WorldWideScience

Sample records for c8 health project

  1. Impact of Exposure Uncertainty on the Association between Perfluorooctanoate and Preeclampsia in the C8 Health Project Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanasi, Raghavendhran; Shin, Hyeong-Moo; Vieira, Verónica M; Savitz, David A; Bartell, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    Uncertainty in exposure estimates from models can result in exposure measurement error and can potentially affect the validity of epidemiological studies. We recently used a suite of environmental models and an integrated exposure and pharmacokinetic model to estimate individual perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) serum concentrations and assess the association with preeclampsia from 1990 through 2006 for the C8 Health Project participants. The aims of the current study are to evaluate impact of uncertainty in estimated PFOA drinking-water concentrations on estimated serum concentrations and their reported epidemiological association with preeclampsia. For each individual public water district, we used Monte Carlo simulations to vary the year-by-year PFOA drinking-water concentration by randomly sampling from lognormal distributions for random error in the yearly public water district PFOA concentrations, systematic error specific to each water district, and global systematic error in the release assessment (using the estimated concentrations from the original fate and transport model as medians and a range of 2-, 5-, and 10-fold uncertainty). Uncertainty in PFOA water concentrations could cause major changes in estimated serum PFOA concentrations among participants. However, there is relatively little impact on the resulting epidemiological association in our simulations. The contribution of exposure uncertainty to the total uncertainty (including regression parameter variance) ranged from 5% to 31%, and bias was negligible. We found that correlated exposure uncertainty can substantially change estimated PFOA serum concentrations, but results in only minor impacts on the epidemiological association between PFOA and preeclampsia. Avanasi R, Shin HM, Vieira VM, Savitz DA, Bartell SM. 2016. Impact of exposure uncertainty on the association between perfluorooctanoate and preeclampsia in the C8 Health Project population. Environ Health Perspect 124:126-132; http://dx.doi.org/10

  2. Perfluoroalkyl Substances, Sex Hormones, and Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 at 6-9 Years of Age: A Cross-Sectional Analysis within the C8 Health Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Espinosa, Maria-Jose; Mondal, Debapriya; Armstrong, Ben G; Eskenazi, Brenda; Fletcher, Tony

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to some perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), such as perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), may alter levels of sex hormones and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in animals. Human studies on this topic are scarce, and none have been conducted in young children. We investigated the relationship between levels of PFAS and estradiol, total testosterone, and IGF-1 in 2,292 children (6-9 years of age) from the C8 Health Project who lived near a chemical plant in the Mid-Ohio Valley (USA) with local contamination from PFOA. Serum samples were collected in 2005-2006 and analyzed for PFAS, sex hormones, and IGF-1. Results from regression models were expressed as the adjusted percentage difference (95% CI) per sex-specific interquartile range (IQR) increment of each PFAS serum concentration. Analyses by PFAS quartiles were also conducted. Median concentrations of PFHxS, PFOA, PFOS, and PFNA were 8, 35, 22, and 1.7 ng/mL in boys and 7, 30, 21, and 1.7 ng/mL in girls. In boys, PFOA concentrations were significantly associated with testosterone levels (-4.9%; 95% CI: -8.7, -0.8%); PFOS with estradiol (-4.0%; 95% CI: -7.7, -0.1%), testosterone (-5.8%; 95% CI: -9.4, -2.0%), and IGF-1 (-5.9%; 95% CI: -8.3, -3.3%); and PFNA with IGF-1 (-3.5%; 95% CI: -6.0, -1.0%). In girls, significant associations were found between PFOS and testosterone (-6.6%; 95% CI: -10.1, -2.8%) and IGF-1 (-5.6%; -8.2, -2.9%); and PFNA and IGF-1 (-3.8%; 95% CI: -6.4, -1.2%). In both sexes, the magnitudes of the associations decreased monotonically across quartiles for both testosterone and IGF-1 in relation to PFOS, and for IGF-1 and PFNA in girls. To our knowledge, this is the first study suggesting that PFAS are associated with lower levels of IGF-1 and sex hormones in young children. Lopez-Espinosa MJ, Mondal D, Armstrong BG, Eskenazi B, Fletcher T. 2016. Perfluoroalkyl substances, sex hormones, and

  3. Perfluoroalkyl Substances, Sex Hormones, and Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 at 6–9 Years of Age: A Cross-Sectional Analysis within the C8 Health Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Espinosa, Maria-Jose; Mondal, Debapriya; Armstrong, Ben G.; Eskenazi, Brenda; Fletcher, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exposure to some perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), such as perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), may alter levels of sex hormones and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in animals. Human studies on this topic are scarce, and none have been conducted in young children. Objectives: We investigated the relationship between levels of PFAS and estradiol, total testosterone, and IGF-1 in 2,292 children (6–9 years of age) from the C8 Health Project who lived near a chemical plant in the Mid-Ohio Valley (USA) with local contamination from PFOA. Methods: Serum samples were collected in 2005–2006 and analyzed for PFAS, sex hormones, and IGF-1. Results from regression models were expressed as the adjusted percentage difference (95% CI) per sex-specific interquartile range (IQR) increment of each PFAS serum concentration. Analyses by PFAS quartiles were also conducted. Results: Median concentrations of PFHxS, PFOA, PFOS, and PFNA were 8, 35, 22, and 1.7 ng/mL in boys and 7, 30, 21, and 1.7 ng/mL in girls. In boys, PFOA concentrations were significantly associated with testosterone levels (–4.9%; 95% CI: –8.7, –0.8%); PFOS with estradiol (–4.0%; 95% CI: –7.7, –0.1%), testosterone (–5.8%; 95% CI: –9.4, –2.0%), and IGF-1 (–5.9%; 95% CI: –8.3, –3.3%); and PFNA with IGF-1 (–3.5%; 95% CI: –6.0, –1.0%). In girls, significant associations were found between PFOS and testosterone (–6.6%; 95% CI: –10.1, –2.8%) and IGF-1 (–5.6%; –8.2, –2.9%); and PFNA and IGF-1 (–3.8%; 95% CI: –6.4, –1.2%). In both sexes, the magnitudes of the associations decreased monotonically across quartiles for both testosterone and IGF-1 in relation to PFOS, and for IGF-1 and PFNA in girls. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study suggesting that PFAS are associated with lower levels of IGF-1 and sex hormones in young children. Citation: Lopez

  4. Perfluorocarbons and Gilbert syndrome (phenotype) in the C8 Health Study Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Hongmin [Cancer Center, School of Public Health, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 265050-9190 (United States); Department of Epidemiology and Statistics, School of Public Health, Hebei United University, Hebei 063000 (China); Ducatman, Alan [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, West Virginia University (United States); Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, West Virginia University (United States); Clinical Translational Science Institute, West Virginia University (United States); Zhang, Jianjun [Department of Biostatistics, School Public Health, West Virginia University (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Background: Gilbert syndrome (GS) is an inherited defect of bilirubin conjugation, most commonly caused by a gene mutation for the enzyme UGT1A. GS is known to affect the metabolism and excretion of drugs and xenobiotics. Perfluorocarbon compounds (PFCs) are bio-persistent environmental contaminants that affect metabolic regulation. In this study, we examined the associations of GS phenotype and serum PFCs in the C8 Health Study Population. Materials and methods: Using 2005–2006 data from a large PFC-exposure population survey, we compared serum PFCs concentrations between GS and non GS clinical phenotypes, in a cross sectional design, adjusting for standard risk factors, including age, BMI, smoking status, socioeconomic status and gender. Results: Among 10 PFC compounds considered, only perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) was seen at a significantly higher concentration in GS men and women. Conclusion: PFHxA exposure may be associated with GS. Our findings do not support increased exposure in GS for other PFCs. - Highlights: • Most serum PFCs are not associated with clinically evident Gilbert syndrome. • However, serum perfluorohexanoic acid is positively associated. • The investigation addresses the clinical presentation, not the genetic mutation.

  5. Health System Measurement Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Health System Measurement Project tracks government data on critical U.S. health system indicators. The website presents national trend data as well as detailed...

  6. Health Equity Pilot Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, Aileen

    : inequities in power, money and resources. They argued that social and economic inequalities underpin the determinants of health: the range of interacting factors that shape health and well-being. Recent analyses of health inequalities and their causes in Europe have supported the findings of the CSDH......The intention of the Health Equity Pilot Project (HEPP) is to maintain focus on and mainstream action on health inequalities. This forms a basis for and is complementary to work on developing the new Joint Action on Health Inequalities in 2017. This is being achieved by focusing work on health...... social groups based on these determinants. In 2008, the World Health Organization (WHO) Commission on Social Determinants of Health (CSDH) concluded that social inequalities in health arise because of inequalities in the conditions of daily life and the fundamental drivers that give rise to them...

  7. Lunar Health Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During the Phase II Lunar Health Monitor program, Orbital Research will develop a second generation wearable sensor suite for astronaut physiologic monitoring. The...

  8. Project management in health informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an educational overview of: * the concept of project management and its role in modern management * the generic project lifecycle process * processes used in developing a plan for the management of resources - time, cost, physical resources and people * the concept of managing risk in projects * communication processes and practices that are important to the management of projects.

  9. Multilingual health education tapes project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vryheid, R

    1992-01-01

    The success of Thailand's 1985 malaria education cassette tapes project motivated the Highland Development Program to produce tapes in 6 tribal languages on family planning, maternal and child health, nutrition, and disease prevention. Staff produced tapes using a drama or radio magazine format as a series of short features with music and sound effects. Scriptwriters consulted villagers, broadcasting professionals, research workers, and health officials to tailor messages to the various hill tribes. They tried to avoid conflict between traditional and modern concepts and to minimize distrust of government services. The scriptwriters used basically short, grammatically simple sentences, and colloquial Thai to simplify translation. The staff tried to recruit literate, adult, native speakers of the target languages with some experience in health education in their own languages. Obstacles encountered with translation included some languages used an uncommon alphabet or translators did not know their own alphabet. The program backtranslated the scripts to assure the accuracy of the messages and the appropriateness of the words used. Backtranslation revealed deficiencies in the translated messages. Altering the meaning of technical terms tended to be simple mistakes, words with multiple meanings, and exaggeration of problems and/or solutions. Translators also sometimes failed to adapt cultural ideas to those of their tribes. For example, some persons translated all possible misconceptions about a disease yet the tribes did not have all the misconceptions. As of early 1992, recording, pretesting, distribution, and follow up had not yet taken place. The staff should meet with a recording studio to coordinate production including technicians and translators identifying means to communicate. Staff should be aware of signs of poor translation which they may have missed earlier and surfaces during recording. Pretesting should occur among literate and illiterate members of

  10. Designing and Conducting Health Systems Research Projects ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Designing and Conducting Health Systems Research Projects Volume 2: Data Analyses and Report Writing. Book cover Designing and Conducting Health Systems Research Projects Volume 2: Data Analyses and Report. Author(s):. Corlien M. Varkevisser, Indra Pathmanathan, and Ann Brownlee. Publisher(s):. KIT, IDRC.

  11. 26 CFR 301.6231(c)-8 - Prompt assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prompt assessment. 301.6231(c)-8 Section 301.6231(c)-8 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Assessment In General § 301.6231(c)-8 Prompt assessment. (a) In general. The treatment of items as...

  12. A general synthesis of C8-arylpurine phosphoramidites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongsutilers, Vorasit; Daft, Jonathan R; Shaughnessy, Kevin H; Gannett, Peter M

    2009-09-02

    A general scheme for the synthesis of C8-arylpurine phosphoramidites has been developed. C8-Arylation of C8-bromo-2'-deoxyguanosine is the key step and has been achieved through the use of a Suzuki coupling. Since the coupling reaction is conducted under aqueous conditions, it is unnecessary to protect and then deprotect the hydroxyl groups, thus saving several steps and improving overall yields. Once the C8-arylgroup is introduced, the glycosidic bond becomes very sensitive to acid catalyzed cleavage. Protection of the amino groups as the corresponding N,N-dimethylformamidine derivative improves stability of the derivatives. Synthetic C8-arylpurines were successfully used to prepare synthetic oligonucleotides.

  13. Wearable Health Monitoring Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposal is to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a wearable health monitoring system for the human body that is functional, comfortable,...

  14. Integrated Structural Health Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) proposes to advance the state of the art in composite health management through refinement of an existing technology developed...

  15. Designing and Conducting Health Systems Research Projects ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Designing and Conducting Health Systems Research Projects Volume 2 : Data Analyses and Report Writing. Book cover Designing and Conducting Health ... Ebola Crisis: Improving Science-Based Communication and Local Journalism in Emergency and Post-outbreak Periods. The World Federation of Science Journalists ...

  16. A General Synthesis of C8-Arylpurine Phosphoramidites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorasit Vongsutilers

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A general scheme for the synthesis of C8-arylpurine phosphoramidites has been developed. C8-Arylation of C8-bromo-2′-deoxyguanosine is the key step and has been achieved through the use of a Suzuki coupling. Since the coupling reaction is conducted under aqueous conditions, it is unnecessary to protect and then deprotect the hydroxyl groups, thus saving several steps and improving overall yields. Once the C8-arylgroup is introduced, the glycosidic bond becomes very sensitive to acid catalyzed cleavage. Protection of the amino groups as the corresponding N,N-dimethylformamidine derivative improves stability of the derivatives. Synthetic C8-arylpurines were successfully used to prepare synthetic oligonucleotides.

  17. UMTRA Project: Environment, Safety, and Health Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    The US Department of Energy has prepared this UMTRA Project Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Plan to establish the policy, implementing requirements, and guidance for the UMTRA Project. The requirements and guidance identified in this plan are designed to provide technical direction to UMTRA Project contractors to assist in the development and implementation of their ES and H plans and programs for UMTRA Project work activities. Specific requirements set forth in this UMTRA Project ES and H Plan are intended to provide uniformity to the UMTRA Project`s ES and H programs for processing sites, disposal sites, and vicinity properties. In all cases, this UMTRA Project ES and H Plan is intended to be consistent with applicable standards and regulations and to provide guidance that is generic in nature and will allow for contractors` evaluation of site or contract-specific ES and H conditions. This plan specifies the basic ES and H requirements applicable to UMTRA Project ES and H programs and delineates responsibilities for carrying out this plan. DOE and contractor ES and H personnel are expected to exercise professional judgment and apply a graded approach when interpreting these guidelines, based on the risk of operations.

  18. Designing and Conducting Health Systems Research Projects ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A new website and resource library will help improve developing country registration and information systems for vital events. ... This project aims to build ecohealth leadership at the municipal level in Colombia and Venezuela to address health priorities, including vector-borne diseases and food systems interventions for ...

  19. The Pacific Island Health Care Project

    OpenAIRE

    Donald Ames Person

    2014-01-01

    Introduction/Background: US Associated/Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI) include three freely associated states: Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, and three Territories: American Samoa, Guam, and Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Objective: The Pacific Island Health Care Project (PIHCP) provides humanitarian medical referral/consultation/care to >500,000 indigenous people of these remote islands. Methods: In the mid-1990s, we developed a simple store-...

  20. A study of project management knowledge and sustainable outcomes in Thailand’s reproductive health projects

    OpenAIRE

    Dumrak, Jantanee; Barroudi, Bassam; Pullen, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    In Thailand, numerous reproductive health projects funded by both national and international agencies have been established in an attempt to mitigate reproductive health problems. Solving problems on reproductive health projects that only have temporary funding requires effective project management that hopefully leads to better long-term desired outcomes. This paper identifies the association between collaborative reproductive health (CRH) project management and sustainable outcomes. The Gui...

  1. Preparation, characterization and biological activity of C8-substituted cytokinins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahajská, Lenka; Nisler, Jaroslav; Voller, Jiří; Gucký, Tomáš; Pospíšil, Tomáš; Spíchal, Lukáš; Strnad, Miroslav

    2017-03-01

    Naturally occurring cytokinins are adenine-based plant hormones. Although, the effect of various substituents at positions N1, C2, N3, N6, N7, or N9 on the biological activity of cytokinins has been studied, the C8-substituted compounds have received little attention. Here, we report the synthesis and in vitro biological testing of thirty-one cytokinin derivatives substituted at the C8 position of the adenine skeleton and twenty-seven compounds which served as their N9-tetrahydropyranyl protected precursors. The cytokinin activity of all the compounds was determined in classical cytokinin biotests (wheat leaf senescence, Amaranthus and tobacco callus assays). With some exceptions, the compounds with a N9-tetrahydropyranyl group were generally less active than their de-protected analogs. The latter were further tested for their ability to activate the Arabidopsis cytokinin receptors AHK3 and CRE1/AHK4 in bacterial receptor activation assays. Using this approach, we identified derivatives bearing short aliphatic chains and retaining high cytokinin activity. Such compounds are suitable candidates for fluorescence labeling or as protein-affinity ligands. We further found that some C8-substituted cytokinins exhibited no or lower cytotoxicity toward tobacco cells when compared to their parent compound. Therefore, we also present and discuss the cytotoxicity of all the compounds against three normal human cell lines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Family Health Services project: the way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabiri, O M

    1993-01-01

    Nigerians did not readily accept family planning when Family Health Services (FHS) began in 1988. FHS has made much headway in training, IEC (information, education, and communication), and constituency building and advocacy. Its staff have identified obstacles to implementation, especially program sustainability and management structure. Key limits to sustainability of IEC efforts were inadequately trained personnel and inability of trained personnel to apply what they learned at work stations. The Federal Ministry and Social Services' role in the FHS project was not clearly defined. Some private sector factors contributing to a confused management structure were inadequate method mix, high contraceptive cost, poor monitoring of quality of care, and no coordination of family planning training with the public factor. FHS has since decided to focus its efforts on increasing the demand for and availability of modern contraceptives and improving the quality of family planning services of both the public and private sectors. FHS hopes that accomplishing these activities will reduce fertility, morbidity, and mortality. Strategic plans include a regional focus, quality of care, a variety of methods offered, intensification, hospital and clinics, a management information system, contraceptive logistics, distribution regulations, and addressing social, cultural, and behavioral factors. To effectively implement the strategy, USAID and the Federal Ministry held a workshop in 1993 to effect full integration of Nigerian experience in the 2nd phase of the project (FHS II). Participants reviewed the strengths and weaknesses of the first phase and agreed on implementation. For example, nongovernmental organizations should implement FHS II. FHS II includes training, IEC, and commodities/logistics.

  3. Experiences from three community health promotion projects in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curtis, Tine; Olesen, Ingelise; Kjeldsen, Ann B

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES AND METHODS: Three community health promotion projects have been implemented in Greenland in the municipalities of Upernavik, Ittoqqortoormiit and Qasigiannguit. Based on project reports and other written material, this paper describes experiences from the three projects and discusses...... with strong leadership and a central organisation, whereas the Qasigiannguit project was designed as a community project with population participation in all phases of the project. The two former projects have probably had a greater direct change impact on the community, whereas the latter has strengthened...

  4. The pacific island health care project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Person, Donald Ames

    2014-01-01

    US Associated/Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI) include three freely associated states: Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, and three Territories: American Samoa, Guam, and Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. The Pacific Island Health Care Project (PIHCP) provides humanitarian medical referral/consultation/care to >500,000 indigenous people of these remote islands. In the mid-1990s, we developed a simple store-and-forward program to link the USAPI with Tripler Army Medical Center. This application allowed image attachment to email consultations. More than 8000 Pacific Islanders have benefited from the program. Three thousand Pacific Islanders prior to telemedicine (1990-1997) and since store-and-forward telemedicine (1997-present), the PIHCP has helped an additional 5000. Records post dynamically and are stored in an archival database. The PIHCP is the longest running telemedicine program in the world delivering humanitarian medical care. It has bridged the Developing World of the remote Pacific Islands with advanced medical and surgical care available at a major US military teaching hospital. (The opinions expressed here are those of the author and not that of the Army, Department of Defense, or the US Government.).

  5. The Pacific Island Health Care Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Ames Person

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/BackgroundUS Associated/Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI include 3 Freely Associated States: Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau and 3 Territories: American Samoa, Guam, and Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. ObjectiveThe Pacific Island Health Care Project (PIHCP provides humanitarian medical referral/consultation/care to >500,000 indigenous people of these remote islands. Methods In the mid-1990s, we developed a simple store-and-forward program to link the USAPI with Tripler Army Medical Center (TAMC. This application allowed image attachment to email consultations. ResultsMore than 8000 Pacific Islanders have benefited from the program. 3000 Pacific Islanders prior to telemedicine (1990-1997 and since store-and-forward telemedicine (1997-present, the PIHCP has helped an additional 5000. Records post dynamically and are stored in an archival database. Conclusion The PIHCP is the longest running telemedicine program in the world delivering humanitarian medical care. It has bridged the Developing World of the remote Pacific islands with advanced medical and surgical care available at a major US military teaching hospital.(The opinions expressed here are those of the author and not that of the Army, Department of Defense, or the US Government.

  6. Needs assessment in health research projects: a new approach to project management in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peykari, Niloofar; Owlia, Parviz; Malekafzali, Hossein; Ghanei, Mostafa; Babamahmoodi, Abdolreza; Djalalinia, Shirin

    2013-01-01

    The science and technology health plan has defined the outline of health research to the national vision of Iran by 2025. The aim of this study was to focus on the process of needs assessment of health research projects also health research priority setting in Iran. THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT LIFE CYCLE HAS FOUR PHASES: Initiation, Planning, Execution and Closure. Based on abovementioned points we conducted the study. Focusing on the needs assessment led to systematic implementation of needs assessment of health project in all of the medical sciences universities. Parallel with this achieved strategies health research priority setting was followed through specific process from empowerment to implementation. We should adopt with more systematic progressive methods of health project managements for both our national convenience as well as our international health research programs.

  7. A study of project management knowledge and sustainable outcomes in Thailand’s reproductive health projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jantanee Dumrak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In Thailand, numerous reproductive health projects funded by both national and international agencies have been established in an attempt to mitigate reproductive health problems. Solving problems on reproductive health projects that only have temporary funding requires effective project management that hopefully leads to better long-term desired outcomes. This paper identifies the association between collaborative reproductive health (CRH project management and sustainable outcomes. The Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide is employed to benchmark project management practices on four CRH projects in Thailand. The research methodology presented in this paper comprises of content analysis and questionnaire survey. It is evident that limited use of certain project management knowledge areas (PMKAs affects CRH project implementation and success. The association between the use of PMKAs and sustainable outcomes on these projects is also presented. Scope, integration and quality management were found to be the most influential PMKAs for sustainable outcomes on CRH projects. Nevertheless, the projects showed a shortage of project management processes for PMKAs that were required to attain the outcomes.

  8. The Health Information Literacy Research Project*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz-Rossi, Sabrina; Funk, Carla J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This research studied hospital administrators' and hospital-based health care providers' (collectively, the target group) perceived value of consumer health information resources and of librarians' roles in promoting health information literacy in their institutions. Methods: A web-based needs survey was developed and administered to hospital administrators and health care providers. Multiple health information literacy curricula were developed. One was pilot-tested by nine hospital libraries in the United States and Canada. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to evaluate the curriculum and its impact on the target group. Results: A majority of survey respondents believed that providing consumer health information resources was critically important to fulfilling their institutions' missions and that their hospitals could improve health information literacy by increasing awareness of its impact on patient care and by training staff to become more knowledgeable about health literacy barriers. The study showed that a librarian-taught health information literacy curriculum did raise awareness about the issue among the target group and increased both the use of National Library of Medicine consumer health resources and referrals to librarians for health information literacy support. Conclusions: It is hoped that many hospital administrators and health care providers will take the health information literacy curricula and recognize that librarians can educate about the topic and that providers will use related consumer health services and resources. PMID:19851494

  9. Designing and Conducting Health Systems Research Projects ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Saharan Africa continues to deal with high morbidity and mortality rates related to health inequalities and diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV/AIDS. View moreUsing Evidence to Reduce Health Inequalities in East and Southern ...

  10. Tanzania Essential Health Interventions Project (TEHIP) Evidence at ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    KATO

    The Tanzanian Essential Health Interventions Project (TEHIP), a joint initiative between the Tanzania Ministry of Health and. Canada's International Development Research Centre, is testing how and to what extent evidence can guide decentralized planning for health. TEHIP Briefs aim at informing a wide audience about.

  11. Evaluating success of mobile health projects in the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginige, J Anupama; Maeder, Anthony J; Long, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Many mobile health (mHealth) projects, typically deploying pilot or small scale implementations, have been undertaken in developing world settings and reported with a widely varying range of claims being made on their effectiveness and benefits. As a result, there is little evidence for which aspects of such projects lead to successful outcomes. This paper describes a literature review of papers from PubMed undertaken to identify strong contributions to execution and evaluation of mHealth projects in developing world settings, and suggests a template for classifying the main success factors to assist with collating evidence in the future.

  12. Evaluating the Accountable Health Communities Demonstration Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Laura; Colvin, Jeffrey D; Fleegler, Eric; Hessler, Danielle; Garg, Arvin; Adler, Nancy

    2017-03-01

    Despite substantial evidence documenting the social patterning of disease, relatively little information is available on how the health care system can best intervene on social determinants to impact individual and population health. Announced in January 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation's (CMMI) Accountable Health Communities (AHC) initiative provides an important opportunity to improve the evidence base around integrated social and medical care delivery. To maximize learning from this large-scale demonstration, comprehensive evaluation efforts should focus on effectiveness and implementation research by supporting local, regional, and national studies across a range of outcomes. Findings from this demonstration could transform how, when, and which patients' health-related social needs are addressed within the health care delivery system. Such findings would strongly complement other initiatives to address social factors outside of health care.

  13. Evolutionary Autonomous Health Monitoring System (EAHMS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For supporting NASA's Robotics, Tele-Robotics and Autonomous Systems Roadmap, we are proposing the "Evolutionary Autonomous Health Monitoring System" (EAHMS) for...

  14. The Current and Projected Taxpayer Shares of US Health Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelstein, David U; Woolhandler, Steffie

    2016-03-01

    We estimated taxpayers' current and projected share of US health expenditures, including government payments for public employees' health benefits as well as tax subsidies to private health spending. We tabulated official Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services figures on direct government spending for health programs and public employees' health benefits for 2013, and projected figures through 2024. We calculated the value of tax subsidies for private spending from official federal budget documents and figures for state and local tax collections. Tax-funded health expenditures totaled $1.877 trillion in 2013 and are projected to increase to $3.642 trillion in 2024. Government's share of overall health spending was 64.3% of national health expenditures in 2013 and will rise to 67.1% in 2024. Government health expenditures in the United States account for a larger share of gross domestic product (11.2% in 2013) than do total health expenditures in any other nation. Contrary to public perceptions and official Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services estimates, government funds most health care in the United States. Appreciation of government's predominant role in health funding might encourage more appropriate and equitable targeting of health expenditures.

  15. Managing externally financed projects: the Integrated Primary Health Care Project in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homedes, N

    2001-12-01

    Bolivia is one of the poorest countries in Latin America. Health indicators are very poor, communicable diseases are prevalent and, coupled with malnutrition, remain the major killers of children under 5 years old. The Integrated Primary Health Care Project (PROISS) was a US$39 million project executed by the Ministry of Health (MOH), 50% financed by the World Bank and aimed at improving primary health care in the four largest Bolivian municipalities. The implementation of the project started in 1990 and ended in 1997. During implementation it went through three distinct phases: Phase 1 (1990-94) was a period characterized by conflict and confusion; Phase 2 (1995-mid-1996) documented major improvements in coverage and service quality; and Phase 3 (mid-1996-97) witnessed the decline of the project. This paper explores the factors that contributed to the success and the decline of the project, draws lessons for project managers and international agencies involved in the definition and implementation of social sector projects, and discusses the unlikelihood that externally financed projects can have a sustainable impact on the development of the health sector of recipient countries.

  16. The Fort Bragg Mental Health Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    that uncsayjptta eanmlt P.1E. SONN. The centimeter sho[all ewe that ohere we sufficient V staffI to preperty perform this contract ad meneg thet...medical director, the gliniest director shal be a Ilces--- child psychologist, a project mange, -a site meneger and cler"ical nd administrative staff. the

  17. Project Agape Microcredit and Health of Women Agricultural Traders ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Project Agape Microcredit and Health of Women Agricultural Traders in Nasarawa State, Nigeria. ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... 26% very good status before the credit; 8% had bad, 45% good and 73% very good after the credit.

  18. Inventory of validation approaches in selected health telematics projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykänen, P; Enning, J; Talmon, J; Hoyer, D; Sanz, F; Thayer, C; Roine, R; Vissers, M; Eurlings, F

    1999-12-01

    This paper presents the results from an inventory of validation approaches and methodologies which have been used in selected health telematics projects. The inventory was performed in the VATAM Validation of Telematic Applications in Medicine project, HC1115HC. The purpose of the inventory was to analyse the methodologies and their application assumptions in order to identify possibilities for harmonization and consolidation. The inventory was performed using five validation dimensions: IT-development; quality; user; technology assessment and marketing. The inventory results show that possibilities exist to synthesise methodologies and to provide practical guidance and support for projects that are developing health telematics applications. All stakeholders in health telematics projects, i.e. users, health care decision-makers, developers, suppliers and IT-industries, can benefit from practical validation guidelines and support for validation when guidelines are represented in a usable, easy to access and informative way.

  19. Three-Dimensional Health Monitoring of Sandwich Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project delivers a single-chip structural health-monitoring (SHM) system that uses the impedance method to monitor bulk interiors and wave propagation...

  20. Role of cytochrome P450 2C8*3 (CYP2C8*3) in paclitaxel metabolism and paclitaxel-induced neurotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Mi-Young; Apellániz-Ruiz, María; Johansson, Inger

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The CYP2C8*3 allele has been suggested as a risk factor for paclitaxel-induced neuropathy but the data hitherto published are conflicting. MATERIALS & METHODS: In total 435 patients were investigated with respect to maximum neuropathy grade and accumulated paclitaxel dose. The enzymatic...... properties of CYP2C8.3 variant were analyzed using heterologous mammalian HEK293 cell expression system. RESULTS: No significant association between CYP2C8*3 allele and neuropathy was found, although a trend was observed. The paclitaxel and amodiaquine metabolism by CYP2C8.3 were found similar to CYP2C8.......1, whereas CYP2C8.3 was more efficient in the metabolism of rosiglitazone. CONCLUSION: These results indicate a difference in substrate specificity between CYP2C8.1 and CYP2C8.3; however, the CYP2C8*3 allele has no major impact on paclitaxel metabolism in vitro or of paclitaxel-induced neuropathy in vivo...

  1. Advertising a "Healthy Lifestyle:" A Cypriot Health Education Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Soula

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a health education program entitled "Young Consumer" project, financed by the European Union and implemented by the Cyprus Consumer Association between March and June 2004. The aim of the project was to promote a healthy lifestyle among a group of Cypriot primary school pupils (11-12 years old). Participants were…

  2. Health Equity Pilot Project Case Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, Aileen

    2017-01-01

    work due to ill health. Strengthening national legislation to curtail marketing of baby food products will give universal protection while helping especially those who are most susceptible to spend their limited financial resources because of sophisticated marketing strategies. Once transferred...

  3. Architecture for Integrated System Health Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Managing the health of vehicle, crew, and habitat systems is a primary function of flight controllers today. We propose to develop an architecture for automating...

  4. Electronic Prognostics for Vehicle Health Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — All electronic systems are prone to wear-out and eventual failure and this has direct implications for Vehicle Health Management for NASA with its long space...

  5. The sustainable farm families project: changing attitudes to health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumby, Susan A; Willder, Stuart J; Martin, John

    2009-01-01

    Farm health and safety has historically focussed on strategies such as injury prevention, safety audits and fulfilling legislative responsibilities. However, farmer injuries mask deeper health issues including higher rates of cancer, suicides, cardiovascular disease and stress. The relationship between occupational health and safety and farm family health has not been fully investigated. The Sustainable Farm Families (SFF) project attempts to make this connection in order to address premature death, morbidity and injury on Australian farms. The SFF project illustrates how increasing health literacy through education and physical assessment can lead to improved health and knowledge outcomes for farm families. The SFF project focuses on the human resource in the triple bottom line and is working with farmers, families, industry and universities to collaboratively assess and promote improvement in the health and wellbeing of farm families. Based on a model of extension that engages farm families as active learners where they commit to healthy living and safe working practices, the SFF project is proving to be an effective model for engaging communities in learning and change. Health education and information is delivered to farm men and women aged 18 to 75 years using a workshop format. Pre- and post-knowledge surveys, annual physical assessments and focus group discussions form the methodological context for the research over a three-year intervention. This article discusses the progress of the research outlining the design of the SFF project, the delivery and extension processes used to engage 321 farm families from within a broadacre and dairy-farming family sample. The article presents key learnings on intersectoral collaboration, engaging farmers and families in health, and the future for this project extending into agricultural industries across the nation. Key results reveal that health issues do exist in farming families and are often underreported by family

  6. [Outcomes evaluation of the school staff health promotion project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woynarowska-Sołdan, Magdalena

    This article presents selected outcomes of a 3-year project "Health promotion of school staff in health-promoting schools," as well as the achievements and difficulties in its implementation. The research was conducted on 644 teachers and 226 members of non-teaching staff in 21 schools. The method involved opinion poll and authored questionnaires. A 2-part model of outcome evaluation was developed. Most participants appreciated the changes that took place within the 3 years of the project implementation. These included the improved level of their knowledge about health, health-conducive behaviors (62-93%) and the physical and social environment of the school (50-92%). Changes were more frequently acknowledged by teachers. About 80% of the participants had a positive attitude to the project, but only 20% assessed their involvement as considerable. About 90% believed that health promotion activities should be continued. According to the project leaders, insufficient support and financial resources, and difficulties in motivating school employees, particularly the nonteaching staff, to undertake health-promotion activities were the major handicaps in the project implementation. The project outcomes can be assessed as satisfying. They revealed that it is posssible to initiate health promotion among school staff. This can be effective on condition that participants are motivated, actively engaged in the project and supported by the head teacher and the local community. Necessarily, school leaders should be prepared to promote health among adults and to gain support from school policy decision makers, school administration, trade unions and universities involved in teacher training. Med Pr 2016;67(2):187-200. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  7. [Health impact assessment of building and investment projects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thriene, B

    2003-02-01

    For regional planning and approval procedures for building projects of a certain order of magnitude and power rating according to the German Federal Act on the Prevention of Emissions with Integrated Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), the German public health departments, acting as public authorities, increasingly perform health impact assessments (HIA). The amended Act on Environmental Impact Assessment, the Decree on industrial plants which require approval (4th Federal Decree on Emission Prevention) and the Health Service Acts of the Federal States of Germany form the legal basis for the assessment of health issues with regard to approval procedures for building and investment projects. In the framework of the "Action Programme for the Environment and Health", the present article aims at making this process binding and to ensure responsibility and general involvement of the Public Health departments in all German Federal States. Future criteria, basic principles and procedures for single-case testing as well as assessment standards should meet these requirements. The Federal Ministry for the Environment and the Federal Ministry for Health should agree on Health Impact Assessment (HIA ) as well as on the relaxant stipulations in their procedures and general administrative regulations for implementing the Environmental Impact Assessment Act (EIA). Current EIA procedures focus on urban development and road construction, industrial investment projects, intensive animal husbandry plants, waste incineration plants, and wind energy farms. This paper illustrates examples meeting with varying degrees of public acceptance. However, being involved in the regional planning procedure for the project "Extension of the federal motorway A 14 from Magdeburg to Schwerin", the Public Health Service also shares global responsibility for health and climate protection. Demands for shortest routing conflict with objectives of environmental protection which should be given long

  8. 26 CFR 1.381(c)(8)-1 - Installment method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Installment method. 1.381(c)(8)-1 Section 1.381(c)(8)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Insolvency Reorganizations § 1.381(c)(8)-1 Installment method. (a) Carryover...

  9. Good practice models for public workplace health promotion projects in Austria: promoting mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkert, Nathalie T; Muckenhuber, Johanna; Großschädl, Franziska; Sprenger, Martin; Rohrauer-Näf, Gerlinde; Ropin, Klaus; Martinel, Evelyn; Dorner, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Promoting mental health is a central public health issue since the Jakarta statement in 1997. In Austria, the nationwide organisation for health promotion is the 'Fonds Gesundes Österreich' (FGÖ), which has been established in 1998. The FGÖ funds and supports workplace health promotion projects; therefore, it co-operates with the Austrian Network on Workplace Health Promotion. In 2011, among others, two Austrian companies were honoured as best practice models for promoting mental health in the project 'Work. In tune with life. Move Europe'. One of their central key success factors are the provision of equal opportunities, engagement, their focus on overall health as well as the implementation of behavioural and environmental preventive measures. Since mental health problems in the population are still rising, public health promotion projects which orientate on the best practice models have to be established in Austria.

  10. Health Impact Assessment of an oil drilling project in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Lindsay C; Souweine, Kathleen; McDaniel, Mary; Koppe, Bart; McFarland, Christine; Butler, Katherine; Ollson, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    The Health Impact Assessment (HIA) was conducted to evaluate the potential community health implications of a proposed oil drilling and production project in Hermosa Beach, California. The HIA considered 17 determinants of health that fell under 6 major categories (i.e., air quality, water and soil quality, upset conditions, noise and light emissions, traffic, and community livability). This paper attempts to address some of the gaps within the HIA practice by presenting the methodological approach and results of this transparent, comprehensive HIA; specifically, the evaluation matrix and decision-making framework that have been developed for this HIA and form the basis of the evaluation and allow for a clear conclusion to be reached in respect of any given health determinant (i.e., positive, negative, neutral). There is a number of aspects of the project that may positively influence health (e.g., increased education funding, ability to enhance green space), and at the same time there have been potential negative effects identified (e.g., odor, blowouts, property values). Except for upset conditions, the negative health outcomes have been largely nuisance-related (e.g., odor, aesthetics) without irreversible health impacts. The majority of the health determinants, that had been examined, have revealed that the project would have no substantial effect on the health of the community. Using the newly developed methodology and based on established mitigation measures and additional recommendations provided in the HIA, the authors have concluded that the project will have no substantial effect on community health. This approach and methodology will assist practitioners, stakeholders and decision-makers in advancing the HIA as a useful, reproducible, and informative tool. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  11. Telemedicine in Primary Health: The Virtual Doctor Project Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustarde Paul

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper is a commentary on a project application of telemedicine to alleviate primary health care problems in Lundazi district in the Eastern province of Zambia. The project dubbed 'The Virtual Doctor Project' will use hard body vehicles fitted with satellite communication devices and modern medical equipment to deliver primary health care services to some of the neediest areas of the country. The relevance and importance of the project lies in the fact that these areas are hard-to-reach due to rugged natural terrain and have very limited telecommunications infrastructure. The lack of these and other basic services makes it difficult for medical personnel to settle in these areas, which leads to an acute shortage of medical personnel. We comment on this problem and how it is addressed by 'The Virtual Doctor Project', emphasizing that while the telemedicine concept is not new in sub-Saharan Africa, the combination of mobility and connectivity to service a number of villages 'on the go' is an important variation in the shift back to the 1978 Alma Ata principles of the United Nations World Health Organization [WHO]. This overview of the Virtual Doctor Project in Zambia provides insight into both the potential for ICT, and the problems and limitations that any "real-world" articulation of this technology must confront.

  12. Researchers' experience with project management in health and medical research: Results from a post-project review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Project management is widely used to deliver projects on time, within budget and of defined quality. However, there is little published information describing its use in managing health and medical research projects. We used project management in the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project (2006-2008) http://www.ichr.uwa.edu.au/alcoholandpregnancy and in this paper report researchers' opinions on project management and whether it made a difference to the project. Methods A national interdisciplinary group of 20 researchers, one of whom was the project manager, formed the Steering Committee for the project. We used project management to ensure project outputs and outcomes were achieved and all aspects of the project were planned, implemented, monitored and controlled. Sixteen of the researchers were asked to complete a self administered questionnaire for a post-project review. Results The project was delivered according to the project protocol within the allocated budget and time frame. Fifteen researchers (93.8%) completed a questionnaire. They reported that project management increased the effectiveness of the project, communication, teamwork, and application of the interdisciplinary group of researchers' expertise. They would recommend this type of project management for future projects. Conclusions Our post-project review showed that researchers comprehensively endorsed project management in the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project and agreed that project management had contributed substantially to the research. In future, we will project manage new projects and conduct post-project reviews. The results will be used to encourage continuous learning and continuous improvement of project management, and provide greater transparency and accountability of health and medical research. The use of project management can benefit both management and scientific outcomes of health and medical research projects. PMID:21635721

  13. Researchers' experience with project management in health and medical research: results from a post-project review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Janet M; France, Kathryn E; Henley, Nadine; D'Antoine, Heather A; Bartu, Anne E; Elliott, Elizabeth J; Bower, Carol

    2011-06-02

    Project management is widely used to deliver projects on time, within budget and of defined quality. However, there is little published information describing its use in managing health and medical research projects. We used project management in the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project (2006-2008) http://www.ichr.uwa.edu.au/alcoholandpregnancy and in this paper report researchers' opinions on project management and whether it made a difference to the project. A national interdisciplinary group of 20 researchers, one of whom was the project manager, formed the Steering Committee for the project. We used project management to ensure project outputs and outcomes were achieved and all aspects of the project were planned, implemented, monitored and controlled. Sixteen of the researchers were asked to complete a self administered questionnaire for a post-project review. The project was delivered according to the project protocol within the allocated budget and time frame. Fifteen researchers (93.8%) completed a questionnaire. They reported that project management increased the effectiveness of the project, communication, teamwork, and application of the interdisciplinary group of researchers' expertise. They would recommend this type of project management for future projects. Our post-project review showed that researchers comprehensively endorsed project management in the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project and agreed that project management had contributed substantially to the research. In future, we will project manage new projects and conduct post-project reviews. The results will be used to encourage continuous learning and continuous improvement of project management, and provide greater transparency and accountability of health and medical research. The use of project management can benefit both management and scientific outcomes of health and medical research projects.

  14. Nqrs Data for C8H9LiO6 [C8H5LiO4·2(H2O)] (Subst. No. 1093)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Substances Containing Ag … C10H15' of Volume 48 `Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III `Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section `3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter `3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C8H9LiO6 [C8H5LiO4·2(H2O)] (Subst. No. 1093)

  15. Poster project to emphasize public health in the pharmacy curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsch, Michael P; Werremeyer, Amy B

    2011-02-10

    To implement and assess a required public health poster project in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program. Third-year PharmD students collaborated in pairs to research a public health topic relating to pharmacy practice. Each student group prepared an informational poster, while receiving feedback from a faculty mentor at each stage of the project. The students presented their completed posters at a statewide pharmacy conference. Faculty members evaluated the posters with a grading rubric, and students completed a survey instrument that assessed the overall experience. In general, faculty members rated the class highly across all domains of the grading rubric. The class generally agreed that the poster project increased their awareness of public health issues related to pharmacy practice, overall knowledge of public health, and presentation skills. The implementation of a poster project was well received by students and faculty members as an effective method for enhancing public health instruction in the PharmD program at North Dakota State University.

  16. Managing collaboration across boundaries in health information technology projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrety, Karin; Dalley, Andrew; McLoughlin, Ian; Wilson, Rob; Yu, Ping

    2012-01-01

    One reason that it is so difficult to build electronic systems for collecting and sharing health information is that their design and implementation requires clear goals and a great deal of collaboration among people from diverse social and occupational worlds. This paper uses empirical examples from two Australian health informatics projects to illustrate the importance of boundary objects and boundary spanning activities in facilitating the high degree of collaboration required for the design and implementation of workable systems.

  17. Health and Environment Project In Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Edou

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In 1989, the Republic of Benin was facing great social and economic upheavals. In 1990, the Canadian and American Mennonite missionaries created the Bethesda Health Care Centre.  In 1993, assessment of the hospital activities showed that many people were coming back to the centre repeatedly with the same illnesses linked to sanitation aspects and living conditions. The Community Development and Environmental Protection Department (DCAM was thus established to face this great challenge. It quickly helped the community and the local authorities to establish a waste management system.  The Programme for Sanitation and Protection of the Environment (PrAPE was designed and funded by the French Embassy and Evangelische Entwicklungsdienst V.e (EED, a German Christian organization. Households then began to subscribe for the collection of their wastes. Bethesda began to assist other communities to put in place waste management systems. Today, it is working throughout the country with many municipalities. While the programme was being implemented, we discovered that the community needed to be supported in their revenue generating activities. We set up in 1996, a solidarity-based microfinance system. The savings of some people were used to grant credit to others. This community bank has developed into a large bank today. In 2006, a system of mutual insurance was put in place. A complete integrated system to address the basic needs of the community was thus set up.En 1989, la République du Bénin a été confrontée à d’importants bouleversements sociaux et économiques. En 1990, des missionnaires mennonites canadiens et américains ont créé le Centre de santé Bethesda. En 1993, l’évaluation des activités hospitalières a montré que de nombreuses personnes revenaient à plusieurs reprises au centre avec les mêmes maladies liées à des problèmes d’assainissement et aux conditions de vie. Le département Développement Communautaire et

  18. Sport, Physical Education And Coaching in Health (SPEACH) project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Johan de Jong

    2015-01-01

    Main goal of the Sport Physical Education And Coaching in Health Project (SPEACH/Erasmus+ 557083-EPP-1-2014-1-NL-SPO-SCP) is to increase awareness and behavioural change in sport professionals and European citizens towards an active and healthy lifestyle. Sedentariness and physical inactivity are a

  19. Assuring health and safety performance on construction projects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article presents findings from an investigation conducted in Botswana and South Africa on how construction clients could influence health and safety (H&S) performance on construction projects. The continued poor state of construction H&S and the inability of designers and contractors to influence an industry-wide ...

  20. Continued multidisciplinary project-based learning - implementation in health informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, C; Spreckelsen, C

    2009-01-01

    Problem- and project-based learning are approved methods to train students, graduates and post-graduates in scientific and other professional skills. The students are trained on realistic scenarios in a broader context. For students specializing in health informatics we introduced continued multidisciplinary project-based learning (CM-PBL) at a department of medical informatics. The training approach addresses both students of medicine and students of computer science. The students are full members of an ongoing research project and develop a project-related application or module, or explore or evaluate a sub-project. Two teachers guide and review the students' work. The training on scientific work follows a workflow with defined milestones. The team acts as peer group. By participating in the research team's work the students are trained on professional skills. A research project on a web-based information system on hospitals built the scenario for the realistic context. The research team consisted of up to 14 active members at a time, who were scientists and students of computer science and medicine. The well communicated educational approach and team policy fostered the participation of the students. Formative assessment and evaluation showed a considerable improvement of the students' skills and a high participant satisfaction. Alternative education approaches such as project-based learning empower students to acquire scientific knowledge and professional skills, especially the ability of life-long learning, multidisciplinary team work and social responsibility.

  1. 75 FR 8796 - Civil Penalties Under ERISA Section 502(c)(8)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... Section 502(c)(8) AGENCY: Employee Benefits Security Administration, Labor. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY... civil penalties by the Department of Labor under section 502(c)(8) of the Employee Retirement Income... model notice for plans in critical status. See 73 FR 15688 (Mar. 25, 2008). However, section 102(b)(1)(C...

  2. Radon, Health and Natural Hazards and IGCP Project 571

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Robin; Gillmore, Gavin

    2010-05-01

    The first - launch - meeting of IGCP Project 571 (Radon, Health and Natural Hazards) was held at the 2009 EGU General Assembly and a total of 24 abstracts was submitted to the three formal sessions. Subsequently, formal communications networks have been established between lead groups in the UK, France, Poland, India and Taiwan and these networks are extending to include Ghana, the Czech Republic, Greece, Trinidad & Tobago, Spain, Japan and Canada. There is also the strong possibility of a UK-India Commonwealth Fellowship to support certain of the Project's activities. The presentation will comprise a review of the first year and set out objectives for the second and subsequent years, and will introduce the Project sessions and presentations at the 2010 EGU General Assembly. See also the session abstract.

  3. Human Sensing Fusion Project for Safety and Health Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maenaka, Kazusuke

    This paper introduces objectives and status of “Human sensing fusion project” in the Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology (ERATO) scheme produced by Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST). This project was started in December 2007 and the laboratory with 11 members opened on April 2008. The aim of this project is to realize a human activity-monitoring device with many kinds of sensors in ultimate small size so that the device can be pasted or patched to the human body, and to establish the algorism for understanding human condition including both physical and mental conditions from obtained data. This system can be used towards the prevention of the danger of accidents and the maintenance of health. The actual research has just begun and preparations for project are well under way.

  4. Innovation in health service management: Adoption of project management offices to support major health care transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Aubry, Monique; Cyr, Guylaine; Richer, Marie-Claire; Fortin-Verreault, Jean-François; Fortin, Claude; Marchionni, Caroline

    2017-11-01

    To explore the characteristics that influence project management offices acceptance and adoption in healthcare sector. The creation of project management offices has been suggested as a promising avenue to promote successful organisational change and facilitate evidence-based practice. However, little is known about the characteristics that promote their initial adoption and acceptance in health care sector. This knowledge is important in the context where many organisations are considering implementing project management offices with nurse managers as leaders. A descriptive multiple case study design was used. The unit of analysis was the project management offices. The study was conducted in three university-affiliated teaching hospitals in 2013-14 (Canada). Individual interviews (n = 34) were conducted with senior managers. Results reveal that project management offices dedicated to project and change management constitute an innovation and an added value that addresses tangible needs in the field. Project management offices are an innovation highly compatible with health care managers and their approach has parallels to the process of clinical problem solving and reasoning well-known to adopters. This knowledge is important in a context where many nurses hold various roles in project management offices, such as Director, project manager, clinical expert and knowledge broker. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Health economics in radiation oncology: introducing the ESTRO HERO project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, Yolande; Grau, Cai

    2012-04-01

    New evidence based regimens and novel high precision technology have reinforced the important role of radiotherapy in the management of cancer. Current data estimate that more than 50% of all cancer patients would benefit from radiotherapy during the course of their disease. Within recent years, the radiotherapy community has become more than conscious of the ever-increasing necessity to come up with objective data to endorse the crucial role and position of radiation therapy within the rapidly changing global oncology landscape. In an era of ever expanding health care costs, proven safety and effectiveness is not sufficient anymore to obtain funding, objective data about cost and cost-effectiveness are nowadays additionally requested. It is in this context that ESTRO is launching the HERO-project (Health Economics in Radiation Oncology), with the overall aim to develop a knowledge base and a model for health economic evaluation of radiation treatments at the European level. To accomplish these objectives, the HERO project will address needs, accessibility, cost and cost-effectiveness of radiotherapy. The results will raise the profile of radiotherapy in the European cancer management context and help countries prioritizing radiotherapy as a highly cost-effective treatment strategy. This article describes the different steps and aims within the HERO-project, starting from evidence on the role of radiotherapy within the global oncology landscape and highlighting weaknesses that may undermine this position. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Social Determinants of Health and the Health Family Project: possibilities and limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lucia Marques da Silva

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to present some of the theoretical models of determinants in health-disease processes, with emphasis on Dahlgren & Whitehead’s proposal (1991 which emphasizes intersectoriality and social participation as fundamental to the success of a social policy for health. The paper also presents an analysis of the possibilities and limits of the Healthy Family Project – an initiative of the Medical School of Campos, RJ – as a possible strategy for intervening on social determinants of health. Although approached as a case study, it presents possible solutions for other health care projects oriented by the Family Health Strategy (FHS, a Federal Government health policy. According to data from the Federal Government, by the year 2007 there were a total of 27 324 family health teams in 5125 municipalities, covering 46.6% of the population – about 87.7 million people (Ministry of Health, 2009. These data demonstrate the relevance of this strategy as a public policy. The discussion presented here is also relevant due to the fact that Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ, is one of the few municipalities with no public health policy, and also because the Family Health Strategy is being reviewed and implemented as publicized local officials. The presentation of the various explanatory models may contribute to the understanding of the theoretical determinants in health-disease processes guide proposals of health interventions and policies that support them.

  7. [Anthropology and oral health projects in developing countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasveld, A E

    2016-01-01

    The mouth and teeth play an important role in social interactions around the world. The way people deal with their teeth and mouth, however, is determined culturally. When oral healthcare projects are being carried out in developing countries, differing cultural worldviews can cause misunderstandings between oral healthcare providers and their patients. The oral healthcare volunteer often has to try to understand the local assumptions about teeth and oral hygiene first, before he or she can bring about a change of behaviour, increase therapy compliance and make the oral healthcare project sustainable. Anthropology can be helpful in this respect. In 2014, in a pilot project commissioned by the Dutch Dental Care Foundation, in which oral healthcare was provided in combination with anthropological research, an oral healthcare project in Kwale (Kenia) was evaluated. The study identified 6 primary themes that indicate the most important factors influencing the oral health of school children in Kwale. Research into the local culture by oral healthcare providers would appear to be an important prerequisite to meaningful work in developing countries.

  8. Building capacity in a health sciences library to support global health projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, Mellanye; Swogger, Susan; McGraw, Kathleen A

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes how a large, academic health sciences library built capacity for supporting global health at its university and discusses related outcomes. Lean budgets require prioritization and organizational strategy. A committee, with leadership responsibilities assigned to one librarian, guided strategic planning and the pursuit of collaborative, global health outreach activities. A website features case studies and videos of user stories to promote how library partnerships successfully contributed to global health projects. Collaborative partnerships were formed through outreach activities and from follow-up to reference questions. The committee and a librarian's dedicated time established the library's commitment to help the university carry out its ambitious global agenda.

  9. Building capacity in a health sciences library to support global health projects*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, Mellanye; Swogger, Susan; McGraw, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes how a large, academic health sciences library built capacity for supporting global health at its university and discusses related outcomes. Lean budgets require prioritization and organizational strategy. A committee, with leadership responsibilities assigned to one librarian, guided strategic planning and the pursuit of collaborative, global health outreach activities. A website features case studies and videos of user stories to promote how library partnerships successfully contributed to global health projects. Collaborative partnerships were formed through outreach activities and from follow-up to reference questions. The committee and a librarian's dedicated time established the library's commitment to help the university carry out its ambitious global agenda. PMID:24860264

  10. C8 cross transfer for the treatment of caudal brachial plexus avulsion in three dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moissonnier, Pierre; Carozzo, Claude; Thibaut, Jean-Laurent; Escriou, Catherine; Hidalgo, Antoine; Blot, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the cervical nerve 8 cross-transfer technique (C8CT) as a part of surgical treatment of caudal brachial plexus avulsion (BPA) in the dog. Case series. Client-owned dogs suspected to have caudal BPA based on neurological examination and electrophysiological testing (n = 3). The distal stump of the surgically transected contralateral C8 ventral branch (donor) was bridged to the proximal stump of the avulsed C8 ventral branch (recipient) and secured with 9-0 polypropylene suture under an operating microscope. A carpal panarthrodesis was performed on the injured limb after C8CT. Surgical exploration confirmed avulsion of nerve roots C7, C8, and T1 in all cases. There was no evidence of an iatrogenic effect on the donor forelimb. Gradual improvement in function of the affected forelimb occurred in all dogs, with eventual recovery of voluntary elbow extension. Reinnervation was evident in EMG recordings 6 months postoperatively in all three dogs. Stimulation of the donor C8 ventral branch led to motor evoked potentials in the avulsed side triceps brachialis and radial carpus extensor muscles. Variable functional outcome was observed in the 3 dogs during clinical evaluation 3-4 years after surgery. Digital abrasion wounds, distal interphalangeal infectious arthritis, and self-mutilation necessitated distal phalanx amputation of digits 3 and 4 in 2 dogs. C8CT provided partial reconnection of the donor C8 ventral branch to the avulsed brachial plexus in the 3 dogs of this series. Reinnervation resulted in active elbow extension and promoted functional recovery in the affected limb. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  11. Overview of the national mental health benchmarking project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Tim; Walter, Garry; Brann, Peter

    2011-02-01

    This paper provides an overview of the National Mental Health Benchmarking Project (NMHBP) which explored the value of benchmarking within the four main program areas of public sector mental health (general adult, child and adolescent, older persons and forensic). The NMHBP involved a series of forums which enabled participating organizations to benchmark themselves against each other, with a view to understanding variability in performance against a range of key performance indicators (KPIs). Twenty-three mental health organizations took part in the NMHBP. The forums culminated in each mental health organization documenting its performance against relevant KPIs. The processes, impacts and outcomes of the NMHBP were evaluated via a multi-methods evaluation. There was considerable variability across program streams for many of the KPIs, much of which could be explained by contextual factors. Within program streams there was considerable intra-organization variability. Participants found the examination of intra-organization variability on particular indicators to be useful. The NMHBP has shown that benchmarking is possible. Managers and clinical leaders will need to champion benchmarking and highlight its utility in relation to quality improvement and service development if the accountability goals of the Fourth National Mental Health Plan are to be realized.

  12. Two human homeobox genes, c1 and c8: structure analysis and expression in embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, A; Mavilio, F; Acampora, D; Giampaolo, A; Faiella, A; Zappavigna, V; D'Esposito, M; Pannese, M; Russo, G; Boncinelli, E

    1987-07-01

    Two human cDNA clones (HHO.c1.95 and HHO.c8.5111) containing a homeobox region have been characterized, and the respective genomic regions have been partially analyzed. Expression of the corresponding genes, termed c1 and c8, was evaluated in different organs and body parts during human embryonic/fetal development. HHO.c1.95 apparently encodes a 217-amino acid protein containing a class I homeodomain that shares 60 out of 61 amino acid residues with the Antennapedia homeodomain of Drosophila melanogaster. HHO.c8.5111 encodes a 153-amino acid protein containing a homeodomain identical to that of the frog AC1 gene. Clones HHO.c1 and HHO.c8 detect by blot-hydridization one and two specific polyadenylylated transcripts, respectively. These are differentially expressed in spinal cord, backbone rudiments, limb buds (or limbs), heart, and skin of human embryos and early fetuses in the 5- to 9-week postfertilization period, thus suggesting that the c1 and c8 genes play a key role in a variety of developmental processes. Together, the results of the embryonic/fetal expression of c1 and c8 and those of two previously analyzed genes (c10 and c13) indicate a coherent pattern of expression of these genes in early human ontogeny.

  13. Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) Technology Demonstration Project Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Ryan; Iverson, David; Pisanich, Greg; Toberman, Mike; Hicks, Ken

    2006-01-01

    Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) is an essential capability that will be required to enable upcoming explorations mission systems such as the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), as well as NASA aeronautics missions. However, the lack of flight experience and available test platforms have held back the infusion by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) of ISHM technologies into future space and aeronautical missions. To address this problem, a pioneer project was conceived to use a high-performance aircraft as a low-cost proxy to develop, mature, and verify the effectiveness of candidate ISHM technologies. Given the similarities between spacecraft and aircraft, an F/A-18 currently stationed at Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) was chosen as a suitable host platform for the test bed. This report describes how the test bed was conceived, how the technologies were integrated on to the aircraft, and how these technologies were matured during the project. It also describes the lessons learned during the project and a forward path for continued work.

  14. Controlling of the optical properties of the solutions of the PTCDI-C8 organic semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğan, Erman; Gündüz, Bayram

    2016-09-01

    N,N'-Dioctyl-3,4,9,10 perylenedicarboximide (PTCDI-C8) organic semiconductor have vast applications in solar cells, thermoelectric generators, thin film photovoltaics and many other optoelectronic devices. These applications of the materials are based on their spectral and optical properties. The solutions of the PTCDI-C8 for different molarities were prepared and the spectral and optical mesaurements were analyzed. Effects of the molarities on optical properties were investigated. Vibronic structure has been observed based on the absorption bands of PTCDI-C8 semiconductor with seven peaks at 2.292, 2.451, 2.616, 3.212, 3.851, 4.477 and 4.733 eV. The important spectral parameteres such as molar/mass extinction coefficients, absorption coefficient of the PTCDI-C8 molecule were calculated. Optical properties such as angle of incidence/refraction, optical band gap, real and imaginary parts of dielectric constant, loss factor and electrical susceptibility of the the PTCDI-C8 were obtained. Finally, we discussed these parameters for optoelectronic applications and compared with related parameters in literature.

  15. Structural analysis of the indium-stabilized GaAs(001)-c(8×2) surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, T.-L.; Kumpf, C.; Kazimirov, A.

    2002-01-01

    The indium-stabilized GaAs(001)-c(8x2) surface was investigated by surface x-ray diffraction and x-ray standing waves. We find that the reconstruction closely resembles the c(8x2) structure described by the recently proposed unified model for clean III-V semiconductor surfaces [Kumpf , Phys. Rev...... different due to the lateral strain induced by the lattice mismatch. This structural difference explains why the ladder-type pattern observed previously by scanning tunneling microscopy only appears for the In/GaAs(001) and InAs/GaAs(001) surfaces, but not for the InAs clean surface. The structural model we...... propose for the In-stabilized GaAs(001)-c(8x2) surface, which fully agrees with the scanning tunneling microscopy results, should therefore generally apply to strained InAs(001) surfaces....

  16. Impact of CYP2C8*3 on paclitaxel clearance in ovarian cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Troels Korshøj; Vach, Werner; Gréen, Henrik

    Background Toxicity and therapeutic effects of paclitaxel vary greatly between patients and remain a clinically relevant problem with regard to the handling of dose delay/reduction or termination of treatment. We investigated the notion that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CYP2C8 could...... be partly responsible for this variation. Paclitaxel is mainly metabolized by CYP2C8; SNPs have been investigated in this context before but conclusions are still lacking. We present a prospective study of paclitaxel clearance (CL) in 93 Caucasian females with epithelial ovarian cancer with regard...... to the CYP2C8 *1b, *1c, *3 and *4 genotypes. Material and methods All patients were diagnosed with primary ovarian/peritoneal cancer and received 175mg/m2 paclitaxel over 3 hrs plus carboplatin (AUC5-6) q3w. All patients gave written and verbal consent. The study was approved by ethics committees in Denmark...

  17. The korean social life, health and aging project-health examination cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Mi; Lee, Won Joon; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Choi, Wungrak; Lee, Jina; Sung, Kiho; Chu, Sang Hui; Park, Yeong-Ran; Youm, Yoosik

    2014-01-01

    The Korean Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (KSHAP) is a population-based longitudinal study of health determinants among elderly Koreans. The target population of the KSHAP are people aged 60 years or older and their spouses living in a rural community of Korea. A complete enumeration survey was conducted in the first wave of the KSHAP on 94.7% (814 of 860) of the target population between December 2011 and July 2012. The KSHAP-Health Examination (KSHAP-HE) cohort consists of 698 people who completed additional health examinations at a public health center (n=533) or at their home (n=165). Face-to-face questionnaires were used to interview participants on their demographics, social network characteristics, medical history, health behaviors, cognitive function, and depression symptoms. Health center examinations included anthropometric measures, body impedance analysis, resting blood pressure measurement, radial artery tonometry, bone densitometry, the timed up-and-go test, and fasting blood analysis. However, only anthropometric measures, blood pressure measurement, and non-fasting blood analysis were available for home health examinations. Collaboration is encouraged and access to the KSHAP baseline data will be available via the website of the Korean Social Science Data Archive (http://www.kossda.or.kr). The Korean Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (KSHAP) is a population-based longitudinal study of health determinants among elderly Koreans. The target population of the KSHAP are people aged 60 years or older and their spouses living in a rural community of Korea. A complete enumeration survey was conducted in the first wave of the KSHAP on 94.7% (814 of 860) of the target population between December 2011 and July 2012. The KSHAP-Health Examination (KSHAP-HE) cohort consists of 698 people who completed additional health examinations at a public health center (n=533) or at their home (n=165). Face-to-face questionnaires were used to interview

  18. Distribution of human CYP2C8*2 allele in three different African populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paganotti Giacomo M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to investigate cytochrome P450 2C8*2 (CYP2C8*2 distribution and allele frequency in three populations from West and East Africa exposed to Plasmodium falciparum malaria. CYP2C8 enzyme is involved in the metabolism of the anti-malarials amodiaquine and chloroquine. The presence of the CYP2C8*2 defective allele has been recently associated to higher rate of chloroquine-resistant malaria parasites. Methods A total of 503 young subjects were genotyped for the single nucleotide polymorphism rs11572103 (A/T. Eighty-eight were from southern Senegal, 262 from eastern Uganda and 153 from southern Madagascar. The PCR-RFLP technique was used to discriminate the wild-type (A from the defective allele (T. Results A CYP2C8*2 (T allele frequency of 0.222 ± 0.044 was detected in Senegal, 0.105 ± 0.019 in Uganda and 0.150 ± 0.029 in Madagascar. Conclusions This study demonstrated that CYP2C8*2 allele is widespread in Africa. This allele occurs at different frequency in West and East Africa, being higher in Senegal than in Uganda and Madagascar. These data indicate that an important fraction of the populations analysed has a decreased enzymatic activity, thus being at higher risk for drug accumulation with two possible consequences: i an exacerbation of drug-associated adverse side effects; ii an increase of drug-resistance selection pressure on P. falciparum parasites.

  19. Health Education Field Experience Stories: A Reflective, Digital, Performance-Based Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyde, Adrian R.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a reflective, systematic, performance-based project resulting in the development of a digital story about a community health education field experience. The project is designed for preservice health education students at the college/university level. The primary benefit of the project is that it challenges students to engage…

  20. Impact of CYP2C8*3 on paclitaxel clearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, T K; Brasch-Andersen, C; Gréen, H

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of CYP2C8*3 and three genetic ABCB1 variants on the elimination of paclitaxel. We studied 93 Caucasian women with ovarian cancer treated with paclitaxel and carboplatin. Using sparse sampling and nonlinear mixed effects modeling...

  1. Data of evolutionary structure change: 15C8H-32C2B [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ain>H 15C8H FNIKD-TYMHW ...> GGG- EEEEture> ATOM 1815 CA PHE H 27 28.7...tryIDChain>32C2B YSISSDYAWNW ucture> EEture...pdbChain> 32C2B GYISY-SGSTS >EEEE - EEE...ce>AQIDPANGNTK >EEEE EEE> ATOM 2

  2. Palladium-Catalyzed Regioselective C8-H Amination of 1-Naphthylamine Derivatives with Aliphatic Amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zexian; Sun, Suyan; Qiao, Huijie; Yang, Fan; Zhu, Yu; Kang, Jianxun; Wu, Yusheng; Wu, Yangjie

    2016-09-16

    A simple and facile protocol for palladium-catalyzed picolinamide-directed C8-H amination of 1-naphthylamine derivatives with simple secondary aliphatic amines was developed, thereby providing a new route to 1,8-naphthalenediamine derivatives. It is noteworthy that the picolinamide moiety as a bidentate directing group may play a key role in this regioselective transformation.

  3. Sexual Health Promotion on Social Networking Sites: A Process Evaluation of the FaceSpace Project

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nguyen, Phuong; Gold, Judy; Pedrana, Alisa; Chang, Shanton; Howard, Steve; Ilic, Olivia; Hellard, Margaret; Stoove, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This article reports findings from an evaluation of reach and engagement of The FaceSpace Project, a novel sexual health promotion project delivered through social networking sites that targeted...

  4. [Globalization, the Camisea Project and the Matsigenkas health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Slimming, Paola

    2010-09-01

    Globalization has been the consequence of an important opening of the economies, achieved through the reduction in the obstacles to commerce, elimination of the capital controls and exchange restrictions. The impact of the Camisea Project in the Peruvian economy has aroused great interest and controversy with respect to the future social and economic national impact, and especially, in the Matsigenka population, located in the 88 and 56 lots, where gas extraction is being done. The area of Camisea gas exploitation offers the challenge of a complex sanitary problem, not only because of the impacts and risks produced by the hidrocarbon exploitation, but also due to a legacy of economical and sanitary precariousness that has accumulated from other times. At the same time, this area offers the opportunity to rethink the public health system according to the indigenous reality. It is necessary to take action in the social determinants of inequity and poverty in order to reach the positive effects the globalization can have in health, ensuring the interests of developing countries and vulnerable populations.

  5. Quality of life and psychological health indicators in the national social life, health, and aging project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiovitz-Ezra, Sharon; Leitsch, Sara; Graber, Jessica; Karraker, Amelia

    2009-11-01

    The National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) measures seven indicators of quality of life (QoL) and psychological health. The measures used for happiness, self-esteem, depression, and loneliness are well established in the literature. Conversely, measures of anxiety, stress, and self-reported emotional health were modified for their use in this unique project. The purpose of this paper is to provide (a) an overview of NSHAP's QoL assessment and (b) evidence for the adequacy of the modified measures. First, we examined the psychometric properties of the modified measures. Second, the established QoL measures were used to examine the concurrent validity of the modified measures. Finally, gender- and age-group differences were examined for each modified measure. The anxiety index exhibited good internal reliability and concurrent validity. Consistent with the literature, a single-factor structure best fit the data. Stress was satisfactory in terms of concurrent validity but with only fair internal consistency. Self-reported emotional health exhibited good concurrent validity and moderate external validity. The modified indices used in NSHAP tended to exhibit good internal reliability and concurrent validity. These measures can confidently be used in the exploration of QoL and psychological health in later life and its many correlates.

  6. The Comprehensive Health Education Workers Project and Caring Professionals as Asset-Builders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévesque, Michel

    2017-01-01

    The Comprehensive Health Education Workers (CHEW) Project is a community-based initiative that educates sexual and gender minority (SGM or LGBTQ) young people about comprehensive--mental, physical, sexual, and social--health and that supports their comprehensive health needs with other services. Since October 2014, CHEW Project staff have served…

  7. Health Impact Assessment of Indira Sagar Project: a paramount to studies on Water Development Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anushrita; Nagpal, B N; Kapoor, Neera; Srivastava, Aruna; Saxena, Rekha; Singh, Shailendra; Gupta, Sanjeev; Singh, Sompal; Vikram, Kumar; Valecha, Neena

    2017-01-26

    Very limited studies on Health Impact Assessment (HIA) of Water Development Projects (WDP) in relation to mosquito-borne diseases have been carried out in India. The current study focuses on using HIA as a tool for finding impact of Indira Sagar Project, Madhya Pradesh on human health in relation to mosquito borne diseases, and emphasizing its incorporation as an integral part of any WDP. Screening, scoping, assessment, recommendation, reporting, and evaluation were carried out in selected study areas. Entomological, epidemiological, socio-economic and knowledge, attitudes and practices data related to malaria transmission in three dam components: Submergence (SUB), Command (CMD) and Resettlement and Rehabilitation (RR) colonies were generated for the period of January 2013-December 2014. Statistical analysis was attempted to compare data among dam components and to identify risk factors. Component-specific mitigation measures were suggested based on observations. Anopheles culicifacies was the dominating species in all three dam components and its man-hour density in CMD areas was higher compared to SUB and RR. The odds of finding a positive malaria case was much higher in CMD compared to SUB (OR 1.24, CI 95% 0.71-2.43) and RR (OR 5.48, CI 95% 0.73-40.63). Respondents of CMD stated more previous episodes of malaria (81.8%) compared to RR (61.4%) and SUB (55.7%). The canonical discriminant analysis concluded that distance from reservoir/Indira Sagar canal had the highest discriminating ability of malaria cases in different components followed by treatment-seeking behaviour and malaria history. The analysis identified these risk factors with 70% accuracy. Engineering manipulations may be carried out in CMD areas to control seepage and RR colonies should be established beyond 3 km from reservoir/Indira Sagar canal considering the flight range of A. culicifacies. Strengthening of surveillance with early detection and complete treatment was recommended for CMD areas

  8. Community participation in primary health care projects of the Muldersdrift Health and Development Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barker

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available After numerous teething problems (1974-1994, the Department of Nursing Education of WITS University took responsibility for the Muldersdrift Health and Development Programme (MHDP. The nursing science students explored and implemented an empowerment approach to community participation. The students worked with MHDP health workers to improve health through community participation, in combination with primary health care (PHC activities and the involvement of a variety of community groups. As the PHC projects evolved overtime, the need arose to evaluate the level of community participation and how much community ownership was present over decision-making and resources. This led to the question “What was the level of community participation in PHC projects of the MHDP?” Based on the question the following objectives were set, i.e. i to evaluate the community participation in PHC initiatives; ii to provide the project partners with motivational affirmation on the level of community participation criteria thus far achieved; iii to indicate to participants the mechanisms that should still be implemented if they wanted to advance to higher levels of community participation; iv to evaluate the MHDP’s implementation of a people-centred approach to community participation in PHC; and v the evaluation of the level of community participation in PHC projects in the MHDP. An evaluative, descriptive, contextual and quantitative research design was used. Ethical standards were adhered to throughout the study. The MHDP had a study population of twentythree (N=23 PHC projects. A purposive sample of seven PHC initiatives was chosen according to specific selection criteria and evaluated according to the “Criteria to evaluate community participation in PHC projects” instrument (a quantitative tool. Structured group interviews were done with PHC projects’ executive committee members. The Joint Management Committee’s data was collected through mailed

  9. Health and Maintenance Status Determination and Predictive Fault Diagnosis System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this project is to demonstrate intelligent health and maintenance status determination and predictive fault diagnosis techniques for NASA rocket...

  10. Latin American special project: kidney health cooperation project between Uruguay and Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Laura; Plata-Cornejo, Raúl; Fernández-Cean, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Uruguay and Bolivia are two countries that show heterogenicity of the Latin American region, including the national income, the expenditure on health and the services for renal care. In Bolivia, there is manpower shortage for renal care with only 5 nephrologists per million people (pmp) and the prevalence of patients on dialysis is only 200 pmp. This is much lower than the mean prevalence rate of renal replacement therapy for Latin America as a whole. Uruguay on the other hand has more dedicated renal resources with 50 nephrologists pmp, and renal replacement therapy is provided to ~ 1,000 dialysis patients pmp. In November 2012, a collaborative project financed by the Uruguayan International Cooperation Agency was signed by both the Uruguay and Bolivia Ministries of Health, and the goal was to develop a comprehensive program for the prevention and management of all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Bolivia. The specific objectives were to: a) promote renal healthcare in the primary healthcare setting, b) identify kidney disease in populations at risk, and c) optimize patient care at all stages of CKD, including dialysis and transplantation supported with a national ESRD registry in Bolivia. As a first step, delegates from the Bolivian Health Ministry, visited Uruguay in April 2014, primarily to strengthen the development of tools required for developing and maintaining a national registry. In addition, during this visit, a meeting with the president of the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Hypertension (SLANH) culminated in designing a training program for peritoneal dialysis. This highly cooperative relationship is advancing the prevention and care of CKD in Bolivia and may serve as a model for international approaches to advance system level CKD care in countries with limited healthcare resources.

  11. Data-intensive structural health monitoring in the infrawatch project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, R.P.; Miao, S.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Knobbe, A.

    2013-01-01

    The InfraWatch project is a Dutch research project, aimed at developing novel techniques for large-scale monitoring of concrete infra-structures. The project involves a large bridge, fitted with multiple types of sensors that capture the high-resolution dynamic behavior of the bridge. With 145

  12. Density equalizing map projections (cartograms) in public health applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1998-05-01

    In studying geographic disease distributions, one normally compares rates among arbitrarily defined geographic subareas (e.g. census tracts), thereby sacrificing some of the geographic detail of the original data. The sparser the data, the larger the subareas must be in order to calculate stable rates. This dilemma is avoided with the technique of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP){copyright}. Boundaries of geographic subregions are adjusted to equalize population density over the entire study area. Case locations plotted on the transformed map should have a uniform distribution if the underlying disease risk is constant. On the transformed map, the statistical analysis of the observed distribution is greatly simplified. Even for sparse distributions, the statistical significance of a supposed disease cluster can be calculated with validity. The DEMP algorithm was applied to a data set previously analyzed with conventional techniques; namely, 401 childhood cancer cases in four counties of California. The distribution of cases on the transformed map was analyzed visually and statistically. To check the validity of the method, the identical analysis was performed on 401 artificial cases randomly generated under the assumption of uniform risk. No statistically significant evidence for geographic non-uniformity of rates was found, in agreement with the original analysis performed by the California Department of Health Services.

  13. The Apheis project: Air Pollution and Health?A European Information System

    OpenAIRE

    Medina, Sylvia; Le Tertre, Alain; Saklad, Michael

    2009-01-01

    At a time when the Health Effects Institute, Centers for Disease Control, and Environmental Protection Agency are creating an Environmental Public Health Tracking Program on Air Pollution Effects in the USA, it seemed useful to share the experience acquired since 1999 by the Apheis project (Air Pollution and Health?A European Information System), which has tracked the effects of air pollution on health in 26 European cities and continues to do so as the new Aphekom project. In particular, thi...

  14. Using and interpreting mental health measures in the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Carolyn; Hedberg, E C; Kozloski, Michael; Dale, William; McClintock, Martha K

    2014-11-01

    National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) included five unique mental health measures in Waves 1 and 2 that researchers can use to measure the overall emotional health of participants: depressive symptoms, happiness-unhappiness, anxiety symptoms, perceived stress, and felt loneliness. For each, we detail the rationale for its development and explain how to score, analyze, and interpret results. NSHAP developed its measures by modifying traditional short-form scales to improve response efficiency and reduce respondent burden. Scoring protocols and interpretations were developed for each measure. U.S. population estimates for older adults born between 1920 and 1947 were generated using age-eligible samples from Waves 1 and 2. NSHAP's protocols yielded U.S. prevalence rates similar to other nationally representative studies of older adults and comparable between waves. Higher estimates of anxiety symptoms and perceived stress in Wave 2 compared with Wave 1 were explained by age, administration mode, and time period. Analytic strategies for longitudinal analyses are provided. In Wave 2, mental health generally was worse at older ages, with women having more symptoms at younger ages than men. Women had fewer anxiety symptoms at the oldest ages. NSHAP's mental health measures were successfully integrated into the project's survey and showed acceptable external reliability as well as moderately stable individual characteristics across the 5 years between Waves 1 and 2. Depressive symptoms and unhappiness may form a mental health cluster in the elderly, distinct from anxiety symptoms, perceived stress, and felt loneliness. Gender differences in age-specific patterns of mental health were evident using the exact age of participants rather than the traditional decade groupings. Administration mode and time period (between 2005-2006 and 2010-2011) were determined to be potential confounds that need to be accommodated in longitudinal analyses of aging, whereas

  15. Research priorities for public mental health in Europe : Recommendations of the ROAMER project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forsman, A.K.; Wahlbeck, K.; Aarø, L.E.; Alonso, J.; Barry, M. M.; Brunn, M.; Cardoso, G.; Cattan, M.; De Girolamo, G.; Eberhard-Gran, M.; Evans-Lacko, S.; Fiorillo, A.; Hansson, L.; Haro, J.M.; Hazo, J.-B.; Hegerl, U.; Katschnig, H.; Knappe, S.; Luciano, M.; Miret, M.; Nordentoft, M.; Obradors-Tarragó, C.; Pilgrim, D.; Ruud, T.; Salize, H.J.; Stewart-Brown, S.L.; Tómasson, K.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.M.; Ventus, D.B.J.; Vuori, J.; Värnik, A.; ROAMER, Consortium

    2015-01-01

    Background: The ROAdmap for MEntal health Research in Europe project aimed to create an integrated European roadmap for mental health research. Leading mental health research experts across Europe have formulated consensus-based recommendations for future research within the public mental health

  16. A Progress Assessment of the School Health Education Project of Appalachian Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Education Service Agency of Appalachian Maryland, Cumberland.

    This document evaluates the effectiveness of a project on health education conducted in Appalachian Maryland. The emphasis of the project was on teaching children in the fifth grade about lung and respiratory system problems and their connection with smoking. This health education course was incorporated into their regular curriculum. Prior to…

  17. Faculty development projects for international health professions educators: Vehicles for institutional change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, William P; Friedman, Stacey R; Diserens, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Projects are an important tool in faculty development, and project emphasis may offer insights into perceived education priorities. Impact of projects has been focused on individuals, not institutions or health. Education innovation projects of Fellows in an international faculty development program were examined to better understand perceived needs in health professions education and institutional impact of projects. Four hundred and thirty-five projects were analyzed to identify focus areas. Fellows were asked to identify changes in their schools and communities resulting from their projects. New education methods and curriculum change were common project focus areas. Regional differences were evident with a higher percentage of education methods projects by Fellows residing in India (52%), compared with South Africa (25%) and Brazil (24%). Fifty-six percent of projects were incorporated into the curriculum and/or incorporated as institutional policy. One-third to two-thirds of respondents noted improved teaching quality, collaboration, education research interest, assessment, student performance, and curriculum alignment with community health needs. National differences in project focus may offer insight into local conditions and needs. High rates of diffusion of projects and impact on faculty, students, and curriculum suggest that faculty development projects may be a strategy for institutional change in resource limited environments.

  18. Ranking the effects of urban development projects on social determinants of health: health impact assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, Parisa; Karimlou, Masoud; Nouri, Jafar; Mohammadi, Farahnaz; Malek Afzali, Hosein; Forouzan, Ameneh Setareh

    2014-05-30

    Health impact assessment (HIA) offer a very logical and interesting approach for those aiming to integrate health issues into planning processes. With a lot of works and plans waiting to be done (e.g., developing and updating plans, counseling planning commissions, cooperation with other organizations), planners find it difficult to prioritize health among a variety of possible issues and solutions they confront. In the present article, first, the list of social determinants of health associated with Chitgar man-made lake was extracted out using a qualitative method and with content analysis approach, and then they were prioritized using analytic hierarchy process. 28 social determinants of health including "intermediary" and "structural" determinants were extracted out. Regarding positive effects of lake on these determinants, "recreational services" and "traffic" received the highest and the lowest weights with 0.895 and 0.638 respectively among structural determinants and with consideration to "construction" option. Furthermore, among intermediary determinants for "construction" option, sub-criteria of both "physical activity" and "air quality" received the final highest weight (0.889) and "pathogenesis" indicated the lowest weight with 0.617. Moreover, lake demonstrated the highest negative effects on "housing" among "structural" determinants which it takes the highest weight (0.476) in "non-construction" option. Additionally, lake had the highest negative effects on "noise pollution" among "intermediary determinants" and it takes the highest weight (0.467) in "non-construction" option. It has been shown that urban development projects such as green spaces, man-made lakes … have a huge range of effects on community's health, and having not considered these effects by urban planners and mangers is going to confront urban health with many challenges.

  19. The European Donor Health Care Project: fulfilling needs and challenges for the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.J.M. van den Burg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Donor Health Care project is a EU granted project to develop a learning programme for professionals working in the field of Donor Health Care. The innovation of this curriculum is the focus on all donors, irrespective of whether they donate blood, cells, tissues or organs. This article describes the background of the project and the current possibilities and limitations of European accreditation, distance learning and Master degrees.

  20. Index of Graduate Theses and Projects in Allied Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Allied Health, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Contains 1,073 entries from 91 institutions, giving author, institution, year, degree, emphasis, discipline, and title, arranged by topic: allied health, biocommunication arts, child development/care, clinical psychology, dentistry, environmental health, exercise science, food service, health education, health services, medical laboratories, nurse…

  1. Family health nurse project--an education program of the World Health Organization: the University of Stirling experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Ian

    2008-11-01

    This article outlines the delivery of the Family Health Nurse Education Programme of the World Health Organization (WHO) at the University of Stirling, Scotland, from 2001 to 2005. The program was part of the WHO European Family Health Nurse pilot project. The curriculum outlined by the WHO Curriculum Planning Group detailed the broad thrust of the Family Health Nurse Education Programme and was modified to be responsive to the context in which it was delivered, while staying faithful to general principles and precepts. The Family Health Nurse Education Programme is described in its evolving format over the two phases of the project; the remote and rural context occurred from 2001 to 2003, and the modification of the program for the urban phase of the project occurred during 2004 and 2005. The conceptual framework that was foundational to the development of the curriculum to prepare family health nurses will be described.

  2. Synthesis and glycosidase inhibitory activity of new hexa-substituted C8-glycomimetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prangé Thierry

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Text abstract Background Glycosidases are involved in several metabolic pathways and the development of inhibitors is an important challenge towards the treatment of diseases, such as diabetes, cancer and viral infections including AIDS. Thus, inhibition of intestinal α-glucosidases can be used to treat diabetes through the lowering of blood glucose levels, and α-glucosidase inhibitors are being marketed against type 2 (non-insulinodependent mellitus diabetes (i.e.: Glyset® or Diastabol®, Basen® and Glucor® or Precose®. Results In that context, new C8-carbasugars and related aminocyclitols have been targeted in order to study the effect of the enhanced flexibility and of the new spatial distribution displayed by these structures on their adaptability in the active site of the enzymes. The synthesis of these new C8-glycomimetics is described from enantiomerically pure C2-symmetrical polyhydroxylated cyclooctenes. Their obtention notably involved a syn-dihydroxylation, and more extended functionalization through formation of a cis-cyclic sulfate followed by amination and subsequent reductive amination. This strategy involving the nucleophilic opening of a cis-cyclic sulfate by sodium azide is to our knowledge the first example in C8-series. It revealead to be an efficient alternative to the nucleoplilic opening of an epoxide moiety which proved unsuccessful in this particular case, due to the hindered conformation of such epoxides as demonstrated by X-ray cristallographic analysis. Conclusion The biological activity of the synthesized glycomimetics has been evaluated towards 24 commercially available glycosidases. The weak observed activities can probably be related to the spatial disposition of the hydroxy and amino groups which depart too much from that realized in glycomimetics such as valiolamine, voglibose and valienamine. Nevertheless, the synthetic strategy described here is efficient and general, and could be extended to increase

  3. On the role of cytochrome c8 in photosynthetic electron transfer of the purple non-sulfur bacterium Rhodoferax fermentans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hochkoeppler, Alejandro; Ciurli, Stefano; Kofod, Pauli

    1997-01-01

    of +285 mV. Partial analysis of the N-terminus amino-acid sequence shows a high similarity with cytochromes of c8 type (formerly called Pseudomonas cytochrome c-551 type). Time-resolved spectrophotometric studies show that this cytochrome c8 reduces the tetraheme subunit of the photosynthetic reaction...... center, in a fast (sub-ms) and a slow (ms) phase. Competition experiments in the presence of both cytochrome c8 and high potential iron-sulfur protein (HiPIP), isolated from the same microorganism, show that cytochrome c8 oxidation is decreased upon addition of HiPIP. These observations suggest...

  4. Diagnostic framework and health check tool for engineering and technology projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon P Philbin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Development of a practitioner oriented diagnostic framework and health check tool to support the robust assessment of engineering and technology projects.Design/methodology/approach: The research is based on a literature review that draws together insights on project assessment and critical success factors to establish an integrated systems view of projects. This is extended to allow a comprehensive diagnostic framework to be developed along with a high-level health check tool that can be readily deployed on projects. The utility of the diagnostic framework and health check tool are explored through three illustrative case studies, with two from Canada and one from the United Kingdom. Findings andOriginality/value: The performance of engineering and technology projects can be viewed through a systems perspective and being a function of six sub-systems that are: process, technology, resources, impact, knowledge and culture. The diagnostic framework that is developed through this research integrates these sub-systems to provide a comprehensive assessment methodology for projects, which is linked to existing best practice for project reviews, performance management and maturity models. The case studies provide managerial insights that are related to the diagnostic framework but crucially also position the approach in the context of industrial applications for construction engineering and technology management.Research limitations/implications: The case study approach includes two case studies from the construction and facilities development sector with the third case study from the research and technology sector. Further work is required to investigate the use of the diagnostic framework and health check tool in other sectors.Practical implications: The health check tool will be of practical benefit to new projects managers that require access to a robust and convenient project review methodology for assessing the status and health of a

  5. Making mapping matter: a case study for short project international partnerships by global public health students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary Wyber

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: A large number of global public health students seek international experience as part of their academic curriculum. These placements are often short, given the constraints of cost and time available within the academic calendar. In contrast to international electives for clinical students there are few published guidelines on practical, ethical or feasible projects. This paper describes a ten-day sanitation mapping project in Mumbai, India and explores the broader implications for global public health student electives. Methods: Three graduate public health students conducted a geographic review of sanitation facilities in Cheeta Camp informal settlement, Mumbai. Forty-six toilet blocks with 701 individual seats were identified. The project was reviewed ethically, educationally and logistically as a possible model for other short-term international projects. Conclusions: Clearer guidelines are needed to support non-clinical placements by global public health students. Projects that are feasible, relevant and meaningful should be foster maximise benefit for learners and host communities.

  6. Making mapping matter: a case study for short project international partnerships by global public health students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyber, Rosemary; Potter, James R; Weaver, Jennifer B

    2014-01-01

    A large number of global public health students seek international experience as part of their academic curriculum. These placements are often short, given the constraints of cost and time available within the academic calendar. In contrast to international electives for clinical students there are few published guidelines on practical, ethical or feasible projects. This paper describes a ten-day sanitation mapping project in Mumbai, India and explores the broader implications for global public health student electives. Three graduate public health students conducted a geographic review of sanitation facilities in Cheeta Camp informal settlement, Mumbai. Forty-six toilet blocks with 701 individual seats were identified. The project was reviewed ethically, educationally and logistically as a possible model for other short-term international projects. Clearer guidelines are needed to support non-clinical placements by global public health students. Projects that are feasible, relevant and meaningful should be foster maximise benefit for learners and host communities.

  7. Sensor Area Network for Integrated Systems Health Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The term Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) is used to describe a capability that focuses on determining the condition (health) of every element in a...

  8. Public mental health research in Europe: A systematic mapping for the ROAMER project

    OpenAIRE

    Forsman, A.K.; Ventus, D.B.J.; van der Feltz, C.M.; Wahlbeck, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: As part of the ROAMER (ROAdmap for MEntal health Research in Europe) project, aiming to create an integrated European roadmap for mental health research, we set out to map the hitherto unmapped territory of public mental health research in Europe. Methods: Five electronic databases (CINAHL, Health Management, Medline, PsycINFO, Social Services Abstracts) were used for identifying public mental health research articles published between January 2007 and April 2012. The number of pu...

  9. Nerve transfer for sensory reconstruction of C8-T1 dermatomes in tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelli, Jayme A; Ghizoni, Marcos F

    2016-11-01

    Absence of sensation in C8-T1 dermatome is a common finding in midcervical spinal cord injury. The goal was to restore sensation on the C8-T1 dermatomes by transferring sensory nerves with afferents on C5-C6 roots. A mean 10 months post spinal cord injury, we operated on 10 upper limbs from 5 tetraplegics averaging 23 years old. Cutaneous branches of the median nerve were transferred to the palm to the ulnar proper digital nerve of the little finger. In two patients, the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve was also transferred to the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve. At a mean 20 months after surgery, on the ulnar side of the hand and little finger, all patients were able to perceive 19.3 g Semmes-Weinstein monofilament pressure. Nociception was restored on the medial side of the elbow, forearm, and hand. Faulty location was a common finding, but not as a major complaint. Sensory nerve transfers should be incorporated into the reconstruction of the upper limb in tetraplegics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery 36:637-641, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The state and profile of open source software projects in health and medical informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janamanchi, Balaji; Katsamakas, Evangelos; Raghupathi, Wullianallur; Gao, Wei

    2009-07-01

    Little has been published about the application profiles and development patterns of open source software (OSS) in health and medical informatics. This study explores these issues with an analysis of health and medical informatics related OSS projects on SourceForge, a large repository of open source projects. A search was conducted on the SourceForge website during the period from May 1 to 15, 2007, to identify health and medical informatics OSS projects. This search resulted in a sample of 174 projects. A Java-based parser was written to extract data for several of the key variables of each project. Several visually descriptive statistics were generated to analyze the profiles of the OSS projects. Many of the projects have sponsors, implying a growing interest in OSS among organizations. Sponsorship, we discovered, has a significant impact on project success metrics. Nearly two-thirds of the projects have a restrictive license type. Restrictive licensing may indicate tighter control over the development process. Our sample includes a wide range of projects that are at various stages of development (status). Projects targeted towards the advanced end user are primarily focused on bio-informatics, data formats, database and medical science applications. We conclude that there exists an active and thriving OSS development community that is focusing on health and medical informatics. A wide range of OSS applications are in development, from bio-informatics to hospital information systems. A profile of OSS in health and medical informatics emerges that is distinct and unique to the health care field. Future research can focus on OSS acceptance and diffusion and impact on cost, efficiency and quality of health care.

  11. Health impairment of system engineers working on projects with heavy workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizui, Hayato; Ooshima, Kirika; Miki, Akiko; Matsushita, Yoshie; Hattori, Youji; Sugita, Minoru

    2011-03-01

    It has been reported that many system engineers must work hard to produce computer systems, and some of them suffer from health impairment due to their hard work. The purpose of the present cross-sectional study was to investigate the situation of impaired health status of system engineers in projects with high job strain. Countermeasures against health impairment of the subjects in the projects with high job strain in practices of occupational health fields are discussed. The study subjects were five superiors and their 35 subordinates working on computer system projects with high job strain at a large computer systems corporation in the Tokyo area. The control group was comprised of three superiors and their 18 subordinates in the same corporation. From July to November, 2006, the above were interviewed by six occupational health nurses, who evaluated their health and recorded their health evaluation scores. The problems involved in producing the computer systems were sometimes very difficult to solve, even if they spent long hours working on them. The present study detected a tendency showing that healthy superiors' subordinates were unhealthy and unhealthy superiors' subordinates were healthy in the overload projects with high job strain, while this was not detected in the control groups. A few employees whose health deteriorated were faced with very hard jobs in the overload projects. This means that heavy workloads were unevenly distributed in the overload projects among superiors, and their subordinates, and the health of a few members with heavy workloads deteriorated due to the heavy workload. In order to improve such a situation, it may be important not only to commit the necessary number of employees whose working ability is high to the section but also to even the workload in the overload project by informing all members of the project the health impairment of a few members due to heavy workload, from the viewpoint of the practice of occupational health

  12. Impact of Construction Health & Safety Regulations on Project ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effectiveness of the construction industry can only be enhanced by repositioning the construction health and safety regulations to safeguard the health of the workers and the entire community. This paper seeks to assess the views of consultants and contractors about the impact of construction health and safety ...

  13. Aircraft Electrical Power System Diagnostics and Health Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the project is the development of an open architecture, computational toolbox for design and implementation of diagnostic and prognostic algorithms...

  14. Avatar Robot for Crew Performance and Behavioral Health Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project investigates the effectiveness of using an avatar robotic platform as a crew assistant and a family member substitute. This type of avatar robot is...

  15. Quantifiable and Reliable Structural Health Management Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Under Project Constellation, NASA is developing a new generation of spacecraft for human spaceflight. A significant percentage of the structures used in these...

  16. EVALUATION CRITERIA OF INNOVATIVE SOCIAL INVESTMENT PROJECTS IN HEALTH CARE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vadim Aleksandrovich Lomazov; Elena Viktorovna Nesterova

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: analysis of key indicators and creation of evaluation criteria of innovative socio-economic investment projects in healthcare, implemented on the basis of public-private partnerships.Methodology...

  17. Sustainability in primary care and Mental Health Integration projects in Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, James H; Krahn, Dean; Oliver, Karen Anderson; Kirchner, JoAnn

    2012-01-01

    To explore staff perceptions about sustainability, commitment to change, participation in change process, and information received about the change project within the Veterans Administration Primary Care and Mental Health Integration (PC-MHI) initiative and to examine differences from the Veterans Health Administration Mental Health Systems Redesign (MHSR) initiative. Surveys of change team members involved in the Veterans Affairs PC-MHI and MHSR initiatives. One-way analysis of variance examined the relationship between commitment, participation and information, and sustainability. Differences in PC-MHI sustainability were explored by location and job classification. Staff sustainability perceptions were compared with MHSR results. Sustainability differed by staff discipline. Difference between MHSR and PC-MHI existed by job function and perceptions about the change benefits. Participation in the change process and information received about the change process were positively correlated with sustainability. Staff commitment to change was positively associated with staff perceptions about the benefits of change and staff attitudes toward change. Sustainability is an important part of organizational change efforts. Change complexity seems to influence perception about sustainability and impacts staff perceptions about the benefits of change. These perceptions seem to be driven by the information received and opportunities to participate in the change process. Further research is needed to understand how information and participation influence sustainability and affect employee commitment to change.

  18. Working with Climate Projections to Estimate Disease Burden: Perspectives from Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Kathryn C.; Kintziger, Kristina W.; Jagger, Meredith; Stefanova, Lydia; Uejio, Christopher K.; Konrad, Charles

    2016-01-01

    There is interest among agencies and public health practitioners in the United States (USA) to estimate the future burden of climate-related health outcomes. Calculating disease burden projections can be especially daunting, given the complexities of climate modeling and the multiple pathways by which climate influences public health. Interdisciplinary coordination between public health practitioners and climate scientists is necessary for scientifically derived estimates. We describe a unique partnership of state and regional climate scientists and public health practitioners assembled by the Florida Building Resilience Against Climate Effects (BRACE) program. We provide a background on climate modeling and projections that has been developed specifically for public health practitioners, describe methodologies for combining climate and health data to project disease burden, and demonstrate three examples of this process used in Florida. PMID:27517942

  19. Working with Climate Projections to Estimate Disease Burden: Perspectives from Public Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn C. Conlon

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There is interest among agencies and public health practitioners in the United States (USA to estimate the future burden of climate-related health outcomes. Calculating disease burden projections can be especially daunting, given the complexities of climate modeling and the multiple pathways by which climate influences public health. Interdisciplinary coordination between public health practitioners and climate scientists is necessary for scientifically derived estimates. We describe a unique partnership of state and regional climate scientists and public health practitioners assembled by the Florida Building Resilience Against Climate Effects (BRACE program. We provide a background on climate modeling and projections that has been developed specifically for public health practitioners, describe methodologies for combining climate and health data to project disease burden, and demonstrate three examples of this process used in Florida.

  20. Incorporation of occupational health and safety in cleaner production projects in South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to reveal ways in which occupational health and safety can be integrated in environmental cleaner production projects. Of particular interest are those cleaner production projects that are run by the Danish government's environmental assistance agency, Danced......, in South Africa.The study explores two main avenues of integration. First, integrating through better planning, focussing at the tools and procedures in use by Danced for project management -- integrating occupational health and safety into the project specification, so to speak.Second, integrating...

  1. Implementation of municipal health promoting projects in primary schools: teachers perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordin, Lone Lindegard

    2013-01-01

    on diet and physically activity, and how factors related to individual and institutional factors, according to the teachers, affected the implementation process. The research is linked to a health-promotion intervention project The School Health Project in a Danish municipality in the province....... The project is funded by the Danish Ministry of Science, University of Aarhus and Silkeborg municipality, and involves 5 primary schools, 23 teachers and 233 pupils from 7th to 9 class. The project is positioned within the critical approach to school health education and health promotion, developed......' convert the politically determined objectives in in relation to diet, physical activity and action competence to practice in health education? • How to understand teachers' practices in relation to the policy objectives set out from their stories of individual and institutional factors? Methodology...

  2. Strengthening rural Latinos' civic engagement for health: The Voceros de Salud project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cevallos, Daniel; Dierwechter, Tatiana; Volkmann, Kelly; Patton-López, Megan

    2013-11-01

    This article describes the Latino Health Ambassadors Network (Voceros de Salud ) project created to support and mobilize Latino community leaders to address health inequalities in a rural Oregon county. Voceros de Salud is discussed as a model that other rural communities may implement towards strengthening Latino civic engagement for health.

  3. The Coronary Health Improvement Projects Impact on Lowering Eating, Sleep, Stress, and Depressive Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Ray M.; Aldana, Stephen G.; Greenlaw, Roger L.; Diehl, Hans A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The Coronary Health Improvement Project (CHIP) is designed to lower cardiovascular risk factors among a group of generally healthy individuals through health education. Purpose: This study will evaluate the efficacy of the CHIP intervention at improving eating, sleep, stress, and depressive disorders. Methods: A health education…

  4. Effects of an Interprofessional Project on Students' Perspectives on Interprofessional Education and Knowledge of Health Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutte, Lisa S.; Browne, Fredrick R.; Reynolds, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Context: Interprofessional education (IPE) is encouraged in health care education in the hope that it will improve communication among future health care professionals. In response, health professional education programs are developing IPE curricula. Objective: To determine if a multicourse interprofessional (IP) project impacted students'…

  5. Public mental health research in Europe : A systematic mapping for the ROAMER project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forsman, A.K.; Ventus, D.B.J.; van der Feltz, C.M.; Wahlbeck, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: As part of the ROAMER (ROAdmap for MEntal health Research in Europe) project, aiming to create an integrated European roadmap for mental health research, we set out to map the hitherto unmapped territory of public mental health research in Europe. Methods: Five electronic databases

  6. Evaluation of a peri-urban community health worker project in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Christian Leadership Assembly (SACLA) Health Project is a non-governmental organisation that runs a community health worker (CHW) programme in 4 peri-urban townships of Cape Town. A cross-sectional descriptive community survey was conducted in April 1990 to evaluate coverage and health ...

  7. Survival of the project: a case study of ICT innovation in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Hege K; Kjekshus, Lars Erik; Tjora, Aksel

    2015-05-01

    From twenty years of information and communication technology (ICT) projects in the health sector, we have learned one thing: most projects remain projects. The problem of pilotism in e-health and telemedicine is a growing concern, both in medical literature and among policy makers, who now ask for large-scale implementation of ICT in routine health service delivery. In this article, we turn the question of failing projects upside down. Instead of investigating the obstacles to implementing ICT and realising permanent changes in health care routines, we ask what makes the temporary ICT project survive, despite an apparent lack of success. Our empirical material is based on Norwegian telemedicine. Through a case study, we take an in-depth look into the history of one particular telemedical initiative and highlight how ICT projects matter on a managerial level. Our analysis reveals how management tasks were delegated to the ICT project, which thus contributed to four processes of organisational control: allocating resources, generating and managing enthusiasm, system correction and aligning local practice and national policies. We argue that the innovation project in itself can be considered an innovation that has become normalised in health care, not in clinical, but in management work. In everyday management, the ICT project appears to be a convenient tool suited to ease the tensions between state regulatory practices and claims of professional autonomy that arise in the wake of new public management reforms. Separating project management and funding from routine practice handles the conceptualised heterogeneity between innovation and routine within contemporary health care delivery. Whilst this separation eases the execution of both normal routines and innovative projects, it also delays expected diffusion of technology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Improving the quality of workers' compensation health care delivery: the Washington State Occupational Health Services Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickizer, T M; Franklin, G; Plaeger-Brockway, R; Mootz, R D

    2001-01-01

    This article has summarized research and policy activities undertaken in Washington State over the past several years to identify the key problems that result in poor quality and excessive disability among injured workers, and the types of system and delivery changes that could best address these problems in order to improve the quality of occupational health care provided through the workers' compensation system. Our investigations have consistently pointed to the lack of coordination and integration of occupational health services as having major adverse effects on quality and health outcomes for workers' compensation. The Managed Care Pilot Project, a delivery system intervention, focused on making changes in how care is organized and delivered to injured workers. That project demonstrated robust improvements in disability reduction; however, worker satisfaction suffered. Our current quality improvement initiative, developed through the Occupational Health Services Project, synthesizes what was learned from the MCP and other pilot studies to make delivery system improvements. This initiative seeks to develop provider incentives and clinical management processes that will improve outcomes and reduce the burden of disability on injured workers. Fundamental to this approach are simultaneously preserving workers' right to choose their own physician and maintaining flexibility in the provision of individualized care based on clinical need and progress. The OHS project then will be a "real world" test to determine if aligning provider incentives and giving physicians the tools they need to optimize occupational health delivery can demonstrate sustainable reduction in disability and improvements in patient and employer satisfaction. Critical to the success of this initiative will be our ability to: (1) enhance the occupational health care management skills and expertise of physicians who treat injured workers by establishing community-based Centers of Occupational

  9. [To live well: health care or life project? Part II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viniegra Velázquez, Leonardo

    On the basis that life project as the driving force behind the life experience, the quest for human dignity is the way for true progress and the improvement of human condition. It's pointed out the need to be aware of the meaning of life understanding the motives behind our will to live that is the antecedent of life project. The proposed life project is a cognitive adventure, capable of transcending consumerism, individualism and passivity, toward the creation of a more inclusive world where the improvement spiritual, intellectual and moral can be viable. Said life project entails: a) A primary need: to link oneself with like-minded people that synergize against the prevailing order b) A core: The everlasting struggle for sublimated dignity c) A desideratum: The well-being of the majority d) An unavoidable purpose: The creation of a suitable world build on different ethical, political, lawful, cognitive and ecological foundations. In conclusion, this paper analyzes the influence of projects with an alternate proposal to the endeavors centered in healthcare that favor individualism, passivity and the current status quo. The best example of said alternate proposals is the commonly called "good death". Copyright © 2016 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical characteristics of rod and cone photoreceptor dystrophies in patients with mutations in the C8orf37 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huet, R.A.C. van; Estrada-Cuzcano, A.; Banin, E.; Rotenstreich, Y.; Hipp, S.; Kohl, S.; Hoyng, C.B.; Hollander, A.I. den; Collin, R.W.J.; Klevering, B.J.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To provide the clinical features in patients with retinal disease caused by C8orf37 gene mutations. METHODS: Eight patients--four diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and four with cone-rod dystrophy (CRD), carrying causal C8orf37 mutations--were clinically evaluated, including

  11. Preliminary safety assessment of C-8 xylitol monoester and xylitol phosphate esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, J E P S; Pereda, M C V; Nogueira, C; Dieamant, G; Cesar, C K M; Assanome, K M; Silva, M S; Torello, C O; Queiroz, M L S; Eberlin, S

    2016-02-01

    Most of the cosmetic compounds with preservative properties available in the market pose some risks concerning safety, such as the possibility of causing sensitization. Due to the fact that there are few options, the proper development of new molecules with this purpose is needed. Xylitol is a natural sugar, and the antimicrobial properties of xylitol-derived compounds have already been described in the literature. C-8 xylitol monoester and xylitol phosphate esters may be useful for the development of skincare products. As an initial screen for safety of chemicals, the combination of in silico methods and in vitro testing can aid in prioritizing resources in toxicological investigations while reducing the ethical and monetary costs that are related to animal and human testing. This study was designed to evaluate the safety of C-8 xylitol monoester and xylitol phosphate esters regarding carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, skin and eye irritation/corrosion and sensitization through alternative methods. For the initial safety assessment, quantitative structure-activity relationship methodology was used. The prediction of the parameters carcinogenicity/mutagenicity, skin and eye irritation/corrosion and sensitization was generated from the chemical structure. The analysis also comprised physical-chemical properties, Cramer rules, threshold of toxicological concern and Michael reaction. In silico results of candidate molecules were compared to 19 compounds with preservative properties that are available in the market. Additionally, in vitro tests (Ames test for mutagenicity, cytotoxicity and phototoxicity tests and hen's egg test--chorioallantoic membrane for irritation) were performed to complement the evaluation. In silico evaluation of both molecules presented no structural alerts related to eye and skin irritation, corrosion and sensitization, but some alerts for micronucleus and carcinogenicity were detected. However, by comparison, C-8 xylitol monoester, xylitol

  12. Immigration, health and diversity management: Preliminary developments of a project in neighborhoods of Catalonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Rodríguez-García

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an ongoing research project on immigration, health, and socio-cultural diversity , and offers preliminary information on the theoretical and socio-demographic context of this investigation. The objective of the project, funded by the Department of Health of the Autonomous Government of Catalonia, Spain, is to analyse the socioeconomic and cultural factors involved in health and the access to the formal health system of a few major migrant communities and ethnic minorities living in high-priority neighbourhoods in Catalonia. The results of this project, which will come fundamentally from ethnographic research, aim to give suggestions for improving health conditions for the population and to provide to those professionals working in the public health care system with some conceptual and practical tools for improving intercultural communication between themselves and their patients, as well as for detecting, preventing, and resolving problems in everyday practice.

  13. Synthesis of the C8’-epimeric thymine pyranosyl amino acid core of amipurimycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod R. Markad

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The C8’-epimeric pyranosyl amino acid core 2 of amipurimycin was synthesized from D-glucose derived alcohol 3 in 13 steps and 14% overall yield. Thus, the Sharpless asymmetric epoxidation of allyl alcohol 7 followed by trimethyl borate mediated regio-selective oxirane ring opening with azide, afforded azido diol 10. The acid-catalyzed 1,2-acetonide ring opening in 10 concomitantly led to the formation of the pyranose ring skeleton to give 2,7-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane 12. Functional group manipulation in 12 gave 21 that on stereoselective β-glycosylation afforded the pyranosyl thymine nucleoside 2 – a core of amipurimycin.

  14. Sequence-selective binding of C8-conjugated pyrrolobenzodiazepines (PBDs) to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basher, Mohammad A; Rahman, Khondaker Miraz; Jackson, Paul J M; Thurston, David E; Fox, Keith R

    2017-11-01

    DNA footprinting and melting experiments have been used to examine the sequence-specific binding of C8-conjugates of pyrrolobenzodiazepines (PBDs) and benzofused rings including benzothiophene and benzofuran, which are attached using pyrrole- or imidazole-containing linkers. The conjugates modulate the covalent attachment points of the PBDs, so that they bind best to guanines flanked by A/T-rich sequences on either the 5'- or 3'-side. The linker affects the binding, and pyrrole produces larger changes than imidazole. Melting studies with 14-mer oligonucleotide duplexes confirm covalent attachment of the conjugates, which show a different selectivity to anthramycin and reveal that more than one ligand molecule can bind to each duplex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Toward the Total Synthesis of Amphidinolide O: An Enantioselective Synthesis of C3-C8 Fragment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Minho; Lee, Duckhyung [Sogang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    The methyl ester 4, a C3-C8 fragment of am-phidinolide O (1), was prepared enantioselectively via 11 steps in 14% overall yields. The diastereoselective Ireland-Claisen rearrangement of 5 via the corresponding (E)-enolate intermediate was used as a key step in order to implement the C4 and C5 chiral centers. Retrosynthetic analysis was described in Figure 1. Amphi-dinolide O (1) might be assembled from two intermediates 2 and 3 via esterification and ring closing metathesis as key steps. Intermediate 4, a precursor to 3 as well as the target molecule in this paper, involves the γ,δ-unsaturated ester moiety along with α,β-chiral substituents with anti-stereochemical relationship.

  16. Directional solidification of C8-BTBT films induced by temperature gradients and its application for transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujieda, Ichiro; Iizuka, Naoki; Onishi, Yosuke

    2015-03-01

    Because charge transport in a single crystal is anisotropic in nature, directional growth of single crystals would enhance device performance and reduce its variation among devices. For an organic thin film, a method based on a temperature gradient would offer advantages in throughput and cleanliness. In experiments, a temperature gradient was established in a spin-coated film of 2,7-dioctyl [1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT) by two methods. First, a sample was placed on a metal plate bridging two heat stages. When one of the heat stages was cooled, the material started to solidify from the colder region. The melt-solid interface proceeded along the temperature gradient. Cracks were formed perpendicular to the solidification direction. Second, a line-shaped region on the film was continuously exposed to the light from a halogen lamp. After the heat stage was cooled, cracks similar to the first experiment were observed, indicating that the melt-solid interface moved laterally. We fabricated top-contact, bottom-gate transistors with these films. Despite the cracks, field-effect mobility of the transistors fabricated with these films was close to 6 cm2 /Vs and 4 cm2 /Vs in the first and second experiment, respectively. Elimination of cracks would improve charge transport and reduce performance variation among devices. It should be noted that the intense light from the halogen lamp did not damage the C8-BTBT films. The vast knowledge on laser annealing is now available for directional growth of this type of materials. The associated cost would be much smaller because an organic thin film melts at a low temperature.

  17. Secretome of the Coprophilous Fungus Doratomyces stemonitis C8, Isolated from Koala Feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Robyn; Grinyer, Jasmine; Nevalainen, Helena

    2011-06-01

    Coprophilous fungi inhabit herbivore feces, secreting enzymes to degrade the most recalcitrant parts of plant biomass that have resisted the digestive process. Consequently, the secretomes of coprophilous fungi have high potential to contain novel and efficient plant cell wall degrading enzymes of biotechnological interest. We have used one-dimensional and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS), and quadrupole time-of-flight liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (Q-TOF LC-MS/MS) to identify proteins from the secretome of the coprophilous fungus Doratomyces stemonitis C8 (EU551185) isolated from koala feces. As the genome of D. stemonitis has not been sequenced, cross-species identification, de novo sequencing, and zymography formed an integral part of the analysis. A broad range of enzymes involved in the degradation of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin, lignin, and protein were revealed, dominated by cellobiohydrolase of the glycosyl hydrolase family 7 and endo-1,4-β-xylanase of the glycosyl hydrolase family 10. A high degree of specialization for pectin degradation in the D. stemonitis C8 secretome distinguishes it from the secretomes of some other saprophytic fungi, such as the industrially exploited T. reesei. In the first proteomic analysis of the secretome of a coprophilous fungus reported to date, the identified enzymes provide valuable insight into how coprophilous fungi subsist on herbivore feces, and these findings hold potential for increasing the efficiency of plant biomass degradation in industrial processes such as biofuel production in the future.

  18. Data Analysis Algorithm Suitable for Structural Health Monitoring Based on Dust Network Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposed project will attempt to develop a data analysis system for structural health monitoring on space structures. The data analysis software will be a key...

  19. Autonomus I&C Maintenance and Health Monitoring System for Fission Surface Power Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary goal of this project is to design and develop an autonomous instrumentation and control (I&C) health monitoring system for space nuclear power...

  20. Onboard Space Autonomy Through Integration of Health Management and Control Reconfiguration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR project we propose to integrate spacecraft control and vehicle health functions to improve the robustness and productivity of space operations. The main...

  1. Wireless Health Monitoring for Large Arrays of MEMS Sensors and Actuators Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this Phase I project is to demonstrate an automated on-line structural health monitoring system for aircraft structures using a combination of...

  2. Report: EPA Needs to Demonstrate Public Health Benefits of Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #15-P-0032, December 5, 2014. The EPA needs to enforce grant requirements for collecting DWSRF project information to demonstrate the public health results of the $11.37 billion it has invested in drinking water infrastructure since 2009.

  3. On-Orbit Health Monitoring and Repair Assessment of Thermal Protection Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project delivers On-orbit health MoNItoring and repair assessment of THERMal protection systems (OMNI_THERM). OMNI_THERM features impedance-based...

  4. Advanced Data Mining and Deployment for Integrated Vehicle Health Management and the Space Vehicle Lifecycle Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In a successful Phase 1 project for NASA SBIR topic A1.05, "Data Mining for Integrated Vehicle Health Management," Michigan Aerospace Corporation (MAC) demonstrated...

  5. Integrating Public Health and Health Promotion Practice in the Medical Curriculum: A Self-Directed Team-Based Project Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Kershaw

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Preparing health professionals in health promotion (HP and disease prevention is essential for improvement of population health, community HP, and better health care for individuals. The aim of this article is to describe an HP project in the form of a major self-directed project-based learning task integrated within the curriculum in the second year of the medical degree program at United Arab Emirates University. The project introduces students to public health and HP practice and develops students’ literature searching, writing, presentation skills, and team work. Students learn the principles underlying behavioral change, and the design of HP programs and materials, through a lecture format. Small groups of students each choose a specific health topic for their project. Over 11 weeks, students obtain information about their topic from appropriate sources (library, PubMed, Google Scholar, credible health sources such as World Health Organization. Using the principles learned in the lectures, they develop appropriate materials for their target audience: for example, posters, a pamphlet, social media content, or a video or radio message. Students seek advice from specialist faculty as needed. In week 12, each team presents their project background, rationale, and materials to their colleagues in a seminar format open to all faculty. They then submit the materials they developed for assessment. Group marks are assigned for presentations and materials. Key concepts are assessed by multiple choice questions in comprehensive course examinations. By participation in the HP project, many students develop a solid background in prevention. The information retrieval, writing, and presentation skills, as well as experience of team work, are valuable both for the remaining years of their training and their future careers.

  6. Integrating Public Health and Health Promotion Practice in the Medical Curriculum: A Self-Directed Team-Based Project Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Geraldine; Grivna, Michal; Elbarazi, Iffat; AliHassan, Souheila; Aziz, Faisal; Al Dhaheri, Aysha Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    Preparing health professionals in health promotion (HP) and disease prevention is essential for improvement of population health, community HP, and better health care for individuals. The aim of this article is to describe an HP project in the form of a major self-directed project-based learning task integrated within the curriculum in the second year of the medical degree program at United Arab Emirates University. The project introduces students to public health and HP practice and develops students' literature searching, writing, presentation skills, and team work. Students learn the principles underlying behavioral change, and the design of HP programs and materials, through a lecture format. Small groups of students each choose a specific health topic for their project. Over 11 weeks, students obtain information about their topic from appropriate sources (library, PubMed, Google Scholar, credible health sources such as World Health Organization). Using the principles learned in the lectures, they develop appropriate materials for their target audience: for example, posters, a pamphlet, social media content, or a video or radio message. Students seek advice from specialist faculty as needed. In week 12, each team presents their project background, rationale, and materials to their colleagues in a seminar format open to all faculty. They then submit the materials they developed for assessment. Group marks are assigned for presentations and materials. Key concepts are assessed by multiple choice questions in comprehensive course examinations. By participation in the HP project, many students develop a solid background in prevention. The information retrieval, writing, and presentation skills, as well as experience of team work, are valuable both for the remaining years of their training and their future careers.

  7. European project HOPE (Health Optimization Protocol for Energy-efficient Buildings)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bluyssen, P.M.; Cox, C.W.J.; Maroni, M.; Boschi, N.; Raw, G.; Roulet, C.A.; Foradini, F.

    2003-01-01

    In January 2002, a new European project named HOPE (Health Optimization Protocol for Energy-efficient Buildings) started with 14 participants from nine European countries. The final goal of the project is to provide the means to increase the number of energy-efficient buildings, i.e. buildings that

  8. 75 FR 8927 - Autism Services Demonstration Project for TRICARE Beneficiaries Under the Extended Care Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... of the Secretary Autism Services Demonstration Project for TRICARE Beneficiaries Under the Extended...: This notice provides a 2-year extension of the Department of Defense Enhanced Access to Autism Services Demonstration Project under the Extended Care Health Option for beneficiaries diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum...

  9. Serendipitous findings from a pilot project on preparation of health preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, P L

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-four healthy preschoolers were pretested and posttested as part of a pilot project on preparation programming. Variables associated with their knowledge about medical equipment were identified. The results of this small pilot project are used to present suggestions for future research evaluating the effects of preparation programs for health young children.

  10. Generic project definitions for improvement of health care delivery: A case-base approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemeijer, G.C.; Does, R.J.M.M.; de Mast, J.; Trip, A.; van den Heuvel, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this article is to create actionable knowledge, making the definition of process improvement projects in health care delivery more effective. Methods: This study is a retrospective analysis of process improvement projects in hospitals, facilitating a case-based reasoning

  11. Sexual health promotion on social networking sites: a process evaluation of The FaceSpace Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuong; Gold, Judy; Pedrana, Alisa; Chang, Shanton; Howard, Steve; Ilic, Olivia; Hellard, Margaret; Stoove, Mark

    2013-07-01

    This article reports findings from an evaluation of reach and engagement of The FaceSpace Project, a novel sexual health promotion project delivered through social networking sites that targeted young people aged 16-29 years. Multiple methods were used to evaluate project reach and engagement. The evaluation focussed on quantitative data (online usage statistics, online surveys), complemented by available qualitative data (project team meeting notes). The project reached 900 fans who were mostly between 18 and 34 years of age. The most successful ways of increasing audience reach were via Facebook advertisements and tagging photos of young people attending a music festival on the project Facebook page. Peaks in Facebook page interactions (comments and "likes") coincided with recruitment peaks and when videos were posted. However, video views varied greatly between postings. Feedback from the project team for increasing engagement in future social networking site interventions included having one centralized Facebook page and using episodic videos. This evaluation is among the first to assess the use of social networking sites for sexual health promotion and provides information to inform the implementation and evaluation of future projects using new media. Social networking sites offer great potential to reach and engage young people for sexual health promotion. However, further work is required to improve implementation and promote audience reach and engagement as well as to determine effectiveness of social networking sites in changing knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of central enterprise architecture elements in models of six eHealth projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkanen, Hannu; Mykkänen, Juha

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale initiatives for eHealth services have been established in many countries on regional or national level. The use of Enterprise Architecture has been suggested as a methodology to govern and support the initiation, specification and implementation of large-scale initiatives including the governance of business changes as well as information technology. This study reports an analysis of six health IT projects in relation to Enterprise Architecture elements, focusing on central EA elements and viewpoints in different projects.

  13. Project management can help to reduce costs and improve quality in health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa Couto, Joaquim

    2008-02-01

    Health care spending has increased steadily over the last 50 years, but there is a consensus that this trend cannot continue indefinitely. The ideal solution would bring about cost reductions coupled with improvements in quality, but this has remained an elusive goal. In this article, a novel idea is proposed that consists of adopting a project type of production in health care, instead of the current mass production methods used in the modern 'health care factories'. The author demonstrates that health care services in general, and medical services in particular, fit the category of projects. This is accomplished through a comprehensive study of the main features of projects and medical services and a comparative analysis. The author infers that the productivity gains brought by project management to so many other human endeavours can be brought to health care. It is also claimed that if project management is adopted in health care, then physicians would be the natural project managers because of their proficiency with the casuistic method (one-off, non-repetitive production) and because of their experience in 'managing' their patient's cases that is indeed what doctors have been doing for as long as their profession exists.

  14. Aircraft Control Augmentation and Health Monitoring Using FADS Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I research proposal is aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of an innovative architecture comprising control augmentation and on-line health monitoring...

  15. Framing Young Childrens Oral Health: A Participatory Action Research Project

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Collins, Chimere C; Villa-Torres, Laura; Sams, Lattice D; Zeldin, Leslie P; Divaris, Kimon

    2016-01-01

    .... We sought to understand what parents of young children consider important and potentially modifiable factors and resources influencing their children's oral health, within the contexts of the family and the community...

  16. Distributed Rocket Engine Testing Health Monitoring System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Leveraging the Phase I achievements of the Distributed Rocket Engine Testing Health Monitoring System (DiRETHMS) including its software toolsets and system building...

  17. Quantifiable and Reliable Structural Health Management Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Major concerns for implementing a practical built-in structural health monitoring system are prediction accuracy and data reliability. It is proposed to develop...

  18. Sensor Area Network for Integrated Systems Health Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The term Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) is used to describe a capability that focuses on determining the condition of every element in a complex System...

  19. Passive Wireless Sensor System for Structural Health Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Albido proposes to develop a Passive Wireless Sensor System for Structural Health Monitoring capable of measuring high-bandwidth temperature and strain of space and...

  20. Distributed Rocket Engine Testing Health Monitoring System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The on-ground and Distributed Rocket Engine Testing Health Monitoring System (DiRETHMS) provides a system architecture and software tools for performing diagnostics...

  1. Self-Assembled Nanostructured Health Monitoring Sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed NASA SBIR program is to design, fabricate and evaluate the performance of self-assembled nanostructured sensors for the health...

  2. Integrated Health Management for Space Flight Digital Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal addresses the need for a real-time Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) system to identify anomalous states in digital electronic systems used in...

  3. All-Fiber-Optic Ultrasonic Health Management System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Health management of composite airframe components is essential for safety and reliability of future aircrafts. It reduces the risk of catastrophic failures and...

  4. Controlled health thesaurus for the CDC web redesign project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Fabio; Bell, Mamie; Chavez, Eliana

    2003-01-01

    A considerable number of robust vocabularies and thesauri have been developed for the healthcare and biomedical domain. No single vocabulary, however; provides complete coverage of the information needs from a public health perspective. The results of an investigation of vocabulary sources for the development of a comprehensive controlled vocabulary for the public health domain at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is presented.

  5. Framing Young Childrens Oral Health: A Participatory Action Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Chimere C; Villa-Torres, Laura; Sams, Lattice D; Zeldin, Leslie P; Divaris, Kimon

    2016-01-01

    Despite the widespread acknowledgement of the importance of childhood oral health, little progress has been made in preventing early childhood caries. Limited information exists regarding specific daily-life and community-related factors that impede optimal oral hygiene, diet, care, and ultimately oral health for children. We sought to understand what parents of young children consider important and potentially modifiable factors and resources influencing their children's oral health, within the contexts of the family and the community. This qualitative study employed Photovoice among 10 English-speaking parents of infants and toddlers who were clients of an urban WIC clinic in North Carolina. The primary research question was: "What do you consider as important behaviors, as well as family and community resources to prevent cavities among young children?" Five group sessions were conducted and they were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative research methodology. Inductive analyses were based on analytical summaries, double-coding, and summary matrices and were done using Atlas.ti.7.5.9 software. Good oral health was associated with avoidance of problems or restorations for the participants. Financial constraints affected healthy food and beverage choices, as well as access to oral health care. Time constraints and occasional frustration related to children's oral hygiene emerged as additional barriers. Establishment of rules/routines and commitment to them was a successful strategy to promote their children's oral health, as well as modeling of older siblings, cooperation among caregivers and peer support. Community programs and organizations, social hubs including playgrounds, grocery stores and social media emerged as promising avenues for gaining support and sharing resources. Low-income parents of young children are faced with daily life struggles that interfere with oral health and care. Financial constraints are pervasive, but parents

  6. Student experiences with an international public health exchange project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, Kim A; Richardson, Eileen; Aarts, Clara; Campbell, Barbara; Hemmingway, Ann; Koskinen, Liisa; Mitchell, Maureen P; Nordstrom, Pam

    2009-01-01

    With growing interconnectivity of healthcare systems worldwide and increased immigration, inappropriate cultural and role assumptions are often seen when cultures clash within a country or when there is practice across country boundaries in times of disaster and during international travel. To increase students' multicultural awareness and work experiences abroad, the authors describe a 7-school, 5-country international student exchange project. The authors also share the students' evaluations of their experiences as they are challenged to erase boundaries and embrace nursing across countries. Participating faculty describe the process, challenges, and keys to success found in creating and living this international project. Students involved in the exchange process evaluate the learning opportunities and challenges and the joy of coming together as newfound colleagues and friends.

  7. Why are there defaulters in eye health projects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Noma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To identify barriers to attendance for eye examination of schoolchildren. METHODS: Cross-sectional study. Students in grades 1-4 in elementary school in Guarulhos (Brazil were screened and referred for ophthalmic examination in 2006. Facilities offered in this project were: examination arranged during weekends, free transportation, spectacle donation and two different opportunities for exam. A questionnaire was applied, by interview, to a sample consisted of students' parents attended in a community project who missed the first call and attended the recall, to identify the reasons for non-attendance. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 767 parents or guardians, corresponding to an equal number of schoolchildren. Personal characteristics of the students: 49.2% male and 50.8% female, 60.2% of them had never received previous ophthalmologic evaluation. Reported reasons for no-show to the project: parents had not received appropriate orientation (35.6%, loss of working day (20.6%, illness (12.4%, had another appointment (10.0%. The need for eyeglasses was higher in the recall. CONCLUSIONS: A significant number of parents did not take their children for ophthalmological exams, even when a second opportunity was offered in projects with transportation facilities, free exams performed during weekends and spectacle donation. The main causes of absenteeism were lack of awareness and work. For 87.1% of the absenteeism cases, the difficulties could be overcome via improved structuring of the first call. A recall increases attendance coverage of target population by only 15.2% (59.3 to 74.5%. Notably, the eye exam campaign was the first exam for most of the absent students.

  8. Teaching and addressing health disparities through the family medicine social and community context of care project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jordan; Heney, Jessica; Esquibel, Angela Y; Dimock, Camia; Goldman, Roberta; Anthony, David

    2014-09-02

    By training future physicians to care for patients with backgrounds different from their own, medical schools can help reduce health disparities. To address the need for education in this area, the leaders of the Family Medicine Clerkship at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University developed the Social and Community Context of Care project, required of all medical students rotating through this clerkship. Students develop a hypothetical intervention addressing a health issue seen at their preceptor site, and are assessed on their grasp of the social and contextual issues affecting that health issue in their particular community. Some interventions are actualized in later clerkships or independent study projects; one example, a health class for pregnant and parenting teens at Central Falls High School, is described here. If made a routine part of medical education, projects such as these may help medical students address the health disparities they will encounter in future practice.

  9. Guadalupe corridor transportation project asbestos health risk assessment, San Jose, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, W E; Koehler, J L; Popenuck, W W

    1990-04-01

    A study was conducted to assess health risks and identify a set of appropriate mitigation measures to control airborne emissions of natural asbestos from construction of the Guadalupe Corridor Transportation Project, a highway and light-rail construction project in San Jose, California. This study supported a state-mandated Environmental Impact Report. Communication Hill, along the project route, is known to contain natural chrysotile asbestos-bearing rock. The study described in this paper estimated potential asbestos emissions, identified and evaluated mitigation measures, and evaluated air pathway exposure and health risks. With mitigation, estimated risks were found to be acceptable by the regulatory agency, and construction proceeded.

  10. Effect of C8mimPF6 on miniemulsion polymerization for application in new latex coating products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Binjie; Kong, Yiyang; Zheng, Rongmeihui; Dong, Jie; Choy, Kwang-Leong; Zhao, Huanhuan

    2016-08-15

    C8mimPF6, as a type of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) with non-volatility and a low melting point, may replace conventional coalescing agents in latex coatings, thus preventing volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions caused by coalescing agents. In this study, systematic investigations on the effect of various factors including initiator type, initiator concentration, temperature and C8mimPF6 concentration on the conversion of latex and droplet/particle size of a miniemulsion during polymerization have been conducted. The presence of C8mimPF6 has shown to have a marked effect on the reaction rate. Such an effect strongly depends on the type of initiator being used. For polymerization initiated by 2,2-azobis (isobutyronitrile) (AIBN), C8mimPF6 had a promoting effect on the reaction rate at low concentrations, but this effect might be reversed upon certain C8mimPF6 concentrations, e.g. 10 wt%. While initiated by H2O2/Vc, this promoting effect faded even at low C8mimPF6 concentrations. The different limiting factors, which determine the reaction rate with different types of initiator, may contribute to the results. For reactions initiated by hydrophobic AIBN, the reaction was dominated by kinetics. The presence of C8mimPF6 may cause an enhanced chain propagation rate and reduced chain termination rate, which may further contribute to the increase in reaction rate at lower concentrations of C8mimPF6. With hydrophilic H2O2/Vc, the resistance for the transfer of radicals into a droplet/particle might be increased significantly with increasing C8mimPF6 concentration due to a tighter interfacial structure at lower concentrations of C8mimPF6. Thus, such transfer of radicals may become a limiting step whilst the presence of C8mimPF6 increases the transfer resistance on radicals resulting in a decrease in reaction rate. The reaction temperature, which is related to the decomposition temperature of the initiator being used, was another factor affecting the conversion

  11. The role of the C8 proton of ATP in the regulation of phosphoryl transfer within kinases and synthetases

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kenyon, CP

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available and KIE. Effect of the concentration of ATP and C8D-ATP on the specific activity (A) and KIE (B) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae hexokinase. (A) ?black circle ? = ATP, black square? = C8D-ATP, (B) Black = KIE, Blue = KIED. The specific enzyme activity... of the residues in facilitating binding and cat- alysis associated with the C8H-ATP. Methods Enzyme source and protein expression and purification Hexokinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Type F-300 (Sigma, H4502), Fructose Phosphokinase (Sigma, F0137...

  12. Weight Care Project: Health professionals' attitudes and ability to assess body weight status - Study protocol

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moorhead, Anne

    2011-03-31

    Abstract Background Health professionals working in primary care and public health have opportunities to address body weight status issues with their patients through face-to-face contact. The objectives of this all-Ireland project are: 1. to assess the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups on body weight status; 2. to assess the health professional groups\\' ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The health professional groups are: (a) community related public health nurses; (b) school public health nurses; (c) GPs and practice nurses (primary care); and (d) occupational health nurses (workplace) from both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Methods\\/Design This all-Ireland multi-disciplinary project follows a mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and consists of four components: 1. Literature review - to explore the role of health professionals in managing obesity through spontaneous intervention in a variety of health promotion settings. 2. Telephone interviews and focus groups - to gain an in-depth insight into the views of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 3. Survey (primarily online but also paper-based) - to determine the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 4. Online evaluation study - an online interactive programme will be developed to assess health professionals\\' ability to identify the body weight status of adults and children. Discussion This project will assess and report the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups within Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on body weight status, and their ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The results of this project will generate recommendations for clinical practice in managing obesity, which may

  13. Weight Care Project: Health professionals' attitudes and ability to assess body weight status - Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Kathy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health professionals working in primary care and public health have opportunities to address body weight status issues with their patients through face-to-face contact. The objectives of this all-Ireland project are: 1. to assess the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups on body weight status; 2. to assess the health professional groups' ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The health professional groups are: (a community related public health nurses; (b school public health nurses; (c GPs and practice nurses (primary care; and (d occupational health nurses (workplace from both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Methods/Design This all-Ireland multi-disciplinary project follows a mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and consists of four components: 1. Literature review - to explore the role of health professionals in managing obesity through spontaneous intervention in a variety of health promotion settings. 2. Telephone interviews and focus groups - to gain an in-depth insight into the views of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 3. Survey (primarily online but also paper-based - to determine the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 4. Online evaluation study - an online interactive programme will be developed to assess health professionals' ability to identify the body weight status of adults and children. Discussion This project will assess and report the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups within Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on body weight status, and their ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The results of this project will generate recommendations for clinical practice in managing obesity, which may

  14. TspanC8 Tetraspanins and A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) Interact via Their Extracellular Regions: EVIDENCE FOR DISTINCT BINDING MECHANISMS FOR DIFFERENT TspanC8 PROTEINS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noy, Peter J; Yang, Jing; Reyat, Jasmeet S; Matthews, Alexandra L; Charlton, Alice E; Furmston, Joanna; Rogers, David A; Rainger, G Ed; Tomlinson, Michael G

    2016-02-12

    A disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane metalloprotease that cleaves the extracellular regions from its transmembrane substrates. ADAM10 is essential for embryonic development and is implicated in cancer, Alzheimer, and inflammatory diseases. The tetraspanins are a superfamily of 33 four-transmembrane proteins in mammals, of which the TspanC8 subgroup (Tspan5, 10, 14, 15, 17, and 33) promote ADAM10 intracellular trafficking and enzymatic maturation. However, the interaction between TspanC8s and ADAM10 has only been demonstrated in overexpression systems and the interaction mechanism remains undefined. To address these issues, an antibody was developed to Tspan14, which was used to show co-immunoprecipitation of Tspan14 with ADAM10 in primary human cells. Chimeric Tspan14 constructs demonstrated that the large extracellular loop of Tspan14 mediated its co-immunoprecipitation with ADAM10, and promoted ADAM10 maturation and trafficking to the cell surface. Chimeric ADAM10 constructs showed that membrane-proximal stalk, cysteine-rich, and disintegrin domains of ADAM10 mediated its co-immunoprecipitation with Tspan14 and other TspanC8s. This TspanC8-interacting region was required for ADAM10 exit from the endoplasmic reticulum. Truncated ADAM10 constructs revealed differential TspanC8 binding requirements for the stalk, cysteine-rich, and disintegrin domains. Moreover, Tspan15 was the only TspanC8 to promote cleavage of the ADAM10 substrate N-cadherin, whereas Tspan14 was unique in reducing cleavage of the platelet collagen receptor GPVI. These findings suggest that ADAM10 may adopt distinct conformations in complex with different TspanC8s, which could impact on substrate selectivity. Furthermore, this study identifies regions of TspanC8s and ADAM10 for potential interaction-disrupting therapeutic targeting. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Framing Young Childrens Oral Health: A Participatory Action Research Project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chimere C Collins

    Full Text Available Despite the widespread acknowledgement of the importance of childhood oral health, little progress has been made in preventing early childhood caries. Limited information exists regarding specific daily-life and community-related factors that impede optimal oral hygiene, diet, care, and ultimately oral health for children. We sought to understand what parents of young children consider important and potentially modifiable factors and resources influencing their children's oral health, within the contexts of the family and the community.This qualitative study employed Photovoice among 10 English-speaking parents of infants and toddlers who were clients of an urban WIC clinic in North Carolina. The primary research question was: "What do you consider as important behaviors, as well as family and community resources to prevent cavities among young children?" Five group sessions were conducted and they were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative research methodology. Inductive analyses were based on analytical summaries, double-coding, and summary matrices and were done using Atlas.ti.7.5.9 software.Good oral health was associated with avoidance of problems or restorations for the participants. Financial constraints affected healthy food and beverage choices, as well as access to oral health care. Time constraints and occasional frustration related to children's oral hygiene emerged as additional barriers. Establishment of rules/routines and commitment to them was a successful strategy to promote their children's oral health, as well as modeling of older siblings, cooperation among caregivers and peer support. Community programs and organizations, social hubs including playgrounds, grocery stores and social media emerged as promising avenues for gaining support and sharing resources.Low-income parents of young children are faced with daily life struggles that interfere with oral health and care. Financial constraints are

  16. Strengths and weaknesses of the Young Black Men, Masculinities, and Mental Health (YBMen) Facebook project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Daphne C; Allen, Julie Ober; Goodwill, Janelle R; Noel, Blake

    2017-01-01

    The Young Black Men, Masculinities, and Mental Health (YBMen) project is a Facebook-based intervention that provides mental health education and social support to young Black men. The YBMen project was created to better understand and address the pressures and needs of young Black men, particularly with regard to issues related to their conceptualization of masculinity and mental health. Black men from a 2-year liberal arts college in the Midwest (United States) enrolled in the YBMen pilot project. The purpose of this study is to report what participants in the YBMen pilot project liked and disliked about the intervention, along with their suggestions for improvement. Qualitative results from the 8 Black men who actively participated in the YBMen Facebook intervention and completed the postintervention interview are reported. A systematic analysis identified 9 subthemes that described participants' reactions to different components and characteristics of the Facebook intervention. Results indicated that opportunities for relationship building and connectivity, coupled with engaging popular culture references used in the intervention encouraged young Black men to actively participate in the YBMen Facebook intervention. The YBMen project has potential to improve the health and well-being of young Black men by providing nontraditional resources that are easily accessible, culturally sensitive, and gender-specific. Implications of the YBMen project as an effective Internet-based program that promotes mental health and increases social support among young Black men are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Implementing a community-based social marketing project to improve agricultural worker health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flocks, J; Clarke, L; Albrecht, S; Bryant, C; Monaghan, P; Baker, H

    2001-06-01

    The Together for Agricultural Safety project is a community-based social marketing project working to reduce the adverse health effects of pesticide exposure among fernery and nursery workers in Florida. In 3 years, the collaboration between university and community researchers has embodied many of the principles of community-based research while completing multiple stages of formative data collection required for a social marketing project. This hybrid approach to developing a health intervention for a minority community has been successful in its early stages because the community partners are organized, empowered, and motivated to execute research activities with the assistance of academic partners. However, this work has also been labor intensive and costly. This article describes the lessons learned by project partners and considers the limitations of this approach for agricultural health research.

  18. Implementation of an ICT-Based Learning Environment in a Nutrition Health Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiha, Teija; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Enkenberg, Jorma; Turunen, Hannele

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the views of school staff on a nutrition health project implemented via an ICT-based learning environment in a secondary school (7th to 9th grades). Design/methodology/approach: The study was a part of the wider European Network for Health Promoting Schools programme (ENHPS; since 2008, Schools…

  19. Evaluation of a peri-urban community health worker project in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-04-20

    Apr 20, 1991 ... The South African Christian Leadership Assembly (SACLA). Health Project is a non-governmental organisation that runs a community health worker (CHW) programme in 4 peri-urban townships of Cape Town. A cross-sectional descriptive com- munity survey was conducted in April 1990 to evaluate cover-.

  20. Parent Partnerships Project for Children's Mental Health Training for Professionals. PHP-c87

    Science.gov (United States)

    PACER Center, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In the fall of 2003, PACER Center's Parent Partnership Project for Children's Mental Health conducted a survey to better understand what parents and families need from the children?s mental health system in Minnesota. The research team developed a survey questionnaire, a telephone interview, and a focus group session directed at learning what was…

  1. Designing and conducting health system research projects, volume ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Annex to the modules: Guidelines for organising short HSR courses on proposal development and fieldwork ...... Identify criteria for selecting health-related problems to be given priority in research; Use a group consensus technique to set priorities for research, applying the selected criteria on a number of research topics ...

  2. Lipophilicity of porphyrins and their retention in IAM, C8-C18 and HILIC chromatographic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaid, D; Chaminade, P; Maillard, Ph; Kasselouri, A

    2015-10-10

    Porphyrins are a class of photosensitizers used in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Understanding the interaction of porphyrins with membrane cells components is important in order to improve this therapy. Many analytical methods can be used for this aim. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used for the separation of porphyrins on RP and HILIC stationary phases as well as on a biomimetic membrane IAM phase. Twenty-six tetraphenyl porphyrins (TPP) were successfully separated on an IAM column, a C18 Gravity RP column, a C8 Gravity RP column, a PolarTec RP column and a HILIC column. Stationary phases were chosen as the most appropriate to cover the study of different types of interactions. Elution was performed with a 45 min linear gradient. Obtained gradient retention times were converted to gradient chromatography hydrophobicity index (CHI) and to an apparent retention factor (kapp). The partition coefficients (logP) of the 26 compounds were measured in a 2-octanol/PBS system and estimated in silico. Correlation between kapp values was studied. Moreover, a multivariate analysis was performed to explain columns relationships. Obtained results show that porphyrins are separated mainly according to hydrophobic interactions that are relative to their structure (sugar number and the disposition around the porphyrin macrocycle). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Optical and Morphological Studies of Thermally Evaporated PTCDI-C8 Thin Films for Organic Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronak Rahimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PTCDI-C8 due to its relatively high photosensitivity and high electron mobility has attracted much attention in organic semiconductor devices. In this work, thin films of PTCDI-C8 with different thicknesses were deposited on silicon substrates with native silicon dioxide using a vacuum thermal evaporator. Several material characterization techniques have been utilized to evaluate the structure, morphology, and optical properties of these films. Their optical constants (refractive index and extinction coefficient have been extracted from the spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE. X-ray reflectivity (XRR and atomic force microscopy (AFM were employed to determine the morphology and structure as well as the thickness and roughness of the PTCDI-C8 thin films. These films revealed a high degree of structural ordering within the layers. All the experimental measurements were performed under ambient conditions. PTCDI-C8 films have shown to endure ambient condition which allows pots-deposition characterization.

  4. Health Advocacy Project: Evaluating the Benefits of Service Learning to Nursing Students and Low Income Individuals Involved in a Community-Based Mental Health Promotion Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels-Dennis, Joan; Xia, Liudi; Secord, Sandra; Raiger, Amelia

    2016-10-08

    Poverty, along with other factors such as unemployment, work and life stressors, interpersonal violence, and lack of access to high quality health and/or social services all play a role in determining who develops a mental illness and for whom those symptoms persist or worsen. Senior nursing student preparing to enter the field and working in a service learning capacity may be able to influence early recovery and symptom abatement among those most vulnerable to mental illness. A consortium of community stakeholders and researchers collaboratively designed a 10-week mental health promotion project called the Health Advocacy Project (HAP). The project combines case management and system navigation support delivered by trained and highly supervised nursing students to individuals experiencing major depressive disorder (MDD) and/or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this article, we present the findings of a qualitative fidelity evaluation that examines the effectiveness of nursing students in delivering the health advocacy intervention at the level and with the intensity originally intended. The findings demonstrate how the services of senior nursing students may be optimized to benefit our healthcare system and populations most at risk for developing MDD and PTSD.

  5. Participatory Action Research, Mental Health Service User Research, and the Hearing (our Voices Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Schneider

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article I discuss participatory action research as a framework for enabling people diagnosed with mental health problems to carry out research and in doing so to promote health equity, citizenship, and social justice for people with a mental health diagnosis. The participatory approach to research aims to involve ordinary community members in generating practical knowledge about issues and problems of concern to them and through this promoting personal and social change. The article traces the development of participatory action research and describes its application in the mental health service user research movement. The Hearing (our Voices projects, participatory research projects carried out in Calgary, Alberta by a group of people diagnosed with schizophrenia, are described to illustrate this approach to mental health research. Participation in research to promote health equity is about inclusion and about how marginalized people can claim full and equal citizenship as participants in and contributors to society.

  6. The demonstration projects: creating the capacity for nursing health human resource planning in Ontario's healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkoski, Vanessa; Tepper, Joshua

    2010-05-01

    Timely access to healthcare services requires the right number, mix and distribution of appropriately educated nurses, physicians and other healthcare professionals. In Ontario, as in several other jurisdictions, changing demographics, patterns of health service utilization and an aging workforce have created challenges related to the supply of nurses available now and in the future to deliver quality patient care. From 2006 to 2009, the Nursing Secretariat (NS) of Ontario's Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (the ministry) undertook a progressive and comprehensive approach to address the issue of nursing supply across the province through the introduction of 17 Nursing Health Human Resources Demonstration Projects (demonstration projects). The demonstration projects initiative has led to the creation of a unique collection of best practices, tools and resources aimed at improving organizational planning capacity. Evaluation of the initiative generated recommendations that may guide the ministry toward policy and program development to foster improved nursing health human resource planning capacity in Ontario healthcare organizations.

  7. The CHIPS project: a health information network to serve the consumer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodchild, E Y; Furman, J A; Addison, B L; Umbarger, H N

    1978-10-01

    CHIPS (Consumer Health Information Program and Services/Salud y Bienestar) is a Library Services and Construction Act Title I-funded project that has as its major goal the formation of a health information network to serve the consumer, the public library client, and the hospital patient. Funded for two years, 1976-1978, this bilingual project coordinates efforts of the Los Angeles County Harbor General Hospital Regional Medical Library and the Los Angeles County Carson Regional Public Library to provide health information resources and services to the public. The target population is over two million people of diverse ethnic backgrounds. This paper discusses the project's objectives and encourages an active role for all libraries in the consumer health education movement.

  8. Novel C8-linked pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD)-heterocycle conjugates that recognize DNA sequences containing an inverted CCAAT box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucoli, Federico; Hawkins, Rachel M; James, Colin H; Wells, Geoff; Jenkins, Terence C; Ellis, Tom; Hartley, John A; Howard, Philip W; Thurston, David E

    2011-06-15

    A series of novel DNA-interactive C8-linked pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD)-heterocycle polyamide conjugates has been synthesised to explore structure/sequence-selectivity relationships. One conjugate (2d) has a greater selectivity and DNA binding affinity for inverted CCAAT sequences within the Topoisomerase IIα promoter than the known C8-bis-pyrrole PBD conjugate GWL-78 (1b). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Status report - The Public Health and Planning 101 project: strengthening collaborations between the public health and planning professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendra, Ahalya; Vo, Tin; Einstoss, Candice; Weppler, Jason; Gillen, Pauline; Ryan, Loretta; Haley, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The Public Health and Planning 101 project aimed to increase cross-disciplinary knowledge among public health and planning professionals involved in the land use planning process. The multi-disciplinary project team administered an online survey in 2012 to Ontario public health and planning professionals in order to identify learning needs related to the built environment that would inform the development of the education module. The survey asked about built environment work, experience with collaborations, barriers faced working with the other profession, and learning needs. Most survey respondents agreed that both professions should be working together on the built environment, although only half indicated they actually were. The survey findings revealed the need for an education module to help public health and planning professionals collaborate in the land use planning process in Ontario, and to help inform policy related to healthy built environments. PMID:28102993

  10. Real options in project coalitions in Dutch health care: two case studies of construction projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Reedt Dortland, Maartje; Voordijk, Johannes T.; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Uncertainties affecting health organizations inevitably influence real estate decisions since real estate is required to facilitate the primary process in cure and care. Decisions have to be taken when there is little knowledge about the future. Therefore, flexibility is needed in the process of

  11. Family planning through child health: a case study of El Kef project in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzidi, M; Jones, M

    1985-01-01

    In 1970, a Dutch medical team began work in the city of El Kef in Tunisia on a project designed to bring family planning into rural areas. The project aimed to persuade the rural people to use urban health centers, but this approach failed partly because of the remoteness of the communities and their reluctance to discuss personal matters with strangers. Funded by UNFPA, a new project began to recruit and train local girls as home health visitors or aides-familiales, an approach which became the central focus of the El Kef project. The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) took over the project and expanded it to include nutrition, health care, health education, family planning, disease prevention and domestic crafts. 4 goals were fixed for the project: total vaccination coverage for children; elimination of severe malnutrition; reduction of infant mortality; and use of family planning practice by at least 1/2 the women of childbearing age. An efficient recordkeeping system enabled the project to be carefully evaluated and provides much-needed data, showing where it has achieved its aims and where new efforts should be directed. The project resulted in large numbers of women receiving ante-natal advice, child care and family planning from their local health centers. 860 pregnant women were followed up during the 3-year study period. Some 57% of pregnant women went for advice; only 15% went for postnatal care, but 50% of the women under 50 attended child welfare sessions during the study period for weight checks, nutrition advice, vaccination and treatment for minor ailments. Over the 3 years, the number of contraceptive users more than trebled, from 14% to 54%. The IUD was the most popular method. The most successful aspect of the project was the emphasis on maternal and child health, and the home visits were the most motivating feature. Vaccination became more popular. A further aspect of the project was the training in home improvement skills, like

  12. Building Geographic Information System Capacity in Local Health Departments: Lessons From a North Carolina Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Marie Lynn; Silva, Jennifer M.; Overstreet Galeano, M. Alicia; Brown, Jeffrey P.; Campbell, Douglas S.; Coley, Evelyn; Cowan, Christopher S.; Harvell, Dianne; Lassiter, Jenny; Parks, Jerry L.; Sandelé, Wanda

    2005-01-01

    State government, university, and local health department (LHD) partners collaborated to build the geographic information system (GIS) capacity of 5 LHDs in North Carolina. Project elements included procuring hardware and software, conducting individualized and group training, developing data layers, guiding the project development process, coordinating participation in technical conferences, providing ongoing project consultation, and evaluating project milestones. The project provided health department personnel with the skills and resources required to use sophisticated information management systems, particularly those that address spatial dimensions of public health practice. This capacity-building project helped LHDs incorporate GIS technology into daily operations, resulting in improved time and cost efficiency. Keys to success included (1) methods training rooted in problems specific to the LHD, (2) required project identification by LHD staff with associated timelines for development, (3) ongoing technical support as staff returned to home offices after training, (4) subgrants to LHDs to ease hardware and software resource constraints, (5) networks of relationships among LHDs and other professional GIS users, and (6) senior LHD leadership who supported the professional development activities being undertaken by staff. PMID:16257950

  13. Factors of human capital related to project success in health care work units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhonen, Marjo; Paasivaara, Leena

    2011-03-01

    To explore factors of human capital related to project success that employees expect from nurse managers. Human capital refers to those resources that managers working with projects possess, such as abilities, knowledge and qualities of character. The data were collected by open interviews (n=14) with nurses, public health nurses and nurse managers working in primary health care and a hospital. Data analysis was carried out using qualitative content analysis. The main factors of human capital related to project success proved to be as follows: (1) management of enthusiastic project culture, (2) management of regeneration and (3) management of emotional intelligence. Future research is needed on the kind of means nurse managers use in human capital management in projects and how they see their possibilities in managing human capital. Human capital management skills should be underlined as an important competence area when recruiting a nurse manager. The success of health care projects cannot be improved only through education or by training of nurse managers; in addition, projects need nurse managers who understand workplace spirituality and have high emotional intelligence. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Evaluation of community-based health projects: the healthy tomorrows experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruch-Ross, Holly; Keller, David; Miller, Nicole; Bassewitz, Jane; Melinkovich, Paul

    2008-09-01

    To address the "millennial morbidities," pediatricians must partner with community-based organizations to develop interventions. Little is known about the capacity of the resulting programs for program evaluation or the importance of evaluation in project success and sustainability. The objective of this study was to examine the capacity of community-based health programs to conduct project evaluations and determine the impact of project evaluation on project outcome. Project directors from 149 community-based programs funded from 1989 to 2003 through the Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children Program were surveyed regarding their project experience with evaluation and documentation of project outcomes and the current status of their project. Program directors from 123 (83%) programs completed the survey. Despite barriers to the evaluation process, 83% of the respondents indicated that their evaluations produced useful information. Programs that were described by respondents as "well evaluated" were more likely to report that the evaluation was implemented as planned and that the evaluation included outcome measures. Projects were more likely to be sustained in their original form when at least 1 outcome was reported on the survey. Evaluation of community-based programs, although challenging, is beneficial to project success and sustainability. Policy makers and funding agencies should consider ways to encourage community partnerships to incorporate evaluation into their planning process.

  15. Integrating Health and Transportation in Nashville, Tennessee, USA: From Policy to Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Leslie A; Whitfield, Geoffrey P

    2017-03-01

    The Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) is among the first MPOs in the United States to recognize the interplay of transportation and public health, particularly regarding physical activity, air pollution, and traffic crashes. The Nashville MPO has taken a multifaceted approach to simultaneously improve the transportation system, quality of life, and health status of the region's population. The purpose of this paper is to describe the multiple programs and projects that the MPO has undertaken to this end, so that other cities might learn from Nashville's example. The MPO's strategy comprised six processes. First, the MPO conducted the Regional Bicycle and Pedestrian Study in 2009 and 2014 that established priority issues to be addressed by bicycle and pedestrian projects in Regional Transportation Plans. Second, the MPO responded to public opinion by adopting new transportation policies in the 2035 and 2040 Regional Transportation Plans, including increasing bicycle and pedestrian options and expanding public transit. Third, the MPO created scoring criteria for proposed roadway projects that prioritized health impacts. Fourth, the MPO reserved funding for projects selected under the new criteria and established a new funding program, the Active Transportation Program. Fifth, the MPO conducted the Middle Tennessee Transportation and Health Study, one of the first regional studies in the nation linking transportation and health. Finally, the MPO implemented the Integrated Transport and Health Impact Model which predicts and monetizes population-level health impacts of shifting the population towards active transportation modes. Recent inventories of bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure suggest these interrelated processes are increasing opportunities for walking, bicycling, and public transit use in the region. Further, each of these projects has contributed to a growing appreciation in the region of the links between transportation and health

  16. Health-promoting residential aged care: a pilot project in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajic, Karl; Cichocki, Martin; Quehenberger, Viktoria

    2015-09-01

    Long-term care for the aged is an area that has not been in the focus of health promotion so far. The paper describes context, concept and project plan of a 2-year pilot project of comprehensive health-promoting setting development in residential aged care in Austria, and provides an overview over main experiences and results. Austria's most relevant health promotion agencies, a specialized scientific institute and Austria's largest provider of aged care acted as partners. The project aimed at developing elements of a comprehensive approach, but also providing evidence for the effectiveness of health promotion. Therefore, the project combined an organizational development approach with a scientific, randomized controlled study on mobility enhancement for residents. A comprehensive settings approach turned out acceptable for the main stakeholders of aged care (owners and management, staff, residents and residents' relatives). Strategy development, based on a systematic needs assessment, found staff health to be of special interest for the organization (ergonomics, workability over life course), and residents' relatives, got more attention. The mobility study was able to achieve positive results on occupational performance, concerning quality-of-life indicators and reached also formerly inactive groups. After the end of the project, health promotion is still on the agenda of the organization; further developments will be monitored. Good support from the policy level and well-established networking between the aged care provider, health promotion agencies and a network for health promotion in health care seems to have been an important resource for success. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Implementing Brief Interventions in Health Care: Lessons Learned from the Swedish Risk Drinking Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Nilsen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Risk Drinking Project was a national implementation endeavour in Sweden, carried out from 2004 to 2010, based on a government initiative to give alcohol issues a more prominent place in routine primary, child, maternity and occupational health care. The article describes and analyses the project. Critical factors that were important for the results are identified. The magnitude of the project contributed to its reach and impact in terms of providers’ awareness of the project goals and key messages. The timing of the project was appropriate. The increase in alcohol consumption in Sweden and diminished opportunities for primary prevention strategies since entry to the European Union in 1995 have led to increased expectations for health care providers to become more actively involved in alcohol prevention. This awareness provided favourable conditions for this project. A multifaceted approach was used in the project. Most educational courses were held in workshops and seminars to encourage learning-by-doing. Motivational interviewing was an integral aspect. The concept of risk drinking was promoted in all the activities. Subprojects were tailored to the specific conditions of each respective setting, building on the skills the providers already had to modify existing work practices. Nurses were afforded a key role in the project.

  18. The role of the C8 proton of ATP in the regulation of phosphoryl transfer within kinases and synthetases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nkosi Thokozani C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kinome comprises functionally diverse enzymes, with the current classification indicating very little about the extent of conserved regulatory mechanisms associated with phosphoryl transfer. The apparent Km of the kinases ranges from less than 0.4 μM to in excess of 1000 μM for ATP. It is not known how this diverse range of enzymes mechanistically achieves the regulation of catalysis via an affinity range for ATP varying by three-orders of magnitude. Results We have demonstrated a previously undiscovered mechanism in kinase and synthetase enzymes where the overall rate of reaction is regulated via the C8-H of ATP. Using ATP deuterated at the C8 position (C8D-ATP as a molecular probe it was shown that the C8-H plays a direct role in the regulation of the overall rate of reaction in a range of kinase and synthetase enzymes. Using comparative studies on the effect of the concentration of ATP and C8D-ATP on the activity of the enzymes we demonstrated that not only did C8D-ATP give a kinetic isotope effect (KIE but the KIE's obtained are clearly not secondary KIE effects as the magnitude of the KIE in all cases was at least 2 fold and in most cases in excess of 7 fold. Conclusions Kinase and synthetase enzymes utilise C8D-ATP in preference to non-deuterated ATP. The KIE obtained at low ATP concentrations is clearly a primary KIE demonstrating strong evidence that the bond to the isotopically substituted hydrogen is being broken. The effect of the ATP concentration profile on the KIE was used to develop a model whereby the C8H of ATP plays a role in the overall regulation of phosphoryl transfer. This role of the C8H of ATP in the regulation of substrate binding appears to have been conserved in all kinase and synthetase enzymes as one of the mechanisms associated with binding of ATP. The induction of the C8H to be labile by active site residues coordinated to the ATP purine ring may play a significant role in explaining the

  19. Delivering a MOOC for literature searching in health libraries: evaluation of a pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Gil; McLaren, Lisa; Maden, Michelle

    2017-12-01

    In an era when library budgets are being reduced, Massive Online Open Courses (MOOC's) can offer practical and viable alternatives to the delivery of costly face-to-face training courses. In this study, guest writers Gil Young from Health Care Libraries Unit - North, Lisa McLaren from Brighton and Sussex Medical School and Liverpool University PhD student Michelle Maden describe the outcomes of a funded project they led to develop a MOOC to deliver literature search training for health librarians. Funded by Health Education England, the MOOC was developed by the Library and Information Health Network North West as a pilot project that ran for six weeks. In particular, the MOOC target audience is discussed, how content was developed for the MOOC, promotion and participation, cost-effectiveness, evaluation, the impact of the MOOC and recommendations for future development. H. S. © 2017 Health Libraries Group.

  20. An Assessment of Stream Health in Urban Creeks with Community Led Improvement Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, L.; Mercado, M.

    2016-12-01

    Small-scale restoration and improvement projects along urban creeks have become increasingly common and the need to assess their impact on stream health is necessary. Courtland and Peralta Creek have been subject to a variety of community, non-profit and city sponsored improvement projects. Assessment of nutrient contamination in the form of ammonia and nitrate indicate that these urban creeks have been impacted by human activity (Water Quality of Peralta and Courtland Creeks Oakland, CA, A. Ahumada). Continued assessment of the stream health through nitrate, ammonia and phosphate concentrations, benthic invertebrate derived biotic index and E. coli concentrations were used to assess site improvements. Youth and community site improvement project at Courtland Creek has resulted in the decline of nitrate contamination and an overall increase in benthic invertebrates species. Peralta Creek has a group of dedicated community volunteers that participate in clean up events but is just now implementing a planned restoration project increasing native plant diversity at the site.

  1. National health expenditure projections: modest annual growth until coverage expands and economic growth accelerates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keehan, Sean P; Cuckler, Gigi A; Sisko, Andrea M; Madison, Andrew J; Smith, Sheila D; Lizonitz, Joseph M; Poisal, John A; Wolfe, Christian J

    2012-07-01

    For 2011-13, US health spending is projected to grow at 4.0 percent, on average--slightly above the historically low growth rate of 3.8 percent in 2009. Preliminary data suggest that growth in consumers' use of health services remained slow in 2011, and this pattern is expected to continue this year and next. In 2014, health spending growth is expected to accelerate to 7.4 percent as the major coverage expansions from the Affordable Care Act begin. For 2011 through 2021, national health spending is projected to grow at an average rate of 5.7 percent annually, which would be 0.9 percentage point faster than the expected annual increase in the gross domestic product during this period. By 2021, federal, state, and local government health care spending is projected to be nearly 50 percent of national health expenditures, up from 46 percent in 2011, with federal spending accounting for about two-thirds of the total government share. Rising government spending on health care is expected to be driven by faster growth in Medicare enrollment, expanded Medicaid coverage, and the introduction of premium and cost-sharing subsidies for health insurance exchange plans.

  2. [RIU project: perceived changes by health agents and professionals after a health intervention in an urban area of socioeconomic disadvantage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviñó, Dory; Paredes-Carbonell, Joan J; Peiró-Pérez, Rosana; La Parra Casado, Daniel; Álvarez-Dardet, Carlos

    2014-12-01

    To describe how health agents and professionals working in a community project perceive the changes related to the population health status and their use of health-care services after the RIU intervention in an urban area of socioeconomic disadvantage. A qualitative descriptive study based on individual and group interviews and participant observation conducted between October 2008-July 2009. Raval (Algemesí-Valencia) We selected by purposive sample 7 women health agents, all persons who completed the intervention, and 10 professionals for their involvement in the intervention. We conducted a group interview with the women at 6 months and a group and 7 individuals interviews both at 9 months of intervention. We realized a thematic descriptive analysis from health promotion framework. We used participant observation in a meeting with professionals at 9 months and analyzed field notes as: appraisal project, detected changes, challenges and recommendations. Women acquired information about health, contraception, pregnancy and heath services; they noted changes in self-care and social skills and leadership; they internalized the role of health worker disseminating what they learned and showed improvement in self-esteem and social recognition. They caused changes in the people related on health care and access to services. Professionals didn't incorporate at their work the community perspective; they valued positively the project; professionals and women agreed on improving access and use of services and closeness population-professionals. RIU increases the capabilities of the participants, their social recognition and improves access and use of health services. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Incorporation of project-based learning into an occupational health course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehdashti, Alireza; Mehralizadeh, Semira; Kashani, Masoud Motalebi

    2013-01-01

    Use of an appropriate teaching approach is a major concern for faculty members who are involved in occupational health and safety academic education. The challenge is to explore teaching tools to equip students with knowledge and skills to prepare them for their practices, in which they will encounter occupational health and safety issues in various occupational settings. The current study presents the design and implementation of a team project-based learning approach for undergraduate occupational health students to examine the appropriateness and perceptions of students and educators with regard to such a learning experience. Steps were taken to guide the educators and students through the learning process based on projects completed in teams. The research tools for collecting data were a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews with participants. The results illustrated that use of the proposed teaching approach as part of occupational health education may have the potential to motivate and enhance the active roles of educators and students in the learning process, and improve students' technical and social skills that are crucial for practice in the occupational health field. The study findings showed that project-based learning may provide a promising teaching strategy in the education and training of occupational health students. In addition, academic institutions should encourage educators to plan, introduce and evaluate the effectiveness of project-based learning.

  4. A survey of oral health, Qalyub Project, Egypt*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatcroft, M. G.; Klimt, C. R.

    1959-01-01

    This report presents the results of an oral health survey of 4324 individuals in three villages near Cairo, Egypt. The results show that the incidence of dental decay (expressed as the number of carious teeth per individual) in this group of Egyptians was lower than that reported for the over-all population of the USA, and that the prevalence of periodontal disease in the group studied was about three times as high as that reported in the USA. There was a statistically significant relationship between the occurrence of asymptomatic enlargement of the parotid glands and the occurrence of angular cheilosis in the same individuals. Other forms of oral disease were observed infrequently. Water samples from the survey area were assayed for fluorides and were shown to contain fluoride levels below that considered to give protection against dental caries. PMID:13638795

  5. The Italian Health Literacy Project: Insights from the assessment of health literacy skills in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Rocco; Annarumma, Carmela; Adinolfi, Paola; Musella, Marco; Piscopo, Gabriella

    2016-09-01

    Inadequate health literacy, namely the problematic individual's ability to navigate the health care system, has been depicted as a silent epidemic affecting a large part of the world population. Inadequate health literacy has been variously found to be a predictor of patient disengagement, inappropriateness of care, increased health care costs, and higher mortality rates. However, to date the evidence on the prevalence of limited health literacy is heterogeneous; moreover, studies dealing with this topic show a pronounced geographical concentration. To contribute in filling these gaps, this paper investigates health literacy skills in Italy. Drawing on the European Health Literacy Survey (HLS-EU), a tool to measure self-perceived levels of health literacy was administered to a representative sample of Italian citizens. A stepwise regression analysis allowed to shed light on the determinants and consequences of limited health literacy. Findings suggested that inadequate health literacy is a prevailing problem in Italy, even though it has been overlooked by both policy makers and health care practitioners. Financial deprivation was found to be a significant predictor of inadequate health literacy. Low health literate patients reported higher hospitalization rates and greater use of health services. As compared with the European Countries, Italy showed some peculiarities in terms of health literacy levels and socio-demographic determinants of health literacy, which provide with intriguing insights for policy making. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. EC multicentre study on short-term effects of air pollution on health. The aphea project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsouyanni, K. [Univ. of Athens (Greece). Medical School; Zmirou, D. [Grenoble Univ. (France). Faculte de Medecine; Spix, C. [GSF- Forschungszentrum Umwelt und Gesundheit (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    The APHEA project is an attempt to provide quantitative estimates of the short-term health effects of air pollution, using an extensive data base from ten different European countries which represent various social, environmental and air pollution situations. Within the framework of the project, the methodology of analyzing epidemiologic time series data, as well as that of performing meta-analysis, are further developed and standardized

  7. The Fresno County Refugee Health Volunteer Project: a case study in cross-cultural health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, D R; Spees, H P

    1987-01-01

    Beginning in 1979, Fresno County received a 2nd dramatic influx of Southeast Asian refugees. There are now approximately 20,000 of these refugees, including the largest population of Hmong in the US. This community includes about 2000 Cambodian, 14,000 Hmong, and 4000 Lowland Lao. Altogether, Southeast Asian refugees comprise nearly 10% of the population of Fresno. These demographics provide the backdrop for significant problems in health care service delivery. Some barriers include: 1) stress, loss, dislocation, poverty, illness, and unemployment that are part of the refugee experience; 2) language differences; 3) cultural isolation; and 4) cultural beliefs and practices whose spiritual, wholistic, and natural forms of care often run contrary to the West's scientific, specialized, and technological treatment modalities. The Health Department began to recognize some difficulties related to health services for refugees and developed a strategy to combat these. This strategy was named the Refugee Health Volunteer Project and its goal was to enable individuals, families, and community groups to better meet their own health care needs. Goals were to be met by 1st creating a community-based health promotion network to 1) identify health needs, 2) communicate health information, 3) train community health volunteers, and 4) build a greater capacity for self-care that would last beyond the end of the program. The program's goal would also be met by overcoming the access problems with the service system by 1) communicating community-identified needs, 2) identifying specific barriers in the service system, 3) initiating broad participation among service providers in designing more accessible approaches to service delivery, and 4) improving coordination between service providers. Significant progress has been made in a very short time. The Project demonstrates that a fairly common, bureaucratic organization can be responsive to extremely unique community needs. The project is

  8. African refugee and immigrant health needs: report from a community-based house meeting project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boise, Linda; Tuepker, Anais; Gipson, Teresa; Vigmenon, Yves; Soule, Isabelle; Onadeko, Sade

    2013-01-01

    As in other communities in the United States, information is lacking about the health needs of Africans refugees and immigrants living in Portland, Oregon. In 2008, the African Partnership for Health coalition (APH) was formed to carry out research, advocacy and education to improve the health and well-being of Africans in Oregon. This was APH's initial project. The purposes of this study were to gather data about the perceived health needs and barriers to health care Africans encounter, and lay the foundation for a program of action to guide APH's future work. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) methods were used to collect data on how to improve the health of the African community in the Portland area and define an agenda for future projects. Popular education principles guided the engagement and training of African community members, who conducted nine house meetings with 56 Africans from 14 countries. The results were analyzed by African community members and researchers and prioritized at a community meeting. Three themes emerged: The stressfulness of life in America, the challenges of gaining access to health care, and the pervasive feelings of disrespect and lack of understanding of Africans' health needs, culture, and life experiences by health providers and staff members. Using CBPR methods, we identified and prioritized the needs of the African community. This information provides a framework for future work of the African Partnership for Health and other service and advocacy groups.

  9. The Perceived Benefits of an Arts Project for Health and Wellbeing of Older Offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean J. Wilkinson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing ageing prison population is becoming a pressing issue throughout the criminal justice system. Alongside the rising population, are a host of health and wellbeing issues that contribute to older offenders needs whilst in prison. It has been recommended that meaningful activities can have positive effects on this population and therefore this paper uniquely reviews older offenders accounts of taking part in an arts based project, Good Vibrations, whilst imprisoned. The Good Vibrations project engages individuals in Gamelan music making with an end of project performance. This study used independent in-depth interviews to capture the voices of older offenders who took part in an art based prison project. The interview data was analysed using thematic analysis, which highlighted themes that were consistent with other populations who have taken part in a Good Vibrations project, along with specific age relating issues of mobility, motivation, identity and wellbeing.

  10. Nutrition and bone health projects funded by the UK Food Standards Agency: have they helped to inform public health policy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwell, Margaret; Stone, Elaine; Mathers, John; Barnes, Stephen; Compston, Juliet; Francis, Roger M.; Key, Tim; Cashman, Kevin D.; Cooper, Cyrus; Khaw, Kay Tee; Lanham-New, Susan; Macdonald, Helen; Prentice, Ann; Shearer, Martin; Stephen, Alison

    2009-01-01

    The UK Food Standards Agency convened an international group of expert scientists to review the Agency-funded projects on diet and bone health in the context of developments in the field as a whole. The potential benefits of fruit and vegetables, vitamin K, early-life nutrition and vitamin D on bone health were presented and reviewed. The workshop reached two conclusions which have public health implications. First, that promoting a diet rich in fruit and vegetable intakes might be beneficial to bone health and would be very unlikely to produce adverse consequences on bone health. The mechanism(s) for any effect of fruit and vegetables remains unknown, but the results from these projects did not support the postulated acid–base balance hypothesis. Secondly, increased dietary consumption of vitamin K may contribute to bone health, possibly through its ability to increase the γ-carboxylation status of bone proteins such as osteocalcin. A supplementation trial comparing vitamin K supplementation with Ca and vitamin D showed an additional effect of vitamin K against baseline levels of bone mineral density, but the benefit was only seen at one bone site. The major research gap identified was the need to investigate vitamin D status to define deficiency, insufficiency and depletion across age and ethnic groups in relation to bone health. PMID:18086331

  11. Evaluating the participatory process in a community-based heart health project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Patti-Jean; Wharf-Higgins, Joan; Blair, Lynne; Green, Lawrence; O'Connor, Brian

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents the evaluation of a participatory research process used in a community-based heart health project, the British Columbia Heart Health Demonstration Project. The project utilized both a population heart health approach and a community mobilization model for taking action on heart health. A participatory evaluation plan was selected to: allow for participation in decision-making, incorporate the community perspective, enhance utilization of data, increase skills and capacities at the community level and enhance the responsiveness of the project team to emerging issues. Six elements common to participatory research were synthesized from the literature and rating scales were developed. Project participants across three project levels (investigative team, community project management committee members, community and provincial project coordinators) were asked to rate each of the elements and then explain their ratings during a focus group interview. Ratings were averaged and plotted on a 'sextagram' to illustrate the extent of participation in the research project. Patterns and themes that emerged from the transcripts and fieldnotes, regarding issues that influenced each rating, were categorized according to the framework of participatory research. Ratings and descriptions of participation on each element varied across project levels. The ratings of participation for the elements of sustainability and resource mobilization were uniformly low reflecting the large dependence on external funds. Participants involved at the community level perceived a greater level of participation in the identification of need and definition of goals and activities. Critical issues identified were related to the predominance of the external funding source, the imposition of funding agency guidelines on the communities, the amount of guidance by experts and the data collection methods. The analysis highlighted the responsiveness of the project to feedback over time and

  12. [Health impact assessment methodology for urban planning projects in Andalusia (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya-Ruano, Luis A; Candau-Bejarano, Ana; Rodríguez-Rasero, Francisco J; Ruiz-Fernández, Josefa; Vela-Ríos, José

    To describe the tool developed in Andalusia (Spain) to conduct an analysis and prospective assessment of health impacts from urban planning projects as well as the process followed to design it. On the one hand, direct and indirect relationships between urban setting and health were identified in light of the best scientific evidence available; and, on the other hand, methods and tools in impact assessment were reviewed. After the design of the tool, it was tested via both internal and external validation processes (meetings, workshops and interviews with key informants). The tool consists of seven phases, structured in two stages. A first descriptive stage shows how to obtain information about goals, objectives and general points pertaining the project and also to characterise the potentially affected population. The second one indicates, in several phases, how to identify and sort out potential impacts from the project using different supporting tools. Both in the testing phase and through its implementation since the entry into force of Andalusian Decree 169/2014 (16 June 2015) and forced all urban planning projects to be subjected to an Health Impact Assessment, this methodology has proved responsive, identifying major potential health impacts from the measures included in those projects. However, the tool has been shaped as a living tool and will be adapted in line with the experience acquired in its use. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  13. A tale of two large community electronic health record extension projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostashari, Farzad; Tripathi, Micky; Kendall, Mat

    2009-01-01

    The Massachusetts eHealth Collaborative and the New York City Primary Care Information Project have provided financial subsidies and extensive support to help hundreds of independent medical practices successfully adopt electronic health records. Their efforts address overcoming key barriers such as the amount of start-up funds needed, productivity lost during implementation, and the difficulty of choosing the right system. Their approaches differ: the Massachusetts project emphasizes continuity of care within selected communities; New York emphasizes improvements in preventive care and chronic disease management across a population. Both, however, offer valuable insights that can be applied elsewhere.

  14. The Role of the Health Information Manager in a Research-Based Information Technology Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyne, Alice

    2009-06-01

    Information technology advances in healthcare provide many and varied opportunities for the Health Information Manager. Here is one example involving a Melbourne-based research project and an innovative approach to patient information delivery. The research project area of study is multimedia content delivery in the following applications: as an adjunct to the surgical informed consent process, patient information or instruction presentation and clinical education. The objective is to develop evidence-based, effective and accessible information and knowledge resources for patients and health care providers.

  15. The effects of human CYP2C8 genotype and fluvoxamine on the pharmacokinetics of rosiglitazone in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus S; Damkier, Per; Brosen, Kim

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: To determine the effect of CYP2C8 genotype and of fluvoxamine on the pharmacokinetics of rosiglitazone. METHODS: Twenty-three healthy subjects with the following genotypes were included in a two-phase, open-label, cross-over trial: CYP2C8*3/ *3 (n = 3), CYP2C8*1/ *3 (n = 10) and CYP2C8*1/ *1...... (n = 10). In Phase A, the subjects were given 4 mg rosiglitazone as a single oral dose. In Phase B, the subjects were treated with multiple oral doses of 50 mg fluvoxamine maleate for 3 days prior to the single oral administration of 4 mg rosiglitazone. Plasma concentrations of rosiglitazone...... and relative amounts of N-desmethylrosiglitazone were measured in both phases for 24 h after drug administration. RESULTS: The pharmacokinetics of rosiglitazone and N-desmethylrosiglitazone were not significantly different between the CYP2C8 genotypic groups. Fluvoxamine caused a statistically significant (P...

  16. A novel C8orf37 splice mutation and genotype-phenotype correlation for cone-rod dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahner, Nils; Nuernberg, Gudrun; Finis, David; Nuernberg, Peter; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte

    2016-09-01

    To identify the disease-causing mutation in a consanguineous family of Morrocan origin with syndromic autosomal recessive (ar) cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) in two patients and describe genotype-phenotype correlations. Genome-wide homozygosity mapping and direct sequencing of C8orf37, located in a homozygous interval, was performed in the family. mRNA analysis revealed the effect of the newly identified splice-site mutation. For a comparative analysis phenotypic and genetic data of C8orf37 mutations were extracted from published cases. The new splice-site mutation c.155+2T>C identified in the family results in a skipping of 82 bp. The CRD phenotypes of our patients were consistent with previous reports. Non-ocular findings in our patients and two previously described patients were postaxial polydactyly present at birth. Both families with additional postaxial polydactyly had splice site mutations affecting intron 1 of C8orf37, one at the slice donor and one at the splice acceptor site. This report extends the genotypic spectrum of C8orf37-associated retinal dystrophies and demonstrates for the first time a genotype-phenotype correlation between an arCRD-polydactyly-association and truncating germline mutations affecting the N-terminal region of the protein. Furthermore, our findings underline the ciliary function of C8orf37 protein.

  17. [Experience in training in emergencies, Division of Special Projects in Health, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Vega, Felipe; Loría-Castellanos, Jorge; Hernández-Olivas, Irma Patricia; Franco-Bey, Rubén; Ochoa-Avila, César; Sánchez-Badillo, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    There has been interest in the Division of Special Projects in Health to offer the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social personnel resources for training and quality thereby respond to potential contingencies. Presented here is their experience in this field. To describe and analyse the productivity in different training programs in emergencies and disasters developed by the Division of Special Projects in Health, Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS). Observational study in which different training activities conducted by the Division of Special Projects in Health between 1989 and 2014 are described. Descriptive statistics were used. In these 25 years have trained 20,674 participants; 19.451 IMSS and 1,223 other health institutions. The most productive courses were life support (BLS/ACLS) (47.17%), distance courses "Hospital medical evacuation plans and units" (14.17%), the workshop-run "Evacuation of hospital units with an emphasis on critical areas" (5.93%) and course "Programme Evaluators of Hospital Insurance" (8.43%). Although the Special Projects Division Health has primarily operational functions, it nevertheless has neglected its responsibility to maintain constantly trained and updated institute staff that every day is in a position to face any type of emergency and disaster. This increases the chance that the answer to any contingency is more organised and of higher quality, always to the benefit of the population. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  18. Pay For Success And Population Health: Early Results From Eleven Projects Reveal Challenges And Promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Paula M; Rosenbaum, Sara; Ku, Leighton; Iovan, Samantha

    2016-11-01

    Pay for success (PFS) is a type of social impact investing that uses private capital to finance proven prevention programs that help a government reduce public expenditures or achieve greater value. We conducted an analysis of the first eleven PFS projects in the United States to investigate the potential of PFS as a strategy for financing and disseminating interventions aimed at improving population health and health equity. The PFS approach has significant potential for bringing private-sector resources to interventions regarding social determinants of health. Nonetheless, a number of challenges remain, including structuring PFS initiatives so that optimal prevention benefits can be achieved and ensuring that PFS interventions and evaluation designs are based on rigorous research principles. In addition, increased policy attention regarding key PFS payout issues is needed, including the "wrong pockets" problem and legal barriers to using federal Medicaid funds as an investor payout source. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  19. The Speak UP! Salon Project: Using Hair Stylists as Lay Health Educators About Unintended Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Dobie, Susan; Rasmusson, Addie; Losch, Mary E

    2018-01-01

    The Speak UP! Salon Project trained 126 hair stylists from 60 salons as lay health educators to increase knowledge about contraceptives and inform clients about financial support for long-acting reversible contraceptives at local family planning clinics. Stylists' informal social support system, combined with the rapport built with clients over time, make them excellent candidates for lay health educator projects. This 3-year salon-based intervention was implemented in nine counties in a Midwestern state. Results from a subsample of participants who completed an online questionnaire (n = 177) indicate that hair stylists are a feasible method to link target populations to health information and to the health care system. The benefits and challenges of collecting data in a salon environment are also discussed.

  20. The European TrustHealth project experiences with implementing a security infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blobel, B

    2000-11-01

    Accepting the shared care paradigm, communication and co-operation required between health care establishments must be provided in a trustworthy way. The solution for establishing such trustworthy environment has to be based on a common policy framework, on services, and mechanisms, which have been standardised. In Europe, the legal framework, other policy issues, and the services and mechanisms needed have been developed within projects launched by the European Commission, by the European standards body CEN as well as by temporarily established groups. Within the European TrustHealth projects. a security infrastructure for trustworthy health telematics applications has been specified, implemented, and evaluated. It is based on Health Professional Cards and Trusted Third Party services. Experiences regarding organisational and technological implications of the specification, implementation, maintenance, and evaluation of such a security infrastructure are described on the basis of the ONOCONET example. For the complete software lifecycle, the UML methodology has been deployed.

  1. Synthesis, properties, and NMR studies of a C8-phenylguanine modified oligonucleotide that preferentially adopts the Z DNA conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannett, Peter M; Heavner, Sue; Daft, Jonathan R; Shaughnessy, Kevin H; Epperson, Jon D; Greenbaum, Nancy L

    2003-10-01

    Carcinogenic aryl hydrazines produce C8-arylated purine adducts. The effect of these adducts on DNA conformation and their role in hydrazine carcinogenesis are unknown. Here, we describe a new synthetic route to produce these adducts that is also compatible with the synthesis of the corresponding phosphoramidites needed for oligonucleotide synthesis. Two oligonucleotides were prepared, an unmodified oligonucleotide, d((5)(')CGCGCGCGCG(3)(')), and a C8-phenylguanine modified oligonucleotide, d((5)(')CGCGCGCGCG(3)(')) (G = 8-phenylguanine). These oligonucleotides were compared using thermal denaturation, circular dichroism, NMR, and molecular modeling. The phenyl modification destabilizes the B DNA form and stabilizes the Z DNA form such that the B:Z ratio is near one under physiological conditions. In light of recent studies that show a role for Z DNA in gene expression and cell transformation, Z DNA stabilization by C8-arylguanine formation from aryl hydrazines may be relevant to their role in carcinogenesis.

  2. Public library consumer health information pilot project: results of a National Library of Medicine evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, F B; Lyon, B; Schell, M B; Kitendaugh, P; Cid, V H; Siegel, E R

    2000-10-01

    In October 1998, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) launched a pilot project to learn about the role of public libraries in providing health information to the public and to generate information that would assist NLM and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) in learning how best to work with public libraries in the future. Three regional medical libraries (RMLs), eight resource libraries, and forty-one public libraries or library systems from nine states and the District of Columbia were selected for participation. The pilot project included an evaluation component that was carried out in parallel with project implementation. The evaluation ran through September 1999. The results of the evaluation indicated that participating public librarians were enthusiastic about the training and information materials provided as part of the project and that many public libraries used the materials and conducted their own outreach to local communities and groups. Most libraries applied the modest funds to purchase additional Internet-accessible computers and/or upgrade their health-reference materials. However, few of the participating public libraries had health information centers (although health information was perceived as a top-ten or top-five topic of interest to patrons). Also, the project generated only minimal usage of NLM's consumer health database, known as MEDLINEplus, from the premises of the monitored libraries (patron usage from home or office locations was not tracked). The evaluation results suggested a balanced follow-up by NLM and the NN/LM, with a few carefully selected national activities, complemented by a package of targeted activities that, as of January 2000, are being planned, developed, or implemented. The results also highlighted the importance of building an evaluation component into projects like this one from the outset, to assure that objectives were met and that evaluative information was available on a timely basis, as was

  3. The diffusion of health economics knowledge in Europe : The EURONHEED (European Network of Health Economics Evaluation Database) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pouvourville, Gérard; Ulmann, Philippe; Nixon, John; Boulenger, Stéphanie; Glanville, Julie; Drummond, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This paper overviews the EURONHEED (EUROpean Network of Health Economics Evaluation Databases) project. Launched in 2003, this project is funded by the EU. Its aim is to create a network of national and international databases dedicated to health economic evaluation of health services and innovations. Seven centres (France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the UK) are involved covering 17 countries. The network is based on two existing databases, the French CODECS (COnnaissance et Decision en EConomie de la Sante) database, created in 2000 by the French Health Economists Association (College des Economistes de la Sante), and the UK NHS-EED (NHS Economic Electronic Database), run by the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York, York, England. The network will provide bibliographic records of published full health economic evaluation studies (cost-benefit, cost-utility and cost-effectiveness studies) as well as cost studies, methodological articles and review papers. Moreover, a structured abstract of full evaluation studies will be provided to users, allowing them access to a detailed description of each study and to a commentary stressing the implications and limits, for decision making, of the study. Access will be free of charge. The database features and its ease of access (via the internet: http://www.euronheed.org) should facilitate the diffusion of existing economic evidence on health services and the generalisation of common standards in the field at the European level, thereby improving the quality, generalisability and transferability of results across countries.

  4. Fall 2015 NASA Internship, and Space Radiation Health Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patience, Luke

    2015-01-01

    This fall, I was fortunate enough to have been able to participate in an internship at NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. I was placed into the Human Health & Performance Directorate, where I was specifically tasked to work with Dr. Zarana Patel, researching the impacts of cosmic level radiation on human cells. Using different laboratory techniques, we were able to examine the cells to see if any damage had been done due to radiation exposure, and if so, how much damage was done. Cell culture samples were exposed at different doses, and fixed at different time points so that we could accumulate a large pool of quantifiable data. After examining quantifiable results relative to the impacts of space radiation on the human body at the cellular and chromosomal level, researchers can defer to different areas of the space program that have to do with astronaut safety, and research and development (extravehicular mobility unit construction, vehicle design and construction, etc.). This experience has been very eye-opening, and I was able to learn quite a bit. I learned some new laboratory techniques, and I did my best to try and learn new ways to balance such a hectic work and school schedule. I also learned some very intimate thing about working at NASA; I learned that far more people want to watch you succeed, rather than watch you fail, and I also learned that this is a place that is alive with innovators and explorers - people who have a sole purpose of exploring space for the betterment of humanity, and not for any other reason. It's truly inspiring. All of these experiences during my internship have impacted me in a really profound way, so much that my educational and career goals are completely different than when I started. I started out as a biotechnology major, and I discovered recently toward the end of the internship, that I don't want to work in a lab, nor was I as enthralled by biological life sciences as a believed myself to be. Taking that all into

  5. Preparing for effective communications during disasters: lessons from a World Health Organization quality improvement project

    OpenAIRE

    Medford-Davis, Laura N; Kapur, G Bobby

    2014-01-01

    Background One hundred ninety-four member nations turn to the World Health Organization (WHO) for guidance and assistance during disasters. Purposes of disaster communication include preventing panic, promoting appropriate health behaviors, coordinating response among stakeholders, advocating for affected populations, and mobilizing resources. Methods A quality improvement project was undertaken to gather expert consensus on best practices that could be used to improve WHO protocols for disas...

  6. Framework to Define Structure and Boundaries of Complex Health Intervention Systems: The ALERT Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriani, Elena; Esposito, Roberto; Frazzoli, Chiara; Fantke, Peter; Hald, Tine; Rüegg, Simon R

    2017-01-01

    Health intervention systems are complex and subject to multiple variables in different phases of implementation. This constitutes a concrete challenge for the application of translational science in real life. Complex systems as health-oriented interventions call for interdisciplinary approaches with carefully defined system boundaries. Exploring individual components of such systems from different viewpoints gives a wide overview and helps to understand the elements and the relationships that drive actions and consequences within the system. In this study, we present an application and assessment of a framework with focus on systems and system boundaries of interdisciplinary projects. As an example on how to apply our framework, we analyzed ALERT [an integrated sensors and biosensors' system (BEST) aimed at monitoring the quality, health, and traceability of the chain of the bovine milk], a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary project based on the application of measurable biomarkers at strategic points of the milk chain for improved food security (including safety), human, and ecosystem health (1). In fact, the European food safety framework calls for science-based support to the primary producers' mandate for legal, scientific, and ethical responsibility in food supply. Because of its multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach involving human, animal, and ecosystem health, ALERT can be considered as a One Health project. Within the ALERT context, we identified the need to take into account the main actors, interactions, and relationships of stakeholders to depict a simplified skeleton of the system. The framework can provide elements to highlight how and where to improve the project development when project evaluations are required.

  7. Framework to Define Structure and Boundaries of Complex Health Intervention Systems: The ALERT Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Boriani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Health intervention systems are complex and subject to multiple variables in different phases of implementation. This constitutes a concrete challenge for the application of translational science in real life. Complex systems as health-oriented interventions call for interdisciplinary approaches with carefully defined system boundaries. Exploring individual components of such systems from different viewpoints gives a wide overview and helps to understand the elements and the relationships that drive actions and consequences within the system. In this study, we present an application and assessment of a framework with focus on systems and system boundaries of interdisciplinary projects. As an example on how to apply our framework, we analyzed ALERT [an integrated sensors and biosensors’ system (BEST aimed at monitoring the quality, health, and traceability of the chain of the bovine milk], a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary project based on the application of measurable biomarkers at strategic points of the milk chain for improved food security (including safety, human, and ecosystem health (1. In fact, the European food safety framework calls for science-based support to the primary producers’ mandate for legal, scientific, and ethical responsibility in food supply. Because of its multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach involving human, animal, and ecosystem health, ALERT can be considered as a One Health project. Within the ALERT context, we identified the need to take into account the main actors, interactions, and relationships of stakeholders to depict a simplified skeleton of the system. The framework can provide elements to highlight how and where to improve the project development when project evaluations are required.

  8. [Subtainable health promotion via organisational development--a model project for teachers in professional training schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, L; Nieskens, B; Bräuer, H; Sieland, B

    2005-02-01

    The goal of this project is the development, implementation and evaluation of a concept designed for sustainable health promotion among occupational and trade school teachers. We assume that for sustainable health promotion -- along with a behavioral prevention program -- a change is necessary in the structure, as well as, the working and communication processes within schools. The realization of early teacher participation and self regulated cooperative groups initiates comprehensive and goal-oriented developmental processes in the project schools. The organizational development process was accomplished in the following way: At the beginning we conducted a diagnosis of school-specific and individual health risks and the resources available to the project schools. The results were reported for both the individual and for the teacher group. This was intended to clarify the potential for improvement and, thus, strengthen the teachers' motivation toward processes of change. Following the diagnosis, the teachers chose areas of stress-related strain and then worked in groups to develop and implement behaviour and working condition-oriented intervention strategies for health promotion. The diagnosis results confirm the necessity of school-specific health promotion: the schools demonstrate very different demand and resource profiles. Furthermore, is has become evident that the central success factor for health promotion in schools is the teachers' willingness for change. The individual and group reports of the diagnosis results seem to have made clear how essential individual and organisational changes are.

  9. The World Health Organization European Health in Prisons Project after 10 years: persistent barriers and achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatherer, Alex; Moller, Lars; Hayton, Paul

    2005-10-01

    The recognition that good prison health is important to general public health has led 28 countries in the European Region of the World Health Organization (WHO) to join a WHO network dedicated to improving health within prisons. Within the 10 years since that time, vital actions have been taken and important policy documents have been produced. A key factor in making progress is breaking down the isolation of prison health services and bringing them into closer collaboration with the country's public health services.However, barriers to progress remain. A continuing challenge is how best to move from policy recommendations to implementation, so that the network's fundamental aim of noticeable improvements in the health and care of prisoners is further achieved.

  10. Strengthening emergency obstetric care in Nepal: The Women's Right to Life and Health Project (WRLHP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, T G; Chataut, B D; Shakya, G; Nanda, G; Pratt, A; Sakai, S

    2007-09-01

    The Women's Right to Life and Health Project contributes to Nepal's National Safe Motherhood Program and maternal mortality reduction efforts by working to improve the availability, quality and utilization of emergency obstetric care services in public health facilities. The project upgraded 8 existing public health facilities through infrastructure, equipment, training, data collection, policy advocacy, and community information activities. The total cost of the project was approximately US$1.6 million. In 5 years, 3 comprehensive and 4 basic emergency obstetric care (EmOC) facilities were established in an area where adequate EmOC services were previously lacking. From 2000 to 2004, met need for EmOC improved from 1.9 to 16.9%; the proportion of births in EmOC project facilities increased from 3.8 to 8.3%; and the case fatality rate declined from 2.7 to 0.3%. While the use of maternity services is still low in Nepal, improving availability and quality of EmOC together with community empowerment can increase utilization by women with complications, even in low-resource settings. Partnerships with government and donors were key to the project's success. Similar efforts should be replicated throughout Nepal to expand the availability of essential life-saving services for pregnant women.

  11. Exploring Contributions of Project-Based Learning to Health and Wellbeing in Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Pete; Gray, Shirley; Sproule, John; Nash, Christine; Martindale, Russell; Wang, John

    2015-01-01

    Regardless of the aims and purposes of education, recent trends in pedagogy suggest an increasing popularity of project-based learning (PBL) and a focus on interdisciplinary approaches to learning, however ill-defined they may be. Connections between PBL, curriculum trends and health and wellbeing are reviewed, as well as potential value of…

  12. Health-Related Fitness Knowledge Development through Project-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastle, Peter A.; Chen, Senlin; Guarino, Anthony J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the process and outcome of an intervention using the project-based learning (PBL) model to increase students' health-related fitness (HRF) knowledge. Method: The participants were 185 fifth-grade students from three schools in Alabama (PBL group: n = 109; control group: n = 76). HRF knowledge was…

  13. A synthesis of evaluation monitoring projects by the forest health monitoring program (1998-2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    William A. Bechtold; Michael J. Bohne; Barbara L. Conkling; Dana L. Friedman; Borys M. Tkacz

    2012-01-01

    The national Forest Health Monitoring Program of the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, has funded over 200 Evaluation Monitoring projects. Evaluation Monitoring is designed to verify and define the extent of deterioration in forest ecosystems where potential problems have been identified. This report is a synthesis of results from over 150 Evaluation...

  14. 78 FR 36163 - Bitterroot National Forest, Darby Ranger District, Como Forest Health Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... Forest Service Bitterroot National Forest, Darby Ranger District, Como Forest Health Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an environmental impact statement. SUMMARY: The USDA Forest Service, Bitterroot National Forest will prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) to...

  15. 78 FR 38287 - Bitterroot National Forest, Darby Ranger District, Como Forest Health Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... Forest Service Bitterroot National Forest, Darby Ranger District, Como Forest Health Project AGENCY: Forest Service. ACTION: Notice; Correction. SUMMARY: The Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, Bitterroot National Forest, Darby Ranger District published a document in the Federal Register of June 17...

  16. 78 FR 14072 - Trestle Forest Health Project, Eldorado National Forest, El Dorado County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ... Forest Service Trestle Forest Health Project, Eldorado National Forest, El Dorado County, CA AGENCY: USDA Forest Service. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an environmental impact statement. SUMMARY: The USDA Forest Service, Eldorado National Forest will prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for a...

  17. Nutrition/Dietetics Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Education in nutrition/dietetics in Kentucky and articulation within the field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and resource…

  18. Acute effects of ozone on mortality from the "Air pollution and health : A European approach" project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gryparis, A; Forsberg, B; Katsouyanni, K; Analitis, A; Touloumi, G; Schwartz, J; Samoli, E; Medina, S; Anderson, HR; Niciu, EM; Wichmann, HE; Kriz, B; Kosnik, M; Skorkovsky, J; Vonk, JM; Dortbudak, Z

    2004-01-01

    In the Air Pollution and Health: A European Approach (APHEA2) project, the effects of ambient ozone concentrations on mortality were investigated. Data were collected on daily ozone concentrations, the daily number of deaths, confounders, and potential effect modifiers from 23 cities/areas for at

  19. Overview of e-Health projects in The Netherlands: Barriers to implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.S.M. Kort; Joost van Hoof

    2012-01-01

    Purpose eHealth projects in the Netherlands have various backgrounds. First, the number of persons aged 65 and over will have increased by 400,000 between 2008 and 20131. Over the same period, the potential workforce will have decreased from 4.2 persons at present to 3.6 persons for each 65 plus.

  20. Framework to Define Structure and Boundaries of Complex Health Intervention Systems: The ALERT Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boriani, Elena; Esposito, Roberto; Frazzoli, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    of a framework with focus on systems and system boundaries of interdisciplinary projects. As an example on how to apply our framework, we analyzed ALERT [an integrated sensors and biosensors’ system (BEST) aimed at monitoring the quality, health, and traceability of the chain of the bovine milk...

  1. Identification and selection of cases and controls in the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deloria-Knoll, Maria; Feikin, Daniel R.; Scott, J. Anthony G.; O'Brien, Katherine L.; DeLuca, Andrea N.; Driscoll, Amanda J.; Levine, Orin S.; Black, Robert E.; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Campbell, Harry; Cherian, Thomas; Crook, Derrick W.; de Jong, Menno D.; Dowell, Scott F.; Graham, Stephen M.; Klugman, Keith P.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Madhi, Shabir A.; Martin, Paul; Nataro, James P.; Piazza, Franco M.; Qazi, Shamim A.; Zar, Heather J.; Baggett, Henry C.; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Chipeta, James; Ebruke, Bernard; Endtz, Hubert P.; Groome, Michelle; Hammitt, Laura L.; Howie, Stephen R. C.; Kotloff, Karen; Maloney, Susan A.; Moore, David; Otieno, Juliet; Seidenberg, Phil; Tapia, Milagritos; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Thea, Donald M.; Zaman, Khaleque

    2012-01-01

    Methods for the identification and selection of patients (cases) with severe or very severe pneumonia and controls for the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) project were needed. Issues considered include eligibility criteria and sampling strategies, whether to enroll hospital or

  2. [A project to reduce the incidence of intubation care errors among foreign health aides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Ju; Lu, Yu-Hua; Chen, Chiu-Chun; Li, Ai-Cheng

    2014-08-01

    Foreign health aides are the main providers of care for the elderly and the physically disabled in Taiwan. Correct care skills improve patient safety. In 2010, the incidence of mistakes among foreign health aides in our hospital unit was 58% for nasogastric tube care and 57% for tracheostomy tube care. A survey of foreign health aides and nurses in the unit identified the main causes of these mistakes as: communication difficulties, inaccurate instructions given to patients, and a lack of standard operating procedures given to the foreign health aides. This project was designed to reduce the rates of improper nasogastric tube care and improper tracheostomy tube care to 20%, respectively. This project implemented several appropriate measures. We produced patient instruction hand-outs in Bahasa Indonesia, established a dedicated file holder for Bahasa Indonesian tube care reference information, produced Bahasa Indonesian tube-care-related posters, produced a short film about tube care in Bahasa Indonesian, and established a standardized operating procedure for tube care in our unit. Between December 15th and 31st, 2011, we audited the performance of a total of 32 foreign health aides for proper execution of nasogastric tube care (21 aides) and of proper execution of tracheostomy tube care (11 aides). Patients with concurrent nasogastric and tracheostomy tubes were inspected separately for each care group. The incidence of improper care decreased from 58% to 18% nasogastric intubation and 57% to 18% for tracheostomy intubation. This project decreased significantly the incidence of improper tube care by the foreign health aides in our unit. Furthermore, the foreign health aides improved their tube nursing care skills. Therefore, this project improved the quality of patient care.

  3. Using public relations strategies to prompt populations at risk to seek health information: the Hanford Community Health Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gregory D; Smith, Stephen M; Turcotte, Joseph A

    2009-01-01

    The Hanford Community Health Project (HCHP) addressed health concerns among "downwinders" exposed to releases of radioactive iodine (I-131) from the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in the 1940s and 1950s. After developing educational materials and conducting initial outreach, HCHP had to decide whether to apply its limited resources to an advertising or public relations approach. The decision to apply public relations strategies was effective in driving awareness of the risk communication message at the community level, reinvigorating the affected community, and ultimately increasing the number of people who sought information about their risk of exposure and related health issues. HCHP used a series of communication tools to reach out to local and regional media, medical and health professionals, and community organizations. The campaign was successful in increasing the number of unique visitors to HCHP Web site and educating and activating the medical community around the releases of I-131 and patient care choices.

  4. Public mental health research in Europe: a systematic mapping for the ROAMER project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsman, Anna K; Ventus, Daniel B J; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M; Wahlbeck, Kristian

    2014-12-01

    As part of the ROAMER (ROAdmap for MEntal health Research in Europe) project, aiming to create an integrated European roadmap for mental health research, we set out to map the hitherto unmapped territory of public mental health research in Europe. Five electronic databases (CINAHL, Health Management, Medline, PsycINFO, Social Services Abstracts) were used for identifying public mental health research articles published between January 2007 and April 2012. The number of publications for each European country in five research domains (i.e. mental health epidemiology, mental health promotion, mental disorder prevention, mental health policy and mental health services) was analysed by population size and gross domestic product (GDP), and mean impact factors were compared. In all, 8143 unique publications were identified. Epidemiology research dominates public mental health research, while promotion, prevention and policy research are scarce. Mental health promotion is the fastest growing research area. Research targeting older adults is under-represented. Publications per capita were highest in northwestern Europe, and similar trends were found also when adjusting the number of publications by GDP per capita. The most widely cited research origins from Italy, Switzerland, the UK, the Nordic countries, the Netherlands, Greece and France. In Europe, public mental health research is currently a matter of the affluent northern and western European countries, and major efforts will be needed to promote public mental health research in south and east Europe. In spite of a smaller public mental health research output, some Mediterranean countries produce highly cited public mental health research. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  5. The Northampton Physical Health and Wellbeing Project: the views of patients with severe mental illness about their physical health check.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Sheila; Deane, Katherine; Gray, Richard

    2012-12-01

    Background Annual health checks are recommended for people with severe mental illness, as they are at high risk of cardiovascular disease. We trained practice nurses from six primary care centres in Northampton, in the UK, how to deliver health checks for this population. Aims The purpose of this study was to examine patients' views about the physical health check delivered by a nurse trained in the Northampton Physical Health and Wellbeing (PhyHWell) project. Method We interviewed five patients from three primary care centres using a topic guide. Results From a total of 29 patients who were invited, five attended. They had a good understanding of the importance of a healthy diet and taking regular exercise, but did not appear to be aware of the risk of cardiovascular disease. Being treated consistently by the same healthcare professional and/or by a nurse was cited as a helpful factor in managing their physical health. Most of the patients were glad to be invited for a health check and thought that it was worthwhile. They would have liked more information about blood tests and medication. All of the patients reported that they had started to make changes to their lifestyle since the health check. Recommendations Training for practice nurses to provide physical health checks for people with severe mental illness should emphasise the patients' views of what will make them effective.

  6. The Utrecht Healthy School Project: Connecting adolescent health behavior, academic achievement and Health Promoting Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Busch, V.

    2014-01-01

    Unhealthy behaviors contribute to the development of diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and psychiatric disorders. Most often these behaviors develop in the teenage years. This thesis addresses the following topics: (1) How do health-related behaviors cluster and affect health in adolescents, (2) how do they affect their school performances and (3) are they improved by a Health Promoting School intervention that applies a Whole School Approach? Firstly, it was studied how healt...

  7. [Application of the technique of analytical structure of project for the sub-project of websites catalog of the Virtual Health Library-Nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos, Santos Luís Augusto; Marin, Heimar de Fátima; Marques, Isaac Rosa; Cunha, Isabel Cristina Kowal Olm

    2007-01-01

    This work intents, in a didactic form, to explain the benefits of use of a technique of project management, named Work Breakdown Structure: a graphical tool to identify the main results to be developed in a project. The real examples are applied to a sub-project of the Virtual Library in Health in Nursing (BVS-Enfermagem) to development of the Sites Catalogs. The benefits of graphical visualization for a major agreement between professionals of different expertise are presented.

  8. Project-based faculty development by international health professions educators: practical strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennin, Stewart; Kalishman, Summers; Eklund, Mary Ann; Friedman, Stacey; Morahan, Page S; Burdick, William

    2013-01-01

    Project design and implementation, applied to real life situations, is emerging as an educational strategy for application of health professions faculty development learning within a supportive environment. We conducted a retrospective analysis of project evolution to identify common experiences, challenges, and successful strategies of 54 mid-career faculty members from 18 developing countries who attended the Foundation for the Advancement of International Medical Education and Research Institute between 2001 and 2006 and designed, conducted, and evaluated education innovations at their home institutions. Chronological analysis of the evolution of 54 projects over the initial 16-18 months of the 2-year Fellowship was based on an iterative qualitative analysis of 324 reports and individual interview transcripts collected over 6 years. Useful skill areas for project implementation included educational methods, leadership and management, and relationships/collaboration. Common challenges included competing responsibilities, lack of protected time, and limited resources. Themes identified with the evolution and success of education innovation projects included leadership and organization, collaboration, personal professional growth, and awareness of the relevant societal context. Common challenges and success factors in project-based faculty development were identified. Twelve practical strategies to promote successful project-based faculty development emerged that can be generalized for faculty development.

  9. Demonstration and education project at the Sestroretsky Health Resort St. Petersburg, Russia. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This project is a continuation of the project `Environment and Energy plan for Sestroretsky Health Resort`, prepared in 1993 as OeLP-project UM No 818 by Christensen and Hofmeister and Horsens Polytechnic. The co-operation partner `All-Union Research Institute for Hydro Mechanization, Sanitary Engineering and Special Constructions` (VNIIGS) was financially supported by the Russian Ministry for Science and Technology Policy. The support by the Russian Ministry followed the manager of VNIIGS, when he, due to `feelings of enmity`, decided to establish the Academic Centre of Heat Energy Effective Technologies (ACHEET). The aim of the project was to `show the way` of how to obtain essential energy saving and related environmental saving effects through energy renovation of the existing housing stock. The main concept behind the project was that the complete project would demonstrate: The principles of project management and the implementation of energy conservation measured based on market conditions; the use of Danish know-how and Danish products in relation to the energy renovation of Russian buildings; how Danish and Russian companies could work together in close cooperation; and how Danish experience within this educational sector could be transferred to Russian educational institutions. (EG)

  10. [Health projects managed by Nursing Coordinators: an analysis of contents and degree of success].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palese, Alvisa; Bresciani, Federica; Brutti, Caterina; Chiari, Ileana; Fontana, Luciana; Fronza, Ornella; Gasperi, Giuseppina; Gheno, Oscar; Guarese, Olga; Leali, Anna; Mansueti, Nadia; Masieri, Enrico; Messina, Laura; Munaretto, Gabriella; Paoli, Claudia; Perusi, Chiara; Randon, Giulia; Rossi, Gloria; Solazzo, Pasquale; Telli, Debora; Trenti, Giuliano; Veronese, Elisabetta; Saiani, Luisa

    2012-01-01

    To describe the evolution and results of health projects run in hospitals and managed by Nursing Coordinators. A convenience sample of 13 north Italian hospital, and a sample of 56 Nursing Coordinators with a permanent position from at least 1 year, was contacted. The following information was collected with a structured interview: projects run in 2009, topic, if bottom up or top down, number of staff involved and state (ended, still running, stopped). In 2009 Nursing Coordinators started 114 projects (mean 1.8±1.2 each): 94 (82.5%) were improvement projects, 17 (14.9%) accreditation, and 3 (2.6%) research. The projects involved 2.732 staff members (73.7%; average commitment 84 hours); 55 (48.2%) projects were still running, 52 (45.6%) completed, for 5 (4.4%) there was no assessment and 2 (1.8%) had been stopped. Nurses are regularly involved in several projects. A systematic monitoring of the results obtained and stabilization strategies are scarce. Due to the large number of resources invested, a correct management and the choice of areas relevant for patients' problems and needs are pivotal.

  11. Electronic medical records: recommendations for routine. Report of the eHID (Electronic Health Indicator Data Project): the eHID project recommendations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pringle, M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Elliott, C.; Fleming, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: eHID (electronic Health Indicator Data) is an EC sponsored project concerned with best practice in recording diagnostic data in routine ( as opposed to research specific) general practice electronic patient records. Design and methods: The project included investigation on site of recording

  12. Human blood and plasma partition coefficients for C4-C8 n-alkanes, isoalkanes, and 1-alkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalski, Paweł; King, Julian; Kupferthaler, Alexander; Unterkofler, Karl; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Amann, Anton

    2012-06-01

    Human blood:air and plasma:air partition coefficients for C(4)-C(8) n-alkanes, isoalkanes, and 1-alkenes were determined using multiple headspace extraction coupled with solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography. Mean blood:air partition coefficients expressed in the form of dimensionless blood-to-air concentration ratio (g/mL(b)/g/mL(a)) were 0.183, 0.416, 1.08, 2.71, and 5.77 for C(4)-C(8) n-alkanes; 0.079, 0.184, 0.473, 1.3, and 3.18 for C(4)-C(8) isoalkanes; and 0.304, 0.589, 1.32, 3.5, and 7.01 for C(4)-C(8) 1-alkenes, respectively (n = 8). The reported partition coefficient values increased exponentially with boiling points, molecular weights, and the carbon atoms in the particle. The solubility of 1-alkenes in blood was higher than in plasma, whereas the blood:air and plasma:air partition coefficients of n-alkanes and isoalkanes did not differ significantly. Consequently, additional interactions of 1-alkenes with whole blood seem to occur. The presented findings are expected to be particularly useful for assessing the uptake, distribution, and elimination of hydrocarbons in human organism.

  13. [Health telematics projects in the perspective of the German federal states].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, S H; Redders, M

    2005-06-01

    Starting in autumn 2005 with pilot projects, the new German electronic health card (EHC) and electronic health professional cards (HPC) will be implemented in the German health system. These cards are constituents of the full coverage networking of more than 120,000 doctor's practices, 22,000 pharmacies, 2,200 hospitals and 300 health insurance companies. The functions of the EHC, for example electronic prescriptions, the digital medication recording and the European emergency database, need both the interactions with the HPCs and with a complex network of IT systems and telecommunication services, i. e. with a comprehensive health telematics infrastructure. Model regions for the construction of a telematics infrastructure have been established in numerous federal states, e. g. Baden- Wurttemberg, Bavaria, Bremen, Lower Saxony, North Rhine-Westphalia, Rhineland-Palatinate, Saxony and Schleswig-Holstein, and also recently in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern and Brandenburg. These model regions are designed in a way that allows smooth integration of the specifications of the so-called solution architecture of the EHC and also of electronic HPCs as soon as these are available. The implementation of first pilot trials in the model regions, each with 10,000 insured, is planned for the second half of 2005. A project task force was founded by a group from the German federal states in December 2004. The objective of these implementations is to establish a fully networked health system providing patients various e-Health applications which can be used any place and any time.

  14. The Utrecht Healthy School Project: Connecting adolescent health behavior, academic achievement and Health Promoting Schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busch, V.

    2014-01-01

    Unhealthy behaviors contribute to the development of diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and psychiatric disorders. Most often these behaviors develop in the teenage years. This thesis addresses the following topics: (1) How do health-related behaviors cluster and affect health in

  15. Addressing the Need for Mental Health Screening of Newly Resettled Refugees: A Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcher, Kelly; Calloway, Susan

    2016-07-01

    Refugees resettling to the United States are at increased risk for mental health disorders, which can lead to difficulty with adaptation and poor health outcomes. Standardized mental health screening of refugees is often neglected at primary care and community health clinics. A pilot project aimed to initiate early mental health screening for newly resettled adult refugees was implemented at a community health center in Fargo, North Dakota. Current refugee screening processes were evaluated to determine appropriate timing for refugee mental health screening. This took into consideration time, staffing, interpreter availability and the refugee "honeymoon" phase following resettlement. The Refugee Health Screener-15 (RHS-15) was identified as an efficient, valid, and reliable tool for assessing emotional distress in this population and was integrated into refugee health screening practices. The RHS-15 was administered to 178 adult refugees with arrival dates between August 1, 2013 and July 31, 2014. Of those screened, 51 (28.6%) screened positive for risk of emotional distress. Follow-up with primary care provider was completed with 30 (59%) of those who screened positive. Half (15) requested mental health treatment. Although the largest group of refugees during this period of time were resettling from Bhutan, refugees from Iraq had greater incidence of positive screening compared with those from Bhutan. Refugees from Iraq were also found to have significantly higher scores on the RHS-15. Although there are some challenges to implementing a standardized mental health screening for refugees, this pilot reiterates the need for standardized mental health screening of refugees. Routine mental health screening should be a part of the overall comprehensive health assessment provided to refugees nationwide. Considerations should be taken in regards to how refugees from Iraq have even greater risk of mental health disorders compared to other refugee groups. © The Author

  16. OA53 "dementia friendly pharmacies" a community based health promotion project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimerl, Katharina; Plunger, Petra; Tatzer, Verena; Reitinger, Elisabeth

    2015-04-01

    Inspired by the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion, which is a major point of reference also for the "Compassionate Communities", we would like to propose that communities consolidate various settings like schools, workplaces, and health care organisations like community pharmacies, all of which might be included in a compassionate communities approach. We aim at enabling community pharmacies to offer informal consulting and support for people with dementia and their informal caregivers. Furthermore we want to support pharmacies to reach out in the community through various activities. By this means the project seeks to contribute to de-stigmatising dementia. The project is based on the approach "Participatory Health Research" (Hockley, Froggatt, Heimerl 2013; Wright et al . 2010). The core elements of the approach are participation, action and reflection. Approximately 40 staff (almost exclusively women) in 18 community pharmacies actively participates in the project, i.e. needs assessment, interactive workshops, practice projects and evaluation. People with dementia and their informal care givers are included in the needs assessment and in different steps of the programme. Community pharmacy staff raised several issues, closely related to communication, counselling and providing advice in a community pharmacy setting: They believe further development of professional practice to be important, since dementia care will become a more prominent issue for the community pharmacy. Moreover, a high frequency of contact with people living with dementia and their caregivers was reported by the majority of staff. Professional competencies related to dementia care are a key issue, and community pharmacy personnel viewed their practice with a critical eye: Communicating with disoriented persons poses some challenges, as does communicating with caregivers. In the still ongoing project the raised issues are being dealt with in practice projects that are performed by the

  17. CYP2C8 but not CYP3A4 is important in the pharmacokinetics of montelukast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karonen, Tiina; Neuvonen, Pertti J; Backman, Janne T

    2012-01-01

    AIM According to product information, montelukast is extensively metabolized by CYP3A4 and CYP2C9. However, CYP2C8 was also recently found to be involved. Our aim was to study the effects of selective CYP2C8 and CYP3A4 inhibitors on the pharmacokinetics of montelukast. METHODS In a randomized crossover study, 11 healthy subjects ingested gemfibrozil 600 mg, itraconazole 100 mg (first dose 200 mg) or both, or placebo twice daily for 5 days, and on day 3, 10 mg montelukast. Plasma concentrations of montelukast, gemfibrozil, itraconazole and their metabolites were measured up to 72 h. RESULTS The CYP2C8 inhibitor gemfibrozil increased the AUC(0,∞) of montelukast 4.3-fold and its t1/2 2.1-fold (P montelukast primary metabolite M6, reduced the AUC and Cmax of the secondary (major) metabolite M4 by more than 90% (P montelukast or its M6 and M4 metabolites, but markedly reduced the AUC and Cmax of M5a and M5b (P montelukast did not differ from those of gemfibrozil alone. CONCLUSIONS CYP2C8 is the dominant enzyme in the biotransformation of montelukast in humans, accounting for about 80% of its metabolism. CYP3A4 only mediates the formation of the minor metabolite M5a/b, and is not important in the elimination of montelukast. Montelukast may serve as a safe and useful CYP2C8 probe drug. PMID:21838784

  18. Health Care Reform Tracking Project: Tracking State Health Care Reforms as They Affect Children and Adolescents with Emotional Disorders and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Sheila A.; Stroul, Beth A.

    The Health Care Reform Tracking Project is a 5-year national project to track and analyze state health care reform initiatives as they affect children and adolescents with emotional/behavioral disorders and their families. The study's first phase was a baseline survey of all 50 states to describe current state reforms as of 1995. Among findings of…

  19. Environmental health literacy within the Italian Asbestos Project: experience in Italy and Latin American contexts. Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsili, Daniela; Comba, Pietro; De Castro, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of multidisciplinary approaches to foster scientific research in public health and strengthen its impact on society is nowadays unavoidable. Environmental health literacy (EHL) may be defined as the ability to search for, understand, evaluate, and use environmental health information to promote the adoption of informed choices, the reduction of health risks, the improvement of quality of life and the protection of the environment. Both public health and environmental health literacy involve access to and dissemination of scientific information (including research findings), individual and collective decision-making and critical thinking. Specific experiences in environmental health literacy have been developed within the Italian National Asbestos Project (Progetto Amianto) in Latin American countries where the use of asbestos is still permitted, and in Italy where a specific effort in EHL has been dedicated to the risks caused by the presence of fluoro-edenite fibers in the town of Biancavilla (Sicily). Taking into account the different geographical and socio-economic contexts, both public health and environmental health literacy were addressed to a wide range of stakeholders, within and outside the health domain.

  20. Environmental health literacy within the Italian Asbestos Project: experience in Italy and Latin American contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Marsili

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of multidisciplinary approaches to foster scientific research in public health and strengthen its impact on society is nowadays unavoidable. Environmental health literacy (EHL may be defined as the ability to search for, understand, evaluate, and use environmental health information to promote the adoption of informed choices, the reduction of health risks, the improvement of quality of life and the protection of the environment. Both public health and environmental health literacy involve access to and dissemination of scientific information (including research findings, individual and collective decision-making and critical thinking. Specific experiences in environmental health literacy have been developed within the Italian National Asbestos Project (Progetto Amianto in Latin American countries where the use of asbestos is still permitted, and in Italy where a specific effort in EHL has been dedicated to the risks caused by the presence of fluoro-edenite fibers in the town of Biancavilla (Sicily. Taking into account the different geographical and socio-economic contexts, both public health and environmental health literacy were addressed to a wide range of stakeholders, within and outside the health domain.

  1. A Health Care Project Management Office's Strategies for Continual Change and Continuous Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Aubry, Monique; Richer, Marie-Claire; Cyr, Guylaine

    2017-09-26

    Health care organizations need project and change management support in order to achieve successful transformations. A project management office (PMO) helps support the organizations through their transformations along with increasing their capabilities in project and change management. The aim of the present study was to extend understanding of the continuous improvement mechanisms used by PMOs and to describe PMO's strategies for continual change and continuous improvement in the context of major transformation in health care. This study is a descriptive case study design with interviews conducted from October to December 2015 with PMO's members (3 managers and 1 director) and 3 clients working with the PMO after a major redevelopment project ended (transition to the new facility). Participants suggested a number of elements including carefully selecting the members of the PMO, having a clear mandate for the PMO, having a method and a discipline at the same time as allowing openness and flexibility, clearly prioritizing projects, optimizing collaboration, planning for everything the PMO will need, not overlooking organizational culture, and retaining the existing support model. This study presents a number of factors ensuring the sustainability of changes.

  2. Organizational development of a university-based interdisciplinary health promotion project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J R; Wallerstein, N; MacLean, T

    1995-01-01

    To analyze the organizational development and implementation of an interdisciplinary health promotion project at the University of New Mexico. The effort involved three academic units in a 3-year externally funded project to institutionalize health promotion curricula in the respective schools and to develop a wellness-oriented service for students, faculty, and staff. The open systems theory was used as a framework to analyze the organizational and role issues that emerged from the data collected through interviews, staff surveys, and document review. The analysis is summarized by five thematic questions: (1) How did the project's vision affect its development? (2) How was leadership enacted, and with what effect? (3) What were the organizational issues for the staff? (4) What were the interdisciplinary dilemmas? (5) What was instituted or changed as a result of the project? The analysis uncovered a series of interpersonal and organizational dilemmas involving the nature of the organizational environment, the character of interdisciplinary work, leadership, boundaries of group membership, and the structuring of a unified vision. Future projects should consider the strength and stability of the boundary spanners, the resource context, and the role of a unified vision for new and organizationally linked units as key issues in facilitating and sustaining change.

  3. Information and Communications Technologies Health Projects in Panama: A Systematic Review and their Relation with Public Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Gema Anabel Castillo; Berbey, Aranzazu; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a review about Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) health projects in Panama. The main contribution is to provide a vision of the situation in Panama, allowing an understanding of the dynamics of health policies and how they have affected the implementation of ICT's Projects to improve the health of Panamanians. We analyze the projects found with ICT's in health of Panama, which allow us to see a perspective of projects information is obtained from 2000 to 2016, however it is important to highlight that there may be other projects that we do not know because we did not find enough information or evidence of the same. That is why this review has interviews with key personnel, who have guided us with the search for information. 56% of technology projects are concentrated in the capital city and only 16% in the province of Chiriquí. 64% of these projects are focused on the development of information systems, mainly focused on electronic patient registration. And 60% refers to projects related to primary health care. The MINSA and CSS both with a 20% participation in ICT project, in addition we can notice the dispersion of projects for hospitals, where each one is developing programs per their needs or priorities. The national information about ICT projects of Health, it has been notorious the state of dispersion and segmented of public health information. We consider that it is a natural consequence of Policy in Panamanian Health System. This situation limits the information retrieval and knowledge of ICT in Health of Panama. To stakeholders, this information is directed so that health policies are designed towards a more effective and integral management, administering the ICT's as tools for the well-being of most the Panamanian population, including indigenous group.

  4. Evaluating the Motivations, Knowledge, and Efficacy of Participants in Environmental Health Citizen Science Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhaus, Shana

    Environmental research is increasingly using citizen scientists in many aspects of projects, such as data collection and question design. To date, only a limited number of co-created citizen science projects where community members are involved in most or all steps of the scientific process have been completed, and few comparing community engagement methods and efficacy and learning outcomes across demo- and geographic data. This study compares two citizen science programs, evaluating what motivates citizen scientists to participate in environmental health research and whether participation affects scientific knowledge and environmental behavior and efficacy. Participants in the Gardenroots: A Citizen Science Garden Project completed sample collection training and submitted soil, water, vegetable, and dust samples for analysis and received their environmental monitoring results. In the Facilitating Community Action to Address Climate Change and Build Resiliency in Southern Metropolitan Tucson project, Spanish speaking community members of South Tucson underwent training in climate change and environmental quality and sample collection, and worked with families in the South Tucson community, collecting soil and water samples and providing environmental health education. For both projects, participants completed a pre- and post-survey with a variety of qualitative and quantitative questions. These survey instruments were used to evaluate differences in environmental self-efficacy and motivations. In addition, select Gardenroots participants were involved in focus groups and semi-structured interviews to understand and gauge changes in knowledge and to further explore changes in motivation and self-efficacy. The participants were primarily internally motivated and saw increases in both efficacy and knowledge as a result of participation in the program. This information is critical to moving citizen science efforts forward and determining whether such projects: 1) co

  5. The Norwegian national project for ethics support in community health and care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magelssen, Morten; Gjerberg, Elisabeth; Pedersen, Reidar; Førde, Reidun; Lillemoen, Lillian

    2016-11-08

    Internationally, clinical ethics support has yet to be implemented systematically in community health and care services. A large-scale Norwegian project (2007-2015) attempted to increase ethical competence in community services through facilitating the implementation of ethics support activities in 241 Norwegian municipalities. The article describes the ethics project and the ethics activities that ensued. The article first gives an account of the Norwegian ethics project. Then the results of two online questionnaires are reported, characterizing the scope, activities and organization of the ethics activities in the Norwegian municipalities and the ethical topics addressed. One hundred and thirty-seven municipal contact persons answered the first survey (55 % response rate), whereas 217 ethics facilitators from 48 municipalities responded to the second (33 % response rate). The Norwegian ethics project is vast in scope, yet has focused on some institutions and professions (e.g., nursing homes, home-based care; nurses, nurses' aides, unskilled workers) whilst seldom reaching others (e.g., child and adolescent health care; physicians). Patients and next of kin were very seldom involved. Through the ethics project employees discussed many important ethical challenges, in particular related to patient autonomy, competence to consent, and cooperation with next of kin. The "ethics reflection group" was the most common venue for ethics deliberation. The Norwegian project is the first of its kind and scope, and other countries may learn from the Norwegian experiences. Professionals have discussed central ethical dilemmas, the handling of which arguably makes a difference for patients/users and service quality. The study indicates that large (national) scale implementation of CES structures for the municipal health and care services is complex, yet feasible.

  6. Championing mental health at work: emerging practice from innovative projects in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mark; Tilford, Sylvia; Branney, Peter; Kinsella, Karina

    2014-09-01

    This paper examines the value of participatory approaches within interventions aimed at promoting mental health and wellbeing in the workplace. Specifically the paper explores data from the thematic evaluation of the Mental Health and Employment project strand within the Altogether Better programme being implemented in England in the Yorkshire and Humber region, which was funded through the BIG Lottery and aimed to empower people across the region to lead better lives. The evaluation combined a systematic evidence review with semi-structured interviews across mental health and employment projects. Drawing on both evaluation elements, the paper examines the potential of workplace-based 'business champions' to facilitate organizational culture change within enterprises within a deprived regional socio-economic environment. First, the paper identifies key policy drivers for interventions around mental health and employment, summarizes evidence review findings and describes the range of activities within three projects. The role of the 'business champion' emerged as crucial to these interventions and therefore, secondly, the paper examines how champions' potential to make a difference depends on the work settings and their existing roles, skills and motivation. In particular, champions can proactively coordinate project strands, embed the project, encourage participation, raise awareness, encourage changes to work procedures and strengthen networks and partnerships. The paper explores how these processes can facilitate changes in organizational culture. Challenges of implementation are identified, including achieving leverage with senior management, handover of ownership to fellow employees, assessing impact and sustainability. Finally, implications for policy and practice are discussed, and conclusions drawn concerning the roles of champions within different workplace environments. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  7. Design, Implementation, and Lessons Learned from a Digital Storytelling Project in an Undergraduate Health Promotion Theory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimando, Marylen; Smalley, K. Bryant; Warren, Jacob C.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the design, implementation and lessons learned from a digital storytelling project in a health promotion theory course. From 2011-2012, 195 health promotion majors completed a digital storytelling project at a Midwestern university. The instructor observed students' understanding of theories and models. This article adds to…

  8. [Occupational health of immigrant workers in Spain [ITSAL Project]: key informants survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Ana M; López-Jacob, María José; Agudelo-Suárez, Andrés Alonso; Ruiz-Frutos, Carlos; Ahonen, Emily Q; Porthé, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    To describe the characteristics, working conditions, and occupational health situation of immigrant workers in Spain through key informants. We performed a qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study using indepth interviews carried out in 2006. Organizations and associations working with immigrant collectives in Alicante, Barcelona, Huelva, Madrid and Valencia were identified and the most representative and accessible entities in each location were selected. Fortythree interviews were performed with key informants from 34 different organisms. A narrative content analysis was performed. Informants described difficulties in having health problems recognized as workrelated, due to irregular and precarious employment, employers' and insurance companies' reluctance, and immigrants' lack of knowledge. Informants coincided in reporting that the occupational risks for immigrant workers did not differ from those affecting Spanish workers in the same occupations and circumstances. However, exposure to occupational risks was exacerbated in immigrants because of their greater presence in unqualified jobs and their economic need to prolong working hours. Immigrants had little knowledge of their occupational health and safetyrelated rights, although some informants detected an increase in empowerment in this area, mostly through greater participation in trade unions. This first step allowed us to identify some of the general factors influencing the health and safety of immigrant workers in Spain. This information will be used in a longterm, ongoing research project [Project Immigration, Work and Health (Proyecto Inmigración, Trabajo y Salud [ITSAL]), which aims to evaluate occupational health problems in inmigrants working in Spain through both qualitative and quantitative methods.

  9. Canada's International Development Research Centre's eco-health projects with Latin Americans: origins, development and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Donald C; Crissman, Charles C; Orozco, A Fadya

    2006-01-01

    Since its founding in 1970, Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC) has supported research by concerned Latin American researchers on environments and human health relationships. Framing of such relationships has changed through different periods. Participant observation, bibliographic searches, document review, and interviews with key IDRC staff. From the early years of multiple different projects, IDRC developed more focussed interest in tropical diseases, pesticides, agriculture and human health in the 1980s. The United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development in the early 1990s gave impetus to examination of links between ecosystems and human health or "EcoHealth". Projects in Latin America built on earlier work but extended it in methods (transdisciplinarity, community participation, gendered approach) and scope (broader land use and development paradigm issues tackled). A key IDRC-funded activity in Latin America was "EcoSalud", an Ecuadorian effort, which has worked with farming communities, agricultural researchers, health practitioners and local politicians to advance integrated pest management, better recognize and treat poisonings and improve pesticide-related policies. ONGOING CHALLENGES INCLUDE: mobilizing sufficient resources for the primary prevention focus of EcoHealth activities when primary care infrastructure remains stretched, promoting micro-level change in diverse communities and ecosystems, and addressing power structures at the global level that profoundly affect environmental change.

  10. [Impact of Integrated Model for Rational Use of Antibiotics in a health area (project MIURA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomina Rodríguez, Javier; Domínguez Márquez, Victoria; Gimeno Vilarrasa, Flor; Sarrió Montes, Gema; Guerrero Espejo, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    MIURA (Integrated Model for the Rational Use of Antimicrobials) is a project that began in January 2004 and ended in December 2006. Through quarterly and training interventions intented for physicians, pharmacists and patients, pretends to improve antibiotic use in a health area. The goal was to analyze the evolution of antibiotic consumption and assess the impact of implementing this project in a health area. A comparative study on the evolution of antibiotic dispensed during the periods 2000-03 (pre-MIURA), 2004-06 (MIURA) and 2007-08 (post-MIURA) in the Department of Health 11 of Valencia was conduced. Antibiotics information was obtained through the GAIA application (Generalitat Valenciana) that collects information about the drugs billed by the pharmacy through the official prescriptions. Technical unit of measurement was used DHD (daily dose defined/1.000 inhabitants/day). During the implementation of the project (2004-2006), antibiotic consumption was reduced in 4.02 DHD. It represents a statistically significant overall reduction from 15% (p= antibiotics haven't showed variability in the consumption data. In the post-MIURA period was detected a further increase in the dispensing of antibiotics. MIURA program has positively influenced on decreasing antibiotic prescription in our health area, as shows the decrease in DHD during the interventions.

  11. SPATIAL ANALYSIS BASED HEALTH AND SAFETY RISK ASSESSMENT FOR LINEAR CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Atay

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an on-going study that aims to develop a web-based spatial decision support system model for proactive health and safety management in linear construction projects. Currently, health and safety management is usually performed reactively instead of proactive management since hazard identification and risk assessment is mostly performed on paper based documents that are not effectively used at site. This leads to accidents and fatalities at construction sites. The proposed system automatically identifies the spatial risks according to the topographic and layout map of the site, project specification and health and safety regulations by means of spatial analysis. It enables the workers and management personnel to access the possible hazards and thematic risk map of any portion of the construction site for linear projects. Finally, the described approach provides the proposed mitigation measures for the identified hazards. The developed system is expected to raise awareness in H&S among workers and engineers, and increase participation of workers to health and safety management.

  12. [The Ineq-Cities research project on urban health inequalities: knowledge dissemination and transfer in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camprubí, Lluís; Díez, Èlia; Morrison, Joana; Borrell, Carme

    2014-01-01

    The Ineq-Cities project analyzed inequalities in mortality in small areas and described interventions to reduce inequalities in health in 16 European cities. This field note describes the dissemination of the project in Spain. In accordance with the recommendations of the project, the objective was to translate relevant results to key stakeholders - mainly technical staff, municipal officers and local social agents - and to provide an introduction to urban inequalities in health and strategies to address them. Twenty-four workshops were given, attended by more than 350 professionals from 92 municipalities. Knowledge dissemination consisted of the publication of a short book on inequalities in health and the approach to this problem in cities and three articles in nonspecialized media, a proposal for a municipal motion, and knowledge dissemination activities in social networks. Users rated these activities highly and stressed the need to systematize these products. This process may have contributed to the inclusion of health inequalities in the political agenda and to the training of officers to correct them. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Increasing Health Portal Utilization in Cardiac Ambulatory Patients: A Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Carmen L; Casterline, Gayle L; Taylor, Dennis; Fogle, Maureen; Granger, Bradi

    2017-10-01

    Increasing health portal participation actively engages patients in their care and improves outcomes. The primary aim for this project was to increase patient health portal utilization. Nurses used a tablet-based demo to teach patients how to navigate the health portal. Assigning health videos to the portal was a tactic used to increase utilization. Each patient participant was surveyed about health portal utilization at initial nurse navigator appointment, day of procedure, and 30 days after discharge. Seventy-three percent (n = 14) of the 19 selected patients received the intervention; 36% (n = 4) of patients reported using a health portal feature; meaningful use metric preintervention increased from 12% to 16% after the intervention; 16% and 18% of patients viewed assigned videos in their health portal prior to procedure and after hospital discharge. Patients need a reason to access their health portal. Education alone is not enough to motivate patient portal use. Further research is needed to specify what tactics are required to motivate patients to use their health portals.

  14. [Methods for health impact assessment of policies for municipal solid waste management: the SESPIR Project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmagnani, Federica; Ranzi, Andrea; Ancona, Carla; Angelini, Paola; Chiusolo, Monica; Cadum, Ennio; Lauriola, Paolo; Forastiere, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The Project Epidemiological Surveillance of Health Status of Resident Population Around the Waste Treatment Plants (SESPIR) included five Italian regions (Emilia-Romagna, Piedmont, Lazio, Campania, and Sicily) and the National Institute of Health in the period 2010-2013. SESPIR was funded by the Ministry of Health as part of the National centre for diseases prevention and control (CCM) programme of 2010 with the general objective to provide methods and operational tools for the implementation of surveillance systems for waste and health, aimed at assessing the impact of the municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment cycle on the health of the population. The specific objective was to assess health impacts resulting from the presence of disposal facilities related to different regional scenarios of waste management. Suitable tools for analysis of integrated assessment of environmental and health impact were developed and applied, using current demographic, environmental and health data. In this article, the methodology used for the quantitative estimation of the impact on the health of populations living nearby incinerators, landfills and mechanical biological treatment plants is showed, as well as the analysis of three different temporal scenarios: the first related to the existing plants in the period 2008-2009 (baseline), the second based on regional plans, the latter referring to MSW virtuous policy management based on reduction of produced waste and an intense recovery policy.

  15. Binational Health Care for Migrants: The Health Data Exchange Pilot Project and the Binational Health Data Transfer System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco Mondragon, Hector Eduardo; And Others

    As the economic integration of Mexico and the United States intensifies, so does the cross-migration of labor forces. Subsequently, when migrant workers or their families become ill, health care is often disjointed and suboptimal. Binational health data exchange among providers of health care becomes essential. GUAPA (incorporating the first three…

  16. The State of Open Source Electronic Health Record Projects: A Software Anthropology Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaffar, Mona; Yellowlees, Peter; Odor, Alberto; Hogarth, Michael

    2017-02-24

    Electronic health records (EHR) are a key tool in managing and storing patients' information. Currently, there are over 50 open source EHR systems available. Functionality and usability are important factors for determining the success of any system. These factors are often a direct reflection of the domain knowledge and developers' motivations. However, few published studies have focused on the characteristics of free and open source software (F/OSS) EHR systems and none to date have discussed the motivation, knowledge background, and demographic characteristics of the developers involved in open source EHR projects. This study analyzed the characteristics of prevailing F/OSS EHR systems and aimed to provide an understanding of the motivation, knowledge background, and characteristics of the developers. This study identified F/OSS EHR projects on SourceForge and other websites from May to July 2014. Projects were classified and characterized by license type, downloads, programming languages, spoken languages, project age, development status, supporting materials, top downloads by country, and whether they were "certified" EHRs. Health care F/OSS developers were also surveyed using an online survey. At the time of the assessment, we uncovered 54 open source EHR projects, but only four of them had been successfully certified under the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC Health IT) Certification Program. In the majority of cases, the open source EHR software was downloaded by users in the United States (64.07%, 148,666/232,034), underscoring that there is a significant interest in EHR open source applications in the United States. A survey of EHR open source developers was conducted and a total of 103 developers responded to the online questionnaire. The majority of EHR F/OSS developers (65.3%, 66/101) are participating in F/OSS projects as part of a paid activity and only 25.7% (26/101) of EHR F/OSS developers are, or have been

  17. Physical health assessment and medicines reconciliation on admission to an acute mental health unit: a quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekanantham, Arani; Sheikh, Abdur-Raoof; Omer, Hisham; Bescoby-Chambers, Nicholas

    2017-09-01

    Individuals with mental health disorders are at greater risk of physical health problems. Medicines reconciliation reduces medication errors on admission. The aim of this project was to improve compliance with the completion of physical health assessments and medicines reconciliation forms by using a set standard stating that all patients must have the above completed at the point of admission to an acute mental health unit. The notes for all inpatients were reviewed for evidence of completed physical assessments and medicines reconciliation forms. This was done at three different time points: baseline, 2 months after the introduction of recommendations (1st intervention) and 2 months later when an online system of record keeping was trialled (2nd intervention). At baseline (n=33), 16 (49%) had a physical examination, 15 (46%) had an ECG, 17 (52%) had baseline bloods and 4 (12%) had a completed medicine reconciliation form. After the 2nd intervention (n=31), 25 (81%) had a physical examination, 25 (81%) had an ECG, 23 (74%) had baseline bloods and 23 (74%) had a completed medicine reconciliation form. Physical health assessments and medicines reconciliation are important aspects of patient care. The interventions introduced have improved the quality of practice at an acute mental health unit.

  18. Environmental factors and health problems among workers of the national project in Toshka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmy, F C; Mohamed, M F; Moselhi, M; Neweir, K H

    2001-01-01

    The National Project in Toshka is a recognized agricultural one, as well as a comprehensive developmental project. The present study was carried out to investigate environmental factors and health problems among workers in this National Project. Environmental levels of vibration, noise, heat stress, total suspended particulates and respirable dust were measured in the different activities of the project during May 2000. The health records of Behera Company Incorporation, the project main implementing contractor, in the period 1997-1999 were analyzed. Workers were classified according to the nature of occupational exposure into three groups namely; earth workers, concrete workers, and services and administration workers. Records of occupational accidents of the same group of workers and in the same period were analyzed as well. Results showed that all the measured environmental factors were within the permissible levels of exposure in the different project activities. Workers showed a significant lower rate of total health problems in the last studied year (1999) as compared to the previous two years (1997-1998) (p=0.001). Prevalence rates of musculoskeletal disorders, urinary tract troubles, ear-nose-throat (ENT) problems and chest problems were significantly higher in earth and concrete workers than in services and administration workers (p=0.001, 0.011, 0.036 and 0.044, respectively). Both occupational accident frequency and severity rates were very low in comparison to other major construction projects such as the High Dam. These rates showed decreasing trends throughout the studied years; however, relatively higher rates were observed among earth workers than the other groups. Miscellaneous wounds were the commonest presentation of occupational injuries among the three occupational groups. In conclusion, the current use of modern technology accounted for the low levels of enviro mental exposure factors, as well as the high safety standards. Workers showed a

  19. Health Care Employee Perceptions of Patient-Centered Care: A Photovoice Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbale, Salva Najib; Turcios, Stephanie; LaVela, Sherri L.

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of health care employees in the delivery of patient-centered care, understanding their unique perspective is essential for quality improvement. The purpose of this study was to use photovoice to evaluate perceptions and experiences around patient-centered care among Veterans Affairs (VA) health care employees. We asked participants to take photographs of salient features in their environment related to patient-centered care. We used the photographs to facilitate dialogue during follow-up interviews. Twelve VA health care employees across two VA sites participated in the project. Although most participants felt satisfied with their work environment and experiences at the VA, several areas for improvement were identified. These included a need for more employee health and wellness initiatives and a need for enhanced opportunities for training and professional growth. Application of photovoice enabled us to learn about employees' unique perspectives around patient-centered care while engaging them in an evaluation of care delivery. PMID:25274626

  20. The European Network of Health Economic Evaluation Databases (EURO NHEED) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, John; Ulmann, Philippe; Glanville, Julie; Boulenger, Stéphanie; Drummond, Michael; de Pouvourville, Gérard

    2004-06-01

    This paper provides a first outline of the European Network of Health Economic Evaluation Databases (EURO NHEED) project. The project is funded by the European Commission and will implement, in 7 European centres based in France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom, databases on the economic evaluation of healthcare interventions. The network will be based on two existing and well-established resources, namely the UK's NHS Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED), and France's Connaissances et Décision en EConomie de la Santé (CODECS) database. EURO NHEED will initially cover 17 European countries and will provide its users with bibliographic records, detailing the main characteristics of all included studies. In addition, structured abstracts will be provided for articles identified as full economic evaluations (cost-benefit, cost-effectiveness or cost-utility), which will offer a detailed critique of the findings and the methodology used. These databases will be accessible free of charge on the Internet. The EURO NHEED project is the first attempt to develop such a resource on a multi-national basis. The project will bring together Health Economists and Information Scientists from the European Union and beyond and is anticipated to facilitate a number of benefits and advances in the field of Health Economics. These include harmonisation and increased understanding of the theory and methodology of economic evaluation in healthcare, the interpretation of the generalisability of studies to target settings, and the influence of healthcare system variations among the European countries. The project will therefore advance the state of the art in collecting, summarising, critiquing and disseminating economic evaluations of healthcare conducted within Europe.

  1. Is the Alma Ata vision of comprehensive primary health care viable? Findings from an international project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Labonté

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The 4-year (2007–2011 Revitalizing Health for All international research program (http://www.globalhealthequity.ca/projects/proj_revitalizing/index.shtml supported 20 research teams located in 15 low- and middle-income countries to explore the strengths and weaknesses of comprehensive primary health care (CPHC initiatives at their local or national levels. Teams were organized in a triad comprised of a senior researcher, a new researcher, and a ‘research user’ from government, health services, or other organizations with the authority or capacity to apply the research findings. Multiple regional and global team capacity-enhancement meetings were organized to refine methods and to discuss and assess cross-case findings. Objective: Most research projects used mixed methods, incorporating analyses of qualitative data (interviews and focus groups, secondary data, and key policy and program documents. Some incorporated historical case study analyses, and a few undertook new surveys. The synthesis of findings in this report was derived through qualitative analysis of final project reports undertaken by three different reviewers. Results: Evidence of comprehensiveness (defined in this research program as efforts to improve equity in access, community empowerment and participation, social and environmental health determinants, and intersectoral action was found in many of the cases. Conclusions: Despite the important contextual differences amongst the different country studies, the similarity of many of their findings, often generated using mixed methods, attests to certain transferable health systems characteristics to create and sustain CPHC practices. These include: 1. Well-trained and supported community health workers (CHWs able to work effectively with marginalized communities 2. Effective mechanisms for community participation, both informal (through participation in projects and programs, and meaningful consultation and formal

  2. Prince Edward Island Heart Health Dissemination Research Project: establishing a sustainable community mobilization initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R; Mitchell, T; Gyorfi-Dyke, E; Sweet, L; Hebert, R; Moase, O; MacPhee, R; MacDonald, B

    2001-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Prince Edward Island Heart Health Program (PEIHHP) Dissemination Research Project. Prince Edward Island (PEI) is a small province in the Atlantic region of Canada with a population of 137,980. The Island's economy is dependent on the fishery, agriculture, and tourism industries. Although unemployment rates are high (14.4%), Prince Edward Island has the lowest poverty rate in the country at 15.2%, high levels of social support (86%), and the second lowest rate of high chronic stress (Report on the Health of Canadians, 1996, 1999).

  3. NASA Human Health and Performance Center: Open innovation successes and collaborative projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Elizabeth E.; Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2014-11-01

    In May 2007, what was then the Space Life Sciences Directorate published the 2007 Space Life Sciences Strategy for Human Space Exploration, setting the course for development and implementation of new business models and significant advances in external collaboration over the next five years. The strategy was updated on the basis of these accomplishments and reissued as the NASA Human Health and Performance Strategy in 2012, and continues to drive new approaches to innovation for the directorate. This short paper describes the successful execution of the strategy, driving organizational change through open innovation efforts and collaborative projects, including efforts of the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC).

  4. Is the Alma Ata vision of comprehensive primary health care viable? Findings from an international project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonté, Ronald; Sanders, David; Packer, Corinne; Schaay, Nikki

    2014-01-01

    The 4-year (2007-2011) Revitalizing Health for All international research program (http://www.globalhealthequity.ca/projects/proj_revitalizing/index.shtml) supported 20 research teams located in 15 low- and middle-income countries to explore the strengths and weaknesses of comprehensive primary health care (CPHC) initiatives at their local or national levels. Teams were organized in a triad comprised of a senior researcher, a new researcher, and a 'research user' from government, health services, or other organizations with the authority or capacity to apply the research findings. Multiple regional and global team capacity-enhancement meetings were organized to refine methods and to discuss and assess cross-case findings. Most research projects used mixed methods, incorporating analyses of qualitative data (interviews and focus groups), secondary data, and key policy and program documents. Some incorporated historical case study analyses, and a few undertook new surveys. The synthesis of findings in this report was derived through qualitative analysis of final project reports undertaken by three different reviewers. Evidence of comprehensiveness (defined in this research program as efforts to improve equity in access, community empowerment and participation, social and environmental health determinants, and intersectoral action) was found in many of the cases. Despite the important contextual differences amongst the different country studies, the similarity of many of their findings, often generated using mixed methods, attests to certain transferable health systems characteristics to create and sustain CPHC practices. These include:1. Well-trained and supported community health workers (CHWs) able to work effectively with marginalized communities2. Effective mechanisms for community participation, both informal (through participation in projects and programs, and meaningful consultation) and formal (though program management structures)3.

  5. A Nurse Leadership Project to Improve Health Literacy on a Maternal-Infant Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stikes, Reetta; Arterberry, Katheryn; Logsdon, M Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    To describe how participation in the Sigma Theta Tau International Maternal-Child Health Nurse Leadership Academy positioned the authors to lead an interdisciplinary team through implementation and evaluation of a change project related to patient education based upon national health literacy standards. The project goal was to improve patient satisfaction with nurse communication and preparation for hospital discharge. Quality improvement. Mother/-baby unit of an academic medical center serving a high percentage of patients of a minority population and underserved clients. The five- step intervention included (a) review of current health literacy standards, (b) formation of an infrastructure for development and evaluation of existing patient education materials, (c) assessment of patient education materials currently in use, (d) assessment of literacy level and learning styles of new mothers, and (e) provision of continuing education to increase knowledge of nurses as patient teachers and of health literacy. Mean scores of Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) in the domains of patient satisfaction with nurse communication and discharge information were used to measure patient satisfaction with health communication. Patient satisfaction with nurse communication increased from 75.9% to 84.6%. Satisfaction with discharge information increased from 84.6% to 98.6%. The leadership academy successfully positioned the authors to guide an interdisciplinary team through development of a process to meet the education and communication needs of patients and improve their health literacy. As a result, a positive effect was noted on patient satisfaction with health communication. © 2015 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  6. [Cu(C8H16N4O2)0.5[N(CN)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Kou, Hui-Zhong; He, Yi; Wang, Hong-Gen; Cui, Ai-Li

    2004-07-01

    A new polymeric copper complex, viz. catena-poly[[[mu-N,N'-bis(3-aminopropyl)oxamidato-kappa6N,N',O:N",N"',O']dicopper(II)]-di-mu-dicyanamido-1:1'kappa2N1:N5;2:2'kappa2N1:N5], [Cu2(C8H16N4O2)(C2N3)2]n or [Cu(oxpn)0.5[N(CN)2

  7. A community-wide school health project for the promotion of smoke-free homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Alice Yuen; Mak, Y W

    2015-11-26

    A community-wide school health project for the promotion of smoke-free homes was launched in June 2010 with the aim of promoting the benefits of smoke-free homes to all school-aged children (aged 6-18), and indirectly to their parents and family members. The 1-year project included health talks on a smoke-free life; the distribution of educational leaflets; slogan and visual art competitions; and a health fair held in June 2011. Two sets of questionnaires were developed to solicit a resolution and action from the participants regarding the establishment of a smoke-free home, and their decision to stay smoke-free. This is a paper to report on the activities of this project, the attempts to reach out to school-aged children, and their indications of agreement with, support for, and commitment to promoting smoke-free homes. The project reached an estimated 12,800 school-aged children in Hong Kong. A large proportion of those received educational leaflets (69.6-88.2 %). Of those who participated in the health fair, 69.7-87.6 % agreed to promote the concept of smoke-free homes to friends and family. More primary than secondary students pledged to not take up smoking (90.8 vs 85.8 %). About 82 % of those who had experimented with smoking pledged to stop. A small proportion of them reported already having established a smoke-free policy at home (14.9 %), placed a 'No Smoking' sign at home (16.4 %), informed visitors of their smoke-free policy at home (12.9 %), and asked visitors to dispose of lit cigarettes before entering their home (15.9 %). This community-wide school health project on the benefits of smoke-free homes reached a large number of students, and indirectly to family members, and home visitors. Public health efforts of this kind should be continued to reach younger generations and the general public.

  8. Similarity and Scaling of Turbulent Flame Speeds for Expanding Premixed Flames of C4-C8 n -alkanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fujia; Saha, Abhishek; Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Yang, Sheng; Law, Chung K.

    2013-11-01

    We experimentally investigated the propagation speed of constant-pressure expanding flames in near isotropic turbulence using a dual-chamber, fan-stirred vessel. The motivation is to test whether the fuel similarity concept among C4-C8 n-alkanes on laminar flames also holds for turbulent flames. Previously it was found that the laminar flame speed and Markstein length are almost identical for C4-C8 n-alkanes. If this fuel similarity concept can also be shown for turbulent flames, it will suggest a canonical flame structure for large hydrocarbon fuels, i . e . , large fuels always decompose to small C0-C4 fuel fragments before being oxidized, and would significantly simplify the description of the flames. Preliminary results show that in the flamelet and thin-reaction zone, turbulent flame speeds of C4-C8 n-alkanes are indeed largely similar at various conditions, thereby suggesting the fuel similarity for turbulent flames. In addition, it is found that the normalized turbulent flame speed also approximately scales with the square root of an appropriately-defined Reynolds number recently found for C0-C4 fuels. This work was supported by the AFOSR under the technical monitoring of Dr. Chiping Li.

  9. Improving Initiation and Tracking of Research Projects at an Academic Health Center: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Susanne; Goros, Martin; Parsons, Helen M; Saygin, Can; Wan, Hung-Da; Shireman, Paula K; Gelfond, Jonathan A L

    2017-09-01

    Research service cores at academic health centers are important in driving translational advancements. Specifically, biostatistics and research design units provide services and training in data analytics, biostatistics, and study design. However, the increasing demand and complexity of assigning appropriate personnel to time-sensitive projects strains existing resources, potentially decreasing productivity and increasing costs. Improving processes for project initiation, assigning appropriate personnel, and tracking time-sensitive projects can eliminate bottlenecks and utilize resources more efficiently. In this case study, we describe our application of lean six sigma principles to our biostatistics unit to establish a systematic continual process improvement cycle for intake, allocation, and tracking of research design and data analysis projects. The define, measure, analyze, improve, and control methodology was used to guide the process improvement. Our goal was to assess and improve the efficiency and effectiveness of operations by objectively measuring outcomes, automating processes, and reducing bottlenecks. As a result, we developed a web-based dashboard application to capture, track, categorize, streamline, and automate project flow. Our workflow system resulted in improved transparency, efficiency, and workload allocation. Using the dashboard application, we reduced the average study intake time from 18 to 6 days, a 66.7% reduction over 12 months (January to December 2015).

  10. Outcome evaluation of community health promotion intervention within a donor funded project climate in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwell, H E; Barclay, L

    2009-01-01

    The Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) funded Women and Children's Health Project sought to improve the health of women and children throughout Papua New Guinea between 1998 and 2004. The project utilised education, community development and health promotion interventions aimed to increase community support for the health of women and children. An outcome evaluation in 2006 investigated the long-term impact of the project using a multi-methods approach and covering 10 selectively sampled provinces, 19 districts and 93 communities. Qualitative data were collected from 175 interviews (national to village level) and 77 community discussions. Quantitative data from national, provincial and district levels were examined to attempt to validate findings. The evaluation found new-health-knowledge initiated changes to lifestyle practices and improved physical health and social and economic well-being in villages where volunteers and staff had been trained. Factors influencing success were a health-motivated person acting as a catalyst for change, empowered leadership through new community governance structures, effective visual tools and village health volunteers linking community and rural health workers. Failure was attributed to poor understanding of community development, limited information sharing, a 'top down' approach to community development and weak community leadership. The project's community health interventions improved the interaction between the community and health system, and influenced improved use of maternal and child health services. Evaluation suggests sustainable improvements in health can be achieved through community led and maintained activity.

  11. The feasibility of determining the impact of primary health care research projects using the Payback Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalucy, Elizabeth C; Jackson-Bowers, Eleanor; McIntyre, Ellen; Reed, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Background Primary health care research is under pressure to be accountable to funders in terms of benefits for practice and policy. However, methods to assess the impact of primary health care research must be appropriate to use with the diverse topics, settings and approaches of this sector. This project explored the feasibility of using the Buxton and Hanney Payback Framework to determine the impact of a stratified random sample (n = 4) of competitively funded, primary health care research projects. Methods The project conducted telephone interviews based on the Payback Framework with leaders of the research teams and nominated users of their research, used bibliometric methods for assessing impact through publication outputs and obtained documentary evidence of impact where possible. The purpose was to determine the effectiveness of the data collection methods and the applicability of the Payback Framework, and any other issues which arose around the assessment of impact of primary health care research. Results and discussion The thirteen interviews were resource intensive to organise conduct and analyse but provided better information about impact than bibliometric analysis or documentary analysis. Bibliometric analysis of the papers published from the four projects was hampered by the inclusion of only one of the journals in major citation indexes. Document analysis provided more evidence of dissemination than of impact. The payback framework and logic model were a sound basis for assessing impact. Chief investigators and nominated users of research provided substantial information relevant to the impact categories closest to their spheres of influence and awareness, but less about the impact their research had on the wider health sector, population health or economic benefits. An additional category of impact emerged from the interviews, that of strengthening research networks which could enhance the impact of later work. The framework provided rich

  12. Preliminary Study of High Resolution HPLC Analytical Method for Sedimentary Pigments Based on Coupled C8 Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, P.; Yu, Z.; Deng, C.; Liu, S.; Zhao, J.

    2008-05-01

    The pigments in marine water columns can provide accurate estimates of community composition and abundance of phytoplankton. In addition, the sedimentary pigments, especially the derivatives of chlorophyll such as pyrophaeophytins, pyrophaeophorbides and steryl chlorin esters (SCEs) formed during early diagenesis can also provide information on the primary producer community and the changes in paleoproductivity. Accordingly, analysis of pigments and their derivatives is of great importance for oceanography, limnology and geochemistry. Many methods have been developed for the separation of chlorophylls, carotenoids and their derivatives derived from phytoplankton and water column samples using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Methods widely cited in the literatures include those developed by Wright et al. (1991) and Zapata et al. (2000). Both methods use reversed-phase columns, but C18 column was employed in Wright et al. (1991) and C8 column in Zapata et al. (2000). However, evident coelutions are observed in published works. This will particularly cause problematic identification and quantification in dealing with sedimentary pigments which are highly complex and often display a broad range in polarity. Clearly, it is necessary to improve the separation of the complex pigments if the information carried by the pigments is to be used fully. Coupled C18 columns were used in the HPLC method developed by Airs et al. (2001) for the analysis of complex pigment distributions. Improved chromatographic resolution, more pigment components and novel bacteriochlorophyll derivatives were obtained by this method. It indicates a new road for HPLC method development. C8 column has shorter carbon chains than that of C18 column and can provide less retention of apolar compounds which is of particular advantaged to hydrophobic chlorophyll a, b and their derivatives. That is one of the reasons why the C8 method developed by Zapata et al. (2000) is admittedly better than

  13. Academic-Hospital Partnership: Conducting a Community Health Needs Assessment as a Service Learning Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumwiede, Kelly A; Van Gelderen, Stacey A; Krumwiede, Norma K

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this service learning project were to trial nursing student application of the Community-Based Collaborative Action Research (CBCAR) framework while conducting a community health needs assessment and to assess the effectiveness of the CBCAR framework in providing real-world learning opportunities for enhancing baccalaureate nursing students' public health knowledge. In this case study analysis, the CBCAR framework linked service learning and community health needs assessment with public health nursing core competencies. Fifteen nursing students partnered with collaborative members. Student observational field notes and narrative reflections were analyzed qualitatively for fidelity to the CBCAR framework and to evaluate student public health knowledge. Students successfully employed the CBCAR framework in collaboration with the critical access hospital and community stakeholders to design and conduct the community health needs assessment. Service learning themes were real-world solutions, professional development, community collaboration, and making a difference. Students developed skills in six of the eight domains of the Quad Council's core competencies for public health nurses. Community-Based Collaborative Action Research facilitates collaborative partnerships and relationships throughout the research process. Students benefited by applying what they have learned from their education to a real community who lacks resources. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Project ‘play and tell’: occupational therapy in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Barbosa e Alcântara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the experience of a “storytelling and playing” group that took place in a FamilyHealth Unit in Sao Carlos, State of Sao Paulo. The group was formed as from the evaluation of the occupationaltherapist in the context of Primary Health Care, which broadly considers the daily lives of the actors involved:children, one user of the system, and the health team. From the viewpoint of Occupational Therapy, with focuson the problems of the territory, interventions linking the following matters were proposed: individual care,collective care, and co-responsibility of the community and staff in pursuit of the resignificance of the everydaylives of the actors involved. This is a concrete example of paradigm shift from the existing health model to theprecepts of the Family Health Strategy, with the involvement of users and professionals from various areas.The occupational therapist identified different demands of the territory: the need for transformation of dailylife and routine of a user; the need for children’s leisure; and the desire of the health team to build this spacethrough a playroom. The possible combination of the user, children and the team’s everyday realities composedan intervention project based on the vision of the clinic expanded. The “playing and storytelling” was able toactually transform the health care model.

  15. Gender Policies and Gender Inequalities in Health in Europe: Results of the SOPHIE Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palència, Laia; De Moortel, Deborah; Artazcoz, Lucía; Salvador-Piedrafita, María; Puig-Barrachina, Vanessa; Hagqvist, Emma; Pérez, Glòria; Ruiz, Marisol E; Trujillo-Alemán, Sara; Vanroelen, Christophe; Malmusi, Davide; Borrell, Carme

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to explain the results of the SOPHIE project regarding the effect of gender policies on gender inequalities in health in Europe. We start with the results of a systematic review on how gender regimes and gender equality policies at the country level impact women's health and gender inequalities in health. Then, we report on three empirical analyses on the relationship between different family policy models existing in Europe and gender inequalities in health. Finally we present four case studies on specific examples of gender policies or determinants of gender inequalities in health. The results show that policies that support women's participation in the labor force and decrease their burden of care, such as public services and support for families and entitlements for fathers, are related to lower levels of gender inequality in terms of health. In addition, public services and benefits for disabled and dependent people can reduce the burden placed on family caregivers and hence improve their health. In the context of the current economic crisis, gender equality policies should be maintained or improved. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Developing health promotion interventions on social networking sites: recommendations from The FaceSpace Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Judy; Pedrana, Alisa E; Stoove, Mark A; Chang, Shanton; Howard, Steve; Asselin, Jason; Ilic, Olivia; Batrouney, Colin; Hellard, Margaret E

    2012-02-28

    Online social networking sites offer a novel setting for the delivery of health promotion interventions due to their potential to reach a large population and the possibility for two-way engagement. However, few have attempted to host interventions on these sites, or to use the range of interactive functions available to enhance the delivery of health-related messages. This paper presents lessons learnt from "The FaceSpace Project", a sexual health promotion intervention using social networking sites targeting two key at-risk groups. Based on our experience, we make recommendations for developing and implementing health promotion interventions on these sites. Elements crucial for developing interventions include establishing a multidisciplinary team, allowing adequate time for obtaining approvals, securing sufficient resources for building and maintaining an online presence, and developing an integrated process and impact evaluation framework. With two-way interaction an important and novel feature of health promotion interventions in this medium, we also present strategies trialled to generate interest and engagement in our intervention. Social networking sites are now an established part of the online environment; our experience in developing and implementing a health promotion intervention using this medium are of direct relevance and utility for all health organizations creating a presence in this new environment.

  17. Health impact assessment on urban development projects in France: finding pathways to fit practice to context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roué-Le Gall, Anne; Jabot, Françoise

    2017-06-01

    In France, there is increasing interest in health impact assessments (HIAs) and most are performed on urban projects. The field of expertise is still under development and mostly established within the public health sector. To date, in France, all HIAs conducted in urban planning are stand-alone HIAs disconnected from the required environmental impact assessment (EIA). The paper opens with an introduction of the close and complex relationship between health and urban planning, HIA and a description of key elements needed for understanding the French context. Then, the paper analyses the context and the implementation process for four HIAs in progress in order to understand the specific characteristics of urban development, identify the key stages for introducing a health perspective into urban projects, and extract avenues to be explored when adapting HIAs applied to urban planning in France. Using a qualitative multiple case study design, an analysis framework was built to compare several aspects of the four HIAs and made it possible to highlight three pathways for adapting HIA to the urban planning sector: the schedule, links between the EIA and HIA, and the complementarity of the initiatives to involve residents. Legal measures enable a point of contact that brings health institutions and cities closer together. HIA is yet another tool that public authorities now have at their fingertips to work together in strengthening democracy and in reducing social, geographical and environmental health inequalities. More research must be undertaken to develop an understanding of the practice-related context; to judge HIA's capacity to draw on existing approaches in different fields; and to explore the different avenues leading to increased health, wellbeing and equity.

  18. Status report, The Public Health and Planning 101 project: strengthening collaborations between the public health and planning professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendra, A; Vo, T; Einstoss, C; Weppler, J; Gillen, P; Ryan, L; Haley, K

    2017-01-01

    Land use planning is a complex field comprised of legislation, policies, processes and tools. A growing body of evidence supports the relationship between land use planning decisions, community design and health. The built environment has been shown to be associated with physical inactivity, obesity, cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease and mental illness. Consequently, there is a growing interest within public health to work with planners on land use planning initiatives such as official plans and transportation master plans. Two surveys were developed: one for public health professionals and the other for planning professionals (survey questions available upon request to the corresponding author). The surveys were pilot tested in two separate focus group sessions with public health and planning professionals. Focus group volunteers helped to validate the surveys by verifying survey questions, design and overall flow. In early 2012, 304 public health professionals and 301 planning professionals completed the two separate surveys, comprising the total survey respondents for each respective profession used to calculate proportions. The survey results represent a convenience sample and are not generalizable to the entire population of public health and planning professionals in Ontario. Results compare survey responses from both groups where appropriate. Most respondents worked either as public health staff (78%) or planners/senior planners (58%). A smaller percentage of public health and planning professionals worked either as managers (15% and 11%, respectively) or directors (5% and 9%, respectively). Health is associated with how communities are planned and built, and the services and resources provided within them. Inspired by the results of our survey and based on user feedback from the pilot tests, a free online training program entitled "Public Health and Planning 101: An Online Course for Public Health and Planning Professionals to Create Healthier

  19. Realizing universal health coverage for maternal health services in the Republic of Guinea: the use of workforce projections to design health labor market interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Christel; Codjia, Laurence; Cometto, Giorgio; Yansané, Mohamed Lamine; Dieleman, Marjolein

    2014-01-01

    Universal health coverage requires a health workforce that is available, accessible, and well-performing. This article presents a critical analysis of the health workforce needs for the delivery of maternal and neonatal health services in Guinea, and of feasible and relevant interventions to improve the availability, accessibility, and performance of the health workforce in the country. A needs-based approach was used to project human resources for health (HRH) requirements. This was combined with modeling of future health sector demand and supply. A baseline scenario with disaggregated need and supply data for the targeted health professionals per region and setting (urban or rural) informed the identification of challenges related to the availability and distribution of the workforce between 2014 and 2024. Subsequently, the health labor market framework was used to identify interventions to improve the availability and distribution of the health workforce. These interventions were included in the supply side modeling, in order to create a "policy rich" scenario B which allowed for analysis of their potential impact. In the Republic of Guinea, only 44% of the nurses and 18% of the midwives required for maternal and neonatal health services are currently available. If Guinea continues on its current path without scaling up recruitment efforts, the total stock of HRH employed by the public sector will decline by 15% between 2014 and 2024, while HRH needs will grow by 22% due to demographic trends. The high density of HRH in urban areas and the high number of auxiliary nurses who are currently employed pose an opportunity for improving the availability, accessibility, and performance of the health workforce for maternal and neonatal health in Guinea, especially in rural areas. Guinea will need to scale up its recruitment efforts in order to improve health workforce availability. Targeted labor market interventions need to be planned and executed over several decades

  20. Realizing universal health coverage for maternal health services in the Republic of Guinea: the use of workforce projections to design health labor market interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Christel; Codjia, Laurence; Cometto, Giorgio; Yansané, Mohamed Lamine; Dieleman, Marjolein

    2014-01-01

    Background Universal health coverage requires a health workforce that is available, accessible, and well-performing. This article presents a critical analysis of the health workforce needs for the delivery of maternal and neonatal health services in Guinea, and of feasible and relevant interventions to improve the availability, accessibility, and performance of the health workforce in the country. Methods A needs-based approach was used to project human resources for health (HRH) requirements. This was combined with modeling of future health sector demand and supply. A baseline scenario with disaggregated need and supply data for the targeted health professionals per region and setting (urban or rural) informed the identification of challenges related to the availability and distribution of the workforce between 2014 and 2024. Subsequently, the health labor market framework was used to identify interventions to improve the availability and distribution of the health workforce. These interventions were included in the supply side modeling, in order to create a “policy rich” scenario B which allowed for analysis of their potential impact. Results In the Republic of Guinea, only 44% of the nurses and 18% of the midwives required for maternal and neonatal health services are currently available. If Guinea continues on its current path without scaling up recruitment efforts, the total stock of HRH employed by the public sector will decline by 15% between 2014 and 2024, while HRH needs will grow by 22% due to demographic trends. The high density of HRH in urban areas and the high number of auxiliary nurses who are currently employed pose an opportunity for improving the availability, accessibility, and performance of the health workforce for maternal and neonatal health in Guinea, especially in rural areas. Conclusion Guinea will need to scale up its recruitment efforts in order to improve health workforce availability. Targeted labor market interventions need to be

  1. Using the Neptune project to benefit Australian aquatic animal health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, M; Ernst, I; Adlard, R D

    2015-06-29

    Diseases of aquatic animals have had, and continue to have, a significant impact on aquatic animal health. In Australia, where fisheries and aquaculture are important industries, aquatic species have been subject to serious disease outbreaks, including pilchard herpesvirus, the cause of one of the largest wild fish kills ever recorded. At the same time, there is a consensus that Australia's parasite fauna are largely unknown, and that aquatic animal health information is difficult to access. Managing aquatic animal diseases is challenging because they may be entirely new, their hosts may be new to aquaculture, and specialist expertise and basic diagnostic tools may be lacking or absent. The Neptune project was created in response to these challenges, and it aims to increase awareness of aquatic animal diseases, improve disease management, and promote communication between aquatic animal health professionals in Australia. The project consists of an online database, a digital microscopy platform containing a whole-slide image library, a community space, and online communications technology. The database contains aquatic animal health information from published papers, government reports, and other sources, while the library contains slides of key diseases both endemic and exotic to Australia. These assets make Neptune a powerful resource for researchers, students, and biosecurity officials.

  2. Aromaticity, optical properties and zero field splitting of homo- and hetero-bimetallic (C8H8)M(μ2-,η8═C8H8)M(C8H8) where M = Ti, Zr, Th Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez-Hernández, Dayán; Arratia-Pérez, Ramiro

    2012-07-19

    This work presents a relativistic calculation of electron delocalization, optical properties, and zero field splitting in a group of molecules with the structure (C(8)H(8))M(μ(2)-,η(8)═C(8)H(8))M(C(8)H(8)), where M = Ti, Zr and Th. Additionally we also studied the heterobimetallic combinations (Ti-Th and Zr-Th). The molecular properties are discussed based on their electronic structure and the influence of the electron mobility in metal-metal communication. Nucleus independent chemical shift (NICS) was determined via the gauge-including-atomic-orbital (GIAO) method with the OPBE functional. The time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) was employed to calculate excitation energies, and the electronic transitions over 500 nm are presented with the objective to analyze the transition metal role as an antenna effect in the absorption band in the near-IR region. Finally the ZFS was calculated using Pederson-Khana and coupled perturbed DFT approaches implemented in the ORCA code. The contributions to spin-spin coupling (SS) and spin-orbit coupling (SOC) were analyzed, and the spin-density over the metal centers is discussed employing our scheme of metal-metal communication. Our aim is to determine the influence of the electronic structure over the optical and magnetic properties in a group of model compounds to understand the transition metals effect over these properties.

  3. An Integrated Curriculum of Nursing, Nutrition, Exercise, and Drugs for Health Care Providers of the Elderly (Project NNED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summit-Portage Area Health Education Network, Akron, OH.

    This document is intended to give health care providers interdisciplinary information concerning drugs, nutrition, and exercise to help them enhance health maintenance of the elderly. Prepared as part of Project NNED, (Nursing, Nutrition, Exercise, and Drugs), an integrated curriculum for health care providers of the elderly, the document includes…

  4. Selecting an indicator set for monitoring and evaluating perinatal health in Europe: Criteria, methods and results from the PERISTAT project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeitlin, J.; Wildman, K.; Bréart, G.; Alexander, S.; Barros, H.; Blondel, B.; Buitendijk, S.E.; Gissler, M.; Macfarlane, A.

    2003-01-01

    The PERISTAT project was charged with developing an indicator set for monitoring and describing perinatal health in Europe as part of the European Commission's Health Monitoring Programme, run by the Directorate General for Health and Consumer Protection (DG-SANCO), which is working towards the

  5. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report VII, Volume 4. Safety and health plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    The Safety and Health Plan recognizes the potential hazards associated with the Project and has been developed specifically to respond to these risks in a positive manner. Prevention, the primary objective of the Plan, starts with building safety controls into the process design and continues through engineering, construction, start-up, and operation of the Project facilities and equipment. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local health and safety laws, regulations, and codes throughout all Project phases is required and assured. The Plan requires that each major Project phase be thoroughly reviewed and analyzed to determine that those provisions required to assure the safety and health of all employees and the public, and to prevent property and equipment losses, have been provided. The Plan requires followup on those items or situations where corrective action needs were identified to assure that the action was taken and is effective. Emphasis is placed on loss prevention. Exhibit 1 provides a breakdown of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc.'s (ASFI's) Loss Prevention Program. The Plan recognizes that the varied nature of the work is such as to require the services of skilled, trained, and responsible personnel who are aware of the hazards and know that the work can be done safely, if done correctly. Good operating practice is likewise safe operating practice. Training is provided to familiarize personnel with good operational practice, the general sequence of activities, reporting requirements, and above all, the concept that each step in the operating procedures must be successfully concluded before the following step can be safely initiated. The Plan provides for periodic review and evaluation of all safety and loss prevention activities at the plant and departmental levels.

  6. Articulating current service development practices: a qualitative analysis of eleven mental health projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Gyuchan Thomas; Morrison, Cecily; Clarkson, P John

    2014-01-17

    The utilisation of good design practices in the development of complex health services is essential to improving quality. Healthcare organisations, however, are often seriously out of step with modern design thinking and practice. As a starting point to encourage the uptake of good design practices, it is important to understand the context of their intended use. This study aims to do that by articulating current health service development practices. Eleven service development projects carried out in a large mental health service were investigated through in-depth interviews with six operation managers. The critical decision method in conjunction with diagrammatic elicitation was used to capture descriptions of these projects. Stage-gate design models were then formed to visually articulate, classify and characterise different service development practices. Projects were grouped into three categories according to design process patterns: new service introduction and service integration; service improvement; service closure. Three common design stages: problem exploration, idea generation and solution evaluation - were then compared across the design process patterns. Consistent across projects were a top-down, policy-driven approach to exploration, underexploited idea generation and implementation-based evaluation. This study provides insight into where and how good design practices can contribute to the improvement of current service development practices. Specifically, the following suggestions for future service development practices are made: genuine user needs analysis for exploration; divergent thinking and innovative culture for idea generation; and fail-safe evaluation prior to implementation. Better training for managers through partnership working with design experts and researchers could be beneficial.

  7. Goal orientation and conflicts: Motors of change in development projects in health care service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elg, Mattias; Kollberg, Beata; Lindmark, Jan; Olsson, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    In this article we present parts of a larger research study, which aims at explaining how a process-oriented innovation unfolds and develops over time in Swedish health care. Through a longitudinal field study of a national and a local development project, we analyze how the flow model--a process-oriented innovation that emphasizes the sequence of activities a patient undertakes through the health care system--has been developed in Swedish health care. We propose to explain how the development projects unfold over time through the use of process theories of organizational development and change. The national project is best understood as a process of evolution from the phase of selection of projects and teleological (goal-oriented, socially constructed development) and dialectic theory (development via conflict of 2 opposing ideas from different organizational entities) through the process in which national ideas face real-world practice. We also propose a synthesis of dialectics and teleological motors for explaining local development. This synthesis proposes that local development teams have a rather broad notion of what it takes to implement the flow model. The team knows the goal, procedures, and activities from a broad perspective. Through a search-and-interact process, in which other organizational entities such as IT consultants, medical units and politicians have a heavy influence, the group sets and implements goals. Details of how to proceed are, however, constructed in the process of acting. This occurs as ideas are developed and tested in real settings. We conclude the article by presenting managerial implications for understanding these process patterns.

  8. Experiences of Social Inclusion and Employment of Mental Health Service Users in a European Union Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieminen, Irja; Ramon, Shulamit; Dawson, Ian

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Aims: The aim of this study is to describe how the mental health service users experienced social inclusion and employment in the EU EMILIA project. Methods: The study design is an intervention group follow-up study, with data collection at three points: baseline (T0), at 10-month follow......-up (T1), and at 20-month follow-up (T2). The data for this study were collected with thematic in- terviews from mental health service users and were thematic analyzed with content analysis. The number of participants was 23 including two to four service users per each demonstration site. Results: Most......, and discrimination were reported to be obstacles to social inclusion. The difficulties identified in social relationships continued to exist. Conclusions: Train- ing intervention impact positively on mental health service users’ social inclusion and employment. However stigma, discrimination, and having a mental...

  9. On-site investigation of the early phase of Bhutan Health Telematics Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongguo; Nakajima, Isao; Juzoji, Hiroshi

    2002-02-01

    Telemedicine is valuable to many developing countries. International use of telemedicine is widespread. Telemedicine can improve health care in the developing countries by removing time and distance barrier, and optimize the use of limited health services in developing countries. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the current situation of healthcare services and telecommunications infrastructure in Bhutan. It summarizes the experience gained from a previous telemedicine pilot project initiated and implemented by the Telecommunication Development Bureau, International Telecommunication Union (BDT/ITU). It also introduces the priorities of telemedicine development set out by the local health authorities as well as the international organizations. By analyzing the common and most urgent problems in the country, which could be alleviated by using telemedicine, it formulates several recommendations concerning the future development strategy of telemedicine in Bhutan.

  10. NASA Human Health and Performance Center: Open Innovation Successes and Collaborative Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Elizabeth E.

    2014-01-01

    In May 2007, what was then the Space Life Sciences Directorate published the 2007 Space Life Sciences Strategy for Human Space Exploration, which resulted in the development and implementation of new business models and significant advances in external collaboration over the next five years. The strategy was updated on the basis of these accomplishments and reissued as the NASA Human Health and Performance Strategy in 2012, and continues to drive new approaches to innovation for the directorate. This short paper describes the open innovation successes and collaborative projects developed over this timeframe, including the efforts of the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC), which was established to advance human health and performance innovations for spaceflight and societal benefit via collaboration in new markets.

  11. Healthcare for migrants, participatory health research and implementation science--better health policy and practice through inclusion. The RESTORE project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, Anne; O'Reilly-de Brún, Mary; de Brún, Tomas; Dowrick, Christopher; O'Donnell, Catherine; Mair, Frances; Spiegel, Wolfgang; van den Muijsenbergh, Maria; van Weel Baumgarten, Evelyn; Lionis, Christos; Clissmann, Ciaran

    2014-06-01

    This is a time of unprecedented mobility across the globe. Healthcare systems need to adapt to ensure that primary care is culturally and linguistically appropriate for migrants. Evidence-based guidelines and training interventions for cultural competence and the use of professional interpreters are available across European healthcare settings. However, in real-world practice migrants and their healthcare providers 'get by' with a range of informal and inadequate strategies. RESTORE is an EU FP7 funded project, which is designed to address this translational gap. The objective of RESTORE is to investigate and support the implementation of guidelines and training initiatives to support communication in cross-cultural consultations in selected European primary care settings. RESTORE is a qualitative, participatory health project running from 2011-2015. It uses a novel combination of normalization process theory and participatory learning and action research to follow and shape the implementation journeys of relevant guidelines and training initiatives. Research teams in Ireland, England, the Netherlands, Austria and Greece are conducting similar parallel qualitative case study fieldwork, with a complementary health policy analysis led by Scotland. In each setting, key stakeholders, including migrants, are involved in participatory data generation and analysis. RESTORE will provide knowledge about the levers and barriers to the implementation of guidelines and training initiatives in European healthcare settings and about successful, transferrable strategies to overcome identified barriers. RESTORE will elucidate the role of policy in shaping these implementation journeys; generate recommendations for European policy driving the development of culturally and linguistically appropriate healthcare systems.

  12. Preliminary report from the World Health Organisation Chest Radiography in Epidemiological Studies project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomed, Nasreen; Fancourt, Nicholas; de Campo, John; de Campo, Margaret; Akano, Aliu; Cherian, Thomas; Cohen, Olivia G; Greenberg, David; Lacey, Stephen; Kohli, Neera; Lederman, Henrique M; Madhi, Shabir A; Manduku, Veronica; McCollum, Eric D; Park, Kate; Ribo-Aristizabal, Jose Luis; Bar-Zeev, Naor; O'Brien, Katherine L; Mulholland, Kim

    2017-10-01

    Childhood pneumonia is among the leading infectious causes of mortality in children younger than 5 years of age globally. Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is the leading infectious cause of childhood bacterial pneumonia. The diagnosis of childhood pneumonia remains a critical epidemiological task for monitoring vaccine and treatment program effectiveness. The chest radiograph remains the most readily available and common imaging modality to assess childhood pneumonia. In 1997, the World Health Organization Radiology Working Group was established to provide a consensus method for the standardized definition for the interpretation of pediatric frontal chest radiographs, for use in bacterial vaccine efficacy trials in children. The definition was not designed for use in individual patient clinical management because of its emphasis on specificity at the expense of sensitivity. These definitions and endpoint conclusions were published in 2001 and an analysis of observer variation for these conclusions using a reference library of chest radiographs was published in 2005. In response to the technical needs identified through subsequent meetings, the World Health Organization Chest Radiography in Epidemiological Studies (CRES) project was initiated and is designed to be a continuation of the World Health Organization Radiology Working Group. The aims of the World Health Organization CRES project are to clarify the definitions used in the World Health Organization defined standardized interpretation of pediatric chest radiographs in bacterial vaccine impact and pneumonia epidemiological studies, reinforce the focus on reproducible chest radiograph readings, provide training and support with World Health Organization defined standardized interpretation of chest radiographs and develop guidelines and tools for investigators and site staff to assist in obtaining high-quality chest radiographs.

  13. Preliminary report from the World Health Organisation Chest Radiography in Epidemiological Studies project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahomed, Nasreen [University of the Witwatersrand, Department of Radiology, Johannesburg (South Africa); University of the Witwatersrand, Medical Research Council: Respiratory and Meningeal Pathogens Research Unit, Johannesburg (South Africa); Fancourt, Nicholas [Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore (United States); Murdoch Children' s Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); De Campo, John; De Campo, Margaret [Murdoch Children' s Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Melbourne University, Melbourne (Australia); Akano, Aliu [Department of Radiology National Hospital, Abuja (Nigeria); Medical Research Council, Gambia (South Africa); Cherian, Thomas [World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland); Cohen, Olivia G. [Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore (United States); World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland); Greenberg, David [Soroka University Medical Center, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Lacey, Stephen [Murdoch Children' s Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Kohli, Neera [King George Medical University, Lucknow (India); Lederman, Henrique M. [Paulista School of Medicine, Hospital Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Madhi, Shabir A. [University of the Witwatersrand, Medical Research Council: Respiratory and Meningeal Pathogens Research Unit, Johannesburg (South Africa); University of the Witwatersrand, Department of Science and Technology/National Research Foundation: Vaccine Preventable Diseases, Johannesburg (South Africa); Manduku, Veronica [Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), Nairobi (Kenya); McCollum, Eric D. [Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Eudowood Division of Pediatric Respiratory Sciences, Baltimore (United States); Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore (United States); Park, Kate [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford (United Kingdom); Ribo-Aristizabal, Jose Luis [Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona (Spain); Bar-Zeev, Naor [University of Malawi, Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme, College of Medicine, Blantyre (Malawi); University of Liverpool, Centre for Global Vaccine Research, Liverpool (United Kingdom); O' Brien, Katherine L. [Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore (United States); Mulholland, Kim [Murdoch Children' s Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-15

    Childhood pneumonia is among the leading infectious causes of mortality in children younger than 5 years of age globally. Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is the leading infectious cause of childhood bacterial pneumonia. The diagnosis of childhood pneumonia remains a critical epidemiological task for monitoring vaccine and treatment program effectiveness. The chest radiograph remains the most readily available and common imaging modality to assess childhood pneumonia. In 1997, the World Health Organization Radiology Working Group was established to provide a consensus method for the standardized definition for the interpretation of pediatric frontal chest radiographs, for use in bacterial vaccine efficacy trials in children. The definition was not designed for use in individual patient clinical management because of its emphasis on specificity at the expense of sensitivity. These definitions and endpoint conclusions were published in 2001 and an analysis of observer variation for these conclusions using a reference library of chest radiographs was published in 2005. In response to the technical needs identified through subsequent meetings, the World Health Organization Chest Radiography in Epidemiological Studies (CRES) project was initiated and is designed to be a continuation of the World Health Organization Radiology Working Group. The aims of the World Health Organization CRES project are to clarify the definitions used in the World Health Organization defined standardized interpretation of pediatric chest radiographs in bacterial vaccine impact and pneumonia epidemiological studies, reinforce the focus on reproducible chest radiograph readings, provide training and support with World Health Organization defined standardized interpretation of chest radiographs and develop guidelines and tools for investigators and site staff to assist in obtaining high-quality chest radiographs. (orig.)

  14. Sexual health of ethnic minority MSM in Britain (MESH project: design and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Low Nicola

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Men who have sex with men (MSM remain the group most at risk of acquiring HIV infection in Britain. HIV prevalence appears to vary widely between MSM from different ethnic minority groups in this country for reasons that are not fully understood. The aim of the MESH project was to examine in detail the sexual health of ethnic minority MSM living in Britain. Methods/Design The main objectives of the MESH project were to explore among ethnic minority MSM living in Britain: (i sexual risk behaviour and HIV prevalence; (ii their experience of stigma and discrimination; (iii disclosure of sexuality; (iv use of, and satisfaction with sexual health services; (v the extent to which sexual health services (for treatment and prevention are aware of the needs of ethnic minority MSM. The research was conducted between 2006 and 2008 in four national samples: (i ethnic minority MSM living in Britain; (ii a comparison group of white British MSM living in Britain; (iii NHS sexual health clinic staff in 15 British towns and cities with significant ethnic minority communities and; (iv sexual health promotion/HIV prevention service providers. We also recruited men from two "key migrant" groups living in Britain: MSM born in Central or Eastern Europe and MSM born in Central or South America. Internet-based quantitative and qualitative research methods were used. Ethnic minority MSM were recruited through advertisements on websites, in community venues, via informal networks and in sexual health clinics. White and "key migrant" MSM were recruited mostly through Gaydar, one of the most popular dating sites used by gay men in Britain. MSM who agreed to take part completed a questionnaire online. Ethnic minority MSM who completed the online questionnaire were asked if they would be willing to take part in an online qualitative interview using email. Service providers were identified through the British Association of Sexual Health and HIV (BASHH and

  15. Educational health inequalities in former Yugoslavia: evidence from the South-East European Social Survey Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikemo, Terje Andreas; Huisman, Martijn; Perlman, Francesca; Ringdal, Kristen

    2010-12-01

    An important gap in our knowledge of social inequalities in health is the former Yugoslavia, a region of culturally and historically diverse countries, with recent conflict. The aim of the present paper is to investigate relative and absolute inequalities in self-assessed health in former Yugoslavia (Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro, Slovenia and Serbia) by sex and education. The data source is the South-East European Social Survey Project fielded in December 2003 to Winter 2004, covering the former Yugoslavia with a total sample of 18 481 respondents. Data from Slovenia were obtained from the 2004-wave of the European Social Survey. The health outcome variables were self-reported general health (SRH) and limiting longstanding illness (LLI). Both absolute and relative educational health inequalities were present throughout the former Yugoslavia to a larger or lesser extent, although odds ratios (ORs) for LLI and SRH were not significant for Montenegrin women [LLI OR = 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.92-1.37; SRH OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 0.96-1.40] and with respect to the reporting of LLI among Slovenian men (OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 0.96-1.44). Overall, Montenegro held the best position. The prevalence of poor health and the degree of relative inequality in self-assessed health in the former Yugoslavian countries were similar in order to one another, and to other East European countries during the same period. Influences on subjective health require further elucidation. Further research should study a wider range of health outcomes using larger survey samples and a wider range of cultural and other predictor variables.

  16. Evolving Health Expenditure Landscape of the BRICS Nations and Projections to 2025.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljevic, Mihajlo; Potapchik, Elena; Popovich, Larisa; Barik, Debasis; Getzen, Thomas E

    2017-07-01

    Global health spending share of low/middle income countries continues its long-term growth. BRICS nations remain to be major drivers of such change since 1990s. Governmental, private and out-of-pocket health expenditures were analyzed based on WHO sources. Medium-term projections of national health spending to 2025 were provided based on macroeconomic budgetary excess growth model. In terms of per capita spending Russia was highest in 2013. India's health expenditure did not match overall economic growth and fell to slightly less than 4% of GDP. Up to 2025 China will achieve highest excess growth rate of 2% and increase its GDP% spent on health care from 5.4% in 2012 to 6.6% in 2025. Russia's spending will remain highest among BRICS in absolute per capita terms reaching net gain from $1523 PPP in 2012 to $2214 PPP in 2025. In spite of BRICS' diversity, all countries were able to significantly increase their investments in health care. The major setback was bold rise in out-of-pocket spending. Most of BRICS' growing share of global medical spending was heavily attributable to the overachievement of People's Republic of China. Such trend is highly likely to continue beyond 2025. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. A tool to assess sex-gender when selecting health research projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás, Concepción; Yago, Teresa; Eguiluz, Mercedes; Samitier, M A Luisa; Oliveros, Teresa; Palacios, Gemma

    2015-04-01

    To validate the questionnaire "Gender Perspective in Health Research" (GPIHR) to assess the inclusion of gender perspective in research projects. Validation study in two stages. Feasibility was analysed in the first, and reliability, internal consistence and validity in the second. Aragón Institute of Health Science, Aragón, Spain. GPIHR was applied to 118 research projects funded in national and international competitive tenders from 2003 to 2012. Analysis of inter- and intra-observer reliability with Kappa index and internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha. Content validity analysed through literature review and construct validity with an exploratory factor analysis. Validated GPIHR has 10 questions: 3 in the introduction, 1 for objectives, 3 for methodology and 3 for research purpose. Average time of application was 13min Inter-observer reliability (Kappa) varied between 0.35 and 0.94 and intra-observer between 0.40 and 0.94. Theoretical construct is supported in the literature. Factor analysis identifies three levels of GP inclusion: "difference by sex", "gender sensitive" and "feminist research" with an internal consistency of 0.64, 0.87 and 0.81, respectively, which explain 74.78% of variance. GPIHR questionnaire is a valid tool to assess GP and useful for those researchers who would like to include GP in their projects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Learning about population-health through a community practice learning project: An evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Maggie; Ooms, Ann; Marks-Maran, Di

    2016-03-01

    Increasing student nurse numbers requiring community placement learning opportunities has led to insufficient numbers of community nurses being available to support student nurses in the community. Although the study presented in the article is based in the UK this issue is reported widely in the literature across the globe. Universities in many countries have had to find innovative ways of providing community health learning opportunities for student nurses. This article reports on how one university in the UK has approached this challenge through students engaging in a population-based study in the community through group work. A research study was undertaken into this innovation which found that the student nurses engaged well with the project and with their groups and undertaking the project had positive value and impact on them and their understanding of population-health. Issues that arose for them largely focused on unequal participation in the group work by some with many participants perceiving that they had done more work on the group project and presentation than others in their group. However, working in this way was perceived to be a good learning experience for the majority of participants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Projections of specialist physicians in Mexico: a key element in planning human resources for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigenda, Gustavo; Muños, José Alberto

    2015-09-22

    Projections are considered a useful tool in the planning of human resources for health. In Mexico, the supply and demand of specialist doctors are clearly disconnected, and decisions must be made to reduce labour market imbalances. Thus, it is critical to produce reliable projections to assess future interactions between supply and demand. Using a service demand approach, projections of the number of specialist physicians required by the three main public institutions were calculated using the following variables: a) recent recruitment of specialists, b) physician productivity and c) retirement rates. Two types of scenarios were produced: an inertial one with no changes made to current production levels and an alternative scenario adjusted by recommended productivity levels. Results show that institutions must address productivity as a major policy element to act upon in future contracting of specialist physicians. The projections that adjusted for productivity suggest that the hiring trends for surgeons and internists should be maintained or increased to compensate for the increase in demand for services. In contrast, due to the decline in demand for obstetric and paediatric services, the hiring of new obstetrician-gynaecologists and paediatricians should be reduced to align with future demand.

  20. Project monitoring and evaluation: an enhancing method for health research system management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djalalinia, Shirin; Owlia, Parviz; Malekafzali, Hossein; Ghanei, Mostafa; Babamahmoodi, Abdolreza; Peykari, Niloofar

    2014-04-01

    Planning, organizing, staffing, leading and monitoring are the basic functional component of management. In present article, we aim to define the project monitoring and evaluation in health research system (HRS) considering its success and challenges based on our national experience. IN THIS STUDY BASED ON THE INFORMATION OF ANNUAL MEDICAL SCIENCE UNIVERSITIES EVALUATION DURING THE LAST DECADE THE HRS INDICATORS HAVE BEEN SCORED IN THREE AXES BASED ON HRS FUNCTIONS: Stewardship, capacity building and knowledge production. In this article, we will focus on the results of HRS evaluation from 2002 to 2010, also on its success and challenges. In an overall view, the main results are the experiences of the designing and implantation of such process after pre-project preparation, all parts followed under the whole supervision of the aims of the HRS evaluation. Project management light the way of practical application of knowledge, skills, tools and techniques for better HRS evaluation and management. We concluded that; although monitoring and evaluation as an essential part of HRS Management light the improvement ahead way but we still need to advantage of the new project management advances.

  1. Systematic review on what works, what does not work and why of implementation of mobile health (mHealth) projects in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Aranda-Jan, Clara B; Mohutsiwa-Dibe, Neo; Loukanova, Svetla

    2014-01-01

    Background Access to mobile phone technology has rapidly expanded in developing countries. In Africa, mHealth is a relatively new concept and questions arise regarding reliability of the technology used for health outcomes. This review documents strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) of mHealth projects in Africa. Methods A systematic review of peer-reviewed literature on mHealth projects in Africa, between 2003 and 2013, was carried out using PubMed and OvidSP. Data was syn...

  2. Community health outreach program of the Chad-Cameroon petroleum development and pipeline project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utzinger, Jürg; Wyss, Kaspar; Moto, Daugla D; Tanner, Marcel; Singer, Burton H

    2004-02-01

    A critical appraisal has been presented of the CHOP for a large-scale energy infrastructure development project that was implemented in two of the world's poorest countries. The project is under close scrutiny from various independent monitoring groups, civil society organizations, and human rights groups. Reviewing the achievements and shortcomings permits the extraction of important lessons that will be critical for the future adoption of the CHOP in the current setting and for the implementation of additional CHOPs elsewhere in the developing world. The authors believe that the design must be flexible, efficient, and innovative so that a CHOP promptly can address pressing public health issues as they arise (eg, epidemic outbreak) and include the needs and demands of the concerned communities. An innovative feature of the current project is the high degree and mix of public-private partnerships. The project's CHOP also relies on partnerships. As elaborated elsewhere, public-private partnerships should be seen as a social experiment--they reveal promise but are not the solution for every problem. For this CHOP, the focus is on partnerships between a multinational consortium, government agencies, and international organizations. The partnerships also include civil society organizations for monitoring and evaluation and local NGOs designated for the implementation of the selected public health interventions within the CHOP. The governments and their respective health policies often form the umbrella under which the partnerships operate. With the increase in globalization, however, the importance and capacities of governments have diminished, and there is growing private-sector involvement. Private enterprise is seen as an efficient, innovative, pragmatic, and powerful means to achieve environmental and social sustainability. Experiences with the partnership configurations in the current CHOP are of importance for tackling grand challenges in global health by

  3. Projection models for health-effects assessment in populations exposed to radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants. Volume I. Introduction to the SPAHR demographic model for health risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, J.J.; Lundy, R.T.; Grahn, D.; Ginevan, M.E.

    1982-09-01

    The Simulation Package for the Analysis of Health Risk (SPAHR) is a computer software package based upon a demographic model for health risk projections. The model extends several health risk projection models by making realistic assumptions about the population at risk, and thus represents a distinct improvement over previous models. Complete documentation for use of SPAHR is contained in this five-volume publication. The demographic model in SPAHR estimates population response to environmental toxic exposures. Latency of response, changing dose level over time, competing risks from other causes of death, and population structure can be incorporated into SPAHR to project health risks. Risks are measured by morbid years, number of deaths, and loss of life expectancy. Comparisons of estimates of excess deaths demonstrate that previous health risk projection models may have underestimated excess deaths by a factor of from 2 to 10, depending on the pollutant and the exposure scenario. The software supporting the use of the demographic model is designed to be user oriented. Complex risk projections are made by responding to a series of prompts generated by the package. The flexibility and ease of use of SPAHR make it an important contribution to existing models and software packages. The first volume presents the theory behind the SPAHR health risk projection model and several applications of the model to actual pollution episodes. The elements required for an effective health risk projection model are specified, and the models that have been used to date in health risk projections are outlined. These are compared with the demographic model, whose formulation is described in detail. Examples of the application of air pollution and radiation dose-response functions are included in order to demonstrate the estimation of future mortality and morbidity levels and the range of variation in excess deaths that occurs when populations structure is changed.

  4. Students Development of Food and Health-Related Action Competence - Upscaling LOMA Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruge, Dorte; Nielsen, Morten Kromann; Jensen, Kirsten

    , pedagogs and students (8-15 years) and teacher-students. It is expected, that LOMA II will contribute to students' development of components of food and healt-related action competence as learning outcomes. Among these are knowledge, insight, skills, motivation, ownership and critical thinking. Moreover...... producers and food communities. All project activities in LOMA I and LOMA II has been facilitated by 'community of practices' (Wenger 2000), that aim at promoting health, learning and sustainable development. The authors regard these activities to be of interest for a broader internatioal audience...... will contribute to students' development of components of food and healt-related action competence as learning outcomes. Among these are knowledge, insight, skills, motivation, ownership and critical thinking. Moreover, based on preliminary results from LOMA I project, there are indications, that students...

  5. Bioethical Considerations in Developing a Biorepository for the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenberg, Alan; Sugarman, Jeremy; Murdoch, David R.; Levine, Orin

    2012-01-01

    The Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) project has the potential to provide a highly valuable resource of biospecimens that may be used to inform future studies on the causes of pneumonia. Designing a biorepository for this complex project was done in collaboration with a wide range of experts including bioethicists. In this paper, we describe the most significant ethical issues encountered related to the biorepository, focusing on its structure and informed consent. We also outline the proposed approach to the PERCH biorepository, which was designed to be sensitive to the ethical, practical, and cultural challenges inherent to the study. Through this process, we concluded that biorepository governance plans and strategies for managing informed consent should be implemented in a way to allow for careful study in order to better understand the attitudes of and impact on the stakeholders involved in the study. PMID:22403233

  6. Transdisciplinary Project Communication and Knowledge Sharing Experiences in Tanzania and Zambia through a One Health Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnol, Brigitte; Clarke, Elizabeth; Li, Mu; Maulaga, Wende; Lumbwe, Hilda; McConchie, Robyn; de Bruyn, Julia; Alders, Robyn Gwen

    2016-01-01

    The project "Strengthening food and nutrition security through family poultry and crop integration in Tanzania and Zambia" brings together animal, crop, and human health specialists, economists, ecologists, social scientists, and practitioners to work with participating communities. It aims to increase poultry value chain, crop farming systems efficiency, and household food and nutrition security and thus requires understanding of, and ability to work effectively within, complex systems. In this context, communication knowledge sharing and synthesis between stakeholders from diverse backgrounds and a range of experiences, perspectives, agendas, and knowledge is a challenge. To address this situation, communication is conceived as a dialog and a participatory process bringing together all stakeholders. This process results in unanticipated and unexpected results that require a high degree of flexibility and adaptability from team members. The paper analyses the approach and aim of the communication strategy developed for the project and the challenges faced.

  7. The study of health coaching: the ithaca coaching project, research design, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforzo, Gary A

    2013-05-01

    Health coaching (HC) is a process holding tremendous potential as a complementary medical intervention to shape healthy behavior change and affect rates of chronic lifestyle diseases. Empirical knowledge of effectiveness for the HC process, however, is lacking. The purposes of this paper are to present the study protocol for the Ithaca Coaching Project while also addressing research design, methodological issues, and directions for HC research. This is one of the first large-scale, randomized control trials of HC for primary prevention examining impact on physical and emotional health status in an employee population. An additional intent for the project is to investigate self-determination theory as a theoretical framework for the coaching process. Participants (n=300) are recruited as part of a campus-wide wellness initiative and randomly assigned to one of three levels of client-centered HC or a control with standard wellness program care. Repeated measures analyses of covariance will be used to examine coaching effectiveness while path analyses will be used to examine relationships between coaching processes, self-determination variables, and health outcomes. There is a great need for well-designed HC studies that define coaching best practices, examine intervention effectiveness, provide cost:benefit analysis, and address scope of practice. This information will allow a clearer definition of HC to emerge and determination of if, and how, HC fits in modern-day healthcare. This is an exciting but critical time for HC research and for the practice of HC.

  8. Digital patient: Personalized and translational data management through the MyHealthAvatar EU project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondylakis, Haridimos; Spanakis, Emmanouil G; Sfakianakis, Stelios; Sakkalis, Vangelis; Tsiknakis, Manolis; Marias, Kostas; Xia Zhao; Hong Qing Yu; Feng Dong

    2015-08-01

    The advancements in healthcare practice have brought to the fore the need for flexible access to health-related information and created an ever-growing demand for the design and the development of data management infrastructures for translational and personalized medicine. In this paper, we present the data management solution implemented for the MyHealthAvatar EU research project, a project that attempts to create a digital representation of a patient's health status. The platform is capable of aggregating several knowledge sources relevant for the provision of individualized personal services. To this end, state of the art technologies are exploited, such as ontologies to model all available information, semantic integration to enable data and query translation and a variety of linking services to allow connecting to external sources. All original information is stored in a NoSQL database for reasons of efficiency and fault tolerance. Then it is semantically uplifted through a semantic warehouse which enables efficient access to it. All different technologies are combined to create a novel web-based platform allowing seamless user interaction through APIs that support personalized, granular and secure access to the relevant information.

  9. [Health services research project "action alliance pain-free city Münster" : Objectives and methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterbrink, J; Ewers, A; Nestler, N; Pogatzki-Zahn, E; Bauer, Z; Gnass, I; Sirsch, E; Krüger, C; Mitterlehner, B; Kutschar, P; Hemling, S; Fischer, B; Marschall, U; Aschauer, W; Weichbold, M; van Aken, H

    2010-12-01

    Inadequate pain care in health care facilities is still a major concern. Due to structural and organizational shortcomings the potential of modern analgesia is far from being exhausted. The project "Action Alliance Pain-free City Münster" is designed to analyze the multiprofessional pain management in health care facilities in the model City of Münster in an epidemiologic study and aims to optimize pain management in accordance with nursing standards and medical guidelines. Hospitals, nursing homes, outpatient nursing services, hospices and pain care centers will be examined. After an analysis of the current state on the basis of a pre-test, the necessary optimization measures will be developed and implemented. Subsequently, the pain management will be reevaluated in a post-test. In partly still unexplored health care areas of Germany, epidemiologic data will be generated, barriers to the implementation of standards and guidelines revealed and measures of improvements developed and tested. In addition, interface problems between the evaluated sectors will be identified. In this article the objective and the methods of the project are described.

  10. Service delivery and coverage in primary healthcare in a community-health project in Ibadan, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabiru K. Salami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Standard health-service delivery aimed toward improving maternal and childhealth status remains elusive in Nigeria because of inaccuracies in data documentation leading to a lack of relatively stable evidence.Objectives: Through a community-health project, this study tested the accuracy of record keeping in primary healthcare services in nine clinics run in Ibadan, Nigeria.Methods: A validation exercise was performed through a sample of the 10 most recent names extracted from three registers maintained by each clinic.Results: A review of the register covering a period of four years showed a steady increase in: fully-immunised children, registration for antenatal care during the first trimester of pregnancy, the number of women who attended antenatal care at least three times, the overall number of women who booked for antenatal care and women who delivered in Eniosa Community-Health Project facilities over the four-year period. It was possible to trace 86% of those selected from the antenatal care register, 88.9% of those from the birth register and 81.1%of those from the immunisation register. Four women who should have been included for antenatal care, seven who had delivered (but were not in the register and 13 who reportedlyreceived immunisation but were not listed were found during the validation exercise.Conclusion: This study concludes that the names appearing in the register are likely to represent valid events, but that the registers did not capture all such events in the community.

  11. [Transparency as a prerequisite of innovation in health services research: deficits in the reporting of model projects concerning managed care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiethege, J; Ommen, O; Ernstmann, N; Pfaff, H

    2010-10-01

    Currently, elements of managed care are being implemented in the German health-care system. The legal basis for these innovations are § 140, § 73, § 137, and §§ 63 et seq. of the German Social Code - Part 5 (SGB V). For the model projects according to §§ 63 et seq. of the German Social Code a scientific evaluation and publication of the evaluation results is mandatory. The present study examines the status of evaluation of German model projects. The present study has a mixed method design: A mail and telephone survey with the German Federal Social Insurance Authority, the health insurance funds, and the regional Associations of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians has been conducted. Furthermore, an internet research on "Medpilot" and "Google" has been accomplished to search for model projects and their evaluation reports. 34 model projects met the inclusion criteria. 13 of these projects had been terminated up to 30/9/2008. 6 of them have published an evaluation report. 4 model projects have published substantial documents. One model project in progress has published a meaningful interim report. 12 model projects failed to give information concerning the evaluator or the duration of the model projects. The results show a significant deficit in the mandatory reporting of the evaluation of model projects in Germany. There is a need for action for the legislator and the health insurance funds in terms of promoting the evaluation and the publication of the results. The institutions evaluating the model projects should obligate themselves to publish the evaluation results. The publication is an essential precondition for the development of managed care structures in the health-care system and in the development of scientific evaluation methods. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Development of transdisciplinarity among students placed with a sustainability for health research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Fadya; Cole, Donald C

    2008-12-01

    Transdisciplinary education on sustainability for health has been primarily developed in high-income countries, yet the need in countries with limited research and human resource investments remains urgent. Little empiric documentation of the facilitators and barriers to transdisciplinary learning in such countries has been described. We assessed transdisciplinary learning among students of different disciplines collaborating with an Ecuadorian sustainability for health research project. Six undergraduate students from four different disciplinary backgrounds were incorporated through work-study agreements with provincial university academic supervisors. Learning was fostered and monitored through participant observations by a field supervisor. Students' learning was evaluated through subsequent in-depth interviews and visualization methods. Academic supervisor key informant and co-investigator observations aided triangulation. Qualitative data were analyzed using indicators of transdisciplinary thinking. Principal factors facilitating transdisciplinary learning were interaction with social actors, the integration of work with other disciplines, the use of alternative research techniques and methods, and the constant support of the field supervisor. Inhibiting factors included the existence of rigid academic rules, lack of training of the academic supervisors in diverse research methods, and social pressures to implement unidisciplinary foci. At the end of their link with the project, students had developed both cognitive outcomes and attitudinal values relevant to sustainable development for health. In countries with limited investments in research and human resources development, transdisciplinary approaches with social actors and engaged researchers can sensitize new professionals training in traditional academic contexts to the ecological-social-health problems faced by poor majorities and encourage their subsequent work on sustainability for human health.

  13. Oral health of community-dwelling older Australian men: the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project (CHAMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Fac; Chu, Sk-Y; Milledge, K L; Valdez, E; Law, G; Hsu, B; Naganathan, V; Hirani, V; Blyth, F M; Le Couteur, D G; Harford, J; Waite, L M; Handelsman, D J; Seibel, M J; Cumming, R G

    2017-08-29

    The Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project (CHAMP) is a cohort study of the health of a representative sample of Australian men aged 70 years and older. The aim of this report is to describe the oral health of these men. Oral health was assessed when the men were all aged 78 years or older. Two calibrated examiners conducted a standardized intraoral assessment. Descriptive data were analysed by statistical association tests. Participants were excluded from the collection of some periodontal assessments if they had a medical contraindication. Dental assessments of 614 participants revealed 90 (14.6%) were edentate. Men had a mean of 13.8 missing teeth and 10.3 filled teeth. Dentate participants had a mean of 1.1 teeth with active coronal decay. Those in the low-income group had a higher rate of decayed teeth and lower rate of filled teeth. Thirty-four participants (5.5%) had one or more dental implants, and 66.3% relied on substitute natural teeth for functional occlusion. Of those with full periodontal assessments; 90.9% had sites with pocket depths of 3 mm or more, 96.6% had sites with CAL of 5 mm or more, and 79.7% had three or more sites with GI scores of 2 or more. There was a high prevalence of periodontal diseases and restorative burden of dentitions, which suggests that greater attention needs to be given to prevention and health maintenance in older Australian men. © 2017 The Authors. Australian Dental Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Dental Association.

  14. Transformative learning experience for physical therapy students through a community health promotion project for mothers of hearing-challenged children

    OpenAIRE

    Yokogawa, Masami; Notoya, Masako; Madokoro, Sachiko

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this project was to expose physical therapy students to transformative learning through a community health promotion project for mothers of hearing-challenged children. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were three mothers with their respective hearing-challenged child and twenty physical therapy students. The project consisted of seven sessions supervised throughout by a physical therapy instructor. The students participated in seven sessions, while the mothers ...

  15. Accelerating preparedness: leveraging the UNC PERLC to improve other projects related to public health surveillance, assessment, and regionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horney, Jennifer A; Wilfert, Rachel A

    2014-01-01

    The co-location of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center (PERLC) and the UNC Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Center (PERRC) and other smaller projects within the North Carolina Institute for Public Health, a public health practice-oriented unit of the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, facilitated many successful collaborations. By sharing personnel, space, and other resources, the UNC PERLC and PERRC and other projects were able to meet the needs of the public health workforce by developing evidence-based training programs and tools around topics including epidemiology, surveillance, and vulnerable populations.

  16. The role of change management in the District Health Authority Consolidation (Transition and Design) project in Nova Scotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Colin; Burstall, Dawn

    2016-03-01

    The District Health Authority Consolidation (Transition and Design) project in Nova Scotia was initiated to consolidate the existing nine district health authorities into one provincial health authority. This article provides an overview of the internal change management approach and activities that were developed to support the various phases of the design and transition process. Three phases of work are outlined, and specific change management activities are described as are lessons learned from the overall approach. © 2016 The Canadian College of Health Leaders.

  17. Effectiveness of an Adaptation of the Project Connect Health Systems Intervention: Youth and Clinic-Level Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loosier, Penny S.; Doll, Shelli; Lepar, Danielle; Ward, Kristin; Gamble, Ginger; Dittus, Patricia J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Project Connect Health Systems Intervention (Project Connect) uses a systematic process of collecting community and healthcare infrastructure information to craft a referral guide highlighting local healthcare providers who provide high quality sexual and reproductive healthcare. Previous self-report data on healthcare usage…

  18. 75 FR 59237 - TRICARE Co-Pay Waiver at Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... of the Secretary TRICARE Co-Pay Waiver at Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center Demonstration Project AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice of TRICARE Co-Pay... is to advise interested parties of a demonstration project entitled ``TRICARE Co-Pay Waiver at...

  19. Health impacts of increasing alcohol prices in the European Union: a dynamic projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhachimi, Stefan K; Cole, Katie J; Nusselder, Wilma J; Smit, H A; Baili, Paolo; Bennett, Kathleen; Pomerleau, Joceline; McKee, Martin; Charlesworth, Kate; Kulik, Margarete C; Mackenbach, Johan P; Boshuizen, Hendriek

    2012-09-01

    Western Europe has high levels of alcohol consumption, with corresponding adverse health effects. Currently, a major revision of the EU excise tax regime is under discussion. We quantify the health impact of alcohol price increases across the EU. We use alcohol consumption data for 11 member states, covering 80% of the EU-27 population, and corresponding country-specific disease data (incidence, prevalence, and case-fatality rate of alcohol related diseases) taken from the 2010 published Dynamic Modelling for Health Impact Assessment (DYNAMO-HIA) database to dynamically project the changes in population health that might arise from changes in alcohol price. Increasing alcohol prices towards those of Finland (the highest in the EU) would postpone approximately 54,000 male and approximately 26,100 female deaths over 10 years. Moreover, the prevalence of a number of chronic diseases would be reduced: in men by approximately 97,800 individuals with diabetes, 65,800 with stroke and 62,200 with selected cancers, and in women by about 19,100, 23,500, and 27,100, respectively. Curbing excessive drinking throughout the EU completely would lead to substantial gains in population health. Harmonisiation of prices to the Finnish level would, for selected diseases, achieve more than 40% of those gains. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Healthy Hearts at work: Prince Edward Island Heart Health Program CSC worksite pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, R; White, R

    1996-01-01

    Prince Edward Island experiences a higher-than-average death rate from cardiovascular disease. The Prince Edward Island Heart Health Program is a health promotion/disease prevention research project of Health Canada and the Prince Edward Island Department of Health and Social Services. This paper describes and evaluates a worksite program, based on the principles of community mobilization, that was initiated with the Civil Service Commission of the Prince Edward Island government. The building of a partnership, the risk appraisal session administered in the workplace, the establishment of an Employee Wellness Committee, and subsequent programming which has occurred in the workplace were the key components in the process. Collaboration with the partner agency and participation of employees in the planning process has resulted in the delivery of programs which could not have been achieved by one of the agencies alone, without many additional resources. It is hoped that these characteristics of collaboration and employee participation will also result in sustainability of this initiative when PEI Heart Health is no longer involved.

  1. Projected health and economic impact of rotavirus vaccination in GAVI-eligible countries: 2011-2030.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherly, Deborah E; Lewis, Kristen D C; Tate, Jacqueline; Parashar, Umesh D; Rheingans, Richard D

    2012-04-27

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of diarrheal disease in children under 5 years of age. It is responsible for more than 450,000 deaths each year, with more than 90% of these deaths occurring in low-resource countries eligible for support by the GAVI Alliance. Significant efforts made by the Alliance and its partners are providing countries with the opportunity to introduce rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs, to help prevent childhood illness and death. We projected the cost-effectiveness and health impact of rotavirus vaccines in GAVI-eligible countries, to assist decision makers in prioritizing resources to achieve the greatest health benefits for their populations. A decision-analytic model was used to project the health outcomes and direct costs of a birth cohort in the target population, with and without a rotavirus vaccine. Current data on disease burden, vaccine efficacy, immunization rates, and costs were used in the model. Vaccination in GAVI-eligible countries would prevent 2.46 million childhood deaths and 83 million disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) from 2011 to 2030, with annual reductions of 180,000 childhood deaths at peak vaccine uptake. The cost per DALY averted is $42 for all GAVI countries combined, over the entire period. Rotavirus vaccination would be considered very cost-effective for the entire cohort of GAVI countries, and in each country individually, as cost-effectiveness ratios are less than the gross domestic product (GDP) per capita. Vaccination is most cost-effective and has the greatest impact in regions with high rotavirus mortality. Rotavirus vaccination in GAVI-eligible countries is very cost-effective and is projected to substantially reduce childhood mortality in this population. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Integrated Vehicle Health Management Project-Modeling and Simulation for Wireless Sensor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallett, Thomas M.; Mueller, Carl H.; Griner, James H., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the efforts in modeling and simulating electromagnetic transmission and reception as in a wireless sensor network through a realistic wing model for the Integrated Vehicle Health Management project at the Glenn Research Center. A computer model in a standard format for an S-3 Viking aircraft was obtained, converted to a Microwave Studio software format, and scaled to proper dimensions in Microwave Studio. The left wing portion of the model was used with two antenna models, one transmitting and one receiving, to simulate radio frequency transmission through the wing. Transmission and reception results were inconclusive.

  3. Working to improve survival and health for babies born very preterm: the WISH project protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Caroline A; Middleton, Philippa F; Bain, Emily; Ashwood, Pat; Bubner, Tanya; Flenady, Vicki; Morris, Jonathan; McIntyre, Sarah

    2013-12-19

    Babies born very preterm (before 30 weeks gestation) are at high risk of dying in their first weeks of life, and those who survive are at risk of developing cerebral palsy in childhood. Recent high-quality evidence has shown that giving women magnesium sulphate immediately prior to very early birth can significantly increase the chances of their babies surviving free of cerebral palsy. In 2010 Australian and New Zealand clinical practice guidelines recommended this therapy. The WISH (Working to Improve Survival and Health for babies born very preterm) Project aims to bi-nationally improve and monitor the use of this therapy to reduce the risk of very preterm babies dying or having cerebral palsy. The WISH Project is a prospective cohort study. The 25 Australian and New Zealand tertiary level maternity hospitals will be provided with a package of active implementation strategies to guide the introduction and local adaptation of guideline recommendations. Surveys will be conducted at individual hospitals to evaluate outcomes related to local implementation progress and the use and value of the WISH implementation strategies. For the hospitals participating in the 'WISH audit of uptake and health outcomes data collection', the primary health outcomes (assessed through case note review, and 24 month corrected age questionnaires) will be: the proportion of eligible women receiving antenatal magnesium sulphate; and rates of death prior to primary hospital discharge and cerebral palsy at two years corrected age in infants born to eligible mothers. For hospitals wishing to assess factors influencing translation locally, barriers and facilitators will be measured through interviews with health care professionals, to further guide implementation strategies. Study outcomes for the early phase of the project (Year 1) will be compared with the later intervention phase (Years 2 and 3). The WISH Project will offer insight into the effectiveness of a multifaceted implementation

  4. Efficient control of the rheological and surface properties of surfactant solutions containing C8-C18 fatty acids as cosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrinova, Z; Tcholakova, S; Popova, Z; Denkov, N; Dasgupta, Bivash R; Ananthapadmanabhan, K P

    2013-07-02

    Systematic experimental study is performed about the effects of chain length (varied between C8 and C18) and concentration of fatty acids (FAc), used as cosurfactants to the mixture of the anionic surfactant SLES and the zwitterionic surfactant CAPB. The following properties are studied: bulk viscosity of the concentrated solutions (10 wt % surfactants), dynamic and equilibrium surface tensions, surface modulus, and foam rheological properties for the diluted foaming solutions (0.5 wt % surfactants). The obtained results show that C8-C10 FAc induce formation of wormlike micelles in the concentrated surfactant solutions, which leads to transformation of these solutions into viscoelastic fluids with very high apparent viscosity. The same FAc shorten the characteristic adsorption time of the diluted solutions by more than 10 times. In contrast, C14-C18 FAc have small effect on the viscosity of the concentrated solutions but increase the surface modulus above 350 mN/m, which leads to higher friction inside sheared foams and to much smaller bubbles in the formed foams. The intermediate chain C12 FAc combines some of the properties seen with C10 FAc and other properties seen with C14 FAc. These results clearly demonstrate how appropriate cosurfactants can be used for efficient control of the rheological properties of concentrated surfactant solutions and of some important foam attributes, such as bubble size and foam rheology.

  5. Systematic review on what works, what does not work and why of implementation of mobile health (mHealth) projects in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda-Jan, Clara B; Mohutsiwa-Dibe, Neo; Loukanova, Svetla

    2014-02-21

    Access to mobile phone technology has rapidly expanded in developing countries. In Africa, mHealth is a relatively new concept and questions arise regarding reliability of the technology used for health outcomes. This review documents strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) of mHealth projects in Africa. A systematic review of peer-reviewed literature on mHealth projects in Africa, between 2003 and 2013, was carried out using PubMed and OvidSP. Data was synthesized using a SWOT analysis methodology. Results were grouped to assess specific aspects of project implementation in terms of sustainability and mid/long-term results, integration to the health system, management process, scale-up and replication, and legal issues, regulations and standards. Forty-four studies on mHealth projects in Africa were included and classified as: "patient follow-up and medication adherence" (n = 19), "staff training, support and motivation" (n = 2), "staff evaluation, monitoring and guidelines compliance" (n = 4), "drug supply-chain and stock management" (n = 2), "patient education and awareness" (n = 1), "disease surveillance and intervention monitoring" (n = 4), "data collection/transfer and reporting" (n = 10) and "overview of mHealth projects" (n = 2). In general, mHealth projects demonstrate positive health-related outcomes and their success is based on the accessibility, acceptance and low-cost of the technology, effective adaptation to local contexts, strong stakeholder collaboration, and government involvement. Threats such as dependency on funding, unclear healthcare system responsibilities, unreliable infrastructure and lack of evidence on cost-effectiveness challenge their implementation. mHealth projects can potentially be scaled-up to help tackle problems faced by healthcare systems like poor management of drug stocks, weak surveillance and reporting systems or lack of resources. mHealth in Africa is an innovative approach

  6. Primary problems associated with the health and welfare of employees observed when implementing lean manufacturing projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampasso, Izabela Simon; Anholon, Rosley; Gonçalves Quelhas, Osvaldo Luiz; Filho, Walter Leal

    2017-01-01

    Lean philosophy is used by companies to increase productivity and reduce costs. Although uncontested benefits are created, it is necessary to highlight the problems related to employees' health and welfare caused by implementing lean manufacturing projects. The primary objective of this paper is to review the literature and identify the most relevant problems created by lean philosophy for employees. Research about the theme was performed on many international databases over three months, and an initial sample of 77 papers was found. Twenty-seven sources were utilized. We identified 22 categories of problems related to health and welfare of employees. The most cited problem was work intensification, mentioned by thirteen papers. Increased stress and increased responsibilities, demands and, consequently, pressure on the workers are among the primary problems observed in the research.

  7. Mental health articulation and solidary economy: report of a social inclusion project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadne Pereira Pedroza

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Psychiatric Reform has as one of the main devices the potentialization of work as a social inclusion instrument. This study has sought to describe the experience lived and the activities developed of the Training Extension Project of Users of the Center of Psychosocial Attention of Cajazeiras – PB (CAPS for the Production of Handicraft Artifacts. It is a report of experience whose developed activities were described thoroughly. It has been perceived that the difficulties found were overcome, favoring like this, in a shy and incipient way, the income production and the improvement in the life quality of each one. It becomes urgent the necessity of the implementation of municipal public policies which promotes the articulation between mental health and solidary economy, contributing to reflections about health care to people in psychic suffering.

  8. Resettling refugees and safeguarding their mental health: lessons learned from the Canadian Refugee Resettlement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiser, Morton

    2009-12-01

    The Ryerson University Refugee Resettlement Project (RRP), a decade-long study of 1348 Southeast Asian refugees who came to Canada between 1979 and 1981, is one of the largest, most comprehensive and longest-lived investigations of refugee resettlement ever carried out. Knowledge gleaned from the RRP about research methodology, about the resettlement experience, about the social costs of resettling refugees, about factors that promote or hinder integration, about risk and protective factors for refugee mental health, and about the refugees' consumption of mental health and social services is summarized in the form of 18 "Lessons." The lessons are offered in order to encourage and stimulate further research, as well to suggest policy and practice innovations that could help make resettlement easier, less costly, more effective, and more humane.

  9. Engaging cultural resources to promote mental health in Dutch LSES neighborhoods: study of a community-based participatory media project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knibbe, Mare; de Vries, Marten; Horstman, Klasien

    2017-06-01

    Community-based participatory media projects form a promising new strategy for mental health promotion that can help address the mental health-gap identified by the World Health Organization. (2008b) mhGAP, Mental Health Gap Action Programme: Scaling Up Care for Mental, Neurological and Substance Use Disorders. World Health Organization, Geneva. In this article we present an ethnographic study about a participatory media project that was developed to promote mental health in selected Dutch low socio-economic status neighborhoods. Through narrowcastings (group film viewings), participant observation and interviews we mapped the ways in which the media project effected and facilitated the collective sense-making process of the audience with regard to sources of stress impacting mental health and opportunities for action. These determinants of mental health are shaped by cultural dimensions, since the cultural context shapes everyday experiences of stress as well as the resources and skills to manage them. Our analysis shows that the media project engaged cultural resources to challenge stressful social scripts. We conclude that more attention should be paid to cultural narratives in a community to understand how health promotion strategies can support social resilience. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. [About experience of producing city health profile as a part of the international who healthy cities project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhilenko, E L; Gomerova, N I; Zakharova, M A; L'vov, A A; Shalygina, L S

    2012-01-01

    The article presents information about the international project "Healthy cities", knowledge about principles and axioms of the project. The authors have analyzed the experience of producing the "City Health Profile" under the project WHO "Healthy cities". The authors believe that the "Health Profile" of each individual city varies depending on specific conditions, both physical (the size of the territory, the state of the environment, its location) and political, and socio-economic. However, the formation of the "City Health Profile" is universally, regardless of geographical location or structure. It was noted that the "City Health Profile" has reflected all aspects of the life of the city, facilitates or barriers the promotion of inhabitants' health and their well-being. For producing of "City Health Profile" additional data are needed: survey, sociological polls of the city population (self-assessment of their health status, lifestyle and quality of life). The advantage of these researches, carried out in the framework of the project "Healthy Cities", is implementation of complex sociological survey with a focused multi-purpose monitoring, covering all spheres of life in the city, to present a versatile, complete and objective evidences to illustrate the city as a territory of health and make up the holistic picture and the centre of which is the citizen and his/her health according to the WHO recommendations.

  11. Health promotion in Local Health Unit 4 Chiavarese--Liguria Region, Italy. "Unplugged" project: needs, methodology and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpi, A; Ferrari Bravo, M; Poggi, L; Chiesa, S; Costa, A; De Leo, A; Rebolini, G; Gabutti, G

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to use and evaluate the unplugged project, a school-based program of proven effectiveness aimed at the prevention of substance abuse based on social influence. This project was conducted during the school-year 2011/2012; it involved the Local Health Unit (LHU)'s personnel specifically and adequately formed and was addressed to teachers working in the three districts of the LHU4 Chiavarese. The courses involved teachers in three consecutive days and provided both theoretical inputs and practical exercises designed to enpower skills and to make the same effective. As a whole, 25 teachers of the secondary schools (public and private) of first and second level were trained. Following the training, 14 curricular courses have been launched and 286 students have been involved. The teachers have mainly worked on personal and social components of their students, stimulating their critical assessment of standards and skills potentially transferable in everyday life. The benefits for students have been: establishment of the classroom, positive relationship with the teacher, empathy, decrease of conflicts, increased self-awareness and self-esteem, better school results. Besides, teachers benefit from increased respect, self-reliance and confidence, as well as acquisition of new skills. Both the interest shown by teachers and the results achieved in classrooms have stimulated school leadership and personnel belonging to LHU4 Chiavarese to plan a new edition of the program the next autumn.

  12. Health economic evidence gaps and methodological constraints in low back pain and neck pain : Results of the Research Agenda for Health Economic Evaluation (RAHEE) project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, J M; Ketheswaran, J; Tordrup, D.; Ostelo, R W J G; Bertollini, R.; van Tulder, M W

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increased interest in economic evaluations, there are difficulties in applying the results of such studies in practice. Therefore, the “Research Agenda for Health Economic Evaluation” (RAHEE) project was initiated, which aimed to improve the use of health economic evidence in practice

  13. Estimating NOA Health Risks from Selected Construction Activities at the Calaveras Dam Replacement Project (CDRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, D. W.

    2012-12-01

    The CDRP is a major construction project involving up to 400 workers using heavy earth moving equipment, blasting, drilling, rock crushing, and other techniques designed to move 7 million yards of earth. Much of this material is composed of serpentinite, blueschist, and other rocks that contain chrysotile, crocidolite, actinolite, tremolite, and Libby-class amphiboles. To date, over 1,000 personal, work area, and emission inventory related samples have been collected and analyzed by NIOSH 7400, NIOSH 7402, and CARB-AHERA methodology. Data indicate that various CDRP construction activities have the potential to generate significant mineral fibers and structures that could represent elevated on site and off site health risks. This presentation will review the Contractors air monitoring program for this major project, followed by a discussion of predictive methods to evaluate potential onsite and offsite risks. Ultimately, the data are used for planning control strategies designed to achieve a Project Action Level of 0.01 f/cc (one tenth the Cal/OSHA PEL) and risk-based offsite target levels.

  14. Integrating Public Health and Deliberative Public Bioethics: Lessons from the Human Genome Project Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Karen M; Lee, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    Public health policy works best when grounded in firm public health standards of evidence and widely shared social values. In this article, we argue for incorporating a specific method of ethical deliberation--deliberative public bioethics--into public health. We describe how deliberative public bioethics is a method of engagement that can be helpful in public health. Although medical, research, and public health ethics can be considered some of what bioethics addresses, deliberative public bioethics offers both a how and where. Using the Human Genome Project Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications program as an example of effective incorporation of deliberative processes to integrate ethics into public health policy, we examine how deliberative public bioethics can integrate both public health and bioethics perspectives into three areas of public health practice: research, education, and health policy. We then offer recommendations for future collaborations that integrate deliberative methods into public health policy and practice.

  15. The impact of the care equity project with community/public health nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamau-Small, Sylvia; Joyce, Barbara; Bermingham, Neysa; Roberts, Jada; Robbins, Curtis

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to report on the evaluation process of a multi-disciplinary interactive teaching-learning workshop implemented in a college of nursing baccalaureate program. A 6-hr workshop on cultural humility and care equity was implemented using educational theater to bring clinical situations involved in community/public health practice into the classroom. One hundred and forty-nine students participated in the workshop. Stages of Change (Prochaska and DiClemente [2005] Handbook of psychotherapy integration. New York: Oxford University Press) and the Learning Transfer Barriers Framework (Price, Miller, Rahm, Brace, & Larson [2010] Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, 30, 237-245.) provided conceptual underpinnings for project evaluation. Nursing students completed a quiz, post-workshop online surveys at 2 and 8 weeks, and a clinical application report (CAR). Survey data provided information on barriers to the transfer of knowledge from theory class to the clinical setting. Qualitative methods were used to audit the CARs. Each CAR was independently reviewed to determine the Stage of Change reflected in the narrative. Workshop evaluation outcomes provide evidence that cultural humility skill building has created behavior change in clinical practice for new health care community/public health nursing providers. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Médicarte software developed for the Quebec microprocessor health card project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, G; Tremblay, L; Durant, P; Papillon, M J; Bérubé, J; Fortin, J P

    1995-01-01

    The Quebec Patient Smart Card Project is a Provincial Government initiative under the responsibility of the Rgie de l'assurance-maladie du Québec (Quebec Health Insurance Board). Development, implementation, and assessment duties were assigned to a team from Université Laval, which in turn joined a group from the Direction de la santé publique du Bas-St-Laurent in Rimouski, where the experiment is taking place. The pilot project seeks to evaluate the use and acceptance of a microprocessor card as a way to improve the exchange of clinical information between card users and various health professionals. The card can be best described as a résumé containing information pertinent to an individual's health history. It is not a complete medical file; rather, it is a summary to be used as a starting point for a discussion between health professionals and patients. The target population is composed of persons 60 years and over, pregnant women, infants under 18 months, and the residents of a small town located in the target area, St-Fabien, regardless of age. The health professionals involved are general practitioners, specialists, pharmacists, nurses, and ambulance personnel. Participation in the project is on a voluntary basis. Each health care provider participating in the project has a personal identification number (PIN) and must use both an access card and a user card to access information. This prevents unauthorized access to a patient's card and allows the staff to sign and date information entered onto the patient card. To test the microprocessor card, we developed software based on a problem-oriented approach integrating diagnosis, investigations, treatments, and referrals. This software is not an expert system that constrains the clinician to a particular decisional algorithm. Instead, the software supports the physician in decision making. The software was developed with a graphical interface (Windows 3.1) to maximize its user friendliness. A version of the

  17. The Italian preadolescent mental health project (PrISMA): rationale and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigerio, Alessandra; Vanzin, Laura; Pastore, Valentina; Nobile, Maria; Giorda, Roberto; Marino, Cecilia; Molteni, Massimo; Rucci, Paola; Ammaniti, Massimo; Lucarelli, Loredana; Lenti, Carlo; Walder, Mauro; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Carlet, Ombretta; Muratori, Filippo; Milone, Annarita; Zuddas, Alessandro; Cavolina, Pina; Nardocci, Franco; Tullini, Andrea; Morosini, Pierluigi; Polidori, Gabriella; De Girolamo, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    The Italian preadolescent mental health project (PrISMA--Progetto Italiano Salute Mentale Adolescenti) is the first Italian study designed to estimate the prevalence of mental disorders in preadolescents (10-14 years old) living in urban areas, and to analyse the demographic and biological correlates of emotional and behavioural problems. This paper describes the rationale, methods and the analysis plan of the project. The design of the study used a two-stage sampling procedure, one screening stage of emotional and behavioural problems in a large sample of subjects attending public and private schools and a second stage of diagnostic assessment in a sample including all high scorers and a proportion of low scorers. In the screening stage, parents of preadolescents were asked to fill in the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), whereas in the second stage preadolescents and their parents were administered the Development and Well Being Assessment for the assessment of mental disorders together with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and two scales (C-GAS and HoNOSCA) designed to evaluate the functioning of the preadolescent in different areas. Genetic samples were collected during the screening stage, after parents gave their informed written consent. The findings of this study are expected to allow an adequate planning of interventions for the prevention and the treatment of mental disorders in preadolescence as well as efficient health services.

  18. Learning With E-books and Project-based Strategy in a Community Health Nursing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Tien-Wen; Wu, Ting-Ting

    2017-11-02

    With advances in information technology, "information-assisted instruction" has been gradually introduced to nursing education curricula. Specifically, the integration of an e-book system can effectively enhance nursing students' attention and interest. Most studies on nursing education that incorporated e-books have focused on the advantages of convenience and assistance provided by e-books. Few studies have addressed community health nursing and off-campus practice activities in relation to suitable teaching strategies for learning activities. This study involved designing and planning a multimedia e-book learning system with a project-based learning activity that conforms to the curriculum and practical requirements of a community health nursing course. The purpose was to reduce the gap between theory and practice and realize an effective learning process. For learning evaluations, a final examination analysis with an independent sample t test; a scoring scheme with intrateam, interteam, and expert ratings; and Bloom's taxonomy-based analysis were conducted. The evaluation results indicated that the comprehension and learning abilities of the experimental group using the e-book system with a mobile device were effectively improved. In addition, the exploratory process involved in project-based learning can develop multiple cognitive skills and problem-solving ability, thereby realizing effective learning.

  19. The Tsimane Health and Life History Project: Integrating anthropology and biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurven, Michael; Stieglitz, Jonathan; Trumble, Benjamin; Blackwell, Aaron D; Beheim, Bret; Davis, Helen; Hooper, Paul; Kaplan, Hillard

    2017-04-01

    The Tsimane Health and Life History Project, an integrated bio-behavioral study of the human life course, is designed to test competing hypotheses of human life-history evolution. One aim is to understand the bidirectional connections between life history and social behavior in a high-fertility, kin-based context lacking amenities of modern urban life (e.g. sanitation, banks, electricity). Another aim is to understand how a high pathogen burden influences health and well-being during development and adulthood. A third aim addresses how modernization shapes human life histories and sociality. Here we outline the project's goals, history, and main findings since its inception in 2002. We reflect on the implications of current findings and highlight the need for more coordinated ethnographic and biomedical study of contemporary nonindustrial populations to address broad questions that can situate evolutionary anthropology in a key position within the social and life sciences. © 2017 The Authors Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues, News, and Reviews Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Competitive CH Activation in (Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)(cyclooctatetraene)alkylzirconium Compounds Cp*Zr(COT)R. Selective Formation of Fulvene or Cyclooctatrienyne Ligands. Molecular Structure of Cp*Zr(μ-η8 : η2-C8H6)ZrCp*(η4-C8H8), a Dinuclear Zwitt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinnema, Piet-Jan; Meetsma, Auke; Teuben, Jan H.

    1993-01-01

    Thermolysis of Cp*Zr(COT)R (Cp* = η5-C5Me5, COT = η8-C8H8, R = CH2SiMe3, Me) proceeds via a double hydrogen abstraction from a cyclooctatetraene ligand to give RH and Cp*Zr(μ-η8:η2-C8H6)ZrCp*(η4-C8H8) as the kinetic product. Cp*Zr(μ-η8:η2-C8H6)ZrCp*(η4-C8H8) undergoes a thermally induced hydrogen

  1. Interfacial chemical and electronic structure of cobalt deposition on 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Menglong; Lyu, Lu; Niu, Dongmei; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yuhe; Liu, Peng; Gao, Yongli

    2017-04-01

    Interfacial chemical and electronic structure of Co deposition on 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene(C8-BTBT) was investigated by ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Chemical reaction of cobalt with C8-BTBT at the interface is confirmed by a new component of S 2s peak which is electron-rich compared to the original one of C8-BTBT molecules. Intensity evolution of the core level in XPS indicates that the adsorption of Co atoms is mainly at the surface without deeper diffusion into C8-BTBT layer. Initial deposition of Co atoms downward shifts the core levels of C8-BTBT by electron transfer from isolated Co atoms or clusters to the C8-BTBT. Further deposition of Co upward shifts the core levels of C8-BTBT because of the neutralization of the thicker metal Co film. Our investigation suggests an inert buffer layer inserted to protect organic layer from reaction or decomposition and to lower the carrier barriers for both the electron and hole to improve the performance of Co/C8-BTBT-based OFETs.

  2. Interfacial chemical and electronic structure of cobalt deposition on 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Menglong; Lyu, Lu [Institute of Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Hunan Key Laboratory for Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Niu, Dongmei, E-mail: mayee@csu.edu.cn [Institute of Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Hunan Key Laboratory for Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yuhe; Liu, Peng [Institute of Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Hunan Key Laboratory for Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Gao, Yongli, E-mail: ygao@pas.rochester.edu [Institute of Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Hunan Key Laboratory for Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester NY14627 (United States)

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Chemical reaction and band bending at the interface are confirmed by the UPS and XPS. • Co atoms mostly accumulate at or near the interface and penetration into sublayer is weak. • The electron and hole barriers are too high and interfacial buffer layer is needed for device design. - Abstract: Interfacial chemical and electronic structure of Co deposition on 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene(C8-BTBT) was investigated by ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Chemical reaction of cobalt with C8-BTBT at the interface is confirmed by a new component of S 2s peak which is electron-rich compared to the original one of C8-BTBT molecules. Intensity evolution of the core level in XPS indicates that the adsorption of Co atoms is mainly at the surface without deeper diffusion into C8-BTBT layer. Initial deposition of Co atoms downward shifts the core levels of C8-BTBT by electron transfer from isolated Co atoms or clusters to the C8-BTBT. Further deposition of Co upward shifts the core levels of C8-BTBT because of the neutralization of the thicker metal Co film. Our investigation suggests an inert buffer layer inserted to protect organic layer from reaction or decomposition and to lower the carrier barriers for both the electron and hole to improve the performance of Co/C8-BTBT-based OFETs.

  3. Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange (HELIX)-Atlanta: A CDC-NASA Joint Environmental Public Health Tracking Collaborative Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamdan, Mohammad; Luvall, Jeff; Crosson, Bill; Estes, Maury; Limaye, Ashutosh; Quattrochi, Dale; Rickman, Doug

    2008-01-01

    HELIX-Atlanta was developed to support current and future state and local EPHT programs to implement data linking demonstration projects which could be part of the CDC EPHT Network. HELIX-Atlanta is a pilot linking project in Atlanta for CDC to learn about the challenges the states will encounter. NASA/MSFC and the CDC are partners in linking environmental and health data to enhance public health surveillance. The use of NASA technology creates value added geospatial products from existing environmental data sources to facilitate public health linkages. Proving the feasibility of the approach is the main objective

  4. The recent and projected public health and economic benefits of cigarette taxation in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Hillel R; Vardavas, Constantine I; Chaloupka, Frank J; Vozikis, Athanassios; Athanasakis, Konstantinos; Kyriopoulos, Ioannis; Bertic, Monique; Behrakis, Panagiotis K; Connolly, Gregory N

    2014-09-01

    Greece is in an economic crisis compounded by the costs caused by smoking. The present investigation estimates the economic and public health benefits ensuing from the recent cigarette excise tax increase in 2011 and projects the potential benefits from an additional €2.00 per pack cigarette tax increase. The effects of the recent cigarette excise tax increase were calculated on outcome measures: total price per pack, including specific excise, ad valorem tax, and value-added tax consumption; tax revenue; and per capita consumption of cigarettes. Additionally, smoking-attributable mortality, years of potential life lost, and productivity losses were estimated. Projected effects of an additional €2.00 per pack tax increase on consumption and tax revenue were also assessed. The cigarette excise tax increase in 2011 created €558 million in new tax revenue. Cigarette consumption reached a recent low of 24.9 billion sticks sold or 2197 sticks per person in 2011, indicating a 16% decrease in per capita cigarette consumption from the previous year. An additional €2.00 per pack increase in Greek cigarette taxes is projected to result in reduced cigarette sales by an additional 20% and lead to an increase in total cigarette tax revenues by nearly €1.2 billion and the prevention of 192,000 premature deaths. Nations such as Greece, should employ taxation as a crucial measure to promote public health and economic development in such dire times. International economic organisations should aggressively pursue programmes and policies that champion the economic benefits of tobacco taxation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Tackling the social determinants of inequalities in health during Phase V of the Healthy Cities Project in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritsatakis, Anna; Ostergren, Per-Olof; Webster, Premila

    2015-06-01

    The WHO European Healthy Cities Network has from its inception aimed at tackling inequalities in health. In carrying out an evaluation of Phase V of the project (2009-13), an attempt was made to examine how far the concept of equity in health is understood and accepted; whether cities had moved further from a disease/medical model to looking at the social determinants of inequalities in health; how far the HC project contributed to cities determining the extent and causes of inequalities in health; what efforts were made to tackle such inequalities and how far inequalities in health may have increased or decreased during Phase V. A broader range of resources was utilized for this evaluation than in previous phases of the project. These indicated that most cities were definitely looking at the broader determinants. Equality in health was better understood and had been included as a value in a range of city policies. This was facilitated by stronger involvement of the HC project in city planning processes. Although almost half the cities participating had prepared a City Health Profile, only few cities had the necessary local level data to monitor changes in inequalities in health. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Public health impacts of city policies to reduce climate change: Findings from the URGENCHE EU-China project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabel, C.E.; Hiscock, R.; Asikainen, A.; Bi, J.; Depledge, M.; Van Den Elshout, S.; Friedrich, R.; Huang, G.; Hurley, F.; Jantunen, M.; Karakitsios, S.P.; Keuken, M.; Kingham, S.; Kontoroupis, P.; Kuenzli, N.; Liu, M.; Martuzzi, M.; Morton, K.; Mudu, P.; Niittynen, M.; Perez, L.; Sarigiannis, D.; Stahl-Timmins, W.; Tobollik, M.; Tuomisto, J.; Willers, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Climate change is a global threat to health and wellbeing. Here we provide findings of an international research project investigating the health and wellbeing impacts of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in urban environments. Methods: Five European and two Chinese city

  7. Pediatric Resident Academic Projects While on Global Health Electives: Ten Years of Experience at the University of Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Michael B; Slusher, Tina M; Howard, Cynthia R; Cole, Valerie B; Gladding, Sophia P

    2017-07-01

    Many residency programs require residents to complete an academic project as part of a global health (GH) elective. However, there has been little description of the range of projects residents have pursued during GH electives or the extent to which these projects are consistent with proposed best practices. The authors conducted a document review of 67 written summaries or copies of presentations of academic projects (hereafter, summaries) completed by pediatric and medicine-pediatric residents at the University of Minnesota while on GH electives from 2005 to 2015. Two authors independently coded each summary for the type of project completed; when the project idea was generated; explicit mention of a mentor from the home institution, host institution, or both; whether a needs assessment was conducted; and whether there were plans for sustainability. Most of the 67 projects were categorized into one of three project types: quality/process improvement (28 [42%]), education (18 [27%]), or clinical research (14 [21%]). Most summaries explicitly mentioned a mentor (45 [67%]), reported conducting a needs assessment (38 [57%]), and indicated sustainability plans (45 [67%]). Of the 42 summaries that indicated the timing of idea generation, 30 (71%) indicated the idea was developed after arriving at the host site. Residents undertook a wide range of academic projects during GH electives, most commonly quality/process improvement and education projects. The projects were largely aligned with best practices, with most summaries indicating the resident worked with a mentor, conducted a needs assessment, and made plans for sustainability.

  8. The Southeastern Minnesota Beacon Project for Community-driven Health Information Technology: Origins, Achievements, and Legacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chute, Christopher G; Hart, Lacey A; Alexander, Alex K; Jensen, Daniel W

    2014-01-01

    The Southeastern (SE) Minnesota Beacon organized all the health care providers, county public health organizations, and school districts in the deployment and integration of health information exchange (HIE) and targeted health communication around childhood asthma and diabetes. The community cooperated to establish a clinical data repository for all residents in the 11-county region. Through this community of practice approach that involved traditional and nontraditional providers, the SE Minnesota Beacon was able to realize unique applications of this technology. This manuscript overviews the associated organization and infrastructure of this community collaboration. The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) stimulus, established 17 projects throughout the United States targeting the introduction and meaningful use of health information technology (HIT). These 17 communities were intended to serve as an example of what could be accomplished. The SE Minnesota Beacon is one of these communities. The community ultimately opted for peer-to-peer HIE, using Nationwide Health Information Network (NwHIN) Connect software. The clinical data repository was established using the infrastructure developed by the Regenstrief Institute, which operated as a trusted third party. As an extension to HIE, the consortium of county public health departments created a patient data portal for use by school nurses and parents. Childhood asthma was addressed by creating, exchanging, and maintaining an "asthma action plan" for each affected child, shared throughout the community, including through the patient portal. Diabetes management introduced patient treatment decision tools and patient quality of life measures, facilitating care. Influenza vaccination was enhanced by large-scale community reporting in partnership with the state vaccination registry. The methodology and

  9. Quantitative analysis of reinforcing phase in AlSi11/CrFe30C8 composite castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dulęba

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper assessment of the morphology and segregation of the reinforcing phase based on optical quantitative analysis was achieved. Microscopic observation of AlSi11/CrFe30C8 composite gravity castings was carried out in electromagnetic field. The purpose of investigation was the analysis of current frequency influence supplying the inductor of electromagnetic field on segregation, quantity and morphology of reinforcement phase in aluminum matrix composite. Technological conception of investigations was based on assumption that chromium-iron matrix of particles dissolved in aluminum composite matrix and carbide phases became actual reinforcement of the composite. Gravity segregation was analyzed. Graphs containing distribution of reinforcing phase in metal matrix were shown.

  10. Analysis of the Functional Polymorphism in the Cytochrome P450 CYP2C8 Gene rs11572080 with Regard to Colorectal Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladero, José M.; Agúndez, José A. G.; Martínez, Carmen; Amo, Gemma; Ayuso, Pedro; García-Martín, Elena

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the known effects on drug metabolism and response, functional polymorphisms of genes coding for xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XME) play a role in cancer. Genes coding for XME act as low-penetrance genes and confer modest but consistent and significant risks for a variety of cancers related to the interaction of environmental and genetic factors. Consistent evidence supports a role for polymorphisms of the cytochrome P450 CYP2C9 gene as a protecting factor for colorectal cancer susceptibility. It has been shown that CYP2C8 and CYP2C9 overlap in substrate specificity. Because CYP2C8 has the common functional polymorphisms rs11572080 and rs10509681 (CYP2C8*3), it could be speculated that part of the findings attributed to CYP2C9 polymorphisms may actually be related to the presence of polymorphisms in the CYP2C8 gene. Nevertheless, little attention has been paid to the role of the CYP2C8 polymorphism in colorectal cancer. We analyzed the influence of the CYP2C8*3 allele in the risk of developing colorectal cancer in genomic DNA from 153 individuals suffering colorectal cancer and from 298 age- and gender-matched control subjects. Our findings do not support any effect of the CYP2C8*3 allele (OR for carriers of functional CYP2C8 alleles = 0.50 (95% CI = 0.16–1.59; p = 0.233). The absence of a relative risk related to CYP2C8*3 did not vary depending on the tumor site. We conclude that the risk of developing colorectal cancer does not seem to be related to the commonest functional genetic variation in the CYP2C8 gene. PMID:23420707

  11. A Statistical Modeling Framework for Projecting Future Ambient Ozone and its Health Impact due to Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Howard H; Hao, Hua; Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt

    2014-06-01

    The adverse health effects of ambient ozone are well established. Given the high sensitivity of ambient ozone concentrations to meteorological conditions, the impacts of future climate change on ozone concentrations and its associated health effects are of concern. We describe a statistical modeling framework for projecting future ozone levels and its health impacts under a changing climate. This is motivated by the continual effort to evaluate projection uncertainties to inform public health risk assessment. The proposed approach was applied to the 20-county Atlanta metropolitan area using regional climate model (RCM) simulations from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program. Future ozone levels and ozone-related excesses in asthma emergency department (ED) visits were examined for the period 2041-2070. The computationally efficient approach allowed us to consider 8 sets of climate model outputs based on different combinations of 4 RCMs and 4 general circulation models. Compared to the historical period of 1999-2004, we found consistent projections across climate models of an average 11.5% higher ozone levels (range: 4.8%, 16.2%), and an average 8.3% (range: -7% to 24%) higher number of ozone exceedance days. Assuming no change in the at-risk population, this corresponds to excess ozone-related ED visits ranging from 267 to 466 visits per year. Health impact projection uncertainty was driven predominantly by uncertainty in the health effect association and climate model variability. Calibrating climate simulations with historical observations reduced differences in projections across climate models.

  12. Do vehicular emissions dominate the source of C6-C8 aromatics in the megacity Shanghai of eastern China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongli; Wang, Qian; Chen, Jianmin; Chen, Changhong; Huang, Cheng; Qiao, Liping; Lou, Shengrong; Lu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The characteristic ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to i-pentane, the indicator of vehicular emissions, were employed to apportion the vehicular and non-vehicular contributions to reactive species in urban Shanghai. Two kinds of tunnel experiments, one tunnel with more than 90% light duty gasoline vehicles and the other with more than 60% light duty diesel vehicles, were carried out to study the characteristic ratios of vehicle-related emissions from December 2009 to January 2010. Based on the experiments, the characteristic ratios of C6-C8 aromatics to i-pentane of vehicular emissions were 0.53 ± 0.08 (benzene), 0.70 ± 0.12 (toluene), 0.41 ± 0.09 (m,p-xylenes), 0.16 ± 0.04 (o-xylene), 0.023 ± 0.011 (styrene), and 0.15 ± 0.02 (ethylbenzene), respectively. The source apportionment results showed that around 23.3% of C6-C8 aromatics in urban Shanghai were from vehicular emissions, which meant that the non-vehicular emissions had more importance. These findings suggested that emission control of non-vehicular sources, i.e. industrial emissions, should also receive attention in addition to the control of vehicle-related emissions in Shanghai. The chemical removal of VOCs during the transport from emissions to the receptor site had a large impact on the apportionment results. Generally, the overestimation of vehicular contributions would occur when the VOC reaction rate constant with OH radicals (kOH) was larger than that of the vehicular indicator, while for species with smaller kOH than the vehicular indicator, the vehicular contribution would be underestimated by the method of characteristic ratios. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Community partnered projects: residents engaging with community health centers to improve care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moushey, Erin; Shomo, Anisa; Elder, Nancy; O'Dea, Christy; Rahner, David

    2014-10-01

    Important residency curricular elements, including scholarship, quality improvement (QI), and community health, often exist as independent components. We developed a curriculum to train residents to become community-responsive physicians that included longitudinal care at a community health center (CHC) with a unique community-partnered project (CPP). We evaluated outcomes of one CPP and delineated challenges in implementing the curriculum. After performing a needs assessment, the resident-CHC team designed a QI intervention to improve documentation of smoking status and cessation counseling. A chart review of 100 random patients assessed pre- and post-intervention documentation. Patient focus groups were held to guide the development of the final intervention, which included medical assistant (MA) education, appropriate patient education materials, and a visual communication system for MAs and providers. Curriculum evaluation via interviews with residency and community partners was done periodically throughout the 2-year process. Focus group participants saw clinicians as a resource for quitting but did not want to talk about quitting at every visit. We reviewed 317 patient visits pre-QI intervention and 191 post-QI intervention. There were no significant changes in the percent of visits where smoking status was documented (82% versus 79%); however, smoking cessation counseling during office visits increased significantly (19% to 54%). Key challenges included academic-community communication and resident scheduling and availability. In this CPP curriculum, residents made a difference in practice outcomes, and ongoing attention to challenges assisted with the project's success, possibly enhancing residents' likelihood of incorporating QI and principles of community health into their future careers.

  14. Projected health effects of realistic dietary changes to address freshwater constraints in India: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, James; Joy, Edward J M; Green, Rosemary; Harris, Francesca; Aleksandrowicz, Lukasz; Agrawal, Sutapa; Smith, Pete; Haines, Andy; Dangour, Alan D

    2017-04-01

    The availability of freshwater for irrigation in the Indian agricultural sector is expected to decline over the coming decades. This might have implications for food production in India, with subsequent effects on diets and health. We identify realistic and healthy dietary changes that could enhance the resilience of the Indian food system to future decreases in water availability. In this modelling study, we optimised typical dietary patterns in an Indian population sample to meet projected decreases in the availability of water per person for irrigation (blue water footprint) due to population growth (to 2025 and 2050). The optimised diets met nutritional guidelines and minimised deviation from existing patterns. Resulting changes in life-years lost due to coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and cancers were modelled using life tables, and changes in greenhouse gas emissions associated with the production of diets were estimated. The primary outcomes of the model were changes in life-years per 100 000 total population over 40 years (to 2050). The optimised diets had up to 30% lower blue water footprints and generally contained lower amounts of wheat, dairy, and poultry, and increased amounts of legumes. In the 2050 scenario, adoption of these diets would on average result in 6800 life-years gained per 100 000 total population (95% CI 1600-13 100) over 40 years. The dietary changes were accompanied by reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. The magnitude of the health and environmental effects varied between dietary patterns. Modest changes in diets could help to address projected reductions in the availability of freshwater for irrigation in India. These dietary changes could also simultaneously reduce diet-related greenhouse gas emissions and improve diet-related health outcomes. Wellcome Trust.

  15. Women Aboard Navy Ships: A Comprehensive Health and Readiness Research Project. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Survey Instrument, Form WD C.8 Follow-up Survey Instrument, Form MD C.9 TWA Flight 800 Recovery Instruments, Form WB G C. 10 TWA Flight 800 Recovery ...With Menstrual Symptoms Donna Kritz-Silverstein, Ph.D. Deborah L. Wingard, Ph.D. Frank C. Garland, Ph.D .. .............................. D-49 D.5...Diana R. Simmes, M.P.H ............................... D-104 D.8 Expected Occurrence of Ectopic Pregnancies and Spontaneous Abortions During the

  16. Reducing Cancer Health Disparities through Community Engagement: Working with Faith-Based Organizations (Project CHURCH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorna H. McNeill, PhD, MPH, is Chair and Associate Professor in the Department of Health Disparities at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. McNeill's research is on the elimination of cancer-related health disparities in minority populations. Her research has particular emphasis on understanding the influence of social contextual determinants of cancer in minorities, with a special focus of the role of physical activity as a key preventive behavior and obesity as a major cancer determinant. Her research takes place in minority and underserved communities such as public housing developments, black churches, community-based clinics and low-income neighborhoods-communities with excess cancer death rates. She has been continuously funded, receiving grants from various funding agencies (i.e., National Institutes of Health, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, etc.), to better understand and design innovative solutions to address obesity in racial/ethnic minority communities. Dr. McNeill is PI of several community-based studies, primarily working with African American churches. One is a called Project CHURCH, an academic-faith-based partnership established to: 1) identify underlying reasons for health disparities in cancer and cancer risk factors (e.g., screening, diet) among AAs using a cohort study (N=2400), 2) engage AAs as partners in the research process, and 3) to ultimately eliminate disparities among AAs. In 2014 Dr. McNeill furthered her partnership through the Faith, Health, and Family (FHF) Collaborative. The goals of FHF are to enhance the Project CHURCH partnership to address family obesity in African Americans, strengthen the partnership by developing a larger coalition of organizations and stakeholders to address the problem, assess church and community interest in family obesity and develop an agenda to address obesity in faith settings. To date we have 50 churches as members. Dr. McNeill is also director of the Center for Community

  17. Ethics issues experienced in HBM within Portuguese health surveillance and research projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel J Pereira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In keeping with the fundamental practice of transparency in the discussion and resolution of ethics conflicts raised by research, a summary of ethics issues raised during Portuguese biomonitoring in health surveillance and research is presented and, where applicable, their resolution is described. Methods Projects underway aim to promote the surveillance of public health related to the presence of solid waste incinerators or to study associations between human exposure to environmental factors and adverse health effects. The methodological approach involves biomonitoring of heavy metals, dioxins and/or other persistent organic pollutants in tissues including blood, human milk and both scalp and pubic hair in groups such as the general population, children, pregnant women or women attempting pregnancy. As such, the projects entail the recruitment of individuals representing different demographic and health conditions, the collection of body tissues and personal data, and the processing of the data and results. Results The issue of autonomy is raised during the recruitment of participants and during the collection of samples and data. This right is protected by the requirement for prior written, informed consent from the participant or, in the case of children, from their guardian. Recruitment has been successful, among eligible participants, in spite of incentives rarely being offered. The exception has been in obtaining guardians' consent for children's participation, particularly for blood sampling. In an attempt to mitigate the harm-benefit ratio, current research efforts include alternative less invasive biomarkers. Surveys are currently being conducted under contract as independent biomonitoring actions and as such, must be explicitly disclosed as a potential conflict of interests. Communication of results to participants is in general only practised when a health issue is present and corrective action possible

  18. Ethics issues experienced in HBM within Portuguese health surveillance and research projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, M Fátima; Segurado, Susana; Brantes, Ana; Simões, Helena Teresinha; Melim, J Maurício; Geraldes, V; Miguel, J Pereira

    2008-01-01

    Background In keeping with the fundamental practice of transparency in the discussion and resolution of ethics conflicts raised by research, a summary of ethics issues raised during Portuguese biomonitoring in health surveillance and research is presented and, where applicable, their resolution is described. Methods Projects underway aim to promote the surveillance of public health related to the presence of solid waste incinerators or to study associations between human exposure to environmental factors and adverse health effects. The methodological approach involves biomonitoring of heavy metals, dioxins and/or other persistent organic pollutants in tissues including blood, human milk and both scalp and pubic hair in groups such as the general population, children, pregnant women or women attempting pregnancy. As such, the projects entail the recruitment of individuals representing different demographic and health conditions, the collection of body tissues and personal data, and the processing of the data and results. Results The issue of autonomy is raised during the recruitment of participants and during the collection of samples and data. This right is protected by the requirement for prior written, informed consent from the participant or, in the case of children, from their guardian. Recruitment has been successful, among eligible participants, in spite of incentives rarely being offered. The exception has been in obtaining guardians' consent for children's participation, particularly for blood sampling. In an attempt to mitigate the harm-benefit ratio, current research efforts include alternative less invasive biomarkers. Surveys are currently being conducted under contract as independent biomonitoring actions and as such, must be explicitly disclosed as a potential conflict of interests. Communication of results to participants is in general only practised when a health issue is present and corrective action possible. Concerning human milk a careful

  19. The Human Genome Project in the United States: a perspective on the commercial, ethical, legislative and health care issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackler, Bruce F; Barach, Micha

    1991-01-01

    The Human Genome Project represents a government supported effort to map and sequence the human genome. Governmental support for the Project should include increased emphasis on grants and contracts to industry. This is particularly true for small highly innovative biotechnology companies that can rapidly integrate and use technology as a base for product development. Private industry must be integrated as a partner into the Project, as it will be in Japan and Europe. There is a consensus in industry that the Genome Project is, at this stage at least, a science research project funded by government and not, at present, a commercial project. It is not seriously expected to have any substantial widespread commercial impact in the near future. The ultimate commercial benefits of the Human Genome Project, in terms of definable health care products, may not be realized until well into the next century. Yet, there are a few companies for which the Genome Project affords immediate commercial opportunities in certain niche areas. The Genome Project can be expected to have a significant impact upon medical knowledge and treatment. Though the Genome Project is just beginning, much of the type of medical knowledge expected to be gained from the Project is already present and even being exploited, albeit on a small scale. The application of genetic understanding to practical applications raises ethical, medical and legal issues central to the Genome Project. Unfortunately, emotion and sensationalism sometimes dominate and prevent a constructive discussion of ethical and social issues pertaining to genetics. To answer public concerns about human gene transfer experiments, the medical and biotechnology communities must constructively discuss the medical realities, the benefits to human health and the adequacy of the current governmental oversights. These presentations must be understandable by the lay public and must address their fears. Failure to assuage public fears and

  20. Nursing inter-shift handover process in mental health settings: a best practice implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Chee Lien; Parasuram, Rajni; Kannusamy, Premarani

    2013-03-01

    Nursing inter-shift handover remains an important traditional ritual in nursing. Timely and effective handover of critical information ensure continuity of patient care and safe delivery. This project took place in a tertiary mental health institution in Singapore. The project aims to (i) examine existing handover practices/process in the tertiary mental health institution; (ii) determine the strengths and limitations of the existing handover practice/process; and (iii) identify, implement and evaluate an evidence-based nursing inter-shift handover process to enhance patient safety and service delivery. This project was conducted in three phases using the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research Into Practice programmes. It was implemented over a period of 4 months from end of August 2011 to beginning of December 2011. Evidence-based strategies such as town hall meetings and education sessions that reinforce proper handover techniques and its importance were implemented to enhance the handover processes and practices in four acute admitting wards. Pre- and post-audit data were observed and recorded for each case handover during each inter-shift handover session in four acute admitting wards. The handover processes for 212 cases for four acute admitting wards were observed using the seven audit criteria. Post-implementation audit findings show that compliance rate had improved significantly for the four criteria: an improvement of 49% compliance rate in the use of standardised documentation during shift handover session; an increase of 74% compliance rate in proper identification of patient at the start of each case report; a 31% increase in proper handing over of significant patient's history; and 18% increased compliance in providing detailed observation of patients. This project had shown that handover sessions can be made effective by translating evidence into practice through ongoing evidence-based audit

  1. Regional Projections of Extreme Apparent Temperature Days in Africa and the Related Potential Risk to Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Rebecca M; Matooane, Mamopeli; Engelbrecht, Francois A; Bopape, Mary-Jane M; Landman, Willem A; Naidoo, Mogesh; Merwe, Jacobus van der; Wright, Caradee Y

    2015-10-12

    Regional climate modelling was used to produce high resolution climate projections for Africa, under a "business as usual scenario", that were translated into potential health impacts utilizing a heat index that relates apparent temperature to health impacts. The continent is projected to see increases in the number of days when health may be adversely affected by increasing maximum apparent temperatures (AT) due to climate change. Additionally, climate projections indicate that the increases in AT results in a moving of days from the less severe to the more severe Symptom Bands. The analysis of the rate of increasing temperatures assisted in identifying areas, such as the East African highlands, where health may be at increasing risk due to both large increases in the absolute number of hot days, and due to the high rate of increase. The projections described here can be used by health stakeholders in Africa to assist in the development of appropriate public health interventions to mitigate the potential health impacts from climate change.

  2. Pediatric dentistry during rooming-in care: evaluation of an innovative project for promoting oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Giovanna Pires da Silva Ribeiro de; Costa, Luciane Ribeiro de Rezende Sucasas da; Cardoso, Regina Aparecida

    2004-06-01

    According to the current paradigm for promoting health, dental care should be a consideration from the first months of life, or even before birth. The aim of this paper is to evaluate mothers' knowledge of and attitude toward their babies' oral health after receiving guidance during the neonatal period. Forty-six mothers were contacted and asked about the advice they had received and how they felt about the information provided. The mothers recruited for the study were divided into two groups, A (n=25) and B (n=21), according to the time elapsed since their participation in the project, that is, less than or equal to three months and more than three months, respectively. A Wilcoxom rank sum test did not show any statistically significant difference between the two groups (p>0.05). Guidance on the baby's oral hygiene, breastfeeding the baby exclusively until the sixth month, as well as the restrictions imposed on sugar intake were what the mothers remembered most. Recommendations concerning good arch development and the use of bottles were what mothers remembered least. Regarding infant oral health, it would be advisable to schedule prenatal and neonatal visits, with the second post-natal consultation no later than four months after childbirth.

  3. An Exploitation of Satellite-based Observation for Health Information: The UFOS Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangin, A.; Morel, M.; Fanton d' Andon, O

    2000-07-01

    Short, medium and long-term trends of UV intensity levels are of crucial importance for either assessing effective biological impacts on human population, or implementing adequate preventive behaviours. Better information on a large spatial scale and increased public awareness of the short-term variations in UV values will help to support health agencies' goals of educating the public on UV risks. The Ultraviolet Forecast Operational Service Project (UFAS), financed in part by the European Commission/DG Information Society (TEN-TELECOM programme), aims to exploit satellite-based observations and to supply a set of UV products directly useful to health care. The short-term objective is to demonstrate the technical and economical feasibility and benefits that could be brought by such a system. UFOS is carried out by ACRI, with the support of an Advisory Group chaired by WHO and involving representation from the sectors of Health (WHO, INTERSUN collaborating centres, ZAMBON), Environment (WMO, IASB), and Telecommunications (EURECOM, IMET). (author)

  4. A vidcasting project to promote the pharmacist's role in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Seena L; Van Amburgh, Jenny A

    2010-08-10

    To develop, implement, and assess an Internet-based vidcasting project to promote the pharmacist's role in public health. This was a collaborative effort for 2 different courses taught at 2 different schools of pharmacy. Faculty members created a special instructional design for students to follow in planning, producing, and publishing video public service announcements on the Internet. Formative and summative assessments, including course examinations, a grading rubric, student survey, and focus group, were implemented to evaluate student learning and public reaction. Students believed Internet video public service announcements served as a useful reference for patients and professionals, aided in promoting disease prevention and wellness initiatives, positively impacted patient-provider relationships, and increased awareness regarding significance and financial impact of disease burden. Producing a public health information video and vidcasting it on the Internet increased pharmacy students' self-esteem, respect for peers, creative and critical-thinking abilities, and understanding of the need for and importance of pharmacists providing accurate public health information.

  5. The Choice Project: Peer Workers Promoting Shared Decision Making at a Youth Mental Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Magenta Bender; Batchelor, Samantha; Dimopoulos-Bick, Tara; Howe, Deb

    2017-08-01

    In youth mental health services, consumer participation is essential, but few implementation strategies exist to engage young consumers. This project evaluated an intervention implemented in an Australian youth mental health service that utilized peer workers to promote shared decision making via an online tool. All new clients ages 16-25 were invited to participate in this nonrandomized comparative study, which used a historical comparison group (N=80). Intervention participants (N=149) engaged with a peer worker and used the online tool before and during their intake assessment. Pre- and postintake data were collected for both groups; measures included decisional conflict, perceived shared decision making, and satisfaction. A series of paired t tests, analyses of variance, and multiple regressions were conducted to assess differences in scores across intervention and comparison groups and pre- and postintake assessments. Ratings of perceived shared decision making with intake workers were higher in the intervention group than in the comparison group (p=.015). In both groups, decisional conflict scores were significantly lower after the intake assessment (pshared decision making and lower decisional conflict were associated with satisfaction (pshared decision making reported feeling more involved in their assessment. Feeling involved and having lower decisional conflict after seeing an intake worker were important for client satisfaction. These findings demonstrate the importance of both peer work and shared decision making for promoting optimal outcomes in youth mental health services.

  6. Health technology assessment of medical devices: What is different? An overview of three European projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell-Inderst, Petra; Mayer, Julia; Lauterberg, Jörg; Hunger, Theresa; Arvandi, Marjan; Conrads-Frank, Annette; Nachtnebel, Anna; Wild, Claudia; Siebert, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    With the growing use and importance of health technology assessment (HTA) in decision making during recent years, health technology assessors, decision makers and stakeholders are confronted with methodological challenges due to specific characteristics of health technologies (e. g., pharmaceuticals, diagnostic tests, screening programs), their developmental environment, and their regulation process. Being aware of the necessity to use HTA as a policy instrument for sustainable health care systems in a regulatory environment of decentralized Conformité Européenne (CE) marking, the European Union (EU) is increasingly supporting the development of methods for the assessment of medical devices (MD) on different levels: within the scope of European research projects and within joint assessment activities of the member states of the European network for Health Technology Assessment (EUnetHTA). First, this article describes three projects: MedtecHTA-Methods for Health Technology Assessment of Medical Devices, a European Perspective Work Package 3 (WP3), Comparative Effectiveness of Medical Devices led by the University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology (UMIT). Second, we discuss the experiences of the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute Health Technology Assessment (LBI HTA) with the joint production of rapid assessments of medical devices by several European HTA agencies within EUnetHTA. Third, a brief outline is given of the framework of joint methodological guideline elaboration by the EUnetHTA partner organizations because a guideline for therapeutic MD is also being developed here. We will describe aims, methods and some preliminary results of MedtecHTA and EUnetHTA Joint Action 2 Work Package 5 Strand B (WP5B) applying the HTA Core Model for Rapid Assessment for national adaptation and reporting, and give an overview of the development process of methodological guidelines within WP 7 of EUnetHTA Joint Action 2. Based on a literature review in Medtec

  7. Factors influencing the development of primary care data collection projects from electronic health records: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentil, Marie-Line; Cuggia, Marc; Fiquet, Laure; Hagenbourger, Camille; Le Berre, Thomas; Banâtre, Agnès; Renault, Eric; Bouzille, Guillaume; Chapron, Anthony

    2017-09-25

    Primary care data gathered from Electronic Health Records are of the utmost interest considering the essential role of general practitioners (GPs) as coordinators of patient care. These data represent the synthesis of the patient history and also give a comprehensive picture of the population health status. Nevertheless, discrepancies between countries exist concerning routine data collection projects. Therefore, we wanted to identify elements that influence the development and durability of such projects. A systematic review was conducted using the PubMed database to identify worldwide current primary care data collection projects. The gray literature was also searched via official project websites and their contact person was emailed to obtain information on the project managers. Data were retrieved from the included studies using a standardized form, screening four aspects: projects features, technological infrastructure, GPs' roles, data collection network organization. The literature search allowed identifying 36 routine data collection networks, mostly in English-speaking countries: CPRD and THIN in the United Kingdom, the Veterans Health Administration project in the United States, EMRALD and CPCSSN in Canada. These projects had in common the use of technical facilities that range from extraction tools to comprehensive computing platforms. Moreover, GPs initiated the extraction process and benefited from incentives for their participation. Finally, analysis of the literature data highlighted that governmental services, academic institutions, including departments of general practice, and software companies, are pivotal for the promotion and durability of primary care data collection projects. Solid technical facilities and strong academic and governmental support are required for promoting and supporting long-term and wide-range primary care data collection projects.

  8. The WHISK (Women's Health: Increasing the Awareness of Science and Knowledge) Pilot Project: Recognizing Sex and Gender Differences in Women's Health and Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lorece V; Dennis, Sabriya; Weaks, Francesca

    2013-09-01

    Women's health encompasses a continuum of biological, psychological, and social challenges that differ considerably from those of men. Despite the remarkable advances in science, women's health and sex differences research is slowly gaining recognition and acceptance. It is important that women's health gain attention as women are usually the gatekeepers of care for the family. Women's health and health outcomes are strongly influenced by sex and gender differences as well as geography. Around the world, the interplay of biology and culture brings about differences in men's and women's health, which have been largely overlooked. The Women's Health: Increasing the Awareness of Science and Knowledge (WHISK) Pilot Project was a multidisciplinary project aimed to increase the awareness of sex and gender differences in women's health and research among healthcare professionals. Theater expression and creative art were used to translate knowledge, enhance understanding, and increase the awareness of sex differences. Findings from this project clearly showed an apparent increase in knowledge and cultivation of new insights.

  9. An eHealth Project on Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: Comprehensive Evaluation of a Promotional Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panatto, Donatella; Domnich, Alexander; Gasparini, Roberto; Bonanni, Paolo; Icardi, Giancarlo; Amicizia, Daniela; Arata, Lucia; Carozzo, Stefano; Signori, Alessio; Bechini, Angela; Boccalini, Sara

    2016-12-02

    The recently launched Pneumo Rischio eHealth project, which consists of an app, a website, and social networking activity, is aimed at increasing public awareness of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The launch of this project was prompted by the inadequate awareness of IPD among both laypeople and health care workers, the heavy socioeconomic burden of IPD, and the far from optimal vaccination coverage in Italy, despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines. The objectives of our study were to analyze trends in Pneumo Rischio usage before and after a promotional campaign, to characterize its end users, and to assess its user-rated quality. At 7 months after launching Pneumo Rischio, we established a 4-month marketing campaign to promote the project. This intervention used various approaches and channels, including both traditional and digital marketing strategies. To highlight usage trends, we used different techniques of time series analysis and modeling, including a modified Mann-Kendall test, change-point detection, and segmented negative binomial regression of interrupted time series. Users were characterized in terms of demographics and IPD risk categories. Customer-rated quality was evaluated by means of a standardized tool in a sample of app users. Over 1 year, the app was accessed by 9295 users and the website was accessed by 143,993 users, while the project's Facebook page had 1216 fans. The promotional intervention was highly effective in increasing the daily number of users. In particular, the Mann-Kendall trend test revealed a significant (P ≤.01) increasing trend in both app and website users, while change-point detection analysis showed that the first significant change corresponded to the start of the promotional campaign. Regression analysis showed a significant immediate effect of the intervention, with a mean increase in daily numbers of users of 1562% (95% CI 456%-4870%) for the app and 620% (95% CI 176%-1777%) for the website

  10. Lessons learned? Nurses and health demonstration projects in New York City, 1920-1935.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antonio, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This historical case study looks at two foundation-funded health demonstration projects in New York City from 1920 to 1935. It specifically examines the disciplinary interests, the work, and the aspirations of nurses and social workers as they tried to provide coordinated and cost-effective care to the individuals and families with whom they worked. It attends to the processes--not just the outcomes--involved in the coming together and moving apart of the different organizations, disciplinary interests, knowledge domains, and spheres of public and private responsibilities involved in caring for those in need. It locates the problems of coordination within disciplinary tensions as nurses and social worker--working within a web of gender, class, race, and power--sought to advance their own disciplinary interests even as they searched for better ways to care for the families in their charge.

  11. Creating a coherent set of indicators to monitor health across Europe: the Euro-REVES 2 project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robine, Jean-Marie; Jagger, Carol

    2003-09-01

    The Euro-REVES 2 project, 'Setting up of a coherent set of health expectancies for the European Union', was begun in 1998 under the European Health Monitoring Programme with the aim of selecting a concise set of instruments to simultaneously monitor mortality and the different facets of health. An in-depth analysis of the current health survey instruments in Europe together with a review of past research, found that, although harmonization in instruments appeared to exist superficially, major differences existed. Four instruments have been recommended (where necessary using existing instruments with modifications suggested by the research literature) covering physical and sensory functional limitations, activity restriction, self-perceived health and mental health. Additionally a new global activity limitation indicator (GALI) has been developed. These instruments are firmly anchored to past research and the health concepts behind the indicators and their relevance to policy and guidelines for implementation are explicitly made. The second phase of the project will recommend further instruments, leading to health expectancies that cover all the conceptual framework of population health measurement. This will allow assessment of health inequalities between the European Union countries, an appreciation of the causes and the production of profiles for each country in terms of the various facets of health.

  12. Air quality and students' health in Shanghai (China): an educational and scientific project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot-Cormier, Florence; Nicolaï, Marie-Pierre; Martinez, Claire-Marie; Bethmont, Valérie; Guinot, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    The quality of our environment and especially air quality is a hot topic in any urban environment. Hourly air quality data tend to be easily available to the populations either in the news or on mobile phones. Studies underlining the relationship between environment and health exist in developed countries, but the results cannot be used in such different environmental and sociological contexts as the ones we have in China. In collaboration with the CNRS, students from the Lycée Français de Shanghai (LFS- 5th and 2nd grade) undertake a study in order to obtain an empiric relationship between the atmospheric pollutants they are exposed to in and out the classrooms, and their own health. This study is a part of a scientific and educational project including Beijing, and possibly other foreign schools in Asia later on. The atmospheric pollution in China is essentially caused by particles from different sizes mainly coming from coal combustion. First, in order to quantify the pollution at Shanghai, the students are recording information regarding fine particles as PM2.5 and PM1.0, NO2, SO2, and O3 using active and passive sensors indoors and outdoors, within the school campus. CO2, temperature and relative humidity are used to qualify the confinement rate indoors. In parallel, approximately 100 students (chosen regarding their age, health records, residence time in China…) and some teachers are going to complete a monthly survey regarding their health. Moreover, they will perform some specific measurements to obtain their breathing performances by spirometry, and an indication of the inflammation of their lower airways by exhaled NO measurements. The protocol of these experimentations and the first results will be presented in the poster. At the end of the project, these results will allow us to get a better knowledge about the air pollution we are exposed to, within the school campus, which will help us to adopt an optimized risk management protocol when pollution

  13. Getting eHealth into basic nursing education: report of the RCN information in nursing project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, June; Baker, Bernice; Baker, David

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a project undertaken in 2008 by the Royal College of Nursing's Information in Nursing Forum. The project, undertaken by the RCN IN Forum in association with the RCN Education Forum and the RCN Association of Nursing Students, was in two parts. The first part consisted of an on-line survey of nursing students to discover their "readiness" for working in an electronic environment. The second part consisted of a workshop for invited stakeholders - organisations responsible for commissioning and providing basic nursing education, regulators, nurse teachers, and nursing students themselves - the objective of which was to consider the results of the survey and other information, in order to develop a consensus on how best to incorporate eHealth issues into basic nursing education. The survey was undertaken during April 2008 via the RCN website. Students were asked how well they felt their nursing education had prepared them for competencies set out in a previously published model curriculum. 1,120 students responded. 565 students who had used electronic patient records during their most recent clinical placement were asked about their experience. Students rated their basic computer skills much higher than their understanding of eHealth. While they felt competent to document assessments and care plans using paper records, few felt competent to do so using electronic records. Few know anything about telehealth (remote diagnosis and delivery of healthcare) or telecare (assistive technology in people's homes). Among those who had used computers in their most recent clinical placement there were clear breaches of the protocols designed to ensure security and confidentiality. Twenty seven invited participants attended the workshop held in October 2008, plus 12 members of the participating Forums and relevant RCN staff. Following presentation and discussion of the findings of the survey, participants worked in three groups to identify and

  14. Cardiovascular risk surveillance to develop a nationwide health promotion strategy: the grenada heart project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansilal, Sameer; Vedanthan, Rajesh; Woodward, Mark; Iyengar, Rupa; Hunn, Marilyn; Lewis, Marcelle; Francis, Lesley; Charney, Alexander; Graves, Claire; Farkouh, Michael E; Fuster, Valentin

    2012-07-01

    The Grenada Heart Project aims to study the clinical, biological, and psychosocial determinants of the cardiovascular health in Grenada in order to develop and implement a nationwide cardiovascular health promotion program. We recruited 2,827 adults randomly selected from the national electronic voter list. The main outcome measures were self-reported cardiovascular disease and behavioral risk factors, anthropometric measures, blood pressure, point-of-care testing for glucose and lipids, and ankle-brachial index. Risk factors were also compared with the U.S. National Health and Nutritional Survey data. Prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors were: overweight and obesity-57.7% of the population, physical inactivity-23.4%, diabetes-13.3%, hypertension-29.7%, hypercholesterolemia-8.6%, and smoking-7%. Subjects who were physically active had a significantly lower 10-year Framingham risk score (p<0.001). Compared with the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Survey data, Grenadian women had higher rates of adiposity, diabetes, hypertension, and elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, whereas Grenadian men had a higher rate of diabetes, a similar rate of hypertension, and lower rates of the other risk factors. Prevalence of peripheral arterial disease was 7.6%; stroke and coronary heart disease were equally prevalent at ∼2%. This randomly selected adult sample in Grenada reveals prevalence rates of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes significantly exceeding those seen in the United States. The contrasting, paradoxically low levels of prevalent cardiovascular disease support the concept that Grenada is experiencing an obesity-related "risk transition." These data form the basis for the implementation of a pilot intervention program based on the Institute of Medicine recommendations and may serve as a model for other low- and middle-income countries. Copyright © 2012 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Pain measurement in the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project: presence, intensity, and location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shega, Joseph W; Tiedt, Andrew D; Grant, Kaelin; Dale, William

    2014-11-01

    To describe the rationale for the pain presence, location, and intensity measures in the National Social Life, Health and Aging Project (NSHAP). Responses to the pain presence, location (pain map), and intensity (verbal descriptor scale) items were analyzed by gender and age (62-69, 70-79, and 80-91). Pain intensity was dichotomized (none to mild vs moderate or higher) and compared by demographics, physical function, mood, and self-rated health. All analyses used Wald tests to compare sample means. Participants completed the pain presence (n = 2,430/2,799), location (n = 2,558/2,799), and intensity (n = 2,589/2,799) items. Pain items varied by gender with women reporting more head, arm, hip/buttock, leg, and foot pain compared to men, (p < .05) at each individual site. Women also reported more intense pain compared to men-2.13 versus 1.94, respectively (p < .05). Pain items demonstrated remarkable similarity among age cohorts. Health indicators were significant and in the expected direction (p < .001). An increase in comorbidity, ADL and IADL dependence, worse self-rated health, and more depressive symptoms were each significantly more common among participants who reported moderate or greater pain compared to none to mild pain. Pain presence, location, and intensity measures were successfully integrated into NSHAP Wave 2 and exhibit construct and external validity. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Impact of online toxicology training on health professionals: the Global Educational Toxicology Uniting Project (GETUP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Anselm; Vohra, Rais; Dawson, Andrew H; Stolbach, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    The Global Educational Toxicology Uniting Project (GETUP), supported by the American College of Medical Toxicology, links countries with and without toxicology services via distance education with the aim to improve education. Due to the lack of toxicology services in some countries there is a knowledge gap in the management of poisonings. We describe our experience with the worldwide delivery of an online introductory toxicology curriculum to emergency doctors and other health professionals treating poisoned patients. We delivered a 15-module introductory Internet-based toxicology curriculum to emergency doctors and health professionals, conducted from August to December 2016. This Internet-based curriculum was adapted from one used to teach emergency residents toxicology in the United States. Modules covered themes such as pharmaceutical (n = 8), toxidromes (n = 2) and agrochemicals (n = 5) poisoning. Participants completed pre-test and post-test multiple choice questions (MCQs) before and after completing the online module, respectively, throughout the course. We collected information on participant demographics, education and training, and perception of relevance of the curriculum. Participants gave feedback on the course and how it affected their practice. One hundred and thirty-six health professionals from 33 countries participated in the course: 98 emergency doctors/medical officers, 25 physicians, eight pharmacists/poisons information specialists, two toxicologists, two medical students and one nurse. Median age of participants was 34 years. Median number of years postgraduate was seven. Ninety (65%) had access to either a poisons information centre over the phone or toxicologist and 48 (35%) did not. All participants expected the course to help improve their knowledge. Overall median pre-module MCQ scores were 56% (95%CI: 38, 75%) compared to post-module MCQ scores median 89% (95% CI: 67, 100%) (p education to health professionals treating

  17. A review package for health impact assessment reports on development projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cave, Ben; Jakobsen, Mette Winge

    2017-01-01

    A review package for assessing the quality of health impact assessment (HIA) reports of development projects in UK was developed in 2009 as a contribution to the improvement of the output of HIAs being conducted in the UK on large development projects. Since its publication, the review package has...... must be followed in order ensure proper modification which is in line with the actual use and need of the users. A modification of the review package is needed. Key messages: •The review package has had an impact on the HIA practice today, not just in the UK. •Revision of the review package is needed...... been used and referenced widely, also beyond the UK. However, there has been no follow up of the progress of use of the review package and no assessment of its use and potential need of revision. This abstract seeks to present how the review package has been used since 2009 and to what extent it has...

  18. Latent classes of alcohol problems in Mauritian men: Results from the Joint Child Health Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczak, Susan E; Prescott, Carol A; Venables, Peter H

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify latent classes of alcohol problems and their sociodemographic correlates in the east African nation of Mauritius. Participants were from the Joint Child Health Project, a longitudinal study of a 1969-1970 birth cohort of 1795 individuals. In mid-adulthood (M = 37 years), all available participants (n = 1206; 67% of the original cohort) were assessed for demographic characteristics, and lifetime drinkers were assessed for alcohol-related problems. Given the low endorsement of problems by women, only male lifetime drinkers (n = 520) were included in the latent class analyses. Analyses indicated the best-fitting model contained four classes of drinkers: Non-problematic (66%), Moderate (16%), Hazardous (11%) and Severe (6%). Lower education and occupation were associated with Moderate and Severe problem classes, whereas higher education and occupation were associated with the Hazardous class. Being Hindu, Tamil and Creole were differentially predictive of class membership, but being Muslim was not. Our findings provide evidence of a distinct Hazardous drinking class that has unique demographic correlates and may represent a cluster of problems that is more bound by cultural factors. We also found problem classes on a severity continuum from none to moderate to severe problems. This study highlights the importance of examining societal, subgroup and person-level factors to produce a more nuanced understanding of distinct classes of alcohol-related problems. [Luczak SE, Prescott CA, Venables PH. Latent classes of alcohol problems in Mauritian men: Results from the Joint Child Health Project. © 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  19. The Environmental Health/Home Safety Education Project: a successful and practical U.S.-Mexico border initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster-Cox, Susan C; Mangadu, Thenral; Jacquez, Benjamín; Fullerton, Lynne

    2010-05-01

    The Environmental Health/Home Safety Education Project (Proyecto de Salud Ambiental y Seguridad en el Hogar) has been developed in response to a wide array of severe and often preventable environmental health issues occurring in and around homes on the U.S.-Mexico border. Utilizing well-trained community members, called promotoras , homes are visited and assessed for potential environmental hazards, including home fire and food safety issues. Data analyzed from project years 2002 to 2005 shows a significant impact in knowledge levels and initial behavior change among targeted participants as it relates to fire and food safety issues. Since the initiation of the project in 1999, hundreds of participants have improved their quality of life by making their homes safer. The project has proven to be sustainable, replicable, flexible, and attractive to funders.

  20. Investigation of the in vitro toxicological properties of the synthetic cannabimimetic drug CP-47,497-C8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koller, Verena J., E-mail: verena.koller@meduniwien.ac.at [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Internal Medicine 1, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8A, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Auwärter, Volker, E-mail: volker.auwaerter@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Institute of Forensic Medicine, University Medical Center Freiburg, Albertstraße 9, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Grummt, Tamara, E-mail: tamara.grummt@uba.de [German Federal Environmental Agency, Heinrich-Heine-Str., 12, 08645 Bad Elster (Germany); Moosmann, Bjoern, E-mail: bjoern.moosmann@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Institute of Forensic Medicine, University Medical Center Freiburg, Albertstraße 9, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Mišík, Miroslav, E-mail: miroslav.misik@meduniwien.ac.at [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Internal Medicine 1, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8A, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Knasmüller, Siegfried, E-mail: siegfried.knasmueller@meduniwien.ac.at [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Internal Medicine 1, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8A, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-06-01

    Cannabicyclohexanol (CP-47,497-C8) is a representative of a group of cannabimimetic cyclohexylphenols which is added to herbal mixtures as a cannabis substitute since 2008. Although in the beginning CP-47,497-C8 was the main ingredient of “Spice” and similar products, it was partly replaced by aminoalkylindole-type cannabinoid receptor agonists like JWH-018, JWH-073 or JWH-250, but never completely disappeared from the market. Since information on its toxicological properties is scarce, we investigated the effects of the drug in human derived cell lines. The cytotoxic effects were studied in a panel of assays (SRB, XTT, LDHe and NR tests) in a buccal derived (TR146) and a liver derived (HepG2) cell line. The strongest effects were seen in the two former assays at levels ≥ 7.5 μM indicating that the compound interferes with protein synthesis and causes membrane damage. In additional comet assays, DNA damage was detected at levels ≥ 10 μM. Experiments with lesion specific enzymes showed that these effects are not due to oxidative damage of DNA bases. The negative findings obtained in Salmonella/microsome assays and the positive results of micronucleus tests with the cell lines indicate that the compound does not cause gene mutations but acts on the chromosomal level. In contrast to other synthetic cannabinoids, no indication for estrogenic/antiestrogenic properties was seen in a luciferase assay with bone marrow derived U2-OS cells. In conclusion, our findings show that the drug has only weak cytotoxic properties. However, the induction of chromosomal damage indicates that it may cause adverse effects in users due to its impact on the stability of the genetic material. - Highlights: • We tested the toxic properties of a synthetic cannabinoid. • Acute cytotoxic effects were detected with doses ≥ 7 μM. • No hormonal effects were found. • DNA damage was detected at levels ≥ 10 μM in comet assay and micronucleus tests. • Effects in directly

  1. [Health impact assessment of policies for municipal solid waste management: findings of the SESPIR Project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranzi, Andrea; Ancona, Carla; Angelini, Paola; Badaloni, Chiara; Cernigliaro, Achille; Chiusolo, Monica; Parmagnani, Federica; Pizzuti, Renato; Scondotto, Salvatore; Cadum, Ennio; Forastiere, Francesco; Lauriola, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The SESPIR Project (Epidemiological Surveillance of Health Status of Resident Population Around the Waste Treatment Plants) assessed the impact on health of residents nearby incinerators, landfills and mechanical biological treatment plants in five Italian regions (Emilia-Romagna, Piedmont, Lazio, Campania, and Sicily). The assessment procedure took into account the available knowledge on health effects of waste disposal facilities. Analyses were related to three different scenarios: a Baseline scenario, referred to plants active in 2008-2009; the regional future scenario, with plants expected in the waste regional plans; a virtuous scenario (Green 2020), based on a policy management of municipal solid waste (MSW) through the reduction of production and an intense recovery policy. Facing with a total population of around 24 million for the 5 regions, the residents nearby the plants were more than 380,000 people at Baseline. Such a population is reduced to approximately 330.000 inhabitants and 170.000 inhabitants in the regional and Green 2020 scenarios, respectively. The health impact was assessed for the period 2008-2040. At Baseline, 1-2 cases per year of cancer attributable to MSW plants were estimated, as well as 26 cases per year of adverse pregnancy outcomes (including low birth weight and birth defects), 102 persons with respiratory symptoms, and about a thousand affected from annoyance caused by odours. These annual estimates are translated into 2,725 years of life with disability (DALYs) estimated for the entire period. The DALYs are reduced by approximately 20% and 80% in the two future scenarios. Even in these cases, health impact is given by the greater effects on pregnancy and the annoyance associated with the odours of plants. In spite of the limitations due to the inevitable assumptions required by the present exercise, the proposed methodology is suitable for a first approach to assess different policies that can be adopted in regional planning in

  2. Umbrella project for Bangladesh: strengthening NGO capacity and linkages to improve reproductive health service and information. RAS/98/P55.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    In Bangladesh, the UN Population Fund is working to strengthen nongovernmental organization (NGO) capacity and linkages to improve reproductive health services and information. Specifically, the aim is to strengthen the technical and human resource capacity of participating NGOs and the functional linkages between national NGOs and relevant government agencies to help harmonize and standardize the delivery of reproductive health information and services. This umbrella project collaborates with RHI-participating NGOs in a policy paper on adolescent reproductive health, and will maintain contact with the regional dimension project to collaborate its activities. Programs implemented by partner NGOs are being reviewed and monitored, and linkages among national NGOs and government agencies are being developed. The main activities of the project are enumerated.

  3. The Torres Indigenous Hip Hop Project: evaluating the use of performing arts as a medium for sexual health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Alexandra; Crouch, Alan; Robertson, Heather; Fagan, Patricia

    2013-08-01

    The Torres Indigenous Hip Hop Project (the Project) was conducted in the Torres and Northern Peninsula Area of Queensland during early 2010. This paper provides a critical analysis of project outcomes and identifies criteria that may form a suitable framework for the assessment of proposals for sexual health promotion using performing arts-based approaches in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander settings. A case study method was used. The first phase of analysis assessed whether project objectives were met using data collected during project planning and implementation. The second phase used these findings, augmented by interviews with key personnel, to respond to the question 'How could this be done better?'. The Project required significant human and organisational implementation support. The project was successful in facilitating event-specific community mobilisation. It raised awareness of sexual health disadvantage and engaged effectively with the target group. It laid important groundwork to progress school-based and community mechanisms to address regional youth disadvantage. Against these benefits are issues of opportunity cost and the need for ongoing resources to capitalise on the opportunities created. With substantial support and planning, such approaches can play an important role in engaging young people and bridging the gap between clinical interventions and improvements in health deriving from community-driven strategies. SO WHAT? This paper contributes to existing literature by identifying key elements of an effective approach to using performing arts in sexual health promotion in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander settings. It also provides guidance when consideration is being given to investment in resource-intensive health promotion initiatives.

  4. [Experience of knowledge translation in the ITSAL (immigration, work and health) research project with representatives of the target population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronda, Elena; López-Jacob, M José; Paredes-Carbonell, Joan J; López, Pilar; Boix, Pere; García, Ana M

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the experience of knowledge translation between researchers of the ITSAL (immigration, work and health) project and representatives of organizations working with immigrants to discuss the results obtained in the project and future research lines. A meeting was held, attended by three researchers and 18 representatives from 11 institutions. Following a presentation of the methodology and results of the project, the participants discussed the results presented and research areas of interest, thus confirming matches between the two sides and obtaining proposals of interest for the ITSAL project. We understand the process described as an approach to social validation of some of the main results of this project. This experience has allowed us to open a channel of communication with the target population of the study, in line with the necessary two-way interaction between researchers and users. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Equipment and modifications that enabled infant child-care by a mother with C8 tetraplegia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Kristine C

    2007-01-01

    In the past, rehabilitative effort after spinal cord injury has focused on maximizing physical functioning related to activities of daily living and self-care, with less emphasis on issues such as care-giving. The number of women becoming pregnant and rearing children after spinal cord injury has increased in recent years, but descriptions of equipment and modifications used in child-care are scarce. Equipment and techniques that enable physical independence in providing infant-care by persons with low-level tetraplegia has not previously been described. This case report describes the modified equipment and physical strategies used by a mother with C8 tetraplegia to physically care for her young infants. Relevant issues of physical function were identified, potential sources for equipment and techniques were reviewed, and then the equipment and technique solutions were formulated. Attachment arms and brackets were made so that a lightweight stroller could be attached directly to the mother's manual wheelchair, a crib was modified with sliding Lexan doors so that it could be accessed at wheelchair level, and a table with sides was designed and built to act as a play surface where the mother could independently place an infant. All other pieces of baby-care equipment were commercially available and the mother developed strategies for their use without modification. With the exception of bathing, using the tools and techniques described, this mother was able to achieve physical independence in providing her children's infant care.

  6. Scale-up of community-based malaria control can be achieved without degrading community health workers' service quality: the Village Malaria Worker project in Cambodia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yasuoka, Junko; Poudel, Krishna C; Ly, Po; Nguon, Chea; Socheat, Duong; Jimba, Masamine

    2012-01-01

    .... Cambodia recently scaled up their Village Malaria Worker (VMW) project by substantially increasing the number of VMWs and expanding the project's health services to include treatment of fever, diarrhoea, and Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI...

  7. Evaluation of regional project to strengthen national health research systems in four countries in West Africa: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sombié, Issiaka; Aidam, Jude; Montorzi, Gabriela

    2017-07-12

    Since the Commission on Health Research for Development (COHRED) published its flagship report, more attention has been focused on strengthening national health research systems (NHRS). This paper evaluates the contribution of a regional project that used a participatory approach to strengthen NHRS in four post-conflict West African countries - Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Mali. The data from the situation analysis conducted at the start of the project was compared to data from the project's final evaluation, using a hybrid conceptual framework built around four key areas identified through the analysis of existing frameworks. The four areas are governance and management, capacities, funding, and dissemination/use of research findings. The project helped improve the countries' governance and management mechanisms without strengthening the entire NHRS. In the four countries, at least one policy, plan or research agenda was developed. One country put in place a national health research ethics committee, while all four countries could adopt a research information management system. The participatory approach and support from the West African Health Organisation and COHRED were all determining factors. The lessons learned from this project show that the fragile context of these countries requires long-term engagement and that support from a regional institution is needed to address existing challenges and successfully strengthen the entire NHRS.

  8. How advocates use health economic data and projections: the Irish experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murray, Eugene

    2009-07-01

    Approximately 30,000 people die in Ireland each year. Currently over 6000 people access specialist palliative care services annually, a figure that is projected to rise to 12,500 by 2016. In 2006, the Irish Hospice Foundation entered a joint advocacy alliance with the Irish Cancer Society and the Irish Association for Palliative Care. By speaking with one voice and using quality data, these three national voluntary groups were able to influence government and social partners to address clearly identified regional inequities in the provision of palliative care services. Over the past three years, there has been significant public investment in palliative care services, culminating in the recent publication by the national health agency of a five-year plan for a comprehensive national palliative care service. However, the sudden economic downturn in 2008 and the severe deterioration of public finances threaten the implementation of the plan. New services can only be developed if there is strong evidence to illustrate that they are cost-effective in delivering patient care. Having reviewed the international evidence, the joint advocacy group has used this economic evidence to strengthen the case that the development of palliative care services can actually save money in health budgets. The campaign mounted by the joint advocacy group was greatly facilitated by the existence of good data and an agreed evidence-based policy on what constitutes a comprehensive service.

  9. Preparing for effective communications during disasters: lessons from a World Health Organization quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medford-Davis, Laura N; Kapur, G Bobby

    2014-03-19

    One hundred ninety-four member nations turn to the World Health Organization (WHO) for guidance and assistance during disasters. Purposes of disaster communication include preventing panic, promoting appropriate health behaviors, coordinating response among stakeholders, advocating for affected populations, and mobilizing resources. A quality improvement project was undertaken to gather expert consensus on best practices that could be used to improve WHO protocols for disaster communication. Open-ended surveys of 26 WHO Communications Officers with disaster response experience were conducted. Responses were categorized to determine the common themes of disaster response communication and areas for practice improvement. Disasters where the participants had experience included 29 outbreaks of 13 different diseases in 16 countries, 18 natural disasters of 6 different types in 15 countries, 2 technical disasters in 2 countries, and ten conflicts in 10 countries. Recommendations to build communications capacity prior to a disaster include pre-writing public service announcements in multiple languages on questions that frequently arise during disasters; maintaining a database of statistics for different regions and types of disaster; maintaining lists of the locally trusted sources of information for frequently affected countries and regions; maintaining email listservs of employees, international media outlet contacts, and government and non-governmental organization contacts that can be used to rapidly disseminate information; developing a global network with 24-h cross-coverage by participants from each time zone; and creating a central electronic sharepoint where all of these materials can be accessed by communications officers around the globe.

  10. Collaboration, Participation and Technology: The San Joaquin Valley Cumulative Health Impacts Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan K. London

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Community-university partnerships have been shown to produce significant value for both sets of partners by providing reciprocal learning opportunities, (rebuilding bonds of trust, and creating unique venues to formulate and apply research that responds to community interests and informs collaborative solutions to community problems. For such partnerships to be mutually empowering, certain design characteristics are necessary. These include mutual respect for different modes and expressions of knowledge, capacity-building for all parties, and an environment that promotes honest and constructive dialogue about the inevitable tensions associated with the interplay of power/knowledge. This article explores an innovative case of community-university partnerships through participatory action research involving a coalition of environmental justice and health advocates, the San Joaquin Valley Cumulative Health Impacts Project, and researchers affiliated with the University of California, Davis. In particular, we examine how participatory GIS and community mapping can promote co-learning and interdependent science. Keywords Community-based participatory research, environmental justice, Public Participation Geographic Information System

  11. Personality measures in the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iveniuk, James; Laumann, Edward O; Waite, Linda J; McClintock, Martha K; Tiedt, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Provide recommendations for researchers on the use of the Big Five personality battery in the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP), and ensure that the battery does proxy the Big Five. Also, describe the levels of Big Five traits across gender and age. We used an Exploratory Structural Equation Model (ESEM) to analyze NHSAP's personality battery, comparing NSHAP with the National Longitudinal Study of Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) and the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). ESEM revealed a 5-factor structure in the NSHAP battery, but with considerable cross-loadings. When these cross-loadings were not included in the model, model fit notably worsened. Reliabilities of Big Five scales were comparable to the HRS and MIDUS, even though NSHAP's battery is shorter. Women were considerably more Agreeable than men, although this gender gap closed among the oldest in the sample (80 years or older). Researchers will be able to make use of NSHAP's personality battery to examine a range of social, biological, and psychological factors at older ages, in light of individuals' general traits. We recommend models which allow for cross-loadings. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Gerontological Society of America 2014.

  12. Improvement of tuberculosis laboratory capacity on Pemba Island, Zanzibar: a health cooperation project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria G Paglia

    Full Text Available Low-income countries with high Tuberculosis burden have few reference laboratories able to perform TB culture. In 2006, the Zanzibar National TB Control Programme planned to decentralize TB diagnostics. The Italian Cooperation Agency with the scientific support of the "L. Spallanzani" National Institute for Infectious Diseases sustained the project through the implementation of a TB reference laboratory in a low-income country with a high prevalence of TB. The implementation steps were: 1 TB laboratory design according to the WHO standards; 2 laboratory equipment and reagent supplies for microscopy, cultures, and identification; 3 on-the-job training of the local staff; 4 web- and telemedicine-based supervision. From April 2007 to December 2010, 921 sputum samples were received from 40 peripheral laboratories: 120 TB cases were diagnosed. Of all the smear-positive cases, 74.2% were culture-positive. During the year 2010, the smear positive to culture positive rate increased up to 100%. In March 20, 2010 the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare of Zanzibar officially recognized the Public Health Laboratory- Ivo de Carneri as the National TB Reference Laboratory for the Zanzibar Archipelago. An advanced TB laboratory can represent a low cost solution to strengthen the TB diagnosis, to provide capacity building and mid-term sustainability.

  13. Project management office in health care: a key strategy to support evidence-based practice change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Bonneville-Roussy, Arielle; Richer, Marie-Claire; Aubry, Monique; Vezina, Michel; Deme, Mariama

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the contribution of a Transition Support Office (TSO) in a health care center in Canada to supporting changes in practice based on evidence and organizational performance in the early phase of a major organizational change. Semistructured individual interviews were conducted with 11 members of the TSO and 13 managers and clinicians from an ambulatory sector in the organization who received support from the TSO. The main themes addressed in the interviews were the description of the TSO, the context of implementation, and the impact. Using the Competing Value Framework by Quinn and Rohrbaugh [Public Product Rev. 1981;5(2):122-140], results revealed that the TSO is a source of expertise that facilitates innovation and implementation of change. It provides material support and human expertise for evidence-based projects. As a single organizational entity responsible for managing change, it gives a sense of cohesiveness. It also facilitates communication among human resources of the entire organization. The TSO is seen as an expertise provider that promotes competency development, training, and evidence-based practices. The impact of a TSO on change in practices and organizational performance in a health care system is discussed.

  14. [Health economic evaluation of the integrated care project "OPTI-MuM"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, S; Greiner, W

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the economic performance of a population-based integrated care project in comparison to standard care. The perspective adopted is that of the participating statutory health insurance companies. The well-defined target region allows the distinction of participants and non-participants. The quasi-experimental study design, which is based on routine data of the participating health insurers, is able to reduce the bias caused by the non-randomised group assignment. Based on the year of enrollment two separate cohorts were generated. The comparison of group differences before and after a propensity score matching shows that this method provides appropriate control groups for both cohorts of participants. Taking into account 4,840 of the 5,164 participants, total savings of € 87,252 were calculated. These findings suggest that the method of propensity score matching permits a scientifically sound performance measurement for population-based care contracts. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Health system and societal barriers for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) services - lessons from World Diabetes Foundation supported GDM projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karoline Kragelund; de Courten, Maximilian; Kapur, Anil

    2012-01-01

    for the offspring. A better understanding of the barriers hindering detection and treatment of GDM is needed. Based on experiences from World Diabetes Foundation (WDF) supported GDM projects this paper seeks to investigate societal and health system barriers to such efforts. Methods Questionnaires were filled out...... included lack of trained health care providers - especially female doctors; high staff turnover; lack of standard protocols, consumables and equipment; financing of health services and treatment; lack of or poor referral systems, feedback mechanisms and follow-up systems; distance to health facility...

  16. Separation of chlorophylls and carotenoids from marine phytoplankton: a new HPLC method using a reversed phase C8 column and pyridine-containing mobile phases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manuel Zapata; Francisco Rodríguez; José L. Garrido

    2000-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method based on a reversed-phase C8 column and pyridine-containing mobile phases was developed for the simultaneous separation of chlorophylls and carotenoids...

  17. Interface electronic structure and morphology of 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT) on Au film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shitan; Niu, Dongmei; Lyu, Lu; Huang, Yingbao; Wei, Xuhui; Wang, Can; Xie, Haipeng; Gao, Yongli

    2017-09-01

    The interfacial electronic structure and morphology of 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene(C8-BTBT) on polycrystalline Au film was investigated with photoemission spectroscopy (PES), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD). The transport barriers of holes and electrons at the interface are 1.72 eV and 2.12 eV, respectively, from the UPS measurement. There is no chemical reaction of C8-BTBT with Au from the XPS investigation of core levels Au 4f, C 1s and S 2p. The upmost molecules adopt a standing up configuration deduced from the diffraction peaks in GIXRD and the step height in AFM. Increasing order of the upright orientation of C8-BTBT molecules with film growth result in decreasing work function of the C8-BTBT thin film by forming an outward pointing dipole layer with the ordered end Csbnd H bonds.

  18. Model for collaboration: a rural medicine and academic health center teleradiology project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Slyke, Mark A.; Eggli, Douglas F.; Prior, Fred W.; Salmon, William; Pappas, Gregory; Vanatta, Fred; Goldfetter, Warren; Hashem, Said

    1996-05-01

    A pilot project was developed to explore the role of subspecialty radiology support to rural medicine sites over a long-distance network. A collaborative relationship between 2 rural radiology practices and an academic health was established. Project objectives included: (1) Does the subspecialty consultation significantly change diagnosis patterns at the rural site? (2) Is there value added as measured by improved clinical care or an overall decreased cost of care? (3) Can a collaborative model be economically self-supportive? (4) Does the collaborative model encourage and support education and collegial relationships? Two rural hospitals were selected based on the level of imaging technology and willingness to cooperate. Image capture and network technology was chosen to make the network process transparent to the users. DICOM standard interfaces were incorporated into existing CT and MRI scanners and a film digitizer. Nuclear medicine images were transferred and viewed using a proprietary vendor protocol. Relevant clinical data was managed by a custom designed PC based Lotus Notes application (Patient Study Tracking System: PaSTS) (Pennsylvania Blue Shield Institute). All data was transferred over a Frame Relay network and managed by the Pennsylvania Commonwealth sponsored PA Health Net. Images, other than nuclear medicine, were viewed on a GE Advantage viewing station using a pair of 2 X 2.5 K gray scale monitors. Patient text data was managed by the PaSTS PC and displayed on a separate 15' color monitor. A total of 476 radiology studies were networked into the AHC. Randomly chosen research studies comprised 82% of the case work. Consultative and primary read cases comprised 17% and 1% respectively. The exercise was judged effective by both rural sites. Significant findings and diagnoses were confirmed in 73% of cases with discrepant findings in only 4%. One site benefited by adopting more advanced imaging techniques increasing the sophistication of radiology

  19. Interdisciplinary Postdoctoral Training in Global Health Through a Novel Joint Project for Trainees from Diverse Disciplines: Benefits, Risks, and Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhelman, Richard A; Huaynate, Cynthia Anticona; Correa, Malena; Malpartida, Holger Mayta; Pajuelo, Monica; Paz-Soldan, Valerie A; Gilman, Robert H; Zimic, Mirko; Murphy, Laura; Belizan, Jose

    2017-03-01

    AbstractPostdoctoral training programs are usually highly individualized arrangements between trainees and a limited number of senior mentors in their field, an approach that contrasts with current trends in public health education that promote interdisciplinary training to spur innovation. Herein, we describe an alternative model for postdoctoral training for a group of fellows from distinct disciplines. Fellows work with mentors from diverse fields to create a joint research project or a group of complementary projects, with the goal of developing a new device, intervention, or innovation to address a global health problem. The perceived benefits, challenges, and limitations of this team approach to interdisciplinary postdoctoral training are presented.

  20. Project INTEGRATE - a common methodological approach to understand integrated health care in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinda Cash-Gibson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of case studies in health services research has proven to be an excellent methodology for gaining in-depth understanding of the organisation and delivery of health care. This is particularly relevant when looking at the complexity of integrated healthcare programmes, where multifaceted interactions occur at the different levels of care and often without a clear link between the interventions (new and/or existing and their impact on outcomes (in terms of patients health, both patient and professional satisfaction and cost-effectiveness. Still, integrated care is seen as a core strategy in the sustainability of health and care provision in most societies in Europe and beyond. More specifically, at present, there is neither clear evidence on transferable factors of integrated care success nor a method for determining how to establish these specific success factors. The drawback of case methodology in this case, however, is that the in-depth results or lessons generated are usually highly context-specific and thus brings the challenge of transferability of findings to other settings, as different health care systems and different indications are often not comparable. Project INTEGRATE, a European Commission-funded project, has been designed to overcome these problems; it looks into four chronic conditions in different European settings, under a common methodology framework (taking a mixed-methods approach to try to overcome the issue of context specificity and limited transferability. The common methodological framework described in this paper seeks to bring together the different case study findings in a way that key lessons may be derived and transferred between countries, contexts and patient-groups, where integrated care is delivered in order to provide insight into generalisability and build on existing evidence in this field.Methodology: To compare the different integrated care experiences, a mixed-methods approach has

  1. Project INTEGRATE - a common methodological approach to understand integrated health care in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash-Gibson, Lucinda; Rosenmoller, Magdalene

    2014-10-01

    The use of case studies in health services research has proven to be an excellent methodology for gaining in-depth understanding of the organisation and delivery of health care. This is particularly relevant when looking at the complexity of integrated healthcare programmes, where multifaceted interactions occur at the different levels of care and often without a clear link between the interventions (new and/or existing) and their impact on outcomes (in terms of patients health, both patient and professional satisfaction and cost-effectiveness). Still, integrated care is seen as a core strategy in the sustainability of health and care provision in most societies in Europe and beyond. More specifically, at present, there is neither clear evidence on transferable factors of integrated care success nor a method for determining how to establish these specific success factors. The drawback of case methodology in this case, however, is that the in-depth results or lessons generated are usually highly context-specific and thus brings the challenge of transferability of findings to other settings, as different health care systems and different indications are often not comparable. Project INTEGRATE, a European Commission-funded project, has been designed to overcome these problems; it looks into four chronic conditions in different European settings, under a common methodology framework (taking a mixed-methods approach) to try to overcome the issue of context specificity and limited transferability. The common methodological framework described in this paper seeks to bring together the different case study findings in a way that key lessons may be derived and transferred between countries, contexts and patient-groups, where integrated care is delivered in order to provide insight into generalisability and build on existing evidence in this field. To compare the different integrated care experiences, a mixed-methods approach has been adopted with the creation of a common

  2. Enhancing the health of women living with HIV: the SMART/EST Women's Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Weiss

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Stephen M Weiss1, Jonathan N Tobin2, Michael Antoni1, Gail Ironson1, Mary Ishii1, Anita Vaughn2, Andrea Cassells2, Deborah Jones1, Neil Schneiderman1, Elizabeth Brondolo3, Arthur LaPerriere1, Maria Lopez1, Olga Villar-Loubet1, Joanne Camille2, Mahendra Kumar1, J Bryan Page1, SMART/EST Women's Project Team*1University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA; 2Clinical Directors Network, New York, NY, USA; 3St Johns University, Queens, NY, USA; *The SMART/EST Womens' Project Team: DeVieux J, Jean-Gilles M, Gousse Y, Alexander K, Bustamonte V, Lopez E, Casani J, Stanley H, Asthana D, Van Splunteren F, Goldstein A, Nasajon R, Wiesner Y, Zukerman M, Segal-Isaacson CJ, Romanowsky A, Masheb R, Coma C, Ubiera M, D'Andrea SM, Ittai N.Abstract: The principal objective of these multisite studies (Florida, New York, New Jersey: epicenters for human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] among women was to develop and implement effective combinations of behavioral interventions to optimize the health status of the most neglected and understudied population affected by the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS epidemic in the United States: poor women of color living with HIV. The two studies enrolled nearly 900 women randomly assigned to “high intensity” (cognitive–behavioral stress management training combined with expressive–supportive therapy [CBSM]+ group or “low intensity” (individual psychoeducational program treatment conditions over a period of 9 years. The initial study of the stress management and relaxation training/expressive–supportive therapy (SMART/EST Women's Project (SWP I focused on reducing depression and anxiety, as well as improving self-efficacy and overall quality of life for women with case-defined AIDS. Findings from this study demonstrated the utility of CBSM+ in reducing distress (depression, anxiety and denial, while improving social support, self-efficacy, coping skills, and quality of life. The second study (SWP II, which included all

  3. Sensory function: insights from Wave 2 of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Jayant M; Kern, David W; Wroblewski, Kristen E; Chen, Rachel C; Schumm, L Philip; McClintock, Martha K

    2014-11-01

    Sensory function, a critical component of quality of life, generally declines with age and influences health, physical activity, and social function. Sensory measures collected in Wave 2 of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) survey focused on the personal impact of sensory function in the home environment and included: subjective assessment of vision, hearing, and touch, information on relevant home conditions and social sequelae as well as an improved objective assessment of odor detection. Summary data were generated for each sensory category, stratified by age (62-90 years of age) and gender, with a focus on function in the home setting and the social consequences of sensory decrements in each modality. Among both men and women, older age was associated with self-reported impairment of vision, hearing, and pleasantness of light touch. Compared with women, men reported significantly worse hearing and found light touch less appealing. There were no gender differences for vision. Overall, hearing loss seemed to have a greater impact on social function than did visual impairment. Sensory function declines across age groups, with notable gender differences for hearing and light touch. Further analysis of sensory measures from NSHAP Wave 2 may provide important information on how sensory declines are related to health, social function, quality of life, morbidity, and mortality in this nationally representative sample of older adults. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Association Rules Analysis of Comorbidity and Multimorbidity: The Concord Health and Aging in Men Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Fabian P; Blyth, Fiona; Gnjidic, Danijela; Hirani, Vasant; Naganathan, Vasikaran; Waite, Louise M; Seibel, Markus J; Rollo, Jennifer; Handelsman, David J; Cumming, Robert G; Le Couteur, David G

    2016-05-01

    Comorbidity and multimorbidity are common in older people. Here we used a novel analytic approach called Association Rules together with network analysis to evaluate multimorbidity (two or more disorders) and comorbidity in old age. A population-based cross-sectional study was undertaken where 17 morbidities were analyzed using network analysis, cluster analysis, and Association Rules methodology. A comorbidity interestingness score was developed to quantify the richness and variability of comorbidities associated with an index condition. The participants were community-dwelling men aged 70 years or older from the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project, Sydney, Australia, with complete data (n = 1,464). The vast majority (75%) of participants had multimorbidity. Several morbidity clusters were apparent (vascular cluster, metabolic cluster, neurodegenerative cluster, mental health and other cluster, and a musculoskeletal and other cluster). Association Rules revealed unexpected comorbidities with high lift and confidence linked to index diseases. Anxiety and heart failure had the highest comorbidity interestingness scores while obesity, hearing impairment, and arthritis had the lowest (zero) scores. We also performed Association Rules analysis for the geriatric syndromes of frailty and falls to determine their association with multimorbidity. Frailty had a very complex and rich set of frequent and interesting comorbidities, while there were no frequent and interesting sets associated with falls. Old age is characterized by a complex pattern of multimorbidity and comorbidity. Single disease definitions do not account for the prevalence and complexity of multimorbidity in older people and a new lexicon may be needed to underpin research and health care interventions for older people. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. The health Oriented pedagogical project (HOPP - a controlled longitudinal school-based physical activity intervention program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Morten Fredriksen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs is increasing worldwide, also among children. Information about primary prevention of NCD’s is increasing; however, convincing strategies among children is needed. The present paper describes the design and methods in the Health Oriented Pedagogical Project (HOPP study. The main objective is to evaluate the effects of a school-based physical activity intervention program on cardio-metabolic risk factors. Secondary objectives include assessment of physical, psychological and academic performance variables. Methods The HOPP study is a 7 years longitudinal large-scale controlled intervention in seven elementary schools (n = 1545 with two control schools (n = 752; all aged 6–11 years at baseline. The school-based physical activity intervention program includes an increase in physical activity (PA of 225 min/week as an integrated part of theoretical learning, in addition to the curriculum based 90 min/week of ordinary PA. Primary outcomes include cardio-metabolic risk factors measured as PA level, BMI status, waist circumference, muscle mass, percent fat, endurance test performance, total serum cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL, non-HDL, micro C-reactive protein (mCRP and long-term blood sugar (HbA1c. In addition, secondary outcomes include anthropometric growth measures, physical fitness, quality of life (QoL, mental health, executive functions, diet and academic performance. Discussion HOPP will provide evidence of effects on cardio-metabolic risk factors after a long-term PA intervention program in elementary schoolchildren. School-based PA intervention programs may be an effective arena for health promotion and disease prevention. Trial registration The study is registered in Clinical trials (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02495714 as of June 20th – 2015, retrospectively registered. The collection of baseline values was initiated in mid-January 2015.

  6. Cognitive impacts of ambient air pollution in the National Social Health and Aging Project (NSHAP) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallon, Lindsay A; Manjourides, Justin; Pun, Vivian C; Salhi, Carmel; Suh, Helen

    2017-07-01

    Pathways through which air pollution may impact cognitive function are poorly understood, particularly with regard to whether and how air pollution interacts with social and emotional factors to influence cognitive health. To examine the association between air pollutant exposures and cognitive outcomes among older adults participating in the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) cohort study. Measures of cognitive function, social connectedness, and physical and mental health were obtained for each NSHAP participant starting with Wave 1 of the study in 2005. Cognitive function was assessed using the Chicago Cognitive Function Measure (CCFM) for 3377 participants. Exposures to fine particles (PM2.5) were estimated for each participant using GIS-based spatio-temporal models, and exposures to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were obtained from the nearest EPA monitors. In adjusted linear regression models, IQR increases in 1 to 7year PM2.5 exposures were associated with a 0.22 (95% CI: -0.44, -0.01) to a 0.25 (95% CI: -0.43, -0.06) point decrease in CCFM scores, equivalent to aging 1.6years, while exposures to NO2 were equivalent to aging 1.9years. The impacts of PM2.5 on cognition were modified by stroke, anxiety, and stress, and were mediated by depression. The impacts of NO2 were mediated by stress and effect modification by impaired activities of daily living for NO2 was found. Exposures to long-term PM2.5 and NO2 were associated with decreased cognitive function in our cohort of older Americans, and individuals who experienced a stroke or elevated anxiety were more susceptible to the effects of PM2.5 on cognition. Additionally, mediation results suggest that PM2.5 may impact cognition through pathways related to mood disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. COMPETITIVE CH ACTIVATION IN (PENTAMETHYLCYCLOPENTADIENYL)(CYCLOOCTATETRAENE)ALKYLZIRCONIUM COMPOUNDS CP-ASTERISK-ZR(COT)R - SELECTIVE FORMATION OF FULVENE OR CYCLOOCTATRIENYNE LIGANDS - MOLECULAR-STRUCTURE OF CP-ASTERISK-ZR(MU-ETA-8-ETA-2-C8H6)ZRCP-ASTERISK(ETA-4-C8H8), A DINUCLEAR ZWITTERIONIC ZIRCONIUM COMPLEX WITH A BRIDGING CYCLOOCTARIENYNE LIGAND

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SINNEMA, PJ; MEETSMA, A; TEUBEN, JH

    Thermolysis of Cp*Zr(COT)R (Cp* = eta5-C5Me5, COT = eta8-C8H8, R = CH2SiMe3, Me) proceeds via a double hydrogen abstraction from a cyclooctatetraene ligand to give RH and Cp*Zr(mu-eta8:eta2-C8H6)ZrCp*(eta4-C8H8) as the kinetic product. Cp*Zr(mu-eta8:eta2-C8H6) undergoes a thermally induced hydrogen

  8. The Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project - a community-level, public health initiative to build community disaster resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenman, David; Chandra, Anita; Fogleman, Stella; Magana, Aizita; Hendricks, Astrid; Wells, Ken; Williams, Malcolm; Tang, Jennifer; Plough, Alonzo

    2014-08-19

    Public health officials need evidence-based methods for improving community disaster resilience and strategies for measuring results. This methods paper describes how one public health department is addressing this problem. This paper provides a detailed description of the theoretical rationale, intervention design and novel evaluation of the Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project (LACCDR), a public health program for increasing community disaster resilience. The LACCDR Project utilizes a pretest-posttest method with control group design. Sixteen communities in Los Angeles County were selected and randomly assigned to the experimental community resilience group or the comparison group. Community coalitions in the experimental group receive training from a public health nurse trained in community resilience in a toolkit developed for the project. The toolkit is grounded in theory and uses multiple components to address education, community engagement, community and individual self-sufficiency, and partnerships among community organizations and governmental agencies. The comparison communities receive training in traditional disaster preparedness topics of disaster supplies and emergency communication plans. Outcome indicators include longitudinal changes in inter-organizational linkages among community organizations, community member responses in table-top exercises, and changes in household level community resilience behaviors and attitudes. The LACCDR Project is a significant opportunity and effort to operationalize and meaningfully measure factors and strategies to increase community resilience. This paper is intended to provide public health and academic researchers with new tools to conduct their community resilience programs and evaluation research. Results are not yet available and will be presented in future reports.

  9. An analysis of subject areas and country participation for all health-related projects in the EU's FP5 and FP6 programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galsworthy, Michael J; Irwin, Rachel; Charlesworth, Kate; Ernst, Kelly; Hristovski, Dimitar; Wismar, Matthias; McKee, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Previous analyses concerning health components of European Union (EU)-funded research have shown low project participation levels of the 12 newest member states (EU-12). Additionally, there has been a lack of subject-area analysis. In the Health Research for Europe project, we screened all projects of the EU's Framework Programmes for research FP5 and FP6 (1998-2006) to identify health research projects and describe participation by country and subject area. FP5 and FP6 project databases were acquired and screened by coders to identify health-related projects, which were then categorized according to the 47 divisions of the EU Health Portal (N = 2728 projects) plus an extra group of 'basic/biotech' projects (N = 1743). Country participation and coordination rates for projects were also analyzed. Approximately 20% of the 26 946 projects (value €29.2bn) were health-related (N = 4756. Value €6.04bn). Within the health categories, the largest expenditures were cancer (11.9%), 'other' (i.e. not mental health or cardiovascular) non-communicable diseases (9.5%) and food safety (9.4%). One hundred thirty-two countries participated in these projects. Of the 27 EU countries (and five partner countries), north-western and Nordic states acquired more projects per capita. The UK led coordination with > 20% of projects. EU-12 countries were generally under-represented for participation and coordination. Combining our findings with the associated literature, we comment on drivers determining distribution of participation and funds across countries and subject areas. Additionally, we discuss changes needed in the core EU projects database to provide greater transparency, data exploitation and return on investment in health research. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  10. Baseline health conditions in selected communities of northern Sierra Leone as revealed by the health impact assessment of a biofuel project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Mirko S; Knoblauch, Astrid M; Righetti, Aurélie A; Divall, Mark J; Koroma, Manso M; Fofanah, Ibrahim; Turay, Hamid; Hodges, Mary H; Utzinger, Jürg

    2014-09-01

    As biofuel projects may be associated with positive and negative effects on people's health and wellbeing, a health impact assessment was performed for the Addax Bioenergy Sierra Leone (ABSL) project. We present data from the baseline health survey, which will provide a point of departure for future monitoring and evaluation activities. In December 2010, a cross-sectional survey was carried out in eight potentially affected communities. A broad set of clinical and parasitological indicators were assessed using standardised, quality-controlled procedures, including anthropometry and prevalence of anaemia, Plasmodium falciparum and helminth infections. Complete datasets were obtained from 1221 individuals of 194 households and eight schools. Of children aged health conditions, in combination with future health surveys, will deepen the understanding of how a biofuel project impacts on community health in a rural setting in sub-Saharan Africa. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Diabetes Care and Treatment Project: A Diabetes Institute of Walter Reed Health Care System and Joslin Telemedicine Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    the potential to bring the highest quality care to all patients with diabetes. The JVN Telehealth program is a web-based interactive telemedicine ... telehealth network demonstration project. Telemedicine Journal and e-Health 2003, 9: 13-23. 48.Feil EG, Glasgow RE, Boles S, McKay HG. Who...Diabetes Institute of Walter Reed Health Care System and Joslin Telemedicine Initiative PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert A

  12. Diabetes Care and Treatment Project: A Diabetes Institute of the Walter Reed Health Care System and Joslin Telemedicine Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-09

    highest quality care to all patients with diabetes. The JVN Telehealth program is a web-based interactive telemedicine application that can...Outcomes of an integrated telehealth network demonstration project. Telemedicine Journal and e-Health 2003, 9: 13-23. 48.Feil EG, Glasgow RE...the Walter Reed Health Care System and Joslin Telemedicine Initiative PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert A. Vigersky, COL MC CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION

  13. Reducing Cancer Health Disparities through Community Engagement: Working with Faith-Based Organizations (Project CHURCH) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker | "Reducing Cancer Health Disparities through Community Engagement: Working with Faith-Based Organizations (Project CHURCH)" will be presented by Lorna H. McNeill, PhD, MPH, Chair of the Department of Health Disparities at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX. Date: 2/20/2018; Time: 11:00am - 12:00pm; Location: NCI Shady Grove Campus, Conference Room Seminar 110 Terrace Level East.

  14. Measurement uncertainty assessment of magnesium trisilicate column for determination of Sudan colorants in food by HPLC using C8 column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; He, Chao; Cheng, Jing-Jun; Huang, Wen-Yao; Shao, Sheng-Wen; Jiang, Ya-Ping; Dai, Ling-Feng; Liu, Jia-Fa; Song, Yi

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to conduct measurement uncertainty assessment of a new method for determination of Sudan colorants (Sudan I, II, III and IV) in food by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Samples were extracted with organic solvents (hexane, 20% acetone) and first purified by magnesium trisilicate (2MgO·3SiO2). The Sudan colorants (Sudan I-IV) were also initially separated on C8 by gradient elution using acetonitrile and 0.1% (v/v) formic acid aqueous solution as the mobile phases and detected with diode-array detector (DAD). The uncertainty of mathematical model of Sudan I, II, III and IV is based on EURACHEM guidelines. The sources and components of uncertainty were calculated. The experiment gave a good linear relationship over the concentration from 0.4 to 4.0 μg/mL and spiked recoveries were from 74.0% to 97.5%. The limits of determination (LOD) were 48, 61, 36, 58 μg/kg for the four analytes, respectively. The total uncertainty of Sudan colorants (Sudan I, II, III and IV) was 810±30.8, 790±28.4, 750±27.0, 730±50.0 μg/kg, respectively. The recovery uncertainty was the most significant factor contributing to the total uncertainty. The developed method is simple, rapid, and highly sensitive. It can be used for the determination of trace Sudan dyes in food samples. The sources of uncertainty have been identified and uncertainty components have been simplified and considered.

  15. Parents as Teachers Health Literacy Demonstration project: integrating an empowerment model of health literacy promotion into home-based parent education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Lauren N; Smith, Sandra A; Thomson, Nicole R

    2015-03-01

    The Parents as Teachers (PAT) Health Literacy Demonstration project assessed the impact of integrating data-driven reflective practices into the PAT home visitation model to promote maternal health literacy. PAT is a federally approved Maternal, Infant, Early Childhood Home Visiting program with the goal of promoting school readiness and healthy child development. This 2-year demonstration project used an open-cohort longitudinal design to promote parents' interactive and reflective skills, enhance health education, and provide direct assistance to personalize and act on information by integrating an empowerment paradigm into PAT's parent education model. Eight parent educators used the Life Skills Progression instrument to tailor the intervention to each of 103 parent-child dyads. Repeated-measures analysis of variance, paired t tests, and logistic regression combined with qualitative data demonstrated that mothers achieved overall significant improvements in health literacy, and that home visitors are important catalysts for these improvements. These findings support the use of an empowerment model of health education, skill building, and direct information support to enable parents to better manage personal and child health and health care. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  16. Increasing use of mental health services in remote areas using mobile technology: a pre-post evaluation of the SMART Mental Health project in rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulik, Pallab K; Kallakuri, Sudha; Devarapalli, Siddhardha; Vadlamani, Vamsi Krishna; Jha, Vivekanand; Patel, Anushka

    2017-06-01

    About 25% of the Indian population experience common mental disorders (CMD) but only 15-25% of them receive any mental health care. Stigma, lack of adequate mental health professionals and mental health services account for this treatment gap, which is worse in rural areas. Our project evaluated task shifting and mobile-technology based electronic decision support systems to enhance the ability of primary care health workers to provide evidence-based mental health care for stress, depression, and suicidal risk in 30 remote villages in the state of Andhra Pradesh, India. The Systematic Medical Appraisal Referral and Treatment (SMART) Mental Health project between May 2014 and April 2016 trained lay village health workers (Accredited Social Health Activists - ASHAs) and primary care doctors to screen, diagnose and manage individuals with common mental disorders using an electronic decision support system. An anti-stigma campaign using multi-media approaches was conducted across the villages at the outset of the project. A pre-post evaluation using mixed methods assessed the change in mental health service utilization by screen positive individuals. This paper reports on the quantitative aspects of that evaluation. Training was imparted to 21 ASHAs and 2 primary care doctors. 5007 of 5167 eligible individuals were screened, and 238 were identified as being positive for common mental disorders and referred to the primary care doctors for further management. Out of them, 2 (0.8%) had previously utilized mental health services. During the intervention period, 30 (12.6%) visited the primary care doctor for further diagnosis and treatment, as advised. There was a significant reduction in the depression and anxiety scores between start and end of the intervention among those who had screened positive at the beginning. Stigma and mental health awareness in the broader community improved during the project. The intervention led to individuals being screened for common mental

  17. Contribution of the North Karelia Project to International Work in CVD and NCD Prevention and Health Promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puska, Pekka; Laatikainen, Tiina; Korpelainen, Vesa; Vartiainen, Erkki

    2016-06-01

    During the decades after the start of the North Karelia Project in 1971, cardiovascular diseases and related noncommunicable diseases have emerged as the greatest global public health burden. The prevention and control of these diseases have thus become a major challenge and target for global public health, as emphasized by the Political Declaration of the United Nations (UN) General Assembly in 2011. The experiences and results of the North Karelia Project have accordingly received much international attention and have in many ways contributed to the international work in the area, including the strategies and programs of the World Health Organization. The experience of the Project shows the great potential of population-based prevention of cardiovascular diseases and other noncommunicable diseases and that influencing lifestyles related to heart health with comprehensive health promotion and national policies is the cost-effective and sustainable way to improve contemporary public health. Copyright © 2016 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Understanding the Function of Genes Involved in Inherited Retinal Degeneration-Insights into the Pathogenesis and Function of C8ORF37

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Ali Sakawa

    Inherited retinal degenerative diseases (IRD) are a group of disorders that lead to progressive deterioration of mainly the photoreceptors. Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) are two forms of IRDs. RP is the most common form of IRD and is due to rod photoreceptor degeneration followed by cone photoreceptor loss. CRD, on the other hand, is characterized by the loss of cones or the concurrent degeneration of both cones and rods. Both RP and CRD are presently incurable. More than 200 genes have been identified to cause IRDs and the functions of many of these genes remain unclear. Mutations in a novel gene, C8ORF37, were identified to cause recessive, severe, and early-onset RP and CRD. I, therefore, pioneered in characterizing the role of C8ORF37 in the retina. This dissertation is comprised of four chapters that is organized as follows: (1) summary of an ocular disorder (2) a genetic model of a retinal disorder (3) biochemical/proteomic analysis of C8ORF37 (4) potential clinical applications. A summary of ocular disorders is discussed in Chapter 1, with an emphasis on CRD. Chapter 2 focuses on the generation and characterization of C8orf37 mutant mouse models that recapitulate the retinal pathologies observed in human patients. In C8orf37 knockout retinas, the outer segment (OS) was nonuniform, swollen, and wider in width when compared to the controls. Moreover, many OS membrane proteins were reduced in the retina of C8orf37 knockout, including CNGB1 and RDS, proteins essential for OS disc morphogenesis and alignment. Our findings shed new light on the pathogenesis underlying retinal dysfunction and degeneration in C8ORF37-deficient patients. To determine the function of a novel protein, a powerful approach is by identifying its binding partners. In Chapter 3, I discuss GST pull-down using bovine retinal lysates, yeast-two-hybrid, and immunoprecipitation with mouse retinal lysate in order to identify C8ORF37-interacting proteins. Our pull

  19. Heat and health in Antwerp under climate change: Projected impacts and implications for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Gerardo Sanchez; Diaz, Julio; Hooyberghs, Hans; Lauwaet, Dirk; De Ridder, Koen; Linares, Cristina; Carmona, Rocio; Ortiz, Cristina; Kendrovski, Vladimir; Aerts, Raf; Van Nieuwenhuyse, An; Dunbar, Maria Bekker-Nielsen

    2017-12-02

    Excessive summer heat is a serious environmental health problem in several European cities. Heat-related mortality and morbidity is likely to increase under climate change scenarios without adequate prevention based on locally relevant evidence. We modelled the urban climate of Antwerp for the summer season during the period 1986-2015, and projected summer daily temperatures for two periods, one in the near (2026-2045) and one in the far future (2081-2100), under the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5. We then analysed the relationship between temperature and mortality, as well as with hospital admissions for the period 2009-2013, and estimated the projected mortality in the near future and far future periods under changing climate and population, assuming alternatively no acclimatization and acclimatization based on a constant threshold percentile temperature. During the sample period 2009-2013 we observed an increase in daily mortality from a maximum daily temperature of 26°C, or the 89th percentile of the maximum daily temperature series. The annual average heat-related mortality in this period was 13.4 persons (95% CI: 3.8-23.4). No effect of heat was observed in the case of hospital admissions due to cardiorespiratory causes. Under a no acclimatization scenario, annual average heat-related mortality is multiplied by a factor of 1.7 in the near future (24.1deaths/year CI 95%: 6.78-41.94) and by a factor of 4.5 in the far future (60.38deaths/year CI 95%: 17.00-105.11). Under a heat acclimatization scenario, mortality does not increase significantly in the near or in the far future. These results highlight the importance of a long-term perspective in the public health prevention of heat exposure, particularly in the context of a changing climate, and the calibration of existing prevention activities in light of locally relevant evidence. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Using CLIL to enhance pupils’ experience of learning and raise attainment in German and health education : a teacher research project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mearns, T.L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes and evaluates an action research project carried out by a teacher in an English comprehensive school, where a class of 13- to 14-year-olds was taught personal, social and health education and German through content–language integrated learning (CLIL) over a six-week period. The

  1. Project CHOICE: #152. A Career Education Unit for Grades 1 and 2. The Dentist. (Health Occupations Career Cluster).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    This teaching unit on the dentist is part of the Health Occupations Career Cluster included in a series of career guidebooks developed by Project CHOICE (Children Have Options in Career Education). The units are designed to provide the classroom teacher with a source of career-related activities linking first and second grade classroom experiences…

  2. Working Group 7.0 Environmental Transport and Health Effects, Chernobyl Studies Project. Progress report, October 1994 -- March 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M. [eds.

    1995-06-01

    This document presents the details from the working group 7.0 Chernobyl Studies Project. This working group looked at the environmental transport and health effects from the fallout due to the meltdown of Chernobylsk-4 reactor. Topics include: hydrological transport; chromosome painting dosimetry; EPR, TL and OSL dosimetry; stochastic effects; thyroid studies; and leukemia studies.

  3. Reflections from a Creative Community-Based Participatory Research Project Exploring Health and Body Image with First Nations Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Shea PhD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In Canada, Aboriginal peoples often experience a multitude of inequalities when compared with the general population, particularly in relation to health (e.g., increased incidence of diabetes. These inequalities are rooted in a negative history of colonization. Decolonizing methodologies recognize these realities and aim to shift the focus from communities being researched to being collaborative partners in the research process. This article describes a qualitative community-based participatory research project focused on health and body image with First Nations girls in a Tribal Council region in Western Canada. We discuss our project design and the incorporation of creative methods (e.g., photovoice to foster integration and collaboration as related to decolonizing methodology principles. This article is both descriptive and reflective as it summarizes our project and discusses lessons learned from the process, integrating evaluations from the participating girls as well as our reflections as researchers.

  4. Chernobyl Studies Project - working group 7.0 environmental transport and health effects. Progress report, October 1993--January 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, S.M. [ed.

    1994-03-01

    The DOE-funded Chernobyl Studies Project was begun as part of a cooperative agreement between the US and the former USSR, (quote) To develop jointly methods to project rapidly the health effects of any future reactor accident (quote). Most of the initial tasks for this project are completed or near completion. The focus has now turned primarily to the issue of health effects from the Chernobyl accident. Currently, we are extensively engaged in case-control and cohort studies of thyroid diseases among Belarussian children and in the Ukraine. A major part of the effort is providing methods and applications of dose reconstruction and providing support and equipment for the medical teams. This document contains reports on progress in the following task areas: Management; External Dose; Hydrological Transport; Chromosome Painting Dosimetry; Stochastic Effects; Thyroid Studies; and Leukemia Studies.

  5. Impact assessment of a maternal health project in a megacity, Nigeria: toward a future with more demand for maternal health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Sadatoshi; Koga, Sumiko; Suzui, Emiko; Tsukada, Yoshiko; Ohashi, Kazutomo; Johnson, Taiwo

    2017-10-01

    To improve the quantity and quality of maternal health services in Lagos State, Nigeria having a maternal mortality ratio of 555 per 100 000 live births, a four-year project was implemented since February 2010. The major activity of the project was training for both the service supply and demand sides. This study aimed to examine the impact of the project on coverages and quality of the services in target areas, and guide statewide policies. The Cochran-Armitage test for trend was applied to understand trends in the service coverages during 2009-2013. The same test was performed to analyse trends in the proportions of perineal conditions (i.e. intact or tear) and to evaluate variations in midwives' snkill during 2011-2013. The paired t-test was used to analyse changes in midwives' knowledge. The project interventions contributed to a significant increase in the overall service coverages, including improvements in midwifery knowledge and possibly in their skills. However, the service coverage was still limited as of the termination of the project. To instal the interventions and maximise the effect of them state-wide, it is recommended to undertake five tasks: (i) establishment of public primary health centres offering 24-h maternal health services; (ii) redeployment and recruitment of public health personnel; (iii) expansion of midwifery trainings and continuous education by the local trainers; (iv) review of grass-roots level activities; and (v) scrutiny of barriers to maternal health services. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Empirically Derived Dietary Patterns and Health-Related Quality of Life in the SUN Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano, Cristina; Henriquez, Patricia; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Sánchez-Villegas, Almudena

    2013-01-01

    Objective The analysis of dietary patterns has become a valuable tool to examine diet-disease relationships but little is known about their effects on quality of life. Our aim was to ascertain the association between major dietary patterns and mental and physical quality of life after 4 years of follow-up. Materials and Methods This analysis included 11,128 participants from the “Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra” (SUN) cohort. Dietary habits were assessed using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Factor analysis was used to derive dietary patterns. Quality of life was measured with the validated Spanish version of the SF-36 Health Survey. Results Two major dietary patterns were identified, the ‘Western’ dietary pattern (rich in red meats, processed pastries and fast-food) and the “Mediterranean” dietary pattern (high in fruits, vegetables and olive oil). After controlling for confounders, the Western dietary pattern was associated with quality of life in all domains. The magnitude of these differences between the subjects in the highest (quintile 5) and the lowest quintile of adherence to the Western pattern ranged from −0.8 (for mental health) to −3.5 (for vitality). On the contrary, the Mediterranean dietary pattern was associated with better quality of life domains: differences ranged from +1.3 (for physical functioning) to +3.4 (for vitality) when comparing extreme quintiles of adherence. Additional sensitivity analyses did not change the reported differences. Conclusions Whereas baseline adherence to a Western dietary pattern was inversely associated with self-perceived quality of life after 4 years of follow-up, baseline adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern was directly associated with better scores in quality of life four years later in the SUN Project. PMID:23658694

  7. Gender Differences in Hypertension Control Among Older Korean Adults: Korean Social Life, Health, and Aging Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hui Chu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Controlling blood pressure is a key step in reducing cardiovascular mortality in older adults. Gender differences in patients’ attitudes after disease diagnosis and their management of the disease have been identified. However, it is unclear whether gender differences exist in hypertension management among older adults. We hypothesized that gender differences would exist among factors associated with hypertension diagnosis and control among community-dwelling, older adults. Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed data from 653 Koreans aged ≥60 years who participated in the Korean Social Life, Health, and Aging Project. Multiple logistic regression was used to compare several variables between undiagnosed and diagnosed hypertension, and between uncontrolled and controlled hypertension. Results: Diabetes was more prevalent in men and women who had uncontrolled hypertension than those with controlled hypertension or undiagnosed hypertension. High body mass index was significantly associated with uncontrolled hypertension only in men. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that in women, awareness of one’s blood pressure level (odds ratio [OR], 2.86; p=0.003 and the number of blood pressure checkups over the previous year (OR, 1.06; p=0.011 might influence the likelihood of being diagnosed with hypertension. More highly educated women were more likely to have controlled hypertension than non-educated women (OR, 5.23; p=0.013. Conclusions: This study suggests that gender differences exist among factors associated with hypertension diagnosis and control in the study population of community-dwelling, older adults. Education-based health promotion strategies for hypertension control might be more effective in elderly women than in elderly men. Gender-specific approaches may be required to effectively control hypertension among older adults.

  8. Empirically derived dietary patterns and health-related quality of life in the SUN project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Ruano

    Full Text Available The analysis of dietary patterns has become a valuable tool to examine diet-disease relationships but little is known about their effects on quality of life. Our aim was to ascertain the association between major dietary patterns and mental and physical quality of life after 4 years of follow-up.This analysis included 11,128 participants from the "Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra" (SUN cohort. Dietary habits were assessed using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Factor analysis was used to derive dietary patterns. Quality of life was measured with the validated Spanish version of the SF-36 Health Survey.Two major dietary patterns were identified, the 'Western' dietary pattern (rich in red meats, processed pastries and fast-food and the "Mediterranean" dietary pattern (high in fruits, vegetables and olive oil. After controlling for confounders, the Western dietary pattern was associated with quality of life in all domains. The magnitude of these differences between the subjects in the highest (quintile 5 and the lowest quintile of adherence to the Western pattern ranged from -0.8 (for mental health to -3.5 (for vitality. On the contrary, the Mediterranean dietary pattern was associated with better quality of life domains: differences ranged from +1.3 (for physical functioning to +3.4 (for vitality when comparing extreme quintiles of adherence. Additional sensitivity analyses did not change the reported differences.Whereas baseline adherence to a Western dietary pattern was inversely associated with self-perceived quality of life after 4 years of follow-up, baseline adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern was directly associated with better scores in quality of life four years later in the SUN Project.

  9. Gender differences in hypertension control among older korean adults: Korean social life, health, and aging project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Sang Hui; Baek, Ji Won; Kim, Eun Sook; Stefani, Katherine M; Lee, Won Joon; Park, Yeong-Ran; Youm, Yoosik; Kim, Hyeon Chang

    2015-01-01

    Controlling blood pressure is a key step in reducing cardiovascular mortality in older adults. Gender differences in patients' attitudes after disease diagnosis and their management of the disease have been identified. However, it is unclear whether gender differences exist in hypertension management among older adults. We hypothesized that gender differences would exist among factors associated with hypertension diagnosis and control among community-dwelling, older adults. This cross-sectional study analyzed data from 653 Koreans aged ≥60 years who participated in the Korean Social Life, Health, and Aging Project. Multiple logistic regression was used to compare several variables between undiagnosed and diagnosed hypertension, and between uncontrolled and controlled hypertension. Diabetes was more prevalent in men and women who had uncontrolled hypertension than those with controlled hypertension or undiagnosed hypertension. High body mass index was significantly associated with uncontrolled hypertension only in men. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that in women, awareness of one's blood pressure level (odds ratio [OR], 2.86; p=0.003) and the number of blood pressure checkups over the previous year (OR, 1.06; p=0.011) might influence the likelihood of being diagnosed with hypertension. More highly educated women were more likely to have controlled hypertension than non-educated women (OR, 5.23; p=0.013). This study suggests that gender differences exist among factors associated with hypertension diagnosis and control in the study population of community-dwelling, older adults. Education-based health promotion strategies for hypertension control might be more effective in elderly women than in elderly men. Gender-specific approaches may be required to effectively control hypertension among older adults.

  10. Determinants of health and disability in ageing population: the COURAGE in Europe Project (collaborative research on ageing in Europe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Matilde; Chatterji, Somnath; Koskinen, Seppo; Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis; Haro, Josep Maria; Frisoni, Giovanni; Frattura, Lucilla; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Tobiasz-Adamczyk, Beata; Gmurek, Michal; Serrano, Ramon; Finocchiaro, Carla

    2014-01-01

    COURAGE in Europe was a 3-year project involving 12 partners from four European countries and the World Health Organization. It was inspired by the pressing need to integrate international studies on disability and ageing in light of an innovative perspective based on a validated data-collection protocol. COURAGE in Europe Project collected data on the determinants of health and disability in an ageing population, with specific tools for the evaluation of the role of the built environment and social networks on health, disability, quality of life and well-being. The main survey was conducted by partners in Finland, Poland and Spain where the survey has been administered to a sample of 10,800 persons, which was completed in March 2012. The newly developed and validated COURAGE Protocol for Ageing Studies has proven to be a valid tool for collecting comparable data in ageing population, and the COURAGE in Europe Project has created valid and reliable scientific evidence, demonstrating cross-country comparability, for disability and ageing research and policy development. It is therefore recommended that future studies exploring determinants of health and disability in ageing use the COURAGE-derived methodology. COURAGE in Europe Project collected data on the determinants of health and disability in an ageing population, with specific tools for the evaluation of the role of built environment and social networks on health, disability quality of life and well-being. The COURAGE Protocol for Ageing Studies has proven to be a valid tool for collecting comparable data in the ageing population. The COURAGE in Europe Consortium recommends that future studies exploring determinants of health and disability in ageing use COURAGE-derived methodology. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Australian rural football club leaders as mental health advocates: an investigation of the impact of the Coach the Coach project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobell Jennifer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental ill health, especially depression, is recognised as an important health concern, potentially with greater impact in rural communities. This paper reports on a project, Coach the Coach, in which Australian rural football clubs were the setting and football coaches the leaders in providing greater mental health awareness and capacity to support early help seeking behaviour among young males experiencing mental health difficulties, especially depression. Coaches and other football club leaders were provided with Mental Health First Aid (MHFA training. Method Pre-post measures of the ability of those club leaders undertaking mental health training to recognise depression and schizophrenia and of their knowledge of evidence supported treatment options, and confidence in responding to mental health difficulties were obtained using a questionnaire. This was supplemented by focus group interviews. Pre-post questionnaire data from players in participating football clubs was used to investigate attitudes to depression, treatment options and ability to recognise depression from a clinical scenario. Key project stakeholders were also interviewed. Results Club leaders (n = 36 who were trained in MHFA and club players (n = 275 who were not trained, participated in this evaluation. More than 50% of club leaders who undertook the training showed increased capacity to recognise mental illness and 66% reported increased confidence to respond to mental health difficulties in others. They reported that this training built upon their existing skills, fulfilled their perceived social responsibilities and empowered them. Indirect benefit to club players from this approach seemed limited as minimal changes in attitudes were reported by players. Key stakeholders regarded the project as valuable. Conclusions Rural football clubs appear to be appropriate social structures to promote rural mental health awareness. Club leaders, including many

  12. [An ethnographic approach to the concepts of health and disease in the Turkana tribe: a project to improve the health of the nomads of the Ilemi Triangle, Kenya].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardós García, José Javier; Lillo Crespo, Manuel; Climent Rubio, Andrés; Hernández Urrutia, Emiliano; Mejias Moreno, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to provide a broad view of the Turkana tribe of the Ilemi Triangle in northwestern Kenya, especially regarding the way the members of this nomadic ethnic group understand and shape their own construct of health and disease. It is based in an ethnographic study carried out in July and August 2014, including participant observation of 15 villages of the Turkana tribe, formal interviews and in-depth interviews carried out with the collaboration of two translators of the tribe and a nurse. Field notes as well videos and audio records were captured and transcribed for later analysis. Among the primary results of this study, it should be highlighted that the concepts of both health and disease differ greatly from the western approach that external projects bring with them a priori and it is likely that the lack of adherence to these projects is related to the scant cultural knowledge regarding such constructs on the part of the health professionals.

  13. Dietary anthocyanins and health: data from FLORA and ATHENA EU projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerletti, Chiara; De Curtis, Amalia; Bracone, Francesca; Digesù, Cinzia; Morganti, Alessio G; Iacoviello, Licia; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Donati, Maria Benedetta

    2017-01-01

    Adherence to a 'Mediterranean diet' has been shown to be beneficial to human health. Fruit and vegetables represent some of the main components of the Mediterranean diet and their role has been increasingly considered in the process of preventing or reducing the risk of chronic degenerative diseases, such as cerebrovascular or coronary heart disorders, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. To investigate the beneficial effect of these dietary compounds, two EU-funded projects were conducted during the last 10 years. Their results from experimental models suggest that dietary anthocyanin enrichment is beneficial against a number of ischemic and degenerative conditions. On the other hand, human studies demonstrated that anthocyanin supplementation can counteract the inflammatory response to stress conditions, such as a fatty meal. Moreover, an intervention trial in patients with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy is presently testing the possible beneficial effect of the administration of a product enriched in anthocyanins on the inflammatory response to radiation and on its consequent skin toxicity, as well as on systemic low-grade inflammation reaction. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. The Health Intervention Project: HIV risk reduction among African American women drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterk, Claire E

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the Health Intervention Project, an intervention for African American women in Atlanta, Georgia, who are crack cocaine users. A formative phase involved ethnographic mapping of the physical and social infrastructure of the study communities and in-depth interviews with women crack cocaine users. Key findings that were incorporated into the intervention program included the exchange of sex for money or drugs, the women's experience with trauma and abuse, the role of men and male partners, the women's roles as mothers and members of extended families, their identity as African Americans, and their desire to reduce their risk for HIV/AIDS related to their drug use and sexual behavior. Individualized intervention sessions were designed to meet the women's needs. The motivation intervention emphasized self-motivation for behavioral change with the assistance of the interventionist, who facilitated the women's goal identification, action plan, and problem-solving skills. The negotiation intervention focused on improving technical and assertive communication skills. An action plan was developed, and the women worked on negotiation skills, self-control regarding sexual and drug-use encounters, assertiveness in sexual and drug-use interactions, and conflict resolution. Effective prevention and intervention programs must be framed within an appropriate racial, ethnic, and cultural context. Future research is needed to better understand risk in its social context, including the impact of community factors.

  15. The role of community context in planning and implementing community-based health promotion projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegler, Michelle C; Rigler, Jessica; Honeycutt, Sally

    2011-08-01

    The current study examines how community context affected collaborative planning and implementation in eight sites participating in a healthy cities and communities initiative in California. Data are from 23 focus groups conducted with coalition members, and 76 semi-structured interviews with local coordinators and community leaders. Multiple case study methods were used to identify major themes related to how five contextual domains influenced collaborative planning and implementation. Results showed that history of collaboration can influence resources and interpersonal and organizational connections available for planning and implementation, as well as priorities selected for action. Community politics and history can affect which segments of the community participate in a planning process and what issues are prioritized, as well as the pool of partners willing to aid in implementation. Some community norms and values bring people together and others appear to limit involvement from certain groups. Community demographics and economic conditions may shape outreach strategies for planning and implementation, and may also shape priorities. Geography can play a role in assessment methods, priority selection, partners available to aid in implementation, and participation in activities and events. Results suggest that community context plays a substantive role in shaping how community-based health promotion projects unfold. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Religious Factors Associated with Alcohol Involvement: Results from the Mauritian Joint Child Health Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczak, Susan E.; Prescott, Carol A.; Dalais, Cyril; Raine, Adrian; Venables, Peter H.; Mednick, Sarnoff A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine religious factors associated with alcohol involvement in Mauritius. The three main religions on the island, Hinduism, Catholicism, and Islam, promote different views of the appropriate use of alcohol. Based on reference group theory, we hypothesized that both the content of a religion’s alcohol norms and an individual’s religious commitment would relate to alcohol use behavior. Methods Participants were from the Joint Child Health Project, a longitudinal study that has followed a birth cohort of 1,795 individuals since 1972 when they were 3 years old. All available participants (67%; 55% male) were assessed in mid-adulthood on religious variables, lifetime drinking, and lifetime alcohol use disorders. Results Across religions, individuals who viewed their religion as promoting abstinence were less likely to be drinkers. Religious commitment was associated with reduced probability of drinking only in those who viewed their religion as promoting abstinence. Among drinkers, abstention norms and religious commitment were not associated with lower likelihood of alcohol use disorders. In Catholics who viewed their religion as promoting abstinence and still were drinkers, high religious commitment was associated with increased risk for alcohol use disorders. Conclusions Predictions based on reference group theory were largely supported, with religious norms and commitment differentially related to alcohol use and problems both across religions and among individuals within religions. Findings highlight the importance of examining multiple aspects of religion to better understand the relationship of religion with alcohol behaviors. PMID:24332801

  17. Increasing physical activity through health-enabling technologies: the project "being strong without violence".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharnweber, Corinna; Ludwig, Wolfram; Marschollek, Michael; Pein, Wolfgang; Schack, Peter; Schubert, Reiner; Haux, Reinhold

    2011-01-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of adiposity in children numerous schools are introducing prevention programmes. Among these is "Gewaltlos Starksein" ("Being strong without violence"), a project of Hauptschule Sophienstraße Braunschweig, Germany (a general education secondary school for grades 5-10). This study aims to discover possible increases in activity through "Gewaltlos Starksein" where health-enabling technologies play a major role. A prospective intervention study with a span of 1.5 years was designed to measure this increase in activity. Partners in this study were Hauptschule Sophienstraße as the intervention group and Grund- und Hauptschule Pestalozzistraße as control group. Data collection was performed using a multi-sensor device, and questionnaires. Confirmatory data analysis of average metabolic equivalent (METs) yielded no significant results. Exploratory analysis showed interesting results, especially concerning the number of steps during leisure time. Descriptive analysis of questionnaires showed that all children enjoy physical activity. There were differences in sports team participation, open-air games and club affiliation. The study could not prove that the intervention "Gewaltlos Starksein" improves physical activity in children. However, the increased leisure activity step count indicates that "Gewaltlos Starksein" has positive effects on children's behaviour. This should be investigated in a further study in cooperation with psychologists.

  18. Diabetes self-management education training for community health center nurses in Indonesia: a best practice implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiharto, Sugiharto; Stephenson, Matthew; Hsu, Yu-Yun; Fajriyah, Nuniek Nizmah

    2017-09-01

    Diabetes complications can increase progressively, leading to morbidity and mortality among diabetes sufferers. To address this, diabetes self-management education is a strategy to increase patients' knowledge and awareness in self-care. However some issues related to diabetes self-management education have emerged for health care providers and patients. The objective of this project was to improve nurses' skills and confidence in delivering diabetes self-management education among type 2 diabetes patients by promoting evidence based practice in community health centers, thereby enhancing patients' knowledge and skills in performing self-care. The Joanna Briggs Institute three-phase Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research into Practice audit and feedback tool were utilized in this project for promoting evidence utilization and changes in the community health setting. In phase 1 of the project, stakeholders were engaged and 12 evidence-based audit criteria were developed. A baseline audit was conducted by the project team in 41 community health centers. In phase 2, barriers underpinning areas of noncompliance found in the baseline audit were identified and strategies developed to target three key areas - staff, administration and patients. In phase 3, a follow-up audit was conducted. The baseline audit results showed that eight of the 12 criteria recorded zero percent compliance, with the remaining four recording below 50%, representing poor compliance with the current evidence. Strategies implemented during phase 2 of the project included a diabetes educator training program, development of diabetes education curriculum and media, and a patient's logbook. After implementation of the strategies, the follow-up audit showed that all 12 criteria achieved 100% compliance. The diabetes training program for community health center nurses increased their skills and confidence in delivering diabetes self-management education to patients.

  19. An Innovative Project Breaks Down Barriers to Oral Health Care for Vulnerable Young Children in Los Angeles County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crall, James J; Illum, Jackie; Martinez, Ana; Pourat, Nadereh

    2016-06-01

    Despite the high rate of untreated tooth decay, many young children in California under six years of age have never been to a dentist. Numerous and complex barriers to access to oral health care for young children exist, and a multifaceted approach is required to improve receipt of preventive and treatment services that could improve the oral health of this population. This policy brief describes the UCLA-First 5 LA 21st Century Dental Homes Project, which was designed to improve oral health care for young children in 12 Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) clinic sites with co-located dental and primary care services and its accessibility in their service areas throughout Los Angeles County. The project funded infrastructure and staffing, provided technical assistance to improve operations, trained clinical personnel to provide oral health care to young children, implemented a quality improvement learning collaborative, trained parents and child care providers in oral hygiene and healthy habits, and disseminated information to promote effective policies. Early data on the project indicated twofold increases in delivery of both diagnostics and treatment visits for young children, and a threefold increase in preventive services for young children during the program.

  20. [Evaluating the efficiency of basic public health service project in Beijing rural areas based on data envelopment analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gui-lin; Pan, Xi-long

    2013-04-18

    To measure the efficiency changes of basic public health service in Beijing rural areas and to provide some suggestions for the basic public health service project throughout China. In the study, stratified random samples from 32 township health centers (THCs) were measured by data envelopment analysis (DEA) model with the panel data from 2007 to 2009. (1) The average total efficiency score of samples was 0.972. The TE non-efficient THCs were with excess in all input indicators and insufficient outputs in technology management, health promotion and chronic disease management. (2) The total factor productivity (TFP) from 2007 to 2008 increased 8.8%, which was attributed to technology change. The TFP decreased by 6.6% from 2008 to 2009, but the technical efficiency increased by 3.3%. There is room for improvemrnt in the basic public health service project in Beijing rural areas. Scale efficiency should be improved and the common development of technical efficiency and technology progress promoted in order to increase the project outputs.

  1. [Logic model of the Franche-Comté Regional Health Project: advantages and limitations for the evaluation process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Claude; Sannino, Nadine; Duboudin, Cédric; Baudier, François; Guillin, Caroline; Billondeau, Christine; Mansion, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    The French "Hospitals, patients, health and territories" law of July 2009 created the Regional Health Project (PRS) to support regional health policy, and requires evaluation of these projects. The construction of these projects, which includes prevention planning, care planning, and medical and social welfare planning, presents an unprecedented complexity in France, where evaluation programmes are still in their infancy. To support future evaluations, the Franche-Comté Regional Health Agency (ARS FC), assisted by the expertise of EFECT Consultants, decided to reconstruct the PRS logic model. This article analyzes the advantages and limitations of this approach. The resulting logic model allows visualization of the strategy adopted to achieve the Franche-Comté PRS ambitions and expected results. The model highlights four main aspects of structural change to the health system, often poorly visible in PRS presentation documents. This model also establishes links with the usual public policy evaluation issues and facilitates their prioritization. This approach also provides a better understanding of the importance of analysis of the programme construction in order to be effective rather than direct analysis of the effects, which constitutes the natural tendency of current practice. The main controversial limit concerns the retrospective design of the PRS framework, both in terms of the reliability of interpretation and adoption by actors not directly involved in this initiative.

  2. The Role of CYP2C8 and CYP2C9 Genotypes in Losartan-Dependent Inhibition of Paclitaxel Metabolism in Human Liver Microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Yuji; Senda, Asuna; Toda, Takaki; Eliasson, Erik; Rane, Anders; Inotsume, Nobuo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to further investigate a previously identified metabolic interaction between losartan and paclitaxel, which is one of the marker substrates of CYP2C8, by using human liver microsomes (HLMs) from donors with different CYP2C8 and CYP2C9 genotypes. Although CYP2C8 and CYP2C9 exhibit genetic linkage, previous studies have yet to determine whether losartan or its active metabolite, EXP-3174 which is specifically generated by CYP2C9, is responsible for CYP2C8 inhibition. Concentrations of 6α-hydroxypaclitaxel and EXP-3174 were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography after incubations with paclitaxel, losartan or EXP-3174 in HLMs from seven donors with different CYP2C8 and CYP2C9 genotypes. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) values were not fully dependent on CYP2C8 genotypes. Although the degree of inhibition was small, losartan significantly inhibited the production of 6α-hydroxypaclitaxel at a concentration of 1 μmol/L in only HL20 with the CYP2C8*3/*3 genotype. HLMs with either CYP2C9*2/*2 or CYP2C9*1/*3 exhibited a lower losartan intrinsic clearance (Vmax /Km ) than other HLMs including those with CYP2C9*1/*1 and CYP2C9*1/*2. Significant inhibition of 6α-hydroxypaclitaxel formation by EXP-3174 could only be found at levels that were 50 times higher (100 μmol/L) than the maximum concentration generated in the inhibition study using losartan. These results suggest that the metabolic interaction between losartan and paclitaxel is dependent on losartan itself rather than its metabolite and that the CYP2C8 inhibition by losartan is not affected by the CYP2C9 genotype. Further study is needed to define the effect of CYP2C8 genotypes on losartan-paclitaxel interaction. © 2015 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  3. Dietary Caprylic Acid (C8:0 Does Not Increase Plasma Acylated Ghrelin but Decreases Plasma Unacylated Ghrelin in the Rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Lemarié

    Full Text Available Focusing on the caprylic acid (C8:0, this study aimed at investigating the discrepancy between the formerly described beneficial effects of dietary medium chain fatty acids on body weight loss and the C8:0 newly reported effect on food intake via ghrelin octanoylation. During 6 weeks, Sprague-Dawley male rats were fed with three dietary C8:0 levels (0, 8 and 21% of fatty acids in three experimental conditions (moderate fat, caloric restriction and high fat. A specific dose-response enrichment of the stomach tissue C8:0 was observed as a function of dietary C8:0, supporting the hypothesis of an early preduodenal hydrolysis of medium chain triglycerides and a direct absorption at the gastric level. However, the octanoylated ghrelin concentration in the plasma was unchanged in spite of the increased C8:0 availability. A reproducible decrease in the plasma concentration of unacylated ghrelin was observed, which was consistent with a decrease in the stomach preproghrelin mRNA and stomach ghrelin expression. The concomitant decrease of the plasma unacylated ghrelin and the stability of its acylated form resulted in a significant increase in the acylated/total ghrelin ratio which had no effect on body weight gain or total dietary consumption. This enhanced ratio measured in rats consuming C8:0 was however suspected to increase (i growth hormone (GH secretion as an increase in the GH-dependent mRNA expression of the insulin like growth Factor 1 (IGF-1 was measured (ii adipocyte diameters in subcutaneous adipose tissue without an increase in the fat pad mass. Altogether, these results show that daily feeding with diets containing C8:0 increased the C8:0 level in the stomach more than all the other tissues, affecting the acylated/total ghrelin plasma ratio by decreasing the concentration of circulating unacylated ghrelin. However, these modifications were not associated with increased body weight or food consumption.

  4. Dietary Caprylic Acid (C8:0) Does Not Increase Plasma Acylated Ghrelin but Decreases Plasma Unacylated Ghrelin in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemarié, Fanny; Beauchamp, Erwan; Dayot, Stéphanie; Duby, Cécile; Legrand, Philippe; Rioux, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Focusing on the caprylic acid (C8:0), this study aimed at investigating the discrepancy between the formerly described beneficial effects of dietary medium chain fatty acids on body weight loss and the C8:0 newly reported effect on food intake via ghrelin octanoylation. During 6 weeks, Sprague-Dawley male rats were fed with three dietary C8:0 levels (0, 8 and 21% of fatty acids) in three experimental conditions (moderate fat, caloric restriction and high fat). A specific dose-response enrichment of the stomach tissue C8:0 was observed as a function of dietary C8:0, supporting the hypothesis of an early preduodenal hydrolysis of medium chain triglycerides and a direct absorption at the gastric level. However, the octanoylated ghrelin concentration in the plasma was unchanged in spite of the increased C8:0 availability. A reproducible decrease in the plasma concentration of unacylated ghrelin was observed, which was consistent with a decrease in the stomach preproghrelin mRNA and stomach ghrelin expression. The concomitant decrease of the plasma unacylated ghrelin and the stability of its acylated form resulted in a significant increase in the acylated/total ghrelin ratio which had no effect on body weight gain or total dietary consumption. This enhanced ratio measured in rats consuming C8:0 was however suspected to increase (i) growth hormone (GH) secretion as an increase in the GH-dependent mRNA expression of the insulin like growth Factor 1 (IGF-1) was measured (ii) adipocyte diameters in subcutaneous adipose tissue without an increase in the fat pad mass. Altogether, these results show that daily feeding with diets containing C8:0 increased the C8:0 level in the stomach more than all the other tissues, affecting the acylated/total ghrelin plasma ratio by decreasing the concentration of circulating unacylated ghrelin. However, these modifications were not associated with increased body weight or food consumption. PMID:26196391

  5. Dialogues and Contrasts Between Development Projects and Health Models. Experience and Considerations About the Achuar of the Ecuadorian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Pulido-Fuentes

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of a health program among the Achuar people of the Ecuadorian Amazon, under the logic of development cooperation and the Western biomedical model redefines the health model of society in which intervenes; and their health workers. The indications trainings, infrastructure precepts contribute to the construction of a prototype that relegates the traditional therapeutic practice, the different categories of evils, and the explanations derived on the origin of the disease, despite maintaining a critical discourse and a theoretical framework that seeks to integrate all models. This article tries to approach the process of health-disease-care Achuar population, analyzing the relationships that occur between the different actors involved in the process. The implementation of a project to promote health, emergency responses and strategies both accommodative and local resistance is analyzed. The recapitulated ethnography, tries to show some reflections on the fragility in the formulation and implementation of health programs, to endure the lack of local perspective and the perspective of the state. Other cultural skills that appeal to the inclusion of these groups and their therapies in health policies are also shown, and not only rhetorically or as political projects-beyond a mere ideological rescue. Nevertheless, the inevitable hybridization and necessary negotiation between the actors involved in the process described.

  6. Dynamics of the reaction of C2 with C6H2: an implication for the formation of interstellar C8H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi-Lun; Huang, Wen-Jian; Chin, Chih-Hao; Lee, Shih-Huang

    2014-11-21

    The reaction C2 + C6H2 → C8H + H was investigated for the first time. Reactant C2 (C6H2) was synthesized from 1% C3F6/He (5% C2H2/He) by pulsed high-voltage discharge. We measured the translational-energy distribution, the angular distribution, and the photoionization spectrum of product C8H in a crossed molecular-beam apparatus using synchrotron vacuum-ultraviolet ionization. This reaction released average translational energy of 8.5 kcal mol(-1) corresponding to a fraction of 0.37 in translation. C8H was identified as octatetranyl based on the maximal translational-energy release 23 ± 2 kcal mol(-1) and the ionization threshold 8.9 ± 0.2 eV. Kinematic constraints can qualitatively account for the nearly isotropic angular distribution. The quantum-chemical calculations indicate that the exothermic reactions C2 (X (1)Σg (+)/a (3)Πu) + HC6H → C8H + H can proceed without entrance and exit barriers, implying the importance in the cold interstellar medium. This work verifies that interstellar C8H can be formed through the C2 + C6H2 reaction.

  7. Harnessing opportunities for good governance of health impacts of mining projects in Mongolia: results of a global partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Michaela; Vanya, Delgermaa; Davison, Colleen; Lkhagvasuren, Oyunaa; Johnston, Lesley; Janes, Craig R

    2017-06-27

    The Sustainable Development Goals call for the effective governance of shared natural resources in ways that support inclusive growth, safeguard the integrity of the natural and physical environment, and promote health and well-being for all. For large-scale resource extraction projects -- e.g. in the mining sector -- environmental regulations and in particular environmental impact assessments (EIA) provide an important but insufficiently developed avenue to ensure that wider sustainable development issues, such as health, have been considered prior to the permitting of projects. In recognition of the opportunity provided in EIA to influence the extent to which health issues would be addressed in the design and delivery of mining projects, an international and intersectoral partnership, with the support of WHO and public funds from Canadian sources, engaged over a period of six years in a series of capacity development activities and knowledge translation/dissemination events aimed at influencing policy change in the extractives sector so as to include consideration of human health impacts. Early efforts significantly increased awareness of the need to include health considerations in EIAs. Coupling effective knowledge translation about health in EIA with the development of networks that fostered good intersectoral partnerships, this awareness supported the development and implementation of key pieces of legislation. These results show that intersectoral collaboration is essential, and must be supported by an effective conceptual understanding about which methods and models of impact assessment, particularly for health, lend themselves to integration within EIA. The results of our partnership demonstrate that when specific conditions are met, integrating health into the EIA system represents a promising avenue to ensure that mining activities contribute to wider sustainable development goals and objectives.

  8. Assessment and prevention of acute health effects of weather conditions in Europe, the PHEWE project: background, objectives, design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Hugh

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The project "Assessment and prevention of acute health effects of weather conditions in Europe" (PHEWE had the aim of assessing the association between weather conditions and acute health effects, during both warm and cold seasons in 16 European cities with widely differing climatic conditions and to provide information for public health policies. Methods The PHEWE project was a three-year pan-European collaboration between epidemiologists, meteorologists and experts in public health. Meteorological, air pollution and mortality data from 16 cities and hospital admission data from 12 cities were available from 1990 to 2000. The short-term effect on mortality/morbidity was evaluated through city-specific and pooled time series analysis. The interaction between weather and air pollutants was evaluated and health impact assessments were performed to quantify the effect on the different populations. A heat/health watch warning system to predict oppressive weather conditions and alert the population was developed in a subgroup of cities and information on existing prevention policies and of adaptive strategies was gathered. Results Main results were presented in a symposium at the conference of the International Society of Environmental Epidemiology in Paris on September 6th 2006 and will be published as scientific articles. The present article introduces the project and includes a description of the database and the framework of the applied methodology. Conclusion The PHEWE project offers the opportunity to investigate the relationship between temperature and mortality in 16 European cities, representing a wide range of climatic, socio-demographic and cultural characteristics; the use of a standardized methodology allows for direct comparison between cities.

  9. Building Health System Capacity Through Implementation Research: Experience of INSPIRE-A Multi-country PMTCT Implementation Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman Owiredu, Morkor; Bellare, Nita B; Chakanyuka Musanhu, Christine C; Oyelade, Taiwo A; Thom, Ellen M; Bigirimana, Francoise; Anyaike, Chukwuma; Eliya, Michael T; Mushavi, Angela; Nyarko, Eugene A; Okello, David O; Zawaira, Felicitas R

    2017-06-01

    The INSPIRE-Integrating and Scaling Up PMTCT through Implementation REsearch-initiative was established as a model partnership of national prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) implementation research in 3 high HIV burden countries-Malawi, Nigeria, and Zimbabwe. INSPIRE aimed to link local research groups with Ministries of Health (MOH), build local research capacity, and demonstrate that implementation research may contribute to improving health care delivery and respond to program challenges. We used a mixed methods approach to review capacity building activities, as experienced by health care workers, researchers, and trainers conducted in the 6 INSPIRE projects before and during study implementation. Between 2011 and 2016, over 3400 health care workers, research team members, and community members participated in INSPIRE activities. This included research prioritization exercises, proposal development, good clinical practice and research ethics training, data management and analysis workshops, and manuscript development. Health care workers in clinics and district health offices acknowledged the value of hosting implementation research projects and how the quality of services improved. Research teams acknowledged the opportunities that projects provided for personal development and the value of participating in a multicountry research network. INSPIRE provided an opportunity for African-led research in which researchers worked closely with national MOH to identify priority research questions and implement studies. Close partnerships between research teams and local implementers facilitated project responsiveness to local program issues. Consequently, processes and training needed for study implementation also improved local program management and service delivery. Additional benefits included improved data management, publications, and career development.

  10. Presenting evidence-based health information for people with multiple sclerosis: the IN-DEEP project protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Sophie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasingly, evidence-based health information, in particular evidence from systematic reviews, is being made available to lay audiences, in addition to health professionals. Research efforts have focused on different formats for the lay presentation of health information. However, there is a paucity of data on how patients integrate evidence-based health information with other factors such as their preferences for information and experiences with information-seeking. The aim of this project is to explore how people with multiple sclerosis (MS integrate health information with their needs, experiences, preferences and values and how these factors can be incorporated into an online resource of evidence-based health information provision for people with MS and their families. Methods This project is an Australian-Italian collaboration between researchers, MS societies and people with MS. Using a four-stage mixed methods design, a model will be developed for presenting evidence-based health information on the Internet for people with MS and their families. This evidence-based health information will draw upon systematic reviews of MS interventions from The Cochrane Library. Each stage of the project will build on the last. After conducting focus groups with people with MS and their family members (Stage 1, we will develop a model for summarising and presenting Cochrane MS reviews that is integrated with supporting information to aid understanding and decision making. This will be reviewed and finalised with people with MS, family members, health professionals and MS Society staff (Stage 2, before being uploaded to the Internet and evaluated (Stages 3 and 4. Discussion This project aims to produce accessible and meaningful evidence-based health information about MS for use in the varied decision making and management situations people encounter in everyday life. It is expected that the findings will be relevant to broader

  11. Proposal of a risk-factor-based analytical approach for integrating occupational health and safety into project risk evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, Adel; Nadeau, Sylvie; Gbodossou, André

    2012-09-01

    Excluding occupational health and safety (OHS) from project management is no longer acceptable. Numerous industrial accidents have exposed the ineffectiveness of conventional risk evaluation methods as well as negligence of risk factors having major impact on the health and safety of workers and nearby residents. Lack of reliable and complete evaluations from the beginning of a project generates bad decisions that could end up threatening the very existence of an organization. This article supports a systematic approach to the evaluation of OHS risks and proposes a new procedure based on the number of risk factors identified and their relative significance. A new concept called risk factor concentration along with weighting of risk factor categories as contributors to undesirable events are used in the analytical hierarchy process multi-criteria comparison model with Expert Choice(©) software. A case study is used to illustrate the various steps of the risk evaluation approach and the quick and simple integration of OHS at an early stage of a project. The approach allows continual reassessment of criteria over the course of the project or when new data are acquired. It was thus possible to differentiate the OHS risks from the risk of drop in quality in the case of the factory expansion project. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Transformative learning experience for physical therapy students through a community health promotion project for mothers of hearing-challenged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokogawa, Masami; Notoya, Masako; Madokoro, Sachiko

    2017-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this project was to expose physical therapy students to transformative learning through a community health promotion project for mothers of hearing-challenged children. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were three mothers with their respective hearing-challenged child and twenty physical therapy students. The project consisted of seven sessions supervised throughout by a physical therapy instructor. The students participated in seven sessions, while the mothers were required to attend only two sessions of a health checkup and exercise program. [Results] Through the interaction between the mothers and students, the former felt physically and mentally refreshed, and the latter experienced transformative learning. The mother's physical status showed that all parameters for health variables were within normal range. However, it was found that mothers had little time for their personal mental or physical well-being because their focus was on planning and executing daily assignments for development of the child's verbal skills. [Conclusion] This project contributed to the students' learning experience and provided them with tools for possible future interest and involvement in community activity. The exercise session appeared to stimulate in the mothers an awareness and importance of their own personal and mental well-being.

  13. Financing transformative health systems towards achievement of the health Sustainable Development Goals: a model for projected resource needs in 67 low-income and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Karin; Hanssen, Odd; Edejer, Tessa Tan-Torres; Bertram, Melanie; Brindley, Callum; Meshreky, Andreia; Rosen, James E; Stover, John; Verboom, Paul; Sanders, Rachel; Soucat, Agnès

    2017-09-01

    The ambitious development agenda of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) requires substantial investments across several sectors, including for SDG 3 (healthy lives and wellbeing). No estimates of the additional resources needed to strengthen comprehensive health service delivery towards the attainment of SDG 3 and universal health coverage in low-income and middle-income countries have been published. We developed a framework for health systems strengthening, within which population-level and individual-level health service coverage is gradually scaled up over time. We developed projections for 67 low-income and middle-income countries from 2016 to 2030, representing 95% of the total population in low-income and middle-income countries. We considered four service delivery platforms, and modelled two scenarios with differing levels of ambition: a progress scenario, in which countries' advancement towards global targets is constrained by their health system's assumed absorptive capacity, and an ambitious scenario, in which most countries attain the global targets. We estimated the associated costs and health effects, including reduced prevalence of illness, lives saved, and increases in life expectancy. We projected available funding by country and year, taking into account economic growth and anticipated allocation towards the health sector, to allow for an analysis of affordability and financial sustainability. We estimate that an additional $274 billion spending on health is needed per year by 2030 to make progress towards the SDG 3 targets (progress scenario), whereas US$371 billion would be needed to reach health system targets in the ambitious scenario-the equivalent of an additional $41 (range 15-102) or $58 (22-167) per person, respectively, by the final years of scale-up. In the ambitious scenario, total health-care spending would increase to a population-weighted mean of $271 per person (range 74-984) across country contexts, and the share of gross

  14. Employers' role in helping Latino workers obtain access to health care services: results of a community-based pilot demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembe, Allard E; Biehl, Jeffrey M; Smith, Alicia D; Garcia de Gutierrez, Teresa

    2013-06-01

    A coalition of employers in the hotel and restaurant industries collaborated with community-based organizations to undertake a unique demonstration project, called the Employed Latino Health Initiative, aimed at improving access to basic health care services for low-wage Latino workers in Columbus, Ohio. With grant funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the project developed and tested protocols allowing Latino workers from participating companies to obtain basic health care screenings, referrals to medical providers, health education training, and the services of a qualified community health navigator. Data from the pilot project indicated high screening participation rates, extensive referrals to providers for follow-up care, and a substantial need for facilitation services by community health navigators. The project provides a model for how employers can potentially promote their own interests in boosting work productivity through facilitating expanded access to basic medical services among vulnerable workers, despite the absence of conventional health insurance coverage.

  15. Chernobyl Studies Project. Working Group 7.0, environmental transport and health effects. Progress report, February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, S.M. [ed.

    1994-04-01

    The focus of the Chernobyl Studies Project has now turned to the issue of health effects from the Chernobyl accident. Currently, we are involved in and making progress on the case-control and co-hort studies of thyroid diseases among Belarussian children. Dosimetric aspects are a fundamental part of these studies. We are working to implement similar studies in Ukraine. A major part of the effort of these projects is supporting these studies, both by providing methods and applications of dose reconstruction and by providing support and equipment for the medical teams.

  16. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research, the Alzheimer's Association has been an active partner in "THE ALZHEIMER'S PROJECT," ... (48 minutes) "Momentum ...

  17. Sexuality and physical contact in National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project Wave 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinsky, Adena M; McClintock, Martha K; Waite, Linda J

    2014-11-01

    Wave 2 of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) includes new measures of sexual interest and behavior, as well as new measures of the context of sexual experience and the frequency and appeal of physical contact. This is the first time many of these constructs have been measured in a nationally representative sample. We describe the new measures and compare the distributions of each across gender and age groups, in some cases by partnership status. Two components of sexuality decrease with age among both men and women: frequency of finding an unknown person sexually attractive and receptivity to a partner's sexual overtures. In contrast, the inclination to make one's self sexually attractive to others was a more complicated function of partner status, gender, and age: partnered women and unpartnered men made the most effort, with the more effortful gender's effort decreasing with age. Both men and women find nonsexual physical contact appealing but sexual physical contact is more appealing to men than women. Finally, two fifths of men and women report dissatisfaction with their partner's frequency of caring behaviors that make later sexual interactions pleasurable, and a fifth of women and a quarter of men who had vaginal sex in the past year report dissatisfaction with amount of foreplay. These data offer the opportunity to characterize sexual motivation in older adulthood more precisely and richly and to examine how the context of sexual experience and the nonsexual aspects of physical intimacy correlate with sexual behavior, enjoyment, and problems. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. The Traditional/Acoustic Music Project: a study of vocal demands and vocal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Molly L

    2012-09-01

    The Traditional/Acoustic Music Project seeks to identify the musical and performance characteristics of traditional/acoustic musicians and determine the vocal demands they face with the goals of (1) providing information and outreach to this important group of singers and (2) providing information to physicians, speech-language pathologists, and singing teachers who will enable them to provide appropriate services. Descriptive cross-sectional study. Data have been collected through administration of a 53-item questionnaire. The questionnaire was administered to artists performing at local venues in Knoxville, Tennessee and also to musicians attending the 2008 Folk Alliance Festival in Memphis, Tennessee. Approximately 41% of the respondents have had no vocal training, whereas approximately 34% of the respondents have had some form of formal vocal training (private lessons or group instruction). About 41% of the participants had experienced a tired voice, whereas about 30% of the participants had experienced either a loss of the top range of the voice or a total loss of voice at least once in their careers. Approximately 31% of the respondents had no health insurance. Approximately 69% of the respondents reported that they get their information about healthy singing practices solely from fellow musicians or that they do not get any information at all. Traditional/acoustic musicians are a poorly studied population at risk for the development of voice disorders. Continued research is necessary with the goal of a large sample that can be analyzed for associations, identification of subpopulations, and formulation of specific hypotheses that lend themselves to experimental research. Appropriate models of information and service delivery tailored for the singer-instrumentalist are needed. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Leadership in workplace health promotion projects: 1- and 2-year effects on long-term work attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellve, Lotta; Skagert, Katrin; Vilhelmsson, Rebecka

    2007-10-01

    Despite the acknowledged role of leadership in the psychosocial work environment, few studies focus on how leadership qualities and strategies may act as key processes of importance to positive effects of workplace health promotion (WHP). The aim of this study was to increase knowledge about how leadership qualities and strategies in WHP projects influence employees' long-term work attendance. The 1- and 2-year effect of leadership on the prevalence of long-term work attendance among municipal human service workers (n = 3 275) was analysed using 3-year register-based data on sick leave, questionnaires and a qualitative categorization of each unit. Increased leadership qualities, especially where leaders used rewards, recognition and respect, were associated with higher prevalence of work attendance at follow-up [PR 1.42 (1.20-1.69)]. Leaders' strategies and views on work-related health had a significant impact on increased work attendance in projects that had goals clearly focusing on changeable factors [1.36 (1.11-1.67)], in multi-focused projects [1.60 (1.24-2.04)] and in projects aimed to increase employees' awareness of their health. Workplace health promotion strategies with a single focus on strengthening individual, professional or organizational resources were negatively associated with work attendance. A higher proportion of employee work attendance was also seen in units whose leaders viewed the organization or the society (rather than individual workers) as responsible for the high rate of sick leave. Leadership, WHP strategies and leaders' attitudes towards employee work-related health have importance for implementation processes, as well as affecting employee work attendance. In this study, multi-focused WHP interventions had the largest effect on work attendance.

  20. Inhibition of Human Cytochrome P450 2c8-catalyzed Amodiaquine N-desethylation: Effect of Five Traditionally and Commonly Used Herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthiah, Yasotha Devi; Ong, Chin Eng; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah; Ismail, Rusli

    2016-01-01

    In Southeast Asia and many parts of the world, herbal products are increasingly used in parallel with modern medicine. This study aimed to investigate the effects of herbs commonly used in Southeast Asia on activity of cytochrome P450 2C8 (CYP2C8), an important human hepatic enzyme in drug metabolism. The selected herbs, such as Eurycoma longifolia Jack (ELJ), Labisia pumila (LP), Echinacea purpurea (EP), Andrographis paniculata (AP), and Ginkgo biloba (GB), were subjected to inhibition studies using an in vitro CYP2C8 activity marker, amodiaquine N-desethylase assay. Inhibition parameters, inhibitory concentration 50% (IC50), and Ki values were determined to study the potency and mode of inhibition. All herbs inhibited CYP2C8 with the following order of potency: LP > ELJ > GB > AP > EP. LP and ELJ inhibited potently at Ki's of 2 and 4 times the Ki of quercetin, the positive control. The inhibition by LP was uncompetitive in nature as compared to competitive or mixed type inhibition observed with other herbs. GB exhibited moderate inhibitory effect at a Ki6 times larger than quercetin Ki. AP and EP, on the other hand, showed only weak inhibition. The herbs we chose represented the more commonly used herbs in Southeast Asia where collision of tradition and modernization in healthcare, if not properly managed, may lead to therapeutic misadventures. We conclude that concurrent consumption of some herbs, in particular, LP and ELJ, may have relevance in drug-herb interactions via CYP2C8 inhibition in vivo. Herbs are increasingly used in parallel with modern medicines nowadays. In this study five commonly used herbs in Southeast Asia region, ELJ, LP, EP, AP and GB, were investigated for their in vitro inhibitory potency on CYP2C8, an important drug-metaboliz-ing human hepatic enzyme. All herbs inhibited CYP2C8 activity marker, amodiaquine N-desethylation, with potency order of LP > ELJ > GB >AP > EP. LP, ELJ and GB exhibited Ki values of 2, 4 and 6 times the Ki of