the usefulness of a bedside assay as compared to a laboratory method of troponin testing to predict adverse cardiac outcome of chest pain patients. METHODS: We studied 358 ER visits of patients suspected of a non ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome. cTnI

  19. Compact Energy Conversion Module, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR project delivers a compact vibration-based Energy Conversion Module (ECM) that powers sensors for purposes such as structural health monitoring (SHM). NASA...

  20. Apparatuses to support photovoltaic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciasulli, John; Jones, Jason

    2017-08-22

    Methods and apparatuses to support photovoltaic ("PV") modules are described. A saddle bracket has a mounting surface to support one or more PV modules over a tube, a gusset coupled to the mounting surface, and a mounting feature coupled to the gusset to couple to the tube. A grounding washer has a first portion to couple to a support; and a second portion coupled to the first portion to provide a ground path to a PV module. A PV system has a saddle bracket; a PV module over the saddle bracket; and a grounding washer coupled to the saddle bracket and the PV module. Saddle brackets can be coupled to a torque tube at predetermined locations. PV modules can be coupled to the saddle brackets.

  1. Surgical bedside master console for neurosurgical robotic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, Jumpei; Kenmotsu, Hajime; Takagi, Motoki; Hori, Tatsuya; Miyagi, Takahiro; Fujimoto, Hideo; Kajita, Yasukazu; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Chinzei, Kiyoyuki; Hashizume, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    We are currently developing a neurosurgical robotic system that facilitates access to residual tumors and improves brain tumor removal surgical outcomes. The system combines conventional and robotic surgery allowing for a quick conversion between the procedures. This concept requires a new master console that can be positioned at the surgical bedside and be sterilized. The master console was developed using new technologies, such as a parallel mechanism and pneumatic sensors. The parallel mechanism is a purely passive 5-DOF (degrees of freedom) joystick based on the author's haptic research. The parallel mechanism enables motion input of conventional brain tumor removal surgery with a compact, intuitive interface that can be used in a conventional surgical environment. In addition, the pneumatic sensors implemented on the mechanism provide an intuitive interface and electrically isolate the tool parts from the mechanism so they can be easily sterilized. The 5-DOF parallel mechanism is compact (17 cm width, 19cm depth, and 15cm height), provides a 505,050 mm and 90° workspace and is highly backdrivable (0.27N of resistance force representing the surgical motion). The evaluation tests revealed that the pneumatic sensors can properly measure the suction strength, grasping force, and hand contact. In addition, an installability test showed that the master console can be used in a conventional surgical environment. The proposed master console design was shown to be feasible for operative neurosurgery based on comprehensive testing. This master console is currently being tested for master-slave control with a surgical robotic system.

  2. Foucault at the bedside: a critical analysis of empowering a healthy lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devisch, Ignaas; Vanheule, Stijn

    2015-06-01

    Since quite a few years, philosophy is heading towards the bedside of the patient: the practice of philosophy has stepped out of its ivory tower, it seems, to deal with empirical or practical questions. Apart from the advantages, we should keep in mind the importance of a critical analysis of medical or clinical practice as such. If ethics partakes the clinical stage, it runs the risk only to discuss the how question and to forget the more fundamental what or why questions: what are we doing exactly and why is it good for? Starting from the principle of the empowerment of the patient, we will demonstrate how the discourse on empowerment in health care seems to forget a profound reflection upon this principle as such. By rehearsing some basics from the governmentality theory of Michel Foucault and the actualization of it by Nicolas Rose, we will argue how philosophical investigation in medical-ethical evolutions such as empowerment of the patient is still needed to understand what is really going on in today's clinical practice. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Managing change in the nursing handover from traditional to bedside handover – a case study from Mauritius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagoo Zaheda B

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The shift handover forms an important part of the communication process that takes place twice within the nurses' working day in the gynaecological ward. This paper addresses the topic of implementing a new system of bedside handover, which puts patients central to the whole process of managing care and also addresses some of the shortcomings of the traditional handover system. Methods A force field analysis in terms of the driving forces had shown that there was dissatisfaction with the traditional method of handover which had led to an increase in the number of critical incidents and complaints from patients, relatives and doctors. The restraining forces identified were a fear of accountability, lack of confidence and that this change would lead to more work. A 3 – step planned change model consisting of unfreezing, moving and refreezing was used to guide us through the change process. Resistance to change was managed by creating a climate of open communication where stakeholders were allowed to voice opinions, share concerns, insights, and ideas thereby actively participating in decision making. Results An evaluation had shown that this process was successfully implemented to the satisfaction of patients, and staff in general. Conclusion This successful change should encourage other nurses to become more proactive in identifying areas for change management in order to improve our health care system.

  4. Current topics in glycemic control by wearable artificial pancreas or bedside artificial pancreas with closed-loop system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Munekage, Masaya; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Munekage, Eri; Shiga, Mai; Maeda, Hiromichi; Namikawa, Tsutomu

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of diabetes is increasing at an unprecedented pace and has become a serious health concern worldwide during the last two decades. Despite this, adequate glycemic control using an artificial pancreas has not been established, although the 21st century has seen rapid developments in this area. Herein, we review current topics in glycemic control for both the wearable artificial pancreas for type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients and the bedside artificial pancreas for surgical diabetic patients. In type 1 diabetic patients, nocturnal hypoglycemia associated with insulin therapy remains a serious problem that could be addressed by the recent development of a wearable artificial pancreas. This smart phone-like device, comprising a real-time, continuous glucose monitoring system and insulin pump system, could potentially significantly reduce nocturnal hypoglycemia compared with conventional glycemic control. Of particular interest in this space are the recent inventions of a low-glucose suspend feature in the portable systems that automatically stops insulin delivery 2 h following a glucose sensor value <70 mg/dL and a bio-hormonal pump system consisting of insulin and glucagon pumps. Perioperative tight glycemic control using a bedside artificial pancreas with the closed-loop system has also proved safe and effective for not only avoiding hypoglycemia, but also for reducing blood glucose level variability resulting in good surgical outcomes. We hope that a more sophisticated artificial pancreas with closed-loop system will now be taken up for routine use worldwide, providing enormous relief for patients suffering from uncontrolled hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and/or variability in blood glucose concentrations.

  5. Analysis of bedside entertainment services' effect on post cardiac surgery physical activity: a prospective, randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaspyros, Sotiris; Uppal, Shitansu; Khan, Shakeeb A; Paul, Sanjoy; O'Regan, David J

    2008-11-01

    A rising number of acute hospitals in the UK have been providing patients with bedside entertainment services (BES) since 1995. However, their effect on postoperative patient mobility has not been explored. The aim of this prospective randomised clinical trial was to compare the level of postoperative physical activity and length of in-hospital stay of patients undergoing cardiac surgery depending on whether they had access to BES or not. One hundred patients requiring elective cardiac surgery were randomised to receive access to BES (52 patients) or not (48 patients). Pedometers were used to quantify postoperative physical activity for 5 days. To assess the significance of the effect of intervention (TV off or on) on the pedometer counts over time a mixed effect Poisson regression model is used, with the time varying aspect as random component. The potential influence of gender difference and age on pedometer counts were assessed by incorporating these two factors as covariates in the Poisson model. On average, patients with no access to BES walked more than those with BES access. This difference ranged between 192 and 609 steps in favour of the first group for each individual postoperative day. Patients with no access to BES were 84% more likely (risk ratio: 1.84, 95% CI: 1.29-2.63) to walk higher number of steps than patients with access to BES. On average, participants with access to BES were likely to stay longer in hospital (median of 7 days with interquartile range 6-7 days), than participants with no access to BES (median of 6 days with interquartile range 5-7 days), however the difference did not reach statistical significance. We have demonstrated that the bedside entertainment systems may have an adverse effect on post cardiac surgery patient ambulation and may contribute to an increase in hospital stay.

  6. Auditory sensitivity to spectral modulation phase reversal as a function of modulation depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Emily; Grose, John

    2018-01-01

    The present study evaluated auditory sensitivity to spectral modulation by determining the modulation depth required to detect modulation phase reversal. This approach may be preferable to spectral modulation detection with a spectrally flat standard, since listeners appear unable to perform the task based on the detection of temporal modulation. While phase reversal thresholds are often evaluated by holding modulation depth constant and adjusting modulation rate, holding rate constant and adjusting modulation depth supports rate-specific assessment of modulation processing. Stimuli were pink noise samples, filtered into seven octave-wide bands (0.125-8 kHz) and spectrally modulated in dB. Experiment 1 measured performance as a function of modulation depth to determine appropriate units for adaptive threshold estimation. Experiment 2 compared thresholds in dB for modulation detection with a flat standard and modulation phase reversal; results supported the idea that temporal cues were available at high rates for the former but not the latter. Experiment 3 evaluated spectral modulation phase reversal thresholds for modulation that was restricted to either one or two neighboring bands. Flanking bands of unmodulated noise had a larger detrimental effect on one-band than two-band targets. Thresholds for high-rate modulation improved with increasing carrier frequency up to 2 kHz, whereas low-rate modulation appeared more consistent across frequency, particularly in the two-band condition. Experiment 4 measured spectral weights for spectral modulation phase reversal detection and found higher weights for bands in the spectral center of the stimulus than for the lowest (0.125 kHz) or highest (8 kHz) band. Experiment 5 compared performance for highly practiced and relatively naïve listeners, and found weak evidence of a larger practice effect at high than low spectral modulation rates. These results provide preliminary data for a task that may provide a better estimate of

  7. Meningkatkan Kemandirian Belajar dan Hasil Belajar Siswa melalui Pengembangan Modul Administrasi Kepegawaian Berbasis Strategi Pembelajaran Inkuiri Terbimbing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharisma Swandhana

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This research and development aimed to produce a module of Employee Administration based on Guided Inquiry Learning Strategy for the twelfth grade students of Office Administration program, to determine the feasibility of the module developed through validation, and to know whether there is an improvement towards independent learning and students’ ourcomes before and after using the module This research and development used 4D model. It consisted of 4 stages of development: define, design, develop, and disseminate. It was obtained the average sore of post-test 91.76 in the experimental class, and the results of material and module validation reached 90.66% and 88.30%.  The result of questionnaire distribution of independent learning using the module showed 90%. Thus, from the results of this research showed that the Employee Administration module was applicable and able to improve independent learning and students’ outcomes. It was suggested to use this module as a supporting alternative for learning Employee Administration, specifically on material of discharging employees and pension. ABSTRAK: Penelitian dan pengembangan ini bertujuan untuk menghasilkan bahan ajar berupa Modul Administrasi Kepegawaian Berbasis Strategi Pembelajaran Inkuiri Terbimbing untuk siswa SMK kelas XII Program Keahlian Administrasi Perkantoran., mengetahui kelayakan modul yang telah dikembangkan melalui hasil validasi, dan mengetahui apakah terjadi peningkatan kemandirian belajar dan hasil belajar siswa sebelum dan sesudah menggunakan modul. Penelitian dan pengembangan ini dilakukan dengan menggunakan 4D model. Model ini terdiri dari 4 tahap pengembangan, yaitu define, design, develop, dan disseminate. Diperoleh hasil rata rata nilai post test 91,76 pada kelas eksperimen, hasil validasi oleh ahli materi dan ahli modul mencapai hasil 90,66% dan 88,30%, hasil penyebaran angket kemandirian belajar siswa dengan menggunakan modul juga mencapai persentase 90

  8. Bedside prediction of right subclavian venous catheter insertion length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Ji Choi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: The present study aimed to evaluate whether right subclavian vein (SCV catheter insertion depth can be predicted reliably by the distances from the SCV insertion site to the ipsilateral clavicular notch directly (denoted as I-IC, via the top of the SCV arch, or via the clavicle (denoted as I-T-IC and I-C-IC, respectively. Method: In total, 70 SCV catheterizations were studied. The I-IC, I-T-IC, and I-C-IC distances in each case were measured after ultrasound-guided SCV catheter insertion. The actual length of the catheter between the insertion site and the ipsilateral clavicular notch, denoted as L, was calculated by using chest X-ray. Results: L differed from the I-T-IC, I-C-IC, and I-IC distances by 0.14±0.53, 2.19±1.17, and -0.45 ±0.68 cm, respectively. The mean I-T-IC distance was the most similar to the mean L (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.89. The mean I-IC was significantly shorter than L, while the mean I-C-IC was significantly longer. Linear regression analysis provided the following formula: Predicted SCV catheter insertion length (cm = -0.037 + 0.036 × Height (cm + 0.903 × I-T-IC (cm (adjusted r2 =0.64. Conclusion: The I-T-IC distance may be a reliable bedside predictor of the optimal insertion length for a right SCV cannulation.

  9. The route of administration (oral vs intravenous) does not influence dose or outcome in Graves' disease and unifocal autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Peter; Biko, Johannes; Haenscheid, Heribert; Hilliger, Stephan; Koutsampelas, Christos; Kranzfelder, Michael; Ladner, Stephan; Reiners, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    In a prospective randomised study, we investigated the influence of the route of administration of radioiodide on dosimetry and therapy outcome. Fifty-four patients suffering from Graves' disease (GD) and 60 patients with unifocal autonomy (UA) participated in the study and were randomly treated with either orally or intravenously administered radioiodide. Pretherapeutic dosimetry was based on single uptake measurements with a calibrated uptake probe system. The radioiodine kinetics during hospitalisation was assessed by daily bedside uptake measurements. Therapeutic dose was determined by half-life and thyroid uptake at the time of discharge using the same uptake probe as for the radioiodine test. No improvement in accuracy of dosimetry was achieved when radioiodide was administered intravenously. Mean therapeutic doses were identical following intravenous or oral administration. Variation in the achieved dose was slightly higher in the patients receiving oral administration, this being attributable to larger deviations in discrete activities of the capsules administered as compared with the values determined by dosimetry. No differences according to treatment modality were found with regard to therapeutic outcome. Eighty-seven patients attended 6-month follow-up after therapy. In the UA group, successful treatment, defined as a normal or elevated TSH level, was observed in 94% of patients after oral administration and in 80% after intravenous administration; corresponding figures in the GD group were 68% and 65%. The causes of individual differences between targeted and therapeutically achieved doses remain undetermined. Variations in the bioavailability of radioiodide or other parameters affecting thyroid status may be involved, and further investigations are needed to clarify this. (orig.)

  10. Effect of bedside shielding on air-kerma rates around gynecologic intracavitary brachytherapy patients containing 226Ra or 137Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papin, P.J.; Ramsey, M.J.; LaFontaine, R.L.; LePage, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    An anthropomorphic phantom was implanted with 226Ra or 137Cs gynecologic intracavitary brachytherapy sources. Air-kerma rate measurements were taken at 10-cm increments along a horizontal plane from the side of the bed at 50 cm, 87 cm, and 136 cm heights above the floor. Five portable lead shields were placed at the head, at the foot and along one side of the bed and readings were taken again at the corresponding heights above, below and behind the shields. The readings were normalized to 100-mg Ra equivalence, and air-kerma rate curves were drawn allowing for the comparison of 226Ra and 137Cs with and without lead shields. The data demonstrated that the air-kerma rates for 137Cs were reduced more than those for 226Ra with the use of the portable lead shields. There was four times the transmission with 226Ra than with 137Cs. The optimal placement was with the lateral bedside shields proximal to the head and foot closest to the bed, with the middle shield overlapping in back. The shields at the head and foot should extend out and overlap the bedside shields. The level of the sources should be positioned near the bottom of the shields. This information will provide the medical health physicist with an estimate of air-kerma rates for both 226Ra and 137Cs with and without shielding for evaluating personnel exposures as well as the effectiveness of current shielding in relation to radiation protection requirements in adjacent rooms or hallways

  11. LMM Holographic Optical Tweezers (HOT) Module, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to expand the capabilities of the LMM for colloidal and other research by developing a holographic optical tweezers (HOT) module, allowing solid-state...

  12. Public Transportation Pricing: An Instructional Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWha, Charley

    A concept-based introduction to public transportation pricing is presented in this instructional module for undergraduate and graduate transportation-related courses for disciplines such as engineering, business administration, and technology. After an introductory section on transportation pricing planning and the history of transportation system…

  13. Patient and nurse preferences for nurse handover-using preferences to inform policy: a discrete choice experiment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinks, Jean; Chaboyer, Wendy; Bucknall, Tracey; Tobiano, Georgia; Whitty, Jennifer A

    2015-11-11

    Nursing bedside handover in hospital has been identified as an opportunity to involve patients and promote patient-centred care. It is important to consider the preferences of both patients and nurses when implementing bedside handover to maximise the successful uptake of this policy. We outline a study which aims to (1) identify, compare and contrast the preferences for various aspects of handover common to nurses and patients while accounting for other factors, such as the time constraints of nurses that may influence these preferences.; (2) identify opportunities for nurses to better involve patients in bedside handover and (3) identify patient and nurse preferences that may challenge the full implementation of bedside handover in the acute medical setting. We outline the protocol for a discrete choice experiment (DCE) which uses a survey design common to both patients and nurses. We describe the qualitative and pilot work undertaken to design the DCE. We use a D-efficient design which is informed by prior coefficients collected during the pilot phase. We also discuss the face-to-face administration of this survey in a population of acutely unwell, hospitalised patients and describe how data collection challenges have been informed by our pilot phase. Mixed multinomial logit regression analysis will be used to estimate the final results. This study has been approved by a university ethics committee as well as two participating hospital ethics committees. Results will be used within a knowledge translation framework to inform any strategies that can be used by nursing staff to improve the uptake of bedside handover. Results will also be disseminated via peer-reviewed journal articles and will be presented at national and international conferences. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Self-Assembling Wireless Autonomous Reconfigurable Modules (SWARM), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Payload Systems Inc. and the MIT Space Systems Laboratory propose Self-assembling, Wireless, Autonomous, Reconfigurable Modules (SWARM) as an innovative approach to...

  15. [Drug vectorization or how to modulate tissular and cellular distribution of biologically active compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvreur, P

    2001-07-01

    Drug vectorization has undergone considerable development over the last few years. This review focuses on the intravenous route of administration. Colloid formulations allow a modulation of drug tissue distribution. Using liposomes and nanoparticles with unmodified surfaces, drugs can be targeted to macrophages of the reticulum endothelium system. When the liposomes or nanoparticles are covered with hydrophilic or flexible polymers, the vascular phase can be favored in order, for example, to facilitate selective extravasation at a tumor site. Therapeutic applications of these systems are presented. The development of "intelligent" vectors capable of modulating intracellular distribution of an active compounds is an equally interesting approach, for example pH-sensitive liposomes or nanoparticles decorated with folic acid capable of targeting intracellular cytoplasm.

  16. Using a virtual breakthrough series collaborative to reduce postoperative respiratory failure in 16 Veterans Health Administration hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkoff, Lisa; Neily, Julia; Mills, Peter D; Borzecki, Ann; Shin, Marlena; Lynn, Marilyn M; Gunnar, William; Rosen, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) Virtual Breakthrough Series (VBTS) process was used in an eight-month (June 2011-January 2012) quality improvement (QI) project to improve care related to reducing postoperative respiratory failure. The VBTS collaborative drew on Patient Safety Indicator 11: Postoperative Respiratory Failure Rate to guide changes in care at the bedside. Sixteen Veterans Health Administration hospitals, each representing a regional Veterans Integrated Service Network, participated in the QI project. During the prework phase (initial two months), hospitals formed multidisciplinary teams, selected measures related to their goals, and collected baseline data. The six-month action phase included group conference calls in which the faculty presented clinical background on the topic, discussed evidence-based processes of care, and/or presented content regarding reducing postoperative respiratory failure. During a final, six-month continuous improvement and spread phase, teams were to continue implementing changes as part of their usual processes. The six most commonly reported interventions to reduce postoperative respiratory failure focused on improving incentive spirometer use, documenting implementation of targeted interventions, oral care, standardized orders, early ambulation, and provider education. A few teams reported reduced ICU readmissions for respiratory failure. The VBTS collaborative helped teams implement process changes to help reduce postoperative respiratory complications. Teams reported initial success at implementing site-specific improvements using real-time data. The VBTS model shows promise for knowledge sharing and efficient multifacility improvement efforts, although long-term sustainability and testing in these and other settings need to be examined.

  17. Using Targeted Virotherapy to Treat a Resistant Ewing Sarcoma Model: From the Bedside to the Bench and Back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham Abdelbary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic Ewing sarcoma (EWS is often resistant to current multimodal chemotherapeutic regimens. Oncolytic virus therapy (OV is a novel therapeutic platform whereby viruses can selectively infect as well as replicate in and kill tumor cells, while sparing normal tissues. The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy of the biotherapeutic oncolytic agent, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔM51, to kill EWS cells that are resistant to conventional therapy. Our hypothesis is that systemic delivery of VSVΔM51 can demonstrate tumor-specific killing of resistant EWS cells, as well as a significant decrease of tumor burden in EWS bearing mice. Methods. A biopsy sample was obtained from a patient with metastatic EWS and was used to establish a novel EWS cell line. In vitro assays evaluated the oncolytic effect of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔM51 on this cell line. EWS xenograft mice model bearing either lung or subcutaneous tumors was established to evaluate the antitumor specific oncolytic effect of VSVΔM51 after local and systemic delivery. Results. The established EWS cell line shared similar molecular and genetic traits to the patient’s original tumor specimen. VSVΔM51 effectively infected and killed EWS cells in vitro. In vivo, VSVΔM51 selectively infected and killed EWS and led to significant delay in tumor growth. Conclusion. This study has been designed to implement a translational link between the bedside and the bench, where a specific challenging clinical scenario guided this basic science research. This research demonstrated that a sarcoma, which is resistant to current conventional standard therapies, is still susceptible to an alternative therapeutic platform, such as OV. Adding OV to the armamentarium of sarcoma treatment can enhance the future therapeutic approach towards these cancer patients.

  18. [Bedside implantation of a new temporary vena cava inferior filter : German results from the European ANGEL registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, S; Becher, T; Giannakopoulos, K; Jabbour, C; Fastner, C; El-Battrawy, I; Ansari, U; Lossnitzer, D; Behnes, M; Alonso, A; Kirschning, T; Dissmann, R; Kueck, O; Stern, D; Michels, G; Borggrefe, M; Akin, I

    2018-04-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a frequently occurring complication in critically ill patients, and the simultaneous occurrence of PE and life-threatening bleeding is a therapeutic dilemma. Inferior vena cava filters (IVCF) may represent an important therapeutic alternative in these cases. The Angel® catheter (Bio2 Medical Inc., San Antonio, TX, USA) is a novel IVCF that provides temporary protection from PE and is implanted at bedside without fluoroscopy. The European Angel® Catheter Registry is an observational, multicenter study. In our German substudy, we investigated patients from three German hospitals and four intensive care units, who underwent Angel® catheter implantation between February 2016 and December 2016. A total of 23 critically ill patients (68 ± 9 years, 43% male) were included. The main indication for implantation was a high risk for or an established PE, combined with contraindications for prophylactic or therapeutic anticoagulation due to either an increased risk of bleeding (81%) or active bleeding (13%). The Angel® catheter was successfully inserted in all patients at bedside. No PE occurred in patients with an indwelling Angel® catheter. Clots with a diameter larger the 20 mm, indicating clot migration, were detected in 5% of the patients by cavography before filter retrieval. Filter retrieval was uneventful in all of our cases, while filter dislocation occurred in 3% of the patients. The German data from the multicenter European Angel® Catheter Registry show that the Angel® catheter is a safe and effective approach for critically ill patients with a high risk for the development of PE or an established PE, when an anticoagulation therapy is contraindicated.

  19. GABAA receptor positive allosteric modulators modify the abuse-related behavioral and neurochemical effects of methamphetamine in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berro, Laís F; Andersen, Monica L; Tufik, Sergio; Howell, Leonard L

    2017-09-01

    GABA A receptor positive allosteric modulators (GABA A receptor modulators) are commonly used for the treatment of insomnia. Nevertheless, the effects of these compounds on psychostimulant-induced sleep impairment are poorly understood. Because GABA A receptor modulators have been shown to decrease the abuse-related effects of psychostimulants, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of temazepam (0.3, 1.0 or 3.0 mg/kg) and eszopiclone (0.3, 1.0 or 3.0 mg/kg), two GABA A receptor modulators, on the behavioral neuropharmacology of methamphetamine in adult rhesus macaques (n = 5). Sleep-like measures and general daytime activity were evaluated with Actiwatch monitors. Methamphetamine self-administration (0.03 mg/kg/inf) was evaluated during morning sessions. Methamphetamine-induced dopamine overflow was assessed through in vivo microdialysis targeting the nucleus accumbens. Nighttime treatment with either temazepam or eszopiclone was ineffective in improving sleep-like measures disrupted by methamphetamine self-administration. Acute pretreatment with a low dose of temazepam before self-administration sessions increased methamphetamine self-administration without affecting normal daytime home-cage activity. At a high dose, acute temazepam pretreatment decreased methamphetamine self-administration and attenuated methamphetamine-induced increases in dopamine in the nucleus accumbens, without decreasing general daytime activity. Acute eszopiclone treatment exerted no effects on methamphetamine intake or drug-induced increases in dopamine. Our study suggests that treatments based on GABA A receptor modulators are not effective for the treatment of sleep disruption in the context of psychostimulant use. In addition, distinct GABA A receptor modulators differentially modulated the abuse-related effects of methamphetamine, with acute treatment with the high efficacy GABA A receptor modulator temazepam decreasing the behavioral and neurochemical effects

  20. Intranasal siRNA administration reveals IGF2 deficiency contributes to impaired cognition in Fragile X syndrome mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Marta; Cheng, Yuyan; Velmeshev, Dmitry; Magistri, Marco; Eldar-Finkelman, Hagit; Martinez, Ana; Faghihi, Mohammad A; Jope, Richard S; Beurel, Eleonore

    2017-03-23

    Molecular mechanisms underlying learning and memory remain imprecisely understood, and restorative interventions are lacking. We report that intranasal administration of siRNAs can be used to identify targets important in cognitive processes and to improve genetically impaired learning and memory. In mice modeling the intellectual deficiency of Fragile X syndrome, intranasally administered siRNA targeting glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC1), HDAC2, or HDAC3 diminished cognitive impairments. In WT mice, intranasally administered brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) siRNA or HDAC4 siRNA impaired learning and memory, which was partially due to reduced insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF2) levels because the BDNF siRNA- or HDAC4 siRNA-induced cognitive impairments were ameliorated by intranasal IGF2 administration. In Fmr1 -/- mice, hippocampal IGF2 was deficient, and learning and memory impairments were ameliorated by IGF2 intranasal administration. Therefore intranasal siRNA administration is an effective means to identify mechanisms regulating cognition and to modulate therapeutic targets.

  1. Team Objective Structured Bedside Assessment (TOSBA) as formative assessment in undergraduate Obstetrics and Gynaecology: a cohort study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Deane, Richard P

    2015-10-09

    Team Objective Structured Bedside Assessment (TOSBA) is a learning approach in which a team of medical students undertake a set of structured clinical tasks with real patients in order to reach a diagnosis and formulate a management plan and receive immediate feedback on their performance from a facilitator. TOSBA was introduced as formative assessment to an 8-week undergraduate teaching programme in Obstetrics and Gynaecology (O&G) in 2013\\/14. Each student completed 5 TOSBA sessions during the rotation. The aim of the study was to evaluate TOSBA as a teaching method to provide formative assessment for medical students during their clinical rotation. The research questions were: Does TOSBA improve clinical, communication and\\/or reasoning skills? Does TOSBA provide quality feedback?

  2. Outbreak of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in different wards at a regional hospital related to untrained bedside caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Hsun; Li, Jin-Feng; Huang, Li-Yueh; Lin, Fu-Mei; Yang, Ya-Sung; Siu, L Kristopher; Chang, Feng-Yee; Lin, Jung-Chung

    2017-10-01

    This study describes an outbreak caused by imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (IRAB) involving 2 general wards at the Penghu branch of Tri-Service General Hospital. Clinical data obtained from the patients with IRAB during an outbreak from May 2014-October 2014 were reviewed. Microbiologic sampling from the environment and the hands of health care workers (HCWs) was performed. Clinical isolates from case patients were genotyped using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). During the outbreak period, 12 patients were colonized or infected with IRAB. The hospital room environments of the case patients were contaminated with IRAB. Hands of nurses and physicians were not colonized with IRAB, but the hands of 2 bedside caregivers of case patients were colonized with IRAB. The PFGE analysis revealed that at least 2 major genetically distinct strains disseminated between 2 different wards. After implementation of infection control measures with a cohort of nursing patients, hand hygiene education for caregivers who had not received instructions before the outbreak, and a critical value alert system to notify case patients, the outbreak was controlled successfully. This outbreak study highlights the importance of adherence to hand hygiene by all HCWs to prevent the dissemination of multidrug-resistant organisms. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of LMS Moodle's functionality for the purpose of supporting the application administrator

    OpenAIRE

    Šperková, Lucie

    2009-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with administrator environment of the Learning Management System Moodle. The aim is to provide a basic outline of the alternatives for administrative tools supporting the learning procedure in Moodle and to create a user's guide for LMS Moodle. The characterisation focuses on the administration of users, courses, modules, appearances, security and some other basic settings. A brief survey on functioning of the system among Czech universities is also a part of this t...

  4. Computed radiography versus mobile direct radiography for bedside chest radiographs: Impact of dose on image quality and reader agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Boo, D.W.; Weber, M.; Deurloo, E.E.; Streekstra, G.J.; Freling, N.J.; Dongelmans, D.A.; Schaefer-Prokop, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To asses the image quality and potential for dose reduction of mobile direct detector (DR) chest radiography as compared with computed radiography (CR) for intensive care unit (ICU) chest radiographs (CXR). Methods and materials: Three groups of age-, weight- and disease-matched ICU patients (n = 114 patients; 50 CXR per acquisition technique) underwent clinically indicated bedside CXR obtained with either CR (single read-out powder plates) or mobile DR (GOS-TFT detectors) at identical or 50% reduced dose (DR 50% ). Delineation of anatomic structures and devices used for patient monitoring, overall image quality and disease were scored by four readers. In 12 patients pairs of follow-up CR and DR images were available, and in 15 patients pairs of CR and DR 50% images were available. In these pairs the overall image quality was also compared side-by-side. Results: Delineation of anatomy in the mediastinum was scored better with DR or DR 50% than with CR. Devices used for patient monitoring were seen best with DR, with DR 50% being superior to CR. In the side-by-side comparison, the overall image quality of DR and DR 50% was rated better than CR in 96% (46/48) and 87% (52/60), respectively. Inter-observer agreement for the assessment of pathology was fair for CR and DR 50% (κ = 0.33 and κ = 0.39, respectively) and moderate for DR (κ = 0.48). Conclusion: Mobile DR units offer better image quality than CR for bedside chest radiography and allow for 50% dose reduction. Inter-observer agreement increases with image quality and is superior with DR, while DR 50% and CR are comparable.

  5. Translational Antidote Research: A Bedside to Bench Tale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Brent

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although antidote development should proceed in an orderly fashion from observation, to experimental and safety studies, to clinical trials, this sequence is not always precisely followed. The development of fomepizole as an antidote for toxic alcohol and glycol poisoning is an example of how this may not be the case. Interest in the development of fomepizole was spurred in the 1960s. Shortly thereafter studies characterized by administration to humans commenced. The potential value of fomepizole as an antidote for methanol poisoning was highlighted by primate experiments. Simultaneously, the utility of fomepizole was shown in an experimental model of ethylene glycol poisoning. Further studies on humans showed effectiveness of fomepizole in the treatment of disulfiram-alcohol reactions and ethylene glycol poisoning. In addition, in primate experiments, the safety of fomepizole was established as the subjects tolerated serum fomepizole concentrations over 150 times higher than therapeutic target levels. Subsequent studies have validated the efficacy of fomepizole in the treatment of ethylene glycol and methanol poisonings. Fomepizole has been found to be associated with fewer complications than the alternative alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitor, ethanol. In serious cases of methanol toxicity, fomepizole has been shown to improve survival compared to that obtained with ethanol.

  6. Development and validation of a bedside risk score for MRSA among patients hospitalized with complicated skin and skin structure infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilberberg Marya D

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a frequent cause of complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSI. Patients with MRSA require different empiric treatment than those with non-MRSA infections, yet no accurate tools exist to aid in stratifying the risk for a MRSA cSSSI. We sought to develop a simple bedside decision rule to tailor empiric coverage more accurately. Methods We conducted a large multicenter (N=62 hospitals retrospective cohort study in a US-based database between April 2005 and March 2009. All adult initial admissions with ICD-9-CM codes specific to cSSSI were included. Patients admitted with MRSA vs. non-MRSA were compared with regard to baseline demographic, clinical and hospital characteristics. We developed and validated a model to predict the risk of MRSA, and compared its performance via sensitivity, specificity and other classification statistics to the healthcare-associated (HCA infection risk factors. Results Of the 7,183 patients with cSSSI, 2,387 (33.2% had MRSA. Factors discriminating MRSA from non-MRSA were age, African-American race, no evidence of diabetes mellitus, cancer or renal dysfunction, and prior history of cardiac dysrhythmia. The score ranging from 0 to 8 points exhibited a consistent dose–response relationship. A MRSA score of 5 or higher was superior to the HCA classification in all characteristics, while that of 4 or higher was superior on all metrics except specificity. Conclusions MRSA is present in 1/3 of all hospitalized cSSSI. A simple bedside risk score can help discriminate the risk for MRSA vs. other pathogens with improved accuracy compared to the HCA definition.

  7. Effects and detection of Nandrosol and ractopamine administration in veal calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Divari, Sara; Berio, Enrica; Pregel, Paola; Sereno, Alessandra; Chiesa, Luca; Pavlovic, Radmila; Panseri, Sara; Bovee, Toine F.H.; Biolatti, Bartolomeo; Cannizzo, Francesca T.

    2017-01-01

    The present study describes different effects of the selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) nandrolone phenylpropionate (Nandrosol) and the β-agonist ractopamine administration in veal calves, and it investigates different strategies applied to trace these molecules. Morphological changes

  8. Modulation of expression of Programmed Death-1 by administration of probiotic Dahi in DMH-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohania, Dheeraj; Kansal, Vinod K; Kumar, Manoj; Nagpal, Ravinder; Yamashiro, Yuichiro; Marotta, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    Interaction of probiotic bacteria with the host immune system elicits beneficial immune modulating effects. Although, there are many published studies on interaction of probiotics with immune system focusing on activation of immune system by bacterial cell wall through the engagement of Toll-like receptor family; very few studies have focused on molecules involved in the T-cell activation, and not much work has been executed to study the correlation of probiotics and programmed death-1 in colorectal carcinogenesis in animal models. Hence, the present study was carried out to assess the effect of probiotic Dahi on expression of programmed death (PD-1) in colorectum of 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine treated Wistar rats. DMH was injected subcutaneously at the rate of 40 mg/kg body weight per animal twice a week for 2 weeks. A total of 168 male Wistar rats were randomly allocated to seven groups, each group having twenty-four animals. The rats were euthanized at the 8th, 16th and 32nd week of the experiment and examined for the expression of PD-1 in colorectal tissues by immunohistochemical staining. Expression of PD-1 was observed in colorectal tissues of normal and DMH-treated rats. Feeding rats with probiotic Dahi or the treatment with piroxicam decreased the expression of PD-1 in DMH-induced colorectal mucosa, and the combined treatment with probiotic Dahi and piroxicam was significantly more effective in reducing the expression of PD-1. PD-1 expressed independent of carcinogen administration in normal colonic mucosa and may play a role in modulation of immune response in DMH-induced colorectal carcinogenesis. The present study suggests that probiotic Dahi can be used as an effective chemopreventive agent in the management of colorectal cancer.

  9. NMDA-NO signaling in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus time-dependently modulates the behavioral responses to forced swimming stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Cassiano R A F; Casarotto, Plínio C; Joca, Sâmia R L

    2016-07-01

    Hodological and genetic differences between dorsal (DH) and ventral (VH) hippocampus may convey distinct behavioral roles. DH is responsible for mediating cognitive process, such as learning and memory, while VH modulates neuroendocrine and emotional-motivational responses to stress. Manipulating glutamatergic NMDA receptors and nitric oxide (NO) systems of the hippocampus induces important changes in behavioral responses to stress. Nevertheless, there is no study concerning functional differences between DH and VH in the modulation of behavioral responses induced by stress models predictive of antidepressant effects. Thus, this study showed that reversible blockade of the DH or VH of animals submitted to the forced swimming test (FST), by using cobalt chloride (calcium-dependent synaptic neurotransmission blocker), was not able to change immobility time. Afterwards, the NMDA-NO system was evaluated in the FST by means of intra-DH or intra-VH administration of NMDA receptor antagonist (AP7), NOS1 and sGC inhibitors (N-PLA and ODQ, respectively). Bilateral intra-DH injections after pretest or before test were able to induce antidepressant-like effects in the FST. On the other hand, bilateral VH administration of AP-7, N-PLA and ODQ induced antidepressant-like effects only when injected before the test. Administration of NO scavenger (C-PTIO) intra-DH, after pretest and before test, or intra-VH before test induced similar results. Increased NOS1 levels was associated to stress exposure in the DH. These results suggest that the glutamatergic-NO system of the DH and VH are both able to modulate behavioral responses in the FST, albeit with differential participation along time after stress exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Intranasal administration of oxytocin modulates behavioral and amygdala responses to infant crying in females with insecure attachment representations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendricx-Riem, M.M.E.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the effects of oxytocin administration on the response to infant crying in individuals with secure or insecure attachment representations as assessed with the Adult Attachment Interview. We measured feelings of irritation and the use of excessive force as indicated by grip

  11. [Implementation of bedside training and advanced objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) trial to learn and confirm about pharmacy clinical skills].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Jin; Takamura, Norito; Ogata, Kenji; Setoguchi, Nao; Sato, Keizo

    2013-01-01

    Bedside training for fourth-year students, as well as seminars in hospital pharmacy (vital sign seminars) for fifth-year students at the Department of Pharmacy of Kyushu University of Health and Welfare have been implemented using patient training models and various patient simulators. The introduction of simulation-based pharmaceutical education, where no patients are present, promotes visually, aurally, and tactilely simulated learning regarding the evaluation of vital signs and implementation of physical assessment when disease symptoms are present or adverse effects occur. A patient simulator also promotes the creation of training programs for emergency and critical care, with which basic as well as advanced life support can be practiced. In addition, an advanced objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) trial has been implemented to evaluate skills regarding vital signs and physical assessments. Pharmacists are required to examine vital signs and conduct physical assessment from a pharmaceutical point of view. The introduction of these pharmacy clinical skills will improve the efficacy of drugs, work for the prevention or early detection of adverse effects, and promote the appropriate use of drugs. It is considered that simulation-based pharmaceutical education is essential to understand physical assessment, and such education will ideally be applied and developed according to on-site practices.

  12. Clearing up the hazy road from bench to bedside: A framework for integrating the fourth hurdle into translational medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Jürgen H

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New products evolving from research and development can only be translated to medical practice on a large scale if they are reimbursed by third-party payers. Yet the decision processes regarding reimbursement are highly complex and internationally heterogeneous. This study develops a process-oriented framework for monitoring these so-called fourth hurdle procedures in the context of product development from bench to bedside. The framework is suitable both for new drugs and other medical technologies. Methods The study is based on expert interviews and literature searches, as well as an analysis of 47 websites of coverage decision-makers in England, Germany and the USA. Results Eight key steps for monitoring fourth hurdle procedures from a company perspective were determined: entering the scope of a healthcare payer; trigger of decision process; assessment; appraisal; setting level of reimbursement; establishing rules for service provision; formal and informal participation; and publication of the decision and supplementary information. Details are given for the English National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, the German Federal Joint Committee, Medicare's National and Local Coverage Determinations, and for Blue Cross Blue Shield companies. Conclusion Coverage determination decisions for new procedures tend to be less formalized than for novel drugs. The analysis of coverage procedures and requirements shows that the proof of patient benefit is essential. Cost-effectiveness is likely to gain importance in future.

  13. Universal Sample Preparation Module for Molecular Analysis in Space, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lynntech proposes to develop and demonstrate the ability of a compact, light-weight, and automated universal sample preparation module (USPM) to process samples from...

  14. Hybrid Windows and Mosaic Video: Reducing Complexity of Space Habitable Modules

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We want to look at the concept of combining small, passive windows with replaceable cameras to improve viewing capabilities for habitable modules of future...

  15. Bedside Ultrasound for the Diagnosis of Small Bowel Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Anshus

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: An elderly female with no history of prior abdominal surgeries presented to the emergency department (ED with acute onset of abdominal pain and distention. Upon arrival, she began having large volume bilious emesis. While waiting for a computed tomography (CT scan of her abdomen and pelvis, a point of care ultrasound (POCUS was performed which showed evidence of a small bowel obstruction (SBO. The patient had a nasogastric tube placed that put out over two liters of bilious contents. A subsequent CT scan confirmed the diagnosis of SBO from a left inguinal hernia and the patient was admitted to the surgical service. Significant findings: The POCUS utilizing the low frequency curvilinear probe demonstrates fluid-filled, dilated bowel loops greater than 2.5cm with to-and-fro peristalsis, and thickened bowel walls greater than 3mm, concerning for SBO. Discussion: Gastrointestinal obstruction is a common diagnosis in the ED, accounting for approximately 15% of all ED visits for acute abdominal pain.1 SBO accounts for approximately 80% of all obstructions.2 In the diagnosis of SBO, studies show that abdominal x-rays have a sensitivity of 66-77% and specificity of 50-57%,3 CT scans have a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 93%,4 and ultrasound has a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 96%.5 While CT scan remains a widely accepted modality for diagnosing SBO, ultrasound is more cost effective, well tolerated, does not involve ionizing radiation, and can be done in a timely manner at the patient’s bedside. Ultrasound can also identify transition points as well as distinguish between functional and mechanical obstruction.6 In addition to SBO, ultrasound can be used to diagnose external hernias, intussusception, tumors, superior mesenteric artery (SMA syndrome, foreign bodies, bezoars, and ascariasis.7

  16. Neurosurgery clinical registry data collection utilizing Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside and electronic health records at the University of Rochester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Christine A; Miranpuri, Amrendra S

    2015-12-01

    In a population health-driven health care system, data collection through the use of clinical registries is becoming imperative to continue to drive effective and efficient patient care. Clinical registries rely on a department's ability to collect high-quality and accurate data. Currently, however, data are collected manually with a high risk for error. The University of Rochester's Department of Neurosurgery in conjunction with the university's Clinical and Translational Science Institute has implemented the integrated use of the Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) informatics framework with the Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) databases.

  17. Complex administrative procedures between administrative efficiency and the obligation to protect individual rights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, R.

    1982-01-01

    Due to their structural premise, administrative procedures possess an inordinate amount of influence, especially in complex situations of judicial decision making, to arrive at the ''right decision'' during the passing of binding regulatory ordinances. Since their system of organization is primarily subject to legislative influence, they are governed by the rules of administrative efficiency in the sense of extensive usage of performance - oriented governmental effectuation of constitutional rights. The demands for adequate judicial protection, of which wide administrative court procedure controls are part, will also serve the goal of reaching the ''right administrative decisions.'' (orig.) [de

  18. Potential Bedside Utility of the Clock-Drawing Test in Evaluating Rapid Therapeutic Response in the Natural Course of Schizophrenia: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransing, Ramdas Sarjerao; Khairkar, Praveen Homdeorao; Mishra, Kshirod; Sakekar, Gajanan

    2017-01-01

    The Clock-Drawing Test (CDT) is a brief, relatively time-efficient, easy to administer at bedside, and well-proven cognitive screening test that assesses a broad range of cognitive abilities in stroke, delirium, and dementia. However, challenges of comprehensive therapeutic outcome evaluations in schizophrenia can also be potentially overcome using CDT. The authors aimed to measure the therapeutic outcome using CDT in 101 schizophrenia patients, irrespective of their diagnostic subtypes. A repeated measures analysis of variance found that improvements on CDT and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale were closely correlated, reflecting critical information about therapeutic response measures in schizophrenia.

  19. MACEDONIAN ADMINISTRATIVE JUDICIAL SYSTEM FOR SOLVING ADMINISTRATIVE DISPUTES COMPARABLE TO EUROPEAN SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sladjana Eftimova

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the legal system, through history until today mostly depends on law and policy which is conducted by the country. In European countries, there is position for historical and cultural conceptions for administrative judicature, differences and similarity that leave mark for solving administrative disputes. The obligation – an internal judicial reform to be established in legal system, is conducted by each of the countries after the breaking down and division of Social Federative Republic of Yugoslavia or SFRY due to following the European law for constitution of legitimacy and constitutionality of acts as well as implementing of independent administrative judicature. Analyze of the current condition regarding the independency and objectiveness of the judicature is necessary in our country and it is important to be seen how the conditions for working of the administrative judicature can be improved.

  20. Effects of GABAergic modulators on food and cocaine self-administration in baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerts, Elise M; Froestl, Wolfgang; Griffiths, Roland R

    2005-12-12

    Drugs that indirectly alter dopaminergic systems may alter the reinforcing effects of cocaine. The inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has extensive neural connections in mesolimbic regions that appear to modulate dopamine. The current study evaluated the effects of GABA(B) receptor agonists baclofen and CGP44532, the benzodiazepine agonist alprazolam, and the GABA reuptake inhibitor tiagabine on lever responding maintained by low dose cocaine injections (0.032 mg/kg) or by food pellet (1 g) delivery in baboons. The benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil was tested as a negative control. Cocaine or food was available under a fixed ratio (FR 10) schedule of reinforcement during daily 2-h sessions. During baseline conditions, cocaine and pellets maintained similar numbers of reinforcers per session. Baclofen, CGP44532 and tiagabine dose-dependently reduced the number of cocaine injections, where as the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil did not. Baclofen, CGP44532 and tiagabine also produced dose-related decreases in food-maintained behavior. In contrast, the benzodiazepine agonist alprazolam, which positively modulates GABA(A) receptors via the benzodiazepine site, produced decreases in cocaine self-injection, but not food-maintained behavior. Thus, the effects of alprazolam were specific for cocaine-maintained behavior, where as the effects of baclofen and CGP44532 were not.

  1. Sensitivity of bedside ultrasound and supine anteroposterior chest radiographs for the identification of pneumothorax after blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, R Gentry; Stone, Michael B

    2010-01-01

    Supine anteroposterior (AP) chest radiographs in patients with blunt trauma have poor sensitivity for the identification of pneumothorax. Ultrasound (US) has been proposed as an alternative screening test for pneumothorax in this population. The authors conducted an evidence-based review of the medical literature to compare sensitivity of bedside US and AP chest radiographs in identifying pneumothorax after blunt trauma. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for trials from 1965 through June 2009 using a search strategy derived from the following PICO formulation of our clinical question: patients included adult (18 + years) emergency department (ED) patients in whom pneumothorax was suspected after blunt trauma. The intervention was thoracic ultrasonography for the detection of pneumothorax. The comparator was the supine AP chest radiograph during the initial evaluation of the patient. The outcome was the diagnostic performance of US in identifying the presence of pneumothorax in the study population. The criterion standard for the presence or absence of pneumothorax was computed tomography (CT) of the chest or a rush of air during thoracostomy tube placement (in unstable patients). Prospective, observational trials of emergency physician (EP)-performed thoracic US were included. Trials in which the exams were performed by radiologists or surgeons, or trials that investigated patients suffering penetrating trauma or with spontaneous or iatrogenic pneumothoraces, were excluded. The methodologic quality of the studies was assessed. Qualitative methods were used to summarize the study results. Data analysis consisted of test performance (sensitivity and specificity, with 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) of thoracic US and supine AP chest radiography. Four prospective observational studies were identified, with a total of 606 subjects who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The sensitivity and specificity of US for the detection of pneumothorax ranged from

  2. Evaluation of Four Bedside Test Systems for Card Performance, Handling and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Felix; Picker, Susanne M; Gathof, Birgit S

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY: OBJECTIVE: Pretransfusion ABO compatibility testing is a simple and required precaution against ABO-incompatible transfusion, which is one of the greatest threats in transfusion medicine. While distinct agglutination is most important for correct test interpretation, protection against infectious diseases and ease of handling are crucial for accurate test performance. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate differences in test card design, handling, and user safety. DESIGN: Four different bedside test cards with pre-applied antibodies were evaluated by 100 medical students using packed red blood cells of different ABO blood groups. Criteria of evaluation were: agglutination, labelling, handling, and safety regarding possible user injuries. Criteria were rated subjectively according to German school notes ranging from 1 = very good to 6 = very bad/insufficient. RESULTS: Overall, all cards received very good/good marks. The ABO blood group was identified correctly in all cases. Three cards (no. 1, no. 3, no. 4) received statistically significant (p labelling (1.5 vs. 2.2-2.4), handling (1.9-2.0 vs. 2.5), and user safety (2.5 vs. 3.4). Analysis of card self-explanation revealed no remarkable differences. CONCLUSION: Despite good performance of all card systems tested, the best results when including all criteria evaluated were obtained with card no. 4 (particularly concerning clear agglutination), followed by cards no. 2, no. 1, and no. 3.

  3. Positive lysosomal modulation as a unique strategy to treat age-related protein accumulation diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Ben A; Wisniewski, Meagan L; Butler, David

    2012-04-01

    Lysosomes are involved in degrading and recycling cellular ingredients, and their disruption with age may contribute to amyloidogenesis, paired helical filaments (PHFs), and α-synuclein and mutant huntingtin aggregation. Lysosomal cathepsins are upregulated by accumulating proteins and more so by the modulator Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK). Such positive modulators of the lysosomal system have been studied in the well-characterized hippocampal slice model of protein accumulation that exhibits the pathogenic cascade of tau aggregation, tubulin breakdown, microtubule destabilization, transport failure, and synaptic decline. Active cathepsins were upregulated by PADK; Rab proteins were modified as well, indicating enhanced trafficking, whereas lysosome-associated membrane protein and proteasome markers were unchanged. Lysosomal modulation reduced the pre-existing PHF deposits, restored tubulin structure and transport, and recovered synaptic components. Further proof-of-principle studies used Alzheimer disease mouse models. It was recently reported that systemic PADK administration caused dramatic increases in cathepsin B protein and activity levels, whereas neprilysin, insulin-degrading enzyme, α-secretase, and β-secretase were unaffected by PADK. In the transgenic models, PADK treatment resulted in clearance of intracellular amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide and concomitant reduction of extracellular deposits. Production of the less pathogenic Aβ(1-38) peptide corresponded with decreased levels of Aβ(1-42), supporting the lysosome's antiamyloidogenic role through intracellular truncation. Amelioration of synaptic and behavioral deficits also indicates a neuroprotective function of the lysosomal system, identifying lysosomal modulation as an avenue for disease-modifying therapies. From the in vitro and in vivo findings, unique lysosomal modulators represent a minimally invasive, pharmacologically controlled strategy against protein accumulation disorders to enhance

  4. Microbial shifts in the swine nasal microbiota in response to parenteral antimicrobial administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeineldin, Mohamed; Aldridge, Brian; Blair, Benjamin; Kancer, Katherine; Lowe, James

    2018-05-24

    The continuous administration of antimicrobials in swine production has been widely criticized with the increase of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and dysbiosis of the beneficial microbial communities. While an increasing number of studies investigate the effects of antimicrobial administration on swine gastrointestinal microbiota biodiversity, the impact of their use on the composition and diversity of nasal microbial communities has not been widely explored. The objective of this study was to characterize the short-term impact of different parenteral antibiotics administration on the composition and diversity of nasal microbial communities in growing pigs. Five antimicrobial treatment groups, each consisting of four, eight-week old piglets, were administered one of the antimicrobials; Ceftiofur Crystalline free acid (CCFA), Ceftiofur hydrochloride (CHC), Tulathromycin (TUL), Oxytetracycline (OTC), and Procaine Penicillin G (PPG) at label dose and route. Individual deep nasal swabs were collected immediately before antimicrobial administration (control = day 0), and again on days 1, 3, 7, and 14 after dosing. The nasal microbiota across all the samples were dominated by Firmicutes, proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. While, the predominant bacterial genera were Moraxella, Clostridium and Streptococcus. Linear discriminant analysis, showed a pronounced, antimicrobial-dependent microbial shift in the composition of nasal microbiota and over time from day 0. By day 14, the nasal microbial compositions of the groups receiving CCFA and OTC had returned to a distribution that closely resembled that observed on day 0. In contrast, pigs that received CHC, TUL and PPG appeared to deviate away from the day 0 composition by day 14. Based on our results, it appears that the impact of parenteral antibiotics on the swine nasal microbiota is variable and has a considerable impact in modulating the nasal microbiota structure. Our results will aid in developing alternative

  5. The sigma-1 receptor modulates dopamine transporter conformation and cocaine binding and may thereby potentiate cocaine self-administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Weimin Conrad; Yano, Hideaki; Hiranita, Takato; Chin, Frederick T; McCurdy, Christopher R; Su, Tsung-Ping; Amara, Susan G; Katz, Jonathan L

    2017-07-07

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) regulates dopamine (DA) neurotransmission by recapturing DA into the presynaptic terminals and is a principal target of the psychostimulant cocaine. The sigma-1 receptor (σ 1 R) is a molecular chaperone, and its ligands have been shown to modulate DA neuronal signaling, although their effects on DAT activity are unclear. Here, we report that the prototypical σ 1 R agonist (+)-pentazocine potentiated the dose response of cocaine self-administration in rats, consistent with the effects of the σR agonists PRE-084 and DTG (1,3-di- o -tolylguanidine) reported previously. These behavioral effects appeared to be correlated with functional changes of DAT. Preincubation with (+)-pentazocine or PRE-084 increased the B max values of [ 3 H]WIN35428 binding to DAT in rat striatal synaptosomes and transfected cells. A specific interaction between σ 1 R and DAT was detected by co-immunoprecipitation and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays. Mutational analyses indicated that the transmembrane domain of σ 1 R likely mediated this interaction. Furthermore, cysteine accessibility assays showed that σ 1 R agonist preincubation potentiated cocaine-induced changes in DAT conformation, which were blocked by the specific σ 1 R antagonist CM304. Moreover, σ 1 R ligands had distinct effects on σ 1 R multimerization. CM304 increased the proportion of multimeric σ 1 Rs, whereas (+)-pentazocine increased monomeric σ 1 Rs. Together these results support the hypothesis that σ 1 R agonists promote dissociation of σ 1 R multimers into monomers, which then interact with DAT to stabilize an outward-facing DAT conformation and enhance cocaine binding. We propose that this novel molecular mechanism underlies the behavioral potentiation of cocaine self-administration by σ 1 R agonists in animal models. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Exploring Careers in Hospital and Health Administration: An Invitation to a Career in Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health Resources Administration (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD. Bureau of Health Manpower.

    This guide to career possibilities in hospital and health administration describes some of the skills required of a health or hospital administrator--interpersonal skills and managerial abilities; and also some of the varied tasks that such an administrator performs. It provides biographical sketches of several health administrators which…

  7. Cell-to-module optical loss/gain analysis for various photovoltaic module materials through systematic characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsian Saw, Min; Khoo, Yong Sheng; Singh, Jai Prakash; Wang, Yan

    2017-08-01

    Reducing levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) is important for solar photovoltaics to compete against other energy sources. Thus, the focus should not only be on improving the solar cell efficiency, but also on continuously reducing the losses (or achieving gain) in the cell-to-module process. This can be achieved by choosing the appropriate module material and design. This paper presents a detailed and systematic characterization of various photovoltaic (PV) module materials (encapsulants, tabbing ribbons, and backsheets) and an evaluation of their impact on the output power of silicon wafer-based PV modules. Various characterization tools/techniques, such as UV-vis (reflectance) measurement, external quantum efficiency (EQE) measurement and EQE line-scan are used. Based on the characterization results, we use module materials with the best-evaluated optical performance to build “optimized modules”. Compared to the standard mini-module, an optical gain of more than 5% is achievable for the “optimized module” with selected module materials.

  8. A comparative study of collimation in bedside chest radiography for preterm infants in two teaching hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stollfuss, J.; Schneider, K.; Krüger-Stollfuss, I.

    2015-01-01

    •Potential factors influencing non-optimal image collimation in the setting of bedside chest X-ray in preterm infants were investigated.•A comparable rate of optimal images was observed in two hospitals.•Size, weight or disease severity had no influence on collimation quality.•Unrelated to the years of experience a large variation of the technician in correct collimation was noted (18–86%).•Individualized quality control and education is necessary. Potential factors influencing non-optimal image collimation in the setting of bedside chest X-ray in preterm infants were investigated. A comparable rate of optimal images was observed in two hospitals. Size, weight or disease severity had no influence on collimation quality. Unrelated to the years of experience a large variation of the technician in correct collimation was noted (18–86%). Individualized quality control and education is necessary. Unnecessary exposure of the abdomen, arms or head may lead to a substantial increase of the radiation dose in portable chest X-rays on the neonatal intensive care unit. The objective was to identify potential factors influencing inappropriate exposure of non-thoracic structures in two teaching hospitals. The study analysed 200 consecutive digital chest radiographs in 20 preterm neonates (mean gestation 25 ± 1 weeks). Demographical data, tube settings and exposure parameters were recorded. To grade the collimation, we used a scoring system with a maximum of 12 exposed non-thoracic structures. Length of gestation, age, the radiographer, years of experience in performing X-rays and the number of in situ catheters or lines, were correlated with collimation quality. There was no significant difference between the rates of optimal images obtained in the two hospitals (0.32 vs 0.39, n.s.). Scores showed that most suboptimal images had only mildly reduced image quality (1.40 ± 1.38 vs 1.20 ± 1.43, n.s.). Length of gestation or presence of surgical drains, catheters and

  9. Pharmacokinetics of pirfenidone after topical administration in rabbit eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guoying; Lin, Xianchai; Zhong, Hua; Yang, Yangfan; Qiu, Xuan; Ye, Chengtian; Wu, Kaili; Yu, Minbin

    2011-01-01

    Pirfenidone (5-methyl-1-phenyl-2-[1H]-pyridone) is a new, broad-spectrum agent that has an inhibition effect on the proliferation, migration, and collagen contraction of human Tenon's fibroblasts, and thus modulating the wound healing process of glaucoma filtering surgical site. This study investigated the pharmacokinetics of topically administered pirfenidone (0.5%) in rabbit eyes. Pirfenidone solution (50 μl) was instilled into the rabbit's conjunctival sac. The rabbits were quickly sacrificed at 2, 5, 8, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after the administration and ocular tissues were obtained. The concentrations of pirfenidone in conjunctiva, sclera, cornea, aqueous humor, and vitreous were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. After topical administration, there was wide distribution and fast clearance of pirfenidone among the various ocular tissues. The mean maximum concentrations (C(max)) of pirfenidone in cornea, conjunctiva, sclera, aqueous humor, and vitreous were 9.64 mg/g, 9.62 mg/g, 2.13 mg/g, 34.88 mg/l and 0.52 mg/l, respectively. The half-life for these tissues was 18.26, 34.16, 15.71, 70.91, and 39.48 min, respectively. Measurable concentrations of pirfenidone are achieved in ocular tissues after topical application in rabbit model. Topical administration of pirfenidone may be an effective approach for modulation of wound healing responses in glaucoma filtration surgical site.

  10. Bedside Ultrasonography as an Adjunct to Routine Evaluation of Acute Appendicitis in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel H.F. Lam

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Appendicitis is a common condition presenting to the emergency department (ED. Increasingly emergency physicians (EP are using bedside ultrasound (BUS as an adjunct diagnostic tool. Our objective is to investigate the test characteristics of BUS for the diagnosis of appendicitis and identify components of routine ED workup and BUS associated with the presence of appendicitis. Methods: Patients four years of age and older presenting to the ED with suspected appendicitis were eligible for enrollment. After informed consent was obtained, BUS was performed on the subjects by trained EPs who had undergone a minimum of one-hour didactic training on the use of BUS to diagnose appendicitis.They then recorded elements of clinical history, physical examination, white blood cell count (WBC with polymophonuclear percentage (PMN, and BUS findings on a data form. We ascertained subject outcomes by a combination of medical record review and telephone follow-up. Results: A total of 125 subjects consented for the study, and 116 had adequate image data for final analysis. Prevalence of appendicitis was 40%. Mean age of the subjects was 20.2 years, and 51% were male. BUS was 100% sensitive (95% CI 87-100% and 32% specific (95% CI 14-57% for detection of appendicitis, with a positive predictive value of 72% (95% CI 56-84%, and a negative predictive value of 100% (95% CI 52-100%. Assuming all non-diagnostic studies were negative would yield a sensitivity of 72% and specificity of 81%. Subjects with appendicitis had a significantly higher occurrence of anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and a higher WBC and PMN count when compared to those without appendicitis. Their BUS studies were significantly more likely to result in visualization of the appendix, appendix diameter >6mm, appendix wall thickness >2mm, periappendiceal fluid, visualization of the appendix tip, and sonographic Mcburney’s sign (p6mm, appendix wall thickness >2mm, periappendiceal fluid were

  11. Bedside Ultrasonography as an Adjunct to Routine Evaluation of Acute Appendicitis in the Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Samuel H.F.; Grippo, Anthony; Kerwin, Chistopher; Konicki, P. John; Goodwine, Diana; Lambert, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Appendicitis is a common condition presenting to the emergency department (ED). Increasingly emergency physicians (EP) are using bedside ultrasound (BUS) as an adjunct diagnostic tool. Our objective is to investigate the test characteristics of BUS for the diagnosis of appendicitis and identify components of routine ED workup and BUS associated with the presence of appendicitis. Methods Patients four years of age and older presenting to the ED with suspected appendicitis were eligible for enrollment. After informed consent was obtained, BUS was performed on the subjects by trained EPs who had undergone a minimum of one-hour didactic training on the use of BUS to diagnose appendicitis. They then recorded elements of clinical history, physical examination, white blood cell count (WBC) with polymophonuclear percentage (PMN), and BUS findings on a data form. We ascertained subject outcomes by a combination of medical record review and telephone follow-up. Results A total of 125 subjects consented for the study, and 116 had adequate image data for final analysis. Prevalence of appendicitis was 40%. Mean age of the subjects was 20.2 years, and 51% were male. BUS was 100% sensitive (95% CI 87–100%) and 32% specific (95% CI 14–57%) for detection of appendicitis, with a positive predictive value of 72% (95% CI 56–84%), and a negative predictive value of 100% (95% CI 52–100%). Assuming all non-diagnostic studies were negative would yield a sensitivity of 72% and specificity of 81%. Subjects with appendicitis had a significantly higher occurrence of anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and a higher WBC and PMN count when compared to those without appendicitis. Their BUS studies were significantly more likely to result in visualization of the appendix, appendix diameter >6mm, appendix wall thickness >2mm, periappendiceal fluid, visualization of the appendix tip, and sonographic Mcburney’s sign (p6mm, appendix wall thickness >2mm, periappendiceal fluid were found

  12. Behavior Tracking Software Enhancement and Integration of a Feedback Module, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Company is proposing to adapt a behavioral tracking program and feedback module specifically developed for the U.S. Army Special Forces for NASA human space...

  13. Weakly distributive modules. Applications to supplement submodules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, we define and study weakly distributive modules as a proper generalization of distributive modules. We prove that, weakly distributive supplemented modules are amply supplemented. In a weakly distributive supplemented module every submodule has a unique coclosure. This generalizes a result of ...

  14. Splenic Rupture Diagnosed with Bedside Ultrasound in a Patient with Shock in the Emergency Department Following Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Mulkerin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A 64-year-old male presented to the emergency department (ED with near syncope and worsening left flank and shoulder pain. He had undergone a difficult colonoscopy two days prior due to a tortuous colon. Initial vital signs were normal. He looked uncomfortable and had significant left upper quadrant abdominal tenderness with guarding. Thirty minutes after ED arrival, his blood pressure dropped to 73/59 mmHg, requiring aggressive fluid resuscitation. Bedside focused assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST exam demonstrated free fluid in the abdomen with mixed echogenicity of the spleen, suggestive of splenic injury. Computed tomography (CT demonstrated a large subcapsular splenic hematoma with active extravasation and surrounding intraperitoneal free fluid (Figure, Video. He was admitted to the surgical intensive care unit. Hemorrhage continued after interventional radiology performed embolization of the splenic artery. He then required laparoscopic splenectomy on hospital day 2 to control bleeding. He subsequently did well and was discharged on hospital day 10.

  15. Emerging hematological targets and therapy for cardiovascular disease: From bench to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Villegas

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Ana Villegas, Fernando A Gonzalez, Leopoldo Llorente, Santiago RedondoService of Hematology and Hemotherapy, Hospital Clinico Universitario San Carlos, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and a major part of its pathophysiology remains obscure. Some hematological targets have been related to the development and clinical outcome of this disease, especially soluble cytokines, leukocytes, red blood cells, hemostatic factors and platelets, and bone-marrow vascular progenitors. These emerging factors may be modulated by current antiatherosclerotic pharmacotherapy, target-designed novel drugs or progenitor cell therapy. The aim of current review article is to comprehensively review the role of these antiatherosclerotic targets and therapy.Keywords: atherosclerosis, blood, progenitor cells, cytokines, therapy

  16. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Chae

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing has been embraced by early adopters to produce medical imaging-guided 3D printed biomodels that facilitate various aspects of clinical practice. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. With increasing accessibility, investigators are now able to convert standard imaging data into Computer Aided Design (CAD files using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography (SLA, multijet modeling (MJM, selective laser sintering (SLS, binder jet technique (BJT, and fused deposition modeling (FDM. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without out-sourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. In this review the existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice, spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative aesthetics, are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, patient and surgical trainee education, and the development of intraoperative guidance tools and patient-specific prosthetics in everyday surgical practice.

  17. Introduction to Standardization Administration of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Brief Introduction of SAC Standardization Administration of the People's Republic of China (SAC) was established in April 2001 and authorized by the State Council to exercise administrative responsibilities by undertaking unified management, supervision and overall coordination of standardization works in China.

  18. Designing interprofessional modules for undergraduate healthcare learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Maree

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Interprofessional education aims to prepare learners to collaborate across specialties to provide high-quality healthcare. Internationally and nationally, the emerging need for integrated healthcare and education has been emphasised. The current education programme at the School of Health Care Sciences, University of Pretoria, South Africa primarily follows a uniprofessional approach.Objectives. To describe the development of interprofessional modules over 4 years between the departments of Human Nutrition, Nursing Science, Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy and Radiography.Methods. The Knowledge-to-Action model guided the module development process. The planning phase comprised three steps: (i problem identification (e.g. national and international policy focus on interprofessional education; (ii review of existing knowledge (e.g. common learning outcomes; and (iii adaptation of knowledge to the local context (e.g. syllabi and logistics.Results. The development of interprofessional modules can be guided by the above-mentioned model to meet the needs of the faculty, departments, students and community and to contribute to interprofessional education, while overcoming the associated challenges.Conclusion. Challenges included clashes in timetable schedules, financial constraints, administrative support, logistical issues and resistance to change. The designing and implementing of new modules were intense and time consuming, and required commitment. The development of the modules was an excellent example of interprofessional teamwork that needs to be transferred to the implementation and role modelling of interprofessional education.

  19. Measuring high-frequency responses of an electro-optic phase modulator based on dispersion induced phase modulation to intensity modulation conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shangjian; Wang, Heng; Wang, Yani; Zou, Xinhai; Zhang, Yali; Liu, Shuang; Liu, Yong

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the phase modulation to intensity modulation conversion in dispersive fibers for measuring frequency responses of electro-optic phase modulators, and demonstrate two typical measurements with cascade path and fold-back path. The measured results achieve an uncertainty of less than 2.8% within 20 GHz. Our measurements show stable and repeatable results because the optical carrier and its phase-modulated sidebands are affected by the same fiber impairments. The proposed method requires only dispersive fibers and works without any small-signal assumption, which is applicable for swept frequency measurement at different driving levels and operating wavelengths.

  20. ANALYSIS OF HARMONIC INJECTION TO THE MODULATION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... Abstract. This paper explores the analysis of third and ninth harmonic injection to the modulation of a multi- level diode clamped converter (DCC) at a varying modulation index. The spectral distributions of the various multi-level waveforms obtained under normal modulation index of 0.8 and over modulation ...

  1. A bedside measure of body composition in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Sarah A; Davidson, Zoe E; Davies, Peter S W; Truby, Helen

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice, monitoring body composition is a critical component of nutritional assessment and weight management in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy of a simple bedside measurement tool for body composition, namely bioelectrical impedance analysis, in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Measures of fat-free mass were determined using a bioelectrical impedance analysis machine and compared against estimations obtained from a reference body composition model. Additionally, the use of raw impedance values was analyzed using three existing predictive equations for the estimation of fat-free mass. Accuracy of bioelectrical impedance analysis was assessed by comparison against the reference model by calculation of biases and limits of agreement. Body composition was measured in 10 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, mean age 9.01 ± 2.34 years. The bioelectrical impedance analysis machine values of fat-free mass were on average 2.3 ± 14.1 kg higher than reference values. Limits of agreement (based on 95% confidence interval of the mean) were -7.4 to 2.9 kg. There was a significant correlation between the mean fat-free mass and difference in fat-free mass between the bioelectrical impedance analysis machine and the reference model (r = -0.86; P = 0.02) suggesting that the bias was not consistent across the range of measurements. The most accurate predictive equation for the estimation of fat-free mass using raw impedance values was the equation by Pietrobelli et al. (mean difference, -0.7 kg; 95% limits of agreement, -3.5 to 2.0 kg). In a clinical setting, where a rapid assessment of body composition is advantageous, the use of raw impedance values, combined with the equation by Pietrobelli et al., is recommended for the accurate estimation of fat-free mass, in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hypocretin 1/orexin A in the ventral tegmental area enhances dopamine responses to cocaine and promotes cocaine self-administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    España, Rodrigo A; Melchior, James R; Roberts, David C S; Jones, Sara R

    2011-03-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the hypocretin/orexin system participates in the regulation of reinforcement and addiction processes. For example, manipulations that decrease hypocretin neurotransmission result in disruptions of neurochemical and behavioral responses to cocaine. To further assess the relationship between the hypocretin system and cocaine reinforcement, the current studies used microdialysis and in vivo voltammetry to examine the effects of hypocretin 1 on cocaine-induced enhancement of dopamine signaling in the nucleus accumbens core. Fixed ratio, discrete trials, and progressive ratio self-administration procedures were also used to assess whether hypocretin 1 promotes cocaine self-administration behavior. Infusions of hypocretin 1 into the ventral tegmental area increased the effects of cocaine on tonic and phasic dopamine signaling and increased the motivation to self-administer cocaine on the discrete trials and progressive ratio schedules. Together with previous observations demonstrating that a hypocretin 1 receptor antagonist disrupts dopamine signaling and reduces self-administration of cocaine, the current observations further indicate that the hypocretin system participates in reinforcement processes likely through modulation of the mesolimbic dopamine system.

  3. Incorporating Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) into Predoctoral Trainee Curriculum to Evaluate Student-Generated Hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieffer, Kathleen M; Peters, Douglas G; Richter, Chesney K; Loc, Welley S; Pawelczyk, James A

    2015-12-01

    As part of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute predoctoral TL1 training program at the Pennsylvania State University, a multidisciplinary team of predoctoral trainees representing the Chemistry, Neurosurgery, Nutritional Sciences, and Public Health Sciences departments were introduced to the NIH-sponsored Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) database to test the following student-generated hypothesis: children with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are at increased risk of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Children aged 4-12 and 4-17 years were categorized into IDA and control groups. De-identified medical records from the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center (HMC) and the Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center (VCUMC) were used for the analysis. Overall, ADHD prevalence at each institution was lower than 2011 state estimates. There was a significant association between IDA and ADHD in the 4-17-year-old age group for all children (OR: 1.902 [95% CI: 1.363-2.656]), Caucasian children (OR: 1.802 [95% CI: 1.133-2.864]), and African American children (OR: 1.865 [95% CI: 1.152-3.021]). Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) infrastructure is particularly useful for trainees to answer de novo scientific questions with minimal additional training and technical expertise. Moreover, projects can be expanded by collaborating within the CTSA network. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Module theory, extending modules and generalizations

    CERN Document Server

    Tercan, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    The main focus of this monograph is to offer a comprehensive presentation of known and new results on various generalizations of CS-modules and CS-rings. Extending (or CS) modules are generalizations of injective (and also semisimple or uniform) modules. While the theory of CS-modules is well documented in monographs and textbooks, results on generalized forms of the CS property as well as dual notions are far less present in the literature. With their work the authors provide a solid background to module theory, accessible to anyone familiar with basic abstract algebra. The focus of the book is on direct sums of CS-modules and classes of modules related to CS-modules, such as relative (injective) ejective modules, (quasi) continuous modules, and lifting modules. In particular, matrix CS-rings are studied and clear proofs of fundamental decomposition results on CS-modules over commutative domains are given, thus complementing existing monographs in this area. Open problems round out the work and establish the...

  5. Time-resolved near-infrared technique for bedside monitoring of absolute cerebral blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diop, Mamadou; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Migueis, Mark; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2010-02-01

    A primary focus of neurointensive care is monitoring the injured brain to detect harmful events that can impair cerebral blood flow (CBF). Since current non-invasive bedside methods can only indirectly assess blood flow, the goal of this research was to develop an optical technique for measuring absolute CBF. A time-resolved near-infrared (NIR) apparatus was built and its ability to accurately measure changes in optical properties was demonstrated in tissue-mimicking phantoms. The time-resolved system was combined with a bolus-tracking method for measuring CBF using the dye indocyanine green (ICG) as an intravascular flow tracer. Cerebral blood flow was measured in newborn piglets and for comparison, CBF was concurrently measured using a previously developed continuous-wave NIR method. Measurements were acquired with both techniques under three conditions: normocapnia, hypercapnia and following occlusion of the carotid arteries. Mean CBF values (N = 3) acquired with the TR-NIR system were 31.9 +/- 11.7 ml/100g/min during occlusion, 39.7 +/- 1.6 ml/100g/min at normocapnia, and 58.8 +/- 9.9 ml/100g/min at hypercapnia. Results demonstrate that the developed TR-NIR technique has the sensitivity to measure changes in CBF; however, the CBF measurements were approximately 25% lower than the values obtained with the CW-NIRS technique.

  6. Constellation modulation - an approach to increase spectral efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Soumya Sunder; Pythoud, Frederic; Hillerkuss, David; Baeuerle, Benedikt; Josten, Arne; Leuchtmann, Pascal; Leuthold, Juerg

    2017-07-10

    Constellation modulation (CM) is introduced as a new degree of freedom to increase the spectral efficiency and to further approach the Shannon limit. Constellation modulation is the art of encoding information not only in the symbols within a constellation but also by encoding information by selecting a constellation from a set of constellations that are switched from time to time. The set of constellations is not limited to sets of partitions from a given constellation but can e.g., be obtained from an existing constellation by applying geometrical transformations such as rotations, translations, scaling, or even more abstract transformations. The architecture of the transmitter and the receiver allows for constellation modulation to be used on top of existing modulations with little penalties on the bit-error ratio (BER) or on the required signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The spectral bandwidth used by this modulation scheme is identical to the original modulation. Simulations demonstrate a particular advantage of the scheme for low SNR situations. So, for instance, it is demonstrated by simulation that a spectral efficiency increases by up to 33% and 20% can be obtained at a BER of 10 -3 and 2×10 -2 for a regular BPSK modulation format, respectively. Applying constellation modulation, we derive a most power efficient 4D-CM-BPSK modulation format that provides a spectral efficiency of 0.7 bit/s/Hz for an SNR of 0.2 dB at a BER of 2 × 10 -2 .

  7. Bedside practice of blood transfusion in a large teaching hospital in Uganda: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Graaf J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adverse transfusion reactions can cause morbidity and death to patients who receive a blood transfusion. Blood transfusion practice in Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda is analyzed to see if and when these practices play a role in the morbidity and mortality of patients. Materials and Methods: An observational study on three wards of Mulago Hospital. Physicians, paramedics, nurses, medical students and nurse students were observed using two questionnaires. For comparison, a limited observational study was performed in the University Medical Centre Groningen (UMCG in Groningen, The Netherlands. Results: In Mulago Hospital guidelines for blood transfusion practice were not easily available. Medical staff members work on individual professional levels. Students perform poorly due to inconsistency in their supervision. Documentation of blood transfusion in patient files is scarce. There is no immediate bedside observation, so transfusion reactions and obstructions in the blood transfusion flow are not observed. Conclusion: The poor blood transfusion practice is likely to play a role in the morbidity and mortality of patients who receive a blood transfusion. There is a need for a blood transfusion policy and current practical guidelines.

  8. Missing Links Between Genetically Inherited Molecules in Split Cord Malformation and Other Anomaly: A Bench to Bedside Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Mayadhar; Mishra, Pravash R; Mohapatra, Ashok Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Split cord malformation (SCM) is associated with extensive vertebral fusions (Klippel-Feil anomaly). In light of previous embryological theories and recent research findings, we attempt to document the origin of split cord, and vertebral fusions involvement of spectrum of genes is necessary to know better the etiopathogenesis of SCM and its associated diseases. We used the various databases such as PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane Review, Hinari, and Google Scholar for the recently published medical literature. The women had been living and still born infants had SCM. The relative risk (RR) and possible molecular mechanism are described details of major genes and its variants in details. Although molecular genetics involvement including with recent advances of study add an evidence of both Mendelian and Non-Mendelian fashion is discussed with all genetic components. We mentioned our earlier experience and responsibility of SCM and its associated diseases. Although different mechanisms are suggested for the development of SCM observed in our experience, there is a midline lesion bisecting the neuroepithelium and the notochordal plate, which is responsible for complete splitting of the cervical cord with anterior bony defect. The localized disturbance of cervical neural tube closure accounts for SCM with partial dorsal splitting of the cord with posterior vertebral defect and associated diseases. According to the best of our knowledge, this report is the first one to be documented by wider spectrum of variants from (experimental studies to human subject). This add a complex interaction of mutant variants drive toward an additional second-hit alterations for the SCM. The up-to-date information, documented in proper order, derived the bench-to-bedside approach to overcome this burden of SCM, which is globally noticed with other additional diseases.

  9. A novel bedside diagnostic test for methanol poisoning using dry chemistry for formate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovda, Knut Erik; Gadeholt, Gaut; Evtodienko, Vladimir; Jacobsen, Dag

    2015-11-01

    The standard diagnostic approach to methanol poisoning is chromatographic measurement of methanol on centrally placed stationary equipment. Methanol poisoning in places where such equipment is unavailable is thus often not diagnosed. Methanol is metabolized to a toxic metabolite, formate; the presence of this compound indicates methanol poisoning. We have developed an enzymatic test for formate and modified it into a portable dry chemistry system that could be used anywhere. The method consists of two enzymatic steps: Formation of NADH from NAD by formate dehydrogenase, and subsequent use of NADH as a reductant of a tetrazolium into a formazan dye that can be quantified photometrically or visually. The photometer gave a good correlation of R(2) = 0.9893 in serum and R(2) = 0.9949 in whole blood, showing an instrumental detection limit of less than 1 mM (4.5 mg/dL). The visual readings showed a correlation of R(2) = 0.8966. Users experienced some difficulty in separating the negative control from the low positives. We have documented the feasibility of an affordable formate strip test for bedside diagnosis of methanol poisoning and for screening of metabolic acidosis of unknown origin. Visual reading is possible, but a reader will improve reliability at lower levels of formate. Future studies are necessary to study the sensitivity and specificity towards other causes of metabolic acidosis and other acids present in human blood.

  10. Proposal for modification to forward module design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, S.; Taylor, G.

    2000-01-01

    Concern for the baseline forward module thermal and mechanical viability has led to a proposed modification to the design described here. In view of the tight schedule to finalise the module design, proposed changes are constrained so that calculations and proto typing can be carried out without major changes to the key elements in the module. The following constraints were considered in the process of this work: 1. The hybrid contributes the bulk of the power to be removed from the module. 2. The temperature and its variation across the detector are the key specifications for the cooling design of the module. The hybrid temperature may impact via (secondary) convection and radiation heating, but its operation temperature is not assumed to be the major constraint. 3. The forward hybrid design is well advanced and represents a large effort that should be preserved. 4. The overall design of the module, in particular overall dimensions and placement of precision mounting points is well advanced. Assembly jigs based upon these dimensions are also advanced. The following problems are addressed by the current proposal: 1. The constraint of the small cooling point required to cool both the hybrid and the detector in the baseline is considered a serious limitation demanding high performance in the design and implementation of this contact in the baseline. 2. The small surface area of this contact is critical. Concerns that distortions of the block or relative distortions in the module between the detector and the hybrid, might further reduce the critical effective contact area, as well as possibly causing other problems, give further impetus to the proposed design modification. 3. Thermo-mechanical stress due to the cooling points at both ends of the module. 4. Lack of support of the hybrid near to the cable connectors. 5. Close proximity of the cooling pipe to the front-end electronics and the wire bonds. The proposal involves extending the hybrid substrate with two

  11. “Back to Bedside”: Residents' and Fellows' Perspectives on Finding Meaning in Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, Dustin M.; Rialon, Kristy L.; Nevel, Kathryn; Kothari, Anai N.

    2017-01-01

    Background Physician burnout is common and associated with significant consequences for physicians and patients. One mechanism to combat burnout is to enhance meaning in work. Objective To provide a trainee perspective on how meaning in work can be enhanced in the clinical learning environment through individual, program, and institutional efforts. Methods “Back to Bedside” resulted from an appreciative inquiry exercise by 37 resident and fellow members of the ACGME's Council of Review Committee Residents (CRCR), which was guided by the memoir When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi. The exercise was designed to (1) discover current best practices in existing learning environments; (2) dream of ideal ways to enhance meaning in work; (3) design solutions that move toward this optimal environment; and (4) support trainees in operationalizing innovative solutions. Results Back to Bedside consists of 5 themes for how the learning environment can enhance meaning in daily work: (1) more time at the bedside, engaged in direct patient care, dialogue with patients and families, and bedside clinical teaching; (2) a shared sense of teamwork and respect among multidisciplinary health professionals and trainees; (3) decreasing the time spent on nonclinical and administrative responsibilities; (4) a supportive, collegial work environment; and (5) a learning environment conducive to developing clinical mastery and progressive autonomy. Participants identified actions to achieve these goals. Conclusions A national, multispecialty group of trainees developed actionable recommendations for how clinical learning environments can be improved to combat physician burnout by fostering meaning in work. These improvements can be championed by trainees. PMID:28439376

  12. How to Develop Sustainable Public Administration Reforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu RADU

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Public administration reform and reform in general is a never ending story. The human so-cieties are evolving and so do their needs. Pub-lic administration has to keep the pace with the changes that are taking place in society. Specifc issues like ageing of the population and the mi-gration from small to larger communities, or from poor to wealthy regions are placing supplemen-tary burdens on modern administrative systems for decades. The economic crisis that started in 2008 made administrative matters even more complicated. Functional economies and consol-idated democracies proved to be vulnerable to what was considered by many as a market failure. The crisis and the responses of the governments around the world raised a number of questions related to the role that state and public authority in general should play in a modern democracy. The paper is briefy exploring the challenges that administrative systems from the new European Union member states and from the candidatestates were or are facing in their attempt to meet the requirements of the European Union mem-bership, and is proposing a challenging measure: the development of an acquis communautaire for the feld of public administration and consequent-ly the establishment of a correspondent structure inside the European Commission. The acquis communautaire will comprise of a minimum set of principles, widely accepted, that should rep-resent a ‘to do list’ for new member states that are having diffculties in promoting a sound and sustainable reform in public administration.

  13. Modulation of morphine antinociceptive tolerance and physical dependence by co-administration of simvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Mohammad Taghi; Khodayar, Mohammad Javad; Tabatabaee, Amirhossein; Ghorbanzadeh, Behnam; Naghizadeh, Bahareh

    2015-10-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl co-enzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, are widely used in the management of different diseases beyond their primary indication for lowering cholesterol. Previous studies have demonstrated the neuroprotective effects of simvastatin in different animal models. In the present study, we examined the effects of simvastatin (30, 60, 100 and 300mg/kg, p.o.) on the development and expression of morphine-induced tolerance and dependence in mice. For the induction of morphine tolerance and dependence, mice were twice daily treated with morphine (10mg/kg, s.c.) for 5 consecutive days. Tolerance was evaluated by the hot-plate test and physical dependence by naloxone challenge, on the sixth day. The results showed that oral administration of simvastatin produced antinociceptive activity in a dose-dependent way. Co-administration of simvastatin with morphine did not affect the acute morphine-induced analgesia (10mg/kg, s.c.). However, repeated co-administration of simvastatin with morphine significantly attenuated the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine and inhibited the naloxone (5mg/kg, s.c.)-precipitated withdrawal signs (jumping and body weight loss). Also, simvastatin at doses of 100 and 300mg/kg attenuated the expression of morphine-induced tolerance and dependence. These data indicated that, while simvastatin can alleviate both development and expression of morphine-induced tolerance, it cannot enhance morphine-induced antinociception. Taken together, simvastatin may be used as an adjutant therapeutic agent in combination with morphine and or other opioids in patients with severe chronic pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Driving Organizational Change From the Bedside: The AACN Clinical Scene Investigator Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Susan R; Goodyear-Bruch, Caryl; Olney, Adrienne; Hanson, Dave; Altman, Marian S; Varn-Davis, Natasha S; Brinker, Debbie; Lavandero, Ramón; Cox, Karen S

    2017-08-01

    Staff nurses are pivotal in leading change related to quality improvement efforts, although many lack skills to steer change from the bedside. The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) staff nurse leadership program, Clinical Scene Investigator (CSI) Academy, teaches and empowers staff nurses in leadership skills and change concepts to translate evidence into practice affecting patient outcomes. To describe the curriculum of the AACN CSI Academy that provides staff nurses with the leadership skills required to create unit-based change projects that positively impact patient/family outcomes. The curriculum of the Academy included leadership topics, communication, change concepts, quality improvement methods, project management, and data management and analysis. Each team of participants collected project data to show improvements in patient care. The program evaluation used many data sources to assess the program effectiveness, relating to the professional growth of the participant nurses. The participants assessed project patient outcomes, sustainability, and spread. The first cohort of CSI participants included 164 direct care nurses from 42 hospitals in 6 cities. They rated the Academy highly in the program evaluation, and they reported that the Academy contributed to their professional development. The individual hospital quality improvement projects resulted in positive patient and estimated fiscal outcomes that were generally sustained 1 year after the program. With the skills, tools, and support obtained from participation in the CSI Academy, staff nurses can make substantial contributions to their organizations in clinical and possibly fiscal outcomes. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  15. Administration of the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 allosteric modulator GET 73 with alcohol: A translational study in rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haass-Koffler, Carolina L; Goodyear, Kimberly; Loche, Antonella; Long, Victoria M; Lobina, Carla; Tran, Harrison H; Cacciaglia, Roberto; Swift, Robert M; Colombo, Giancarlo; Leggio, Lorenzo

    2018-02-01

    Preclinical work suggests that GET 73 (N-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-4-methoxybutyramide), a novel metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 negative allosteric modulator, may represent a novel pharmacological treatment for alcohol use disorder. Two independent experiments evaluated the effect of acutely administered GET 73 (0, 30, and 100 mg/kg, intragastrically) on alcohol-induced hypolocomotion ( n=72) and sedation/hypnosis ( n=36) in rats. In healthy male volunteers ( n=14), an open-label, randomised, crossover study was conducted to compare adverse events and pharmacokinetic parameters, in two experiments in which 300 mg GET 73 was administered, with and without alcohol, once and thrice. In rats, when administered with alcohol-vehicle, 100 mg/kg, but not 30 mg/kg, GET 73 reduced spontaneous locomotor activity. When administered with alcohol, no dose of GET 73 altered either alcohol-induced hypolocomotion or sedation/hypnosis. In humans, both single and thrice 300 mg GET 73 administration were well tolerated, in the presence and absence of alcohol, with no differences in adverse events. There were no significant differences in relative bioavailability between administering 300 mg GET 73 in the presence or absence of alcohol.

  16. Obama administration's National Drought Resilience Partnership to help

    Science.gov (United States)

    RESEARCH COASTS CAREERS National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, United States Department of Administration today announced an interagency National Drought Resilience Partnership to help communities better across the nation, and the Obama Administration took every possible measure to help," said

  17. Effects of intraperitoneal administration of the GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulator 2,6-di tert-butyl-4-(2-hydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-propyl)-phenol (CGP7930) on food intake in non-deprived rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenezer, Ivor S

    2012-09-05

    γ-Aminobutyric acid-(B) (GABA(B)) receptor positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) act on an allosteric site on the GABA(B) receptor to potentiate the effects of GABA and GABA(B) receptor agonists. It has previously been demonstrated that the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen increases food intake in non-deprived rats. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the GABA(B) receptor PAM 2,6-di tert-butyl-4-(2-hydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-propyl)-phenol (CGP7930) would (i) increase food intake, and (ii) potentiate the hyperphagic effects of baclofen in rats. In Experiment 1, the effects of intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of CGP7930 (1, 6 and 12 mg/kg) was investigated on food intake in non-deprived male Wistar rats. The 12 mg/kg dose of CGP7930 significantly increased cumulative food intake 30, 60 and 120 min (PGABA and GABA(B) receptor agonists by allosteric modulation of the GABA(B) receptor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. When do national administrations adapt to EU policies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzopoulou, Sevasti

    2015-01-01

    This article joins the Europeanization studies and examines the administrative adaptation to Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), a highly institutionalized and regulated policy, in two small older member states, Denmark and Greece. The findings demonstrate variation in administrative adaptation....... In Denmark, both formal and informal administrative structures adapt to CAP, while in Greece administrative adaptation is limited to formal structures. This variation is attributed to two dimensions of the domestic institutional and organizational settings, namely “centralization” and “professionalism...

  19. Improved self- and external assessment of the clinical abilities of medical students through structured improvement measures in an internal medicine bedside course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fünger, S. M.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bedside courses are of outstanding importance when training medical students. The fact that less and less teaching is taking place nowadays at the patient's bedside makes it all the more important that the available time be put to effective use. The aim of this study was to check whether structured improvement measures in the course (scripts, lecturer briefing, e-learning cases would improve the abilities of the students on the basis of a subjective self-assessment as well as an external assessment by the lecturers with respect to clinical abilities. Methods: Bedside teaching takes place in the fourth study year in the Medical Clinics of the TU Munich. Both students and lecturers had the chance to hand in an anonymous, quantitative self- and external assessment of the clinical abilities of the students (German grading system after every course date. This assessment took place online in the three categories "Medical history & examination", "Diagnosis" and "Therapy". An overall period of four semesters, each with 6 course dates, was investigated. After two of the total of four semesters in the study, the course was changed by introducing scripts, lecturer briefing as well as interactive e-learning cases. The self- and external assessment was compared both within the semester (date 1-3: A; date 4-6: B, during the course as well as before and after introducing the improvement measures ("before" (T0: SS 2012, SS 2013, "after" (T1: WS 2013/2014, SS 2014.Results: There was a significant improvement in one's own abilities on the basis of the self-assessment within each semester when comparing the first (A and the last (B course dates. Moreover, there was a significant improvement in the performances in all three categories when T0 was compared with T1, from both the point of view of the students ("Medical history & examination": T0 =2.5±0.9, T1=2.2±0.7, pp<0.001; "Diagnosis" T0=3.1±1.0, T1=2.8 ±0.9, pp<0.001; "Therapy": T0=3.8±1.3, T1

  20. Last LEP superconducting module travels to surface

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    The last superconducting module is raised from the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider tunnel, through the main shaft, to the surface. Superconducting modules were only used in the LEP-2 phase of the accelerator, from 1996 to 2000.

  1. Realtime aspects of pulse-to-pulse modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, R.; Riedel, C.; Roesch, W.

    1992-01-01

    The pulse-to-pulse modulation of the SIS-ESR control system is described. Fast response to operator interaction and to changes in process conditions is emphasized as well as the essential part played by the timing system in pulse-to-pulse modulation. (author)

  2. Supporting Fiscal Aspect of Land Administration through an LADM-based Valuation Information Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kara, A.; Çağdaş, V.; Lemmen, C.H.J.; Işıkdağ, Ü.; van Oosterom, P.J.M.; Stubkjær, E.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an information system artifact for the fiscal aspect of land administration, a valuation information model for the specification of inventories or databases used in valuation for recurrently levied immovable property taxes. The information model is designed as an extension module

  3. EEG in children, in the laboratory or at the patient's bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminska, A; Cheliout-Heraut, F; Eisermann, M; Touzery de Villepin, A; Lamblin, M D

    2015-03-01

    In pediatrics, EEG recordings are performed on patients from the neonatal period up to young adults. This means adapting techniques to many different conditions, concerning not only the patient's age, the need for asepsis and the patient's behavior, but also the environment (e.g. in the laboratory, at the patient's bedside, or in the neonatal intensive care unit [NICU]). Technical requirements depend on age, indication and the type of examination; in infancy, there should be a minimum of 12 EEG electrodes, ECG and respiration recording. In epileptology, surface EMG is also necessary to characterize the type of seizures and refine the diagnosis of epilepsy syndrome, on which physicians will base their treatment choice. The role of the EEG technician is essential because the quality of the recording, its analysis and conclusion will depend on the quality of the technical set-up and the interaction with the child. Sleep is a systematic part of the study up to the age of 5 years for several reasons: sleep EEG yields information on brain maturation; the EEG tracing during wakefulness can contain too many artefacts; and some grapho-elements, key to the diagnosis, only appear during sleep. The time of the examination must be chosen according to the child's usual nap times, possibly after sleep deprivation. Grapho-elements and spatio-temporal organization of the EEG vary with age, and normal variants and unusual aspects are quite wide for any given age; this is why a physician experienced in pediatric EEG should perform the interpretation. This chapter concerns EEG performed in infants, children and adolescents, its technical aspects according to age and indications (general pediatrics, emergency, epilepsy). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Post-exposure administration of diazepam combined with soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition stops seizures and modulates neuroinflammation in a murine model of acute TETS intoxication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vito, Stephen T.; Austin, Adam T.; Banks, Christopher N.; Inceoglu, Bora; Bruun, Donald A.; Zolkowska, Dorota; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Rogawski, Michael A.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Lein, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TETS) is a potent convulsant poison for which there is currently no approved antidote. The convulsant action of TETS is thought to be mediated by inhibition of type A gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA A R) function. We, therefore, investigated the effects of post-exposure administration of diazepam, a GABA A R positive allosteric modulator, on seizure activity, death and neuroinflammation in adult male Swiss mice injected with a lethal dose of TETS (0.15 mg/kg, ip). Administration of a high dose of diazepam (5 mg/kg, ip) immediately following the second clonic seizure (approximately 20 min post-TETS injection) effectively prevented progression to tonic seizures and death. However, this treatment did not prevent persistent reactive astrogliosis and microglial activation, as determined by GFAP and Iba-1 immunoreactivity and microglial cell morphology. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) has been shown to exert potent anti-inflammatory effects and to increase survival in mice intoxicated with other GABA A R antagonists. The sEH inhibitor TUPS (1 mg/kg, ip) administered immediately after the second clonic seizure did not protect TETS-intoxicated animals from tonic seizures or death. Combined administration of diazepam (5 mg/kg, ip) and TUPS (1 mg/kg, ip, starting 1 h after diazepam and repeated every 24 h) prevented TETS-induced lethality and influenced signs of neuroinflammation in some brain regions. Significantly decreased microglial activation and enhanced reactive astrogliosis were observed in the hippocampus, with no changes in the cortex. Combining an agent that targets specific anti-inflammatory mechanisms with a traditional antiseizure drug may enhance treatment outcome in TETS intoxication. - Highlights: • Acute TETS intoxication causes delayed and persistent neuroinflammation. • Diazepam given post-TETS prevents lethal tonic seizures but not neuroinflammation. • A soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor alters

  5. Post-exposure administration of diazepam combined with soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition stops seizures and modulates neuroinflammation in a murine model of acute TETS intoxication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vito, Stephen T., E-mail: stvito@ucdavis.edu [Department of Entomology, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Austin, Adam T., E-mail: aaustin@ucdavis.edu [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of California-Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States); Banks, Christopher N., E-mail: Christopher.Banks@oehha.ca.gov [Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Inceoglu, Bora, E-mail: abinceoglu@ucdavis.edu [Department of Entomology, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Bruun, Donald A., E-mail: dabruun@ucdavis.edu [Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Zolkowska, Dorota, E-mail: dzolkowska@gmail.com [Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States); Tancredi, Daniel J., E-mail: djtancredi@ucdavis.edu [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of California-Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States); Rogawski, Michael A., E-mail: rogawski@ucdavis.edu [Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States); Hammock, Bruce D., E-mail: bdhammock@ucdavis.edu [Department of Entomology, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Lein, Pamela J., E-mail: pjlein@ucdavis.edu [Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TETS) is a potent convulsant poison for which there is currently no approved antidote. The convulsant action of TETS is thought to be mediated by inhibition of type A gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA{sub A}R) function. We, therefore, investigated the effects of post-exposure administration of diazepam, a GABA{sub A}R positive allosteric modulator, on seizure activity, death and neuroinflammation in adult male Swiss mice injected with a lethal dose of TETS (0.15 mg/kg, ip). Administration of a high dose of diazepam (5 mg/kg, ip) immediately following the second clonic seizure (approximately 20 min post-TETS injection) effectively prevented progression to tonic seizures and death. However, this treatment did not prevent persistent reactive astrogliosis and microglial activation, as determined by GFAP and Iba-1 immunoreactivity and microglial cell morphology. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) has been shown to exert potent anti-inflammatory effects and to increase survival in mice intoxicated with other GABA{sub A}R antagonists. The sEH inhibitor TUPS (1 mg/kg, ip) administered immediately after the second clonic seizure did not protect TETS-intoxicated animals from tonic seizures or death. Combined administration of diazepam (5 mg/kg, ip) and TUPS (1 mg/kg, ip, starting 1 h after diazepam and repeated every 24 h) prevented TETS-induced lethality and influenced signs of neuroinflammation in some brain regions. Significantly decreased microglial activation and enhanced reactive astrogliosis were observed in the hippocampus, with no changes in the cortex. Combining an agent that targets specific anti-inflammatory mechanisms with a traditional antiseizure drug may enhance treatment outcome in TETS intoxication. - Highlights: • Acute TETS intoxication causes delayed and persistent neuroinflammation. • Diazepam given post-TETS prevents lethal tonic seizures but not neuroinflammation. • A soluble epoxide hydrolase

  6. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Michael P; Rozen, Warren M; McMenamin, Paul G; Findlay, Michael W; Spychal, Robert T; Hunter-Smith, David J

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  7. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Michael P.; Rozen, Warren M.; McMenamin, Paul G.; Findlay, Michael W.; Spychal, Robert T.; Hunter-Smith, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  8. Opportunities for administrators to promote disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kash, Bita A; Gamm, Larry D; Bolin, Jane Nelson; Peck, B Mitchell

    2005-01-01

    Studies of disease management (DM) have shown that patients who participate in such programs achieve better health status and make fewer emergency room visits. Private and government payers have recently increased their efforts to promote DM initiatives through financial incentives to healthcare providers. This article explores opportunities for administrators of health services organizations (HSO) to promote DM in the current political and economic environment. Our survey of professionals (DM leaders, physicians, and DM nurses) in six DM programs reveals these professionals' assessments of the key players and resources that they deem important to their respective DM programs. They view DM programs as heavily dependent on the support of physicians, nurses, and health plan leaders but relatively less so on the support of HSO administrators- a situation that may suggest opportunities for administrators to take on greater leadership in moving the HSO toward developing DM programs. Survey results also indicate a strong need for the integration of resources such as communication systems, electronic medical records, and DM reporting. Taken collectively, these needs suggest a number of strategies for the administrator to play a larger role in supporting the adoption and effective implementation of DM. In the article, we propose that DM programs can benefit substantially from an administrator who can demonstrate a thorough knowledge of DM-related government and private-payer initiatives and who has the ability to provide leadership to develop and implement viable DM programs. Valued contributions that the administrator should bring to the table include support of standardized DM processes, use of practice guidelines, and provision of pertinent information systems.

  9. Simulation as a Central Feature of an Elective Course: Does Simulated Bedside Care Impact Learning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Thomas

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A three-credit, simulation-based, emergency medicine elective course was designed and offered to doctor of pharmacy students for two years. The primary objective was to determine if there was a difference in exam performance stratified by student simulation experience, namely either as an active observer or as part of bedside clinical care. The secondary objective was to report student satisfaction. Examination performance for simulation-based questions was compared based on the student role (evaluator versus clinical using the Student’s t-test. Summary responses from Likert scale-based student satisfaction responses were collected. A total of 24 students took the course: 12 in each offering. Performance was similar whether the student was assigned to the evaluation team or the clinical team for all of the comparisons (mid-term and final 2015 and 2016, all p-values > 0.05. Students were very satisfied with the course. Of the 19 questions assessing the qualitative aspects of the course, all of the students agreed or strongly agreed to 17 statements, and all of the students were neutral, agreed, or strongly agreed to the remaining two statements. Direct participation and active observation in simulation-based experiences appear to be equally valuable in the learning process, as evidenced by examination performance.

  10. Formal faculty observation and assessment of bedside skills for 3rd-year neurology clerks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson Stone, Robert; Mooney, Christopher; Wexler, Erika; Mink, Jonathan; Post, Jennifer; Jozefowicz, Ralph F

    2016-11-22

    To evaluate the feasibility and utility of instituting a formalized bedside skills evaluation (BSE) for 3rd-year medical students on the neurology clerkship. A neurologic BSE was developed for 3rd - year neurology clerks at the University of Rochester for the 2012-2014 academic years. Faculty directly observed 189 students completing a full history and neurologic examination on real inpatients. Mock grades were calculated utilizing the BSE in the final grade, and number of students with a grade difference was determined when compared to true grade. Correlation was explored between the BSE and clinical scores, National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) scores, case complexity, and true final grades. A survey was administered to students to assess their clinical skills exposure and the usefulness of the BSE. Faculty completed and submitted a BSE form for 88.3% of students. There was a mock final grade change for 13.2% of students. Correlation coefficients between BSE score and clinical score/NBME score were 0.36 and 0.35, respectively. A statistically significant effect of BSE was found on final clerkship grade (F 2,186 = 31.9, p neurology clerkship was feasible. Low correlation between BSE score and other evaluations indicated a unique measurement to contribute to student grade. Using real patients with differing case complexity did not alter the grade. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Electrochemically Modulated Gas/Liquid Separation Technology for In Situ Resource Utilization Process Streams, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this phase I program MicroCell Technologies, LLC (MCT) proposes to demonstrate the feasibility of an electrochemically modulated phase separator for in situ...

  12. Another Look at Administrators: Dodgers to Masters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludewig, Larry M.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a tongue-in-cheek system for classifying educational administrators into four categories (Artful Dodger, Commander in Chief, Leader of the Pack, and Facilitating Master) according to leadership style and administrator characteristics. A brief sampler survey is included. (JAC)

  13. Use of Electronic Technologies to Manage Seed Cotton Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most U.S. farmers and ginners still use paper tags to identify cotton modules along with a large number painted on the side of traditional modules. The gin typically assigns tags for the modules. When the gin gets the module, the paper tag is removed and the information is manually entered into a s...

  14. Addressing challenges of training a new generation of clinician-innovators through an interdisciplinary medical technology design program: Bench-to-Bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Patrick D; Elder, Craig T; D'Ambrosio, Troy; Langell, John T

    2015-01-01

    Graduate medical education has traditionally focused on training future physicians to be outstanding clinicians with basic and clinical science research skills. This focus has resulted in substantial knowledge gains, but a modest return on investment based on direct improvements in clinical care. In today's shifting healthcare landscape, a number of important challenges must be overcome to not only improve the delivery of healthcare, but to prepare future physicians to think outside the box, focus on and create healthcare innovations, and navigate the complex legal, business and regulatory hurdles of bringing innovation to the bedside. We created an interdisciplinary and experiential medical technology design competition to address these challenges and train medical students interested in moving new and innovative clinical solutions to the forefront of medicine. Medical students were partnered with business, law, design and engineering students to form interdisciplinary teams focused on developing solutions to unmet clinical needs. Over the course of six months teams were provided access to clinical and industry mentors, $500 prototyping funds, development facilities, and non-mandatory didactic lectures in ideation, design, intellectual property, FDA regulatory requirements, prototyping, market analysis, business plan development and capital acquisition. After four years of implementation, the program has supported 396 participants, seen the development of 91 novel medical devices, and launched the formation of 24 new companies. From our perspective, medical education programs that develop innovation training programs and shift incentives from purely traditional basic and clinical science research to also include high-risk innovation will see increased student engagement in improving healthcare delivery and an increase in the quality and quantity of innovative solutions to medical problems being brought to market.

  15. The 6-Item Cognitive Impairment Test as a bedside screening for dementia in general hospital patients: results of the General Hospital Study (GHoSt).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessler, Johannes Baltasar; Schäufele, Martina; Hendlmeier, Ingrid; Nora Junge, Magdalena; Leonhardt, Sarah; Weber, Joshua; Bickel, Horst

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the psychometric quality of the 6-Item Cognitive Impairment Test (6CIT) as a bedside screening for the detection of dementia in general hospital patients. Participants (N = 1,440) were inpatients aged ≥65 of 33 randomly selected general hospitals in Southern Germany. The 6CIT was conducted at bedside, and dementia was diagnosed according to DSM-IV. Nursing staff was asked to rate the patients' cognitive status, and previous diagnoses of dementia were extracted from medical records. Completion rates and validity statistics were calculated. Two-hundred seventy patients had dementia. Cases with delirium but no dementia were excluded. Feasibility was 97.9% and 83.3% for patients without and with dementia, respectively, and decreased from moderate (93.8%) to severe dementia (53%). The area under the curve of the 6CIT was 0.98. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were calculated for the cutoffs 7/8 (0.96, 0.82, 0.85, 0.52, 0.99) and 10/11 (0.88, 0.95, 0.94, 0.76, 0.98). The nurse ratings and medical records information had lower validity statistics. Logistic regression analyses revealed that the 6CIT statistically significantly provided information above nurse ratings and medical records. Twenty-five and 37 additional patients were correctly classified by the 7/8 and 10/11 cutoffs, respectively. The 6CIT is a feasible and valid screening tool for the detection of dementia in older general hospital patients. The 6CIT outperformed the nurse ratings of cognitive status and dementia diagnoses from medical records, suggesting that standardized screening may have benefits with regard to case finding. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. The New Epidemiology--A Challenge to Health Administration. Issues in Epidemiology for Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, Anne, Ed.; Neuhauser, Duncan, Ed.

    The role of epidemiology in health administration is considered in 11 articles, and three course descriptions and a bibliography are provided. Titles and authors include the following: "The Need for Creative Managerial Epidemiology" (Gary L. Filerman); "The Growing Role of Epidemiology in Health Administration" (Maureen M.…

  17. Test-to-Failure of Crystalline Silicon Modules: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Glick, S.; Trudell, D.; Bosco, N.; Johnston, S.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2010-10-01

    Accelerated lifetime testing of five crystalline silicon module designs was carried out according to the Terrestrial Photovoltaic Module Accelerated Test-to-Failure Protocol. This protocol compares the reliability of various module constructions on a quantitative basis. The modules under test are subdivided into three accelerated lifetime testing paths: 85..deg..C/85% relative humidity with system bias, thermal cycling between ?40..deg..C and 85..deg..C, and a path that alternates between damp heat and thermal cycling. The most severe stressor is damp heat with system bias applied to simulate the voltages that modules experience when connected in an array. Positive 600 V applied to the active layer with respect to the grounded module frame accelerates corrosion of the silver grid fingers and degrades the silicon nitride antireflective coating on the cells. Dark I-V curve fitting indicates increased series resistance and saturation current around the maximum power point; however, an improvement in junction recombination characteristics is obtained. Shunt paths and cell-metallization interface failures are seen developing in the silicon cells as determined by electroluminescence, thermal imaging, and I-V curves in the case of negative 600 V bias applied to the active layer. Ability to withstand electrolytic corrosion, moisture ingress, and ion drift under system voltage bias are differentiated.

  18. Stress modulation of cognitive and affective processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAMPEAU, SERGE; LIBERZON, ISRAEL; MORILAK, DAVID; RESSLER, KERRY

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes the major discussion points of a symposium on stress modulation of cognitive and affective processes, which was held during the 2010 workshop on the neurobiology of stress (Boulder, CO, USA). The four discussants addressed a number of specific cognitive and affective factors that are modulated by exposure to acute or repeated stress. Dr David Morilak discussed the effects of various repeated stress situations on cognitive flexibility, as assessed with a rodent model of attentional set-shifting task, and how performance on slightly different aspects of this test is modulated by different prefrontal regions through monoaminergic neurotransmission. Dr Serge Campeau summarized the findings of several studies exploring a number of factors and brain regions that regulate habituation of various autonomic and neuroendocrine responses to repeated audiogenic stress exposures. Dr Kerry Ressler discussed a body of work exploring the modulation and extinction of fear memories in rodents and humans, especially focusing on the role of key neurotransmitter systems including excitatory amino acids and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Dr Israel Liberzon presented recent results on human decision-making processes in response to exogenous glucocorticoid hormone administration. Overall, these discussions are casting a wider framework on the cognitive/affective processes that are distinctly regulated by the experience of stress and some of the brain regions and neurotransmitter systems associated with these effects. PMID:21790481

  19. A Waveform Archiving System for the GE Solar 8000i Bedside Monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Andrea; Jaishankar, Rohan; Filippidis, Aristotelis; Holsapple, James; Heldt, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Our objective was to develop, deploy, and test a data-acquisition system for the reliable and robust archiving of high-resolution physiological waveform data from a variety of bedside monitoring devices, including the GE Solar 8000i patient monitor, and for the logging of ancillary clinical and demographic information. The data-acquisition system consists of a computer-based archiving unit and a GE Tram Rac 4A that connects to the GE Solar 8000i monitor. Standard physiological front-end sensors connect directly to the Tram Rac, which serves as a port replicator for the GE monitor and provides access to these waveform signals through an analog data interface. Together with the GE monitoring data streams, we simultaneously collect the cerebral blood flow velocity envelope from a transcranial Doppler ultrasound system and a non-invasive arterial blood pressure waveform along a common time axis. All waveform signals are digitized and archived through a LabView-controlled interface that also allows for the logging of relevant meta-data such as clinical and patient demographic information. The acquisition system was certified for hospital use by the clinical engineering team at Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA. Over a 12-month period, we collected 57 datasets from 11 neuro-ICU patients. The system provided reliable and failure-free waveform archiving. We measured an average temporal drift between waveforms from different monitoring devices of 1 ms every 66 min of recorded data. The waveform acquisition system allows for robust real-time data acquisition, processing, and archiving of waveforms. The temporal drift between waveforms archived from different devices is entirely negligible, even for long-term recording.

  20. Emotional Modulation of Learning and Memory: Pharmacological Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaLumiere, Ryan T; McGaugh, James L; McIntyre, Christa K

    2017-07-01

    Memory consolidation involves the process by which newly acquired information becomes stored in a long-lasting fashion. Evidence acquired over the past several decades, especially from studies using post-training drug administration, indicates that emotional arousal during the consolidation period influences and enhances the strength of the memory and that multiple different chemical signaling systems participate in this process. The mechanisms underlying the emotional influences on memory involve the release of stress hormones and activation of the basolateral amygdala, which work together to modulate memory consolidation. Moreover, work suggests that this amygdala-based memory modulation occurs with numerous types of learning and involves interactions with many different brain regions to alter consolidation. Additionally, studies suggest that emotional arousal and amygdala activity in particular influence synaptic plasticity and associated proteins in downstream brain regions. This review considers the historical understanding for memory modulation and cellular consolidation processes and examines several research areas currently using this foundational knowledge to develop therapeutic treatments. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  1. Observation Platform for Dynamic Biomedical and Biotechnology Experiments using the ISS Light Microscopy Module, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed "Observation platform for dynamic biomedical and biotechnology experiments using the ISS Light Microscopy Module" consists of a platen sized to fit the...

  2. Review article: Critical Care Airway Management eLearning modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Deepak; McCarthy, Sally; Mowatt, Elizabeth; Cahill, Angela; Peirce, Bronwyn; Hawking, Geoff; Osborne, Ruth; Hibble, Belinda; Ebbs, Katharine

    2017-11-16

    The Australasian College for Emergency Medicine (ACEM) has recently launched the Critical Care Airway Management eLearning modules to support emergency medicine trainees in developing their airway management skills in the ED. A team of emergency physicians and trainees worked collaboratively to develop the eLearning resources ensuring extensive stakeholder consultation. A comprehensive resource manual was written to provide learners with knowledge that underpins the modules. ACEM provided project coordination as well as administrative and technical team support to the production. Although specifically developed with early ACEM trainees in mind, it is envisaged the resources will be useful for all emergency clinicians. The project was funded by the Australian Commonwealth Department of Health. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  3. Nasally administered Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains differentially modulate respiratory antiviral immune responses and induce protection against respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomosada, Yohsuke; Chiba, Eriko; Zelaya, Hortensia; Takahashi, Takuya; Tsukida, Kohichiro; Kitazawa, Haruki; Alvarez, Susana; Villena, Julio

    2013-08-15

    Some studies have shown that nasally administered immunobiotics had the potential to improve the outcome of influenza virus infection. However, the capacity of immunobiotics to improve protection against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection was not investigated before. The aims of this study were: a) to evaluate whether the nasal administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 (Lr05) and L. rhamnosus CRL1506 (Lr06) are able to improve respiratory antiviral defenses and beneficially modulate the immune response triggered by TLR3/RIG-I activation; b) to investigate whether viability of Lr05 or Lr06 is indispensable to modulate respiratory immunity and; c) to evaluate the capacity of Lr05 and Lr06 to improve the resistance of infant mice against RSV infection. Nasally administered Lr05 and Lr06 differentially modulated the TLR3/RIG-I-triggered antiviral respiratory immune response. Lr06 administration significantly modulated the production of IFN-α, IFN-β and IL-6 in the response to poly(I:C) challenge, while nasal priming with Lr05 was more effective to improve levels of IFN-γ and IL-10. Both viable Lr05 and Lr06 strains increased the resistance of infant mice to RSV infection while only heat-killed Lr05 showed a protective effect similar to those observed with viable strains. The present work demonstrated that nasal administration of immunobiotics is able to beneficially modulate the immune response triggered by TLR3/RIG-I activation in the respiratory tract and to increase the resistance of mice to the challenge with RSV. Comparative studies using two Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains of the same origin and with similar technological properties showed that each strain has an specific immunoregulatory effect in the respiratory tract and that they differentially modulate the immune response after poly(I:C) or RSV challenges, conferring different degree of protection and using distinct immune mechanisms. We also demonstrated in this work that it is possible

  4. Progesterone modulates the LPS-induced nitric oxide production by a progesterone-receptor independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Manuel Luis; Schander, Julieta Aylen; Bariani, María Victoria; Correa, Fernando; Franchi, Ana María

    2015-12-15

    Genital tract infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria induce miscarriage and are one of the most common complications of human pregnancy. LPS administration to 7-day pregnant mice induces embryo resorption after 24h, with nitric oxide playing a fundamental role in this process. We have previously shown that progesterone exerts protective effects on the embryo by modulating the inflammatory reaction triggered by LPS. Here we sought to investigate whether the in vivo administration of progesterone modulated the LPS-induced nitric oxide production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from pregnant and non-pregnant mice. We found that progesterone downregulated LPS-induced nitric oxide production by a progesterone receptor-independent mechanism. Moreover, our results suggest a possible participation of glucocorticoid receptors in at least some of the anti-inflammatory effects of progesterone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Variable Coding and Modulation Experiment Using NASA's Space Communication and Navigation Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Joseph A.; Mortensen, Dale J.; Evans, Michael A.; Tollis, Nicholas S.

    2016-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)'s Space Communication and Navigation Testbed on the International Space Station provides a unique opportunity to evaluate advanced communication techniques in an operational system. The experimental nature of the Testbed allows for rapid demonstrations while using flight hardware in a deployed system within NASA's networks. One example is variable coding and modulation, which is a method to increase data-throughput in a communication link. This paper describes recent flight testing with variable coding and modulation over S-band using a direct-to-earth link between the SCaN Testbed and the Glenn Research Center. The testing leverages the established Digital Video Broadcasting Second Generation (DVB-S2) standard to provide various modulation and coding options. The experiment was conducted in a challenging environment due to the multipath and shadowing caused by the International Space Station structure. Performance of the variable coding and modulation system is evaluated and compared to the capacity of the link, as well as standard NASA waveforms.

  6. Chronic Uridine Administration Induces Fatty Liver and Pre-Diabetic Conditions in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyo Urasaki

    Full Text Available Uridine is a pyrimidine nucleoside that exerts restorative functions in tissues under stress. Short-term co-administration of uridine with multiple unrelated drugs prevents drug-induced liver lipid accumulation. Uridine has the ability to modulate liver metabolism; however, the precise mechanism has not been delineated. In this study, long-term effects of uridine on liver metabolism were examined in both HepG2 cell cultures and C57BL/6J mice. We report that uridine administration was associated with O-GlcNAc modification of FOXO1, increased gluconeogenesis, reduced insulin signaling activity, and reduced expression of a liver-specific fatty acid binding protein FABP1. Long-term uridine feeding induced systemic glucose intolerance and severe liver lipid accumulation in mice. Our findings suggest that the therapeutic potentials of uridine should be designed for short-term acute administration.

  7. Amplitude modulation reduces loudness adaptation to high-frequency tones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, Dwight P; George, Sahara E; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2015-07-01

    Long-term loudness perception of a sound has been presumed to depend on the spatial distribution of activated auditory nerve fibers as well as their temporal firing pattern. The relative contributions of those two factors were investigated by measuring loudness adaptation to sinusoidally amplitude-modulated 12-kHz tones. The tones had a total duration of 180 s and were either unmodulated or 100%-modulated at one of three frequencies (4, 20, or 100 Hz), and additionally varied in modulation depth from 0% to 100% at the 4-Hz frequency only. Every 30 s, normal-hearing subjects estimated the loudness of one of the stimuli played at 15 dB above threshold in random order. Without any amplitude modulation, the loudness of the unmodulated tone after 180 s was only 20% of the loudness at the onset of the stimulus. Amplitude modulation systematically reduced the amount of loudness adaptation, with the 100%-modulated stimuli, regardless of modulation frequency, maintaining on average 55%-80% of the loudness at onset after 180 s. Because the present low-frequency amplitude modulation produced minimal changes in long-term spectral cues affecting the spatial distribution of excitation produced by a 12-kHz pure tone, the present result indicates that neural synchronization is critical to maintaining loudness perception over time.

  8. Bedside identification of patients at risk for PVC-induced cardiomyopathy: Is ECG useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garster, Noelle C; Henrikson, Charles A

    2017-07-01

    Premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) are an underrecognized cause of cardiomyopathy. Standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) has potential to direct attention toward at-risk patients. We performed a single-center, retrospective chart review of 1,240 patients who completed ECG and Holter monitoring at Oregon Health and Science University Hospital between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2013 to investigate the relationship of PVC frequency on ECG with burden on Holter. Primary outcome measures included PVC quantity on ECG, mean PVC quantity on Holter, and percentage of total beats on Holter recorded as PVCs. High PVC burden was defined as ≥10% of total beats. Weighted mean percentages of total beats on Holter monitor recorded as PVCs were calculated for 0, 1, 2, and ≥3 PVCs on ECG and found to be 1.4% (n = 1,128), 3.5% (n = 32), 4.3% (n = 25), and 16.6% (n = 55), respectively, which represent statistically significant differences (P ECG for ≥10% PVC Holter burden was 58%. Negative predictive value for 0 PVCs on ECG was 98%. The sensitivity and specificity of ECG to identify high PVC burden on Holter was 72% and 93.6%, respectively, when utilizing a positive ECG result as one PVC or more, and 44% and 98.9%, respectively, with ≥3 PVCs on ECG. The positive likelihood ratio corresponding to ≥3 PVCs on ECG was 40. These findings demonstrate that the number of PVCs on ECG can be utilized for quick bedside estimation of high PVC burden. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Travel and Tourism Module. An Advanced-Level Option For Distribution and Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Occupational Education Curriculum Development.

    Intended as an advanced option for distributive education students in the twelfth grade, this travel and tourism module is designed to cover a minimum of ten weeks or a maximum of twenty weeks. Introductory material includes information on employment demands, administrative considerations, course format, teaching suggestions, expected outcomes,…

  10. Devil's Claw to suppress appetite--ghrelin receptor modulation potential of a Harpagophytum procumbens root extract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Torres-Fuentes

    Full Text Available Ghrelin is a stomach-derived peptide that has been identified as the only circulating hunger hormone that exerts a potent orexigenic effect via activation of its receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1a. Hence, the ghrelinergic system represents a promising target to treat obesity and obesity-related diseases. In this study we analysed the GHS-R1a receptor activating potential of Harpagophytum procumbens, popularly known as Devil's Claw, and its effect on food intake in vivo. H. procumbens is an important traditional medicinal plant from Southern Africa with potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. This plant has been also used as an appetite modulator but most evidences are anecdotal and to our knowledge, no clear scientific studies relating to appetite modulation have been done to this date. The ghrelin receptor activation potential of an extract derived from the dried tuberous roots of H. procumbens was analysed by calcium mobilization and receptor internalization assays in human embryonic kidney cells (Hek stably expressing the GHS-R1a receptor. Food intake was investigated in male C57BL/6 mice following intraperitoneal administration of H. procumbens root extract in ad libitum and food restricted conditions. Exposure to H. procumbens extract demonstrated a significant increased cellular calcium influx but did not induce subsequent GHS-R1a receptor internalization, which is a characteristic for full receptor activation. A significant anorexigenic effect was observed in male C57BL/6 mice following peripheral administration of H. procumbens extract. We conclude that H. procumbens root extract is a potential novel source for potent anti-obesity bioactives. These results reinforce the promising potential of natural bioactives to be developed into functional foods with weight-loss and weight maintenance benefits.

  11. Targeted alpha therapy for melanoma : from bench to bedside

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, B.J.; Rizvi, S.M.A.; Li, Y.; Tsui, W.; Douglas, S.; Raja, C.; Graham, P.; Smart, R.; Butler, P.; Kearsley, J.; Thompson, J.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The control of metastatic melanoma remains an elusive objective. Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) offers a new approach to the control of micrometastases and regression of tumours. The alpha emitting immunoconjugate (AIC) against malignant melanoma has been prepared by chelating Bi-213 to the anti-melanoma antibody 9.2.27, and injected locally at 2 d post-inoculation of 1.5 million melanoma cells, or intralesionally into skin tumours. Human subjects receive 50μCi intralesional dose, escalating to 1 mCi. The clearances from the tumour, kidneys and bladder are monitored by a NaI detector that detects the 440 keV gamma ray. Blood samples and tumour photographs are taken at O. 2 and 4 weeks; tumours are excised at 4 weeks. Isolated cancer cells and preangiogenic cell clusters in mice can be eliminated with 25 μCi local AIC injection, and intra-lesional injections of 100 μCi are sufficient to completely regress melanomas with volumes up to 300 mm 3 without side-effects. Systemic TAT with a single administration is less effective with 100% growth delay of tumours observed, and ∼20% complete inhibition. The clinical TAT trial for recurrent subcutaneous melanoma has been approved by the NSW Radiation Advisory Committee and the SES Human Ethics Committee. In a world first phase 1 study, the first 5 subjects have been treated by intralesional injection, 3 at 50 μCi, and 2 at 150 μCi. All subjects having unchanged blood profiles at 2 and 4 weeks post-therapy. Tumour volumes appear little changed. However, histology of a 3 cm melanoma shows that almost complete cell kill occurred at 150 μCi, with only a few small cell clusters surviving. Local TAT inhibits tumourogenesis and intralesional TAT completely regresses melanoma in mice. Intralesional TAT for melanoma in human subjects is non-toxic so far and appears to be a promising modality. The ultimate objective is to apply systemic TAT for the control of melanoma micrometastases. Copyright (2001) Australasian

  12. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA Contamination in Bedside Surfaces of a Hospital Ward and the Potential Effectiveness of Enhanced Disinfection with an Antimicrobial Polymer Surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. M. Yuen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim in this study was to assess the effectiveness of a quaternary ammonium chloride (QAC surfactant in reducing surface staphylococcal contamination in a routinely operating medical ward occupied by patients who had tested positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. The QAC being tested is an antibacterial film that is sprayed onto a surface and can remain active for up to 8 h. A field experimental study was designed with the QAC plus daily hypochlorite cleaning as the experimental group and hypochlorite cleaning alone as the control group. The method of swabbing on moistened surfaces was used for sampling. It was found that 83% and 77% of the bedside surfaces of MRSA-positive and MRSA-negative patients respectively were contaminated with staphylococci at 08:00 hours, and that the staphylococcal concentrations increased by 80% at 1200 h over a 4-hour period with routine ward and clinical activities. Irrespective of the MRSA status of the patients, high-touch surfaces around the bed-units within the studied medical ward were heavily contaminated (ranged 1 to 276 cfu/cm2 amongst the sites with positive culture with staphylococcal bacteria including MRSA, despite the implementation of daily hypochlorite wiping. However, the contamination rate dropped significantly from 78% to 11% after the application of the QAC polymer. In the experimental group, the mean staphylococcal concentration of bedside surfaces was significantly (p < 0.0001 reduced from 4.4 ± 8.7 cfu/cm2 at 08:00 hours to 0.07 ± 0.26 cfu/cm2 at 12:00 hours by the QAC polymer. The results of this study support the view that, in addition to hypochlorite wiping, the tested QAC surfactant is a potential environmental decontamination strategy for preventing the transmission of clinically important pathogens in medical wards.

  13. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination in bedside surfaces of a hospital ward and the potential effectiveness of enhanced disinfection with an antimicrobial polymer surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, John W M; Chung, Terence W K; Loke, Alice Y

    2015-03-11

    The aim in this study was to assess the effectiveness of a quaternary ammonium chloride (QAC) surfactant in reducing surface staphylococcal contamination in a routinely operating medical ward occupied by patients who had tested positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The QAC being tested is an antibacterial film that is sprayed onto a surface and can remain active for up to 8 h. A field experimental study was designed with the QAC plus daily hypochlorite cleaning as the experimental group and hypochlorite cleaning alone as the control group. The method of swabbing on moistened surfaces was used for sampling. It was found that 83% and 77% of the bedside surfaces of MRSA-positive and MRSA-negative patients respectively were contaminated with staphylococci at 08:00 hours, and that the staphylococcal concentrations increased by 80% at 1200 h over a 4-hour period with routine ward and clinical activities. Irrespective of the MRSA status of the patients, high-touch surfaces around the bed-units within the studied medical ward were heavily contaminated (ranged 1 to 276 cfu/cm2 amongst the sites with positive culture) with staphylococcal bacteria including MRSA, despite the implementation of daily hypochlorite wiping. However, the contamination rate dropped significantly from 78% to 11% after the application of the QAC polymer. In the experimental group, the mean staphylococcal concentration of bedside surfaces was significantly (p<0.0001) reduced from 4.4±8.7 cfu/cm2 at 08:00 hours to 0.07±0.26 cfu/cm2 at 12:00 hours by the QAC polymer. The results of this study support the view that, in addition to hypochlorite wiping, the tested QAC surfactant is a potential environmental decontamination strategy for preventing the transmission of clinically important pathogens in medical wards.

  14. Effectiveness of an Online Educational Module in Improving Evidence-Based Practice Skills of Practicing Registered Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lora

    2017-10-01

    Implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) at the bedside has been difficult to achieve. Significant gaps between current research and actual practice have been identified and must be addressed in effort to increase utilization of EBP. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of an online EBP educational intervention and to examine the relationship between educational preparation and years of nursing experience on nurses' practice, attitudes, and knowledge and skills of EBP. An experimental pretest-posttest design study with three randomized groups utilizing the EBPQ instrument was conducted. No significant differences were noted in EBPQ subscale scores of practice, attitude, or knowledge and skills from pre- to posttest. In addition, no statistical difference in EBPQ subscale scores regarding educational preparation or years of experience were noted. While nurses report positive attitudes toward EBP, their perceptions of practice and knowledge and skills score much lower. Educational interventions are needed for practicing nurses to overcome this knowledge deficit to successfully implement EBP. However, the use of online, independent, computer-based learning modules, while cost-efficient and offer several benefits when educating nurses, may not necessarily be the most effective method for teaching EBP knowledge and skills to practicing nurses. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  15. Transporting the last superconducting module to be removed from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    All 72 of LEP's superconducting modules have now been raised to the surface. Some 80% will be preserved at CERN, with 10% being reused for the LHC and a further 10% of obsolete non-radioactive material destined for recycling. These pictures show the last of these modules on its journey from PM18 to the old ISR tunnel where the modules will be stored in the short term. Photo 01: The Ansaldo 1020 module leaves PM18 by lorry. Photo 03: The module on the SM18 site. Photos 06, 08: The module on the road.

  16. Spatiotemporal brain dynamics of emotional face processing modulations induced by the serotonin 1A/2A receptor agonist psilocybin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, Fosco; Schmidt, André; Pokorny, Thomas; Kometer, Michael; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2014-12-01

    Emotional face processing is critically modulated by the serotonergic system. For instance, emotional face processing is impaired by acute psilocybin administration, a serotonin (5-HT) 1A and 2A receptor agonist. However, the spatiotemporal brain mechanisms underlying these modulations are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the spatiotemporal brain dynamics underlying psilocybin-induced modulations during emotional face processing. Electrical neuroimaging analyses were applied to visual evoked potentials in response to emotional faces, following psilocybin and placebo administration. Our results indicate a first time period of strength (i.e., Global Field Power) modulation over the 168-189 ms poststimulus interval, induced by psilocybin. A second time period of strength modulation was identified over the 211-242 ms poststimulus interval. Source estimations over these 2 time periods further revealed decreased activity in response to both neutral and fearful faces within limbic areas, including amygdala and parahippocampal gyrus, and the right temporal cortex over the 168-189 ms interval, and reduced activity in response to happy faces within limbic and right temporo-occipital brain areas over the 211-242 ms interval. Our results indicate a selective and temporally dissociable effect of psilocybin on the neuronal correlates of emotional face processing, consistent with a modulation of the top-down control. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Dopaminergic modulation of striatal acetylcholine release in rats depleted of dopamine as neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B J; Bruno, J P

    1995-02-01

    A repeated sessions, in vivo microdialysis design was used to determine the D1- and D2-like receptor modulation of striatal ACh efflux in intact adult rats and those depleted of DA on postnatal Day 3. Systemic administration of the D1-like agonist SKF 38393 (1.0 or 10.0 mg/kg, or the D2-like antagonist clebopride (1.0 or 10.0 mg/kg) increased ACh efflux in both controls and DA-depleted animals. Systemic administration of the D1-like antagonist SCH 23390 (0.05 or 0.2 mg/kg) or D2-like agonist quinpirole (0.5 or 1.0 mg/kg) decreased ACh efflux in both groups of animals. DA-depleted animals exhibited a larger response than did controls to the lower doses of these drugs. Intrastriatal administration of clebopride (10 microM) increased ACh efflux in DA-depleted animals. Finally, basal and clebopride-stimulated ACh efflux were unaffected by the repeated microdialysis sessions. These data demonstrate that the reciprocal modulation of striatal ACh efflux, seen in controls and in rats depleted of DA as adults, is also present in adults depleted of DA as neonates. Because the roles of D1- and D2-receptors in the expression of motor behavior differ between rats depleted of DA as adults vs as neonates, these data suggest that alterations in the dopaminergic modulation of striatal ACh release do not underlie the sparing from motoric deficits seen in animals depleted of DA as neonates.

  18. Bringing the Best of Business to School Administration

    OpenAIRE

    De Filippis, Michael Antony

    2015-01-01

    The disciplines of business and school administration are recognized as distinct and separate in purpose, product, and operation. While fundamental differences do exist between the two, school administrators have a need for application of business principles in order to manage an educational institution. Schools are, at their foundation, organizations relying on effective management, budgeting, public relations, value creation, etc. Despite this need, school administrators often come from bac...

  19. Modulation of Rat Cecal Microbiota by Administration of Raffinose and Encapsulated Bifidobacterium breve

    OpenAIRE

    Dinoto, Achmad; Suksomcheep, Akarat; Ishizuka, Satoshi; Kimura, Hanae; Hanada, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Asano, Kozo; Tomita, Fusao; Yokota, Atsushi

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the effects of administration of raffinose and encapsulated Bifidobacterium breve JCM 1192T cells on the rat cecal microbiota, in a preclinical synbiotic study groups of male WKAH/Hkm Slc rats were fed for 3 weeks with four different test diets: basal diet (group BD), basal diet supplemented with raffinose (group RAF), basal diet supplemented with encapsulated B. breve (group CB), and basal diet supplemented with both raffinose and encapsulated B. breve (group RCB). The bacteri...

  20. An integrative approach to inferring biologically meaningful gene modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Kai

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to construct biologically meaningful gene networks and modules is critical for contemporary systems biology. Though recent studies have demonstrated the power of using gene modules to shed light on the functioning of complex biological systems, most modules in these networks have shown little association with meaningful biological function. We have devised a method which directly incorporates gene ontology (GO annotation in construction of gene modules in order to gain better functional association. Results We have devised a method, Semantic Similarity-Integrated approach for Modularization (SSIM that integrates various gene-gene pairwise similarity values, including information obtained from gene expression, protein-protein interactions and GO annotations, in the construction of modules using affinity propagation clustering. We demonstrated the performance of the proposed method using data from two complex biological responses: 1. the osmotic shock response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and 2. the prion-induced pathogenic mouse model. In comparison with two previously reported algorithms, modules identified by SSIM showed significantly stronger association with biological functions. Conclusions The incorporation of semantic similarity based on GO annotation with gene expression and protein-protein interaction data can greatly enhance the functional relevance of inferred gene modules. In addition, the SSIM approach can also reveal the hierarchical structure of gene modules to gain a broader functional view of the biological system. Hence, the proposed method can facilitate comprehensive and in-depth analysis of high throughput experimental data at the gene network level.

  1. Bench-to-bedside review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janum, Susanne; Zingg, Walter; Classen, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are indispensable in modern pediatric medicine. CVCs provide secure vascular access, but are associated with a risk of severe complications, in particular bloodstream infection. We provide a review of the recent literature about the diagnostic and therapeutic...... challenges of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) in children and its prevention. Variations in blood sampling and limitations in blood culturing interfere with accurate and timely diagnosis of CRBSI. Although novel molecular testing methods appear promising in overcoming some of the present...... diagnostic limitations of conventional blood sampling in children, they still need to solidly prove their accuracy and reliability in clinical practice. Standardized practices of catheter insertion and care remain the cornerstone of CRBSI prevention although their implementation in daily practice may...

  2. Photovoltaic module and interlocked stack of photovoltaic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wares, Brian S.

    2014-09-02

    One embodiment relates to an arrangement of photovoltaic modules configured for transportation. The arrangement includes a plurality of photovoltaic modules, each photovoltaic module including a frame. A plurality of individual male alignment features and a plurality of individual female alignment features are included on each frame. Adjacent photovoltaic modules are interlocked by multiple individual male alignment features on a first module of the adjacent photovoltaic modules fitting into and being surrounded by corresponding individual female alignment features on a second module of the adjacent photovoltaic modules. Other embodiments, features and aspects are also disclosed.

  3. BRAZILIAN ADMINISTRATION, ADMINISTRATIVE REFORM AND THE NEW STATE: THE ROLE OF ADMINISTRATIVE APPARATUS IN VARGAS ADMINISTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Moura

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The role played by the administrative apparatus through the Department of Administrative Services in the Government policy Vargas is the object put in debate. Analyzes the theme from the the investigation of patrimonial, authoritarian and inefficient context which marks the formation and development of administrative bureaucracy, the tenders of professionalization and efficiency brought by the administrative reforms of the 1930s and 1940s with the contrast of the limitations of the import of the Weberian model in the Brazilian context and analysis of the establishment of the New State DASP and their assignments. Search the work demonstrate the control position he held directly and through the State Departments in the Brazilian Public Administration ensuring centralized and developmental policy of the government. For this is adopted as the research method of approach structuralism in order to identify the deconstruction of the phenomenon - of administrative reforms - in the superficial perception - the proposed impersonality and efficiency as the best way of achieving the public interest - its invariant structure - the search for the adequacy of the administrative apparatus and bureaucracy for pursuit of political ends pursued by the Government.

  4. THE PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION COMPARED TO PUBLIC MANAGEMENT AND OTHER SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAZAR IOAN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we try to analyze the meaning of the public administration term. In our opinion it is necessary to be able to define exactly what public administration means but at the same time to clearly distinguish it from the other sciences. This is due to the fact that very often confusion is made between public administration and public management, public administration and bureaucracy or public administration and policy. Throughout this paper we hope to clarify some of the aspects related to what exactly distinguishes public administration from the above mentioned sciences and what are its own particularities.

  5. Administrative Transparency and the Access to Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Paulo Petersen Andreazza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the various forms and application ranges of the State secret throughout history, from its origins in classical political culture, to the evanescence of its intensity, when the right to information and the principles of good administration, advertising, transparency and democracy gain strength. In this scenario, in Brazil, the constitutional principle of transparency is highlighted, which transforms the notion of advertising, being no longer just an administrator option, to demand a public space in which the free movement of ideas and information starts to have potential to influence the scope and the action strategies of the State, providing certainty to State conducts and security to the administered. In the wake of this principle, comes the Access to Information Act, in order to print effectiveness in access to  administrative  information,  producing  intense  practical  effects  to  the  legal  and administrative relationship established between the Public Administration and administered and subjecting the power to control people, presenting a notorious identity with democracy. However, some points of this law provoked discussions regarding the possible conflict between individual and collective fundamental rights, as well as between the constitutional principles of transparency and publicity with the intimacy and privacy, as well as any collision with the infra-constitutional norms derived from the latter, as the confidentiality of financial data, bank secrecy and tax secrecy. The intention presented in this study is to establish the ownership of the reach of the Access to Information Act before the particular issue of disclosure in nominal compensation of state agents.

  6. Irreducible Specht modules are signed Young modules

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmer, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Recently Donkin defined signed Young modules as a simultaneous generalization of Young and twisted Young modules for the symmetric group. We show that in odd characteristic, if a Specht module $S^\\lambda$ is irreducible, then $S^\\lambda$ is a signed Young module. Thus the set of irreducible Specht modules coincides with the set of irreducible signed Young modules. This provides evidence for our conjecture that the signed Young modules are precisely the class of indecomposable self-dual module...

  7. Right to know: reducing risks of fecal pathogen exposure for ED patients and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Molly Bridget

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the literature regarding the multiple challenges that contribute to ED bedside toileting and examine best practices that will reduce fecal exposure, cross-contamination among patients, and employee splash injuries. We searched the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, MEDLINE, and Cochrane database for information about the multiple challenges involved in bedside toileting, using the following search terms: bedside toileting, gastroenteritis, macerator, sluice machine, fecal pathogen exposure, and splash injury. In addition, costs and benefits of reusable versus disposable bedside toileting equipment were compared and contrasted. Emergency departments have a higher exposure rate to fecal pathogens with current methods of bedside toileting. Short incubation periods may not allow the proper lead time needed for patients to access primary care providers. As a result, emergency departments and urgent care centers become a likely point of entry into the health care system. Although most inpatient rooms have built-in bathrooms, most emergency departments and outpatient examination rooms do not. Although many patients are ambulatory, restrictive monitoring equipment is required. For safety reasons, staff must bring toileting equipment to the bedsides of both ambulatory and non-ambulatory patients. Hopper dependence creates longer walking distances and delays. These delays may lead to incontinence events, skin breakdown, more frequent bed changes, and higher linen and labor costs. Reusable bedside toileting equipment is associated with at-risk behaviors. Examples are procrastination and sanitization shortcuts. These behaviors risk cross-contamination of patients especially when urgent situations require equipment to be reused in the interim. ED patients and staff are 5 times more likely to undergo fecal exposure. The 5 phases of ED bedside toileting at which risks occur are as follows: equipment setup, transport

  8. Intranasal administration of oxytocin modulates behavioral and amygdala responses to infant crying in females with insecure attachment representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riem, Madelon M E; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the effects of oxytocin administration on the response to infant crying in individuals with secure or insecure attachment representations as assessed with the Adult Attachment Interview. We measured feelings of irritation and the use of excessive force as indicated by grip strength using a handgrip dynamometer during exposure to infant crying in 42 women without children who were administered intranasal oxytocin or a placebo. In addition, amygdala responses to infant crying and control sounds were measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The effects of oxytocin on reactivity to crying were moderated by attachment security. Oxytocin decreased the use of excessive handgrip force and amygdala reactivity in response to crying in individuals with insecure attachment representations. Our findings indicate that insecure individuals, who show emotional, behavioral, and neural hyperreactivity to crying, benefit the most from intranasal oxytocin.

  9. Weyl modules, demazure modules, KR-modules, crystals, fusion products and limit constructions

    OpenAIRE

    Fourier, G.; Littelmann, P.

    2007-01-01

    We study finite dimensional representations of current algebras, loop algebras and their quantized versions. For the current algebra of a simple Lie algebra of type {\\tt ADE}, we show that Kirillov-Reshetikhin modules and Weyl modules are in fact all Demazure modules. As a consequence one obtains an elementary proof of the dimension formula for Weyl modules for the current and the loop algebra. Further, we show that the crystals of the Weyl and the Demazure module are the same up to some addi...

  10. Analysis of Harmonic Injection to the Modulation of Multi-Level ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores the analysis of third and ninth harmonic injection to the modulation of a multilevel diode clamped converter (DCC) at a varying modulation index. The spectral distributions of the various multi-level waveforms obtained under normal modulation index of 0.8 and over modulation index of 1.15 were ...

  11. Using structure to inform carbohydrate binding module function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, D. Wade; Lammerts van Bueren, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Generally, non-catalytic carbohydrate binding module (CBM) specificity has been shown to parallel the catalytic activity of the carbohydrate active enzyme (CAZyme) module it is appended to. With the rapid expansion in metagenomic sequence space for the potential discovery of new CBMs in addition to

  12. Integrated High-Speed Digital Optical True-Time-Delay Modules for Synthetic Aperture Radars, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Crystal Research, Inc. proposes an integrated high-speed digital optical true-time-delay module for advanced synthetic aperture radars. The unique feature of this...

  13. InGaP DHBT for High Efficiency L-band T/R Module, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A fully monolithically integrated L-band T/R module using InGaP/GaAs-based HBTs (heterojunction bipolar transistors) for both the transmit and receive functions is...

  14. mGluR5 Positive Allosteric Modulation Enhances Extinction Learning Following Cocaine Self-Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Cleva, Richard M.; Hicks, Megan P.; Gass, Justin T.; Wischerath, Kelly C.; Plasters, Elizabeth T.; Widholm, John J.; Olive, M. Foster

    2011-01-01

    Extinction of classically and instrumentally conditioned behaviors, such as conditioned fear and drug-seeking behavior, is a process of active learning, and recent studies indicate that potentiation of glutamatergic transmission facilitates extinction learning. In this study we investigated the effects of the type 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR5) positive allosteric modulator 3-cyano-N-(1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)benzamide (CDPPB) on the extinction of cocaine-seeking behavior in ...

  15. Psychologists in Academic Administration: A Call to Action and Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaling, Karen B; Linton, John C

    2017-06-01

    Academic psychologists' backgrounds may prepare them for many aspects of academic administration such as: understanding and working with people; prioritizing others' needs and institutional needs; and managing projects and budgets, e.g., for research grants or training programs. Contemporary academic health centers also may provide opportunities for psychologists to serve in academic health administration. This article encourages psychologists to consider preparing for and seeking administrative and higher-level leadership roles. Six psychologists serving diverse administrative roles-from vice chairs in medical school departments to presidents of universities with academic health centers-reflected on: their paths to administration; their preparation for administrative roles; and the commonalities and differences between the work and skills sets of psychologist health service providers and the work and skill sets required for higher level administrative and leadership roles.

  16. 49 CFR 577.6 - Notification pursuant to Administrator's decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... making his decision. (6) A clear description of the Administrator' stated evaluation as provided in his..., of the purchase price; and (C) A statement that, if the Court upholds the Administrator's decision... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notification pursuant to Administrator's decision...

  17. Modulator-free quadrature amplitude modulation signal synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhixin; Kakande, Joseph; Kelly, Brian; O'Carroll, John; Phelan, Richard; Richardson, David J.; Slavík, Radan

    2014-12-01

    The ability to generate high-speed on-off-keyed telecommunication signals by directly modulating a semiconductor laser’s drive current was one of the most exciting prospective applications of the nascent field of laser technology throughout the 1960s. Three decades of progress led to the commercialization of 2.5 Gbit s-1-per-channel submarine fibre optic systems that drove the growth of the internet as a global phenomenon. However, the detrimental frequency chirp associated with direct modulation forced industry to use external electro-optic modulators to deliver the next generation of on-off-keyed 10 Gbit s-1 systems and is absolutely prohibitive for today’s (>)100 Gbit s-1 coherent systems, which use complex modulation formats (for example, quadrature amplitude modulation). Here we use optical injection locking of directly modulated semiconductor lasers to generate complex modulation format signals showing distinct advantages over current and other currently researched solutions.

  18. Intratracheal administration of fullerene nanoparticles activates splenic CD11b+ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Ning; Kunugita, Naoki; Ichinose, Takamichi; Song, Yuan; Yokoyama, Mitsuru; Arashidani, Keiichi; Yoshida, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Fullerene administration triggered splenic responses. → Splenic responses occurred at different time-points than in the lung tissue. → CD11b + cells were demonstrated to function as responder cells to fullerene. - Abstract: Fullerene nanoparticles ('Fullerenes'), which are now widely used materials in daily life, have been demonstrated to induce elevated pulmonary inflammation in several animal models; however, the effects of fullerenes on the immune system are not fully understood. In the present study, mice received fullerenes intratracheally and were sacrificed at days 1, 6 and 42. Mice that received fullerenes exhibited increased proliferation of splenocytes and increased splenic production of IL-2 and TNF-α. Changes in the spleen in response to fullerene treatment occurred at different time-points than in the lung tissue. Furthermore, fullerenes induced CDK2 expression and activated NF-κB and NFAT in splenocytes at 6 days post-administration. Finally, CD11b + cells were demonstrated to function as responder cells to fullerene administration in the splenic inflammatory process. Taken together, in addition to the effects on pulmonary responses, fullerenes also modulate the immune system.

  19. Modules to enhance smart lighting education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Robert M.; Joenathan, Charles; Connor, Kenneth; Chouikha, Mohamed

    2012-10-01

    Over the past several years there has been a rapid advancement in solid state lighting applications brought on by the development of high efficiency light emitting diodes. Development of lighting devices, systems and products that meet the demands of the future lighting marketplace requires workers from many disciplines including engineers, scientists, designers and architects. The National Science Foundation has recognized this fact and established the Smart Lighting Engineering Research Center that promotes research leading to smart lighting systems, partners with industry to enhance innovation and educates a diverse, world-class workforce. The lead institution is Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute with core partners Boston University and The University of New Mexico. Outreach partners include Howard University, Morgan State University, and Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. Because of the multidisciplinary nature of advanced smart lighting systems workers often have little or no formal education in basic optics, lighting and illumination. This paper describes the initial stages of the development of self-contained and universally applicable educational modules that target essential optics topics needed for lighting applications. The modules are intended to be easily incorporated into new and existing courses by a variety of educators and/or to be used in a series of stand-alone, asynchronous training exercises by new graduate students. The ultimate goal of this effort is to produce resources such as video lectures, video presentations of students-teaching-students, classroom activities, assessment tools, student research projects and laboratories integrated into learning modules. Sample modules and resources will be highlighted. Other outreach activities such as plans for coursework, undergraduate research, design projects, and high school enrichment programs will be discussed.

  20. Bench-to-bedside translation of dendrimers: Reality or utopia? A concise analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignani, Serge; Rodrigues, João; Tomas, Helena; Roy, René; Shi, Xiangyang; Majoral, Jean-Pierre

    2017-11-16

    Nanomedicine, which is an application of nanotechnologies in healthcare is developed to improve the treatments and lives of patients suffering from a range of disorders and to increase the successes of drug candidates. Within the nanotechnology universe, the remarkable unique and tunable properties of dendrimers have made them promising tools for diverse biomedical applications such as drug delivery, gene therapy and diagnostic. Up-to-date, very few dendrimers has yet gained regulatory approval for systemic administration, why? In this critical review, we briefly focus on the list of desired basic dendrimer requirements for decision-making purpose by the scientists (go/no-go decision), in early development stages, to become clinical candidates, and to move towards Investigational New Drugs (IND) application submission. In addition, the successful translation between research and clinic should be performed by the implementation of a simple roadmap to jump the 'valley of death' successfully. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Signed Young Modules and Simple Specht Modules

    OpenAIRE

    Danz, Susanne; Lim, Kay Jin

    2015-01-01

    By a result of Hemmer, every simple Specht module of a finite symmetric group over a field of odd characteristic is a signed Young module. While Specht modules are parametrized by partitions, indecomposable signed Young modules are parametrized by certain pairs of partitions. The main result of this article establishes the signed Young module labels of simple Specht modules. Along the way we prove a number of results concerning indecomposable signed Young modules that are of independent inter...

  2. Texture analysis on the fluence map to evaluate the degree of modulation for volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, So-Yeon; Kim, Il Han; Ye, Sung-Joon; Carlson, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Texture analysis on fluence maps was performed to evaluate the degree of modulation for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans. Methods: A total of six textural features including angular second moment, inverse difference moment, contrast, variance, correlation, and entropy were calculated for fluence maps generated from 20 prostate and 20 head and neck VMAT plans. For each of the textural features, particular displacement distances (d) of 1, 5, and 10 were adopted. To investigate the deliverability of each VMAT plan, gamma passing rates of pretreatment quality assurance, and differences in modulating parameters such as multileaf collimator (MLC) positions, gantry angles, and monitor units at each control point between VMAT plans and dynamic log files registered by the Linac control system during delivery were acquired. Furthermore, differences between the original VMAT plan and the plan reconstructed from the dynamic log files were also investigated. To test the performance of the textural features as indicators for the modulation degree of VMAT plans, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients (r s ) with the plan deliverability were calculated. For comparison purposes, conventional modulation indices for VMAT including the modulation complexity score for VMAT, leaf travel modulation complexity score, and modulation index supporting station parameter optimized radiation therapy (MI SPORT ) were calculated, and their correlations were analyzed in the same way. Results: There was no particular textural feature which always showed superior correlations with every type of plan deliverability. Considering the results comprehensively, contrast (d = 1) and variance (d = 1) generally showed considerable correlations with every type of plan deliverability. These textural features always showed higher correlations to the plan deliverability than did the conventional modulation indices, except in the case of modulating parameter differences. The r s values

  3. 49 CFR 1.45 - Delegations to all Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., facilities protection and warfare effects monitoring and reporting, research, stockpiling, financial aid, and... understanding with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in regard to setting and enforcing... concur in each memorandum of understanding with OSHA prior to its execution by the Administrator of the...

  4. Abnormal metabolic brain networks in Parkinson's disease from blackboard to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chris C; Eidelberg, David

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic imaging in the rest state has provided valuable information concerning the abnormalities of regional brain function that underlie idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Moreover, network modeling procedures, such as spatial covariance analysis, have further allowed for the quantification of these changes at the systems level. In recent years, we have utilized this strategy to identify and validate three discrete metabolic networks in PD associated with the motor and cognitive manifestations of the disease. In this chapter, we will review and compare the specific functional topographies underlying parkinsonian akinesia/rigidity, tremor, and cognitive disturbance. While network activity progressed over time, the rate of change for each pattern was distinctive and paralleled the development of the corresponding clinical symptoms in early-stage patients. This approach is already showing great promise in identifying individuals with prodromal manifestations of PD and in assessing the rate of progression before clinical onset. Network modulation was found to correlate with the clinical effects of dopaminergic treatment and surgical interventions, such as subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) and gene therapy. Abnormal metabolic networks have also been identified for atypical parkinsonian syndromes, such as multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Using multiple disease-related networks for PD, MSA, and PSP, we have developed a novel, fully automated algorithm for accurate classification at the single-patient level, even at early disease stages. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Oxytocin administration suppresses hypothalamic activation in response to visual food cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Klaauw, Agatha A; Ziauddeen, Hisham; Keogh, Julia M; Henning, Elana; Dachi, Sekesai; Fletcher, Paul C; Farooqi, I Sadaf

    2017-06-27

    The aim of this study was to use functional neuroimaging to investigate whether oxytocin modulates the neural response to visual food cues in brain regions involved in the control of food intake. Twenty-four normal weight volunteers received intranasal oxytocin (24 IU) or placebo in a double-blind, randomized crossover study. Measurements were made forty-five minutes after dosing. On two occasions, functional MRI (fMRI) scans were performed in the fasted state; the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response to images of high-calorie foods versus low-calorie foods was measured. Given its critical role in eating behaviour, the primary region of interest was the hypothalamus. Secondary analyses examined the parabrachial nuclei and other brain regions involved in food intake and food reward. Intranasal oxytocin administration suppressed hypothalamic activation to images of high-calorie compared to low-calorie food (P = 0.0125). There was also a trend towards suppression of activation in the parabrachial nucleus (P = 0.0683). No effects of intranasal oxytocin were seen in reward circuits or on ad libitum food intake. Further characterization of the effects of oxytocin on neural circuits in the hypothalamus is needed to establish the utility of targeting oxytocin signalling in obesity.

  6. Using Procedure Codes to Define Radiation Toxicity in Administrative Data: The Devil is in the Details.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Anne-Marie; Kuo, Tzy-Mey; Chang, YunKyung; Carpenter, William R; Chen, Ronald C; Sturmer, Til

    2017-05-01

    Systematic coding systems are used to define clinically meaningful outcomes when leveraging administrative claims data for research. How and when these codes are applied within a research study can have implications for the study validity and their specificity can vary significantly depending on treatment received. Data are from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked dataset. We use propensity score methods in a retrospective cohort of prostate cancer patients first examined in a recently published radiation oncology comparative effectiveness study. With the narrowly defined outcome definition, the toxicity event outcome rate ratio was 0.88 per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval, 0.71-1.08). With the broadly defined outcome, the rate ratio was comparable, with 0.89 per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval, 0.76-1.04), although individual event rates were doubled. Some evidence of surveillance bias was suggested by a higher rate of endoscopic procedures the first year of follow-up in patients who received proton therapy compared with those receiving intensity-modulated radiation treatment (11.15 vs. 8.90, respectively). This study demonstrates the risk of introducing bias through subjective application of procedure codes. Careful consideration is required when using procedure codes to define outcomes in administrative data.

  7. Specialty pharmaceuticals: policy initiatives to improve assessment, pricing, prescription, and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James C; Howell, Scott

    2014-10-01

    The value of "specialty pharmaceuticals" for cancer and other complex conditions depends not merely on their molecular structures but also on the manner in which the drugs are assessed, insured, priced, prescribed, and used. This article analyzes the five principal stages through which a specialty drug must pass on its journey from the laboratory to the bedside. These include regulatory approval by the Food and Drug Administration for market access, insurance coverage, pricing and payment, physician prescription, and patient engagement. If structured appropriately, each stage improves performance and supports continued research and development. If structured inappropriately, however, each stage adds to administrative burdens, distorts clinical decision making, and weakens incentives for innovation. Cautious optimism is in order, but neither the continued development of breakthrough products nor their use according to evidence-based guidelines can be taken for granted. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  8. On the Logic of Separating the Fiscal Policy from the Fiscal Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionel Leonida

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the problems yet to be solved in a satisfactorily manner in Romania is the decentralisation of the public administration. In general, by decentralisation we understand the separation of the central decision from the local (or regional decision based on the principle of subsidiarity. In our opinion, The National Agency for Fiscal Administration should function, in a decentralised manner, meaning outside of the Ministry of Public Finances. In support of this statement we will present two modules or arguments: a wewill first debate on the matter of public administration decentralisation; b second, we will debate in favour ofthe institutional separation of ANAF from the Ministry of Public Finances. Objectives: Implementation of concrete desire for decentralization of public administration; Identification of conceptual distinctions, structural and functional development of tax policy and administration of fiscal policy. Prior work: Assessment of net tax burden; Phillips curve assessment for Romania; Automatic fiscal stabilizers; Sustainability of fiscal policy. Approach: Logical analysis of the concepts involved in the study; Highlighting the distinctions of semantic and pragmatic nature of the concepts involved in the study. Results: decisive arguments concerning the desirability of the structural separation of the fiscal policy from the fiscal administration. Implications: providing arguments for a separation of fiscal policy decision to tax administration; a collection efficiency of budgetary obligations. Potential beneficiaries : The Ministry of Finance; the National Agency for Fiscal Administration; the Government of Romania; the Ministry ofInternal Affairs and Administration. Value: Contributions from conceptual nature: semantic separation of fiscal policy from tax administration; from methodological nature: demonstrating scientific research force of un application logic analysis method; from empirical nature: demonstrating the need

  9. 49 CFR 1.66 - Delegations to Maritime Administrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... delegated to the Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration relating to the... the functions vested in the Secretary by section 3(d) of the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (33 U...) Carry out the functions vested in the Secretary by the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (August 18, 1990; Pub...

  10. Pharmacological Modulation of Long-Term Potentiation-Like Activity in the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Salavati

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Long-term potentiation (LTP depends on glutamatergic neurotransmission and is modulated by cholinergic, dopaminergic and GABAergic inputs. Paired associative stimulation (PAS is a neurostimulation paradigm that, when combined with electroencephalography (EEG, assesses LTP-like activity (PAS-induced LTP in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. Thus, we conducted a study to assess the role of cholinergic, dopaminergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission on PAS-induced LTP in the DLPFC. We hypothesized that increasing the dopaminergic tone with L-DOPA and the cholinergic tone with rivastigmine will enhance PAS-induced LTP, while increasing the GABAergic tone with baclofen and inhibiting glutamatergic neurotransmission with dextromethorphan will reduce it compared to placebo.Methods: In this randomized controlled, double-blind cross-over within-subject study, 12 healthy participants received five sessions of PAS to the DLPFC in a random order, each preceded by the administration of placebo or one of the four active drugs. PAS-induced LTP was assessed after each drug administration and compared to PAS-induced LTP after placebo.Results: As predicted, L-DOPA and rivastigmine resulted in enhanced PAS-induced LTP in the DLPFC and dextromethorphan inhibited it compared to placebo. In contrast, baclofen did not significantly suppress PAS-induced LTP compared to placebo.Conclusions: This study provides a novel approach to study DLPFC neuroplasticity and its modulation in patients with brain disorders that are associated with abnormalities in these neurochemical systems. This study was based on a single dose administration of each drug. Given that these drugs are typically administered chronically, future studies should assess the effects of chronic administration.

  11. Texture analysis on the fluence map to evaluate the degree of modulation for volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So-Yeon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Il Han [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Ye, Sung-Joon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744, (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Seoul National University Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Suwon 433-270 (Korea, Republic of); Carlson, Joel [Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Seoul National University Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Suwon 433-270 (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Texture analysis on fluence maps was performed to evaluate the degree of modulation for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans. Methods: A total of six textural features including angular second moment, inverse difference moment, contrast, variance, correlation, and entropy were calculated for fluence maps generated from 20 prostate and 20 head and neck VMAT plans. For each of the textural features, particular displacement distances (d) of 1, 5, and 10 were adopted. To investigate the deliverability of each VMAT plan, gamma passing rates of pretreatment quality assurance, and differences in modulating parameters such as multileaf collimator (MLC) positions, gantry angles, and monitor units at each control point between VMAT plans and dynamic log files registered by the Linac control system during delivery were acquired. Furthermore, differences between the original VMAT plan and the plan reconstructed from the dynamic log files were also investigated. To test the performance of the textural features as indicators for the modulation degree of VMAT plans, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients (r{sub s}) with the plan deliverability were calculated. For comparison purposes, conventional modulation indices for VMAT including the modulation complexity score for VMAT, leaf travel modulation complexity score, and modulation index supporting station parameter optimized radiation therapy (MI{sub SPORT}) were calculated, and their correlations were analyzed in the same way. Results: There was no particular textural feature which always showed superior correlations with every type of plan deliverability. Considering the results comprehensively, contrast (d = 1) and variance (d = 1) generally showed considerable correlations with every type of plan deliverability. These textural features always showed higher correlations to the plan deliverability than did the conventional modulation indices, except in the case of modulating parameter differences. The r

  12. 10 CFR 455.150 - Right to administrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Right to administrative review. 455.150 Section 455.150 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS AND BUILDINGS OWNED BY UNITS OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC CARE INSTITUTIONS Administrative Review § 455.150 Right to...

  13. 6 CFR 13.44 - Right to administrative offset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Right to administrative offset. 13.44 Section 13.44 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.44 Right to administrative offset. The amount of any penalty or assessment that has become...

  14. Repeated administration of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists, but not positive allosteric modulators, increases alpha7 nAChR levels in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ditte Z; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Hansen, Henrik H

    2010-01-01

    AChR binding sites in several brain regions, particularly in the prefrontal cortex. The alpha7 nAChR agonists SSR180711 and PNU-282987 also increase [(125)I]-BTX binding, suggesting that this is a general consequence of alpha7 nAChR agonism. Interestingly, the alpha7 nAChR positive allosteric modulators PNU......The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is an important target for treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. However, the receptor desensitizes rapidly in vitro, which has led to concern regarding its applicability as a clinically relevant drug target....... Here we investigate the effects of repeated agonism on alpha7 nAChR receptor levels and responsiveness in vivo in rats. Using [(125)I]-alpha-bungarotoxin (BTX) autoradiography we show that acute or repeated administration with the selective alpha7 nAChR agonist A-582941 increases the number of alpha7 n...

  15. Body weight-supported bedside treadmill training facilitates ambulation in ICU patients: An interventional proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Juultje; Wieferink, Denise C; Dongelmans, Dave A; Nollet, Frans; Engelbert, Raoul H H; van der Schaaf, Marike

    2017-10-01

    Early mobilisation is advocated to improve recovery of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. However, severe weakness in combination with tubes, lines and machinery are practical barriers for the implementation of ambulation with critically ill patients. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of Body Weight-Supported Treadmill Training (BWSTT) in critically ill patients in the ICU. A custom build bedside Body Weight-Supported Treadmill was used and evaluated in medical and surgical patients in the ICU. Feasibility was evaluated according to eligibility, successful number of BWSTT, number of staff needed, adverse events, number of patients that could not have walked without BWSTT, patient satisfaction and anxiety. Twenty participants, underwent 54 sessions BWSTT. Two staff members executed the BWSTT and no adverse events occurred. Medical equipment did not have to be disconnected during all treatment sessions. In 74% of the sessions, the participants would not have been able to walk without the BWSTT. Patient satisfaction with BWSTT was high and anxiety low. This proof of concept study demonstrated that BWSTT is safe, reduces staff resource, and facilitates the first time to ambulation in critically ill patients with severe muscle weakness in the ICU. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bench-to-bedside review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Schrenzel, Jacques; Ieven, Margareta

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Among critically ill patients, the diagnosis of bloodstream infection poses a major challenge. Current standard bacterial identification based on blood culture platforms is intrinsically time-consuming and slow. The continuous evolvement of molecular techniques has the potential of prov...

  17. Hypothalamic and pituitary clusterin modulates neurohormonal responses to stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Mi-Seon; Chang, Hyukki; Namkoong, Churl; Kang, Gil Myoung; Kim, Hyun-Kyong; Gil, So Young; Yu, Ji Hee; Park, Kyeong Han; Kim, Min-Seon

    2013-01-01

    Clusterin is a sulfated glycoprotein abundantly expressed in the pituitary gland and hypothalamus of mammals. However, its physiological role in neuroendocrine function is largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of clusterin on plasma pituitary hormone levels in normal rats. Single ICV injection of clusterin provoked neurohormonal changes seen under acute stress condition: increased plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), corticosterone, GH and prolactin levels and decreased LH and FSH levels. Consistently, hypothalamic and pituitary clusterin expression levels were upregulated following a restraint stress, suggesting an involvement of endogenous clusterin in stress-induced neurohormonal changes. In the pituitary intermediate lobe, clusterin was coexpressed with proopiomelanocortin (POMC), a precursor of ACTH. Treatment of clusterin in POMC expressing AtT-20 pituitary cells increased basal and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)-stimulated POMC promoter activities and intracellular cAMP levels. Furthermore, clusterin treatment triggered ACTH secretion from AtT-20 cells in a CRH-dependent manner, indicating that increased clusterin under stressful conditions may augment CRH-stimulated ACTH production and release. In summary, hypothalamic and pituitary clusterin may function as a modulator of neurohormonal responses under stressful conditions. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Administrative Appeals and ADR in Danish Administrative Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Inger Marie; Gøtze, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Administrative Appeals, review, administrative tribunals, ombudsman, alternative dispute resolution......Administrative Appeals, review, administrative tribunals, ombudsman, alternative dispute resolution...

  19. Introduction to the Virtual Issue on Behavioral Public Administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tummers, Lars; Olsen, Asmus Leth; Jilke, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    For public administration scholars, psychological theories and methods can be extremely helpful, especially when studying attitudes or behaviors of (groups of) citizens, public professionals, or public managers. Behavioral public administration explicitly connects public administration...

  20. Physics-Based Scientific Learning Module to Improve Students Motivation and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soni Nugroho Yuliono

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Teaching materials that available in the school to learn physics especially scientific-based is limited and become one of the obstacles to achieving the learning objectives on electromagnetic waves maerial. The research aims is to gain scientific Physics-based learning modules for high school grade XII students who have met the eligibility criteria, determine the effectiveness of using scientific-based learning modules Physics to improve motivation and learning outcomes from students of grade XII High School. The development of this research on Physics module using 4D development procedure which consist of the steps of define, design, development, and dissemination. Definition phase consists of the teacher and student’s needs analysis process, material analysis, as well as the formulation of the learning module. The design phase of physics learning modules according to the stage of scientific learning are integrated into the module. The development phase consists of the development process of the modules from the design results, validating the feasibility, module revision, limited testing, and the use of scientifically-based learning modules Physics in grade XII IPA 1 Batik 2 Surakarta senior high school. The deployment phase is the deployment process module to another Senior High School in Surakarta. Data Analysis for the study is quantitative descriptive analysis based on the score criteria and analysis of increasing student motivation through N-gain. Conclusion obtained are ; 1 Physics-based scientific learning modules that developed meet the eligibility criteria on aspects of content and presentation, language, the chart, and aspects of learning. The module is declared worthy of the ideals validation results with the percentage of 85.16%, 83.66% by students and teachers in the response phase of the deployment of 85.93%, which is included in the category of "very good"; 2 Physics-based scietific learning modules with material scientific

  1. Introduction to the Virtual Issue on Behavioral Public Administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tummers, Lars; Leth Olsen, Asmus; Jilke, Sebastian; Grimmelikhuijsen, S.G.

    2016-01-01

    For public administration scholars, psychological theories and methods can be extremely helpful, especially when studying attitudes or behaviors of (groups of) citizens, public professionals, or public managers. Behavioral public administration explicitly connects public administration and

  2. MOTIVATION OF ADMINISTRATIVE ACTS – GUARANTEE OF GOOD ADMINISTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelin Mihai ZĂGĂRIN

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The present article deals with the aspects of motivating administrative acts, both doctrinaire and practical, of jurisprudence. The duty of the administration to motivate its decisions is submitted in the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, art. 41. In the current European legal order, the rationale for administrative acts is considered and refers to one of the most important conditions of validity of the administrative act. The Romanian Constitution ensures and emphasizes the motivation, as it is imposed by the Charter. The realization of this fundamental right to motivate administrative acts is possible by calling upon a set of values from the administration, such as transparency, professionalism and the imposition of high quality standards. Motivation is achieved where we have a good administration, and whether citizens are, among other things, respected fundamental rights and freedoms, access to information is guaranteed and motivated their decisions. Although administrative normative acts are motivated by the administration, examples that show that individual ones are unmotivated or incompletely motivated are enough, which made the various employers legally answer for the non-motivation of their decisions to terminate work relationships with several of the employees. The motivation of administrative acts is necessary, mandatory and must be done with rigor. It is highlighted that inadequate, incomplete or vicious reasoning may result in suspension or even annulment of the administrative act by the court.

  3. Motor modules during adaptation to walking in a powered ankle exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Daniel A; Koller, Jeffrey R; Steele, Katherine M; Ferris, Daniel P

    2018-01-03

    Modules of muscle recruitment can be extracted from electromyography (EMG) during motions, such as walking, running, and swimming, to identify key features of muscle coordination. These features may provide insight into gait adaptation as a result of powered assistance. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes (module size, module timing and weighting patterns) of surface EMG data during assisted and unassisted walking in an powered, myoelectric, ankle-foot orthosis (ankle exoskeleton). Eight healthy subjects wore bilateral ankle exoskeletons and walked at 1.2 m/s on a treadmill. In three training sessions, subjects walked for 40 min in two conditions: unpowered (10 min) and powered (30 min). During each session, we extracted modules of muscle recruitment via nonnegative matrix factorization (NNMF) from the surface EMG signals of ten muscles in the lower limb. We evaluated reconstruction quality for each muscle individually using R 2 and normalized root mean squared error (NRMSE). We hypothesized that the number of modules needed to reconstruct muscle data would be the same between conditions and that there would be greater similarity in module timings than weightings. Across subjects, we found that six modules were sufficient to reconstruct the muscle data for both conditions, suggesting that the number of modules was preserved. The similarity of module timings and weightings between conditions was greater then random chance, indicating that muscle coordination was also preserved. Motor adaptation during walking in the exoskeleton was dominated by changes in the module timings rather than module weightings. The segment number and the session number were significant fixed effects in a linear mixed-effect model for the increase in R 2 with time. Our results show that subjects walking in a exoskeleton preserved the number of modules and the coordination of muscles within the modules across conditions. Training (motor adaptation within the session and

  4. Pump-To-Signal Intensity Modulation Transfer Characteristics in FOPAs: Modulation Frequency and Saturation Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Cristofori, Valentina; Lund-Hansen, Toke

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a comprehensive study of pump- to-signal intensity modulation transfer (IMT) in single-pump fiber optic parametric amplifiers (FOPAs). In particular, the IMT is studied for the first time for high-frequency fluctuations of the pump as well as in the saturated gain regime. The IMT...... cut-off frequency in typical single-pump FOPAs is around 100–200 GHz. The possibilities to shift this frequency based on dispersion and nonlinearities involved in the parametric gain are discussed. The severe IMT to the signal at low modulation frequencies can be suppressed by more than 50...

  5. [Expectations of hospital administrators about administrative functions of nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, M R; Fávero, N; Trevizan, M A; Hayashida, M

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate hospital administrator's expectations about the administrative role played by nurses, utilizing functions proposed by the Neoclassical Theory of Administration: planning, organization, direction, and control as theoretical references. An instrument established in TREVIZAN (1989) was applied to 11 hospital administrators. The results showed they expect the four functions to be done by nurses. Therefore, the interaction between nurses and hospital administrators is critical to improve the patient's assistance.

  6. Photovoltaic module and interlocked stack of photovoltaic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wares, Brian S.

    2012-09-04

    One embodiment relates to an arrangement of photovoltaic modules configured for transportation. The arrangement includes a plurality of photovoltaic modules, each photovoltaic module including a frame having at least a top member and a bottom member. A plurality of alignment features are included on the top member of each frame, and a plurality of alignment features are included on the bottom member of each frame. Adjacent photovoltaic modules are interlocked by the alignment features on the top member of a lower module fitting together with the alignment features on the bottom member of an upper module. Other embodiments, features and aspects are also disclosed.

  7. A Collaboration of School Administrators and a University Faculty to Advance School Administrator Practices Using Appreciative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: An appreciative inquiry (AI) collaborative study with 11 school administrators in a highly diverse suburban school district sought to understand if observing and sharing successful school practices/events in a whole group setting led to change in their perceptions, attitudes, and administrative practice. The paper aims to discuss these…

  8. PRINCIPLE OF SKEW QUADRUPOLE MODULATION TO MEASURE BETATRON COUPLING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LUO, Y.; PILAT, F.; ROSER, T.

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of the residual betatron coupling via skew quadrupole modulation is a new diagnostics technique that has been developed and tested at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) as a very promising method for the linear decoupling on the ramp. By modulating the strengths of different skew quadrupole families the two eigentunes are precisely measured with the phase lock loop system. The projections of the residual coupling coefficient onto the skew quadrupole coupling modulation directions are determined. The residual linear coupling could be corrected according to the measurement. An analytical solution for skew quadrupole modulation based on Hamiltonian perturbation approximation is given, and simulation code using smooth accelerator model is also developed. Some issues concerning the practical applications of this technique are discussed

  9. Superstability for Generalized Module Left Derivations and Generalized Module Derivations on a Banach Module (I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rassias JM

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the superstability of generalized module left derivations and generalized module derivations on a Banach module. Let be a Banach algebra and a Banach -module, and . The mappings , and are defined and it is proved that if (resp., is dominated by then is a generalized (resp., linear module- left derivation and is a (resp., linear module- left derivation. It is also shown that if (resp., is dominated by then is a generalized (resp., linear module- derivation and is a (resp., linear module- derivation.

  10. Cross-flow filtration of yeast extract with multi-tubular membrane module and rotating-disk membrane module; Makukaitengata heibanmaku module to tankanjomaku module ni yoru kobo hasaieki no cross flow roka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, K.; Shimizu, Y.; Watanabe, a. [Toto Ltd., Kitakyushu (Japan)

    1994-09-15

    A membrane separation experiment was made with multi-tubular membrane module and rotating-disk membrane module to study the cross-flow filtration of yeast extract. The membrane was an alumina precision filtration membrane with 0.15 micron m diameter pores. A multi-tubular membrane which was 19 in number of channels and 0.113{sup 2} in effective membrane area was fitted to the multi-tubular membrane module. A rotating-disk membrane which was 0.071m{sup 2} in effective membrane area was fitted to the rotating-disk membrane module. Judging from the concentration speed and factor, the rotating-disk type is more advantageous in concentrating the suspension than the multi-tubular type. The soluble high-molecular component was more easily filtrated through the rotating-disk type, which is judged attributable to its possible operation at a high flow rate on the membrane surface without necessitating a high-flow rate circulation pump. As compared with the conventional cross-filtration type, the rotating-disk type gives a high permeate flux even at a high concentration factor. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Grants to Institutions: A Guide to Administrative Procedures

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    Typically, these milestones are technical or financial reports, but they can also be ... please contact either the responsible officer or the administrative contact person .... to IDRC must be signed by both the project leader and the chief financial.

  12. Design and evaluation of a mobile bedside PET/SPECT imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studenski, Matthew Thomas

    Patients confined to an intensive care unit, the emergency room, or a surgical suite are managed without nuclear medicine procedures such as positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). These studies have diagnostic value which can greatly benefit the physician's treatment of the patient but require that the patient is moved to a scanner. This dissertation examines the feasibility of an economical PET/SPECT system that can be brought to the bedside of an immobile patient for imaging. We chose to focus on cardiac SPECT imaging including perfusion imaging using 99mTc tracers and viability imaging using 18F tracers first because of problems arising from positioning a detector beneath a patient's bed, a requirement for the opposed detector orientation in PET imaging. Second, SPECT imaging acquiring over the anterior 180 degrees of the patient results in reduced attenuation effects due to the heart's location in the anterior portion of the body. Four studies were done to assess the clinical feasibility of the mobile system; 1) the performance of the system was evaluated in SPECT mode at both 140 keV (99mTc tracers) and 511 keV (positron emitting tracers), 2) a dynamic cardiac phantom was used to develop and test image acquisition and processing methods for the system at both energies, 3) a high energy pinhole collimator was designed to reduce the effects of high energy photon penetration through the parallel hole collimator, and 4) we estimated the radiation dose to persons that would be in the vicinity of a patient to ensure that the effective dose is below the regulatory limit. With these studies, we show that the mobile system provides an economical means of bringing nuclear medicine to an immobile patient while staying below the regulatory dose limit to other persons. The system performed well at both 140 keV and 511 keV and provided viable images of a phantom myocardium at both energies. The system does not achieve the

  13. The Potential Role of Grid-Like Software in Bedside Chest Radiography in Improving Image Quality and Dose Reduction: An Observer Preference Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Su Yeon; Chae, Kum Ju; Goo, Jin Mo

    2018-01-01

    To compare the observer preference of image quality and radiation dose between non-grid, grid-like, and grid images. Each of the 38 patients underwent bedside chest radiography with and without a grid. A grid-like image was generated from a non-grid image using SimGrid software (Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd.) employing deep-learning-based scatter correction technology. Two readers recorded the preference for 10 anatomic landmarks and the overall appearance on a five-point scale for a pair of non-grid and grid-like images, and a pair of grid-like and grid images, respectively, which were randomly presented. The dose area product (DAP) was also recorded. Wilcoxon's rank sum test was used to assess the significance of preference. Both readers preferred grid-like images to non-grid images significantly ( p software significantly improved the image quality of non-grid images to a level comparable to that of grid images with a relatively lower level of radiation exposure.

  14. The mixed serotonin receptor agonist psilocybin reduces threat-induced modulation of amygdala connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraehenmann, Rainer; Schmidt, André; Friston, Karl; Preller, Katrin H; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2016-01-01

    Stimulation of serotonergic neurotransmission by psilocybin has been shown to shift emotional biases away from negative towards positive stimuli. We have recently shown that reduced amygdala activity during threat processing might underlie psilocybin's effect on emotional processing. However, it is still not known whether psilocybin modulates bottom-up or top-down connectivity within the visual-limbic-prefrontal network underlying threat processing. We therefore analyzed our previous fMRI data using dynamic causal modeling and used Bayesian model selection to infer how psilocybin modulated effective connectivity within the visual-limbic-prefrontal network during threat processing. First, both placebo and psilocybin data were best explained by a model in which threat affect modulated bidirectional connections between the primary visual cortex, amygdala, and lateral prefrontal cortex. Second, psilocybin decreased the threat-induced modulation of top-down connectivity from the amygdala to primary visual cortex, speaking to a neural mechanism that might underlie putative shifts towards positive affect states after psilocybin administration. These findings may have important implications for the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders.

  15. The mixed serotonin receptor agonist psilocybin reduces threat-induced modulation of amygdala connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Kraehenmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stimulation of serotonergic neurotransmission by psilocybin has been shown to shift emotional biases away from negative towards positive stimuli. We have recently shown that reduced amygdala activity during threat processing might underlie psilocybin's effect on emotional processing. However, it is still not known whether psilocybin modulates bottom-up or top-down connectivity within the visual-limbic-prefrontal network underlying threat processing. We therefore analyzed our previous fMRI data using dynamic causal modeling and used Bayesian model selection to infer how psilocybin modulated effective connectivity within the visual–limbic–prefrontal network during threat processing. First, both placebo and psilocybin data were best explained by a model in which threat affect modulated bidirectional connections between the primary visual cortex, amygdala, and lateral prefrontal cortex. Second, psilocybin decreased the threat-induced modulation of top-down connectivity from the amygdala to primary visual cortex, speaking to a neural mechanism that might underlie putative shifts towards positive affect states after psilocybin administration. These findings may have important implications for the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders.

  16. Glutamate requires NMDA receptors to modulate alpha2 adrenoceptor in medulla oblongata cultured cells of newborn rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho da Silva, Sergio; Carrettiero, Daniel C; Chadi, Débora R F

    2014-04-03

    α2 Adrenoceptors (α2-ARs) are important in regulating the central control of blood pressure in medulla oblongata. However, it is unclear how this receptor is modulated by different receptors, especially the glutamatergic. In the present study, we studied the influence of ionotropic glutamatergic receptors over the α2-ARs in cultured cells of the medulla oblongata of newborn rats. For this purpose, the protein level of the α2-ARs was assessed after administration to the cultured cells of glutamate (glu), the agonists NMDA and kainate (KA), the NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 and the KA receptor antagonist DNQX. Results indicate that the α2-AR protein levels were increased after the treatments with glu and NMDA, and the addition of MK801 to this treatment thwarted this increase. Notwithstanding the fact that KA did not alter the receptor protein level, the combined treatment of DNQX with glu prevented the α2-AR protein modulation. In conclusion, the present study suggests that ionotropic glutamatergic receptors could be related to the α2-AR protein regulation in the medulla oblongata. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 29 CFR 102.35 - Duties and powers of administrative law judges; stipulations of cases to administrative law...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., the judge (or the Board) will decide the case or make other disposition of it. (10) To make and file... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Duties and powers of administrative law judges; stipulations of cases to administrative law judges or to the Board; assignment and powers of settlement judges...

  18. 29 CFR 6.41 - Referral to Chief Administrative Law Judge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Administrative Law Judge to conduct such hearings as may be necessary to decide the disputed matters. A copy of... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Referral to Chief Administrative Law Judge. 6.41 Section 6... Substantial Interest Proceedings § 6.41 Referral to Chief Administrative Law Judge. (a) Upon timely receipt of...

  19. CONTRIBUTION OF A LINEAR PROGRAMMING VBA MODULE TO STUDENTS PEFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KUČÍRKOVÁ Lenka

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the application of freeware modules as a teaching support of Operations Research methods at the Department of Systems Engineering, Czech university of Life Sciences (CULS Prague. In particular, we concentrated on a linear programming module and measured the impact on student performance. The motivation for this evaluation is based on a current development of a new module that focuses on Traveling Salesman Problem. First, we explain the current situation both worldwide and in the Czech Republic and the CULS Prague. Subsequently, we describe the content of students’ exams and statistical methods applied to the evaluation. Finally, we analyze and generalize the obtained results. The students exams have show a positive impact of the modules. Further, our analysis has proven that this impact is statistically significant. The findings motivate us to made new modules for other methods.

  20. Transitioning Communication Education to an Interactive Online Module Format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kristine; Abd-Hamid, Nor Hashidah; Perkhounkova, Yelena

    2017-07-01

    The Changing Talk intervention improves nursing home staff communication by reducing elderspeak. To facilitate dissemination, interactive online modules were created, maintaining the original content. This article reports on the process of transitioning and the results of pilot testing the modules. Interactive online modules were developed, pilot tested, and the evaluated in comparison to outcomes from the classroom format training. Online participants (N = 9) demonstrated pre to posttest knowledge gain (scores improved from M = 82.4% to M = 91.2%). Rating of a staff-resident interaction showed improved recognition of elderspeak and person-centered communication after training. Online and original participants reported similar intentions to use learned skills and rated the program highly. Evidence-based interventions can be translated from traditional classroom to online format maintaining effects on increasing staff knowledge and intentions to use learned skills in practice. However, the modules should be tested in a larger and more representative sample. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(7):320-328. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. New approaches to improving the quality of administrative services in the modernization of public administration in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Y. Zapysnyy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The benefit of the study is to highlight the issues of the administrative (municipal services by Ukrainian public authorities as a priority of the on-going decentralization and administrative reforms in Ukraine. Consequently, provision of the high quality services to the citizens became a main mission of all public authorities (State bodies, regional authorities, local self-government bodies in the framework of the implementation of the new public management and good governance standards on all levels – national, regional and local. It reflects also the main European tendencies in the field of public administration reform which are fixed in the documents of the international organizations (Council of Europe, European Union, OECD/ SIGMA etc.. For example, the European Strategy on Innovation and Good Governance on Local Level which was adopted by the Council of Europe Committee of Ministers in 2008 fixed the principle of the ability to provide high quality services to the citizens as one of its twelve main principles of good governance on local level. This study tested the key issues of increasing the quality of the services which are provided to the citizens by the State bodies and the local self-government bodies. Moreover the study pointed out the main tendencies in the realization of the State policy in the field of the improvement of the quality of the administrative (municipal services (in the context of the on-going large-scaled decentralization reform in Ukraine as well as the main direction for its further modernization. The questions concerning the quality standards in the activity of the State bodies and LSG bodies are highlighted in order to increase the quality of the services to be provided to the citizens. Besides, the study emphasized the issues related to ensuring the transparency of the activity of the State bodies as well as the regional and the local authorities, in the field of the provision of the administrative (municipal

  2. Breast feeding's interruption following radiopharmaceutical administration to nursing mothers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, A.M.; Gomez Parada, I.M.; Dubner, D.; Gisone, P.; Perez de Serrano, M.

    1995-01-01

    The radiopharmaceutical administration to lactating women for therapeutic or diagnostic purpose can achieve a radiological risk to the breast feeding child due to levels of radioactivity in the breast milk. International recommendations regarding safe assumption of nursing mother after radiopharmaceutical administration were analysed. We examined the formula proposed by Rommey et al. to establish objective guidelines in case of the administration of radiopharmaceutical to nursing mothers. The ICRP 54 metabolic model for iodine was modified in order to calculate the suppression breast feeding's period according to the radioactivity measured in the breast milk. (author). 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  3. Quantifying cognition at the bedside: a novel approach combining cognitive symptoms and signs in HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouillette, Marie-Josée; Fellows, Lesley K; Palladini, Lisa; Finch, Lois; Thomas, Réjean; Mayo, Nancy E

    2015-11-13

    Up to half of all people with HIV infection have some degree of cognitive impairment. This impairment is typically mild, but nonetheless often disabling. Although early detection of cognitive impairment offers the greatest hope of effective intervention, there are important barriers to this goal in most clinical settings. These include uncertainty about how self-reported cognitive symptoms relate to objective impairments, and the paucity of bedside measurement tools suitable for mild deficits. Clinicians need guidance in interpreting cognitive symptoms in this population, and a brief cognitive measurement tool targeted to mild impairment. We addressed these two problems together here. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which performance on cognitive tests and self-reported cognitive symptoms form a unidimensional construct. Two hundred three HIV+ individuals completed the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, computerized cognitive tasks and a questionnaire eliciting cognitive symptoms. Rasch measurement theory was applied to determine whether patient-reported and performance items could be combined to measure cognition as a unidimensional latent construct. Performance-based items and cognitive symptoms are arranged hierarchically along the same continuum of cognitive ability, forming a measure with thresholds covering a broad spectrum of ability that has good internal reliability. The cognitive symptoms that fit the measurement model relate to important aspects of everyday life, providing evidence that the identified construct is meaningful. This finding lays the foundation for a rapid measure of cognitive ability in people with HIV infection that is feasible for routine clinical use, and shows that some cognitive symptoms are systematically related to performance in this population.

  4. Behavioral Public Administration:Combining Insights from Public Administration and Psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Grimmelikhuijsen, Stephan; Jilke, Sebastian; Olsen, Asmus Leth; Tummers, Lars

    2017-01-01

    We propose behavioral public administration as a designated subfield in public administration which explicitly deals with the integration of theories and methods from psychology into the study of public administration. We discuss how scholars in public administration currently draw on both methodological and theoretical innovations in psychology and point to research questions in public administration which could benefit from further integration. Behavioral public administration cannot, and s...

  5. Protein kinase C isozymes as regulators of sensitivity to and self-administration of drugs of abuse-studies with genetically modified mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Michael Foster; Newton, Philip M

    2010-09-01

    Studies using targeted gene deletion in mice have revealed distinct roles for individual isozymes of the protein kinase C (PKC) family of enzymes in regulating sensitivity to various drugs of abuse. These changes in drug sensitivity are associated with altered patterns of drug self-administration. The purpose of this review is to summarize behavioral studies conducted on mice carrying targeted deletions of genes encoding specific PKC isozymes (namely the beta, gamma, delta, and epsilon isozymes), and to critically evaluate the possibility of using pharmacological inhibitors of specific PKC isozymes as modulators of the sensitivity to various drugs of abuse, as well as potential aids in the treatment of substance use disorders.

  6. Responses to amplitude modulated infrared stimuli in the guinea pig inferior colliculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Young, Hunter

    2013-03-01

    Responses of units in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus of the guinea pig were recorded with tungsten electrodes. The set of data presented here is limited to high stimulus levels. The effect of changing the modulation frequency and the modulation depth was explored for acoustic and laser stimuli. The selected units responded to sinusoidal amplitude modulated (AM) tones, AM trains of clicks, and AM trains of laser pulses with a modulation of their spike discharge. At modulation frequencies of 20 Hz, some units tended to respond with 40 Hz to the acoustic stimuli, but only at 20 Hz for the trains of laser pulses. For all modes of stimulation the responses revealed a dominant response to the first cycle of the modulation, with decreasing number of action potential during successive cycles. While amplitude modulated tone bursts and amplitude modulated trains of acoustic clicks showed similar patterns, the response to trains of laser pulses was different.

  7. Cross-Modulation Interference with Lateralization of Mixed-Modulated Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, I-Hui; Petrosyan, Agavni; Goncalves, Oscar F.; Hickok, Gregory; Saberi, Kourosh

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the ability to use spatial information in mixed-modulated (MM) sounds containing concurrent frequency-modulated (FM) and amplitude-modulated (AM) sounds by exploring patterns of interference when different modulation types originated from different loci as may occur in a multisource acoustic field. Method:…

  8. Behavioral Public Administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijsen, Stephan; Jilke, Sebastian; Olsen, Asmus Leth

    2017-01-01

    on theories and methods from psychology and related fields and point to research in public administration that could benefit from further integration. An analysis of public administration topics through a psychological lens can be useful to confirm, add nuance to, or extend classical public administration...... theories. As such, behavioral public administration complements traditional public administration. Furthermore, it could be a two-way street for psychologists who want to test the external validity of their theories in a political-administrative setting. Finally, four principles are proposed to narrow......Behavioral public administration is the analysis of public administration from the micro-level perspective of individual behavior and attitudes by drawing on insights from psychology on the behavior of individuals and groups. The authors discuss how scholars in public administration currently draw...

  9. Modulation of ethanol-intake by morphine: Evidence for a central site of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, K.D.; Reid, L.D. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that subcutaneous administration of low doses of morphine increase, while subcutaneous naloxone decreases, ethanol-intake in rats. However, the site of action of morphine modulation of ethanol-intake remains unclear. In an attempt to elucidate this issue, seven graded doses of morphine were given intracerebroventricularly to rats 15 min prior to an opportunity to consume water and sweetened alcoholic beverage for 2 hr. Two lower doses of intracerebroventricular morphine reliably increased ethanol-intake, while higher doses decreased intake of water. Preference ratios were reliably increased by morphine doses of 1 {mu}g and higher. The present data provide support for a central site of morphine modulation of ethanol-intake.

  10. A proposal for amending administrative law to facilitate adaptive management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Robin K.; Ruhl, J.B.; Brown, Eleanor D.; Williams, Byron K.

    2017-01-01

    In this article we examine how federal agencies use adaptive management. In order for federal agencies to implement adaptive management more successfully, administrative law must adapt to adaptive management, and we propose changes in administrative law that will help to steer the current process out of a dead end. Adaptive management is a form of structured decision making that is widely used in natural resources management. It involves specific steps integrated in an iterative process for adjusting management actions as new information becomes available. Theoretical requirements for adaptive management notwithstanding, federal agency decision making is subject to the requirements of the federal Administrative Procedure Act, and state agencies are subject to the states' parallel statutes. We argue that conventional administrative law has unnecessarily shackled effective use of adaptive management. We show that through a specialized 'adaptive management track' of administrative procedures, the core values of administrative law—especially public participation, judicial review, and finality— can be implemented in ways that allow for more effective adaptive management. We present and explain draft model legislation (the Model Adaptive Management Procedure Act) that would create such a track for the specific types of agency decision making that could benefit from adaptive management.

  11. Modifications and additions to selected TOUGH2 modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y.S.; Mishra, A.K.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide all software baseline documents necessary for the software qualification of the revised versions of the selected TOUGH2 modules, which include single-phase gas (EOS1G), effective continuum method (EOS3/ECM), saturated/unsaturated flow (EOS9), and radionuclide transport (T2R3D) modules of the TOUGH2 code. TOUGH2 is a numerical simulation code for multi-dimensional, coupled fluid and heat flow of multiphase, multicomponent fluid mixtures in porous and fractured media. This report augments the document Software Qualification of Selected TOUGH2 modules. This report contains the following sections: (1) requirement specifications and code development and (2) software validation test plan and results. These sections comprise sequential parts of Software Lifecycle, and should be used in conjunction with the TOUGH User's Guide, TOUGH2 documentation, TOUGH2 Software Qualification, and Software Qualification of Selected TOUGH2 modules. The version of TOUGH2 used with the software being qualified herein is the October 1996 Standard Version 1.2, as qualified in Wu et al. (1996) and housed at the Department of Energy's Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

  12. Response to Agencywide Crisis: A Model for Administrative Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwon, Floyd J.

    1980-01-01

    Guidelines are suggested whereby mental health agency administrators can promote organizational growth and avoid dangers during an agency crisis. Emphasis is placed on the administrator's comprehension of leadership styles and task organization. Typical staff reactions to agency crises are described. (Author/DB)

  13. Administrative Circulars

    CERN Document Server

    Département des Ressources humaines

    2004-01-01

    Administrative Circular N° 2 (Rev. 2) - May 2004 Guidelines and procedures concerning recruitment and probation period of staff members This circular has been revised. It cancels and replaces Administrative Circular N° 2 (Rev. 1) - March 2000. Administrative Circular N° 9 (Rev. 3) - May 2004 Staff members contracts This circular has been revised. It cancels and replaces Administrative Circular N° 9 (Rev. 2) - March 2000. Administrative Circular N° 26 (Rev. 4) - May 2004 Procedure governing the career evolution of staff members This circular has also been revised. It Administrative Circulars Administrative Circular N° 26 (Rev. 3) - December 2001 and brings up to date the French version (Rev. 4) published on the HR Department Web site in January 2004. Operational Circular N° 7 - May 2004 Work from home This circular has been drawn up. Operational Circular N° 8 - May 2004 Dealing with alcohol-related problems...

  14. Opiates Modulate Thermosensation by Internalizing Cold Receptor TRPM8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Shapovalov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stimulation of μ-opioid receptors (OPRMs brings powerful pain relief, but it also leads to the development of tolerance and addiction. Ensuing withdrawal in abstinent patients manifests itself with severe symptoms, including cold hyperalgesia, often preventing addicted patients from successfully completing the rehabilitation. Unsurprisingly, OPRMs have been a central point of many studies. Nonetheless, a satisfactory understanding of the pathways leading to distorted sensory responses during opiate administration and abstinence is far from complete. Here, we present a mechanism that leads to modulation by OPRMs of one of the sensory responses, thermosensation. Activation of OPRM1 leads to internalization of a cold-sensor TRPM8, which can be reversed by a follow-up treatment with the inverse OPRM agonist naloxone. Knockout of TRPM8 protein leads to a decrease in morphine-induced cold analgesia. The proposed pathway represents a universal mechanism that is probably shared by regulatory pathways modulating general pain sensation in response to opioid treatment.

  15. Bedside screen for oral cavity structure, salivary flow, and vocal production over the 14days following endotracheal extubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheryl Chia-Hui; Wu, Kuo-Hsiang; Ku, Shih-Chi; Chan, Ding-Cheng; Lee, Jang-Jaer; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Hsiao, Tzu-Yu

    2018-06-01

    To describe the sequelae of oral endotracheal intubation by evaluating prevalence rates of structural injury, hyposalivation, and impaired vocal production over 14days following extubation. Consecutive adults (≥20years, N=114) with prolonged (≥48h) endotracheal intubation were enrolled from medical intensive care units at a university hospital. Participants were assessed by trained nurses at 2, 7, and 14days after extubation, using a standardized bedside screening protocol. Within 48-hour postextubation, structural injuries were common, with 51% having restricted mouth opening. Unstimulated salivary flow was reduced in 43%. For vocal production, 51% had inadequate breathing support for phonation, dysphonia was common (94% had hoarseness and 36% showed reduced efficiency of vocal fold closure), and >40% had impaired articulatory precision. By 14days postextubation, recovery was noted in most conditions, but reduced efficiency of vocal fold closure persisted. Restricted mouth opening (39%) and reduced salivary flow (34%) remained highly prevalent. After extubation, restricted mouth opening, reduced salivary flow, and dysphonia were common and prolonged in recovery. Reduced efficiency of vocal cord closure persisted at 14days postextubation. The extent and duration of these sequelae remind clinicians to screen for them up to 2weeks after extubation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Modifications and applications of DSNP-modules to the THTR-300 steamgenerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokcic-Kostic, M.; Scherer, W.

    1991-01-01

    The DSNP System (Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power Plants) is being used for describing of the dynamic behaviour of the THTR-300 high temperature reactor power plant. Three different models of steam generators of different degree of sophistication have been examined and compared. The calculation of steam properties was changed to a fast table-lookup mode and several errors in the computational modules are eliminated. In one of the steam generator modules the capability of using helium on the primary side was newly implemented. The comparison of the modules showed that the most elaborated module gives detailed results close to the reality. For fast overview calculations the simplest module can be used satisfactorily. (author)

  17. Wideband laser locking to an atomic reference with modulation transfer spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negnevitsky, V; Turner, L D

    2013-02-11

    We demonstrate that conventional modulated spectroscopy apparatus, used for laser frequency stabilization in many atomic physics laboratories, can be enhanced to provide a wideband lock delivering deep suppression of frequency noise across the acoustic range. Using an acousto-optic modulator driven with an agile oscillator, we show that wideband frequency modulation of the pump laser in modulation transfer spectroscopy produces the unique single lock-point spectrum previously demonstrated with electro-optic phase modulation. We achieve a laser lock with 100 kHz feedback bandwidth, limited by our laser control electronics. This bandwidth is sufficient to reduce frequency noise by 30 dB across the acoustic range and narrows the imputed linewidth by a factor of five.

  18. Comparison between preoperative administration of methylprednisolone with its administration before and during congenital heart surgery on serum levels of IL-6 and IL-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi Tashnizi, Mohammad; Soltani, Ghasem; Moeinipour, Ali Asghar; Ayatollahi, Hossein; Tanha, Amir Saber; Jarahi, Lida; Sepehri Shamloo, Alireza; Zirak, Nahid

    2013-02-01

    Steroid administration during cardiopulmonary bypass is considered to improve cardiopulmonary function by modulating inflammations caused by bypass. This study was performed to compare effectiveness of preoperative and intraoperative methylprednisolone (MP) to preoperative methylprednisolone alone in post bypass inflammatory (IL-6) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) factors. Fifty pediatric patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery from August 2011 to 2012 in the cardiac surgery department of Imam Reza Hospital, the major center for CPB, in Mashhad, Iran were randomly assigned to receive preoperative and intraoperative MP (30 mg/kg, 4 hours before bypass and in bypass prime, number 25) or preoperative MP only (30 mg/kg, number 25). Before and after bypass, four and 24 hours after bypass, serum IL-6 and IL-10 were measured by ELISA. In both groups, no significant difference with variation of expression for IL-6 (inflammatory factor) and IL-10 (anti-inflammatory factor) in different times after bypass was observed. No significant difference in reducing post bypass inflammation between preoperative steroid treatment and combined preoperative and intraoperative steroid administration reported and they had the same effects.

  19. Mission possible: creating a technology infrastructure to help reduce administrative costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alper, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Controlling administrative costs associated with managed care benefits has traditionally been considered a "mission impossible" in healthcare, with the unreasonably high cost of paperwork and administration pushing past the $420 billion mark. Why administrative costs remain a critical problem in healthcare while other industries have alleviated their administrative burdens must be carefully examined. This article looks at the key factors contributing to high administrative costs and how these costs can be controlled in the future with "mission possible" tools, including business process outsourcing, IT outsourcing, technology that helps to bring "consumerism" to managed care, and an IT infrastructure that improves quality and outcomes.

  20. Passive listening to preferred motor tempo modulates corticospinal excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Kelly; Wiener, Martin; Thompson, James C

    2014-01-01

    Rhythms are an essential characteristic of our lives, and auditory-motor coupling affects a variety of behaviors. Previous research has shown that the neural regions associated with motor system processing are coupled to perceptual rhythmic and melodic processing such that the perception of rhythmic stimuli can entrain motor system responses. However, the degree to which individual preference modulates the motor system is unknown. Recent work has shown that passively listening to metrically strong rhythms increases corticospinal excitability, as indicated by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Furthermore, this effect is modulated by high-groove music, or music that inspires movement, while neuroimaging evidence suggests that premotor activity increases with tempos occurring within a preferred tempo (PT) category. PT refers to the rate of a hypothetical endogenous oscillator that may be indicated by spontaneous motor tempo (SMT) and preferred perceptual tempo (PPT) measurements. The present study investigated whether listening to a rhythm at an individual's PT preferentially modulates motor system excitability. SMT was obtained in human participants through a tapping task in which subjects were asked to tap a response key at their most comfortable rate. Subjects listened a 10-beat tone sequence at 11 log-spaced tempos and rated their preference for each (PPT). We found that SMT and PPT measurements were correlated, indicating that preferred and produced tempos occurred at a similar rate. Crucially, single-pulse TMS delivered to left M1 during PPT judgments revealed that corticospinal excitability, measured by motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), was modulated by tempos traveling closer to individual PT. However, the specific nature of this modulation differed across individuals, with some exhibiting an increase in excitability around PT and others exhibiting a decrease. These findings suggest that auditory-motor coupling induced by rhythms is preferentially

  1. Only small fractions of soluble ß-glucan modulate the mucosal immune system in carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Przybylska, Dominika Alicja; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    For decades the ability of β-glucans to modulate immunity through activation of innate cellular components has been observed. However, toxicological effects associated with the systemic administration and dose-related immune-suppression has also been described. The superior aim of this study...... is to understand the effect of β-glucan induced modulation in carp in relation to tissue regeneration, mucosal immunity and host-pathogen interactions. Expression profiles of immune related genes will be measured in fresh water specie – common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.). The methodology of the project involves...

  2. Educational Administration and the Social, Policy, and Administrative Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Samuel A.

    1983-01-01

    The politics of education has been ignored in educational administration programs; it has been not enough taught in American programs for educational administrators and not enough emphasized in discussions of administrative roles. Administration increasingly includes political as well as rational decisions. Thus, administrators need a unified…

  3. Translation and validation of Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ 3.0 Diabetes Module (PedsQL™ 3.0 Diabetes Module) in Brazil-Portuguese language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Leila F Dos S; Manna, Thais Della; Passone, Caroline de Gouveia Buff; Oliveira, Lygia Spassapan de

    2017-11-14

    The aim of the present study was to create a translated version of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ 3.0 Diabetes Module (PedsQL™ 3.0 Diabetes Module) in Brazilian Portuguese that was conceptually equivalent to the original American English version and to linguistically validate it in a Brazilian pediatric population with type 1 diabetes mellitus and their parents or caregivers. The instrument was translated, back-translated, and then administered to 83 children/adolescents (5-18 years) with type 1 diabetes mellitus and their family members and to 25 parents/caregivers of patients aged between 2 and 4 years. The final translated version was tested for reliability by analyzing internal consistency, intraobserver (test-retest) reliability, and concurrent validity. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the total score of the questionnaires of children/adolescents (α=0.85) and their parents (α=0.82) was above the recommended minimum of 0.70 for group comparisons. Intraobserver reliability and concurrent validity exhibited a significant positive correlation (p3.0 Diabetes Module revealed adequate psychometric characteristics with respect to reliability and validity following administration to a sample of Brazilian children/adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus and their caregivers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  4. CLS to higher education administrator: the price they paid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Suzanne; LaCost, Barbara Y

    2010-01-01

    To identify the barriers and/or obstacles these women experienced during their career paths as women clinical laboratory scientists who transitioned to higher education administration. To identify how being a woman influenced their careers as higher education administrators. A multi-site case study design was selected for this qualitative research involving a purposive sample of eight research participants. Data collection was guided by ten open-ended questions in seven face-to-face and one telephone semi-formal interviews. The purposive sample included women clinical laboratory scientists who held a current higher education administrative position at the dean's level, including associate and assistant dean positions, in a university setting. The participants were located in eight higher education institutions in Nebraska, Illinois, Ohio, Tennessee, Missouri, and Texas. The price women pay, gender considerations, a need for balance, existence/absence of the glass ceiling for women in higher education administration. Making personal sacrifices, struggling with gender stereotypes, being a woman, knowing you are okay, and possessing the ability to separate the personal from the professional were identified by this group of women as challenging experiences as they obtained and maintained a position as a higher education administrator. Additionally, they described the need for balance, a support system, and how they successfully managed their marriage, family, and career. The participants presented conflicting statements concerning

  5. Auxiliary controller for time-to-digital converter module readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermolin, Yu.V.

    1992-01-01

    The KD-225 auxiliary controller for time-to-digital converter module readout in the SUMMA crate is described. After readout and preliminary processing the data are written in the P-140 buffer memory module. The controller is used in the FODS-2 experimental setup data acquisition system. 12 refs.; 1 fig

  6. Spirulina Protects against Hepatic Inflammation in Aging: An Effect Related to the Modulation of the Gut Microbiota?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey M. Neyrinck

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aging predisposes to hepatic dysfunction and inflammation that can contribute to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Spirulina, a cyanobacterium used as a food additive or food supplement, has been shown to impact immune function. We have tested the potential hepatoprotective effect of a Spirulina in aged mice and to determine whether these effects can be related to a modulation of the gut microbiota. Old mice have been fed a standard diet supplemented with or without 5% Spirulina for six weeks. Among several changes of gut microbiota composition, an increase in Roseburia and Lactobacillus proportions occurs upon Spirulina treatment. Interestingly, parameters related to the innate immunity are upregulated in the small intestine of Spirulina-treated mice. Furthermore, the supplementation with Spirulina reduces several hepatic inflammatory and oxidative stress markers that are upregulated in old mice versus young mice. We conclude that the oral administration of a Spirulina is able to modulate the gut microbiota and to activate the immune system in the gut, a mechanism that may be involved in the improvement of the hepatic inflammation in aged mice. Those data open the way to new therapeutic tools in the management of immune alterations in aging, based on gut microbe-host interactions.

  7. A proposal for amending administrative law to facilitate adaptive management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Robin K.; Ruhl, J. B.; Brown, Eleanor D.; Williams, Byron K.

    2017-07-01

    In this article we examine how federal agencies use adaptive management. In order for federal agencies to implement adaptive management more successfully, administrative law must adapt to adaptive management, and we propose changes in administrative law that will help to steer the current process out of a dead end. Adaptive management is a form of structured decision making that is widely used in natural resources management. It involves specific steps integrated in an iterative process for adjusting management actions as new information becomes available. Theoretical requirements for adaptive management notwithstanding, federal agency decision making is subject to the requirements of the federal Administrative Procedure Act, and state agencies are subject to the states’ parallel statutes. We argue that conventional administrative law has unnecessarily shackled effective use of adaptive management. We show that through a specialized ‘adaptive management track’ of administrative procedures, the core values of administrative law—especially public participation, judicial review, and finality— can be implemented in ways that allow for more effective adaptive management. We present and explain draft model legislation (the Model Adaptive Management Procedure Act) that would create such a track for the specific types of agency decision making that could benefit from adaptive management.

  8. Intratracheal administration of fullerene nanoparticles activates splenic CD11b{sup +} cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Ning [Department of Immunology and Parasitology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555 (Japan); Kunugita, Naoki [Department of Environmental Health, National Institute of Public Health, 2-3-6, Minami, Wako 351-0197 (Japan); Ichinose, Takamichi [Department of Health Sciences, Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Oita 870-1201 (Japan); Song, Yuan [Department of Immunology and Parasitology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555 (Japan); Yokoyama, Mitsuru [Bio-information Research Center, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555 (Japan); Arashidani, Keiichi [School of Health Sciences, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555 (Japan); Yoshida, Yasuhiro, E-mail: freude@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp [Department of Immunology and Parasitology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555 (Japan)

    2011-10-30

    Highlights: {yields} Fullerene administration triggered splenic responses. {yields} Splenic responses occurred at different time-points than in the lung tissue. {yields} CD11b{sup +} cells were demonstrated to function as responder cells to fullerene. - Abstract: Fullerene nanoparticles ('Fullerenes'), which are now widely used materials in daily life, have been demonstrated to induce elevated pulmonary inflammation in several animal models; however, the effects of fullerenes on the immune system are not fully understood. In the present study, mice received fullerenes intratracheally and were sacrificed at days 1, 6 and 42. Mice that received fullerenes exhibited increased proliferation of splenocytes and increased splenic production of IL-2 and TNF-{alpha}. Changes in the spleen in response to fullerene treatment occurred at different time-points than in the lung tissue. Furthermore, fullerenes induced CDK2 expression and activated NF-{kappa}B and NFAT in splenocytes at 6 days post-administration. Finally, CD11b{sup +} cells were demonstrated to function as responder cells to fullerene administration in the splenic inflammatory process. Taken together, in addition to the effects on pulmonary responses, fullerenes also modulate the immune system.

  9. Tune modulation due to synchrotron oscillations and chromaticity, and the dynamic aperture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parzen, G.

    1995-01-01

    A tracking study was done of the effects of a tune modulations, due to synchrotron oscillations and the tune dependence on momentum (chromaticity), on the dynamic aperture. The studies were done using several RHIC lattices and tracking runs of about 1 x 10 6 turns. The dynamic aperture was found to decrease roughly linearly with the amplitude of the tune modulation. Lower order non-linear resonances, like the 1/3 and 1/4 resonance are not crossed because of the tune modulation. Three different cases were studied, corresponding to RHIC lattices with different β*, and with different synchrotron oscillation amplitudes. In each case, the tune modulation amplitude was varied by changing the chromaticity. In each case, roughly the same result, was found. The result found here for the effect of a tune modulation due to chromaticity may be compared with the result found for the effect of a tune modulation due to a gradient ripple in the quadrupoles. The effect of a tune modulation due to a gradient ripple appears to be about 4 times stronger than the effect of a tune modulation due to chromaticity and synchrotron oscillations

  10. Positive allosteric modulation of mGluR5 accelerates extinction learning but not relearning following methamphetamine self-administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R Kufahl

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have implicated glutamate neurotransmission as an important substrate for the extinction of conditioned behaviors, including responding for drug reinforcement. Positive allosteric modulation of the type-5 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR5 in particular has emerged as a treatment strategy for the enhancement of extinction of drug-motivated behaviors. Here, we investigated the effects of the mGluR5 positive allosteric modulator CDPPB, a compound known for its cognitive enhancing effects in rodents, on extinction learning in rats with different histories of methamphetamine (METH training. Rats were trained to self-administer METH under two conditions: 16 daily sessions of short access (90 min/day, ShA, or 8 daily sessions of short access followed by 8 sessions of long access (6 hr/day, LgA. Control rats self-administered sucrose pellets in daily 30 min sessions. Next, rats were administered vehicle or 30 mg/kg CDPPB prior to 7 consecutive daily extinction sessions, subjected to additional extinction sessions to re-establish a post-treatment baseline, and then tested for reinstatement of behavior in the presence of METH- or sucrose-paired cues. Rats were then subjected to a second series of extinction sessions, preceded by vehicle or 30 mg/kg CDPPB, and an additional test for cue-triggered reinstatement. CDPPB treatment resulted in a more rapid extinction of responding on the active lever, especially in the early sessions of the first extinction sequence. However, treatment effects were minimal during subsequent cue reinstatement tests and nonexistent during the second series of extinction sessions. Rats with histories of ShA, LgA and sucrose training expressed similar behavioral sensitivities to CDPPB, with LgA rats demonstrating a modestly higher treatment effect. Positive allosteric modulation of mGluR5 may therefore have some beneficial effects on efforts to facilitate extinction learning and reduce methamphetamine seeking.

  11. Modelling modulation perception : modulation low-pass filter or modulation filter bank?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dau, T.; Kollmeier, B.; Kohlrausch, A.G.

    1995-01-01

    In current models of modulation perception, the stimuli are first filtered and nonlinearly transformed (mostly half-wave rectified). In order to model the low-pass characteristic of measured modulation transfer functions, the next stage in the models is a first-order low-pass filter with a typical

  12. Processing module operating methods, processing modules, and communications systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCown, Steven Harvey; Derr, Kurt W.; Moore, Troy

    2014-09-09

    A processing module operating method includes using a processing module physically connected to a wireless communications device, requesting that the wireless communications device retrieve encrypted code from a web site and receiving the encrypted code from the wireless communications device. The wireless communications device is unable to decrypt the encrypted code. The method further includes using the processing module, decrypting the encrypted code, executing the decrypted code, and preventing the wireless communications device from accessing the decrypted code. Another processing module operating method includes using a processing module physically connected to a host device, executing an application within the processing module, allowing the application to exchange user interaction data communicated using a user interface of the host device with the host device, and allowing the application to use the host device as a communications device for exchanging information with a remote device distinct from the host device.

  13. Predictive value of vaginal IL-6 and TNFα bedside tests repeated until delivery for the prediction of maternal-fetal infection in cases of premature rupture of membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayem, Gilles; Batteux, Frederic; Girard, Noémie; Schmitz, Thomas; Willaime, Marion; Maillard, Francoise; Jarreau, Pierre Henri; Goffinet, Francois

    2017-04-01

    Examine the predictive value for maternal-fetal infection of routine bedside tests detecting the proinflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-6, in the vaginal secretions of women with premature rupture of the membranes (PROM). This prospective two-center cohort study included all women hospitalized for PROM over a 2-year period. A bedside test assessed IL-6 and TNFα in vaginal secretions. Both centers routinely tested CRP and leukocytes, assaying both in maternal serum, and analyzed vaginal bacterial flora; all samples were repeated twice weekly until delivery. The study included 689 women. In cases of preterm PROM (PPROM) before 37 weeks (n=184), a vaginal sample positive for one or more bacteria was the only marker associated with early neonatal infection (OR 5.6, 95%CI; 2.0-15.7). Its sensitivity was 82% (95%CI; 62-94) and its specificity 56% (95%CI; 47-65). All positive markers of infection were associated with the occurrence of chorioamnionitis. In cases of PROM from 37 weeks onward (n=505), only CRP >5mg/dL was associated with early neonatal infection (OR=8.3, 95%CI; 1.1-65.4) or clinical chorioamnionitis (OR=6.8, 95%CI; 1.5-30.0). The sensitivity of CRP >5mg/dL was 91% (95%CI; 59-100) and its specificity 45% (95%CI; 40-51) for predicting early neonatal infection, and 89% (95%CI; 65-99) and 46% (95%CI; 41-51), respectively, for predicting clinical chorioamnionitis. The association of vaginal cytokines with maternal-fetal infection is weak and thus prevents their use as a good predictor of maternal-fetal infection. CRP and vaginal samples may be useful for identifying a group of women at low risk of infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Administrative Synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Kimberly Kappler; Weckstein, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    One of the biggest obstacles to overcome in creating and sustaining an administrative professional learning community (PLC) is time. Administrators are constantly deluged by the tyranny of the urgent. It is a Herculean task to carve out time for PLCs, but it is imperative to do so. In this article, the authors describe how an administrative PLC…

  15. Emergency Department Crowding and Time to Antibiotic Administration in Febrile Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K Light

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Early antibiotic administration is recommended in newborns presenting with febrile illness to emergency departments (ED to avert the sequelae of serious bacterial infection. Although ED crowding has been associated with delays in antibiotic administration in a dedicated pediatric ED, the majority of children that receive emergency medical care in the U.S. present to EDs that treat both adult and pediatric emergencies. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between time to antibiotic administration in febrile newborns and crowding in a general ED serving both an adult and pediatric population.Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of 159 newborns presenting to a general ED between 2005 and 2011 and analyzed the association between time to antibiotic administration and ED occupancy rate at the time of, prior to, and following infant presentation to the ED.Results: We observed delayed and variable time to antibiotic administration and found no association between time to antibiotic administration and occupancy rate prior to, at the time of, or following infant presentation (P > 0.05. ED time to antibiotic administration was not associated with hospital length of stay, and there was no inpatient mortality.Conclusion: Delayed and highly variable time to antibiotic treatment in febrile newborns was common but unrelated to ED crowding in the general ED study site. Guidelines for time to antibiotic administration in this population may reduce variability in ED practice patterns. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:518-524.

  16. Evoked responses of the superior olive to amplitude-modulated signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, N G; Lang, T T

    1977-01-01

    Evoked potentials of some auditory centers of Rhinolophidae bats to amplitude-modulated signals were studied. A synchronization response was found in the cochlear nuclei (with respect to the fast component of the response) and in the superior olivary complex (with respect to both fast and slow components of the response) within the range of frequency modulation from 50 to 2000 Hz. In the inferior colliculus a synchronized response was recorded at modulation frequencies below 150 Hz, but in the medial geniculate bodies no such response was found. Evoked responses of the superior olivary complex were investigated in detail. The lowest frequencies of synchronization were recorded within the carrier frequency range of 15-30 and 80-86 kHz. The amplitude of the synchronized response is a function of the frequency and coefficient of modulation and also of the angle of stimulus presentation.

  17. Teaching cardiac auscultation to trainees in internal medicine and family practice: Does it work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favrat, B; Pécoud, A; Jaussi, A

    2004-01-01

    Background The general proficiency in physical diagnostic skills seems to be declining in relation to the development of new technologies. The few studies that have examined this question have invariably used recordings of cardiac events obtained from patients. However, this type of evaluation may not correlate particularly well with bedside skills. Our objectives were 1) To compare the cardiac auscultatory skills of physicians in training with those of experienced cardiologists by using real patients to test bedside diagnostic skills. 2) To evaluate the impact of a five-month bedside cardiac auscultation training program. Methods 1) In an academic primary care center, 20 physicians (trainees in internal medicine and family practice) and two skilled academic cardiologists listened to 33 cardiac events in 13 patients directly at bedside and identified the cardiac events by completing an open questionnaire. Heart sounds, murmurs and diagnosis were determined beforehand by an independent skilled cardiologist and were validated by echocardiography. Thirteen primary cardiologic diagnoses were possible. 2) Ten of the physicians agreed to participate in a course of 45-minute sessions once a week for 5 months. After the course they listened again to the same patients (pre/post-interventional study). Results 1) The experts were the most skillful, achieving 69% recognition of heart sounds and murmurs and correct diagnoses in 62% of cases. They also heard all of the diastolic murmurs. The residents heard only 40% of the extra heart sounds and made a correct diagnosis in 24% of cases. 2) After the weekly training sessions, their mean percentage for correct diagnosis was 35% [an increase of 66% (p < 0.05)]. Conclusions The level of bedside diagnostic skills in this relatively small group of physicians in training is indeed low, but can be improved by a course focusing on realistic bedside teaching. PMID:15056393

  18. Modulation Classification of Satellite Communication Signals Using Cumulants and Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aaron; Evans, Michael; Downey, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)'s future communication architecture is evaluating cognitive technologies and increased system intelligence. These technologies are expected to reduce the operational complexity of the network, increase science data return, and reduce interference to self and others. In order to increase situational awareness, signal classification algorithms could be applied to identify users and distinguish sources of interference. A significant amount of previous work has been done in the area of automatic signal classification for military and commercial applications. As a preliminary step, we seek to develop a system with the ability to discern signals typically encountered in satellite communication. Proposed is an automatic modulation classifier which utilizes higher order statistics (cumulants) and an estimate of the signal-to-noise ratio. These features are extracted from baseband symbols and then processed by a neural network for classification. The modulation types considered are phase-shift keying (PSK), amplitude and phase-shift keying (APSK),and quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM). Physical layer properties specific to the Digital Video Broadcasting - Satellite- Second Generation (DVB-S2) standard, such as pilots and variable ring ratios, are also considered. This paper will provide simulation results of a candidate modulation classifier, and performance will be evaluated over a range of signal-to-noise ratios, frequency offsets, and nonlinear amplifier distortions.

  19. ADMINISTRATIVE CONTRACTS. DELIMITATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Teodora PASCARIU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Article examines whether all contracts of public persons are administrative contracts; in other words, if the administration may conclude contracts that, according to their legal nature, are not administrative. If we start from the definition of administrative contracts as it appears in Law no. 554/2004, these include contracts by public authorities which concern the enhancement of public property execution of works of public interest, public services, public procurement and other administrative contracts provided by special laws and subject to the jurisdiction of the administrative courts.

  20. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of detomidine following sublingual administration to horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimaio Knych, Heather K; Stanley, Scott D

    2011-10-01

    To characterize pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of detomidine gel administered sublingually in accordance with label instructions to establish appropriate withdrawal guidelines for horses before competition. 12 adult racehorses. Horses received a single sublingual administration of 0.04 mg of detomidine/kg. Blood samples were collected before and up to 72 hours after drug administration. Urine samples were collected for 5 days after detomidine administration. Plasma and urine samples were analyzed via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and resulting data were analyzed by use of noncompartmental analysis. Chin-to-ground distance, heart rate and rhythm, glucose concentration, PCV, and plasma protein concentration were also assessed following detomidine administration. Mean ± SD terminal elimination half-life of detomidine was 1.5 ± 1 hours. Metabolite concentrations were below the limit of detection (0.02, 0.1, and 0.5 ng/mL for detomidine, carboxydetomidine, and hydroxydetomidine, respectively) in plasma by 24 hours. Concentrations of detomidine and its metabolites were below the limit of detection (0.05 ng/mL for detomidine and 0.10 ng/mL for carboxydetomidine and hydroxydetomidine) in urine by 3 days. All horses had various degrees of sedation after detomidine administration. Time of onset was ≤ 40 minutes, and duration of sedation was approximately 2 hours. Significant decreases, relative to values at time 0, were detected for chin-to-ground distance and heart rate. There was an increased incidence and exacerbation of preexisting atrioventricular blocks after detomidine administration. A 48-hour and 3-day withdrawal period for detection in plasma and urine samples, respectively, should be adopted for sublingual administration of detomidine gel.

  1. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B transporters modulate hydroxyurea pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Aisha L; Lancaster, Cynthia S; Finkelstein, David; Ware, Russell E; Sparreboom, Alex

    2013-12-15

    Hydroxyurea is currently the only FDA-approved drug that ameliorates the pathophysiology of sickle cell anemia. Unfortunately, substantial interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics (PK) of hydroxyurea may result in variation of the drug's efficacy. However, little is known about mechanisms that modulate hydroxyurea PK. Recent in vitro studies identifying hydroxyurea as a substrate for organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP1B) transporters prompted the current investigation assessing the role of OATP1B transporters in modulating hydroxyurea PK. Using wild-type and Oatp1b knockout (Oatp1b(-/-)) mice, hydroxyurea PK was analyzed in vivo by measuring [(14)C]hydroxyurea distribution in plasma, kidney, liver, urine, or the exhaled (14)CO2 metabolite. Plasma levels were significantly reduced by 20% in Oatp1b(-/-) mice compared with wild-type (area under the curve of 38.64 or 48.45 μg·h(-1)·ml(-1), respectively) after oral administration, whereas no difference was observed between groups following intravenous administration. Accumulation in the kidney was significantly decreased by twofold in Oatp1b(-/-) mice (356.9 vs. 748.1 pmol/g), which correlated with a significant decrease in urinary excretion. Hydroxyurea accumulation in the liver was also decreased (136.6 vs. 107.3 pmol/g in wild-type or Oatp1b(-/-) mice, respectively) correlating with a decrease in exhaled (14)CO2. These findings illustrate that deficiency of Oatp1b transporters alters the absorption, distribution, and elimination of hydroxyurea thus providing the first in vivo evidence that cell membrane transporters may play a significant role in modulating hydroxyurea PK. Future studies to investigate other transporters and their role in hydroxyurea disposition are warranted for understanding the sources of variation in hydroxyurea's PK.

  2. Emerging therapies for the management of decompensated heart failure: from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGoma, Emil M; Vagelos, Randall H; Fowler, Michael B; Ashley, Euan A

    2006-12-19

    While pharmaceutical innovation has been highly successful in reducing mortality in chronic heart failure, this has not been matched by similar success in decompensated heart failure syndromes. Despite outstanding issues over definitions and end points, we argue in this paper that an unprecedented wealth of pharmacologic innovation may soon transform the management of these challenging patients. Agents that target contractility, such as cardiac myosin activators and novel adenosine triphosphate-dependent transmembrane sodium-potassium pump inhibitors, provide inotropic support without arrhythmogenic increases in cytosolic calcium or side effects of more traditional agents. Adenosine receptor blockade may improve glomerular filtration and diuresis by exerting a direct beneficial effect on glomerular blood flow while vasopressin antagonists promote free water excretion without compromising renal function and may simultaneously inhibit myocardial remodeling. Urodilatin, the renally synthesized isoform of atrial natriuretic peptide, may improve pulmonary congestion via vasodilation and enhanced diuresis. Finally, metabolic modulators such as perhexiline may optimize myocardial energy utilization by shifting adenosine triphosphate production from free fatty acids to glucose, a unique and conceptually appealing approach to the management of heart failure. These advances allow optimism not only for the advancement of our understanding and management of decompensated heart failure syndromes but for the translational research effort in heart failure biology in general.

  3. Mutually-modulated cross-gain modulation and slow light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternklar, Shmuel; Sarid, Eyal; Wart, Maxim; Granot, Er'el

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of pump and Stokes light in a Brillouin medium, where both beams are modulated, can be utilized for controlling the group velocity of the amplified Stokes (or depleted pump). The dependence of the group velocity for this mutually-modulated cross-gain modulation (MMXGM) technique on the Brillouin gain parameter is studied. A sharp transition to slow light occurs in the G 1 α/β≈1 regime, where G 1 is the Brillouin gain parameter, and α and β are the pump and Stokes modulation indices, respectively. A comparison of MMXGM slow light to the Brillouin dispersion-based slow-light technique reveals the fundamental differences between them. The formation of higher harmonics of the modulation frequency is also discussed. The theoretical predictions are experimentally corroborated and potential applications in fiber-based sensing and interferometry are discussed

  4. Administrating Solr

    CERN Document Server

    Mohan, Surendra

    2013-01-01

    A fast-paced, example-based guide to learning how to administrate, monitor, and optimize Apache Solr.""Administrating Solr"" is for developers and Solr administrators who have a basic knowledge of Solr and who are looking for ways to keep their Solr server healthy and well maintained. A basic working knowledge of Apache Lucene is recommended, but this is not mandatory.

  5. Administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogen handler om den praksis, vi kalder administration. Vi er i den offentlige sektor i Danmark hos kontorfolkene med deres sagsmapper, computere, telefoner,, lovsamlinger,, retningslinier og regneark. I bogen udfoldes en mangfoldighed af konkrete historier om det administrative arbejde fra...... forskellige områder i den offentlige sektor. Hensigten er at forstå den praksis og faglighed der knytter sig til det administrative arbejde...

  6. The predictive diagnostic value of serial daily bedside ultrasonography for severe dengue in Indonesian adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meta Michels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identification of dengue patients at risk for progressing to severe disease is difficult. Significant plasma leakage is a hallmark of severe dengue infection which can suddenly lead to hypovolemic shock around the time of defervescence. We hypothesized that the detection of subclinical plasma leakage may identify those at risk for severe dengue. The aim of the study was to determine the predictive diagnostic value of serial ultrasonography for severe dengue. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Daily bedside ultrasounds were performed with a handheld ultrasound device in a prospective cohort of adult Indonesians with dengue. Timing, localization and relation to dengue severity of the ultrasonography findings were determined, as well as the relation with serial hematocrit and albumin values. The severity of dengue was retrospectively determined by WHO 2009 criteria. A total of 66 patients with proven dengue infection were included in the study of whom 11 developed severe dengue. Presence of subclinical plasma leakage at enrollment had a positive predictive value of 35% and a negative predictive value of 90% for severe dengue. At enrollment, 55% of severe dengue cases already had subclinical plasma leakage, which increased to 91% during the subsequent days. Gallbladder wall edema was more pronounced in severe than in non-severe dengue patients and often preceded ascites/pleural effusion. Serial hematocrit and albumin measurements failed to identify plasma leakage and patients at risk for severe dengue. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Serial ultrasonography, in contrast to existing markers such as hematocrit, may better identify patients at risk for development of severe dengue. Patients with evidence of subclinical plasma leakage and/or an edematous gallbladder wall by ultrasonography merit intensive monitoring for development of complications.

  7. The process of outsourcing applied to public administration - legal approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Magera Conceição

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an analysis of outsourcing in the Brazilian Public Administration and the way it currently operates, initiating a process of reform, aiming to reduce the size of the administrative apparatus. Several doctrinal and jurisprudential concepts have been demonstrated in order to demonstrate in a concise way the applicability of outsourcing as a mechanism to reduce costs of the public machine, increase its efficiency and decrease its size. Some advantages of the use of outsourcing by the public administration by several jurists are presented, including the gains in competitiveness and ease of supervision by the citizens. The extension of the responsibility of the public administration by the outsourced company and the way in which it operates, in the light of the legislation, jurisprudence and the best doctrine, suggest efficient alternatives in the exercise of the administration, increasing its credibility and efficiency in the attainment of governmental objectives. The methodology used was through deductive. The achieved results demonstrate that the process of outsourcing after quality and a new dynamics in the public service.

  8. High-Voltage, Multiphasic, Nanosecond Pulses to Modulate Cellular Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Hollie A; Hirakawa, Shinji; Yang, Enbo; Zhou, Chunrong; Xiao, Shu

    2018-04-01

    Nanosecond electric pulses are an effective power source in plasma medicine and biological stimulation, in which biophysical responses are governed by peak power and not energy. While uniphasic nanosecond pulse generators are widely available, the recent discovery that biological effects can be uniquely modulated by reversing the polarity of nanosecond duration pulses calls for the development of a multimodal pulse generator. This paper describes a method to generate nanosecond multiphasic pulses for biomedical use, and specifically demonstrates its ability to cancel or enhance cell swelling and blebbing. The generator consists of a series of the fundamental module, which includes a capacitor and a MOSFET switch. A positive or a negative phase pulse module can be produced based on how the switch is connected. Stacking the modules in series can increase the voltage up to 5 kV. Multiple stacks in parallel can create multiphase outputs. As each stack is independently controlled and charged, multiphasic pulses can be created to produce flexible and versatile pulse waveforms. The circuit topology can be used for high-frequency uniphasic or biphasic nanosecond burst pulse production, creating numerous opportunities for the generator in electroporation applications, tissue ablation, wound healing, and nonthermal plasma generation.

  9. Early bedside care during preclinical medical education: can technology-enhanced patient simulation advance the Flexnerian ideal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, James A; Hayden, Emily M; Ahmed, Rami A; Pawlowski, John B; Khoury, Kimberly N; Oriol, Nancy E

    2010-02-01

    Flexner wanted medical students to study at the patient bedside-a remarkable innovation in his time-so that they could apply science to clinical care under the watchful eye of senior physicians. Ever since his report, medical schools have reserved the latter years of their curricula for such an "advanced" apprenticeship, providing clinical clerkship experiences only after an initial period of instruction in basic medical sciences. Although Flexner codified the segregation of preclinical and clinical instruction, he was committed to ensuring that both domains were integrated into a modern medical education. The aspiration to fully integrate preclinical and clinical instruction continues to drive medical education reform even to this day. In this article, the authors revisit the original justification for sequential preclinical-clinical instruction and argue that modern, technology-enhanced patient simulation platforms are uniquely powerful for fostering simultaneous integration of preclinical-clinical content in a way that Flexner would have applauded. To date, medical educators tend to focus on using technology-enhanced medical simulation in clinical and postgraduate medical education; few have devoted significant attention to using immersive clinical simulation among preclinical students. The authors present an argument for the use of dynamic robot-mannequins in teaching basic medical science, and describe their experience with simulator-based preclinical instruction at Harvard Medical School. They discuss common misconceptions and barriers to the approach, describe their curricular responses to the technique, and articulate a unifying theory of cognitive and emotional learning that broadens the view of what is possible, feasible, and desirable with simulator-based medical education.

  10. Local sleep spindle modulations in relation to specific memory cues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, R.; Hofman, W.F.; de Boer, M.; Talamini, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep spindles have been connected to memory processes in various ways. In addition, spindles appear to be modulated at the local cortical network level. We investigated whether cueing specific memories during sleep leads to localized spindle modulations in humans. During learning of word-location

  11. Using incident reports to inform the prevention of medication administration errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härkänen, Marja; Saano, Susanna; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2017-11-01

    To describe ways of preventing medication administration errors based on reporters' views expressed in medication administration incident reports. Medication administration errors are very common, and nurses play important roles in committing and in preventing such errors. Thus far, incident reporters' perceptions of how to prevent medication administration errors have rarely been analysed. This is a qualitative, descriptive study using an inductive content analysis of the incident reports related to medication administration errors (n = 1012). These free-text descriptions include reporters' views on preventing the reoccurrence of medication administration errors. The data were collected from two hospitals in Finland and pertain to incidents that were reported between 1 January 2013 and 31 December 2014. Reporters' views on preventing medication administration errors were divided into three main categories related to individuals (health professionals), teams and organisations. The following categories related to individuals in preventing medication administration errors were identified: (1) accuracy and preciseness; (2) verification; and (3) following the guidelines, responsibility and attitude towards work. The team categories were as follows: (1) distribution of work; (2) flow of information and cooperation; and (3) documenting and marking the drug information. The categories related to organisation were as follows: (1) work environment; (2) resources; (3) training; (4) guidelines; and (5) development of the work. Health professionals should administer medication with a high moral awareness and an attempt to concentrate on the task. Nonetheless, the system should support health professionals by providing a reasonable work environment and encouraging collaboration among the providers to facilitate the safe administration of medication. Although there are numerous approaches to supporting medication safety, approaches that support the ability of individual health

  12. Radionuclide administration to nursing mothers: mathematically derived guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romney, B.M.; Nickoloff, E.L.; Esser, P.D.; Alderson, P.O.

    1986-01-01

    We determined a formula to establish objective guidelines for the administration of radionuclides to nursing mothers. The formula is based on the maximum permissible dose to the infant's critical organ, serial measurements of breast milk activity, milk volume, and dose to the critical organ per microcurie in milk. Using worst-case assumptions, we believe that cessation of nursing for 24 hours after administration of technetium labeled radiopharmaceuticals is sufficient for safety. Longer-lived agents require greater delays. Iodine-123 radiopharmaceuticals are preferable to iodine-131 agents and should always be used when studying the unblocked thyroid

  13. Semantic Modeling of Administrative Procedures from a Spanish Regional Public Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Hidalgo López

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few years, Public Administrations have been providing systems for procedures and files electronic processing to ensure compliance with regulations and provide public services to citizens. Although each administration provides similar services to their citizens, these systems usually differ from the internal information management point of view since they usually come from different products and manufacturers. The common framework that regulations demand, and that Public Administrations must respect when processing electronic files, provides a unique opportunity for the development of intelligent agents in the field of administrative processes. However, for this development to be truly effective and applicable to the public sector, it is necessary to have a common representation model for these administrative processes. Although a lot of work has already been done in the development of public information reuse initiatives and common vocabularies standardization, this has not been carried out at the processes level. In this paper, we propose a semantic representation model of both processes models and processes for Public Administrations: the procedures and administrative files. The goal is to improve public administration open data initiatives and help to develop their sustainability policies, such as improving decision-making procedures and administrative management sustainability. As a case study, we modelled public administrative processes and files in collaboration with a Regional Public Administration in Spain, the Principality of Asturias, which enabled access to its information systems, helping the evaluation of our approach.

  14. Changes to the forward SCT module design and their effect on thermal performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, S.; Taylor, G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents detailed calculations of a module design of a module design with separate cooling to the hybrid and detector. In this paper, comparison of the baseline module with the separated-cooling module are presented to help identify critical elements of the baseline

  15. A brief bedside visual art intervention decreases anxiety and improves pain and mood in patients with haematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, J J; Curry, E A; Ehlers, S L; Scanlon, P D; Bauer, B A; Rian, J; Larson, D R; Wolanskyj, A P

    2018-04-17

    Treatment of cancer-related symptoms represents a major challenge for physicians. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether a brief bedside visual art intervention (BVAI) facilitated by art educators improves mood, reduces pain and anxiety in patients with haematological malignancies. Thirty-one patients (21 women and 10 men) were invited to participate in a BVAI where the goal of the session was to teach art technique for ~30 min. Primary outcome measures included the change in visual analog scale, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule scale, from baseline prior to and immediately post-BVAI. Total of 21 patients (19 women and two men) participated. A significant improvement in positive mood and pain scores (p = .003 and p = .017 respectively) as well as a decrease in negative mood and anxiety (p = .016 and p = .001 respectively) was observed. Patients perceived BVAI as overall positive (95%) and wished to participate in future art-based interventions (85%). This accessible experience, provided by artists within the community, may be considered as an adjunct to conventional treatments in patients with cancer-related mood symptoms and pain, and future studies with balanced gender participation may support the generalisability of these findings. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Network monitoring module of BES III system environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Liwen; Zhao Jingwei; Zhang Bingyun

    2002-01-01

    In order to meet the needs of the complicated network architecture of BES III (Beijing Spectrometer III) and make sure normal online running in the future, it is necessary to develop a multi-platforms Network Monitoring Tool which can help system administrator monitor and manage BES III network. The author provides a module that can monitor not only the traffic of switch-router's ports but also the performance status of key devices in the network environment, meanwhile it can also give warning to manager and submit the related reports. the great sense, the theory basis, the implementing method and the graph in formation of this tool will be discussed

  17. Oral Administration of Heat-Killed Lactobacillus gasseri OLL2809 Reduces Cedar Pollen Antigen-Induced Peritoneal Eosinophilia in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Sashihara

    2008-01-01

    Conclusions: We demonstrated that the oral administration of heat-killed L. gasseri OLL2809 suppresses eosinophilia via the modulation of Th1/Th2 balance. These observations suggested that heat-killed L. gasseri OLL2809 might potentially ameliorate the increased number of eosinophils in patients with Japanese cedar pollinosis.

  18. Synchronized conductivity modulation to realize broadband lossless magnetic-free non-reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinc, Tolga; Tymchenko, Mykhailo; Nagulu, Aravind; Sounas, Dimitrios; Alu, Andrea; Krishnaswamy, Harish

    2017-10-06

    Recent research has explored the spatiotemporal modulation of permittivity to break Lorentz reciprocity in a manner compatible with integrated-circuit fabrication. However, permittivity modulation is inherently weak and accompanied by loss due to carrier injection, particularly at higher frequencies, resulting in large insertion loss, size, and/or narrow operation bandwidths. Here, we show that the presence of absorption in an integrated electronic circuit may be counter-intuitively used to our advantage to realize a new generation of magnet-free non-reciprocal components. We exploit the fact that conductivity in semiconductors provides a modulation index several orders of magnitude larger than permittivity. While directly associated with loss in static systems, we show that properly synchronized conductivity modulation enables loss-free, compact and extremely broadband non-reciprocity. We apply these concepts to obtain a wide range of responses, from isolation to gyration and circulation, and verify our findings by realizing a millimeter-wave (25 GHz) circulator fully integrated in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology.Optical non-reciprocity achieved through refractive index modulation can have its challenges and limitations. Here, Dinc et al. introduce the concept of non-reciprocity based on synchronized spatio-temporal modulation of conductivity to achieve different types of non-reciprocal functionality.

  19. Protocol Adherence in Prehospital Medical Care Provided for Patients with Chest Pain and Loss of Consciousness; a Brief Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Mehrara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although many protocols are available in the field of the prehospital medical care (PMC, there is still a notable gap between protocol based directions and applied clinical practice. This study measures the rate of protocol adherence in PMC provided for patients with chest pain and loss of consciousness (LOC.Method: In this cross-sectional study, 10 educated research assistants audited the situation of provided PMC for non-traumatic chest pain and LOC patients, presenting to the emergency department of a tertiary level teaching hospital, compare to national recommendations in these regards.Results: 101 cases with the mean age of 56.7 ± 12.3 years (30-78 were audited (55.4% male. 61 (60.3% patients had chest pain and 40 (39.7% cases had LOC. Protocol adherence rates for cardiac monitoring (62.3%, O2 therapy (32.8%, nitroglycerin administration (60.7%, and aspirin administration (52.5% in prehospital care of patients with chest pain were fair to poor. Protocol adherence rates for correct patient positioning (25%, O2 therapy (75%, cardiac monitoring (25%, pupils examination (25%, bedside glucometery (50%, and assessing for naloxone administration (55% in prehospital care of patients with LOC were fair to poor.Conclusion: There were more than 20% protocol violation regarding prehospital care of chest pain patients regarding cardiac monitoring, O2 therapy, and nitroglycerin and aspirin administration. There were same situation regarding O2 therapy, positioning, cardiac monitoring, pupils examination, bedside glucometery, and assessing for naloxone administration of LOC patients in prehospital setting.

  20. Customer Preference-Based Information Retrieval to Build Module Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxing Cao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Preference is viewed as an outer feeling of a product, also as a reflection of human's inner thought. It dominates the designers' decisions and affects our purchase intention. In the paper, a model of preference elicitation from customers is proposed to build module concepts. Firstly, the attributes of customer preference are classified in a hierarchy and make the surveys to build customer preference concepts. Secondly, the documents or catalogs of design requirements, perhaps containing some textual description and geometric data, are normalized by using semantic expressions. Some semantic rules are developed to describe low-level features of customer preference to construct a knowledge base of customer preference. Thirdly, designers' needs are used to map customer preference for generating module concepts. Finally, an empirical study of the stapler is surveyed to illustrate the validity of module concept generation.

  1. Best practice strategies to safeguard drug prescribing and drug administration: an anthology of expert views and opinions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidling, Hanna M; Stützle, Marion; Hoppe-Tichy, Torsten; Allenet, Benoît; Bedouch, Pierrick; Bonnabry, Pascal; Coleman, Jamie J; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando; Lovis, Christian; Rei, Maria Jose; Störzinger, Dominic; Taylor, Lenka A; Pontefract, Sarah K; van den Bemt, Patricia M L A; van der Sijs, Heleen; Haefeli, Walter E

    2016-04-01

    While evidence on implementation of medication safety strategies is increasing, reasons for selecting and relinquishing distinct strategies and details on implementation are typically not shared in published literature. We aimed to collect and structure expert information resulting from implementing medication safety strategies to provide advice for decision-makers. Medication safety experts with clinical expertise from thirteen hospitals throughout twelve European and North American countries shared their experience in workshop meetings, on-site-visits and remote structured interviews. We performed an expert-based, in-depth assessment of implementation of best-practice strategies to improve drug prescribing and drug administration. Workflow, variability and recommended medication safety strategies in drug prescribing and drug administration processes. According to the experts, institutions chose strategies that targeted process steps known to be particularly error-prone in the respective setting. Often, the selection was channeled by local constraints such as the e-health equipment and critically modulated by national context factors. In our study, the experts favored electronic prescribing with clinical decision support and medication reconciliation as most promising interventions. They agreed that self-assessment and introduction of medication safety boards were crucial to satisfy the setting-specific differences and foster successful implementation. While general evidence for implementation of strategies to improve medication safety exists, successful selection and adaptation of a distinct strategy requires a thorough knowledge of the institute-specific constraints and an ongoing monitoring and adjustment of the implemented measures.

  2. Fashion Merchandising Module. An Advanced-Level Option for Distribution and Marketing. For the U.S.O.E. Occupational Cluster of 04.02 Apparel and Accessories Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clis, Pat; And Others

    This instructional module on fashion merchandising is designed as a guide for secondary education teachers who are helping twelfth grade students develop occupational competency for entry-level positions in fashion-related jobs. An introductory section covers module goals, career opportunities and employment demands, administrative considerations,…

  3. Sustainable Administrative Reform Movements Policy in Joko Widodo's Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogi Suprayogi Sugandi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Joko Widodo (Jokowi is a leader that is widely expected to transform Indonesia into a better country. Hopes and wishes were rising when he was elected as the president of Indonesia. This paper will describe various innovations undertaken before and after his presidential inauguration as well as the assorted innovations made in reforming the administration of his cabinet. As the president of Indonesia, Joko Widodo is required to realize the aspirations of the people in freeing the government from corruption, collusion, and nepotism. The management of ministerial and non-ministerial institutions becomes the very first crucial issue undertaken by Joko Widodo. This led to a polemic in regards to reducing or increasing the number of institutions, as the Jokowi administration actually increased the amount. In Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono's administration, several policies were made systematically and based on legislations that had been approved by the lagislature. Joko Widodo's administration in more partial in nature. The administrative reform program that is highly anticipated is the continuation of the Public Service Act. This law is a step forward from the administrative reform program that aims at the creation of good governance. Changes is career path, salary system, pension and benefits for civil servants, performance-based staffing are various efforts of sustainability carried out by Joko Widodo's administration.

  4. Class-Wide Access to a Commercial Step 1 Question Bank During Preclinical Organ-Based Modules: A Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baños, James H; Pepin, Mark E; Van Wagoner, Nicholas

    2018-03-01

    The authors examined the usefulness of a commercially available Step 1 question bank as a formative academic support tool throughout organ-based modules in an integrated preclinical medical curriculum. The authors also determined the extent to which correlation between question bank utilization and academic metrics varied with Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) scores. In 2015, a cohort of 185 first-year medical students at University of Alabama School of Medicine were provided with 18-month full access to a commercially available Step 1 question bank of over 2,100 items throughout organ-based modules, although there were no requirements for use. Data on student use of the question bank were collected via an online administrative portal. Relationships between question bank utilization and academic outcomes including exams, module grades, and United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 were determined using multiple linear regression. MCAT scores and number of items attempted in the question bank significantly predicted all academic measures, with question bank utilization as the stronger predictor. The association between question bank utilization and academic outcome was stronger for individuals with lower MCAT scores. The findings elucidate a novel academic support mechanism that, for some programs, may help bridge the gap between holistic and mission-based admissions practices and a residency match process that places a premium on USMLE exam scores. Distributed formative use of USMLE Step 1 practice questions may be of value as an academic support tool that benefits all students, but particularly those entering with lower MCAT scores.