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Sample records for ca3 dendritic retraction

  1. Chronic glucocorticoids increase hippocampal vulnerability to neurotoxicity under conditions that produce CA3 dendritic retraction but fail to impair spatial recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Cheryl D; McLaughlin, Katie J; Harman, James S; Foltz, Cainan; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Lightner, Elizabeth; Wright, Ryan L

    2007-08-01

    We previously found that chronic stress conditions producing CA3 dendritic retraction and spatial memory deficits make the hippocampus vulnerable to the neurotoxin ibotenic acid (IBO). The purpose of this study was to determine whether exposure to chronic corticosterone (CORT) under conditions that produce CA3 dendritic retraction would enhance CA3 susceptibility to IBO. Male Sprague Dawley rats were chronically treated for 21 d with CORT in drinking water (400 microg/ml), and half were given daily injections of phenytoin (40 mg/kg), an antiepileptic drug that prevents CA3 dendritic retraction. Three days after treatments stopped, IBO was infused into the CA3 region. Conditions producing CA3 dendritic retraction (CORT and vehicle) exacerbated IBO-induced CA3 damage compared with conditions in which CA3 dendritic retraction was not observed (vehicle and vehicle, vehicle and phenytoin, CORT and phenytoin). Additionally, spatial recognition memory was assessed using the Y-maze, revealing that conditions producing CA3 dendritic retraction failed to impair spatial recognition memory. Furthermore, CORT levels in response to a potentially mild stressor (injection and Y-maze exposure) stayed at basal levels and failed to differ among key groups (vehicle and vehicle, CORT and vehicle, CORT and phenytoin), supporting the interpretations that CORT levels were unlikely to have been elevated during IBO infusion and that the neuroprotective actions of phenytoin were not through CORT alterations. These data are the first to show that conditions with prolonged glucocorticoid elevations leading to structural changes in hippocampal dendritic arbors can make the hippocampus vulnerable to neurotoxic challenges. These findings have significance for many disorders with elevated glucocorticoids that include depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and Cushing's disease.

  2. Active dendrites support efficient initiation of dendritic spikes in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sooyun; Guzman, Segundo J.; Hu, Hua; Jonas, Peter

    2012-01-01

    CA3 pyramidal neurons are important for memory formation and pattern completion in the hippocampal network. It is generally thought that proximal synapses from the mossy fibers activate these neurons most efficiently, whereas distal inputs from the perforant path have a weaker modulatory influence. We used confocally targeted patch-clamp recording from dendrites and axons to map the activation of rat CA3 pyramidal neurons at the subcellular level. Our results reveal two distinct dendritic dom...

  3. Impaired dendritic inhibition leads to epileptic activity in a computer model of CA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjay, M; Neymotin, Samuel A; Krothapalli, Srinivasa B

    2015-11-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a common type of epilepsy with hippocampus as the usual site of origin. The CA3 subfield of hippocampus is reported to have a low epileptic threshold and hence initiates the disorder in patients with TLE. This study computationally investigates how impaired dendritic inhibition of pyramidal cells in the vulnerable CA3 subfield leads to generation of epileptic activity. A model of CA3 subfield consisting of 800 pyramidal cells, 200 basket cells (BC) and 200 Oriens-Lacunosum Moleculare (O-LM) interneurons was used. The dendritic inhibition provided by O-LM interneurons is reported to be selectively impaired in some TLEs. A step-wise approach is taken to investigate how alterations in network connectivity lead to generation of epileptic patterns. Initially, dendritic inhibition alone was reduced, followed by an increase in the external inputs received at the distal dendrites of pyramidal cells, and finally additional changes were made at the synapses between all neurons in the network. In the first case, when the dendritic inhibition of pyramidal cells alone was reduced, the local field potential activity changed from a theta-modulated gamma pattern to a prominently gamma frequency pattern. In the second case, in addition to this reduction of dendritic inhibition, with a simultaneous large increase in the external excitatory inputs received by pyramidal cells, the basket cells entered a state of depolarization block, causing the network to generate a typical ictal activity pattern. In the third case, when the dendritic inhibition onto the pyramidal cells was reduced and changes were simultaneously made in synaptic connectivity between all neurons in the network, the basket cells were again observed to enter depolarization block. In the third case, impairment of dendritic inhibition required to generate an ictal activity pattern was lesser than the two previous cases. Moreover, the ictal like activity began earlier in the third case

  4. Retraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Bruce

    2011-12-23

    Science is fully retracting the report "Detection of an infectious retrovirus, XMRV, in blood cells of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome" (V. C. Lombardi et al., Science 326, 585 (2009); 10.1126/science.1179052)

  5. Retraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This article has been retracted at the request of: Editor-in-Chief and Author 'TW-37, a small-molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2, inhibits cell growth and invasion in pancreatic cancer' by Wang, Z., Song, W., Aboukameel, A., Mohammad, M., Wang, G., Banerjee, S., Kong, D., Wang, S., Sarkar, F. H. and Mohammad, R. M. The above article, published online on 4 June 2008, in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor-in-Chief, Professor Peter Lichter, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. A university investigation involving the first and the second-to-last author determined that several figures from another published paper were manipulated or duplicated and re-used in this paper. Therefore, the authors are retracting the paper in its entirety although they maintain that these issues did not affect the major conclusions. They apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused. Reference Wang, Z., Song, W., Aboukameel, A., Mohammad, M., Wang, G., Banerjee, S., Kong, D., Wang, S., Sarkar, F. H. and Mohammad, R. M. (2008), TW-37, a small-molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2, inhibits cell growth and invasion in pancreatic cancer. Int. J. Cancer, 123: 958-966. doi: 10.1002/ijc.23610.

  6. Retraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This article corrects: Retracted: Three BUB1 and BUBR1/MAD3-related spindle assembly checkpoint proteins are required for accurate mitosis in Arabidopsis. New Phytologist 205: 202-215. Article first published online: 29 September 2014. This article has been retracted at the request of: Editor-in-Chief and Author 'Three BUB1 and BUBR1/MAD3-related spindle assembly checkpoint proteins are required for accurate mitosis in Arabidopsis', by Paganelli L, Caillaud M-C, Quentin M, Damiani I, Govetto B, Lecomte P, Karpov, PA, Abad P, Chabouté M-E and Favery B. The above article, first published online on Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), and in New Phytologist 205: 202-215, has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor-in-Chief, Alistair Hetherington, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Since publication of the above article, it has been brought to our attention that errors occurred in the construction of Figs 1 and 2(a); some components were inappropriately edited and duplicated, including the duplication and editing of images that first appeared in Caillaud et al. (2009), which were used by the authors as a basic template. Consequently, the integrity of the yeast two-hybrid experiments reported in the article is undermined, and, with agreement of all parties, the decision has been made to retract this article. We apologize for any inconvenience the publication of this work may have caused our readers. References Caillaud MC, Paganelli L, Lecomte P, Deslandes L, Quentin M, Pecrix Y, Le Bris M, Marfaing N, Abad P, Favery B. 2009. Spindle assembly checkpoint protein dynamics reveal conserved and unsuspected roles in plant cell division. PLoS One 4: e6757. Paganelli L, Caillaud M-C, Quentin M, Damiani I, Govetto B, Lecomte P, Karpov PA, Abad P, Chabouté M-E, Favery B. 2015. Three BUB1 and BUBR1/MAD3-related spindle assembly checkpoint proteins are required for accurate mitosis in Arabidopsis. New Phytologist 205: 202-215.

  7. Retraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhiheng [Vanderbilt University; Feldman, Leonard C [ORNL; Tolk, Norman H. [Vanderbilt University; Zhang, Zhenyu [ORNL; Cohen, Philip [University of Minnesota

    2012-01-01

    IN OUR 2006 REPORT, DESORPTION OF H FROM SI(111) BY RESONANT EXCITATION OF THE Si-H vibrational stretch mode (1), we reported resonant photodesorption of hydrogen from a Si(111) surface using tunable infrared radiation that corresponded to the Si-H vibrational stretch mode. Our recent attempts to reproduce these experiments have been unsuccessful, and the free electron laser facility at Vanderbilt, a unique light source for this experiment, has shut down, prohibiting further research. Because our conclusions are now in question, we retract the Report.

  8. Retraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamarra LF

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cárdenas WH, Mamani JB, Sibov TT, Caous CA, Amaro E Jr, Gamarra LF. Particokinetics: computational analysis of the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles deposition process. Int J Nanomedicine. 2012;7:2699–2712.It was brought to our attention that the Cárdenas et al paper did not cite a key source paper for the mathematics and approach to modeling the particokinetics of nanoparticles: Hinderliter PM, Minard KR, Orr O, et al. ISDD: A computational model of particle sedimentation, diffusion and target cell dosimetry for in vitro toxicity studies. Part Fibre Toxicol. 2010;7:36.In addition to unacceptable similarities in equations, computer implementation, and use of parameters from the above reference, three of the figures appearing in the paper are nearly identical to those published in the abovementioned Hinderliter et al, while others are very similar to those published in Teeguarden JG, Hinderliter PM, Orr G, Thrall BD, Pounds JG. Particokinetics in vitro: dosimetry considerations for in vitro nanoparticle toxicity assessments. Toxicol Sci. 2007;95(2 300–312. A number of other relevant citations were not included:Bird RB, Stewart WE, Lightfoot EN. Transport Phenomena. 2nd edition. New York: John Wiley and Sons Inc; 2002:97.Socolofsky SA, Jirka GH. Environmental Fluid Mechanics Part I: Mass Transfer and Diffusion Engineering – Lectures. 2nd edition. Karlsruhe-Germany; 2002:23.Probstein RF. Physicochemical Hydrodynamics – An Introduction. 2nd Edition. New York: John Wiley and Sons Inc; 2003:45.Bejan A. Convection Heat Transfer. 3rd edition. New York: John Wiley and Sons Inc; 2004:515.We have no choice but to retract the publication by Cárdenas et al.

  9. GABA actions in hippocampal area CA3 during postnatal development: differential shift from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing in somatic and dendritic compartments.

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    Romo-Parra, Héctor; Treviño, Mario; Heinemann, Uwe; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2008-03-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)-R) activation leads to depolarization of pyramidal cells during the first postnatal week and produces hyperpolarization from the second week. However, immunohistochemical evidence has suggested that during the second and third postnatal weeks the NKCC1 cotransporter relocates from the soma to the dendrites of CA3 pyramidal cells. We hypothesized that this leads to depolarizing responses in apical dendrites. Here we show that the activation of GABA(A)-R in the distal dendrites of CA3 pyramidal cells at P15 by restricted application of muscimol or synaptic activation by stimulation of interneurons in stratum radiatum (SR) causes depolarizing postsynaptic potentials (PSPs), which are blocked by NKCC1 cotransporter antagonists. By contrast, activation of proximal GABA(A)-R by muscimol application or by stimulation of interneurons in s. oriens (SO) leads to hyperpolarizing PSPs. Activation of the dentate gyrus (DG) in the presence of glutamatergic blockers evokes hyperpolarizing responses during the second postnatal week; however, the reversal potential of the DG-evoked inhibitory (I)PSPs is more depolarized than that of IPSPs evoked by activation of SO interneurons. Despite the shift of GABA action from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing, DG-evoked field potentials (f-PSPs) recorded in s. lucidum/radiatum (SL/R) do not change in polarity until the third week. Current source density analysis yielded results consistent with depolarizing actions of GABA in the dendritic compartment. Our data suggest that GABAergic input to apical dendrites of pyramidal cells of CA3 evokes depolarizing PSPs long after synaptic inhibition has become hyperpolarizing in the somata, in the axon initial segments and in basal dendrites.

  10. Physical exercise and antidepressants enhance BDNF targeting in hippocampal CA3 dendrites: further evidence of a spatial code for BDNF splice variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baj, Gabriele; D'Alessandro, Valentina; Musazzi, Laura; Mallei, Alessandra; Sartori, Cesar R; Sciancalepore, Marina; Tardito, Daniela; Langone, Francesco; Popoli, Maurizio; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2012-06-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is encoded by multiple BDNF transcripts, whose function is unclear. We recently showed that a subset of BDNF transcripts can traffic into distal dendrites in response to electrical activity, while others are segregated into the somatoproximal domains. Physical exercise and antidepressant treatments exert their beneficial effects through upregulation of BDNF, which is required to support survival and differentiation of newborn dentate gyrus (DG) neurons. While these DG processes are required for the antidepressant effect, a role for CA1 in antidepressant action has been excluded, and the effect on CA3 neurons remains unclear. Here, we show for the first time that physical exercise and antidepressants induce local increase of BDNF in CA3. Voluntary physical exercise for 28 consecutive days, or 2-week treatment with 10 mg/kg per day fluoxetine or reboxetine, produced a global increase of BDNF mRNA and protein in the neuronal somata of the whole hippocampus and a specific increase of BDNF in dendrites of CA3 neurons. This increase was accounted for by BDNF exon 6 variant. In cultured hippocampal neurons, application of serotonin or norepinephrine (10-50 μM) induced increase in synaptic transmission and targeting of BDNF mRNA in dendrites. The increased expression of BDNF in CA3 dendrites following antidepressants or exercise further supports the neurotrophin hypothesis of antidepressants action and confirms that the differential subcellular localization of BDNF mRNA splice variants provides a spatial code for a selective expression of BDNF in specific subcellular districts. This selective expression may be exploited to design more specific antidepressants.

  11. Physical Exercise and Antidepressants Enhance BDNF Targeting in Hippocampal CA3 Dendrites: Further Evidence of a Spatial Code for BDNF Splice Variants

    OpenAIRE

    Baj, Gabriele; D'Alessandro, Valentina; Musazzi, Laura; Mallei, Alessandra; Sartori, Cesar R; Sciancalepore, Marina; Tardito, Daniela; Langone, Francesco; Popoli, Maurizio; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is encoded by multiple BDNF transcripts, whose function is unclear. We recently showed that a subset of BDNF transcripts can traffic into distal dendrites in response to electrical activity, while others are segregated into the somatoproximal domains. Physical exercise and antidepressant treatments exert their beneficial effects through upregulation of BDNF, which is required to support survival and differentiation of newborn dentate gyrus (DG) neurons...

  12. Retraction Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The article "Evaluation of Selected Nutrients and Contaminants in Distillers Grains from Ethanol Production in Texas" by Kyung-Min Lee and Timothy J. Herrman has been retracted by the authors and the Scientific Editors. The retraction is necessary owing to several corrections requested by the authors that significantly affect the findings.

  13. Retraction Notice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    <正>Retraction:"Which lamp will be optimum to eye?Incandescent,fluorescent or LED etc"by Liang Chen and Xiao-Wei Zhang published on International Journal of Ophthalmology 2014;7(1):163-168.Authors of the above article failed to declare conflicts of interest,which violates the research ethics and moral norms.After a thorough investigation,we regret to announce that we must retract this article.We regret any adverse effects this article may have caused.

  14. 噻奈普汀对慢性应激大鼠海马 CA3区锥体细胞顶树突可塑性的效应%Effects of tianeptine on changes of plasticity induced by chronic stress in the rat hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neuronal apical dendrites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金海燕; 刘少文; 杨权

    2006-01-01

    目的 探讨抗抑郁剂噻奈普汀对慢性应激大鼠海马CA3区锥体细胞顶树突形态的效应.方法 将45只雄性Sprague-Dawley大鼠(2月龄),随机分为对照组、应激组及应激给药组,每组15只.高尔基(Golgi)镀染法测定海马CA3区锥体细胞顶树突分支及一级树突直径,常规透射电镜观察树突细胞骨架特别是微管的改变.结果 应激给药组大鼠海马CA3区锥体细胞顶树突分支数目[(15.37±1.54)支]较应激组的分支数目[(13.06±1.28)支]明显增多,与对照组[(16.29±1.95)支]差异无显著性;一级树突直径[(5.74±0.87)μm]较应激组[(6.41±0.94)μm]明显变小,与对照组(5.67±0.83)μm无明显差别;与应激组比较,应激给药组树突骨架基本完整.结论 噻奈普汀可抑制慢性应激导致的大鼠海马CA3区锥体细胞顶树突可塑性的改变.

  15. Hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells selectively innervate aspiny interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittner, Lucia; Henze, Darrell A; Záborszky, László; Buzsáki, György

    2006-09-01

    The specific connectivity among principal cells and interneurons determines the flow of activity in neuronal networks. To elucidate the connections between hippocampal principal cells and various classes of interneurons, CA3 pyramidal cells were intracellularly labelled with biocytin in anaesthetized rats and the three-dimensional distribution of their axon collaterals was reconstructed. The sections were double-stained for substance P receptor (SPR)- or metabotropic glutamate receptor 1alpha (mGluR-1alpha)-immunoreactivity to investigate interneuron targets of the CA3 pyramidal cells. SPR-containing interneurons represent a large portion of the GABAergic population, including spiny and aspiny classes. Axon terminals of CA3 pyramidal cells contacted SPR-positive interneuron dendrites in the hilus and in all hippocampal strata in both CA3 and CA1 regions (7.16% of all boutons). The majority of axons formed single contacts (87.5%), but multiple contacts (up to six) on single target neurons were also found. CA3 pyramidal cell axon collaterals innervated several types of morphologically different aspiny SPR-positive interneurons. In contrast, spiny SPR-interneurons or mGluR-1alpha-positive interneurons in the hilus, CA3 and CA1 regions were rarely contacted by the filled pyramidal cells. These findings indicate a strong target selection of CA3 pyramidal cells favouring the activation of aspiny classes of interneurons.

  16. EFFECT OF MOBILE PHONE RADIOFREQUENCY ON HIPPOCAMPAL CA3 NEURONS

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    Srinivas Rao Bolla

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the study is to investigate the effects of mobile phone [MP] radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF exposure for different durations on dendritic morphology and nerve cell damage in CA3 sub region of Hippocampus in Swiss albino mice. Materials &Methods: Total 70 Swiss albino mice of both sexes were used in the study. Animals were divided into 10 groups randomly. Five groups (n=6 were used for assessment of neuronal damage by cresyl violet staining. Another five groups (n=8 were used for assessment of dendritic morphology by Golgi- Cox staining. Groups were divided by exposure duration (15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes/ per day for 30 days; age matched unexposed groups served as controls. Results: Results of the study have shown that there was decrease in the number of viable neurons and dendritic arborization in CA3 sub region of hippocampus in 30, 45 and 60 min exposed groups. Conclusions: Increased neuronal damage and decreased dendritic arborization of hippocampal CA3 neurons was found with increase in exposure duration of MPRF-EMF.

  17. Important note! – Retraction

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    Simeon Oka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prof. Ji-Huan He, corresponding author of the paper (DOI: TSCI1305508D: Hao DOU, Hong-Yan LIU, Ping WANG, and Ji-Huan HE: A Belt-Like Superfine Film Fabricated by the Bubble-Electrospinning, published in THERMAL SCIENCE, Year 2013, Vol. 17, No. 5, pp. 1508-1510, asked Editor-in-chief to retract paper due to an unchangeable erratum, i.e. the experiment presented was wrongly described as another one, and the given figures do not fit experiment. Link to the retracted article 10.2298/TSCI1305508D

  18. Homeostatic maintenance in excitability of tree shrew hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons after chronic stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kole, MHP; Czeh, B; Fuchs, E

    2004-01-01

    The experience of chronic stress induces a reversible regression of hippocampal CA3 apical neuron dendrites. Although such postsynaptic membrane reduction will obviously diminish the possibility of synaptic input, the consequences for the functional membrane properties of these cells are not well un

  19. Preputial retraction in children

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    Agarwal Abhinav

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to assess preputial retractability in children at various ages. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nine hundred and sixty boys attending the hospital were included in the study. Children with hypospadias or history of preputial manipulation were excluded. Preputial anatomy was studied and subjects were classified into five groups as described by Kayaba et al . RESULTS: The prepuce could not be retracted at all so as to make even the external urethral meatus visible in 61.4% children aged 0-6 months while this decreased to only 0.9% in children aged 10-12 years. At the other end of the spectrum, while prepuce could not be fully retracted in any child below 6 months, it could be done in about 60% in the age group of 10-12 years. CONCLUSION Preputial nonseparation is the major cause of preputial nonretraction in the pediatric age group. Prepuce spontaneously separates from the glans as age increases and true phimosis is rare in children. Surgical intervention should be avoided for nonseparation of prepuce.

  20. Passive electrotonic properties of rat hippocampal CA3 interneurones.

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    Chitwood, R A; Hubbard, A; Jaffe, D B

    1999-03-15

    1. The linear membrane responses of CA3 interneurones were determined with the use of whole-cell patch recording methods. The mean input resistance (RN) for all cells in this study was 526 +/- 16 MOmega and the slowest membrane time constant (tau0) was 73 +/- 3 ms. 2. The three-dimensional morphology of 63 biocytin-labelled neurones was used to construct compartmental models. Specific membrane resistivity (Rm) and specific membrane capacitance (Cm) were estimated by fitting the linear membrane response. Acceptable fits were obtained for 24 CA3 interneurones. The mean Rm was 61.9 +/- 34.2 Omega cm2 and the mean Cm was 0.9 +/- 0.3 microF cm-2. Intracellular resistance (Ri) could not be resolved in this study. 3. Examination of voltage attenuation revealed a significantly low synaptic efficiency from most dendritic synaptic input locations to the soma. 4. Simulations of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) were analysed at both the site of synaptic input and at the soma. There was little variability in the depolarization at the soma from synaptic inputs placed at different locations along the dendritic tree. The EPSP amplitude at the site of synaptic input was progressively larger with distance from the soma, consistent with a progressive increase in input impedance. 5. The 'iso-efficiency' of spatially different synaptic inputs arose from two opposing factors: an increase in EPSP amplitude at the synapse with distance from the soma was opposed by a nearly equivalent increase in voltage attenuation. These simulations suggest that, in these particular neurones, the amplitude of EPSPs measured at the soma will not be significantly affected by the location of synaptic inputs.

  1. Area CA3 interneurons receive two spatially segregated mossy fiber inputs

    OpenAIRE

    Cosgrove, Kathleen E.; Galvan, Emilio J.; Meriney, Stephen D.; Barrionuevo, German

    2010-01-01

    Area CA3 receives two extrinsic excitatory inputs, the mossy fibers (MF) and the perforant path (PP). Interneurons with somata in str. lacunosum moleculare (L-M) of CA3 modulate the influence of the MF and PP on pyramidal cell activity by providing strong feed-forward inhibitory influence to pyramidal cells. Here we report that L-M interneurons receive two separate MF inputs, one to the dorsal dendrites from the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus (MFSDG), and a second to ventral dendri...

  2. Notice of retraction

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    Tunali S

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Dear Colleagues,It has recently been brought to my attention that the following case report by Padeyappanavar et al., which was published online in the International Journal of Anatomical Variations (IJAV on February 23rd, 2010 (Padeyappanavar KV, Kazi AK, Nagaleekar A, Kulkarni D, Kulkarni U, Hukkeri V. Elongated styloid process – report of three cases. International Journal of Anatomical Variations. 2010; 3: 30–32. [1], has already been published in the Journal of the Anatomical Society of India in June 2008 [2], and in the Al Ameen Journal of Medical Sciences in January 2010 [3]. The manuscript has been submitted to IJAV in July 30th, 2009, and accepted for publication in January 22nd, 2010. It is obvious that the manuscript has been submitted to IJAV one year later to its initial publication in the Journal of the Anatomical Society of India. The editorial office of IJAV has confirmed that this case report by Padeyappanavar et al. was a duplicate publication, violating the publication agreement of IJAV. The most important condition of submission of a manuscript for publication is explicit declaration of the authors that the paper has not been published or is not under consideration for publication in any other journal. As such this manuscript represents a severe abuse of the scientific publishing system.We immediately contacted the corresponding author (Dr. Kiran V. Padeyappanavar, Department of Anatomy, Belgaum Institute of Medical Sciences, India. E-mail: dr.kiranvp@gmail.com. Unfortunately, we could not get a satisfactory or logical explanation. Therefore, we hereby notice our readers that the paper by Padeyappanavar et al. [1] has been retracted.The institutions of the authors will also be advised via this notice of retraction.We deeply apologize to our readers and the international scientific community for this inconvenience that was totally occurred out of IJAV, and respectfully announce to the scientific world

  3. Morphology of CA3 non-pyramidal cells in the developing rat hippocampus.

    OpenAIRE

    Gaïarsa, Jean-Luc; Khalilov, Ilgam; Gozlan, Henri; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2001-01-01

    International audience; Although several investigations have shown that the local GABAergic circuit in the rat hippocampus is functional very early in development, this result has not been yet completed by the investigation of the full dendritic and axonal arborization of the neonatal interneurones. In the present study, intracellular injection of biocytin was used to assess the branching pattern of interneurones in the hippocampal CA3 region of rat between 2 and 6 days of age. Based on their...

  4. Unitary inhibitory field potentials in the CA3 region of rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazelot, Michaël; Dinocourt, Céline; Cohen, Ivan; Miles, Richard

    2010-06-15

    Glickfeld and colleagues (2009) suggested that single hippocampal interneurones generate field potentials at monosynaptic latencies. We pursued this observation in simultaneous intracellular and multiple extracellular records from the CA3 region of rat hippocampal slices. We confirmed that interneurones evoked field potentials at monosynaptic latencies. Pyramidal cells initiated disynaptic inhibitory field potentials, but did not initiate detectable monosynaptic excitatory fields. We confirmed that inhibitory fields were GABAergic in nature and showed they were suppressed at low external Cl(-), suggesting they originate at postsynaptic sites. Field potentials generated by a single interneuron were detected at multiple sites over distances of more than 800 mum along the stratum pyramidale of the CA3 region. We used arrays of extracellular electrodes to examine amplitude distributions of spontaneous inhibitory fields recorded at sites orthogonal to or along the CA3 stratum pyramidale. Cluster analysis of spatially distributed inhibitory field events let us separate events generated by interneurones terminating on distinct zones of somato-dendritic axis. Events generated at dendritic sites had similar amplitudes but occurred less frequently and had somewhat slower kinetics than perisomatic events generated near the stratum pyramidale. In records from multiple sites in the CA3 stratum pyramidale, we distinguished inhibitory fields that seemed to be initiated by interneurones with spatially distinct axonal arborisations.

  5. Area CA3 interneurons receive two spatially segregated mossy fiber inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Kathleen E; Galván, Emilio J; Meriney, Stephen D; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2010-09-01

    Area CA3 receives two extrinsic excitatory inputs, the mossy fibers (MF), and the perforant path (PP). Interneurons with somata in str. lacunosum moleculare (L-M) of CA3 modulate the influence of the MF and PP on pyramidal cell activity by providing strong feed-forward inhibitory influence to pyramidal cells. Here we report that L-M interneurons receive two separate MF inputs, one to the dorsal dendrites from the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus (MF(SDG)), and a second to ventral dendrites from the str. lucidum (MF(SL)). Responses elicited from MF(SDG) and MF(SL) stimulation sites have strong paired-pulse facilitation, similar DCG-IV sensitivity, amplitude, and decay kinetics but target spatially segregated domains on the interneuron dendrites. These data demonstrate that certain interneuron subtypes are entrained by two convergent MF inputs to spatially separated regions of the dendritic tree. This anatomical arrangement could make these interneurons considerably more responsive to the excitatory drive from dentate granule cells. Furthermore, temporal summation is linear or slightly sublinear between PP and MF(SL) but supralinear between PP and MF(SDG). This specific boosting of the excitatory drive to interneurons from the SDG location may indicate that L-M interneurons could be specifically involved in the processing of the associational component of the recognition memory.

  6. Area CA3 interneurons receive two spatially segregated mossy fiber inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Kathleen E.; Galvan, Emilio J.; Meriney, Stephen D.; Barrionuevo, German

    2009-01-01

    Area CA3 receives two extrinsic excitatory inputs, the mossy fibers (MF) and the perforant path (PP). Interneurons with somata in str. lacunosum moleculare (L-M) of CA3 modulate the influence of the MF and PP on pyramidal cell activity by providing strong feed-forward inhibitory influence to pyramidal cells. Here we report that L-M interneurons receive two separate MF inputs, one to the dorsal dendrites from the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus (MFSDG), and a second to ventral dendrites from the str. lucidum (MFSL). Responses elicited from MFSDG and MFSL stimulation sites have strong paired-pulse facilitation, similar DCG-IV sensitivity, amplitude, and decay kinetics but target spatially segregated domains on the interneuron dendrites. These data demonstrate that certain interneuron subtypes are entrained by two convergent MF inputs to spatially separated regions of the dendritic tree. This anatomical arrangement could make these interneurons considerably more responsive to the excitatory drive from dentate granule cells. Furthermore, temporal summation is linear or slightly sublinear between PP and MFSL but supralinear between PP and MFSDG. This specific boosting of the excitatory drive to interneurons from the SDG location may indicate that L-M interneurons could be specifically involved in the processing of the associational component of the recognition memory. PMID:19830814

  7. Sparse and Specific Coding during Information Transmission between Co-cultured Dentate Gyrus and CA3 Hippocampal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Daniele; Thiagarajan, Srikanth; DeMarse, Thomas B.; Wheeler, Bruce C.; Brewer, Gregory J.

    2017-01-01

    To better understand encoding and decoding of stimulus information in two specific hippocampal sub-regions, we isolated and co-cultured rat primary dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 neurons within a two-chamber device with axonal connectivity via micro-tunnels. We tested the hypothesis that, in these engineered networks, decoding performance of stimulus site information would be more accurate when stimuli and information flow occur in anatomically correct feed-forward DG to CA3 vs. CA3 back to DG. In particular, we characterized the neural code of these sub-regions by measuring sparseness and uniqueness of the responses evoked by specific paired-pulse stimuli. We used the evoked responses in CA3 to decode the stimulation sites in DG (and vice-versa) by means of learning algorithms for classification (support vector machine, SVM). The device was placed over an 8 × 8 grid of extracellular electrodes (micro-electrode array, MEA) in order to provide a platform for monitoring development, self-organization, and improved access to stimulation and recording at multiple sites. The micro-tunnels were designed with dimensions 3 × 10 × 400 μm allowing axonal growth but not migration of cell bodies and long enough to exclude traversal by dendrites. Paired-pulse stimulation (inter-pulse interval 50 ms) was applied at 22 different sites and repeated 25 times in each chamber for each sub-region to evoke time-locked activity. DG-DG and CA3-CA3 networks were used as controls. Stimulation in DG drove signals through the axons in the tunnels to activate a relatively small set of specific electrodes in CA3 (sparse code). CA3-CA3 and DG-DG controls were less sparse in coding than CA3 in DG-CA3 networks. Using all target electrodes with the three highest spike rates (14%), the evoked responses in CA3 specified each stimulation site in DG with optimum uniqueness of 64%. Finally, by SVM learning, these evoked responses in CA3 correctly decoded the stimulation sites in DG for 43% of the

  8. Ca3Mn2O7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiblin, Nicolas; Grebille, Dominique; Leligny, Henri; Martin, Christine

    2002-01-01

    The tricalcium dimanganese heptaoxide (Ca3Mn2O7) member of the Ruddlesden-Popper series Ca(n+1)Mn(n)O(3n+1), i.e. with n = 2, was previously reported with an I-centred tetragonal lattice [a(t) = 3.68 and c(t) = 19.57 A] by Fawcett, Sunstrom, Greenblatt, Croft & Ramanujachary [Chem. Mater. (1998), 10, 3643-3651]. It is now found to be orthorhombic, with an A-centred lattice [a = 5.2347 (6), b = 5.2421 (2) and c = 19.4177 (19) A]. The structure has been refined in space group A2(1)am using X-ray single-crystal diffraction data and assuming the existence of twin domains related by the (1-10) plane. A comparison with the basic perovskite structure CaMnO3 (n = infinity) is proposed.

  9. Bidirectional shift in the cornu ammonis 3 pyramidal dendritic organization following brief stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kole, MHP; Costoli, T; Koolhaas, JM; Fuchs, E

    2004-01-01

    The negative impact of chronic stress at the structure of apical dendrite branches of cornu ammonis 3 (CA3) pyramidal neurons is well established. However, there is no information available on the CA3 dendritic organization related to short-lasting stress, which suffices to produce longterm habituat

  10. Delayed cell death in the contralateral hippocampus following kainate injection into the CA3 subfield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglóczky, Z; Freund, T F

    1995-06-01

    A model of epileptic cell death has been developed employing unilateral injections of kainic acid, a glutamate agonist, into the CA3 subfield of the hippocampus. The contralateral hippocampus, where neuronal damage is induced by hyperactivity in afferent pathways, served as the model structure. The pattern of cell death in this model was shown earlier to correspond to the vulnerable regions in human temporal lobe epilepsy. In the present time-course study we demonstrated that the different subpopulations of vulnerable cells in the contralateral hippocampus of the rat degenerate at different times following kainate injection. Spiny calretinin-containing cells in the hilus and CA3 stratum lucidum disappear at 12-24 h, other types of hilar neurons and CA3c pyramidal cells show shrinkage and argyrophilia at two days, whereas CA1 pyramidal cells degenerate at three days postinjection. The majority of cells destined to die showed a transient expression of the heatshock protein 72, approximately one day (for hilar-CA3c) or two days (for CA1) before degeneration. Parvalbumin-immunoreactivity transiently disappeared from the soma and dendrites of interneurons between the first and the fourth day. The results suggest that seizure-induced cell death is delayed, therefore acute oedema, even if it occurs, is insufficient to kill neurons. The only exception is the population of calretinin-containing interneurons degenerating at 12-24 h. The further one day delay between hilar-CA3c and CA1 cell death is likely to be due to differences in the relative density of glutamate receptor types (kainate versus NMDA) and the source of afferent input of these subfields. Thus, simple pharmacotherapy targeting only one of the excitotoxic mechanisms (i.e. acute oedema of calretinin cells versus delayed death of hilar-CA3c and CA1 cells at different time points) is likely to fail.

  11. Retracted publications in the drug literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samp, Jennifer C; Schumock, Glen T; Pickard, A Simon

    2012-07-01

    Recent studies have suggested an increase in the number of retracted scientific publications. It is unclear how broadly the issue of misleading and fraudulent publications pertains to retractions of drug therapy studies. Therefore, we sought to determine the trends and factors associated with retracted publications in drug therapy literature. A PubMed search was conducted to identify retracted drug therapy articles published from 2000-2011. Articles were grouped according to reason for retraction, which was classified as scientific misconduct or error. Scientific misconduct was further divided into data fabrication, data falsification, questions of data veracity, unethical author conduct, and plagiarism. Error was defined as duplicate publication, scientific mistake, journal error, or unstated reasons. Additional data were extracted from the retracted articles, including type of article, funding source, author information, therapeutic area, and retraction issue. A total of 742 retractions were identified from 2000-2011 in the general biomedical literature, and 102 drug studies met our inclusion criteria. Of these, 73 articles (72%) were retracted for a reason classified as scientific misconduct, whereas 29 articles (28%) were retracted for error. Among the 73 articles classified as scientific misconduct, those classified as unethical author conduct (32 articles [44%]) and data fabrication (24 articles [33%]) constituted the majority. The median time from publication of the original article to retraction was 31 months (range 1-130). Fifty percent of retracted articles did not state a funding source, whereas pharmaceutical manufacturer funding accounted for only 13 articles (13%) analyzed. Many retractions were due to repeat offenses by a small number of authors, with nearly 40% of the retracted studies associated with two individuals. We found that a greater proportion of drug therapy articles were retracted for reasons of misconduct and fraud compared with other

  12. Terminal field and firing selectivity of cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons in the hippocampal CA3 area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasztóczi, Bálint; Tukker, John J; Somogyi, Peter; Klausberger, Thomas

    2011-12-07

    Hippocampal oscillations reflect coordinated neuronal activity on many timescales. Distinct types of GABAergic interneuron participate in the coordination of pyramidal cells over different oscillatory cycle phases. In the CA3 area, which generates sharp waves and gamma oscillations, the contribution of identified GABAergic neurons remains to be defined. We have examined the firing of a family of cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons during network oscillations in urethane-anesthetized rats and compared them with firing of CA3 pyramidal cells. The position of the terminals of individual visualized interneurons was highly diverse, selective, and often spatially coaligned with either the entorhinal or the associational inputs to area CA3. The spike timing in relation to theta and gamma oscillations and sharp waves was correlated with the innervated pyramidal cell domain. Basket and dendritic-layer-innervating interneurons receive entorhinal and associational inputs and preferentially fire on the ascending theta phase, when pyramidal cell assemblies emerge. Perforant-path-associated cells, driven by recurrent collaterals of pyramidal cells fire on theta troughs, when established pyramidal cell assemblies are most active. In the CA3 area, slow and fast gamma oscillations occurred on opposite theta oscillation phases. Perforant-path-associated and some COUP-TFII-positive interneurons are strongly coupled to both fast and slow gamma oscillations, but basket and dendritic-layer-innervating cells are weakly coupled to fast gamma oscillations only. During sharp waves, different interneuron types are activated, inhibited, or remain unaffected. We suggest that specialization in pyramidal cell domain and glutamatergic input-specific operations, reflected in the position of GABAergic terminals, is the evolutionary drive underlying the diversity of cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons.

  13. Neuromodulation of the Feedforward Dentate Gyrus-CA3 Microcircuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Luke Y.; Bacon, Travis J.; Tigaret, Cezar M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2016-01-01

    The feedforward dentate gyrus-CA3 microcircuit in the hippocampus is thought to activate ensembles of CA3 pyramidal cells and interneurons to encode and retrieve episodic memories. The creation of these CA3 ensembles depends on neuromodulatory input and synaptic plasticity within this microcircuit. Here we review the mechanisms by which the neuromodulators aceylcholine, noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin reconfigure this microcircuit and thereby infer the net effect of these modulators on the processes of episodic memory encoding and retrieval. PMID:27799909

  14. Neuromodulation of the feedforward dentate gyrus-CA3 microcircuit

    OpenAIRE

    Luke Yuri Prince; Travis J Bacon; Tigaret, Cezar M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2016-01-01

    The feedforward dentate gyrus-CA3 microcircuit in the hippocampus is thought to activate ensembles of CA3 pyramidal cells and interneurons to encode and retrieve episodic memories. The creation of these CA3 ensembles depends on neuromodulatory input and synaptic plasticity within this microcircuit. Here we review the mechanisms by which the neuromodulators aceylcholine, noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin reconfigure this microcircuit and thereby infer the net effect of these modulators on...

  15. Neuromodulation of the Feedforward Dentate Gyrus-CA3 Microcircuit

    OpenAIRE

    Prince, Luke; Travis J Bacon; Tigaret, Cezar; Mellor, Jack

    2016-01-01

    The feedforward dentate gyrus-CA3 microcircuit in the hippocampus is thought to activate ensembles of CA3 pyramidal cells and interneurons to encode and retrieve episodic memories. The creation of these CA3 ensembles depends on neuromodulatory input and synaptic plasticity within this microcircuit. Here we review the mechanisms by which the neuromodulators aceylcholine, noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin reconfigure this microcircuit and thereby infer the net effect of these modulators on...

  16. Neuromodulation of the Feedforward Dentate Gyrus-CA3 Microcircuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Luke Y; Bacon, Travis J; Tigaret, Cezar M; Mellor, Jack R

    2016-01-01

    The feedforward dentate gyrus-CA3 microcircuit in the hippocampus is thought to activate ensembles of CA3 pyramidal cells and interneurons to encode and retrieve episodic memories. The creation of these CA3 ensembles depends on neuromodulatory input and synaptic plasticity within this microcircuit. Here we review the mechanisms by which the neuromodulators aceylcholine, noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin reconfigure this microcircuit and thereby infer the net effect of these modulators on the processes of episodic memory encoding and retrieval.

  17. Quantitative morphometry of electrophysiologically identified CA3b interneurons reveals robust local geometry and distinct cell classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascoli, Giorgio A; Brown, Kerry M; Calixto, Eduardo; Card, J Patrick; Galván, E J; Perez-Rosello, T; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2009-08-20

    The morphological and electrophysiological diversity of inhibitory cells in hippocampal area CA3 may underlie specific computational roles and is not yet fully elucidated. In particular, interneurons with somata in strata radiatum (R) and lacunosum-moleculare (L-M) receive converging stimulation from the dentate gyrus and entorhinal cortex as well as within CA3. Although these cells express different forms of synaptic plasticity, their axonal trees and connectivity are still largely unknown. We investigated the branching and spatial patterns, plus the membrane and synaptic properties, of rat CA3b R and L-M interneurons digitally reconstructed after intracellular labeling. We found considerable variability within but no difference between the two layers, and no correlation between morphological and biophysical properties. Nevertheless, two cell types were identified based on the number of dendritic bifurcations, with significantly different anatomical and electrophysiological features. Axons generally branched an order of magnitude more than dendrites. However, interneurons on both sides of the R/L-M boundary revealed surprisingly modular axodendritic arborizations with consistently uniform local branch geometry. Both axons and dendrites followed a lamellar organization, and axons displayed a spatial preference toward the fissure. Moreover, only a small fraction of the axonal arbor extended to the outer portion of the invaded volume, and tended to return toward the proximal region. In contrast, dendritic trees demonstrated more limited but isotropic volume occupancy. These results suggest a role of predominantly local feedforward and lateral inhibitory control for both R and L-M interneurons. Such a role may be essential to balance the extensive recurrent excitation of area CA3 underlying hippocampal autoassociative memory function.

  18. Retraction RETRACTION of two articles with plagiarism in common.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A M Duarte, Francisco

    2016-10-07

    The GMR editorial staff was alerted about two manuscripts that were found to be substantially equal. The Publisher and Editor decided to retract these articles in accordance with the recommendations of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE). After a thorough investigation, there is strong reason to believe that the peer review process was failure and, after review and contacting the authors, the editors of Genetics and Molecular Research decided to retract the article. The authors and their institutions were advised of this serious breach of ethics. The retracted articles are: Li Q, Chen C-F, Wang D-Y, Lü Y-T, et al. (2015). Transplantation of umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells increases levels of nerve growth factor in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with autism. Genet. Mol. Res. 14: 8725-8732. and Li Q, Chen C-F, Wang D-Y, Lü Y-T, et al. (2016). Changes in growth factor levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of autism patients after transplantation of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells and umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Genet. Mol. Res. 15: gmr.15027526. There is large-scale duplication of text from a previous publication by the authors in all sections of the articles and the Material and Methods section is identical for both manuscripts Li et al. (2015) and Li et al. (2016). Other major study, from where the text has been copied substantially, was found and can be accessed at https://translational-medicine.biomedcentral.com/ articles/10.1186/1479-5876-11-196.

  19. Management of postblepharoplasty lower eyelid retraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlus, Brett; Schwarcz, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Future advances in the treatment of lower eyelid retraction will likely focus on new synthetic graft materials that are inert and stable with minimal potential for reabsorption. Other advances may focus on biomodulating agents that reduce the risk of retraction at the time of cosmetic eyelid surgery or reverse existing exuberant scarring. Nonsurgical options are viable for modest cases, and these conservative measures may continue to improve, but, for severe retraction, surgery still offers the best promise of correction.

  20. Dendritic Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Sevda Söker

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells, a member of family of antigen presenting cells, are most effective cells in the primary immune response. Dendritic cells originated from dendron, in mean of tree in the Greek, because of their long and elaborate cytoplasmic branching processes. Dendritic cells constitute approximately 0.1 to 1 percent of the blood’s mononuclear cell. Dendritic cells are widely distributed, and specialized for antigen capture and T cell stimulation. In this article, structures and functions of...

  1. Upper Eyelid Retraction After Periorbital Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    We report four unusual cases of upper eyelid retraction following periorbital trauma. Four previously healthy patients were evaluated for unilateral upper eyelid retraction following periorbital trauma. A 31-year-old man (Case 1) and a 24-year-old man (Case 2) presented with left upper eyelid retraction which developed after blow-out fractures, a 44-year-old woman (Case 3) presented with left upper eyelid retraction secondary to a periorbital contusion that occurred one week prior, and a 56-y...

  2. BK potassium channels control transmitter release at CA3-CA3 synapses in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaelli, Giacomo; Saviane, Chiara; Mohajerani, Majid H; Pedarzani, Paola; Cherubini, Enrico

    2004-05-15

    Large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channels (BK channels) activate in response to calcium influx during action potentials and contribute to the spike repolarization and fast afterhyperpolarization. BK channels targeted to active zones in presynaptic nerve terminals have been shown to limit calcium entry and transmitter release by reducing the duration of the presynaptic spike at neurosecretory nerve terminals and at the frog neuromuscular junction. However, their functional role in central synapses is still uncertain. In the hippocampus, BK channels have been proposed to act as an 'emergency brake' that would control transmitter release only under conditions of excessive depolarization and accumulation of intracellular calcium. Here we demonstrate that in the CA3 region of hippocampal slice cultures, under basal experimental conditions, the selective BK channel blockers paxilline (10 microM) and iberiotoxin (100 nM) increase the frequency, but not the amplitude, of spontaneously occurring action potential-dependent EPSCs. These drugs did not affect miniature currents recorded in the presence of tetrodotoxin, suggesting that their action was dependent on action potential firing. Moreover, in double patch-clamp recordings from monosynaptically interconnected CA3 pyramidal neurones, blockade of BK channels enhanced the probability of transmitter release, as revealed by the increase in success rate, EPSC amplitude and the concomitant decrease in paired-pulse ratio in response to pairs of presynaptic action potentials delivered at a frequency of 0.05 Hz. BK channel blockers also enhanced the appearance of delayed responses, particularly following the second action potential in the paired-pulse protocol. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that BK channels are powerful modulators of transmitter release and synaptic efficacy in central neurones.

  3. A Case-Control Comparison of Retracted and Non-Retracted Clinical Trials: Can Retraction Be Predicted?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Grant Steen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Does scientific misconduct severe enough to result in retraction disclose itself with warning signs? We test a hypothesis that variables in the results section of randomized clinical trials (RCTs are associated with retraction, even without access to raw data. We evaluated all English-language RCTs retracted from the PubMed database prior to 2011. Two controls were selected for each case, matching publication journal, volume, issue, and page as closely as possible. Number of authors, subjects enrolled, patients at risk, and patients treated were tallied in cases and controls. Among case RCTs, 17.5% had ≤2 authors, while 6.3% of control RCTs had ≤2 authors. Logistic regression shows that having few authors is associated with retraction (p < 0.03, although the number of subjects enrolled, patients at risk, or treated patients is not. However, none of the variables singly, nor all of the variables combined, can reliably predict retraction, perhaps because retraction is such a rare event. Exploratory analysis suggests that retraction rate varies by medical field (p < 0.001. Although retraction cannot be predicted on the basis of the variables evaluated, concern is warranted when there are few authors, enrolled subjects, patients at risk, or treated patients. Ironically, these features urge caution in evaluating any RCT, since they identify studies that are statistically weaker.

  4. Progressive alterations of hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses in an animal model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Hui; An, Shu-Cheng; Ren, Wei; Ma, Xin-Ming

    2014-12-15

    Major depressive disorder is the most prevalent psychiatric condition, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this disorder are largely unknown, although multiple hypotheses have been proposed. The aim of this study was to characterize the progressive alteration of neuronal plasticity in the male rat hippocampus during depression induced by chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), an established animal model of depression. The data in the hippocampus were collected on days 7, 14 and 21 after the onset of three-week CUMS. When analyzed on day 21, three-week CUMS induced typically depressive-like behaviors, impaired LTP induction, and decreased basal synaptic transmission at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses recorded in vivo, which was accompanied by decreased density of dendritic spines in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons. The levels of both Kalirin-7 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus were decreased at the same time. On day 14 (middle phase), some depressive-like behaviors were observed, which was accompanied by depressed basal synaptic transmission and enhanced LTP induction at the CA3-CA1 synapses. However, BDNF expression was decreased without alteration of Kalirin7 expression in comparison with no-stress control. Depressed basal synaptic transmission occurred in the middle phase of CUMS may contribute to decreased expression of BDNF. On day 7, depressive-like behaviors were not observed, and LTP induction, spine density, Kalirin-7 and BDNF expression were not altered by CUMS in comparison with no-stress control. These results showed that the functional changes at CA3-CA1synapses occurred earlier than the structural alteration during three-week CUMS as a strategy of neural adaptation, and rats required three weeks to develop depressive-like behaviors during CUMS. Our results suggest an important role of Kalirin-7 in CUMS-mediated alterations in spine density, synaptic function and overall depressive-like behaviors on day 21.

  5. Topological organization of CA3-to-CA1 excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Yoshie; Ogawa, Koichi; Takahara, Yuji; Takasu, Keiko; Royer, Sebastien; Hasegawa, Minoru; Sakaguchi, Gaku; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2015-09-01

    The CA1-projecting axons of CA3 pyramidal cells, called Schaffer collaterals, constitute one of the major information flow routes in the hippocampal formation. Recent anatomical studies have revealed the non-random structural connectivity between CA3 and CA1, but little is known regarding the functional connectivity (i.e. how CA3 network activity is functionally transmitted downstream to the CA1 network). Using functional multi-neuron calcium imaging of rat hippocampal slices, we monitored the spatiotemporal patterns of spontaneous CA3 and CA1 burst activity under pharmacological GABAergic blockade. We found that spatially clustered CA3 activity patterns were transformed into layered CA1 activity sequences. Specifically, synchronized bursts initiated from multiple hot spots in CA3 ensembles, and CA1 neurons located deeper in the pyramidal cell layer were recruited during earlier phases of the burst events. The order of these sequential activations was maintained across the bursts, but the sequence velocity varied depending on the inter-burst intervals. Thus, CA3 axons innervate CA1 neurons in a highly topographical fashion.

  6. Retraction of Hard, Lozano, and Tversky (2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hard, B. M.; Lozano, S. C.; Tversky, B.

    2008-01-01

    Reports a retraction of "Hierarchical encoding of behavior: Translating perception into action" by Bridgette Martin Hard, Sandra C. Lozano and Barbara Tversky (Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 2006[Nov], Vol 135[4], 588-608). All authors retract this article. Co-author Tversky and co-author Hard believe that the research results cannot…

  7. Retracted: FLT3: beyond good and evil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunas-Rangel, Francisco Alejandro; Cortes-Penagos, Carlos; Viveros-Sandoval, Martha Eva

    2016-07-29

    The above article, published online on 29 July 2016 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the Journal Editor in Chief, Journal Production Manager, and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. The retraction has been agreed due to 48% similar significant between this article and an article published in Nature Reviews Cancer journal.

  8. A Novel Rubric for Rating the Quality of Retraction Notices

    OpenAIRE

    Emma Bilbrey; Natalie O'Dell; Jonathan Creamer

    2014-01-01

    When a scientific article is found to be either fraudulent or erroneous, one course of action available to both the authors and the publisher is to retract said article. Unfortunately, not all retraction notices properly inform the reader of the problems with a retracted article. This study developed a novel rubric for rating and standardizing the quality of retraction notices, and used it to assess the retraction notices of 171 retracted articles from 15 journals. Results suggest the rubric ...

  9. Neuromodulation of the feedforward dentate gyrus-CA3 microcircuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Yuri Prince

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The feedforward dentate gyrus-CA3 microcircuit in the hippocampus is thought to activate ensembles of CA3 pyramidal cells and interneurons to encode and retrieve episodic memories. The creation of these CA3 ensembles depends on neuromodulatory input and synaptic plasticity within this microcircuit. Here we review the mechanisms by which the neuromodulators aceylcholine, noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin reconfigure this microcircuit and thereby infer the net effect of these modulators on the processes of episodic memory encoding and retrieval.

  10. Excitation/inhibition imbalance and impaired synaptic inhibition in hippocampal area CA3 of Mecp2 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calfa, Gaston; Li, Wei; Rutherford, John M; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2015-02-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopment disorder associated with intellectual disabilities and caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator Methyl-CpG-binding Protein-2 (MeCP2). Neuronal dysfunction and changes in cortical excitability occur in RTT individuals and Mecp2-deficient mice, including hippocampal network hyperactivity and higher frequency of spontaneous multiunit spikes in the CA3 cell body layer. Here, we describe impaired synaptic inhibition and an excitation/inhibition (E/I) imbalance in area CA3 of acute slices from symptomatic Mecp2 knockout male mice (referred to as Mecp2(-/y) ). The amplitude of TTX-resistant miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSC) was smaller in CA3 pyramidal neurons of Mecp2(-/y) slices than in wildtype controls, while the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSC) was significantly larger in Mecp2(-/y) neurons. Consistently, quantitative confocal immunohistochemistry revealed significantly lower intensity of the alpha-1 subunit of GABAA Rs in the CA3 cell body layer of Mecp2(-/y) mice, while GluA1 puncta intensities were significantly higher in the CA3 dendritic layers of Mecp2(-/y) mice. In addition, the input/output (I/O) relationship of evoked IPSCs had a shallower slope in CA3 pyramidal neurons Mecp2(-/y) neurons. Consistent with the absence of neuronal degeneration in RTT and MeCP2-based mouse models, the density of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-expressing interneurons in area CA3 was not affected in Mecp2(-/y) mice. Furthermore, the intrinsic membrane properties of several interneuron subtypes in area CA3 were not affected by Mecp2 loss. However, mEPSCs are smaller and less frequent in CA3 fast-spiking basket cells of Mecp2(-/y) mice, suggesting an impaired glutamatergic drive in this interneuron population. These results demonstrate that a loss-of-function mutation in Mecp2 causes impaired E/I balance onto CA3 pyramidal neurons, leading to a

  11. Neuronal migration and its disorders affecting the CA3 region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard eBelvindrah

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we focus on CA3 neuronal migration disorders in the rodent. We begin by introducing the main steps of hippocampal development, and we summarize characteristic hippocampal malformations in human. We then describe various mouse mutants showing structural hippocampal defects. Notably, genes identified in human cortical neuronal migration disorders consistently give rise to a CA3 phenotype when mutated in the mouse. We successively describe their molecular, physiological and behavioral phenotypes that together contribute to a better understanding of CA3-dependent functions. We finally discuss potential factors underlying the CA3 vulnerability revealed by these mouse mutants and that may also contribute to other human neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  12. Retracted: Exploring resident reflections to understand burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Abigail Ford; Jakalow, Holli; Benton, Laura; Moss, Haley; Mitchell, Lauren; Feldman, Nathalie

    2016-04-05

    Retraction: Winkel, A. F., Jakalow, H., Benton, L., Moss, H., Mitchell, L. and Feldman, N. (2016), Exploring resident reflections to understand burnout. The Clinical Teacher. doi: 10.1111/tct.12513 The above article, published online on 5th April 2016 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Co-Editors, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The retraction has been agreed due to a change in the status of the research project's Institutional Review Board approval, leading to permission to use some of the data in this article being revoked.

  13. The CA3 "backprojection" to the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfman, Helen E

    2007-01-01

    The hippocampus is typically described in the context of the trisynaptic circuit, a pathway that relays information from the perforant path to the dentate gyrus, dentate to area CA3, and CA3 to area CA1. Associated with this concept is the assumption that most hippocampal information processing occurs along the trisynaptic circuit. However, the entorhinal cortex may not be the only major extrinsic input to consider, and the trisynaptic circuit may not be the only way information is processed in hippocampus. Area CA3 receives input from a variety of sources, and may be as much of an "entry point" to hippocampus as the dentate gyrus. The axon of CA3 pyramidal cells targets diverse cell types, and has commissural projections, which together make it able to send information to much more of the hippocampus than granule cells. Therefore, CA3 pyramidal cells seem better designed to spread information through hippocampus than the granule cells. From this perspective, CA3 may be a point of entry that receives information which needs to be "broadcasted," whereas the dentate gyrus may be a point of entry that receives information with more selective needs for hippocampal processing. One aspect of the argument that CA3 pyramidal cells have a widespread projection is based on a part of its axonal arbor that has received relatively little attention, the collaterals that project in the opposite direction to the trisynaptic circuit, "back" to the dentate gyrus. The evidence for this "backprojection" to the dentate gyrus is strong, particularly in area CA3c, the region closest to the dentate gyrus, and in temporal hippocampus. The influence on granule cells is indirect, through hilar mossy cells and GABAergic neurons of the dentate gyrus, and appears to include direct projections in the case of CA3c pyramidal cells of ventral hippocampus. Physiological studies suggest that normally area CA3 does not have a robust excitatory influence on granule cells, but serves instead to inhibit

  14. Enhancement of CA3 hippocampal network activity by activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ster, Jeanne; Mateos, José María; Grewe, Benjamin Friedrich; Coiret, Guyllaume; Corti, Corrado; Corsi, Mauro; Helmchen, Fritjof; Gerber, Urs

    2011-06-14

    Impaired function or expression of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRIIs) is observed in brain disorders such as schizophrenia. This class of receptor is thought to modulate activity of neuronal circuits primarily by inhibiting neurotransmitter release. Here, we characterize a postsynaptic excitatory response mediated by somato-dendritic mGluRIIs in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells and in stratum oriens interneurons. The specific mGluRII agonists DCG-IV or LCCG-1 induced an inward current blocked by the mGluRII antagonist LY341495. Experiments with transgenic mice revealed a significant reduction of the inward current in mGluR3(-/-) but not in mGluR2(-/-) mice. The excitatory response was associated with periods of synchronized activity at theta frequency. Furthermore, cholinergically induced network oscillations exhibited decreased frequency when mGluRIIs were blocked. Thus, our data indicate that hippocampal responses are modulated not only by presynaptic mGluRIIs that reduce glutamate release but also by postsynaptic mGluRIIs that depolarize neurons and enhance CA3 network activity.

  15. A retractable barb needle for drug darts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.L. van Rooyen

    1973-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism and action of a new retractable barbneedle for drug darts are described. This dart needle is particularly successful in obviating unnecessary flight reactions andtrauma in darted animals, and facilitates the complete injection of the drug dose before the barb is retracted and the dart is dislogded from the animal. The whole process is completed within a few seconds and the expended dart can usually be retrieved in the immediate vicinity where the animal was darted.

  16. Low Concentrations of Alcohol Inhibit BDNF-Dependent GABAergic Plasticity via L-type Ca2+ channel Inhibition in Developing CA3 Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Zucca, Stefano; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is associated with learning and memory alterations that could be, in part, a consequence of hippocampal damage. The CA3 hippocampal subfield is one of the regions affected by ethanol (EtOH), including exposure during the 3rd trimester-equivalent (i.e. neonatal period in rats). However, the mechanism of action of EtOH is poorly understood. In CA3 pyramidal neurons from neonatal rats, dendritic BDNF release causes long-term potentiation of the frequency of...

  17. Transitional function of DG to CA3 in the hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Using single cell channel model,the transmission features of CA3-DG network in the hippocampus are investigated.The influence of the stimulation on discharge pattern of pyramidal neurons is analyzed,which shows that it starts with period spiking discharges,followed by period-doubling bifurcation to chaos,and period 3 discharge evolving into chaos,and ultimately a period of bursting discharges.Bv the synaptic model,the CA3.DG network model is constructed,which analyzes the summation of postsynaptic currents in the network,the influence of postsynaptic current on discharge rhythm as well as the mechanism of bursting discharges.The strong capacitv of spatiotemporal encoding in the network indicates the features of CA3 network during the information transmission process in the hippocampus.The modeling result with time delay of the synaptic transmission is in accordance with the experimental phenomena of action potential in the hippocampus.

  18. Physiological origins of evoked magnetic fields and extracellular field potentials produced by guinea-pig CA3 hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shingo; Zhang, Tongsheng; Hirose, Akira; Okada, Yoshio C

    2002-10-01

    This study examined whether evoked magnetic fields and intra- and extracellular potentials from longitudinal CA3 slices of guinea-pig can be interpreted within a single theoretical framework that incorporates ligand- and voltage-sensitive conductances in the dendrites and soma of the pyramidal cells. The 1991 CA3 mathematical model of R. D. Traub is modified to take into account the asymmetric branching patterns of the apical and basal dendrites of the pyramidal cells. The revised model accounts for the magnitude and waveform of the bi- and triphasic magnetic fields evoked by somatic and apical stimulations, respectively, in the slice in the absence of fast inhibition (blocked by 0.1 mM picrotoxin). The revised model also accounts for selective effects of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) and tetraethylammonium (TEA), which block the potassium channels of A and C type, respectively, on the slow wave of the magnetic fields. Furthermore, the model correctly predicts the laminar profiles of field potential as well as intracellular potentials in the pyramidal cells produced by two classes of cells - those directly activated and those indirectly (synaptically) activated by the applied external stimulus. The intracellular potentials in this validated model reveal that the spikes and slow waves of the magnetic fields are generated in or near the soma and apical dendrites, respectively. These results demonstrate that a single theoretical framework couched within the modern concepts of cellular physiology provides a unified account of magnetic fields outside the slice, extracellular potentials within the slice and intracellular potentials of the pyramidal cells for CA3.

  19. The hippocampal CA3 region can generate two distinct types of sharp wave-ripple complexes, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Katharina T; Kandrács, Ágnes; Ulbert, István; Pál, Ildikó; Szabó, Csilla; Héja, László; Wittner, Lucia

    2015-02-01

    Hippocampal sharp wave-ripples (SPW-Rs) occur during slow wave sleep and behavioral immobility and are thought to play an important role in memory formation. We investigated the cellular and network properties of SPW-Rs with simultaneous laminar multielectrode and intracellular recordings in a rat hippocampal slice model, using physiological bathing medium. Spontaneous SPW-Rs were generated in the dentate gyrus (DG), CA3, and CA1 regions. These events were characterized by a local field potential gradient (LFPg) transient, increased fast oscillatory activity and increased multiple unit activity (MUA). Two types of SPW-Rs were distinguished in the CA3 region based on their different LFPg and current source density (CSD) pattern. Type 1 (T1) displayed negative LFPg transient in the pyramidal cell layer, and the associated CSD sink was confined to the proximal dendrites. Type 2 (T2) SPW-Rs were characterized by positive LFPg transient in the cell layer, and showed CSD sinks involving both the apical and basal dendrites. In both types, consistent with the somatic CSD source, only a small subset of CA3 pyramidal cells fired, most pyramidal cells were hyperpolarized, while most interneurons increased firing rate before the LFPg peak. Different neuronal populations, with different proportions of pyramidal cells and distinct subsets of interneurons were activated during T1 and T2 SPW-Rs. Activation of specific inhibitory cell subsets-with the possible leading role of perisomatic interneurons-seems to be crucial to synchronize distinct ensembles of CA3 pyramidal cells finally resulting in the expression of different SPW-R activities. This suggests that the hippocampus can generate dynamic changes in its activity stemming from the same excitatory and inhibitory circuits, and so, might provide the cellular and network basis for an input-specific and activity-dependent information transmission.

  20. Behavioral Functions of the CA3 Subregion of the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesner, Raymond P.

    2007-01-01

    From a behavioral perspective, the CA3a,b subregion of the hippocampus plays an important role in the encoding of new spatial information within short-term memory with a duration of seconds and minutes. This can easily be observed in tasks that require rapid encoding, novelty detection, one-trial short-term or working memory, and one-trial cued…

  1. The role of the dentate gyrus, CA3a,b, and CA3c for detecting spatial and environmental novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsaker, Michael R; Rosenberg, Jenna S; Kesner, Raymond P

    2008-01-01

    It has been suggested that the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 cooperate to efficiently process spatial information. The DG has been proposed to be important for fine spatial discrimination, and the CA3 has been proposed to mediate larger scale spatial information processing. To evaluate the roles of the DG and CA3a,b for spatial processing, we developed a task that measures responses to either overall environmental novelty or a response to more subtle changes within the environment. Animals with lesions to the DG showed impaired novelty detection for both environment as well as smaller changes in the environment, whereas animals with lesions to CA3a,b showed no such deficits. A closer look at the lesions suggested that the CA3 lesions included only CA3a and CA3b, but spared CA3c. To test the role of the spared CA3c region, animals with selective lesions to CA3c that spared CA3a,b were run on the same task and showed an intermediate pattern of deficits. These results suggest that the DG is critical for spatial information processing. These data also suggest that CA3 is a heterogeneous structure, with CA3c lesioned animals showing greater spatial processing deficits than CA3a,b lesioned animals. These findings extend our knowledge of hippocampal function and need to be accounted for in future computational models.

  2. Versatile retraction mechanics: Implant assisted en-masse retraction with a boot loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Philip

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explain the versatility offered by the use of arch wires with boot loops in retraction mechanics while taking direct anchorage from mini-screws. Materials and Methods: The materials include the mini screws placed at the appropriate location and retraction arches made of 0.019 X 0.025 SS with boot loops placed distal to the lateral incisors. Mini screw provides a stable anchorage for enmasse retraction of the anterior teeth with the help of a boot loop using sliding and/or loop mechanics. Results: The arch wires with boot loops have a definite advantage over the soldered/ crimpable hooks because of the versatility it offers during the process of retraction. Conclusion: An innovative approach combining the advantages of absolute anchorage using mini implants and a retraction arch with boot loop is presented here.

  3. A new method for rapid Canine retraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Khavari A

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Distraction osteogenesis method (Do in bone lengthening and rapid midpalatal expansion have shown the great ability of osteognic tissues for rapid bone formation under distraction force and special protocol with optimum rate of one millimeter per day. Periodontal membrane of teeth (PDM is the extension of periostium in the alveolar socked. Orthodontic force distracts PDM fibers in the tension side and then bone formation will begin.Objects: Rapid retraction of canine tooth into extraction space of first premolar by DO protocol in order to show the ability of the PDM in rapid bone formation. The other objective was reducing total orthodontic treatment time of extraction cases.Patients and Methods: Tweleve maxillary canines in six patients were retracted rapidly in three weeks by a custom-made tooth-born appliance. Radiographic records were taken to evaluate the effects of heavy applied force on canine and anchorage teeth.Results: Average retraction was 7.05 mm in three weeks (2.35 mm/week. Canines rotated distal- in by mean 3.5 degrees.Anchorage loss was from 0 to 0.8 mm with average of 0.3 mm.Root resorption of canines was negligible, and was not significant clinically. Periodontium was normal after rapid retraction. No hazard for pulp vitality was observed.Discussion: PDM responded well to heavy distraction force by Do protocol. Rapid canine retraction seems to be a safe method and can considerabely reduce orthodontic time.

  4. Cellular anatomy, physiology and epileptiform activity in the CA3 region of Dcx knockout mice: a neuronal lamination defect and its consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazelot, Michael; Simonnet, Jean; Dinocourt, Céline; Bruel-Jungerman, Elodie; Miles, Richard; Fricker, Desdemona; Francis, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    We report data on the neuronal form, synaptic connectivity, neuronal excitability and epileptiform population activities generated by the hippocampus of animals with an inactivated doublecortin gene. The protein product of this gene affects neuronal migration during development. Human doublecortin (DCX) mutations are associated with lissencephaly, subcortical band heterotopia, and syndromes of intellectual disability and epilepsy. In Dcx(-/Y) mice, CA3 hippocampal pyramidal cells are abnormally laminated. The lamination defect was quantified by measuring the extent of the double, dispersed or single pyramidal cell layer in the CA3 region of Dcx(-/Y) mice. We investigated how this abnormal lamination affected two groups of synapses that normally innervate defined regions of the CA3 pyramidal cell membrane. Numbers of parvalbumin (PV)-containing interneurons, which contact peri-somatic sites, were not reduced in Dcx(-/Y) animals. Pyramidal cells in double, dispersed or single layers received PV-containing terminals. Excitatory mossy fibres which normally target proximal CA3 pyramidal cell apical dendrites apparently contact CA3 cells of both layers in Dcx(-/Y) animals but sometimes on basilar rather than apical dendrites. The dendritic form of pyramidal cells in Dcx(-/Y) animals was altered and pyramidal cells of both layers were more excitable than their counterparts in wild-type animals. Unitary inhibitory field events occurred at higher frequency in Dcx(-/Y) animals. These differences may contribute to a susceptibility to epileptiform activity: a modest increase in excitability induced both interictal and ictal-like discharges more effectively in tissue from Dcx(-/Y) mice than from wild-type animals.

  5. Retracted: Modern Concepts for Caries Tissue Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendicke, Falk

    2016-02-15

    "Modern Concepts for Caries Tissue Removal", by Falk Schwendicke The above article, published online on 15 February 2016 in Wiley Online Library (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.llll/jerd.12201), has been retracted by agreement between the author, Dr. Falk Schwendicke, the journal Editor-in-Chief, Dr. Harald O. Heymann, Associate Editor, Dr. Edward Swift and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed as the article was published in advance of other companion work which should have had precedence. The article pages have been replaced by the Retraction Statement and the article condensed accordingly. Schwendicke, F. Swift, EJ. Modern concepts for caries tissue removal. Dent J Esthet Rest 2016; 28:1; DOI: 10.1111/jerd.12201.

  6. [Inflammatory dendritic cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Elodie; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells are a rare and heterogeneous population of professional antigen-presenting cells. Several murine dendritic cell subpopulations have been identified that differ in their phenotype and functional properties. In the steady state, committed dendritic cell precursors differentiate into lymphoid organ-resident dendritic cells and migratory tissue dendritic cells. During inflammation appears an additional dendritic cell subpopulation that has been termed « inflammatory dendritic cells ». Inflammatory dendritic cells differentiate in situ from monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation. Here, we discuss how mouse inflammatory dendritic cells differ from macrophages and from other dendritic cell populations. Finally, we review recent work on human inflammatory dendritic cells.

  7. Deployable and retractable telescoping tubular structure development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    A new deployable and retractable telescoping boom capable of high deployed stiffness and strength is described. Deployment and retraction functions are controlled by simple, reliable, and fail-safe latches between the tubular segments. The latch and a BI-STEM (Storable Tubular Extendible Member) actuator work together to eliminate the need for the segments to overlap when deployed. This yields an unusually lightweight boom and compact launch configuration. An aluminum space-flight prototype with three joints displays zero structural deadband, low hysteresis, and high damping. The development approach and difficulties are discussed. Test results provide a joint model for sizing flight booms of any diameter and length.

  8. Extendable retractable telescopic mast for deployable structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, M.; Aguirre, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Extendable and Retractable Mast (ERM) which is presently developed by Dornier in the frame of an ESA-contract, will be used to deploy and retract large foldable structures. The design is based on a telescopic carbon-fiber structure with high stiffness, strength and pointing accuracy. To verify the chosen design, a breadboard model of an ERM was built and tested under thermal vacuum (TV)-conditions. It is planned as a follow-on development to manufacture and test an Engineering Model Mast. The Engineering Model will be used to establish the basis for an ERM-family covering a wide range of requirements.

  9. Housing under the pyramid reduces susceptibility of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons to prenatal stress in the developing rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Krishna Dilip; George, Mitchel Constance; Ramasamy, Perumal; Mustapha, Zainal Arifin

    2013-12-01

    Mother-offspring interaction begins before birth. The foetus is particularly vulnerable to environmental insults and stress. The body responds by releasing excess of the stress hormone cortisol, which acts on glucocorticoid receptors. Hippocampus in the brain is rich in glucocorticoid receptors and therefore susceptible to stress. The stress effects are reduced when the animals are placed under a model wooden pyramid. The present study was to first explore the effects of prenatal restraint-stress on the plasma corticosterone levels and the dendritic arborisation of CA3 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus of the offspring. Further, to test whether the pyramid environment would alter these effects, as housing under a pyramid is known to reduce the stress effects, pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were restrained for 9 h per day from gestation day 7 until parturition in a wire-mesh restrainer. Plasma corticosterone levels were found to be significantly increased. In addition, there was a significant reduction in the apical and the basal total dendritic branching points and intersections of the CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons. The results thus suggest that, housing in the pyramid dramatically reduces prenatal stress effects in rats.

  10. CA3 size predicts the precision of memory recall

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    How does the brain allow us to recall numerous life experiences despite there often being a high degree of similarity between memories? This is a key question in neuroscience. Moreover, there is also keen interest in understanding why some people are able to recall memories with greater clarity than other people. In this study, we identified a specific brain region, CA3, an area within a structure called the hippocampus, and a mechanism within it that helps to explain individual differences i...

  11. Symmetric spike timing-dependent plasticity at CA3CA3 synapses optimizes storage and recall in autoassociative networks

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Rajiv K; Kim, Sooyun; Guzman, Segundo J.; Jonas, Peter

    2016-01-01

    CA3–CA3 recurrent excitatory synapses are thought to play a key role in memory storage and pattern completion. Whether the plasticity properties of these synapses are consistent with their proposed network functions remains unclear. Here, we examine the properties of spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) at CA3CA3 synapses. Low-frequency pairing of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) and action potentials (APs) induces long-term potentiation (LTP), independent of temporal order....

  12. Article retracted, but the message lives on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greitemeyer, Tobias

    2014-04-01

    The retraction of an original article aims to ensure that readers are alerted to the fact that the findings are not trustworthy. However, the present research suggests that individuals still believe in the findings of an article even though they were later told that the data were fabricated and that the article was retracted. Participants in a debriefing condition and a no-debriefing condition learned about the scientific finding of an empirical article, whereas participants in a control condition did not. Afterward, participants in the debriefing condition were told that the article had been retracted because of fabricated data. Results showed that participants in the debriefing condition were less likely to believe in the findings than participants in the no-debriefing condition but were more likely to believe in the findings than participants in the control condition, suggesting that individuals do adjust their beliefs in the perceived truth of a scientific finding after debriefing-but insufficiently. Mediational analyses revealed that the availability of generated causal arguments underlies belief perseverance. These results suggest that a retraction note of an empirical article in a scientific journal is not sufficient to ensure that readers of the original article no longer believe in the article's conclusions.

  13. 16 CFR 1101.52 - Procedure for retraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedure for retraction. 1101.52 Section 1101.52 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INFORMATION DISCLOSURE UNDER SECTION 6(b) OF THE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT Retraction § 1101.52 Procedure for retraction. (a) Initiative....

  14. Coincidence detection of convergent perforant path and mossy fibre inputs by CA3 interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto, Eduardo; Galván, Emilio J; Card, J Patrick; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2008-06-01

    We performed whole-cell recordings from CA3 s. radiatum (R) and s. lacunosum-moleculare (L-M) interneurons in hippocampal slices to examine the temporal aspects of summation of converging perforant path (PP) and mossy fibre (MF) inputs. PP EPSPs were evoked from the s. lacunosum-moleculare in area CA1. MF EPSPs were evoked from the medial extent of the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus. Summation was strongly supralinear when examining PP EPSP with MF EPSP in a heterosynaptic pair at the 10 ms ISI, and linear to sublinear at longer ISIs. This pattern of nonlinearities suggests that R and L-M interneurons act as coincidence detectors for input from PP and MF. Summation at all ISIs was linear in voltage clamp mode demonstrating that nonlinearities were generated by postsynaptic voltage-dependent conductances. Supralinearity was not detected when the first EPSP in the pair was replaced by a simulated EPSP injected into the soma, suggesting that the conductances underlying the EPSP boosting were located in distal dendrites. Supralinearity was selectively eliminated with either Ni2+ (30 microm), mibefradil (10 microm) or nimodipine (15 microm), but was unaffected by QX-314. This pharmacological profile indicates that supralinearity is due to recruitment of dendritic T-type Ca2+channels by the first subthreshold EPSP in the pair. Results with the hyperpolarization-activated (Ih) channel blocker ZD 7288 (50 microm) revealed that Ih restricted the time course of supralinearity for coincidently summed EPSPs, and promoted linear to sublinear summation for asynchronous EPSPs. We conclude that coincidence detection results from the counterbalanced activation of T-type Ca2+ channels and inactivation of Ih.

  15. Modeling sharp wave-ripple complexes through a CA3-CA1 network model with chemical synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taxidis, Jiannis; Coombes, Stephen; Mason, Robert; Owen, Markus R

    2012-05-01

    The hippocampus, and particularly the CA3 and CA1 areas, exhibit a variety of oscillatory rhythms that span frequencies from the slow theta range (4-10 Hz) up to fast ripples (200 Hz). Various computational models of different complexities have been developed in an effort to simulate such population oscillations. Nevertheless the mechanism that underlies the so called Sharp Wave-Ripple complex (SPWR), observed in extracellular recordings in CA1, still remains elusive. We present here, the combination of two simple but realistic models of the rat CA3 and CA1 areas, connected together in a feedforward scheme mimicking Schaffer collaterals. Both network models are computationally simple one-dimensional arrays of excitatory and inhibitory populations interacting only via fast chemical synapses. Connectivity schemes and postsynaptic potentials are based on physiological data, yielding a realistic network topology. The CA3 model exhibits quasi-synchronous population bursts, which give rise to sharp wave-like deep depolarizations in the CA1 dendritic layer accompanied by transient field oscillations at ≈ 150-200 Hz in the somatic layer. The frequency and synchrony of these oscillations is based on interneuronal activity and fast-decaying recurrent inhibition in CA1. Pyramidal cell spikes are sparse and come from a subset of cells receiving stronger than average excitatory input from CA3. The model is shown to accurately reproduce a large number of basic characteristics of SPWRs and yields a new mechanism for the generation of ripples, offering an interpretation to a range of neurophysiological observations, such as the ripple disruption by halothane and the selective firing of pyramidal cells during ripples, which may have implications for memory consolidation during SPWRs.

  16. A Novel Rubric for Rating the Quality of Retraction Notices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Bilbrey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When a scientific article is found to be either fraudulent or erroneous, one course of action available to both the authors and the publisher is to retract said article. Unfortunately, not all retraction notices properly inform the reader of the problems with a retracted article. This study developed a novel rubric for rating and standardizing the quality of retraction notices, and used it to assess the retraction notices of 171 retracted articles from 15 journals. Results suggest the rubric to be a robust, if preliminary, tool. Analysis of the retraction notices suggest that their quality has not improved over the last 50 years, that it varies both between and within journals, and that it is dependent on the field of science, the author of the retraction notice, and the reason for retraction. These results indicate a lack of uniformity in the retraction policies of individual journals and throughout the scientific literature. The rubric presented in this study could be adopted by journals to help standardize the writing of retraction notices.

  17. Anatomically heterogeneous populations of CB1 cannabinoid receptor-expressing interneurons in the CA3 region of the hippocampus show homogeneous input-output characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Gergely G; Papp, Orsolya I; Máté, Zoltán; Szabó, Gábor; Hájos, Norbert

    2014-12-01

    A subpopulation of GABAergic cells in cortical structures expresses CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1 ) on their axon terminals. To understand the function of these interneurons in information processing, it is necessary to uncover how they are embedded into neuronal circuits. Therefore, the proportion of GABAergic terminals expressing CB1 and the morphological and electrophysiological properties of CB1 -immunoreactive interneurons should be revealed. We investigated the ratio and the origin of CB1 -expressing inhibitory boutons in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Using immunocytochemical techniques, we estimated that ∼40% of GABAergic axon terminals in different layers of CA3 also expressed CB1 . To identify the inhibitory cell types expressing CB1 in this region, we recorded and intracellularly labeled interneurons in hippocampal slices. CB1 -expressing interneurons showed distinct axonal arborization, and were classified as basket cells, mossy-fiber-associated cells, dendritic-layer-innervating cells or perforant-path-associated cells. In each morphological category, a substantial variability in axonal projection was observed. In contrast to the diverse morphology, the active and passive membrane properties were found to be rather similar. Using paired recordings, we found that pyramidal cells displayed large and fast unitary postsynaptic currents in response to activating basket and mossy-fiber-associated cells, while they showed slower and smaller synaptic events in pairs originating from interneurons that innervate the dendritic layer, which may be due to dendritic filtering. In addition, CB1 activation significantly reduced the amplitude of the postsynaptic currents in each cell pair tested. Our data suggest that CB1 -expressing interneurons with different axonal projections have comparable physiological characteristics, contributing to a similar proportion of GABAergic inputs along the somato-dendritic axis of CA3 pyramidal cells.

  18. Fluctuations in type IV pilus retraction

    CERN Document Server

    Linden, M; Jonsson, A B; Wallin, M; Linden, Martin; Johansson, Emil; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Wallin, Mats

    2005-01-01

    The type IV pilus retraction motor is found in many important bacterial pathogens. It is the strongest known linear motor protein and is required for bacterial infectivity. We characterize the dynamics of type IV pilus retraction in terms of a stochastic chemical reaction model. We find that a two state model can describe the experimental force velocity relation and qualitative dependence of ATP concentration. The results indicate that the dynamics is limited by an ATP-dependent step at low load and a force-dependent step at high load, and that at least one step is effectively irreversible in the measured range of forces. The irreversible nature of the sub-step(s) lead to interesting predictions for future experiments: We find different parameterizations with mathematically identical force velocity relations but different fluctuations (diffusion constant). We also find a longer elementary step compared to an earlier analysis, which agrees better with known facts about the structure of the pilus filament and e...

  19. Spatial Phosphoprotein Profiling Reveals a Compartmentalized Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Switch Governing Neurite Growth and Retraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yingchun; Yang, Feng; Fu, Yi; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Xining; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pertz, Olivier C.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Orton, Daniel J.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2011-05-20

    Abstract - Brain development and spinal cord regeneration require neurite sprouting and growth cone navigation in response to extension and collapsing factors present in the extracellular environment. These external guidance cues control neurite growth cone extension and retraction processes through intracellular protein phosphorylation of numerous cytoskeletal, adhesion, and polarity complex signaling proteins. However, the complex kinase/substrate signaling networks that mediate neuritogenesis have not been investigated. Here, we compare the neurite phosphoproteome under growth and retraction conditions using neurite purification methodology combined with mass spectrometry. More than 4000 non-redundant phosphorylation sites from 1883 proteins have been annotated and mapped to signaling pathways that control kinase/phosphatase networks, cytoskeleton remodeling, and axon/dendrite specification. Comprehensive informatics and functional studies revealed a compartmentalized ERK activation/deactivation cytoskeletal switch that governs neurite growth and retraction, respectively. Our findings provide the first system-wide analysis of the phosphoprotein signaling networks that enable neurite growth and retraction and reveal an important molecular switch that governs neuritogenesis.

  20. Spatial Phosphoprotein Profiling Reveals a Compartmentalized Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Switch Governing Neurite Growth and Retraction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingchun; Yang, Feng; Fu, Yi; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Xinning; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Monore, Matthew E.; Pertz, Olivier C.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Orton, Daniel J.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Brain development and spinal cord regeneration require neurite sprouting and growth cone navigation in response to extension and collapsing factors present in the extracellular environment. These external guidance cues control neurite growth cone extension and retraction processes through intracellular protein phosphorylation of numerous cytoskeletal, adhesion, and polarity complex signaling proteins. However, the complex kinase/substrate signaling networks that mediate neuritogenesis have not been investigated. Here, we compare the neurite phosphoproteome under growth and retraction conditions using neurite purification methodology combined with mass spectrometry. More than 4000 non-redundant phosphorylation sites from 1883 proteins have been annotated and mapped to signaling pathways that control kinase/phosphatase networks, cytoskeleton remodeling, and axon/dendrite specification. Comprehensive informatics and functional studies revealed a compartmentalized ERK activation/deactivation cytoskeletal switch that governs neurite growth and retraction, respectively. Our findings provide the first system-wide analysis of the phosphoprotein signaling networks that enable neurite growth and retraction and reveal an important molecular switch that governs neuritogenesis. PMID:21454597

  1. Spatial phosphoprotein profiling reveals a compartmentalized extracellular signal-regulated kinase switch governing neurite growth and retraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingchun; Yang, Feng; Fu, Yi; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Xinning; Gritsenko, Marina A; Zhao, Rui; Monore, Matthew E; Pertz, Olivier C; Purvine, Samuel O; Orton, Daniel J; Jacobs, Jon M; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Klemke, Richard L

    2011-05-20

    Brain development and spinal cord regeneration require neurite sprouting and growth cone navigation in response to extension and collapsing factors present in the extracellular environment. These external guidance cues control neurite growth cone extension and retraction processes through intracellular protein phosphorylation of numerous cytoskeletal, adhesion, and polarity complex signaling proteins. However, the complex kinase/substrate signaling networks that mediate neuritogenesis have not been investigated. Here, we compare the neurite phosphoproteome under growth and retraction conditions using neurite purification methodology combined with mass spectrometry. More than 4000 non-redundant phosphorylation sites from 1883 proteins have been annotated and mapped to signaling pathways that control kinase/phosphatase networks, cytoskeleton remodeling, and axon/dendrite specification. Comprehensive informatics and functional studies revealed a compartmentalized ERK activation/deactivation cytoskeletal switch that governs neurite growth and retraction, respectively. Our findings provide the first system-wide analysis of the phosphoprotein signaling networks that enable neurite growth and retraction and reveal an important molecular switch that governs neuritogenesis.

  2. Convergence of entorhinal and CA3 inputs onto pyramidal neurons and interneurons in hippocampal area CA1--an anatomical study in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiwara, Riichi; Wouterlood, Floris G; Sah, Anupam; Boekel, Amber J; Baks-te Bulte, Luciënne T G; Witter, Menno P

    2008-01-01

    The entorhinal cortex (EC) conveys information to hippocampal field CA1 either directly by way of projections from principal neurons in layer III, or indirectly by axons from layer II via the dentate gyrus, CA3, and Schaffer collaterals. These two pathways differentially influence activity in CA1, yet conclusive evidence is lacking whether and to what extent they converge onto single CA1 neurons. Presently we studied such convergence. Different neuroanatomical tracers injected into layer III of EC and into CA3, respectively, tagged simultaneously the direct entorhino-hippocampal fibers and the indirect innervation of CA1 neurons by Schaffer collaterals. In slices of fixed brains we intracellularly filled CA1 pyramidal cells and interneurons in stratum lacunosum-moleculare (LM) and stratum radiatum (SR). Sections of these slices were scanned in a confocal laser scanning microscope. 3D-reconstruction was used to determine whether boutons of the labeled input fibers were in contact with the intracellularly filled neurons. We analyzed 12 pyramidal neurons and 21 interneurons. Perforant path innervation to pyramidal neurons in our material was observed to be denser than that from CA3. All pyramidal neurons and 17 of the interneurons received contacts of both perforant pathway and Schaffer input on their dendrites and cell bodies. Four interneurons, which were completely embedded in LM, received only labeled perforant pathway input. Thus, we found convergence of both projection systems on single CA1 pyramidal and interneurons with dendrites that access the layers where perforant pathway fibers and Schaffer collaterals end.

  3. Injective objects and retracts of Fra\\"iss\\'e limits

    CERN Document Server

    Kubiś, Wieslaw

    2011-01-01

    We present a purely category-theoretic characterization of retracts of Fra\\"iss\\'e limits. For this aim, we consider a natural version of injectivity with respect to a pair of categories (a category and its subcategory). It turns out that retracts of Fra\\"iss\\'e limits are precisely the objects that are injective relatively to such a pair. One of the applications is a characterization of non-expansive retracts of Urysohn's universal metric space.

  4. Dissociation of CA3 pyramidal cells with attached, functional, identified mossy fiber and interneuronal boutons for studying glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán, Jesús Q; Reyes, Sebastián; Pérez-Guzmán, José A; Elías-Viñas, David; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2012-07-15

    Pyramidal cells of CA3 area receive glutamatergic signals from the mossy fibers (MFs), perforant path and collaterals of other pyramidal cells, as well as GABAergic inputs from interneurons. In hippocampal slices, an extracellular stimulation electrode is often used to activate the MFs, with the disadvantage of possibly activating fibers other than MFs. We set-up a preparation that allows the analysis of the glutamatergic input from identified, giant MF boutons as well as of GABAergic inputs from boutons of interneurons on single CA3 pyramidal cells. Mossy fiber boutons were labeled by exposing hippocampal slices to a zinc-reactive fluorescent dye, or by injecting a fluorescent dye in the granule cell layer and allowing its transport along the MFs to their terminals in CA3 area. After conducting an enzyme-free, mechanical dissociation of CA3 area, we obtained pyramidal cells containing fluorescent, giant MF boutons attached to their apical dendrites, as well as boutons of interneuronal origin. Whole cell recordings were then performed, whereby synaptic responses could be evoked by selective stimulation of the identified boutons. The synaptic currents evoked by stimulation of MF boutons, unlike those evoked by stimulation of interneuronal boutons, underwent strong frequency potentiation and were depressed by activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors, which are characteristics of transmission of MF origin. Combination of fluorophores can be used to label different tracts/boutons allowing the study of the different characteristics of neurotransmitter release from a variety of sources on single target cells.

  5. Low concentrations of alcohol inhibit BDNF-dependent GABAergic plasticity via L-type Ca2+ channel inhibition in developing CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucca, Stefano; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2010-05-12

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is associated with learning and memory alterations that could be, in part, a consequence of hippocampal damage. The CA3 hippocampal subfield is one of the regions affected by ethanol (EtOH), including exposure during the third trimester-equivalent (i.e., neonatal period in rats). However, the mechanism of action of EtOH is poorly understood. In CA3 pyramidal neurons from neonatal rats, dendritic BDNF release causes long-term potentiation of the frequency of GABAA receptor-mediated spontaneous postsynaptic currents (LTP-GABAA) and this mechanism is thought to play a role in GABAergic synapse maturation. Here, we show that short- and long-term exposure of neonatal male rats to low EtOH concentrations abolishes LTP-GABAA by inhibiting L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. These findings support the recommendation that even light drinking should be avoided during pregnancy.

  6. Fixed Simplex Property for Retractable Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zapart Anna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Retractable complexes are defined in this paper. It is proved that they have the fixed simplex property for simplicial maps. This implies the theorem of Wallace and the theorem of Rival and Nowakowski for finite trees: every simplicial map transforming vertices of a tree into itself has a fixed vertex or a fixed edge. This also implies the Hell and Nešetřil theorem: any endomorphism of a dismantlable graph fixes some clique. Properties of recursively contractible complexes are examined.

  7. Ablation of NMDA receptors enhances the excitability of hippocampal CA3 neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiaki Fukushima

    Full Text Available Synchronized discharges in the hippocampal CA3 recurrent network are supposed to underlie network oscillations, memory formation and seizure generation. In the hippocampal CA3 network, NMDA receptors are abundant at the recurrent synapses but scarce at the mossy fiber synapses. We generated mutant mice in which NMDA receptors were abolished in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons by postnatal day 14. The histological and cytological organizations of the hippocampal CA3 region were indistinguishable between control and mutant mice. We found that mutant mice lacking NMDA receptors selectively in CA3 pyramidal neurons became more susceptible to kainate-induced seizures. Consistently, mutant mice showed characteristic large EEG spikes associated with multiple unit activities (MUA, suggesting enhanced synchronous firing of CA3 neurons. The electrophysiological balance between fast excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission was comparable between control and mutant pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA3 region, while the NMDA receptor-slow AHP coupling was diminished in the mutant neurons. In the adult brain, inducible ablation of NMDA receptors in the hippocampal CA3 region by the viral expression vector for Cre recombinase also induced similar large EEG spikes. Furthermore, pharmacological blockade of CA3 NMDA receptors enhanced the susceptibility to kainate-induced seizures. These results raise an intriguing possibility that hippocampal CA3 NMDA receptors may suppress the excitability of the recurrent network as a whole in vivo by restricting synchronous firing of CA3 neurons.

  8. Synapse-specific compartmentalization of signaling cascades for LTP induction in CA3 interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, E J; Pérez-Rosello, T; Gómez-Lira, G; Lara, E; Gutiérrez, R; Barrionuevo, G

    2015-04-02

    Inhibitory interneurons with somata in strata radiatum and lacunosum-molecular (SR/L-M) of hippocampal area CA3 receive excitatory input from pyramidal cells via the recurrent collaterals (RCs), and the dentate gyrus granule cells via the mossy fibers (MFs). Here we demonstrate that Hebbian long-term potentiation (LTP) at RC synapses on SR/L-M interneurons requires the concomitant activation of calcium-impermeable AMPARs (CI-AMPARs) and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). RC LTP was prevented by voltage clamping the postsynaptic cell during high-frequency stimulation (HFS; 3 trains of 100 pulses delivered at 100 Hz every 10s), with intracellular injections of the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA (20mM), and with the NMDAR antagonist D-AP5. In separate experiments, RC and MF inputs converging onto the same interneuron were sequentially activated. We found that RC LTP induction was blocked by inhibitors of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII; KN-62, 10 μM or KN-93, 10 μM) but MF LTP was CaMKII independent. Conversely, the application of the protein kinase A (PKA) activators forskolin/IBMX (50 μM/25 μM) potentiated MF EPSPs but not RC EPSPs. Together these data indicate that the aspiny dendrites of SR/L-M interneurons compartmentalize synapse-specific Ca(2+) signaling required for LTP induction at RC and MF synapses. We also show that the two signal transduction cascades converge to activate a common effector, protein kinase C (PKC). Specifically, LTP at RC and MF synapses on the same SR/LM interneuron was blocked by postsynaptic injections of chelerythrine (10 μM). These data indicate that both forms of LTP share a common mechanism involving PKC-dependent signaling modulation.

  9. High affinity group III mGluRs regulate mossy fiber input to CA3 interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Kathleen E; Meriney, Stephen D; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2011-12-01

    Stratum lacunosum-moleculare interneurons (L-Mi) in hippocampal area CA3 target the apical dendrite of pyramidal cells providing feedforward inhibition. Here we report that selective activation of group III metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) 4/8 with L(+)-2-amino-4-phosphnobytyric acid (L-AP4; 10 μM) decreased the probability of glutamate release from the mossy fiber (MF) terminals synapsing onto L-Mi. Consistent with this interpretation, application of L-AP4 in the presence of 3 mM strontium decreased the frequency of asynchronous MF EPSCs in L-Mi. Furthermore, the dose response curve showed that L-AP4 at 400 μM produced no further decrease in MF EPSC amplitude compared with 20 μM L-AP4, indicating the lack of mGluRs 7 at these MF terminals. We also found that one mechanism of mGluRs 4/8-mediated inhibition of release is linked to N-type voltage gated calcium channels at MF terminals. Application of the group III mGluR antagonist MSOP (100 μM) demonstrated that mGluRs 4/8 are neither tonically active nor activated by low and moderate frequencies of activity. However, trains of stimuli to the MF at 20 and 40 Hz delivered during the application of MSOP revealed a relief of inhibition of transmitter release and an increase in the overall probability of action potential firing in the postsynaptic L-Mi. Interestingly, the time to first action potential was significantly shorter in the presence of MSOP, indicating that mGluR 4/8 activation delays L-Mi firing in response to MF activity. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the timing and probability of action potentials in L-Mi evoked by MF synaptic input is regulated by the activation of presynaptic high affinity group III mGluRs.

  10. Canine retraction with J hook headgear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala Perez, C; de Alba, J A; Caputo, A A; Chaconas, S J

    1980-11-01

    Several methods have been described for accomplishing distal movement of canines without losing posterior anchorage. An accepted method in canine retraction is the use of headgear with J hooks. Since it incorporates extraoral anchorage, it is most effective in maximum-anchorage cases. It was the purpose of this study to analyze the distribution of force transmitted to the alveolus and surrounding structures by means of photoelastic visualization, utilizing J hook headgear for maxillary canine retraction. A three-dimensional model representing a human skull was used. This model was constructed with different birefringent materials to simulate bone, teeth, and periodontal membranes. Three different vectors of force were applied representing high-, medium-, and low-pull headgear, which were placed at angles of 40, 20, and 0 degrees to the occlusal plane. The photoelastic analysis was made by means of a circular-transmission polariscope arrangement, and the photoelastic data were recorded photographically. The stress areas created by the three different vectors of force were associated with various degrees of canine tipping. This effect was greater with the low-pull force component than with the medium-pull traction. The high-pull headgear produced the least tipping tendency, being closer to a bodily movemment effect. Further, stresses were transmitted to deeper structures of the simulated facial bones; these regions were the frontozygomatic, zygomaticomaxillary, and zygomaticotemporal sutures.

  11. Fabrication and Characterization of Ca3Co4O9 Ceramics%Ca3Co4O9陶瓷的制备与表征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    漆小玲; 曾令可

    2009-01-01

    Ca3Co4O9 ceramics were prepared by a Sol-gel method using hydrous calcium and cobalt nitrate as raw materials and citric acid as complexing agent. The phase composition, atomic composition and microstructure of Ca3Co4O9 ceramics were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD),energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. The results show that Ca3Co4O9 single phase can be fabricated at 800~900 ℃. Ca3Co4O9 ceramics contain randomly-oriented plate-shaped grains with layered structure. All the sample are not dense enough and the porosities are relatively large.%本实验采用溶胶-凝胶法制备了Ca3Co4O9陶瓷,寻求了其合适的制备工艺,并对陶瓷的显微结构、物相组成、元素组成等进行了表征测试.实验结果表明:煅烧温度为800~900 ℃时均能得到纯相Ca3Co4O9;Ca3Co4O9为取向无规则层片状组织,颗粒尺寸均匀,为2 μm左右;样品的致密度不高,气孔率相对较大.

  12. Atypical protein kinase C regulates primary dendrite specification of cerebellar Purkinje cells by localizing Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Koji; Kani, Shuichi; Shimizu, Takashi; Bae, Young-Ki; Abe, Takaya; Hibi, Masahiko

    2010-12-15

    Neurons have highly polarized structures that determine what parts of the soma elaborate the axon and dendrites. However, little is known about the mechanisms that establish neuronal polarity in vivo. Cerebellar Purkinje cells extend a single primary dendrite from the soma that ramifies into a highly branched dendritic arbor. We used the zebrafish cerebellum to investigate the mechanisms by which Purkinje cells acquire these characteristics. To examine dendritic morphogenesis in individual Purkinje cells, we marked the cell membrane using a Purkinje cell-specific promoter to drive membrane-targeted fluorescent proteins. We found that zebrafish Purkinje cells initially extend multiple neurites from the soma and subsequently retract all but one, which becomes the primary dendrite. In addition, the Golgi apparatus specifically locates to the root of the primary dendrite, and its localization is already established in immature Purkinje cells that have multiple neurites. Inhibiting secretory trafficking through the Golgi apparatus reduces dendritic growth, suggesting that the Golgi apparatus is involved in the dendritic morphogenesis. We also demonstrated that in a mutant of an atypical protein kinase C (aPKC), Prkci, Purkinje cells retain multiple primary dendrites and show disrupted localization of the Golgi apparatus. Furthermore, a mosaic inhibition of Prkci in Purkinje cells recapitulates the aPKC mutant phenotype. These results suggest that the aPKC cell autonomously controls the Golgi localization and thereby regulates the specification of the primary dendrite of Purkinje cells.

  13. Medium afterhyperpolarization and firing pattern modulation in interneurons of stratum radiatum in the CA3 hippocampal region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savić, N; Pedarzani, P; Sciancalepore, M

    2001-05-01

    Stratum (st.) radiatum interneurons represent a heterogeneous class of hippocampal cells with as yet poorly characterized physiological properties. Intracellular staining with biocytin, in situ hybridization, and patch-clamp recording have been combined to investigate the morphological and electrophysiological properties of these cells in the CA3 hippocampal region in young rats [postnatal days 10 to 21 (P10-21)]. Labeled cells presented a heterogeneous morphology with various soma shapes, often found multipolar, and dendritic arborizations confined to st. radiatum. The passive membrane properties of these st. radiatum interneurons showed instead no significant differences between P10 and P21. Low resting potential, high-input resistance, and short time constants characterized CA3 st. radiatum interneurons, which were silent at rest. Action potentials, elicited by brief current pulses, were lower and shorter than in pyramidal cells and followed by a Ca(2+)-dependent medium-duration afterhyperpolarizing potential (mAHP). Prolonged depolarizing current injection generated trains of action potentials that fired at constant frequency after a slight accommodation. The maximum steady-state firing rate was 31 +/- 4 (SD) Hz. Hyperpolarizing current pulses revealed a prominent inward rectification characterized by a "sag," followed by a depolarizing rebound that triggered action potentials. Sag and anodal brake excitation were blocked by Cs(+), suggesting that they were mediated by a hyperpolarization-activated cation conductance (I(h)). In the presence of tetrodotoxin and tetraethylammonium, biphasic tail currents were elicited in voltage clamp after a depolarizing step inducing Ca(2+) influx. Tail currents presented a fast Ca(2+)-activated and apamin-sensitive component (I(AHP)) and were further reduced by carbachol. The presence of I(AHP) was consistent with the high expression level of the apamin-sensitive SK2 subunit transcript in CA3 st. radiatum interneurons as

  14. AORN Ergonomic Tool 5: Tissue Retraction in the Perioperative Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, Patrice; Lloyd, John D; Hernandez, Edward; Hughes, Nancy; Petersen, Carol; Nelson, Audrey; Spratt, Deborah G

    2011-07-01

    Manual retraction, a task performed to expose the surgical site, poses a high risk for musculoskeletal disorders that affect the hands, arms, shoulders, neck, and back. In recent years, minimally invasive and laparoscopic procedures have led to the development of multifunctional instruments and retractors capable of performing these functions that, in many cases, has eliminated the need for manual retraction. During surgical procedures that are not performed endoscopically, the use of self-retaining retractors enables the assistant to handle tissue and use exposure techniques that do not require prolonged manual retraction. Ergonomic Tool #5: Tissue Retraction in the Perioperative Setting provides an algorithm for perioperative care providers to determine when and under what circumstances manual retraction of tissue is safe and when the use of a self-retaining retractor should be considered.

  15. Bilateral upper eyelid retraction caused by topical bimatoprost therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noma, Kazunami; Kakizaki, Hirohiko

    2012-01-01

    The authors report a case with upper eyelid retraction caused by topical bimatoprost therapy. Topical bimatoprost 0.03% was administered to a 69-year-old woman with bilateral normal-tension glaucoma. It was first administered to the left eye, and 3 weeks later, therapy on the right side of the eye was initiated. One week after the initiation of therapy on the right side, right upper eyelid retraction occurred, and 63 days after starting treatment on the left side (42 days after initiation on the right side), conspicuous bilateral upper eyelid retraction was observed. Bimatoprost instillation was then stopped and the medication was switched to latanoprost 0.005%. Upper eyelid retraction was reversed to normal levels approximately 1 week after cessation of bimatoprost therapy. In conclusion, a rare case of upper eyelid retraction caused by topical bimatoprost therapy, which was reversed after discontinuation of the medication, is reported.

  16. Opening and retraction of particulate soap films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timounay, Yousra; Lorenceau, Elise; Rouyer, Florence

    2015-07-01

    We study for the first time the bursting dynamics of thin liquid films laden with hydrophobic micronic particles either with free or constrained edges. We highlight that the particles can arrange in bilayer or monolayer configurations and explore a range of particles coverage from zero to random close packing. When the particles bridge the two interfaces (monolayer configuration) of free-edge films, the hole opens intermittently. For the other cases, we observe constant retraction velocities, modeled by balancing liquid and particles inertia against surface tension as in Taylor-Culick theory. But, this approach is only valid up to a critical value of particles coverage due to the interplay between the interfaces and the friction between particles.

  17. A process analysis of the CA3 subregion of the hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond PIERRE Kesner

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractFrom a behavioral perspective the CA3a,b subregion of the hippocampus plays an important role in the encoding of new spatial information within short-term memory with a duration of seconds and minutes. This can easily be observed in tasks that require rapid encoding, novelty detection, 1-trial short- term or working memory, and 1-trial cued recall primarily for spatial information. These are tasks that have been assumed to reflect the operations of episodic memory and require interactions between CA3a,b and the dentate gyrus via mossy fiber inputs into the CA3a,b. The CA3a,b is also important for encoding of spatial information requiring the acquisition of arbitrary and relational associations. All these tasks are assumed to operate within an autoassociative network function of the CA3 region. The CA3a,b also supports retrieval of short-term memory information based on a spatial pattern completion process. Based on afferent inputs into CA3a,b from the dentate gyrus (DG via mossy fibers and afferents from the entorhinal cortex into CA3a,b as well as reciprocal connections with the septum, CA3a,b can bias the process of encoding utilizing the operation of spatial pattern separation and the process of retrieval utilizing the operation of pattern completion. The CA3a,b also supports sequential processing of information in cooperation with CA1 based on the Schaffer collateral output from CA3a,b to CA1. The CA3c function is in part based on modulation of the DG in supporting pattern separation processes.

  18. A process analysis of the CA3 subregion of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesner, Raymond P

    2013-01-01

    From a behavioral perspective, the CA3a,b subregion of the hippocampus plays an important role in the encoding of new spatial information within short-term memory with a duration of seconds and minutes. This can easily be observed in tasks that require rapid encoding, novelty detection, one-trial short-term or working memory, and one-trial cued recall primarily for spatial information. These are tasks that have been assumed to reflect the operations of episodic memory and require interactions between CA3a,b and the dentate gyrus (DG) via mossy fiber inputs into the CA3a,b. The CA3a,b is also important for encoding of spatial information requiring the acquisition of arbitrary and relational associations. All these tasks are assumed to operate within an autoassociative network function of the CA3 region. The CA3a,b also supports retrieval of short-term memory information based on a spatial pattern completion process. Based on afferent inputs into CA3a,b from the DG via mossy fibers and afferents from the entorhinal cortex into CA3a,b as well as reciprocal connections with the septum, CA3a,b can bias the process of encoding utilizing the operation of spatial pattern separation and the process of retrieval utilizing the operation of pattern completion. The CA3a,b also supports sequential processing of information in cooperation with CA1 based on the Schaffer collateral output from CA3a,b to CA1. The CA3c function is in part based on modulation of the DG in supporting pattern separation processes.

  19. RETRACTED: Menselijke vrijheid en het Christelijk geloof

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper Doomen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human freedom and the Christian faith. In this article, it is examined whether there is room for human freedom in a Christian perspective. Augustine’s and Luther’s views are illuminating in order to clarify this matter. The way they deal with the idea of predestination is an important issue. According to Augustine, man is, to a certain degree, able to grasp the way in which God governs man; this idea is not present in Luther’s thoughts. Their notions of ‘freedom’ differ considerably as well; here, too, Augustine has more confidence in human reason than Luther does. However, it is difficult for both Luther and Augustine to defend a notion of human freedom and at the same time maintain God’s foreknowledge. Still, even irrespective of that, human freedom is something which cannot easily be demonstrated. For both Christians and non-believers, the issue of human freedom remains an unresolved problem.*This article has been retracted at the request of the Editor-in-Chief.Reason: ‘The article has been retracted to straighten the academic record. It has come to light that this article has significant overlap with an article that had already appeared in Informción Filosófica, Volume 1 (2004, num. 2, pp. 251–265, entitled ‘De onverenigbaarheid van menselijke vrijheid met het christelijk geloof’. Apologies are offered to readers of the journal that this was not detected during the submission process’.The full-text of the original article (2004 is here: https://openaccess.leidenuniv.nl/handle/1887/17816

  20. Giant synaptic potentials in immature rat CA3 hippocampal neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Y; Cherubini, E; Corradetti, R; Gaiarsa, J L

    1989-09-01

    1. Intracellular recordings were made from rat CA3 hippocampal neurones in vitro during the first eighteen days of postnatal life. The cells had resting membrane potentials more negative than -51 mV, action potentials greater than 55 mV and membrane input resistances of 117 +/- 12 M omega. An unusual characteristic of these cells was the presence of spontaneous giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) which were observed during the first eight postnatal (P) days in over 85% of neurones. They were less frequent between P9 and P12 (48%) and disappeared after P12. 2. The GDPs were synchronously generated by a population of neurones; they reversed polarity at -27 mV when recorded with KCl-containing electrodes and at -51 mV with potassium acetate- or potassium methylsulphate-filled electrodes. 3. The GDPs were blocked by bath application of bicuculline (10 microM) or picrotoxin (100-200 microM). Exogenously applied gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA; 0.2-1 mM) induced at resting membrane potential a bicuculline-sensitive membrane depolarization which reversed polarity at -25 and -51 mV when recorded with KCl- or potassium methylsulphate-filled electrodes respectively. 4. The GDPs were reduced in frequency or blocked by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists DL-2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoate (AP-7; 50 microM), D(-)2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP-5, 10-50 microM) and (+-)3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP, 10-50 microM) or NMDA channel blockers phencyclidine (2 microM) and ketamine (20 microM). 5. Stimulation of the hilus during the first week of life evoked a GDP followed by a hyperpolarization. The GDPs were generated by a population of synchronized neurones and reversed polarity at -27 mV with KCl-filled electrodes and at -52 mV with potassium acetate- or potassium methylsulphate-containing electrodes. 6. Bath application of bicuculline (1-10 microM) or picrotoxin (100-200 microM) reversibly blocked the evoked GDPs in the majority of cells

  1. Retraction dynamics of aquous drops upon impact on nonwetting surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolo, D; Bonn, D; Bartolo, Denis; Josserand, Christophe; Bonn, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    We study the impact and subsequent retraction dynamics of liquid droplets upon high-speed impact on hydrophobic surfaces. Performing extensive experiments, we show that the drop retraction rate is a material constant and does not depend on the impact velocity. We show that when increasing the Ohnesorge number, $\\Oh=\\eta/\\sqrt{\\rho R_{\\rm I} \\gamma}$, the retraction, i.e. dewetting, dynamics crosses over from a capillaro-inertial regime to a capillaro-viscous regime. We rationalize the experimental observations by a simple but robust semi-quantitative model for the solid-liquid contact line dynamics inspired by the standard theories for thin film dewetting.

  2. Duane's retraction syndrome associated with morning glory syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, K; Fujita, S

    1981-01-01

    A 9-year-old boy with Duane's retraction syndrome and morning glory syndrome is presented. The right eye showed a grayish-pink optic disc, which had a deep excavation containing a white mass in its center and was surrounded by an annulus of pigment disturbance, i.e., consistent with the features of morning glory syndrome. The left eye had a congenital disturbance of ocular motility, which was typical of Duane's retraction syndrome. This is probably the first report of the association of Duane's retraction syndrome and morning glory syndrome. It is hypothesized that a noxious stimulus given at around two months of gestation was responsible for this rare association.

  3. The Retraction Penalty: Evidence from the Web of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Susan Feng; Jin, Ginger Zhe; Uzzi, Brian; Jones, Benjamin

    2013-11-01

    Scientific articles are retracted at increasing rates, with the highest rates among top journals. Here we show that a single retraction triggers citation losses through an author's prior body of work. Compared to closely-matched control papers, citations fall by an average of 6.9% per year for each prior publication. These chain reactions are sustained on authors' papers (a) published up to a decade earlier and (b) connected within the authors' own citation network by up to 4 degrees of separation from the retracted publication. Importantly, however, citation losses among prior work disappear when authors self-report the error. Our analyses and results span the range of scientific disciplines.

  4. Altered network timing in the CA3-CA1 circuit of hippocampal slices from aged mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Kanak

    Full Text Available Network patterns are believed to provide unique temporal contexts for coordinating neuronal activity within and across different regions of the brain. Some of the characteristics of network patterns modeled in vitro are altered in the CA3 or CA1 subregions of hippocampal slices from aged mice. CA3-CA1 network interactions have not been examined previously. We used slices from aged and adult mice to model spontaneous sharp wave ripples and carbachol-induced gamma oscillations, and compared measures of CA3-CA1 network timing between age groups. Coherent sharp wave ripples and gamma oscillations were evident in the CA3-CA1 circuit in both age groups, but the relative timing of activity in CA1 stratum pyramidale was delayed in the aged. In another sample of aged slices, evoked Schaffer collateral responses were attenuated in CA3 (antidromic spike amplitude and CA1 (orthodromic field EPSP slope. However, the amplitude and timing of spontaneous sharp waves recorded in CA1 stratum radiatum were similar to adults. In both age groups unit activity recorded juxtacellularly from unidentified neurons in CA1 stratum pyramidale and stratum oriens was temporally modulated by CA3 ripples. However, aged neurons exhibited reduced spike probability during the early cycles of the CA3 ripple oscillation. These findings suggest that aging disrupts the coordination of patterned activity in the CA3-CA1 circuit.

  5. Invariant and energy analysis of an axially retracting beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xiaodong; Liu Ming; Zhang Wei; Roderick V.N. Melnik

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of a retracting cantilevered beam has been investigated by the invariant and energy-based analysis. The time-varying parameter partial differential equation governing the transverse vibrations of a beam with retracting motion is derived based on the momentum theorem. The assumed-mode method is used to truncate the governing partial differential equation into a set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with time-dependent coefficients. It is found that if the order of truncation is not less than the order of the initial conditions, the assumed-mode method can yield accurate results. The energy transfers among assumed modes are discussed during retrac-tion. The total energy varying with time has been investigated by numerical and analytical methods, and the results have good agreement with each other. For the transverse vibrations of the axially retracting beam, the adiabatic invariant is derived by both the averaging method and the Bessel function method.

  6. Self-similar breakup of a retracting liquid cone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasz, Frederik; Berny, Alexis; Bird, James

    2016-11-01

    When a fluid filament breaks up due to the Rayleigh-Plateau instability, a thin thread typically pinches off from a nearly spherical drop. Depending on its shape, this thread can break up again while it retracts to form satellite and even sub-satellite droplets. Past studies have modeled the shape of the retracting filament as a cone, yet the dynamics of nearly inviscid retracting cones are known to be stable, preventing any further filament breakup. Here we show that under certain finite perturbations, retracting conical liquid filaments can become unstable and break up into a cascade of self-similar droplets. Combining numerical simulations and experiments, we explore whether or not a conical filament is likely to break up based on cone angle and initial perturbation. We expect our results to be relevant in applications in which satellite bubbles or droplets are important, such as in modeling the flux of aerosols from the ocean to the atmosphere.

  7. An explicit construction of sunny nonexpansive retractions in Banach spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeon Reich

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available An explicit algorithmic scheme for constructing the unique sunny nonexpansive retraction onto the common fixed point set of a nonlinear semigroup of nonexpansive mappings in a Banach space is analyzed and a proof of convergence is given.

  8. Retracted: Post-stroke epilepsy in Polish paediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopyta, Ilona; Sarecka-Hujar, Beata

    2015-08-01

    The above article, published online on 5 October 2013 in Wiley Online Library Early View (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor in Chief, Dr Peter Baxter, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The retraction has been agreed due to several errors in the statistics. These errors make interpretation of the data difficult and the validity of the conclusions questionable.

  9. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment - PVA Dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. IDGE used transparent organic liquids that form dendrites (treelike structures) similar to those inside metal alloys. Comparing Earth-based and space-based dendrite growth velocity, tip size and shape provides a better understanding of the fundamentals of dentritic growth, including gravity's effects. Shalowgraphic images of pivalic acid (PVA) dendrites forming from the melt show the subtle but distinct effects of gravity-driven heat convection on dentritic growth. In orbit, the dendrite grows as its latent heat is liberated by heat conduction. This yields a blunt dendrite tip. On Earth, heat is carried away by both conduction and gravity-driven convection. This yields a sharper dendrite tip. In addition, under terrestrial conditions, the sidebranches growing in the direction of gravity are augmented as gravity helps carry heat out of the way of the growing sidebranches as opposed to microgravity conditions where no augmentation takes place. IDGE was developed by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and NASA/Glenn Research Center. Advanced follow-on experiments are being developed for flight on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center

  10. Noradrenergic mechanism involved in the nociceptive modulation of hippocampal CA3 region of normal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hua; Teng, Yueqiu; Zhang, Xuexin; Yang, Chunxiao; Xu, Manying; Yang, Lizhuang

    2014-06-27

    Norepinephrine (NE) is an important neurotransmitter in the brain, and regulates antinociception. However, the mechanism of action of NE on pain-related neurons in the hippocampal CA3 region is not clear. This study examines the effects of NE, phentolamine on the electrical activities of pain-excited neurons (PENs) and pain-inhibited neurons (PINs) in the hippocampal CA3 region of rats. Trains of electric impulses applied to the right sciatic nerve were used as noxious stimulation. The electrical activities of PENs or PINs in the hippocampal CA3 region were recorded by using a glass microelectrode. Our results revealed that, in the hippocampal CA3 region, the intra-CA3 region microinjection of NE decreased the pain-evoked discharged frequency and prolonged the discharged latency of PEN, and increased the pain-evoked discharged frequency and shortened discharged inhibitory duration (ID) of PIN, exhibiting the specific analgesic effect of NE. While intra-CA3 region microinjection of phentolamine produced the opposite response. It implies that phentolamine can block the effect of endogenous NE to cause the enhanced response of PEN and PIN to noxious stimulation. On the basis of above findings we can deduce that NE, phentolamine and alpha-adrenoceptor are involved in the modulation of nociceptive information transmission in the hippocampal CA3 region.

  11. Postsynaptic target specific synaptic dysfunctions in the CA3 area of BACE1 knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Beta-amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1, a major neuronal β-secretase critical for the formation of β-amyloid (Aβ peptide, is considered one of the key therapeutic targets that can prevent the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Although a complete ablation of BACE1 gene prevents Aβ formation, we previously reported that BACE1 knockouts (KOs display presynaptic deficits, especially at the mossy fiber (MF to CA3 synapses. Whether the defect is specific to certain inputs or postsynaptic targets in CA3 is unknown. To determine this, we performed whole-cell recording from pyramidal cells (PYR and the stratum lucidum (SL interneurons in the CA3, both of which receive excitatory MF terminals with high levels of BACE1 expression. BACE1 KOs displayed an enhancement of paired-pulse facilitation at the MF inputs to CA3 PYRs without changes at the MF inputs to SL interneurons, which suggests postsynaptic target specific regulation. The synaptic dysfunction in CA3 PYRs was not restricted to excitatory synapses, as seen by an increase in the paired-pulse ratio of evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents from SL to CA3 PYRs. In addition to the changes in evoked synaptic transmission, BACE1 KOs displayed a reduction in the frequency of miniature excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs and mIPSCs in CA3 PYRs without alteration in mEPSCs recorded from SL interneurons. This suggests that the impairment may be more global across diverse inputs to CA3 PYRs. Our results indicate that the synaptic dysfunctions seen in BACE1 KOs are specific to the postsynaptic target, the CA3 PYRs, independent of the input type.

  12. Postsynaptic target specific synaptic dysfunctions in the CA3 area of BACE1 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Megill, Andrea; Wong, Philip C; Kirkwood, Alfredo; Lee, Hey-Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    Beta-amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), a major neuronal β-secretase critical for the formation of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide, is considered one of the key therapeutic targets that can prevent the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although a complete ablation of BACE1 gene prevents Aβ formation, we previously reported that BACE1 knockouts (KOs) display presynaptic deficits, especially at the mossy fiber (MF) to CA3 synapses. Whether the defect is specific to certain inputs or postsynaptic targets in CA3 is unknown. To determine this, we performed whole-cell recording from pyramidal cells (PYR) and the stratum lucidum (SL) interneurons in the CA3, both of which receive excitatory MF terminals with high levels of BACE1 expression. BACE1 KOs displayed an enhancement of paired-pulse facilitation at the MF inputs to CA3 PYRs without changes at the MF inputs to SL interneurons, which suggests postsynaptic target specific regulation. The synaptic dysfunction in CA3 PYRs was not restricted to excitatory synapses, as seen by an increase in the paired-pulse ratio of evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents from SL to CA3 PYRs. In addition to the changes in evoked synaptic transmission, BACE1 KOs displayed a reduction in the frequency of miniature excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs and mIPSCs) in CA3 PYRs without alteration in mEPSCs recorded from SL interneurons. This suggests that the impairment may be more global across diverse inputs to CA3 PYRs. Our results indicate that the synaptic dysfunctions seen in BACE1 KOs are specific to the postsynaptic target, the CA3 PYRs, independent of the input type.

  13. An ID-like current that is downregulated by Ca2+ modulates information coding at CA3-CA3 synapses in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saviane, Chiara; Mohajerani, Majid H; Cherubini, Enrico

    2003-10-15

    Voltage-gated K+ channels localised on presynaptic nerve terminals control information coding by modulating presynaptic firing and synaptic efficacy in target neurones. We found that at CA3-CA3 connections in hippocampal slice cultures, a fast-activating, slowly inactivating K+ conductance similar to the so-called delay current (ID) is responsible for the delayed appearance of the first spike upon membrane depolarisation, for action potential repolarisation and for modulation of transmitter release. The ID-like current was downregulated by intracellular Ca2+, as indicated by the increased delay in the appearance of the first action potential following either the block of Ca2+ flux through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels with Cd2+ or replacement of the bathing solution with one devoid of Ca2+. In both cases, this effect was reversed by blocking this conductance with a low concentration of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 10-50 muM). Application of 4-AP shortened the delay to the first spike generation, prevented the effect of Cd2+ and increased the spike duration. The earlier appearance of the first action potential was also observed in the presence of dendrotoxin-1 (100 nM). In voltage-clamp experiments larger currents were recorded in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, thus confirming the downregulation of the ID-like current by Ca2+ due to the positive shift of its inactivation. Spike broadening was associated with an enhancement of synaptic efficacy in target neurones, as assessed by the increase in EPSC amplitude and in the percentage of successes. Moreover, in the presence of 4-AP, EPSCs appeared with a longer latency and were more scattered. This conductance is therefore crucial for setting the timing and strength of synaptic transmission at CA3-CA3 connections. It is conceivable that switching off ID by increasing intracellular Ca2+ following activity-dependent processes may facilitate network synchronisation and crosstalk between CA3 pyramidal cells, leading to

  14. Free dendritic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Free dendritic growth refers to the unconstrained development of crystals within a supercooled melt, which is the classical 'dendrite problem'. Great strides have been taken in recent years in both the theoretical understanding of dendritic growth and its experimental status. The development of this field will be sketched, showing that transport theory and interfacial thermodynamics (capillarity theory) were sufficient ingredients to develop a truly predictive model of dendrite formation. The convenient, but incorrect, notion of 'maximum velocity' was used for many years to estimate the behavior of dendritic transformations until supplanted by modern dynamic stability theory. The proper combinations of transport theory and morphological stability seem to able to predict the salient aspects of dendritic growth, especially in the neighborhood of the tip. The overall development of cast microstructures, such as equiaxed zone formation, rapidly solidified microstructures, etc., also seems to contain additional non-deterministic features which lie outside the current theories discussed here.

  15. Single granule cells reliably discharge targets in the hippocampal CA3 network in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henze, Darrell A; Wittner, Lucia; Buzsáki, György

    2002-08-01

    Processing of neuronal information depends on interactions between the anatomical connectivity and cellular properties of single cells. We examined how these computational building blocks work together in the intact rat hippocampus. Single spikes in dentate granule cells, controlled intracellularly, generally failed to discharge either interneurons or CA3 pyramidal cells. In contrast, trains of spikes effectively discharged both CA3 cell types. Increasing the discharge rate of the granule cell increased the discharge probability of its target neuron and decreased the delay between the onset of a granule cell train and evoked firing in postsynaptic targets. Thus, we conclude that the granule cell to CA3 synapses are 'conditional detonators,' dependent on granule cell firing pattern. In addition, we suggest that information in single granule cells is converted into a temporal delay code in target CA3 pyramidal cells and interneurons. These data demonstrate how a neural circuit of the CNS may process information.

  16. A Multi-dimensional Investigation of the Effects of Publication Retraction on Scholarly Impact

    CERN Document Server

    Shuai, Xin; Rollins, Jason; Custis, Tonya; Schilder, Frank; Edmunds, Mathilda

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, the rate of publication retractions has increased dramatically in academia. In this study, we investigate retractions from a quantitative perspective, aiming to answer two fundamental questions. One, how do retractions influence the scholarly impact of retracted papers, authors, and institutions? Two, does this influence propagate to the wider academic community through scholarly associations? Specifically, we analyzed a set of retracted articles indexed in Thomson Reuters Web of Science (WoS), and ran multiple experiments to compare changes in scholarly impact against a control set of non-retracted articles, authors, and institutions. We further applied the Granger Causality test to investigate whether different scientific topics are dynamically affected by retracted papers occurring within those topics. Our results show two key findings: first, the scholarly impact of retracted papers and authors significantly decreases after retraction, and the most severe impact decrease correla...

  17. Dendritic polyurea polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuerp, David; Bruchmann, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic polymers, subsuming dendrimers as well as hyperbranched or highly branched polymers are well established in the field of polymer chemistry. This review article focuses on urea based dendritic polymers and summarizes their synthetic routes through both isocyanate and isocyanate-free processes. Furthermore, this article highlights applications where dendritic polyureas show their specific chemical and physical potential. For these purposes scientific publications as well as patent literature are investigated to generate a comprehensive overview on this topic.

  18. A signature of attractor dynamics in the CA3 region of the hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Rennó-Costa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The notion of attractor networks is the leading hypothesis for how associative memories are stored and recalled. A defining anatomical feature of such networks is excitatory recurrent connections. These "attract" the firing pattern of the network to a stored pattern, even when the external input is incomplete (pattern completion. The CA3 region of the hippocampus has been postulated to be such an attractor network; however, the experimental evidence has been ambiguous, leading to the suggestion that CA3 is not an attractor network. In order to resolve this controversy and to better understand how CA3 functions, we simulated CA3 and its input structures. In our simulation, we could reproduce critical experimental results and establish the criteria for identifying attractor properties. Notably, under conditions in which there is continuous input, the output should be "attracted" to a stored pattern. However, contrary to previous expectations, as a pattern is gradually "morphed" from one stored pattern to another, a sharp transition between output patterns is not expected. The observed firing patterns of CA3 meet these criteria and can be quantitatively accounted for by our model. Notably, as morphing proceeds, the activity pattern in the dentate gyrus changes; in contrast, the activity pattern in the downstream CA3 network is attracted to a stored pattern and thus undergoes little change. We furthermore show that other aspects of the observed firing patterns can be explained by learning that occurs during behavioral testing. The CA3 thus displays both the learning and recall signatures of an attractor network. These observations, taken together with existing anatomical and behavioral evidence, make the strong case that CA3 constructs associative memories based on attractor dynamics.

  19. Frequency dependence of CA3 spike phase response arising from h-current properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melodie eBorel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The phase of firing of hippocampal neurons during theta oscillations encodes spatial information. Moreover, the spike phase response to synaptic inputs in individual cells depends on the expression of the hyperpolarisation-activated mixed cation current (Ih, which differs between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons. Here, we compared the phase response of these two cell types, as well as their intrinsic membrane properties. We found that both CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons show a voltage sag in response to negative current steps but that this voltage sag is significantly smaller in CA3 cells. Moreover, CA3 pyramidal neurons have less prominent resonance properties compared to CA1 pyramidal neurons. This is consistent with differential expression of Ih by the two cell types. Despite their distinct intrinsic membrane properties, both CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons displayed bidirectional spike phase control by excitatory conductance inputs during theta oscillations. In particular, excitatory inputs delivered at the descending phase of a dynamic clamp-induced membrane potential oscillation delayed the subsequent spike by nearly 50 mrad. The effect was shown to be mediated by Ih and was counteracted by increasing inhibitory conductance driving the membrane potential oscillation. Using our experimental data to feed a computational model, we showed that differences in Ih between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons could predict frequency-dependent differences in phase response properties between these cell types. We confirmed experimentally such frequency-dependent spike phase control in CA3 neurons. Therefore, a decrease in theta frequency, which is observed in intact animals during novelty, might switch the CA3 spike phase response from unidirectional to bidirectional and thereby promote encoding of the new context.

  20. Oscillatory dynamics in the hippocampus support dentate gyrus–CA3 coupling.

    OpenAIRE

    Akam T; Oren I; Mantoan L; Ferenczi E; Kullmann DM.

    2012-01-01

    Gamma oscillations in the dentate gyrus and hippocampal CA3 show variable coherence in vivo, but the mechanisms and relevance for information flow are unknown. We found that carbachol-induced oscillations in rat CA3 have biphasic phase-response curves, consistent with the ability to couple with oscillations in afferent projections. Differences in response to stimulation of either the intrinsic feedback circuit or the dentate gyrus were well described by varying an impulse vector in a two-dime...

  1. Bidirectional Hebbian Plasticity at Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Synapses on CA3 Interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Galván, Emilio J; Calixto, Eduardo; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2008-01-01

    Hippocampal area CA3 is critically involved in the formation of non-overlapping neuronal subpopulations (“pattern separation”) to store memory representations as distinct events. Efficient pattern separation relies on the strong and sparse excitatory input from the mossy fibers (MF) to pyramidal cells and feed-forward inhibitory interneurons. However, MF synapses on CA3 pyramidal cells undergo LTP, which, if unopposed, will degrade pattern separation as MF activation will now recruit addition...

  2. Recurrent synapses and circuits in the CA3 region of the hippocampus: an associative network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Duigou, Caroline; Simonnet, Jean; Teleñczuk, Maria T; Fricker, Desdemona; Miles, Richard

    2014-01-08

    In the CA3 region of the hippocampus, pyramidal cells excite other pyramidal cells and interneurons. The axons of CA3 pyramidal cells spread throughout most of the region to form an associative network. These connections were first drawn by Cajal and Lorente de No. Their physiological properties were explored to understand epileptiform discharges generated in the region. Synapses between pairs of pyramidal cells involve one or few release sites and are weaker than connections made by mossy fibers on CA3 pyramidal cells. Synapses with interneurons are rather effective, as needed to control unchecked excitation. We examine contributions of recurrent synapses to epileptiform synchrony, to the genesis of sharp waves in the CA3 region and to population oscillations at theta and gamma frequencies. Recurrent connections in CA3, as other associative cortices, have a lower connectivity spread over a larger area than in primary sensory cortices. This sparse, but wide-ranging connectivity serves the functions of an associative network, including acquisition of neuronal representations as activity in groups of CA3 cells and completion involving the recall from partial cues of these ensemble firing patterns.

  3. Recurrent synapses and circuits in the CA3 region of the hippocampus: an associative network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard eMiles

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the CA3 region of the hippocampus, pyramidal cells excite other pyramidal cells and interneurons. The axons of CA3 pyramidal cells spread throughout most of the region to form an associative network. These connections were first drawn by Cajal and Lorente de No. Their physiological properties were explored to understand epileptiform discharges generated in the region. Synapses between pairs of pyramidal cells involve one or few release sites and are weaker than connections made by mossy fibres on CA3 pyramidal cells. Synapses with interneurons are rather effective, as needed to control unchecked excitation. We examine contributions of recurrent synapses to epileptiform synchrony, to the genesis of sharp waves in the CA3 region and to population oscillations at theta and gamma frequencies. Recurrent connections in CA3, as other associative cortices, have a lower connectivity spread over a larger area than in primary sensory cortices. This sparse, but wide-ranging connectivity serves the functions of an associative network, including acquisition of neuronal representations as activity in groups of CA3 cells and completion involving the recall from partial cues of these ensemble firing patterns.

  4. Expression pattern and polymorphism of three microsatellite markers in the porcine CA3 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Rong

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbonic anhydrase III (CA3 is an abundant muscle protein characteristic of adult type-1, slow-twitch, muscle fibres. In order to further understand the functions of the porcine CA3 protein in muscle, the temporal and spatial distributions of its gene product were analysed and the association between the presence of specific polymorphisms and carcass traits in the pig was also examined. Real-time PCR revealed that the CA3 mRNA expression showed no differences with age in skeletal muscles from Yorkshire pigs at postnatal day-1, month-2, and month-4. We provide the first evidence that CA3 is differentially expressed in the skeletal muscle of Yorkshire and Meishan pig breeds. In addition, the whole pig genomic DNA sequence of CA3 was investigated and shown to contain seven exons and six introns. Comparative sequencing of the gene from three pig breeds revealed the existence of microsatellite SJ160 in intron 5 and microsatellite SJ158 and a novel microsatellite marker that includes a tandem repeat of (TCn in intron 4. We also determined the allele number and frequencies of the three loci in seven pig breeds and found that they are low polymorphic microsatellite markers. Statistical analysis showed that the CA3 microsatellite polymorphism was associated with dressing percentage, internal fat rate, carcass length, rib number and backfat thickness in the pig.

  5. Formation of Ca3SiO5 prepared by electric and microwave burning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai Wang; Shizong Long; Caixia Yan

    2008-01-01

    A new method of sintering Ca3SiO5 by the combination of conventional and microwave heating methods was studied. The influence of transitional metal oxides such as Fe2O3, Cr2O3, MnO2, and V2O5 used as the additive of microwave absorption on the mi- crowave-promoted burning of Ca3SiO5 was investigated. The experimental results indicate that the new burning technique is capable of promoting the sintering of Ca3SiO5. At 1200-1300℃ in an electric furnace, Ca3SiO5 can be obtained only when the sample is heat- ed in a microwave for 110-240 s, and the free lime content is below 40wt%. Based on the experiments, Fe2O3, Cr2O3, MnO2, and V2O5 can enhance microwave sintering. Amongst them, Cr2O3 is the most effective. The characteristic of the X-ray diffraction peaks of Ca3SiO5 is similar to those of standard Ca3SiO5, but the peaks are wider.

  6. Lower eyelid retraction repair with resorbable polydioxanone implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel H Alsuhaibani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a unique technique to repair lower eyelid retraction using resorbable polydioxanone implants. Patients and Methods: This was a retrospective, consecutive, nonrandomized interventional case series. Patients with lower eyelid retraction after trauma repaired facial fracture, thyroid eye disease, lower eyelid blepharoplasty, and long-standing facial palsy were treated with middle lamellar spacer using absorbable polydioxanone implant. All patients were recruited from the King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Only patients with minimum follow-up of 12 months were included in the study. Results: Eight patients (4 males and 4 females underwent lower eyelid retraction repair using absorbable polydioxanone implant. The mean age was 43 years (range, 23-63 years. All patients noted improved ocular surface symptoms. The improvement in eyelid retraction ranged from 1.5 to 4 mm with an average of 2.7 mm postoperatively. The implant was well tolerated with no major complications. Conclusions: Several options for spacer materials are available. Absorbable polydioxanone implants seem to be an effective middle lamellar spacer that is a good alternative for repairing middle lamella related lower eyelid retraction and lower eyelid support.

  7. Reactive oxygen species are involved in BMP-induced dendritic growth in cultured rat sympathetic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Lea, Charlotte; Sosa, Jose Carlo; Higgins, Dennis; Lein, Pamela J

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) promote dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons; however, the downstream signaling molecules that mediate the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs are not well characterized. Here we test the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling links BMP receptor activation to dendritic growth. In cultured rat sympathetic neurons, exposure to any of the three mechanistically distinct antioxidants, diphenylene iodinium (DPI), nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NGA) or desferroxamine (DFO), blocked de novo BMP-induced dendritic growth. Addition of DPI to cultures previously induced with BMP to extend dendrites caused dendritic retraction while DFO and NGA prevented further growth of dendrites. The inhibition of the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs by antioxidants was concentration-dependent and occurred without altering axonal growth or neuronal cell survival. Antioxidant treatment did not block BMP activation of SMAD 1,5 as determined by nuclear localization of these SMADs. While BMP treatment did not cause a detectable increase in intracellular ROS in cultured sympathetic neurons as assessed using fluorescent indicator dyes, BMP treatment increased the oxygen consumption rate in cultured sympathetic neurons as determined using the Seahorse XF24 Analyzer, suggesting increased mitochondrial activity. In addition, BMPs upregulated expression of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) and either pharmacological inhibition or siRNA knockdown of NOX2 significantly decreased BMP-7 induced dendritic growth. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that ROS are involved in the downstream signaling events that mediate BMP7-induced dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons, and suggest that ROS-mediated signaling positively modulates dendritic complexity in peripheral neurons.

  8. Nanomedicine to improve drug delivery outcomes [Retracted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Joshi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The early genesis of the concept of nanomedicine sprang from the visionary idea that tiny nanorobots and related machines could be designed, manufactured, and introduced into the human body to perform cellular repairs at the molecular level. Nanomedicine today has branched out in hundreds of different directions, each of them embodying the key insight that the ability to structure materials and devices at the molecular scale can bring enormous immediate benefits in the research and practice of medicine. The integration of nanotechnology with biology and medicine has given birth to a new field of science called "Nanomedicine". Research into the rational delivery and targeting of pharmaceutical, therapeutic, and diagnostic agents is at the forefront of projects in nanomedicine. These involve the identification of precise targets (cells and receptors related to specific clinical conditions and choice of the appropriate nanocarriers to achieve the required responses while minimizing the side effects. Mononuclear phagocytes, dendritic cells, endothelial cells, and cancers (tumor cells as well as tumor neovasculature are key targets. The ultimate goal of nanomedicine is to develop well-engineered nanotools for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of many diseases. Nanomedicine today has branched out in hundreds of different directions, each of them embodying the key insight that the ability to structure materials and devices at the molecular scale can bring enormous immediate benefits in the research and practice of medicine.

  9. Home advantage in retractable-roof baseball stadia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowich, Paul

    2012-10-01

    This study examined whether the home advantage varies for open-air, domed, or retractable-roof baseball stadia, and whether having the roof open or closed affects the home advantage in retractable-roof baseball stadia. Data from Major League Baseball (MLB) games played between 2001 and 2009 were analyzed for whether or not the presence of a home-advantage was dependent on the type of home stadium used. Home advantage was robust for all three types of stadia. A significant effect of stadium type on home advantage was found, with a greater home advantage for teams playing home games in domed stadia relative to open-air stadia, replicating a previous study. There was a greater home advantage for teams playing home games in domed stadia relative to retractable-roof stadia. No other differences in the home advantage were found; results are discussed in terms of familiarity with the facility.

  10. Retraction statement: Modern Concepts for Caries Tissue Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    "Modern Concepts for Caries Tissue Removal", by Falk Schwendicke The above article, published online on 15 February 2016 in Wiley Online Library (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.llll/jerd.12201), has been retracted by agreement between the author, Dr. Falk Schwendicke, the journal Editor-in-Chief, Dr. Harald O. Heymann, Associate Editor, Dr. Edward Swift and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed as the article was published in advance of other companion work which should have had precedence. The article pages have been replaced by the Retraction Statement and the article condensed accordingly. Schwendicke, F. Swift, EJ. Modern concepts for caries tissue removal. Dent J Esthet Rest 2016; 28:1; DOI: 10.1111/jerd.12201.

  11. Visible luminescence of lanthanide ions in Ca3Sc2Si3O12 and Ca3Y2Si3O12

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabio Piccinelli; Adolfo Speghini; Gino Mariotto; Laura Bovo; Marco Bettinelli

    2009-01-01

    The crystalline materials Ca3Sc2Si3O12 and Ca3Y2Si3O12 were characterized by different crystal structures,as the former is a cubic garnet,while the latter is an orthorhombic compound.We investigated the optical spectroscopy of these materials doped with several trivalent lanthanide ions and compared the results for the two hosts.Polycrystalline samples were prepared by solid state reaction,both undoped and doped with the trivalent lanthanide ions Eu3+,Tb3+ and Sm3+.Emission,excitation and Raman spectra of these materials were measured at temperatures ranging from 300 to 10 K.The optical spectra were assigned and discussed,and the effects of the crystal structure of the host on the spectroscopic behaviour were addressed.The technological potential of these compounds in the field of optical materials and devices was discussed.

  12. Characteristics of Retractions from Korean Medical Journals in the KoreaMed Database: A Bibliometric Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hye-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Flawed or misleading articles may be retracted because of either honest scientific errors or scientific misconduct. This study explored the characteristics of retractions in medical journals published in Korea through the KoreaMed database. Methods We retrieved retraction articles indexed in the KoreaMed database from January 1990 to January 2016. Three authors each reviewed the details of the retractions including the reason for retraction, adherence to retraction guidelines, and appropriateness of retraction. Points of disagreement were reconciled by discussion among the three. Results Out of 217,839 articles in KoreaMed published from 1990 to January 2016, the publication type of 111 articles was retraction (0.051%). Of the 111 articles (addressing the retraction of 114 papers), 58.8% were issued by the authors, 17.5% were jointly issued (author, editor, and publisher), 15.8% came from editors, and 4.4% were dispatched by institutions; in 5.3% of the instances, the issuer was unstated. The reasons for retraction included duplicate publication (57.0%), plagiarism (8.8%), scientific error (4.4%), author dispute (3.5%), and other (5.3%); the reasons were unstated or unclear in 20.2%. The degree of adherence to COPE’s retraction guidelines varied (79.8%–100%), and some retractions were inappropriate by COPE standards. These were categorized as follows: retraction of the first published article in the case of duplicate publication (69.2%), authorship dispute (15.4%), errata (7.7%), and other (7.7%). Conclusion The major reason for retraction in Korean medical journals is duplicate publication. Some retractions resulted from overreaction by the editors. Therefore, editors of Korean medical journals should take careful note of the COPE retraction guidelines and should undergo training on appropriate retraction practices. PMID:27706245

  13. Ischemic damage in hippocampal CA1 is dependent on glutamate release and intact innervation from CA3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benveniste, H; Jørgensen, M B; Sandberg, M;

    1989-01-01

    The removal of glutamatergic afferents to CA1 by destruction of the CA3 region is known to protect CA1 pyramidal cells against 10 min of transient global ischemia. To investigate further the pathogenetic significance of glutamate, we measured the release of glutamate in intact and CA3-lesioned CA...... is dependent on glutamate release and intact innervation from CA3....

  14. Family of deployable/retractable structures for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unda, J.; Weisz, J.; Rivacoba, J.; Uríen, I. Ruiz; Capitanio, R. S.

    New trends in the frame of space applications lead to the necessity of using deployable/retractable structures, working either as beams (with payloads all along their length) or masts (loaded at their tip). SENER—under ESA/ESTEC and Spanish Space Program contracts—are developing a family of structures with deployment and retraction capabilities (LTS, SENERMAST, CTM) so as to cover all ranges of potential necessities in the space community (antennas, experiment support, solar arrays, heat rejection systems …). This paper consists of a summary of the performances and range of applications of LTS, SENERMAST and CTM, and pays special attention to the large truss structure (LTS) development and verification.

  15. A custom made jig for individual canine retraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Kumar Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We face difficulty in individual canine retraction in the bracket system lacking power arms on the canines. When orthodontic force is applied through the center of resistance (CR, then, tooth translation ensues. Forces applied at a distance from the CR create a moment that tends to rotate and tip the tooth. The tendency of tipping is increased in the bracket system lacking power arm, since, force is applied more occlusally. Hence, we have designed a chair side custom made jig to retract the canines individually.

  16. Retracted: Spontaneous rectus sheath haematoma associated with rivaroxaban treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas Tuna, A; Palabiyik, O; Beyaz, S G

    2015-08-01

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jcpt.12228/pdf The above article, published online on 10 November 2014 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor in Chief, A. Li Wan Po, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The retraction has been agreed because, unknown to the authors, another group published a similar study based on the same material in the Indian Journal of Pharmacology: Kocayigit I, Can Y, Sahinkus S, et al. Spontaneous rectus sheath haematoma during rivaroxaban therapy. Indian Journal of Pharmacology. 2014;46(3):339-340. doi:10.4103/0253-7613.132193.

  17. Toward a self-wired active reconstruction of the hippocampal trisynaptic loop: DG-CA3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J. Brewer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian hippocampus functions to encode and retrieve memories by transiently changing synaptic strengths, yet encoding in individual subregions for transmission between regions remains poorly understood. Toward the goal of better understanding the coding in the trisynaptic pathway from the dentate gyrus (DG to the CA3 and CA1, we report a novel microfabricated device that divides a micro-electrode array into two compartments of separate hippocampal network subregions connected by axons that grow through 3x10x400 μm tunnels. Gene expression by qPCR demonstrated selective enrichment of separate DG, CA3 and CA1 subregions. Reconnection of DG to CA3 altered burst dynamics associated with marked enrichment of GAD67 in DG and GFAP in CA3. Surprisingly, DG axon spike propagation was preferentially unidirectional to the CA3 region at 0.5 m/s with little reverse transmission. Therefore, select hippocampal subregions intrinsically self-wire in anatomically appropriate patterns and maintain their distinct subregion phenotype without external inputs

  18. Mossy fiber synaptic transmission: communication from the dentate gyrus to area CA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, David B; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    Communication between the dentate gyrus (DG) and area CA3 of the hippocampus proper is transmitted via axons of granule cells--the mossy fiber (MF) pathway. In this review we discuss and compare the properties of transmitter release from the MFs onto pyramidal neurons and interneurons. An examination of the anatomical connectivity from DG to CA3 reveals a surprising interplay between excitation and inhibition for this circuit. In this respect it is particularly relevant that the major targets of the MFs are interneurons and that the consequence of MF input into CA3 may be inhibitory or excitatory, conditionally dependent on the frequency of input and modulatory regulation. This is further complicated by the properties of transmitter release from the MFs where a large number of co-localized transmitters, including GABAergic inhibitory transmitter release, and the effects of presynaptic modulation finely tune transmitter release. A picture emerges that extends beyond the hypothesis that the MFs are simply "detonators" of CA3 pyramidal neurons; the properties of synaptic information flow from the DG have more subtle and complex influences on the CA3 network.

  19. Energy deprivation transiently enhances rhythmic inhibitory events in the CA3 hippocampal network in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, C E; Benquet, P; Demont-Guignard, S; Wendling, F; Gerber, U

    2010-07-14

    Oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) leads to rapid suppression of synaptic transmission. Here we describe an emergence of rhythmic activity at 8 to 20 Hz in the CA3 subfield of hippocampal slice cultures occurring for a few minutes prior to the OGD-induced cessation of evoked responses. These oscillations, dominated by inhibitory events, represent network activity, as they were abolished by tetrodotoxin. They were also completely blocked by the GABAergic antagonist picrotoxin, and strongly reduced by the glutamatergic antagonist NBQX. Applying CPP to block NMDA receptors had no effect and neither did UBP302, an antagonist of GluK1-containing kainate receptors. The gap junction blocker mefloquine disrupted rhythmicity. Simultaneous whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings from neighboring or distant CA3 pyramidal cells revealed strong cross-correlation of the incoming rhythmic activity. Interneurons in the CA3 area received similar correlated activity. Interestingly, oscillations were much less frequently observed in the CA1 area. These data, together with the observation that the recorded activity consists primarily of inhibitory events, suggest that CA3 interneurons are important for generating these oscillations. This transient increase in inhibitory network activity during OGD may represent a mechanism contributing to the lower vulnerability to ischemic insults of the CA3 area as compared to the CA1 area.

  20. Oxygen/Glucose Deprivation and Reperfusion Cause Modifications of Postsynaptic Morphology and Activity in the CA3 Area of Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yeon Joo; Suh, Eun Cheng; Lee, Kyung Eun

    2012-12-01

    Brain ischemia leads to overstimulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, referred as excitotoxicity, which mediates neuronal cell death. However, less attention has been paid to changes in synaptic activity and morphology that could have an important impact on cell function and survival following ischemic insult. In this study, we investigated the effects of reperfusion after oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) not only upon neuronal cell death, but also on ultrastructural and biochemical characteristics of postsynaptic density (PSD) protein, in the stratum lucidum of the CA3 area in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. After OGD/reperfusion, neurons were found to be damaged; the organelles such as mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, dendrites, and synaptic terminals were swollen; and the PSD became thicker and irregular. Ethanolic phosphotungstic acid staining showed that the density of PSD was significantly decreased, and the thickness and length of the PSD were significantly increased in the OGD/reperfusion group compared to the control. The levels of PSD proteins, including PSD-95, NMDA receptor 1, NMDA receptor 2B, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, were significantly decreased following OGD/reperfusion. These results suggest that OGD/reperfusion induces significant modifications to PSDs in the CA3 area of organotypic hippocampal slice cultures, both morphologically and biochemically, and this may contribute to neuronal cell death and synaptic dysfunction after OGD/reperfusion.

  1. PHASE TRANSITION IN LAYERED PEROVSKITE LIKE MANGANATE Ca3Mn2O7 UNDER HIGH PRESSURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.L.ZHU; L.C.CHEN; R.C.YU; F.Y.LI; J.LIU; C.Q.JIN

    2001-01-01

    In situ high pressure energy dispersive X-ray diffraction measurements on layered perovskite-like manganate Ca3Mn2O7 under pressures up to 35 GPa have been Performed by using diamond anvil cell with synchrotron radiation.The results show that the structure of layered perovskite-like manganate Ca3Mn2O7 is unstable under pressure due to the easy compression of NaCl-type blocks.The structure of Ca3Mn2O7 underwent two phase transitions under pressures in the range of 0-35GPa.One was at about 1.3GPa with the crystal structure changing from tetragonalt go orthorhombic.The other was at about 9.5GPa with the crystal structure changing form orthorhombic back to another tetragonal.

  2. A new form of Ca3P2 with a ring of Dirac nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia S. Xie

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis and crystal structure of a new high-temperature form of Ca3P2. The crystal structure was determined through Rietveld refinements of synchrotron powder x-ray diffraction data. This form of Ca3P2 has a crystal structure of the hexagonal Mn5Si3 type, with a Ca ion deficiency compared to the ideal 5:3 stoichiometry. This yields a stable, charge-balanced compound of Ca2+ and P3−. We also report the observation of a secondary hydride phase, Ca5P3H, which again is a charge-balanced compound. The calculated band structure of Ca3P2 indicates that it is a three-dimensional Dirac semimetal with a highly unusual ring of Dirac nodes at the Fermi level. The Dirac states are protected against gap opening by a mirror plane in a manner analogous to what is seen for graphene.

  3. Conceptualizing Fraudulent Studies as Viruses: New Models for Handling Retractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Kathleen; Oliver, Amalya L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the growing problem of retractions in the scientific literature of publications that contain bad data (i.e., fabricated, falsified, or containing error), also called "false science." While the problem is particularly acute in the biomedical literature because of the life-threatening implications when treatment…

  4. Ergodic Retractions for Families of Asymptotically Nonexpansive Mappings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeidi Shahram

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove some theorems for the existence of ergodic retractions onto the set of common fixed points of a family of asymptotically nonexpansive mappings. Our results extend corresponding results of Benavides and Ramírez (2001, and Li and Sims (2002.

  5. Electrophysiological changes of CA3 neurons and dentate granule cells following transient forebrain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, E M; Gao, T M; Pulsinelli, W A; Xu, Z C

    1998-07-06

    The electrophysiological responses of CA3 pyramidal neurons and dentate granule (DG) cells in rat hippocampus were studied after transient forebrain ischemia using intracellular recording and staining techniques in vivo. Approximately 5 min of ischemic depolarization was induced using 4-vessel occlusion method. The spike threshold and rheobase of CA3 neurons remained unchanged up to 12 h following reperfusion. No significant change in spike threshold was observed in DG cells but the rheobase transiently increased 6-9 h after ischemia. The input resistance and time constant of CA3 neurons increased 0-3 h after ischemia and returned to control ranges at later time periods. The spontaneous firing rate in CA3 neurons transiently decreased shortly following reperfusion, while that of DG cells progressively decreased after ischemia. In CA3 neurons, the amplitude and slope of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) transiently decreased 0-3 h after reperfusion, and the stimulus intensity threshold for EPSPs transiently increased at the same time. No significant changes in amplitude and slope of EPSPs were observed in DG cells, but the stimulus intensity threshold for EPSPs slightly increased shortly after reperfusion. The present study demonstrates that the excitability of CA3 pyramidal neurons and DG cells after 5 min ischemic depolarization is about the same as control levels, whereas the synaptic transmission to these cells was transiently suppressed after the ischemic insult. These results suggest that synaptic transmission is more sensitive to ischemia than membrane properties, and the depression of synaptic transmission may be a protective mechanism against ischemic insults.

  6. Plagiarism Allegations Account for Most Retractions in Major Latin American/Caribbean Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Renan Moritz V R; de Albuquerque Rocha, Karina; Catelani, Fernanda; Fontes-Pereira, Aldo José; Vasconcelos, Sonia M R

    2016-10-01

    This study focuses on retraction notices from two major Latin American/Caribbean indexing databases: SciELO and LILACS. SciELO includes open scientific journals published mostly in Latin America/the Caribbean, from which 10 % are also indexed by Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge Journal of Citation Reports (JCR). LILACS has a similar geographical coverage and includes dissertations and conference/symposia proceedings, but it is limited to publications in the health sciences. A search for retraction notices was performed in these two databases using the keywords "retracted", "retraction" "withdrawal", "withdrawn", "removed" and "redress". Documents were manually checked to identify those that actually referred to retractions, which were then analyzed and categorized according to the reasons alleged in the notices. Dates of publication/retraction and time to retraction were also recorded. Searching procedures were performed between June and December 2014. Thirty-one retraction notices were identified, fifteen of which were in JCR-indexed journals. "Plagiarism" was alleged in six retractions of this group. Among the non-JCR journals, retraction reasons were alleged in fourteen cases, twelve of which were attributed to "plagiarism". The proportion of retracted articles for the SciELO database was approximately 0.005 %. The reasons alleged in retraction notices may be used as signposts to inform discussions in Latin America on plagiarism and research integrity. At the international level, these results suggest that the correction of the literature is becoming global and is not limited to mainstream international publications.

  7. Inhibition of GABA release by presynaptic ionotropic GABA receptors in hippocampal CA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axmacher, Nikolai; Draguhn, Andreas

    2004-02-09

    Vesicular transmitter release can be regulated by transmitter-gated ion channels at presynaptic axon terminals. The central inhibitory transmitter GABA acts on such presynaptic ionotropic receptors in various cells, including inhibitory interneurons. Here we report that GABA-mediated postsynaptic inhibitory currents in CA3 pyramidal cells of rat hippocampal slices are suppressed by agonists of GABAA receptors. The effect is present for both stimulus-induced and miniature IPSCs, indicating a reduction in the probability of vesicular release by presynaptic, action-potential-independent mechanisms. We conclude that the release of GABA from hippocampal CA3 interneurons is regulated by a negative feedback via presynaptic ionotropic GABA autoreceptors.

  8. Quantal transmission at mossy fibre targets in the CA3 region of the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J Josh; Grinspan, Zachary M; McBain, Chris J

    2004-01-01

    Recent anatomical evidence that inhibitory interneurones receive approximately 10 times more synapses from mossy fibres than do principal neurones (Acsády et al. 1998) has led to the re-examination of the extent to which interneurones are involved in CA3 network excitability. Although many of the anatomical and physiological properties of mossy fibre-CA3 interneurone synapses have been previously described (Acsády et al. 1998; Tóth et al. 2000), an investigation into the quantal nature of transmission at this synapse has not yet been conducted. Here, we employed variance-mean (VM) analysis to compare the release probability, quantal size (q) and number of release sites (n) at mossy fibre target neurones in CA3. At six of seven interneurone synapses in which a high concentration of Ca2+ was experimentally imposed, the variance-mean relationship could be approximated by a parabola. Estimates of n were 1-2, and the weighted release probability in normal Ca2+ conditions ranged from 0.34 to 0.51. At pyramidal cell synapses, the variance-mean relationship approximated a linear relationship, suggesting that release probability was significantly lower. The weighted quantal amplitude was similar at interneurone synapses and pyramidal cell synapses, although the variability in quantal amplitude was larger at interneurone synapses. Mossy fibre transmission at CA3 interneurone synapses can be explained by a lower number of release sites, a broader range of release probabilities, and larger range of quantal amplitudes than at CA3 pyramidal synapses. Finally, quantal events on to interneurones elicited spike transmission, owing in part to the more depolarized membrane potential than pyramidal cells. These results suggest that although mossy fibre synapses on to pyramidal cells are associated with a larger number of release sites per synapse, the higher connectivity, higher initial release probability, and larger relative impact per quantum on to CA3 interneurones generate

  9. Thermoelectric Properties and Electronic Structure of Ca3Co2O6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Ji-ming; MIN Xin-min; CHEN Sheng-li; NAN Ce-wen

    2004-01-01

    The nanosized Ca3Co2O6 powder was synthesized via sol-gel process. The phase composition was characterized by means of X-ray diffraction. Polycrystalline samples of Ca3Co2O6 were prepared by a sintering procedure of nanosized power. The seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity of the samples were measured from 450K up to 750K. The results show that the Seebeck coefficient increases with the increasing temperature. The electronic structures were calculated using the self-consistent full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave(LAPW) method within the density functional theory. The relationship between thermoelectric property and electronic structures was discussed.

  10. Retractable Pin Tools for the Friction Stir Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Two companies have successfully commercialized a specialized welding tool developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Friction stir welding uses the high rotational speed of a tool and the resulting frictional heat created from contact to crush, 'stir' together, and forge a bond between two metal alloys. It has had a major drawback, reliance on a single-piece pin tool. The pin is slowly plunged into the joint between two materials to be welded and rotated as high speed. At the end of the weld, the single-piece pin tool is retracted and leaves a 'keyhole,' something which is unacceptable when welding cylindrical objects such as drums, pipes and storage tanks. Another drawback is the requirement for different-length pin tools when welding materials of varying thickness. An engineer at the MSFC helped design an automatic retractable pin tool that uses a computer-controlled motor to automatically retract the pin into the shoulder of the tool at the end of the weld, preventing keyholes. This design allows the pin angle and length to be adjusted for changes in material thickness and results in a smooth hole closure at the end of the weld. Benefits of friction stir welding, using the MSFC retractable pin tool technology, include the following: The ability to weld a wide range of alloys, including previously unweldable and composite materials; provision of twice the fatigue resistance of fusion welds and no keyholes; minimization of material distortion; no creation of hazards such as welding fumes, radiation, high voltage, liquid metals, or arcing; automatic retraction of the pin at the end of the weld; and maintaining full penetration of the pin.

  11. Plasticity-dependent, full detonation at hippocampal mossy fiber–CA3 pyramidal neuron synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyleta, Nicholas P; Borges-Merjane, Carolina; Jonas, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mossy fiber synapses on CA3 pyramidal cells are 'conditional detonators' that reliably discharge postsynaptic targets. The 'conditional' nature implies that burst activity in dentate gyrus granule cells is required for detonation. Whether single unitary excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) trigger spikes in CA3 neurons remains unknown. Mossy fiber synapses exhibit both pronounced short-term facilitation and uniquely large post-tetanic potentiation (PTP). We tested whether PTP could convert mossy fiber synapses from subdetonator into detonator mode, using a recently developed method to selectively and noninvasively stimulate individual presynaptic terminals in rat brain slices. Unitary EPSPs failed to initiate a spike in CA3 neurons under control conditions, but reliably discharged them after induction of presynaptic short-term plasticity. Remarkably, PTP switched mossy fiber synapses into full detonators for tens of seconds. Plasticity-dependent detonation may be critical for efficient coding, storage, and recall of information in the granule cell–CA3 cell network. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17977.001 PMID:27780032

  12. Doublecortin knockout mice show normal hippocampal-dependent memory despite CA3 lamination defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanne Germain

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human X-linked doublecortin gene (DCX cause major neocortical disorganization associated with severe intellectual disability and intractable epilepsy. Although Dcx knockout (KO mice exhibit normal isocortical development and architecture, they show lamination defects of the hippocampal pyramidal cell layer largely restricted to the CA3 region. Dcx-KO mice also exhibit interneuron abnormalities. As well as the interest of testing their general neurocognitive profile, Dcx-KO mice also provide a relatively unique model to assess the effects of a disorganized CA3 region on learning and memory. Based on its prominent anatomical and physiological features, the CA3 region is believed to contribute to rapid encoding of novel information, formation and storage of arbitrary associations, novelty detection, and short-term memory. We report here that Dcx-KO adult males exhibit remarkably preserved hippocampal- and CA3-dependant cognitive processes using a large battery of classical hippocampus related tests such as the Barnes maze, contextual fear conditioning, paired associate learning and object recognition. In addition, we show that hippocampal adult neurogenesis, in terms of proliferation, survival and differentiation of granule cells, is also remarkably preserved in Dcx-KO mice. In contrast, following social deprivation, Dcx-KO mice exhibit impaired social interaction and reduced aggressive behaviors. In addition, Dcx-KO mice show reduced behavioral lateralization. The Dcx-KO model thus reinforces the association of neuropsychiatric behavioral impairments with mouse models of intellectual disability.

  13. The similarity of astrocytes number in dentate gyrus and CA3 subfield of rats hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshahi, Mehrdad; Sadeghi, Y; Hosseini, A; Naghdi, N

    2007-01-01

    The dentate gyrus is a part of hippocampal formation that it contains granule cells, which project to the pyramidal cells and interneurons of the CA3 subfield of the hippocampus. Astrocytes play a more active role in neuronal activity, including regulating ion flux currents, energy production, neurotransmitter release and synaptogenesis. Astrocytes are the only cells in the brain that contain the energy molecule glycogen. The close relationship between dentate gyrus and CA3 area can cause the similarity of the number of astrocytes in these areas. In this study 5 male albino wistar rats were used. Rats were housed in large plastic cage in animal house and were maintained under standard conditions, after histological processing, The 7 microm slides of the brains were stained with PTAH staining for showing the astrocytes. This staining is specialized for astrocytes. We showed that the number of astrocytes in different (ant., mid., post) parts of dentate gyrus and CA3 of hippocampus is the same. For example, the anterior parts of two area have the most number of astrocytes and the middle parts of two area have the least number of astrocytes. We concluded that dentate gyrus and CA3 area of hippocampus have the same group of astrocytes.

  14. Electronic Structure and Thermoelectric Properties of Ca3 Co4O9

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The relation among electronic structure, chemical bond and thermoelectric property of Ca3 Co4 O9 was studied using density function and discrete variation method (DFT-DVM).The gap between the highest valence band (HVB) and the lowest conduction band (LCB) shows a semiconducting property.Ca3 Co4 O9 colsists of CoO2 and Ca2 CoO3 two layers.The HVB and LCB near Fermi level are only mainly from O(2) 2p and Co(2) 3d in Ca2 CoO3 layer. Therefore, the semiconducting or thermoelectric property of Ca3 Co4 O9 should be mainly from Ca2 CoO3 layer, but it seems to have no direct relation to the CoO2 layer,which is consistent with that binary oxides hardly have a thermoelectric property, but trinary oxide compounds have quite a good thermoelectric property.The covalent and ionic bonds of Ca2 CoO3 layer are both weaker than those of CoO2 layer.Ca plays the role of connections between CoO2 and Ca2 CoO3 layers in Ca3 Co4 O9, decrease the ionic and covalent bond strength, and improve the thermoelectric property.

  15. Preparation and Luminescence Characteristics of Ca3Y2(BO3)4:Eu3+ Phosphor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Pan-Lai; YANG Zhi-Ping; WANG Zhi-Jun; Guo Qing-Lin

    2007-01-01

    Ca3Y2(BO3)4:Eu3+ phosphor is synthesized by high temperature solid-state reaction method, and the luminescence characteristics are investigated. The emission spectrum exhibits two strong red emissions at 613 and 621 nm corresponding to the electric dipole 5 Do-7F2 transition of Eu3+ under 365 nm excitation, the reason is that Eu3+ substituting for y3+ occupies the non-centrosymmetric position in the crystal structure of Ca3Y2 (BO3 )4. The excitation spectrum for 613 nm indicates that the phosphor can be effectively excited by ultraviolet (UV) (254 nm,365nm and 400nm) and blue (470nm) light. The effect of Eu3+ concentration on the emission intensity of Ca3Y2 (BO3 )4:Eu3+ phosphor is measured, the result shows that the emission intensities increase with increasing Eu3+ concentration, then decrease. The CIE colour coordinates of Ca3Y2(BO3)4:Eu3+ phosphor is (0.639, 0.357) at 15mol% Eu3+.

  16. Penicillin-induced epileptogenesis in immature rat CA3 hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, J W; Brady, R J

    1984-02-01

    Penicillin's ability to produce epileptiform discharges in the CA3 region of hippocampus was examined both extracellularly and intracellularly in slices taken from immature rats 3-25 days of age. Comparisons were made to similar recordings from slices taken from mature rats. Between postnatal days 9 and 19 penicillin treatment resulted in spontaneous extracellular epileptiform bursts and coincident intracellular depolarization shifts. These events were more prolonged and less frequent than in slices from mature rats, and the bursts were followed by prolonged afterdischarges, often 20-30 s in duration. Intracellularly these afterdischarges consisted of large, rhythmic slow depolarizing potentials, which resulted in one or more action potentials in individual CA3 pyramidal cells. Extracellular field recordings showed these events to be simultaneous with synchronous discharges of a large population of CA3 pyramidal cells. In pups 1-2 weeks of age the ability of hippocampus to produce prolonged afterdischarges was associated with a slow depolarizing afterpotential, which followed the downstroke of the depolarization shift. Coincident with this afterpotential was a prolonged negative field in the CA3 pyramidal cell body layer. By postnatal days 24 and 25 the tendency to generate afterdischarges was greatly reduced. In addition, afterdischarges were observed infrequently in slices taken during the first postnatal week. Spike trains produced by prolonged intracellular current injection in slices taken on postnatal days 9-19 were followed by large afterhyperpolarizations and were unable to produce afterdischarges in individual CA3 pyramidal cells. Intracellular recordings from presumed glial cells suggest that extracellular K+ accumulation may play a role in the pronounced capacity of hippocampus from 1- and 2-week-old rat pups to generate prolonged afterdischarges.

  17. Optimization principles of dendritic structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borst Alexander

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendrites are the most conspicuous feature of neurons. However, the principles determining their structure are poorly understood. By employing cable theory and, for the first time, graph theory, we describe dendritic anatomy solely on the basis of optimizing synaptic efficacy with minimal resources. Results We show that dendritic branching topology can be well described by minimizing the path length from the neuron's dendritic root to each of its synaptic inputs while constraining the total length of wiring. Tapering of diameter toward the dendrite tip – a feature of many neurons – optimizes charge transfer from all dendritic synapses to the dendritic root while housekeeping the amount of dendrite volume. As an example, we show how dendrites of fly neurons can be closely reconstructed based on these two principles alone.

  18. Intracellular activities related to in vitro hippocampal sharp waves are altered in CA3 pyramidal neurons of aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi-Chameh, H; Peng, J; Wu, C; Zhang, L

    2014-09-26

    Pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA3 area interconnect intensively via recurrent axonal collaterals, and such CA3-to-CA3 recurrent circuitry plays important roles in the generation of hippocampal network activities. In particular, the CA3 circuitry is able to generate spontaneous sharp waves (SPWs) when examined in vitro. These in vitro SPWs are thought to result from the network activity of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons as SPW-correlating intracellular activities are featured with strong IPSPs in pyramidal neurons and EPSPs or spikes in GABAergic interneurons. In view of accumulating evidence indicating a decrease in subgroups of hippocampal GABAergic interneurons in aged animals, we test the hypothesis that the intracellular activities related to in vitro SPWs are altered in CA3 pyramidal neurons of aged mice. Hippocampal slices were prepared from adult and aged C57 black mice (ages 3-6 and 24-28months respectively). Population and single-cell activities were examined via extracellular and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. CA3 SPW frequencies were not significantly different between the slices of adult and aged mice but SPW-correlating intracellular activities featured weaker IPSC components in aged CA3 pyramidal neurons compared to adult neurons. It was unlikely that this latter phenomenon was due to general impairments of GABAergic synapses in the aged CA3 circuitry as evoked IPSC responses and pharmacologically isolated IPSCs were observed in aged CA3 pyramidal neurons. In addition, aged CA3 pyramidal neurons displayed more positive resting potentials and had a higher propensity of burst firing than adult neurons. We postulate that alterations of GABAergic network activity may explain the reduced IPCS contributions to in vitro SPWs in aged CA3 pyramidal neurons. Overall, our present observations are supportive of the notion that excitability of hippocampal CA3 circuitry is increased in aged mice.

  19. Pyrotechnic Actuator for Retracting Tubes Between MSL Subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallon, John C.; Webster, Richard G.; Patterson, Keith D.; Orzewalla, Matthew A.; Roberts, Eric T.; Tuszynski, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus, denoted the "retractuator" (a contraction of "retracting actuator"), was designed to help ensure clean separation between the cruise stage and the entry-vehicle subsystem of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The retractuator or an equivalent mechanism is needed because of tubes that (1) transport a heat-transfer fluid between the stages during flight and (2) are cut immediately prior to separation of the stages retractuator. The role of the retractuator is to retract the tubes, after they are cut and before separation of the subsystem, so that cut ends of the tubes do not damage thermal-protection coats on the entry vehicle and do not contribute to uncertainty of drag and consequent uncertainty in separation velocity.

  20. TCDQ-TCT retraction and losses during asynchronous beam dump

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, Chiara; Quaranta, Elena; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The protection provided by the TCDQs in case of asynchronous beam dump depends strongly on their correct setup. They have to respect the strict hierarchy of the full collimation system and shield the tertiary collimators in the experimental regions. This MD aimed at performing asynchronous beam dump tests with different configurations, in order to assess the minimum allowed retraction between TCTs and TCDQs and, as a consequence, on the The protection provided by the TCDQs in case of asynchronous beam dump depends strongly on their correct setup. They have to respect the strict hierarchy of the full collimation system and shield the tertiary collimators in the experimental regions. This MD aimed at performing asynchronous beam dump tests with different configurations, in order to assess the minimum allowed retraction between TCTs and TCDQs and, as a consequence, on the β* reach.

  1. RAB-10 Regulates Dendritic Branching by Balancing Dendritic Transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin A Taylor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction of a large dendritic arbor requires robust growth and the precise delivery of membrane and protein cargoes to specific subcellular regions of the developing dendrite. How the microtubule-based vesicular trafficking and sorting systems are regulated to distribute these dendritic development factors throughout the dendrite is not well understood. Here we identify the small GTPase RAB-10 and the exocyst complex as critical regulators of dendrite morphogenesis and patterning in the C. elegans sensory neuron PVD. In rab-10 mutants, PVD dendritic branches are reduced in the posterior region of the cell but are excessive in the distal anterior region of the cell. We also demonstrate that the dendritic branch distribution within PVD depends on the balance between the molecular motors kinesin-1/UNC-116 and dynein, and we propose that RAB-10 regulates dendrite morphology by balancing the activity of these motors to appropriately distribute branching factors, including the transmembrane receptor DMA-1.

  2. Modified Dento - Alveolar Distraction Osteogenesis Technique for Rapid Canine Retraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Patil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distraction Osteogenesis claims to reduce the duration of treatment as well aid in conservation of anchorage. With the introduction of Dento- alveolar distraction retraction of canine can now be done in about 2-3 weeks with minimal loss of anchorage and little/no root resorption. However, surgical procedure required for dento-alveolar distraction can cause significant swelling and post operative discomfort. Our small modification in the surgical procedure drastically reduces the discomfort and improves patient compliance.

  3. Modified Dento - Alveolar Distraction Osteogenesis Technique for Rapid Canine Retraction

    OpenAIRE

    Sameer Patil; Sharadindu Kotrashetti; Sumit Yadev; Ketan Vhora

    2012-01-01

    Distraction Osteogenesis claims to reduce the duration of treatment as well aid in conservation of anchorage. With the introduction of Dento- alveolar distraction retraction of canine can now be done in about 2-3 weeks with minimal loss of anchorage and little/no root resorption. However, surgical procedure required for dento-alveolar distraction can cause significant swelling and post operative discomfort. Our small modification in the surgical procedure drastically reduces the discomfort an...

  4. Novel Control by the CA3 Region of the Hippocampus on Neurogenesis in the Dentate Gyrus of the Adult Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Xin Liu; Pinnock, Scarlett B.; Joe Herbert

    2011-01-01

    The dentate gyrus is a site of continued neurogenesis in the adult brain. The CA3 region of the hippocampus is the major projection area from the dentate gyrus. CA3 sends reciprocal projections back to the dentate gyrus. Does this imply that CA3 exerts some control over neurogenesis? We studied the effects of lesions of CA3 on neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, and on the ability of fluoxetine to stimulate mitotic activity in the progenitor cells. Unilateral ibotenic-acid generated lesions we...

  5. Electronic and Optical Properties of Ca3MN (M = Ge, Sn, Pb, P, As, Sb and Bi) Antiperovskite Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Samad; Murtaza, G.; Khenata, R.; Mahmood, Asif; Yar, Abdullah; Muzammil, M.; Khan, Matiullah

    2016-08-01

    The electronic and optical properties of cubic antiperovskites Ca3MN (M = Ge, Sn, Pb, P, As, Sb and Bi) were investigated by applying the full potential linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbitals (FP-LAPW + lo) scheme based on density functional theory. Different exchange correlation potentials were adopted for the calculations. The results of band structure and density of states show that, by changing the central anion of Ca3MN, the nature of the materials change from metallic (Ca3GeN, Ca3SnN, Ca3PbN) to semiconducting with small band gaps (Ca3SbN and Ca3BiN) to insulating (Ca3PN and Ca3AsN). The optical properties such as dielectric function, absorption coefficient, optical conductivity, reflectivity and refractive indices have also been calculated. The results reveal that all the studied compounds are optically active in the visible and ultraviolet energy regions, and therefore can be effectively utilized for optoelectronic devices.

  6. RETRACTED: Flap side edge noise modeling and prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yueping

    2013-08-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal (http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy).This article has been retracted at the request of the first author because of the overlap with previously published papers. The first author takes full responsibility and sincerely apologizes for the error made.This article has been retracted at the request of the Editor-in-Chief.The article duplicates significant parts of an earlier paper by the same author, published in AIAA (Y.P. Guo, Aircraft flap side edge noise modeling and prediction. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, (2011), 10.2514/6.2011-2731). Prior to republication, conference papers should be comprehensively extended, and re-use of any data should be appropriately cited. As such this article represents a severe abuse of the scientific publishing system. The scientific community takes a very strong view on this matter and apologies are offered to readers of the journal that this was not detected during the submission process.

  7. Type-IV Pilus Deformation Can Explain Retraction Behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Ranajay; Vaziri, Ashkan

    2014-01-01

    Polymeric filament like type IV Pilus (TFP) can transfer forces in excess of 100pN during their retraction before stalling, powering surface translocation(twitching). Single TFP level experiments have shown remarkable nonlinearity in the retraction behavior influenced by the external load as well as levels of PilT molecular motor protein. This includes reversal of motion near stall forces when the concentration of the PilT protein is lowered significantly. In order to explain this behavior, we analyze the coupling of TFP elasticity and interfacial behavior with PilT kinetics. We model retraction as reaction controlled and elongation as transport controlled process. The reaction rates vary with TFP deformation which is modeled as a compound elastic body consisting of multiple helical strands under axial load. Elongation is controlled by monomer transport which suffer entrapment due to excess PilT in the cell periplasm. Our analysis shows excellent agreement with a host of experimental observations and we prese...

  8. Retractions of the gingival margins evaluated by holographic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Manole, Marius; de Sabata, Aldo; Rusu, Laura-Cristina; Stratul, Stefan; Dudea, Diana; Dughir, Ciprian; Duma, Virgil-Florin

    2015-05-01

    The periodontal disease is one of the most common pathological states of the teeth and gums system. The issue is that its evaluation is a subjective one, i.e. it is based on the skills of the dental medical doctor. As for any clinical condition, a quantitative evaluation and monitoring in time of the retraction of the gingival margins is desired. This phenomenon was evaluated in this study with a holographic method by using a He-Ne laser with a power of 13 mW. The holographic system we have utilized - adapted for dentistry applications - is described. Several patients were considered in a comparative study of their state of health - regarding their oral cavity. The impressions of the maxillary dental arch were taken from a patient during his/her first visit and after a period of six months. The hologram of the first model was superposed on the model cast after the second visit. The retractions of the gingival margins could be thus evaluated three-dimensionally in every point of interest. An evaluation of the retraction has thus been made. Conclusions can thus be drawn for the clinical evaluation of the health of the teeth and gums system of each patient.

  9. Interneuron diversity series: containing the detonation--feedforward inhibition in the CA3 hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J Josh; McBain, Chris J

    2003-11-01

    Feedforward inhibitory circuits are involved both in the suppression of excitability and timing of action potential generation in principal cells. In the CA3 hippocampus, a single mossy fiber from a dentate gyrus granule cell forms giant boutons with multiple release sites, which are capable of detonating CA3 principal cells. By contrast, mossy fiber terminals form a larger number of Lilliputian-sized synapses with few release sites onto local circuit interneurons, with distinct presynaptic and postsynaptic properties. This dichotomy between the two synapse types endows the circuit with exquisite control over pyramidal cell discharge. Under pathological conditions where feedforward inhibition is compromised, focal excitation is no longer contained, rendering the circuit susceptible to hyperexcitability.

  10. Optical spectroscopy and band gap analysis of hybrid improper ferroelectric Ca3Ti2O7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Judy G.; Birol, Turan; Harms, Nathan C.; Gao, Bin; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Vanderbilt, David; Musfeldt, Janice L.

    2016-06-01

    We bring together optical absorption spectroscopy, photoconductivity, and first principles calculations to reveal the electronic structure of the room temperature ferroelectric Ca3Ti2O7. The 3.94 eV direct gap in Ca3Ti2O7 is charge transfer in nature and noticeably higher than that in CaTiO3 (3.4 eV), a finding that we attribute to dimensional confinement in the n = 2 member of the Ruddlesden-Popper series. While Sr substitution introduces disorder and broadens the gap edge slightly, oxygen deficiency reduces the gap to 3.7 eV and gives rise to a broad tail that persists to much lower energies.

  11. Domains and ferroelectric switching pathways in Ca3Ti2O7 from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowadnick, Elizabeth A.; Fennie, Craig J.

    2016-09-01

    Hybrid improper ferroelectricity, where an electrical polarization can be induced via a trilinear coupling to two nonpolar structural distortions of different symmetries, recently was demonstrated experimentally in the n =2 Ruddlesden-Popper compound Ca3Ti2O7 . In this paper we use group theoretic methods and first-principles calculations to identify possible ferroelectric switching pathways in Ca3Ti2O7 . We identify low-energy paths that reverse the polarization direction by switching via an orthorhombic twin domain or via an antipolar structure. We also introduce a chemically intuitive set of local order parameters to give insight into how these paths are relevant to ferroelectric switching nucleated at domain walls. Our findings suggest that switching may proceed via more than one mechanism in this material.

  12. Active properties of neuronal dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, D; Magee, J C; Colbert, C M; Cristie, B R

    1996-01-01

    Dendrites of neurons in the central nervous system are the principal sites for excitatory synaptic input. Although little is known about their function, two disparate perspectives have arisen to describe the activity patterns inherent to these diverse tree-like structures. Dendrites are thus considered either passive or active in their role in integrating synaptic inputs. This review follows the history of dendritic research from before the turn of the century to the present, with a primary focus on the hippocampus. A number of recent techniques, including high-speed fluorescence imaging and dendritic patch clamping, have provided new information and perspectives about the active properties of dendrites. The results support previous notions about the dendritic propagation of action potentials and also indicate which types of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels are expressed and functionally active in dendrites. Possible roles for the active properties of dendrites in synaptic plasticity and integration are also discussed.

  13. Cooperative retraction of bundled type IV pili enables nanonewton force generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Biais

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The causative agent of gonorrhea, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, bears retractable filamentous appendages called type IV pili (Tfp. Tfp are used by many pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria to carry out a number of vital functions, including DNA uptake, twitching motility (crawling over surfaces, and attachment to host cells. In N. gonorrhoeae, Tfp binding to epithelial cells and the mechanical forces associated with this binding stimulate signaling cascades and gene expression that enhance infection. Retraction of a single Tfp filament generates forces of 50-100 piconewtons, but nothing is known, thus far, on the retraction force ability of multiple Tfp filaments, even though each bacterium expresses multiple Tfp and multiple bacteria interact during infection. We designed a micropillar assay system to measure Tfp retraction forces. This system consists of an array of force sensors made of elastic pillars that allow quantification of retraction forces from adherent N. gonorrhoeae bacteria. Electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy were used in combination with this novel assay to assess the structures of Tfp. We show that Tfp can form bundles, which contain up to 8-10 Tfp filaments, that act as coordinated retractable units with forces up to 10 times greater than single filament retraction forces. Furthermore, single filament retraction forces are transient, whereas bundled filaments produce retraction forces that can be sustained. Alterations of noncovalent protein-protein interactions between Tfp can inhibit both bundle formation and high-amplitude retraction forces. Retraction forces build over time through the recruitment and bundling of multiple Tfp that pull cooperatively to generate forces in the nanonewton range. We propose that Tfp retraction can be synchronized through bundling, that Tfp bundle retraction can generate forces in the nanonewton range in vivo, and that such high forces could affect infection.

  14. Load System of Segmental T-Loops for Canine Retraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zeyang; Chen, Jie; Jiang, Feifei; Li, Shuning; Viecilli, Rodrigo F; Liu, Sean Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The orthodontic load system, especially the ideal moment-to-force ratios (M/F), is the commonly used design parameter of segmental T-loops for canine retraction. However, the load system, including M/F, may be affected by the changes in canine angulations and interbracket distance (IBD). Here, we hypothesize that clinical changes in canine position and angulation during canine retraction will significantly affect the load system delivered to the tooth. Methods The load systems of two T-loop groups, one for translation (TR) and the other for controlled tipping (CT), from nine bilateral canine retraction patients were made to the targeted values obtained from finite element analyses and validated. Each loop was tested on the corresponding maxillary dental cast obtained in the clinic. The casts were made before and after each treatment interval so that both initial and residual load systems could be obtained. The pre- and post-treatment IBDs were recorded for calculating IBD changes. Results As the IBDs decreased, the averaged retraction-force-drop per IBD reduction was 36 cN/mm, a 30% drop per 1 mm IBD decrease. The averaged anti-tipping-moment-drops per IBD reductions were 0.02 N-mm/mm for CT and 1.4 N-mm/mm for TR, ~0.6 % and 17% drop per 1 mm IBD decrease, respectively. Consequently, the average M/F increases per 1 mm IBD reduction were 1.24 mm/mm for CT and 6.34 mm/mm for TR. There was significant residual load left, which could continue to move the tooth if the patient missed the scheduled appointment. Conclusions Clinical changes in canine position and angulation during canine retraction significantly affect the load system. The initial planned M/F needs to be lower to reach the expected average ideal value. Patients should be required to follow the office visit schedule closely to avoid negative effects due to significant M/F increases with time. PMID:24075663

  15. Tonic GABAA conductance bidirectionally controls interneuron firing pattern and synchronization in the CA3 hippocampal network.

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlov, I.; Savtchenko, L P; Song, I.; Koo, J; A. PIMASHKIN; Rusakov, D A; A. SEMYANOV

    2013-01-01

    The spiking output of interneurons is key for rhythm generation in the brain. However, what controls interneuronal firing remains incompletely understood. Here we combine dynamic clamp experiments with neural network simulations to understand how tonic GABAA conductance regulates the firing pattern of CA3 interneurons. In baseline conditions, tonic GABAA depolarizes these cells, thus exerting an excitatory action while also reducing the excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) amplitude throu...

  16. Synapse-specific compartmentalization of signaling cascades for LTP induction in CA3 interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Galván, Emilio J; Pérez-Rosello, Tamara; Gómez-Lira, Gisela; Lara, Erika; Gutiérrez, Rafael; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons with somata in strata radiatum and lacunosun-moleculare (SR/L-M) of hippocampal area CA3 receive excitatory input from pyramidal cells via the recurrent collaterals (RC), and the dentate gyrus granule cells via the mossy fibers (MFs). Here we demonstrate that Hebbian long-term potentiation (LTP) at RC synapses on SR/L-M interneurons requires the concomitant activation of calcium-impermeable AMPARs (CI- AMPARs) and NMDARs. RC LTP was prevented by voltage clamping the po...

  17. Bidirectional Hebbian plasticity at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses on CA3 interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, Emilio J; Calixto, Eduardo; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2008-12-24

    Hippocampal area CA3 is critically involved in the formation of nonoverlapping neuronal subpopulations ("pattern separation") to store memory representations as distinct events. Efficient pattern separation relies on the strong and sparse excitatory input from the mossy fibers (MFs) to pyramidal cells and feedforward inhibitory interneurons. However, MF synapses on CA3 pyramidal cells undergo long-term potentiation (LTP), which, if unopposed, will degrade pattern separation because MF activation will now recruit additional CA3 pyramidal cells. Here, we demonstrate MF LTP in stratum lacunosum-moleculare (L-M) interneurons induced by the same stimulation protocol that induces MF LTP in pyramidal cells. This LTP was NMDA receptor (NMDAR) independent and occurred at MF Ca(2+)-impermeable AMPA receptor synapses. LTP was prevented by with voltage clamping the postsynaptic cell soma during high-frequency stimulation (HFS), intracellular injections of the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA (20 mm), or bath applications of the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nimodipine (10 microm). We propose that MF LTP in L-M interneurons preserves the sparsity of pyramidal cell activation, thus allowing CA3 to maintain its role in pattern separation. In the presence of the mGluR1alpha antagonist LY367385 [(S)-(+)-a-amino-4-carboxy-2-methylbenzeneacetic acid] (100 microm), the same HFS that induces MF LTP in naive slices triggered NMDAR-independent MF LTD. This LTD, like LTP, required activation of the L-type Ca(2+) channel and also was induced after blockade of IP(3) receptors with heparin (4 mg/ml) or the selective depletion of receptor-gated Ca(2+) stores with ryanodine (10 or 100 microm). We conclude that L-M interneurons are endowed with Ca(2+) signaling cascades suitable for controlling the polarity of MF long-term plasticity induced by joint presynaptic and postsynaptic activities.

  18. α2-containing GABAA receptors expressed in hippocampal region CA3 control fast network oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heistek, Tim S; Ruiperez-Alonso, Marta; Timmerman, A Jaap; Brussaard, Arjen B; Mansvelder, Huibert D

    2013-02-15

    GABA(A) receptors are critically involved in hippocampal oscillations. GABA(A) receptor α1 and α2 subunits are differentially expressed throughout the hippocampal circuitry and thereby may have distinct contributions to oscillations. It is unknown which GABA(A) receptor α subunit controls hippocampal oscillations and where these receptors are expressed. To address these questions we used transgenic mice expressing GABA(A) receptor α1 and/or α2 subunits with point mutations (H101R) that render these receptors insensitive to allosteric modulation at the benzodiazepine binding site, and tested how increased or decreased function of α subunits affects hippocampal oscillations. Positive allosteric modulation by zolpidem prolonged decay kinetics of hippocampal GABAergic synaptic transmission and reduced the frequency of cholinergically induced oscillations. Allosteric modulation of GABAergic receptors in CA3 altered oscillation frequency in CA1, while modulation of GABA receptors in CA1 did not affect oscillations. In mice having a point mutation (H101R) at the GABA(A) receptor α2 subunit, zolpidem effects on cholinergically induced oscillations were strongly reduced compared to wild-type animals, while zolpidem modulation was still present in mice with the H101R mutation at the α1 subunit. Furthermore, genetic knockout of α2 subunits strongly reduced oscillations, whereas knockout of α1 subunits had no effect. Allosteric modulation of GABAergic receptors was strongly reduced in unitary connections between fast spiking interneurons and pyramidal neurons in CA3 of α2H101R mice, but not of α1H101R mice, suggesting that fast spiking interneuron to pyramidal neuron synapses in CA3 contain α2 subunits. These findings suggest that α2-containing GABA(A) receptors expressed in the CA3 region provide the inhibition that controls hippocampal rhythm during cholinergically induced oscillations.

  19. mGluRs modulate strength and timing of excitatory transmission in hippocampal area CA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Kathleen E; Galván, Emilio J; Barrionuevo, Germán; Meriney, Stephen D

    2011-08-01

    Excitatory transmission within hippocampal area CA3 stems from three major glutamatergic pathways: the perforant path formed by axons of layer II stellate cells in the entorhinal cortex, the mossy fiber axons originating from the dentate gyrus granule cells, and the recurrent axon collaterals of CA3 pyramidal cells. The synaptic communication of each of these pathways is modulated by metabotropic glutamate receptors that fine-tune the signal by affecting both the timing and strength of the connection. Within area CA3 of the hippocampus, group I mGluRs (mGluR1 and mGluR5) are expressed postsynaptically, whereas group II (mGluR2 and mGluR3) and III mGluRs (mGluR4, mGluR7, and mGluR8) are expressed presynaptically. Receptors from each group have been demonstrated to be required for different forms of pre- and postsynaptic long-term plasticity and also have been implicated in regulating short-term plasticity. A recent observation has demonstrated that a presynaptically expressed mGluR can affect the timing of action potentials elicited in the postsynaptic target. Interestingly, mGluRs can be distributed in a target-specific manner, such that synaptic input from one presynaptic neuron can be modulated by different receptors at each of its postsynaptic targets. Consequently, mGluRs provide a mechanism for synaptic specialization of glutamatergic transmission in the hippocampus. This review will highlight the variability in mGluR modulation of excitatory transmission within area CA3 with an emphasis on how these receptors contribute to the strength and timing of network activity within pyramidal cells and interneurons.

  20. Terminal Field and Firing Selectivity of Cholecystokinin-Expressing Interneurons in the Hippocampal CA3 Area

    OpenAIRE

    Lasztóczi, Bálint; Tukker, John J.; Somogyi, Peter; Klausberger, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hippocampal oscillations reflect coordinated neuronal activity on many timescales. Distinct types of GABAergic interneuron participate in the coordination of pyramidal cells over different oscillatory cycle phases. In the CA3 area, which generates sharp waves and gamma oscillations, the contribution of identified GABAergic neurons remains to be defined. We have examined the firing of a family of cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons during network oscillations in urethane-anesthetized rats ...

  1. Postsynaptic Target Specific Synaptic Dysfunctions in the CA3 Area of BACE1 Knockout Mice

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Beta-amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), a major neuronal β-secretase critical for the formation of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide, is considered one of the key therapeutic targets that can prevent the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although a complete ablation of BACE1 gene prevents Aβ formation, we previously reported that BACE1 knockouts (KOs) display presynaptic deficits, especially at the mossy fiber (MF) to CA3 synapses. Whether the defect is specific to certain input...

  2. Energy deprivation transiently enhances rhythmic inhibitory events in the CA3 hippocampal network in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Gee, C E; Benquet, Pascal; Demont-Guignard, Sophie; Wendling, Fabrice; Gerber, U.

    2010-01-01

    CE. GEE and P. Benquet : These authors contributed equally to this study.; International audience; Oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) leads to rapid suppression of synaptic transmission. Here we describe an emergence of rhythmic activity at 8 to 20 Hz in the CA3 subfield of hippocampal slice cultures occurring for a few minutes prior to the OGD-induced cessation of evoked responses. These oscillations, dominated by inhibitory events, represent network activity, as they were abolished by tetrodo...

  3. Energy deprivation transiently enhances rhythmic inhibitory events in the CA3 hippocampal network in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Gee, C.(Particle Physics Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, United Kingdom); Benquet, P.; Demont-Guignard, S; Wendling, F; Gerber, U.

    2010-01-01

    Oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) leads to rapid suppression of synaptic transmission. Here we describe an emergence of rhythmic activity at 8 to 20 Hz in the CA3 subfield of hippocampal slice cultures occurring for a few minutes prior to the OGD-induced cessation of evoked responses. These oscillations, dominated by inhibitory events, represent network activity, as they were abolished by tetrodotoxin. They were also completely blocked by the GABAergic antagonist picrotoxin, and strongly reduc...

  4. Ontogeny of Kainate-Induced Gamma Oscillations in the Rat CA3 Hippocampus in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Vera eTsintsadze; Marat eMinlebaev; Dimitry eSuchkov; Mark eCunningham; Rustem eKhazipov

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic inhibition, which is instrumental in the generation of hippocampal gamma oscillations, undergoes significant changes during development. However, the development of hippocampal gamma oscillations remains largely unknown. Here, we explored the developmental features of kainate-induced oscillations (KA-Os) in CA3 region of rat hippocampal slices. Up to postnatal day P5, the bath application of kainate failed to evoke any detectable oscillations. KA-Os emerged by the end of the first p...

  5. Ontogeny of kainate-induced gamma oscillations in the rat CA3 hippocampus in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Tsintsadze, Vera; Minlebaev, Marat; Suchkov, Dimitry; Mark O. Cunningham; Khazipov, Roustem

    2015-01-01

    International audience; GABAergic inhibition, which is instrumental in the generation of hippocampal gamma oscillations, undergoes significant changes during development. However, the development of hippocampal gamma oscillations remains largely unknown. Here, we explored the developmental features of kainate-induced oscillations (KA-Os) in CA3 region of rat hippocampal slices. Up to postnatal day P5, the bath application of kainate failed to evoke any detectable oscillations. KA-Os emerged b...

  6. The spatial representations acquired in CA3 by self-organizing recurrent connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eCerasti

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Neural computation models have hypothesized that the dentate gyrus drives the storage in the CA3 network of new memories including, e.g. in rodents, spatial memories. Can recurrent CA3 connections self-organize, during storage, and form what have been called continuous attractors, or charts – so that they express spatial information later, when aside from a partial cue the information may not be available in the inputs? We use a simplified mathematical network model to contrast the properties of spatial representations self-organized through simulated Hebbian plasticity with those of charts pre-wired in the synaptic matrix, a control case closer to the ideal notion of continuous attractors. Both models form granular quasi-attractors, characterized by drift, which approach continuous ones only in the limit of an infinitely large network. The two models are comparable in terms of precision, but not of accuracy: with self-organized connections, the metric of space remains distorted, ill-adequate for accurate path integration, even when scaled up to the real hippocampus. While prolonged self-organization makes charts somewhat more informative about position in the environment, some positional information is surprisingly present also about environments never learned, borrowed, as it were, from unrelated charts. In contrast, context discrimination decreases with more learning, as different charts tend to collapse onto each other. These observations challenge the feasibility of the idealized CA3 continuous chart concept, and are consistent with a CA3 specialization for episodic memory rather than path integration.

  7. The cumulative analgesic effect of repeated electroacupuncture involves synaptic remodeling in the hippocampal CA3 region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiuling Xu; Tao Liu; Shuping Chen; Yonghui Gao; Junying Wang; Lina Qiao; Junling Liu

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the analgesic effect of repeated electroacupuncture at bilateral Zusanli (ST36) and Yanglingquan (GB34) once a day for 14 consecutive days in a rat model of chronic sciatic nerve constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain. In addition, concomitant changes in calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II expression and synaptic ultrastructure of neurons in the hippocampal CA3 region were examined. The thermal pain threshold (paw withdrawal latency) was increased significantly in both groups at 2 weeks after electroacupuncture intervention compared with 2 days of electroacupuncture. In ovariectomized rats with chronic constriction injury, the analgesic effect was significantly reduced. Electroacupuncture for 2 weeks significantly diminished the injury-induced increase in synaptic cleft width and thinning of the postsynaptic density, and it significantly suppressed the down-regulation of intracellular calcium/ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II expression in the hippocampal CA3 region. Repeated electroacupuncture intervention had a cumulative analgesic effect on injury-induced neuropathic pain reactions, and it led to synaptic remodeling of hippocampal neurons and upregulated calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II expression in the hippocampal CA3 region.

  8. Kindling induces transient fast inhibition in the dentate gyrus--CA3 projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, R; Heinemann, U

    2001-04-01

    The granule cells of the dentate gyrus (DG) send a strong glutamatergic projection, the mossy fibre tract, toward the hippocampal CA3 field, where it excites pyramidal cells and neighbouring inhibitory interneurons. Despite their excitatory nature, granule cells contain small amounts of GAD (glutamate decarboxylase), the main synthetic enzyme for the inhibitory transmitter GABA. Chronic temporal lobe epilepsy results in transient upregulation of GAD and GABA in granule cells, giving rise to the speculation that following overexcitation, mossy fibres exert an inhibitory effect by release of GABA. We therefore stimulated the DG and recorded synaptic potentials from CA3 pyramidal cells in brain slices from kindled and control rats. In both preparations, DG stimulation caused excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP)/inhibitory postsynaptic potential (IPSP) sequences. These potentials could be completely blocked by glutamate receptor antagonists in control rats, while in the kindled rats, a bicuculline-sensitive fast IPSP remained, with an onset latency similar to that of the control EPSP. Interestingly, this IPSP disappeared 1 month after the last seizure. When synaptic responses were evoked by high-frequency stimulation, EPSPs in normal rats readily summate to evoke action potentials. In slices from kindled rats, a summation of IPSPs overrides that of the EPSPs and reduces the probability of evoking action potentials. Our data show for the first time that kindling induces functionally relevant activity-dependent expression of fast inhibition onto pyramidal cells, coming from the DG, that can limit CA3 excitation in a frequency-dependent manner.

  9. Network state-dependent inhibition of identified hippocampal CA3 axo-axonic cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viney, Tim J; Lasztoczi, Balint; Katona, Linda; Crump, Michael G; Tukker, John J; Klausberger, Thomas; Somogyi, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Hippocampal sharp waves are population discharges initiated by an unknown mechanism in pyramidal cell networks of CA3. Axo-axonic cells (AACs) regulate action potential generation through GABAergic synapses on the axon initial segment. We found that CA3 AACs in anesthetized rats and AACs in freely moving rats stopped firing during sharp waves, when pyramidal cells fire most. AACs fired strongly and rhythmically around the peak of theta oscillations, when pyramidal cells fire at low probability. Distinguishing AACs from other parvalbumin-expressing interneurons by their lack of detectable SATB1 transcription factor immunoreactivity, we discovered a somatic GABAergic input originating from the medial septum that preferentially targets AACs. We recorded septo-hippocampal GABAergic cells that were activated during hippocampal sharp waves and projected to CA3. We hypothesize that inhibition of AACs, and the resulting subcellular redistribution of inhibition from the axon initial segment to other pyramidal cell domains, is a necessary condition for the emergence of sharp waves promoting memory consolidation.

  10. Functional distribution of nicotinic receptors in CA3 region of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grybko, Michael; Sharma, Geeta; Vijayaraghavan, Sukumar

    2010-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) modulation of a number of parameters of synaptic signaling in the brain has been demonstrated. It is likely that effects of nicotine are due to its ability to modulate network excitability as a whole. A pre-requisite to understanding the effects of nicotine on network properties is the elucidation of functional receptors. We have examined the distribution of functional nAChRs in the dentate gyrus granule cells and the CA3 region of the mammalian hippocampus using calcium imaging from acute slices. Our results demonstrate the presence of functional nAChRs containing the alpha7 subunit (alpha7-nAChRs) on mossy fiber boutons, CA3 pyramidal cells, and on astrocytes. In addition, both CA3 interneurons and granule cells show nicotinic signals. Our study suggests that functional nicotinic receptors are widespread in their distribution and that calcium imaging might be an effective technique to examine locations of these receptors in the mammalian brain.

  11. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This video, captured during the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) flown on STS-87 as a part of the fourth United States Microgravity payload, shows the growth of a dendrite, and the surface solidification that occurred on the front and back windows of the growth chamber. Dendrites are tiny, tree like structures that form as metals solidify.

  12. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor inhibition prevents denervation-induced dendritic atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Laurent M; Zahn, Nadine; Ferreirós, Nerea; Scholich, Klaus; Maggio, Nicola; Deller, Thomas; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-03-31

    A hallmark of several major neurological diseases is neuronal cell death. In addition to this primary pathology, secondary injury is seen in connected brain regions in which neurons not directly affected by the disease are denervated. These transneuronal effects on the network contribute considerably to the clinical symptoms. Since denervated neurons are viable, they are attractive targets for intervention. Therefore, we studied the role of Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-receptor signaling, the target of Fingolimod (FTY720), in denervation-induced dendritic atrophy. The entorhinal denervation in vitro model was used to assess dendritic changes of denervated mouse dentate granule cells. Live-cell microscopy of GFP-expressing granule cells in organotypic entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures was employed to follow individual dendritic segments for up to 6 weeks after deafferentation. A set of slice cultures was treated with FTY720 or the S1P-receptor (S1PR) antagonist VPC23019. Lesion-induced changes in S1P (mass spectrometry) and S1PR-mRNA levels (laser microdissection and qPCR) were determined. Denervation caused profound changes in dendritic stability. Dendritic elongation and retraction events were markedly increased, resulting in a net reduction of total dendritic length (TDL) during the first 2 weeks after denervation, followed by a gradual recovery in TDL. These changes were accompanied by an increase in S1P and S1PR1- and S1PR3-mRNA levels, and were not observed in slice cultures treated with FTY720 or VPC23019. We conclude that inhibition of S1PR signaling prevents dendritic destabilization and denervation-induced dendrite loss. These results suggest a novel neuroprotective effect for pharmaceuticals targeting neural S1PR pathways.

  13. Enhanced electrochemical performance of the solid oxide fuel cell cathode using Ca3Co4O9+δ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Alfred Junio; Søgaard, Martin; Van Nong, Ngo;

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the electrochemical performance of an SOFC cathode for potential use in intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs) using the oxygen non-stoichiometric misfit-layered cobaltite Ca3Co4O9+δ or composites of Ca3Co4O9+δ with Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (CGO/Ca3Co4O9+δ......). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed that symmetric cells with an electrode of pure Ca3Co4O9+δ exhibit a cathode polarization resistance (Rp) of 12.4 Ω cm2, at 600 °C in air. Strikingly, Rp of the composite CGO/Ca3Co4O9+δ with 50 vol.% CGO was reduced by a factor of 19 (i.e. Rp = 0.64 Ω cm2...

  14. Exploring why and how journal editors retract articles: findings from a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Peter; Wager, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Editors have a responsibility to retract seriously flawed articles from their journals. However, there appears to be little consistency in journals' policies or procedures for this. In a qualitative study, we therefore interviewed editors of science journals using semi-structured interviews to investigate their experience of retracting articles. We identified potential barriers to retraction, difficulties in the process and also sources of support and encouragement. Our findings have been used as the basis for guidelines developed by the Committee on Publication Ethics.

  15. Transport Processes in Dendritic Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Free dentritic growth refers to the unconstrained development of crystals within a supercooled melt, which is the classical dendrite problem. The development of theoretical understanding of dendritic growth and its experimental status is sketched showing that transport theory and interfacial thermodynamics (capillarity theory) are insufficient ingredients to develop a truly predictive model of dendrite formation. The convenient, but incorrect, notion of maximum velocity was used for many years to estimate the behavior of dendritic transformations until supplanted by modern dynamic stability theory. The proper combinations of transport theory and morphological stability seem to be able to predict the salient aspects of dendritic growth, especially in the neighborhood of the tip.

  16. Modification of dendritic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; del Angel, Alma Rosa; Gonzalez-Burgos, Ignacio

    2002-01-01

    Since 1890 Ramón y Cajal strongly defended the theory that dendrites and their processes and spines had a function of not just nutrient transport to the cell body, but they had an important conductive role in neural impulse transmission. He extensively discussed and supported this theory in the Volume 1 of his extraordinary book Textura del Sistema Nervioso del Hombre y de los Vertebrados. Also, Don Santiago significantly contributed to a detailed description of the various neural components of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex during development. Extensive investigation has been done in the last Century related to the functional role of these complex brain regions, and their association with learning, memory and some limbic functions. Likewise, the organization and expression of neuropsychological qualities such as memory, exploratory behavior and spatial orientation, among others, depend on the integrity and adequate functional activity of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. It is known that brain serotonin synthesis and release depend directly and proportionally on the availability of its precursor, tryptophan (TRY). By using a chronic TRY restriction model in rats, we studied their place learning ability in correlation with the dendritic spine density of pyramidal neurons in field CA1 of the hippocampus during postnatal development. We have also reported alterations in the maturation pattern of the ability for spontaneous alternation and task performance evaluating short-term memory, as well as adverse effects on the density of dendritic spines of hippocampal CA1 field pyramidal neurons and on the dendritic arborization and the number of dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons from the third layer of the prefrontal cortex using the same model of TRY restriction. The findings obtained in these studies employing a modified Golgi method, can be interpreted as a trans-synaptic plastic response due to understimulation of serotoninergic receptors located in the

  17. Complete axon arborization of a single CA3 pyramidal cell in the rat hippocampus, and its relationship with postsynaptic parvalbumin-containing interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sik, A; Tamamaki, N; Freund, T F

    1993-12-01

    The complete axon arborization of a single CA3 pyramidal cell has been reconstructed from 32 (60 microns thick) sections from the rat hippocampus following in vivo intracellular injection of neurobiotin. The same sections were double-immunostained for parvalbumin--a calcium-binding protein selectively present in two types of GABAergic interneurons, the basket and chandelier cells--in order to map boutons of the pyramidal cell in contact with dendrites and somata of these specific subsets of interneurons visualized in a Golgi-like manner. The axon of the pyramidal cell formed 15,295 boutons, 63.8% of which were in stratum oriens, 15.4% in stratum pyramidale and 20.8% in stratum radiatum. Only 2.1% of the axon terminals contacted parvalbumin-positive neurons. Most of these were single contacts (84.7%), but double or triple contacts (15.3%) were also found. The majority of the boutons terminated on dendrites (84.1%) of parvalbumin-positive cells, less frequently on cell bodies (15.9%). In order to estimate the proportion of contacts representing synapses, 16 light microscopically identified contacts between boutons of the filled pyramidal cell axon and the parvalbumin-positive targets were examined by correlated electron microscopy. Thirteen of them were found to be asymmetrical synapses, and in the remaining three cases synapses between the labelled profiles could not be confirmed. We conclude that the physiologically effective excitatory connections between single pyramidal cells and postsynaptic inhibitory neurons are mediated by a small number of contacts, mostly by a single synapse. This results in a high degree of convergence and divergence in hippocampal networks.

  18. Simultaneous Occurrence of Duane Retraction Syndrome with Marfan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihir Kothari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome (MFS is an autosomal dominant disorder of connective tissue, while Duane retraction syndrome (DRS is a congenital cranial dysinnervation disorder (CCDD which can be transmitted as autosomal dominant disorder in 5–10% of patients. In this paper, we present an 8-year-old girl who presented with left eye DRS and bilateral subluxation of the lens associated with MFS in absence of familial involvement. To our knowledge this is the first case report of DRS with MFS. The occurrence of these syndromes together is very rare and appears to be coincidental.

  19. Unusual "ratchet syndrome": spontaneous lead retraction after a generator exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejima, Koichiro; Shoda, Morio; Yashiro, Bun; Yoshida, Kentaro; Nuki, Toshiaki; Kato, Ken; Manaka, Tetsuyuki; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa

    2014-07-01

    A 72-year-old female with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy underwent a generator exchange for a cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator with a full-pocket capsulectomy. The lead position after the operation was identical to that before the operation on the chest X-ray. After 4 months, a subacute exacerbation of her heart failure was caused by cardiac resynchronization therapy failure due to a dislodgement of the left ventricular lead. An aggressive adhesiotomy of the connective tissue around the leads made it possible for the lead to retract by a ratchet-like movement through the suture sleeve, so-called "ratchet syndrome", after the generator exchange.

  20. Slow synaptic transmission mediated by TRPV1 channels in CA3 interneurons of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Noriomi; Hishimoto, Akitoyo; Sora, Ichiro; Mori, Masahiro

    2016-03-11

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) modulate various neuronal functions in the central nervous system. Many studies reported that mGluRs have linkages to neuronal disorders such as schizophrenia and autism related disorders, indicating that mGluRs are involved in critical functions of the neuronal circuits. To study this possibility further, we recorded mGluR-induced synaptic responses in the interneurons of the CA3 stratum radiatum using rat hippocampal organotypic slice cultures. Electrical stimulation in the CA3 pyramidal cell layer evoked a slow inward current in the interneurons at a holding potential of -70mV in the presence of antagonists for AMPA/kainate receptors, NMDA receptors, GABAA receptors and GABAB receptors. The slow inward current was blocked in the absence of extracellular calcium, suggesting that this was a synaptic response. The slow excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) reversed near 0mV, reflecting an increase in a non-selective cationic conductance. The slow EPSC is mediated by group I mGluRs, as it was blocked by AP3, a group I mGluR antagonist. Neither a calcium chelator BAPTA nor a phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122 affected the slow EPSC. La(3+), a general TRP channel blocker or capsazepine, a selective TRPV1 channel antagonist significantly suppressed the slow EPSC. DHPG, a selective group I mGluRs agonist induced an inward current, which was suppressed by capsazepine. These results indicate that in the interneurons of the hippocampal CA3 stratum radiatum group I mGluRs activate TRPV1 channels independently of PLC and intracellular Ca(2+), resulting in the slow EPSC in the interneurons.

  1. Control of GABA release at single mossy fiber-CA3 connections in the developing hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria F Safiulina

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this review some of the recent work carried out in our laboratory concerning the functional role of GABAergic signalling at immature mossy fibres (MF-CA3 principal cell synapses has been highlighted. While in adulthood MF, the axons of dentate gyrus granule cells release onto CA3 principal cells and interneurons glutamate, early in postnatal life they release GABA, which exerts into targeted cells a depolarizing and excitatory action. We found that GABAA-mediated postsynaptic currents (MF-GPSCs exhibited a very low probability of release, were sensitive to L-AP4, a group III metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, and revealed short-term frequency-dependent facilitation. Moreover, MF-GPSCs were down regulated by presynaptic GABAB and kainate receptors, activated by spillover of GABA from MF terminals and by glutamate present in the extracellular medium, respectively. Activation of these receptors contributed to the low release probability and in some cases to synapses silencing. By pairing calcium transients, associated with network-driven giant depolarizing potentials or GDPs (a hallmark of developmental networks thought to represent a primordial form of synchrony between neurons, generated by the synergistic action of glutamate and GABA with MF activation increased the probability of GABA release and caused the conversion of silent synapses into conductive ones suggesting that GDPs act as coincident detector signals for enhancing synaptic efficacy. Finally, to compare the relative strength of CA3 pyramidal cell output in relation to their MF glutamatergic or GABAergic inputs in adulthood or in postnatal development, respectively, a realistic model was constructed taking into account different biophysical properties of these synapses.

  2. Blocking brain-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits injury-induced hyperexcitability of hippocampal CA3 neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Raminder; Chang, Philip K-Y; Prenosil, George A; Deane, Emily C; McKinney, Rebecca A

    2013-12-01

    Brain trauma can disrupt synaptic connections, and this in turn can prompt axons to sprout and form new connections. If these new axonal connections are aberrant, hyperexcitability can result. It has been shown that ablating tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), a receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), can reduce axonal sprouting after hippocampal injury. However, it is unknown whether inhibiting BDNF-mediated axonal sprouting will reduce hyperexcitability. Given this, our purpose here was to determine whether pharmacologically blocking BDNF inhibits hyperexcitability after injury-induced axonal sprouting in the hippocampus. To induce injury, we made Schaffer collateral lesions in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. As reported by others, we observed a 50% reduction in axonal sprouting in cultures treated with a BDNF blocker (TrkB-Fc) 14 days after injury. Furthermore, lesioned cultures treated with TrkB-Fc were less hyperexcitable than lesioned untreated cultures. Using electrophysiology, we observed a two-fold decrease in the number of CA3 neurons that showed bursting responses after lesion with TrkB-Fc treatment, whereas we found no change in intrinsic neuronal firing properties. Finally, evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potential recordings indicated an increase in network activity within area CA3 after lesion, which was prevented with chronic TrkB-Fc treatment. Taken together, our results demonstrate that blocking BDNF attenuates injury-induced hyperexcitability of hippocampal CA3 neurons. Axonal sprouting has been found in patients with post-traumatic epilepsy. Therefore, our data suggest that blocking the BDNF-TrkB signaling cascade shortly after injury may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of post-traumatic epilepsy.

  3. Control of GABA Release at Mossy Fiber-CA3 Connections in the Developing Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safiulina, Victoria F; Caiati, Maddalena D; Sivakumaran, Sudhir; Bisson, Giacomo; Migliore, Michele; Cherubini, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    In this review some of the recent work carried out in our laboratory concerning the functional role of GABAergic signalling at immature mossy fibres (MF)-CA3 principal cell synapses has been highlighted. While in adulthood MF, the axons of dentate gyrus granule cells release onto CA3 principal cells and interneurons glutamate, early in postnatal life they release GABA, which exerts into targeted cells a depolarizing and excitatory action. We found that GABA(A)-mediated postsynaptic currents (MF-GPSCs) exhibited a very low probability of release, were sensitive to L-AP4, a group III metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, and revealed short-term frequency-dependent facilitation. Moreover, MF-GPSCs were down regulated by presynaptic GABA(B) and kainate receptors, activated by spillover of GABA from MF terminals and by glutamate present in the extracellular medium, respectively. Activation of these receptors contributed to the low release probability and in some cases to synapses silencing. By pairing calcium transients, associated with network-driven giant depolarizing potentials or GDPs (a hallmark of developmental networks thought to represent a primordial form of synchrony between neurons), generated by the synergistic action of glutamate and GABA with MF activation increased the probability of GABA release and caused the conversion of silent synapses into conductive ones suggesting that GDPs act as coincident detector signals for enhancing synaptic efficacy. Finally, to compare the relative strength of CA3 pyramidal cell output in relation to their MF glutamatergic or GABAergic inputs in adulthood or in postnatal development, respectively, a realistic model was constructed taking into account different biophysical properties of these synapses.

  4. Regulation of phenylacetic acid uptake is sigma54 dependent in Pseudomonas putida CA-3.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O' Leary, Niall D

    2011-10-13

    Abstract Background Styrene is a toxic and potentially carcinogenic alkenylbenzene used extensively in the polymer processing industry. Significant quantities of contaminated liquid waste are generated annually as a consequence. However, styrene is not a true xenobiotic and microbial pathways for its aerobic assimilation, via an intermediate, phenylacetic acid, have been identified in a diverse range of environmental isolates. The potential for microbial bioremediation of styrene waste has received considerable research attention over the last number of years. As a result the structure, organisation and encoded function of the genes responsible for styrene and phenylacetic acid sensing, uptake and catabolism have been elucidated. However, a limited understanding persists in relation to host specific regulatory molecules which may impart additional control over these pathways. In this study the styrene degrader Pseudomonas putida CA-3 was subjected to random mini-Tn5 mutagenesis and mutants screened for altered styrene\\/phenylacetic acid utilisation profiles potentially linked to non-catabolon encoded regulatory influences. Results One mutant, D7, capable of growth on styrene, but not on phenylacetic acid, harboured a Tn5 insertion in the rpoN gene encoding σ54. Complementation of the D7 mutant with the wild type rpoN gene restored the ability of this strain to utilise phenylacetic acid as a sole carbon source. Subsequent RT-PCR analyses revealed that a phenylacetate permease, PaaL, was expressed in wild type P. putida CA-3 cells utilising styrene or phenylacetic acid, but could not be detected in the disrupted D7 mutant. Expression of plasmid borne paaL in mutant D7 was found to fully restore the phenylacetic acid utilisation capacity of the strain to wild type levels. Bioinformatic analysis of the paaL promoter from P. putida CA-3 revealed two σ54 consensus binding sites in a non-archetypal configuration, with the transcriptional start site being resolved by

  5. High-temperature stability of thermoelectric Ca3Co4O9 thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinks, P.; Van Nong, Ngo; Pryds, Nini;

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced thermal stability in thermoelectric Ca3Co4O9 thin films up to 550 °C in an oxygen rich environment was demonstrated by high-temperature electrical and X-ray diffraction measurements. In contrast to generally performed heating in helium gas, it is shown that an oxygen/helium mixture...... provides sufficient thermal contact, while preventing the previously disregarded formation of oxygen vacancies. Combining thermal cycling with electrical measurements proves to be a powerful tool to study the real intrinsic thermoelectric behaviour of oxide thin films at elevated temperatures. © 2015 AIP...

  6. Superconductivity of Bi1.6Pbo.4Sr2Ca3Cu4O12

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atilla Coskun; Ahmet Ekicibil; Bekir Ozgelik

    2002-01-01

    The superconducting ceramics Bi1.6Pbo.4Sr2Ca3Cu4O12 have been prepared by the melt-casting method. A zero resistance temperature at 60 K has been observed. It has been found that the superconducting phase temperature Tc increases with increasing sintering temperature. The effect of Pb content on the superconductivity of the ceramic has been studied. The microstructure of the samplehas been investigated by scanning electron microscopy. Phase analysis has been carried out by x-ray diffraction patterns and energy dispersive analysis through x-ray spectroscopy.

  7. Novel control by the CA3 region of the hippocampus on neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the adult rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Xin Liu

    Full Text Available The dentate gyrus is a site of continued neurogenesis in the adult brain. The CA3 region of the hippocampus is the major projection area from the dentate gyrus. CA3 sends reciprocal projections back to the dentate gyrus. Does this imply that CA3 exerts some control over neurogenesis? We studied the effects of lesions of CA3 on neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, and on the ability of fluoxetine to stimulate mitotic activity in the progenitor cells. Unilateral ibotenic-acid generated lesions were made in CA3. Four days later there was no change on the number of either BrdU or Ki67-positive progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus. However, after 15 or 28 days, there was a marked reduction in surviving BrdU-labelled cells on the lesioned side (but no change in Ki-67+ cells. pCREB or Wnt3a did not co-localise with Ki-67 but with NeuN, a marker of mature neurons. Lesions had no effect on the basal expression of either pCREB or Wnt3a. Subcutaneous fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/day for 14 days increased the number of Ki67+ cells as expected on the control (non-lesioned side but not on that with a CA3 lesion. Nevertheless, the expected increase in BDNF, pCREB and Wnt3a still occurred on the lesioned side following fluoxetine treatment. Fluoxetine has been reported to decrease the number of "mature" calbindin-positive cells in the dentate gyrus; we found this still occurred on the side of a CA3 lesion. We then showed that the expression GAP-43 was reduced in the dentate gyrus on the lesioned side, confirming the existence of a synaptic connection between CA3 and the dentate gyrus. These results show that CA3 has a hitherto unsuspected role in regulating neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the adult rat.

  8. Pycnogenol protects CA3-CA1 synaptic function in a rat model of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Christopher M; Sompol, Pradoldej; Roberts, Kelly N; Ansari, Mubeen; Scheff, Stephen W

    2016-02-01

    Pycnogenol (PYC) is a patented mix of bioflavonoids with potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Previously, we showed that PYC administration to rats within hours after a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury significantly protects against the loss of several synaptic proteins in the hippocampus. Here, we investigated the effects of PYC on CA3-CA1 synaptic function following CCI. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats received an ipsilateral CCI injury followed 15 min later by intravenous injection of saline vehicle or PYC (10 mg/kg). Hippocampal slices from the injured (ipsilateral) and uninjured (contralateral) hemispheres were prepared at seven and fourteen days post-CCI for electrophysiological analyses of CA3-CA1 synaptic function and induction of long-term depression (LTD). Basal synaptic strength was impaired in slices from the ipsilateral, relative to the contralateral, hemisphere at seven days post-CCI and susceptibility to LTD was enhanced in the ipsilateral hemisphere at both post-injury timepoints. No interhemispheric differences in basal synaptic strength or LTD induction were observed in rats treated with PYC. The results show that PYC preserves synaptic function after CCI and provides further rationale for investigating the use of PYC as a therapeutic in humans suffering from neurotrauma.

  9. GABAergic input onto CA3 hippocampal interneurons remains shunting throughout development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banke, Tue G; McBain, Chris J

    2006-11-08

    In hippocampus, the net flow of excitability is controlled by inhibitory input provided by the many populations of local circuit inhibitory interneurons. In principal cells, GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic input undergoes a highly coordinated shift from depolarizing early in life to a more conventional hyperpolarizing inhibition on maturation. This switch in inhibitory input polarity is controlled by the developmental regulation of two chloride cotransporters (NKCC1 and KCC2) that results in a net shift from high to low intracellular Cl(-). Whether inhibitory input onto inhibitory interneurons demonstrates a similar developmental shift in intracellular Cl(-) is unexplored. Using the gramicidin perforated-patch configuration, we recorded from CA3 hippocampal stratum lucidum interneurons and pyramidal cells to monitor inhibitory input across a broad developmental range. GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic input onto stratum lucidum inhibitory interneurons was shunting in nature across the entire developmental age range tested, as resting membrane potential and the IPSC reversal potential remained within a few millivolts (1-4 mV) between postnatal day 5 (P5) and P31. Furthermore, sensitivity to block of the two chloride cotransporters KCC2 and NKCC1 did not differ across the same age range, suggesting that their relative expression is fixed across development. In contrast, pyramidal cell synaptic inhibition demonstrated the well described switch from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing over the same age range. Thus, in contrast to principal cells, inhibitory synaptic input onto CA3 interneurons remains shunting throughout development.

  10. GABAB and adenosine receptors mediate enhancement of the K+ current, IAHP, by reducing adenylyl cyclase activity in rat CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, U; Gähwiler, B H

    1994-11-01

    1. Gamma-aminobuturic acid-B (GABAB) and adenosine A1 receptors, which are expressed in hippocampal pyramidal cells, are linked to pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins known to be coupled negatively to the enzyme adenylyl cyclase. This study investigates the electrophysiological consequences of adenylyl cyclase inhibition in response to stimulation of these receptors. 2. Single-electrode voltage-clamp recordings were obtained from CA3 pyramidal cells in rat hippocampal slice cultures in presence of tetrodotoxin. The calcium-dependent potassium current (IAHP), which is very sensitive to intracellular levels of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), was used as an electrophysiological indicator of adenylyl cyclase activity. 3. Application of baclofen (10 microM), a selective agonist at GABAB receptors, or adenosine (50 microM) each resulted in a transient decrease followed by a significant enhancement in the amplitude of evoked IAHP. The initial reduction in amplitude of IAHP probably reflects inadequacies in voltage clamp of electronically distant dendritic sites, due to the shunting caused by concomitant activation of potassium conductance by baclofen/adenosine. Comparable increases in membrane conductance in response to the GABAA agonist, muscimol, caused a similar reduction in IAHP. The enhancement of IAHP is consistent with an inhibition of constitutively active adenylyl cyclase. 4. The receptor mediating the responses to adenosine was identified as belonging to the A1 subtype on the basis of its sensitivity to the selective antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Dynamic Remodeling of Dendritic Arbors in GABAergic Interneurons of Adult Visual Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of evidence for functional plasticity in the adult brain, the role of structural plasticity in its manifestation remains unclear. To examine the extent of neuronal remodeling that occurs in the brain on a day-to-day basis, we used a multiphoton-based microscopy system for chronic in vivo imaging and reconstruction of entire neurons in the superficial layers of the rodent cerebral cortex. Here we show the first unambiguous evidence (to our knowledge of dendrite growth and remodeling in adult neurons. Over a period of months, neurons could be seen extending and retracting existing branches, and in rare cases adding new branch tips. Neurons exhibiting dynamic arbor rearrangements were GABA-positive non-pyramidal interneurons, while pyramidal cells remained stable. These results are consistent with the idea that dendritic structural remodeling is a substrate for adult plasticity and they suggest that circuit rearrangement in the adult cortex is restricted by cell type-specific rules.

  12. Dynamic remodeling of dendritic arbors in GABAergic interneurons of adult visual cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chung Allen Lee

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of evidence for functional plasticity in the adult brain, the role of structural plasticity in its manifestation remains unclear. To examine the extent of neuronal remodeling that occurs in the brain on a day-to-day basis, we used a multiphoton-based microscopy system for chronic in vivo imaging and reconstruction of entire neurons in the superficial layers of the rodent cerebral cortex. Here we show the first unambiguous evidence (to our knowledge of dendrite growth and remodeling in adult neurons. Over a period of months, neurons could be seen extending and retracting existing branches, and in rare cases adding new branch tips. Neurons exhibiting dynamic arbor rearrangements were GABA-positive non-pyramidal interneurons, while pyramidal cells remained stable. These results are consistent with the idea that dendritic structural remodeling is a substrate for adult plasticity and they suggest that circuit rearrangement in the adult cortex is restricted by cell type-specific rules.

  13. Acquisition of operant behavior in rats with delayed reinforcement: A retractable-lever procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Andrew A; Johnson, Lyndsey E; Tate, Christopher; Chiang, Thomas; Byrne, Tom

    2015-02-01

    Experimentally naïve rats acquired lever pressing with delayed reinforcement when the immediate programmed consequence for lever pressing was the simultaneous retraction of two identical levers. Presses on one lever also produced access to sweetened condensed milk after a delay of 10s following retraction. Presses on the second lever resulted in retraction only. Lever retraction prevented the possibility of adventitious reinforcement of contacting the operanda during the reinforcement delays. Several measures indicated that the delayed reinforcers strengthened behavior. The majority of responses for all rats were on the lever that initiated reinforcer delivery. Responding for seven out of eight rats decreased during a subsequent extinction phase in which retraction was the only consequence arranged for lever pressing. Responding recovered rapidly when food reinforcement was available again. Furthermore, when contingencies on the two levers were switched, rats allocated their behavior accordingly, showing control by the delayed reinforcers.

  14. Feedforward Inhibition Underlies the Propagation of Cholinergically Induced Gamma Oscillations from Hippocampal CA3 to CA1

    OpenAIRE

    Zemankovics, Rita; Veres, Judit M.; Oren, Iris; Hájos, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Gamma frequency (30–80 Hz) oscillations are implicated in memory processing. Such rhythmic activity can be generated intrinsically in the CA3 region of the hippocampus from where it can propagate to the CA1 area. To uncover the synaptic mechanisms underlying the intrahippocampal spread of gamma oscillations, we recorded local field potentials, as well as action potentials and synaptic currents in anatomically identified CA1 and CA3 neurons during carbachol-induced gamma oscillations in mouse ...

  15. Quantitative Morphometry of Electrophysiologically Identified CA3b Interneurons Reveals Robust Local Geometry and Distinct Cell Classes

    OpenAIRE

    Ascoli, Giorgio A.; Brown, Kerry M.; Calixto, Eduardo; Card, J. Patrick; Galvan, E. J.; Perez-Rosello, T.; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2009-01-01

    The morphological and electrophysiological diversity of inhibitory cells in hippocampal area CA3 may underlie specific computational roles and is not yet fully elucidated. In particular, interneurons with somata in strata radiatum (R) and lacunosum-moleculare (L-M) receive converging stimulation from the dentate gyrus and entorhinal cortex as well as within CA3. Although these cells express different forms of synaptic plasticity, their axonal trees and connectivity are still largely unknown. ...

  16. A Hopfield-like hippocampal CA3 neural network model for studying associative memory in Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wangxiong Zhao; Qingli Qiao; Dan Wang

    2010-01-01

    Associative memory, one of the major cognitive functions in the hippocampal CA3 region, includes auto-associative memory and hetero-associative memory. Many previous studies have shown that Alzheimer's disease (AD) can lead to loss of functional synapses in the central nervous system, and associative memory functions in patients with AD are often impaired, but few studies have addressed the effect of AD on hetero-associative memory in the hippocampal CA3 region. In this study, based on a simplified anatomical structure and synaptic connections in the hippocampal CA3 region, a three-layered Hopfield-like neural network model of hippocampal CA3 was proposed and then used to simulate associative memory functions in three circumstances: normal, synaptic deletion and synaptic compensation, according to Ruppin's synaptic deletion and compensation theory. The influences of AD on hetero-associative memory were further analyzed. The simulated results showed that the established three-layered Hopfield-like neural network model of hippocampal CA3 has both auto-associative and hetero-associative memory functions. With increasing synaptic deletion level, both associative memory functions were gradually impaired and the mean firing rates of the neurons within the network model were decreased. With gradual increasing synaptic compensation, the associative memory functions of the network were improved and the mean firing rates were increased. The simulated results suggest that the Hopfield-like neural network model can effectively simulate both associative memory functions of the hippocampal CA3 region. Synaptic deletion affects both auto-associative and hetero-associative memory functions in the hippocampal CA3 region, and can also result in memory dysfunction. To some extent, synaptic compensation measures can offset two kinds of associative memory dysfunction caused by synaptic deletion in the hippocampal CA3 area.

  17. Feedforward inhibition underlies the propagation of cholinergically induced gamma oscillations from hippocampal CA3 to CA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemankovics, Rita; Veres, Judit M; Oren, Iris; Hájos, Norbert

    2013-07-24

    Gamma frequency (30-80 Hz) oscillations are implicated in memory processing. Such rhythmic activity can be generated intrinsically in the CA3 region of the hippocampus from where it can propagate to the CA1 area. To uncover the synaptic mechanisms underlying the intrahippocampal spread of gamma oscillations, we recorded local field potentials, as well as action potentials and synaptic currents in anatomically identified CA1 and CA3 neurons during carbachol-induced gamma oscillations in mouse hippocampal slices. The firing of the vast majority of CA1 neurons and all CA3 neurons was phase-coupled to the oscillations recorded in the stratum pyramidale of the CA1 region. The predominant synaptic input to CA1 interneurons was excitatory, and their discharge followed the firing of CA3 pyramidal cells at a latency indicative of monosynaptic connections. Correlation analysis of the input-output characteristics of the neurons and local pharmacological block of inhibition both agree with a model in which glutamatergic CA3 input controls the firing of CA1 interneurons, with local pyramidal cell activity having a minimal role. The firing of phase-coupled CA1 pyramidal cells was controlled principally by their inhibitory inputs, which dominated over excitation. Our results indicate that the synchronous firing of CA3 pyramidal cells rhythmically recruits CA1 interneurons and that this feedforward inhibition generates the oscillatory activity in CA1. These findings identify distinct synaptic mechanisms underlying the generation of gamma frequency oscillations in neighboring hippocampal subregions.

  18. Retractions in general and internal medicine in a high-profile scientific indexing database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan Moritz Varnier Rodrigues de Almeida

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Increased frequency of retractions has recently been observed, and retractions are important events that deserve scientific investigation. This study aimed to characterize cases of retraction within general and internal medicine in a high-profile database, with interest in the country of origin of the article and the impact factor (IF of the journal in which the retraction was made. DESIGN AND SETTING: This study consisted of reviewing retraction notes in the Thomson-Reuters Web of Knowledge (WoK indexing database, within general and internal medicine. METHODS: The retractions were classified as plagiarism/duplication, error, fraud and authorship problems and then aggregated into two categories: "plagiarism/duplication" and "others." The countries of origin of the articles were dichotomized according to the median of the indicator "citations per paper" (CPP, and the IF was dichotomized according to its median within general and internal medicine, also obtained from the WoK database. These variables were analyzed using contingency tables according to CPP (high versus low, IF (high versus low and period (1992-2002 versus 2003-2014. The relative risk (RR and 95% confidence interval (CI were estimated for plagiarism/duplication. RESULTS: A total of 86 retraction notes were identified, and retraction reasons were found for 80 of them. The probability that plagiarism/duplication was the reason for retraction was more than three times higher for the low CPP group (RR: 3.4; 95% CI: [1.9-6.2], and similar results were seen for the IF analysis. CONCLUSION: The study identified greater incidence of plagiarism/duplication among retractions from countries with lower scientific impact.

  19. Anisotropic laser properties of Yb:Ca3La2(BO3)4 disordered crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lisha; Xu, Honghao; Pan, Zhongben; Han, Wenjuan; Chen, Xiaowen; Liu, Junhai; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin

    2016-08-01

    A study is carried out experimentally on the anisotropy in the laser action of Yb:Ca3La2(BO3)4 disordered crystal, demonstrated with the output coupling changed over a wide range from 0.5% to 40%. Complex polarization state variation with output coupling and evolution with pump power are observed in the laser operation achieved with a- and c-cut crystal samples. A maximum output power of 8.2 W is produced at wavelengths around 1043 nm, with an incident pump power of 24.9 W, the optical-to-optical efficiency being 33%. The polarized absorption and emission cross section spectra are also presented.

  20. OLM interneurons differentially modulate CA3 and entorhinal inputs to hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Richardson N; Mikulovic, Sanja; Leão, Katarina E; Munguba, Hermany; Gezelius, Henrik; Enjin, Anders; Patra, Kalicharan; Eriksson, Anders; Loew, Leslie M; Tort, Adriano B L; Kullander, Klas

    2012-11-01

    The vast diversity of GABAergic interneurons is believed to endow hippocampal microcircuits with the required flexibility for memory encoding and retrieval. However, dissection of the functional roles of defined interneuron types has been hampered by the lack of cell-specific tools. We identified a precise molecular marker for a population of hippocampal GABAergic interneurons known as oriens lacunosum-moleculare (OLM) cells. By combining transgenic mice and optogenetic tools, we found that OLM cells are important for gating the information flow in CA1, facilitating the transmission of intrahippocampal information (from CA3) while reducing the influence of extrahippocampal inputs (from the entorhinal cortex). Furthermore, we found that OLM cells were interconnected by gap junctions, received direct cholinergic inputs from subcortical afferents and accounted for the effect of nicotine on synaptic plasticity of the Schaffer collateral pathway. Our results suggest that acetylcholine acting through OLM cells can control the mnemonic processes executed by the hippocampus.

  1. Subthreshold membrane-potential oscillations in immature rat CA3 hippocampal neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psarropoulou, C; Avoli, M

    1995-12-15

    Subthreshold membrane potential oscillations (MPOs) were recorded intracellularly in 31 of 43 (>70%) immature CA3 hippocampal neurones (from 3-17 days postnatally). MPOs (3-5 mV, 3-15 Hz) occurred at resting membrane potential (RMP) in 20 of 31 neurones, or following depolarization (11 of 31 neurones); with sufficient depolarization spontaneous action potentials (APs) were generated from the positive-going phase of MPOs. In all cells, MPOs were blocked by steady membrane hyperpolarization. Tetrodotoxin abolished MPOs (n = 4); Co(2+) markedly reduced them (n = 3), and tetraethylammonium, added in the presence of TTX, revealed lower frequency oscillatory activity (n = 2). We conclude that subthreshold MPOs in immature hippocampus, possibly linked to theta rhythm generation and memory acquisition, depend on voltage-dependent Na+ electrogenesis and they might be additionally controlled by Ca(2+) and K+ conductances.

  2. Shocks and Thermal Conduction Fronts in Retracting Reconnected Flux Tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Guidoni, Silvina

    2010-01-01

    We present a model for plasma heating produced by time-dependent, spatially localized reconnection within a flare current sheet separating skewed magnetic fields. The reconnection creates flux tubes of new connectivity which subsequently retract at Alfv\\'enic speeds from the reconnection site. Heating occurs in gas-dynamic shocks which develop inside these tubes. Here we present generalized thin flux tube equations for the dynamics of reconnected flux tubes, including pressure-driven parallel dynamics as well as temperature dependent, anisotropic viscosity and thermal conductivity. The evolution of tubes embedded in a uniform, skewed magnetic field, following reconnection in a patch, is studied through numerical solutions of these equations, for solar coronal conditions. Even though viscosity and thermal conductivity are negligible in the quiet solar corona, the strong gas-dynamic shocks generated by compressing plasma inside reconnected flux tubes generate large velocity and temperature gradients along the t...

  3. Periodontal ligament distraction: A simplified approach for rapid canine retraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Prabhat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distraction osteogenesis is a method of inducing new bone formation by applying mechanical strains on preexisting bone. The process of osteogenesis in the periodontal ligament during orthodontic tooth movement is similar to the osteogenesis in the midpalatal suture during rapid palatal expansion. A new concept of "distracting the periodontal ligament" is proposed to elicit rapid canine retraction in two weeks. At the time of first premolar extraction, the interseptal bone distal to the canine was undermined with a bone bur, grooving vertically inside the extraction socket along the buccal and lingual sides and extending obliquely toward the socket base. Then, a tooth-borne, custom-made, intraoral distraction device was placed to distract the canine distally into the extraction space. It was activated 0.5 mm/day, immediately after the extraction. Canine was distracted 6.5 mm into the extraction space within two weeks.

  4. Retraction: Evaluation of carcinogenic effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehic, Bakir

    2010-11-01

    The Editor-in-chief of the Bosnian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences has decided to retract the article from Bayazit V et al. [1] entitled as: "Evaluation of carcinogenic effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF)" published in Bosn J Basic Med Sci. 2010 Aug;10(3):245-50. After the editorial office was alerted of possible plagiarism in the article, it conducted thorough investigation and concluded that the article apparently represents plagiarized material from two World Health Organization reports, one European Commission report and other sources. Since this is considered scientific plagiarism and scientific misconduct, Editor-in-chief has decided to withdraw the article. The authors have agreed with the editorial office decision.

  5. GABA B receptor modulation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission onto rat CA3 hippocampal interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Saobo; McBain, Chris J

    2003-01-15

    Hippocampal stratum radiatum inhibitory interneurons receive glutamatergic excitatory innervation via the recurrent collateral fibers of CA3 pyramidal neurons and GABAergic inhibition from other interneurons. We examined both presynaptic- and postsynaptic-GABA(B) receptor-mediated responses at both synapse types. Postsynaptic GABA(B) receptor-mediated responses were absent in recordings from young (P16-18) but present in recordings from older animals (> or =P30) suggesting developmental regulation. In young animals, the GABA(B) receptor agonist, baclofen, inhibited the amplitude of evoked EPSCs and IPSCs, an effect blocked by prior application of the selective antagonist CGP55845. Baclofen enhanced the paired-pulse ratio and coefficient of variation of evoked EPSCs and IPSCs, consistent with a presynaptic mechanism of regulation. In addition, baclofen reduced the frequency of miniature IPSCs but not mEPSCs. However, baclofen reduced the frequency of KCl-induced mEPSCs; an effect blocked by Cd(2+), implicating presynaptic voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels as a target for baclofen modulation. In contrast, although Cd(2+) prevented the KCl-induced increase in mIPSC frequency, it failed to block baclofen's reduction of mIPSC frequency. Whereas N- and P/Q-types of Ca(2+) channels contributed equally to GABA(B) receptor-mediated inhibition of EPSCs, more P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels were involved in GABA(B) receptor-mediated inhibition of IPSCs. Finally, baclofen blocked the frequency-dependent depression of EPSCs and IPSCs, but was less effective at blocking frequency-dependent facilitation of EPSCs. Our results demonstrate that presynaptic GABA(B) receptors are expressed on the terminals of both excitatory and inhibitory synapses onto CA3 interneurons and that their activation modulates essential components of the release process underlying transmission at these two synapse types.

  6. Synaptic currents in anatomically identified CA3 neurons during hippocampal gamma oscillations in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Iris; Mann, Edward O; Paulsen, Ole; Hájos, Norbert

    2006-09-27

    Gamma-frequency oscillations are prominent during active network states in the hippocampus. An intrahippocampal gamma generator has been identified in the CA3 region. To better understand the synaptic mechanisms involved in gamma oscillogenesis, we recorded action potentials and synaptic currents in distinct types of anatomically identified CA3 neurons during carbachol-induced (20-25 microM) gamma oscillations in rat hippocampal slices. We wanted to compare and contrast the relationship between excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents in pyramidal cells and perisomatic-targeting interneurons, cell types implicated in gamma oscillogenesis, as well as in other interneuron subtypes, and to relate synaptic currents to the firing properties of the cells. We found that phasic synaptic input differed between cell classes. Most strikingly, the dominant phasic input to pyramidal neurons was inhibitory, whereas phase-coupled perisomatic-targeting interneurons often received a strong phasic excitatory input. Differences in synaptic input could account for some of the differences in firing rate, action potential phase precision, and mean action potential phase angle, both between individual cells and between cell types. There was a strong positive correlation between the ratio of phasic synaptic excitation to inhibition and firing rate over all neurons and between the phase precision of excitation and action potentials in interneurons. Moreover, mean action potential phase angle correlated with the phase of the peak of the net-estimated synaptic reversal potential in all phase-coupled neurons. The data support a recurrent mechanism of gamma oscillations, whereby spike timing is controlled primarily by inhibition in pyramidal cells and by excitation in interneurons.

  7. Up-regulation of GLT-1 severely impairs LTD at mossy fibre--CA3 synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omrani, Azar; Melone, Marcello; Bellesi, Michele; Safiulina, Victoria; Aida, Tomomi; Tanaka, Kohishi; Cherubini, Enrico; Conti, Fiorenzo

    2009-10-01

    Glutamate transporters are responsible for clearing synaptically released glutamate from the extracellular space. By this action, they maintain low levels of ambient glutamate, thus preventing excitotoxic damage, and contribute to shaping synaptic currents. We show that up-regulation of the glutamate transporter GLT-1 by ceftriaxone severely impaired mGluR-dependent long-term depression (LTD), induced at rat mossy fibre (MF)-CA3 synapses by repetitive stimulation of afferent fibres. This effect involved GLT-1, since LTD was rescued by the selective GLT-1 antagonist dihydrokainate (DHK). DHK per se produced a modest decrease in fEPSP amplitude that rapidly regained control levels after DHK wash out. Moreover, the degree of fEPSP inhibition induced by the low-affinity glutamate receptor antagonist gamma-DGG was similar during basal synaptic transmission but not during LTD, indicating that in ceftriaxone-treated rats LTD induction did not alter synaptic glutamate transient concentration. Furthermore, ceftriaxone-induced GLT-1 up-regulation significantly reduced the magnitude of LTP at MF-CA3 synapses but not at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses. Postembedding immunogold studies in rats showed an increased density of gold particles coding for GLT-1a in astrocytic processes and in mossy fibre terminals; in the latter, gold particles were located near and within the active zones. In both CEF-treated and untreated GLT-1 KO mice used for verifying the specificity of immunostaining, the density of gold particles in MF terminals was comparable to background levels. The enhanced expression of GLT-1 at release sites may prevent activation of presynaptic receptors, thus revealing a novel mechanism by which GLT-1 regulates synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus.

  8. Phase field modeling of dendrite growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yutuo ZHANG; Chengzhi WANG; Dianzhong LI; Yiyi LI

    2009-01-01

    Single dendrite and multi-dendrite growth for A1-2 mol pct Si alloy during isothermal solidification are simulated by phase field method. In the case of single equiaxed dendrite growth, the secondary and the necking phenomenon can be observed. For multi-dendrite growth, there exists the competitive growth among the dendrites dur-ing solidification. As solidification proceeds, growing and coarsening of the primary arms occurs, together with the branching and coarsening of the secondary arms.When the diffusion fields of dendrite tips come into contact with those of the branches growing from the neighboring dendrites, the dendrites stop growing and being to ripen and thicken.

  9. RETRACTION of articles with plagiarism in common with other publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    The GMR editorial staff was alerted about some manuscripts that were found to be substantially equal. The Publisher and Editor decided to retract these articles in accordance with the recommendations of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE). After a thorough investigation, we have strong reason to believe that the peer review process was failure and, after review and contacting the authors, the editors of Genetics and Molecular Research decided to retract these articles. The authors and their institutions were advised of this serious breach of ethics. The articles containing plagiarism in common with other publications are: Peng ZA, Lu RB, Xiao DM and Xiao ZM (2016). Increased expression of the lncRNA BANCR and its prognostic significance in human osteosarcoma. Genet. Mol. Res. 15 (1): gmr15017480 - DOI: 10.4238/gmr.15017480. Man HB, Bi WP and Man HH (2016). Decreased microRNA-198 expression and its prognostic significance in human glioma. Genet. Mol. Res. 15 (2): gmr.15027656 - DOI: 10.4238/gmr.15027656. Tang T, Zhang GC, Li CF, Liu YF, et al. (2016). Decreased miR-452 expression in human colorectal cancer and its tumor suppressive function. Genet. Mol. Res. 15 (2): gmr.15027730 - DOI: 10.4238/gmr.15027730. Ma YB, Song DW, Nie RH and Mu GY (2016). MicroRNA-32 functions as a tumor suppressor and directly targets EZH2 in uveal melanoma. Genet. Mol. Res. 15 (2): gmr.15027935 - DOI: 10.4238/gmr.15027935. Wang XJ, Xia M and Bi WP (2016). Decreased expression of miR-874 and its tumor suppressive function in human colorectal cancer. Genet. Mol. Res. 15 (2): gmr.15028077 - DOI: 10.4238/gmr.15028077. Zhuo HC, Song YF, Ye J, Lai GX, et al. (2016). MicroRNA-154 functions as a tumor suppressor and directly targets HMGA2 in human non-small cell lung cancer. Genet. Mol. Res. 15 (2): gmr.15028173 - DOI: 10.4238/gmr.15028173.

  10. Retractable tube design issues in ITER CXRS UPP no. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baross, T., E-mail: baross.teteny@wigner.mta.hu [WIGNER RCP, RMKI, PO Box 91, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary); Biel, W. [Institut für Energieforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich Gmbh, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Member of Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Krejczinger, A. [WIGNER RCP, RMKI, PO Box 91, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary); Krasikov, Yu.; Panin, A. [Institut für Energieforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich Gmbh, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Member of Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► The retractable tube is located in the upper port plug no. 3 of ITER core charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (cCXRS) that carries the cleaning system of the first mirror. ► Various manufacturing methods were investigated for the proper layout of the tube cooling structure. ► The tube support boundary conditions were examined. ► A flexible compensator element was developed between the floating and structural flange of the tube. -- Abstract: The retractable tube is located in the upper port plug no. 3 of ITER core charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (cCXRS), where it is surrounded by a set of mirrors, diagnostic shielding module (DSM), outer shell, cleaning device and shutter. Accordingly to the recent port plug concept the tube is an optional unit that carries the cleaning system of the first mirror. The cleaning device shall be a compact instrument at the tube head that influences the tube diameter primarily. Independently of the cleaning device the tube cooling channels and its proper support concept has to be developed. Various manufacturing methods are investigated for the proper layout of the tube cooling structure. They are the gun-drilled deep holes, the solid state bonded sheets forming cooling channels between the welded layers, ‘tube-in-tube’ approach. Most of them were analyzed in view of their thermal conditions. The tube support system design is a complex task, that has to take into account several boundary conditions and limitations. The tube must be compatible with the assumed ITER generic installation procedure, withstand the electromagnetic (EM) and thermal loads. Furthermore, the tube has to be exchanged several times during its lifetime. The paper summarizes the tube cooling layout possibilities and the assumptions on its support concepts.

  11. GABA application to hippocampal CA3 or CA1 stratum lacunosum-moleculare excites an interneuron network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Katherine L

    2002-03-01

    Whole cell voltage-clamp recording and focal application of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were used to investigate the ability of exogenous GABA applied to different locations within the guinea pig hippocampal slice to trigger a giant GABA-mediated postsynaptic current (GPSC) in pyramidal cells. A GPSC reflects the synchronous release of GABA from a group of interneurons. Recordings were done in the presence of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) and blockers of ionotropic glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Spontaneous GPSCs occurred rhythmically in pyramidal cells under these conditions. Brief focal pressure application of GABA (500 microM; 30-200 ms) to CA3 stratum lacunosum-moleculare (SLM) or to the border between CA3 s. radiatum (SR) and SLM triggered an "all-or-none" GPSC in CA3 and CA1 pyramidal cells that looked like the spontaneous GPSCs. During the refractory period following a spontaneous GPSC, application of GABA could not trigger a GPSC. Both spontaneous GPSCs and GPSCs triggered by exogenous GABA were blocked by suppressing synaptic transmission with high Mg(2+)/low Ca(2+) bath solution. On the other hand, focal application of GABA to CA3 s. oriens (SO) or to proximal SR did not trigger a GPSC in the CA3 pyramidal cell; instead it produced a graded response. Focal application of GABA to regions other than CA3 was also tested. Focal application of GABA to CA1 SLM always triggered a GPSC in the CA3 pyramidal cell. Focal application of GABA within the outer two-thirds of the dentate molecular layer often elicited a GPSC in the CA3 pyramidal cell. In contrast, focal application of GABA to CA1 SO, to CA1 SR, or to the hilus elicited no current response in the CA3 pyramidal cell. These data indicate that the GPSC recorded in pyramidal cells that was triggered by focal GABA application resulted from the synchronous synaptic release of GABA from activated interneurons rather than from the binding of exogenous GABA to receptors on the pyramidal cell

  12. Electromagnetic panel deployment and retraction using the geomagnetic field in LEO satellite missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamori, Takaya; Sugawara, Yoshiki; Satou, Yasutaka

    2015-12-01

    Increasingly, spacecraft are installed with large-area structures that are extended and deployed post-launch. These extensible structures have been applied in several missions for power generation, thermal radiation, and solar propulsion. Here, we propose a deployment and retraction method using the electromagnetic force generated when the geomagnetic field interacts with electric current flowing on extensible panels. The panels are installed on a satellite in low Earth orbit. Specifically, electrical wires placed on the extensible panels generate magnetic moments, which interfere with the geomagnetic field. The resulting repulsive and retraction forces enable panel deployment and retraction. In the proposed method, a satellite realizes structural deployment using simple electrical wires. Furthermore, the satellite can achieve not only deployment but also retraction for avoiding damage from space debris and for agile attitude maneuvers. Moreover, because the proposed method realizes quasi-static deployment and the retraction of panels by electromagnetic forces, low impulsive force is exerted on fragile panels. The electrical wires can also be used to detect the panel deployment and retraction and generate a large magnetic moment for attitude control. The proposed method was assessed in numerical simulations based on multibody dynamics. Simulation results shows that a small cubic satellite with a wire current of 25 AT deployed 4 panels (20 cm × 20 cm) in 500 s and retracted 4 panels in 100 s.

  13. Retracted: Differential expression of microRNAs in myometrium and leiomyomas and regulation by ovarian steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The above article, published online on 20 December 2007 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Professor L Popescu and John Wiley and Sons Ltd. The retraction has been requested by the University of Florida, Office of Research, in response to their investigation which concluded fabrication of data in Figures 2, 3 and 4. Reference Pan Q, Luo X, Chegini N. Retracted: differential expression of microRNAs in myometrium and leiomyomas and regulation by ovarian steroids. J Cell Mol Med 12: 227-240. Doi: 10.1111/j.1582-4934.2007.00207.x.

  14. Retraction. I148M PNPLA3 variant and progressive liver disease: A new paradigm in hepatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Retraction: The following editorial from HEPATOLOGY, "I148M PNPLA3 variant and progressive liver disease: A new paradigm in hepatology", by Luca Valenti, Anna Alisi and Valerio Nobili, posted online on 2 December 2011 as an Accepted Article in Wiley Online Library (www.wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the AASLD, the journal Editor in Chief, Michael H. Nathanson, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed due to the fact that an incorrect version was posted online. The correct version of the Editorial has been issued under a separate DOI, 10.1002/hep.25617.

  15. Terbium Ion Doping in Ca3Co4O9: A Step towards High-Performance Thermoelectric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Shrikant; Yaddanapudi, Haritha Sree; Tian, Kun; Yin, Yinong; Magginetti, David; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2017-01-01

    The potential of thermoelectric materials to generate electricity from the waste heat can play a key role in achieving a global sustainable energy future. In order to proceed in this direction, it is essential to have thermoelectric materials that are environmentally friendly and exhibit high figure of merit, ZT. Oxide thermoelectric materials are considered ideal for such applications. High thermoelectric performance has been reported in single crystals of Ca3Co4O9. However, for large scale applications single crystals are not suitable and it is essential to develop high-performance polycrystalline thermoelectric materials. In polycrystalline form, Ca3Co4O9 is known to exhibit much weaker thermoelectric response than in single crystal form. Here, we report the observation of enhanced thermoelectric response in polycrystalline Ca3Co4O9 on doping Tb ions in the material. Polycrystalline Ca3−xTbxCo4O9 (x = 0.0–0.7) samples were prepared by a solid-state reaction technique. Samples were thoroughly characterized using several state of the art techniques including XRD, TEM, SEM and XPS. Temperature dependent Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity measurements were performed. A record ZT of 0.74 at 800 K was observed for Tb doped Ca3Co4O9 which is the highest value observed till date in any polycrystalline sample of this system. PMID:28317853

  16. [Surgical technique of displacement and retraction of the heart with a pigtail shaped hook and Tentacles Heart Positioner].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, Yoshiei; Mochizuki, Y; Yamada, Y; Eda, K; Shibasaki, I; Inoue, Y; Miyoshi, S

    2007-07-01

    We describe a novel heart retracting system with Tentacles Heart Positioner (Sumitomo Bakelite, Tokyo) during off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB). The heart retracting system is composed of a pigtail shaped hook attached to a flexible Universal Stabilizer Arm (Estech, Minneapolis). After Tentacles suction device is applied on the surface of the heart, the retracting system is fixed on the sternal retracter so that the hook can hang and support the retracting tubes of the sucker. By regulating the shape of the Universal Stabilizer Arm and the position of the hook, the retracting system can lift the heart sufficiently and maintain the optimal position of the heart during OPCAB procedure. Together with Tentacles Heart Positioner, the heart retracting system provides excellent exposure of target coronary arteries with minimal effect on hemodynamics.

  17. Development of dendrite polarity in Drosophila neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Sarah E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drosophila neurons have dendrites that contain minus-end-out microtubules. This microtubule arrangement is different from that of cultured mammalian neurons, which have mixed polarity microtubules in dendrites. Results To determine whether Drosophila and mammalian dendrites have a common microtubule organization during development, we analyzed microtubule polarity in Drosophila dendritic arborization neuron dendrites at different stages of outgrowth from the cell body in vivo. As dendrites initially extended, they contained mixed polarity microtubules, like mammalian neurons developing in culture. Over a period of several days this mixed microtubule array gradually matured to a minus-end-out array. To determine whether features characteristic of dendrites were localized before uniform polarity was attained, we analyzed dendritic markers as dendrites developed. In all cases the markers took on their characteristic distribution while dendrites had mixed polarity. An axonal marker was also quite well excluded from dendrites throughout development, although this was perhaps more efficient in mature neurons. To confirm that dendrite character could be acquired in Drosophila while microtubules were mixed, we genetically disrupted uniform dendritic microtubule organization. Dendritic markers also localized correctly in this case. Conclusions We conclude that developing Drosophila dendrites initially have mixed microtubule polarity. Over time they mature to uniform microtubule polarity. Dendrite identity is established before the mature microtubule arrangement is attained, during the period of mixed microtubule polarity.

  18. Thermoelectric properties of Al substituted misfit cobaltite Ca3(Co1-xAlx)4O9 at low temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Liu; Hong-mei Chen; Jin-lian Hu; Xu-bing Tang; Hai-jin Li; Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Thermoelectric properties of Al substituted compounds Ca3(Co1−xAlx)4O9 (x=0, 0.03, 0.05), prepared by a sol−gel process, have been investigated in the temperature range 305−20 K. The results indicate that after Al substitution for Co in Ca3(Co1−xAlx)4O9, the direct current electrical resistivity and thermopower increase due to the reduction of carrier concentration. Experiments show that Al substitution results in decreased lattice thermal conductivity. The figure of merit of temperature behavior suggests that Ca3(Co0.97Al0.03)4O9 would be a promising candidate thermoelectric material for high-temperature thermoelectric application.

  19. Phase transition in layered perovskite-like manganate Ca3Mn2O7 under high pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱嘉林; 陈良辰; 禹日成; 李凤英; 刘景; 靳常青

    2002-01-01

    In situ high pressure energy dispersive X-ray diffraction measurements on the layered perovskite-like manganate Ca3Mn2O7 powder under pressures were performed by using the diamond anvil cell with synchrotron radiation. The results show that the structure of layered perovskite-like manganate Ca3Mn2O7 is unstable under pressure due to the easy compression of NaCl-type blocks. The structure of Ca3Mn2O7 underwent two phase transitions under pressures in the range of 0-35 GPa. One was at about 1.3 GPa with the crystal structure changing from tetragonal to orthorhombic. The other was at about 9.5 GPa with the crystal structure changing from orthorhombic back to another tetragonal.

  20. Tonic GABAA conductance bidirectionally controls interneuron firing pattern and synchronization in the CA3 hippocampal network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Ivan; Savtchenko, Leonid P; Song, Inseon; Koo, Jaeyeon; Pimashkin, Alexey; Rusakov, Dmitri A; Semyanov, Alexey

    2014-01-07

    The spiking output of interneurons is key for rhythm generation in the brain. However, what controls interneuronal firing remains incompletely understood. Here we combine dynamic clamp experiments with neural network simulations to understand how tonic GABAA conductance regulates the firing pattern of CA3 interneurons. In baseline conditions, tonic GABAA depolarizes these cells, thus exerting an excitatory action while also reducing the excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) amplitude through shunting. As a result, the emergence of weak tonic GABAA conductance transforms the interneuron firing pattern driven by individual EPSPs into a more regular spiking mode determined by the cell intrinsic properties. The increased regularity of spiking parallels stronger synchronization of the local network. With further increases in tonic GABAA conductance the shunting inhibition starts to dominate over excitatory actions and thus moderates interneuronal firing. The remaining spikes tend to follow the timing of suprathreshold EPSPs and thus become less regular again. The latter parallels a weakening in network synchronization. Thus, our observations suggest that tonic GABAA conductance can bidirectionally control brain rhythms through changes in the excitability of interneurons and in the temporal structure of their firing patterns.

  1. Properties and functional implications of I (h) in hippocampal area CA3 interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Warren D; Galván, Emilio J; Mauna, Jocelyn C; Thiels, Edda; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2011-12-01

    The present study examines the biophysical properties and functional implications of I (h) in hippocampal area CA3 interneurons with somata in strata radiatum and lacunosum-moleculare. Characterization studies showed a small maximum h-conductance (2.6 ± 0.3 nS, n = 11), shallow voltage dependence with a hyperpolarized half-maximal activation (V (1/2) = -91 mV), and kinetics characterized by double-exponential functions. The functional consequences of I (h) were examined with regard to temporal summation and impedance measurements. For temporal summation experiments, 5-pulse mossy fiber input trains were activated. Blocking I (h) with 50 μM ZD7288 resulted in an increase in temporal summation, suggesting that I (h) supports sensitivity of response amplitude to relative input timing. Impedance was assessed by applying sinusoidal current commands. From impedance measurements, we found that I (h) did not confer theta-band resonance, but flattened the impedance-frequency relations instead. Double immunolabeling for hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated proteins and glutamate decarboxylase 67 suggests that all four subunits are present in GABAergic interneurons from the strata considered for electrophysiological studies. Finally, a model of I (h) was employed in computational analyses to confirm and elaborate upon the contributions of I (h) to impedance and temporal summation.

  2. The quadruple pre-main sequence system LkCa3: Implications for stellar evolution models

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, Guillermo; Badenas, Mariona; Prato, L; Schaefer, G H; Wasserman, Lawrence H; Mathieu, Robert D; Latham, David W

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery that the pre-main sequence object LkCa3 in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region is a hierarchical quadruple system of M stars. It was previously known to be a close (~0.5 arc sec) visual pair, with one component being a moderately eccentric 12.94-day single-lined spectroscopic binary. A re-analysis of archival optical spectra complemented with new near-infrared spectroscopy shows both visual components to be double-lined, the second one having a period of 4.06 days and a circular orbit. In addition to the orbital elements, we determine optical and near-infrared flux ratios, effective temperatures, and projected rotational velocities for all four stars. Using existing photometric monitoring observations of the system that had previously revealed the rotational period of the primary in the longer-period binary, we detect also the rotational signal of the primary in the 4.06-day binary, which is synchronized with the orbital motion. With only the assumption of coevality, a comparison of ...

  3. Activity-dependent upregulation of presynaptic kainate receptors at immature CA3-CA1 synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Vernon R J; Molchanova, Svetlana M; Hirvonen, Teemu; Taira, Tomi; Lauri, Sari E

    2014-12-10

    Presynaptic kainate-type glutamate receptors (KARs) regulate glutamate release probability and short-term plasticity in various areas of the brain. Here we show that long-term depression (LTD) in the area CA1 of neonatal rodent hippocampus is associated with an upregulation of tonic inhibitory KAR activity, which contributes to synaptic depression and causes a pronounced increase in short-term facilitation of transmission. This increased KAR function was mediated by high-affinity receptors and required activation of NMDA receptors, nitric oxide (NO) synthetase, and postsynaptic calcium signaling. In contrast, KAR activity was irreversibly downregulated in response to induction of long-term potentiation in a manner that depended on activation of the TrkB-receptor of BDNF. Both tonic KAR activity and its plasticity were restricted to early stages of synapse development and were lost in parallel with maturation of the network due to ongoing BDNF-TrkB signaling. These data show that presynaptic KARs are targets for activity-dependent modulation via diffusible messengers NO and BDNF, which enhance and depress tonic KAR activity at immature synapses, respectively. The plasticity of presynaptic KARs in the developing network allows nascent synapses to shape their response to incoming activity. In particular, upregulation of KAR function after LTD allows the synapse to preferentially pass high-frequency afferent activity. This can provide a potential rescue from synapse elimination by uncorrelated activity and also increase the computational dynamics of the developing CA3-CA1 circuitry.

  4. In vitro remineralization of acid-etched human enamel with Ca 3SiO 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhihong; Chang, Jiang; Deng, Yan; Joiner, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    Bioactive and inductive silicate-based bioceramics play an important role in hard tissue prosthetics such as bone and teeth. In the present study, a model was established to study the acid-etched enamel remineralization with tricalcium silicate (Ca 3SiO 5, C 3S) paste in vitro. After soaking in simulated oral fluid (SOF), Ca-P precipitation layer was formed on the enamel surface, with the prolonged soaking time, apatite layer turned into density and uniformity and thickness increasingly from 250 to 350 nm for 1 day to 1.7-1.9 μm for 7 days. Structure of apatite crystals was similar to that of hydroxyapatite (HAp). At the same time, surface smoothness of the remineralized layer is favorable for the oral hygiene. These results suggested that C 3S treated the acid-etched enamel can induce apatite formation, indicating the biomimic mineralization ability, and C 3S could be used as an agent of inductive biomineralization for the enamel prosthesis and protection.

  5. Dendrite Injury Triggers DLK-Independent Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle C. Stone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Axon injury triggers regeneration through activation of a conserved kinase cascade, which includes the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK. Although dendrites are damaged during stroke, traumatic brain injury, and seizure, it is not known whether mature neurons monitor dendrite injury and initiate regeneration. We probed the response to dendrite damage using model Drosophila neurons. Two larval neuron types regrew dendrites in distinct ways after all dendrites were removed. Dendrite regeneration was also triggered by injury in adults. Next, we tested whether dendrite injury was initiated with the same machinery as axon injury. Surprisingly, DLK, JNK, and fos were dispensable for dendrite regeneration. Moreover, this MAP kinase pathway was not activated by injury to dendrites. Thus, neurons respond to dendrite damage and initiate regeneration without using the conserved DLK cascade that triggers axon regeneration.

  6. Academic medical libraries' policies and procedures for notifying library users of retracted scientific publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, C

    1998-01-01

    Academic medical libraries have a responsibility to inform library users regarding retracted publications. Many have created policies and procedures that identify flawed journal articles. A questionnaire was sent to the 129 academic medical libraries in the United States and Canada to find out how many had policies and procedures for identifying retracted publications. Of the returned questionnaires, 59% had no policy and no practice for calling the attention of the library user to retracted publications. Forty-one percent of the libraries called attention to retractions with or without a formal policy for doing so. Several responding libraries included their policy statement with the survey. The increasing number of academic medical libraries that realize the importance of having policies and practices in place highlights the necessity for this procedure.

  7. RETRACTION - In Vitro Derivation of Human Sperm from Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayernia, Karim; Lee, Jae Ho; Lako, Majlinda; Armstrong, Lyle; Herbert, Mary; Li, Manyu; Engel, Wolfgang; Elliott, David; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Parrington, John; Murdoch, Alison; Strachan, Tom; Zhang, Xin

    2009-07-07

    This article, "In Vitro Derivation of Human Sperm from Embryonic Stem Cells," is being retracted from Stem Cells and Development. Further details will follow online, and in a subsequent issue of the Journal.

  8. A Jurassic stem pleurodire sheds light on the functional origin of neck retraction in turtles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anquetin, Jérémy; Tong, Haiyan; Claude, Julien

    2017-01-01

    Modern turtles are composed of two monophyletic groups, notably diagnosed by divergent neck retraction mechanisms. Pleurodires (side-necked turtles) bend their neck sideways and protect their head under the anterior margin of the carapace. Cryptodires (hidden-necked turtles) withdraw their neck and head in the vertical plane between the shoulder girdles. These two mechanisms of neck retraction appeared independently in the two lineages and are usually assumed to have evolved for protective reasons. Here we describe the neck of Platychelys oberndorferi, a Late Jurassic early stem pleurodire, and find remarkable convergent morphological and functional similarities with modern cryptodires. Partial vertical neck retraction in this taxon is interpreted to have enabled fast forward projection of the head during underwater prey capture and offers a likely explanation to the functional origin of neck retraction in modern cryptodires. Complete head withdrawal for protection may therefore have resulted from an exaptation in that group. PMID:28206991

  9. Retraction Note: Radiation Sialadenitis Induced by High-dose Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Jaetae [Kyungpook National Univ. Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    The senior author (J. Lee) and the first author (S. Y. Jeong) have retracted this review article due to misconduct. They have discovered multiple instances of misreferencing and misquotation in the text which raise the concern of potential plagiarism.

  10. Bilateral inverse Duane′s retraction syndrome-A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee Pranab

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Duane′s retraction syndrome is a well known congenital musculo-facial anomaly. Various explanations have been given for the aetiology of this syndrome. Inverse Duane′s retraction syndrome is a condition with reverse clinical features. Abduction of the affected eye is possible to some extent and is accompanied by retraction of the eyeball, narrowing of the palpebral fissure and pseudoptosis. There may be some restriction of movement on adduction. The primary lesion is suspected to be in the medial rectus muscle. Frequently the muscle is found to be entrapped following trauma to the medial wall of the orbit. A case of bilateral inverse Duane′s retraction syndrome and convergent squint along with left-sided perceptive deafness is reported. As is usually the case there was no structural abnormality or entrapment of the muscle from trauma.

  11. Crystal Growth and Characterization of Ca3NbGa3Si2O14 Single Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Single crystals of Ca3NbGa3Si2O14 (CNGS) with ordered Ca3Ga2Ge4O14 (CGG) structure were successfully grown from stoichiometric melts by conventional Czochralski technique along the a-axis and two large (001) facets and two small (100) facets appear in every crystal. An arrangement of parallel steps and a clear height change were observed in (001) facet by atomic force microscopy (AFM). High-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) results indicate that CNGS crystals have good quality and free low-angle boundaries. The crystals also exhibit good optical quality and high optical transmittance in c-direction.

  12. RETRACTED: Effect of flux jump on temperature distributions in high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu-Feng; He, Tian-Hu; Wang, Ping-Bo

    2010-10-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal ( http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy). This article is retracted at the request of the authors, due to admitted plagiarism of unpublished work of Tian-Hu He. He wishes to state that he was not involved in the publication process and his name was used on the paper without his knowledge.

  13. RETRACTED: Test Taking Strategies Instruction and Iranian EFL Learners’ Performance on International Language Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Ghabelju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article has been retracted: please see AIAC PTY.LTD. Policy on Publication Ethics and Publication Malpractice Statement.(http://www.aiac.org.au/journals/Subtemps/PEPMS.pdf This article has been retracted based on the editorial decision upon conducting a thorough invesitigatiosn. It came to our notice that the author has plagirised this paper from an unpblished thesis carried out in Iran in 2010.

  14. RETRACTED: Test Taking Strategies Instruction and Iranian EFL Learners’ Performance on International Language Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra Ghabelju

    2013-01-01

    This article has been retracted: please see AIAC PTY.LTD. Policy on Publication Ethics and Publication Malpractice Statement.(http://www.aiac.org.au/journals/Subtemps/PEPMS.pdf) This article has been retracted based on the editorial decision upon conducting a thorough invesitigatiosn. It came to our notice that the author has plagirised this paper from an unpblished thesis carried out in Iran in 2010.

  15. Kinematic analysis of the lower cervical spine in the protracted and retracted neck flexion positions

    OpenAIRE

    Park, So Hyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to analyze lower cervical spine kinematics in protracted and retracted neck flexion positions in healthy people. [Subjects and Methods] The craniovertebral angle (CVA) and intervertebral body angles of the lower cervical spine of 10 healthy individuals were analyzed using fluoroscopy in a neutral sitting with the head in the neutral (N), protracted (Pro), and retracted (Ret) positions and with the neck in full flexion with the head in the neutral (N-fx), pr...

  16. Retraction: Two novel duck antibacterial peptides, avian β-defensins 9 and 10, with antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The article by Ma et al. that published in the Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology (2009, 19: 1447-1455) was used the same data in two journal articles (Acta Veterinaria et Zootechnica Sinica, 2009, 40(9): 1320-1326, Scientia Agricultura Sinica, 2009, 42(4): 1406-1412). Therefore, the article is retracted from JMB as a misconduct of the authors. JMB as the publisher regrets for any inconvenience may have caused by the retraction to readers.

  17. Quick, painless, and atraumatic gingival retraction: An overview of advanced materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajambigai, M Aarti; Raja, S Ramesh; Soundar, S I Joephin; Kandasamy, M

    2016-10-01

    The success of any fixed prosthesis depends on the accuracy of impressions. Finish line exposure has to be adequate during impression making. The goal of gingival retraction is to atraumatically displace gingival tissues to allow access for impression material to record the finish line and provide sufficient thickness of gingival sulcus so that the impression does not tear off during removal. Numerous advanced materials are available for gingival retraction. This article describes the different advanced materials available.

  18. Viability of fibroblasts in cell culture after treatment with different chemical retraction agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopac, I; Batista, U; Cvetko, E; Marion, L

    2002-01-01

    Prior to fixed prosthodontic impression procedures, temporary horizontal retraction of the free gingival tissue should be accomplished apically to the preparation finishing line. The mechanical-chemical method using cotton retraction cords of various sizes impregnated with various retraction chemicals is the most commonly employed retraction technique. Most retraction agents have pH values from 0.8 to 0.3, and are therefore hazardous to the cut dentine and periodontal tissues. Sympathomimetic vasoconstrictors introduced recently have a pH of 5.6, and are free of systemic side-effects. The present study using the dye exclusion test, colony forming ability test and colorimetric assay was undertaken to evaluate cytotoxic effects of four chemical retraction agents on cultured V-79 fibroblasts, and the dependence of cytotoxicity on the agent concentration and time of exposure. Original concentrations of retraction agents produced stronger cytotoxic effects than dilutions of 1:1 and 1:10. The most aggressive agent, 25% aluminium chloride, took only 1 min to damage all cell cultures. The proportion of cells damaged after 10 min of exposure to tetrahydrozoline was 60%, which was significantly less compared with other chemicals tested. With the colony forming ability test using retraction agents diluted to 1:10 the greatest number of colonies emerged in samples treated with tetrahydrozoline (statistical significance: P < 0.01). The colorimetric assay showed equal cytotoxic effects for 25% aluminium sulphate and tetrahydrozoline. The colorimetric test used in the study has proved an ergonomic, accurate and reliable test for cytotoxicity determination.

  19. Quick, painless, and atraumatic gingival retraction: An overview of advanced materials

    OpenAIRE

    M Aarti Rajambigai; S Ramesh Raja; S I. Joephin Soundar; Kandasamy, M

    2016-01-01

    The success of any fixed prosthesis depends on the accuracy of impressions. Finish line exposure has to be adequate during impression making. The goal of gingival retraction is to atraumatically displace gingival tissues to allow access for impression material to record the finish line and provide sufficient thickness of gingival sulcus so that the impression does not tear off during removal. Numerous advanced materials are available for gingival retraction. This article describes the differe...

  20. Summation in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 network remains robustly linear following inhibitory modulation and plasticity, but undergoes scaling and offset transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanya eParameshwaran

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Many theories of neural network function assume linear summation. This is in apparent conflict with several known forms of nonlinearity in real neurons. Furthermore, key network properties depend on the summation parameters, which are themselves subject to modulation and plasticity in real neurons. We tested summation responses as measured by spiking activity in small groups of CA1 pyramidal neurons using permutations of inputs delivered on an electrode array. We used calcium dye recordings as a readout of the summed spiking response of cell assemblies in the network. Each group consisted of 2-10 cells, and the calcium signal from each cell correlated with individual action potentials. We find that the responses of these small cell groups sum linearly, despite previously reported dendritic nonlinearities and the thresholded responses of individual cells. This linear summation persisted when input strengths were reduced. Blockage of inhibition shifted responses up towards saturation, but did not alter the slope of the linear region of summation. Long-term potentiation of synapses in the slice also preserved the linear fit, with an increase in absolute response. However, in this case the summation gain decreased, suggesting a homeostatic process for preserving overall network excitability. Overall, our results suggest that cell groups in the CA3-CA1 network robustly follow a consistent set of linear summation and gain-control rules, notwithstanding the intrinsic nonlinearities of individual neurons. Cell-group responses remain linear, with well-defined transformations following inhibitory modulation and plasticity. Our measures of these transformations provide useful parameters to apply to neural network analyses involving modulation and plasticity.

  1. Hydrogen Storage Properties of Ca3-x Mg2+xNi13 Alloys%Ca3-xMg2+xNi13合金的储氢性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张庆安; 赵刚; 斯庭智; 庞刚

    2009-01-01

    为了弄清Mg含量对Ca3Mg2Ni13型化合物结构参数和储氢性能的影响,利用X射线衍射研究了Ca3-xMg2+x,Ni13(x=0.5,1.0和1.5)合金的相结构,并采用Sieverts型设备测量了其P-C-T曲线.研究表明,Mg在Ca3Mg2Ni13型化合物中的最大固溶度接近于Ca1.5MgNi13合金中的Mg含量.固溶的Mg含量增加导致化合物点阵常数减小,这可以有效地改善吸放氢热力学性能,其中Ca2Mg3Ni13吸、放氢的焓变分别为-28,30 kJ/mol H2.此外,Ca2Mg3Ni13在吸放氢循环过程中不发生氢致非晶化和氢致分解,因而具有良好的循环稳定性.%To understand the effects of Mg content on the structural parameters and hydrogen storage properties of Ca3Mg2Ni13-type compound, the phase structures of the Ca3-xMg2+xNi13 (x =0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 ) alloys were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and their pressure-composition isotherms (P-C-T curves) were measured with a Sieverts-type apparatus. The results indicate that the maximum solid solubility of Mg in the Ca3Mg2Ni13-type compound is close to the Mg content of Ca1.5 Mg3.5 Ni13 alloy. The increase of Mg content leads to the decrease in the lattice parameters of Ca3 Mg2Ni13-type compound, which may effectively improve the thermodynamics of hydrogen absorption-desorption. The enthalpy changes for the hydrogen absorption and desorption of Ca2Mg3Ni13 are -28 and 30 kJ/mol H2, respectively. Moreover, Ca2Mg3Ni13 shows good cycling stability because the hydrogen-induced amorphization and decomposition do not occur during hydrogen absorption-desorption cycles.

  2. Na4Ca3(AlO2)10:Eu2+,Mn2+荧光粉的发光特性%Photoluminescence Characteristics of Na4 Ca3(AlO2)10:Eu2+ ,Mn2+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雪; 田莲花

    2011-01-01

    A novel phosphor Na4Ca3(AlO2) 10:Eu2+ was prepared by solid state reaction method in a thermal-carbon reducing atmosphere. The photoluminescence(PL) properties were investigated in this paper. The excitation spectrum of Na4Ca3(AlO2) 10:Eu2+ showed two absorption bands centered at 262 nm and 320 nm respectively. The photoluminescence spectrum of Na4Ca3(AlO2) 10:Eu2+ exhibited a single emission peak centered at 441 nm, which could be attributed to 5d-4f transition of Eu + . The excitation spectrum of Na4Ca3(AlO2) 10:Eu2+ showed absorption peak at about 440 nm monitoring at 542 nm, which shows spectral overlap between emission spectrum of Na4Ca3(AlO2) 10:Eu2+. Co-doped Mn2+ with Eu2+, the photoluminescence spectra of Na4Ca3(AlO2) 10:Eu2+ were observed two peaks centered at 441 nm and 542 nm corresponding to the 5d-4f transition of Eu2+ and the d-d transition of Mn2+ , respectively. With increasing the concentration of Mn2+ ,the emission intensity of 5d-4f transition of Eu2+ at 441 nm was significantly decreased,whereas the d-d transition of Mn2+ at 542 nm was found to increase. The decay lifetime for Eu2+ was found to decrease with increasing Mn2+ dopant content, which was strong evidence for the energy transfer from Eu2+ to Mn2+ . We were also interested in investigating the energy transfer efficiency ηT of Eu2+→Mn2+ . With increasing Mn2+ dopant content, the energy transfer efficiency ηT was found to increase gradually. According to the Dexter's energy transfer formula of multipolar interaction, it was demonstrated that the energy transfer from Eu2+ to Mn2+ was due to the electric quadripole-quadripole interaction of the resonance transfer. According to the CIE chromaticity coordinates of Na4Ca3(AlO2) 10:Eu2+ , it was clearly observed that the CIE chro-maticity coordinates with the increase of Mn content shifted from blue region to white region.

  3. Analysis and implications of retraction period and coauthorship of fraudulent publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Jong Yong Abdiel; Tan, Xin Ji Alan

    2014-01-01

    Studies have indicated that the number and frequency of fraudulent publications being retracted are not subsiding even with greater awareness of such incidents in the recent decades. In this study, the trends of retraction period, number of citations and coauthors of 5 selected researchers who had ≥ 15 fraudulent publications retracted were analyzed. The obtained results shows that the retraction period is 48.96 ± 32.16 months for the 113 publications affiliated to the 5 studied researchers. There are a total of 180 coauthors with 6.40 ± 3.26 coauthors per researcher's retracted publication. The linear regression analysis indicates that there is limited correlation (R(2) = .008) between the citation counts and retraction period. The p value for multiple F-tests to assess the number of coauthors to a fraudulent publication on an interresearcher basis is found to be ranging from < .001 to .458. It is also found that a better correlation (R(2) = .592) exists between the likelihood of a researcher to involve different individuals for isolated fraudulent publications while only selecting very few to be their frequent coauthors of their mischievous acts. With this study, the possible use of coauthors as a strategy for publishing fraudulent work and a potential approach to tighten coauthorship are discussed.

  4. Optimal Current Transfer in Dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Alex D.

    2016-01-01

    Integration of synaptic currents across an extensive dendritic tree is a prerequisite for computation in the brain. Dendritic tapering away from the soma has been suggested to both equalise contributions from synapses at different locations and maximise the current transfer to the soma. To find out how this is achieved precisely, an analytical solution for the current transfer in dendrites with arbitrary taper is required. We derive here an asymptotic approximation that accurately matches results from numerical simulations. From this we then determine the diameter profile that maximises the current transfer to the soma. We find a simple quadratic form that matches diameters obtained experimentally, indicating a fundamental architectural principle of the brain that links dendritic diameters to signal transmission. PMID:27145441

  5. Role of CA3 theta-modulated interneurons during the transition to spontaneous seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, Suganya; Grasse, Dane W; Moxon, Karen A

    2016-09-01

    Multiple studies have observed heterogeneous neuronal firing patterns as a local network transitions to spontaneous seizures. We demonstrated that separately examining interneurons and pyramidal cells during this transition in a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy elucidates some of this heterogeneity. Recently, it was demonstrated that classifying cells into specific theta-related subtypes further clarified the heterogeneity. Moreover, changes in neuronal synchrony with the local field potential were identified and determined to be specific to interneurons during the transition to seizures. To extend our understanding of the chronic changes in epileptic networks, we examined field potentials and single neuron activity in the CA3 hippocampus of pilocarpine-treated rats during interictal periods and compared these to neuronal activity in healthy controls and during preictal periods. Neurons were classified into theta-subtypes based on changes in firing patterns during theta periods. As previously reported, we find a high probability of theta oscillations before seizure onset and a selective increase in theta-on interneuron firing rate immediately preceding seizure onset. However, we also find overall slower theta rhythm and a general decrease in subtype-specific firing during interictal periods compared to that in control animals. The decrease in subtype specific interneuron activity is accompanied by increases in synchrony. Exceptionally, theta-on interneurons, that selectively increase their firing rate at seizure onset, maintain similar firing rates and synchrony as controls during interictal period. These data suggest that increased synchrony during interictal periods may compensate for low firing rates creating instability during theta that is prone to seizure initiation via a transition to hyper-synchronous activation of theta-on interneurons.

  6. Cell type-specific synaptic dynamics of synchronized bursting in the juvenile CA3 rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradi, Ildiko; Maccaferri, Gianmaria

    2004-10-27

    Spontaneous synchronous bursting of the CA3 hippocampus in vitro is a widely studied model of physiological and pathological network synchronization. The role of inhibitory conductances during network bursting is not understood in detail, despite the fact that several antiepileptic drugs target GABA(A) receptors. Here, we show that the first manifestation of a burst event is a cell type-specific flurry of GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory input to pyramidal cells, but not to stratum oriens horizontal interneurons. Moreover, GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic input is proportionally smaller in these interneurons compared with pyramidal cells. Computational models and dynamic-clamp studies using experimentally derived conductance waveforms indicate that both these factors modulate spike timing during synchronized activity. In particular, the different kinetics and the larger strength of GABAergic input to pyramidal cells defer action potential initiation and contribute to the observed delay of firing, so that the interneuronal activity leads the burst cycle. In contrast, excitatory inputs to both neuronal populations during a burst are kinetically similar, as required to maintain synchronicity. We also show that the natural pattern of activation of inhibitory and excitatory conductances during a synchronized burst cycle is different within the same neuronal population. In particular, GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents activate earlier and outlast the excitatory components driving the bursts. Thus, cell type-specific balance and timing of GABA(A) receptor-mediated input are critical to set the appropriate spike timing in pyramidal cells and interneurons and coordinate additional neurotransmitter release modulating burst strength and network frequency.

  7. Observations on Hippocampal Mossy Cells in Mink (Neovison vison) with Special Reference to Dendrites Ascending to the Granular and Molecular Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstad, Jan Sigurd; Osen, Kirsten K.; Scharfman, Helen E.; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Blackstad, Theodor W.; Leergaard, Trygve B.

    2017-01-01

    Detailed knowledge about the neural circuitry connecting the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex is necessary to understand how this system contributes to spatial navigation and episodic memory. The two principal cell types of the dentate gyrus, mossy cells and granule cells, are interconnected in a positive feedback loop, by which mossy cells can influence information passing from the entorhinal cortex via granule cells to hippocampal pyramidal cells. Mossy cells, like CA3 pyramidal cells, are characterized by thorny excrescences on their proximal dendrites, postsynaptic to giant terminals of granule cell axons. In addition to disynaptic input from the entorhinal cortex and perforant path via granule cells, mossy cells may also receive monosynaptic input from the perforant path via special dendrites ascending to the molecular layer. We here report qualitative and quantitative descriptions of Golgi-stained hippocampal mossy cells in mink, based on light microscopic observations and three-dimensional reconstructions. The main focus is on the location, branching pattern, and length of dendrites, particularly those ascending to the granular and molecular layers. In mink, the latter dendrites are more numerous than in rat, but fewer than in primates. They form on average 12% (and up to 29%) of the total dendritic length, and appear to cover the terminal fields of both the lateral and medial perforant paths. In further contrast to rat, the main mossy cell dendrites in mink branch more extensively with distal dendrites encroaching upon the CA3 field. The dendritic arbors extend both along and across the septotemporal axis of the dentate gyrus, not conforming to the lamellar pattern of the hippocampus. The findings suggest that the afferent input to the mossy cells becomes more complex in species closer to primates. PMID:26286893

  8. Electrical advantages of dendritic spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan T Gulledge

    Full Text Available Many neurons receive excitatory glutamatergic input almost exclusively onto dendritic spines. In the absence of spines, the amplitudes and kinetics of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs at the site of synaptic input are highly variable and depend on dendritic location. We hypothesized that dendritic spines standardize the local geometry at the site of synaptic input, thereby reducing location-dependent variability of local EPSP properties. We tested this hypothesis using computational models of simplified and morphologically realistic spiny neurons that allow direct comparison of EPSPs generated on spine heads with EPSPs generated on dendritic shafts at the same dendritic locations. In all morphologies tested, spines greatly reduced location-dependent variability of local EPSP amplitude and kinetics, while having minimal impact on EPSPs measured at the soma. Spine-dependent standardization of local EPSP properties persisted across a range of physiologically relevant spine neck resistances, and in models with variable neck resistances. By reducing the variability of local EPSPs, spines standardized synaptic activation of NMDA receptors and voltage-gated calcium channels. Furthermore, spines enhanced activation of NMDA receptors and facilitated the generation of NMDA spikes and axonal action potentials in response to synaptic input. Finally, we show that dynamic regulation of spine neck geometry can preserve local EPSP properties following plasticity-driven changes in synaptic strength, but is inefficient in modifying the amplitude of EPSPs in other cellular compartments. These observations suggest that one function of dendritic spines is to standardize local EPSP properties throughout the dendritic tree, thereby allowing neurons to use similar voltage-sensitive postsynaptic mechanisms at all dendritic locations.

  9. Model-based asessment of an in-vivo predictive relationship from CA1 to CA3 in the rodent hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Roman A; Song, Dong; Hampson, Robert E; Deadwyler, Sam A; Berger, Theodore W; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z

    2015-02-01

    Although an anatomical connection from CA1 to CA3 via the Entorhinal Cortex (EC) and through backprojecting interneurons has long been known it exist, it has never been examined quantitatively on the single neuron level, in the in-vivo nonpatholgical, nonperturbed brain. Here, single spike activity was recorded using a multi-electrode array from the CA3 and CA1 areas of the rodent hippocampus (N = 7) during a behavioral task. The predictive power from CA3→CA1 and CA1→CA3 was examined by constructing Multivariate Autoregressive (MVAR) models from recorded neurons in both directions. All nonsignificant inputs and models were identified and removed by means of Monte Carlo simulation methods. It was found that 121/166 (73 %) CA3→CA1 models and 96/145 (66 %) CA1→CA3 models had significant predictive power, thus confirming a predictive 'Granger' causal relationship from CA1 to CA3. This relationship is thought to be caused by a combination of truly causal connections such as the CA1→EC→CA3 pathway and common inputs such as those from the Septum. All MVAR models were then examined in the frequency domain and it was found that CA3 kernels had significantly more power in the theta and beta range than those of CA1, confirming CA3's role as an endogenous hippocampal pacemaker.

  10. Investigation on luminescence of red-emitting Mg3Ca3(PO4)4:Ce3+,Mn2+ phosphors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张佳; 张凤; 韩丽丽

    2015-01-01

    To realize red emission, the Ce3+-Mn2+ activated Mg3Ca3(PO4)4 phosphors were synthesized by solid-state reaction. The phase and luminescence properties of the as-prepared samples were characterized by using XRD and photoluminescence spectra. XRD result showed that single-phase samples were obtained successfully. The diffuse reflection spectrum of Mg3Ca3(PO4)4 revealed that two main absorptions existed, and the optical band gap was calculated to be about 5.31 eV. For Ce3+ doped Mg3Ca3(PO4)4, a broad emission band from 300 to 500 nm was observed under 254 nm excitation, which was due to the d-f transition of Ce3+; by monitoring 352 nm, the excitation spectrum covered the region from 240 to 340 nm. The Ce3+-Mn2+ co-doped Mg3Ca3(PO4)4 showed an efficient energy transfer from Ce3+ to Mn2+ upon 254 nm excitation, and the red emission was obtained by adjusting the relative concentrations of Ce3+ and Mn2+.

  11. The antidepressant tianeptine persistently modulates glutamate receptor currents of the hippocampal CA3 commissural associational synapse in chronically stressed rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kole, MHP; Swan, L; Fuchs, E

    2002-01-01

    Recent hypotheses on the action of antidepressants imply a modulation of excitatory amino acid transmission. Here, the effects of long-term antidepressant application in rats with the drug tianeptine were examined at hippocampal CA3 commissural associational (c/a) glutamate receptor ion channels, em

  12. Encoding, Consolidation, and Retrieval of Contextual Memory: Differential Involvement of Dorsal CA3 and CA1 Hippocampal Subregions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daumas, Stephanie; Halley, Helene; Frances, Bernard; Lassalle, Jean-Michel

    2005-01-01

    Studies on human and animals shed light on the unique hippocampus contributions to relational memory. However, the particular role of each hippocampal subregion in memory processing is still not clear. Hippocampal computational models and theories have emphasized a unique function in memory for each hippocampal subregion, with the CA3 area acting…

  13. Evidence of the Current Collector Effect: Study of the SOFC Cathode Material Ca3Co4O9+d

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rolle, A.; Thoréton, V.; Rozier, P.; Capoen, E.; Mentré, O.; Boukamp, B.A.; Daviero-Minaud, S.

    2012-01-01

    In the study of the performance of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes, the possible influence of the applied current collector is often not mentioned or recognized. In this article, as part of an optimization study of the potentially attractive Ca3Co4O9+δ cathode material (Ca349), special atten

  14. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Koss, M. B.; Malarik, D. C.

    1998-01-01

    The growth of dendrites is one of the commonly observed forms of solidification encountered when metals and alloys freeze under low thermal gradients, as occurs in most casting and welding processes. In engineering alloys, the details of the dendritic morphology directly relates to important material responses and properties. Of more generic interest, dendritic growth is also an archetypical problem in morphogenesis, where a complex pattern evolves from simple starting conditions. Thus, the physical understanding and mathematical description of how dendritic patterns emerge during the growth process are of interest to both scientists and engineers. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is a basic science experiment designed to measure, for a fundamental test of theory, the kinetics and morphology of dendritic growth without complications induced by gravity-driven convection. The IDGE, a collaboration between Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, in Troy NY, and NASA's Lewis Research Center (LeRC) was developed over a ten year period from a ground-based research program into a space flight experiment. Important to the success of this flight experiment was provision of in situ near-real-time teleoperations during the spaceflight experiment.

  15. Differential gene expression during compensatory sprouting of dendrites in the auditory system of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horch, H W; McCarthy, S S; Johansen, S L; Harris, J M

    2009-08-01

    Neurones that lose their presynaptic partners because of injury usually retract or die. However, when the auditory interneurones of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus are denervated, dendrites respond by growing across the midline and forming novel synapses with the opposite auditory afferents. Suppression subtractive hybridization was used to detect transcriptional changes 3 days after denervation. This is a stage at which we demonstrate robust compensatory dendritic sprouting. Whereas 49 unique candidates were down-regulated, no sufficiently up-regulated candidates were identified at this time point. Several candidates identified in this study are known to influence the translation and degradation of proteins in other systems. The potential role of these factors in the compensatory sprouting of cricket auditory interneurones in response to denervation is discussed.

  16. Excitation-inhibition balance in the CA3 network--neuronal specificity and activity-dependent plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño, Mario; Vivar, Carmen; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2011-05-01

    Activation of the axons of the granule cells, the mossy fibers, excites pyramidal cells and interneurons in the CA3 area, which, in turn, inhibit pyramidal cells. The integration of the various inputs that converge onto CA3 cells has been studied by pharmacological dissection of either the excitatory or inhibitory components. This strategy has the disadvantage of partially isolating the recorded cell from the network, ignoring the sources and the impact of concurrent inputs. To overcome this limitation, we dissociated excitatory and inhibitory synaptic conductances by mathematical extraction techniques, and analysed the dynamics of the integration of excitatory and inhibitory inputs in pyramidal cells and stratum lucidum interneurons (Sl-Ints) of CA3. We have uncovered a shunting mechanism that decreases the responsiveness of CA3 output cells to mossy fiber input after a period of enhanced excitability. The activation of the dentate gyrus (DG) after applying a kindling-like protocol in vitro, or after producing one or several seizures in vivo, results in a graded and reversible increase of inhibitory conductances in pyramidal cells, while in Sl-Ints, an increase of excitatory conductances occurs. Thus, interneurons reach more depolarized membrane potentials on DG activation yielding a high excitatory postsynaptic potential-spike coupling, while the contrary occurs in pyramidal cells. This effective activation of feedforward inhibition is synergized by the emergence of direct DG-mediated inhibition on pyramidal cells. These factors force the synaptic conductance to peak at a potential value close to resting membrane potential, thus producing shunt inhibition and decreasing the responsiveness of CA3 output cells to mossy fiber input.

  17. Mechanical and thermal-expansion characteristics of Ca10(PO46(OH2-Ca3(PO42 composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruseska G.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Three types of composites consisting of Ca10(PO46(OH2 and Ca3(PO42 with composition: 75% (wt Ca10(PO46(OH2: 25%(wt Ca3(PO42; 50%(wt Ca10(PO46(OH2: 50%(wtCa3(PO42 and 25 %(wt Ca10(PO46(OH2: 75%(wt Ca3(PO42 were the subject of our investigation. Sintered compacts were in thermal equilibrium, which was proved by the absence of hysteresis effect of the dependence ΔL/L=f(T during heating /cooling in the temperature interval 20-1000-200C. Sintered compacts with the previously mentioned composition possess 26-50% higher values of the E-modulus, G-modulus and K-modulus indicating the presence of a synergism effect. Several proposed model equations for predicting the thermal expansion coefficient in dependence of the thermal and elastic properties of the constitutive phases and their volume fractions, given by: Turner, Kerner, Tummala and Friedberg, Thomas and Taya, were used for making correlations between mechanical and thermal-expansion characteristics of the Ca10(PO46(OH2 - Ca3(PO42 composites. Application of the previously mentioned model equations to all kinds of composites leads to the conclusion that the experimentally obtained results for the thermal expansion coefficient are in an excellent agreement with the theoretical calculated values on account of the volume fraction of each constitutive phase and with all applied model equations, with a coefficient of correlation from 98.16-99.86 %.

  18. Shocks and Thermal Conduction Fronts in Retracting Reconnected Flux Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidoni, S. E.; Longcope, D. W.

    2010-08-01

    We present a model for plasma heating produced by time-dependent, spatially localized reconnection within a flare current sheet separating skewed magnetic fields. The reconnection creates flux tubes of new connectivity which subsequently retract at Alfvénic speeds from the reconnection site. Heating occurs in gas-dynamic shocks (GDSs) which develop inside these tubes. Here we present generalized thin flux tube equations for the dynamics of reconnected flux tubes, including pressure-driven parallel dynamics as well as temperature-dependent, anisotropic viscosity and thermal conductivity. The evolution of tubes embedded in a uniform, skewed magnetic field, following reconnection in a patch, is studied through numerical solutions of these equations, for solar coronal conditions. Even though viscosity and thermal conductivity are negligible in the quiet solar corona, the strong GDSs generated by compressing plasma inside reconnected flux tubes generate large velocity and temperature gradients along the tube, rendering the diffusive processes dominant. They determine the thickness of the shock that evolves up to a steady state value, although this condition may not be reached in the short times involved in a flare. For realistic solar coronal parameters, this steady state shock thickness might be as long as the entire flux tube. For strong shocks at low Prandtl numbers, typical of the solar corona, the GDS consists of an isothermal sub-shock where all the compression and cooling occur, preceded by a thermal front where the temperature increases and most of the heating occurs. We estimate the length of each of these sub-regions and the speed of their propagation.

  19. Experience-driven axon retraction in the pharmacologically inactivated visual cortex does not require synaptic transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kana Watanabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experience during early postnatal development plays an important role in the refinement of specific neural connections in the brain. In the mammalian visual system, altered visual experiences induce plastic adaptation of visual cortical responses and guide rearrangements of afferent axons from the lateral geniculate nucleus. Previous studies using visual deprivation demonstrated that the afferents serving an open eye significantly retract when cortical neurons are pharmacologically inhibited by applying a gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor agonist, muscimol, whereas those serving a deprived eye are rescued from retraction, suggesting that presynaptic activity can lead to the retraction of geniculocortical axons in the absence of postsynaptic activity. Because muscimol application suppresses the spike activity of cortical neurons leaving transmitter release intact at geniculocortical synapses, local synaptic interaction may underlie the retraction of active axons in the inhibited cortex. METHOD AND FINDINGS: New studies reported here determined whether experience-driven axon retraction can occur in the visual cortex inactivated by blocking synaptic inputs. We inactivated the primary visual cortex of kittens by suppressing synaptic transmission with cortical injections of botulinum neurotoxin type E, which cleaves a synaptic protein, SNAP-25, and blocks transmitter release, and examined the geniculocortical axon morphology in the animals with normal vision and those deprived of vision binocularly. We found that afferent axons in the animals with normal vision showed a significant retraction in the inactivated cortex, as similarly observed in the muscimol-treated cortex, whereas the axons in the binocularly deprived animals were preserved. CONCLUSIONS: Therefore, the experience-driven axon retraction in the inactivated cortex can proceed in the absence of synaptic transmission. These results suggest that presynaptic mechanisms play

  20. Hippocampal neurogenesis and dendritic plasticity support running-improved spatial learning and depression-like behaviour in stressed rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk-Yu Yau

    Full Text Available Exercise promotes hippocampal neurogenesis and dendritic plasticity while stress shows the opposite effects, suggesting a possible mechanism for exercise to counteract stress. Changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and dendritic modification occur simultaneously in rats with stress or exercise; however, it is unclear whether neurogenesis or dendritic remodeling has a greater impact on mediating the effect of exercise on stress since they have been separately examined. Here we examined hippocampal cell proliferation in runners treated with different doses (low: 30 mg/kg; moderate: 40 mg/kg; high: 50 mg/kg of corticosterone (CORT for 14 days. Water maze task and forced swim tests were applied to assess hippocampal-dependent learning and depression-like behaviour respectively the day after the treatment. Repeated CORT treatment resulted in a graded increase in depression-like behaviour and impaired spatial learning that is associated with decreased hippocampal cell proliferation and BDNF levels. Running reversed these effects in rats treated with low or moderate, but not high doses of CORT. Using 40 mg/kg CORT-treated rats, we further studied the role of neurogenesis and dendritic remodeling in mediating the effects of exercise on stress. Co-labelling with BrdU (thymidine analog /doublecortin (immature neuronal marker showed that running increased neuronal differentiation in vehicle- and CORT-treated rats. Running also increased dendritic length and spine density in CA3 pyramidal neurons in 40 mg/kg CORT-treated rats. Ablation of neurogenesis with Ara-c infusion diminished the effect of running on restoring spatial learning and decreasing depression-like behaviour in 40 mg/kg CORT-treated animals in spite of dendritic and spine enhancement. but not normal runners with enhanced dendritic length. The results indicate that both restored hippocampal neurogenesis and dendritic remodelling within the hippocampus are essential for running to counteract

  1. Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Dendritic Plasticity Support Running-Improved Spatial Learning and Depression-Like Behaviour in Stressed Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jian-Bin; Wong, Richard; Ching, Yick-Pang; Qiu, Guang; Tang, Siu-Wa; Lee, Tatia M. C.; So, Kwok-Fai

    2011-01-01

    Exercise promotes hippocampal neurogenesis and dendritic plasticity while stress shows the opposite effects, suggesting a possible mechanism for exercise to counteract stress. Changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and dendritic modification occur simultaneously in rats with stress or exercise; however, it is unclear whether neurogenesis or dendritic remodeling has a greater impact on mediating the effect of exercise on stress since they have been separately examined. Here we examined hippocampal cell proliferation in runners treated with different doses (low: 30 mg/kg; moderate: 40 mg/kg; high: 50 mg/kg) of corticosterone (CORT) for 14 days. Water maze task and forced swim tests were applied to assess hippocampal-dependent learning and depression-like behaviour respectively the day after the treatment. Repeated CORT treatment resulted in a graded increase in depression-like behaviour and impaired spatial learning that is associated with decreased hippocampal cell proliferation and BDNF levels. Running reversed these effects in rats treated with low or moderate, but not high doses of CORT. Using 40 mg/kg CORT-treated rats, we further studied the role of neurogenesis and dendritic remodeling in mediating the effects of exercise on stress. Co-labelling with BrdU (thymidine analog) /doublecortin (immature neuronal marker) showed that running increased neuronal differentiation in vehicle- and CORT-treated rats. Running also increased dendritic length and spine density in CA3 pyramidal neurons in 40 mg/kg CORT-treated rats. Ablation of neurogenesis with Ara-c infusion diminished the effect of running on restoring spatial learning and decreasing depression-like behaviour in 40 mg/kg CORT-treated animals in spite of dendritic and spine enhancement. but not normal runners with enhanced dendritic length. The results indicate that both restored hippocampal neurogenesis and dendritic remodelling within the hippocampus are essential for running to counteract stress. PMID:21935393

  2. Perpetuation of Retracted Publications Using the Example of the Scott S. Reuben Case: Incidences, Reasons and Possible Improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornemann-Cimenti, Helmar; Szilagyi, Istvan S; Sandner-Kiesling, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    In 2009, Scott S. Reuben was convicted of fabricating data, which lead to 25 of his publications being retracted. Although it is clear that the perpetuation of retracted articles negatively effects the appraisal of evidence, the extent to which retracted literature is cited had not previously been investigated. In this study, to better understand the perpetuation of discredited research, we examine the number of citations of Reuben's articles within 5 years of their retraction. Citations of Reuben's retracted articles were assessed using the Web of Science Core Collection (Thomson Reuters, NY). All citing articles were screened to discriminate between articles in which Reuben's work was quoted as retracted, and articles in which his data was wrongly cited without any note of the retraction status. Twenty of Reuben's publications had been cited 274 times between 2009 and 1024. In 2014, 45 % of the retracted articles had been cited at least once. In only 25.8 % of citing articles was it clearly stated that Reuben's work had been retracted. Annual citations decreased from 108 in 2009 to 18 in 2014; however, the percentage of publications correctly indicating the retraction status also declined. The percentage of citations in top-25 %-journals, as well as the percentage of citations in journals from Reuben's research area, declined sharply after 2009. Our data show that even 5 years after their retraction, nearly half of Reuben's articles are still being quoted and the retraction status is correctly mentioned in only one quarter of the citations.

  3. Spatial modelling of brief and long interactions between T cells and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltman, Joost B; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J

    2007-06-01

    In the early phases of an immune response, T cells of appropriate antigen specificity become activated by antigen-presenting cells in secondary lymphoid organs. Two-photon microscopy imaging experiments have shown that this stimulation occurs in distinct stages during which T cells exhibit different motilities and interactions with dendritic cells (DCs). In this paper, we utilize the Cellular Potts Model, a model formalism that takes cell shapes and cellular interactions explicitly into account, to simulate the dynamics of, and interactions between, T cells and DCs in the lymph node paracortex. Our three-dimensional simulations suggest that the initial decrease in T-cell motility after antigen appearance is due to "stop signals" transmitted by activated DCs to T cells. The long-lived interactions that occur at a later stage can only be explained by the presence of both stop signals and a high adhesion between specific T cells and antigen-bearing DCs. Furthermore, our results indicate that long-lasting contacts with T cells are promoted when DCs retract dendrites that detect a specific contact at lower velocities than other dendrites. Finally, by performing long simulations (after prior fitting to short time scale data) we are able to provide an estimate of the average contact duration between T cells and DCs.

  4. Migratory dermal dendritic cells act as rapid sensors of protozoan parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Guan Ng

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC, including those of the skin, act as sentinels for intruding microorganisms. In the epidermis, DC (termed Langerhans cells, LC are sessile and screen their microenvironment through occasional movements of their dendrites. The spatio-temporal orchestration of antigen encounter by dermal DC (DDC is not known. Since these cells are thought to be instrumental in the initiation of immune responses during infection, we investigated their behavior directly within their natural microenvironment using intravital two-photon microscopy. Surprisingly, we found that, under homeostatic conditions, DDC were highly motile, continuously crawling through the interstitial space in a Galpha(i protein-coupled receptor-dependent manner. However, within minutes after intradermal delivery of the protozoan parasite Leishmania major, DDC became immobile and incorporated multiple parasites into cytosolic vacuoles. Parasite uptake occurred through the extension of long, highly dynamic pseudopods capable of tracking and engulfing parasites. This was then followed by rapid dendrite retraction towards the cell body. DDC were proficient at discriminating between parasites and inert particles, and parasite uptake was independent of the presence of neutrophils. Together, our study has visualized the dynamics and microenvironmental context of parasite encounter by an innate immune cell subset during the initiation of the immune response. Our results uncover a unique migratory tissue surveillance program of DDC that ensures the rapid detection of pathogens.

  5. Model-Based Assessment of an In-Vivo Predictive Relationship from CA1 to CA3 in the Rodent Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Sandler, Roman A.; Song, Dong; Hampson, Robert E.; Deadwyler, Sam A.; Berger, Theodore W; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.

    2014-01-01

    Although an anatomical connection from CA1 to CA3 via the Entorhinal Cortex (EC) and through backprojecting interneurons has long been known it exist, it has never been examined quantitatively on the single neuron level, in the in-vivo nonpatholgical, nonperturbed brain. Here, single spike activity was recorded using a multi-electrode array from the CA3 and CA1 areas of the rodent hippocampus (N=7) during a behavioral task. The predictive power from CA3→CA1 and CA1→CA3 was examined by constru...

  6. A comprehensive analysis of articles retracted between 2004 and 2013 from biomedical literature - a call for reforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harkanwal Preet; Mahendra, Ashish; Yadav, Bhupender; Singh, Harpreet; Arora, Nitin; Arora, Monika

    2014-07-01

    Science is a dynamic subject and it was never free of misconduct or bad research. Indeed, the scientific method itself is intended to overcome mistakes and misdeeds. So, we aimed to assess various factors associated with retraction of scientific articles from 2004 to 2013. Data were retrieved from PubMed and Medline using the keywords retraction of articles, retraction notice, and withdrawal of article in April 2014 to detect articles retracted from 2004 to 2013. Statistical analysis was carried out using t-test and Karl Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results showed that a total of 2343 articles were retracted between 2004 and 2013, and original articles followed by case reports constituted major part of it. Time interval between submission and retraction of article has reduced in recent times. Impact factor and retraction do not have any significant correlation. We conclude that although retraction of articles is a rare event, its constant rise in scientific literature is quite worrisome. It is still unclear whether misconduct/mistakes in articles are increasing hastily or the articles are retracted at a rapid rate in recent times. So, it should be considered as an urgent issue and it is the responsibility of journal editors to track misconduct by following Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) guidelines and making an effective strategy.

  7. 新型热电材料Ca3Co4O9的制备与性能表征%Preparation and Characterization of Novel Thermoelectric Material of Ca3Co4O9

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏长平; 冯建林; 许洁

    2008-01-01

    钴基氧化物Ca3Co4O9是一种新型的中高温热电材料.本文采用溶胶-凝胶法(sol-gel)制备出Ca3Co4O9样品.通过TG-DTA、IR、XRD、SEM等技术对样品结构进行表征,重点考察了Ca3Co4O9热电材料的热电性能参数Seebeck系数、电导率和功率因子等.结果表明,制备的热电材料样品的XRD谱图与标准的JCPDS卡片一致,没有原始氧化物及其他杂质相出现,结构致密,气孔少,影响载流子迁移的因素减少,从而具有较大的Seebeck系数和电导率,得到较高的功率因子.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Unsteady Flows and Shape Oscillations in Liquid Droplets Induced by Deployment Needle Retraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jin; Shaw, Benjamin D.

    2010-02-01

    Retractable opposed needles are often used in reduced-gravity droplet combustion experiments to deploy droplets prior to ignition. Needle retraction induces droplet shape oscillations and internal flows that can have important effects on subsequent droplet behaviors. In the present paper, the unsteady flows and droplet shape oscillations associated with deployment needle retraction are investigated using the commercial CFD software package Fluent. A volume-of-fluid method with a second-order upwind scheme and a dual time stepping solver is employed to solve the conservation equations in 2-d and 3-d simulations of droplets prior to ignition. A moving-mesh method is employed to model needle movements. Calculations indicate that rapid needle retraction causes ligament formation between a droplet and a needle, with ligament breakage sometimes resulting in the formation of satellite droplets. Needle retraction also induces droplet shape oscillations that rapidly decay, though significant internal flows are predicted to remain within droplets even after droplet shape oscillations have damped to low levels. The calculations indicate that the initial needle spacing can have important effects on droplet shape oscillations and internal flow characteristics. Comparison of model predictions and experimental data is favorable.

  9. Extracellular polysaccharides mediate pilus retraction during social motility of Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinuo; Sun, Hong; Ma, Xiaoyuan; Lu, Ann; Lux, Renate; Zusman, David; Shi, Wenyuan

    2003-04-29

    Myxococcus xanthus is a Gram-negative bacterium with a complex life cycle that includes vegetative swarming and fruiting-body formation. Social (S)-motility (coordinated movement of large cell groups) requires both type IV pili and fibrils (extracellular matrix material consisting of polysaccharides and protein). Little is known about the role of this extracellular matrix, or fibril material, in pilus-dependent motility. In this study, mutants lacking fibril material and, therefore, S-motility were found to be hyperpiliated. We demonstrated that addition of fibril material resulted in pilus retraction and rescued this phenotype. The fibril material was further examined to determine the component(s) that were responsible for triggering pilus retraction. Protein-free fibril material was found to be highly active in correcting hyperpiliation. However, the amine sugars present in hydrolyzed fibril material, e.g., glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) had no effect on fibril(-) mutants, but, interestingly, cause hyperpiliation in wild-type cells. In contrast, chitin, a natural GlcNAc polymer, was found to restore pilus retraction in hyperpiliated mutants, indicating that a polysaccharide containing amine sugars is likely required for pilus retraction. These data suggest that the interaction of type IV pili with amine-containing polysaccharides on cell and slime-trail surfaces may trigger pilus retraction, resulting in S-motility and slime-trailing behaviors.

  10. A Miniature Robot for Retraction Tasks under Vision Assistance in Minimally Invasive Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Tortora

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS is one of the main aims of modern medicine. It enables surgery to be performed with a lower number and severity of incisions. Medical robots have been developed worldwide to offer a robotic alternative to traditional medical procedures. New approaches aimed at a substantial decrease of visible scars have been explored, such as Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES. Simple surgical tasks such as the retraction of an organ can be a challenge when performed from narrow access ports. For this reason, there is a continuous need to develop new robotic tools for performing dedicated tasks. This article illustrates the design and testing of a new robotic tool for retraction tasks under vision assistance for NOTES. The retraction robots integrate brushless motors to enable additional degrees of freedom to that provided by magnetic anchoring, thus improving the dexterity of the overall platform. The retraction robot can be easily controlled to reach the target organ and apply a retraction force of up to 1.53 N. Additional degrees of freedom can be used for smooth manipulation and grasping of the organ.

  11. Effect of a cordless retraction paste on titanium surface: a topographic, chemical and biocompatibility evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Cooper

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Good exposure of the preparation margins and haemostasis in the sulcular gingiva are necessary for accurate impressions to produce precise restorations. The use of cordless retraction paste material in implant dentistry is a relatively novel application. However, few studies have been conducted on the use of retraction pastes and their possible interaction with implant surfaces. Recent literature has described remnants on titanium implant surfaces and expressed the need for an assessment of the biocompatibility of the exposed surface (Chang et al.. This in vitro study evaluated the effect of a cordless gingival retraction paste on sterile titanium disks. Surface chemistry was determined using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, and further investigated using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS. After exposure to retraction paste, surface chemistry alterations were identified. A fibroblast cell line (L929 was exposed to the disks and the live/dead viability/cytotoxicity assay was used to determine any effects on the proliferation and health of cells. The disks exposed to the retraction paste showed fewer dead cells compared to the unexposed disks. This was statistically significant.

  12. Activity of the principal cells of the olfactory bulb promotes a structural dynamic on the distal dendrites of immature adult-born granule cells via activation of NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton-Provencher, Vincent; Coté, Daniel; Saghatelyan, Armen

    2014-01-29

    The adult olfactory bulb is continuously supplied with neuronal precursors that differentiate into granule and periglomerular cells. Little is known about the structural dynamic of adult-born granule cells (GCs) at their different maturational stages, the mechanisms controlling the integration of new neurons into the pre-existing neuronal circuitry, or the role of principal cell activity in these processes. We used two-photon time-lapse imaging to reveal a high level of filopodia formation and retraction on the distal dendrites of adult-born GCs at their early maturational stages. This dynamic decreased as the adult-born interneurons matured. Filopodia formation/retraction on the dendrites of adult-born GCs at the early maturational stages depended on the activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs). The stimulation of mitral cells using a pattern that mimics activity of these principal neurons to odor presentation promotes the NMDAR-dependent filopodia dynamic of adult-born GCs during their early but not late maturational stages. Moreover, NMDA iontophoresis was sufficient to induce the formation of new filopodia on the distal dendrites of immature adult-born GCs. The maturation of adult-born interneurons was accompanied by a progressive hyperpolarization of the membrane potential and an increased Mg(2+) block of NMDARs. Decreasing the extracellular Mg(2+) concentration led to filopodia formation on the dendrites of mature adult-born GCs following NMDA iontophoresis. Our findings reveal an increased structural dynamic of adult-born GCs during the early stages of their integration into the mouse bulbar circuitry and highlight a critical period during which the principal cells' activity influences filopodia formation/retraction on the dendrites of interneurons.

  13. Forest management could counteract distribution retractions forced by climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Louise; Harrison, Philip J; Räty, Minna; Bärring, Lars; Strandberg, Gustav; Snäll, Tord

    2017-03-28

    Climate change is expected to drive the distribution retraction of northern species. However, particularly in regions with a history of intensive exploitation, changes in habitat management could facilitate distribution expansions counter to expectations under climate change. Here, we test the potential for future forest management to facilitate the southwards expansion of an old-forest species from the boreal region into the boreo-nemoral region, contrary to expectations under climate change. We used an ensemble of species distribution models based on citizen science data to project the response of Phellinus ferrugineofuscus, a red-listed old-growth indicator, wood-decaying fungus, to six forest management and climate change scenarios. We projected change in habitat suitability across the boreal and boreo-nemoral regions of Sweden for the period 2020-2100. Scenarios varied in the proportion of forest set-aside from production, the level of timber extraction, and the magnitude of climate change. Habitat suitabilities for the study species were projected to show larger relative increases over time in the boreo-nemoral region compared to the boreal region, under all scenarios. By 2100, mean suitabilities in set-aside forest in the boreo-nemoral region were similar to the suitabilities projected for set-aside forest in the boreal region in 2020, suggesting that occurrence in the boreo-nemoral region could be increased. However, across all scenarios, consistently higher projected suitabilities in set-aside forest in the boreal region indicated that the boreal region remained the species stronghold. Furthermore, negative effects of climate change were evident in the boreal region, and projections suggested that climatic changes may eventually counteract the positive effects of forest management in the boreo-nemoral region. Our results suggest that the current rarity of this old-growth indicator species in the boreo-nemoral region may be due to the history of intensive

  14. Frequency-dependent associative long-term potentiation at the hippocampal mossy fiber-CA3 synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick, B E; Martinez, J L

    1994-10-25

    The mossy fiber-CA3 synapse displays an N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor-independent mu-opioid-receptor-dependent form of long-term potentiation (LTP) that is thought not to display cooperativity or associativity with coactive afferents. However, because mossy fiber LTP requires repetitive synaptic activity for its induction, we reevaluated cooperativity and associativity at this synapse by using trains of mossy fiber stimulation. Moderate-, but not low-, intensity trains induced mossy fiber LTP, indicating cooperativity. Low-intensity mossy fiber trains that were normally ineffective in inducing LTP could induce mossy fiber LTP when delivered in conjunction with trains delivered to commissural-CA3 afferents. Associative mossy fiber LTP also could be induced with single mossy fiber pulses when delivered with commissural trains in the presence of a mu-opioid-receptor agonist. Our findings suggest a frequency-dependent variation of Hebbian associative LTP induction that is regulated by the release of endogenous opioid peptides.

  15. The Deterministic Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2010-01-01

    The Dendritic Cell Algorithm is an immune-inspired algorithm orig- inally based on the function of natural dendritic cells. The original instantiation of the algorithm is a highly stochastic algorithm. While the performance of the algorithm is good when applied to large real-time datasets, it is difficult to anal- yse due to the number of random-based elements. In this paper a deterministic version of the algorithm is proposed, implemented and tested using a port scan dataset to provide a controllable system. This version consists of a controllable amount of parameters, which are experimented with in this paper. In addition the effects are examined of the use of time windows and variation on the number of cells, both which are shown to influence the algorithm. Finally a novel metric for the assessment of the algorithms output is introduced and proves to be a more sensitive metric than the metric used with the original Dendritic Cell Algorithm.

  16. Excitation/Inhibition Imbalance and Impaired Synaptic Inhibition in Hippocampal Area CA3 of Mecp2 Knockout Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Calfa, Gaston; Li, Wei; Rutherford, John M.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopment disorder associated with intellectual disabilities and caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator Methyl-CpG-binding Protein-2 (MeCP2). Neuronal dysfunction and changes in cortical excitability occur in RTT individuals and Mecp2-deficient mice, including hippocampal network hyperactivity and higher frequency of spontaneous multi-unit spikes in the CA3 cell body layer. Here, we describe impaired synaptic inh...

  17. Identification of Potentially Neuroprotective Genes Upregulated by Neurotrophin Treatment of CA3 Neurons in the Injured Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Malik, Saafan Z.; Motamedi, Shahab; Royo, Nicolas C.; LeBold, David; Watson, Deborah J.

    2011-01-01

    Specific neurotrophic factors mediate histological and/or functional improvement in animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). In previous work, several lines of evidence indicated that the mammalian neurotrophin NT-4/5 is neuroprotective for hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons after experimental TBI. We hypothesized that NT-4/5 neuroprotection is mediated by changes in the expression of specific sets of genes, and that NT-4/5-regulated genes are potential therapeutic targets for blocking d...

  18. Effects of cromakalim (BRL 34915) on potassium conductances in CA3 neurons of the guinea-pig hippocampus in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Alzheimer, Christian; Sutor, Bernd; Ten Bruggencate, Gerrit

    1989-01-01

    The action of the potassium channel activator, cromakalim (BRL 34915), on membrane potential, input resistance and current-voltage-relationship of CA3 neurons in a slice preparation of the guinea-pig hippocampus was investigated by means of intracellular recordings. In the presence of tetrodotoxin, cromakalim (30–100 mol/l) produced a hyperpolarization up to 4 mV associated with a decrease in input resistance up to 10 MOhms. Determination of the equilibrium potential of the cromakalim action ...

  19. Synapse loss from chronically elevated glucocorticoids: relationship to neuropil volume and cell number in hippocampal area CA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tata, Despina A; Marciano, Veronica A; Anderson, Brenda J

    2006-09-20

    Individuals with clinical disorders associated with elevated plasma glucocorticoids, such as major depressive disorder and Cushing's syndrome, are reported to have smaller hippocampal volume. To understand how the hippocampus responds at the cellular and subcellular levels to glucocorticoids and how such changes are related to volume measures, we have undertaken a comprehensive study of glucocorticoid effects on hippocampal CA3 volume and identified elements in the neuropil including astrocytic volume and cell and synapse number and size. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with corticosterone (40 mg/kg), the primary glucocorticoid in rodents, or vehicle for 60 days. The CA3 was further subdivided so that the two-thirds of CA3 (nearest the dentate gyrus) previously shown to be vulnerable to corticosterone could be analyzed as two separate subfields. Corticosterone had no effect on neuropil volume or glial volume in the proximal subfield but caused a strong tendency for astrocytic processes to make up a larger proportion of the tissue and for volume of tissue made of constituents other than glial cells (primarily neuronal processes) to be smaller in the middle subfield. Within the neuropil, there were no cellular or subcellular profiles that indicated degeneration, suggesting that corticosterone does not cause prolonged damage. Corticosterone did not reduce cell number or cell or nonperforated synapse size but did cause a pronounced loss of synapses. This loss occurred in both subfields and, therefore, was independent of volume loss. Together, the findings suggest that volume measures can underestimate corticosterone effects on neural structure.

  20. Spin frustration and magnetic ordering in triangular lattice antiferromagnet Ca3CoNb2O9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jia; Zhou, Ping; Wang, Peng-Shuai; Pang, Fei; Munsie, Tim J.; Luke, Graeme M.; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Yu, Wei-Qiang

    2015-12-01

    We synthesized a quasi-two-dimensional distorted triangular lattice antiferromagnet Ca3CoNb2O9, in which the effective spin of Co2+ is 1/2 at low temperatures, whose magnetic properties were studied by dc susceptibility and magnetization techniques. The x-ray diffraction confirms the quality of our powder samples. The large Weiss constant θCW˜ -55 K and the low Neel temperature TN˜ 1.45 K give a frustration factor f = | θCW/TN | ≈ 38, suggesting that Ca3CoNb2O9 resides in strong frustration regime. Slightly below TN, deviation between the susceptibility data under zero-field cooling (ZFC) and field cooling (FC) is observed. A new magnetic state with 1/3 of the saturate magnetization Ms is suggested in the magnetization curve at 0.46 K. Our study indicates that Ca3CoNb2O9 is an interesting material to investigate magnetism in triangular lattice antiferromagnets with weak anisotropy. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374364 and 11222433), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CBA00112). Research at McMaster University supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council. Work at North China Electric Power University supported by the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry.

  1. Dendritic cells star in Vancouver

    OpenAIRE

    Klechevsky, Eynav; Kato, Hiroki; Sponaas, Anne-Marit

    2005-01-01

    The fast-moving field of dendritic cell (DC) biology is hard to keep pace with. Here we report on advances from the recent Keystone Symposium, “Dendritic Cells at the Center of Innate and Adaptive Immunity,” organized in Vancouver, BC on Feb. 1–7, 2005 by Anne O'Garra, Jacques Banchereau, and Alan Sher. New insights into the molecular mechanisms of DC function and their influence on immune regulation, their role in infectious and autoimmune disease, and new clinical applications are highlight...

  2. Severe bidentoalveolar protrusion treated with orthodontic microimplant-dependent en-masse retraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Nelson, Gerald; Kim, Seong-Hun; Kook, Yoon-Ah

    2007-07-01

    This article describes the orthodontic treatment of a 14.5-year-old girl with severe bidentoalveolar protrusion. Specially designed sandblasted, large-grit, acid-etched (SLA) orthodontic microimplants (C-implants, Cimplant Co, Seoul, Korea) were placed in the alveolar bone in all 4 quadrants to provide anchorage for en-masse retraction without the help of banded or bonded molars. Successful retraction was achieved. The mandibular dentition was detailed by using conventional orthodontic appliances during the finishing stage. The osseointegration potential of these microimplants allows them to resist rotational force moments and control 3-dimensional movements of the anterior teeth during retraction. Facial esthetics improved for the patient, fullness of the upper and lower lips was reduced, and the interdental relationship was corrected. Biomechanical considerations, efficacy, and potential complications of the treatment technique are discussed.

  3. RETRACTED: Influence of temperature and microstructure on the mechanical properties of sintered nanosilver joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Gang; Wang, Yi-Zhe [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Mei, Yunhui, E-mail: yunhui@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Yu, Lin [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Li, Xin [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Chen, Xu [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China)

    2015-02-25

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal ( (http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy)). This article has been retracted at the request of the Editor-in-Chief. Please note that the reason for this retraction has been updated in July 2015, as follows: The authors have plagiarized part of a paper that had already appeared in 'Electronic System-Integration Technology Conference (ESTC), 2010 3rd', 1-6, (101109/ESTC.2010.5642948). One of the conditions of submission of a paper for publication is that authors declare explicitly that their work is original and that no substantial portion has appeared in a publication elsewhere. As such this article represents an abuse of the scientific publishing system. The scientific community takes a very strong view on this matter and apologies are offered to readers of the journal that this was not detected during the submission process.

  4. α-FUZZY PAIRWISE RETRACT OF L-VALUED PAIRWISE STRATIFICATION SPACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. H. GHANIM; F. S. MAHMOUD; M. A. FATH ALLA; M.A. HEBESHI

    2004-01-01

    The notion of a fuzzy retract was introduced by Rodabaugh (1981). The notion of a fuzzy pairwise retract was introduced in 2001. Some weak forms and some strong forms of α-continuous mappings were introduced in 1988 and 1997. The authors extend some of these forms to the L-fuzzy bitopological setting and construct various α-fuzzy pairwise retracts. The concept of weakly induced spaces in the case L = [0, 1] was introduced by Martin (1980). Lin and Luo (1987) generalized this notion to the case that L is an arbitrary F-lattice and introduced the notion of induced L-fts. Several results are obtained, especially, for L-valued pairwise stratification spaces.

  5. Retracted: Identification of Novel Biomarkers for Pancreatic Cancer Using Integrated Transcriptomics With Functional Pathways Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Tong, Pan; Chen, Jinyun; Pei, Zenglin; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Weiping; Xu, Jianqing; Wang, Jin

    2016-02-22

    Retraction: 'Identification of Novel Biomarkers for Pancreatic Cancer Using Integrated Transcriptomics With Functional Pathways Analysis' by Zhang, X., Tong, P., Chen, J., Pei, Z., Zhang, X., Chen, W., Xu, J. and Wang, J. The above article from the Journal of Cellular Physiology, published online on 10 March 2016 in Wiley Online Library as Early View (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/enhanced/doi/10.1002/jcp.25353/), has been retracted by agreement between Gary Stein, the journal's Editor-in-Chief, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation at the University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, which confirmed that the article was submitted and approved for publication by Dr. Jin Wang without acknowledgement of NIH funding received or the consent and authorship of Dr. Ann Killary and Dr. Subrata Sen, with whom the manuscript was originally drafted.

  6. The effects of early-life seizures on hippocampal dendrite development and later-life learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, J R; Nishimura, Masataka; Swann, John W

    2014-04-01

    Severe childhood epilepsy is commonly associated with intellectual developmental disabilities. The reasons for these cognitive deficits are likely multifactorial and will vary between epilepsy syndromes and even among children with the same syndrome. However, one factor these children have in common is the recurring seizures they experience - sometimes on a daily basis. Supporting the idea that the seizures themselves can contribute to intellectual disabilities are laboratory results demonstrating spatial learning and memory deficits in normal mice and rats that have experienced recurrent seizures in infancy. Studies reviewed here have shown that seizures in vivo and electrographic seizure activity in vitro both suppress the growth of hippocampal pyramidal cell dendrites. A simplification of dendritic arborization and a resulting decrease in the number and/or properties of the excitatory synapses on them could help explain the observed cognitive disabilities. There are a wide variety of candidate mechanisms that could be involved in seizure-induced growth suppression. The challenge is designing experiments that will help focus research on a limited number of potential molecular events. Thus far, results suggest that growth suppression is NMDA receptor-dependent and associated with a decrease in activation of the transcription factor CREB. The latter result is intriguing since CREB is known to play an important role in dendrite growth. Seizure-induced dendrite growth suppression may not occur as a single process in which pyramidal cells dendrites simply stop growing or grow slower compared to normal neurons. Instead, recent results suggest that after only a few hours of synchronized epileptiform activity in vitro dendrites appear to partially retract. This acute response is also NMDA receptor dependent and appears to be mediated by the Ca(+2)/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin. An understanding of the staging of seizure-induced growth suppression and the

  7. Effects of inhaled anesthetic isoflurane on long-term potentiation of CA3 pyramidal cell afferents in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballesteros KA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Kristen A Ballesteros,1 Angela Sikorski,2 James E Orfila,3 Joe L Martinez Jr41Department of Biology, The University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA; 2Texas A&M University Texarkana, Texarkana, TX, USA; 3University of Colorado in Denver, Denver, CO, USA; 4University of Illinois in Chicago, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Isoflurane is a preferred anesthetic, due to its properties that allow a precise concentration to be delivered continually during in vivo experimentation. The major mechanism of action of isoflurane is modulation of the γ-amino butyric acid (GABAA receptor-chloride channel, mediating inhibitory synaptic transmission. Animal studies have shown that isoflurane does not cause cell death, but it does inhibit cell growth and causes long-term hippocampal learning deficits. As there are no studies characterizing the effects of isoflurane on electrophysiological aspects of long-term potentiation (LTP in the hippocampus, it is important to determine whether isoflurane alters the characteristic responses of hippocampal afferents to cornu ammonis region 3 (CA3. We investigated the effects of isoflurane on adult male rats during in vivo induction of LTP, using the mossy fiber pathway, the lateral perforant pathway, the medial perforant pathway, and the commissural CA3 (cCA3 to CA3, with intracranial administration of Ringer’s solution, naloxone, RS-aminoindan-1, 5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA, or 3-[(R-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl]-propo-2-enyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP. Then, we compared these responses to published electrophysiological data, using sodium pentobarbital as an anesthetic, under similar experimental conditions. Our results showed that LTP was exhibited in animals anesthetized with isoflurane under vehicle conditions. With the exception of AIDA in the lateral perforant pathway, the defining characteristics of the four pathways appeared to remain intact, except for the observation that LTP was markedly reduced in animals

  8. Proteolytic degradation of glutamate decarboxylase mediates disinhibition of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells in cathepsin D-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Tokiko; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Yamasaki, Ryo; Yamada, Jun; Zhang, Jian; Ukai, Kiyoharu; Koike, Masato; Mine, Kazunori; von Figura, Kurt; Peters, Christoph; Saftig, Paul; Fukuda, Takaichi; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2005-08-01

    Although of clinical importance, little is known about the mechanism of seizure in neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). In the present study, we have attempted to elucidate the mechanism underlying the seizure of cathepsin D-deficient (CD-/-) mice that show a novel type of lysosomal storage disease with a phenotype resembling late infantile NCL. In hippocampal slices prepared from CD-/- mice at post-natal day (P)24, spontaneous burst discharges were recorded from CA3 pyramidal cells. At P24, the mean amplitude of IPSPs after stimulation of the mossy fibres was significantly smaller than that of wild-type mice, which was substantiated by the decreased level of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contents in the hippocampus measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). At this stage, activated microglia were found to accumulate in the pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampal CA3 subfield of CD-/- mice. However, there was no significant change in the numerical density of GABAergic interneurons in the CA3 subfield of CD-/- mice at P24, estimated by counting the number of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) 67-immunoreactive somata. In the hippocampus and the cortex of CD-/- mice at P24, some GABAergic interneurons displayed extremely high somatic granular immunoreactivites for GAD67, suggesting the lysosomal accumulation of GAD67. GAD67 levels in axon terminals abutting on to perisomatic regions of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells was not significantly changed in CD-/- mice even at P24, whereas the total protein levels of GAD67 in both the hippocampus and the cortex of CD-/- mice after P24 were significantly decreased as a result of degradation. Furthermore, the recombinant human GAD65/67 was rapidly digested by the lysosomal fraction prepared from the whole brain of wild-type and CD-/- mice. These observations strongly suggest that the reduction of GABA contents, presumably because of lysosomal degradation of GAD67 and lysosomal accumulation of its degraded forms

  9. K(Ca3.1 channel-blockade attenuates airway pathophysiology in a sheep model of chronic asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Van Der Velden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ca(2+-activated K(+ channel K(Ca3.1 is expressed in several structural and inflammatory airway cell types and is proposed to play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma. The aim of the current study was to determine whether inhibition of K(Ca3.1 modifies experimental asthma in sheep. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Atopic sheep were administered either 30 mg/kg Senicapoc (ICA-17073, a selective inhibitor of the K(Ca3.1-channel, or vehicle alone (0.5% methylcellulose twice daily (orally. Both groups received fortnightly aerosol challenges with house dust mite allergen for fourteen weeks. A separate sheep group received no allergen challenges or drug treatment. In the vehicle-control group, twelve weeks of allergen challenges resulted in a 60±19% increase in resting airway resistance, and this was completely attenuated by treatment with Senicapoc (0.25±12%; n = 10, P = 0.0147. The vehicle-control group had a peak-early phase increase in lung resistance of 82±21%, and this was reduced by 58% with Senicapoc treatment (24±14%; n = 10, P = 0.0288. Senicapoc-treated sheep also demonstrated reduced airway hyperresponsiveness, requiring a significantly higher dose of carbachol to increase resistance by 100% compared to allergen-challenged vehicle-control sheep (20±5 vs. 52±18 breath-units of carbachol; n = 10, P = 0.0340. Senicapoc also significantly reduced eosinophil numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage taken 48 hours post-allergen challenge, and reduced vascular remodelling. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that K(Ca3.1-activity contributes to allergen-induced airway responses, inflammation and vascular remodelling in a sheep model of asthma, and that inhibition of K(Ca3.1 may be an effective strategy for blocking allergen-induced airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in humans.

  10. Translational profiling of stress-induced neuroplasticity in the CA3 pyramidal neurons of BDNF Val66Met mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, J D; Rubin, T G; Kogan, J F; Marrocco, J; Weidmann, J; Lindkvist, S; Lee, F S; Schmidt, E F; McEwen, B S

    2016-12-13

    Genetic susceptibility and environmental factors (such as stress) can interact to affect the likelihood of developing a mood disorder. Stress-induced changes in the hippocampus have been implicated in mood disorders, and mutations in several genes have now been associated with increased risk, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The hippocampus has important anatomical subdivisions, and pyramidal neurons of the vulnerable CA3 region show significant remodeling after chronic stress, but the mechanisms underlying their unique plasticity remain unknown. This study characterizes stress-induced changes in the in vivo translating mRNA of this cell population using a CA3-specific enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter fused to the L10a large ribosomal subunit (EGFPL10a). RNA-sequencing after isolation of polysome-bound mRNAs allows for cell-type-specific, genome-wide characterization of translational changes after stress. The data demonstrate that acute and chronic stress produce unique translational profiles and that the stress history of the animal can alter future reactivity of CA3 neurons. CA3-specific EGFPL10a mice were then crossed to the stress-susceptible BDNF Val66Met mouse line to characterize how a known genetic susceptibility alters both baseline translational profiles and the reactivity of CA3 neurons to stress. Not only do Met allele carriers exhibit distinct levels of baseline translation in genes implicated in ion channel function and cytoskeletal regulation, but they also activate a stress response profile that is highly dissimilar from wild-type mice. Closer examination of genes implicated in the mechanisms of neuroplasticity, such as the NMDA and AMPA subunits and the BDNF pathway, reveal how wild-type mice upregulate many of these genes in response to stress, but Met allele carriers fail to do so. These profiles provide a roadmap of stress-induced changes in a genetically homogenous population of hippocampal neurons and

  11. Effects of acupuncture in combination with exercise on learning, memory and the expression of microtubuleassociated protein-2 in the hippocampal CA3 region after experimental focal cerebral infarction in rats%针刺结合运动训练对脑梗死大鼠学习记忆功能和患侧海马CA3区微管相关蛋白-2表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜伟; 杨敏; 毕研贞; 胡可慧; 余茜

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the expression of microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2) in the CA3 region of the hippocampus and any effect of acupuncture combined with exercise training on the recovery of learning and memory after experimental cerebral infarction.Methods Eighty Wistar rats were randomly divided into a sham-operation group (n = 8 ) and an operation group (n = 72 ) subdivided randomly and equally into a model group, an exercisetraining group and an acupuncture plus exercise training group, with 24 rats in each group. After right middle cerebral artery occlusion or a mock operation, the expression of MAP-2 in the CA3 region of the hippocampus was detected with immunohistochemistry 1, 3 and 5 weeks after the operation. Learning and memory function was assessed at the 5th week post operation.Results MAP-2- positive fibers were arranged in an orderly way and distributed densely in the shamoperation group. After cerebral infarction, number of MAP-2 positive neurons and dendrite fibers decreased in the CA3 region of the affected side. A week after the operation, MAP-2 positive fibers had increased significantly in the acupuncture plus exercise group compared with the model group and the exercise group. At the 3rd and 5th week post operation, expression of MAP-2 and optical density had increased significantly compared with the model group and the exercise training group. At the 5th week post operation, Y maze discrimination and learning tests showed that learning and memory had improved significantly more in the acupuncture plus exercise training group compared with the model group and the exercise training group.Conclusions Exercise training combined with acupuncture can promote changes in dendritic plasticity and increase MAP-2 expression in the CA3 region after cerebral infarction. This may be correlated positively with the recovery of learning and memory after cerebral infarction, at least in rats.%目的 探讨针刺结合运动训练对脑梗死大鼠患侧海马CA

  12. Multiple Ocular and Systemic Disorders in Association with Bilateral Duane's Retraction Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Mohammad Ali; Akbari, Mohammad Reza; Kiarudi, Mohammad Yaser; Mehrjardi, Hadi Zare

    2016-01-01

    Duane's retraction syndrome (DRS) is characterized by limitations in horizontal eye movements, globe retraction, and palpebral fissure narrowing on attempted adduction. This disorder is caused by a disturbance in innervation originating in the brain stem and represents <1% of all cases of strabismus. It is postulated that this syndrome is due to an insult during the early weeks (8–10 weeks) of pregnancy and is 10–20 times more frequently associated with other systemic congenital anomalies. This case report of bilateral DRS included bilateral iris-retinal coloboma and congenital heart disease, sensory hearing loss, and inguinal hernia. PMID:27555711

  13. $F$-Dugundji spaces, $F$-Milutin spaces and absolute $F$-valued retracts

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    For every functional functor $F:Comp\\to Comp$ in the category $Comp$ of compact Hausdorff spaces we define the notions of $F$-Dugundji and $F$-Milutin spaces, generalizing the classical notions of a Dugundji and Milutin spaces. We prove that the class of $F$-Dugundji spaces coincides with the class of absolute $F$-valued retracts. Next, we show that for a monomorphic continuous functor $F:Comp\\to Comp$ admitting tensor products each Dugundji compact is an absolute $F$-valued retract if and on...

  14. RETRACTED: Electrochemical formation of platinum nanoparticles by a novel rotating cathode method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Min; Chen, Shenhao; Ren, Haipeng; Wu, Ling; Zhao, Shiyong

    2005-04-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal (http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy). This article has been retracted at the request of the Editors of Physica E: Low-dimensional Systems and Nanostructures together with the corresponding author of the article because after thorough investigation it appears that in this article some illustrations and data contained mistakes. The scientific community takes a very strong view on this matter and apologies are offered to readers of the journal that this was not detected during the submission process.

  15. RETRACTED: One-step synthesis of Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles by a convenient electrochemical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Min; Chen, Shenhao; Zhao, Shiyong; Ma, Houyi

    2006-06-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal ( http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy). This article has been retracted at the request of the Editors of Physica E: Low-Dimensional Systems and Nanostructures together with the corresponding author of the article because after thorough investigation it now appears that in this article some pictures are wrong and data contain mistakes.The scientific community takes a very strong view on this matter and apologies are offered to readers of the journal that this was not detected during the submission process.

  16. RETRACTED: Transverse photovoltaic effect of tetragonal BiFeO3 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, R. L.; Zhang, H. R.; Fu, C. L.; Cai, W.; Chen, G.; Deng, X. L.; Sun, J. R.

    2016-05-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal. This article has been retracted at the request of the corresponding author. The corresponding author contacted the journal to report measurement errors in Figures 1b and 1c that have been found after the article publication. Also the corresponding author did not ask permission to the co-authors, who were not aware of the submission and publication of this article. After the article was published, some of the co-authors requested to withdraw this article

  17. RETRACTED: Translating Connotative Meaning in Literary Texts at the University of Petra

    OpenAIRE

    Akram M. Beiruti

    2013-01-01

    This article has been retracted: please see AIAC PTY.LTD. Policy on Publication Ethics and Publication Malpractice Statement.(http://www.aiac.org.au/journals/Subtemps/PEPMS.pdf) This article has been retracted based on the editorial decision upon conducting a thorough invesitigatiosn. It came to our notice that Akram Beirtui, supposedly the author of this paper, has plagirised the entire paper from an unpublished paper conducted by Ahmad Al-Hassan, who is the main author of the paper from...

  18. RETRACTED: Translating Connotative Meaning in Literary Texts at the University of Petra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram M. Beiruti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article has been retracted: please see AIAC PTY.LTD. Policy on Publication Ethics and Publication Malpractice Statement.(http://www.aiac.org.au/journals/Subtemps/PEPMS.pdf This article has been retracted based on the editorial decision upon conducting a thorough invesitigatiosn. It came to our notice that Akram Beirtui, supposedly the author of this paper, has plagirised the entire paper from an unpublished paper conducted by Ahmad Al-Hassan, who is the main author of the paper from the same university. Upon his proof to us, we reserve his rights and removed the paper.

  19. Retraction statement: Advances in the physiological and pathological implications of cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The above article, published online on 28 February 2013 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, William Foster, and John Wiley and Sons Ltd. The retraction has been agreed due to the publication of a similar paper by the same authors (with the exclusion of P Mardones) in Frontiers in Bioscience in January 2014. The authors believed that they had taken the necessary steps to withdraw their paper from Frontiers in Bioscience before they submitted to Biological Reviews in June 2012.

  20. Retracted: Effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines on mineralization potential of rat dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    The following article from the Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, 'Effects of Pro-inflammatory Cytokines on Mineralization Potential of Rat Dental Pulp Stem Cells' by Yang X, Walboomers XF, Bian Z, Jansen JA, Fan M, published online on 11 July 2011 in Wiley Online Library (onlinelibrary.wiley.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor-in-Chief, and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. The retraction has been agreed due to two authors (Walboomers XF, and Jansen JA) not having been involved in the research described, nor made aware of their names being listed on the manuscript, nor told of its submission to the journal.

  1. RETRACTED: Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of silver nanoparticles using Tribulus terrestris leaf extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashokkumar, S.; Ravi, S.; Kathiravan, V.; Velmurugan, S.

    2014-03-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal. This article has been retracted at the request of the Editor. The article contains duplicate images (Fig. 5A and B as well as Fig. 5C and D) which differ only in magnification and orientation despite being described as different samples. Figure 3 displays duplicated data despite being described as different samples. The scientific community takes a very strong view on this scientific misbehavior and apologies are offered to readers of the journal that this was not detected during the submission process.

  2. On retracting properties and covering homotopy theorem for S-maps into Sχ-cofibrations and Sχ-fibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Saif

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we generalize the retracting property in homotopy theory for topological semigroups by introducing the notions of deformation S-retraction with its weaker forms and ES-homotopy extension property. Furthermore, the covering homotopy theorems for S-maps into Sχ-fibrations and Sχ-cofibrations are introduced and pullbacks for Sχ-fibrations behave properly.

  3. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roney, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    While much is understood about dendritic cells and their role in the immune system, the study of these cells is critical to gain a more complete understanding of their function. Dendritic cell isolation from mouse body tissues can be difficult and the number of cells isolated small. This protocol describes the growth of large number of dendritic cells from the culture of mouse bone marrow cells. The dendritic cells grown in culture facilitate experiments that may require large number of dendritic cells without great expense or use of large number of mice.

  4. Evidence that dendritic mitochondria negatively regulate dendritic branching in pyramidal neurons in the neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Toshiya; Murakami, Fujio

    2014-05-14

    The precise branching patterns of dendritic arbors have a profound impact on information processing in individual neurons and the brain. These patterns are established by positive and negative regulation of the dendritic branching. Although the mechanisms for positive regulation have been extensively investigated, little is known about those for negative regulation. Here, we present evidence that mitochondria located in developing dendrites are involved in the negative regulation of dendritic branching. We visualized mitochondria in pyramidal neurons of the mouse neocortex during dendritic morphogenesis using in utero electroporation of a mitochondria-targeted fluorescent construct. We altered the mitochondrial distribution in vivo by overexpressing Mfn1, a mitochondrial shaping protein, or the Miro-binding domain of TRAK2 (TRAK2-MBD), a truncated form of a motor-adaptor protein. We found that dendritic mitochondria were preferentially targeted to the proximal portion of dendrites only during dendritic morphogenesis. Overexpression of Mfn1 or TRAK2-MBD depleted mitochondria from the dendrites, an effect that was accompanied by increased branching of the proximal portion of the dendrites. This dendritic abnormality cannot be accounted for by changes in the distribution of membrane trafficking organelles since the overexpression of Mfn1 did not alter the distributions of the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, or endosomes. Additionally, neither did these constructs impair neuronal viability or mitochondrial function. Therefore, our results suggest that dendritic mitochondria play a critical role in the establishment of the precise branching pattern of dendritic arbors by negatively affecting dendritic branching.

  5. Prenatal hypoxia-ischemia induces abnormalities in CA3 microstructure, potassium chloride cotransporter 2 expression and inhibitory tone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren L Jantzie

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Infants who suffer perinatal brain injury, including those with encephalopathy of prematurity, are prone to chronic neurological deficits including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, and behavioral problems such as anxiety, inattention and poor social interaction. These deficits, especially in combination, pose the greatest hindrance to these children becoming independent adults. Cerebral function depends on adequate development of essential inhibitory neural circuits and the appropriate amount of excitation and inhibition at specific stages of maturation. Early neuronal synaptic responses to γ-amino butyric acid (GABA are initially excitatory. During the early postnatal period, GABAAR responses switch to inhibitory with the upregulation of potassium-chloride co-transporter KCC2. With extrusion of chloride by KCC2, the Cl- reversal potential shifts and GABA and glycine responses become inhibitory. We hypothesized that prenatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury chronically impairs the developmental upregulation of KCC2 that is essential for cerebral circuit formation. Following late gestation hypoxia-ischemia, diffusion tensor imaging in juvenile rats shows poor microstructural integrity in the hippocampal CA3 subfield, with reduced fractional anisotropy and elevated radial diffusivity. The loss of microstructure correlates with early reduced KCC2 expression on NeuN-positive pyramidal neurons, and decreased monomeric and oligomeric KCC2 protein expression in the CA3 subfield. Together with decreased IPSCs during a critical window of development, we document for the first time that prenatal transient systemic hypoxia-ischemia in rats impairs hippocampal CA3 inhibitory tone. Failure of timely development of inhibitory tone likely contributes to a lower seizure threshold and impaired cognitive function in children who suffer perinatal brain injury.

  6. Activity-dependent induction of multitransmitter signaling onto pyramidal cells and interneurons of hippocampal area CA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-Parra, Héctor; Vivar, Carmen; Maqueda, Jasmín; Morales, Miguel A; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2003-06-01

    The granule cells of the dentate gyrus (DG) are considered to be glutamatergic, but they contain glutamic acid decarboxylase, gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), and the vesicular GABA transporter mRNA. Their expression is regulated in an activity-dependent manner and coincides with the appearance of GABAergic transmission from the mossy fibers (MF) to pyramidal cells in area CA3. These data support the hypothesis that MF are able to release glutamate and GABA. Following the principle that a given neuron releases the same neurotransmitter(s) onto all its targets, we here demonstrate the emergence, after a generalized convulsive seizure, of MF GABAergic signaling sensitive to activation mGluR-III onto pyramidal cells and interneurons of CA3. Despite this, excitation overrides inhibition in interneurons, preventing disinhibition. Furthermore, on blockade of GABA and glutamate ionotropic receptors, an M1-cholinergic depolarizing signal is also revealed in both targets, which postsynaptically modulates the glutamatergic and GABAergic fast neurotransmission. The emergence of these nonglutamatergic signals depends on protein synthesis. In contrast to cholinergic responses evoked by associational/commissural fibers activation, cholinergic transmission evoked by DG stimulation is only observed after seizures and is strongly depressed by the activation of mGluR-II, whereas both are depressed by M2-AChR activation. With immunohistological experiments, we show that this cholinergic pathway runs parallel to the MF. Thus seizures compromise a delicate balance of excitation and inhibition, on which a complex interaction of different neurotransmitters emerges to counteract excitation at pre- and postsynaptic sites. Particularly, MF GABAergic inhibition emerges to exert an overall inhibitory action on CA3.

  7. Melamine Alters Glutamatergic Synaptic Transmission of CA3-CA1 Synapses Presynaptically Through Autophagy Activation in the Rat Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Hui; Xiao, Xi; Zhang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Melamine is an industrial chemical that can cause central nervous system disorders including excitotoxicity and cognitive impairment. Its illegal use in powdered baby formula was the focus of a milk scandal in China in 2008. One of our previous studies showed that melamine impaired glutamatergic transmission in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells. However, the underlying mechanism of action of melamine is unclear, and it is unknown if the CA3-CA1 pathway is directly involved. In the present study, a whole-cell patch-clamp technique was employed to investigate the effect of melamine on the hippocampal CA3-CA1 pathway in vitro. Both the evoked excitatory postsynaptic current (eEPSC) and the paired-pulse ratio (PPR) were recorded. Furthermore, we examined whether autophagy was involved in glutamatergic transmission alterations induced by melamine. Our data showed that melamine significantly increased the amplitude of eEPSCs in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor did not prevent the increase in eEPSC amplitude. In addition, the PPR was remarkably decreased by a melamine concentration of 5 × 10(-5) g/mL. It was found that autophagy could be activated by melamine and an autophagy inhibitor, 3-MA, prevented the melamine-induced increase in eEPSC amplitude. Overall, our results show that melamine presynaptically alters glutamatergic synaptic transmission of hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses in vitro and this is likely associated with autophagy alteration.

  8. Maxillary dentoalveolar assessment following retraction of maxillary incisors: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Tiago Maia Fernandes; Claudino, Lígia Vieira; Mattos, Cláudia Trindade; Sant'Anna, Eduardo Franzotti

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this preliminary study was to assess changes in tooth length and alveolar thickness following retraction of maxillary incisors. Methods: A total of 11 patients presenting severe maxillary dentoalveolar protrusion revealed by initial (T1) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and whose treatment plan included extraction of maxillary first premolars and retraction of maxillary incisors, were selected and submitted to CBCT examination one month after the end of incisors retraction (T2). The premaxilla was assessed through seven axial slices by means of Dolphin ImagingTM software. In each of these slices, five measurements of the distance from the buccal cortical bone to the palatal cortical bone were performed. Tooth length of maxillary incisors (n = 44) was also measured in sagittal slices. Measurements were repeated after a two-week interval, and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to test examiner calibration. Wilcoxon test was used to detect differences in measurements performed at the two time intervals. Results: The ICC was satisfactory for tooth length (0.890) and for premaxilla alveolar thickness measurements (0.980). Analysis of data showed no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) in tooth length or alveolar thickness between the two-time intervals assessed. Conclusion: The force used in retraction of maxillary incisors in this research did not promote significant changes in tooth length of maxillary incisors or in premaxilla alveolar thickness. PMID:27901233

  9. Maxillary dentoalveolar assessment following retraction of maxillary incisors: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Maia Fernandes Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this preliminary study was to assess changes in tooth length and alveolar thickness following retraction of maxillary incisors. Methods: A total of 11 patients presenting severe maxillary dentoalveolar protrusion revealed by initial (T1 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT, and whose treatment plan included extraction of maxillary first premolars and retraction of maxillary incisors, were selected and submitted to CBCT examination one month after the end of incisors retraction (T2. The premaxilla was assessed through seven axial slices by means of Dolphin ImagingTM software. In each of these slices, five measurements of the distance from the buccal cortical bone to the palatal cortical bone were performed. Tooth length of maxillary incisors (n = 44 was also measured in sagittal slices. Measurements were repeated after a two-week interval, and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC was used to test examiner calibration. Wilcoxon test was used to detect differences in measurements performed at the two time intervals. Results: The ICC was satisfactory for tooth length (0.890 and for premaxilla alveolar thickness measurements (0.980. Analysis of data showed no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05 in tooth length or alveolar thickness between the two-time intervals assessed. Conclusion: The force used in retraction of maxillary incisors in this research did not promote significant changes in tooth length of maxillary incisors or in premaxilla alveolar thickness.

  10. Orthodontic retraction of autotransplanted premolar to replace ankylosed maxillary incisor with replacement resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Jeong; Shin, Sujung; Kim, Kyung-Ho; Chung, Chooryung J

    2014-04-01

    This case report describes the successful treatment of an adult with lip protrusion and a previously traumatized maxillary central incisor that had experienced replacement root resorption. An extracted premolar was transplanted into the incisor space and retracted orthodontically. Autotransplantation was successful with complete root formation and, combined with orthodontic treatment, provided a satisfying esthetic outcome.

  11. RETRACTED: Investigation into the kinetic behavior of molten aluminum pressureless infiltration into SiC preforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Sharifi

    2016-10-01

    According to the policy of our Journal, this paper has been retracted because of sheer plagiarism. This paper has been published at the same time in the International Journal of Materials Research (IJMR: http://dx.doi.org/10.3139/146.111422.

  12. A retracting wire knife for cutting fiber bundles and making sheet lesions of brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, M; Russell, I S

    1979-07-01

    A retracting knife which has two cutting wires for the transection of fiber bundles is described. The knife holds the fiber bundles of the stria terminalis between the two cutting wires and transects them by a shearing movement as the wires close. In addition, the feasability of such a knife producing a sheet lesion around the n. caudatus is also described.

  13. Retraction of an intrathecal baclofen infusion catheter following suprapubic cystotomy: a case report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, F.M.J.; Somford, D.M.; Kuppevelt, D.H. van; Burg, M.J. van den; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Intrathecal baclofen, administered via a Baclofen pump, is used for patients with spasticity. We report here a case of intrathecal catheter retraction following surgery. CASE REPORT: A male patient with adrenoleukodystrophy and a baclofen pump implant was admitted to the urology depart

  14. 77 FR 31039 - Certain Electronic Devices Having a Retractable USB Connector; Institution of Investigation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices Having a Retractable USB Connector; Institution of Investigation Pursuant to 19 U.S.C. 1337 AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice...

  15. 77 FR 75189 - Certain Electronic Devices Having a Retractable USB Connector; Termination of an Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    .... 77 FR 31039-40 (Aug. 12, 2011). The notice of investigation named more than forty respondents. The... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices Having a Retractable USB Connector; Termination of an...

  16. Presynaptic ultrastructural plasticity along CA3→CA1 axons during long-term potentiation in mature hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Jennifer N; Chirillo, Michael A; Harris, Kristen M

    2013-12-01

    In area CA1 of the mature hippocampus, synaptogenesis occurs within 30 minutes after the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP); however, by 2 hours many small dendritic spines are lost, and those remaining have larger synapses. Little is known, however, about associated changes in presynaptic vesicles and axonal boutons. Axons in CA1 stratum radiatum were evaluated with 3D reconstructions from serial section electron microscopy at 30 minutes and 2 hours after induction of LTP by theta-burst stimulation (TBS). The frequency of axonal boutons with a single postsynaptic partner was decreased by 33% at 2 hours, corresponding perfectly to the 33% loss specifically of small dendritic spines (head diameters complement postsynaptic ultrastructural plasticity during LTP.

  17. The functional genome of CA1 and CA3 neurons under native conditions and in response to ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossner Moritz

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The different physiological repertoire of CA3 and CA1 neurons in the hippocampus, as well as their differing behaviour after noxious stimuli are ultimately based upon differences in the expressed genome. We have compared CA3 and CA1 gene expression in the uninjured brain, and after cerebral ischemia using laser microdissection (LMD, RNA amplification, and array hybridization. Results Profiling in CA1 vs. CA3 under normoxic conditions detected more than 1000 differentially expressed genes that belong to different, physiologically relevant gene ontology groups in both cell types. The comparison of each region under normoxic and ischemic conditions revealed more than 5000 ischemia-regulated genes for each individual cell type. Surprisingly, there was a high co-regulation in both regions. In the ischemic state, only about 100 genes were found to be differentially expressed in CA3 and CA1. The majority of these genes were also different in the native state. A minority of interesting genes (e.g. inhibinbetaA displayed divergent expression preference under native and ischemic conditions with partially opposing directions of regulation in both cell types. Conclusion The differences found in two morphologically very similar cell types situated next to each other in the CNS are large providing a rational basis for physiological differences. Unexpectedly, the genomic response to ischemia is highly similar in these two neuron types, leading to a substantial attenuation of functional genomic differences in these two cell types. Also, the majority of changes that exist in the ischemic state are not generated de novo by the ischemic stimulus, but are preexistant from the genomic repertoire in the native situation. This unexpected influence of a strong noxious stimulus on cell-specific gene expression differences can be explained by the activation of a cell-type independent conserved gene-expression program. Our data generate both novel

  18. Critical involvement of postsynaptic protein kinase activation in LTP at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses on CA3 interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Galván, Emilio J; Cosgrove, Kathleen E.; Mauna, Jocelyn C.; Card, J. Patrick; Thiels, Edda; Meriney, Stephen D.; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2010-01-01

    Hippocampal mossy fiber (MF) synapses on area CA3 lacunosum-moleculare (L-M) interneurons are capable of undergoing a Hebbian form of NMDAR-independent LTP induced by the same type of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) that induces LTP at MF synapses on pyramidal cells. LTP of MF input to L-M interneurons occurs only at synapses containing mostly calcium impermeable (CI)-AMPARs. Here, we demonstrate that HFS-induced LTP at these MF-interneuron synapses requires postsynaptic activation of protei...

  19. Lidocaine injections targeting CA3 hippocampus impair long-term spatial memory and prevent learning-induced mossy fiber remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holahan, Matthew R; Routtenberg, Aryeh

    2011-05-01

    Learning a spatial location induces remodeling of the mossy fiber terminal field (MFTF) in the CA3 subfield of the dorsal hippocampus (Ramirez-Amaya et al. (2001) J Neurosci 21:7340-7348; Holahan et al. (2006) Hippocampus 16:560-570; Rekart et al. (2007a) Learn Mem 14:416-421). These fibers appear to grow from the stratum lucidum into distal stratum oriens. Is this axonal growth dependent on “repeated and persistent” neural activity in the CA3 region during training? To address this issue, we targeted local inactivation of the MFTF region in a post-training, consolidation paradigm. Male Wistar rats, bilaterally implanted with chronic indwelling cannulae aimed at the MFTF CA3 region, were trained on a hidden platform water maze task (10 trials per day for 5 days). Immediately after the 10th trial on each training day, rats were injected with lidocaine (4% w/v; 171 mM; n=7) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS; n=7). Behavioral measures of latency, path length, and thigmotaxis were recorded, as was directional heading. A retention test (probe trial) was given 7 days after the last training day, and brains were subsequently processed for MFTF distribution (Timm's stain) and cannula location. Lidocaine treatment was found to block the learning-associated structural remodeling of the MFTF that was reported previously and observed in the PBS-injected controls. During training, the lidocaine group showed elevated latencies and a misdirected heading to locate the platform on the first trial of each training day. On the 7-day retention probe trial, the lidocaine-injected group showed poor retention indicated by the absence of a search bias in the area where the platform had been located during training. These data suggest that the reduction of neuronal activity in the CA3 region impairs long-term storage of spatial information. As this was associated with reduced MFTF structural remodeling, it provides initial anatomical and behavioral evidence for an activity

  20. Altered mitochondria and Bcl-2 expression in the hippocampal CA3 region in a rat model of acute epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiyan Cheng; Lina Wu; Qiaozhi Wang; Yanfeng Gan; Guangyi Liu; Hong Yu

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that the mitochondrial structure and function are damaged in animal models of epilepsy. In addition, the Bcl-2 protein is capable of regulating mitochondrial stability.OBJECTIVE: To observe and validate changes in mitochondrial structure and Bcl-2 expression, and to analyze these characteristics in the hippocampal CA3 region of rat models of epilepsy. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This randomized, controlled, animal experiment was performed at the Laboratory of Electron Microscopy and Department of Histology and Embryology, Luzhou Medical College between 2007 and 2008.MATERIALS: Coriamyrtin was provided by the Pharmacy Factory of West China University of Medical Sciences. The primary and secondary antibodies were provided by Zhongshan Goldenbridge Biotechnology, Beijing.METHODS: A total of 44 adult, male, Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into control (n=11) and epilepsy (n=33) groups. Rats in the epilepsy group were induced by coriamyrtin (50μg/kg), which was injected into the lateral ventricles. The rats were then observed at 3, 6, and 24 hours after epilepsy induction, with 11 rats at each time point. Epilepsy was not induced in rats from the control group.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pathological changes in the hippocampal CA3 region were observed by light microscopy; Bcl-2 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry; and mitochondrial changes in the hippocampus were observed under transmission electron microscopy.RESULTS: (1) The control group displayed very little Bcl-2 protein expression in the hippocampal CA3 region. However, after 3 hours of epilepsy, expression was visible. By 6 hours, expression peaked and then subsequently decreased after 24 hours, but remained higher than the control group (P<0.05). (2) Mitochondria were damaged to varying degrees in the epilepsy groups. For example, mitochondria edema, cristae space increase, and disappearance of mitochondria were apparent. Moreover, mitochondrial damage

  1. Switching effect in the magnetization response in a superconducting specimen of Ca3Rh4Sn13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, M. Suresh; Thamizhavel, A.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Grover, A. K.; Pal, D.

    2016-05-01

    The isofield magnetization measurements in a superconducting single crystal of Ca3Rh4Sn13 show the paramagnetic magnetization response in a specific region of the magnetization curve while field cooling under various experimental conditions. Such a response in the specific region is found to be multivalued/metastable, which can be manipulated in a characteristics manner by altering the experimental conditions. The controlled switching of magnetization between widely differing values including the change in sign of magnetization, has application potential in magnetic switching and binary memory devices.

  2. Ontogenesis of presynaptic GABAB receptor-mediated inhibition in the CA3 region of the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillard, O; McLean, H A; Ben-Ari, Y; Gaïarsa, J L

    1998-03-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid-B(GABAB) receptor-dependent and -independent components of paired-pulse depression (PPD) were investigated in the rat CA3 hippocampal region. Intracellular and whole cell recordings of CA3 pyramidal neurons were performed on hippocampal slices obtained from neonatal (5-7 day old) and adult (27-34 day old) rats. Electrical stimulation in the hilus evoked monosynaptic GABAA postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) isolated in the presence of the ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX, 10 microM) and D(-)2-amino-5-phosphovaleric acid (-AP5, 50 microM) with 2(triethylamino)-N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl) acetamine (QX314) filled electrodes. In adult CA3 pyramidal neurons, when a pair of identical stimuli was applied at interstimulus intervals (ISIs) ranging from 50 to 1,500 ms the amplitude of the second eIPSC was depressed when compared with the first eIPSC. This paired-pulse depression (PPD) was partially blocked by P-3-aminoprophyl -P-diethoxymethylphosphoric acid (CGP35348, 0.5 mM), a selective GABAB receptor antagonist. In neonates, PPD was restricted to ISIs shorter than 200 ms and was not affected by CGP35348. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen reduced the amplitude of eIPSCs in a dose-dependent manner with the same efficiency in both adults and neonates. Increasing the probability of transmitter release with high Ca2+ (4 mM)/low Mg2+ (0.3 mM) external solution revealed PPD in neonatal CA3 pyramidal neurons that was 1) partially prevented by CGP35348, 2) independent of the membrane holding potential of the recorded cell, and 3) not resulting from a change in the reversal potential of GABAA eIPSCs. In adults the GABA uptake blocker tiagabine (20 microM) increased the duration of eIPSCs and the magnitude of GABAB receptor-dependent PPD. In neonates, tiagabine also increased duration of eIPSCs but to a lesser extent than in adult and did not reveal a GABAB receptor-dependent PPD. These results demonstrate that

  3. Activation of metabotropic glutamate 5 and NMDA receptors underlies the induction of persistent bursting and associated long-lasting changes in CA3 recurrent connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, Ron; Conquet, François; Zuber, Benoit; Voronin, Leon L; Pralong, Etienne

    2003-07-02

    The aim of this study was to describe the induction and expression mechanisms of a persistent bursting activity in a horizontal slice preparation of the rat limbic system that includes the ventral part of the hippocampus and the entorhinal cortex. Disinhibition of this preparation by bicuculline led to interictal-like bursts in the CA3 region that triggered synchronous activity in the entorhinal cortex. Washout of bicuculline after a 1 hr application resulted in a maintained production of hippocampal bursts that continued to spread to the entorhinal cortex. Separation of CA3 from the entorhinal cortex caused the activity in the latter to become asynchronous with CA3 activity in the presence of bicuculline and disappear after washout; however, in CA3, neither the induction of bursting nor its persistence were affected. Associated with the CA3 persistent bursting, a strengthening of recurrent collateral excitatory input to CA3 pyramidal cells and a decreased input to CA3 interneurons was found. Both the induction of the persistent bursting and the changes in synaptic strength were prevented by antagonists of metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) or NMDA receptors or protein synthesis inhibitors and did not occur in slices from mGlu5 receptor knock-out mice. The above findings suggest potential synaptic mechanisms by which the hippocampus switches to a persistent interictal bursting mode that may support a spread of interictal-like bursting to surrounding temporal lobe regions.

  4. Attenuation of the Type IV Pilus Retraction Motor Influences Neisseria gonorrhoeae Social and Infection Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Danielle M.; Agellon, Al

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retraction of the type IV pilus (Tfp) mediates DNA uptake, motility, and social and infection behavior in a wide variety of prokaryotes. To date, investigations into Tfp retraction-dependent activities have used a mutant deleted of PilT, the ATPase motor protein that causes the pilus fiber to retract. ΔpilT cells are nontransformable, nonmotile, and cannot aggregate into microcolonies. We tested the hypothesis that these retraction-dependent activities are sensitive to the strength of PilT enzymatic activity by using the pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae as a model. We constructed an N. gonorrhoeae mutant with an amino acid substitution in the PilT Walker B box (a substitution of cysteine for leucine at position 201, encoded by pilTL201C). Purified PilTL201C forms a native hexamer, but mutant hexamers hydrolyze ATP at half the maximal rate. N. gonorrhoeae pilTL201C cells produce Tfp fibers, crawl at the same speed as the wild-type (wt) parent, and are equally transformable. However, the social behavior of pilTL201C cells is intermediate between the behaviors of wt and ΔpilT cells. The infection behavior of pilTL201C is also defective, due to its failure to activate the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) pathway. Our study indicates that pilus retraction, per se, is not sufficient for N. gonorrhoeae microcolony formation or infectivity; rather, these activities are sensitive to the strength of PilT enzymatic activity. We discuss the implications of these findings for Neisseria pathogenesis in the context of mechanobiology. PMID:27923924

  5. Finite element analysis of rapid canine retraction through reducing resistance and distraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie XUE

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aims of this study were to compare different surgical approaches to rapid canine retraction by designing and selecting the most effective method of reducing resistance by a three-dimensional finite element analysis. Material and Methods: Three-dimensional finite element models of different approaches to rapid canine retraction by reducing resistance and distraction were established, including maxillary teeth, periodontal ligament, and alveolar. The models were designed to dissect the periodontal ligament, root, and alveolar separately. A 1.5 N force vector was loaded bilaterally to the center of the crown between first molar and canine, to retract the canine distally. The value of total deformation was used to assess the initial displacement of the canine and molar at the beginning of force loading. Stress intensity and force distribution were analyzed and evaluated by Ansys 13.0 through comparison of equivalent (von Mises stress and maximum shear stress. Results: The maximum value of total deformation with the three kinds of models occurred in the distal part of the canine crown and gradually reduced from the crown to the apex of the canine; compared with the canines in model 3 and model 1, the canine in model 2 had the maximum value of displacement, up to 1.9812 mm. The lowest equivalent (von Mises stress and the lowest maximum shear stress were concentrated mainly on the distal side of the canine root in model 2. The distribution of equivalent (von Mises stress and maximum shear stress on the PDL of the canine in the three models was highly concentrated on the distal edge of the canine cervix. . Conclusions: Removal of the bone in the pathway of canine retraction results in low stress intensity for canine movement. Periodontal distraction aided by surgical undermining of the interseptal bone would reduce resistance and effectively accelerate the speed of canine retraction.

  6. Review of various liver retraction techniques in single incision laparoscopic surgery for the exposure of hiatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveenraj Palanivelu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main aspect of concern for upper GI procedures has been the retraction of the liver especially large left lobes as commonly encountered in Bariatric surgery. Not doing so would compromise the view of the hiatus, hence theoretically reducing the quality of the surgery and increasing the possibility of complications. The aim of this study was to review the various liver retraction techniques in single incision surgery being done at our institute and analyze them. Material and Methods: A retrospective study of the various techniques and a subsequent analysis was made based on advantages and disadvantages of each method. Objectively a quantitative measure of hiatal exposure was done using a scoring system based on the grade of exposure after reviewing the surgical videos. From January 2011 to January 2013 total 104 patients underwent single incision surgery with the various liver retraction techniques with following grades of exposure -liver suspension tube technique with naso gastric tubing (2.11 and with corrugated drain (2.09 needlescopic method (1.2, Umbilical tape sling (1.95, crural stitch method (2.5. Needeloscopic method has the best grade of exposure and is the easiest to start with. The average time to create the liver retraction was 2.8 to 8.6 min.There was no procedure related morbidity or mortality. Conclusions: The mentioned liver retraction techniques are cost effective and easy to learn. We recommend using these techniques to have a good exposure of hiatus, without compromising the safety of surgery in single incision surgery.

  7. Phase field modeling of dendritic coarsening during isothermal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yutuo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic coarsening in Al-2mol%Si alloy during isothermal solidification at 880K was investigated by phase field modeling. Three coarsening mechanisms operate in the alloy: (a melting of small dendrite arms; (b coalescence of dendrites near the tips leading to the entrapment of liquid droplets; (c smoothing of dendrites. Dendrite melting is found to be dominant in the stage of dendritic growth, whereas coalescence of dendrites and smoothing of dendrites are dominant during isothermal holding. The simulated results provide a better understanding of dendrite coarsening during isothermal solidification.

  8. Mechanism of Formation of the Thermoelectric Layered Cobaltate Ca3Co4O9 by Annealing of CaO–CoO Thin Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, Biplab; Schroeder, Jeremy L.; Kerdsongpanya, Sit

    2015-01-01

    The layered cobaltate Ca3Co4O9 is of interest for energy-harvesting and heat-conversion applications because of its good thermoelectric properties and the fact that the raw materials Ca and Co are nontoxic, abundantly available, and inexpensive. While single-crystalline Ca3Co4O9 exhibits high....... With this method, we demonstrate production of epitaxial Ca3Co4O9 thin films with in-plane electrical resistivity of 6.44 mΩ cm and a Seebeck coefficient of 118 μV K−1 at 300 K....

  9. Dendritic cells and contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yoshinori; Aiba, Setsuya

    2007-10-01

    Contact dermatitis is a biological response to simple chemicals in the skin. Although it is well known that allergic contact dermatitis is mediated by the immune system, it is still uncertain whether it is a kind of protective response or it is simply an unnecessary response. We have demonstrated the following: (1) haptens activate Langerhans cells in the initiation phase of murine allergic contact dermatitis in vivo, (2) haptens activate human monocyte-derived dendritic cells in vitro, (3) the activation of dendritic cells by haptens is primarily mediated by the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and (4) the activation of p38 MAPK is mediated by stimulation related to an imbalance of intracellular redox. Based on these observations, we will discuss the biological significance of contact dermatitis. In addition, we will review some up-to-date findings on Langerhans cell biology.

  10. Lipid dynamics at dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotti, Carlos Gerardo; Esteban, Jose Antonio; Ledesma, María Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic changes in the structure and composition of the membrane protrusions forming dendritic spines underlie memory and learning processes. In recent years a great effort has been made to characterize in detail the protein machinery that controls spine plasticity. However, we know much less about the involvement of lipids, despite being major membrane components and structure determinants. Moreover, protein complexes that regulate spine plasticity depend on specific interactions with membrane lipids for proper function and accurate intracellular signaling. In this review we gather information available on the lipid composition at dendritic spine membranes and on its dynamics. We pay particular attention to the influence that spine lipid dynamism has on glutamate receptors, which are key regulators of synaptic plasticity.

  11. Closed head injury causes hyperexcitability in rat hippocampal CA1 but not in CA3 pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesemer, Désirée; Mautes, Angelika M

    2007-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury frequently elicits epileptic seizures hours or days after the impact. The mechanisms on cellular level are poorly understood. Because posttraumatic epilepsy appears in many cases as a temporal-lobe epilepsy which originated the hippocampus, we studied trauma-induced hyperexcitability on the cellular level in this brain area. We used the model of closed head injury to analyse the electrophysiological changes in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells and in interneurones of the CA1 field, which is extremely sensitive to ischemia. We found that morphologically closed head injury (CHI) led to a gradual progressive, cell type specific time course in neuronal degeneration. To analyse electrophysiological impairment we measured resting membrane potential, recorded spontaneous action potentials and induced action potentials by current pulses at different times after CHI. We found a dramatic increase in the frequency of spontaneous action potentials of CA1 but not of CA3 pyramidal cells after CHI. This hyperexcitability was maximal at 2 h (4.5-fold higher than sham), was also observed at 24 h after CHI and disappeared after 3 days. We found that CA1 interneurones responded by a much weaker increase of AP frequency after CHI. We conclude that the strong hyperexcitability after CHI is cell-type specific and transient. The understanding of the complex neuronal interactions probably offers a promising possibility for pharmacological intervention to prevent posttraumatic epilepsy.

  12. Input-output features of anatomically identified CA3 neurons during hippocampal sharp wave/ripple oscillation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hájos, Norbert; Karlócai, Mária R; Németh, Beáta; Ulbert, István; Monyer, Hannah; Szabó, Gábor; Erdélyi, Ferenc; Freund, Tamás F; Gulyás, Attila I

    2013-07-10

    Hippocampal sharp waves and the associated ripple oscillations (SWRs) are implicated in memory processes. These network events emerge intrinsically in the CA3 network. To understand cellular interactions that generate SWRs, we detected first spiking activity followed by recording of synaptic currents in distinct types of anatomically identified CA3 neurons during SWRs that occurred spontaneously in mouse hippocampal slices. We observed that the vast majority of interneurons fired during SWRs, whereas only a small portion of pyramidal cells was found to spike. There were substantial differences in the firing behavior among interneuron groups; parvalbumin-expressing basket cells were one of the most active GABAergic cells during SWRs, whereas ivy cells were silent. Analysis of the synaptic currents during SWRs uncovered that the dominant synaptic input to the pyramidal cell was inhibitory, whereas spiking interneurons received larger synaptic excitation than inhibition. The discharge of all interneurons was primarily determined by the magnitude and the timing of synaptic excitation. Strikingly, we observed that the temporal structure of synaptic excitation and inhibition during SWRs significantly differed between parvalbumin-containing basket cells, axoaxonic cells, and type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1)-expressing basket cells, which might explain their distinct recruitment to these synchronous events. Our data support the hypothesis that the active current sources restricted to the stratum pyramidale during SWRs originate from the synaptic output of parvalbumin-expressing basket cells. Thus, in addition to gamma oscillation, these GABAergic cells play a central role in SWR generation.

  13. Effect of erbium substitution on thermoelectric properties of complex oxide Ca3Co2O6 at high temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Dongqing; CHEN Gang; PEI Jian; YANG Xi; XIAN Hengze

    2008-01-01

    Polycrystalline particles of Ca3-xErxCo2O6 (x=0.0, 0.15, 0.3, 0.45 and 0.6) were synthesized using sol-gel method combined with Low Temperature Sintering procedure (LTS) to evaluate the effect of Er substitution on the thermoelectric properties of Ca3Co2O6. The crystal structure and microstructure were investigated using X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope. The electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of the complex oxides were measured from 300 to 1073 K. The results showed that all the samples were p-type semiconductors. The electrical conductivity increased with the increase in temperature. Er substitutions at Ca site affected carrier concentrations and carrier mobility, resulting an increase in Seebeck coefficient and decrease in electrical conductivity. The power factor of Ca2.85Er0.15Co2O6 reached 10.66 μw/mK2 at 1073 K.

  14. Microstructure and Thermoelectric Properties of Bi- and Cu-Substituted Ca3Co4O9 Oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haoshan Hao; Limin Zhao; Xing Hu

    2009-01-01

    Bi- and Cu-substituted Ca3Co4O9 samples were prepared by conventional solid-state reaction method and the effect of element substitution on the microstructures and thermoelectric properties was investigated. Partial substitution of Cu for Co leads to an increase in electrical conductivity and a decrease in Seebeck coefficient due to the rise of hole concentration. The microstructure of Cu-substituted sample is almost unchanged compared with undoped Ca3Co4O9. On the other hand, partial substitution of Bi for Ca gives rise to a significant increase in the grain size, and c-axis-oriented structure can be formed in Ca2.7Bi0.3Co4O9, resulting in an obvious increase in electrical conductivity. Cu and Bi co-substitution further increases the grain growth and the electrical conductivity of Ca2.7Bi0.3Co3.7Cu0.3O9. Thus, Cu and Bi co-substitution samples possess the optimal thermoelectric performance at high temperature and the highest value of power factor can reach 3.1×10-4 Wm-1·K-2 at 1000 K.

  15. Identification of potentially neuroprotective genes upregulated by neurotrophin treatment of CA3 neurons in the injured brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Saafan Z; Motamedi, Shahab; Royo, Nicolas C; LeBold, David; Watson, Deborah J

    2011-03-01

    Specific neurotrophic factors mediate histological and/or functional improvement in animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). In previous work, several lines of evidence indicated that the mammalian neurotrophin NT-4/5 is neuroprotective for hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons after experimental TBI. We hypothesized that NT-4/5 neuroprotection is mediated by changes in the expression of specific sets of genes, and that NT-4/5-regulated genes are potential therapeutic targets for blocking delayed neuronal death after TBI. In this study, we performed transcription profiling analysis of CA3 neurons to identify genes regulated by lateral fluid percussion injury, or by treatment with the trkB ligands NT-4/5 or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The results indicate extensive overlap between genes upregulated by neurotrophins and genes upregulated by injury, suggesting that the mechanism behind neurotrophin neuroprotection may mimic the brain's endogenous protective response. A subset of genes selected for further study in vitro exhibited neuroprotection against glutamate excitotoxicity. The neuroprotective genes identified in this study were upregulated at 30 h post-injury, and are thus expected to act during a clinically useful time frame of hours to days after injury. Modulation of these factors and pathways by genetic manipulation or small molecules may confer hippocampal neuroprotection in vivo in preclinical models of TBI.

  16. Ongoing intrinsic synchronous activity is required for the functional maturation of CA3-CA1 glutamatergic synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huupponen, Johanna; Molchanova, Svetlana M; Lauri, Sari E; Taira, Tomi

    2013-11-01

    Fine-tuning of synaptic connectivity during development is guided by intrinsic activity of the immature networks characteristically consisting of intermittent bursts of synchronous activity. However, the role of synchronous versus asynchronous activity in synapse maturation in the brain is unclear. Here, we have pharmacologically prevented generation of synchronous activity in the immature rat CA3-CA1 circuitry in a manner that preserves unitary activity. Long-term desynchronization of the network resulted in weakening of AMPA-receptor-mediated glutamatergic transmission in CA1 pyramidal cells. This weakening was dependent on protein phosphatases and mGluR activity, associated with an increase in the proportion of silent synapses and a decrease in the protein levels of GluA4 suggesting postsynaptic mechanisms of expression. The findings demonstrate that synchronous activity in the immature CA3-CA1 circuitry is critical for the induction and maintenance of glutamatergic synapses and underscores the importance of temporal activity patterns in shaping the synaptic circuitry during development.

  17. Spectral variations of Ca3Sc2Si3O12:Ce phosphors via substitution and energy transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yuanhong; ZHUANG Weidong; LIU Ronghui; HU Yunsheng; HE Huaqiang; ZHANG Shusheng; GAO Wei

    2012-01-01

    The luminescence intensity of emission peak at around 525 nm decreased in the Ce3+ and Er3+ co-doped Ca3Sc2Si3O12 phosphors.Mg2+ ion,which was likely incorporated into the Sc3+ position of the host crystal,was co-doped to adjust the crystal field and compensate for the excess positive charge due to the doping of Ce3+.The green emission belonged to the 5d→4f transition of Ce3+ moved toward longer wavelength by addition of Mg2+ in Ce3+ and Er3+ co-doped Ca3Sc2Si3O12 phosphor,which could increase the brightness of the phosphor.However,the position of weakening of luminescence intensity at around 525 nm remained basically unchanged by increasing the amount of Mg2+.The results showed that the weakening of luminescence intensity at around 525 nm caused by the absorption of Er3+,which had littleinfluence on the environment of the crystal field.

  18. Critical points in the Bragg glass phase of a weakly pinned crystal of Ca3Rh4Sn13

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sarkar; A D Thakur; C V Tomy; G Balakrishnan; D McK Paul; S Ramakrishnan; A K Grover

    2006-01-01

    New experimental data are presented on the scan rate dependence of the magnetization hysteresis width () (∝ critical current density c()) in isothermal - scans in a weakly pinned single crystal of Ca3Rh4Sn13, which displays second magnetization peak (SMP) anomaly as distinct from the peak effect (PE). We observe an interesting modulation in the field dependence of a parameter which purports to measure the dynamical annealing of the disordered bundles of vortices injected through the sample edges towards the destined equilibrium vortex state at a given . These data, in conjunction with the earlier observations made while studying the thermomagnetic history dependence in c() in the tracing of the minor hysteresis loops, imply that the partially disordered state heals towards the more ordered state between the peak field of the SMP anomaly and the onset field of the PE. The vortex phase diagram in the given crystal of Ca3Rh4Sn13 has been updated in the context of the notion of the phase coexistence of the ordered and disordered regions between the onset field of the SMP anomaly and the spinodal line located just prior to the irreversibility line. A multi-critical point and a critical point in the (, ) region of the Bragg glass phase have been marked in this phase diagram and the observed behavior is discussed in the light of recent data on multi-critical point in the vortex phase diagram in a single crystal of Nb.

  19. Inhibition of a slow synaptic response by a metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, U; Lüthi, A; Gähwiler, B H

    1993-11-22

    The effects of a novel antagonist of metabotropic glutamate receptors were investigated in CA3 pyramidal cells in hippocampal slice cultures of the rat. Earlier experiments showed that selective activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors with low concentrations of an agonist, 1S, 3R-1-amino-cyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (ACPD), induced an inward current associated with a decrease in membrane conductance and inhibition of the slow calcium-dependent potassium current. These responses were strongly and reversibly reduced by the antagonist, (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG, 0.5-1 mM). In the presence of antagonists of ionotropic glutamate receptors, stimulation of the afferent mossy fibres evoked postsynaptic responses in CA3 pyramidal cells which paralleled those observed with exogenously applied metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists, i.e. a slow inward current and a reduction of calcium-dependent potassium current. Both responses were greatly reduced by bath-applied MCPG (1 mM). These results show that MCPG acts as an effective antagonist at metabotropic glutamate receptors coupled to potassium conductances in the hippocampus. Furthermore, they confirm that glutamate release from presynaptic terminals can modulate postsynaptic properties by activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors.

  20. Melanoma immunotherapy: dendritic cell vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Lozada-Requena, Ivan; Laboratorios de Inmunología #108, Laboratorio de investigación y Desarrollo, Facultad de Ciencieas y Filosofía, Universidad Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú Empresa de Investigación y Desarrollo en Cáncer (EMINDES) SAC. Lima, Perú.; Núñez, César; Empresa de Investigación y Desarrollo en Cáncer (EMINDES) SAC. Lima, Perú.; Aguilar, José Luis; Laboratorios de Inmunología #108, Laboratorio de investigación y Desarrollo, Facultad de Ciencieas y Filosofía, Universidad Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú.

    2015-01-01

    This is a narrative review that shows accessible information to the scientific community about melanoma and immunotherapy.Dendritic cells have the ability to participate in innate and adaptive immunity, but are not unfamiliar to the immune evasion oftumors. Knowing the biology and role has led to generate in vitro several prospects of autologous cell vaccines against diversetypes of cancer in humans and animal models. However, given the low efficiency they have shown, we must implementstrateg...

  1. Microtubules in Dendritic Spine Development

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    It is generally believed that only the actin cytoskeleton resides in dendritic spines and controls spine morphology and plasticity. Here we report that microtubules (MTs) are present in spines and that shRNA knockdown of the MT-plus end binding protein EB3 significantly reduces spine formation. Furthermore, stabilization and inhibition of MTs by low doses of taxol and nocodazole enhance and impair spine formation elicited by BDNF, respectively. Therefore, MTs play an important role in the con...

  2. Development of Dendritic Cell System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiWu; AleksandarDakic

    2004-01-01

    The dendritic cell system contains conventional dendritic cells (DCs) and plasmacytoid pre-dendritic cells (pDCs). Both DCs and pDCs are bone marrow derived calls. Although the common functions of DCs are antigen-processing and T-lymphocyte activation, they differ in surface markers, migratory patterns, and cytokine output. These differences can determine the fate of the T cells they activate. Several subsets of mature DCs have been described in both mouse and human and the developmental processes of these specialized DC subsets have been studied extensively. The original concept that all DCs were of myeloid origin was questioned by several recent studies, which demonstrated that in addition to the DCs derived from myeloid precursors, some DCs could also be efficiently generated from lymphoid-restricted precursors. Moreover, it has been shown recently that both conventional DCs and pDCs can be generated by the Fit3 expressing hemopoietic progenitors regardless of their myeloid- or lymphoid-origin. These findings suggest an early developmental flexibility of precursors for DCs and pDCs. This review summarizes some recent observations on the development of DC system in both human and mouse. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(2):112-118.

  3. Development of Dendritic Cell System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wu; Aleksandar Dakic

    2004-01-01

    The dendritic cell system contains conventional dendritic cells (DCs) and plasmacytoid pre-dendritic cells (pDCs). Both DCs and pDCs are bone marrow derived cells. Although the common functions of DCs are antigen-processing and T-lymphocyte activation, they differ in surface markers, migratory patterns, and cytokine output. These differences can determine the fate of the T cells they activate. Several subsets of mature DCs have been described in both mouse and human and the developmental processes of these specialized DC subsets have been studied extensively. The original concept that all DCs were of myeloid origin was questioned by several recent studies, which demonstrated that in addition to the DCs derived from myeloid precursors,some DCs could also be efficiently generated from lymphoid-restricted precursors. Moreover, it has been shown recently that both conventional DCs and pDCs can be generated by the Flt3 expressing hemopoietic progenitors regardless of their myeloid- or lymphoid-origin. These findings suggest an early developmental flexibility of precursors for DCs and pDCs. This review summarizes some recent observations on the development of DC system in both human and mouse.

  4. Clinical study of gingival retraction time on the effect of gingival retraction%排龈时间对排龈效果影响的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张津京; 刘玉华

    2011-01-01

    目的 比较三种排龈时间下的排龈效果,为临床上排龈时间的选择提供参考.方法 选取10名志愿者的59颗前磨牙或尖牙,于颊侧龈沟分别进行三种时间的排龈(5、10、15分钟),两次排龈间隔至少2周.制取排龈后的印模并灌制石膏模型.根据模型上牙龈不同位置牙龈与牙面的分离情况,对排龈效果由好到差进行0~3分的评分,其中0分及1分记为满意,比较不同排龈时间下排龈效果得分及满意率间的差异.结果 三种排龈时间的排龈效果得分存在统计学差异(P<0.05),随排龈时间的延长排龈效果满意率逐渐增大,排龈10分钟即可达到较好的排龈效果满意率.结论 在本实验条件下,印模制取前使用单线机械法排龈至少需要10分钟.%Objective To compare gingival retraction effects under three different types of retraction time, so as to provide references for dentists to choose gingival retraction time in clinical works. Methods Selecting 59 premolars or canines from 10 volunteers, for which gingival retraction cords were applied on the buccal sulcus under three different types of retraction time (5, 10 and 15 minutes) , respectively. The least interval between two retraction procedures was 2 weeks. Impressions and plaster models were made after gingival retraction. Based on the separation between gingival crest and tooth surface on different gingival areas of the models, gingival retraction effects from good to bad were graded from 0 to 3 score, in which 0 and 1 scores were considered to be acceptable. The scores and accepting rates of gingival retraction effects among different retraction time were compared and analyzed. Results There are statistical differences of the scores on gingival retraction effects under three types of retraction time ( P <0.05 ). The accepting rates of gingival retraction effects increased as gingival retraction time prolonged. A good accepting rate of gingival retraction effect could be

  5. Active dendrites enhance neuronal dynamic range.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo L Gollo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the first experimental evidences of active conductances in dendrites, most neurons have been shown to exhibit dendritic excitability through the expression of a variety of voltage-gated ion channels. However, despite experimental and theoretical efforts undertaken in the past decades, the role of this excitability for some kind of dendritic computation has remained elusive. Here we show that, owing to very general properties of excitable media, the average output of a model of an active dendritic tree is a highly non-linear function of its afferent rate, attaining extremely large dynamic ranges (above 50 dB. Moreover, the model yields double-sigmoid response functions as experimentally observed in retinal ganglion cells. We claim that enhancement of dynamic range is the primary functional role of active dendritic conductances. We predict that neurons with larger dendritic trees should have larger dynamic range and that blocking of active conductances should lead to a decrease in dynamic range.

  6. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) inhibits cortical dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sean C; Palmer, Lucy M; Nyffeler, Thomas; Müri, René M; Larkum, Matthew E

    2016-03-18

    One of the leading approaches to non-invasively treat a variety of brain disorders is transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). However, despite its clinical prevalence, very little is known about the action of TMS at the cellular level let alone what effect it might have at the subcellular level (e.g. dendrites). Here, we examine the effect of single-pulse TMS on dendritic activity in layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex using an optical fiber imaging approach. We find that TMS causes GABAB-mediated inhibition of sensory-evoked dendritic Ca(2+) activity. We conclude that TMS directly activates fibers within the upper cortical layers that leads to the activation of dendrite-targeting inhibitory neurons which in turn suppress dendritic Ca(2+) activity. This result implies a specificity of TMS at the dendritic level that could in principle be exploited for investigating these structures non-invasively.

  7. Dendritic Cells, New Tools for Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Review Dendritic cells , new tools for vaccination Jesus Colino, Clifford M. Snapper * Department of Pathology, Uniformed Services University of the...2003 Éditions scientifiques et médicales Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved. Keywords: Vaccines; Immunotherapy; Dendritic cells 1. Introduction During...DATE 2003 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dendritic cells , new tools for vaccination 5a

  8. Retraction: Genistein protects genioglossus myocyte against hypoxia-induced injury through PI3K-Akt and ERK MAPK pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    RETRACTION: The following article from Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, Genistein protects genioglossus myocyte against hypoxia-induced injury through PI3K-Akt and ERK MAPK pathways by Wanghui Ding and Yuehua Liu, posted online on May 19, 2011 in Wiley Online Library (onlinelibrary.wiley.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor in Chief, Dr. Gary S. Stein and Wiley-Liss, Inc. The retraction has been made as authorization to publish was not granted by one of the funding bodies.

  9. Deposition, structure, physical and invitro characteristics of Ag-doped β-Ca3(PO4)2/chitosan hybrid composite coatings on Titanium metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ram Kishore; Awasthi, Sharad; Dhayalan, Arunkumar; Ferreira, J M F; Kannan, S

    2016-05-01

    Pure and five silver-doped (0-5Ag) β-tricalcium phosphate [β-TCP, β-Ca3(PO4)2]/chitosan composite coatings were deposited on Titanium (Ti) substrates and their properties that are relevant for applications in hard tissue replacements were assessed. Silver, β-TCP and chitosan were combined to profit from their salient and complementary antibacterial and biocompatible features.The β-Ca3(PO4)2 powders were synthesized by co-precipitation. The characterization results confirmed the Ag(+) occupancy at the crystal lattice of β-Ca3(PO4)2. The Ag-dopedβ-Ca3(PO4)2/chitosan composite coatings deposited by electrophoresis showed good antibacterial activity and exhibited negative cytotoxic effects towards the human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63. The morphology of the coatings was observed by SEM and their efficiency against corrosion of metallic substrates was determined through potentiodynamic polarization tests.

  10. Neoplasms derived from plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchetti, Fabio; Cigognetti, Marta; Fisogni, Simona; Rossi, Giuseppe; Lonardi, Silvia; Vermi, William

    2016-02-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms manifest in two clinically and pathologically distinct forms. The first variant is represented by nodular aggregates of clonally expanded plasmacytoid dendritic cells found in lymph nodes, skin, and bone marrow ('Mature plasmacytoid dendritic cells proliferation associated with myeloid neoplasms'). This entity is rare, although likely underestimated in incidence, and affects predominantly males. Almost invariably, it is associated with a myeloid neoplasm such as chronic myelomonocytic leukemia or other myeloid proliferations with monocytic differentiation. The concurrent myeloid neoplasm dominates the clinical pictures and guides treatment. The prognosis is usually dismal, but reflects the evolution of the associated myeloid leukemia rather than progressive expansion of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. A second form of plasmacytoid dendritic cells tumor has been recently reported and described as 'blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm'. In this tumor, which is characterized by a distinctive cutaneous and bone marrow tropism, proliferating cells derive from immediate CD4(+)CD56(+) precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. The diagnosis of this form can be easily accomplished by immunohistochemistry, using a panel of plasmacytoid dendritic cells markers. The clinical course of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is characterized by a rapid progression to systemic disease via hematogenous dissemination. The genomic landscape of this entity is currently under intense investigation. Recurrent somatic mutations have been uncovered in different genes, a finding that may open important perspectives for precision medicine also for this rare, but highly aggressive leukemia.

  11. Low Power Dendritic Computation for Wordspotting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Nease

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate how a network of dendrites can be used to build the state decoding block of a wordspotter similar to a Hidden Markov Model (HMM classifier structure. We present simulation and experimental data for a single line dendrite and also experimental results for a dendrite-based classifier structure. This work builds on previously demonstrated building blocks of a neural network: the channel, synapses and dendrites using CMOS circuits. These structures can be used for speech and pattern recognition. The computational efficiency of such a system is >10 MMACs/μW as compared to Digital Systems which perform 10 MMACs/mW.

  12. Glutamic acid decarboxylase-67-positive hippocampal interneurons undergo a permanent reduction in number following kainic acid-induced degeneration of ca3 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, A K; Turner, D A

    2001-06-01

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced degeneration of CA3 pyramidal neurons leads to synaptic reorganization and hyperexcitability in both dentate gyrus and CA1 region of the hippocampus. We hypothesize that the substrate for hippocampal inhibitory circuitry incurs significant and permanent alterations following degeneration of CA3 pyramidal neurons. We quantified changes in interneuron density (N(v)) in all strata of the dentate gyrus and the CA1 and CA3 subfields of adult rats at 1, 4, and 6 months following intracerebroventricular (icv) KA administration, using glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 (GAD-67) immunocytochemistry. At 1 month postlesion, GAD-67-positive interneuron density was significantly reduced in all strata of every hippocampal region except stratum pyramidale of CA1. The reduction in GAD-67-positive interneuron density either persisted or exacerbated at 4 and 6 months postlesion in every stratum of all hippocampal regions. Further, the soma of remaining GAD-67-positive interneurons in dentate gyrus and CA3 subfield showed significant hypertrophy. Thus, both permanent reductions in the density of GAD-67-positive interneurons in all hippocampal regions and somatic hypertrophy of remaining GAD-67-positive interneurons in dentate gyrus and CA3 subfield occur following icv KA. In contrast, the density of interneurons visualized with Nissl in CA1 and CA3 regions was nearly equivalent to that in the intact hippocampus at all postlesion time points. Collectively, these results suggest that persistent reductions in GAD-67-positive interneuron density observed throughout the hippocampus following CA3 lesion are largely due to a permanent loss of GAD-67 expression in a significant fraction of interneurons, rather than widespread degeneration of interneurons. Nevertheless, a persistent decrease in interneuron activity, as evidenced by permanent down-regulation of GAD-67 in a major fraction of interneurons, would likely enhance the degree of hyperexcitability in the CA3

  13. Oxygen/glucose deprivation induces a reduction in synaptic AMPA receptors on hippocampal CA3 neurons mediated by mGluR1 and adenosine A3 receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis, Siobhan; Jaafari, Nadia; Cimarosti, Helena; Hanley, Jonathan G.; Henley, Jeremy M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2011-01-01

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are highly sensitive to ischemic damage, whereas neighboring CA3 pyramidal neurons are less susceptible. It is proposed that switching of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunits on CA1 neurons during an in vitro model of ischemia, oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD), leads to an enhanced permeability of AMPARs to Ca2+, resulting in delayed cell death. However, it is unclear whether the same mechanisms exist in CA3 neurons and whether this underlies the differential sensi...

  14. Oxygen/glucose Deprivation Induces a Reduction in Synaptic AMPA Receptors on Hippocampal CA3 Neurons Mediated by mGluR1 and A3 Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis, Siobhan H.; Jaafari, Nadia; Cimarosti, Helena; Hanley, Jonathan G.; Henley, Jeremy M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2011-01-01

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are highly sensitive to ischemic damage, whereas neighbouring CA3 pyramidal neurons are less susceptible. It is proposed that switching of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunits on CA1 neurons during an in vitro model of ischemia, oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD), leads to an enhanced permeability of AMPARs to Ca2+ resulting in delayed cell death. However, it is unclear if the same mechanisms exist in CA3 neurons and whether this underlies the differential sensitivit...

  15. Differential dendritic targeting of AMPA receptor subunit mRNAs in adult rat hippocampal principal neurons and interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, David J; Racca, Claudia

    2013-06-15

    In hippocampal neurons, AMPA receptors (AMPARs) mediate fast excitatory postsynaptic responses at glutamatergic synapses, and are involved in various forms of synaptic plasticity. Dendritic local protein synthesis of selected AMPAR subunit mRNAs is considered an additional mechanism to independently and rapidly control the strength of individual synapses. We have used fluorescent in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry to analyze the localization of AMPAR subunit (GluA1-4) mRNAs and their relationship with the translation machinery in principal cells and interneurons of the adult rat hippocampus. The mRNAs encoding all four AMPAR subunits were detected in the somata and dendrites of CA3 and CA1 pyramidal cells and those of six classes of CA1 γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons. GluA1-4 subunit mRNAs were highly localized to the apical dendrites of pyramidal cells, whereas in interneurons they were present in multiple dendrites. In contrast, in the dentate gyrus, GluA1-4 subunit mRNAs were virtually restricted to the somata and were absent from the dendrites of granule cells. These different regional and cell type-specific labeling patterns also correlated with the localization of markers for components of the protein synthesis machinery. Our results support the local translation of GluA1-4 mRNAs in dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal cells and CA1 interneurons but not in granule cells of the dentate gyrus. Furthermore, the regional and cell type-specific differences we observed suggest that each cell type uses distinct ways of regulating the local translation of AMPAR subunits.

  16. Regional differences in GABAergic modulation for TEA-induced synaptic plasticity in rat hippocampal CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Etsuko; Okada, Takashi

    2007-10-01

    Tetraethylammonium (TEA), a K(+)-channel blocker, reportedly induces long-term potentiation (LTP) of hippocampal CA1 synaptic responses, but at CA3 and the dentate gyrus (DG), the characteristics of TEA-induced plasticity and modulation by inhibitory interneurons remain unclear. This study recorded field EPSPs from CA1, CA3 and DG to examine the involvement of GABAergic modulation in TEA-induced synaptic plasticity for each region. In Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses and associational fiber (AF)-CA3 synapses, bath application of TEA-induced LTP in the presence and absence of picrotoxin (PTX), a GABA(A) receptor blocker, whereas TEA-induced LTP at mossy fiber (MF)-CA3 synapses was detected only in the absence of GABA(A) receptor blockers. MF-CA3 LTP showed sensitivity to Ni(2+), but not to nifedipine. In DG, synaptic plasticity was modulated by GABAergic inputs, but characteristics differed between the afferent lateral perforant path (LPP) and medial perforant path (MPP). LPP-DG synapses showed TEA-induced LTP during PTX application, whereas at MPP-DG synapses, TEA-induced long-term depression (LTD) was seen in the absence of PTX. This series of results demonstrates that TEA-induced DG and CA3 plasticity displays afferent specificity and is exposed to GABAergic modulation in an opposite manner.

  17. Neuropeptide Y and nestin expression in the hippocampal CA3 region following restrained and inverted stress in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guogang Sun; Ailing Li; Bo Chen; Guangbi Fan; Hongwen Xiao; Yue Chen; Jie Xu; Ye Nie; Bing Zhang; Lin Gong

    2011-01-01

    Our preliminary study demonstrated that neuropeptide Y (NPY)/nestin-positive cells exhibit a consistent spatial distribution in the hippocampus of normal adult rats. However, following severe acute and chronic stress-induced impaired learning and memory, synchronous decreased expression of nestin and NPY takes place in the hippocampus, and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, acute and chronic stress rat models were established using combined restrained and inverted stress. Results showed that learning and memory significantly decreased in acute and chronic stress rats. In addition, hippocampal cells were damaged, in particular in the acute stress rats, and nestin and NPY expression, as well as the number of NPY/nestin-positive cells in the CA3 region, significantly decreased. Furthermore, mature neurofilament 200-positive neurons were absent in the chronic stress rats. The NPY and cytoskeletal protein system equally contributed to stress-induced early learning and memory deficits, as well as sustained cerebral injury in the adult hippocampus.

  18. Structural and magnetic anomalies among the spin-chain compounds, Ca3Co1+Ir1-O6

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Rayaprol; Kausik Sengupta; E V Sampathkumaran

    2003-10-01

    The results of X-ray diffraction, and ac and dc magnetisation as a function of temperature are reported for a new class of spin-chain oxides, Ca3Co1+Ir1-O6. While the = 0.0, 0.3, 0.5 and 1.0 are found to form in the K4CdCl6-derived rhombhohedral (space group $\\bar{3}$) structure, the = 0.7 composition is found to undergo a monoclinic distortion in contrast to a literature report. Apparently, the change in the crystal symmetry with x manifests itself as a change in the sign of paramagnetic Curie temperature for this composition as though magnetic coupling sensitively depends on such crystallographic distortions. All the compositions exhibit spin-glass anomalies with an unusually large frequency dependence of the peak temperature in susceptibility in a temperature range below 50 K, interestingly obeying Vogel-Fulcher relationship even for the stoichiometric compounds.

  19. Neural stem cell activation and glial proliferation in the hippocampal CA3 region of posttraumatic epileptic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanxiang Lin; Kun Lin; Dezhi Kang; Feng Wang

    2011-01-01

    The present study observed the dynamic expression of CD133, nuclear factor-κB and glial fibrillary acidic protein in the hippocampal CA3 area of the experimental posttraumatic epilepsy rats to investigate whether gliosis occurs after posttraumatic epilepsy. CD133 and nuclear factor-κB expression was increased at 1 day after posttraumatic epilepsy, peaked at 7 days, and gradually decreased up to 14 days, as seen by double-immunohistochemical staining. Glial fibrillary acidic protein/nuclear factor-κB double-labeled cells increased with time and peaked at 14 days after posttraumatic epilepsy. Results show that activation of hippocampal neural stem cells and glial proliferation after posttraumatic epilepsy-induced oxidative stress increases hippocampal glial cell density.

  20. Size and receptor density of glutamatergic synapses: a viewpoint from left-right asymmetry of CA3-CA1 connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Shinohara

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity is considered to be the main mechanism for learning and memory. Excitatory synapses in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus undergo plastic changes during development and in response to electric stimulation. It is widely accepted that this process is mediated by insertion and elimination of various glutamate receptors. In a series of recent investigations on left-right asymmetry of hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses, glutamate receptor subunits have been found to have distinctive expression patterns that depend on the postsynaptic density (PSD area. Particularly notable are the GluR1 AMPA receptor subunit and NR2B NMDA receptor subunit, where receptor density has either a supra-linear (GluR1 AMPA or inverse (NR2B NMDAR relationship to the PSD area. We review current understanding of structural and physiological synaptic plasticity and propose a scheme to classify receptor subtypes by their expression pattern with respect to PSD area.

  1. Effects of Synthesis and Processing on the Thermoelectric Properties of Ca3Co4O9+δ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, NingYu; Holgate, Tim; Van Nong, Ngo

    . The thermoelectric performance improvement observed for the solid-state and sol-gel reactions suggests that the particle sizes may be a predominant key parameter of the Ca3Co4O9+δ thermoelectric properties. Smaller particle size (500 nm) as produced in this study by sol-gel synthesis method with optimal SPS process......, phase purity and thermoelectric properties. With the identical optimal SPS process, the power factor of about 400 µW/m•K2 and 465 µW/m•K2 (at 800 °C) is measured from samples produced by solid-state and sol-gel reactions respectively, both of these values are higher than the value reported so far...

  2. Complex network analysis of CA3 transcriptome reveals pathogenic and compensatory pathways in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Yumi Bando

    Full Text Available We previously described - studying transcriptional signatures of hippocampal CA3 explants - that febrile (FS and afebrile (NFS forms of refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy constitute two distinct genomic phenotypes. That network analysis was based on a limited number (hundreds of differentially expressed genes (DE networks among a large set of valid transcripts (close to two tens of thousands. Here we developed a methodology for complex network visualization (3D and analysis that allows the categorization of network nodes according to distinct hierarchical levels of gene-gene connections (node degree and of interconnection between node neighbors (concentric node degree. Hubs are highly connected nodes, VIPs have low node degree but connect only with hubs, and high-hubs have VIP status and high overall number of connections. Studying the whole set of CA3 valid transcripts we: i obtained complete transcriptional networks (CO for FS and NFS phenotypic groups; ii examined how CO and DE networks are related; iii characterized genomic and molecular mechanisms underlying FS and NFS phenotypes, identifying potential novel targets for therapeutic interventions. We found that: i DE hubs and VIPs are evenly distributed inside the CO networks; ii most DE hubs and VIPs are related to synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability whereas most CO hubs, VIPs and high hubs are related to neuronal differentiation, homeostasis and neuroprotection, indicating compensatory mechanisms. Complex network visualization and analysis is a useful tool for systems biology approaches to multifactorial diseases. Network centrality observed for hubs, VIPs and high hubs of CO networks, is consistent with the network disease model, where a group of nodes whose perturbation leads to a disease phenotype occupies a central position in the network. Conceivably, the chance for exerting therapeutic effects through the modulation of particular genes will be higher if these genes

  3. Characterizing the persistent CA3 interneuronal spiking activity in elevated extracellular potassium in the young rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Damian Seung-Ho; Yu, Wilson; Fawcett, Adrian; Carlen, Peter Louis

    2010-05-17

    Seizures coincide with an increase in extracellular potassium concentrations [K(+)](e) yet little information is available regarding this phenomenon on the firing pattern, frequency and neuronal properties of inhibitory neurons responsible for modulating network excitability. Therefore, we investigated the effects of elevating [K(+)](e) from 2.5 to 12.5mM on CA3 rat hippocampal interneurons in vitro using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. We found that the majority of interneurons (21/25) in artificial cerebral spinal fluid (aCSF) exhibited spontaneous tonic spiking activity. As the [K(+)](e) increased to 12.5mM, interneurons exhibited a tonic, irregular, burst firing activity, or a combination of these. The input resistance decreased significantly to 59+/-18% at 7.5mM K(+) and did not further change at higher [K(+)](e) while the amount of K(+)-induced depolarization significantly increased from 5 to 12.5mM K(+) perfusion; a depolarization block occurred in 4 of the 12 interneurons at 12.5mM. Also, as [K(+)](e) increased, a transition from lower (1.3+/-0.6Hz) to higher dominant peak frequency (15.0+/-5.0Hz) was observed. We found that non-fast spiking (NFS) interneurons represented the majority of cells recorded and exhibited mostly tonic firing activity in raised K(+). Fast spiking (FS) interneurons predominately had a tonic firing pattern with very few exhibiting bursting activity in elevated K(+). In conclusion, we report that raised [K(+)](e) in amounts observed during seizures increases hippocampal CA3 interneuronal activity and suggests that a loss or impairment of inhibitory function may be present during these events.

  4. Transition to seizure: ictal discharge is preceded by exhausted presynaptic GABA release in the hippocampal CA3 region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang J; Koifman, Julius; Shin, Damian S; Ye, Hui; Florez, Carlos M; Zhang, Liang; Valiante, Taufik A; Carlen, Peter L

    2012-02-15

    How the brain transitions into a seizure is poorly understood. Recurrent seizure-like events (SLEs) in low-Mg2+/ high-K+ perfusate were measured in the CA3 region of the intact mouse hippocampus. The SLE was divided into a "preictal phase," which abruptly turns into a higher frequency "ictal" phase. Blockade of GABA(A) receptors shortened the preictal phase, abolished interictal bursts, and attenuated the slow preictal depolarization, with no effect on the ictal duration, whereas SLEs were blocked by glutamate receptor blockade. In CA3 pyramidal cells and stratum oriens non-fast-spiking and fast-spiking interneurons, recurrent GABAergic IPSCs predominated interictally and during the early preictal phase, synchronous with extracellularly measured recurrent field potentials (FPs). These IPSCs then decreased to zero or reversed polarity by the onset of the higher-frequency ictus. However, postsynaptic muscimol-evoked GABA(A) responses remained intact. Simultaneously, EPSCs synchronous with the FPs markedly increased to a maximum at the ictal onset. The reversal potential of the compound postsynaptic currents (combined simultaneous EPSCs and IPSCs) became markedly depolarized during the preictal phase, whereas the muscimol-evoked GABA(A) reversal potential remained unchanged. During the late preictal phase, interneuronal excitability was high, but IPSCs, evoked by local stimulation, or osmotically by hypertonic sucrose application, were diminished, disappearing at the ictal onset. We conclude that the interictal and early preictal states are dominated by GABAergic activity, with the onset of the ictus heralded by exhaustion of presynaptic release of GABA, and unopposed increased glutamatergic responses.

  5. Expression of PER, CRY, and TIM genes for the pathological features of colorectal cancer patients [Retraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Wang Y, Cheng YS, Yu G, et al. Expression of PER, CRY, and TIM genes for the pathological features of colorectal cancer patients. OncoTargets and Therapy. 2016;9:1997–2005.Concerns about this paper were raised by a reader. Upon seeking an explanation from the authors we conclude that the content and data in the paper were extensively plagiarized from:Mazzocoli G, Panza A, Valvano MR, et al. Clock Gene Expression Levels and Relationship with Clinical and Pathological Features in Colorectal Cancer Patients. Chronobiology International. 2011;28(10:841–851.Dr Faris Farassati has decided that the paper in OncoTargets and Therapy should be retracted, and the relevant supervisors at the authors institutions are advised of this decision.This Retraction relates to this article   

  6. RETRACTED: Complexity of Generating Multi-collisions for MD4 and MD5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wei; Liu, Yang; Pan, Lei

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal. This article has been retracted at the request of the publisher. The authors have plagiarized a paper that had already appeared on http://www.thi.uni-hannover.de/fileadmin/forschung/arbeiten/knopf-sa.pdf. One of the conditions of submission of a paper for publication is that authors declare explicitly that their work is original and has not appeared in a publication elsewhere. Re-use of any data should be appropriately cited. As such this article represents a severe abuse of the scientific publishing system. The scientific community takes a very strong view on this matter and apologies are offered to readers of the journal that this was not detected during the submission process.

  7. RETRACTED: On a general class of regular rotating black holes based on a smeared mass distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larranaga, Alexis; Cardenas-Avendano, Alejandro; Torres, Daniel Alexdy

    2015-04-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal (http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy). This article has been retracted at the request of the Editor-in-Chief. The authors have plagiarized part of a paper that had already appeared in Adv. High Energy Physics, P. Nicolini, A. Orlandi, E. Spallucci, The Final Stage of Gravitationally Collapsed Thick Matter Layers, Vol 2013 (2013), Article ID 812084 http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/812084. One of the conditions of submission of a paper for publication is that authors declare explicitly that their work is original and has not appeared in a publication elsewhere. Re-use of any data should be appropriately cited. As such this article represents a severe abuse of the scientific publishing system. The scientific community takes a very strong view on this matter and apologies are offered to readers of the journal that this was not detected during the submission process.

  8. Retracted: Postoperative pain after irrigation with Vibringe versus a conventional needle: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgili, D; Yilmaz, S; Dumani, A; Yoldas, O

    2016-08-01

    The following article from International Endodontic Journal, 'Postoperative pain after irrigation with Vibringe versus a conventional needle: a randomized controlled trial' by D. Bilgili, S. Yilmaz, A. Dumani & O. Yoldas, published online on 29 February 2016 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the Journal Editor in Chief, Prof. Paul Dummer, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The retraction has been agreed because the corresponding author did not contact the first author who carried out the work before alterations to the article were made prior to submission. This damages the integrity of the work and there are additional concerns over the number of patients and the accuracy of the results and conclusions.

  9. RETRACTED: Effect of F- ions on spectroscopic properties of Yb3+-doped zinc tellurite glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guonian; Zhang, Junjie; Dai, Shixun; Yang, Jianhu; Jiang, Zhonghong

    2005-06-01

    This article has been retracted at the request of the Editors, after a reader brought the following to their attention. Reason: The article substantially reproduces parts of articles published by the same authors in the Journal of Luminescence (“Effect of F- ions on physical and spectroscopic properties of Yb3+-doped TeO2 glasses”, Volume 113, Issues 1-2, Pages 27-32) and the Journal of Alloys and Compounds (“Fluorescence lifetime increase by introduction of F- ions in ytterbium-doped TeO2-based glasses”, Volume 393, Issues 1-2, Pages 279-282). There was also a failure to cite either of these articles. These other articles have also been retracted. This action has been agreed by the Editors of the three journals.

  10. 不同排龈药物的排龈效果观察%The retractive effects of different gingival retraction agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯云枝; 曾晓华

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the retractive effects of different gingival retraction agents. Methods Thirty subjects with healthy gingival conditions were recruited to the trial, and the buccal gingival sulcns of the hibateral first max-illary premolars of each subject (n=60) were treated randomly with one of the six agents-Group A was tetrahydrozoline hydrochloride, Group B was oxymetazoline hydrochloride, Group C was epinephrine hydrochlorid, Group D was AlCl3, Group E was Fe2 (S04)3, and Group F was normal saline as control. Both pre-treated and post-treated accurate impressions of buccal gingival sulcus of the experimental teeth were made, so were the anhydrite casts. The casts of experimental teeth were sectioned into 2 mm slices bucco-lingually at the buccal eminence. Then the width of the sulcus was measured as the distance from the tooth to the crest of the gingival under a low-power microscope to compare the effect of these giagival retraction agents. Results The width of gingival sulcus became larger after the treatment in all groups(P<0.05). Either Group A or Group B had greater gingival retraction effects than Group C and Group F (P<0.05). Except Group F, both Group D and Group E had no significant differences from the other groups (P>0.05). There was no statistically signification between Group D and Group E (P>0.05), neither was there any statistically significance between Group A and Group B (P>0.05). Conclusion Tetrahydrozoline manifested excellent effect of gingival retraction.%目的 观察不同排龈药物的排龈效果.方法选择30例志愿者的双侧上颌第一前磨牙(共60颗)作为研究牙齿,随机分成A~F共6组,分别使用含不同排龈药物的排龈线进行颊侧排龈处理.A组为盐酸四氢唑啉,B组为盐酸羟甲唑啉组,C组为盐酸肾上腺素,D组为氯化铝,E组为硫酸铁,F组为生理盐水.于排龈前后分别精确取模,获得排龈牙颊侧龈沟的清晰印模,在硬石膏模型上沿牙冠长轴

  11. Results of Surgery in Patients with type 1 Duane’s Retraction Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seren Pehlivanoğlu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the results of surgery techniques used in Duane’s retraction syndrome (DRS type 1. Material and Method: 194 DRS cases followed in the department of strabismus were retrospectively investigated. We assessed 58 cases operated for esotropic DRS type 1 in terms of pre- and post-operative deviations in primary position, abnormal head posture (AHP, abduction deficiency, globe retraction, and up-down shoot. The cases were divided into 3 groups according to the surgical technique applied. The mean follow-up period was 22.4±4.6 (1-13 years months. Results: The cases in group 1 had undergone uni- or bilateral medial rectus (MR recession, and the postoperative 1stmonth improvement rates for distance deviation, near deviation and AHP were 68.6%, 73.9% and 50%, respectively. These rates were 69.3%, 64.7% and 57.1%, respectively in group 2 which consisted of eyes that had undergone vertical rectus muscle transposition (VRT surgery. In group 3, in which we had performed Y-split (with or without LR/MR recession surgery, the improvement rates for distance and near deviation were 63.6% and 63.9%, and 50% was determined for AHP. The improvement in globe retraction was 60% in group 1 and 66.6% in group 3. Discussion: Medial rectus muscle recession was more effective for correction of deviation and AHP in cases of DRS type 1. VRT was found to be more effective surgical option in abduction deficiency. Y-split surgery has an important place in eliminating globe retraction and up/down shoot. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2011; 41: 156-63

  12. "Demographic faultlines: A meta-analysis of the literature": Retraction of Thatcher and Patel (2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Reports the retraction of "Demographic faultlines: A meta-analysis of the literature" by Sherry M. B. Thatcher and Pankaj C. Patel (, 2011[Nov], Vol 96[6], 1119-1139). At the request of the editor and in consultation with the American Psychological Association, the article is being retracted. This action is a result of a review by the editor and two additional experts that determined that there are significant errors in Tables 1, 2, and 3 which may affect the overall conclusions of the article. Co-author Pankaj C. Patel led the analysis, and both authors acknowledge that inaccuracies were made. The retraction of this article does not preclude resubmission of a new article that addresses the issues noted in the retraction. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record .) We propose and test a theoretical model focusing on antecedents and consequences of demographic faultlines. We also posit contingencies that affect overall team dynamics in the context of demographic faultlines, such as the study setting and performance measurement. Using meta-analysis structural equation modeling with a final data set consisting of 311 data points (i.e., [predictor-criterion relationships]), from 39 studies that were obtained from 36 papers with a total sample size of 24,388 individuals in 4,366 teams, we found that sex and racial diversity increased demographic faultline strength more than did diversity on the attributes of functional background, educational background, age, and tenure. Demographic faultline strength was found to increase task and relationship conflict as well as decrease team cohesion. Furthermore, although demographic faultline strength decreased both team satisfaction and team performance, there was a stronger decrease in team performance than in team satisfaction. The strength of these relationships increased when the study was conducted in the lab rather than in the field. We describe the theoretical and practical implications of these

  13. Retraction pattern of delaminated rotator cuff tears: dual-layer rotator cuff repair

    OpenAIRE

    Cha, Sang-Won; Lee, Choon-Key; Sugaya, Hiroyuki; Kim, Taegyun; Lee, Su-Chan

    2016-01-01

    Background There has been no report to date regarding retraction patterns of delaminated rotator cuff tears. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence and tearing patterns of delamination and repair integrity after the dual-layer repair of delaminated cuff tears. Methods/design A consecutive series of 64 patients with posterosuperior rotator cuff tears underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair from August 2011 to September 2012. Among the patients, 53 who received either dual-l...

  14. H\\"{o}lder continuous retractions and amenable semigroups of uniformly Lipschitzian mappings in Hilbert spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Wiśnicki, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Suppose that S is a left amenable semitopological semigroup. We prove that if $\\{T_{t}: t \\in S \\}$ is a uniformly k-Lipschitzian semigroup on a bounded closed and convex subset C of a Hilbert space and $k<\\sqrt{2}$, then the set of fixed points of this semigroup is a H\\"{o}lder continuous retract of C. This gives a qualitative complement to the Ishihara-Takahashi fixed point existence theorem.

  15. Kinematic analysis of the lower cervical spine in the protracted and retracted neck flexion positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Hyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to analyze lower cervical spine kinematics in protracted and retracted neck flexion positions in healthy people. [Subjects and Methods] The craniovertebral angle (CVA) and intervertebral body angles of the lower cervical spine of 10 healthy individuals were analyzed using fluoroscopy in a neutral sitting with the head in the neutral (N), protracted (Pro), and retracted (Ret) positions and with the neck in full flexion with the head in the neutral (N-fx), protracted (Pro-fx), and retracted (Ret-fx) positions. [Results] There were significant differences in the CVA and intervertebral body angle at the C3-4 level, and the Ret position showed the highest values followed by the N and Pro positions. Regarding the intervertebral body angle at the C4-5 level, the Pro position showed a higher value than the N and Ret positions. At the C6-7 level, the Pro position showed the lowest value compared with the N and Ret positions. In the CVA, the Ret-fx position showed a higher value than the N-fx and Ret-fx positions. [Conclusion] The results suggest that in the neutral sitting position, protraction is an ineffective posture due to overstress of the C6-7 segment, which is placed in a hyperflexed position at this level. Instead, retraction is the recommend posture for the patient with C6-7 degeneration, which makes for a more flexed position in the upper cervical spine and a less flexed position in the lower cervical spine.

  16. RETRACTION (G' / G)-expansion method equivalent to the extended tanh-function method

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Wakil, S. A.; Abdou, M. A.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Hendi, A.; Abdelwahed, H. G.

    2010-10-01

    This paper has been formally retracted on ethical grounds due to the similarity in content, presentation and style to another article published by Liu Chun-Ping in the journal Communications in Theoretical Physics (Chun-Ping 2009 Commun. Theor. Phys. 51 985). It is unfortunate that this was not detected before going to press. Our thanks go to the original author for bringing this fact to our attention. Corrections were made to this article on 22 October 2010.

  17. Hounsfield Unit Change in Root and Alveolar Bone during Canine Retraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Feifei; Liu, Sean Y.; Xia, Zeyang; Li, Shuning; Chen, Jie; Kula, Katherine S.; Eckert, George

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the Hounsfield unit (HU) changes in the alveolar bone and root surface during controlled canine retractions. Methods Eighteen maxillary canine retraction patients were selected for this split mouth design clinical trial. The canines in each patient were randomly assigned to receive either translation or controlled tipping treatment strategy. Pre- and post-treatment cone beam computed tomography scans of each patient were used to determine tooth movement direction and HU changes. The alveolar bone and root surface were divided into 108 divisions, respectively. The HU in each division was measured. The Mixed-model ANOVA was applied to test the HU change distribution at the p<0.05 significant level. Results The HU changes varied with the directions relative to the canine movement. The HU reduction occurred at the root surface. Larger reductions occurred in the divisions that were perpendicular to the moving direction. However, HU decreased in the alveolar bone in the moving direction. The highest HU reduction was at the coronal level. Conclusions HU reduction occurs on the root surface in the direction perpendicular to the tooth movement and in the alveolar bone in the direction of tooth movement when a canine is retracted. PMID:25836004

  18. Comparison of temporary anchorage devices and transpalatal arch-mediated anchorage reinforcement during canine retraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecik, Defne

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the dental and skeletal effects of canine retraction using conventional anchorage reinforcement systems and comparing them with the usage of TADs. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of 50 patients having Class I malocclusions with bimaxillary protrusion indicated for first premolar extraction, and allocated into two groups. The first group consisted of 25 patients with a mean age of 18,7 years (min:14, max:22 years, 16 girls and 9 boys) that TADs were applied as an anchorage mechanic between attached gingiva of upper second premolar and first molar teeth. The second group consisted of 25 patients with a mean age of 19,4 years (min:15, max:23 years, 14 girls and 11 boys) that conventional molar anchorage with Transpalatal arch (TPA) was applied for the anchorage mechanics against canine retraction. Results: The results showed that mean mesial movement and the tipping of the first molars in TAD group between T0 - T1 were insignificant (P > 0,05), however in the TPA group were significant (P0,05). Conclusion: Although TPA is a useful appliance, it doesn't provide an effective anchorage control on anteroposterior movement maxillary first molar teeth concerning first premolar extraction treatment. TADs are more convenient to provide absolute anchorage during maxillary canine retraction in contrast to transpalatal arch. PMID:28042267

  19. Effects of intrusion combined with anterior retraction on apical root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Décio Rodrigues; Tibola, Douglas; Janson, Guilherme; Maria, Fábio Rogério Torres

    2012-04-01

    This study evaluated the influence of intrusion mechanics combined with anterior retraction on root resorption of the maxillary incisors. A sample of 56 patients was divided into two groups: group 1 comprised 28 patients (12 females and 16 males), presenting with an increased overjet and deep overbite (6.48 and 4.78 mm, respectively) treated with reverse curve of Spee intrusion mechanics and group 2 comprised 28 patients (12 females and 16 males) with an increased overjet of 5.67 mm and a normal overbite of 1.12 mm. The initial mean ages for groups 1 and 2 were 13.41 and 13.27 years, respectively. Pre- (T1) and post- (T2) treatment periapical radiographs were used to evaluate root resorption. The groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Correlation between root resorption and tooth movement was investigated with Spearman's correlation coefficient. The subjects in group 1 had statistically greater root resorption (P resorption (r = 0.324 and r = 0.320, respectively). The combination of anterior retraction with intrusive mechanics causes more root resorption than anterior retraction of the maxillary incisors alone.

  20. Intraluminal magnetisation of bowel by ferromagnetic particles for retraction and manipulation by magnetic probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z; André, P; McLean, D; Brown, S I; Florence, G J; Cuschieri, A

    2014-11-01

    Feasibility studies are needed to demonstrate that safe and effective manipulation of bowel during Minimal Access Surgery (MAS) can be obtained by use of magnetic force. This paper characterises two classes of magnetic particles: stainless steel microparticles (SS-μPs) and iron oxide nanoparticles (IO-nPs) in terms of their magnetisation, chemical composition, crystallinity, morphology and size distribution. Both magnetic particles were dispersed in a high viscosity biological liquid for intraluminal injection of bowel. Ex vivo porcine bowel segments were then retracted by permanent magnetic probes of 5.0 and 10mm diameter. Strong retraction forces reaching 6N maximum were obtained by magnetic fluid based on dispersion of SS-μPs. In contrast, the IO-nP-based magnetic liquid generated less attraction force, due to both lower magnetic and solution properties of the IO-nPs. The comparison of the two particles allowed the identification of the rules to engineer the next generation of particles. The results with SS-μPs provide proof on concept that intraluminal injection of magnetic fluid can generate sufficient force for efficient bowel retraction. Thereafter we shall carry out in vivo animal studies for efficacy and safety of both types of ferrofluids.

  1. Recrystallization phenomena of solution grown paraffin dendrites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, F.F.A.; Stasse, O.; Suchtelen, van J.; Enckevort, van W.J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Paraffin crystals were grown from decane solutions using a micro-Bridgman set up for in-situ observation of the morphology at the growth front. It is shown that for large imposed velocities, dendrites are obtained. After dendritic growth, aging or recrystallization processes set in rather quickly, c

  2. A Case of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Köpeczi Judit Beáta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukemia is a rare subtype of acute leukemia, which has recently been established as a distinct pathologic entity that typically follows a highly aggressive clinical course in adults. The aim of this report is to present a case of plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukemia due to its rarity and difficulty to recognize and diagnose it.

  3. To evaluate the use of modified power arm [Discopender 468] for efficient anterior teeth retraction - A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemavathi Patil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many new bracket prescriptions and Techniques have been developed and modified as treatment mechanics progress to create force system that can work efficiently and shorten the orthodontic treatment period. Aim of this study was to evaluate the use of modified power arm [Discopender 468] for efficient anterior Teeth retraction, to determine anchorage loss and upper incisor changes after space closure. Material & Method: Ten patients of class II division1were selected to need maxillary first premolars was extracted and the retraction of anterior teeth was carried out segmentally by using discopender468 which applies variable force with respect to height of power arm. To prevent anchor loss during anterior retraction we have placed the mini implant screw mesial to 1stmolar bilaterally in maxillary arch. Pre and post lateral cephalograms were taken to determine the anchorage loss and upper incisor changes. Result and Conclusion: Anterior retraction carried out by a new design of discopender 468 and minim plant brings out controlled bodily tooth movement and also has variable force vectors, which is one of the variable method to use for retraction in Straight Wire Appliance in day to day orthodontic practices and also has advantage over conventional retraction mechanics.

  4. The Vibrio cholerae Minor Pilin TcpB Initiates Assembly and Retraction of the Toxin-Coregulated Pilus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harn, Tony; Spielman, Ingrid; Gao, Yang; Kovacikova, Gabriela; Biais, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Type IV pilus (T4P) systems are complex molecular machines that polymerize major pilin proteins into thin filaments displayed on bacterial surfaces. Pilus functions require rapid extension and depolymerization of the pilus, powered by the assembly and retraction ATPases, respectively. A set of low abundance minor pilins influences pilus dynamics by unknown mechanisms. The Vibrio cholerae toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) is among the simplest of the T4P systems, having a single minor pilin TcpB and lacking a retraction ATPase. Here we show that TcpB, like its homolog CofB, initiates pilus assembly. TcpB co-localizes with the pili but at extremely low levels, equivalent to one subunit per pilus. We used a micropillars assay to demonstrate that TCP are retractile despite the absence of a retraction ATPase, and that retraction relies on TcpB, as a V. cholerae tcpB Glu5Val mutant is fully piliated but does not induce micropillars movements. This mutant is impaired in TCP-mediated autoagglutination and TcpF secretion, consistent with retraction being required for these functions. We propose that TcpB initiates pilus retraction by incorporating into the growing pilus in a Glu5-dependent manner, which stalls assembly and triggers processive disassembly. These results provide a framework for understanding filament dynamics in more complex T4P systems and the closely related Type II secretion system. PMID:27992883

  5. Transition between fast and slow gamma modes in rat hippocampus area CA1 in vitro is modulated by slow CA3 gamma oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietersen, Alexander N J; Ward, Peter D; Hagger-Vaughan, Nicholas; Wiggins, James; Jefferys, John G R; Vreugdenhil, Martin

    2014-02-15

    Hippocampal gamma oscillations have been associated with cognitive functions including navigation and memory encoding/retrieval. Gamma oscillations in area CA1 are thought to depend on the oscillatory drive from CA3 (slow gamma) or the entorhinal cortex (fast gamma). Here we show that the local CA1 network can generate its own fast gamma that can be suppressed by slow gamma-paced inputs from CA3. Moderate acetylcholine receptor activation induces fast (45 ± 1 Hz) gamma in rat CA1 minislices and slow (33 ± 1 Hz) gamma in CA3 minislices in vitro. Using pharmacological tools, current-source density analysis and intracellular recordings from pyramidal cells and fast-spiking stratum pyramidale interneurons, we demonstrate that fast gamma in CA1 is of the pyramidal-interneuron network gamma (PING) type, with the firing of principal cells paced by recurrent perisomal IPSCs. The oscillation frequency was only weakly dependent on IPSC amplitude, and decreased to that of CA3 slow gamma by reducing IPSC decay rate or reducing interneuron activation through tonic inhibition of interneurons. Fast gamma in CA1 was replaced by slow CA3-driven gamma in unlesioned slices, which could be mimicked in CA1 minislices by sub-threshold 35 Hz Schaffer collateral stimulation that activated fast-spiking interneurons but hyperpolarised pyramidal cells, suggesting that slow gamma frequency CA3 outputs can suppress the CA1 fast gamma-generating network by feed-forward inhibition and replaces it with a slower gamma oscillation driven by feed-forward inhibition. The transition between the two gamma oscillation modes in CA1 might allow it to alternate between effective communication with the medial entorhinal cortex and CA3, which have different roles in encoding and recall of memory.

  6. Effect of acetylcholine receptors on the pain-related electrical activities in the hippocampal CA3 region of morphine-addicted rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Zeng Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:To determine the effect of acetylcholine (ACh, pilocarpine, and atropine on pain evoked responses of pain excited neurons (PEN and pain inhibited neurons (PIN in hippocampal CA3 region of morphine addicted rats. Materials and Methods:Female Wistar rats, weighing between 230-260 g were used in this study. Morphine addicted rats were generated by subcutaneous injection of increasing concentrations of morphine hydrochloride for six days. Trains of electrical impulses applied to the sciatic nerve were used as noxious stimulation and the evoked electrical activities of PEN or PIN in hippocampal CA3 area were recorded using extracellular electrophysiological recording techniques in hippocampal slices. The effect of acetylcholine receptor stimulation byACh, the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine, and the muscarinic antagonist atropine on the pain evoked responses of pain related electrical activities was analyzed in hippocampal CA3 area of morphine addicted rats. Results:Intra-CA3 microinjection of ACh (2 μg/1 μl or pilocarpine (2 μg/1 μl decreased the discharge frequency and prolonged the firing latency of PEN, but increased the discharge frequency and shortened the firing inhibitory duration (ID of PIN. The intra-CA3 administration of atropine (0.5 μg/1 μl produced opposite effect. The peak activity of cholinergic modulators was 2 to 4 min later in morphine addicted rats compared to peak activity previously observed in normal rats. Conclusion: ACh dependent modulation of noxious stimulation exists in hippocampal CA3 area of morphine addicted rats. Morphine treatment may shift the sensitivity of pain related neurons towards a delayed response to muscarinergic neurotransmission in hippocampal CA3 region.

  7. Numerical simulation of facet dendrite growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhi; CHEN Chang-le; HAO Li-mei

    2008-01-01

    Numerical simulation based on phase field method was performed to describe the solidification of silicon. The effect of anisotropy, undercooling and coupling parameter on dendrite growth shape was investigated. It is indicated that the entire facet dendrite shapes are obtained by using regularized phase field model. Steady state tip velocity of dendrite drives to a fixed value when γ≤0.13. With further increasing the anisotropy value, steady state tip velocity decreases and the size is smaller. With the increase in the undercooling and coupling parameter, crystal grows from facet to facet dendrite. In addition, with increasing coupling parameter, the facet part of facet dendrite decreases gradually, which is in good agreement with Wulff theory.

  8. Early events in axon/dendrite polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pei-lin; Poo, Mu-ming

    2012-01-01

    Differentiation of axons and dendrites is a critical step in neuronal development. Here we review the evidence that axon/dendrite formation during neuronal polarization depends on the intrinsic cytoplasmic asymmetry inherited by the postmitotic neuron, the exposure of the neuron to extracellular chemical factors, and the action of anisotropic mechanical forces imposed by the environment. To better delineate the functions of early signals among a myriad of cellular components that were shown to influence axon/dendrite formation, we discuss their functions by distinguishing their roles as determinants, mediators, or modulators and consider selective degradation of these components as a potential mechanism for axon/dendrite polarization. Finally, we examine whether these early events of axon/dendrite formation involve local autocatalytic activation and long-range inhibition, as postulated by Alan Turing for the morphogenesis of patterned biological structure.

  9. Essential role for vav Guanine nucleotide exchange factors in brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced dendritic spine growth and synapse plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Carly F; Dietz, Karen C; Varela, Juan A; Wood, Cody B; Zirlin, Benjamin C; Leverich, Leah S; Greene, Robert W; Cowan, Christopher W

    2011-08-31

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its cognate receptor, TrkB, regulate a wide range of cellular processes, including dendritic spine formation and functional synapse plasticity. However, the signaling mechanisms that link BDNF-activated TrkB to F-actin remodeling enzymes and dendritic spine morphological plasticity remain poorly understood. We report here that BDNF/TrkB signaling in neurons activates the Vav family of Rac/RhoA guanine nucleotide exchange factors through a novel TrkB-dependent mechanism. We find that Vav is required for BDNF-stimulated Rac-GTP production in cortical and hippocampal neurons. Vav is partially enriched at excitatory synapses in the postnatal hippocampus but does not appear to be required for normal dendritic spine density. Rather, we observe significant reductions in both BDNF-induced, rapid, dendritic spine head growth and in CA3-CA1 theta burst-stimulated long-term potentiation in Vav-deficient mouse hippocampal slices, suggesting that Vav-dependent regulation of dendritic spine morphological plasticity facilitates normal functional synapse plasticity.

  10. Chronic stress alters the dendritic morphology of callosal neurons and the acute glutamate stress response in the rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczynski, Pauline; Moquin, Luc; Gratton, Alain

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that interhemispheric regulation of medial prefrontal cortex (PFC)-mediated stress responses is subserved by glutamate (GLU)- containing callosal neurons. Evidence of chronic stress-induced dendritic and spine atrophy among PFC pyramidal neurons led us to examine how chronic restraint stress (CRS) might alter the apical dendritic morphology of callosal neurons and the acute GLU stress responses in the left versus right PFC. Morphometric analyses of retrogradely labeled, dye-filled PFC callosal neurons revealed hemisphere-specific CRS-induced dendritic retraction; whereas significant dendritic atrophy occurred primarily within the distal arbor of left PFC neurons, it was observed within both the proximal and distal arbor of right PFC neurons. Overall, CRS also significantly reduced spine densities in both hemispheres with the greatest loss occurring among left PFC neurons, mostly at the distal extent of the arbor. While much of the overall decrease in dendritic spine density was accounted by the loss of thin spines, the density of mushroom-shaped spines, despite being fewer in number, was halved. Using microdialysis we found that, compared to controls, basal PFC GLU levels were significantly reduced in both hemispheres of CRS animals and that their GLU response to 30 min of tail-pinch stress was significantly prolonged in the left, but not the right PFC. Together, these findings show that a history of chronic stress alters the dendritic morphology and spine density of PFC callosal neurons and suggest a mechanism by which this might disrupt the interhemispheric regulation of PFC-mediated responses to subsequent stressors.

  11. Reduced hippocampal dendritic spine density and BDNF expression following acute postnatal exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl phthalate in male Long Evans rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Smith

    Full Text Available Early developmental exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP has been linked to a variety of neurodevelopmental changes, particularly in rodents. The primary goal of this work was to establish whether acute postnatal exposure to a low dose of DEHP would alter hippocampal dendritic morphology and BDNF and caspase-3 mRNA expression in male and female Long Evans rats. Treatment with DEHP in male rats led to a reduction in spine density on basal and apical dendrites of neurons in the CA3 dorsal hippocampal region compared to vehicle-treated male controls. Dorsal hippocampal BDNF mRNA expression was also down-regulated in male rats exposed to DEHP. No differences in hippocampal spine density or BDNF mRNA expression were observed in female rats treated with DEHP compared to controls. DEHP treatment did not affect hippocampal caspase-3 mRNA expression in male or female rats. These results suggest a gender-specific vulnerability to early developmental DEHP exposure in male rats whereby postnatal DEHP exposure may interfere with normal synaptogenesis and connectivity in the hippocampus. Decreased expression of BDNF mRNA may represent a molecular mechanism underlying the reduction in dendritic spine density observed in hippocampal CA3 neurons. These findings provide initial evidence for a link between developmental exposure to DEHP, reduced levels of BDNF and hippocampal atrophy in male rats.

  12. Reduced hippocampal dendritic spine density and BDNF expression following acute postnatal exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate in male Long Evans rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Catherine A; Holahan, Matthew R

    2014-01-01

    Early developmental exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) has been linked to a variety of neurodevelopmental changes, particularly in rodents. The primary goal of this work was to establish whether acute postnatal exposure to a low dose of DEHP would alter hippocampal dendritic morphology and BDNF and caspase-3 mRNA expression in male and female Long Evans rats. Treatment with DEHP in male rats led to a reduction in spine density on basal and apical dendrites of neurons in the CA3 dorsal hippocampal region compared to vehicle-treated male controls. Dorsal hippocampal BDNF mRNA expression was also down-regulated in male rats exposed to DEHP. No differences in hippocampal spine density or BDNF mRNA expression were observed in female rats treated with DEHP compared to controls. DEHP treatment did not affect hippocampal caspase-3 mRNA expression in male or female rats. These results suggest a gender-specific vulnerability to early developmental DEHP exposure in male rats whereby postnatal DEHP exposure may interfere with normal synaptogenesis and connectivity in the hippocampus. Decreased expression of BDNF mRNA may represent a molecular mechanism underlying the reduction in dendritic spine density observed in hippocampal CA3 neurons. These findings provide initial evidence for a link between developmental exposure to DEHP, reduced levels of BDNF and hippocampal atrophy in male rats.

  13. Electroconvulsive stimulations prevent stress-induced morphological changes in the hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hageman, I; Nielsen, M; Wörtwein, Gitta;

    2008-01-01

    pathophysiological events contribute to the shrinkage phenomenon. Animal studies have shown that various stress paradigms can induce dendritic retraction in the CA3 pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. Since electroconvulsive treatment is the most effective treatment in humans with major depression, we investigated...

  14. Stress and trauma: BDNF control of dendritic-spine formation and regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, M R; Lagopoulos, J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic restraint stress leads to increases in brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein in some regions of the brain, e.g. the basal lateral amygdala (BLA) but decreases in other regions such as the CA3 region of the hippocampus and dendritic spine density increases or decreases in line with these changes in BDNF. Given the powerful influence that BDNF has on dendritic spine growth, these observations suggest that the fundamental reason for the direction and extent of changes in dendritic spine density in a particular region of the brain under stress is due to the changes in BDNF there. The most likely cause of these changes is provided by the stress initiated release of steroids, which readily enter neurons and alter gene expression, for example that of BDNF. Of particular interest is how glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids tend to have opposite effects on BDNF gene expression offering the possibility that differences in the distribution of their receptors and of their downstream effects might provide a basis for the differential transcription of the BDNF genes. Alternatively, differences in the extent of methylation and acetylation in the epigenetic control of BDNF transcription are possible in different parts of the brain following stress. Although present evidence points to changes in BDNF transcription being the major causal agent for the changes in spine density in different parts of the brain following stress, steroids have significant effects on downstream pathways from the TrkB receptor once it is acted upon by BDNF, including those that modulate the density of dendritic spines. Finally, although glucocorticoids play a canonical role in determining BDNF modulation of dendritic spines, recent studies have shown a role for corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) in this regard. There is considerable improvement in the extent of changes in spine size and density in rodents with forebrain specific knockout of CRF receptor 1 (CRFR1) even when

  15. Evaluation of Ca3(Co,M2O6 (M=Co, Fe, Mn, Ni as new cathode materials for solid-oxide fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fushao Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Series compounds Ca3(Co0.9M0.12O6 (M=Co, Fe, Mn, Ni with hexagonal crystal structure were prepared by sol–gel route as the cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs. Effects of the varied atomic compositions on the structure, electrical conductivity, thermal expansion and electrochemical performance were systematically evaluated. Experimental results showed that the lattice parameters of Ca3(Co0.9Fe0.12O6 and Ca3(Co0.9Mn0.12O6 were both expanded to certain degree. Electron-doping and hole-doping effects were expected in Ca3(Co0.9Mn0.12O6 and Ca3(Co0.9Ni0.12O6 respectively according to the chemical states of constituent elements and thermal-activated behavior of electrical conductivity. Thermal expansion coefficients (TEC of Ca3(Co0.9M0.12O6 were measured to be distributed around 16×10−6 K−1, and compositional elements of Fe, Mn, and Ni were especially beneficial for alleviation of the thermal expansion problem of cathode materials. By using Ca3(Co0.9M0.12O6 as the cathodes operated at 800 °C, the interfacial area-specific resistance varied in the order of M=CoCa3(Co0.9Fe0.12O6 showed the best electrochemical performance and the power density as high as ca. 500 mW cm−2 at 800 °C achieved in the single cell with La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.83Mg0.17O2.815 as electrolyte and Ni–Ce0.8Sm0.2O1.9 as anode. Ca3(Co0.9M0.12O6 (M=Co, Fe, Mn, Ni can be used as the cost-effective cathode materials for SOFCs.

  16. GDNF selectively induces microglial activation and neuronal survival in CA1/CA3 hippocampal regions exposed to NMDA insult through Ret/ERK signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Boscia

    Full Text Available The glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF is a potent survival factor for several neuronal populations in different brain regions, including the hippocampus. However, no information is available on the: (1 hippocampal subregions involved in the GDNF-neuroprotective actions upon excitotoxicity, (2 identity of GDNF-responsive hippocampal cells, (3 transduction pathways involved in the GDNF-mediated neuroprotection in the hippocampus. We addressed these questions in organotypic hippocampal slices exposed to GDNF in presence of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA by immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, and confocal analysis. In hippocampal slices GDNF acts through the activation of the tyrosine kinase receptor, Ret, without involving the NCAM-mediated pathway. Both Ret and ERK phosphorylation mainly occurred in the CA3 region where the two activated proteins co-localized. GDNF protected in a greater extent CA3 rather than CA1 following NMDA exposure. This neuroprotective effect targeted preferentially neurons, as assessed by NeuN staining. GDNF neuroprotection was associated with a significant increase of Ret phosphorylation in both CA3 and CA1. Interestingly, confocal images revealed that upon NMDA exposure, Ret activation occurred in microglial cells in the CA3 and CA1 following GDNF exposure. Collectively, this study shows that CA3 and CA1 hippocampal regions are highly responsive to GDNF-induced Ret activation and neuroprotection, and suggest that, upon excitotoxicity, such neuroprotection involves a GDNF modulation of microglial cell activity.

  17. Effects of Ce doping on the luminescent property of Ca3 SiO4 Cl2 :Eu phosphor for green lighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingsheng

    2015-03-01

    White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for green lighting are new solutions for energy saving and environmental protection. Ca3 SiO4 Cl2 :Ce,Eu is an efficient phosphor for white LEDs. Effective energy transfer from Ce(3+) to Eu(2+) occurs in Ca3 SiO4 Cl2 :Ce,Eu due to good spectrum overlap between the emission band of Ca3 SiO4 Cl2 :Ce and the excitation band of Ca3 SiO4 Cl2 :Eu, and hues vary systematically from blue to green at different Ce concentrations. A great improvement in the luminescent property of Ca3 SiO4 Cl2 :Eu has been observed on Ce(3+) doping, which is attributed to energy transfer from Ce(3+) to Eu(2+) and an increase in the number of luminescent centers (Eu(2+) ) on Ce doping. The optimal sample has a quantum efficiency of up to 75%, and can be an efficient green phosphor for white LEDs.

  18. Localization of brain-derived neurotrophic factor to distinct terminals of mossy fiber axons implies regulation of both excitation and feedforward inhibition of CA3 pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzer, Steve C; McNamara, James O

    2004-12-15

    Hippocampal dentate granule cells directly excite and indirectly inhibit CA3 pyramidal cells via distinct presynaptic terminal specializations of their mossy fiber axons. This mossy fiber pathway contains the highest concentration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the CNS, yet whether BDNF is positioned to regulate the excitatory and/or inhibitory pathways is unknown. To localize BDNF, confocal microscopy of green fluorescent protein transgenic mice was combined with BDNF immunohistochemistry. Approximately half of presynaptic granule cell-CA3 pyramidal cell contacts were found to contain BDNF. Moreover, enhanced neuronal activity virtually doubled the percentage of BDNF-immunoreactive terminals contacting CA3 pyramidal cells. To our surprise, BDNF was also found in mossy fiber terminals contacting inhibitory neurons. These studies demonstrate that mossy fiber BDNF is poised to regulate both direct excitatory and indirect feedforward inhibitory inputs to CA3 pyramdal cells and reveal that seizure activity increases the pool of BDNF-expressing granule cell presynaptic terminals contacting CA3 pyramidal cells.

  19. Ongoing epileptiform activity in the post-ischemic hippocampus is associated with a permanent shift of the excitatory-inhibitory synaptic balance in CA3 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epsztein, Jérôme; Milh, Mathieu; Bihi, Rachid Id; Jorquera, Isabel; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Represa, Alfonso; Crépel, Valérie

    2006-06-28

    Ischemic strokes are often associated with late-onset epilepsy, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In the hippocampus, which is one of the regions most sensitive to ischemic challenge, global ischemia induces a complete loss of CA1 pyramidal neurons, whereas the resistant CA3 pyramidal neurons display a long-term hyperexcitability several months after the insult. The mechanisms of this long-term hyperexcitability remain unknown despite its clinical implication. Using chronic in vivo EEG recordings and in vitro field recordings in slices, we now report spontaneous interictal epileptiform discharges in the CA3 area of the hippocampus from post-ischemic rats several months after the insult. Whole-cell recordings from CA3 pyramidal neurons, revealed a permanent reduction in the frequency of spontaneous and miniature GABAergic IPSCs and a parallel increase in the frequency of spontaneous and miniature glutamatergic postsynaptic currents. Global ischemia also induced a dramatic loss of GABAergic interneurons and terminals together with an increase in glutamatergic terminals in the CA3 area of the hippocampus. Altogether, our results show a morpho-functional reorganization in the CA3 network several months after global ischemia, resulting in a net shift in the excitatory-inhibitory balance toward excitation that may constitute a substrate for the generation of epileptiform discharges in the post-ischemic hippocampus.

  20. Adolescent mice show anxiety- and aggressive-like behavior and the reduction of long-term potentiation in mossy fiber-CA3 synapses after neonatal maternal separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, S Y; Han, S H; Woo, R-S; Jang, S H; Min, S S

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to maternal separation (MS) during early life is an identified risk factor for emotional disorders such as anxiety and depression later in life. This study investigated the effects of neonatal MS on the behavior and long-term potentiation (LTP) as well as basic synaptic transmission at hippocampal CA3-CA1 and mossy fiber (MF)-CA3 synapses in adolescent mice for 19days. When mice were adolescents, we measured depression, learning, memory, anxious and aggressive behavior using the forced swimming test (FST), Y-maze, Morris water maze (MWM), elevated plus maze (EPM), three consecutive days of the open field test, the social interaction test, the tube-dominance test and the resident-intruder test. The results showed that there was no difference in FST, Y-maze, and MWM performance. However, MS mice showed more anxiety-like behavior in the EPM test and aggressive-like behavior in the tube-dominance and resident-intruder tests. In addition, the magnitude of LTP and release probability in the MF-CA3 synapses was reduced in the MS group but not in the CA3-CA1 synapse. Our results indicate that early life stress due to MS may induce anxiety- and aggressive-like behavior during adolescence, and these effects are associated with synaptic plasticity at the hippocampal MF-CA3 synapses.

  1. Sequential elucidation of the β-Ca3(PO4)2/TiO2 composite development from the solution precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandha Kumar, P; Kannan, S

    2017-03-07

    The sequential formation of β-Ca3(PO4)2/TiO2 composites with assorted ratios synthesized from the solution precursors is described. The phase evolution of the synthesized powders to yield a composite during progressive heat treatments is determined through a set of analytical techniques. Investigation reveals the initial crystallization of apatite and anatase TiO2 (a-TiO2) mixtures at TiO2 (r-TiO2) transpires in the range of 800-1000 °C before the complete r-TiO2 transformation accomplishes at 1100 °C. The structural stability of the resultant β-Ca3(PO4)2/r-TiO2 composites is retained until 1300 °C. The β-Ca3(PO4)2 lattice also hosts a selective amount of Ti(4+) and as a consequence the anticipated β- → α-Ca3(PO4)2 conversion that occurs at 1180 °C is delayed. TiO2 plays a crucial role in the attainment of dense and pore free microstructures of β-Ca3(PO4)2/r-TiO2 composites. The mechanical properties determined through nanoindentation revealed an upsurge trend as a function of TiO2 content in the composites.

  2. Dendritic potassium channels in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, D; Hoffman, D A; Magee, J C; Poolos, N P; Watanabe, S; Colbert, C M; Migliore, M

    2000-05-15

    Potassium channels located in the dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons control the shape and amplitude of back-propagating action potentials, the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials and dendritic excitability. Non-uniform gradients in the distribution of potassium channels in the dendrites make the dendritic electrical properties markedly different from those found in the soma. For example, the influence of a fast, calcium-dependent potassium current on action potential repolarization is progressively reduced in the first 150 micrometer of the apical dendrites, so that action potentials recorded farther than 200 micrometer from the soma have no fast after-hyperpolarization and are wider than those in the soma. The peak amplitude of back-propagating action potentials is also progressively reduced in the dendrites because of the increasing density of a transient potassium channel with distance from the soma. The activation of this channel can be reduced by the activity of a number of protein kinases as well as by prior depolarization. The depolarization from excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) can inactivate these A-type K+ channels and thus lead to an increase in the amplitude of dendritic action potentials, provided the EPSP and the action potentials occur within the appropriate time window. This time window could be in the order of 15 ms and may play a role in long-term potentiation induced by pairing EPSPs and back-propagating action potentials.

  3. Imaging a memory trace over half a life-time in the medial temporal lobe reveals a time-limited role of CA3 neurons in retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Vanessa; Atucha, Erika; Kitsukawa, Takashi; Sauvage, Magdalena M

    2016-02-12

    Whether retrieval still depends on the hippocampus as memories age or relies then on cortical areas remains a major controversy. Despite evidence for a functional segregation between CA1, CA3 and parahippocampal areas, their specific role within this frame is unclear. Especially, the contribution of CA3 is questionable as very remote memories might be too degraded to be used for pattern completion. To identify the specific role of these areas, we imaged brain activity in mice during retrieval of recent, early remote and very remote fear memories by detecting the immediate-early gene Arc. Investigating correlates of the memory trace over an extended period allowed us to report that, in contrast to CA1, CA3 is no longer recruited in very remote retrieval. Conversely, we showed that parahippocampal areas are then maximally engaged. These results suggest a shift from a greater contribution of the trisynaptic loop to the temporoammonic pathway for retrieval.

  4. Non-linear dendrites can tune neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Daniel Cazé

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A signature of visual, auditory, and motor cortices is the presence of neurons tuned to distinct features of the environment. While neuronal tuning can be observed in most brain areas, its origin remains enigmatic, and new calcium imaging data complicate this problem. Dendritic calcium signals, in a L2/3 neuron from the mouse visual cortex, display a wide range of tunings that could be different from the neuronal tuning (Jia et al 2010. To elucidate this observation we use multi-compartmental models of increasing complexity, from a binary to a realistic biophysical model of L2/3 neuron. These models possess non-linear dendritic subunits inside which the result of multiple excitatory inputs is smaller than their arithmetic sum. While dendritic non-linear subunits are ad-hoc in the binary model, non-linearities in the realistic model come from the passive saturation of synaptic currents. Because of these non-linearities our neuron models are scatter sensitive: the somatic membrane voltage is higher when presynaptic inputs target different dendrites than when they target a single dendrite. This spatial bias in synaptic integration is, in our models, the origin of neuronal tuning. Indeed, assemblies of presynaptic inputs encode the stimulus property through an increase in correlation or activity, and only the assembly that encodes the preferred stimulus targets different dendrites. Assemblies coding for the non-preferred stimuli target single dendrites, explaining the wide range of observed tunings and the possible difference between dendritic and somatic tuning. We thus propose, in accordance with the latest experimental observations, that non-linear integration in dendrites can generate neuronal tuning independently of the coding regime.

  5. Evolution of neck vertebral shape and neck retraction at the transition to modern turtles: an integrated geometric morphometric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneburg, Ingmar; Wilson, Laura A B; Parr, William C H; Joyce, Walter G

    2015-03-01

    The unique ability of modern turtles to retract their head and neck into the shell through a side-necked (pleurodiran) or hidden-necked (cryptodiran) motion is thought to have evolved independently in crown turtles. The anatomical changes that led to the vertebral shapes of modern turtles, however, are still poorly understood. Here we present comprehensive geometric morphometric analyses that trace turtle vertebral evolution and reconstruct disparity across phylogeny. Disparity of vertebral shape was high at the dawn of turtle evolution and decreased after the modern groups evolved, reflecting a stabilization of morphotypes that correspond to the two retraction modes. Stem turtles, which had a very simple mode of retraction, the lateral head tuck, show increasing flexibility of the neck through evolution towards a pleurodiran-like morphotype. The latter was the precondition for evolving pleurodiran and cryptodiran vertebrae. There is no correlation between the construction of formed articulations in the cervical centra and neck mobility. An increasing mobility between vertebrae, associated with changes in vertebral shape, resulted in a more advanced ability to retract the neck. In this regard, we hypothesize that the lateral tucking retraction of stem turtles was not only the precondition for pleurodiran but also of cryptodiran retraction. For the former, a kink in the middle third of the neck needed to be acquired, whereas for the latter modification was necessary between the eighth cervical vertebra and first thoracic vertebra. Our paper highlights the utility of 3D shape data, analyzed in a phylogenetic framework, to examine the magnitude and mode of evolutionary modifications to vertebral morphology. By reconstructing and visualizing ancestral anatomical shapes, we provide insight into the anatomical features underlying neck retraction mode, which is a salient component of extant turtle classification.

  6. Prenatal morphine exposure reduces pyramidal neurons in CA1, CA2 and CA3 subfields of mice hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Ghafari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of maternal morphine exposure during gestational and lactation period on pyramidal neurons of hippocampus in 18 and 32 day mice offspring. Materials and Methods: Thirty female mice were randomly allocated into cases and controls. In case group, animals received morphinesulfate 10 mg/kg.body weight intraperitoneally during 7 days before mating, gestational period (GD 0-21, 18 and 32 days after delivery in the experimental groups. The control animals received an equivalent volume of normal saline. Cerebrum of six offsprings in each group was removed and stained with cresyl violet and a monoclonal antibody NeuN for immunohistochemical detection of surviving pyramidal neurons. Quantitative computer-assisted morphometric study was done on hippocampus. Results: The number of pyramidal neurons in CA1, CA2 and CA3 in treated groups was significantly reduced in postnatal day 18 and 32 (P18, P32 compared to control groups (P

  7. Ultra-low coercive field of improper ferroelectric Ca3Ti2O7 epitaxial thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Yang, L.; Li, C. F.; Liu, M. F.; Fan, Z.; Xie, Y. L.; Lu, C. L.; Lin, L.; Yan, Z. B.; Zhang, Z.; Dai, J. Y.; Liu, J.-M.; Cheong, S. W.

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid improper ferroelectrics have their electric polarization generated by two or more combined non-ferroelectric structural distortions, such as the rotation and tilting of Ti-O octahedral in the Ca3Ti2O7 (CTO) family. In this work, we prepare the high quality (010)-oriented CTO thin films on (110) SrTiO3 (STO) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The good epitaxial growth of the CTO thin films on the substrates with the interfacial epitaxial relationship of [001]CTO//[001]STO and [100]CTO//[-110]STO is revealed. The in-plane ferroelectric hysteresis unveils an ultralow coercive field of ˜5 kV/cm even at low temperature, nearly two orders of magnitude lower than that of bulk CTO single crystals. The huge difference between the epitaxial thin films and bulk crystals is most likely due to the lattice imperfections in the thin films rather than substrate induced lattice strains, suggesting high sensitivity of the ferroelectric properties to lattice defects.

  8. A novel form of synaptic plasticity in field CA3 of hippocampus requires GPER1 activation and BDNF release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briz, Victor; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Guoqi; Bi, Xiaoning; Baudry, Michel

    2015-09-28

    Estrogen is an important modulator of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation through its rapid action on membrane-associated receptors. Here, we found that both estradiol and the G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1) specific agonist G1 rapidly induce brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) release, leading to transient stimulation of activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated (Arc) protein translation and GluA1-containing AMPA receptor internalization in field CA3 of hippocampus. We also show that type-I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) activation does not induce Arc translation nor long-term depression (LTD) at the mossy fiber pathway, as opposed to its effects in CA1, and it only triggers LTD after GPER1 stimulation. Furthermore, this form of mGluR-dependent LTD is associated with ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation of GluA1, and is prevented by proteasome inhibition. Overall, our study identifies a novel mechanism by which estrogen and BDNF regulate hippocampal synaptic plasticity in the adult brain.

  9. Prenatal protein malnutrition results in increased frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in rat CA3 interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Ming; Galler, Janina R; Luebke, Jennifer I

    2003-08-01

    Electrophysiological studies have revealed an increase in the level of tonic inhibition in the hippocampus following prenatal protein malnutrition in rats. In the present study, whole cell patch clamp recordings of bipolar interneurons in the stratum radiatum of the CA3 subfield were used to determine whether this increase in inhibition can be accounted for by a change in the electrophysiological properties of GABAergic interneurons. Hippocampal slices were prepared from juvenile rats whose dams were fed either a normal (25% casein) or low (6% casein) protein diet throughout pregnancy. Intrinsic membrane and action potential properties were unaltered by the prenatal nutritional insult. In most respects the characteristics of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) and the modulation of such currents by the benzodiazepine agonist zolpidem were also similar in cells from the two nutritional groups. While the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory currents was unaltered, miniature (Tetrodotoxin resistant) inhibitory currents occurred at a significantly increased frequency in interneurons from prenatally protein malnourished rats. Thus, while the basic membrane properties of interneurons are preserved, there is a significant increase in the probability of GABA release from interneurons following prenatal protein malnutrition.

  10. Effect of ageing on CA3 interneuron sAHP and gamma oscillations is activity-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng B; Hamilton, James B; Powell, Andrew D; Toescu, Emil C; Vreugdenhil, Martin

    2011-05-01

    Normal ageing-associated spatial memory impairment has been linked to subtle changes in the hippocampal network. Here we test whether the age-dependent reduction in gamma oscillations can be explained by the changes in intrinsic properties of hippocampal interneurons. Kainate-induced gamma oscillations, but not spontaneous gamma oscillations, were reduced in slices from aged mice. CA3 interneurons were recorded in slices from young and aged mice using Fura-2-filled pipettes. Passive membrane properties, firing properties, medium- and slow-afterhyperpolarisation amplitudes, basal [Ca(2+)](i) and firing-induced [Ca(2+)](i) transients were not different with ageing. Kainate caused a larger depolarisation and increase in [Ca(2+)](i) signal in aged interneurons than in young ones. In contrast to young interneurons, kainate increased the medium- and slow-afterhyperpolarisation and underlying [Ca(2+)](i) transient in aged interneurons. Modulating the slow-afterhyperpolarisation by modulating L-type calcium channels with BAY K 8644 and nimodipine suppressed and potentiated, respectively, kainate-induced gamma oscillations in young slices. The age-dependent and stimulation-dependent increase in basal [Ca(2+)](i), firing-induced [Ca(2+)](i) transient and associated afterhyperpolarisation may reduce interneuron excitability and contribute to an age-dependent impairment of hippocampal gamma oscillations.

  11. HERC 1 Ubiquitin Ligase Mutation Affects Neocortical, CA3 Hippocampal and Spinal Cord Projection Neurons: An Ultrastructural Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva María; Bachiller, Sara; Rosa, José Luis; Armengol, José Angel

    2016-01-01

    The spontaneous mutation tambaleante is caused by the Gly483Glu substitution in the highly conserved N terminal RCC1-like domain of the HERC1 protein, which leads to the increase of mutated protein levels responsible for cerebellar Purkinje cell death by autophagy. Until now, Purkinje cells have been the only central nervous neurons reported as being targeted by the mutation, and their degeneration elicits an ataxic syndrome in adult mutant mice. However, the ultrastructural analysis performed here demonstrates that signs of autophagy, such as autophagosomes, lysosomes, and altered mitochondria, are present in neocortical pyramidal, CA3 hippocampal pyramidal, and spinal cord motor neurons. The main difference is that the reduction in the number of neurons affected in the tambaleante mutation in the neocortex, the hippocampus, and the spinal cord is not so evident as the dramatic loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Interestingly, signs of autophagy are absent in both interneurons and neuroglia cells. Affected neurons have in common that they are projection neurons which receive strong and varied synaptic inputs, and possess the highest degree of neuronal activity. Therefore, because the integrity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is essential for protein degradation and hence, for normal protein turnover, it could be hypothesized that the deleterious effects of the misrouting of these pathways would depend directly on the neuronal activity.

  12. HERC 1 ubiquitin ligase mutation affects neocortical, CA3 hippocampal and spinal cord projection neurons. An ultrastructural study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío eRuiz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneous mutation tambaleante is caused by the Gly483Glu substitution in the highly conserved N terminal RCC1-like domain of the HERC1 protein, which leads to the increase of mutated protein levels responsible for cerebellar Purkinje cell death by autophagy. Until now, Purkinje cells have been the only central nervous neurons reported as being targeted by the mutation, and their degeneration elicits an ataxic syndrome in adult mutant mice. However, the ultrastructural analysis performed here demonstrates that signs of autophagy, such as autophagosomes, lysosomes, and altered mitochondria, are present in neocortical pyramidal, CA3 hippocampal pyramidal, and spinal cord motor neurons. The main difference is that the reduction in the number of neurons affected in the tambaleante mutation in the neocortex, the hippocampus, and the spinal cord is not so evident as the dramatic loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Interestingly, signs of autophagy are absent in both interneurons and neuroglia cells. Affected neurons have in common that they are projection neurons which receive strong and varied synaptic inputs, and possess the highest degree of neuronal activity. Therefore, because the integrity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is essential for protein degradation and, hence, for normal protein turnover, it could be hypothesized that the deleterious effects of the misrouting of these pathways would depend directly on the neuronal activity.

  13. Multiple Kinases Involved in the Nicotinic Modulation of Gamma Oscillations in the Rat Hippocampal CA3 Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, JianGang; He, XiaoLong; Guo, Fangli; Cheng, XiangLin; Wang, Yali; Wang, XiaoFang; Feng, ZhiWei; Vreugdenhil, Martin; Lu, ChengBiao

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal synchronization at gamma band frequency (20–80 Hz, γ oscillations) is closely associated with higher brain function, such as learning, memory and attention. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are highly expressed in the hippocampus, and modulate hippocampal γ oscillations, but the intracellular mechanism underlying such modulation remains elusive. We explored multiple kinases by which nicotine can modulate γ oscillations induced by kainate in rat hippocampal area CA3 in vitro. We found that inhibitors of cyclic AMP dependent kinase (protein kinase A, PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA) receptors, Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and extracellular signal-related kinases (ERK), each individually could prevent the γ oscillation-enhancing effect of 1 μM nicotine, whereas none of them affected baseline γ oscillation strength. Inhibition of the serine/threonine kinase Akt increased baseline γ oscillations and partially blocked its nicotinic enhancement. We propose that the PKA-NMDAR-PI3K-ERK pathway modifies cellular properties required for the nicotinic enhancement of γ oscillations, dependent on a PKC-ERK mediated pathway. These signaling pathways provide clues for restoring γ oscillations in pathological conditions affecting cognition. The suppression of γ oscillations at 100 μM nicotine was only dependent on PKA-NMDAR activation and may be due to very high intracellular calcium levels.

  14. Electronic Structure and Thermoelectric Properties of Na and Ni-doped Ca3Co2O6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Xinmin; YANG Wen

    2006-01-01

    The electronic structures of Ca3Co2O6, Na and Ni doped models were studied by the quantum chemical software of Cambride Serial Total Energy Package (CASTEP) that is based on density function theory (DFT) and pseudo-potential. The electronic conductivity, seebeck coefficient, thermal conductivity and figure of merit (Z) were computed. The energy band structure reveals the form of the impurity levels due to the substitutional impurity in semiconductors. Na-doped model shows the character of p-type semiconductor, but Ni-doped model is n-type semiconductor. The calculation results show that the electric conductivity of the doped model is higher than that of the non-doped model, while the Seebeck coefficient and thermal conductivity of the doped model are lower than those of the non-doped one. Because of the great increase of the electric conductivity, Z of Na-doped model is enhanced and thermoelectric properties are improved. On the other hand, as the large decline of Seebeck coefficient, Z of Ni-doped model is less than that of the non-doped model.

  15. [Effects of beta-cypermethrin on voltage-gated potassium channels in rat hippocampal CA3 neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhi-Yan; DU, Chun-Yun; Yao, Yang; Liu, Chao-Wei; Tian, Yu-Tao; He, Bing-Jun; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Zhuo

    2007-02-25

    The effects of beta-cypermethrin (consisting of alpha-cypermethrin and theta-cypermethrin) on the transient outward potassium current (I(A)) and delayed rectifier potassium current (I(K)) in freshly dissociated hippocampal CA3 neurons of rats were studied using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The results indicated that alpha-cypermethrin increased the value of I(A) and theta-cypermethrin decreased the value of I(A), though both of them shifted steady activation curve of I(A) towards negative potential. theta-cypermethrin contributed to the inactivation of I(A). The results also showed that alpha-cypermethrin and theta-cypermethrin decreased the value of I(K), and shifted the steady state activation curve of I(K) towards negative potential. Both alpha-cypermethrin and theta-cypermethrin had no obvious effects on the inactivation of I(K). theta-cypermethrin prolonged recovery process of I(K). These results imply that both transient outward potassium channels and delayed rectified potassium channels are the targets of beta-cypermethrin, which may explain the mechanism of toxical effects of beta-cypermethrin on mammalian neurons.

  16. Advanced piezoelectric crystal Ca3TaGa3Si2O14: growth, crystal structure perfection, and acoustic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Ortega, Luc; Plotitcyna, Olga; Erko, Alexei; Zizak, Ivo; Irzhak, Dmitry; Fahrtdinov, Rashid; Buzanov, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    A five-component crystal of the lanthanum-gallium silicate family Ca3TaGa3Si2O14 (CTGS) was grown by the Czochralski method. The CTGS crystal, like the langasite crystal (La3Ga5SiO14, LGS), possesses unique temperature properties and the fewer number of the Ga atoms in the unit cell makes the density much lower and, consequently, increases the velocity of acoustic wave propagation. The unit-cell parameters were determined by the powder diffraction technique. The defects in the CTGS crystal structure were studied by X-ray topography, which enables the visualization of growth banding characteristics of crystals grown by the Czochralski method. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in the CTGS crystal was investigated by the high-resolution X-ray diffraction method on the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. The velocities of propagation and power flow angles of SAWs in the Y- and X-cuts of the CTGS crystal were determined from the X-ray diffraction spectra.

  17. Lattice and transport properties of the misfit-layered oxide thermoelectric Ca3Co4O9 from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebola, Alejandro; Klie, Robert; Zapol, Peter; Ogut, Serdar

    2013-03-01

    The misfit-layered oxide Ca3Co4O9 (CCO) has recently been the subject of many experimental and some theoretical investigations due to its remarkable thermoelectric properties. CCO is composed of two incommensurate subsystems, a distorted rocksalt-type Ca2CoO3 layer sandwiched between hexagonal CoO2 layers. Taking into account that the composition ratio between these subsystems is very close to the golden mean, which is the limit of the sequence of the ratios of consecutive Fibonacci numbers F (n) , we model CCO from first principles[1] by using rational approximants of composition [Ca2CoO3]2 F (n)[CoO2]2 F (n + 1). In the present study, we use 3/2 and 5/3 rational approximants and PBE+U computations to calculate the ab initio phonon dispersion curves, related thermal properties, as well as ab initio electronic transport properties such as DC conductivity and thermopower within the relaxation time approximation by applying the Boltzmann transport theory. Results are compared with available experimental data and potential routes for increasing the thermopower of CCO are discussed.

  18. Site-sensitive energy transfer modes in Ca3Al2O6: Ce(3+)/Tb(3+)/Mn(2+) phosphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jilin; He, Yani; Qiu, Zhongxian; Zhang, Weilu; Zhou, Wenli; Yu, Liping; Lian, Shixun

    2014-12-28

    Ce(3+)/Eu(2+), Tb(3+) and Mn(2+) co-doping in single-phase hosts is a common strategy to achieve white-light phosphors via energy transfer, which provides a high color rendering index (CRI) value and good color stability. However, not all hosts are suitable for white-light phosphors due to inefficient energy transfer. In this study, the site-sensitive energy transfer from different crystallographic sites of Ce(3+) to Tb(3+)/Mn(2+) in Ca3Al2O6 has been investigated in detail. The energy transfer from purplish-blue Ce(3+) to Tb(3+) is an electric dipole-dipole mode, and the calculated critical distance (Rc) suggests the existence of purplish-blue Ce(3+)-Tb(3+) clusters. No energy transfer is observed from purplish-blue Ce(3+) to Mn(2+). In co-doped phosphors based on greenish-blue Ce(3+), however, the radiative mode dominates the energy transfer from Ce(3+) to Tb(3+), and an electric dipole-quadrupole interaction is responsible for the energy transfer from Ce(3+) to Mn(2+). A detailed discussion on the site-sensitive energy transfer modes might provide a new aspect to discuss and understand the possibilities and mechanisms of energy transfer, according to certain crystallographic sites in a complex host with different cation sites, as well as provide a possible approach in searching for single-phase white-light-emitting phosphors.

  19. Inhibition of the K+ channel K(Ca3.1 reduces TGF-β1-induced premature senescence, myofibroblast phenotype transition and proliferation of mesangial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Guo Fu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: K(Ca3.1 channel participates in many important cellular functions. This study planned to investigate the potential involvement of K(Ca3.1 channel in premature senescence, myofibroblast phenotype transition and proliferation of mesangial cells. METHODS & MATERIALS: Rat mesangial cells were cultured together with TGF-β1 (2 ng/ml and TGF-β1 (2 ng/ml + TRAM-34 (16 nM separately for specified times from 0 min to 60 min. The cells without treatment served as controls. The location of K(Ca3.1 channels in mesangial cells was determined with Confocal laser microscope, the cell cycle of mesangial cells was assessed with flow cytometry, the protein and mRNA expression of K(Ca3.1, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA and fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1 were detected with Western blot and RT-PCR. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls-q test (SNK-q were used to do statistical analysis. Statistical significance was considered at P<0.05. RESULTS: Kca3.1 channels were located in the cell membranes and/or in the cytoplasm of mesangial cells. The percentage of cells in G0-G1 phase and the expression of K(ca3.1, α-SMA and FSP-1 were elevated under the induction of TGF-β1 when compared to the control and decreased under the induction of TGF-β1+TRAM-34 when compared to the TGF-β1 induced (P<0.05 or P<0.01. CONCLUSION: Targeted disruption of K(Ca3.1 inhibits TGF-β1-induced premature aging, myofibroblast-like phenotype transdifferentiation and proliferation of mesangial cells.

  20. Fate mapping of dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ursula Schraml

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are a heterogeneous group of mononuclear phagocytes with versatile roles in immunity. They are classified predominantly based on phenotypic and functional properties, namely their stellate morphology, expression of the integrin CD11c and major histocompatibility class II molecules, as well as their superior capacity to migrate to secondary lymphoid organs and stimulate naïve T cells. However, these attributes are not exclusive to DCs and often change within inflammatory or infectious environments. This led to debates over cell identification and questioned even the mere existence of DCs as distinct leukocyte lineage. Here, we review experimental approaches taken to fate map DCs and discuss how these have shaped our understanding of DC ontogeny and lineage affiliation. Considering the ontogenetic properties of DCs will help to overcome the inherent shortcomings of purely phenotypic- and function-based approaches to cell definition and will yield a more robust way of DC classification.

  1. Dendritic tellurides acting as antioxidants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Huaping; WANG Yapei; WANG Zhiqiang; LIU Junqiu; Mario Smet; Wim Dehaen

    2006-01-01

    We have described the synthesis of a series of poly(aryl ether) dendrimers with telluride in the core and oligo(ethylene oxide) chains at the periphery which act as glutathione peroxidase (GPx) mimics. These series of compounds were well characterized by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and ESI-MS. Using different ROOH (H2O2, cumene hydroperoxide) for testing the antioxidizing properties of these compounds, we have found that from generation 0 to 2, the activity of the dendritic GPx mimics first decreased and then increased. This can be explained on the basis of a greater steric hindrance, going from generation 0 to 1, and stronger binding interactions going from generation 1 to 2. In other words, there exists a balance between binding interactions and steric hindrance that may optimize the GPx activity.

  2. Dendritic Cells for Anomaly Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Artificial immune systems, more specifically the negative selection algorithm, have previously been applied to intrusion detection. The aim of this research is to develop an intrusion detection system based on a novel concept in immunology, the Danger Theory. Dendritic Cells (DCs) are antigen presenting cells and key to the activation of the human signals from the host tissue and correlate these signals with proteins know as antigens. In algorithmic terms, individual DCs perform multi-sensor data fusion based on time-windows. The whole population of DCs asynchronously correlates the fused signals with a secondary data stream. The behaviour of human DCs is abstracted to form the DC Algorithm (DCA), which is implemented using an immune inspired framework, libtissue. This system is used to detect context switching for a basic machine learning dataset and to detect outgoing portscans in real-time. Experimental results show a significant difference between an outgoing portscan and normal traffic.

  3. Two-port laparoscopic cholecystectomy with modified suture retraction of the fundus: A practical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming G Tian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Although transumbilical single incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SILC has been demonstrated to be superior cosmetic, it is only limited to simple cases at present. In complex cases, the standard four- or three-port LC is still the treatment of choice. Aim: To summarize the clinical effect of a modified technique in two-port LC. Settings and Design: A consecutive series of patients with benign gallbladder diseases admitted to the provincial teaching hospital who underwent LC in the past 4 years were included. A modified two-port LC was the first choice except for those requiring laparoscopic common bile duct exploration (LCBDE. Materials and Methods: The operation was done with suture retraction of the fundus by a needle-like retractor. The patients′ data, including the operative time, time consumed by gallbladder retraction, operative bleeding, conversion rate, rate of adding trocars, and postoperative complications were recorded. Statistical Analysis: Data were expressed as percentage and mean with standard deviation. Results: Total 107 patients with chronic calculous cholecystitis (N = 61, acute calculous cholecystitis (N = 43, and cholecystic polyps (N = 3 received two-port LC. The procedure was successful in 99 out of 107 cases (success rate, 92.5%, and a third trocar was added in the remaining 8 cases (7.5% due to severe pathological changes. The operative time was 47.2 (±13.21 min. There was no conversion to open surgery. Conclusion: Two-port LC using a needle-like retractor for suture retraction of the gallbladder fundus is a practical approach when considering the safety, convenience, and indications as well as relatively minimal invasion.

  4. Comparative photoelastic study of dental and skeletal anchorages in the canine retraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Aparecida de Assis Claro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare dental and skeletal anchorages in mandibular canine retraction by means of a stress distribution analysis. METHODS: A photoelastic model was produced from second molar to canine, without the first premolar, and mandibular canine retraction was simulated by a rubber band tied to two types of anchorage: dental anchorage, in the first molar attached to adjacent teeth, and skeletal anchorage with a hook simulating the mini-implant. The forces were applied 10 times and observed in a circular polariscope. The stresses located in the mandibular canine were recorded in 7 regions. The Mann-Whitney test was employed to compare the stress in each region and between both anchorage systems. The stresses in the mandibular canine periradicular regions were compared by the Kruskal-Wallis test. RESULTS: Stresses were similar in the cervical region and the middle third. In the apical third, the stresses associated with skeletal anchorage were higher than the stresses associated with dental anchorage. The results of the Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the highest stresses were identified in the cervical-distal, apical-distal, and apex regions with the use of dental anchorage, and in the apical-distal, apical-mesial, cervical-distal, and apex regions with the use of skeletal anchorage. CONCLUSIONS: The use of skeletal anchorage in canine retraction caused greater stress in the apical third than the use of dental anchorage, which indicates an intrusive component resulting from the direction of the force due to the position of the mini-implant and the bracket hook of the canine.

  5. OPTIMAL ALGORITHM FOR NO TOOlRETRACTIONS CONTOUR-PARALLEL OFFSET TOOL-PATH LINKING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Yongtao; JIANG Lili

    2007-01-01

    A contour-parallel offset (CPO) tool-path linking algorithm is derived without toolretractions and with the largest practicability. The concept of "tool-path loop tree" (TPL-tree)providing the information on the parent/child relationships among the tool-path loops (TPLs) is presented. The direction, tool-path loop, leaf/branch, layer number, and the corresponding points of the TPL-tree are introduced. By defining TPL as a vector, and by traveling throughout the tree, a CPO tool-path without tool-retractions can be derived.

  6. Time-Dependent Response of Polypropylene/Clay Nanocomposites Under Tension and Retraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drozdov, Aleksey; Christiansen, Jesper de Claville

    2013-01-01

    Observations are reported in relaxation tests under tension and retraction on polypropylene/clay nanocomposites with various contents of filler. A two-phase constitutive model is developed in cyclic viscoelasticity and viscoplasticity of nanocomposites. Adjustable parameters in the stress......–strain relations are found by fitting the observations. Ability of the constitutive equations to describe characteristic features of the timedependent behavior of nanocomposites under cyclic deformation is confirmed by numerical simulation. POLYM. ENG. SCI., 00:000–000, 2012. ª2012 Society of Plastics Engineers...

  7. Retraction: Risks of avian influenza (H5) in duck farms in the Ayeyarwaddy Delta Region, Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The following article from Zoonoses and Public Health, 'Risks of Avian Influenza (H5) in Duck Farms in the Ayeyarwaddy Delta Region, Myanmar' by H. H. Win, C. C. Su Mon, K. M. Aung, K. N. Oo, K. Sunn, T. Htun, T. Tiensin, M. Maclean, W. Kalpravidh and A. Amonsin published online on 09 August 2013 on Wiley Online Library (http://onlinelibrary.wiley. com/) has been retracted by the journal Editor-in-Chief, Mary Torrence, the Authors, and Blackwell Verlag GmbH, as the article has already been published in the Myanmar Veterinary Journal [Myanmar Veterinary Journal 2013, Vol. 15, No. 1, 43–50].

  8. Retracted article: Flexible Fourier Stationary Test in GDP per capita for Central Eastern European Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Nan Zhu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Retraction (http://www.efri.uniri.hr/prikaz.asp?txt_id=7366 This is to notify our respectful reading public that the Editorial Board of the journal Zbornik radova Ekonomskog fakulteta u Rijeci, časopis za ekonomsku teoriju i praksu/ Proceedings of Rijeka Faculty of Economics, Journal of Economics and Business has retracted the following article from publication: “Flexible Fourier Stationary Test in GDP per capita for Central Eastern European Countries“, by Hsu-Ling Chang, Chi-Wei Su, Meng-Nan Zhu, published in our journal Zbornik radova Ekonomskog fakulteta u Rijeci, časopis za ekonomsku teoriju i praksu/ Proceedings of Rijeka Faculty of Economics, Journal of Economics and Business, 2011, vol. 29 (1, pp. 51-63 and almost concurrently published in the journal Eastern European Economics, 2011, vol. 49 (3, pp. 54-65. Being in contact with Josef C Brada, Professor Emeritus, Editor of the journal Eastern European Economics (EEE, we realized that the paper had been sent to both journals, although first published in the EEE and then in our Journal. According to professor Brada’s and our analysis, the paper published in these two journals is exactly the same, except for minor differences in wording, most likely due to editing the text before publication. The outstanding differences are in the title and the fact that the paper published in our Journal has three authors and in EEE journal has two. Whatsoever, owing to the fact that the article had been sent to both journals almost at the same time, it had been impossible to find out the case during the review procedure. Due to this unpleasant situation, our Editorial Board would like to inform our valuable readers that all the necessary measures to retract the paper from our publication have been undertaken and according to publishing ethical principles, cooperation with the authors of the retracted paper have been stopped. Although, in this case neither EEE nor our Journal had any

  9. Drosophila motor neuron retraction during metamorphosis is mediated by inputs from TGF-β/BMP signaling and orphan nuclear receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Boulanger

    Full Text Available Larval motor neurons remodel during Drosophila neuro-muscular junction dismantling at metamorphosis. In this study, we describe the motor neuron retraction as opposed to degeneration based on the early disappearance of β-Spectrin and the continuing presence of Tubulin. By blocking cell dynamics with a dominant-negative form of Dynamin, we show that phagocytes have a key role in this process. Importantly, we show the presence of peripheral glial cells close to the neuro-muscular junction that retracts before the motor neuron. We show also that in muscle, expression of EcR-B1 encoding the steroid hormone receptor required for postsynaptic dismantling, is under the control of the ftz-f1/Hr39 orphan nuclear receptor pathway but not the TGF-β signaling pathway. In the motor neuron, activation of EcR-B1 expression by the two parallel pathways (TGF-β signaling and nuclear receptor triggers axon retraction. We propose that a signal from a TGF-β family ligand is produced by the dismantling muscle (postsynapse compartment and received by the motor neuron (presynaptic compartment resulting in motor neuron retraction. The requirement of the two pathways in the motor neuron provides a molecular explanation for the instructive role of the postsynapse degradation on motor neuron retraction. This mechanism insures the temporality of the two processes and prevents motor neuron pruning before postsynaptic degradation.

  10. “Dermal dendritic cells” comprise two distinct populations: CD1+ dendritic cells and CD209+ macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Ochoa,Maria Teresa; Loncaric, Anya; Krutzik, Stephan R.; Becker, Todd C.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    A key cell type of the resident skin immune system is the dendritic cell, which in normal skin is located in two distinct microanatomical compartments: Langerhans cells (LC) mainly in the epidermis and dermal dendritic cells (DDC) in the dermis. Here, the lineage of dermal dendritic cells was investigated using monoclonal antibodies and immunohistology. We provide evidence that “dermal dendritic cells” comprise at least two major phenotypic populations of dendritic appearing cells: immature D...

  11. Dendritic cells are stressed out in tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Tomasz; Zou, Weiping

    2015-09-01

    A recently paper published in Cell reports that dendritic cells (DCs) are dysfunctional in the tumor environment. Tumor impairs DC function through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress response and subsequent disruption of lipid metabolic homeostasis.

  12. Artificial Dendritic Cells: Multi-faceted Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the crime scene investigators of the human immune system. Their function is to correlate potentially anomalous invading entities with observed damage to the body. The detection of such invaders by dendritic cells results in the activation of the adaptive immune system, eventually leading to the removal of the invader from the host body. This mechanism has provided inspiration for the development of a novel bio-inspired algorithm, the Dendritic Cell Algorithm. This algorithm processes information at multiple levels of resolution, resulting in the creation of information granules of variable structure. In this chapter we examine the multi-faceted nature of immunology and how research in this field has shaped the function of the resulting Dendritic Cell Algorithm. A brief overview of the algorithm is given in combination with the details of the processes used for its development. The chapter is concluded with a discussion of the parallels between our understanding of the human immune system a...

  13. Ca3Sm3[Si9N17] and Ca3Yb3[Si9N17] nitridosilicates with interpenetrating nets that consist of star-shaped [N[4](SiN3)4] units and [Si5N16] supertetrahedra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppertz, Hubert; Oeckler, Oliver; Lieb, Alexandra; Glaum, Robert; Johrendt, Dirk; Tegel, Marcus; Kaindl, Reinhard; Schnick, Wolfgang

    2012-08-27

    New nitridosilicates Ca(3)Sm(3)[Si(9)N(17)] and Ca(3)Yb(3)[Si(9)N(17)] were synthesized from the reactions of the pure metals (calcium and samarium/ytterbium) with silicon diimide "Si(NH)(2) " in a radio-frequency (rf) furnace at temperatures of up to 1650 °C. These isotypic compounds crystallize in the cubic space group P4(-)3m (no. 215) with lattice parameters a=739.50(3) pm; V=0.4044(1) nm(3); Z=1; wR(2) =0.029 (240 diffraction data, 26 parameters) for Ca(3)Sm(3)[Si(9)N(17)] and a=730.20(2) pm; V=0.3893(1) nm(3); wR(2) =0.039 (387 diffraction data, 27 parameters) for Ca(3)Yb(3)[Si(9)N(17)]. The new structure type of Ca(3)RE(3)[Si(9)N(17)] (RE=Sm, Yb) consists of two independent infinite networks, each of which have an expanded sphalerite (ZnS) topology in which the positions of the Zn and S atoms are replaced by voluminous [N([4])(SiN(3))(4)] units and [Si(5)N(16)] supertetrahedra, respectively, thereby displaying twofold interpenetration. As well, a structural description of Ca(3)Yb(3)[Si(9)N(17)], its thermal stability, and magnetic properties, as well as UV/Vis, IR, and Raman spectra, are presented.

  14. Effect of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Haploinsufficiency on Stress-Induced Remodeling of Hippocampal Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Magariños, A.M.; Li, C. J.; Toth, J. Gal; Bath, K.G.; Jing, D; Lee, F S; MCEWEN, B. S.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic restraint stress (CRS) induces the remodeling (i.e., retraction and simplification) of the apical dendrites of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons in rats, suggesting that intrahippocampal connectivity can be affected by a prolonged stressful challenge. Since the structural maintenance of neuronal dendritic arborizations and synaptic connectivity requires neurotrophic support, we investigated the potential role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin enriched in the ...

  15. Effects of social housing on hippocampal dendrites and behavior in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leedy, Gail M; Barrows, Lorraine F; Clark, Suzanne

    2013-03-01

    Social stress is both species and gender specific. For female rats, individual housing and social instability housing conditions are associated with behavioral indicators of stress and depression. The present study directly compared the effects of six weeks of individual housing, social instability and mixed sex, semi-crowded housing in a visible burrow system (VBS) on ovariectomized female rats. Paired, stable housing was used as the control. Behavioral tests were conducted two, four and six weeks into the housing manipulations and included sucrose consumption, social interest, and activity in the open field. Following a series of four behavioral tests, animals were sacrificed and brains were processed for Golgi impregnation. Basal dendrites of CA3 hippocampal neurons were measured. Results indicate that the individual housing and social instability groups were comparable to the control group for all measures. In contrast, the rats housed in the VBS exhibited reduced activity in open field testing, and alterations in social interest. Dendritic lengths were also reduced in those animals living in the VBS in comparison to the animals housed in pairs. To our knowledge, this is the first report of behavioral and neural effects of VBS housing on female rats. Further research is necessary to determine what facets of the VBS housing are responsible for the behavioral and neural changes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Animal Models'.

  16. Adenosine A(2A) receptor modulation of hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapse plasticity during associative learning in behaving mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontinha, Bruno M; Delgado-García, José M; Madroñal, Noelia; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M; Gruart, Agnès

    2009-06-01

    Previous in vitro studies have characterized the electrophysiological and molecular signaling pathways of adenosine tonic modulation on long-lasting synaptic plasticity events, particularly for hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). However, it remains to be elucidated whether the long-term changes produced by endogenous adenosine in the efficiency of synapses are related to those required for learning and memory formation. Our goal was to understand how endogenous activation of adenosine excitatory A(2A) receptors modulates the associative learning evolution in conscious behaving mice. We have studied here the effects of the application of a highly selective A(2A) receptor antagonist, SCH58261, upon a well-known associative learning paradigm-classical eyeblink conditioning. We used a trace paradigm, with a tone as the conditioned stimulus (CS) and an electric shock presented to the supraorbital nerve as the unconditioned stimulus (US). A single electrical pulse was presented to the Schaffer collateral-commissural pathway to evoke field EPSPs (fEPSPs) in the pyramidal CA1 area during the CS-US interval. In vehicle-injected animals, there was a progressive increase in the percentage of conditioning responses (CRs) and in the slope of fEPSPs through conditioning sessions, an effect that was completely prevented (and lost) in SCH58261 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) -injected animals. Moreover, experimentally evoked LTP was impaired in SCH58261-injected mice. In conclusion, the endogenous activation of adenosine A(2A) receptors plays a pivotal effect on the associative learning process and its relevant hippocampal circuits, including activity-dependent changes at the CA3-CA1 synapse.

  17. Persistent current oscillations produced by activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors in immature rat CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniksztejn, L; Sciancalepore, M; Ben Ari, Y; Cherubini, E

    1995-04-01

    1. The single-electrode voltage-clamp technique was used to study the effects of the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) agonist 1S,3R-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (1S,3R-ACPD, ACPD, 3-10 microM) on CA3 hippocampal neurons during the 1st 10 days of postnatal (P) life and in adulthood. 2. Repeated applications of 1S,3R-ACPD, in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 microM), tetraethylammonium chloride (TEACl 10 mM), and CsCl (2 mM), induced in immature but not in adult neurons periodic inward currents (PICs) that persisted for several hours after the last application of the agonist. 3. PICs, which were generated by nonspecific cationic currents, reversed polarity at 2.8 +/- 3 (SD) mV. They were reversibly blocked by kynurenic acid (1 mM), suggesting that they were mediated by glutamate acting on ionotropic receptors. They were also abolished in a nominally Ca(2+)-free medium. 4. PICs were irreversibly abolished by thapsigargin (10 microM) but were unaffected by ryanodine (10-40 microM). Caffeine (2 mM) also reversibly blocked PICs; this effect was independent from adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation, inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ current, or blockade of adenosine receptors. 5. We suggest that, in neonatal slices, mGluRs-induced PICs are triggered by elevation of [Ca2+]i, after mobilization of Ca2+ from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-sensitive stores. This will lead to a persistent, pulsatile release of glutamate from presynaptic nerve terminals, a phenomenon that is probably maintained via a calcium-induced-calcium release process.

  18. Free energy and dendritic self-organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan J Kiebel

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we pursue recent observations that, through selective dendritic filtering, single neurons respond to specific sequences of presynaptic inputs. We try to provide a principled and mechanistic account of this selectivity by applying the free energy principle to a dendrite that is immersed in its neuropil or environment. We assume that neurons self-organize to minimise a free energy bound on the self-information or surprise of presynaptic inputs that are sampled. We model this as a selective pruning of dendritic spines that are expressed on a dendritic branch. This pruning occurs when the optimized postsynaptic gain falls below a threshold. Crucially, postsynaptic gain is itself optimized with respect to free energy. Pruning suppresses free energy as the dendrite selects presynaptic signals that conform to its expectations, specified by a generative model implicit in its intracellular kinetics. Not only does this provide a principled account of how neurons organize and selectively sample the myriad of potential presynaptic inputs they are exposed to, but it also connects the optimization of elemental neuronal (dendritic processing to generic (surprise or evidence-based schemes in statistics and machine learning, such as Bayesian model selection and automatic relevance determination.

  19. Synaptic Control of Secretory Trafficking in Dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Hanus

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Localized signaling in neuronal dendrites requires tight spatial control of membrane composition. Upon initial synthesis, nascent secretory cargo in dendrites exits the endoplasmic reticulum (ER from local zones of ER complexity that are spatially coupled to post-ER compartments. Although newly synthesized membrane proteins can be processed locally, the mechanisms that control the spatial range of secretory cargo transport in dendritic segments are unknown. Here, we monitored the dynamics of nascent membrane proteins in dendritic post-ER compartments under regimes of low or increased neuronal activity. In response to activity blockade, post-ER carriers are highly mobile and are transported over long distances. Conversely, increasing synaptic activity dramatically restricts the spatial scale of post-ER trafficking along dendrites. This activity-induced confinement of secretory cargo requires site-specific phosphorylation of the kinesin motor KIF17 by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMK. Thus, the length scales of early secretory trafficking in dendrites are tuned by activity-dependent regulation of microtubule-dependent transport.

  20. CREB Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotide Administration into the Dorsal Hippocampal CA3 Region Impairs Long- but Not Short-Term Spatial Memory in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian, Cedrick; Mons, Nicole; Roullet, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    The transcription factor cAMP response-element binding protein (CREB) has a pivotal role in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent long-term memory. We recently demonstrated that the dorsal hippocampal CA3 region is involved in memory consolidation of spatial information tested on a Morris water maze in mice. To test whether…

  1. The Kinetics, Stability and Thermal Contact Resistance of Nickel-Ca3Co4O9 Interfaces Formed by Spark Plasma Sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgate, Tim; Wu, NingYu; Søndergaard, M.

    2012-01-01

    (Ca3Co4O9) have been formed directly by spark plasma sintering (SPS). An intermediate NiO phase is formed during the SPS processes, which grows during post heating with Co entering from the cobaltate side to form a graded Ni1-xCoxO interfacial layer. The electrical and thermal transport across...

  2. Preliminary observation of self-reduction of Eu ions in α-Ca3(PO4)2 phosphors prepared in air condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Chao; Zhu, Yangguang; Xu, Chuanyan; Li, Yadong

    2016-11-01

    A series of Eu doped α-Ca3(PO4)2 phosphors were synthesized by a high-temperature solid-state reaction in air atmosphere. The crystal structures, photoluminescence properties of the phosphors were systematically studied. The emission spectra showed a broad emission band centered at 492 nm attributed to the typical 4f65d1→4f7 transition of Eu2+ions, and several sharp peaks from 560 to 750 nm attributed to the 5D0→7FJ(J=0,1,2,3,4) transition of Eu3+ions. The results, combined with the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, demonstrate self-reduction of Eu3+to Eu2+occurred in α-Ca3(PO4)2 matrix for the first time. This suggested that the Eu2+ions in α-Ca3(PO4)2could serve as a spectroscopic probe to detect the content of α-Ca3(PO4)2in phase transition process.

  3. Axonal sorting of Kir3.3 defines a GABA-containing neuron in the CA3 region of rodent hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Gisela; Eulitz, Dirk; Thiele, Theodor; Pahner, Ingrid; Schröter, Sascha; Takamori, Shigeo; Grosse, Johannes; Wickman, Kevin; Tapp, Rosemarie; Veh, Rüdiger W; Ottersen, Ole Petter; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun

    2003-11-01

    Hippocampal interneurons comprise a heterogeneous group of locally acting GABAergic neurons. In addition to their variability in cotransmitter content and receptor profile, they express a variety of potassium channels that specify their individual properties. Here we describe a new type of large GABA-containing neuron in rodent hippocampus that is characterized by an axonal sorting of the potassium channel Kir3.3. The parent cell bodies of the Kir3.3-positive axons are located in CA3, as assessed by primary cultures derived from hippocampal subareas. At postnatal day 14 these neurons appear at the border between stratum oriens and stratum pyramidale of CA3, from where their axons pass through stratum pyramidale to join the mossy fiber tract. In adult hippocampus, high levels of Kir3.3 channel protein exist in axons that run with the mossy fiber tract. Kir3.3 and the vesicular GABA transporter could be identified in subpopulations of large synaptic terminals that probably derive from Kir3.3 neurons. Axonal sorting of Kir3.3 appears to be typical of a group of large inhibitory neurons, including Purkinje cells and a novel type of interneuron in CA3. Kir3.3 neurons might modulate the activity of CA3 circuitries and consequently memory processing in the hippocampus.

  4. Beta/gamma oscillatory activity in the CA3 hippocampal area is depressed by aberrant GABAergic transmission from the dentate gyrus after seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño, Mario; Vivar, Carmen; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2007-01-03

    Oscillatory activity in the CA3 region is thought to be involved in the encoding and retrieval of information. These oscillations originate from the recurrent excitation between pyramidal cells that are entrained by the synchronous rhythmic inhibition of local interneurons. We show here that, after seizures, the dentate gyrus (DG) tonically inhibits beta/gamma (20-24 Hz) field oscillations in the CA3 area through GABA-mediated signaling. These oscillations originate in the interneuron network because they are maintained in the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, and they can be blocked by GABA(A) receptor antagonists or by perfusion of a calcium-free extracellular medium. Inhibition of this oscillatory activity requires intact DG-to-CA3 connections, and it is suppressed by the activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR). The influence of mGluR activation was reflected in the spontaneous subthreshold membrane oscillations of CA3 interneurons after one seizure but could also be observed in pyramidal cells after several seizures. Coincident stimulation of the DG at and beta/gamma frequencies produced a frequency-dependent excitation of interneurons and the inhibition of pyramidal cells. Indeed, these effects were maximal at the frequency that matched the mGluR-sensitive spontaneous field oscillations, suggesting a resonance phenomenon. Our results shed light on the mechanisms that may underlie the deficits in memory and cognition observed after epileptic seizures.

  5. Anisomycin Injection in Area CA3 of the Hippocampus Impairs Both Short-Term and Long-Term Memories of Contextual Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remaud, Jessica; Ceccom, Johnatan; Carponcy, Julien; Dugué, Laura; Menchon, Gregory; Pech, Stéphane; Halley, Helene; Francés, Bernard; Dahan, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Protein synthesis is involved in the consolidation of short-term memory into long-term memory. Previous electrophysiological data concerning LTP in CA3 suggest that protein synthesis in that region might also be necessary for short-term memory. We tested this hypothesis by locally injecting the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin in hippocampal…

  6. The Relationship between the Field-Shifting Phenomenon and Representational Coherence of Place Cells in CA1 and CA3 in a Cue-Altered Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Inah; Knierim, James J.

    2007-01-01

    Subfields of the hippocampus display differential dynamics in processing a spatial environment, especially when changes are introduced to the environment. Specifically, when familiar cues in the environment are spatially rearranged, place cells in the CA3 subfield tend to rotate with a particular set of cues (e.g., proximal cues), maintaining a…

  7. Phosphorylation of the tau protein sequence 199-205 in the hippocampal CA3 region of Syrian hamsters in adulthood and during aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartig, W; Oklejewicz, M; Strijkstra, AM; Boerema, AS; Stieler, J; Arendt, T

    2005-01-01

    Paired helical filaments formed by the abnormally phosphorylated microtubule-associated tau are a main sign of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. The hippocampal CA3 region, a brain region with a high degree of synaptic plasticity, is known to be strongly involved in tau hype

  8. Differential Needs of Zinc in the CA3 Area of Dorsal Hippocampus for the Consolidation of Contextual Fear and Spatial Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccom, Johnatan; Bouhsira, Emilie; Halley, Helene; Daumas, Stephanie; Lassalle, Jean Michel

    2013-01-01

    One peculiarity of the hippocampal CA3 mossy fiber terminals is the co-release of zinc and glutamate upon synaptic transmission. How these two players act on hippocampal-dependent memories is still unclear. To decipher their respective involvement in memory consolidation, a pharmacological approach was chosen. Using two hippocampal-dependent…

  9. Synthesis and photoluminescence properties of Ca3R2-xWO9:xEu3+(R=Y, Gd) phosphors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    茹晶晶; 秦小焕; 颜桂炀; 陈建中

    2015-01-01

    Ca3R2–xWO9:xEu3+(R=Y, Gd) red-emitting phosphors were prepared by solid state reactions. These samples were charac-terized by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry analysis (DSC-TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), photoluminescence (PL) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) analyses. The optimum sintering temperature for these phosphors was 1100 ºC, and the optimum sintering time was 2 h. The optimum doped con-centration of Eu3+in Ca3Y2–xWO9:xEu3+and Ca3Gd2–xWO9:xEu3+were x=1.5 and x=1.1, respectively. These phosphors could be ex-cited by near-UV light of 394 nm and blue light of 465 nm, and showed strong red emission line at 612 nm (5D0→7F2), which indi-cated that Ca3R2–xWO9:xEu3+(R=Y, Gd) were promising red candidates for white LED.

  10. A first-principles study of the structural and elastic properties of orthorhombic and tetragonal Ca3Mn2O7

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Wei; Tong Pei-Qing

    2013-01-01

    The structural and elastic properties of multiferroic Ca3Mn2O7 with ferroelectric orthorhombic (O-phase) and paraelectric tetragonal structures (T-phase) have been studied by first-principles calculations within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and the GGA plus Hubbard U approaches (GGA + U).The calculated theoretical structures are in good agreement with the experimental values.The T-phase is found to be antiferromagnetic (AFM) and the AFM O-phase is more stable than the T-phase,which also agree with the experiments.On these bases,the single-crystal elastic constants (Cijs) and elastic properties of polycrystalline aggregates are investigated for the two phases.Our elasticity calculations indicate Ca3Mn2O7 is mechanically stable against volume expansions.The AFM O-phase is found to be a ductile material,while the AFM T-phase shows brittle nature and tends to be elastically isotropic.We also investigate the influence of strong correlation effects on the elastic properties,qualitatively consistent results are obtained in a reasonable range of values of U.Finally,the ionicity is discussed by Bader analysis.Our work provides useful guidance for the experimental elasticity measurements of Ca3Mn2O7,and makes the strain energy calculation in multiferroic Ca3Mn2O7 thin films possible.

  11. Retraction - Request that it is necessary to retract paper: Thermal and electrical energy yield analysis of a directly water cooled photovoltaic module DOI:10.2298/TSCI130118144M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prof. Dr. Simeon Oka, Editor-in-chief of the journal THERMAL SCIENCE request that it is necessary to retract paper Thermal and electrical energy yield analysis of a directly water cooled photovoltaic module DOI:10.2298/TSCI130118144M by Mtunzi Busiso, Meyer Edson L., Michael Simon published in the journal Thermal Science, Vol. 20, Year 2016, No. 1, pp. 155-163 since, by technical error of the Editorial stuff, this paper has already been published in the journal THERMAL SCIENCE, Supplement 2, 2015, Vol. 19, pp. S547-S555. Link to the retracted article 2016 Volume 20, Issue 1, Pages: 155-163

  12. Hypersensitivity of the hippocampal CA3 region to stress-induced neurodegeneration and amyloidogenesis in a rat model of surgical menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan-Guang; Wang, Rui-Min; Scott, Erin; Han, Dong; Dong, Yan; Tu, Jing-Yi; Yang, Fang; Reddy Sareddy, Gangadhara; Vadlamudi, Ratna K; Brann, Darrell W

    2013-05-01

    Females who enter menopause prematurely via bilateral ovariectomy (surgical menopause) have a significantly increased risk for cognitive decline and dementia. To help elucidate the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, we used an animal model of surgical menopause, long-term (10-week) bilateral ovariectomy in female rats. Herein, we demonstrate that long-term oestrogen deprivation dramatically increases sensitivity of the normally resistant hippocampal CA3 region to ischaemic stress, an effect that was gender-specific, as it was not observed in long-term orchiectomized males. Furthermore, the enhanced damage to the CA3 region correlated with a worse cognitive outcome after ischaemic stress. Long-term ovariectomized rats also displayed a robust hyperinduction of Alzheimer's disease-related proteins in the CA3 region and a switch in amyloid precursor protein processing from non-amyloidogenic to amyloidogenic following ischaemic stress CA3 hypersensitivity also extended to an Alzheimer's disease-relevant insult, as the CA3 region of long-term ovariectomized rats was profoundly hypersensitive to the neurotoxic effects of amyloid-β1-42, the most amyloidogenic form of the amyloid-β peptide. Additional studies revealed that CA3 region hypersensitivity, Alzheimer's disease-related protein induction, and amyloidogenesis are mediated by a NADPH oxidase/superoxide/c-Jun N-terminal kinase/c-Jun signalling pathway, involving both transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. In addition, while 17β-oestradiol replacement at the end of the long-term oestrogen deprivation period could not prevent CA3 hypersensitivity and amyloidogenesis, if 17β-oestradiol was initiated at the time of ovariectomy and maintained throughout the 10-week oestrogen deprivation period, it completely prevented these events, providing support for the 'critical window' hypothesis for oestrogen replacement therapy benefit. Collectively, these findings may help explain the increased risk of

  13. Retraction statement: 'Species distributions shift downward across western North America' by M.A. Harsch and J. Hille Ris Lambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The above article, published online on 18 August 2014 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, Dr Melanie Harsch and Associate Professor Janneke Hille Ris Lambers, journal Editor-in-Chief, Professor Stephen Long, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The retraction has been agreed for the following reasons: a coding error affected the results and therefore invalidated the broadscale conclusions presented in the article. The article presented broad-scale patterns of species distribution shifts in response to recent climate change. Unfortunately, it has since been found that one approach used to account for sampling bias, the null model approach, was affected by the coding error. Following the identification of the coding error, we are therefore retracting the article. We thank Drs Adam Wolf and William Anderegg for bringing this issue to our attention.

  14. In Situ Observation of Cell-to-Dendrite Transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Xiu-Hong; HONG Yong; JIN Wei-Qing

    2005-01-01

    @@ The cell-to-dendrite transition of succinonitrile melt suspended on a loop-shaped Pt heater is observed in real time by a differential interference microscope coupled with Schlieren technique. The transition is divided into two parts: a dendrite coalition process and a subsequent dendrite elimination process. Firstly the dendrites from the same cell are united into a single dendrite. Secondly the competitive growth of dendrites from different cells leads to the elimination of dendrites. The two processes can be understood when involving crystallographic orientation. In addition, the tip velocity and primary spacing of a cell/dendrite are also measured. It turns out that the primary spacing has a significant jump, whereas the growth velocity has no abrupt change during the cell-to-dendrite transition.

  15. Dendritic cells in melanoma - immunohistochemical study and research trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedelcu, Roxana Ioana; Ion, Daniela Adriana; Holeab, Cosmin Adrian; Cioplea, Mirela Daniela; Brînzea, Alice; Zurac, Sabina Andrada

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous dendritic cells play multiple physiological roles and are involved in various pathophysiological processes. Research studies of dendritic cells abound in the medical literature. Nevertheless, the role of dendritic cells in melanoma regression phenomenon is not completely understood. We conducted a scientometric analysis in order to highlight the current state on research regarding dendritic cells and melanoma. We also performed an immunohistochemical study, using specific markers for dendritic cells (CD1a, langerin). We evaluated the frequency and distribution of dendritic cells in areas of tumor regression compared to the areas of inflammatory infiltrate of melanoma without regression. The immunohistochemical study we performed revealed that dendritic cells are more frequent in the regressed areas, comparing with non-regressed ones. In regressed areas, dendritic cells have a predominant nodular pattern (19 cases), followed by diffuse isolate pattern (eight cases) and mixed pattern (diffuse and nodular) (three cases). In melanoma without regression, most cases presented a diffuse pattern (27 cases) of dendritic cells distribution. In conclusion, our immunohistochemical study stressed differences between frequency and distribution of dendritic cells located in the melanoma with regression and melanoma without regression. These data suggest that dendritic cells are involved in the regression phenomenon. Following the literature analysis we obtained, we observed that dendritic cells profile in melanoma with regression was poorly studied. Insights into antitumor immune response and dendritic cells may be essential for the understanding of the potential prognostic role of dendritic cells in melanoma and for the development of new promising therapeutic strategies for melanoma.

  16. Usefulness of Titanized Polypropylene Mesh and an Anchor System for Correction of Lower Lid Retraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Naoshige; Watanabe, Ayako

    2016-02-01

    Because of the lower eyelid's free edge anatomy, it is difficult to preserve its contours after reconstruction. We recently attempted a new operative procedure to treat 2 cases of lower lid retraction by using a titanized polypropylene mesh and an anchor system. As the lower lid skin is elevated laterally in an oblique upward direction, the location of the mesh insertion is decided and the site is marked accordingly. The mesh to be inserted is approximately 20 × 10 mm. A skin incision is rendered from the medial to the lateral side of the lower eyelid edge, and the line of incision is raised beyond the lateral canthus along the skinfold. The mesh insertion site is then developed in the deep fat layer. After hemostasis, the mesh is densely sutured with the fat tissue. Next, the lateral orbital rim is exposed under the periosteum, and 2 anchors, each 2 mm in diameter, are driven into place. The thread connected to each anchor is passed through the mesh and subcutaneous tissue and placed in the lateral orbital rim. Excess skin is trimmed, and the wound is closed. Both patients had complained of dry eye and lacrimation before treatment. No postoperative complications were observed, and in both cases, the symptoms disappeared, and the patient's appearance was improved. During the follow-up period, which lasted from 15 to 29 months, elevation of the lower eyelid edge was kept at a favorable level, and neither case exhibited a relapse of retraction.

  17. [Retracted] Slit-miR-218-Robo axis regulates retinal neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yichun; Sun, Bei; Han, Quanhong; Han, Shuang; Wang, Yuchuan; Chen, Ying

    2016-12-01

    Following the publication of this article, it was brought to our attention that five of the Figures contained in this study were published entirely, or in part, in the following publication, on which several of us were co-authors: Han S, Kong YC, Sun B, Han QH, Chen Y and Wang YC: microRNA-218 inhibits oxygen-induced retinal neovascularization via reducing the expression of roundabout 1. Chin Med J (Engl) 129: 709-715, 2016. While we had intended that these papers offered different research perspectives, we were reminded of the fact that, in submitting the article to International Journal of Molecular Medicine, the work described therein was required to be "original research that has not been published previously, and is not under consideration for publication elsewhere, in whole or in part". Therefore, owing to the redundancy in the data between these publications, the above paper is to be retracted. All the authors have agreed to the retraction. We sincerely apologize for our misunderstanding, and deeply regret any inconvenience this mistake has caused.[the original article was published in the International Journal of Molecular Medicine 37: 1139-1145, 2016; DOI: 10.3892/ijmm.2016.2511].

  18. Effect of intrusive and retraction forces in labial and lingual orthodontics: A finite element study

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    Rohan Mascarenhas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Lingual orthodontics differs in biomechanics as compared to labial system and has biomechanical advantages. Although theoretical approaches have explained the differences between labial and lingual orthodontics, the finite element method (FEM may be better suited to analyze these differences. This study analyzes the effect of vertical and horizontal forces together on the tooth using FEM. Materials and Methods: An extracted right maxillary central incisor was radiographed and was used to create a solid model using ANSYS. The geometric model was converted into a finite element model with the help of ANSYS software. The model consists of 27,000 elements and 30,000 nodes. Two force vectors (vertical and horizontal were applied labially and lingually at 3 different heights- 4 mm, 5 mm and 6 mm from the incisal edge. Results: In the labial system, the net force vector passes through the center of resistance (CR and brings about intrusion. The net force vector in lingual orthodontics does not pass through the center of resistance and produces lingual tipping of the incisors. Conclusion: Intrusion and retraction forces bring about tipping of incisors in lingual orthodontics. The same amount of intrusion and retraction forces brings about intrusion of incisors in labial orthodontics. Therefore, direction and amount of forces should be carefully and judiciously applied after taking into consideration the resultant biomechanical differences.

  19. Vision Therapy for Convergence Insufficiency Co-Incident with Duane Retraction Syndrome

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    Tonya Tira, OD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Duane retraction syndrome (DRS is a congenital ocular motility disorder characterized by limited abduction and/or limited adduction, globe retraction, and narrowing of the palpebral fissure on adduction. Because of adduction limits, these patients may also exhibit convergence insufficiency (CI. Symptomatic individuals can often benefit from optometric vision therapy (OVT. Although OVT does not treat the DRS itself, these procedural interventions can alleviate symptoms by improving vergence and accommodative ability. Case: A 10-year-old girl was referred for complaints of asthenopia at near and intermittent horizontal diplopia on side gaze. She exhibited signs of intermittent alternating exotropia at near and poor pursuit eye movements. A visual skills evaluation revealed DRS and CI; with the latter being managed successfully with OVT. Symptoms were relieved entirely with a relatively short course of therapy for the CI, despite the presence of adduction limitations due to congenital miswiring of the lateral rectus. Conclusion: Optometric vision therapy is not a common treatment consideration for patients with DRS, but underlying binocular vision anomalies may cause some of these patients to be symptomatic. Appropriate testing should be performed to reveal these visual skills deficits and referrals should be made for OVT when indicated. It is important to understand that a disease or pathological state can have one or more associated functional overlays that can be successfully treated with a resultant improved quality of life.

  20. Does retraction of the sternum during median sternotomy result in brachial plexus injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Scott; O'Neill, Bridie; Bilal, Haris; Waterworth, Paul

    2013-07-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'does retraction of the sternum during median sternotomy result in brachial plexus injuries or peripheral neuropathies?' Altogether 58 papers were found using the reported search, of which 12 represented the best evidence to answer the question. The authors, date, journal and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers were tabulated. Caudal placement of the retractor or relieving the pressure superiorly by removing the upper blades of a retractor (P = 0.02) and use of a caudally placed symmetrical retractor has been shown to reduce neuropathy. Positioning of the patient with 'hands up' positioning showed significant reduction in the incidence of brachial plexus injuries. Furthermore, how wide the retractor is opened and use of an asymmetrical retractor for internal mammary artery (IMA) harvesting are also important factors in quantifying risk of postoperative neuropathy. Wider sternal retraction and longer bypass time did increase the risk of developing postoperative neuropathy. Three asymmetrical retractors were looked at that demonstrates the Delacroix-Chevalier to be the safest (P retractor and using a caudally placed retractor.

  1. Sustained increase of spontaneous input and spike transfer in the CA3-CA1 pathway following long-term potentiation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ruiz, Antonio; Makarov, Valeri A; Herreras, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is commonly used to study synaptic plasticity but the associated changes in the spontaneous activity of individual neurons or the computational properties of neural networks in vivo remain largely unclear. The multisynaptic origin of spontaneous spikes makes it difficult to estimate the impact of a particular potentiated input. Accordingly, we adopted an approach that isolates pathway-specific postsynaptic activity from raw local field potentials (LFPs) in the rat hippocampus in order to study the effects of LTP on ongoing spike transfer between cell pairs in the CA3-CA1 pathway. CA1 Schaffer-specific LFPs elicited by spontaneous clustered firing of CA3 pyramidal cells involved a regular succession of elementary micro-field-EPSPs (gamma-frequency) that fired spikes in CA1 units. LTP increased the amplitude but not the frequency of these ongoing excitatory quanta. Also, the proportion of Schaffer-driven spikes in both CA1 pyramidal cells and interneurons increased in a cell-specific manner only in previously connected CA3-CA1 cell pairs, i.e., when the CA3 pyramidal cell had shown pre-LTP significant correlation with firing of a CA1 unit and potentiated spike-triggered average (STA) of Schaffer LFPs following LTP. Moreover, LTP produced subtle reorganization of presynaptic CA3 cell assemblies. These findings show effective enhancement of pathway-specific ongoing activity which leads to increased spike transfer in potentiated segments of a network. They indicate that plastic phenomena induced by external protocols may intensify spontaneous information flow across specific channels as proposed in transsynaptic propagation of plasticity and synfire chain hypotheses that may be the substrate for different types of memory involving multiple brain structures.

  2. Sustained increase of spontaneous input and spike transfer in the CA3-CA1 pathway following long term potentiation in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar eHerreras

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Long term potentiation (LTP is commonly used to study synaptic plasticity but the associated changes in the spontaneous activity of individual neurons or the computational properties of neural networks in vivo remain largely unclear. The multisynaptic origin of spontaneous spikes makes difficult estimating the impact of a particular potentiated input. Accordingly, we adopted an approach that isolates pathway-specific postsynaptic activity from raw local field potentials (LFPs in the rat hippocampus in order to study the effects of LTP on ongoing spike transfer between cell pairs in the CA3-CA1 pathway. CA1 Schaffer-specific LFPs elicited by spontaneous clustered firing of CA3 pyramidal cells involved a regular succession of elementary micro-field-EPSPs (gamma-frequency that fired spikes in CA1 units. LTP increased the amplitude but not the frequency of these ongoing excitatory quanta. Also, the proportion of Schaffer-driven spikes in both CA1 pyramidal cells and interneurons increased in a cell-specific manner only in previously connected CA3-CA1 cell pairs, i.e., when the CA3 pyramidal cell had shown pre-LTP significant correlation with firing of a CA1 unit and potentiated spike-triggered average of Schaffer LFPs following LTP. Moreover, LTP produced subtle reorganization of presynaptic CA3 cell assemblies. These findings show effective enhancement of pathway specific ongoing activity which leads to increased spike transfer in potentiated segments of a network. These indicate that plastic phenomena induced by external protocols may intensify spontaneous information flow across specific channels as proposed in transsynaptic propagation of plasticity and synfire chain hypotheses that may be the substrate for different types of memory involving multiple brain structures.

  3. [Alteration of neural oscillations in hippocampal CA3 area in the fast avoidance response rat before and after electric shock avoidance training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Wei; Wang, Dan-Dan; Wang, Dan; Guan, Yan; Tang, Ying-Ying; Ye, Zheng; Li, Jing; Li, Min; Zhu, Zai-Man; Pan, Qun-Wan

    2015-10-25

    The purpose of the present study is to explore the relationship of spatial learning ability and specific electrical activities of neural oscillations in the rat. The fast and general avoidance response groups were selected on the basis of the animals' responses to the electric shock in Y type maze, and their local field potentials (LFPs) of hippocampal CA3 area were recorded by wireless telemetry before and after shock avoidance training, respectively. The components of neural oscillations related to spatial identifying and learning ability were analyzed. The results showed that, compared with the general avoidance response group, the fast avoidance response group did not show any differences of LFPs in hippocampal CA3 area before electric shock avoidance trial, but showed significantly increased percentages of 0-10 Hz and 30-40 Hz rhythm in right hippocampal CA3 area after the shock avoidance training (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05). Fast Fourier transform showed that percentage increase of 0-10 Hz band occurred mainly in θ (3-7 Hz) frequency, and 30-40 Hz frequency change was equivalent to the γ1 band. Furthermore, compared with those before training, only the percentages of β, β2 (20-30 Hz) and γ1 rhythm increased (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05) in fast avoidance response rats after training, while the θ rhythm percentage remained unchanged. In contrast, θ rhythm percentage and the large amplitude (intensity: +2.5 - -2.5 db) θ waves in right CA3 area of general avoidance response rats were significantly reduced after training (P < 0.01). These results suggest that the increased percentages of β2 and γ1 rhythm and high-level (unchanged) percentage of θ rhythm in the right hippocampus CA3 area might be related to strong spatial cognition ability of fast avoidance response rats.

  4. Slow feedback inhibition in the CA3 area of the rat hippocampus by synergistic synaptic activation of mGluR1 and mGluR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Masahiro; Gerber, Urs

    2002-11-01

    Interneurons are critical in regulating the excitability of principal cells in neuronal circuits, thereby modulating the output of neuronal networks. We investigated synaptically evoked inhibitory responses in CA3 pyramidal cells mediated by metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) expressed somatodendritically by interneurons. Although pharmacological activation of mGluRs in interneurons has been shown to enhance their excitability, the inability to record mGluR-mediated synaptic responses has precluded detailed characterization of mGluR function in hippocampal interneurons. We found that a single extracellular pulse in CA3 stratum pyramidale was sufficient to induce disynaptic inhibitory responses mediated by postsynaptic mGluRs of the interneurons in CA3 pyramidal cells of hippocampal slice cultures. The disynaptic inhibitory response followed a short-latency monosynaptic inhibitory response, and was observed at stimulus intensities evoking half-maximal monosynaptic IPSCs. Synergistic activation of mGluR1 and mGluR5 was required to induce the full inhibitory response. When recordings were obtained from interneurons in CA3 stratum radiatum or stratum oriens, a single extracellular stimulus induced a slow inward cationic current with a time course corresponding to the slow inhibitory response measured in pyramidal cells. DCG IV, a group II mGluR agonist, which specifically blocks synaptic transmission through mossy fibres, had no effect on mGluR-mediated synaptic responses in interneurons, suggesting that feed-forward inhibition via mossy fibres is not involved. Thus, postsynaptic mGluR1 and mGluR5 in hippocampal interneurons cooperatively mediate slow feedback inhibition of CA3 pyramidal cells. This mechanism may allow interneurons to monitor activity levels from populations of neighbouring principal cells to adapt inhibitory tone to the state of the network.

  5. Influence of Slow Oscillation on Hippocampal Activity and Ripples Through Cortico-Hippocampal Synaptic Interactions, Analyzed by a Cortical-CA3-CA1 Network Model

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    Jiannis eTaxidis

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal sharp wave-ripple complexes (SWRs involve the synchronous discharge of thousands of cells throughout the CA3-CA1-subiculum-entorhinal cortex axis. Their strong transient output affects cortical targets, rendering SWRs a possible means for memory transfer from the hippocampus to the neocortex for long-term storage. Neurophysiological observations of hippocampal activity modulation by the cortical slow oscillation (SO during deep sleep and anesthesia, and correlations between ripples and UP states, support the role of SWRs in memory consolidation through a cortico-hippocampal feedback loop. We couple a cortical network exhibiting SO with a hippocampal CA3-CA1 computational network model exhibiting SWRs, in order to model such cortico-hippocampal correlations and uncover important parameters and coupling mechanisms controlling them. The cortical oscillatory output entrains the CA3 network via connections representing the mossy fiber input, and the CA1 network via the temporoammonic pathway. The spiking activity in CA3 and CA1 is shown to depend on the excitation-to-inhibition ratio, induced by combining the two hippocampal inputs, with mossy fiber input controlling the UP-state correlation of CA3 population bursts and corresponding SWRs, whereas the temporoammonic input affects the overall CA1 spiking activity. Ripple characteristics and pyramidal spiking participation to SWRs are shaped by the strength of the Schaffer collateral drive. A set of in vivo recordings from the rat hippocampus confirms a model-predicted segregation of pyramidal cells into subgroups according to the SO state where they preferentially fire and their response to SWRs. These groups can potentially play distinct functional roles in the replay of spike sequences.

  6. Oxygen/glucose deprivation induces a reduction in synaptic AMPA receptors on hippocampal CA3 neurons mediated by mGluR1 and adenosine A3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Siobhan H; Jaafari, Nadia; Cimarosti, Helena; Hanley, Jonathan G; Henley, Jeremy M; Mellor, Jack R

    2011-08-17

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are highly sensitive to ischemic damage, whereas neighboring CA3 pyramidal neurons are less susceptible. It is proposed that switching of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunits on CA1 neurons during an in vitro model of ischemia, oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD), leads to an enhanced permeability of AMPARs to Ca(2+), resulting in delayed cell death. However, it is unclear whether the same mechanisms exist in CA3 neurons and whether this underlies the differential sensitivity to ischemia. Here, we investigated the consequences of OGD for AMPAR function in CA3 neurons using electrophysiological recordings in rat hippocampal slices. Following a 15 min OGD protocol, a substantial depression of AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission was observed at CA3 associational/commissural and mossy fiber synapses but not CA1 Schaffer collateral synapses. The depression of synaptic transmission following OGD was prevented by metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) or A(3) receptor antagonists, indicating a role for both glutamate and adenosine release. Inhibition of PLC, PKC, or chelation of intracellular Ca(2+) also prevented the depression of synaptic transmission. Inclusion of peptides to interrupt the interaction between GluA2 and PICK1 or dynamin and amphiphysin prevented the depression of transmission, suggesting a dynamin and PICK1-dependent internalization of AMPARs after OGD. We also show that a reduction in surface and total AMPAR protein levels after OGD was prevented by mGluR1 or A(3) receptor antagonists, indicating that AMPARs are degraded following internalization. Thus, we describe a novel mechanism for the removal of AMPARs in CA3 pyramidal neurons following OGD that has the potential to reduce excitotoxicity and promote neuroprotection.

  7. Oxygen/glucose Deprivation Induces a Reduction in Synaptic AMPA Receptors on Hippocampal CA3 Neurons Mediated by mGluR1 and A3 Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Siobhan H.; Jaafari, Nadia; Cimarosti, Helena; Hanley, Jonathan G.; Henley, Jeremy M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are highly sensitive to ischemic damage, whereas neighbouring CA3 pyramidal neurons are less susceptible. It is proposed that switching of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunits on CA1 neurons during an in vitro model of ischemia, oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD), leads to an enhanced permeability of AMPARs to Ca2+ resulting in delayed cell death. However, it is unclear if the same mechanisms exist in CA3 neurons and whether this underlies the differential sensitivity to ischemia. Here, we investigated the consequences of OGD for AMPAR function in CA3 neurons using electrophysiological recordings in rat hippocampal slices. Following a 15 minute OGD protocol a substantial depression of AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission was observed at CA3 associational/commissural and mossy fiber synapses but not CA1 Schaffer collateral synapses. The depression of synaptic transmission following OGD was prevented by mGluR1 or A3 receptor antagonists, indicating a role for both glutamate and adenosine release. Inhibition of PLC, PKC or chelation of intracellular Ca2+ also prevented the depression of synaptic transmission. Inclusion of peptides to interrupt the interaction between GluA2 and PICK1 or dynamin and amphiphysin prevented the depression of transmission, suggesting a dynamin and PICK1-dependent internalisation of AMPARs after OGD. We also show a reduction in surface and total AMPAR protein levels after OGD was prevented by mGluR1 or A3 receptor antagonists indicating that AMPARs are degraded following internalisation. Thus, we describe a novel mechanism for the removal of AMPARs in CA3 pyramidal neurons following OGD that has the potential to reduce excitotoxicity and promote neuroprotection. PMID:21849555

  8. mTORC2 controls dendritic arbor development through Akt-mTORC1-p70S6K pathway

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    Malgorzata Barbara Urbanska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is a serine/threonine protein kinase that was identified as one of the important regulators of dendritogenesis. mTOR forms two functionally separate complexes (mTORC in mammalian cells. The complexes are defined by unique mTOR binding partners, Raptor for the mTORC1, and Rictor for the mTORC2. These two complexes control different cellular processes and their roles seem non-overlapping. mTORC1 was initially characterized as a protein translation regulator while mTORC2 was shown to affect cytoskeleton. Both processes are known to be essential for neuron development, but until now the role of particular mTORCs in dendritogenesis was not studied. Therefore, in our study we precisely characterized mTOR involvement in dendrite development. Using RNA interference in developing rat hippocampal neurons in culture we targeted either Raptor or Rictor to separate activities of mTORC1 and mTORC2, respectively. Dendritic arbors of neurons, depleted of either one of these proteins were reduced. However, no obvious differences were observed in context of dendrite number, length, dendritic arbor complexity and dynamics of dendritic growth and retraction between cells with either Raptor or Rictor knockdown. Yet on the molecular level we were able to pin-point differences between cells lacking Rictor and Raptor. For example, Rictor, but not Raptor knockdown phenotype could be rescued by overexpression of a constitutively active mutant of Akt (myr-Akt, a kinase known to be mTORC2 effector. Besides of being mTORC2 effector, Akt is the most important positive regulator of mTORC1. Since, Rictor and Raptor knockdown have similar and not additive dendritic phenotypes, we hypothesized that mTORC1 acts downstream of mTORC2 during dendritic growth. Therefore, we tested the effects of Rictor knockdown in neurons on phosphorylation of S6 (Ser-235/236 and eIF4B (Ser-422, canonical targets for mTORC1. Indeed, downregulation of Rictor

  9. Evaluating the effects of consolidation on intrusion and retraction using temporary anchorage devices—a FEM study

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    Monica Namburi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extraction of premolars and retracting the anterior teeth using mini-implants and anterior retraction hooks became advent now a day. In such treatments, consolidation of arches is not done in regular practice. So, the present study is concentrated on effects of consolidation in two implant and three implant combinations of retraction and intrusion. Methods A three-dimensional FEM model of maxillary teeth and periodontal ligament housed in the alveolar bone with the first premolars extracted is generated with appropriate number of elements and nodes. The models were broadly divided into two groups according to the no. of implants. Mini-implants were placed bilaterally between the second premolar and molar at varying heights (7, 10, 13 mm in group I, and along with bilateral implants, an additional mid-implant is placed between the central incisors as group II. Brackets with 0.022 slot were placed on the teeth, 19 × 25 SS wire is placed in the brackets, an anterior retraction hook was placed at 9 mm height, and analysis was done to evaluate the stresses and displacement patterns in consolidation and non-consolidation models. Results The results showed that consolidation of the anterior teeth during intrusion and retraction shows various advantages such as less stresses on the bone, PDL, implant, teeth, and no labial flaring of the anterior teeth and three implant system, i.e., two bilateral implant at 10 mm and a mid-implant at 12 mm between the centrals has shown to be better than other models as bodily movement is observed. Conclusion Consolidation is better than non consolidation during enmasse retraction and intrusion.

  10. Architecture of apical dendrites in the murine neocortex: dual apical dendritic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, M I; Pimienta, H; Caviness, V S; Jacobson, M; Crandall, J E; Kosik, K S

    1986-04-01

    A monoclonal antibody (5F9) against microtubule-associated protein 2 is a selective and sensitive marker for neocortical dendrites in the mouse. The marker stains all dendrites. It affords a particularly comprehensive picture of the patterns of arrangements of apical dendrites which are most intensely stained with this antibody. Dual systems of apical dendrites arise from the polymorphic neurons of layer VI, on the one hand, and the pyramidal neurons of layers II-V, on the other. Terminal arborization of the former is concentrated principally at the interface of layers V and IV, while that of the latter is in the molecular layer. Apical dendrites of both systems are grouped into fascicles. In supragranular layers and in upper layer VI-lower layer V, where apical dendrites are most abundant, the fascicles coalesce into septa. These generate a honeycomb-like pattern, subdividing these cortical levels into columnar spaces of approximately 20-40 micron diameter. At the level of layer IV, where the number of apical dendrites is greatly reduced, the fascicles are isolated bundles. These bundles have the form of circular, elliptical or rectangular columns in the primary somatosensory, temporal and frontal regions, respectively. Those in the barrel field are preferentially concentrated in the sides of barrels and the interbarrel septa. The configurations of the dendritic fascicles, particularly the midcortical bundles, may conform to the spatial configuration of investing axons of interneurons.

  11. Targeting vaccines to dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foged, Camilla; Sundblad, Anne; Hovgaard, Lars

    2002-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are specialized antigen presenting cells (APC) with a remarkable ability to take up antigens and stimulate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted specific immune responses. Recent discoveries have shown that their role in initiating primary immune responses seems to be far superior to that of B-cells and macrophages. DC are localized at strategic places in the body at sites used by pathogens to enter the organism, and are thereby in an optimal position to capture antigens. In general, vaccination strategies try to mimic the invasiveness of the pathogens. DC are considered to play a central role for the provocation of primary immune responses by vaccination. A rational way of improving the potency and safety of new and already existing vaccines could therefore be to direct vaccines specifically to DC. There is a need for developing multifunctional vaccine drug delivery systems (DDS) with adjuvant effect that target DC directly and induce optimal immune responses. This paper will review the current knowledge of DC physiology as well as the progress in the field of novel vaccination strategies that directly or indirectly aim at targeting DC.

  12. Retraction: Association between the use of biomass fuels on respiratory health of workers in food catering enterprises in Nairobi Kenya. Pan Afr Med J. 2013 May 6;15:12. doi: 10.11604/pamj.2013.15.12.1831.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The editors of the Pan African Medical Journal retract the manuscript above. The manuscript has been the subject of a protracted and unresolved authors dispute. Not all the authors listed in this manuscript consented to the retraction.

  13. Progenitor cells from the CA3 region of the embryonic day 19 rat hippocampus generate region-specific neuronal phenotypes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Ashok K

    2004-01-01

    Progenitor cells that endure in different regions of the CNS after the initial neurogenesis can be expanded in culture and used as a source of donor tissue for grafting in neurodegenerative diseases. However, the proliferation and differentiation characteristics of residual neural progenitor cells from distinct regions of the CNS are mostly unknown. This study elucidated the characteristics of progenitor cells that endure in the CA3 region of the hippocampus after neurogenesis, by in vitro analyses of cells that are responsive to epidermal growth factor (EGF) or fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) in the embryonic day 19 (E19) rat hippocampus. Isolated cells from the E19 CA3 region formed neurospheres in the presence of either EGF or FGF-2, but the yield of neurospheres was greater with FGF-2 exposure, Differentiation cultures revealed a greater yield of neurons from FGF-2 neurospheres (60%) than from EGF neurospheres (35%). Exposure to brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhanced the yield of neurons from EGF neurospheres but had no consequence on FGF-2 neurospheres. A large number of neurons from EGF/FGF-2 neurospheres demonstrated clearly palpable morphological features of CA3 pyramidal neurons and lacked gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) expression. However, a fraction of neurons (17-20%) from EGF/FGF-2 neurospheres expressed GABA, and exposure to BDNF increased the number of GABAergic neurons (30%) from EGF neurospheres. Neurons from EGF/FGF-2 neurospheres also contained smaller populations of calbindin- and calretinin-positive interneuron-like cells. Thus, progenitor cells responsive to FGF-2 are prevalent in the CA3 region of the E19 rat hippocampus and give rise to a greater number of neurons than progenitor cells responsive to EGF. However, both FGF-2- and EGF-responsive progenitor cells from E19 CA3 region are capable of giving rise to CA3 field-specific phenotypic neurons. These results imply that progenitor cells that persist in the hippocampus after

  14. Modeling cell elongation during germ band retraction: cell autonomy versus applied anisotropic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Holley E.; Veldhuis, Jim; Brodland, G. Wayne; Hutson, M. Shane

    2014-05-01

    The morphogenetic process of germ band retraction in Drosophila embryos involves coordinated movements of two epithelial tissues—germ band and amnioserosa. The germ band shortens along its rostral-caudal or head-to-tail axis, widens along its perpendicular dorsal-ventral axis, and uncurls from an initial ‘U’ shape. The amnioserosa mechanically assists this process by pulling on the crook of the U-shaped germ band. The amnioserosa may also provide biochemical signals that drive germ band cells to change shape in a mechanically autonomous fashion. Here, we use a finite-element model to investigate how these two contributions reshape the germ band. We do so by modeling the response to laser-induced wounds in each of the germ band’s spatially distinct segments (T1-T3, A1-A9) during the middle of retraction when segments T1-A3 form the ventral arm of the ‘U’, A4-A7 form its crook, and A8-A9 complete the dorsal arm. We explore these responses under a range of externally applied stresses and internal anisotropy of cell edge tensions—akin to a planar cell polarity that can drive elongation of cells in a direction parallel to the minimum edge tension—and identify regions of parameter space (edge-tension anisotropy versus stress anisotropy) that best match previous experiments for each germ band segment. All but three germ band segments are best fit when the applied stress anisotropy and the edge-tension anisotropy work against one another—i.e., when the isolated effects would elongate cells in perpendicular directions. Segments in the crook of the germ band (A4-A7) have cells that elongate in the direction of maximum external stress, i.e., external stress anisotropy is dominant. In most other segments, the dominant factor is internal edge-tension anisotropy. These results are consistent with models in which the amnioserosa pulls on the crook of the germ band to mechanically assist retraction. In addition, they suggest a mechanical cue for edge

  15. Filopodial retraction force is generated by cortical actin dynamics and controlled by reversible tethering at the tip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornschlögl, Thomas; Romero, Stéphane; Vestergaard, Christian L.

    2013-01-01

    Filopodia are dynamic, finger-like plasma membrane protrusions that sense the mechanical and chemical surroundings of the cell. Here, we show in epithelial cells that the dynamics of filopodial extension and retraction are determined by the difference between the actin polymerization rate at the ...

  16. Edg8/S1P5: an oligodendroglial receptor with dual function on process retraction and cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaillard, C; Harrison, S; Stankoff, B; Aigrot, M S; Calver, A R; Duddy, G; Walsh, F S; Pangalos, M N; Arimura, N; Kaibuchi, K; Zalc, B; Lubetzki, C

    2005-02-09

    Endothelial differentiation gene (Edg) proteins are G-protein-coupled receptors activated by lysophospholipid mediators: sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) or lysophosphatidic acid. We show that in the CNS, expression of Edg8/S1P5, a high-affinity S1P receptor, is restricted to oligodendrocytes and expressed throughout development from the immature stages to the mature myelin-forming cell. S1P activation of Edg8/S1P5 on O4-positive pre-oligodendrocytes induced process retraction via a Rho kinase/collapsin response-mediated protein signaling pathway, whereas no retraction was elicited by S1P on these cells derived from Edg8/S1P5-deficient mice. Edg8/S1P5-mediated process retraction was restricted to immature cells and was no longer observed at later developmental stages. In contrast, S1P activation promoted the survival of mature oligodendrocytes but not of pre-oligodendrocytes. The S1P-induced survival of mature oligodendrocytes was mediated through a pertussis toxin-sensitive, Akt-dependent pathway. Our data demonstrate that Edg8/S1P5 activation on oligodendroglial cells modulates two distinct functional pathways mediating either process retraction or cell survival and that these effects depend on the developmental stage of the cell.

  17. RETRACTION: Reply to Editorial Comment Regarding "X:Y Sperm Ratio in Boron Exposed Men," by Robbins et al. 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Wendie A; Elashoff, David A; Xun, Lin; Jia, Juan

    2011-06-30

    The Editorial Response listed above, which did not appear in the print journal, was retracted by the Editors of the Journal of Andrology with the consent of the authors because the significant delay in processing the Editorial Response has rendered the information contained in it not currently relevant. The Editors extend their apologies to the authors and to the scientific community.

  18. Correlation between synaptic protein expression and synaptic reorganization in the hippocampal CA3 region in a rat model of post-traumatic epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gaolian Zhang; Jianmin Huang; Bang Zhao; Haineng Huang; Yuanyang Deng; Huadong Huang; Qirong He; Jianping Liang

    2010-01-01

    Postsynaptic density protein-95 and synaptophysin participate in synaptic reorganization in the forebrain of epilepsy models.However,the time-effect relationship between dynamic synapsin expression in hippocampus and synaptic reorganization in the post-traumatic epilepsy model remains unclear.FeCl2 was injected into the hippocampal CA3 region of the right forebrain in rats to induce post-traumatic epilepsy.Postsynaptic density protein-95 and synaptophysin expression was detected using immunohistochemistry.Epileptiform discharge induced by FeCl2 injection was determined in rat forebrain neurons,revealing decreased postsynaptic density protein-95expression at 24 hours and lowest levels at 7 days.Synaptophysin expression was markedly reduced at 24 hours,but increased at 7 days.Postsynaptic density protein-95 and synaptophysin expression was consistent with abnormal mossy fiber sprouting and synaptic reorganization following neuronal injury in the hippocampal CA3 region of FeCl2-induced epilepsy models.

  19. Ab initio density functional theory investigation of the structural, electronic and optical properties of Ca3Sb2 in hexagonal and cubic phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arghavani Nia, Borhan; Sedighi, Matin; Shahrokhi, Masoud; Moradian, Rostam

    2013-11-01

    A density functional theory study of structural, electronical and optical properties of Ca3Sb2 compound in hexagonal and cubic phases is presented. In the exchange-correlation potential, generalized gradient approximation (PBE-GGA) has been used to calculate lattice parameters, bulk modulus, cohesive energy, dielectric function and energy loss spectra. The electronic band structure of this compound has been calculated using the above two approximations as well as another form of PBE-GGA, proposed by Engle and Vosko (EV-GGA). It is found that the hexagonal phase of Ca3Sb2 has an indirect gap in the Γ→N direction; while in the cubic phase there is a direct-gap at the Γ point in the PBE-GGA and EV-GGA. Effects of applying pressure on the band structure of the system studied and optical properties of these systems were calculated.

  20. Excitation of the nucleus /sup 40/Ca (3. 74 MeV) by protons with momentum 5. 0 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirpichnikov, I.V.; Kuznetsov, V.A.; Starostin, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    The reaction /sup 40/Ca (p,pX)/sup 40/Ca* (3.74 MeV) ..-->.. /sup 40/Ca+..gamma.. has been studied at a proton momentum 5.0 GeV/c. The total cross section sigma/sub e/ for excitation of the level and the cross section sigma/sub theta/ characterized by proton scattering angles theta/sub p/ = 1/sup 0/15'--5/sup 0/30' have been measured. It is shown that sigma/sub theta/, which practically completely includes the entire cross section for the two-particle process /sup 40/Ca (p,p') /sup 40/Ca* (3.74 MeV), amounts to less than half of sigma/sub e/.