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Sample records for c5a enhances dysregulated

  1. C5a enhances dysregulated inflammatory and angiogenic responses to malaria in vitro: potential implications for placental malaria.

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    Andrea Conroy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Placental malaria (PM is a leading cause of maternal and infant mortality. Although the accumulation of parasitized erythrocytes (PEs and monocytes within the placenta is thought to contribute to the pathophysiology of PM, the molecular mechanisms underlying PM remain unclear. Based on the hypothesis that excessive complement activation may contribute to PM, in particular generation of the potent inflammatory peptide C5a, we investigated the role of C5a in the pathogenesis of PM in vitro and in vivo. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using primary human monocytes, the interaction between C5a and malaria in vitro was assessed. CSA- and CD36-binding PEs induced activation of C5 in the presence of human serum. Plasmodium falciparum GPI (pfGPI enhanced C5a receptor expression (CD88 on monocytes, and the co-incubation of monocytes with C5a and pfGPI resulted in the synergistic induction of cytokines (IL-6, TNF, IL-1beta, and IL-10, chemokines (IL-8, MCP-1, MIP1alpha, MIP1beta and the anti-angiogenic factor sFlt-1 in a time and dose-dependent manner. This dysregulated response was abrogated by C5a receptor blockade. To assess the potential role of C5a in PM, C5a plasma levels were measured in malaria-exposed primigravid women in western Kenya. Compared to pregnant women without malaria, C5a levels were significantly elevated in women with PM. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that C5a may contribute to the pathogenesis of PM by inducing dysregulated inflammatory and angiogenic responses that impair placental function.

  2. An agonist of human complement fragment C5a enhances vaccine immunity against Coccidioides infection.

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    Hung, Chiung-Yu; Hurtgen, Brady J; Bellecourt, Michael; Sanderson, Sam D; Morgan, Edward L; Cole, Garry T

    2012-06-29

    Coccidioides is a fungal pathogen and causative agent of a human respiratory disease against which no clinical vaccine exists. In this study we evaluated a novel vaccine adjuvant referred to as EP67, which is a peptide agonist of the biologically active C-terminal region of human complement component C5a. The EP67 peptide was conjugated to live spores of an attenuated vaccine strain (ΔT) of Coccidioides posadasii. The non-conjugated ΔT vaccine provided partial protection to BALB/c mice against coccidioidomycosis. In this report we compared the protective efficacy of the ΔT-EP67 conjugate to the ΔT vaccine in BALB/c mice. Animals immunized subcutaneously with the ΔT-EP67 vaccine showed significant increase in survival and decrease in fungal burden over 75 days postchallenge. Increased pulmonary infiltration of dendritic cells and macrophages was observed on day 7 postchallenge but marked decrease in neutrophil numbers had occurred by 11 days. The reduced influx of neutrophils may have contributed to the observed reduction of inflammatory pathology. Mice immunized with the ΔT-EP67 vaccine also revealed enhanced expression of MHC II molecules on the surface of antigen presenting cells, and in vitro recall assays of immune splenocytes showed elevated Th1- and Th17-type cytokine production. The latter correlated with a marked increase in lung infiltration of IFN-γ- and IL-17-producing CD4(+) T cells. Elevated expression of T-bet and RORc transcription factors in ΔT-EP67-vaccinated mice indicated the promotion of Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation. Higher titers of Coccidioides antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2a were detected in mice immunized with the EP67-conjugated versus the non-conjugated vaccine. These combined results suggest that the EP67 adjuvant enhances protective efficacy of the live vaccine by augmentation of T-cell immunity, especially through Th1- and Th17-mediated responses to Coccidioides infection.

  3. Synergistic enhancement of chemokine generation and lung injury by C5a or the membrane attack complex of complement

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    Czermak, B J; Lentsch, A B; Bless, N M;

    1999-01-01

    Complement plays an important role in many acute inflammatory responses. In the current studies it was demonstrated that, in the presence of either C5a or sublytic forms of the complement-derived membrane attack complex (MAC), rat alveolar macrophages costimulated with IgG immune complexes...... increased neutrophil accumulation occurred, as did lung injury. These observations suggest that C5a and MAC function synergistically with a costimulus to enhance chemokine generation and the intensity of the lung inflammatory response....

  4. Enhancement of In Vivo and In Vitro Immune Functions by a Conformationally-Biased, Response-Selective Agonist of Human C5a: Implications for a Novel Adjuvant in Vaccine Design

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    Morgan, Edward L.; Morgan, Brandon N.; Stein, Elisabeth A.; Vitrs, Elizabeth L.; Thoman, Marilyn L.; Sanderson, Sam D.; Phillips, Joy A.

    2009-01-01

    A conformationally-biased, agonist of human C5a65–74 (EP67) was assessed for its adjuvant activities in vitro and in vivo. EP67 induced the release of the inflammatory (Th1) type cytokines from C5a receptor (CD88)-bearing antigen presenting cells (APC). Serum from mice immunized with EP67-ovalbumin (OVA) contained high OVA-specific antibody (Ab) titers [IgG1, IgG2a (IGg2c), IgG2b]. Mice receiving OVA alone produced only IgG1 Abs, indicating the ability of EP67 to induce a Th1-like antibody (A)b class switch. Spleen cell cultures from wild type mice but not CD88−/− mice showed an enhanced OVA-specific proliferative response in vitro. These results indicate the ability of EP67 to drive a Th1-mediated immune response and its potential use as a unique adjuvant PMID:19836478

  5. Real-Time Imaging of Interactions of Neutrophils with Cryptococcus neoformans Demonstrates a Crucial Role of Complement C5a-C5aR Signaling.

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    Sun, Donglei; Zhang, Mingshun; Liu, Gongguan; Wu, Hui; Zhu, Xiaoping; Zhou, Hong; Shi, Meiqing

    2015-10-26

    Neutrophils have been shown to efficiently kill Cryptococcus neoformans, a causative agent of meningoencephalitis. Here, using live-cell imaging, we characterize the dynamic interactions of neutrophils with C. neoformans and the underlying mechanisms in real time. Neutrophils were directly seen to chase C. neoformans cells and then rapidly internalize them. Complement C5a-C5aR signaling guided neutrophils to migrate to the yeast cells, resulting in optimal phagocytosis and subsequent killing of the organisms. The addition of recombinant complement C5a enhanced neutrophil movement but did not induce chemotaxis, suggesting that the C5a gradient is crucial. Incubation with C. neoformans resulted in enhanced activation of Erk and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases (MAPKs) in neutrophils. Inhibition of the p38 MAPK pathway, but not the Erk pathway, significantly impaired neutrophil migration and its subsequent killing of C. neoformans. Deficiency of CD11b or blocking of CD11b did not affect the migration of neutrophils toward C. neoformans but almost completely abolished phagocytosis and killing of the organisms by neutrophils. C5a-C5aR signaling induced enhanced surface expression of CD11b. Interestingly, the original surface expression of CD11b was essential and sufficient for neutrophils to attach to C. neoformans but was unable to mediate phagocytosis. In contrast, the enhanced surface expression of CD11b induced by C5a-C5aR signaling was essential for neutrophil phagocytosis and subsequent killing of yeast cells. Collectively, this is the first report of the dynamic interactions of neutrophils with C. neoformans, demonstrating a crucial role of C5a-C5aR signaling in neutrophil killing of C. neoformans in real time.

  6. A Novel Role for the Receptor of the Complement Cleavage Fragment C5a, C5aR1, in CCR5-Mediated Entry of HIV into Macrophages.

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    Moreno-Fernandez, Maria E; Aliberti, Julio; Groeneweg, Sander; Köhl, Jörg; Chougnet, Claire A

    2016-04-01

    The complement system is an ancient pattern recognition system that becomes activated during all stages of HIV infection. Previous studies have shown that C5a can enhance the infection of monocyte-derived macrophages and T cells indirectly through the production of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the attraction of dendritic cells. C5a exerts its multiple biologic functions mainly through activation of C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1). Here, we assessed the role of C5aR1 as an enhancer of CCR5-mediated HIV infection. We determined CCR5 and C5aR1 heterodimer formation in myeloid cells and the impact of C5aR1 blockade on HIV entry and genomic integration. C5aR1/CCR5 heterodimer formation was identified by immunoprecipitation and western blotting. THP-1 cells and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) were infected by R5 laboratory strains or HIV pseudotyped for the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) envelope. Levels of integrated HIV were measured by quantitative PCR after targeting of C5aR1 by a C5aR antagonist, neutralizing C5aR1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) or hC5a. C5aR1 was also silenced by specific siRNA prior to viral entry. We found that C5aR1 forms heterodimers with the HIV coreceptor CCR5 in myeloid cells. Targeting C5aR1 significantly decreased integration by R5 viruses but not by VSV-pseudotyped viruses, suggesting that C5aR1 is critical for viral entry. The level of inhibition achieved with C5aR1-blocking reagents was comparable to that of CCR5 antagonists. Mechanistically, C5aR1 targeting decreased CCR5 expression. MDM from CCR5Δ32 homozygous subjects expressed levels of C5aR1 similar to CCR5 WT individuals, suggesting that mere C5aR1 expression is not sufficient for HIV infection. HIV appeared to preferentially enter THP-1 cells expressing high levels of both C5aR1 and CCR5. Targeted reduction of C5aR1 expression in such cells reduced HIV infection by ~50%. Our data thus suggest that C5aR1 acts as an enhancer of CCR5-mediated HIV entry into

  7. Mice deficient in Sfrp1 exhibit increased adiposity, dysregulated glucose metabolism, and enhanced macrophage infiltration.

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    Kelly J Gauger

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms involved in the development of obesity and related complications remain unclear. Wnt signaling plays an important role in preadipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis. The expression of a Wnt antagonist, secreted frizzled related protein 1 (SFRP1, is increased in response to initial weight gain, then levels are reduced under conditions of extreme obesity in both humans and animals. Here we report that loss of Sfrp1 exacerbates weight gain, glucose homeostasis and inflammation in mice in response to diet induced obesity (DIO. Sfrp1(-/- mice fed a high fat diet (HFD exhibited an increase in body mass accompanied by increases in body fat percentage, visceral white adipose tissue (WAT mass, and adipocyte size. Moreover, Sfrp1 deficiency increases the mRNA levels of key de novo lipid synthesis genes (Fasn, Acaca, Acly, Elovl, Scd1 and the transcription factors that regulate their expression (Lxr-α, Srebp1, Chreb, and Nr1h3 in WAT. Fasting glucose levels are elevated, glucose clearance is impaired, hepatic gluconeogenesis regulators are aberrantly upregulated (G6pc and Pck1, and glucose transporters are repressed (Slc2a2 and Slc2a4 in Sfrp1(-/- mice fed a HFD. Additionally, we observed increased steatosis in the livers of Sfrp1(-/- mice. When there is an expansion of adipose tissue there is a sustained inflammatory response accompanied by adipokine dysregulation, which leads to chronic subclinical inflammation. Thus, we assessed the inflammatory state of different tissues and revealed that Sfrp1(-/- mice fed a HFD exhibited increased macrophage infiltration and expression of pro-inflammatory markers including IL-6, Nmnat, Tgf-β2, and SerpinE1. Our findings demonstrate that the expression of Sfrp1 is a critical factor required for maintaining appropriate cellular signaling in response to the onset of obesity.

  8. Peptidyl arginine deiminase from Porphyromonas gingivalis abolishes anaphylatoxin C5a activity.

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    Bielecka, Ewa; Scavenius, Carsten; Kantyka, Tomasz; Jusko, Monika; Mizgalska, Danuta; Szmigielski, Borys; Potempa, Barbara; Enghild, Jan J; Prossnitz, Eric R; Blom, Anna M; Potempa, Jan

    2014-11-21

    Evasion of killing by the complement system, a crucial part of innate immunity, is a key evolutionary strategy of many human pathogens. A major etiological agent of chronic periodontitis, the Gram-negative bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis, produces a vast arsenal of virulence factors that compromise human defense mechanisms. One of these is peptidylarginine deiminase (PPAD), an enzyme unique to P. gingivalis among bacteria, which converts Arg residues in polypeptide chains into citrulline. Here, we report that PPAD citrullination of a critical C-terminal arginine of the anaphylatoxin C5a disabled the protein function. Treatment of C5a with PPAD in vitro resulted in decreased chemotaxis of human neutrophils and diminished calcium signaling in monocytic cell line U937 transfected with the C5a receptor (C5aR) and loaded with a fluorescent intracellular calcium probe: Fura-2 AM. Moreover, a low degree of citrullination of internal arginine residues by PPAD was also detected using mass spectrometry. Further, after treatment of C5 with outer membrane vesicles naturally shed by P. gingivalis, we observed generation of C5a totally citrullinated at the C-terminal Arg-74 residue (Arg74Cit). In stark contrast, only native C5a was detected after treatment with PPAD-null outer membrane vesicles. Our study suggests reduced antibacterial and proinflammatory capacity of citrullinated C5a, achieved via lower level of chemotactic potential of the modified molecule, and weaker cell activation. In the context of previous studies, which showed crosstalk between C5aR and Toll-like receptors, as well as enhanced arthritis development in mice infected with PPAD-expressing P. gingivalis, our findings support a crucial role of PPAD in the virulence of P. gingivalis.

  9. Protective effects of C5a blockade in sepsis

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    Czermak, B J; Sarma, V; Pierson, C L

    1999-01-01

    Sepsis in humans is a difficult condition to treat and is often associated with a high mortality rate. In this study, we induced sepsis in rats using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). In rats depleted of the complement factor C3, CLP led to very short survival times (about 4 days). Of the rats......). These data indicate that sepsis causes an excessive production of C5a, which compromises the bactericidal function of neutrophils. Thus, C5a may be a useful target for the treatment of sepsis....

  10. HSV neutralization by the microbicidal candidate C5A

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    de Witte, L.; Bobardt, M.D.; Chatterji, U.; van Loenen, F.B.; Verjans, G.M.G.M.; Geijtenbeek, T.B.H.; Gallay, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Genital herpes is a major risk factor in acquiring human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection and is caused by both Herpes Simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. The amphipathic peptide C5A, derived from the non-structural hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein 5A, was shown to prevent HIV-1 in

  11. Galectin-3 Deletion Enhances Visceral Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Dysregulates Glucose Metabolism in Mice on a High-Fat Diet

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    Jeftic Ilija

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM constitute major health problems worldwide. Increased visceral adiposity enhances the risk of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The mechanisms involved in obesity-associated chronic inflammation in metabolic tissues (metaflammation that lead to insulin resistance and dysregulated glucose metabolism are incompletely defined. Galectin-3 (Gal-3, a β-galactoside-binding lectin, modulates immune/inflammatory responses and specifically binds to metabolic danger molecules. To dissect the role of Gal-3 in obesity and diabetes, Gal-3-deficient (LGALS3-/- and wild-type (WT C57Bl/6 male mice were placed on a high-fat diet (HFD, 60% kcal fat or a standard chow diet (10% kcal fat for 6 months and metabolic, histological and immunophenotypical analyses of the visceral adipose tissue were performed. HFD-fed LGALS3-/- mice had higher body weights and more body weight gain, visceral adipose tissue (VAT, hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia than diet-matched WT mice. Compared to WT mice, the enlarged VAT in obese LGALS3-/- mice contained larger adipocytes. Additionally, we demonstrate enhanced inflammation in the VAT of LGALS3-/- mice compared with diet-matched WT mice. The VAT of LGALS3-/- mice fed a HFD contained more numerous dendritic cells and proinflammatory F4/80+CD11c+CD11b+ and F4/80high macrophages. In contrast to WT mice, the numbers of CXCR3+ and CD8+ T cells were increased in the VAT of Gal-3-deficient mice after 6 months of high-fat feeding. We provide evidence that Gal-3 ablation results in enhanced HFD-induced adiposity, inflammation in the adipose tissue, insulin resistance and hyperglycaemia. Thus, Gal-3 represents an important regulator of obesity-associated immunometabolic alterations.

  12. Genetically enhanced asynapsis of autosomal chromatin promotes transcriptional dysregulation and meiotic failure.

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    Homolka, David; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiri

    2012-02-01

    During meiosis, pairing of homologous chromosomes and their synapsis are essential prerequisites for normal male gametogenesis. Even limited autosomal asynapsis often leads to spermatogenic impairment, the mechanism of which is not fully understood. The present study was aimed at deliberately increasing the size of partial autosomal asynapsis and analysis of its impact on male meiosis. For this purpose, we studied the effect of t(12) haplotype encompassing four inversions on chromosome 17 on mouse autosomal translocation T(16;17)43H (abbreviated T43H). The T43H/T43H homozygotes were fully fertile in both sexes, while +/T43H heterozygous males, but not females, were sterile with meiotic arrest at late pachynema. Inclusion of the t(12) haplotype in trans to the T43H translocation resulted in enhanced asynapsis of the translocated autosome, ectopic phosphorylation of histone H2AX, persistence of RAD51 foci, and increased gene silencing around the translocation break. Increase was also on colocalization of unsynapsed chromatin with sex body. Remarkably, we found that transcriptional silencing of the unsynapsed autosomal chromatin precedes silencing of sex chromosomes. Based on the present knowledge, we conclude that interference of meiotic silencing of unsynapsed autosomes with meiotic sex chromosome inactivation is the most likely cause of asynapsis-related male sterility.

  13. Loratadine dysregulates cell cycle progression and enhances the effect of radiation in human tumor cell lines

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    Cook John A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The histamine receptor-1 (H1-antagonist, loratadine has been shown to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenografts in part due to cell cycle arrest in G2/M. Since this is a radiation sensitive phase of the cell cycle, we sought to determine if loratadine modifies radiosensitivity in several human tumor cell lines with emphasis on human colon carcinoma (HT29. Methods Cells were treated with several doses of loratadine at several time points before and after exposure to radiation. Radiation dose modifying factors (DMF were determined using full radiation dose response survival curves. Cell cycle phase was determined by flow cytometry and the expression of the cell cycle-associated proteins Chk1, pChk1ser345, and Cyclin B was analyzed by western blot. Results Loratadine pre-treatment of exponentially growing cells (75 μM, 24 hours increased radiation-induced cytotoxicity yielding a radiation DMF of 1.95. However, treatment of plateau phase cells also yielded a DMF of 1.3 suggesting that mechanisms other than cell cycle arrest also contribute to loratadine-mediated radiation modification. Like irradiation, loratadine initially induced G2/M arrest and activation of the cell-cycle associated protein Chk1 to pChk1ser345, however a subsequent decrease in expression of total Chk1 and Cyclin B correlated with abrogation of the G2/M checkpoint. Analysis of DNA repair enzyme expression and DNA fragmentation revealed a distinct pattern of DNA damage in loratadine-treated cells in addition to enhanced radiation-induced damage. Taken together, these data suggest that the observed effects of loratadine are multifactorial in that loratadine 1 directly damages DNA, 2 activates Chk1 thereby promoting G2/M arrest making cells more susceptible to radiation-induced DNA damage and, 3 downregulates total Chk1 and Cyclin B abrogating the radiation-induced G2/M checkpoint and allowing cells to re-enter the cell cycle despite the persistence of

  14. Dysregulated miR34a/diacylglycerol kinase ζ interaction enhances T-cell activation in acquired aplastic anemia.

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    Sun, Yuan-Xin; Li, Hui; Feng, Qi; Li, Xin; Yu, Ying-Yi; Zhou, Li-Wei; Gao, Yan; Li, Guo-Sheng; Ren, Juan; Ma, Chun-Hong; Gao, Cheng-Jiang; Peng, Jun

    2017-01-24

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an idiopathic paradigm of human bone marrow failure syndrome, which involves active destruction of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors by cytotoxic T cells in the bone marrow. Aberrant expression of microRNAs in T cells has been shown to lead to development of certain autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we performed a microarray analysis of miRNA expression in bone marrow CD3+ T cells from patients with aplastic anemia and healthy controls. Overexpression of miR34a and underexpression of its target gene diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) ζ in bone marrow mononuclear cells were validated in 41 patients and associated with the severity of aplastic anemia. Further, the level of miR34a was higher in naïve T cells from patients than from controls. The role of miR34a and DGKζ in aplastic anemia was investigated in a murine model of immune-mediated bone marrow failure using miR34a-/- mice. After T-cell receptor stimulation in vitro, lymph node T cells from miR34a-/- mice demonstrated reduced activation and proliferation accompanied with a less profound down-regulation of DGKζ expression and decreased ERK phosphorylation compared to those from wild-type C57BL6 control mice. Infusion of 5 × 106 miR34a-/- lymph node T cells into sublethally irradiated CB6F1 recipients led to increased Lin-Sca1+CD117+ cells and less vigorous expansion of CD8+ T cells than injection of same number of wild-type lymph node cells. Our study demonstrates that the miR34a/DGKζ dysregulation enhances T-cell activation in aplastic anemia and targeting miR34a may represent a novel molecular therapeutic approach for patients with aplastic anemia.

  15. Dysregulated miR34a/diacylglycerol kinase ζ interaction enhances T-cell activation in acquired aplastic anemia

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    Sun, Yuan-xin; Li, Hui; Feng, Qi; Li, Xin; Yu, Ying-yi; Zhou, Li-wei; Gao, Yan; Li, Guo-sheng; Ren, Juan; Ma, Chun-hong; Gao, Cheng-jiang; Peng, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an idiopathic paradigm of human bone marrow failure syndrome, which involves active destruction of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors by cytotoxic T cells in the bone marrow. Aberrant expression of microRNAs in T cells has been shown to lead to development of certain autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we performed a microarray analysis of miRNA expression in bone marrow CD3+ T cells from patients with aplastic anemia and healthy controls. Overexpression of miR34a and underexpression of its target gene diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) ζ in bone marrow mononuclear cells were validated in 41 patients and associated with the severity of aplastic anemia. Further, the level of miR34a was higher in naïve T cells from patients than from controls. The role of miR34a and DGKζ in aplastic anemia was investigated in a murine model of immune-mediated bone marrow failure using miR34a−/− mice. After T-cell receptor stimulation in vitro, lymph node T cells from miR34a−/− mice demonstrated reduced activation and proliferation accompanied with a less profound down-regulation of DGKζ expression and decreased ERK phosphorylation compared to those from wild-type C57BL6 control mice. Infusion of 5 × 106 miR34a−/− lymph node T cells into sublethally irradiated CB6F1 recipients led to increased Lin-Sca1+CD117+ cells and less vigorous expansion of CD8+ T cells than injection of same number of wild-type lymph node cells. Our study demonstrates that the miR34a/DGKζ dysregulation enhances T-cell activation in aplastic anemia and targeting miR34a may represent a novel molecular therapeutic approach for patients with aplastic anemia. PMID:28008152

  16. The C5a/C5aR1 axis controls the development of experimental allergic asthma independent of LysM-expressing pulmonary immune cells.

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    Wiese, Anna V; Ender, Fanny; Quell, Katharina M; Antoniou, Konstantina; Vollbrandt, Tillman; König, Peter; Köhl, Jörg; Laumonnier, Yves

    2017-01-01

    C5a regulates the development of maladaptive immune responses in allergic asthma mainly through the activation of C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1). Yet, the cell types and the mechanisms underlying this regulation are ill-defined. Recently, we described increased C5aR1 expression in lung tissue eosinophils but decreased expression in airway and pulmonary macrophages as well as in pulmonary CD11b+ conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) and monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) during the allergic effector phase using a floxed green fluorescent protein (GFP)-C5aR1 knock-in mouse. Here, we determined the role of C5aR1 signaling in neutrophils, moDCs and macrophages for the pulmonary recruitment of such cells and the importance of C5aR1-mediated activation of LysM-expressing cells for the development of allergic asthma. We used LysM-C5aR1 KO mice with a specific deletion of C5aR1 in LysMCre-expressing cells and confirmed the specific deletion of C5aR1 in neutrophils, macrophages and moDCs in the airways and/or the lung tissue. We found that alveolar macrophage numbers were significantly increased in LysM-C5aR1 KO mice. Induction of ovalbumin (OVA)-driven experimental allergic asthma in GFP-C5aR1fl/fl and LysM-C5aR1 KO mice resulted in strong but similar airway resistance, mucus production and Th2/Th17 cytokine production. In contrast, the number of airway but not of pulmonary neutrophils was lower in LysM-C5aR1 KO as compared with GFP-C5aR1fl/fl mice. The recruitment of macrophages, cDCs, moDCs, T cells and type 2 innate lymphoid cells was not altered in LysM-C5aR1 KO mice. Our findings demonstrate that C5aR1 is critical for steady state control of alveolar macrophage numbers and the transition of neutrophils from the lung into the airways in OVA-driven allergic asthma. However, C5aR1 activation of LysM-expressing cells plays a surprisingly minor role in the recruitment and activation of such cells and the development of the allergic phenotype in OVA-driven experimental allergic asthma.

  17. Fibroblast growth factor 23 dysregulates late sodium current and calcium homeostasis with enhanced arrhythmogenesis in pulmonary vein cardiomyocytes.

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    Huang, Shih-Yu; Chen, Yao-Chang; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiung; Lin, Yung-Kuo; Chung, Cheng-Chih; Lee, Ting-I; Tsai, Wen-Chin; Chen, Shih-Ann; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2016-10-25

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), elevated in chronic renal failure, increases atrial arrhythmogenesis and dysregulates calcium homeostasis. Late sodium currents (INa-Late) critically induces ectopic activity of pulmoanry vein (the most important atrial fibrillation trigger). This study was to investigate whether FGF23 activates the INa-Late leading to calcium dysregulation and increases PV arrhythmogenesis. Patch clamp, western blot, and confocal microscopy were used to evaluate the electrical activities, calcium homeostasis, and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) in PV cardiomyocytes with or without FGF23 (0.1 or 1 ng/mL) incubation for 4~6 h. Compared to the control, FGF23 (1 ng/mL, but not 0.1 ng/mL)-treated PV cardiomyocytes had a faster beating rate. FGF23 (1 ng/mL)-treated PV cardiomyocytes had larger INa-Late, calcium transients, and mitochondrial ROS than controls. However, ranolazine (an inhibitor of INa-Late) attenuated FGF23 (1 ng/mL)-increased beating rates, calcium transients and mitochondrial ROS. FGF23 (1 ng/mL)-treated PV cardiomyocytes exhibited larger phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). Chelerythrine chloride (an inhibitor of protein kinase C) decreased INa-Late in FGF23 (1 ng/mL)-treated PV cardiomyocytes. However, KN93 (a selective CaMKII blocker) decreased INa-Late in control and FGF23 (1 ng/mL)-treated PV cardiomyocytes to a similar extent. In conclusion, FGF23 increased PV arrhythmogenesis through sodium and calcium dysregulation by acting protein kinase C signaling.

  18. Complement factor C5a and C5a receptor contribute to morphine tolerance and withdrawal-induced hyperalgesia in rats.

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    Li, Yan-Hua; Jin, Hua; Xu, Jing-Shu; Guo, Guang-Qiong; Chen, DA-Lin; Bo, Yun

    2012-10-01

    Morphine is a potent opioid analgesic. However, the repeated use of morphine causes tolerance and hyperalgesia. Neuroinflammation has been reported to be involved in morphine tolerance and withdrawal-induced hyperalgesia. The complement system is a crucial effector mechanism of immune responses. The present study investigated the roles of complement factor C5a and C5a receptor (C5aR) in the development of morphine tolerance and withdrawal-induced hyperalgesia. In the present study, the levels of C5a and C5aR were increased in the L5 lumbar spinal cords of morphine-tolerant rats. The administration of C5a promoted the development of hyperalgesia and the expression of spinal antinociceptive tolerance to intrathecal morphine in both mechanical and thermal test. However, these phenomena caused by morphine were significantly attenuated by the C5aR antagonist PMX53. These results suggest that complement activation within the spinal cord is involved in morphine tolerance and withdrawal-induced hyperalgesia. C5a and C5aR may serve as novel targets for the control of morphine tolerance and withdrawal-induced hyperalgesia.

  19. Increased local concentration of complement C5a contributes to incisional pain in mice

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    Clark David J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In our previous study, we demonstrated that local injection of complement C5a and C3a produce mechanical and heat hyperalgesia, and that C5a and C3a activate and sensitize cutaneous nociceptors in normal skin, suggesting a contribution of complement fragments to acute pain. Other studies also have shown that the complement system can be activated by surgical incision, and the systemic blockade of C5a receptor (C5aR reduces incision-induced pain and inflammation. In this study, we further examined the possible contribution of wound area C5a to incisional pain. Methods Using of a hind paw incisional model, the effects of a selective C5aR antagonist, PMX53, on nociceptive behaviors were measured after incision in vivo. mRNA levels of C5 and C5aR in skin, dorsal root ganglia (DRG and spinal cord, and C5a protein levels in the skin were quantified after incision. The responses of nociceptors to C5a were also evaluated using the in vitro skin-nerve preparation. Results Local administration of PMX53 suppressed heat hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia induced by C5a injection or after hind paw incision in vivo. mRNA levels of C5 and C5aR in the skin, but not DRG and spinal cord, were dramatically increased after incision. C5a protein in the skin was also increased after incision. In vitro C5a did not increase the prevalence of fibers with ongoing activity in afferents from incised versus control, unincised skin. C5a sensitized C-fiber afferent responses to heat; however, this was less evident in afferents adjacent to the incision. PMX53 blocked sensitization of C-fiber afferents to heat by C5a but did not by itself influence ongoing activity or heat sensitivity in afferents innervating control or incised skin. The magnitude of mechanical responses was also not affected by C5a in any nociceptive fibers innervating incised or unincised skin. Conclusions This study demonstrates that high locally generated C5a levels are present in

  20. Structural and functional characterization of human and murine C5a anaphylatoxins

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    Schatz-Jakobsen, Janus Asbjørn; Yatime, Laure, E-mail: lay@mb.au.dk; Larsen, Casper [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Petersen, Steen Vang [Aarhus University, Bartholin Building, Wilhelm Meyers Allé 4, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Klos, Andreas [Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Andersen, Gregers Rom, E-mail: lay@mb.au.dk [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark)

    2014-06-01

    The structure of the human C5aR antagonist, C5a-A8, reveals a three-helix bundle conformation similar to that observed for human C5a-desArg, whereas murine C5a and C5a-desArg both form the canonical four-helix bundle. These conformational differences are discussed in light of the differential C5aR activation properties observed for the human and murine complement anaphylatoxins across species. Complement is an ancient part of the innate immune system that plays a pivotal role in protection against invading pathogens and helps to clear apoptotic and necrotic cells. Upon complement activation, a cascade of proteolytic events generates the complement effectors, including the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Signalling through their cognate G-protein coupled receptors, C3aR and C5aR, leads to a wide range of biological events promoting inflammation at the site of complement activation. The function of anaphylatoxins is regulated by circulating carboxypeptidases that remove their C-terminal arginine residue, yielding C3a-desArg and C5a-desArg. Whereas human C3a and C3a-desArg adopt a canonical four-helix bundle fold, the conformation of human C5a-desArg has recently been described as a three-helix bundle. Here, the crystal structures of an antagonist version of human C5a, A8{sup Δ71–73}, and of murine C5a and C5a-desArg are reported. Whereas A8{sup Δ71–73} adopts a three-helix bundle conformation similar to human C5a-desArg, the two murine proteins form a four-helix bundle. A cell-based functional assay reveals that murine C5a-desArg, in contrast to its human counterpart, exerts the same level of activition as murine C5a on its cognate receptor. The role of the different C5a conformations is discussed in relation to the differential activation of C5a receptors across species.

  1. Experimental Malaria in Pregnancy Induces Neurocognitive Injury in Uninfected Offspring via a C5a-C5a Receptor Dependent Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloë R McDonald

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The in utero environment profoundly impacts childhood neurodevelopment and behaviour. A substantial proportion of pregnancies in Africa are at risk of malaria in pregnancy (MIP however the impact of in utero exposure to MIP on fetal neurodevelopment is unknown. Complement activation, in particular C5a, may contribute to neuropathology and adverse outcomes during MIP. We used an experimental model of MIP and standardized neurocognitive testing, MRI, micro-CT and HPLC analysis of neurotransmitter levels, to test the hypothesis that in utero exposure to malaria alters neurodevelopment through a C5a-C5aR dependent pathway. We show that malaria-exposed offspring have persistent neurocognitive deficits in memory and affective-like behaviour compared to unexposed controls. These deficits were associated with reduced regional brain levels of major biogenic amines and BDNF that were rescued by disruption of C5a-C5aR signaling using genetic and functional approaches. Our results demonstrate that experimental MIP induces neurocognitive deficits in offspring and suggest novel targets for intervention.

  2. C5a receptor deficiency alters energy utilization and fat storage.

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    Christian Roy

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of whole body C5a receptor (C5aR deficiency on energy metabolism and fat storage. DESIGN: Male wildtype (WT and C5aR knockout (C5aRKO mice were fed a low fat (CHOW or a high fat high sucrose diet-induced obesity (DIO diet for 14 weeks. Body weight and food intake were measured weekly. Indirect calorimetry, dietary fatload clearance, insulin and glucose tolerance tests were also evaluated. Liver, muscle and adipose tissue mRNA gene expression were measured by RT-PCR. RESULTS: At week one and 12, C5aRKO mice on DIO had increased oxygen consumption. After 12 weeks, although food intake was comparable, C5aRKO mice had lower body weight (-7% CHOW, -12% DIO as well as smaller gonadal (-38% CHOW, -36% DIO and inguinal (-29% CHOW, -30% DIO fat pads than their WT counterparts. Conversely, in WT mice, C5aR was upregulated in DIO vs CHOW diets in gonadal adipose tissue, muscle and liver, while C5L2 mRNA expression was lower in C5aRKO on both diet. Furthermore, blood analysis showed lower plasma triglyceride and non-esterified fatty acid levels in both C5aRKO groups, with faster postprandial triglyceride clearance after a fatload. Additionally, C5aRKO mice showed lower CD36 expression in gonadal and muscle on both diets, while DGAT1 expression was higher in gonadal (CHOW and liver (CHOW and DIO and PPARγ was increased in muscle and liver. CONCLUSION: These observations point towards a role (either direct or indirect for C5aR in energy expenditure and fat storage, suggesting a dual role for C5aR in metabolism as well as in immunity.

  3. Restructuring reward processing with Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement: novel therapeutic mechanisms to remediate hedonic dysregulation in addiction, stress, and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Eric L

    2016-06-01

    Though valuation processes are fundamental to survival of the human species, hedonic dysregulation is at the root of an array of maladies, including addiction, stress, and chronic pain, as evidenced by the allostatic shift in the relative salience of natural reward to drug reward observed among persons with severe substance use disorders. To address this crucial problem, novel interventions are needed to restore hedonic regulatory processes gone awry in persons exhibiting addictive behaviors. This article describes a theoretical rationale and empirical evidence for the effects of one such new intervention, Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE), on top-down and bottom-up mechanisms implicated in cognitive control and hedonic regulation. MORE is innovative and distinct from extant mindfulness-based interventions in that it unites traditional mindfulness meditation with reappraisal and savoring strategies designed to reverse the downward shift in salience of natural reward relative to drug reward, representing a crucial tipping point to disrupt the progression of addiction-a mechanistic target that no other behavioral intervention has been designed to address. Though additional studies are needed, clinical and biobehavioral data from several completed and ongoing trials suggest that MORE may exert salutary effects on addictive behaviors and the neurobiological processes that underpin them.

  4. Differences in the involvement of prostanoids from Kupffer cells in the mediation of anaphylatoxin C5a-, zymosan-, and lipopolysaccharide-dependent hepatic glucose output and flow reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestel, Sabine; Schlaf, Gerald; Götze, Otto; Jungermann, Kurt; Schieferdecker, Henrike L

    2003-12-01

    Various inflammatory stimuli such as anaphylatoxin C5a, zymosan, and lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) have been reported both to enhance glucose output in the perfused rat liver and to induce prostanoid (ie, prostaglandin and thromboxane) release from Kupffer cells, the resident liver macrophages. Because prostanoids can enhance glucose output from hepatocytes, it was the aim of this study to compare the possible roles of prostanoids released after C5a, zymosan, and LPS in the mediation of hepatic glucose output. In perfused livers both C5a and zymosan immediately enhanced glucose output, reduced flow, and induced prostanoid overflow into the hepatic vein, but with different quantities and kinetics. Only the C5a-induced but not the zymosan-induced effects were abrogated by inhibitors of prostanoid signaling as the prostanoid synthesis inhibitor indomethacin and the thromboxane receptor antagonist daltroban. In contrast to C5a and zymosan, LPS had no effect on glucose output, flow rate, or prostanoid overflow. In isolated Kupffer cells, C5a and zymosan induced maximal release of prostaglandins D(2) and E(2) and of thromboxane A(2) within a period of 0 to 2 minutes and 5 to 15 minutes, respectively. In pulse-chase experiments, maximal prostanoid release was already observed after 2 minutes of continuous stimulation with C5a, but only after 10 to 15 minutes of continuous stimulation with zymosan. LPS-dependent prostanoid release was not seen before 1 hour. Thus, even though C5a, zymosan, and LPS induced prostanoid release from Kupffer cells, only C5a quickly regulated hepatic glucose metabolism in a prostanoid-dependent manner (due to the kinetics and quantities of prostanoids released).

  5. Reduced expression of C5a receptors on neutrophils from cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Mads; Sørensen, O; Leslie, R;

    1998-01-01

    MLP was tested by measuring migration and exocytosis of myeloperoxidase and lactoferrin. RESULTS: C5a mean fluorescence on neutrophils from neonates was significantly lower (22.4 (SD 3.5)) than in adult controls (31.5 (3.1)). Neutrophils from neonates migrated poorly towards both C5a and fMLP compared with those...... from adult controls. Exocytosis of myeloperoxidase, but not lactoferrin from neonatal neutrophils stimulated with C5a, was significantly lower than in adult controls. fMLP stimulation, on the other hand, resulted in significantly higher exocytosis in neonates. CONCLUSION: The lower expression of C5a...... receptors on neutrophils from neonates could be related to reduced C5a mediated exocytosis of myeloperoxidase....

  6. CCAAT-enhancer-binding Protein β (C/EBPβ) and Downstream Human Placental Growth Hormone Genes Are Targets for Dysregulation in Pregnancies Complicated by Maternal Obesity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, Hana; Jin, Yan; Menticoglou, Savas; Cattini, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Human chorionic somatomammotropin (CS) and placental growth hormone variant (GH-V) act as metabolic adaptors in response to maternal insulin resistance, which occurs in “normal” pregnancy. Maternal obesity can exacerbate this “resistance,” suggesting that CS, GH-V, or transcription factors that regulate their production might be targets. The human CS genes, hCS-A and hCS-B, flank the GH-V gene. A significant decrease in pre-term placental CS/GH-V RNA levels was observed in transgenic mice containing the CS/GH-V genes in a model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced maternal obesity. Similarly, a decrease in CS/GH-V RNA levels was detected in term placentas from obese (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m2) versus lean (BMI 20–25 kg/m2) women. A specific decrease in transcription factor CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) RNA levels was also seen with obesity; C/EBPβ is required for mouse placenta development and is expressed, like CS and GH-V, in syncytiotrophoblasts. Binding of C/EBPβ to the CS gene downstream enhancer regions, which by virtue of their position distally flank the GH-V gene, was reduced in placenta chromatin from mice on a HFD and in obese women; a corresponding decrease in RNA polymerase II associated with CS/GH-V promoters was also observed. Detection of decreased endogenous CS/GH-V RNA levels in human placental tumor cells treated with C/EBPβ siRNA is consistent with a direct effect. These data provide evidence for CS/GH-V dysregulation in acute HFD-induced obesity in mouse pregnancy and chronic obesity in human pregnancy and implicate C/EBPβ, a factor associated with CS regulation and placental development. PMID:23782703

  7. CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and downstream human placental growth hormone genes are targets for dysregulation in pregnancies complicated by maternal obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, Hana; Jin, Yan; Menticoglou, Savas; Cattini, Peter A

    2013-08-01

    Human chorionic somatomammotropin (CS) and placental growth hormone variant (GH-V) act as metabolic adaptors in response to maternal insulin resistance, which occurs in "normal" pregnancy. Maternal obesity can exacerbate this "resistance," suggesting that CS, GH-V, or transcription factors that regulate their production might be targets. The human CS genes, hCS-A and hCS-B, flank the GH-V gene. A significant decrease in pre-term placental CS/GH-V RNA levels was observed in transgenic mice containing the CS/GH-V genes in a model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced maternal obesity. Similarly, a decrease in CS/GH-V RNA levels was detected in term placentas from obese (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m(2)) versus lean (BMI 20-25 kg/m(2)) women. A specific decrease in transcription factor CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) RNA levels was also seen with obesity; C/EBPβ is required for mouse placenta development and is expressed, like CS and GH-V, in syncytiotrophoblasts. Binding of C/EBPβ to the CS gene downstream enhancer regions, which by virtue of their position distally flank the GH-V gene, was reduced in placenta chromatin from mice on a HFD and in obese women; a corresponding decrease in RNA polymerase II associated with CS/GH-V promoters was also observed. Detection of decreased endogenous CS/GH-V RNA levels in human placental tumor cells treated with C/EBPβ siRNA is consistent with a direct effect. These data provide evidence for CS/GH-V dysregulation in acute HFD-induced obesity in mouse pregnancy and chronic obesity in human pregnancy and implicate C/EBPβ, a factor associated with CS regulation and placental development.

  8. Human C5a anaphylatoxin: gene cloning and expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautsch, W; Emde, M; Kretzschmar, T; Köhl, J; Suckau, D; Bitter-Suermann, D

    1992-06-01

    A gene coding for the human anaphylatoxin C5a was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. A combination of reverse transcription of mRNA of the U937 cell line with subsequent preparative polymerase chain reaction was employed to obtain the gene. The sequence was cloned into the plasmid vector pKK 233-2 behind an ATG initiation codon under the control of a trc promotor. After purification by ion exchange chromatography and reversed phase FPLC a mixture of predominantly non-glycosylated recombinant human C5a with a beta-mercaptoethanol adduct at cysteine 27 and the N-methionyl derivative was obtained which was homogeneous on silver-stained gels, immunoreactive with C5a-specific monoclonal antibodies and functionally active in releasing myeloperoxidase from human granulocytes and ATP from guinea pig platelets. The final yield was about 0.4-0.8 mg purified recombinant C5a per liter bacterial culture.

  9. Inhibition by prostaglandin E(2) of anaphylatoxin C5a- but not zymosan-induced prostanoid release from rat Kupffer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestel, Sabine; Jungermann, Kurt; Götze, Otto; Schieferdecker, Henrike L

    2002-04-01

    The proinflammatory anaphylatoxin C5a induces the release of prostanoids, ie, prostaglandins (PG) and thromboxane (TX), from the resident liver macrophages (Kupffer cells [KC]). Because KC themselves express prostanoid receptors, prostanoids--besides having paracrine functions--might regulate their own release in an autocrine loop. So far, such a possible feedback regulation has not been investigated systematically, probably because of methodological difficulties to measure newly synthesized prostanoids in the presence of added prostanoids. Here, after prelabeling of phospholipids with [(14)C]arachidonate, cellularly formed [(14)C]prostanoids were determined in the presence of added unlabelled prostanoids by thin layer chromatography. In cultured KC, recombinant rat C5a (rrC5a) rapidly increased PGD(2), PGE(2), and TXA(2) release, which was strongly reduced by PGE(2), but neither by PGD(2) nor by the TXA(2) analog U46619. The inhibitory effect of PGE(2) was mimicked by cAMP, indicating that the G(s)-coupled PGE(2) receptors type 2 or 4 were involved. Zymosan also enhanced prostanoid release from KC, but with slightly slower kinetics; this action was neither inhibited by PGE(2) nor by cAMP. Also in perfused rat livers, rrC5a enhanced prostanoid release from KC as shown by prostanoid overflow and thereby indirectly increased glucose output from hepatocytes. Again, PGE(2), but not PGD(2), inhibited rrC5a-elicited prostanoid overflow. This resulted in a complete inhibition of rrC5a-induced, prostanoid-mediated glucose output. Thus, PGE(2) can inhibit specifically the C5a-induced prostanoid release from KC via a feedback mechanism and thereby limit prostanoid-mediated hepatocellular defense reactions, eg, glucose release.

  10. Deletion of the complement C5a receptor alleviates the severity of acute pneumococcal otitis media following influenza A virus infection in mice.

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    Hua Hua Tong

    Full Text Available There is considerable evidence that influenza A virus (IAV promotes adherence, colonization, and superinfection by S. pneumoniae (Spn and contributes to the pathogenesis of otitis media (OM. The complement system is a critical innate immune defense against both pathogens. To assess the role of the complement system in the host defense and the pathogenesis of acute pneumococcal OM following IAV infection, we employed a well-established transtympanically-induced mouse model of acute pneumococcal OM. We found that antecedent IAV infection enhanced the severity of acute pneumococcal OM. Mice deficient in complement C1qa (C1qa-/- or factor B (Bf -/- exhibited delayed viral and bacterial clearance from the middle ear and developed significant mucosal damage in the eustachian tube and middle ear. This indicates that both the classical and alternative complement pathways are critical for the oto-immune defense against acute pneumococcal OM following influenza infection. We also found that Spn increased complement activation following IAV infection. This was characterized by sustained increased levels of anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a in serum and middle ear lavage samples. In contrast, mice deficient in the complement C5a receptor (C5aR demonstrated enhanced bacterial clearance and reduced severity of OM. Our data support the concept that C5a-C5aR interactions play a significant role in the pathogenesis of acute pneumococcal OM following IAV infection. It is possible that targeting the C5a-C5aR axis might prove useful in attenuating acute pneumococcal OM in patients with influenza infection.

  11. C5a receptor signaling prevents folate deficiency-induced neural tube defects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Kerina J; Coulthard, Liam G; Jeanes, Angela; Lisgo, Steven; Simmons, David G; Callaway, Leonie K; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan; Finnell, Richard H; Woodruff, Trent M; Taylor, Stephen M

    2013-04-01

    The complement system is involved in a range of diverse developmental processes, including cell survival, growth, differentiation, and regeneration. However, little is known about the role of complement in embryogenesis. In this study, we demonstrate a novel role for the canonical complement 5a receptor (C5aR) in the development of the mammalian neural tube under conditions of maternal dietary folic acid deficiency. Specifically, we found C5aR and C5 to be expressed throughout the period of neurulation in wild-type mice and localized the expression to the cephalic regions of the developing neural tube. C5aR was also found to be expressed in the neuroepithelium of early human embryos. Ablation of the C5ar1 gene or the administration of a specific C5aR peptide antagonist to folic acid-deficient pregnant mice resulted in a high prevalence of severe anterior neural tube defect-associated congenital malformations. These findings provide a new and compelling insight into the role of the complement system during mammalian embryonic development.

  12. Differential Contributions of the Complement Anaphylotoxin Receptors C5aR1 and C5aR2 to the Early Innate Immune Response against Staphylococcus aureus Infection

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    Sarah A. Horst

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The complement anaphylatoxin C5a contributes to host defense against Staphylococcus aureus. In this study, we investigated the functional role of the two known C5a receptors, C5aR1 and C5aR2, in the host response to S. aureus. We found that C5aR1−/− mice exhibited greater susceptibility to S. aureus bloodstream infection than wild type and C5aR2−/− mice, as demonstrated by the significantly higher bacterial loads in the kidneys and heart at 24 h of infection, and by the higher levels of inflammatory IL-6 in serum. Histological and immunohistochemistry investigation of infected kidneys at 24 h after bacterial inoculation revealed a discrete infiltration of neutrophils in wild type mice but already well-developed abscesses consisting of bacterial clusters surrounded by a large number of neutrophils in both C5aR1−/− and C5aR2−/− mice. Furthermore, blood neutrophils from C5aR1−/− mice were less efficient than those from wild type or C5aR2−/− mice at killing S. aureus. The requirement of C5aR1 for efficient killing of S. aureus was also demonstrated in human blood after disrupting C5a-C5aR1 signaling using specific inhibitors. These results demonstrated a role for C5aR1 in S. aureus clearance as well as a role for both C5aR1 and C5aR2 in the orchestration of the inflammatory response during infection.

  13. Cloning, expression, cellular distribution, and role in chemotaxis of a C5a receptor in rainbow trout: the first identification of a C5a receptor in a nonmammalian species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshra, Hani; Li, Jun; Peters, Rodney; Hansen, John; Matlapudi, Anjan; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2004-01-01

    C3a, C4a, and C5a anaphylatoxins generated during complement activation play a key role in inflammation. C5a is the most potent of the three anaphylatoxins in eliciting biological responses. The effects of C5a are mediated by its binding to C5a receptor (C5aR, CD88). To date, C5aR has only been identified and cloned in mammalian species, and its evolutionary history remains ill-defined. To gain insights into the evolution, conserved structural domains, and functions of C5aR, we have cloned and characterized a C5aR in rainbow trout, a teleost fish. The isolated cDNA encoded a 350-aa protein that showed the highest sequence similarity to C5aR from other species. Genomic analysis revealed the presence of one continuous exon encoding the entire open reading frame. Northern blot analysis showed significant expression of the trout C5a receptor (TC5aR) message in PBLs and kidney. Flow cytometric analysis showed that two Abs generated against two different areas of the extracellular N-terminal region of TC5aR positively stained the same leukocyte populations from PBLs. B lymphocytes and granulocytes comprised the majority of cells recognized by the anti-TC5aR. More importantly, these Abs inhibited chemotaxis of PBLs toward a chemoattractant fraction purified from complement-activated trout serum. Our data suggest that the split between C5aR and C3aR from a common ancestral molecule occurred before the emergence of teleost fish. Moreover, we demonstrate that the overall structure of C5aR as well as its role in chemotaxis have remained conserved for >300 million years.

  14. Structural complexes of the agonist, inverse agonist and antagonist bound C5a receptor: insights into pharmacology and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Soumendra; Sahoo, Amita Rani; Majhi, Bharat Kumar

    2016-04-26

    The C5a receptor (C5aR) is a pharmacologically important G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that interacts with (h)C5a, by recruiting both the "orthosteric" sites (site1 at the N-terminus and site2 at the ECS, extra cellular surface) on C5aR in a two site-binding model. However, the complex pharmacological landscape and the distinguishing chemistry operating either at the "orthosteric" site1 or at the functionally important "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR are still not clear, which greatly limits the understanding of C5aR pharmacology. One of the major bottlenecks is the lack of an experimental structure or a refined model structure of C5aR with appropriately defined active sites. The study attempts to understand the pharmacology at the "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR rationally by generating a highly refined full-blown model structure of C5aR through advanced molecular modeling techniques, and further subjecting it to automated docking and molecular dynamics (MD) studies in the POPC bilayer. The first series of structural complexes of C5aR respectively bound to a linear native peptide agonist ((h)C5a-CT), a small molecule inverse agonist (NDT) and a cyclic peptide antagonist (PMX53) are reported, apparently establishing the unique pharmacological landscape of the "orthosteric" site2, which also illustrates an energetically distinct but coherent competitive chemistry ("cation-π" vs. "π-π" interactions) involved in distinguishing the established ligands known for targeting the "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR. Over a total of 1 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in the POPC bilayer, it is evidenced that while the agonist prefers a "cation-π" interaction, the inverse agonist prefers a "cogwheel/L-shaped" interaction in contrast to the "edge-to-face/T-shaped" type π-π interactions demonstrated by the antagonist by engaging the F275(7.28) of the C5aR. In the absence of a NMR or crystallographically guided model structure of C5aR, the computational model complexes not only

  15. CYP4F18-Deficient Neutrophils Exhibit Increased Chemotaxis to Complement Component C5a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Vaivoda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CYP4Fs were first identified as enzymes that catalyze hydroxylation of leukotriene B4 (LTB4. CYP4F18 has an unusual expression in neutrophils and was predicted to play a role in regulating LTB4-dependent inflammation. We compared chemotaxis of wild-type and Cyp4f18 knockout neutrophils using an in vitro assay. There was no significant difference in the chemotactic response to LTB4, but the response to complement component C5a increased 1.9–2.25-fold in knockout cells compared to wild-type (P < 0.01. This increase was still observed when neutrophils were treated with inhibitors of eicosanoid synthesis. There were no changes in expression of other CYP4 enzymes in knockout neutrophils that might compensate for loss of CYP4F18 or lead to differences in activity. A mouse model of dextran sodium sulfate colitis was used to investigate the consequences of increased C5a-dependent chemotaxis in vivo, but there was no significant difference in weight loss, disease activity, or colonic tissue myeloperoxidase between wild-type and Cyp4f18 knockout mice. This study demonstrates the limitations of inferring CYP4F function based on an ability to use LTB4 as a substrate, points to expanding roles for CYP4F enzymes in immune regulation, and underscores the in vivo challenges of CYP knockout studies.

  16. Loxoprofen sodium induces the production of complement C5a in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Tomoaki; Yamaguchi, Nozomi; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Shigeyuki; Kodani, Yoshiko; Hashiguchi, Akihiko; Haida, Michiko; Nakamura, Masataka

    2016-04-01

    Basophil activation test (BAT) is an in vitro allergy test that is useful to identify allergens that cause IgE-dependent allergies. The test has been used to detect not only food allergies and allergies caused by environmental factors but also to detect drug hypersensitivity, which has been known to include IgE-independent reactions. In our preliminary studies in which BAT was applied to detect hypersensitivity of loxoprofen, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), conventional BAT with incubation for 30min did not show basophil activation by means of increased CD203c expression. In this study, we extended the incubation time to 24h on the basis of the hypothesis that loxoprofen indirectly activates basophils. Basophils from healthy control donors as well as allergic patients showed up-regulation of CD203c after incubation with loxoprofen for 24h. Activation was induced using loxoprofen-treated serum. Proteomic and pharmacologic analyses revealed that serum incubation with loxoprofen generated an active complement component C5a, which induced CD203c expression via binding to the C5a receptor on basophils. Because C3a production was also detected after incubation for 24h, loxoprofen is likely to stimulate the complement classical pathway. Our findings suggest that the complement activation is involved in drug hypersensitivity and the suppression of this activation may contribute to the elimination of false positive of BAT for drug allergies.

  17. Complement anaphylatoxin C5a neuroprotects through regulation of glutamate receptor subunit 2 in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Sunil

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complement system is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of numerous neurological diseases. We previously reported that pre-treatment of murine cortico-hippocampal neuronal cultures with the complement derived anaphylatoxin C5a, protects against glutamate mediated apoptosis. Our present study with C5a receptor knock out (C5aRKO mice corroborates that the deficiency of C5a renders C5aRKO mouse more susceptible to apoptotic injury in vivo. In this study we explored potential upstream mechanisms involved in C5a mediated neuroprotection in vivo and in vitro. Methods Based on evidence suggesting that reduced expression of glutamate receptor subunit 2 (GluR2 may influence apoptosis in neurons, we studied the effect of human recombinant C5a on GluR2 expression in response to glutamate neurotoxicity. Glutamate analogs were injected into C5aRKO mice or used to treat in vitro neuronal culture and GluR2 expression were assessed in respect with cell death. Results In C5aRKO mice we found that the neurons are more susceptible to excitotoxicity resulting in apoptotic injury in the absence of the C5a receptor compared to WT control mice. Our results suggest that C5a protects against apoptotic pathways in neurons in vitro and in vivo through regulation of GluR2 receptor expression. Conclusion Complement C5a neuroprotects through regulation of GluR2 receptor subunit.

  18. Activatable Water-Soluble Probes Enhance Tumor Imaging by Responding to Dysregulated pH and Exhibiting High Tumor-to-Liver Fluorescence Emission Contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Hu; Kos, Petra; Yan, Yunfeng; Zhou, Kejin; Miller, Jason B; Elkassih, Sussana; Siegwart, Daniel J

    2016-07-20

    Dysregulated pH has been recognized as a universal tumor microenvironment signature that can delineate tumors from normal tissues. Existing fluorescent probes that activate in response to pH are hindered by either fast clearance (in the case of small molecules) or high liver background emission (in the case of large particles). There remains a need to design water-soluble, long circulating, pH-responsive nanoprobes with high tumor-to-liver contrast. Herein, we report a modular chemical strategy to create acidic pH-sensitive and water-soluble fluorescent probes for high in vivo tumor detection and minimal liver activation. A combination of a modified Knoevenagel reaction and PEGylation yielded a series of NIR BODIPY fluorophores with tunable pKas, high quantum yield, and optimal orbital energies to enable photoinduced electron transfer (PeT) activation in response to pH. After intravenous administration, Probe 5c localized to tumors and provided excellent tumor-to-liver contrast (apparent T/L = 3) because it minimally activates in the liver. This phenomenon was further confirmed by direct ex vivo imaging experiments on harvested organs. Because no targeting ligands were required, we believe that this report introduces a versatile strategy to directly synthesize soluble probes with broad potential utility including fluorescence-based image-guided surgery, cancer diagnosis, and theranostic nanomedicine.

  19. Propiconazole-enhanced hepatic cell proliferation is associated with dysregulation of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway leading to activation of Erk1/2 through Ras farnesylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Lynea A.; Moore, Tanya; Nesnow, Stephen, E-mail: nesnow.stephen@epa.gov

    2012-04-15

    Propiconazole is a mouse hepatotumorigenic fungicide designed to inhibit CYP51, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ergosterol in fungi and is widely used in agriculture to prevent fungal growth. Metabolomic studies in mice revealed that propiconazole increased levels of hepatic cholesterol metabolites and bile acids, and transcriptomic studies revealed that genes within the cholesterol biosynthesis, cholesterol metabolism and bile acid biosyntheses pathways were up-regulated. Hepatic cell proliferation was also increased by propiconazole. AML12 immortalized hepatocytes were used to study propiconazole's effects on cell proliferation focusing on the dysregulation of cholesterol biosynthesis and resulting effects on Ras farnesylation and Erk1/2 activation as a primary pathway. Mevalonate, a key intermediate in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, increases cell proliferation in several cancer cell lines and tumors in vivo and serves as the precursor for isoprenoids (e.g. farnesyl pyrophosphate) which are crucial in the farnesylation of the Ras protein by farnesyl transferase. Farnesylation targets Ras to the cell membrane where it is involved in signal transduction, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. In our studies, mevalonic acid lactone (MVAL), a source of mevalonic acid, increased cell proliferation in AML12 cells which was reduced by farnesyl transferase inhibitors (L-744,832 or manumycin) or simvastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, indicating that this cell system responded to alterations in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Cell proliferation in AML12 cells was increased by propiconazole which was reversed by co-incubation with L-744,832 or simvastatin. Increasing concentrations of exogenous cholesterol muted the proliferative effects of propiconazole and the inhibitory effects of L-733,832, results ascribed to reduced stimulation of the endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Western blot analysis of subcellular

  20. Effect of anaphylatoxin C3a, C5a on the tubular epithelial-myofibroblast transdifferentiation in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Fang; QIU Hong-yu; WEI Da-peng; GOU Rong; HUANG Jun; FU Ping; CHEN Feng; FAN Wen-xing; HUANG You-qun; ZANG Li; WU Min

    2011-01-01

    Background Tubulointerstitial renal fibrosis is the common end point of progressive kidney diseases,and tubular epithelial-myofibroblast transdifferentiation (TEMT) plays a key role in the progress of tubulointerstitial renal fibrosis.Anaphylatoxin C3a and C5a are identified as novel profibrotic factors in renal disease and as potential new therapeutic targets.The aim of this study was to investigate whether C3a,C5a can regulate TEMT by transforming growth factor-β31 (TGF-β1)/connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) signaling pathway and the effects of C3a and C5a receptor antagonists (C3aRA and C5aRA) on C3a- and C5a-induced TEMT.Methods HK-2 cells were divided into C3a and C5a groups which were subdivided into four subgroups:control group,10 ng/ml TGF-β1 group,50 nmol/L C3a group,50 nmol/L C3a plus 1 μmol/L C3aRA group; control group,10 ng/ml TGF-β31 group,50 nmol/L C5a group,50 nmol/L C5a plus 2.5 μmol/L C5aRA group.TGF-β1 receptor antagonist (TGF-β1 RA) 10 μg/ml was used to investigate the mechanism of C3a- and C5a-induced TEMT.Electron microscopy was used to observe the morphological changes.Immunocytochemistry staining,real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the expressions of α smooth muscle actin (α-SMA),E-cadherin,Col-I,C3a receptor (C3aR),C5aR,CTGF and TGF-β1.Results HK-2 cells cultured with C3a and C5a for 72 hours exhibited strong staining of α-SMA,lost the positive staining of E-cadherin,and showed a slightly spindle-like shape and loss of microvilli on the cell surface.The expressions of α-SMA,E-cadherin,Col-I,C3aR,C5aR,TGF-β1 and CTGF in C3a- and C5a-treated groups were higher than normal control group (P <0.05).C3aRA and C5aRA inhibited the expressions of α-SMA,Col-I,C3aR,C5aR,and up-regulated the expression of E-cadherin (P <0.05).TGF-β1 and CTGF mRNA expressions induced by C3a and C5a were partly blocked by TGF-β1 RA (P <0.05).Conclusion C3a and C5a can induce TEMT via the up-regulations of C3aR and C5aR m

  1. C5a receptor (CD88) inhibition improves hypothermia-induced neuroprotection in an in vitro ischemic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thundyil, John; Pavlovski, Dale; Hsieh, Yu-Hsuan; Gelderblom, Mathias; Magnus, Tim; Fairlie, David P; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2012-03-01

    The concept of 'salvageble penumbra' has prompted both scientists and physicians to explore various neuroprotective approaches that could be beneficial during stroke therapy. Unfortunately, most of them have proved ineffective in targeting multiple cellular death cascades incited within the ischemic penumbra. Hypothermia has been shown to be capable of addressing this problem to some extent. Although many studies have shown that hypothermia targets several cellular processes, its effects on innate immune receptor-mediated apoptotic death still remain unclear. Moreover, whether inhibiting the signaling of innate immune receptors like complement anaphylatoxin C5a receptor (CD88) plays a role in this hypothermic neuroprotection still need to be deciphered. Using various types of ischemic insults in different neuronal cells, we confirm that hypothermia does indeed attenuate apoptotic neuronal cell death in vitro and this effect can be further enhanced by pharmacologically blocking or knocking out CD88. Thus, our study raises a promising therapeutic possibility of adding CD88 antagonists along with hypothermia to improve stroke outcomes.

  2. Enhanced microglial pro-inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide correlates with brain infiltration and blood-brain barrier dysregulation in a mouse model of telomere shortening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raj, Divya D.A.; Moser, Jill; van der Pol, Susanne M. A.; van Os, Ronald P.; Holtman, Inge R.; Brouwer, Nieske; Oeseburg, Hisko; Schaafsma, Wandert; Wesseling, Evelyn M.; Dunnen, den Wilfred; Biber, Knut P. H.; de Vries, Helga E.; Eggen, Bart J. L.; Boddeke, Hendrikus W. G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Microglia are a proliferative population of resident brain macrophages that under physiological conditions self-renew independent of hematopoiesis. Microglia are innate immune cells actively surveying the brain and are the earliest responders to injury. During aging, microglia elicit an enhanced inn

  3. Complement C3a and C5a modulate osteoclast formation and inflammatory response of osteoblasts in synergism with IL-1β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatius, Anita; Schoengraf, Philipp; Kreja, Ludwika; Liedert, Astrid; Recknagel, Stefan; Kandert, Sebastian; Brenner, Rolf E; Schneider, Marion; Lambris, John D; Huber-Lang, Markus

    2011-09-01

    There is a tight interaction of the bone and the immune system. However, little is known about the relevance of the complement system, an important part of innate immunity and a crucial trigger for inflammation. The aim of this study was, therefore, to investigate the presence and function of complement in bone cells including osteoblasts, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), and osteoclasts. qRT-PCR and immunostaining revealed that the central complement receptors C3aR and C5aR, complement C3 and C5, and membrane-bound regulatory proteins CD46, CD55, and CD59 were expressed in human MSC, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts. Furthermore, osteoblasts and particularly osteoclasts were able to activate complement by cleaving C5 to its active form C5a as measured by ELISA. Both C3a and C5a alone were unable to trigger the release of inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 from osteoblasts. However, co-stimulation with the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β significantly induced IL-6 and IL-8 expression as well as the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) indicating that complement may modulate the inflammatory response of osteoblastic cells in a pro-inflammatory environment as well as osteoblast-osteoclast interaction. While C3a and C5a did not affect osteogenic differentiation, osteoclastogenesis was significantly induced even in the absence of RANKL and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) suggesting that complement could directly regulate osteoclast formation. It can therefore be proposed that complement may enhance the inflammatory response of osteoblasts and increase osteoclast formation, particularly in a pro-inflammatory environment, for example, during bone healing or in inflammatory bone disorders.

  4. Enhanced microglial pro-inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide correlates with brain infiltration and blood-brain barrier dysregulation in a mouse model of telomere shortening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Divya D A; Moser, Jill; van der Pol, Susanne M A; van Os, Ronald P; Holtman, Inge R; Brouwer, Nieske; Oeseburg, Hisko; Schaafsma, Wandert; Wesseling, Evelyn M; den Dunnen, Wilfred; Biber, Knut P H; de Vries, Helga E; Eggen, Bart J L; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2015-12-01

    Microglia are a proliferative population of resident brain macrophages that under physiological conditions self-renew independent of hematopoiesis. Microglia are innate immune cells actively surveying the brain and are the earliest responders to injury. During aging, microglia elicit an enhanced innate immune response also referred to as 'priming'. To date, it remains unknown whether telomere shortening affects the proliferative capacity and induces priming of microglia. We addressed this issue using early (first-generation G1 mTerc(-/-) )- and late-generation (third-generation G3 and G4 mTerc(-/-) ) telomerase-deficient mice, which carry a homozygous deletion for the telomerase RNA component gene (mTerc). Late-generation mTerc(-/-) microglia show telomere shortening and decreased proliferation efficiency. Under physiological conditions, gene expression and functionality of G3 mTerc(-/-) microglia are comparable with microglia derived from G1 mTerc(-/-) mice despite changes in morphology. However, after intraperitoneal injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), G3 mTerc(-/-) microglia mice show an enhanced pro-inflammatory response. Nevertheless, this enhanced inflammatory response was not accompanied by an increased expression of genes known to be associated with age-associated microglia priming. The increased inflammatory response in microglia correlates closely with increased peripheral inflammation, a loss of blood-brain barrier integrity, and infiltration of immune cells in the brain parenchyma in this mouse model of telomere shortening. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Complement component C5a permits the coexistence of pathogenic Th17 cells and type I IFN in lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawaria, Sudesh; Ramani, Kritika; Maers, Kelly; Liu, Youhua; Kane, Lawrence P; Levesque, Marc C; Biswas, Partha S

    2014-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a type I IFN (IFN-I)-driven autoimmune disorder with exaggerated B and Th cell responses. Th17 cells, a recently identified Th cell subset, have been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of SLE. Because IFN-I suppresses the generation and expansion of Th17 cells in an IL-27-dependent manner, it is unclear how pathogenic Th17 cells are generated in SLE in the presence of an environment characterized by high IFN-I levels. In this study, we showed that activation of c5aR on murine macrophages blocked IFN-I-mediated IL-27 production, thus permitting the development of Th17 cells. C5aR activation on IFN-I-responsive macrophages inhibits IRF-1-mediated transactivation of IL-27 gene expression via the PI3K/Akt pathway. Consistently, C5aR-deficient mice exhibited increased IL-27 expression and fewer Th17 cells and consequently developed reduced lupus nephritis in comparison with wild-type mice. In support of these findings in mice, we found that C5a inhibited IFN-I-induced IL-27 production from macrophages of lupus subjects. Moreover, the level of serum C5a correlated with Th17 frequency in peripheral blood. Collectively, these data indicate an essential role for C5a in the generation of pathogenic Th17 responses in SLE. Thus, therapeutic strategies to block C5aR activation may be beneficial for controlling pathogenic Th17-mediated inflammation in SLE.

  6. C5a alters blood-brain barrier integrity in a human in vitro model of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Supriya D; Parikh, Neil U; Woodruff, Trent M; Jarvis, James N; Lopez, Molly; Hennon, Teresa; Cunningham, Patrick; Quigg, Richard J; Schwartz, Stanley A; Alexander, Jessy J

    2015-09-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a crucial role in brain homeostasis, thereby maintaining the brain environment precise for optimal neuronal function. Its dysfunction is an intriguing complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE is a systemic autoimmune disorder where neurological complications occur in 5-50% of cases and is associated with impaired BBB integrity. Complement activation occurs in SLE and is an important part of the clinical profile. Our earlier studies demonstrated that C5a generated by complement activation caused the loss of brain endothelial layer integrity in rodents. The goal of the current study was to determine the translational potential of these studies to a human system. To assess this, we used a two dimensional in vitro BBB model constructed using primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells and astroglial cells, which closely emulates the in vivo BBB allowing the assessment of BBB integrity. Increased permeability monitored by changes in transendothelial electrical resistance and cytoskeletal remodelling caused by actin fiber rearrangement were observed when the cells were exposed to lupus serum and C5a, similar to the observations in mice. In addition, our data show that C5a/C5aR1 signalling alters nuclear factor-κB translocation into nucleus and regulates the expression of the tight junction proteins, claudin-5 and zonula occludens 1 in this setting. Our results demonstrate for the first time that C5a regulates BBB integrity in a neuroinflammatory setting where it affects both endothelial and astroglial cells. In addition, we also demonstrate that our previous findings in a mouse model, were emulated in human cells in vitro, bringing the studies one step closer to understanding the translational potential of C5a/C5aR1 blockade as a promising therapeutic strategy in SLE and other neurodegenerative diseases. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Antiarthritic activity of an orally active C5a receptor antagonist against antigen-induced monarticular arthritis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Trent M; Strachan, Anna J; Dryburgh, Nathan; Shiels, Ian A; Reid, Robert C; Fairlie, David P; Taylor, Stephen M

    2002-09-01

    To determine if the new, orally active C5a receptor antagonist, the cyclic peptide AcF-[OPdChaWR], reduces the severity of pathology in a rat model of immune-mediated monarticular arthritis. Arthritis was induced in the right knee of previously sensitized rats by the intraarticular injection of methylated bovine serum albumin. Rats were examined for either 14 days or 28 days, or for 49 days following a second antigen challenge at 28 days. The C5a antagonist (1 or 3 mg/kg/day) and/or ibuprofen (30 mg/kg/day) were administered orally on a daily basis either before or after arthritis induction. Rats receiving AcF-[OPdChaWR] had significant reductions in right knee swelling, gait disturbance, lavaged joint cell numbers, and right knee histopathology, as well as in serum levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and intraarticular levels of interleukin-6 and TNFalpha on day 14. In the 14- and 28-day studies, ibuprofen resulted in a similar reduction in gait abnormalities and intraarticular inflammatory cells compared with the C5a antagonist, but was less effective in reducing knee swelling over the course of the study and had no effect on knee histopathology. Combination therapy with AcF-[OPdChaWR] and ibuprofen resulted in no greater efficacy than with the C5a antagonist alone. Rats injected twice with the antigen in the 49-day study displayed the most severe histopathology and this, as well as knee swelling and gait abnormalities, was significantly reduced by repeated treatment with the C5a antagonist. An agent that inhibits the action of C5a in this model significantly reduced joint pathology, while ibuprofen was not effective. C5a antagonists could therefore have broader therapeutic benefits than nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs as antiarthritic agents for rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. The C5a anaphylatoxin receptor CD88 is expressed in presynaptic terminals of hippocampal mossy fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Stephen M

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the periphery, C5a acts through the G-protein coupled receptor CD88 to enhance/maintain inflammatory responses. In the brain, CD88 can be expressed on astrocytes, microglia and neurons. Previous studies have shown that the hippocampal CA3 region displays CD88-immunolabelling, and CD88 mRNA is present within dentate gyrus granule cells. As granule cells send dense axonal projections (mossy fibres to CA3 pyramidal neurons, CD88 expression could be expressed on mossy fibres. However, the cellular location of CD88 within the hippocampal CA3 region is unknown. Methods The expression of CD88 within the hippocampal CA3 region was characterized using dual-immunolabelling of hippocampal sections prepared from Wistar rats. Immunolabelling for CD88, using a monoclonal antibody, was combined with immunolabelling for markers of astrocytes (GFAP, microglia (IBA1, presynaptic proteins (synaptophysin and synapsin-1 and preterminal axons (neurofilament. In addition, electron microscopy was performed on peroxidase-visualized CD88-immunolabelling to determine its cellular localisation within the CA3 region. Results Dense CD88-immunolabelling was observed within the stratum lucidum of the CA3, consistent with the presence of CD88 on mossy fibres. Labelling for CD88 rarely co-localized with astrocytes or microglia, but was highly co-localized with presynaptic proteins. Electron microscopy revealed CD88-immunolabelling was localized to large presynaptic terminals within the stratum lucidum. Conclusion These results demonstrate that CD88 is expressed on presynaptic terminals of mossy fibres within the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Although the role of CD88 on mossy fibres remains to be established, their involvement in synaptic/cellular plasticity, and in cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease deserves investigation.

  9. Characterization of Cracking and Crack Growth Properties of the C5A Aircraft Tie-Box Forging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Smith, Stephen W.; Newman, John A.; Willard, Scott A.

    2003-01-01

    Detailed destructive examinations were conducted to characterize the integrity and material properties of two aluminum alloy (7075-T6) horizontal stabilizer tie box forgings removed.from US. Air Force C5A and C5B transport aircraft. The C5B tie box forging was,found to contain no evidence of cracking. Thirteen cracks were found in the CSA,forging. All but one of the cracks observed in the C5A component were located along the top cap region (one crack was located in the bottom cap region). The cracks in the C5A component initiated at fastener holes and propagated along a highly tunneled intergranular crack path. The tunneled crack growth configuration is a likelv result of surface compressive stress produced during peening of the .forging suijace. The tie box forging ,fatigue crack growth, fracture and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) properties were characterized. Reported herein are the results of laboratory air ,fatigue crack growth tests and 95% relative humidity SCC tests conducted using specimens machined from the C5A ,forging. SCC test results revealed that the C5A ,forging material was susceptible to intergranular environmental assisted cracking: the C5A forging material exhibited a SCC crack-tip stress-intensity factor threshold of less than 6 MPadn. Fracture toughness tests revealed that the C5A forging material exhibited a fracture toughness that was 25% less than the C5B forging. The C5A forging exhibited rapid laboratory air fatigue crack growth rates having a threshold crack-tip stress-intensity factor range of less than 0.8 MPa sup m. Detailed fractographic examinations revealed that the ,fatigue crack intergranular growth crack path was similar to the cracking observed in the C5A tie box forging. Because both fatigue crack propagation and SCC exhibit similar intergranular crack path behavior, the damage mechanism resulting in multi-site cracking of tie box forgings cannot be determined unless local cyclic stresses can be quantified.

  10. C5a regulates IL-12+ DC migration to induce pathogenic Th1 and Th17 cells in sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Ma

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It is well known that complement system C5a is excessively activated during the onset of sepsis. However, it is unclear whether C5a can regulate dentritic cells (DCs to stimulate adaptive immune cells such as Th1 and Th17 in sepsis. METHODS: Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP. CLP-induced sepsis was treated with anti-C5a or IL-12. IL-12(+DC, IFNγ(+Th1, and IL-17(+Th17 cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. IL-12 was measured by ELISA. RESULTS: Our studies here showed that C5a induced IL-12(+DC cell migration from the peritoneal cavity to peripheral blood and lymph nodes. Furthermore, IL-12(+DC cells induced the expansion of pathogenic IFNγ(+Th1 and IL-17(+Th17 cells in peripheral blood and lymph nodes. Moreover, IL-12, secreted by DC cells in the peritoneal cavity, is an important factor that prevents the development of sepsis. CONCLUSION: Our data suggests that C5a regulates IL-12(+DC cell migration to induce pathogenic Th1 and Th17 cells in sepsis.

  11. Properdin provides protection from Citrobacter rodentium-induced intestinal inflammation in a C5a/IL-6-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Umang; Cao, Qi; Thomas, Nikhil A; Woodruff, Trent M; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J; Stover, Cordula M; Stadnyk, Andrew W

    2015-04-01

    Citrobacter rodentium is an attaching and effacing mouse pathogen that models enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli in humans. The complement system is an important innate defense mechanism; however, only scant information is available about the role of complement proteins during enteric infections. In this study, we examined the impact of the lack of properdin, a positive regulator of complement, in C. rodentium-induced colitis. Following infection, properdin knockout (P(KO)) mice had increased diarrhea and exacerbated inflammation combined with defective epithelial cell-derived IL-6 and greater numbers of colonizing bacteria. The defect in the mucosal response was reversed by administering exogenous properdin to P(KO) mice. Then, using in vitro and in vivo approaches, we show that the mechanism behind the exacerbated inflammation of P(KO) mice is due to a failure to increase local C5a levels. We show that C5a directly stimulates IL-6 production from colonic epithelial cells and that inhibiting C5a in infected wild-type mice resulted in defective epithelial IL-6 production and exacerbated inflammation. These outcomes position properdin early in the response to an infectious challenge in the colon, leading to complement activation and C5a, which in turn provides protection through IL-6 expression by the epithelium. Our results unveil a previously unappreciated mechanism of intestinal homeostasis involving complement, C5a, and IL-6 during bacteria-triggered epithelial injury.

  12. In vitro and in vivo dependency of chemokine generation on C5a and TNF-alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czermak, B J; Sarma, V; Bless, N M

    1999-01-01

    Under a variety of conditions, alveolar macrophages can generate early response cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1), complement components, and chemotactic cytokines (chemokines). In the current studies, we determined the requirements for TNF-alpha and the complement activation product C5a in chemokine...... production in vitro and in vivo. Two rat CXC chemokines (macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)) as well as three rat CC chemokines (MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1) were investigated. Chemokine generation in vitro...... was studied in rat alveolar macrophages stimulated with IgG immune complexes in the absence or presence of Abs to TNF-alpha or C5a. The rat lung injury model induced by IgG immune complex deposition was employed for in vivo studies. Abs to TNF-alpha or C5a were administered intratracheally or i...

  13. Expression of the familial Mediterranean fever gene and activity of the C5a inhibitor in human primary fibroblast cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzner, Y; Abedat, S; Shapiro, E; Eisenberg, S; Bar-Gil-Shitrit, A; Stepensky, P; Calco, S; Azar, Y; Urieli-Shoval, S

    2000-07-15

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an inherited disease whose manifestations are acute but reversible attacks of sterile inflammation affecting synovial and serosal spaces. The FMF gene (MEFV) was recently cloned, and it codes for a protein (pyrin/marenostrin) homologous to known nuclear factors. We previously reported the deficient activity of a C5a/interleukin (IL)-8 inhibitor, a physiologic regulator of inflammatory processes, in FMF serosal and synovial fluids. We now describe the concomitant expression of MEFV and C5a/IL-8-inhibitor activity in primary cultures of human fibroblasts. Fibroblasts grown from synovial and peritoneal tissues displayed C5a/IL-8-inhibitor activity that could be further induced with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and IL-1 beta. Very low levels of chemotactic inhibitor were evident in skin fibroblast cultures or in peritoneal and skin fibroblasts obtained from FMF patients. MEFV was expressed in peritoneal and skin fibroblasts at a lower level than in neutrophils and could be further induced by PMA and IL-1 beta. In the FMF cultures, the MEFV transcript carried the M694V mutation, consistent with the genetic defect found in patients with this disease. MEFV was also expressed in other cell lines that do not produce C5a/IL-8 inhibitor. These findings suggest that human primary fibroblast cultures express MEFV and produce C5a/IL-8-inhibitor activity. The interrelationship between pyrin, the MEFV product, and the C5a/IL-8 inhibitor requires further investigation. (Blood. 2000;96:727-731)

  14. Dysregulated lipid metabolism in cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Alteration of lipid metabolism has been increasingly recognized as a hallmark of cancer cells. The changes of expression and activity of lipid metabolizing enzymes are directly regulated by the activity of oncogenic signals. The dependence of tumor cells on the dysregulated lipid metabolism suggests that proteins involved in this process are excellent chemotherapeutic targets for cancer treatment. There are currently several drugs under development or in clinical trials that are based on specifically targeting the altered lipid metabolic pathways in cancer cells. Further understanding of dysregulated lipid metabolism and its associated signaling pathways will help us to better design efficient cancer therapeutic strategy.

  15. 基于STC12C5A60S2单片机的光立方设计%Design of Light Cube Based on STC12C5A60S2 MCU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐志颖; 廖远; 聂玲子

    2016-01-01

    Aimed at the limitation of the traditional flat panel display, this paper puts forward a light cube based on STC12C5A60S2 MCU. It uses STC12C5A60S2 microcomputer as the core controller, adopts monochromatic fog shaped square LEDs to form the light cube, and chooses NPN transistors to form the driven circuit. So users can use the program to achieve 3D animation display. The system has excellent features of low cost of production, good dis-play effect and functional perfection.%针对传统平面显示单一的局限性,本文设计了一种基于STC12C5A60S2单片机的光立方。整个光立方以STC12C5A60S2单片机作为核心控制器,采用单色雾状方形LED组成光立方灯体,并配以NPN型三极管构成驱动电路。用户可以通过编程实现自定义3D动画显示功能,该系统具有制作成本低、显示效果好、功能完善的特点。

  16. Opposite Dysregulation of Fragile-X Mental Retardation Protein and Heteronuclear Ribonucleoprotein C Protein Associates with Enhanced APP Translation in Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borreca, Antonella; Gironi, Katia; Amadoro, Giusy; Ammassari-Teule, Martine

    2016-07-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is overexpressed in familiar and sporadic Alzheimer Disease (AD) patients suggesting that, in addition to abnormalities in APP cleavage, enhanced levels of APP full length might contribute to the pathology. Based on data showing that the two RNA binding proteins (RBPs), Fragile-X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) and heteronuclear Ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNP C), exert an opposite control on APP translation, we have analyzed whether expression and translation of these two RBPs vary in relation to changes in APP protein and mRNA levels in the AD brain at 1, 3, and 6 months of age. Here, we show that, as expected, human APP is overexpressed in hippocampal total extract from Tg2576 mice at all age points. APP overexpression, however, is not stable over time but reaches its maximal level in 1-month-old mutants in association with the stronger (i) reduction of FMRP and (ii) augmentation of hnRNP C. APP levels then decrease progressively as a function of age in close relationship with the gradual normalization of FMRP and hnRNP C levels. Consistent with the mouse data, expression of FMRP and hnRNP C are, respectively, decreased and increased in hippocampal synaptosomes from sporadic AD patients. Our findings identify two RBP targets that might be manipulated for reducing abnormally elevated levels of APP in the AD brain, with the hypothesis that acting upstream of amyloidogenic processing might contribute to attenuate the amyloid burden.

  17. Dysregulation in pediatric obsessive compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Joseph F; Small, Brent J; Lewin, Adam B; Murphy, Tanya K; De Nadai, Alessandro S; Phares, Vicky; Geffken, Gary; Storch, Eric A

    2013-10-30

    Although obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and common co-occurring conditions share deficits in self-regulatory abilities, there has been minimal examination of impaired self-regulation (dysregulation) in youth with OCD. This study examined the association of dysregulation with symptom severity, impairment, and treatment outcome in pediatric OCD. Clinicians assessed obsessive-compulsive severity, family accommodation and global severity in 144 youth with OCD. Youth completed self-report severity ratings of anxiety and depressive symptoms. Parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), and both children and parents completed parallel ratings of obsessive-compulsive impairment. Ninety-seven youth received cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and were re-assessed after treatment. Dysregulation was assessed using the CBCL-Dysregulation Profile. Before treatment, dysregulated youth exhibited greater obsessive-compulsive symptom severity, depressive mood, family accommodation, and impairment than non-dysregulated youth. The magnitude of dysregulation directly predicted child-rated impairment, parent-rated impairment, and family accommodation, beyond obsessive-compulsive severity. The magnitude of pretreatment dysregulation predicted treatment discontinuation but not treatment response. Obsessive-compulsive symptom severity and dysregulation level significantly decreased after CBT. Dysregulated youth with OCD presented as more clinically severe than their non-dysregulated counterparts, and may require more individualized interventions to reduce dysregulated behavior to prevent CBT attrition. For treatment completers, CBT was associated with a decrease in dysregulation level.

  18. Innate immune induction and influenza protection elicited by a response-selective agonist of human C5a.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam D Sanderson

    Full Text Available The anaphylatoxin C5a is an especially potent mediator of both local and systemic inflammation. However, C5a also plays an essential role in mucosal host defense against bacterial, viral, and fungal infection. We have developed a response-selective agonist of human C5a, termed EP67, which retains the immunoenhancing activity of C5a at the expense of its inflammatory, anaphylagenic properties. EP67 insufflation results in the rapid induction of pulmonary cytokines and chemokines. This is followed by an influx of innate immune effector cells, including neutrophils, NK cells, and dendritic cells. EP67 exhibits both prophylactic and therapeutic protection when tested in a murine model of influenza A infection. Mice treated with EP67 within a twenty-four hour window of non-lethal infection were significantly protected from influenza-induced weight loss. Furthermore, EP67 delivered twenty-four hours after lethal infection completely blocked influenza-induced mortality (0% vs. 100% survival. Since protection based on innate immune induction is not restricted to any specific pathogen, EP67 may well prove equally efficacious against a wide variety of possible viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens. Such a strategy could be used to stop the worldwide spread of emergent respiratory diseases, including but not limited to novel strains of influenza.

  19. Compromised neutrophil function and severe bovine E.coli mastitis: is C5a the missing link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Around the periparturient period and during early lactation dairy cows have an elevated risk for clinical mastitis. The severity of Gram-negative infections during these periods has been correlated with reduced neutrophil functions. In this review we focus on the potential role of C5a in the develop...

  20. UDP-glucosyltransferase71c5, a major glucosyltransferase, mediates abscisic acid homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Yan, Jin-Ping; Li, De-Kuan; Luo, Qin; Yan, Qiujie; Liu, Zhi-Bin; Ye, Li-Ming; Wang, Jian-Mei; Li, Xu-Feng; Yang, Yi

    2015-04-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) plays a key role in plant growth and development. The effect of ABA in plants mainly depends on its concentration, which is determined by a balance between biosynthesis and catabolism of ABA. In this study, we characterize a unique UDP-glucosyltransferase (UGT), UGT71C5, which plays an important role in ABA homeostasis by glucosylating ABA to abscisic acid -: glucose ester (GE) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Biochemical analyses show that UGT71C5 glucosylates ABA in vitro and in vivo. Mutation of UGT71C5 and down-expression of UGT71C5 in Arabidopsis cause delay in seed germination and enhanced drought tolerance. In contrast, overexpression of UGT71C5 accelerates seed germination and reduces drought tolerance. Determination of the content of ABA and ABA-GE in Arabidopsis revealed that mutation in UGT71C5 and down-expression of UGT71C5 resulted in increased level of ABA and reduced level of ABA-GE, whereas overexpression of UGT71C5 resulted in reduced level of ABA and increased level of ABA-GE. Furthermore, altered levels of ABA in plants lead to changes in transcript abundance of ABA-responsive genes, correlating with the concentration of ABA regulated by UGT71C5 in Arabidopsis. Our work shows that UGT71C5 plays a major role in ABA glucosylation for ABA homeostasis.

  1. Augmentation of Antitumor T-Cell Responses by Increasing APC T-Cell C5a/C3a-C5aR/C3aR Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    signaling which drives Th1/ Th17 effector cell responses (14). While we described the connection of C3aR/C5aR signaling with the PI-3Kγ- AKT-mTOR...involved in controlling the anti-tumor immune response, i.e. biasing between Th1/ Th17 effector cell vs Treg commitment, but also directly involved in

  2. A Potential Link between the C5a Receptor 1 and the β1-Adrenoreceptor in the Mouse Heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan Hua Khor

    Full Text Available Inflammation may contribute to the pathogenesis of specific cardiovascular diseases, but it is uncertain if mediators released during the inflammatory process will affect the continued efficacy of drugs used to treat clinical signs of the cardiac disease. We investigated the role of the complement 5a receptor 1 (C5aR1/CD88 in the cardiac response to inflammation or atenolol, and the effect of C5aR1 deletion in control of baseline heart rate in an anesthetized mouse model.An initial study showed that PMX53, an antagonist of C5aR1 in normal C57BL6/J (wild type, WT mice reduced heart rate (HR and appeared to have a protective effect on the heart following induced sepsis. C5aR1 knockout (CD88-/- mice had a lower HR than wild type mice, even during sham surgery. A model to assess heart rate variability (HRV in anesthetized mice was developed to assess the effects of inhibiting the β1-adrenoreceptor (β1-AR in a randomized crossover study design.HR and LF Norm were constitutively lower and SDNN and HF Norm constitutively higher in the CD88-/- compared with WT mice (P 0.05, except for the reduced LF/HF (Lower frequency/High frequency ratio (P< 0.05 at 60 min post-atenolol, suggesting increased parasympathetic tone of the heart due to the effect of atenolol administration. The HR of the WT mice were lower post atenolol compared to the CD88-/- mice (P = 0.001 but the HRV of CD88-/- mice were significantly increased (P< 0.05, compared with WT mice.Knockout of the C5aR1 attenuated the effect of β1-AR in the heart, suggesting an association between the β1-AR and C5aR1, although further investigation is required to determine if this is a direct or causal association.

  3. Roles for C-X-C chemokines and C5a in lung injury after hindlimb ischemia-reperfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bless, N M; Warner, R L; Padgaonkar, V A;

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the roles of the C-X-C chemokines cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) as well as the complement activation product C5a in development of lung injury after hindlimb ischemia-reperfusion in rats. During reperfusion, CD11b...... and CD18, but not CD11a, were upregulated on neutrophils [bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and blood] and lung macrophages. BAL levels of CINC and MIP-2 were increased during the ischemic and reperfusion periods. Treatment with either anti-CINC or anti-MIP-2 IgG significantly reduced lung vascular......, 58, and 23%, respectively (P MIP-2 as well as the complement activation product C5a are required for lung neutrophil recruitment and full induction of lung injury after hindlimb ischemia-reperfusion in rats....

  4. Treatment with the C5a receptor antagonist ADC-1004 reduces myocardial infarction in a porcine ischemia-reperfusion model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arheden Håkan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphonuclear neutrophils, stimulated by the activated complement factor C5a, have been implicated in cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury. ADC-1004 is a competitive C5a receptor antagonist that has been shown to inhibit complement related neutrophil activation. ADC-1004 shields the neutrophils from C5a activation before they enter the reperfused area, which could be a mechanistic advantage compared to previous C5a directed reperfusion therapies. We investigated if treatment with ADC-1004, according to a clinically applicable protocol, would reduce infarct size and microvascular obstruction in a large animal myocardial infarct model. Methods In anesthetized pigs (42-53 kg, a percutaneous coronary intervention balloon was inflated in the left anterior descending artery for 40 minutes, followed by 4 hours of reperfusion. Twenty minutes after balloon inflation the pigs were randomized to an intravenous bolus administration of ADC-1004 (175 mg, n = 8 or saline (9 mg/ml, n = 8. Area at risk (AAR was evaluated by ex vivo SPECT. Infarct size and microvascular obstruction were evaluated by ex vivo MRI. The observers were blinded to the treatment at randomization and analysis. Results ADC-1004 treatment reduced infarct size by 21% (ADC-1004: 58.3 ± 3.4 vs control: 74.1 ± 2.9%AAR, p = 0.007. Microvascular obstruction was similar between the groups (ADC-1004: 2.2 ± 1.2 vs control: 5.3 ± 2.5%AAR, p = 0.23. The mean plasma concentration of ADC-1004 was 83 ± 8 nM at sacrifice. There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to heart rate, mean arterial pressure, cardiac output and blood-gas data. Conclusions ADC-1004 treatment reduces myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and represents a novel treatment strategy of myocardial infarct with potential clinical applicability.

  5. Receptor residence time trumps drug-likeness and oral bioavailability in determining efficacy of complement C5a antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Vernon; Lim, Junxian; Cotterell, Adam J.; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Xu, Weijun; Lohman, Rink-Jan; Kok, W. Mei; Stoermer, Martin J.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Reid, Robert C.; Suen, Jacky Y.; Fairlie, David P.

    2016-04-01

    Drug discovery and translation are normally based on optimizing efficacy by increasing receptor affinity, functional potency, drug-likeness (rule-of-five compliance) and oral bioavailability. Here we demonstrate that residence time of a compound on its receptor has an overriding influence on efficacy, exemplified for antagonists of inflammatory protein complement C5a that activates immune cells and promotes disease. Three equipotent antagonists (3D53, W54011, JJ47) of inflammatory responses to C5a (3nM) were compared for drug-likeness, receptor affinity and antagonist potency in human macrophages, and anti-inflammatory efficacy in rats. Only the least drug-like antagonist (3D53) maintained potency in cells against higher C5a concentrations and had a much longer duration of action (t1/2 ~ 20 h) than W54011 or JJ47 (t1/2 ~ 1-3 h) in inhibiting macrophage responses. The unusually long residence time of 3D53 on its receptor was mechanistically probed by molecular dynamics simulations, which revealed long-lasting interactions that trap the antagonist within the receptor. Despite negligible oral bioavailability, 3D53 was much more orally efficacious than W54011 or JJ47 in preventing repeated agonist insults to induce rat paw oedema over 24 h. Thus, residence time on a receptor can trump drug-likeness in determining efficacy, even oral efficacy, of pharmacological agents.

  6. Neutrophil Recruitment to the Lung in both C5a and CXCL1-Induced Alveolitis is Impaired in Vitamin D Binding Protein Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Glenda; Habiel, David M.; Ge, Lingyin; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Cooke, Nancy E.; Kew, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of how neutrophils respond to chemotactic signals in a complex inflammatory environment is not completely understood. Moreover, even less is known about factors in physiological fluids that regulate the activity of chemoattractants. The vitamin D binding protein (DBP) has been shown to significantly enhance chemotaxis to complement activation peptide C5a using purified proteins in vitro, and by ex vivo depletion of DBP in physiological fluids, but this function has not been determined in vivo. DBP null (-/-) mice were used to investigate how a systemic absence of this plasma protein affects leukocyte recruitment in alveolitis models of lung inflammation. DBP-/- mice had significantly reduced (~50%) neutrophil recruitment to the lungs compared to their wild-type DBP+/+ counterparts in three different alveolitis models, two acute and one chronic. The histology of DBP-/- mouse lungs also showed significantly less injury than wild-type animals. The chemotactic cofactor function of DBP appears to be selective for neutrophil recruitment, but in contrast to previous in vitro results, in vivo DBP can enhance the activity of other chemoattractants including CXCL1. The reduced neutrophil response in DBP-/- mice could be rescued to wild-type levels by administering exogenous DBP. Finally, in inflammatory fluids DBP binds to G-actin released from damaged cells and this complex may be the active chemotactic cofactor. Results show for the first time that DBP is a significant chemotactic cofactor in vivo and not specific for C5a, suggesting that this ubiquitous plasma protein may have a more significant role in neutrophil recruitment than previously recognized. PMID:23752613

  7. Neutrophil recruitment to the lung in both C5a- and CXCL1-induced alveolitis is impaired in vitamin D-binding protein-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Glenda; Habiel, David M; Ge, Lingyin; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Cooke, Nancy E; Kew, Richard R

    2013-07-15

    Knowledge of how neutrophils respond to chemotactic signals in a complex inflammatory environment is not completely understood. Moreover, even less is known about factors in physiological fluids that regulate the activity of chemoattractants. The vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) has been shown to significantly enhance chemotaxis to complement activation peptide C5a using purified proteins in vitro, and by ex vivo depletion of DBP in physiological fluids, but this function has not been determined in vivo. DBP null ((-/-)) mice were used to investigate how a systemic absence of this plasma protein affects leukocyte recruitment in alveolitis models of lung inflammation. DBP(-/-) mice had significantly reduced (~50%) neutrophil recruitment to the lungs compared with their wild-type DBP(+/+) counterparts in three different alveolitis models, two acute and one chronic. The histology of DBP(-/-) mouse lungs also showed significantly less injury than wild-type animals. The chemotactic cofactor function of DBP appears to be selective for neutrophil recruitment, but, in contrast to previous in vitro results, in vivo DBP can enhance the activity of other chemoattractants, including CXCL1. The reduced neutrophil response in DBP(-/-) mice could be rescued to wild-type levels by administering exogenous DBP. Finally, in inflammatory fluids, DBP binds to G-actin released from damaged cells, and this complex may be the active chemotactic cofactor. To our knowledge, results show for the first time that DBP is a significant chemotactic cofactor in vivo and not specific for C5a, suggesting that this ubiquitous plasma protein may have a more significant role in neutrophil recruitment than previously recognized.

  8. 基于STC12C5A60S2单片机的智能机器人设计%Design of the Intelligent Robot Based on the STC12C5A60S2 MCU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁明亮; 孙逸洁

    2012-01-01

    The paper explains the general design of an I telligent robot that the key part of the control system is based on Type STC12C5A60S2Single Chip Micyoco and the design principle and methods of the type of robot.It is the higher liability of the robot that it won the technical skill competition for higher vocational colleges all over China.The robot has contribute a lot to the excellent competition result.%介绍一种以STC12C5A60S2单片机为控制核心的智能机器人的总体设计思路,阐述了智能机器人的硬件设计原理和C51软件设计方法。该机器人参加全国职业院校技能大赛,运行稳定可靠,为获得优异的竞赛成绩起到了重要作用。

  9. Design of Intelligent Tracking Car Based on STC12C5A60S2%基于STC12C5A60S2的智能循迹小车设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈和娟

    2012-01-01

      The design adopts STC12C5A60S2 microcontrol er as the core device of simple smart car. The tracking module is composed of a plurality of photoelectric tube, by reflecting infrared changes in judgments of black have to achieve the tracking function, motor drive module selection of commonly used H bridge driver L293D with single-chip microcomputer to control the motor working. The electric circuit construction of whole system is simple, reliable performance. It can meet a variety of design requirements.%  本设计采用STC12C5A60S2单片机为简易智能小车的核心器件。循迹模块由3对红外收发管组成,通过反射红外线的变化判断黑线的有无以达到循迹的功能,电机驱动模块选用H桥驱动芯片L293D结合单片机来控制电机工作。整个系统的电路结构简单,可靠性能高,能满足设计的要求。

  10. Fosb gene products contribute to excitotoxic microglial activation by regulating the expression of complement C5a receptors in microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomaru, Hiroko; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Katogi, Atsuhisa; Ohnishi, Yoshinori N; Kajitani, Kosuke; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Nestler, Eric J; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2014-08-01

    The Fosb gene encodes subunits of the activator protein-1 transcription factor complex. Two mature mRNAs, Fosb and ΔFosb, encoding full-length FOSB and ΔFOSB proteins respectively, are formed by alternative splicing of Fosb mRNA. Fosb products are expressed in several brain regions. Moreover, Fosb-null mice exhibit depressive-like behaviors and adult-onset spontaneous epilepsy, demonstrating important roles in neurological and psychiatric disorders. Study of Fosb products has focused almost exclusively on neurons; their function in glial cells remains to be explored. In this study, we found that microglia express equivalent levels of Fosb and ΔFosb mRNAs to hippocampal neurons and, using microarray analysis, we identified six microglial genes whose expression is dependent on Fosb products. Of these genes, we focused on C5ar1 and C5ar2, which encode receptors for complement C5a. In isolated Fosb-null microglia, chemotactic responsiveness toward the truncated form of C5a was significantly lower than that in wild-type cells. Fosb-null mice were significantly resistant to kainate-induced seizures compared with wild-type mice. C5ar1 mRNA levels and C5aR1 immunoreactivity were increased in wild-type hippocampus 24 hours after kainate administration; however, such induction was significantly reduced in Fosb-null hippocampus. Furthermore, microglial activation after kainate administration was significantly diminished in Fosb-null hippocampus, as shown by significant reductions in CD68 immunoreactivity, morphological change and reduced levels of Il6 and Tnf mRNAs, although no change in the number of Iba-1-positive cells was observed. These findings demonstrate that, under excitotoxicity, Fosb products contribute to a neuroinflammatory response in the hippocampus through regulation of microglial C5ar1 and C5ar2 expression.

  11. 基于STC12C5A60S2自动太阳能跟踪器的设计%Design of automatic solar tracker based on STC12C5A60S2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张树人; 周景雷

    2015-01-01

    在此阐述了利用光敏电阻寻找直射太阳的原理,以STC12C5A60S2为控制核心,设计了一种自动太阳能跟踪器。太阳照射情况通过太阳能电池板4边上的4个光敏电阻测得,经过放大后输送到单片机,在单片机内由软件进行分析计算,得出电池板需要偏移的方向和角度,最后通过2个伺服电机对电池板左右和上下偏移进行控制,从而提高了转化效率。%The principle to look for the direct sun by using photosensitive resistance is expounded in this article. An auto⁃matic solar tracker taking the STC12C5A60S2 as its core was designed. The sun’s irradiation status is measured by the four pho⁃tosensitive resistances embedded on four sides of the solar panel,sent to the single chip microcomputer(SCM)after amplifica⁃tion,and then analyzed and calculated in the SCM by software to get deviation direction and angle that the panel needs to be moved. At last,two servo motors are adopted to control panels’left⁃right and up⁃down migration,and improve the luminous effi⁃ciency.

  12. Emotion dysregulation, problem-solving, and hopelessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatan, Sevginar; Lester, David; Gunn, John F

    2014-04-01

    A sample of 87 Turkish undergraduate students was administered scales to measure hopelessness, problem-solving skills, emotion dysregulation, and psychiatric symptoms. All of the scores from these scales were strongly associated. In a multiple regression, hopelessness scores were predicted by poor problem-solving skills and emotion dysregulation.

  13. DMPD: Functions of anaphylatoxin C5a in rat liver: direct and indirect actions onnonparenchymal and parenchymal cells. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11367531 Functions of anaphylatoxin C5a in rat liver: direct and indirect actions onnon...rect and indirect actions onnonparenchymal and parenchymal cells. PubmedID 113675...31 Title Functions of anaphylatoxin C5a in rat liver: direct and indirect actions onnonparenchymal and paren

  14. Targeting the minor pocket of C5aR for the rational design of an oral allosteric inhibitor for inflammatory and neuropathic pain relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriconi, Alessio; Cunha, Thiago M.; Souza, Guilherme R.; Lopes, Alexandre H.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Carneiro, Victor L.; Pinto, Larissa G.; Brandolini, Laura; Aramini, Andrea; Bizzarri, Cinzia; Bianchini, Gianluca; Beccari, Andrea R.; Fanton, Marco; Bruno, Agostino; Costantino, Gabriele; Bertini, Riccardo; Galliera, Emanuela; Locati, Massimo; Ferreira, Sérgio H.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Allegretti, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain resulting from inflammatory and neuropathic disorders causes considerable economic and social burden. Pharmacological therapies currently available for certain types of pain are only partially effective and may cause severe adverse side effects. The C5a anaphylatoxin acting on its cognate G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), C5aR, is a potent pronociceptive mediator in several models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Although there has long been interest in the identification of C5aR inhibitors, their development has been complicated, as for many peptidomimetic drugs, mostly by poor drug-like properties. Herein, we report the de novo design of a potent and selective C5aR noncompetitive allosteric inhibitor, DF2593A, guided by the hypothesis that an allosteric site, the “minor pocket,” previously characterized in CXC chemokine receptors-1 and -2, is functionally conserved in the GPCR class. In vitro, DF2593A potently inhibited C5a-induced migration of human and rodent neutrophils. In vivo, oral administration of DF2593A effectively reduced mechanical hyperalgesia in several models of acute and chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain, without any apparent side effects. Mechanical hyperalgesia after spared nerve injury was also reduced in C5aR−/− mice compared with WT mice. Furthermore, treatment of C5aR−/− mice with DF2593A did not produce any further antinociceptive effect compared with C5aR−/− mice treated with vehicle. The successful medicinal chemistry strategy confirms that a conserved minor pocket is amenable for the rational design of selective inhibitors and the pharmacological results support that the allosteric blockade of the C5aR represents a highly promising therapeutic approach to control chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PMID:25385614

  15. Dysregulated metabolism contributes to oncogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschey, Matthew D.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Diehl, Anna Mae E.; Drew, Janice E.; Frezza, Christian; Green, Michelle F.; Jones, Lee W.; Ko, Young H.; Le, Anne; Lea, Michael A.; Locasale, Jason W.; Longo, Valter D.; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; McDonnell, Eoin; Mehrmohamadi, Mahya; Michelotti, Gregory; Muralidhar, Vinayak; Murphy, Michael P.; Pedersen, Peter L.; Poore, Brad; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.; Sivanand, Sharanya; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Wellen, Kathryn E.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a disease characterized by unrestrained cellular proliferation. In order to sustain growth, cancer cells undergo a complex metabolic rearrangement characterized by changes in metabolic pathways involved in energy production and biosynthetic processes. The relevance of the metabolic transformation of cancer cells has been recently included in the updated version of the review “Hallmarks of Cancer”, where the dysregulation of cellular metabolism was included as an emerging hallmark. While several lines of evidence suggest that metabolic rewiring is orchestrated by the concerted action of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, in some circumstances altered metabolism can play a primary role in oncogenesis. Recently, mutations of cytosolic and mitochondrial enzymes involved in key metabolic pathways have been associated with hereditary and sporadic forms of cancer. Together, these results suggest that aberrant metabolism, once seen just as an epiphenomenon of oncogenic reprogramming, plays a key role in oncogenesis with the power to control both genetic and epigenetic events in cells. In this review, we discuss the relationship between metabolism and cancer, as part of a larger effort to identify a broad-spectrum of therapeutic approaches. We focus on major alterations in nutrient metabolism and the emerging link between metabolism and epigenetics. Finally, we discuss potential strategies to manipulate metabolism in cancer and tradeoffs that should be considered. More research on the suite of metabolic alterations in cancer holds the potential to discover novel approaches to treat it. PMID:26454069

  16. C5a Regulates IL-1β Production and Leukocyte Recruitment in a Murine Model of Monosodium Urate Crystal-Induced Peritonitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khameneh, Hanif J.; Ho, Adrian W. S.; Laudisi, Federica; Derks, Heidi; Kandasamy, Matheswaran; Sivasankar, Baalasubramanian; Teng, Gim Gee; Mortellaro, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Gouty arthritis results from the generation of monosodium urate (MSU) crystals within joints. These MSU crystals elicit acute inflammation characterized by massive infiltration of neutrophils and monocytes that are mobilized by the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. MSU crystals also activate the complement system, which regulates the inflammatory response; however, it is unclear whether or how MSU-mediated complement activation is linked to IL-1β release in vivo, and the various roles that might be played by individual components of the complement cascade. Here we show that exposure to MSU crystals in vivo triggers the complement cascade, leading to the generation of the biologically active complement proteins C3a and C5a. C5a, but not C3a, potentiated IL-1β and IL-1α release from LPS–primed MSU-exposed peritoneal macrophages and human monocytic cells in vitro; while in vivo MSU–induced C5a mediated murine neutrophil recruitment as well as IL-1β production at the site of inflammation. These effects were significantly ameliorated by treatment of mice with a C5a receptor antagonist. Mechanistic studies revealed that C5a most likely increased NLRP3 inflammasome activation via production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and not through increased transcription of inflammasome components. Therefore we conclude that C5a generated upon MSU-induced complement activation increases neutrophil recruitment in vivo by promoting IL-1 production via the generation of ROS, which activate the NLRP3 inflammasome. Identification of the C5a receptor as a key determinant of IL-1-mediated recruitment of inflammatory cells provides a novel potential target for therapeutic intervention to mitigate gouty arthritis. PMID:28167912

  17. Tissue microarray methodology identifies complement pathway activation and dysregulation in progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, Sam; Neal, James W; Howell, Owain W; Harding, Katharine E; Sarkies, Patrick; Evans, Rhian; Bevan, Ryan J; Hakobyan, Svetlana; Harris, Claire L; Robertson, Neil P; Morgan, Bryan Paul

    2017-07-14

    The complement pathway has potential contributions to both white (WM) and grey matter (GM) pathology in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). A quantitative assessment of complement involvement is lacking. Here we describe the use of Tissue MicroArray (TMA) methodology in conjunction with immunohistochemistry to investigate the localization of complement pathway proteins in progressive MS cortical GM and subcortical WM. Antibodies targeting complement proteins C1q, C3b, regulatory proteins C1 inhibitor (C1INH, complement receptor 1 (CR1), clusterin, factor H (FH) and the C5a anaphylatoxin receptor (C5aR) were utilised alongside standard markers of tissue pathology. All stained slides were digitised for quantitative analysis. We found that numbers of cells immunolabelled for HLA-DR, GFAP, C5aR, C1q and C3b were increased in WM lesions (WML) and GM lesions (GML) compared to normal appearing WM (NAWM) and GM (NAGM), respectively. The complement regulators C1INH, CR1, FH and clusterin were more abundant in WM lesions, while the number of C1q+ neurons were increased and the number of C1INH+, clusterin+, FH+ and CR1+ neurons decreased in GM lesions. The number of complement component positive cells (C1q, C3b) correlated with complement regulator expression in WM, but there was no statistical association between complement activation and regulator expression in the GM. We conclude that TMA methodology and quantitative analysis provides evidence of complement dysregulation in MS GML, including an association of the numerical density of C1q+ cells with tissue lesions. Our work confirms that complement activation and dysregulation occur in all cases of progressive MS and suggest that complement may provide potential biomarkers of the disease. © 2017 International Society of Neuropathology.

  18. A pro-inflammatory role of C5L2 in C5a-primed neutrophils for ANCA-induced activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Hao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The complement system is crucial for the development of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV. In particular, C5a and its receptor on neutrophils, CD88, play a central role. The functional role of the second receptor of C5a, C5L2, remains unclear. In the current study, we investigated the role of C5L2 in C5a-primed neutrophils for ANCA-induced activation. METHODS: The effect of blocking C5L2 by anti-human C5L2 blocking antibody were tested on respiratory burst and degranulation of C5a-primed neutrophils activated with ANCA, as well as on membrane-bound proteinase 3 (mPR3 and concentration of myeloperoxidase (MPO in supernatant of C5a-primed neutrophils. An antagonist for CD88 was also employed. RESULTS: Blocking C5L2 resulted in a significantly decreased MPO concentration in the supernatant of C5a-primed neutrophils. mPR3 expression increased from 209.0±43.0 in untreated cells to 444.3±60.8 after C5a treatment (P<0.001, and decreased to 375.8±65.44, 342.2±54.3 and 313.7±43.6 by pre-incubating blocking C5L2 antibody at 2.5 µg/ml, 5 µg/ml or 10 µg/ml (compared with C5a-priming group, P<0.001, P<0.001, and P<0.001, respectively. In C5a-primed neutrophils, subsequently activating with MPO-ANCA-positive IgG, the MFI value was 425.8±160.6, which decreased to 292.8±141.2, 289.7±130.0 and 280.3±136.4 upon pre-incubation with mouse anti-human C5L2 blocking antibody at 2.5 µg/ml, 5 µg/ml or 10 µg/ml (compared with C5a-primed neutrophils, for MPO-ANCA-positive IgG-induced activation, P<0.05, P<0.05, and P<0.05, respectively. Blocking C5L2 also resulted in significantly decreased C5a-primed neutrophils for PR3-ANCA-positive IgG-induced activation. Moreover, the lactoferrin concentration in the supernant significantly decreased in pre-incubation with anti-human C5L2 blocking antibody, compared with C5a-primed neutrophils induced by PR3- or MPO-ANCA-positive IgG. CONCLUSIONS: C5L2 may be implicated in

  19. Complement component C5a Promotes Expression of IL-22 and IL-17 from Human T cells and its Implication in Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Michael L

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in elderly populations worldwide. Inflammation, among many factors, has been suggested to play an important role in AMD pathogenesis. Recent studies have demonstrated a strong genetic association between AMD and complement factor H (CFH, the down-regulatory factor of complement activation. Elevated levels of complement activating molecules including complement component 5a (C5a have been found in the serum of AMD patients. Our aim is to study whether C5a can impact human T cells and its implication in AMD. Methods Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were isolated from the blood of exudative form of AMD patients using a Ficoll gradient centrifugation protocol. Intracellular staining and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to measure protein expression. Apoptotic cells were detected by staining of cells with the annexin-V and TUNEL technology and analyzed by a FACS Caliber flow cytometer. SNP genotyping was analyzed by TaqMan genotyping assay using the Real-time PCR system 7500. Results We show that C5a promotes interleukin (IL-22 and IL-17 expression by human CD4+ T cells. This effect is dependent on B7, IL-1β and IL-6 expression from monocytes. We have also found that C5a could protect human CD4+ cells from undergoing apoptosis. Importantly, consistent with a role of C5a in promoting IL-22 and IL-17 expression, significant elevation in IL-22 and IL-17 levels was found in AMD patients as compared to non-AMD controls. Conclusions Our results support the notion that C5a may be one of the factors contributing to the elevated serum IL-22 and IL-17 levels in AMD patients. The possible involvement of IL-22 and IL-17 in the inflammation that contributes to AMD may herald a new approach to treat AMD.

  20. Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder: current insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baweja R

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Raman Baweja, Susan D Mayes, Usman Hameed, James G Waxmonsky Department of Psychiatry, Penn State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA Abstract: Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD was introduced as a new diagnostic entity under the category of depressive disorders in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5. It was included in DSM-5 primarily to address concerns about the misdiagnosis and consequent overtreatment of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents. DMDD does provide a home for a large percentage of referred children with severe persistent irritability that did not fit well into any DSM, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV diagnostic category. However, it has been a controversial addition to the DSM-5 due to lack of published validity studies, leading to questions about its validity as a distinct disorder. In this article, the authors discuss the diagnostic criteria, assessment, epidemiology, criticism of the diagnosis, and pathophysiology, as well as treatment and future directions for DMDD. They also review the literature on severe mood dysregulation, as described by the National Institute of Mental Health, as the scientific support for DMDD is based primarily on studies of severe mood dysregulation. Keywords: disruptive mood dysregulation disorder, persistent irritability, temper outbursts 

  1. Validation of MIL-F-9490D. General Specification for Flight Control System for Piloted Military Aircraft. Volume III. C-5A Heavy Logistics Transport Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-04-01

    of IELT -F-9490D are not compatible with the C-5A. The elevation of the pilot affects his visibility. Although there is similarity in the provisions...requiremnts. Other considerations were to insure that the air vehicle and its subsysbems, trainers , engines, test vehicles, ground support equipment, •tc

  2. Expression of complement C5a receptor and the viability of 4T1 tumor cells following agonist–antagonist treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurneqman Nashreq Kosni

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This experiment shows the presence of C5a receptor on 4T1 cell line. We believe that the antagonist peptide is eligible to be used widely in cancer immunotherapy field; but in vivo studies need to be carried out first in the future, as it will determine how these drugs affect the tumor cell growth.

  3. p38MAPK, ERK and PI3K signaling pathways are involved in C5a-primed neutrophils for ANCA-mediated activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Hao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The complement system is one of the important contributing factors in the development of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV. C5a and the neutrophil C5a receptor play a central role in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA-mediated neutrophil recruitment and activation. The current study further investigated the signaling pathways of C5a-mediated priming of human neutrophils for ANCA-induced neutrophil activation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The effects of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK inhibitor (SB202190, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK inhibitor (PD98059, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK inhibitor (6o and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K inhibitor (LY294002 were tested on respiratory burst and degranulation of C5a-primed neutrophils activated with ANCA, as well as on C5a-induced increase in expression of membrane-bound PR3 (mPR3 on neutrophils. For C5a-primed neutrophils for MPO-ANCA-induced respiratory burst, the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI value was 254.8±67.1, which decreased to 203.6±60.3, 204.4±36.7, 202.4±49.9 and 188±47.9 upon pre-incubation with SB202190, PD98059, LY294002 and the mixture of above-mentioned three inhibitors (compared with that without inhibitors, P<0.01, P<0.05, P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively. For PR3-ANCA-positive IgG, the MFI value increased in C5a-primed neutrophils, which decreased upon pre-incubation with above-mentioned inhibitors. The lactoferrin concentration increased in C5a-primed neutrophils induced by MPO or PR3-ANCA-positive IgG supernatant and decreased upon pre-incubation with above-mentioned three inhibitors. mPR3 expression increased from 923.3±182.4 in untreated cells to 1278.3±299.3 after C5a treatment and decreased to 1069.9±188.9, 1100±238.2, 1092.3±231.8 and 1053.9±200.3 by SB202190, PD98059, LY294002 and the mixture of above-mentioned three inhibitors (compared with that without inhibitors, P<0.01, P<0

  4. Schema Therapy for Emotional Dysregulation: Theoretical Implication and Clinical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Dadomo, Harold; Grecucci, Alessandro; Giardini, Irene; Ugolini, Erika; Carmelita, Alessandro; Panzeri, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The term emotional dysregulation refers to an impaired ability to regulate unwanted emotional states. Scientific evidence supports the idea that emotional dysregulation underlies several psychological disorders as, for example: personality disorders, bipolar disorder type II, interpersonal trauma, anxiety disorders, mood disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder. Emotional dysregulation may derive from early interpersonal traumas in childhood. These early traumatic events create a persiste...

  5. Exercise Training Attenuates the Dysregulated Expression of Adipokines and Oxidative Stress in White Adipose Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Sakurai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity-induced inflammatory changes in white adipose tissue (WAT, which caused dysregulated expression of inflammation-related adipokines involving tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, contribute to the development of insulin resistance. Moreover, current literature reports state that WAT generates reactive oxygen species (ROS, and the enhanced production of ROS in obese WAT has been closely associated with the dysregulated expression of adipokines in WAT. Therefore, the reduction in excess WAT and oxidative stress that results from obesity is thought to be one of the important strategies in preventing and improving lifestyle-related diseases. Exercise training (TR not only brings about a decrease in WAT mass but also attenuates obesity-induced dysregulated expression of the adipokines in WAT. Furthermore, some reports indicate that TR affects the generation of oxidative stress in WAT. This review outlines the impact of TR on the expression of inflammation-related adipokines and oxidative stress in WAT.

  6. Adipose tissue and adipocyte dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafontan, M

    2014-02-01

    Obesity-associated insulin resistance is a complex disorder involving a number of candidate molecules, pathways and transduction systems possessing potential causal actions. Inflammation in adipose tissue (AT) is one mechanism proposed to explain the development of insulin resistance, while identification of factors that lead to or cause AT dysfunction when it reaches its limit of expansion represents an important challenge. Pathological expansion of AT is characterized by changes in its blood flow, and the presence of enlarged and dysfunctional adipocytes that begin an inflammatory campaign of altered adipokine and cytokine secretions. Adipocyte senescence, necrosis and death are associated with increased immune cell and macrophage infiltration of AT in obesity. This can boost inflammation and reinforce fat cell dysfunction and death. In addition, pathological fat mass expansion is also related to limited recruitment of fat cell progenitors able to proliferate and differentiate into healthy small fat cells to compensate for cell death and preserve adipocyte numbers. Limiting vascular development and enhancing fibrotic processes worsen inflammation towards chronic irreversibility. The AT expandability hypothesis states that failure of AT expansion is one of the key factors linking positive energy balance and cardiometabolic risks, not obesity per se. Besides the usual treatment of obesity based on behavioral approaches (specific dietary/nutritional approaches together with increased physical activity), a number of questions remain concerning the possible recovery of metabolic health after inflammation-preventing interventions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Treatment with anti-C5aR mAb leads to early-onset clinical and mechanistic effects in the murine delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Nansen, Anneline; Usher, Pernille A.

    2015-01-01

    Blockade of the complement cascade at the C5a/C5a receptor (C5aR)-axis is believed to be an attractive treatment avenue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the effects of such interventions during the early phases of arthritis remain to be clarified. In this study we use the murine delayed-typ...

  8. Dimensions of emotion dysregulation in bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Jason M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Peterson, Carol B; Crosby, Ross D; Engel, Scott G; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Smith, Tracey L; Klein, Marjorie H; Goldschmidt, Andrea B; Berg, Kelly C

    2014-05-01

    The goal of this study was to examine associations between dimensions of emotion dysregulation and eating disorder (ED) symptoms in bulimia nervosa (BN). This investigation used baseline data from a BN treatment study that included 80 adults (90% women) with full or subthreshold BN. Participants completed the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS) and the Eating Disorders Examination interview. The Eating Disorders Examination global score was significantly correlated with the DERS total score, as well as several DERS subscales: nonacceptance, impulse and strategies. Further, the DERS goals subscale was found to be uniquely associated with frequency of purging and driven exercise, although none of the subscales were associated with frequency of objective binge eating. Findings indicate that emotion dysregulation is associated with ED symptoms in BN, suggesting the utility of interventions that address emotion regulation skills deficits in the treatment of the disorder.

  9. Levels of complement components C3a and C5a in renal injury among trichloroethylene-sensitized BALB/c mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    查晚生

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the levels of complement components C3a and C5a in the kidneys of trichloroethylene(TCE)-sensitized BALB/c mice,and to investigate the role of complement components in TCE-induced renal injury among BALB/c mice.Methods Sixty-two female BALB/c mice were randomly divided into blank control group,vehicle control group,and TCE sensitization

  10. Endocrine Dysregulation in Anorexia Nervosa Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Context: Anorexia nervosa is a primary psychiatric disorder with serious endocrine consequences, including dysregulation of the gonadal, adrenal, and GH axes, and severe bone loss. This Update reviews recent advances in the understanding of the endocrine dysregulation observed in this state of chronic starvation, as well as the mechanisms underlying the disease itself. Evidence Acquisition: Findings of this update are based on a PubMed search and the author's knowledge of this field. Evidence Synthesis: Recent studies have provided insights into the mechanisms underlying endocrine dysregulation in states of chronic starvation as well as the etiology of anorexia nervosa itself. This includes a more complex understanding of the pathophysiologic bases of hypogonadism, hypercortisolemia, GH resistance, appetite regulation, and bone loss. Nevertheless, the etiology of the disease remains largely unknown, and effective therapies for the endocrine complications and for the disease itself are lacking. Conclusions: Despite significant progress in the field, further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the development of anorexia nervosa and its endocrine complications. Such investigations promise to yield important advances in the therapeutic approach to this disease as well as to the understanding of the regulation of endocrine function, skeletal biology, and appetite regulation. PMID:21976742

  11. Complement anaphylatoxin receptors C3aR and C5aR are required in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingjun; Bell, Brent A; Yu, Minzhong; Chan, Chi-Chao; Peachey, Neal S; Fung, John; Zhang, Xiaoming; Caspi, Rachel R; Lin, Feng

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested that reagents inhibiting complement activation could be effective in treating T cell mediated autoimmune diseases such as autoimmune uveitis. However, the precise role of the complement anaphylatoxin receptors (C3a and C5a receptors) in the pathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis remains elusive and controversial. We induced experimental autoimmune uveitis in mice deficient or sufficient in both C3a and C5a receptors and rigorously compared their retinal phenotype using various imaging techniques, including indirect ophthalmoscopy, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, topical endoscopic fundus imaging, and histopathological analysis. We also assessed retinal function using electroretinography. Moreover, we performed Ag-specific T cell recall assays and T cell adoptive transfer experiments to compare pathogenic T cell activity between wild-type and knockout mice with experimental autoimmune uveitis. These experiments showed that C3a receptor/C5a receptor-deficient mice developed much less severe uveitis than did control mice using all retinal examination methods and that these mice had reduced pathogenic T cell responses. Our data demonstrate that both complement anaphylatoxin receptors are important for the development of experimental autoimmune uveitis, suggesting that targeting these receptors could be a valid approach for treating patients with autoimmune uveitis.

  12. The effects of early positive parenting and developmental delay status on child emotion dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norona, A N; Baker, B L

    2017-02-01

    , findings provided support for our hypothesis that early positive parenting mediated the relationship between DD and dysregulation. This work enhances our understanding of the development of ER across childhood and how endogenous child factors (DD status) and exogenous family factors (positive parenting) affect this process. Our findings provide clear implications for early intervention programmes for children with DD. Because of the predictive relationships between (a) developmental status and ER and (b) parenting and ER, the results imply that sensitive parenting behaviours should be specifically targeted in parent interventions for children with DD. © 2016 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. 基于STC12C5A08AD单片机的自动电阻测试仪的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚成莹; 何辉; 兰聪花; 陶冶

    2012-01-01

    阐述利用电阻分压原理实现自动电阻测量的设计思想和系统实现.通过场效应管电阻测量电路采样的电压,经高速A/D转换器MAX187和微控制器STC12C5A08AD处理后在12864液晶上实时显示被测阻值.系统具有4档量程,可实现“自动与手动测量转换、电阻的筛选、自动测量和显示电位器阻值随旋转角度变化曲线”等功能,用户界面友好,操作简单.%This paper describes the basic idea and implementation about achieving resistor-divider principle of automatic resistance measurement Voltage is sampled by the FET resistance measurement circuit and processed by high-speed A/D converter MAX 187 and microcontroller STC12C5A08AD and measured resistance is displayed on the LCD 12864.System has 4 ranges, can achieve "automatic and manual measurement conversion, resistance selection, automatic measurement and display the curve of changed potentiometer" and etc. User-friendly interface, simple operation.

  14. Examining trait mindfulness, emotion dysregulation, and quality of life in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirda, Brittney; Nicholas, Jacqueline A; Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya

    2015-11-01

    Dispositional mindfulness exhibits a positive association with quality of life (QoL). One potential mechanism for this association is enhanced emotion regulation abilities. Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience a range of physical, cognitive, and affective impairments, thus reducing overall QoL. The current cross-sectional study examines the relation between trait mindfulness and QoL, mediated by emotion dysregulation in individuals with MS. Ninety-five participants with self-reported MS completed an online survey that incorporated self-report measures of trait mindfulness, emotion dysregulation, and QoL. Although clinically significant depression was exclusionary, we observed a wide range of depressive symptoms in our sample. These scores were thus entered as a moderator in the mediation analysis. Dispositional mindfulness correlated positively with QoL, with lower emotion dysregulation partially mediating the correlation. Depression scores moderated the observed mediation, such that the effect was stronger in those with higher symptoms of depression. Trait mindfulness is positively associated with QoL in individuals with MS. Reduced emotion dysregulation may be a critical pathway linking mindfulness and QoL in MS, especially in those with higher symptoms of depression. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Dysregulation of Glutathione Homeostasis in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William M.; Wilson-Delfosse, Amy L.; Mieyal, John. J.

    2012-01-01

    Dysregulation of glutathione homeostasis and alterations in glutathione-dependent enzyme activities are increasingly implicated in the induction and progression of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Friedreich’s ataxia. In this review background is provided on the steady-state synthesis, regulation, and transport of glutathione, with primary focus on the brain. A brief overview is presented on the distinct but vital roles of glutathione in cellular maintenance and survival, and on the functions of key glutathione-dependent enzymes. Major contributors to initiation and progression of neurodegenerative diseases are considered, including oxidative stress, protein misfolding, and protein aggregation. In each case examples of key regulatory mechanisms are identified that are sensitive to changes in glutathione redox status and/or in the activities of glutathione-dependent enzymes. Mechanisms of dysregulation of glutathione and/or glutathione-dependent enzymes are discussed that are implicated in pathogenesis of each neurodegenerative disease. Limitations in information or interpretation are identified, and possible avenues for further research are described with an aim to elucidating novel targets for therapeutic interventions. The pros and cons of administration of N-acetylcysteine or glutathione as therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative diseases, as well as the potential utility of serum glutathione as a biomarker, are critically evaluated. PMID:23201762

  16. Dysregulation of glutathione homeostasis in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William M; Wilson-Delfosse, Amy L; Mieyal, John J

    2012-10-09

    Dysregulation of glutathione homeostasis and alterations in glutathione-dependent enzyme activities are increasingly implicated in the induction and progression of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Friedreich's ataxia. In this review background is provided on the steady-state synthesis, regulation, and transport of glutathione, with primary focus on the brain. A brief overview is presented on the distinct but vital roles of glutathione in cellular maintenance and survival, and on the functions of key glutathione-dependent enzymes. Major contributors to initiation and progression of neurodegenerative diseases are considered, including oxidative stress, protein misfolding, and protein aggregation. In each case examples of key regulatory mechanisms are identified that are sensitive to changes in glutathione redox status and/or in the activities of glutathione-dependent enzymes. Mechanisms of dysregulation of glutathione and/or glutathione-dependent enzymes are discussed that are implicated in pathogenesis of each neurodegenerative disease. Limitations in information or interpretation are identified, and possible avenues for further research are described with an aim to elucidating novel targets for therapeutic interventions. The pros and cons of administration of N-acetylcysteine or glutathione as therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative diseases, as well as the potential utility of serum glutathione as a biomarker, are critically evaluated.

  17. Emotion Dysregulation and the Core Features of Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Andrea C.; Phillips, Jennifer M.; Parker, Karen J.; Shah, Shweta; Gross, James J.; Hardan, Antonio Y.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between emotion dysregulation and the core features of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), which include social/communication deficits, restricted/repetitive behaviors, and sensory abnormalities. An 18-item Emotion Dysregulation Index was developed on the basis of expert ratings of the Child…

  18. Emotion Dysregulation and Adolescent Psychopathology: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Background Emotion regulation deficits have been consistently linked to psychopathology in cross-sectional studies. However, the direction of the relationship between emotion regulation and psychopathology is unclear. This study examined the longitudinal and reciprocal relationships between emotion regulation deficits and psychopathology in adolescents. Methods Emotion dysregulation and symptomatology (depression, anxiety, aggressive behavior, and eating pathology) were assessed in a large, diverse sample of adolescents (N = 1,065) at two time points separated by seven months. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the longitudinal and reciprocal relationships between emotion dysregulation and symptoms of psychopathology. Results The three distinct emotion processes examined here (emotional understanding, dysregulated expression of sadness and anger, and ruminative responses to distress) formed a unitary latent emotion dysregulation factor. Emotion dysregulation predicted increases in anxiety symptoms, aggressive behavior, and eating pathology after controlling for baseline symptoms but did not predict depressive symptoms. In contrast, none of the four types of psychopathology predicted increases in emotion dysregulation after controlling for baseline emotion dysregulation. Conclusions Emotion dysregulation appears to be an important transdiagnostic factor that increases risk for a wide range of psychopathology outcomes in adolescence. These results suggest targets for preventive interventions during this developmental period of risk. PMID:21718967

  19. MicroRNA Dysregulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar ede Faria Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by central nervous system (CNS demyelination and axonal degeneration. Although the cause of MS is still unknown, it is widely accepted that novel drug targets need to focus on both decreasing inflammation and promoting CNS repair. In MS and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE non-coding small microRNAs (miRNAs are dysregulated in the immune and central nervous systems. Since individual miRNAs are able to downregulate multiple targeted mRNA transcripts, even minor changes in miRNA expression may lead to significant alterations in post-transcriptional gene expression. Herein, we review miRNA signatures reported in CNS tissue and immune cells of MS patients and consider how altered miRNA expression may influence MS pathology.

  20. Dysregulated microRNAs in neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Pierre; de Strooper, Bart

    2010-09-01

    The complexity of the nervous system arises in part, from the large diversity of neural cell types that support the architecture of neuronal circuits. Recent studies have highlighted microRNAs as important players in regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and therefore the phenotype of neural cells. A link between microRNAs and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease is becoming increasingly evident. Here, we discuss microRNAs in neurodegeneration, from the fruit fly and mouse utilized as experimental models to dysregulated microRNAs in human neurodegenerative disorders. We propose that studying microRNAs and their mRNA targets in the context of neurodegeneration will significantly contribute to the identification of proteins important for neuronal function and might reveal underlying molecular networks that drive these diseases.

  1. Aldosterone Production and Signaling Dysregulation in Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiola, Andrea; Lagos, Carlos F; Carvajal, Cristian A; Baudrand, Rene; Fardella, Carlos E

    2016-03-01

    In the past decades, we have extended the view of aldosterone effects beyond epithelial tissues. New evidence regarding the aldosterone/mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) pathway in active metabolic tissues, including adipose tissue, has confirmed its pathogenic role in systemic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. Obesity, a current epidemic worldwide, increases aldosterone production by several adipocyte factors such as leptin but is also associated with local aldosterone production. In addition, obesity can modulate MR activation leading to signaling dysregulation and a pro-inflammatory profile of adipocytes. Current knowledge have deciphered that this phenotypical differences of obesity may be explained, at least in part, by novel non-genomic activation of MR, new inducers of aldosterone synthesis, and probably by several epigenetic modifications. In addition, with the understanding of the complex interplay of obesity, hormones, and receptors, targeted pharmacological therapy is expected and is currently under active research.

  2. IED blast postconcussive syncope and autonomic dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, Richard; LaBrie, D Walter; Norris, Jacob; Schauer, Judy; Frantz, Earl

    2012-01-01

    Concussions are the most frequent battle injury sustained in Afghanistan. The Concussion Restoration Care Center provides multidisciplinary care to concussed service members in theater. The Concussion Restoration Care Center has managed over 500 concussions, the majority being from improvised explosive device (IED) blasts. Syncope following a concussion without a loss of consciousness is rarely reported in the literature. The pathophysiology of concussion from a blast injury may be distinct from a concussion secondary to blunt trauma. Two cases of syncope following concussions with an alteration of consciousness are presented, and a mechanism of action is proposed. Post-IED blast concussive symptom frequency at initial presentation on a cohort of patients is reported, with 1.3% of patients experiencing postconcussive syncope. Syncope following an IED blast may be related to centrally mediated autonomic dysregulation at the brain stem level. Syncope should be added to the list of possible symptoms that occur following concussions, in particular concussions following a blast injury.

  3. Autonomic nervous system dysregulation in pediatric hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feber, Janusz; Ruzicka, Marcel; Geier, Pavel; Litwin, Mieczyslaw

    2014-05-01

    Historically, primary hypertension (HTN) has been prevalent typically in adults. Recent data however, suggests an increasing number of children diagnosed with primary HTN, mainly in the setting of obesity. One of the factors considered in the etiology of HTN is the autonomous nervous system, namely its dysregulation. In the past, the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) was regarded as a system engaged mostly in buffering major acute changes in blood pressure (BP), in response to physical and emotional stressors. Recent evidence suggests that the SNS plays a much broader role in the regulation of BP, including the development and maintenance of sustained HTN by a chronically elevated central sympathetic tone in adults and children with central/visceral obesity. Consequently, attempts have been made to reduce the SNS hyperactivity, in order to intervene early in the course of the disease and prevent HTN-related complications later in life.

  4. Treatment with anti-C5aR mAb leads to early-onset clinical and mechanistic effects in the murine delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Nansen, Anneline; Usher, Pernille A.;

    2015-01-01

    Blockade of the complement cascade at the C5a/C5a receptor (C5aR)-axis is believed to be an attractive treatment avenue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the effects of such interventions during the early phases of arthritis remain to be clarified. In this study we use the murine delayed...... lymph node is also reduced following a single dose of anti-C5aR, suggesting that modulation of the C5a/C5aR axis results in effects on the T cell compartment in inflammatory arthritis. In summary, these data demonstrate that blockade of C5aR leads to rapid and significant effects on arthritic disease......-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA) model to study the very early effects of a blocking, non-depleting anti-C5aR mAb on joint inflammation with treatment synchronised with disease onset, an approach not previously described. The DTHA model is a single-paw inflammatory arthritis model characterised by synchronised...

  5. 基于STC12 C5 A60 S2的双向DC-DC变换器的系统设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤正

    2016-01-01

    本文以2015年全国大学生电子设计竞赛为背景,系统设计了一种基于STC12C5A60S2单片机微处理器,使用集成电路芯片TPS5430和UC3842作为主控制芯片的双向DC-DC变换器.本设计由可控硅构成静态开关,当电池放电时,DC-DC变换器以Boost工作模式运行;当电池充电时,DC-DC变换器以Buck工作模式运行.此外使用TLC2543和TLV5618两款芯片通过AD采样和DA输出的电流检测技术实现了对直流充电电流测量,并由STC单片机控制液晶显示屏进行显示,成功设计出了一个高性能双向DC-DC变换电路,实现对18650型锂电池的充放电功能.本设计具有低成本高性能、结构简单、控制方便、直观显示等优点.

  6. DYSREGULATION OF ION HOMEOSTASIS BY ANTIFUNGAL AGENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqiang eZhang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ion signaling and transduction networks are central to fungal development and virulence because they regulate gene expression, filamentation, host association and invasion, pathogen stress response and survival. Dysregulation of ion homeostasis rapidly mediates cell death, forming the mechanistic basis by which a growing number of amphipathic but structurally unrelated compounds elicit antifungal activity. Included in this group is carvacrol, a terpenoid phenol that is a prominent component of oregano and other plant essential oils. Carvacrol triggers an early dose dependent Ca2+ burst and long lasting pH changes in the model yeast S. cerevisiae. The distinct phases of ionic transients and a robust transcriptional response that overlaps with Ca2+ stress and nutrient starvation point to specific signaling events elicited by plant terpenoid phenols, rather than a non-specific lesion of the membrane as was previously considered. We discuss the potential use of plant essential oils and other agents that disrupt ion signaling pathways as chemosensitizers to augment conventional antifungal therapy, and to convert fungistatic drugs with strong safety profiles into fungicides.

  7. Circadian dysregulation disrupts bile acid homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bile acids are potentially toxic compounds and their levels of hepatic production, uptake and export are tightly regulated by many inputs, including circadian rhythm. We tested the impact of disrupting the peripheral circadian clock on integral steps of bile acid homeostasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Both restricted feeding, which phase shifts peripheral clocks, and genetic ablation in Per1(-/-/Per2(-/- (PERDKO mice disrupted normal bile acid control and resulted in hepatic cholestasis. Restricted feeding caused a dramatic, transient elevation in hepatic bile acid levels that was associated with activation of the xenobiotic receptors CAR and PXR and elevated serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST, indicative of liver damage. In the PERDKO mice, serum bile acid levels were elevated and the circadian expression of key bile acid synthesis and transport genes, including Cyp7A1 and NTCP, was lost. This was associated with blunted expression of a primary clock output, the transcription factor DBP, which transactivates the promoters of both genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that disruption of the circadian clock results in dysregulation of bile acid homeostasis that mimics cholestatic disease.

  8. The Child Behavior Checklist Dysregulation Profile in Preschool Children: A Broad Dysregulation Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geeraerts, Sanne Barbara; Deutz, Marike Hester Francisca; Deković, Maja; Bunte, Tessa; Schoemaker, Kim; Espy, Kimberly Andrews; Prinzie, Peter; van Baar, Anneloes; Matthys, Walter

    2015-07-01

    Children with concurrent impairments in regulating affect, behavior, and cognition can be identified with the Anxious/Depressed, Aggressive Behavior, and Attention Problems scales (or AAA scales) of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Jointly, these scales form the Dysregulation Profile (DP). Despite persuasive evidence that DP is a marker for severe developmental problems, no consensus exists on the preferred conceptualization and operationalization of DP in preschool years. We addressed this concern by testing and validating the factor structure of DP in a group of predominantly clinically referred preschool children. Participants were 247 children (195 boys and 52 girls), aged 3.5 to 5.5 years. Children were assessed at baseline and 18 months later, using parent and teacher reports, a clinical interview with parents, behavioral observations, and neuropsychological tasks. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that a bifactor model, with a general DP factor and 3 specific factors representing the AAA scales, fitted the data better than a second-order model and a one-factor model for both parent-reported and teacher-reported child problem behavior. Criterion validity analyses showed that the DP factor was concurrently and longitudinally associated with markers of dysregulation and clinically relevant criteria, whereas the specific factors representing the AAA scales were more differentially related to those criteria. DP is best conceptualized as a broad syndrome of dysregulation that exists in addition to the specific syndromes as represented by the AAA scales. Implications for researchers and clinicians are discussed. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Redox Dysregulation in the Pathophysiology of Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulak, Anita; Steullet, Pascal; Cabungcal, Jan-Harry

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) are classified as two distinct diseases. However, accumulating evidence shows that both disorders share genetic, pathological, and epidemiological characteristics. Based on genetic and functional findings, redox dysregulation due...

  10. Toddlers’ dysregulated fear predicts delta–beta coupling during preschool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi A. Phelps

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulated fear, or the persistence of high levels of fear in low-threat contexts, is an early risk factor for the development of anxiety symptoms. Previous work has suggested both propensities for over-control and under-control of fearfulness as risk factors for anxiety problems, each of which may be relevant to observations of dysregulated fear. Given difficulty disentangling over-control and under-control through traditional behavioral measures, we used delta–beta coupling to begin to understand the degree to which dysregulated fear may reflect propensities for over- or under-control. We found that toddlers who showed high levels of dysregulated fear evidenced greater delta–beta coupling at frontal and central electrode sites as preschoolers relative to children who were low in dysregulated fear. Importantly, these differences were not observed when comparisons were made based on fear levels in high threat contexts. Results suggest dysregulated fear may involve tendencies toward over-control at the neural level.

  11. Schema Therapy for Emotional Dysregulation: Theoretical Implication and Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadomo, Harold; Grecucci, Alessandro; Giardini, Irene; Ugolini, Erika; Carmelita, Alessandro; Panzeri, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The term emotional dysregulation refers to an impaired ability to regulate unwanted emotional states. Scientific evidence supports the idea that emotional dysregulation underlies several psychological disorders as, for example: personality disorders, bipolar disorder type II, interpersonal trauma, anxiety disorders, mood disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder. Emotional dysregulation may derive from early interpersonal traumas in childhood. These early traumatic events create a persistent sensitization of the central nervous system in relation to early life stressing events. For this reason, some authors suggest a common endophenotypical origin across psychopathologies. In the last 20 years, cognitive behavioral therapy has increasingly adopted an interactive-ontogenetic view to explain the development of disorders associated to emotional dysregulation. Unfortunately, standard Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) methods are not useful in treating emotional dysregulation. A CBT-derived new approach called Schema Therapy (ST), that integrates theory and techniques from psychodynamic and emotion focused therapy, holds the promise to fill this gap in cognitive literature. In this model, psychopathology is viewed as the interaction between the innate temperament of the child and the early experiences of deprivation or frustration of the subject's basic needs. This deprivation may lead to develop early maladaptive schemas (EMS), and maladaptive Modes. In the present paper we point out that EMSs and Modes are associated with either dysregulated emotions or with dysregulatory strategies that produce and maintain problematic emotional responses. Thanks to a special focus on the therapeutic relationship and emotion focused-experiential techniques, this approach successfully treats severe emotional dysregulation. In this paper, we make several comparisons between the main ideas of ST and the science of emotion regulation, and we present how to conceptualize pathological

  12. Identifying dysregulated pathways in cancers from pathway interaction networks

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    Liu Ke-Qin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancers, a group of multifactorial complex diseases, are generally caused by mutation of multiple genes or dysregulation of pathways. Identifying biomarkers that can characterize cancers would help to understand and diagnose cancers. Traditional computational methods that detect genes differentially expressed between cancer and normal samples fail to work due to small sample size and independent assumption among genes. On the other hand, genes work in concert to perform their functions. Therefore, it is expected that dysregulated pathways will serve as better biomarkers compared with single genes. Results In this paper, we propose a novel approach to identify dysregulated pathways in cancer based on a pathway interaction network. Our contribution is three-fold. Firstly, we present a new method to construct pathway interaction network based on gene expression, protein-protein interactions and cellular pathways. Secondly, the identification of dysregulated pathways in cancer is treated as a feature selection problem, which is biologically reasonable and easy to interpret. Thirdly, the dysregulated pathways are identified as subnetworks from the pathway interaction networks, where the subnetworks characterize very well the functional dependency or crosstalk between pathways. The benchmarking results on several distinct cancer datasets demonstrate that our method can obtain more reliable and accurate results compared with existing state of the art methods. Further functional analysis and independent literature evidence also confirm that our identified potential pathogenic pathways are biologically reasonable, indicating the effectiveness of our method. Conclusions Dysregulated pathways can serve as better biomarkers compared with single genes. In this work, by utilizing pathway interaction networks and gene expression data, we propose a novel approach that effectively identifies dysregulated pathways, which can not only be used

  13. 基于STC12C5A60S2单片机的模拟路灯控制系统设计%Design of simulation street lamp control system based on STC12C5A60S2 single chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张旭彬; 丁戈; 王航宇

    2013-01-01

    文中详细描述了路灯模拟控制系统的设计方法.系统包括单片机控制、显示、红外感应、恒流驱动、路灯单元控制、故障检测与报警等6个模块.单片机控制模块以STC12C5A60S2为核心,完成各感应器件的信号采集任务,控制LED灯的工作模式,LCD显示各种数据.采用PWM波数字调节恒流源输出功率,达到控制LED路灯的照度;故障检测与报警模块可以实时检测各路灯单元的工作状态.实验证明该系统电路运行可靠.%This article describes in detail the design method of analog control system of street lamp.The system consists of microcomputer control,display,the six module of infrared induction,constant current drive,street lamp unit control,fault detection and alarm etc..MCU control module with STC12C5A60S2 as the core,to complete the signal acquisition task in each sensor,control LED lamp operating mode,LCD display data.Using the PWM wave digital control constant current source output power,achieve the illumination control LED lamp; fault detection and alarm module can work in real-time detection of each lamp unit state.The experiment proves that the system circuit is reliable in operation.

  14. Complement Receptors C5aR and C5L2 Are Associated with Metabolic Profile, Sex Hormones, and Liver Enzymes in Obese Women Pre- and Postbariatric Surgery

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    Reza Rezvani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Obesity is associated with metabolic dysfunction with sex differences and chronic, low-grade inflammation. We proposed that hepatic expression of immune complement C3 related receptors (C3aR, C5aR, and C5L2 would be associated with pre- or postmenopausal status and metabolic profile in severely obese women. We hypothesized that C5L2/C5aR ratio, potentially influencing the ASP/C5L2 metabolic versus C5a/C5aR immune response, would predict metabolic profiles after weight loss surgery. Materials and Methods. Fasting plasma (hormone, lipid, and enzyme analysis and liver biopsies (RT-PCR gene expression were obtained from 91 women during surgery. Results. Hepatic C5L2 mRNA expression was elevated in pre- versus postmenopausal women (P<0.01 and correlated positively with circulating estradiol, estrone, ApoB, ApoA1, ApoA1/B, waist circumference, age, and LDL-C (all P<0.05. While plasma ASP was lower in pre- versus postmenopausal women (P<0.01, the hepatic C5L2/C5aR mRNA ratio was increased (P<0.001 and correlated positively with estrone (P<0.01 and estradiol (P<0.001 and negatively with circulating ApoB and liver enzymes ALT, AST, and GGT (all P<0.05. Over 12 months postoperatively, liver enzymes in low C5L2/C5aR mRNA ratio group remained higher (ALP and ALT, P<0.05, AST and GGT, P<0.001 2-way-ANOVA. Conclusion. C5L2-C5aR association with other mediators including estrogens may contribute to hepatic metabolic and inflammatory function.

  15. The Keap1-Nrf2 pathway: Mechanisms of activation and dysregulation in cancer

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    Emilia Kansanen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Keap1-Nrf2 pathway is the major regulator of cytoprotective responses to oxidative and electrophilic stress. Although cell signaling pathways triggered by the transcription factor Nrf2 prevent cancer initiation and progression in normal and premalignant tissues, in fully malignant cells Nrf2 activity provides growth advantage by increasing cancer chemoresistance and enhancing tumor cell growth. In this graphical review, we provide an overview of the Keap1-Nrf2 pathway and its dysregulation in cancer cells. We also briefly summarize the consequences of constitutive Nrf2 activation in cancer cells and how this can be exploited in cancer gene therapy.

  16. Dysregulation of Macrophage Activation Profiles by Engineered Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodali, Vamsi; Littke, Matthew H.; Tilton, Susan C.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Shi, Liang; Frevert, Charles W.; Wang, Wei; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-08-27

    Although the potential human health impacts from exposure to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are uncertain, past epidemiological studies have established correlations between exposure to ambient air pollution particulates and the incidence of pneumonia and lung infections. Using amorphous silica and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) as model high production volume ENPs, we examined how macrophage activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the lung pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is altered by ENP pretreatment. Neither silica nor SPIO treatment elicited direct cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory effects in bone marrow-derived macrophages. However, pretreatment of macrophages with SPIO caused extensive reprogramming of nearly 500 genes regulated in response to LPS challenge, hallmarked by exaggerated activation of oxidative stress response pathways and suppressed activation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Silica pretreatment altered regulation of only 67 genes, but there was strong correlation with gene sets affected by SPIO. Macrophages exposed to SPIO displayed a phenotype suggesting an impaired ability to transition from an M1 to M2-like activation state, characterized by suppressed IL-10 induction, enhanced TNFα production, and diminished phagocytic activity toward S. pneumoniae. Studies in macrophages deficient in scavenger receptor A (SR-A) showed SR-A participates in cell uptake of both the ENPs and S. pneumonia and co-regulates the anti-inflammatory IL-10 pathway. Thus, mechanisms for dysregulation of innate immunity exist by virtue that common receptor recognition pathways are used by some ENPs and pathogenic bacteria, although the extent of transcriptional reprogramming of macrophage function depends on the physicochemical properties of the ENP after internalization. Our results also illustrate that biological effects of ENPs may be indirectly manifested only after challenging normal cell function. Finally, nanotoxicology screening

  17. Dysregulated sexuality and high sexual desire: distinct constructs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Jason; Christoff, Kalina; Gorzalka, Boris B

    2010-10-01

    The literature on dysregulated sexuality, whether theoretical, clinical or empirical, has failed to differentiate the construct from high sexual desire. In this study, we tested three hypotheses which addressed this issue. A sample of 6458 men and 7938 women, some of whom had sought treatment for sexual compulsivity, addiction or impulsivity, completed an online survey comprised of various sexuality measures. Men and women who reported having sought treatment scored significantly higher on measures of dysregulated sexuality and sexual desire. For men, women, and those who had sought treatment, dysregulated sexuality was associated with increased sexual desire. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a one-factor model, indicating that, in both male and female participants, dysregulated sexuality and sexual desire variables loaded onto a single underlying factor. The results of this study suggest that dysregulated sexuality, as currently conceptualized, labelled, and measured, may simply be a marker of high sexual desire and the distress associated with managing a high degree of sexual thoughts, feelings, and needs.

  18. Mosaic Epigenetic Dysregulation of Ectodermal Cells in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berko, Esther R.; Suzuki, Masako; Beren, Faygel; Lemetre, Christophe; Alaimo, Christine M.; Calder, R. Brent; Ballaban-Gil, Karen; Gounder, Batya; Kampf, Kaylee; Kirschen, Jill; Maqbool, Shahina B.; Momin, Zeineen; Reynolds, David M.; Russo, Natalie; Shulman, Lisa; Stasiek, Edyta; Tozour, Jessica; Valicenti-McDermott, Maria; Wang, Shenglong; Abrahams, Brett S.; Hargitai, Joseph; Inbar, Dov; Zhang, Zhengdong; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Molholm, Sophie; Foxe, John J.; Marion, Robert W.; Auton, Adam; Greally, John M.

    2014-01-01

    DNA mutational events are increasingly being identified in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but the potential additional role of dysregulation of the epigenome in the pathogenesis of the condition remains unclear. The epigenome is of interest as a possible mediator of environmental effects during development, encoding a cellular memory reflected by altered function of progeny cells. Advanced maternal age (AMA) is associated with an increased risk of having a child with ASD for reasons that are not understood. To explore whether AMA involves covert aneuploidy or epigenetic dysregulation leading to ASD in the offspring, we tested a homogeneous ectodermal cell type from 47 individuals with ASD compared with 48 typically developing (TD) controls born to mothers of ≥35 years, using a quantitative genome-wide DNA methylation assay. We show that DNA methylation patterns are dysregulated in ectodermal cells in these individuals, having accounted for confounding effects due to subject age, sex and ancestral haplotype. We did not find mosaic aneuploidy or copy number variability to occur at differentially-methylated regions in these subjects. Of note, the loci with distinctive DNA methylation were found at genes expressed in the brain and encoding protein products significantly enriched for interactions with those produced by known ASD-causing genes, representing a perturbation by epigenomic dysregulation of the same networks compromised by DNA mutational mechanisms. The results indicate the presence of a mosaic subpopulation of epigenetically-dysregulated, ectodermally-derived cells in subjects with ASD. The epigenetic dysregulation observed in these ASD subjects born to older mothers may be associated with aging parental gametes, environmental influences during embryogenesis or could be the consequence of mutations of the chromatin regulatory genes increasingly implicated in ASD. The results indicate that epigenetic dysregulatory mechanisms may complement and interact

  19. Mosaic epigenetic dysregulation of ectodermal cells in autism spectrum disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther R Berko

    Full Text Available DNA mutational events are increasingly being identified in autism spectrum disorder (ASD, but the potential additional role of dysregulation of the epigenome in the pathogenesis of the condition remains unclear. The epigenome is of interest as a possible mediator of environmental effects during development, encoding a cellular memory reflected by altered function of progeny cells. Advanced maternal age (AMA is associated with an increased risk of having a child with ASD for reasons that are not understood. To explore whether AMA involves covert aneuploidy or epigenetic dysregulation leading to ASD in the offspring, we tested a homogeneous ectodermal cell type from 47 individuals with ASD compared with 48 typically developing (TD controls born to mothers of ≥35 years, using a quantitative genome-wide DNA methylation assay. We show that DNA methylation patterns are dysregulated in ectodermal cells in these individuals, having accounted for confounding effects due to subject age, sex and ancestral haplotype. We did not find mosaic aneuploidy or copy number variability to occur at differentially-methylated regions in these subjects. Of note, the loci with distinctive DNA methylation were found at genes expressed in the brain and encoding protein products significantly enriched for interactions with those produced by known ASD-causing genes, representing a perturbation by epigenomic dysregulation of the same networks compromised by DNA mutational mechanisms. The results indicate the presence of a mosaic subpopulation of epigenetically-dysregulated, ectodermally-derived cells in subjects with ASD. The epigenetic dysregulation observed in these ASD subjects born to older mothers may be associated with aging parental gametes, environmental influences during embryogenesis or could be the consequence of mutations of the chromatin regulatory genes increasingly implicated in ASD. The results indicate that epigenetic dysregulatory mechanisms may complement

  20. 基于STC12C5A60S2单片机的室内环境检测系统设计%Design of Indoor Environment Detecting System Based on STC12C5A60S2 Microcontroller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰高羽; 边树海

    2012-01-01

    介绍了基于STC12C5A60S2单片机的室内环境检测系统设计方法。为了对室内不同环境(包括客厅、卧室、厨房和卫生间)的不同参数进行实时检测,整个系统以客厅为核心,将实时检测到的卧室、厨房、卫生间等处的环境参数值传送给客厅系统,实现了对室内不同环境、不同参数的实时检测和显示。当室内环境中的CO浓度、NH,浓度、H2S浓度、煤气浓度或甲醛浓度超标时,系统会自动报警,同时根据实时检测到的温、湿度和光照度值来决定电器(如空调、加湿器、灯具)的开关状态,以达到节能的效果。该系统简单,可靠性强,成本低,可扩展性好。%A design method of indoor environment detecting system based on STC12C5A60S2 microcontroller was introduced. In order to detect different parameters in the real time in different indoor environment, including the sitting room, bedroom, kitchen and toilet, the whole system centers on sitting room system, transmits the environment parameters detected from bedroom, kitchen and toilet respectively to the sitting room system, realizes the detection and display of different parameters in different indoor environment. When the concentration of CO, NH3 , H2S, coal gas and formaldehyde in the indoor environment is higher than respective criterion, the system will alarm automatically based on the temperature, humidity, intensity of illumination detecting, the system decides to open or close household appliances in order to get the result of energy saving. The system is simple, it has strong reliability, low cost and good expansibility, and it can be used in the intelligent community.

  1. Metabolic dysregulation and late-life depression : a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnissen, R. M.; Vogelzangs, N.; Mulder, M.E.; van den Brink, R. H. S.; Comijs, H. C.; Oude Voshaar, Richard

    Background. Depression is associated with the metabolic syndrome (MS). We examined whether metabolic dysregulation predicted the 2-year course of clinical depression. Method. A total of 285 older persons (>= 60 years) suffering from depressive disorder according to DSM-IV-TR criteria was followed up

  2. Immune System Dysregulation in First-Onset Postpartum Psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergink, Veerle; Burgerhout, Karin M.; Weigelt, Karin; Pop, Victor J.; de Wit, Harm; Drexhage, Roos C.; Kushner, Steven A.; Drexhage, Hemmo A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Accumulating evidence suggests that dysregulation of the immune system represents an important vulnerability factor for mood disorders. Postpartum psychosis (PP) is a severe mood disorder occurring within 4 weeks after delivery, a period of heightened immune responsiveness and an altered

  3. Screening for Dysregulation among Toddlers Born Very Low Birth Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Sarah J.; MacLean, Peggy; Duvall, Susanne Woolsey; Lowe, Jean R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Children born very low birth weight (VLBW) are at increased risk for regulatory difficulties. However, identifying toddlers at risk has been impeded by a lack of screening measures appropriate for this population. Methods: We studied the nature of dysregulation in toddlers born VLBW (N = 32) using the Infant-Toddler Social and…

  4. Emotion dysregulation and hypersexuality : Review and clinical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garofalo, C.; Velotti, P.; Zavattini, G.C.

    2016-01-01

    There is a long and varied history of research on hypersexuality, but no consensus on either etiology or therapeutic interventions. In an effort to advance understanding of hypersexuality, we review the largely separate literatures on hypersexuality and emotion dysregulation, which has recently been

  5. DEGAS: de novo discovery of dysregulated pathways in human diseases.

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    Igor Ulitsky

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular studies of the human disease transcriptome typically involve a search for genes whose expression is significantly dysregulated in sick individuals compared to healthy controls. Recent studies have found that only a small number of the genes in human disease-related pathways show consistent dysregulation in sick individuals. However, those studies found that some pathway genes are affected in most sick individuals, but genes can differ among individuals. While a pathway is usually defined as a set of genes known to share a specific function, pathway boundaries are frequently difficult to assign, and methods that rely on such definition cannot discover novel pathways. Protein interaction networks can potentially be used to overcome these problems. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present DEGAS (DysrEgulated Gene set Analysis via Subnetworks, a method for identifying connected gene subnetworks significantly enriched for genes that are dysregulated in specimens of a disease. We applied DEGAS to seven human diseases and obtained statistically significant results that appear to home in on compact pathways enriched with hallmarks of the diseases. In Parkinson's disease, we provide novel evidence for involvement of mRNA splicing, cell proliferation, and the 14-3-3 complex in the disease progression. DEGAS is available as part of the MATISSE software package (http://acgt.cs.tau.ac.il/matisse. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The subnetworks identified by DEGAS can provide a signature of the disease potentially useful for diagnosis, pinpoint possible pathways affected by the disease, and suggest targets for drug intervention.

  6. Metabolic dysregulation and late-life depression : a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnissen, R. M.; Vogelzangs, N.; Mulder, M.E.; van den Brink, R. H. S.; Comijs, H. C.; Voshaar, R. C. Oude

    2017-01-01

    Background. Depression is associated with the metabolic syndrome (MS). We examined whether metabolic dysregulation predicted the 2-year course of clinical depression. Method. A total of 285 older persons (>= 60 years) suffering from depressive disorder according to DSM-IV-TR criteria was followed up

  7. Emotion dysregulation, anticipatory cortisol, and substance use in urban adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliewer, Wendy; Riley, Tennisha; Zaharakis, Nikola; Borre, Alicia; Drazdowski, Tess K; Jäggi, Lena

    2016-09-01

    Anticipatory cortisol is associated with risk for substance use in adolescents. The present study extended prior literature by testing a model linking family emotional climate, emotion dysregulation, anticipatory cortisol, and substance use. Participants were 229 adolescents (M = 11.94 years, SD = 1.55; 41% male; 92% African American) enrolled in a 4-wave study of stressors, physiological stress responses, and substance use. Caregivers completed measures of family emotional climate at baseline and adolescents' emotion dysregulation one and two years later; adolescents reported on their substance use at baseline and three years later at Wave 4. Adolescents completed a stress task at Wave 4; saliva samples taken immediately prior to the task were analyzed for cortisol. Longitudinal path models revealed that a negative emotional climate at home was associated with elevated emotion dysregulation at subsequent waves for all youth. Emotional dysregulation was prospectively associated with blunted anticipatory cortisol, which in turn was associated with elevated substance use, controlling for baseline substance use and age. However, these associations only were observed for females. This study suggests that helping girls in particular manage their emotional responses to stress more effectively may impact their physiological responses and reduce risk for substance use.

  8. Metabolic dysregulation and late-life depression : a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnissen, R. M.; Vogelzangs, N.; Mulder, M.E.; van den Brink, R. H. S.; Comijs, H. C.; Oude Voshaar, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Background. Depression is associated with the metabolic syndrome (MS). We examined whether metabolic dysregulation predicted the 2-year course of clinical depression. Method. A total of 285 older persons (>= 60 years) suffering from depressive disorder according to DSM-IV-TR criteria was followed up

  9. The Role of Emotional Dysregulation in Perfectionism and Psychological Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, Mirela A.; Rice, Kenneth G.

    2006-01-01

    Data from a sample of university students (N = 349) were used to test a model in which emotional dysregulation (a composite of emotional reactivity and splitting) was expected to account for the effect of perfectionism on general psychological distress. Significant positive effects were observed between maladaptive perfectionism and distress,…

  10. Inflammatory and Metabolic Dysregulation and the 2-Year Course of Depressive Disorders in Antidepressant Users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelzangs, Nicole; Beekman, Aartjan T. F.; Dortland, Arianne K. B. van Reedt; Schoevers, Robert A.; Giltay, Erik J.; de Jonge, Peter; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Scarce evidence suggests that inflammatory and metabolic dysregulation predicts poor response to antidepressants, which could result in worse depression outcome. This study prospectively examined whether inflammatory and metabolic dysregulation predicted the 2-year course of depressive disorders amo

  11. Multiple aspects of gene dysregulation in Huntington’s Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara eMoumne

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s Disease (HD is a genetic neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG expansion in the gene encoding Huntingtin (Htt. It is characterized by chorea, cognitive and psychiatric disorders. The most affected brain region is the striatum, and the clinical symptoms are directly correlated to the rate of striatal degeneration. The wild-type Htt is a ubiquitous protein and its deletion is lethal. Mutated (expanded Htt produces excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunctions, axonal transport deficit, altered proteasome activity, and gene dysregulation. Transcriptional dysregulation occurs at early neuropathological stages in HD patients. Multiple genes are dysregulated, with overlaps of altered transcripts between mouse models of HD and patient brains. Nuclear localization of Exp-Htt interferes with transcription factors, co-activators and proteins of the transcriptional machinery. Another key mechanism described so far, is an alteration of cytoplasmic retention of the transcriptional repressor REST, which is normally associated with wild-type Htt. As such, Exp-Htt causes alteration of transcription of multiple genes involved in neuronal survival, plasticity, signaling and mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration. Besides these transcriptional dysregulations, Exp-Htt affects the chromatin structure through altered post-translational modifications (PTM of histones and methylation of DNA. Multiple alterations of histone PTM are described, including acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation, polyamination and phosphorylation. Exp-Htt also affects the expression and regulation of non-coding microRNAs. First multiple neural microRNAs are controlled by REST, and dysregulated in HD, with concomitant de-repression of downstream mRNA targets. Second, Exp-Htt protein or RNA may also play a major role in the processing of miRNAs and hence pathogenesis. These pleiotropic effects of Exp-Htt on gene expression may represent seminal deleterious effects on the

  12. Dysregulated pH in Tumor Microenvironment Checkmates Cancer Therapy

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    Jaleh Barar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The dysregulation of pH by cancerous cells of solid tumors is able to create a unique milieu that is in favor of progression, invasion and metastasis as well as chemo-/immuno-resistance traits of solid tumors. Bioelements involved in pH dysregulation provide new set of oncotargets, inhibition of which may result in better clinical outcome. Methods: To study the impacts of pH dysregulation, we investigated the tumor development and progression in relation with Warburg effect, glycolysis and formation of aberrant tumor microenvironment. Results: The upregulation of glucose transporter GLUT-1 and several enzymes involve in glycolysis exacerbates this phenomenon. The accumulation of lactic acids in cancer cells provokes upregulation of several transport machineries (MCT-1, NHE-1, CA IX and H+ pump V-ATPase resulting in reinforced efflux of proton into extracellular fluid. This deviant event makes pH to be settled at 7.4 and 6.6 respectively in cancer cells cytoplasm and extracellular fluid within the tumor microenvironment, which in return triggers secretion of lysosomal components (various enzymes in acidic milieu with pH 5 into cytoplasm. All these anomalous phenomena make tumor microenvironment (TME to be exposed to cocktail of various enzymes with acidic pH, upon which extracellular matrix (ECM can be remodeled and even deformed, resulting in emergence of a complex viscose TME with high interstitial fluid pressure. Conclusion: It seems that pH dysregulation is able to remodel various physiologic functions and make solid tumors to become much more invasive and metastatic. It also can cause undesired resistance to chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Hence, cancer therapy needs to be reinforced using specific inhibitors of bioelements involved in pH dysregulation of TME in solid tumors.

  13. Dysregulation of the Autonomic Nervous System Predicts the Development of the Metabolic Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Licht, Carmilla M. M.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    Context: Stress is suggested to lead to metabolic dysregulations as clustered in the metabolic syndrome. Although dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system is found to associate with the metabolic syndrome and its dysregulations, no longitudinal study has been performed to date to examine the

  14. Dysregulation of the Autonomic Nervous System Predicts the Development of the Metabolic Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Licht, Carmilla M. M.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Stress is suggested to lead to metabolic dysregulations as clustered in the metabolic syndrome. Although dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system is found to associate with the metabolic syndrome and its dysregulations, no longitudinal study has been performed to date to examine the pr

  15. Design of music player based on MCU STC12C5A60S2%一种基于51单片机的音乐播放器的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何谐; 唐大权; 张淑廷; 陈雪

    2014-01-01

    The hardware design method of the music player based on MCU STC12C5A60S2 is introduced in this paper. The program design of the music player based on principle of FAT32 file system is studied. In the music player, MCU STC12C5A60S2 is taken as a main controller,SD card as a memory medium of music files and VS1003 chip as a decoder unit. When the player is running,MCU STC12C5A60S2 reads the music file from the SD card and continuously transfers data flow to VS1003 for decoding. In the meantime,the OLED liquid crystal display shows the message of the music in real time. The tested results from experiments show the music player can play the music files in multiple formats fluently if the player is connected with ear phone.%主要介绍一种基于51单片机的音乐播放器的硬件设计方法,并研究在FAT32文件系统下音乐播放器的程序设计。该音乐播放器采用STC12C5A60S2单片机为主控制器,SD卡作为音乐文件的存储介质,VS1003芯片作为解码器。STC12C5A60S2单片机从 SD卡中读取音乐文件,并不断将数据流传送至VS1003解码,最后连接耳机播放,同时STC12C5A60S2连接OLED液晶显示屏实时显示音乐播放信息。实验表明,该音乐播放器连接耳机能流畅播放多种格式的音乐文件。

  16. Dysregulation of the NF-κB pathway as a potential inducer of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhaik, Eran; Zandi, Peter

    2015-11-01

    A century of investigations enhanced our understanding of bipolar disorder although it remains a complex multifactorial disorder with a mostly unknown pathophysiology and etiology. The role of the immune system in this disorder is one of the most controversial topics in genetic psychiatry. Though inflammation has been consistently reported in bipolar patients, it remains unclear how the immunologic process influences the disorder. One of the core components of the immune system is the NF-κB pathway, which plays an essential role in the development of innate and adaptive immunity. Remarkably, the NF-κB pathway received only little attention in bipolar studies, as opposed to studies of related psychiatric disorders where immune dysregulation has been proposed to explain the neurodegeneration in patient conditions. If immune dysregulation can also explains the neurodegeneration in bipolar disorder, it will underscore the role of the immune system in the chronicity and pathophysiology of the disorder and may promote personalized therapeutic strategies. This is the first review to summarize the current knowledge of the pathophysiological functions of NF-κB in bipolar disorder.

  17. Dysregulated autophagy increased melanocyte sensitivity to H2O2-induced oxidative stress in vitiligo

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuanmin; Li, Shuli; Zhang, Weigang; Dai, Wei; Cui, Tingting; Wang, Gang; Gao, Tianwen; Li, Chunying

    2017-01-01

    In vitiligo, melanocytes are particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress owing to the pro-oxidant state generated during melanin synthesis and to the genetic antioxidant defects. Autophagy is a controlled self-digestion process which can protect cells against oxidative damage. However, the exact role of autophagy in vitiligo melanocytes in response to oxidative stress and the mechanism involved are still not clear. To determine the implications of autophagy for melanocyte survival in response to oxidative stress, we first detected the autophagic flux in normal melanocytes exposure to H2O2, and found that autophagy was significantly enhanced in normal melanocytes, for protecting cells against H2O2-induced oxidative damage. Nevertheless, vitiligo melanocytes exhibited dysregulated autophagy and hypersensitivity to H2O2-induced oxidative injury. In addition, we confirmed that the impairment of Nrf2-p62 pathway is responsible for the defects of autophagy in vitiligo melanocytes. Noteworthily, upregulation of the Nrf2-p62 pathway or p62 reduced H2O2-induced oxidative damage of vitiligo melanocytes. Therefore, our data demonstrated that dysregulated autophagy owing to the impairment of Nrf2-p62 pathway increase the sensitivity of vitiligo melanocytes to oxidative stress, thus promote the development of vitiligo. Upregulation of p62-dependent autophagy may be applied to vitiligo treatment in the future. PMID:28186139

  18. Does epigenetic dysregulation of pancreatic islets contribute to impaired insulin secretion and type 2 diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayeh, Tasnim; Ling, Charlotte

    2015-10-01

    β cell dysfunction is central to the development and progression of type 2 diabetes (T2D). T2D develops when β cells are not able to compensate for the increasing demand for insulin caused by insulin resistance. Epigenetic modifications play an important role in establishing and maintaining β cell identity and function in physiological conditions. On the other hand, epigenetic dysregulation can cause a loss of β cell identity, which is characterized by reduced expression of genes that are important for β cell function, ectopic expression of genes that are not supposed to be expressed in β cells, and loss of genetic imprinting. Consequently, this may lead to β cell dysfunction and impaired insulin secretion. Risk factors that can cause epigenetic dysregulation include parental obesity, an adverse intrauterine environment, hyperglycemia, lipotoxicity, aging, physical inactivity, and mitochondrial dysfunction. These risk factors can affect the epigenome at different time points throughout the lifetime of an individual and even before an individual is conceived. The plasticity of the epigenome enables it to change in response to environmental factors such as diet and exercise, and also makes the epigenome a good target for epigenetic drugs that may be used to enhance insulin secretion and potentially treat diabetes.

  19. Emotional dysregulation, internalizing symptoms, and self-injurious and suicidal behavior: Structural equation modeling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranzler, Amy; Fehling, Kara B; Anestis, Michael D; Selby, Edward A

    2016-07-01

    This study used structural equation modeling to examine the relationships between emotion dysregulation, internalizing symptoms, nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), and suicide. One hundred forty-eight undergraduates completed a brief structured interview and self-report measures of emotion dysregulation, internalizing symptoms, and NSSI and suicidal behaviors. Results indicated a significant indirect effect of emotion dysregulation on NSSI via internalizing symptoms and on suicide attempts via NSSI. Findings provide a more nuanced understanding of the indirect association between emotion dysregulation and NSSI and suicidal behaviors. Implications for the potential utility of targeting internalizing symptoms as well as emotion dysregulation in interventions addressing NSSI and suicidal behaviors are discussed.

  20. Impulsivity and emotion dysregulation as predictors of food addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivarunas, Bernadette; Conner, Bradley T

    2015-12-01

    Food addiction is the clinical occurrence in which individuals develop physical and psychological dependencies on high fat, high sugar, and highly palatable foods. Past research has demonstrated a number of similarities between food addiction and drug use disorders including the activation of specific brain regions and neurotransmitters, disrupted neuronal circuitry, and behavioral indicators of addiction such as continued use despite negative consequences. The present study examined the role of impulsivity and emotion dysregulation in food addiction as both play salient roles in drug use disorders. Poisson regression analyses using data from 878 undergraduate students revealed negative urgency, the tendency to act impulsively when under distress, and emotion dysregulation positively predicted symptom count on the Yale Food Addiction Scale (Gearhardt, Corbin, & Brownell, 2009) whereas a lack of premeditation negatively predicted symptom count (all psaddiction, elucidate causal mechanisms, and support an explanatory model of food addiction.

  1. Pediatric Obesity-Related Asthma: The Role of Metabolic Dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakanthi, Nandini; Greally, John M; Rastogi, Deepa

    2016-05-01

    The burden of obesity-related asthma among children, particularly among ethnic minorities, necessitates an improved understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms. Although obesity is an independent risk factor for asthma, not all obese children develop asthma. Several recent studies have elucidated mechanisms, including the role of diet, sedentary lifestyle, mechanical fat load, and adiposity-mediated inflammation that may underlie the obese asthma pathophysiology. Here, we review these recent studies and emerging scientific evidence that suggest metabolic dysregulation may play a role in pediatric obesity-related asthma. We also review the genetic and epigenetic factors that may underlie susceptibility to metabolic dysregulation and associated pulmonary morbidity among children. Lastly, we identify knowledge gaps that need further exploration to better define pathways that will allow development of primary preventive strategies for obesity-related asthma in children.

  2. Eosinophilia associated with disorders of immune deficiency or immune dysregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kelli W.; Milner, Joshua D.; Freeman, Alexandra F.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Elevated serum eosinophil levels have been associated with multiple disorders of immune deficiency or immune dysregulation. Although primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are rare, it is important to consider these in the differential diagnosis of patients with eosinophilia. This review discusses the clinical features, laboratory findings, diagnosis, and genetic basis of disease of several disorders of immune deficiency or dysregulation – all which have documented eosinophilia as part of the syndrome. The article includes autosomal dominant hyper IgE syndrome, DOCK8 deficiency, PGM3 deficiency, ADA-SCID, Omenn syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome, Comel-Netherton syndrome, and severe dermatitis, multiple allergies, and metabolic wasting syndrome (SAM). PMID:26209898

  3. Pediatric Bipolar Disorder and Mood Dysregulation: Diagnostic Controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shain, Benjamin N

    2014-08-01

    Pediatric bipolar disorder, once thought rare, has gone through stages of conceptualization. DSM criteria were reinterpreted such that children and adolescents, particularly those with ADHD, were commonly diagnosed with bipolar disorder and thought to be atypical by adult standards. Research criteria separated pediatric bipolar patients into 3 phenotypes, including a research diagnosis of "severe mood dysregulation." DSM-5 largely maintained previous criteria for bipolar disorder at all ages and created a new diagnosis called "disruptive mood dysregulation disorder," categorized as a depressive disorder, for persistently angry or irritable patients with symptoms of childhood onset. However, the controversy regarding the diagnosis of pediatric bipolar disorder continues. Progress has been made in the classification of children and adolescents with mood symptoms who are predominantly irritable or angry, but lack of clarity remains regarding classification of children and adolescents with "symptoms characteristic of bipolar disorder" who do not meet criteria for bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, or cyclothymia.

  4. Dysregulated microRNA Activity in Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    ordering individual cells  throughout  the  course   of  a  biological  process  such  as  hematopoietic  differentiation.  His  specialized skill set is...pathways. 6240101 (Novina) 08/01/2013-07/31/2016* 0.08 CM* American Society of Hematology , Bridge Grant Dysregulated microRNA function in

  5. Complex PTSD, affect dysregulation, and borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Julian D; Courtois, Christine A

    2014-01-01

    Complex PTSD (cPTSD) was formulated to include, in addition to the core PTSD symptoms, dysregulation in three psychobiological areas: (1) emotion processing, (2) self-organization (including bodily integrity), and (3) relational security. The overlap of diagnostic criteria for cPTSD and borderline personality disorder (BPD) raises questions about the scientific integrity and clinical utility of the cPTSD construct/diagnosis, as well as opportunities to achieve an increasingly nuanced understanding of the role of psychological trauma in BPD. We review clinical and scientific findings regarding comorbidity, clinical phenomenology and neurobiology of BPD, PTSD, and cPTSD, and the role of traumatic victimization (in general and specific to primary caregivers), dissociation, and affect dysregulation. Findings suggest that BPD may involve heterogeneity related to psychological trauma that includes, but extends beyond, comorbidity with PTSD and potentially involves childhood victimization-related dissociation and affect dysregulation consistent with cPTSD. Although BPD and cPTSD overlap substantially, it is unwarranted to conceptualize cPTSD either as a replacement for BPD, or simply as a sub-type of BPD. We conclude with implications for clinical practice and scientific research based on a better differentiated view of cPTSD, BPD and PTSD.

  6. Microglial Dysregulation in OCD, Tourette Syndrome, and PANDAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that immune dysregulation contributes to the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Tourette syndrome, and Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS). The mechanistic details of this pathophysiology, however, remain unclear. Here we focus on one particular component of the immune system: microglia, the brain's resident immune cells. The role of microglia in neurodegenerative diseases has been understood in terms of classic, inflammatory activation, which may be both a consequence and a cause of neuronal damage. In OCD and Tourette syndrome, which are not characterized by frank neural degeneration, the potential role of microglial dysregulation is much less clear. Here we review the evidence for a neuroinflammatory etiology and microglial dysregulation in OCD, Tourette syndrome, and PANDAS. We also explore new hypotheses as to the potential contributions of microglial abnormalities to pathophysiology, beyond neuroinflammation, including failures in neuroprotection, lack of support for neuronal survival, and abnormalities in synaptic pruning. Recent advances in neuroimaging and animal model work are creating new opportunities to elucidate these issues. PMID:28053994

  7. Microglial Dysregulation in OCD, Tourette Syndrome, and PANDAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Frick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is accumulating evidence that immune dysregulation contributes to the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, Tourette syndrome, and Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS. The mechanistic details of this pathophysiology, however, remain unclear. Here we focus on one particular component of the immune system: microglia, the brain’s resident immune cells. The role of microglia in neurodegenerative diseases has been understood in terms of classic, inflammatory activation, which may be both a consequence and a cause of neuronal damage. In OCD and Tourette syndrome, which are not characterized by frank neural degeneration, the potential role of microglial dysregulation is much less clear. Here we review the evidence for a neuroinflammatory etiology and microglial dysregulation in OCD, Tourette syndrome, and PANDAS. We also explore new hypotheses as to the potential contributions of microglial abnormalities to pathophysiology, beyond neuroinflammation, including failures in neuroprotection, lack of support for neuronal survival, and abnormalities in synaptic pruning. Recent advances in neuroimaging and animal model work are creating new opportunities to elucidate these issues.

  8. Primary respiratory chain disease causes tissue-specific dysregulation of the global transcriptome and nutrient-sensing signaling network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Zhang

    Full Text Available Primary mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC diseases are heterogeneous in etiology and manifestations but collectively impair cellular energy metabolism. Mechanism(s by which RC dysfunction causes global cellular sequelae are poorly understood. To identify a common cellular response to RC disease, integrated gene, pathway, and systems biology analyses were performed in human primary RC disease skeletal muscle and fibroblast transcriptomes. Significant changes were evident in muscle across diverse RC complex and genetic etiologies that were consistent with prior reports in other primary RC disease models and involved dysregulation of genes involved in RNA processing, protein translation, transport, and degradation, and muscle structure. Global transcriptional and post-transcriptional dysregulation was also found to occur in a highly tissue-specific fashion. In particular, RC disease muscle had decreased transcription of cytosolic ribosomal proteins suggestive of reduced anabolic processes, increased transcription of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, shorter 5'-UTRs that likely improve translational efficiency, and stabilization of 3'-UTRs containing AU-rich elements. RC disease fibroblasts showed a strikingly similar pattern of global transcriptome dysregulation in a reverse direction. In parallel with these transcriptional effects, RC disease dysregulated the integrated nutrient-sensing signaling network involving FOXO, PPAR, sirtuins, AMPK, and mTORC1, which collectively sense nutrient availability and regulate cellular growth. Altered activities of central nodes in the nutrient-sensing signaling network were validated by phosphokinase immunoblot analysis in RC inhibited cells. Remarkably, treating RC mutant fibroblasts with nicotinic acid to enhance sirtuin and PPAR activity also normalized mTORC1 and AMPK signaling, restored NADH/NAD(+ redox balance, and improved cellular respiratory capacity. These data specifically highlight a common

  9. Primary Respiratory Chain Disease Causes Tissue-Specific Dysregulation of the Global Transcriptome and Nutrient-Sensing Signaling Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Tsukikawa, Mai; Peng, Min; Polyak, Erzsebet; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Ostrovsky, Julian; McCormack, Shana; Place, Emily; Clarke, Colleen; Reiner, Gail; McCormick, Elizabeth; Rappaport, Eric; Haas, Richard; Baur, Joseph A.; Falk, Marni J.

    2013-01-01

    Primary mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) diseases are heterogeneous in etiology and manifestations but collectively impair cellular energy metabolism. Mechanism(s) by which RC dysfunction causes global cellular sequelae are poorly understood. To identify a common cellular response to RC disease, integrated gene, pathway, and systems biology analyses were performed in human primary RC disease skeletal muscle and fibroblast transcriptomes. Significant changes were evident in muscle across diverse RC complex and genetic etiologies that were consistent with prior reports in other primary RC disease models and involved dysregulation of genes involved in RNA processing, protein translation, transport, and degradation, and muscle structure. Global transcriptional and post-transcriptional dysregulation was also found to occur in a highly tissue-specific fashion. In particular, RC disease muscle had decreased transcription of cytosolic ribosomal proteins suggestive of reduced anabolic processes, increased transcription of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, shorter 5′-UTRs that likely improve translational efficiency, and stabilization of 3′-UTRs containing AU-rich elements. RC disease fibroblasts showed a strikingly similar pattern of global transcriptome dysregulation in a reverse direction. In parallel with these transcriptional effects, RC disease dysregulated the integrated nutrient-sensing signaling network involving FOXO, PPAR, sirtuins, AMPK, and mTORC1, which collectively sense nutrient availability and regulate cellular growth. Altered activities of central nodes in the nutrient-sensing signaling network were validated by phosphokinase immunoblot analysis in RC inhibited cells. Remarkably, treating RC mutant fibroblasts with nicotinic acid to enhance sirtuin and PPAR activity also normalized mTORC1 and AMPK signaling, restored NADH/NAD+ redox balance, and improved cellular respiratory capacity. These data specifically highlight a common pathogenesis

  10. Artistic profession: a potential risk factor for dopamine dysregulation syndrome in Parkinson's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwingenschuh, Petra; Katschnig, Petra; Saurugg, Ronald; Ott, Erwin; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2010-03-15

    A small proportion of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) develop a dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS). Management of such patients can be difficult; hence, early identification and careful monitoring of at-risk individuals are important. Based on four illustrative cases, we wish to draw attention to the risk of developing DDS in PD patients engaged in a creative and artistic profession, who compulsively abuse dopaminergic drugs to maintain or enhance their artistic creativity. Balancing the drug requirement for treating motor symptoms on one hand and improving creativity on the other hand has to be carefully evaluated and early neuropsychiatric intervention may be necessary. Apart from the known risk factors-young age at PD onset, male gender, heavy alcohol consumption, illegal drug use, and history of affective disorder-engagement in a creative or artistic profession may be an additional risk factor for developing DDS.

  11. Dysregulated transforming growth factor-beta in neonatal and adult autoimmune MRL-lpr mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreft, B; Yokoyama, H; Naito, T; Kelley, V R

    1996-08-01

    Transforming growth factor- beta (TGF- beta) is a cytokine that promotes inflammatory processes and prevents tissue injury. Autoimmune destruction of the kidney in MRL-lpr mice is spontaneous, rapid, fatal and consists of glomerular damage and an influx of lymphocytes surrounding vessels and in the interstitium. In MRL-lpr mice, cytokine dysregulation is apparent in neonates and continues throughout the life span. Circulating levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF- alpha) and colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) are detected in neonatal mice and progressively increase in proportion to the loss of renal function. We now report elevated intracellular expression of distinct isoforms of TGF- beta (TGF- beta 3, TGF- beta 2, and TGF- beta 1) detected immunohistochemically in MRL-lpr kidneys and other tissues including the liver and thymus. Enhanced TGF- beta 3 and TGF- beta 2 isoforms are detectable in neonatal mice within the renal tubular epithelial cells (TEC) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). In MRL-lpr mice 4-6 months of age, TGF- beta 2 and TGF- beta 1 are detected in TEC, VSMC, glomerular epithelial cells (GEC) and in perivascular infiltrating cells. By comparison, TGF- beta is minimally detectable in the normal kidneys of age and sex matched MRL(-)+2 or C3H/Fej mice. Paradoxically, in vitro cultured TEC and VSMC from MRL-lpr mice secrete less TGF- beta than TEC and VSMC isolated from MRL(-)+2 or C3H/FeJ mice. TNF- alpha, but not IL-6, CSF-1, or IFN- gamma stimulated the secretion of TGF- beta in TEC and VSMC. Our data demonstrate the dysregulation of TGF- beta isoforms in neonatal and adult MRL-lpr mice prior to and after the onset of autoimmune renal disease. We suggest that TNF- alpha and/or other molecules increase TGF- beta expression in MRL-lpr mice. We speculate that enhanced expression of TGF- beta promotes autoinmune renal injury in MRL-lpr mice.

  12. Infant and toddler crying, sleeping and feeding problems and trajectories of dysregulated behavior across childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsper, Catherine; Wolke, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Infant and toddler regulatory problems (RPs) including crying, sleeping and feeding, are a frequent concern for parents and have been associated with negative behavioral outcomes in early and middle childhood. Uncertain is whether infant and toddler RPs predict stable, trait-like dysregulated behavior across childhood. We addressed this gap in the literature using data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). RPs at 6, 15-18, & 24-30 months and childhood dysregulated behavior at 4, 7, 8, & 9.5 years were assessed using mother report. Latent Class Growth Analysis (LCGA) indicated that trajectories of childhood dysregulated behavior were stable over time. All single RPs (i.e., crying, sleeping & feeding problems) were significantly associated with childhood dysregulated behavior. For example, crying problems at 6 months after controlling for confounders (Odds Ratios; 95% Confidence Intervals): Moderate dysregulated behavior: OR = 1.50, 95% CI [1.09 to 2.06], high dysregulated behavior: OR = 2.13, 95% CI [1.49 to 3.05] and very high dysregulated behavior: OR = 2.85, 95% CI [1.64 to 4.94]. Multiple RPs were especially strongly associated with dysregulated behavior. For example, the RP composite at 15-18 months: 1 RP, very high dysregulated behavior: OR = 2.79, 95% CI [2.17 to 3.57], 2 RPs, very high dysregulated behavior: OR = 3.46, 95% CI [2.38 to 5.01], 3 RPs, very high dysregulated behavior: OR = 12.57, 95% CI [6.38 to 24.74]. These findings suggest that RPs in infants and toddlers predict stable dysregulated behavior trajectories across childhood. Interventions for early RPs could help prevent the development of chronic, highly dysregulated behavior.

  13. Involvement and targeted intervention of dysregulated Hedgehog signaling in osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Winnie W; Wunder, Jay S; Dickson, Brendan C; Campbell, Veronica; McGovern, Karen; Alman, Benjamin A; Andrulis, Irene L

    2014-02-15

    During development, the Hedgehog pathway plays important roles regulating the proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes, providing a template for growing bone. In this study, the authors investigated the components of dysregulated Hedgehog signaling as potential therapeutic targets for osteosarcoma. Small-molecule agonists and antagonists that modulate the Hedgehog pathway at different levels were used to investigate the mechanisms of dysregulation and the efficacy of Hedgehog blockade in osteosarcoma cell lines. The inhibitory effect of a small-molecule Smoothened (SMO) antagonist, IPI-926 (saridegib), also was examined in patient-derived xenograft models. An inverse correlation was identified in osteosarcoma cell lines between endogenous glioma-associated oncogene 2 (GLI2) levels and Hedgehog pathway induction levels. Cells with high levels of GLI2 were sensitive to GLI inhibition, but not SMO inhibition, suggesting that GLI2 overexpression may be a mechanism of ligand-independent activation. In contrast, cells that expressed high levels of the Hedgehog ligand gene Indian hedgehog (IHH) and the target genes patched 1 (PTCH1) and GLI1 were sensitive to modulation of both SMO and GLI, suggesting ligand-dependent activation. In 2 xenograft models, active autocrine and paracrine, ligand-dependent Hedgehog signaling was identified. IPI-926 inhibited the Hedgehog signaling interactions between the tumor and the stroma and demonstrated antitumor efficacy in 1 of 2 ligand-dependent models. The current results indicate that both ligand-dependent and ligand-independent Hedgehog dysregulation may be involved in osteosarcoma. It is the first report to demonstrate Hedgehog signaling crosstalk between the tumor and the stroma in osteosarcoma. The inhibitory effect of IPI-926 warrants additional research and raises the possibility of using Hedgehog pathway inhibitors as targeted therapeutics to improve treatment for osteosarcoma. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  14. Equine hyperinsulinemia: investigation of the enteroinsular axis during insulin dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, M A; McGree, J M; Sillence, M N

    2016-01-01

    Compared with some other species, insulin dysregulation in equids is poorly understood. However, hyperinsulinemia causes laminitis, a significant and often lethal disease affecting the pedal bone/hoof wall attachment site. Until recently, hyperinsulinemia has been considered a counterregulatory response to insulin resistance (IR), but there is growing evidence to support a gastrointestinal etiology. Incretin hormones released from the proximal intestine, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, augment insulin secretion in several species but require investigation in horses. This study investigated peripheral and gut-derived factors impacting insulin secretion by comparing the response to intravenous (iv) and oral d-glucose. Oral and iv tests were performed in 22 ponies previously shown to be insulin dysregulated, of which only 15 were classified as IR (iv test). In a more detailed study, nine different ponies received four treatments: d-glucose orally, d-glucose iv, oats, and commercial grain mix. Insulin, glucose, and incretin concentrations were measured before and after each treatment. All nine ponies showed similar iv responses, but five were markedly hyperresponsive to oral d-glucose and four were not. Insulin responsiveness to oral d-glucose was strongly associated with blood glucose concentrations and oral glucose bioavailability, presumably driven by glucose absorption/distribution, as there was no difference in glucose clearance rates. Insulin was also positively associated with the active amide of GLP-1 following d-glucose and grain. This study has confirmed a functional enteroinsular axis in ponies that likely contributes to insulin dysregulation that may predispose them to laminitis. Moreover, iv tests for IR are not reliable predictors of the oral response to dietary nonstructural carbohydrate.

  15. A Positive Affective Neuroendocrinology (PANE Approach to Reward and Behavioral Dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith eWelker

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Emerging lines of research suggest that both testosterone and maladaptive reward processing can modulate behavioral dysregulation. Yet to date, no integrative account has been provided that systematically explains neuroendocrine function, dysregulation of reward, and behavioral dysregulation in a unified perspective. This is particularly important given specific neuroendocrine systems are potential mechanisms underlying and giving rise to reward-relevant behaviors. In this review, we propose a forward thinking approach to study the mechanisms of reward and behavioral dysregulation from a positive affective neuroendocrinology (PANE perspective. This approach holds that testosterone increases reward processing, which increases the likelihood of behavioral dysregulation. Additionally, the PANE framework holds that reward processing mediates the effects of testosterone on behavioral dysregulation. We also explore sources of potential sex differences and the roles of age, cortisol, and individual differences within the PANE framework. Finally, we discuss future prospects for research questions and methodology in the emerging field of affective neuroendocrinology.

  16. Dysregulation of microRNA biogenesis machinery in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Akiko; Kashima, Risa

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are integral to the gene regulatory network. A single miRNA is capable of controlling the expression of hundreds of protein coding genes and modulate a wide spectrum of biological functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, stress responses, DNA repair, cell adhesion, motility, inflammation, cell survival, senescence and apoptosis, all of which are fundamental to tumorigenesis. Overexpression, genetic amplification, and gain-of-function mutation of oncogenic miRNAs ("onco-miRs") as well as genetic deletion and loss-of-function mutation of tumor suppressor miRNAs ("suppressor-miRs") are linked to human cancer. In addition to the dysregulation of a specific onco-miR or suppressor-miRs, changes in global miRNA levels resulting from a defective miRNA biogenesis pathway play a role in tumorigenesis. The function of individual onco-miRs and suppressor-miRs and their target genes in cancer has been described in many different articles elsewhere. In this review, we primarily focus on the recent development regarding the dysregulation of the miRNA biogenesis pathway and its contribution to cancer.

  17. Centrosomal dysregulation in human metastatic melanoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charters, Geoffrey A; Stones, Clare J; Shelling, Andrew N; Baguley, Bruce C; Finlay, Graeme J

    2011-09-01

    Correct partitioning of the replicated genome during mitosis is orchestrated by centrosomes, and chromosomal instability is a commonly reported feature of human cancer. Melanomas are notorious for their genetic instability and rapid clonal evolution that may be manifested as aggressive growth and facile generation of therapy-resistant variants. We characterized the centrosomal status, ploidy, and gene status (TP53, CDKN2A/B, BRAF, and NRAS) of 15 human metastatic melanoma cell lines. Cells were labelled for pericentrin (a centrosomal marker), DNA and α-tubulin, and scored for centrosome morphology, supernumerary centrosomes, and mitotic symmetry. The incidence of supernumerary centrosomes correlated with that of gross centrosomal abnormalities (r = 0.90), mitotic asymmetry (r = 0.90), and, surprisingly, increased content of G/M cells (r = 0.79). Centrosomal numerical dysregulation, observed in all cell lines, was found not to be specifically related to the status of any of the characterized gene mutations that were found in 13/15 cell lines. We conclude that centrosomal dysregulation may arise from multiple mechanisms and may drive the generation of genetic and phenotypic diversity in melanoma.

  18. Transcriptional dysregulation in NIPBL and cohesin mutant human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinglan Liu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cohesin regulates sister chromatid cohesion during the mitotic cell cycle with Nipped-B-Like (NIPBL facilitating its loading and unloading. In addition to this canonical role, cohesin has also been demonstrated to play a critical role in regulation of gene expression in nondividing cells. Heterozygous mutations in the cohesin regulator NIPBL or cohesin structural components SMC1A and SMC3 result in the multisystem developmental disorder Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS. Genome-wide assessment of transcription in 16 mutant cell lines from severely affected CdLS probands has identified a unique profile of dysregulated gene expression that was validated in an additional 101 samples and correlates with phenotypic severity. This profile could serve as a diagnostic and classification tool. Cohesin binding analysis demonstrates a preference for intergenic regions suggesting a cis-regulatory function mimicking that of a boundary/insulator interacting protein. However, the binding sites are enriched within the promoter regions of the dysregulated genes and are significantly decreased in CdLS proband, indicating an alternative role of cohesin as a transcription factor.

  19. Cytosine methylation dysregulation in neonates following intrauterine growth restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine Einstein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Perturbations of the intrauterine environment can affect fetal development during critical periods of plasticity, and can increase susceptibility to a number of age-related diseases (e.g., type 2 diabetes mellitus; T2DM, manifesting as late as decades later. We hypothesized that this biological memory is mediated by permanent alterations of the epigenome in stem cell populations, and focused our studies specifically on DNA methylation in CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from cord blood from neonates with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR and control subjects. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Our epigenomic assays utilized a two-stage design involving genome-wide discovery followed by quantitative, single-locus validation. We found that changes in cytosine methylation occur in response to IUGR of moderate degree and involving a restricted number of loci. We also identify specific loci that are targeted for dysregulation of DNA methylation, in particular the hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4A gene, a well-known diabetes candidate gene not previously associated with growth restriction in utero, and other loci encoding HNF4A-interacting proteins. CONCLUSIONS: Our results give insights into the potential contribution of epigenomic dysregulation in mediating the long-term consequences of IUGR, and demonstrate the value of this approach to studies of the fetal origin of adult disease.

  20. Childhood poverty and health: cumulative risk exposure and stress dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Gary W; Kim, Pilyoung

    2007-11-01

    A massive literature documents the inverse association between poverty or low socioeconomic status and health, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying this robust relation. We examined longitudinal relations between duration of poverty exposure since birth, cumulative risk exposure, and physiological stress in two hundred seven 13-year-olds. Chronic stress was assessed by basal blood pressure and overnight cortisol levels; stress regulation was assessed by cardiovascular reactivity to a standard acute stressor and recovery after exposure to this stressor. Cumulative risk exposure was measured by multiple physical (e.g., substandard housing) and social (e.g., family turmoil) risk factors. The greater the number of years spent living in poverty, the more elevated was overnight cortisol and the more dysregulated was the cardiovascular response (i.e., muted reactivity). Cardiovascular recovery was not affected by duration of poverty exposure. Unlike the duration of poverty exposure, concurrent poverty (i.e., during adolescence) did not affect these physiological stress outcomes. The effects of childhood poverty on stress dysregulation are largely explained by cumulative risk exposure accompanying childhood poverty.

  1. Growth Dysregulation and ADHD: An Epidemiologic Study of Children in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraone, Stephen V.; Lecendreux, Michel; Konofal, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Objective: A small literature suggests that ADHD may be associated with dysregulated growth, but this prior work primarily used clinically referred samples, so it faces difficulties of interpretation. The objective of this study is to sample the general French population for ADHD and evaluate if ADHD is associated with dysregulated growth.…

  2. Unraveling toxicological mechanisms and predicting toxicity classes with gene dysregulation networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, T.E.; Someren, P. van; Stierum, R.H.; Ezendam, J.; Pennings, J.L.A.

    2013-01-01

    The use of genes for distinguishing classes of toxicity has become well established. In this paper we combine the reconstruction of a gene dysregulation network (GDN) with a classifier to assign unseen compounds to their appropriate class. Gene pairs in the GDN are dysregulated in the sense that the

  3. Unraveling toxicological mechanisms and predicting toxicity classes with gene dysregulation networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, T.E.; Someren, P. van; Stierum, R.H.; Ezendam, J.; Pennings, J.L.A.

    2013-01-01

    The use of genes for distinguishing classes of toxicity has become well established. In this paper we combine the reconstruction of a gene dysregulation network (GDN) with a classifier to assign unseen compounds to their appropriate class. Gene pairs in the GDN are dysregulated in the sense that

  4. Designof temperature acquisition system based on STC12CSA16S2%基于STC12C5A16S2的温度采集系统的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鑫; 崔忠林; 刘建

    2012-01-01

    Based on the semiconductor physical and electrical properties of semiconductor devices, a low temperature self-start heater thermostat is designed for making sure the low temperature self-start and using as few components as possible to form a complete closed-loop control system. In this paper, using the temperature characteristic of PT100 metal platinum resistance with three wire connection and STC12C5A165S2 to acquire temperature signal, and 485 line of industry is used as communication of the temperature transfer in order to improving the reliability of information transmission. Through the thermal simulation experiment, the feasibility of the low-temperature self-start temperature acquisition system is verified.%以半导体器件的物理特性和电学特性为依据,设计了一种低温自启动恒温加热器,保证系统内部温度处于芯片正常工作范围内,并以尽可能少的元件构成完整的闭环控制系统。剃用PT100型金属铂电阻温度特性,使用三线制接法,采用STC12C5A16S2型单片机芯片对温度信号进行采集。使用工业上常用的RS485总线作为温度传输的通讯方式,以提高信息传输的可靠性。通过在高低温环境下实验,验证了该温度采集系统的可行性。

  5. 基于STC12C5A60S2单片机的视频遥控小车设计%The Design of Wireless Video Remote Control Car Based on STC12 Series MCU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋扬; 朱江

    2014-01-01

    该文对视频遥控小车进行了深入的研究,设计出了一套基于STC12C5A60S2单片机的视频遥控小车系统。为了能够远程控制小车的运行状态,采用无线视频发射与接收模块将小车在现场采集到的视频信号显示在PC机上,以便控制室的人能够观察到小车现场的实时情况,利用无线数据传输模块完成主控体对小车的控制及小车运行状态的反馈,最终实现了小车的远程实时控制。%In this paper, wireless video remote control car is studied deeply, and designs a system of wireless video remote control car based on STC12C5A60S2 MCU. In order to control operation state of car wirelessly, by using the wireless video transmission and reception module, the video signal is displayed on PC in time to make person who is in control room observe the scene of the car, the use of wireless date transmission module completes the control of controller for car and a feedback of car for control-ler.

  6. HPA axis dysregulation in men with hypersexual disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzittofis, Andreas; Arver, Stefan; Öberg, Katarina; Hallberg, Jonas; Nordström, Peter; Jokinen, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    Hypersexual disorder integrating pathophysiological aspects such as sexual desire deregulation, sexual addiction, impulsivity and compulsivity was suggested as a diagnosis for the DSM-5. However, little is known about the neurobiology behind this disorder. A dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis has been shown in psychiatric disorders but has not been investigated in hypersexual disorder. The aim of this study was to investigate the function of the HPA axis in hypersexual disorder. The study includes 67 male patients with hypersexual disorder and 39 healthy male volunteers. Basal morning plasma levels of cortisol and ACTH were assessed and low dose (0.5mg) dexamethasone suppression test was performed with cortisol and ACTH measured post dexamethasone administration. Non-suppression status was defined with DST-cortisol levels ≥ 138 nmol/l. The Sexual Compulsive scale (SCS), Hypersexual disorder current assessment scale (HD:CAS), Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Scale-self rating (MADRS-S) and Childhood trauma questionnaire (CTQ), were used for assessing hypersexual behavior, depression severity and early life adversity. Patients with hypersexual disorder were significantly more often DST non-suppressors and had significantly higher DST-ACTH levels compared to healthy volunteers. The patients reported significantly more childhood trauma and depression symptoms compared to healthy volunteers. CTQ scores showed a significant negative correlation with DST-ACTH whereas SCS and HD:CAS scores showed a negative correlation with baseline cortisol in patients. The diagnosis of hypersexual disorder was significantly associated DST non-suppression and higher plasma DST-ACTH even when adjusted for childhood trauma. The results suggest HPA axis dysregulation in male patients with hypersexual disorder.

  7. Melatonin and the pathologies of weakened or dysregulated circadian oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeland, Rüdiger

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic aspects of melatonin's actions merit increasing future attention. This concerns particularly entirely different effects in senescent, weakened oscillators and in dysregulated oscillators of cancer cells that may be epigenetically blocked. This is especially obvious in the case of sirtuin 1, which is upregulated by melatonin in aged tissues, but strongly downregulated in several cancer cells. These findings are not at all controversial, but are explained on the basis of divergent changes in weakened and dysregulated oscillators. Similar findings can be expected to occur in other accessory oscillator components that are modulated by melatonin, among them several transcription factors and metabolic sensors. Another cause of opposite effects concerns differences between nocturnally active laboratory rodents and the diurnally active human. This should be more thoroughly considered in the field of metabolic syndrome and related pathologies, especially with regard to type 2 diabetes and other aspects of insulin resistance. Melatonin was reported to impair glucose tolerance in humans, especially in carriers of the risk allele of the MT2 receptor gene, MTNR1B, that contains the SNP rs10830963. These findings contrast with numerous reports on improvements of glucose tolerance in preclinical studies. However, the relationship between melatonin and insulin may be more complex, as indicated by loss-of-function mutants of the MT2 receptor that are also prodiabetic, by the age-dependent time course of risk allele overexpression, by progressive reduction in circadian amplitudes and melatonin secretion, which are aggravated in diabetes. By supporting high-amplitude rhythms, melatonin may be beneficial in preventing or delaying diabetes.

  8. Top-Down Dysregulation-From ADHD to Emotional Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Predrag; Castellanos, F Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Deficient cognitive top-down executive control has long been hypothesized to underlie inattention and impulsivity in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, top-down cognitive dysfunction explains a modest proportion of the ADHD phenotype whereas the salience of emotional dysregulation is being noted increasingly. Together, these two types of dysfunction have the potential to account for more of the phenotypic variance in patients diagnosed with ADHD. We develop this idea and suggest that top-down dysregulation constitutes a gradient extending from mostly non-emotional top-down control processes (i.e., "cool" executive functions) to mainly emotional regulatory processes (including "hot" executive functions). While ADHD has been classically linked primarily to the former, conditions involving emotional instability such as borderline and antisocial personality disorder are closer to the other. In this model, emotional subtypes of ADHD are located at intermediate levels of this gradient. Neuroanatomically, gradations in "cool" processing appear to be related to prefrontal dysfunction involving dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) and caudal anterior cingulate cortex (cACC), while "hot" processing entails orbitofrontal cortex and rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC). A similar distinction between systems related to non-emotional and emotional processing appears to hold for the basal ganglia (BG) and the neuromodulatory effects of the dopamine system. Overall we suggest that these two systems could be divided according to whether they process non-emotional information related to the exteroceptive environment (associated with "cool" regulatory circuits) or emotional information related to the interoceptive environment (associated with "hot" regulatory circuits). We propose that this framework can integrate ADHD, emotional traits in ADHD, borderline and antisocial personality disorder into a related cluster of mental conditions.

  9. The impact of attachment security and emotion dysregulation on anxiety in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bender, Patrick K.; Sømhovd, Mikael; Pons, Francisco;

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical views and empirical findings suggest interrelations among attachment security, emotion dysregulation and anxiety in childhood and adolescence. However, the associations among the three constructs have rarely been investigated in children, and no study has yet addressed these associati......Theoretical views and empirical findings suggest interrelations among attachment security, emotion dysregulation and anxiety in childhood and adolescence. However, the associations among the three constructs have rarely been investigated in children, and no study has yet addressed...... to anxiety and that emotion dysregulation would help explain the association between attachment security and anxiety. Results showed that more securely attached youths reported less emotion dysregulation and that youths who had fewer emotion regulation difficulties experienced less anxiety. The association...... between attachment security and anxiety was mediated by emotion dysregulation. The model was confirmed for both children and adolescents. Findings are discussed with respect to theoretical implications, as well as future directions....

  10. Role of endocrine-immune dysregulation in osteoporosis, sarcopenia, frailty and fracture risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Cherian; Kenny, Anne M; Taxel, Pamela; Lorenzo, Joseph A; Duque, Gustavo; Kuchel, George A

    2005-06-01

    Osteoporosis, a key predictor of hip fractures can be treated using a variety of safe and effective interventions. Nevertheless, optimally effective strategies for the prevention of hip fractures must also incorporate efforts to address a broad range of other potentially reversible factors. Hyperthyroidism, anticonvulsants, caffeine and smoking may decrease bone mass and increase fracture risk at any age. In older individuals it is important to also consider additional risk factors, including long-acting benzodiazepines, poor vision and sarcopenia. The presence of sarcopenia, an age-related decline in muscle bulk and quality enhances the risk of frailty and possibly also hip fracture, particularly if associated with diminished functional mobility, lower quadriceps strength and poor balance or body sway. In this review we examine evidence which indicates the presence of endocrine-immune dysregulation in both osteoporosis and sarcopenia. Post-menopausal declines in serum estrogen and androgen levels contribute to increases in local bone levels of cytoclastic cytokines, followed by increased osteoclastogenesis and bone loss. Similarly, the presence of decreased gonadal hormones and IGF-1, combined with unusually high peripheral levels of cytokines, inflammatory mediators and coagulation markers all enhance the risk of sarcopenia and frailty. We propose that a translational research approach which emphasizes common pathophysiologic mechanisms in osteoporosis and sarcopenia could accelerate the speed of discovery of effective strategies for both frailty and hip fracture prevention.

  11. Dysregulation of CDK8 and Cyclin C in tumorigenesis %Dysregulation of CDK8 and Cyclin C in tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Xu; Jun-Yuan Ji

    2011-01-01

    Appropriately controlled gene expression is fundamental for normal growth and survival of all living organisms.In eukaryotes,the transcription of protein-coding mRNAs is dependent on RNA polymerase Ⅱ (Pol Ⅱ).The multi-subunit transcription cofactor Mediator complex is proposed to regulate most,if not all,of the Pol Ⅱ-dependent transcription.Here we focus our discussion on two subunits of the Mediator complex,cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) and its regulatory partner Cyclin C (CycC),because they are either mutated or amplified in a variety of human cancers.CDK8 functions as an oncoprotein in melanoma and colorectal cancers,thus there are considerable interests in developing drugs specifically targeting the CDK8 kinase activity.However,to evaluate the feasibility of targeting CDK8 for cancer therapy and to understand how their dysregulation contributes to tumorigenesis,it is essential to elucidate the in vivo function and regulation of CDK8-CycC,which are still poorly understood in multi-cellular organisms.We summarize the evidence linking their dysregulation to various cancers and present our bioinformatics and computational analyses on the structure and evolution of CDK8.We also discuss the implications of these observations in tumorigenesis.Because most of the Mediator subunits,including CDK8 and CycC,are highly conserved during eukaryotic evolution,we expect that investigations using model organisms such as Drosophila will provide important insights into the function and regulation of CDK8 and CycC in different cellular and developmental contexts.

  12. Dysregulated fear predicts social wariness and social anxiety symptoms during kindergarten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Kristin A; Davis, Elizabeth L; Kiel, Elizabeth J; Brooker, Rebecca J; Beekman, Charles; Early, Martha C

    2013-01-01

    Fearful temperament is associated with risk for the development of social anxiety disorder in childhood; however, not all fearful children become anxious. Identifying maladaptive trajectories is thus important for clarifying which fearful children are at risk. In an unselected sample of 111 two-year-olds (55% male, 95% Caucasian), Buss ( 2011 ) identified a pattern of fearful behavior, dysregulated fear, characterized by high fear in low threat situations. This pattern of behavior predicted parent- and teacher-reported withdrawn/anxious behaviors in preschool and at kindergarten entry. The current study extended original findings and examined whether dysregulated fear predicted observed social wariness with adults and peers, and social anxiety symptoms at age 6. We also examined prosocial adjustment during kindergarten as a moderator of the link between dysregulated fear and social wariness. Consistent with predictions, children with greater dysregulated fear at age 2 were more socially wary of adults and unfamiliar peers in the laboratory, were reported as having more social anxiety symptoms, and were nearly 4 times more likely to manifest social anxiety symptoms than other children with elevated wariness in kindergarten. Results demonstrated stability in the dysregulated fear profile and increased risk for social anxiety symptom development. Dysregulated fear predicted more social wariness with unfamiliar peers only when children became less prosocial during kindergarten. Findings are discussed in relation to the utility of the dysregulated fear construct for specifying maladaptive trajectories of risk for anxiety disorder development.

  13. Maternal emotion dysregulation is related to heightened mother-infant synchrony of facial affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotzin, Annett; Schiborr, Julia; Barkmann, Claus; Romer, Georg; Ramsauer, Brigitte

    2016-05-01

    A heightened synchrony between the mother's and infant's facial affect predicts adverse infant development. We know that maternal psychopathology is related to mother-infant facial affect synchrony, but it is unclear how maternal psychopathology is transmitted to mother-infant synchrony. One pathway might be maternal emotion dysregulation. We examined (a) whether maternal emotion dysregulation is positively related to facial affect synchrony and (b) whether maternal emotion dysregulation mediates the effect of maternal psychopathology on mother-infant facial affect synchrony. We observed 68 mothers with mood disorders and their 4- to 9-month-old infants in the Still-Face paradigm during two play interactions. The mother's and infant's facial affect were rated from high negative to high positive, and the degree of synchrony between the mother's and infant's facial affect was computed with a time-series analysis. Emotion dysregulation was measured with the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale, and psychopathology was assessed with the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised. Higher maternal emotion dysregulation was significantly associated with higher facial affect synchrony; emotion dysregulation fully mediated the effect of maternal psychopathology on facial affect synchrony. Our findings demonstrate that maternal emotion dysregulation rather than maternal psychopathology per se places mothers and infants at risk for heightened facial affect synchrony.

  14. Gaze Synchrony between Mothers with Mood Disorders and Their Infants: Maternal Emotion Dysregulation Matters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annett Lotzin

    Full Text Available A lowered and heightened synchrony between the mother's and infant's nonverbal behavior predicts adverse infant development. We know that maternal depressive symptoms predict lowered and heightened mother-infant gaze synchrony, but it is unclear whether maternal emotion dysregulation is related to mother-infant gaze synchrony. This cross-sectional study examined whether maternal emotion dysregulation in mothers with mood disorders is significantly related to mother-infant gaze synchrony. We also tested whether maternal emotion dysregulation is relatively more important than maternal depressive symptoms in predicting mother-infant gaze synchrony, and whether maternal emotion dysregulation mediates the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and mother-infant gaze synchrony. We observed 68 mothers and their 4- to 9-month-old infants in the Still-Face paradigm during two play interactions, before and after social stress was induced. The mothers' and infants' gaze behaviors were coded using microanalysis with the Maternal Regulatory Scoring System and Infant Regulatory Scoring System, respectively. The degree of mother-infant gaze synchrony was computed using time-series analysis. Maternal emotion dysregulation was measured by the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale; depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory. Greater maternal emotion dysregulation was significantly related to heightened mother-infant gaze synchrony. The overall effect of maternal emotion dysregulation on mother-infant gaze synchrony was relatively more important than the effect of maternal depressive symptoms in the five tested models. Maternal emotion dysregulation fully mediated the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and mother-infant gaze synchrony. Our findings suggest that the effect of the mother's depressive symptoms on the mother-infant gaze synchrony may be mediated by the mother's emotion dysregulation.

  15. Gaze Synchrony between Mothers with Mood Disorders and Their Infants: Maternal Emotion Dysregulation Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotzin, Annett; Romer, Georg; Schiborr, Julia; Noga, Berit; Schulte-Markwort, Michael; Ramsauer, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    A lowered and heightened synchrony between the mother's and infant's nonverbal behavior predicts adverse infant development. We know that maternal depressive symptoms predict lowered and heightened mother-infant gaze synchrony, but it is unclear whether maternal emotion dysregulation is related to mother-infant gaze synchrony. This cross-sectional study examined whether maternal emotion dysregulation in mothers with mood disorders is significantly related to mother-infant gaze synchrony. We also tested whether maternal emotion dysregulation is relatively more important than maternal depressive symptoms in predicting mother-infant gaze synchrony, and whether maternal emotion dysregulation mediates the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and mother-infant gaze synchrony. We observed 68 mothers and their 4- to 9-month-old infants in the Still-Face paradigm during two play interactions, before and after social stress was induced. The mothers' and infants' gaze behaviors were coded using microanalysis with the Maternal Regulatory Scoring System and Infant Regulatory Scoring System, respectively. The degree of mother-infant gaze synchrony was computed using time-series analysis. Maternal emotion dysregulation was measured by the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale; depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory. Greater maternal emotion dysregulation was significantly related to heightened mother-infant gaze synchrony. The overall effect of maternal emotion dysregulation on mother-infant gaze synchrony was relatively more important than the effect of maternal depressive symptoms in the five tested models. Maternal emotion dysregulation fully mediated the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and mother-infant gaze synchrony. Our findings suggest that the effect of the mother's depressive symptoms on the mother-infant gaze synchrony may be mediated by the mother's emotion dysregulation.

  16. Emotion dysregulation and impulsivity additively predict borderline personality disorder features in Italian nonclinical adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossati, Andrea; Gratz, Kim L; Maffei, Cesare; Borroni, Serena

    2013-11-01

    The present study aimed to test if measures of emotion dysregulation and impulsivity additively predicted dimensional scores of borderline personality disorder assessed using the Borderline Personality Disorder Scale of the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4+ in two independent samples of Italian nonclinical adolescents. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that three dimensions of emotion dysregulation (difficulties controlling impulsive behaviours when distressed, limited access to effective emotional regulation strategies and lack of emotional clarity) were significantly associated with BPD features in both samples. Further, impulsivity scores accounted for a significant amount of additional variance in BPD features above and beyond emotion dysregulation.

  17. Dysregulation of Histone Acetyltransferases and Deacetylases in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD remains a leading cause of mortality worldwide despite advances in its prevention and management. A comprehensive understanding of factors which contribute to CVD is required in order to develop more effective treatment options. Dysregulation of epigenetic posttranscriptional modifications of histones in chromatin is thought to be associated with the pathology of many disease models, including CVD. Histone acetyltransferases (HATs and deacetylases (HDACs are regulators of histone lysine acetylation. Recent studies have implicated a fundamental role of reversible protein acetylation in the regulation of CVDs such as hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, diabetic cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease, arrhythmia, and heart failure. This reversible acetylation is governed by enzymes that HATs add or HDACs remove acetyl groups respectively. New evidence has revealed that histone acetylation regulators blunt cardiovascular and related disease states in certain cellular processes including myocyte hypertrophy, apoptosis, fibrosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. The accumulating evidence of the detrimental role of histone acetylation in cardiac disease combined with the cardioprotective role of histone acetylation regulators suggests that the use of histone acetylation regulators may serve as a novel approach to treating the millions of patients afflicted by cardiac diseases worldwide.

  18. Angiogenin levels and ANG genotypes: dysregulation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Lewis McLaughlin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine whether 5 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associate with ALS in 3 different populations. We also assessed the contribution of genotype to angiogenin levels in plasma and CSF. METHODS: Allelic association statistics were calculated for polymorphisms in the ANG gene in 859 patients and 1047 controls from Sweden, Ireland and Poland. Plasma, serum and CSF angiogenin levels were quantified and stratified according to genotypes across the ANG gene. The contribution of SNP genotypes to variance in circulating angiogenin levels was estimated in patients and controls. RESULTS: All SNPs showed association with ALS in the Irish group. The SNP rs17114699 replicated in the Swedish cohort. No SNP associated in the Polish cohort. Age- and sex-corrected circulating angiogenin levels were significantly lower in patients than in controls (p<0.001. An allele dose-dependent regulation of angiogenin levels was observed in controls. This regulation was attenuated in the ALS cohort. A significant positive correlation between CSF plasma angiogenin levels was present in controls and abolished in ALS. CONCLUSIONS: ANG variants associate with ALS in the Irish and Swedish populations, but not in the Polish. There is evidence of dysregulation of angiogenin expression in plasma and CSF in sporadic ALS. Angiogenin expression is likely to be important in the pathogenesis of ALS.

  19. Dysregulation of Nutrient Sensing and CLEARance in Presenilin Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavya Reddy

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Attenuated auto-lysosomal system has been associated with Alzheimer disease (AD, yet all underlying molecular mechanisms leading to this impairment are unknown. We show that the amino acid sensing of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 is dysregulated in cells deficient in presenilin, a protein associated with AD. In these cells, mTORC1 is constitutively tethered to lysosomal membranes, unresponsive to starvation, and inhibitory to TFEB-mediated clearance due to a reduction in Sestrin2 expression. Normalization of Sestrin2 levels through overexpression or elevation of nuclear calcium rescued mTORC1 tethering and initiated clearance. While CLEAR network attenuation in vivo results in buildup of amyloid, phospho-Tau, and neurodegeneration, presenilin-knockout fibroblasts and iPSC-derived AD human neurons fail to effectively initiate autophagy. These results propose an altered mechanism for nutrient sensing in presenilin deficiency and underline an importance of clearance pathways in the onset of AD.

  20. Dopamine dysregulation syndrome in Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A V Nikitina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS is an iatrogenic disease developing during dopaminergic therapy. According to the data available in the literature, DDS develops in 3-4% of the Parkinson’s disease (PD cases. DDS in PD is frequently accompanied by other impulse control disorders (ICD: punding, compulsive shopping, hypersexuality, overeating. 246 patients with PD, of whom 16 (6.4% were found to have DDS, were examined. The patients’ age was 64±7.4 years. Women (n = 10 more often developed DDS than men (n = 6. The patients mainly suffered from the mixed form of the disease. Stages III and IV were diagnosed in 72 and 22%, respectively. The duration of PD was 12+2.6 years. In the PD patients with DDS, the quality-of-life indicators ranged from 19.8 to 90% (54+20.1%. The equivalent dose of levodopa is 1323.4+299 mg/day. DDS was concurrent with other types of ICD in 4 patients: panding in 2, compulsive shopping and punding in 1, and punding and hypersexuality. The doses of levodopa were corrected in patients receiving high doses of dopaminergic drugs. In the patients with DDS concurrent with punding or hypersexuality, the dose of dopaminergic receptor agonists was gradually reduced and subsequently discontinued.

  1. Dopaminergic Dysregulation, Artistic Expressiveness, and Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. López-Pousa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most frequent behavioral manifestations in Parkinson’s disease (PD are attributed to the dopaminergic dysregulation syndrome (DDS, which is considered to be secondary to the iatrogenic effects of the drugs that replace dopamine. Over the past few years some cases of patients improving their creative abilities after starting treatment with dopaminergic pharmaceuticals have been reported. These effects have not been clearly associated to DDS, but a relationship has been pointed out. Methods: Case study of a patient with PD. The evolution of her paintings along medication changes and disease advance has been analyzed. Results: The patient showed a compulsive increase of pictorial production after the diagnosis of PD was made. She made her best paintings when treated with cabergolide, and while painting, she reported a feeling of well-being, with loss of awareness of the disease and reduction of physical limitations. Conclusions: Dopaminergic antagonists (DA trigger a dopaminergic dysfunction that alters artistic creativity in patients having a predisposition for it. The development of these skills might be due to the dopaminergic overstimulation due to the therapy with DA, which causes a neurophysiological alteration that globally determines DDS.

  2. [Pain and emotional dysregulation: Cellular memory due to pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Minoru; Watanabe, Moe; Hamada, Yusuke; Tamura, Hideki; Ikegami, Daigo; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Igarashi, Katsuhide

    2015-08-01

    Genetic factors are involved in determinants for the risk of psychiatric disorders, and neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Chronic pain stimuli and intense pain have effects at a cellular and/or gene expression level, and will eventually induce "cellular memory due to pain", which means that tissue damage, even if only transient, can elicit epigenetically abnormal transcription/translation and post-translational modification in related cells depending on the degree or kind of injury or associated conditions. Such cell memory/transformation due to pain can cause an abnormality in a fundamental intracellular response, such as a change in the three-dimensional structure of DNA, transcription, or translation. On the other hand, pain is a multidimensional experience with sensory-discriminative and motivational-affective components. Recent human brain imaging studies have examined differences in activity in the nucleus accumbens between controls and patients with chronic pain, and have revealed that the nucleus accumbens plays a role in predicting the value of a noxious stimulus and its offset, and in the consequent changes in the motivational state. In this review, we provide a very brief overview of a comprehensive understanding of chronic pain associated with emotional dysregulation due to transcriptional regulation, epigenetic modification and miRNA regulation.

  3. Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder and its effect on bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faheem, Shama; Petti, Victoria; Mellos, George

    2017-05-01

    In the last few decades, a noticeable increase in the diagnosis of bipolar disorder (BD) in youth has raised concerns, particularly because of a consequent increase in the use of psychotropic medications with adverse side effects. After observing the development of those youth into adulthood, clinicians and researchers have questioned the notion of expanding the diagnostic boundaries of BD to encapsulate these youth. Our research is aimed at gleaning further information on disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD) and to observe whether its introduction has affected the rates of BD in children and adolescents. In a retrospective study, we calculated the frequencies of patients with BD admitted to a pediatric psychiatric hospital both before and after the introduction of DSM-5. We also observed age, sex, comorbid disorders, and management of DMDD. We found a decrease in the diagnosis of BD with the introduction of DMDD in DSM-5, without much change in treatment interventions utilized. Research on DMDD is limited so far. Further studies are needed to put together evidence-based guidelines and practice parameters for its management.

  4. Dysregulation of energy balance by trichothecene mycotoxins: Mechanisms and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, Bruno; Tardivel, Catherine; Félix, Bernadette; Abysique, Anne; Troadec, Jean-Denis; Gaigé, Stéphanie; Dallaporta, Michel

    2015-07-01

    Trichothecenes are toxic metabolites produced by fungi that constitute a worldwide hazard for agricultural production and both animal and human health. More than 40 countries have introduced regulations or guidelines for food and feed contamination levels of the most prevalent trichothecene, deoxynivalenol (DON), on the basis of its ability to cause growth suppression. With the development of analytical tools, evaluation of food contamination and exposure revealed that a significant proportion of the human population is chronically exposed to DON doses exceeding the provisional maximum tolerable daily dose. Accordingly, a better understanding of trichothecene impact on health is needed. Upon exposure to low or moderate doses, DON and other trichothecenes induce anorexia, vomiting and reduced weight gain. Several recent studies have addressed the mechanisms by which trichothecenes induce these symptoms and revealed a multifaceted action targeting gut, liver and brain and causing dysregulation in neuroendocrine signaling, immune responses, growth hormone axis, and central neurocircuitries involved in energy homeostasis. Newly identified trichothecene toxicosis biomarkers are just beginning to be exploited and already open up new questions on the potential harmful effects of chronic exposure to DON at apparently asymptomatic very low levels. This review summarizes our current understanding of the effects of DON and other trichothecenes on food intake and weight growth.

  5. Role of Melanin in Melanocyte Dysregulation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah C. Jenkins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have recently reported a potential alternative tumor suppressor function for p16 relating to its capacity to regulate oxidative stress and observed that oxidative dysregulation in p16-depleted cells was most profound in melanocytes, compared to keratinocytes or fibroblasts. Moreover, in the absence of p16 depletion or exogenous oxidative insult, melanocytes exhibited significantly higher basal levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS than these other epidermal cell types. Given the role of oxidative stress in melanoma development, we speculated that this increased susceptibility of melanocytes to oxidative stress (and greater reliance on p16 for suppression of ROS may explain why genetic compromise of p16 is more commonly associated with predisposition to melanoma rather than other cancers. Here we show that the presence of melanin accounts for this differential oxidative stress in normal and p16-depleted melanocytes. Thus the presence of melanin in the skin appears to be a double-edged sword: it protects melanocytes as well as neighboring keratinocytes in the skin through its capacity to absorb UV radiation, but its synthesis in melanocytes results in higher levels of intracellular ROS that may increase melanoma susceptibility.

  6. Influenza virus induces apoptosis via BAD-mediated mitochondrial dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Anh T; Cortens, John P; Du, Qiujiang; Wilkins, John A; Coombs, Kevin M

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus infection results in host cell death and major tissue damage. Specific components of the apoptotic pathway, a signaling cascade that ultimately leads to cell death, are implicated in promoting influenza virus replication. BAD is a cell death regulator that constitutes a critical control point in the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, which occurs through the dysregulation of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and the subsequent activation of downstream apoptogenic factors. Here we report a novel proviral role for the proapoptotic protein BAD in influenza virus replication. We show that influenza virus-induced cytopathology and cell death are considerably inhibited in BAD knockdown cells and that both virus replication and viral protein production are dramatically reduced, which suggests that virus-induced apoptosis is BAD dependent. Our data showed that influenza viruses induced phosphorylation of BAD at residues S112 and S136 in a temporal manner. Viral infection also induced BAD cleavage, late in the viral life cycle, to a truncated form that is reportedly a more potent inducer of apoptosis. We further demonstrate that knockdown of BAD resulted in reduced cytochrome c release and suppression of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway during influenza virus replication, as seen by an inhibition of caspases-3, caspase-7, and procyclic acidic repetitive protein (PARP) cleavage. Our data indicate that influenza viruses carefully modulate the activation of the apoptotic pathway that is dependent on the regulatory function of BAD and that failure of apoptosis activation resulted in unproductive viral replication.

  7. Potential Therapeutic Effects of Meditation for Treating Affective Dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie T. Y. Leung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Affective dysregulation is at the root of many psychopathologies, including stress induced disorders, anxiety disorders, and depression. The root of these disorders appears to be an attenuated, top-down cognitive control from the prefrontal cortices over the maladaptive subcortical emotional processing. A form of mental training, long-term meditation practice can trigger meditation-specific neuroplastic changes in the brain regions underlying cognitive control and affective regulation, suggesting that meditation can act as a kind of mental exercise to foster affective regulation and possibly a cost-effective intervention in mood disorders. Increasing research has suggested that the cultivation of awareness and acceptance along with a nonjudgmental attitude via meditation promotes adaptive affective regulation. This review examined the concepts of affective regulation and meditation and discussed behavioral and neural evidence of the potential clinical application of meditation. Lately, there has been a growing trend toward incorporating the “mindfulness” component into existing psychotherapeutic treatment. Promising results have been observed thus far. Future studies may consider exploring the possibility of integrating the element of “compassion” into current psychotherapeutic approaches.

  8. Transcriptional dysregulation in Huntington's disease: The role of histone deacetylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sorabh; Taliyan, Rajeev

    2015-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurological disorder for which there are no disease-modifying treatments. Although, the exact underlying mechanism(s) leading to the neural cell death in HD still remains elusive, the transcriptional dysregulation is a major molecular feature. Recently, the transcriptional activation and repression regulated by chromatin acetylation has been found to be impaired in HD pathology. The acetylation and deacetylation of histone proteins is carried out by opposing actions of histone acetyl-transferases and histone deacetylases (HDACs), respectively. Studies carried out in cell culture, yeast, Drosophila and rodent model(s) have indicated that HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) might provide useful class of therapeutic agents for HD. Clinical trials have also reported the beneficial effects of HDACIs in patients suffering from HD. Therefore, the development of HDACIs as therapeutics for HD has been vigorously pursued. In this review, we highlight and summarize the putative role of HDACs in HD like pathology and further discuss the potential of HDACIs as new therapeutic avenues for the treatment of HD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sleep study in Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder and Bipolar children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Prat, Xavier; Álvarez-Guerrico, Ion; Bleda-Hernández, María J; Camprodon-Rosanas, Ester; Batlle-Vila, Santiago; Pujals-Altes, Elena; Nascimento-Osorio, María T; Martín-López, Luís M; Álvarez-Martínez, Enric; Pérez-Solá, Víctor; Romero-Cela, Soledad

    2017-01-01

    Decreased need for sleep has been proposed as a core symptom of mania and it has been associated with the pathogenesis of Bipolar Disorder. The emergence of Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder (DMDD) as a new diagnostic has been controversial and much has been speculated about its relationship with the bipolar spectrum. REM sleep fragmentation could be a biomarker of affective disorders and it would help us to differentiate them from other disorders. Polysomnographic cross-sectional study of children with DMDD, bipolar disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). All participants underwent a psychiatric semi-structured interview to obtain the diagnosis, comorbidities and primary sleep disorders. DMDD’s sample was performed following DSM5 criteria. Perform polysomnography in a sample of bipolar, DMDD and ADHD children and compare their profiles to provide more evidence about the differences or similarities between bipolar disorder and DMDD. Bipolar group had the highest REM density values while ADHD had the lowest. REM density was not statiscally different between bipolar phenotypes. REM density was associated with antidepressant treatment, episodes of REM and their interaction. REM latency was associated with antipsychotic treatment and school performance. Bipolar patients had higher scores on the depression scale than DMDD and ADHD groups. No significant differences between the two compared affective disorders were found. However there were differences in REM density between bipolar and ADHD groups. REM sleep study could provide a new theoretical framework to better understand the pathogenesis of pediatric bipolar disorder.

  10. Cytokines and dysregulation of the immune response in human malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fátima C. Alves

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The dysregulation of the immune response by malaria parasite has been considered as a possible constraint to the effectiveness of malaria vaccination. In spite of the important role interleukin-I (IL-1 in malaria are lacking. We found that only 2 out of 35 subjectswith acute malaria showed increased levels of serum IL-1 alpha by enzyme immunoassay. To assess whether IL-1 could interfere with T- lymphocyte responses, blood mononuclear cells from patients infected with Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, or healthy subjects were cultured with phytohemagglutinin, and lymphocyte proliferation measured 72h later by 3H-thymidine incorporation. Our data showed that T-lymphocyte responses are depressed both in P. falciparum (10,500 ñ 2,900 and P. vivax malaria (13,000 ñ 3,300, as compared to that of healthy individuals (27,000 ñ 3,000. Addition of IL-1 partially reserved depression of malaria lymphocytes, but had no effect on normal cells. On the other hand, T-lymphocytes from malaria infected-subjects presented a minimal decrease in proliferation, when cultured in the presence of exogenous PGE2. These data indicate the occurrence of two defects of immunoregulation in malaria: a deficiency of IL-1 production by monocytes/macrophages, and an increased resistance of lymphocytes to the antiproliferative effect of PGE2.

  11. Lymphatic dysregulation in intestinal inflammation: new insights into inflammatory bowel disease pathomechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, F; Yi, P; Al-Kofahi, M; Ganta, V C; Morris, J; Alexander, J S

    2014-03-01

    Alterations in the intestinal lymphatic network are well-established features of human and experimental inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Such lymphangiogenic expansion might enhance classic intestinal lymphatic transport, eliminating excess accumulations of fluid, inflammatory cells and mediators, and could therefore be interpreted as an 'adaptive' response to acute and chronic inflammatory processes. However, whether these new lymphatic vessels are functional, unregulated or immature (and what factors may promote 'maturation' of these vessels) is currently an area under intense investigation. It is still controversial whether impaired lymphatic function in IBD is a direct consequence of the intestinal inflammation, or a preceding lymphangitis-like event. Current research has uncovered novel regulatory factors as well as new roles for familiar signaling pathways, which appear to be linked to inflammation-induced lymphatic alterations. The current review summarizes mechanisms amplifying lymphatic dysregulation and remodeling in intestinal inflammation at the organ, cell and molecular levels and discusses the influence of lymphangiogenesis and intestinal lymphatic transport function as they relate to IBD pathophysiology.

  12. Microglia in the TBI brain: The good, the bad, and the dysregulated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loane, David J; Kumar, Alok

    2016-01-01

    As the major cellular component of the innate immune system in the central nervous system (CNS) and the first line of defense whenever injury or disease occurs, microglia play a critical role in neuroinflammation following a traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the injured brain microglia can produce neuroprotective factors, clear cellular debris and orchestrate neurorestorative processes that are beneficial for neurological recovery after TBI. However, microglia can also become dysregulated and can produce high levels of pro-inflammatory and cytotoxic mediators that hinder CNS repair and contribute to neuronal dysfunction and cell death. The dual role of microglial activation in promoting beneficial and detrimental effects on neurons may be accounted for by their polarization state and functional responses after injury. In this review article we discuss emerging research on microglial activation phenotypes in the context of acute brain injury, and the potential role of microglia in phenotype-specific neurorestorative processes such as neurogenesis, angiogenesis, oligodendrogenesis and regeneration. We also describe some of the known molecular mechanisms that regulate phenotype switching, and highlight new therapeutic approaches that alter microglial activation state balance to enhance long-term functional recovery after TBI. An improved understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that control microglial phenotypic shifts may advance our knowledge of post-injury recovery and repair, and provide opportunities for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for TBI.

  13. Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms in College Students: The Complex Interplay between Alexithymia, Emotional Dysregulation and Rumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaney, Rebecca; Hasking, Penelope; Reupert, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Both Emotional Cascade Theory and Linehan's Biosocial Theory suggest dysregulated behaviors associated with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) emerge, in part, because of cycles of rumination, poor emotional recognition and poor emotion regulation. In this study we examined relationships between rumination, alexithymia, and emotion regulation in predicting dysregulated behaviors associated with BPD (e.g. self-harm, substance use, aggression), and explored both indirect and moderating effects among these variables. The sample comprised 2261 college students who completed self-report measures of the aforementioned constructs. BPD symptoms, stress, family psychological illness, and alexithymia exerted direct effects on behaviors. Symptoms had an indirect effect on behaviors through rumination, alexithymia and emotional dysregulation. In addition, the relationship between symptoms and dysregulated behaviors was conditional on level of rumination and alexithymia. Implications for early identification and treatment of BPD and related behaviors in college settings are discussed.

  14. Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms in College Students: The Complex Interplay between Alexithymia, Emotional Dysregulation and Rumination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Meaney

    Full Text Available Both Emotional Cascade Theory and Linehan's Biosocial Theory suggest dysregulated behaviors associated with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD emerge, in part, because of cycles of rumination, poor emotional recognition and poor emotion regulation. In this study we examined relationships between rumination, alexithymia, and emotion regulation in predicting dysregulated behaviors associated with BPD (e.g. self-harm, substance use, aggression, and explored both indirect and moderating effects among these variables. The sample comprised 2261 college students who completed self-report measures of the aforementioned constructs. BPD symptoms, stress, family psychological illness, and alexithymia exerted direct effects on behaviors. Symptoms had an indirect effect on behaviors through rumination, alexithymia and emotional dysregulation. In addition, the relationship between symptoms and dysregulated behaviors was conditional on level of rumination and alexithymia. Implications for early identification and treatment of BPD and related behaviors in college settings are discussed.

  15. Alcohol dementia and thermal dysregulation: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanev, Kaloyan S; Roether, Melissa; Yang, Clifford

    Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's psychosis in alcoholics are thought to be due to thiamine deficiency. When the process goes untreated, patients may develop alcohol-induced persisting dementia. We review the literature on thermal dysregulation and the place of thiamine treatment in Wernicke's encephalopathy, Korsakoff's psychosis, and alcohol-induced persisting dementia. We describe a patient with alcohol-induced persisting dementia who showed thermal dysregulation which responded to parenteral but not oral thiamine. Subsequently, he developed aspiration pneumonia with associated fever reaction and expired. We describe the neuroimaging findings--diffuse cortical atrophy, ventricular dilatation, atrophy of the corpus callosum, hypothalamus, and medulla, and a probable arachnoid cyst in the left temporal tip. We conclude that thermal dysregulation was likely related to dysfunction of temperature regulatory brain centers, that thermal dysregulation was stabilized with parenteral but not oral thiamine, and that parenteral thiamine may have a role even in chronic cases of alcohol-induced persisting dementia.

  16. Systematic identification of core transcription factors mediating dysregulated links bridging inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Xiao

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence shows a tight link between inflammation and cancer. However, comprehensive identification of pivotal transcription factors (i.e., core TFs mediating the dysregulated links remains challenging, mainly due to a lack of samples that can effectively reflect the connections between inflammation and tumorigenesis. Here, we constructed a series of TF-mediated regulatory networks from a large compendium of expression profiling of normal colonic tissues, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs and colorectal cancer (CRC, which contains 1201 samples in total, and then proposed a network-based approach to characterize potential links bridging inflammation and cancer. For this purpose, we computed significantly dysregulated relationships between inflammation and their linked cancer networks, and then 24 core TFs with their dysregulated genes were identified. Collectively, our approach provides us with quite important insight into inflammation-associated tumorigenesis in colorectal cancer, which could also be applied to identify functionally dysregulated relationships mediating the links between other different disease phenotypes.

  17. Maternal Agreeableness Moderates Associations Between Young Children's Emotion Dysregulation and Socioemotional Functioning at School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipson, Will E; Gardiner, Sarah L; Coplan, Robert J; Ooi, Laura L

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore associations among maternal agreeableness, child temperament (i.e., emotion dysregulation), and children's social adjustment at school. Participants were 146 children in kindergarten and Grade 1 (76 girls; Mage = 67.78 months, SD = 10.81 months). Mothers provided ratings of their own agreeableness and their child's temperament, and teachers assessed indices of children's socioemotional functioning at school. Among the results, maternal agreeableness moderated associations between child dysregulation and aspects of adjustment at school. Specifically, at higher levels of maternal agreeableness, the relations between child dysregulation and both anxiety with peers and their prosocial behavior were attenuated. Overall, the results suggest that maternal agreeableness may serve as a protective factor for dysregulated children. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  18. Dysregulation of Kv3.4 Channels in Dorsal Root Ganglia Following Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ritter, David M.; Zemel, Benjamin M.; Hala, Tamara J.; O'Leary, Michael E; Lepore, Angelo C.; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients develop chronic pain involving poorly understood central and peripheral mechanisms. Because dysregulation of the voltage-gated Kv3.4 channel has been implicated in the hyperexcitable state of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following direct injury of sensory nerves, we asked whether such a dysregulation also plays a role in SCI. Kv3.4 channels are expressed in DRG neurons, where they help regulate action potential (AP) repolarization in a manner that depen...

  19. Immunomodulatory properties of carbon nanotubes are able to compensate immune function dysregulation caused by microgravity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescio, Claudia; Orecchioni, Marco; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Sgarrella, Francesco; Pippia, Proto; Manetti, Roberto; Bianco, Alberto; Delogu, Lucia Gemma

    2014-08-21

    Spaceflights lead to dysregulation of the immune cell functionality affecting the expression of activation markers and cytokine production. Short oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized by 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition have been reported to activate immune cells. In this Communication we have performed surface marker assays and multiplex ELISA on primary monocytes and T cells under microgravity. We have discovered that carbon nanotubes, through their immunostimulatory properties, are able to fight spaceflight immune system dysregulations.

  20. A genome-wide association study of emotion dysregulation: Evidence for interleukin 2 receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Abigail; Almli, Lynn; Smith, Alicia; Lori, Adriana; Leveille, Jen; Ressler, Kerry J; Jovanovic, Tanja; Bradley, Bekh

    2016-12-01

    Emotion dysregulation has been implicated as a risk factor for many psychiatric conditions. Therefore, examining genetic risk associated with emotion dysregulation could help inform cross-disorder risk more generally. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of emotion dysregulation using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array technology was conducted in a highly traumatized, minority, urban sample (N = 2600, males = 774). Post-hoc analyses examined associations between SNPs identified in the GWAS and current depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and history of suicide attempt. Methylation quantitative trait loci were identified and gene set enrichment analyses were used to broadly determine biological processes involved with these SNPs. Among males, SNP rs6602398, located within the interleukin receptor 2A gene, IL2RA, was significantly associated with emotion dysregulation (p = 1.1 × 10(-8)). Logistic regression analyses revealed this SNP was significantly associated with depression (Exp(B) = 2.67, p < 0.001) and PTSD (Exp(B) = 2.07, p < 0.01). This SNP was associated with differential DNA methylation (p < 0.05) suggesting it may be functionally active. Finally, through gene set enrichment analyses, ten psychiatric disease pathways (adjusted p < 0.01) and the calcium signaling pathway (adjusted p = 0.008) were significantly associated with emotion dysregulation. We found initial evidence for an association between emotion dysregulation and genetic risk loci that have already been implicated in medical disorders that have high comorbidity with psychiatric disorders. Our results provide further evidence that emotion dysregulation can be understood as a potential psychiatric cross-disorder risk factor, and that sex differences across these phenotypes may be critical. Continued research into genetic and biological risk associated with emotion dysregulation is needed.

  1. NASA 14 Day Undersea Missions: A Short-Duration Spaceflight Analog for Immune System Dysregulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, B. E.; Stowe, R. P.; Mehta, S. K.; Chouker, A.; Feuerecker, M.; Quiriarte, H.; Pierson, D. L.; Sams, C. F.

    2011-01-01

    This poster paper reviews the use of 14 day undersea missions as a possible analog for short duration spaceflight for the study of immune system dysregulation. Sixteen subjects from the the NASA Extreme Enviro nment Mission Operations (NEEMO) 12, 13 and 14 missions were studied for immune system dysregulation. The assays that are presented in this poster are the Virleukocyte subsets, the T Cell functions, and the intracellular/secreted cytokine profiles. Other assays were performed, but are not included in this presntation.

  2. Body regard as a moderator of the relation between emotion dysregulation and nonsuicidal self-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J; Bagge, Courtney L; Tull, Matthew T; Gratz, Kim L

    2013-10-01

    Despite research documenting a strong association between emotion dysregulation and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), the moderators of this association have received little attention. Thus, it remains unclear why some individuals with heightened emotion dysregulation engage in NSSI and others do not. Body regard (i.e., how one perceives, experiences, and cares for the body) may be one such moderator, explaining the risk for NSSI among some individuals with emotion dysregulation. The current study used structural equation modeling within a sample of 398 undergraduates (26% reporting NSSI, mean frequency = 25.16, SD = 40.5) to test the interactive effect of emotion dysregulation and body regard on NSSI frequency when controlling for negative affect and borderline personality disorder symptoms. The interaction model provided a strong fit to the data and showed that emotion regulation was associated with NSSI only when low levels of body regard were present. Results suggest that body regard may be important to understanding who engages in NSSI within the context of emotion dysregulation. Possible mechanisms underlying the interaction between body regard and emotion dysregulation are discussed along with treatment and prevention implications.

  3. Emotion dysregulation as a mechanism linking peer victimization to internalizing symptoms in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Katie A; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L; Hilt, Lori M

    2009-10-01

    Peer victimization experiences represent developmentally salient stressors among adolescents and are associated with the development of internalizing symptoms. However, the mechanisms linking peer victimization to adolescent psychopathology remain inadequately understood. This study examined emotion dysregulation as a mechanism linking peer stress to changes in internalizing symptoms among adolescents in a longitudinal design. Peer victimization was assessed with the Revised Peer Experiences Questionnaire (M. J. Prinstein, J. Boergers, & E. M. Vernberg, 2001) in a large (N = 1,065), racially diverse (86.6% non-White) sample of adolescents 11-14 years of age. Emotion dysregulation and symptoms of depression and anxiety were also assessed. Structural equation modeling was used to create a latent construct of emotion dysregulation from measures of discrete emotion processes and of peer victimization and internalizing symptoms. Peer victimization was associated with increased emotion dysregulation over a 4-month period. Increases in emotion dysregulation mediated the relationship between relational and reputational, but not overt, victimization and changes in internalizing symptoms over a 7-month period. Evidence for a reciprocal relationship between internalizing symptoms and relational victimization was found, but emotion dysregulation did not mediate this relationship. The implications for preventive interventions are discussed.

  4. Emotion dysregulation as a mechanism linking stress exposure to adolescent aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herts, Kate L; McLaughlin, Katie A; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L

    2012-10-01

    Exposure to stress is associated with a wide range of internalizing and externalizing problems in adolescents, including aggressive behavior. Extant research examining mechanisms underlying the associations between stress and youth aggression has consistently identified social information processing pathways that are disrupted by exposure to violence and increase risk of aggressive behavior. In the current study, we use longitudinal data to examine emotion dysregulation as a potential mechanism linking a broader range of stressful experiences to aggressive behavior in a diverse sample of early adolescents (N = 1065). Specifically, we examined the longitudinal associations of peer victimization and stressful life events with emotion dysregulation and aggressive behavior. Structural equation modeling was used to create latent constructs of emotion dysregulation and aggression. Both stressful life events and peer victimization predicted subsequent increases in emotion dysregulation over a 4-month period. These increases in emotion dysregulation, in turn, were associated with increases in aggression over the subsequent 3 months. Longitudinal mediation models showed that emotion dysregulation mediated the relationship of both peer victimization (z = 2.35, p = 0.019) and stressful life events (z = 2.32, p = 0.020) with aggressive behavior. Increasing the use of adaptive emotion regulation strategies is an important target for interventions aimed at preventing the onset of adolescent aggressive behavior.

  5. Circadian arrhythmia dysregulates emotional behaviors in aged Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Brian J; Onishi, Kenneth G; Patel, Priyesh N; Stevenson, Tyler J

    2014-03-15

    Emotional behaviors are influenced by the circadian timing system. Circadian disruptions are associated with depressive-like symptoms in clinical and preclinical populations. Circadian rhythm robustness declines markedly with aging and may contribute to susceptibility to emotional dysregulation in aged individuals. The present experiments used a model of chronic circadian arrhythmia generated noninvasively, via a series of circadian-disruptive light treatments, to investigate interactions between circadian desynchrony and aging on depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors, and on limbic neuroinflammatory gene expression that has been linked with emotionality. We also examined whether a social manipulation (group housing) would attenuate effects of arrhythmia on emotionality. In aged (14-18 months of age) male Siberian hamsters, circadian arrhythmia increased behavioral despair and decreased social motivation, but decreased exploratory anxiety. These effects were not evident in younger (5-9 months of age) hamsters. Social housing (3-5 hamsters/cage) abolished the effects of circadian arrhythmia on emotionality. Circadian arrhythmia alone was without effect on hippocampal or cortical interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (Ido) mRNA expression in aged hamsters, but social housing decreased hippocampal IL-1β and Ido mRNAs. The data demonstrate that circadian disruption can negatively impact affective state, and that this effect is pronounced in older individuals. Although clear associations between circadian arrhythmia and constitutive limbic proinflammatory activity were not evident, the present data suggest that social housing markedly inhibits constitutive hippocampal IL-1β and Ido activity, which may contribute to the ameliorating effects of social housing on a number of emotional behaviors.

  6. Dysregulated but not decreased salience network activity in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eWhite

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Effective estimation of the salience of environmental stimuli underlies adaptive behaviour, while related aberrance is believed to undermine rational thought processes in schizophrenia. A network including bilateral frontoinsular cortex (FIC and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC has been observed to respond to salient stimuli using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. To test the hypothesis that activity in this salience network (SN is less discriminately modulated by contextually-relevant stimuli in schizophrenia than in healthy individuals, fMRI data were collected in 20 individuals with schizophrenia and 13 matched controls during performance of a modified monetary incentive delay task. After quantitatively identifying spatial components representative of the FIC and dACC features of the SN, two principal analyses were conducted. In the first, modulation of SN activity by salience was assessed by measuring response to trial outcome. First-level general linear models were applied to individual-specific time-courses of SN activity identified using spatial independent component analysis. This analysis revealed a significant salience-by-performance-by-group interaction on the best-fit FIC component’s activity at reward outcome, whereby healthy individuals but not individuals with schizophrenia exhibited significantly greater distinction between the response to hits and misses in high salience trials than in low salience trials. The second analysis aimed to ascertain whether SN component amplitude differed between the study groups over the duration of the experiment. Independent-samples T-tests on back-projected, percent-signal-change scaled SN component images importantly showed that the groups did not differ in the overall amplitude of SN expression over the entire dataset. These findings of dysregulated but not decreased SN activity in schizophrenia provide physiological support for mechanistic conceptual frameworks of delusional

  7. Dysregulated but not decreased salience network activity in schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Thomas P.; Gilleen, James; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.

    2013-01-01

    Effective estimation of the salience of environmental stimuli underlies adaptive behavior, while related aberrance is believed to undermine rational thought processes in schizophrenia. A network including bilateral frontoinsular cortex (FIC) and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) has been observed to respond to salient stimuli using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). To test the hypothesis that activity in this salience network (SN) is less discriminately modulated by contextually-relevant stimuli in schizophrenia than in healthy individuals, fMRI data were collected in 20 individuals with schizophrenia and 13 matched controls during performance of a modified monetary incentive delay (MID) task. After quantitatively identifying spatial components representative of the FIC and dACC features of the SN, two principal analyses were conducted. In the first, modulation of SN activity by salience was assessed by measuring response to trial outcome. First-level general linear models were applied to individual-specific time-courses of SN activity identified using spatial independent component analysis (ICA). This analysis revealed a significant salience-by-performance-by-group interaction on the best-fit FIC component's activity at trial outcome, whereby healthy individuals but not individuals with schizophrenia exhibited greater distinction between the response to hits and misses in high salience trials than in low salience trials. The second analysis aimed to ascertain whether SN component amplitude differed between the study groups over the duration of the experiment. Independent-samples T-tests on back-projected, percent-signal-change scaled SN component images importantly showed that the groups did not differ in the overall amplitude of SN expression over the entire dataset. These findings of dysregulated but not decreased SN activity in schizophrenia provide physiological support for mechanistic conceptual frameworks of delusional thought formation

  8. Rhythms dysregulation: A new perspective for understanding PTSD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Jacques; Rauchs, Géraldine; Guillery-Girard, Bérengère

    2017-02-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a complex syndrome that may occur after exposure to one or more traumatic events. It associates physiological, emotional, and cognitive changes Brain and hormonal modifications contribute to some impairments in learning, memory, and emotion regulation. Some of these biological dysfunctions may be analyzed in terms of rhythms dysregulation that would be expressed through endocrine rhythmicity, sleep organization, and temporal synchrony in brain activity. In the first part of this article, we report studies on endocrine rhythmicity revealing that some rhythms abnormalities are frequently observed, although not constantly, for both cortisol and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. The most typical changes are a flattening of the diurnal secretion of cortisol and the hyperactivation of the SNS. These results may explain why cognitive functioning, in particular consolidation of emotional memories, attention, learning, vigilance and arousal, is altered in patients with PTSD. The second part of this article focuses on sleep disturbances, one of the core features of PTSD. Abnormal REM sleep reported in various studies may have a pathophysiological role in PTSD and may exacerbate some symptoms such as emotional regulation and memory. In addition, sleep disorders, such as paradoxical insomnia, increase the risk of developing PTSD. We also discuss the potential impact of sleep disturbances on cognition. Finally, temporal synchrony of brain activity and functional connectivity, explored using electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging, are addressed. Several studies reported abnormalities in alpha, beta and gamma frequency bands that may affect both attentional and memory processes. Other studies confirmed abnormalities in connectivity and recent fMRI data suggest that this could limit top-down control and may be associated with flashback intrusive memories. These data illustrate that a better knowledge of

  9. Epigenetic dysregulation in mesenchymal stem cell aging and spontaneous differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilong Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs hold great promise for the treatment of difficult diseases. As MSCs represent a rare cell population, ex vivo expansion of MSCs is indispensable to obtain sufficient amounts of cells for therapies and tissue engineering. However, spontaneous differentiation and aging of MSCs occur during expansion and the molecular mechanisms involved have been poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human MSCs in early and late passages were examined for their expression of genes involved in osteogenesis to determine their spontaneous differentiation towards osteoblasts in vitro, and of genes involved in self-renewal and proliferation for multipotent differentiation potential. In parallel, promoter DNA methylation and hostone H3 acetylation levels were determined. We found that MSCs underwent aging and spontaneous osteogenic differentiation upon regular culture expansion, with progressive downregulation of TERT and upregulation of osteogenic genes such as Runx2 and ALP. Meanwhile, the expression of genes associated with stem cell self-renewal such as Oct4 and Sox2 declined markedly. Notably, the altered expression of these genes were closely associated with epigenetic dysregulation of histone H3 acetylation in K9 and K14, but not with methylation of CpG islands in the promoter regions of most of these genes. bFGF promoted MSC proliferation and suppressed its spontaneous osteogenic differentiation, with corresponding changes in histone H3 acetylation in TERT, Oct4, Sox2, Runx2 and ALP genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that histone H3 acetylation, which can be modulated by extrinsic signals, plays a key role in regulating MSC aging and differentiation.

  10. Power spectrum scale invariance identifies prefrontal dysregulation in paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulescu, Anca R; Rubin, Denis; Strey, Helmut H; Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R

    2012-07-01

    Theory and experimental evidence suggest that complex living systems function close to the boundary of chaos, with erroneous organization to an improper dynamical range (too stiff or chaotic) underlying system-wide dysregulation and disease. We hypothesized that erroneous organization might therefore also characterize paranoid schizophrenia, via optimization abnormalities in the prefrontal-limbic circuit regulating emotion. To test this, we acquired fMRI scans from 35 subjects (N = 9 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and N = 26 healthy controls), while they viewed affect-valent stimuli. To quantify dynamic regulation, we analyzed the power spectrum scale invariance (PSSI) of fMRI time-courses and computed the geometry of time-delay (Poincaré) maps, a measure of variability. Patients and controls showed distinct PSSI in two clusters (k(1) : Z = 4.3215, P = 0.00002 and k(2) : Z = 3.9441, P = 0.00008), localized to the orbitofrontal/medial prefrontal cortex (Brodmann Area 10), represented by β close to white noise in patients (β ≈ 0) and in the pink noise range in controls (β ≈ -1). Interpreting the meaning of PSSI differences, the Poincaré maps indicated less variability in patients than controls (Z = -1.9437, P = 0.05 for k(1) ; Z = -2.5099, P = 0.01 for k(2) ). That the dynamics identified Brodmann Area 10 is consistent with previous schizophrenia research, which implicates this area in deficits of working memory, executive functioning, emotional regulation and underlying biological abnormalities in synaptic (glutamatergic) transmission. Our results additionally cohere with a large body of work finding pink noise to be the normal range of central function at the synaptic, cellular, and small network levels, and suggest that patients show less supple responsivity of this region.

  11. Dysregulated relationship of inflammation and oxidative stress in major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawdin, B.J.; Mellon, S.H.; Dhabhar, F.S.; Epel, E.S.; Puterman, E.; Su, Y.; Burke, H.M.; Reus, V.I.; Rosser, R.; Hamilton, S.P.; Nelson, J.C.; Wolkowitz, O.M.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and oxidative stress have been implicated in the pathophysiology of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), as well as in a number of chronic medical conditions. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between peripheral inflammatory and oxidative stress markers in un-medicated subjects with MDD compared to non-depressed healthy controls and compared to subjects with MDD after antidepressant treatment. We examined the relationships between IL-6, IL-10, and the IL-6/IL-10 inflammatory ratio vs. F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoP), a marker of oxidative stress, in un-medicated MDD patients (n = 20) before and after 8 weeks of open-label sertraline treatment (n = 17), compared to healthy non-depressed controls (n = 20). Among the un-medicated MDD subjects, F2-IsoP concentrations were positively correlated with IL-6 concentrations (p < 0.05) and were negatively correlated with IL-10 concentrations (p < 0.01). Accordingly, F2-IsoP concentrations were positively correlated with the ratio of IL-6/IL-10 (p < 0.01). In contrast, in the control group, there were no significant correlations between F2-IsoPs and either cytokine or their ratio. After MDD subjects were treated with sertraline for 8 weeks, F2-IsoPs were no longer significantly correlated with IL-6, IL-10 or the IL-6/IL-10 ratio. These data suggest oxidative stress and inflammatory processes are positively associated in untreated MDD. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the homeostatic buffering mechanisms regulating oxidation and inflammation in healthy individuals become dysregulated in untreated MDD, and may be improved with antidepressant treatment. These findings may help explain the increased risk of comorbid medical illnesses in MDD. PMID:23201587

  12. Angiogenesis dysregulation in term asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henna Shaikh

    Full Text Available Neonatal encephalopathy following birth asphyxia is a major predictor of long-term neurological impairment. Therapeutic hypothermia is currently the standard of care to prevent brain injury in asphyxiated newborns but is not protective in all cases. More robust and versatile treatment options are needed. Angiogenesis is a demonstrated therapeutic target in adult stroke. However, no systematic study examines the expression of angiogenesis-related markers following birth asphyxia in human newborns.This study aimed to evaluate the expression of angiogenesis-related protein markers in asphyxiated newborns developing and not developing brain injury compared to healthy control newborns.Twelve asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia were prospectively enrolled; six developed eventual brain injury and six did not. Four healthy control newborns were also included. We used Rules-Based Medicine multi-analyte profiling and protein array technologies to study the plasma concentration of 49 angiogenesis-related proteins. Mean protein concentrations were compared between each group of newborns.Compared to healthy newborns, asphyxiated newborns not developing brain injury showed up-regulation of pro-angiogenic proteins, including fatty acid binding protein-4, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, neuropilin-1, and receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-3; this up-regulation was not evident in asphyxiated newborns eventually developing brain injury. Also, asphyxiated newborns developing brain injury showed a decreased expression of anti-angiogenic proteins, including insulin-growth factor binding proteins -1, -4, and -6, compared to healthy newborns.These findings suggest that angiogenesis pathways are dysregulated following birth asphyxia and are putatively involved in brain injury pathology and recovery.

  13. REM sleep dysregulation in depression: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palagini, Laura; Baglioni, Chiara; Ciapparelli, Antonio; Gemignani, Angelo; Riemann, Dieter

    2013-10-01

    Disturbances of sleep are typical for most depressed patients and belong to the core symptoms of the disorder. Since the 1960s polysomnographic sleep research has demonstrated that besides disturbances of sleep continuity, depression is associated with altered sleep architecture, i.e., a decrease in slow wave sleep (SWS) production and disturbed rapid eye movement (REM) sleep regulation. Shortened REM latency (i.e., the interval between sleep onset and the occurrence of the first REM period), increased REM sleep duration and increased REM density (i.e., the frequency of rapid eye movements per REM period) have been considered as biological markers of depression which might predict relapse and recurrence. High risk studies including healthy relatives of patients with depression demonstrate that REM sleep alterations may precede the clinical expression of depression and may thus be useful in identifying subjects at high risk for the illness. Several models have been developed to explain REM sleep abnormalities in depression, like the cholinergic-aminergic imbalance model or chronobiologically inspired theories, which are reviewed in this overview. Moreover, REM sleep alterations have been recently considered not only as biological "scars" but as true endophenotypes of depression. This review discusses the genetic, neurochemical and neurobiological factors that have been implicated to play a role in the complex relationships between REM sleep and depression. We hypothesize on the one hand that REM sleep dysregulation in depression may be linked to a genetic predisposition/vulnerability to develop the illness; on the other hand it is conceivable that REM sleep disinhibition in itself is a part of a maladaptive stress reaction with increased allostatic load. We also discuss whether the REM sleep changes in depression may contribute themselves to the development of central symptoms of depression such as cognitive distortions including negative self-esteem and the

  14. Dysregulation of immune responses in an allergic mouse model following low-level toluene exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki, Hidekazu; Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Kunugita, Naoki; Arashidani, Keiichi

    2011-08-15

    To investigate the effect of low-level toluene inhalation on immune regulation in an allergic mouse model, C3H/HeN mice were exposed to 0, 5, 50, or 500ppm of toluene for 6h/day, 5 days/week for 3 or 6 weeks. For allergic mouse model, half of the mice in each group were immunized with ovalbumin (OVA). Allergic mice exposed to toluene for 3 weeks did not exhibit any changes in their plasma, lung or spleen samples. Although exposure to toluene alone for 6 weeks did not increase the number of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, coexposure to 50ppm toluene and OVA increased the number of BAL cells. Histological changes and increased amounts of fibronectin were observed in the lungs of OVA-immunized, 50-ppm-toluene-exposed mice. Exposure to 500ppm significantly increased the expressions of transcription factors STAT3, STAT4 and STAT5a mRNAs in spleen. In spleens from the allergic mouse model, the expressions of STAT3, STAT4, STAT5a, STAT6, GATA3 and Foxp3 mRNAs were significantly enhanced following exposure to 50ppm toluene for 6 weeks, but the expression of T-bet mRNA was not increased. Regarding the Th1/Th2 balance, the expressions of IL-4 and IL-12 mRNAs were enhanced in the spleens of toluene-exposed mice. Total IgG1 antibody production in the plasma was significantly increased in the 50-ppm-toluene-exposed allergic mouse model. These results indicate that low-level toluene exposure might dysregulate the allergic responses to OVA in C3H/HeN mice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dysregulation of Uterine Signaling Pathways in Progesterone Receptor-Cre Knockout of Dicer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Vieyra, Claudia V.; Kim, Tae Hoon; Jeong, Jae-Wook; Hodgson, Myles C.; Chen, Ruihong; Creighton, Chad J.; Lydon, John P.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial-stromal interactions in the uterus are required for normal uterine functions such as pregnancy, and multiple signaling pathways are essential for this process. Although Dicer and microRNA (miRNA) have been implicated in several reproductive processes, the specific roles of Dicer and miRNA in uterine development are not known. To address the roles of miRNA in the regulation of key uterine pathways, we generated a conditional knockout of Dicer in the postnatal uterine epithelium and stroma using progesterone receptor-Cre. These Dicer conditional knockout females are sterile with small uteri, which demonstrate significant defects, including absence of glandular epithelium and enhanced stromal apoptosis, beginning at approximately postnatal d 15, with coincident expression of Cre and deletion of Dicer. Specific miRNA (miR-181c, −200b, −101, let-7d) were down-regulated and corresponding predicted proapoptotic target genes (Bcl2l11, Aldh1a3) were up-regulated, reflecting the apoptotic phenomenon. Although these mice had normal serum hormone levels, critical uterine signaling pathways, including progesterone-responsive genes, Indian hedgehog signaling, and the Wnt/β-catenin canonical pathway, were dysregulated at the mRNA level. Importantly, uterine stromal cell proliferation in response to progesterone was absent, whereas uterine epithelial cell proliferation in response to estradiol was maintained in adult uteri. These data implicate Dicer and appropriate miRNA expression as essential players in the regulation of multiple uterine signaling pathways required for uterine development and appropriate function. PMID:22798293

  16. Alcohol-Induced Molecular Dysregulation in Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Precursor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yi Young; Roubal, Ivan; Lee, Youn Soo; Kim, Jin Seok; Hoang, Michael; Mathiyakom, Nathan; Kim, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Adverse effect of alcohol on neural function has been well documented. Especially, the teratogenic effect of alcohol on neurodevelopment during embryogenesis has been demonstrated in various models, which could be a pathologic basis for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). While the developmental defects from alcohol abuse during gestation have been described, the specific mechanisms by which alcohol mediates these injuries have yet to be determined. Recent studies have shown that alcohol has significant effect on molecular and cellular regulatory mechanisms in embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation including genes involved in neural development. To test our hypothesis that alcohol induces molecular alterations during neural differentiation we have derived neural precursor cells from pluripotent human ESCs in the presence or absence of ethanol treatment. Genome-wide transcriptomic profiling identified molecular alterations induced by ethanol exposure during neural differentiation of hESCs into neural rosettes and neural precursor cell populations. The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) functional analysis on significantly altered genes showed potential ethanol’s effect on JAK-STAT signaling pathway, neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and regulation of autophagy. We have further quantitatively verified ethanol-induced alterations of selected candidate genes. Among verified genes we further examined the expression of P2RX3, which is associated with nociception, a peripheral pain response. We found ethanol significantly reduced the level of P2RX3 in undifferentiated hESCs, but induced the level of P2RX3 mRNA and protein in hESC-derived NPCs. Our result suggests ethanol-induced dysregulation of P2RX3 along with alterations in molecules involved in neural activity such as neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction may be a molecular event

  17. Adipose tissue hypoxia in obesity and its impact on adipocytokine dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosogai, Naomi; Fukuhara, Atsunori; Oshima, Kazuya; Miyata, Yugo; Tanaka, Sachiyo; Segawa, Katsumori; Furukawa, Shigetada; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Komuro, Ryutaro; Matsuda, Morihiro; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2007-04-01

    Obesity is linked to a variety of metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Dysregulated production of fat-derived secretory factors, adipocytokines, is partly responsible for obesity-linked metabolic disorders. However, the mechanistic role of obesity per se to adipocytokine dysregulation has not been fully elucidated. Here, we show that adipose tissue of obese mice is hypoxic and that local adipose tissue hypoxia dysregulates the production of adipocytokines. Tissue hypoxia was confirmed by an exogenous marker, pimonidazole, and by an elevated concentration of lactate, an endogenous marker. Moreover, local tissue hypoperfusion (measured by colored microspheres) was confirmed in adipose tissue of obese mice. Adiponectin mRNA expression was decreased, and mRNA of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated protein, was significantly increased in adipose tissue of obese mice. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, hypoxia dysregulated the expression of adipocytokines, such as adiponectin and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1, and increased the mRNAs of ER stress marker genes, CHOP and GRP78 (glucose-regulated protein, 78 kD). Expression of CHOP attenuated adiponectin promoter activity, and RNA interference of CHOP partly reversed hypoxia-induced suppression of adiponectin mRNA expression in adipocytes. Hypoxia also increased instability of adiponectin mRNA. Our results suggest that hypoperfusion and hypoxia in adipose tissues underlie the dysregulated production of adipocytokines and metabolic syndrome in obesity.

  18. Emotion Dysregulation and Anorexia Nervosa: An Exploration of the Role of Childhood Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Sarah E.; Wildes, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Theoretical models of emotion regulation difficulties in anorexia nervosa (AN) specify a role for factors that predispose to or precipitate emotion dysregulation. The current study considered whether childhood abuse (i.e., emotional, sexual, physical) might be related to emotion regulation difficulties and eating disorder symptom severity in patients with AN. Childhood abuse was hypothesized to relate to AN symptoms indirectly via emotion dysregulation. Method Participants were 188 patients with AN presenting to an intensive treatment facility. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale, and Eating Disorder Examination were used to assess childhood abuse, emotion dysregulation, and AN symptom severity, respectively. Results Of the three forms of childhood abuse, reports of emotional abuse were most strongly related to emotion regulation difficulties and AN symptom severity. Mediation analyses revealed that emotion dysregulation significantly explained the relationship between childhood emotional abuse and AN symptomatology, and mediation effects did not differ by AN subtype (i.e., restricting versus binge-eating/purging). Discussion Findings provide initial support for a model in which childhood emotional abuse precipitates emotion dysregulation and the development of AN. Future studies with longitudinal designs and control groups are necessary to examine the direction and specificity of these cross-sectional associations. PMID:25358997

  19. Understanding the connection between self-esteem and aggression: The mediating role of emotion dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Carlo; Holden, Christopher J; Zeigler-Hill, Virgil; Velotti, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to extend previous knowledge concerning the link between self-esteem and aggression by examining the mediating role of emotion dysregulation among offenders and community participants. A sample of 153 incarcerated violent offenders and a community sample of 197 individuals completed self-report measures of self-esteem level, emotion dysregulation, and trait aggression. Offenders reported lower levels of self-esteem than community participants, as well as greater levels of emotional nonacceptance and hostility. Bootstrapping analyses were performed to test whether emotion dysregulation mediated the association between self-esteem level and aggression. In the offender sample, mediation models were significant for three of the four aspects of trait aggression that were considered. Emotion dysregulation fully mediated the links that low self-esteem had with physical aggression, anger, and hostility. The same pattern (with the addition of full mediation for verbal aggression) was confirmed in the community sample. Our findings suggest that emotion dysregulation may play an important role in the connection between low self-esteem and aggression. Alternative models of the associations among these variables were tested and discussed. As a whole, the present results are consistent with those of other studies and suggest that it may be beneficial to include emotion regulation modules as part of prevention and treatment programs for violent offenders.

  20. PTSD, emotion dysregulation, and dissociative symptoms in a highly traumatized sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Abigail; Cross, Dorthie; Fani, Negar; Bradley, Bekh

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to multiple traumas has been shown to result in many negative mental health outcomes, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Dissociation, which involves disruptions in memory, identity, and perceptions, may be a component of PTSD, particularly among individuals who have experienced childhood trauma. Emotion regulation difficulties are also strongly associated with childhood trauma and emotion dysregulation may be a particularly important factor to consider in the development and maintenance of dissociative symptoms. The goal of the present study was to determine whether emotion dysregulation mediated the relationship between PTSD symptoms and dissociation in a sample of 154 (80% female, 97% African-American) adults recruited from a public, urban hospital. PTSD was measured using the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale, emotion dysregulation was measured using the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale, and dissociation was measured using the Multiscale Dissociation Inventory. A linear regression analysis showed that both PTSD and emotion dysregulation were statistically significant predictors of dissociation even after controlling for trauma exposure. Alexithymia and an inability to use emotion regulation strategies in particular were predictive of dissociation above and beyond other predictor variables. Using bootstrapping techniques, we found that overall emotion dyregulation partially mediated the effect of PTSD symptoms on dissociative symptoms. Our results suggest that emotion dysregulation may be important in understanding the relation between PTSD and dissociative symptoms. Treatment approaches may consider a focus on training in emotional understanding and the development of adaptive regulation strategies as a way to address dissociative symptoms in PTSD patients. PMID:25573648

  1. Nonsuicidal self-injury and diminished pain perception: the role of emotion dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Joseph C; Aaron, Rachel V; Arthur, Michael S; Shorkey, S Paul; Prinstein, Mitchell J

    2012-08-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is the deliberate destruction of one's own body tissue in the absence of suicidal intent (e.g., cutting or burning the skin). Previous studies have found that people with a history of NSSI display diminished pain perception. However, it remains unclear why this effect occurs. In the present study, we used a sample of participants with (n = 25) and without (n = 47) a history of NSSI to test the hypothesis that emotion dysregulation partially explains why NSSI is associated with diminished pain perception. Pain perception was quantified as pain threshold, pain tolerance, and pain intensity ratings assessed during the cold pressor task. Nonsuicidal self-injury was associated with increased emotion dysregulation and diminished pain perception. Results showed that emotion dysregulation was correlated with diminished pain perception within both groups, demonstrating that this association exists regardless of NSSI history. Results also specified that emotion dysregulation partially accounted for the association between NSSI and pain tolerance but not other pain variables. Overall, results were consistent with the hypothesis that emotion dysregulation may increase NSSI risk in part by increasing the willingness to experience the pain involved in self-injury. Studies are needed to more directly investigate this hypothesis.

  2. Emotional dysregulation and anxiety control in the psychopathological mechanism underlying drive for thinness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca eFiore

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Emotional dysregulation is a process which consists in mitigating, intensifying or maintaining a given emotion and is the trigger for some psychological disorders. Research has shown that a anxiety control plays an important role in emotional expression and regulation and, in addition, for anorexia nervosa and, more in general, in drive for thinness. Scientific literature suggests that in anorexia nervosa there is a core of emotional dysregulation and anxiety control. The aim of this study is to explore the roles of emotional dysregulation and anxiety control as independent or third variables in a mediational regression model related to drive for thinness. 154 clinical individuals with anorexia participated in the study and all completed a set of self-report questionnaires: eating disorders inventory version 3 (EDI-3, DERS, and the anxiety control questionnaire (ACQ. The data confirmed a mediational model in which the relation between emotional dysregulation and drive for thinness is mediated by anxiety control. The current study partially supports a clinical model in which emotional dysregulation is a distal factor in eating disorders while the mediator variable anxiety control is a proximal factor in the psychopathological process underlying it.

  3. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and children's emotion dysregulation: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Paulo A; Garcia, Alexis

    2016-06-01

    While executive functioning deficits have been central to cognitive theories of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), recent work has suggested that emotion dysregulation may also play a key role in understanding the impairments suffered by youth with ADHD. However, given the multiple processes involved in emotion dysregulation, the extent to which youth with ADHD are impaired across multiple domains of emotion dysregulation including: emotion recognition/understanding (ERU), emotion reactivity/negativity/lability (ERNL), emotion regulation (EREG), and empathy/callous-unemotional traits (ECUT) remains unclear. A meta-analysis of 77 studies (n=32,044 youths) revealed that youth with ADHD have the greatest impairment on ERNL (weighted ES d=.95) followed by EREG (weighted ES d=.80). Significantly smaller effects were observed for ECUT (weighted ES d=.68) and ERU (weighted ES d=.64). Moderation analyses indicated that the association between ADHD and ERNL was stronger among studies that had a sample containing older youth (no other demographic factors were significant). Additionally, the association between ADHD and ECUT was significantly weaker among studies that controlled for co-occurring conduct problems. Co-occurring conduct problems did not moderate the link between ADHD and any other emotion dysregulation domain. Lastly, the association between ADHD and ERNL was significantly weaker when controlling for youth's cognitive functioning. Cognitive functioning did not moderate the link between ADHD and ERU, EREG, or ECUT, respectively. Theoretical/practical implications for the study of emotional dysregulation in youth with ADHD are discussed.

  4. Emotion dysregulation mediates the relationship between child maltreatment and psychopathology: A structural equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennissen, Simone; Holl, Julia; Mai, Hannah; Wolff, Sebastian; Barnow, Sven

    2016-12-01

    The present study investigated the mediating effects of emotion dysregulation on the relationship between child maltreatment and psychopathology. An adult sample (N=701) from diverse backgrounds of psychopathology completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), and the negative affect subscale of the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) in a cross-sectional online survey. Correlational analyses showed that all types of child maltreatment were uniformly associated with emotion dysregulation, and dimensions of emotion dysregulation were strongly related to psychopathology. Limited access to strategies for emotion regulation emerged as the most powerful predictor. Structural equation modeling analyses revealed that emotion dysregulation partially mediated the relationship between child maltreatment and psychopathology, even after controlling for shared variance with negative affect. These findings emphasize the importance of emotion dysregulation as a possible mediating mechanism in the association between child maltreatment and later psychopathology. Additionally, interventions targeting specific emotion regulation strategies may be effective to reduce psychopathology in victims of child maltreatment.

  5. Sexual victimization, fear of sexual powerlessness, and cognitive emotion dysregulation as barriers to sexual assertiveness in college women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerubavel, Noga; Messman-Moore, Terri L

    2013-12-01

    The current study examined sexual victimization and two barriers to young women's sexual assertiveness: fear of sexual powerlessness and cognitive emotion dysregulation. College women (N = 499) responded to surveys and indicated that fear of sexual powerlessness and, to a lesser extent, cognitive emotion dysregulation were barriers to sexual assertiveness. Compared with nonvictims, sexually victimized women had greater problems with sexual assertiveness, fear of sexual powerlessness, and cognitive emotion dysregulation. Among victims, fear of sexual powerlessness and emotion dysregulation interacted to impede sexual assertiveness. Findings support targeting identified barriers in interventions to improve sexual assertiveness and reduce risk for unwanted sexual experiences and sexual victimization.

  6. Pharmacogenomic and clinical data link non-pharmacokinetic metabolic dysregulation to drug side effect pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zielinski, Daniel C.; Filipp, F. V.; Bordbar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Drug side effects cause a significant clinical and economic burden. However, mechanisms of drug action underlying side effect pathogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we integrate pharmacogenomic and clinical data with a human metabolic network and find that non-pharmacokinetic metabolic pathways...... dysregulated by drugs are linked to the development of side effects. We show such dysregulated metabolic pathways contain genes with sequence variants affecting side effect incidence, play established roles in pathophysiology, have significantly altered activity in corresponding diseases, are susceptible...... to metabolic inhibitors and are effective targets for therapeutic nutrient supplementation. Our results indicate that metabolic dysregulation represents a common mechanism underlying side effect pathogenesis that is distinct from the role of metabolism in drug clearance. We suggest that elucidating...

  7. Advances in researches on the immune dysregulation and therapy of severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-ping ZHANG; Han-qing CHEN; Fang LIU; Jie ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    During the development and progression of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), conspicuous immune dysregulation develops, which is mainly manifested as excessive immune response in the early stage and immunosuppression in the late stage.This process involves complex changes in a variety of immune molecules and cells, such as cytokines, complements, lymphocytes,and leukocytes. With the gradual deepening of studies on the development and progression of SAP, the role of immune dysregulation in the pathogenesis of SAP has attracted more and more attention. In this article, we review the advances in research on the immune dysregulation in SAP and the immunotherapy of this disease through exploring the formation of excessive immune response and immune suppression as well as their mutual transformation.

  8. Exploring divergent trajectories: Disorder-specific moderators of the association between negative urgency and dysregulated eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Sarah E; Martin, Shelby J

    2016-08-01

    Negative urgency (i.e., the tendency to act impulsively when experiencing negative emotions) is a well-established risk factor for dysregulated eating (e.g., binge eating, loss of control eating, emotional eating). However, negative urgency is transdiagnostic, in that it is associated with multiple forms of psychopathology. It is currently unclear why some individuals with high negative urgency develop dysregulated eating while others experience depressive symptoms or problematic alcohol use. Investigating disorder-specific moderators of the association between negative urgency and psychopathology may help elucidate these divergent trajectories. The current study examined interactions among negative urgency and eating disorder-specific risk factors specified in the well-established dual-pathway model of bulimic pathology (i.e., appearance pressures, thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, dietary restraint). We hypothesized that these interactions would predict dysregulated eating, but not depressive symptoms or problematic alcohol use. Latent moderated structural equation modeling was used to test this hypothesis in a large (N = 313) sample of female college students. Negative urgency was significantly associated with dysregulated eating, depressive symptoms, and problematic alcohol use. However, interactions among negative urgency and dual-pathway model variables were specific to dysregulated eating and accounted for an additional 3-5% of the variance beyond main effects. Findings suggest that eating disorder-specific risk factors may shape negative urgency into manifesting as dysregulated eating versus another form of psychopathology. Future research should use longitudinal designs to further test the impact of interactions among disorder-specific risk factors and negative urgency on divergent psychopathology trajectories.

  9. Ventral striatum gray matter density reduction in patients with schizophrenia and psychotic emotional dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Stegmayer

    2014-01-01

    Discussion: Decreased gray matter density in a large cluster including the right ventral striatum was associated with severe symptoms of emotional dysregulation in patients with schizophrenia. The ventral striatum is an important part of the limbic system, and was indicated to be involved in the generation of incentive salience and psychotic symptoms. Only patients with severe emotional dysregulation had decreased gray matter in several brain structures associated with emotion and reward processing compared to healthy controls. The results support the hypothesis that grouping patients according to specific clinical symptoms matched to the limbic system allows identifying patient subgroups with structural abnormalities in the limbic network.

  10. Immune System Dysregulation and Herpesvirus Reactivation Persist During Long-Duration Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, B. E.; Mehta, S.; Stowe, R. P.; Uchakin, P.; Quiriarte, H.; Pierson, D.; Sams, C. F.

    2011-01-01

    This poster presentation reviews a study that is designed to address immune system dysregulation and the risk to crewmembers in long duration exploration class missions. This study will address these objectives: (1) Determine the status of adaptive immunity physiological stress, viral immunity, latent herpesvirus reactivation in astronauts during 6 month missions to the International Space Station; (2) determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight; and (3) determine an appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures. The study anticipates 17 subjects, and for this presentation, (midpoint study data) 10 subjects are reviewed.

  11. Significant grey matter changes in a region of the orbitofrontal cortex in healthy participants predicts emotional dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Predrag; Ekman, Carl Johan; Klahr, Johanna; Tigerström, Lars; Rydén, Göran; Johansson, Anette G M; Sellgren, Carl; Golkar, Armita; Olsson, Andreas; Öhman, Arne; Ingvar, Martin; Landén, Mikael

    2016-07-01

    The traditional concept of 'categorical' psychiatric disorders has been challenged as many of the symptoms display a continuous distribution in the general population. We suggest that this is the case for emotional dysregulation, a key component in several categorical psychiatric disorder constructs. We used voxel-based magnetic resonance imaging morphometry in healthy human subjects (n = 87) to study how self-reported subclinical symptoms associated with emotional dysregulation relate to brain regions assumed to be critical for emotion regulation. To measure a pure emotional dysregulation, we also corrected for subclinical symptoms of non-emotional attentional dysregulation. We show that such subclinical emotional symptoms correlate negatively with the grey matter volume of lateral orbitofrontal cortex bilaterally-a region assumed to be critical for emotion regulation and dysfunctional in psychiatric disorders involving emotional dysregulation. Importantly, this effect is mediated both by a decrease in volume associated with emotional dysregulation and an increase in volume due to non-emotional attentional dysregulation. Exploratory analysis suggests that other regions involved in emotional processing such as insula and ventral striatum also show a similar reduction in grey matter volume mirroring clinical disorders associated with emotional dysregulation. Our findings support the concept of continuous properties in psychiatric symptomatology.

  12. Dysregulation of the Autonomic Nervous System and Its Association With the Presence and Intensity of Chronic Widespread Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barakat, Ansam; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Licht, Carmilla M. M.; Geenen, Rinie; Macfarlane, Gary J.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Smit, Johannes H.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Dekker, Joost

    Objective. To test the hypotheses that dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) is associated with the presence of chronic widespread pain (CWP), and that dysregulation of the ANS is associated with higher pain intensity in CWP. Methods. Cross-sectional data were obtained from 1,574

  13. Significant grey matter changes in a region of the orbitofrontal cortex in healthy participants predicts emotional dysregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Carl Johan; Klahr, Johanna; Tigerström, Lars; Rydén, Göran; Johansson, Anette G. M.; Sellgren, Carl; Golkar, Armita; Olsson, Andreas; Öhman, Arne; Ingvar, Martin; Landén, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    The traditional concept of ‘categorical’ psychiatric disorders has been challenged as many of the symptoms display a continuous distribution in the general population. We suggest that this is the case for emotional dysregulation, a key component in several categorical psychiatric disorder constructs. We used voxel-based magnetic resonance imaging morphometry in healthy human subjects (n = 87) to study how self-reported subclinical symptoms associated with emotional dysregulation relate to brain regions assumed to be critical for emotion regulation. To measure a pure emotional dysregulation, we also corrected for subclinical symptoms of non-emotional attentional dysregulation. We show that such subclinical emotional symptoms correlate negatively with the grey matter volume of lateral orbitofrontal cortex bilaterally—a region assumed to be critical for emotion regulation and dysfunctional in psychiatric disorders involving emotional dysregulation. Importantly, this effect is mediated both by a decrease in volume associated with emotional dysregulation and an increase in volume due to non-emotional attentional dysregulation. Exploratory analysis suggests that other regions involved in emotional processing such as insula and ventral striatum also show a similar reduction in grey matter volume mirroring clinical disorders associated with emotional dysregulation. Our findings support the concept of continuous properties in psychiatric symptomatology. PMID:26078386

  14. Loneliness mediates the relationship between emotion dysregulation and bulimia nervosa/binge eating disorder psychopathology in a clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southward, Matthew W; Christensen, Kara A; Fettich, Karla C; Weissman, Jessica; Berona, Johnny; Chen, Eunice Y

    2014-12-01

    Emotion dysregulation has been linked to binge eating disorder (BED) and bulimia nervosa (BN) although the mechanisms by which it affects BN/BED psychopathology are unclear. This study tested loneliness as a mediator between emotion dysregulation and BN/BED psychopathology. A treatment-seeking sample of 107 women with BN or BED was assessed for loneliness (UCLA Loneliness Scale), emotion dysregulation (Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale), and BN/BED psychopathology (Eating Disorder Examination) before treatment. Hierarchical linear regressions and bootstrapping mediation models were run. Greater overall emotion dysregulation was associated with greater BN/BED psychopathology, mediated by loneliness (95 % CI 0.03, 0.09). Emotion dysregulation, however, did not mediate between loneliness and BN/BED psychopathology (95 % CI −0.01, 0.01). Targeting loneliness may effectively treat emotional aspects of BN/BED in women.

  15. Dysregulated Circulating Dendritic Cell Function in Ulcerative Colitis Is Partially Restored by Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus casei Shirota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R. Mann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dendritic cells regulate immune responses to microbial products and play a key role in ulcerative colitis (UC pathology. We determined the immunomodulatory effects of probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS on human DC from healthy controls and active UC patients. Methods. Human blood DC from healthy controls (control-DC and UC patients (UC-DC were conditioned with heat-killed LcS and used to stimulate allogeneic T cells in a 5-day mixed leucocyte reaction. Results. UC-DC displayed a reduced stimulatory capacity for T cells (P<0.05 and enhanced expression of skin-homing markers CLA and CCR4 on stimulated T cells (P<0.05 that were negative for gut-homing marker β7. LcS treatment restored the stimulatory capacity of UC-DC, reflecting that of control-DC. LcS treatment conditioned control-DC to induce CLA on T cells in conjunction with β7, generating a multihoming profile, but had no effects on UC-DC. Finally, LcS treatment enhanced DC ability to induce TGFβ production by T cells in controls but not UC patients. Conclusions. We demonstrate a systemic, dysregulated DC function in UC that may account for the propensity of UC patients to develop cutaneous manifestations. LcS has multifunctional immunoregulatory activities depending on the inflammatory state; therapeutic effects reported in UC may be due to promotion of homeostasis.

  16. Slit2-Robo4 pathway modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial inflammation and its expression is dysregulated during endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Helong; Anand, Appakkudal R; Ganju, Ramesh K

    2014-01-01

    The secretory protein Slit2 and its receptors Robo1 and Robo4 are considered to regulate mobility and permeability of endothelial cells and other cell types. However, the roles of Slit2 and its two receptors in endothelial inflammatory responses remain to be clarified. In this study, we show that, in primary HUVECs, Slit2 represses LPS-induced secretion of certain inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, cell adhesion molecule ICAM-1 upregulation, and monocyte adhesion. Slit2's anti-inflammatory effect is mediated by its dominant endothelial-specific receptor Robo4. However, the minor receptor Robo1 has proinflammatory properties and is downregulated by Slit2 via targeting of miR-218. Elucidation of molecular mechanism reveals that Slit2 represses inflammatory responses by inhibiting the Pyk2-NF-κB pathway downstream of LPS-TLR4. Further studies reveal that LPS enhances endothelial inflammation by downregulating the anti-inflammatory Slit2 and Robo4 in HUVECs in vitro, as well as in arterial endothelial cells and liver in vivo during endotoxemia. These results suggest that Slit2-Robo4 signaling is important in regulating LPS-induced endothelial inflammation, and LPS, in turn, enhances inflammation by interfering with the expression of the anti-inflammatory Slit2-Robo4 during the disease state. This implies that Slit2-Robo4 is a key regulator of endothelial inflammation, and its dysregulation during endotoxemia is a novel mechanism for LPS-induced vascular pathogenesis.

  17. Heterozygous triplication of upstream regulatory sequences leads to dysregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 19 in patients with cavitary optic disc anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazlewood, Ralph J; Roos, Benjamin R; Solivan-Timpe, Frances; Honkanen, Robert A; Jampol, Lee M; Gieser, Stephen C; Meyer, Kacie J; Mullins, Robert F; Kuehn, Markus H; Scheetz, Todd E; Kwon, Young H; Alward, Wallace L M; Stone, Edwin M; Fingert, John H

    2015-03-01

    Patients with a congenital optic nerve disease, cavitary optic disc anomaly (CODA), are born with profound excavation of the optic nerve resembling glaucoma. We previously mapped the gene that causes autosomal-dominant CODA in a large pedigree to a chromosome 12q locus. Using comparative genomic hybridization and quantitative PCR analysis of this pedigree, we report identifying a 6-Kbp heterozygous triplication upstream of the matrix metalloproteinase 19 (MMP19) gene, present in all 17 affected family members and no normal members. Moreover, the triplication was not detected in 78 control subjects or in the Database of Genomic Variants. We further detected the same 6-Kbp triplication in one of 24 unrelated CODA patients and in none of 172 glaucoma patients. Analysis with a Luciferase assay showed that the 6-Kbp sequence has transcription enhancer activity. A 773-bp fragment of the 6-Kbp DNA segment increased downstream gene expression eightfold, suggesting that triplication of this sequence may lead to dysregulation of the downstream gene, MMP19, in CODA patients. Lastly, immunohistochemical analysis of human donor eyes revealed strong expression of MMP19 in optic nerve head. These data strongly suggest that triplication of an enhancer may lead to overexpression of MMP19 in the optic nerve that causes CODA. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  18. Emotion Dysregulation and Anxiety in Adults with ASD: Does Social Motivation Play a Role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Deanna; Scarpa, Angela; White, Susan; Laugeson, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Young adults with ASD and no intellectual impairment are more likely to exhibit clinical levels of anxiety than typically developing peers (DSM-5, American Psychiatric Association, 2013). This study tests a mechanistic model in which anxiety culminates via emotion dysregulation and social motivation. Adults with ASD (49 males, 20 females)…

  19. Cyclophosphamide for Rapid-Onset Obesity, Hypothalamic Dysfunction, Hypoventilation, and Autonomic Dysregulation Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Paz-Priel, Ido; Cooke, David W.; Chen, Allen R

    2010-01-01

    Patients with rapid-onset obesity, hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, autonomic dysregulation, and neural crest tumor syndrome have poor long-term outcomes. We report a patient who was treated successfully with high-dose cyclophosphamide immunoablation. This experience offers a novel therapeutic approach and an indirect insight into the underlying pathogenesis of this syndrome.

  20. Moderators of the Relation between Shyness and Behavior with Peers: Cortisol Dysregulation and Maternal Emotion Socialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elizabeth L.; Buss, Kristin A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relations among shyness, physiological dysregulation, and maternal emotion socialization in predicting children's social behavior with peers during the kindergarten year (N = 66; 29 girls). For shy children, interactions with peers represent potential stressors that can elicit negative emotion and physiological…

  1. Genome-Wide Association Study of the Child Behavior Checklist Dysregulation Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mick, Eric; McGough, James; Loo, Sandra; Doyle, Alysa E.; Wozniak, Janet; Wilens, Timothy E.; Smalley, Susan; McCracken, James; Biederman, Joseph; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A potentially useful tool for understanding the distribution and determinants of emotional dysregulation in children is a Child Behavior Checklist profile, comprising the Attention Problems, Anxious/Depressed, and Aggressive Behavior clinical subscales (CBCL-DP). The CBCL-DP indexes a heritable trait that increases susceptibility for…

  2. Emotional Dysregulation and Interpersonal Difficulties as Risk Factors for Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Molly; Zeman, Janice; Erdley, Cynthia; Lisa, Ludmila; Sim, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine a model of factors that place psychiatrically hospitalized girls at risk for non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). The role of familial and peer interpersonal difficulties, as well as emotional dysregulation, were examined in relationship to NSSI behaviors. Participants were 99 adolescent girls (83.2% Caucasian;…

  3. Emotion Dysregulation as a Mechanism Linking Peer Victimization to Internalizing Symptoms in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Katie A.; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; Hilt, Lori M.

    2009-01-01

    Peer victimization experiences represent developmentally salient stressors among adolescents and are associated with the development of internalizing symptoms. However, the mechanisms linking peer victimization to adolescent psychopathology remain inadequately understood. This study examined emotion dysregulation as a mechanism linking peer stress…

  4. Infant Neurobehavioral Dysregulation Related to Behavior Problems in Children with Prenatal Substance Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Barry M.; Bagner, Daniel M.; Liu, Jing; LaGasse, Linda L.; Seifer, Ronald; Bauer, Charles R.; Shankaran, Seetha; Bada, Henrietta; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Das, Abhik

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test a developmental model of neurobehavioral dysregulation relating prenatal substance exposure to behavior problems at age 7. PATIENTS AND METHODS The sample included 360 cocaine-exposed and 480 unexposed children from lower to lower middle class families of which 78% were African American. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test models whereby prenatal exposure to cocaine and other substances would result in neurobehavioral dysregulation in infancy, which would predict externalizing and internalizing behavior problems in early childhood. SEM models were developed for individual and combined parent and teacher report for externalizing, internalizing, and total problem scores on the Child Behavior Checklist. RESULTS The Goodness of Fit Statistics indicated that all of the models met criteria for adequate fit with 7 of the 9 models explaining 18 to 60% of the variance in behavior problems at age 7. The paths in the models indicate that there are direct effects of prenatal substance exposure on 7-year behavior problems as well as indirect effects, including neurobehavioral dysregulation. CONCLUSIONS Prenatal substance exposure affects behavior problems at age 7 through two mechanisms. The direct pathway is consistent with a teratogenic effect. Indirect pathways suggest cascading effects where prenatal substance exposure results in neurobehavioral dysregulation manifesting as deviations in later behavioral expression. Developmental models provide an understanding of pathways that describe how prenatal substance exposure affects child outcome and have significant implications for early identification and prevention. PMID:19822596

  5. Cortisol Predicts Behavioral Dysregulation and Length of Stay among Children Admitted for Psychiatric Inpatient Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebbe, Aaron M.; Elledge, L. Christian; Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Stoppelbein, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Individual differences in behavioral regulation system (BRS) and stress response system (SRS) functioning may reflect greater biological sensitivity to context. The current study tested whether children's cortisol, a measure of the SRS, was related to observed dysregulated behavior, an indicator of the BRS, in a sample of children admitted for…

  6. Anxious Attachment Style and Salivary Cortisol Dysregulation in Healthy Female Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskis, Andrea; Loveday, Catherine; Hucklebridge, Frank; Thorn, Lisa; Clow, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Background: Attachment style has been linked with basal cortisol secretion in healthy adult women. We investigated whether dysregulation in basal cortisol secretion may be evident in younger healthy females. Methods: Sixty healthy females aged 9-18 years (mean 14.16, SD [plus or minus] 2.63 years) participated in the Attachment Style Interview…

  7. Just Breathe: The Effects of Emotional Dysregulation and Test Anxiety on GPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Samantha D.; Wasieleski, David T.; Whatley, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    College is considered to be one of the most evaluative and stressful times during a student's academic career. A student's inability to regulate emotions may be correlated with an increased level of test anxiety. Previous research has indicated significant relationships between emotional dysregulation and generalized anxiety disorders (e.g.,…

  8. Dysregulated Fear in Toddlerhood Predicts Kindergarten Social Withdrawal through Protective Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Buss, Kristin A.

    2014-01-01

    Two recent advances in the study of fearful temperament (behavioural inhibition) include the validation of dysregulated fear as a temperamental construct that more specifically predicts later social withdrawal and anxiety, and the use of conceptual and statistical models that place parenting as a mechanism of development from temperament to these…

  9. Genome-Wide Association Study of the Child Behavior Checklist Dysregulation Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mick, Eric; McGough, James; Loo, Sandra; Doyle, Alysa E.; Wozniak, Janet; Wilens, Timothy E.; Smalley, Susan; McCracken, James; Biederman, Joseph; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A potentially useful tool for understanding the distribution and determinants of emotional dysregulation in children is a Child Behavior Checklist profile, comprising the Attention Problems, Anxious/Depressed, and Aggressive Behavior clinical subscales (CBCL-DP). The CBCL-DP indexes a heritable trait that increases susceptibility for…

  10. Adult Outcomes of Childhood Dysregulation: A 14-Year Follow-up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althoff, Robert R.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Rettew, David C.; Hudziak, James J.; van der Ende, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Using a general population sample, the adult outcomes of children who presented with severe problems with self-regulation defined as being concurrently rated highly on attention problems, aggressive behavior, and anxious-depression on the Child Behavior Checklist-Dysregulation Profile (CBCL-DP) were examined. Method: Two thousand…

  11. Childhood trauma and eating psychopathology: a mediating role for dissociation and emotion dysregulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, Stuart J; Newman, Emily; Power, Kevin; Swanson, Vivien; Day, Kenny

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between different forms of childhood trauma and eating psychopathology using a multiple mediation model that included emotion dysregulation and dissociation as hypothesised mediators. 142 female undergraduate psychology students studying at two British Universities participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants completed measures of childhood trauma (emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional neglect and physical neglect), eating psychopathology, dissociation and emotion dysregulation. Multiple mediation analysis was conducted to investigate the study's proposed model. Results revealed that the multiple mediation model significantly predicted eating psychopathology. Additionally, both emotion dysregulation and dissociation were found to be significant mediators between childhood trauma and eating psychopathology. A specific indirect effect was observed between childhood emotional abuse and eating psychopathology through emotion dysregulation. Findings support previous research linking childhood trauma to eating psychopathology. They indicate that multiple forms of childhood trauma should be assessed for individuals with eating disorders. The possible maintaining role of emotion regulation processes should also be considered in the treatment of eating disorders.

  12. Sensorimotor Development and Dysregulation of Activity in Young Children with Autism and with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seynhaeve, Isabel; Nader-Grosbois, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    Dysregulation of activity linked with development was analysed in 12 children with intellectual disabilities (ID) and in 12 children with autism (ASD) matched on their developmental age (18 months). The "Batterie d'Evaluation du Developpement Cognitif et Social" [Adrien, J. L. (1996). "Autisme du jeune enfant. Developpement…

  13. Initial Development of a Measure of Emotional Dysregulation for Individuals with Cluster B Personality Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhill, Christina E.; Mulvey, Edward P.; Pilkonis, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    Individuals with DSM-IV Cluster B personality disorders are at particular risk of violence toward self or others. Emotional dysregulation is likely to be a factor in such incidents and is a central issue addressed in therapies with personality-disordered individuals. This article reports findings from a study that developed an original 18-item…

  14. Inhibition of transglutaminase 2 mitigates transcriptional dysregulation in models of Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConoughey, Stephen J; Basso, Manuela; Niatsetskaya, Zoya V; Sleiman, Sama F; Smirnova, Natalia A; Langley, Brett C; Mahishi, Lata; Cooper, Arthur J L; Antonyak, Marc A; Cerione, Rick A; Li, Bo; Starkov, Anatoly; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar; Beal, M Flint; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H; Ryu, Hoon; Xia, Li; Iismaa, Siiri E; Pallos, Judit; Pasternack, Ralf; Hils, Martin; Fan, Jing; Raymond, Lynn A; Marsh, J Lawrence; Thompson, Leslie M; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2010-09-01

    Caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein, Huntington's disease leads to striatal degeneration via the transcriptional dysregulation of a number of genes, including those involved in mitochondrial biogenesis. Here we show that transglutaminase 2, which is upregulated in HD, exacerbates transcriptional dysregulation by acting as a selective corepressor of nuclear genes; transglutaminase 2 interacts directly with histone H3 in the nucleus. In a cellular model of HD, transglutaminase inhibition de-repressed two established regulators of mitochondrial function, PGC-1alpha and cytochrome c and reversed susceptibility of human HD cells to the mitochondrial toxin, 3-nitroproprionic acid; however, protection mediated by transglutaminase inhibition was not associated with improved mitochondrial bioenergetics. A gene microarray analysis indicated that transglutaminase inhibition normalized expression of not only mitochondrial genes but also 40% of genes that are dysregulated in HD striatal neurons, including chaperone and histone genes. Moreover, transglutaminase inhibition attenuated degeneration in a Drosophila model of HD and protected mouse HD striatal neurons from excitotoxicity. Altogether these findings demonstrate that selective TG inhibition broadly corrects transcriptional dysregulation in HD and defines a novel HDAC-independent epigenetic strategy for treating neurodegeneration.

  15. Severe Affective and Behavioural Dysregulation Is Associated with Significant Psychosocial Adversity and Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jucksch, Viola; Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Lenz, Klaus; Goth, Kirstin; Dopfner, Manfred; Poustka, Fritz; Freitag, Christine M.; Lehmkuhl, Gerd; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Holtmann, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Recently, a highly heritable behavioral phenotype of simultaneous deviance on the Anxious/Depressed, Attention Problems, and Aggressive Behavior syndrome scales has been identified on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL-Dysregulation Profile, CBCL-DP). This study aims to investigate psychosocial adversity and impairment of the CBCL-DP.…

  16. Pediatric Bipolar Disorder versus Severe Mood Dysregulation: Risk for Manic Episodes on Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringaris, Argyris; Baroni, Argelinda; Haimm, Caroline; Brotman, Melissa; Lowe, Catherine H.; Myers, Frances; Rustgi, Eileen; Wheeler, Wanda; Kayser, Reilly; Towbin, Kenneth; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: An important question in pediatric bipolar research is whether marked nonepisodic irritability is a manifestation of bipolar disorder in youth. This study tests the hypothesis that youth with severe mood dysregulation (SMD), a category created for the purpose of studying children presenting with severe nonepisodic irritability, will be…

  17. Differentiating Bipolar Disorder--Not Otherwise Specified and Severe Mood Dysregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towbin, Kenneth; Axelson, David; Leibenluft, Ellen; Birmaher, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Bipolar disorder--not otherwise specified (BP-NOS) and severe mood dysregulation (SMD) are severe mood disorders that were defined to address questions about the diagnosis of bipolar disorder (BD) in youth. SMD and BP-NOS are distinct phenotypes that differ in clinical presentation and longitudinal course. The purpose of this review is…

  18. In Search of HPA Axis Dysregulation in Child and Adolescent Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerry, John D.; Hastings, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in adults with major depressive disorder is among the most consistent and robust biological findings in psychiatry. Given the importance of the adolescent transition to the development and recurrence of depressive phenomena over the lifespan, it is important to have an integrative…

  19. Cortisol Predicts Behavioral Dysregulation and Length of Stay among Children Admitted for Psychiatric Inpatient Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebbe, Aaron M.; Elledge, L. Christian; Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Stoppelbein, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Individual differences in behavioral regulation system (BRS) and stress response system (SRS) functioning may reflect greater biological sensitivity to context. The current study tested whether children's cortisol, a measure of the SRS, was related to observed dysregulated behavior, an indicator of the BRS, in a sample of children admitted for…

  20. Anxious Attachment Style and Salivary Cortisol Dysregulation in Healthy Female Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskis, Andrea; Loveday, Catherine; Hucklebridge, Frank; Thorn, Lisa; Clow, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Background: Attachment style has been linked with basal cortisol secretion in healthy adult women. We investigated whether dysregulation in basal cortisol secretion may be evident in younger healthy females. Methods: Sixty healthy females aged 9-18 years (mean 14.16, SD [plus or minus] 2.63 years) participated in the Attachment Style Interview…

  1. Metabolic dysregulation and interventions in type 2 diabetes mellitus and HIV-lipodystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, J.P.H. van

    2005-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is on two aspects of metabolic dysregulation, type 2 diabetes mellitus and HIV-lipodystrophy, and the effects of insulin-sensitizing agents. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) have received increasing attenttion for the treatment of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. Currently, ther

  2. Neural Correlates of Reversal Learning in Severe Mood Dysregulation and Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adleman, Nancy E.; Kayser, Reilly; Dickstein, Daniel; Blair, R. James R.; Pine, Daniel; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Outcome and family history data differentiate children with severe mood dysregulation (SMD), a syndrome characterized by chronic irritability, from children with "classic" episodic bipolar disorder (BD). Nevertheless, the presence of cognitive inflexibility in SMD and BD highlights the need to delineate neurophysiologic similarities and…

  3. Differentiating Bipolar Disorder--Not Otherwise Specified and Severe Mood Dysregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towbin, Kenneth; Axelson, David; Leibenluft, Ellen; Birmaher, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Bipolar disorder--not otherwise specified (BP-NOS) and severe mood dysregulation (SMD) are severe mood disorders that were defined to address questions about the diagnosis of bipolar disorder (BD) in youth. SMD and BP-NOS are distinct phenotypes that differ in clinical presentation and longitudinal course. The purpose of this review is…

  4. Pediatric Bipolar Disorder versus Severe Mood Dysregulation: Risk for Manic Episodes on Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringaris, Argyris; Baroni, Argelinda; Haimm, Caroline; Brotman, Melissa; Lowe, Catherine H.; Myers, Frances; Rustgi, Eileen; Wheeler, Wanda; Kayser, Reilly; Towbin, Kenneth; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: An important question in pediatric bipolar research is whether marked nonepisodic irritability is a manifestation of bipolar disorder in youth. This study tests the hypothesis that youth with severe mood dysregulation (SMD), a category created for the purpose of studying children presenting with severe nonepisodic irritability, will be…

  5. Longitudinal Relations between Peer Victimization, Emotion Dysregulation, and Internalizing Symptoms among Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Sarah T.; Sullivan, Terri N.

    2017-01-01

    The current study examined longitudinal relations between overt and relational victimization, sadness and anger dysregulation, and depressive and anxiety symptoms across 6 months among an ethnically diverse sample of sixth graders (N = 485; 48% male; 65% African American). No direct longitudinal relations were found between peer victimization and…

  6. Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder Symptoms by Age in Autism, ADHD, and General Population Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Kokotovich, Cari; Mathiowetz, Christine; Baweja, Raman; Calhoun, Susan L.; Waxmonsky, James

    2017-01-01

    Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD) is a controversial "DSM-5" diagnosis. It is not known how DMDD symptoms vary by age and if differences are similar for autism, ADHD, and general population samples. Our study analyzed the two DMDD symptoms (irritable-angry mood and temper outbursts) in 1,827 children with autism or ADHD (with…

  7. Dysregulation of coronary microvascular reactivity in asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momose, Mitsuru; Neverve, Jodi; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Schwaiger, Markus; Bengel, Frank M. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Abletshauser, Claudia [Department of Medicine, Novartis Pharma GmbH, Nuernberg (Germany); Schnell, Oliver; Standl, Eberhard [Institut fuer Diabetesforschung, Munich (Germany)

    2002-12-01

    In diabetic patients, a number of studies have suggested an impairment of vascular reactivity in response to vasodilatory stimuli. The pattern of dysregulation at the coronary microcirculatory level, however, has not been clearly defined. Thus, it was the aim of this study to characterise coronary microvascular function non-invasively in a homogeneous group of asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients. In 46 patients with type 2 diabetes, myocardial blood flow (MBF) was quantified at baseline, in response to cold pressor test (CPT) and during adenosine-mediated vasodilation using positron emission tomography and nitrogen-13 ammonia. None of the patients had been treated with insulin, and none had symptoms of cardiac disease. Decreased MBF during CPT, indicating microvascular dysregulation, was observed in 16 patients (CPT-), while 30 patients demonstrated increased MBF during CPT (CPT+). Response to CPT was mildly, but significantly correlated with response to adenosine (r=0.44, P=0.0035). There was no difference in HbA1c, serum lipid levels or serum endothelial markers between the groups. Microvascular dysregulation in the CPT- group was associated with elevated baseline MBF (P<0.0001), reduced baseline vascular resistance (P=0.0026) and an abnormal increase in resistance during CPT (P=0.0002). In conclusion, coronary microvascular dysregulation is present in approximately one-third of asymptomatic, non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients. Elevated baseline blood flow and reduced microvascular resistance at rest are characteristics of this dysregulation. These data suggest a state of activation of endothelial-dependent vasodilation at baseline which appears to limit the flow response to stress conditions. (orig.)

  8. Obesity Weighs down Memory through a Mechanism Involving the Neuroepigenetic Dysregulation of Sirt1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyward, Frankie D; Gilliam, Daniel; Coleman, Mark A; Gavin, Cristin F; Wang, Jing; Kaas, Garrett; Trieu, Richard; Lewis, John; Moulden, Jerome; Sweatt, J David

    2016-01-27

    Aberrant gene expression within the hippocampus has recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced memory impairment. Whether a dysregulation of epigenetic modifications mediates this disruption in gene transcription has yet to be established. Here we report evidence of obesity-induced alterations in DNA methylation of memory-associated genes, including Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1), within the hippocampus, and thus offer a novel mechanism by which SIRT1 expression within the hippocampus is suppressed during obesity. Forebrain neuron-specific Sirt1 knock-out closely recapitulated the memory deficits exhibited by obese mice, consistent with the hypothesis that the high-fat diet-mediated reduction of hippocampal SIRT1 could be responsible for obesity-linked memory impairment. Obese mice fed a diet supplemented with the SIRT1-activating molecule resveratrol exhibited increased hippocampal SIRT1 activity and preserved hippocampus-dependent memory, further strengthening this conclusion. Thus, our findings suggest that the memory-impairing effects of diet-induced obesity may potentially be mediated by neuroepigenetic dysregulation of SIRT1 within the hippocampus. Previous studies have implicated transcriptional dysregulation within the hippocampus as being a relevant pathological concomitant of obesity-induced memory impairment, yet a deeper understanding of the basis for, and etiological significance of, transcriptional dysregulation in this context is lacking. Here we present the first evidence of epigenetic dysregulation (i.e., altered DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation) of memory-related genes, including Sirt1, within the hippocampus of obese mice. Furthermore, experiments using transgenic and pharmacological approaches strongly implicate reduced hippocampal SIRT1 as being a principal pathogenic mediator of obesity-induced memory impairment. This paper offers a novel working model that may serve as a conceptual basis for the development of therapeutic

  9. Can Emotional and Behavioral Dysregulation in Youth Be Decoded from Functional Neuroimaging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana C L Portugal

    Full Text Available High comorbidity among pediatric disorders characterized by behavioral and emotional dysregulation poses problems for diagnosis and treatment, and suggests that these disorders may be better conceptualized as dimensions of abnormal behaviors. Furthermore, identifying neuroimaging biomarkers related to dimensional measures of behavior may provide targets to guide individualized treatment. We aimed to use functional neuroimaging and pattern regression techniques to determine whether patterns of brain activity could accurately decode individual-level severity on a dimensional scale measuring behavioural and emotional dysregulation at two different time points.A sample of fifty-seven youth (mean age: 14.5 years; 32 males was selected from a multi-site study of youth with parent-reported behavioral and emotional dysregulation. Participants performed a block-design reward paradigm during functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI. Pattern regression analyses consisted of Relevance Vector Regression (RVR and two cross-validation strategies implemented in the Pattern Recognition for Neuroimaging toolbox (PRoNTo. Medication was treated as a binary confounding variable. Decoded and actual clinical scores were compared using Pearson's correlation coefficient (r and mean squared error (MSE to evaluate the models. Permutation test was applied to estimate significance levels.Relevance Vector Regression identified patterns of neural activity associated with symptoms of behavioral and emotional dysregulation at the initial study screen and close to the fMRI scanning session. The correlation and the mean squared error between actual and decoded symptoms were significant at the initial study screen and close to the fMRI scanning session. However, after controlling for potential medication effects, results remained significant only for decoding symptoms at the initial study screen. Neural regions with the highest contribution to the pattern regression model

  10. Dysregulated development of IL-17- and IL-21-expressing follicular helper T cells and increased germinal center formation in the absence of RORγt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichner, Katharina; Stauss, Dennis; Kampfrath, Branka; Krüger, Kerstin; Müller, Gerd; Rehm, Armin; Lipp, Martin; Höpken, Uta E

    2016-02-01

    Interleukin 17-producing helper T (Th17) cells have been widely defined by the lineage transcription factor retinoid-related orphan receptor (ROR)γt. Pathophysiologically, these cells play a crucial role in autoimmune diseases and have been linked to dysregulated germinal center (GC) reactions and autoantibody production. In this study, we used gene expression and flow cytometric analyses for the characterization of Rorγt(-/-) and Rorγt(-/-)Il21(RFP/+) mice to demonstrate a previously unknown transcriptional flexibility in the development of IL-17-producing Th-cell subsets. We found an accumulation of follicular Th (Tfh) cells by 5.2-fold, spontaneous 13-fold higher GC formation, decreased frequency of follicular Foxp3(+) T-regulatory (Treg) cells (50%), and a 3.4-fold increase in the number of proliferating follicular B cells in RORγt-deficient vs. wild-type mice. Dysregulated B-cell responses were associated with enhanced production of IL-17 (6.4-fold), IL-21 (2.2-fold), and B-cell-activating factor (BAFF) (2-fold) and were partially rescued by adoptive transfer of Treg cells. In an unexpected finding, we detected RORγt-independent IL-17 expression in ICOS(+)CXCR5(+)Tfh and in ICOS(+)CXCR5(-)Th cells. Based on the observed high Irf4 and Batf gene expression, we suggest that CD4(+) T-cell transcription factors other than RORγt can cooperatively induce differentiation of IL-17-producing Th cells, including Th17-like Tfh-cell subsets. We conclude that the occurrence of aberrant Tfh and follicular Treg cells support spontaneous GC formation and dysregulated B-cell responses in RORγt-deficient mice.

  11. Dysregulation of PLDN (pallidin) is a mechanism for platelet dense granule deficiency in RUNX1 haplodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, G F; Goldfinger, L E; Fan, D C; Lambert, M P; Jalagadugula, G; Freishtat, R; Rao, A K

    2017-04-01

    Essentials Platelet dense granule (DG) deficiency is a major abnormality in RUNX1 haplodeficiency patients. The molecular mechanisms leading to the platelet DG deficiency are unknown. Platelet expression of PLDN (BLOC1S6, pallidin), involved in DG biogenesis, is regulated by RUNX1. Downregulation of PLDN is a mechanism for DG deficiency in RUNX1 haplodeficiency. Background Inherited RUNX1 haplodeficiency is associated with thrombocytopenia and platelet dysfunction. Dense granule (DG) deficiency has been reported in patients with RUNX1 haplodeficiency, but the molecular mechanisms are unknown. Platelet mRNA expression profiling in a patient previously reported by us with a RUNX1 mutation and platelet dysfunction showed decreased expression of PLDN (BLOC1S6), which encodes pallidin, a subunit of biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex-1 (BLOC-1) involved in DG biogenesis. PLDN mutations in the pallid mouse and Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome-9 are associated with platelet DG deficiency. Objectives We postulated that PLDN is a RUNX1 target, and that its decreased expression leads to platelet DG deficiency in RUNX1 haplodeficiency. Results Platelet pallidin and DG levels were decreased in our patient. This was also observed in two siblings from a different family with a RUNX1 mutation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays with phorbol ester-treated human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells showed RUNX1 binding to RUNX1 consensus sites in the PLDN1 5' upstream region. In luciferase reporter studies, mutation of RUNX1 sites in the PLDN promoter reduced activity. RUNX1 overexpression enhanced and RUNX1 downregulation decreased PLDN1 promoter activity and protein expression. RUNX1 downregulation resulted in impaired handling of mepacrine and mislocalization of the DG marker CD63 in HEL cells, indicating impaired DG formation, recapitulating findings on PLDN downregulation. Conclusions These studies provide the first evidence that PLDN is a

  12. Orexin-1 receptor blockade dysregulates REM sleep in the presence of orexin-2 receptor antagonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eDugovic

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with the prominent role of orexins in the maintenance of wakefulness via activation of orexin-1 (OX1R and orexin-2 (OX2R receptors, various dual OX1/2R antagonists have been shown to promote sleep in animals and humans. While selective blockade of OX2R seems to be sufficient to initiate and prolong sleep, the beneficial effect of additional inhibition of OX1R remains controversial. The relative contribution of OX1R and OX2R to the sleep effects induced by a dual OX1/2R antagonist was further investigated in the rat, and specifically on rapid eye movement (REM sleep since a deficiency of the orexin system is associated with narcolepsy/cataplexy based on clinical and pre-clinical data. As expected, the dual OX1/2R antagonist SB-649868 was effective in promoting non-REM (NREM and REM sleep following oral dosing (10 and 30 mg/kg at the onset of the dark phase. However, a disruption of REM sleep was evidenced by a more pronounced reduction in the onset of REM as compared to NREM sleep, a marked enhancement of the REM/total sleep ratio, and the occurrence of a few episodes of direct wake to REM sleep transitions (REM intrusion. When administered subcutaneously, the OX2R antagonist JNJ-10397049 (10 mg/kg increased NREM duration whereas the OX1R antagonist GSK-1059865 (10 mg/kg did not alter sleep. REM sleep was not affected either by OX2R or OX1R blockade alone, but administration of the OX1R antagonist in combination with the OX2R antagonist induced a significant reduction in REM sleep latency and an increase in REM sleep duration at the expense of the time spent in NREM sleep. These results indicate that additional blockade of OX1R to OX2R antagonism elicits a dysregulation of REM sleep by shifting the balance in favor of REM sleep at the expense of NREM sleep that may increase the risk of adverse events. Translation of this hypothesis remains to be tested in the clinic.

  13. Dysregulation of the stress response in asthmatic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priftis, K N; Papadimitriou, A; Nicolaidou, P; Chrousos, G P

    2009-01-01

    The stress system co-ordinates the adaptive responses of the organism to stressors of any kind. Inappropriate responsiveness may account for increased susceptibility to a variety of disorders, including asthma. Accumulated evidence from animal models suggests that exogenously applied stress enhances airway reactivity and increases allergen-induced airway inflammation. This is in agreement with the clinical observation that stressful life events increase the risk of a new asthma attack. Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis by specific cytokines increases the release of cortisol, which in turn feeds back and suppresses the immune reaction. Data from animal models suggest that inability to increase glucocorticoid production in response to stress is associated with increased airway inflammation with mechanical dysfunction of the lungs. Recently, a growing body of evidence shows that asthmatic subjects who are not treated with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are likely to have an attenuated activity and/or responsiveness of their HPA axis. In line with this concept, most asthmatic children demonstrate improved HPA axis responsiveness on conventional doses of ICS, as their airway inflammation subsides. Few patients may experience further deterioration of adrenal function, a phenomenon which may be genetically determined.

  14. Dysregulated proinflammatory and fibrogenic phenotype of fibroblasts in cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Huaux

    Full Text Available Morbi-mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF is mainly related to chronic lung infection and inflammation, uncontrolled tissue rearrangements and fibrosis, and yet the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. We evaluated inflammatory and fibrosis responses to bleomycin in F508del homozygous and wild-type mice, and phenotype of fibroblasts explanted from mouse lungs and skin. The effect of vardenafil, a cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, was tested in vivo and in culture. Responses of proinflammatory and fibrotic markers to bleomycin were enhanced in lungs and skin of CF mice and were prevented by treatment with vardenafil. Purified lung and skin fibroblasts from CF mice proliferated and differentiated into myofibroblasts more prominently and displayed higher sensitivity to growth factors than those recovered from wild-type littermates. Under inflammatory stimulation, mRNA and protein expression of proinflammatory mediators were higher in CF than in wild-type fibroblasts, in which CFTR expression reached similar levels to those observed in other non-epithelial cells, such as macrophages. Increased proinflammatory responses in CF fibroblasts were reduced by half with submicromolar concentrations of vardenafil. Proinflammatory and fibrogenic functions of fibroblasts are upregulated in CF and are reduced by vardenafil. This study provides compelling new support for targeting cGMP signaling pathway in CF pharmacotherapy.

  15. Genes dysregulated to different extent or oppositely in estrogen receptor-positive and estrogen receptor-negative breast cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianxiao Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Directly comparing gene expression profiles of estrogen receptor-positive (ER+ and estrogen receptor-negative (ER- breast cancers cannot determine whether differentially expressed genes between these two subtypes result from dysregulated expression in ER+ cancer or ER- cancer versus normal controls, and thus would miss critical information for elucidating the transcriptomic difference between the two subtypes. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using microarray datasets from TCGA, we classified the genes dysregulated in both ER+ and ER- cancers versus normal controls into two classes: (i genes dysregulated in the same direction but to a different extent, and (ii genes dysregulated to opposite directions, and then validated the two classes in RNA-sequencing datasets of independent cohorts. We showed that the genes dysregulated to a larger extent in ER+ cancers than in ER- cancers enriched in glycerophospholipid and polysaccharide metabolic processes, while the genes dysregulated to a larger extent in ER- cancers than in ER+ cancers enriched in cell proliferation. Phosphorylase kinase and enzymes of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchor biosynthesis were upregulated to a larger extent in ER+ cancers than in ER- cancers, whereas glycogen synthase and phospholipase A2 were downregulated to a larger extent in ER+ cancers than in ER- cancers. We also found that the genes oppositely dysregulated in the two subtypes significantly enriched with known cancer genes and tended to closely collaborate with the cancer genes. Furthermore, we showed the possibility that these oppositely dysregulated genes could contribute to carcinogenesis of ER+ and ER- cancers through rewiring different subpathways. CONCLUSIONS: GPI-anchor biosynthesis and glycogenolysis were elevated and hydrolysis of phospholipids was depleted to a larger extent in ER+ cancers than in ER- cancers. Our findings indicate that the genes oppositely dysregulated in the two subtypes are potential

  16. Genetic dys-regulation of astrocytic glutamate transporter EAAT2 and its implications in neurological disorders and manganese toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Pratap; Smith, Keisha; Johnson, James; Aschner, Michael; Lee, Eunsook Y

    2015-02-01

    Astrocytic glutamate transporters, the excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) 2 and EAAT1 (glutamate transporter 1 and glutamate aspartate transporter in rodents, respectively), are the main transporters for maintaining optimal glutamate levels in the synaptic clefts by taking up more than 90% of glutamate from extracellular space thus preventing excitotoxic neuronal death. Reduced expression and function of these transporters, especially EAAT2, has been reported in numerous neurological disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and epilepsy. The mechanism of down-regulation of EAAT2 in these diseases has yet to be fully established. Genetic as well as transcriptional dys-regulation of these transporters by various modes, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms and epigenetics, resulting in impairment of their functions, might play an important role in the etiology of neurological diseases. Consequently, there has been an extensive effort to identify molecular targets for enhancement of EAAT2 expression as a potential therapeutic approach. Several pharmacological agents increase expression of EAAT2 via nuclear factor κB and cAMP response element binding protein at the transcriptional level. However, the negative regulatory mechanisms of EAAT2 have yet to be identified. Recent studies, including those from our laboratory, suggest that the transcriptional factor yin yang 1 plays a critical role in the repressive effects of various neurotoxins, such as manganese (Mn), on EAAT2 expression. In this review, we will focus on transcriptional epigenetics and translational regulation of EAAT2.

  17. Stress, depression and cardiovascular dysregulation: a review of neurobiological mechanisms and the integration of research from preclinical disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grippo, Angela J; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2009-01-01

    Bidirectional associations between mood disorders and cardiovascular diseases are extensively documented. However, the precise physiological and biochemical mechanisms that underlie such relationships are not well understood. This review focuses on the neurobiological processes and mediators that are common to both mood and cardiovascular disorders. The discussion places an emphasis on the role of exogenous stressors in addition to: (a) neuroendocrine and neurohumoral changes involving dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, (b) immune alterations including activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, (c) autonomic and cardiovascular dysregulation including increased sympathetic drive, withdrawal of parasympathetic tone, cardiac rate and rhythm disturbances, and altered baroreceptor reflex function, (d) central neurotransmitter system dysfunction involving the dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin systems, and (e) behavioral changes including fatigue and physical inactivity. The review also discusses experimental investigations using preclinical disease models to elucidate the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the link between mood disorders and cardiovascular disease. These include: (a) the chronic mild stress model of depression, (b) a model of congestive heart failure, (c) a model of cardiovascular deconditioning, (d) pharmacological manipulations of body fluid and sodium balance, and (e) pharmacological manipulations of the central serotonergic system. In combination with an extensive human research literature, the investigation of mechanisms underlying mood and cardiovascular regulation using animal models will enhance understanding the association between depression and cardiovascular disease. This will ultimately promote the development of better treatments and interventions for individuals with co-morbid psychological and somatic pathologies.

  18. Genetic dys-regulation of astrocytic glutamate transporter EAAT2 and its implications in neurological disorders and manganese toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Pratap; Smith, Keisha; Johnson, James; Aschner, Michael; Lee, Eunsook

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytic glutamate transporters, the excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) 2 and EAAT1 [glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) in rodents, respectively], are the main transporters for maintaining optimal glutamate levels in the synaptic clefts by taking up more than 90% of glutamate from extracellular space thus preventing excitotoxic neuronal death. Reduced expression and function of these transporters, especially EAAT2, has been reported in numerous neurological disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia and epilepsy. The mechanism of down-regulation of EAAT2 in these diseases has yet to be fully established. Genetic as well as transcriptional dys-regulation of these transporters by various modes, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and epigenetics, resulting in impairment of their functions, might play an important role in the etiology of neurological diseases. Consequently, there has been an extensive effort to identify molecular targets for enhancement of EAAT2 expression as a potential therapeutic approach. Several pharmacological agents increase expression of EAAT2 via NF-κB and CREB at the transcriptional level. However, the negative regulatory mechanisms of EAAT2 have yet to be identified. Recent studies, including those from our laboratory, suggest that the transcriptional factor yin yang 1 (YY1) plays a critical role in the repressive effects of various neurotoxins, such as manganese (Mn), on EAAT2 expression. In this review, we will focus on transcriptional epigenetics, and translational regulation of EAAT2. PMID:25064045

  19. Chronic complex dissociative disorders and borderline personality disorder: disorders of emotion dysregulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Bethany L; Lanius, Ruth A

    2014-01-01

    Emotion dysregulation is a core feature of chronic complex dissociative disorders (DD), as it is for borderline personality disorder (BPD). Chronic complex DD include dissociative identity disorder (DID) and the most common form of dissociative disorder not otherwise specified (DDNOS, type 1), now known as Other Specified Dissociative Disorders (OSDD, type 1). BPD is a common comorbid disorder with DD, although preliminary research indicates the disorders have some distinguishing features as well as considerable overlap. This article focuses on the epidemiology, clinical presentation, psychological profile, treatment, and neurobiology of chronic complex DD with emphasis placed on the role of emotion dysregulation in each of these areas. Trauma experts conceptualize borderline symptoms as often being trauma based, as are chronic complex DD. We review the preliminary research that compares DD to BPD in the hopes that this will stimulate additional comparative research.

  20. Interferon gamma and sonic hedgehog signaling are required to dysregulate murine neural stem/precursor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Walter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon gamma (IFNγ, a key player in various neurological diseases, was recently shown to induce a dysregulated phenotype in neural stem/precursor cells (NSPCs that is characterized by the simultaneous expression of glial and neuronal markers and irregular electrophysiological properties. Thus far, the mechanisms of this phenomenon have remained unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine if binding of the signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat 1 to the sonic hedgehog (SHH promoter is important for this phenomenon to occur, chromatin immunoprecipitation and pharmacological inhibition studies were performed. We report here that the activation of both the Stat 1 and SHH pathways is necessary to elicit the dysregulated phenotype. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Thus, blocking these pathways might preserve functional differentiation of NSPCs under inflammatory conditions leading to more effective regeneration.

  1. Dysregulated miR-183 inhibits migration in breast cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lowery, Aoife J

    2010-01-01

    The involvement of miRNAs in the regulation of fundamental cellular functions has placed them at the fore of ongoing investigations into the processes underlying carcinogenesis. MiRNA expression patterns have been shown to be dysregulated in numerous human malignancies, including breast cancer, suggesting their probable involvement as novel classes of oncogenes or tumour suppressor genes. The identification of differentially expressed miRNAs and elucidation of their functional roles may provide insight into the complex and diverse molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis. MiR-183 is located on chromosome 7q32 and is part of a miRNA family which are dysregulated in numerous cancers. The aims of this study were to further examine the expression and functional role of miR-183 in breast cancer.

  2. The Pathogenesis and Treatment of Emotion Dysregulation in Borderline Personality Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Laddis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrollable emotional lability and impulsivity are a paramount phenomenon of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD. This paper aims to review theories that entertain emotion dysregulation as the core deficit of BPD and a key factor in the etiology of BPD, in order, then, to propose the author’s own theory, which arguably transcends certain limitations of the earlier ones. The author asserts that his psychodynamic theory explains the symptoms of BPD more thoroughly and it inspires a more parsimonious interpretation of brain imaging findings. In closing, the author draws implications of the proposed theory for clinical practice. He reports an efficacy study for treatment of emotion dysregulation based on that theory.

  3. Mild KCC2 hypofunction causes inconspicuous chloride dysregulation that degrades neural coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eDoyon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Disinhibition caused by Cl- dysregulation is implicated in several neurological disorders. This form of disinhibition, which stems primarily from impaired Cl- extrusion through the co-transporter KCC2, is typically identified by a depolarizing shift in GABA reversal potential (EGABA. Here we show, using computer simulations, that intracellular [Cl-] exhibits exaggerated fluctuations during transient Cl- loads and recovers more slowly to baseline when KCC2 level is even modestly reduced. Using information theory and signal detection theory, we show that increased Cl- lability and settling time degrade neural coding. Importantly, these deleterious effects manifest after less KCC2 reduction than needed to produce the gross changes in EGABA required for detection by most experiments, which assess KCC2 function under weak Cl- load conditions. By demonstrating the existence and functional consequences of occult Cl- dysregulation, these results suggest that modest KCC2 hypofunction plays a greater role in neurological disorders than previously believed.

  4. Reactive aggression among maltreated children: the contributions of attention and emotion dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, A; Cicchetti, D

    1998-12-01

    Examined the complex interplay among emotion, attention, and aggression in a sample of 141 maltreated and 87 non-maltreated impoverished, inner-city children. Data were collected during a summer day camp, which provided an ecologically valid setting for studying children's behavior in social contexts. Maltreated children were more likely than non-maltreated children to be aggressive, with findings suggesting that physically abused children were at heightened risk for reactive aggression. Maltreated children also evidenced attention deficits, and subclinical or nonpathological dissociation was more likely among children who had experienced physical or sexual abuse. A history of abuse also predicted emotion dysregulation, affective lability/negativity, and socially inappropriate emotion expressions. This emotion dysregulation, fostered by poor attention modulation, was a mechanism of the effects of maltreatment on reactive aggression.

  5. Dysregulated iron metabolism in the choroid plexus in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza, Jeanelle; Steward, Craig; Rueckert, Flora; Widdison, Matt; Coffman, Robert; Afjei, Atiyeh; Noctor, Stephen C; Hagerman, Randi; Hagerman, Paul; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica

    2015-02-19

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder associated with premutation alleles of the FMR1 gene that is characterized by progressive action tremor, gait ataxia, and cognitive decline. Recent studies of mitochondrial dysfunction in FXTAS have suggested that iron dysregulation may be one component of disease pathogenesis. We tested the hypothesis that iron dysregulation is part of the pathogenic process in FXTAS. We analyzed postmortem choroid plexus from FXTAS and control subjects, and found that in FXTAS iron accumulated in the stroma, transferrin levels were decreased in the epithelial cells, and transferrin receptor 1 distribution was shifted from the basolateral membrane (control) to a predominantly intracellular location (FXTAS). In addition, ferroportin and ceruloplasmin were markedly decreased within the epithelial cells. These alterations have implications not only for understanding the pathophysiology of FXTAS, but also for the development of new clinical treatments that may incorporate selective iron chelation.

  6. DNA methylation dynamics in plants and mammals: overview of regulation and dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhamamsy, Amr Rafat

    2016-07-01

    DNA methylation is a major epigenetic marking mechanism regulating various biological functions in mammals and plant. The crucial role of DNA methylation has been observed in cellular differentiation, embryogenesis, genomic imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation. Furthermore, DNA methylation takes part in disease susceptibility, responses to environmental stimuli and the biodiversity of natural populations. In plant, different types of environmental stress have demonstrated the ability to alter the archetype of DNA methylation through the genome, change gene expression and confer a mechanism of adaptation. DNA methylation dynamics are regulated by three processes de novo DNA methylation, methylation maintenance and DNA demethylation. These processes have their similarities and differences between mammals and plants. Furthermore, the dysregulation of DNA methylation dynamics represents one of the primary molecular mechanisms of developing diseases in mammals. This review discusses the regulation and dysregulation of DNA methylation in plants and mammals. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Review on Neural Correlates of Emotion Regulation and Music: Implications for Emotion Dysregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jiancheng; Song, Bei; Chen, Andrew C. N.; Sun, Changan; Zhou, Jiaxian; Zhu, Haidong; Beauchaine, Theodore P.

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have examined the neural correlates of emotion regulation and the neural changes that are evoked by music exposure. However, the link between music and emotion regulation is poorly understood. The objectives of this review are to (1) synthesize what is known about the neural correlates of emotion regulation and music-evoked emotions, and (2) consider the possibility of therapeutic effects of music on emotion dysregulation. Music-evoked emotions can modulate activities in both cortical and subcortical systems, and across cortical-subcortical networks. Functions within these networks are integral to generation and regulation of emotions. Since dysfunction in these networks are observed in numerous psychiatric disorders, a better understanding of neural correlates of music exposure may lead to more systematic and effective use of music therapy in emotion dysregulation. PMID:28421017

  8. Infant acetylcholine, dopamine, and melatonin dysregulation: Neonatal biomarkers and causal factors for ASD and ADHD phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmer, Kahl; Nyström, Pär

    2017-03-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and ADHD are common neurodevelopmental disorders that benefit from early intervention but currently suffer from late detection and diagnosis: neurochemical dysregulations are extant already at birth but clinical phenotypes are not distinguishable until preschool age or later. The vast heterogeneity between subjects' phenotypes relates to interaction between multiple unknown factors, making research on factor causality insurmountable. To unlock this situation we pose the hypothesis that atypical pupillary light responses from rods, cones, and the recently discovered ipRGC system reflect early acetylcholine, melatonin, and dopamine dysregulation that are sufficient but not necessary factors for developing ASD and/or ADHD disorders. Current technology allows non-invasive cost-efficient assessment already from the first postnatal month. The benefits of the current proposal are: identification of clinical subgroups based on cause rather than phenotypes; facilitation of research on other causal factors; neonatal prediction of later diagnoses; and guidance for targeted therapeutical intervention.

  9. Immune System Dysregulation, Viral Reactivation and Stress During Short-Duration Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarence

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a study that was conducted to ascertain if the immune system dysregulation, viral reactivation and stress from short duration space flight were a result of the stress of landing and readjustment to gravity. The objectives of the study were to replace several recent immune studies with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling; address lack of in-flight data: (i.e., determine the in-flight status of immunity, physiological stress, viral immunity/reactivation); determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight; and determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  10. The emerging role of angiogenic factor dysregulation in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Reshef; Seifer, David B; Arici, Aydin

    2015-05-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder in reproductive age affecting 5 to 7% of women. It is characterized by anovulatory infertility, hyperandrogenism, and polycystic ovaries. Angiogenesis in the ovary is critical for follicular growth, ovulation, and the subsequent development and regression of the corpus luteum. Accumulating evidence suggests that multiple angiogenic factors are dysregulated in PCOS, including vascular endothelial growth factor, angiopoietins, platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor-β, and basic fibroblast growth factor. This angiogenic factor imbalance likely underlies the increased stromal vascularity observed in PCOS. Angiogenic factor dysregulation may play an important role in the pathophysiology of PCOS and may contribute to ovulatory dysfunction, subfertility, and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, which are commonly seen in women with PCOS. Further experimental studies are needed to gain a better understanding of the growth factors that are involved in normal and pathological ovarian angiogenesis, and to assess the potential of angiogenesis-based treatment strategies in PCOS.

  11. Dysregulation of Kv3.4 channels in dorsal root ganglia following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, David M; Zemel, Benjamin M; Hala, Tamara J; O'Leary, Michael E; Lepore, Angelo C; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2015-01-21

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients develop chronic pain involving poorly understood central and peripheral mechanisms. Because dysregulation of the voltage-gated Kv3.4 channel has been implicated in the hyperexcitable state of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following direct injury of sensory nerves, we asked whether such a dysregulation also plays a role in SCI. Kv3.4 channels are expressed in DRG neurons, where they help regulate action potential (AP) repolarization in a manner that depends on the modulation of inactivation by protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation of the channel's inactivation domain. Here, we report that, 2 weeks after cervical hemicontusion SCI, injured rats exhibit contralateral hypersensitivity to stimuli accompanied by accentuated repetitive spiking in putative DRG nociceptors. Also in these neurons at 1 week after laminectomy and SCI, Kv3.4 channel inactivation is impaired compared with naive nonsurgical controls. At 2-6 weeks after laminectomy, however, Kv3.4 channel inactivation returns to naive levels. Conversely, Kv3.4 currents at 2-6 weeks post-SCI are downregulated and remain slow-inactivating. Immunohistochemistry indicated that downregulation mainly resulted from decreased surface expression of the Kv3.4 channel, as whole-DRG-protein and single-cell mRNA transcript levels did not change. Furthermore, consistent with Kv3.4 channel dysregulation, PKC activation failed to shorten the AP duration of small-diameter DRG neurons. Finally, re-expressing synthetic Kv3.4 currents under dynamic clamp conditions dampened repetitive spiking in the neurons from SCI rats. These results suggest a novel peripheral mechanism of post-SCI pain sensitization implicating Kv3.4 channel dysregulation and potential Kv3.4-based therapeutic interventions.

  12. North Carolina Macular Dystrophy Is Caused by Dysregulation of the Retinal Transcription Factor PRDM13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Small, Kent W; DeLuca, Adam P; Whitmore, S Scott

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify specific mutations causing North Carolina macular dystrophy (NCMD). DESIGN: Whole-genome sequencing coupled with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of gene expression in human retinal cells. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 141 members of 12 families...... development. Four of these strongly implicate the involvement of PRDM13 in macular development, whereas the pathophysiologic mechanism of the fifth remains unknown but may involve the developmental dysregulation of IRX1....

  13. Alzheimer's disease shares gene expression aberrations with purinergic dysregulation of HPRT deficiency (Lesch-Nyhan disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Tae Hyuk; Friedmann, Theodore

    2015-03-17

    Transcriptomic studies of murine D3 embryonic stem (ES) cells deficient in the purinergic biosynthetic function hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) and undergoing dopaminergic neuronal differentiation has demonstrated a marked shift from neuronal to glial gene expression and aberrant expression of multiple genes also known to be aberrantly expressed in Alzheimer's and other CNS disorders. Such genetic dysregulations may indicate some shared pathogenic metabolic mechanisms in diverse CNS diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification and validation of dysregulated metabolic pathways in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nicole M A; Newsted, Daniel W; Masui, Olena; Romaschin, Alexander D; Siu, K W Michael; Yousef, George M

    2014-03-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is a devastating disease with a 5-year survival rate of approximately 9 % and low response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Targeted therapies have slightly improved patient survival, but are only effective in a small subset of patients, who eventually develop resistance. A better understanding of pathways contributing to tumor progression and metastasis will allow for the development of novel targeted therapies and accurate prognostic markers. We performed extensive bioinformatics coupled with experimental validation on proteins dysregulated in mRCC. Gene ontology analysis showed that many proteins are involved in oxidation reduction, metabolic processes, and signal transduction. Pathway analysis showed metabolic pathways are altered in mRCC including glycolysis and pyruvate metabolism, the citric acid cycle, and the pentose phosphate pathway. RT-qPCR analysis showed that genes involved in the citric acid cycle were downregulated in metastatic RCC while genes of the pentose phosphate pathway were overexpressed. Protein-protein interaction analysis showed that most of the 198 proteins altered in mRCC clustered together and many were involved in glycolysis and pyruvate metabolism. We identified 29 reported regions of chromosomal aberrations in metastatic disease that correlate with the direction of protein dysregulation in mRCC. Furthermore, 36 proteins dysregulated in mRCC are predicted to be targets of metastasis-related miRNAs. A more comprehensive understanding of the pathways dysregulated in metastasis can be useful for the development of new therapies and novel prognostic markers. Also, multileveled analyses provide a unique "snapshot" of the molecular "environment" in RCC with prognostic and therapeutic implications.

  15. Minireview: Obesity and Breast Cancer: A Tale of Inflammation and Dysregulated Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Evan R.; Brown, Kristy A

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the spectrum of conditions known collectively as the Metabolic Syndrome, obesity is now recognized to be associated with increased risk of several cancers including colon, endometrial, and breast cancer. Obesity and carcinogenesis share 2 characteristics in common. On the one hand, they involve inflammatory pathways, and on the other hand, they involve dysregulated metabolism. In this review we focus on postmenopausal breast cancer and discuss the metabolic and cellular mechani...

  16. Dysregulation of Alternative Poly-adenylation as a Potential Player in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkop, Krzysztof J.; Cooke, Peter I. C.; Humphries, Joanne A.; Kalna, Viktoria; Moss, David S.; Schuster, Eugene F.; Nobeli, Irene

    2017-01-01

    We present here the hypothesis that alternative poly-adenylation (APA) is dysregulated in the brains of individuals affected by Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), due to disruptions in the calcium signaling networks. APA, the process of selecting different poly-adenylation sites on the same gene, yielding transcripts with different-length 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs), has been documented in different tissues, stages of development and pathologic conditions. Differential use of poly-adenylation sites has been shown to regulate the function, stability, localization and translation efficiency of target RNAs. However, the role of APA remains rather unexplored in neurodevelopmental conditions. In the human brain, where transcripts have the longest 3′ UTRs and are thus likely to be under more complex post-transcriptional regulation, erratic APA could be particularly detrimental. In the context of ASD, a condition that affects individuals in markedly different ways and whose symptoms exhibit a spectrum of severity, APA dysregulation could be amplified or dampened depending on the individual and the extent of the effect on specific genes would likely vary with genetic and environmental factors. If this hypothesis is correct, dysregulated APA events might be responsible for certain aspects of the phenotypes associated with ASD. Evidence supporting our hypothesis is derived from standard RNA-seq transcriptomic data but we suggest that future experiments should focus on techniques that probe the actual poly-adenylation site (3′ sequencing). To address issues arising from the use of post-mortem tissue and low numbers of heterogeneous samples affected by confounding factors (such as the age, gender and health of the individuals), carefully controlled in vitro systems will be required to model the effect of calcium signaling dysregulation in the ASD brain. PMID:28955198

  17. Adult attachment, emotion dysregulation, and symptoms of depression and generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marganska, Anna; Gallagher, Michelle; Miranda, Regina

    2013-01-01

    Differences in attachment style have been linked to both emotion regulation and psychological functioning, but the emotion regulatory mechanism through which attachment style might impact symptoms of depression and anxiety is unclear. The present study examined the explanatory role of emotion dysregulation in the relation between adult attachment style and symptoms of depression and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in a sample of 284 adults. Secure attachment was associated with lower depression and GAD symptoms and lower emotion dysregulation, whereas insecure attachment styles were generally associated with higher depression and GAD scores and higher emotion dysregulation. Perceived inability to generate effective emotion regulation strategies mediated the relation between insecure attachment and both depression and GAD symptoms. Nonacceptance of negative emotions and inability to control impulsive behaviors emerged as additional mediators of the relation between insecure attachment styles and GAD symptoms. The differential contribution of attachment style and emotion regulation to the prediction of depression and GAD symptoms may reflect differences in vulnerability to depression and GAD.

  18. Dysregulation of Iron Metabolism in Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Oshiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of iron metabolism has been observed in patients with neurodegenerative diseases (NDs. Utilization of several importers and exporters for iron transport in brain cells helps maintain iron homeostasis. Dysregulation of iron homeostasis leads to the production of neurotoxic substances and reactive oxygen species, resulting in iron-induced oxidative stress. In Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson's disease (PD, circumstantial evidence has shown that dysregulation of brain iron homeostasis leads to abnormal iron accumulation. Several genetic studies have revealed mutations in genes associated with increased iron uptake, increased oxidative stress, and an altered inflammatory response in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Here, we review the recent findings on brain iron metabolism in common NDs, such as AD, PD, and ALS. We also summarize the conventional and novel types of iron chelators, which can successfully decrease excess iron accumulation in brain lesions. For example, iron-chelating drugs have neuroprotective effects, preventing neural apoptosis, and activate cellular protective pathways against oxidative stress. Glial cells also protect neurons by secreting antioxidants and antiapoptotic substances. These new findings of experimental and clinical studies may provide a scientific foundation for advances in drug development for NDs.

  19. Mitigating HPA Axis Dysregulation Associated With Placement Changes in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Philip A.; Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Gunnar, Megan R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Maltreated foster children often exhibit alterations in diurnal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity that are characterized by lower cortisol levels upon waking and smaller declines in morning-to-evening cortisol levels. Previous research has shown that this dysregulated pattern is associated with high caregiver stress levels over the course of foster care placements. In contrast, therapeutic interventions that emphasize consistent and responsive caregiving have been associated with more regulated cortisol rhythms. In this paper, two related issues were explored: whether placement changes (i.e., moving between foster homes or from a foster home to a permanent placement) were associated with more blunted daily cortisol rhythms and whether a caregiver-based intervention exerted a protective effect in this context. Because the intervention program has components specifically designed to prepare foster children for placement changes and to maintain consistent parenting techniques despite them, a prevention effect on HPA axis dysregulation during placement changes was hypothesized. The results of linear mixed modeling analyses showed that placement changes predicted dysregulation in cortisol rhythms in the regular foster care group but not in the intervention foster care group. These findings are discussed in terms of implications for child welfare policy and practice. PMID:20888698

  20. Regulation and dysregulation of immunoglobulin E: a molecular and clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi David S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Altered levels of Immunoglobulin E (IgE represent a dysregulation of IgE synthesis and may be seen in a variety of immunological disorders. The object of this review is to summarize the historical and molecular aspects of IgE synthesis and the disorders associated with dysregulation of IgE production. Methods Articles published in Medline/PubMed were searched with the keyword Immunoglobulin E and specific terms such as class switch recombination, deficiency and/or specific disease conditions (atopy, neoplasia, renal disease, myeloma, etc.. The selected papers included reviews, case reports, retrospective reviews and molecular mechanisms. Studies involving both sexes and all ages were included in the analysis. Results Both very low and elevated levels of IgE may be seen in clinical practice. Major advancements have been made in our understanding of the molecular basis of IgE class switching including roles for T cells, cytokines and T regulatory (or Treg cells in this process. Dysregulation of this process may result in either elevated IgE levels or IgE deficiency. Conclusion Evaluation of a patient with elevated IgE must involve a detailed differential diagnosis and consideration of various immunological and non-immunological disorders. The use of appropriate tests will allow the correct diagnosis to be made. This can often assist in the development of tailored treatments.

  1. Immune System Dysregulation and Latent Herpesvirus Reactivation During Winterover at Concordia Station, Dome C, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, B. E.; Feuerecker, M.; Salam, A. P.; Rybka, A.; Stowe, R. P.; Morrels, M.; Meta, S. K.; Quiriarte, H.; Quintens, Roel; Thieme, U.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Immune system dysregulation occurs during spaceflight and consists of altered peripheral leukocyte distribution, reductions in immunocyte function and altered cytokine production profiles. Causes may include stress, confinement, isolation, and disrupted circadian rhythms. All of these factors may be replicated to some degree in terrestrial environments. NASA is currently evaluating the potential for a ground-based analog for immune dysregulation, which would have utility for mechanistic investigations and countermeasures evaluation. For ground-based space physiology research, the choice of terrestrial analog must carefully match the system of interest. Antarctica winter-over, consisting of prolonged durations in an extreme/dangerous environment, station-based habitation, isolation and disrupted circadian rhythms, is potentially a good ground-analog for spaceflight-associated immune dysregulation. Of all Antarctica bases, the French-Italian Concordia Station, may be the most appropriate to replicate spaceflight/exploration conditions. Concordia is an interior base located in harsh environmental conditions, and has been constructed to house small, international crews in a station-environment similar to what should be experienced by deep space astronauts. The ESA-NASA CHOICE study assessed innate and adaptive immunity, viral reactivation and stress factors during Concordia winterover deployment. The study was conducted over two winterover missions in 2009 and 2010. Final study data from NASA participation in these missions will be presented.

  2. Optimal Versus Realized Trajectories of Physiological Dysregulation in Aging and Their Relation to Sex-Specific Mortality Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arbeev, Konstantin G; Cohen, Alan A; Arbeeva, Liubov S

    2016-01-01

    While longitudinal changes in biomarker levels and their impact on health have been characterized for individual markers, little is known about how overall marker profiles may change during aging and affect mortality risk. We implemented the recently developed measure of physiological dysregulation...... dysregulation is related to different aging-related characteristics such as decline in stress resistance and adaptive capacity (which typically are not observed in the data and thus can be analyzed only indirectly), and, ultimately, to estimate how such dynamic relationships increase mortality risk with age. We...... substantial sex differences in these processes, with women becoming dysregulated more quickly but with men showing a much greater sensitivity to dysregulation in terms of mortality risk....

  3. Longitudinal pathways from early maternal depression to children's dysregulated representations: a moderated mediation analysis of harsh parenting and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martoccio, Tiffany L; Brophy-Herb, Holly E; Maupin, Angela N; Robinson, Joann L

    2016-01-01

    There is some evidence linking maternal depression, harsh parenting, and children's internal representations of attachment, yet, longitudinal examinations of these relationships and differences in the developmental pathways between boys and girls are lacking. Moderated mediation growth curves were employed to examine harsh parenting as a mechanism underlying the link between maternal depression and children's dysregulated representations using a nationally-representative, economically-vulnerable sample of mothers and their children (n = 575; 49% boys, 51% girls). Dysregulation representations were measured using the MacArthur Story Stem Battery at five years of age (M = 5.14, SD = 0.29). Harsh parenting mediated the association between early maternal depression and dysregulated representations for girls. Though initial harsh parenting was a significant mediator for boys, a stronger direct effect of maternal depression to dysregulated representations emerged over time. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for intervention efforts aimed at promoting early supportive parenting.

  4. Personalised pathway analysis reveals association between DNA repair pathway dysregulation and chromosomal instability in sporadic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Srihari, Sriganesh; Lal, Samir; Gautier, Benoît; Simpson, Peter T; Khanna, Kum Kum; Ragan, Mark A; Lê Cao, Kim-Anh

    2016-01-01

    The Homologous Recombination (HR) pathway is crucial for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated during DNA replication. Defects in HR repair have been linked to the initiation and development of a wide variety of human malignancies, and exploited in chemical, radiological and targeted therapies. In this study, we performed a personalised pathway analysis independently for four large sporadic breast cancer cohorts to investigate the status of HR pathway dysregulation in individual sporadic breast tumours, its association with HR repair deficiency and its impact on tumour characteristics. Specifically, we first manually curated a list of HR genes according to our recent review on this pathway (Liu et al., 2014), and then applied a personalised pathway analysis method named Pathifier (Drier et al., 2013) on the expression levels of the curated genes to obtain an HR score quantifying HR pathway dysregulation in individual tumours. Based on the score, we observed a great diversity in HR dysregulation between and within gene expression-based breast cancer subtypes, and by using two published HR-defect signatures, we found HR pathway dysregulation reflects HR repair deficiency. Furthermore, we identified a novel association between HR pathway dysregulation and chromosomal instability (CIN) in sporadic breast cancer. Although CIN has long been considered as a hallmark of most solid tumours, with recent extensive studies highlighting its importance in tumour evolution and drug resistance, the molecular basis of CIN in sporadic cancers remains poorly understood. Our results imply that HR pathway dysregulation might contribute to CIN in sporadic breast cancer.

  5. Early life ozone exposure results in dysregulated innate immune function and altered microRNA expression in airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Candice C; Maniar-Hew, Kinjal; Gerriets, Joan E; Wang, Theodore T; Postlethwait, Edward M; Evans, Michael J; Fontaine, Justin H; Miller, Lisa A

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ozone has been associated with increased incidence of respiratory morbidity in humans; however the mechanism(s) behind the enhancement of susceptibility are unclear. We have previously reported that exposure to episodic ozone during postnatal development results in an attenuated peripheral blood cytokine response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that persists with maturity. As the lung is closely interfaced with the external environment, we hypothesized that the conducting airway epithelium of neonates may also be a target of immunomodulation by ozone. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated primary airway epithelial cell cultures derived from juvenile rhesus macaque monkeys with a prior history of episodic postnatal ozone exposure. Innate immune function was measured by expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 in primary cultures established following in vivo LPS challenge or, in response to in vitro LPS treatment. Postnatal ozone exposure resulted in significantly attenuated IL-6 mRNA and protein expression in primary cultures from juvenile animals; IL-8 mRNA was also significantly reduced. The effect of antecedent ozone exposure was modulated by in vivo LPS challenge, as primary cultures exhibited enhanced cytokine expression upon secondary in vitro LPS treatment. Assessment of potential IL-6-targeting microRNAs miR-149, miR-202, and miR-410 showed differential expression in primary cultures based upon animal exposure history. Functional assays revealed that miR-149 is capable of binding to the IL-6 3' UTR and decreasing IL-6 protein synthesis in airway epithelial cell lines. Cumulatively, our findings suggest that episodic ozone during early life contributes to the molecular programming of airway epithelium, such that memory from prior exposures is retained in the form of a dysregulated IL-6 and IL-8 response to LPS; differentially expressed microRNAs such as miR-149 may play a role in the persistent modulation of the epithelial innate

  6. Early life ozone exposure results in dysregulated innate immune function and altered microRNA expression in airway epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candice C Clay

    Full Text Available Exposure to ozone has been associated with increased incidence of respiratory morbidity in humans; however the mechanism(s behind the enhancement of susceptibility are unclear. We have previously reported that exposure to episodic ozone during postnatal development results in an attenuated peripheral blood cytokine response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS that persists with maturity. As the lung is closely interfaced with the external environment, we hypothesized that the conducting airway epithelium of neonates may also be a target of immunomodulation by ozone. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated primary airway epithelial cell cultures derived from juvenile rhesus macaque monkeys with a prior history of episodic postnatal ozone exposure. Innate immune function was measured by expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 in primary cultures established following in vivo LPS challenge or, in response to in vitro LPS treatment. Postnatal ozone exposure resulted in significantly attenuated IL-6 mRNA and protein expression in primary cultures from juvenile animals; IL-8 mRNA was also significantly reduced. The effect of antecedent ozone exposure was modulated by in vivo LPS challenge, as primary cultures exhibited enhanced cytokine expression upon secondary in vitro LPS treatment. Assessment of potential IL-6-targeting microRNAs miR-149, miR-202, and miR-410 showed differential expression in primary cultures based upon animal exposure history. Functional assays revealed that miR-149 is capable of binding to the IL-6 3' UTR and decreasing IL-6 protein synthesis in airway epithelial cell lines. Cumulatively, our findings suggest that episodic ozone during early life contributes to the molecular programming of airway epithelium, such that memory from prior exposures is retained in the form of a dysregulated IL-6 and IL-8 response to LPS; differentially expressed microRNAs such as miR-149 may play a role in the persistent modulation of the

  7. PSD-Zip70 Deficiency Causes Prefrontal Hypofunction Associated with Glutamatergic Synapse Maturation Defects by Dysregulation of Rap2 Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayanagi, Taira; Yasuda, Hiroki; Sobue, Kenji

    2015-10-21

    Dysregulation of synapse formation and plasticity is closely related to the pathophysiology of psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is particularly important for executive functions such as working memory, cognition, and emotional control, which are impaired in the disorders. PSD-Zip70 (Lzts1/FEZ1) is a postsynaptic density (PSD) protein predominantly expressed in the frontal cortex, olfactory bulb, striatum, and hippocampus. Here we found that PSD-Zip70 knock-out (PSD-Zip70KO) mice exhibit working memory and cognitive defects, and enhanced anxiety-like behaviors. These abnormal behaviors are caused by impaired glutamatergic synapse transmission accompanied by tiny-headed immature dendritic spines in the PFC, due to aberrant Rap2 activation, which has roles in synapse formation and plasticity. PSD-Zip70 modulates the Rap2 activity by interacting with SPAR (spine-associated RapGAP) and PDZ-GEF1 (RapGEF) in the postsynapse. Furthermore, suppression of the aberrant Rap2 activation in the PFC rescued the behavioral defects in PSD-Zip70KO mice. Our data demonstrate a critical role for PSD-Zip70 in Rap2-dependent spine synapse development in the PFC and underscore the importance of this regulation in PFC-dependent behaviors. PSD-Zip70 deficiency causes behavioral defects in working memory and cognition, and enhanced anxiety due to prefrontal hypofunction. This study revealed that PSD-Zip70 plays essential roles in glutamatergic synapse maturation via modulation of the Rap2 activity in the PFC. PSD-Zip70 interacts with both SPAR (spine-associated RapGAP) and PDZ-GEF1 (RapGEF) and modulates the Rap2 activity in postsynaptic sites. Our results provide a novel Rap2-specific regulatory mechanism in synaptic maturation involving PSD-Zip70. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3514327-14$15.00/0.

  8. The mediating role of emotion dysregulation and depression on the relationship between childhood trauma exposure and emotional eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michopoulos, Vasiliki; Powers, Abigail; Moore, Carla; Villarreal, Stephanie; Ressler, Kerry J; Bradley, Bekh

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to childhood adversity is implicated in the etiology of adverse health outcomes, including depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and obesity. The relationship between childhood trauma and obesity may be related to the association of childhood trauma and risk for emotional eating. One pathway between trauma exposure, psychopathology, and emotional eating may be through emotion dysregulation and depression. The current study was undertaken to characterize demographic, environmental, and psychological risk factors for emotional eating in a primarily African American, low socioeconomic status (SES), inner-city population (N = 1110). Emotional eating was measured using the Dutch Eating Behavioral Questionnaire and the Emotional Dysregulation Scale was used to assess emotion regulation. The Beck Depression Inventory and the modified PTSD Symptom Scale were used to assess depression and PTSD, respectively. Higher levels of emotional eating were associated with body mass index, income, childhood and adulthood trauma exposure, depressive and PTSD symptoms, negative affect and emotion dysregulation. Childhood emotional abuse was the most associated with emotional eating in adulthood. Hierarchical linear regression and mediation analyses indicated that the association between childhood trauma exposure (and emotional abuse specifically) and emotional eating was fully mediated by depression symptoms and emotion dysregulation, with emotional dysregulation contributing more to the mediation effect. Together these findings support a model in which obesity and related adverse health outcomes in stress- and trauma-exposed populations may be directly related to self-regulatory coping strategies accompanying emotion dysregulation. Our data suggest that emotion dysregulation is a viable therapeutic target for emotional eating in at-risk populations.

  9. Comparison Analysis of Dysregulated LncRNA Profile in Mouse Plasma and Liver after Hepatic Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenzhen; Luo, Yanjin; Yang, Weili; Ding, Liwei; Wang, Junpei; Tu, Jian; Geng, Bin; Cui, Qinghua; Yang, Jichun

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (LncRNAs) have been believed to be the major transcripts in various tissues and organs, and may play important roles in regulation of many biological processes. The current study determined the LncRNA profile in mouse plasma after liver ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) using microarray technology. Microarray assays revealed that 64 LncRNAs were upregulated, and 244 LncRNAs were downregulated in the plasma of liver IRI mouse. Among these dysregulated plasma LncRNAs, 59-61% were intergenic, 22-25% were antisense overlap, 8-12% were sense overlap and 6-7% were bidirectional. Ten dysregulated plasma LncRNAs were validated by quantitative PCR assays, confirming the accuracy of microarray analysis result. Comparison analysis between dysregulated plasma and liver LncRNA profile after liver IRI revealed that among the 308 dysregulated plasma LncRNAs, 245 LncRNAs were present in the liver, but remained unchanged. In contrast, among the 98 dysregulated liver LncRNAs after IRI, only 19 were present in the plasma, but remained unchanged. LncRNA AK139328 had been previously reported to be upregulated in the liver after IRI, and silencing of hepatic AK139328 ameliorated liver IRI. Both microarray and RT-PCR analyses failed to detect the presence of AK139328 in mouse plasma. In summary, the current study compared the difference between dysregulated LncRNA profile in mouse plasma and liver after liver IRI, and suggested that a group of dysregulated plasma LncRNAs have the potential of becoming novel biomarkers for evaluation of ischemic liver injury.

  10. New insights into the role of perinatal HPA-axis dysregulation in postpartum depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Laura M; Davis, Elysia Poggi; Sandman, Curt A

    2013-12-01

    Postpartum depression affects 10-20% of women following birth and exerts persisting adverse consequences on both mother and child. An incomplete understanding of its etiology constitutes a barrier to early identification and treatment. It is likely that prenatal hormone trajectories represent both markers of risk and also causal factors in the development of postpartum depression. During pregnancy the maternal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis undergoes dramatic alterations, due in large part, to the introduction of the placenta, a transient endocrine organ of fetal origin. We suggest that prenatal placental and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation is predictive of risk for postpartum depression. In this model the positive feedback loop involving the systems regulating the products of the HPA axis results in higher prenatal levels of cortisol and placental corticotropin-releasing hormone. Greater elevations in placental corticotropin-releasing hormone are related to a disturbance in the sensitivity of the anterior pituitary to cortisol and also perhaps to decreased central corticotropin-releasing hormone secretion. Secondary or tertiary adrenal insufficiencies of a more extreme nature, which emerge during the prenatal period, may be predictive of an extended or more pronounced postpartum hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal refractory period, which in turn represents a risk factor for development of postpartum depression. In addition to reviewing the relevant existing literature, new data are presented in support of this model which link elevated placental corticotropin-releasing hormone with low levels of ACTH at 3-months postpartum. Future research will further elucidate the role of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation in postpartum depression and also whether prenatal placental and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal profiles might prove useful in the early identification of mothers at risk for postpartum mood dysregulation. Copyright © 2013

  11. Cancer-related fatigue shows a stable association with diurnal cortisol dysregulation in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Martina E; Semik, Johanna; Habermann, Nina; Wiskemann, Joachim; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Steindorf, Karen

    2016-02-01

    Fatigue is a major burden for breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant therapy. Yet, its pathophysiology is still not well understood. Hypothesized mechanisms include dysregulations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which may be reflected in alterations in the diurnal cortisol patterns. However, studies on the association between cortisol and fatigue during adjuvant cancer therapy are rare. We therefore assessed salivary cortisol at awakening, 0.5h post-awakening, noon, 5 pm and 10 pm/bedtime in 265 breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant therapy at three timepoints. Cancer-related fatigue was assessed with the Fatigue Assessment Questionnaire (FAQ) covering the physical, affective, and cognitive fatigue dimensions. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed cross-sectionally at the three timepoints as well as longitudinally considering changes in cortisol and fatigue over time. The results showed that the physical dimension of cancer-related fatigue was significantly associated with increased evening cortisol levels and higher overall cortisol secretion. These associations were independent of depressive symptoms. Morning cortisol levels, the cortisol awakening response and the diurnal slope were not consistently associated with physical fatigue. Affective and cognitive fatigue showed no clear association with any of the cortisol parameters. In conclusion, the physical but not the affective or cognitive dimension of fatigue seems associated with cortisol dysregulations in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant therapy, characterized by an unaffected cortisol level in the morning but blunted decline to the evening level. Research focusing on disturbances of the cortisol rhythm and HPA dysregulations during and after cancer treatment may open new strategies to reduce cancer-related fatigue.

  12. Dysregulated left inferior parietal activity in schizophrenia and depression: functional connectivity and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika I. Müller

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The inferior parietal cortex (IPC is a heterogeneous region that is known to be involved in a multitude of diverse different tasks and processes, though its contribution to these often-complex functions is yet poorly understood. In a previous study we demonstrated that patients with depression failed to deactivate the left IPC during processing of congruent audiovisual information. We now found the same dysregulation (same region and condition in schizophrenia. By using task-independent (resting state and task-dependent (MACM analyses we aimed at characterizing this particular region with regard to its connectivity and function. Across both approaches, results revealed functional connectivity of the left inferior parietal seed region with bilateral IPC, precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex (PrC/PCC, medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC, left middle frontal (MFG as well as inferior frontal (IFG gyrus. Network-level functional characterization further revealed that on the one hand, all interconnected regions are part of a network involved in memory processes. On the other hand, sub-networks are formed when emotion, language, social cognition and reasoning processes are required. Thus, the IPC-region that is dysregulated in both depression and schizophrenia is functionally connected to a network of regions which, depending on task demands may form sub-networks. These results therefore indicate that dysregulation of left IPC in depression and schizophrenia might not only be connected to deficits in audiovisual integration, but is possibly also associated to impaired memory and deficits in emotion processing in these patient groups.

  13. Association of haemolytic uraemic syndrome with dysregulation of chemokine receptor expression in circulating monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Maria Victoria; Ruggieri, Matias; Panek, Analia Cecilia; Mejias, Maria Pilar; Fernandez-Brando, Romina Jimena; Abrey-Recalde, Maria Jimena; Exeni, Andrea; Barilari, Catalina; Exeni, Ramon; Palermo, Marina Sandra

    2015-08-01

    Haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) is the major complication of Escherichia coli gastrointestinal infections that are Shiga toxin (Stx) producing. Monocytes contribute to HUS evolution by producing cytokines that sensitize endothelial cells to Stx action and migration to the injured kidney. As CC chemokine receptors (CCRs) are involved in monocyte recruitment to injured tissue, we analysed the contribution of these receptors to the pathogenesis of HUS. We analysed CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 expression in peripheral monocytes from HUS patients during the acute period, with healthy children as controls. We observed an increased expression of CCRs per cell in monocytes from HUS patients, accompanied by an increase in the absolute number of monocytes CCR1+, CCR2+ and CCR5+. It is interesting that prospective analysis confirmed that CCR1 expression positively correlated with HUS severity. The evaluation of chemokine levels in plasma showed that regulated on activation of normal T-cell-expressed and -secreted (RANTES) protein was reduced in plasma from patients with severe HUS, and this decrease correlated with thrombocytopenia. Finally, the expression of the higher CCRs was accompanied by a loss of functionality which could be due to a mechanism for desensitization to compensate for altered receptor expression. The increase in CCR expression correlates with HUS severity, suggesting that the dysregulation of these receptors might contribute to an increased risk of renal damage. Activated monocytes could be recruited by chemokines and then receptors could be dysregulated. The dysregulation of CCRs and their ligands observed during the acute period suggests that a chemokine pathway would participate in HUS development.

  14. Dysregulated Lysine Acetyltransferase 2B Promotes Inflammatory Bowel Disease Pathogenesis Through Transcriptional Repression of Interleukin-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Alfa H C; Wu, William K K; Xu, Liangliang; Wong, Sunny H; Go, Minnie Y; Chan, Anthony W H; Harbord, Marcus; Zhang, Shenghong; Chen, Minhu; Wu, Justin C Y; Chan, Michael W Y; Chan, Matthew T V; Chan, Francis K L; Sung, Joseph J Y; Yu, Jun; Cheng, Alfred S L; Ng, Siew C

    2016-06-01

    Accumulating evidence supports epigenetic modifications in mediating intestinal immunity in inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] pathogenesis. This study aimed to identify key dysregulated epigenetic modulators and the molecular downstream pathways in IBD. Expression of 116 well-defined epigenetic modulators was profiled and validated in 96 intestinal tissues from patients with Crohn's disease [CD], ulcerative colitis [UC], and healthy controls using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction [QRT-PCR], western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Dysregulation of histone modifications and IBD-related cytokines were examined by chromatin immunoprecipitation, luciferase activity, and gene expression analyses in normal colonic epithelial cell line, NCM460, upon small-molecule inhibition or RNA interference, followed by validation in primary colonic tissues. Targeted expression profiling uncovered seven differentially expressed epigenetic modulators, of which the down-regulation of lysine acetyltransferase 2B [KAT2B] mRNA and protein was the most significant and was consequently validated in inflamed CD and UC compared with healthy colonic tissues. KAT2B protein localised abundantly in nuclei of normal colonic epithelium but diminished in paired inflamed CD and UC tissues. Pharmacological inhibition of KAT2B by anacardic acid in NCM460 cells reduced the levels of histone H4 lysine 5 acetylation [H4K5ac] and interleukin-10 [IL-10] in a dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of KAT2B reduced the IL-10 promoter occupancy of KAT2B and H4K5ac, resulting in transcriptional silencing. IL-10 level was also diminished in inflamed IBD tissues. Our findings demonstrated a novel epigenetic mechanism of IL-10 dysregulation in IBD. Down-regulation of KAT2B may disrupt the innate and adaptive inflammatory responses due to the suppression of this crucial anti-inflammatory cytokine. Copyright © 2016 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University

  15. Evidence for a dysregulated immune system in the etiology of psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibney, Sinead M; Drexhage, Hemmo A

    2013-09-01

    There is extensive bi-directional communication between the brain and the immune system in both health and disease. In recent years, the role of an altered immune system in the etiology of major psychiatric disorders has become more apparent. Studies have demonstrated that some patients with major psychiatric disorders exhibit characteristic signs of immune dysregulation and that this may be a common pathophysiological mechanism that underlies the development and progression of these disorders. Furthermore, many psychiatric disorders are also often accompanied by chronic medical conditions related to immune dysfunction such as autoimmune diseases, diabetes and atherosclerosis. One of the major psychiatric disorders that has been associated with an altered immune system is schizophrenia, with approximately one third of patients with this disorder showing immunological abnormalities such as an altered cytokine profile in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. An altered cytokine profile is also found in a proportion of patients with major depressive disorder and is thought to be potentially related to the pathophysiology of this disorder. Emerging evidence suggests that altered immune parameters may also be implicated in the neurobiological etiology of autism spectrum disorders. Further support for a role of immune dysregulation in the pathophysiology of these psychiatric disorders comes from studies showing the immunomodulating effects of antipsychotics and antidepressants, and the mood altering effects of anti-inflammatory therapies. This review will not attempt to discuss all of the psychiatric disorders that have been associated with an augmented immune system, but will instead focus on several key disorders where dysregulation of this system has been implicated in their pathophysiology including depression, schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder.

  16. Hypothalamic sensing of ketone bodies after prolonged cerebral exposure leads to metabolic control dysregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Lionel; Geller, Sarah; Hébert, Audrey; Repond, Cendrine; Fioramonti, Xavier; Leloup, Corinne; Pellerin, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Ketone bodies have been shown to transiently stimulate food intake and modify energy homeostasis regulatory systems following cerebral infusion for a moderate period of time (neuropeptides. Moreover, insulinemia was increased and caused a decrease in glucose production despite an increased resistance to insulin. The present study confirms that ketone bodies reaching the brain stimulates food intake. Moreover, we provide evidence that a prolonged hyperketonemia leads to a dysregulation of energy homeostasis control mechanisms. Finally, this study shows that brain exposure to ketone bodies alters insulin signaling and consequently glucose homeostasis. PMID:27708432

  17. Early life adversity potentiates the effects of later life stress on cumulative physiological dysregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dich, Nadya; Hansen, Åse Marie; Avlund, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Previous research indicates that early life adversity may heighten stress reactivity and impair mechanisms for adaptive coping, suggesting that experience of stress in early life may also potentiate adults' physiological vulnerability to stress in later life. The study...... tested this hypothesis by investigating whether experience of stressful events and circumstances (SEC) in childhood or adolescence amplified the effect of adulthood SEC on physiological dysregulation (allostatic load, AL) in later midlife. Design: Observational data were used in the present study......: The results provide further insight into the mechanisms behind the "biological embedding" of childhood stress....

  18. Minireview: Obesity and breast cancer: a tale of inflammation and dysregulated metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Evan R; Brown, Kristy A

    2013-05-01

    In addition to the spectrum of conditions known collectively as the Metabolic Syndrome, obesity is now recognized to be associated with increased risk of several cancers including colon, endometrial, and breast cancer. Obesity and carcinogenesis share 2 characteristics in common. On the one hand, they involve inflammatory pathways, and on the other hand, they involve dysregulated metabolism. In this review we focus on postmenopausal breast cancer and discuss the metabolic and cellular mechanisms whereby obesity and breast cancer are related. Because a majority of postmenopausal breast tumors are estrogen responsive, we include a discussion of the action of obesity-related factors on estrogen formation within the breast.

  19. Treating children with affect dysregulation. Discussion of Dr. Wendy Olesker's analysis of Matt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanof, Judith A

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a discussion of Dr. Wendy Olesker's sensitive analytic treatment of an impulsive, affectively dysregulated, preschool child. Drawing on her knowledge and understanding of developmental interference, trauma, and conflict, Dr. Olesker uses a variety of nonverbal, interpretative, developmental, and play techniques during the analysis to help this boy progress in his development. She also works with the parents collaboratively as part of the therapeutic process. Because Dr. Olesker's description of Matt might easily fit a diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, it is suggested that child analysts recognize the usefulness of considering child analysis when they are evaluating or treating children with this diagnosis.

  20. LPS Induces Occludin Dysregulation in Cerebral Microvascular Endothelial Cells via MAPK Signaling and Augmenting MMP-2 Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan-hui Qin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB integrity contributes to cerebral edema during central nervous system infection. The current study explored the mechanism of lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced dysregulation of tight junction (TJ proteins. Human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3 were exposed to LPS, SB203580 (p38MAPK inhibitor, or SP600125 (JNK inhibitor, and cell vitality was determined by MTT assay. The proteins expressions of p38MAPK, JNK, and TJs (occludin and zonula occludens- (ZO- 1 were determined by western blot. The mRNA levels of TJ components and MMP-2 were measured with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, and MMP-2 protein levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. LPS, SB203580, and SP600125 under respective concentrations of 10, 7.69, or 0.22 µg/mL had no effects on cell vitality. Treatment with LPS decreased mRNA and protein levels of occludin and ZO-1 and enhanced p38MAPK and JNK phosphorylation and MMP-2 expression. These effects were attenuated by pretreatment with SB203580 or SP600125, but not in ZO-1 expression. Both doxycycline hyclate (a total MMP inhibitor and SB-3CT (a specific MMP-2 inhibitor partially attenuated the LPS-induced downregulation of occludin. These data suggest that MMP-2 overexpression and p38MAPK/JNK pathways are involved in the LPS-mediated alterations of occludin in hCMEC/D3; however, ZO-1 levels are not influenced by p38MAPK/JNK.

  1. Dysregulation of Src family kinases in mast cells from epilepsy-resistant ASK versus epilepsy-prone EL mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaura, Jiro; Kawakami, Yuko; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari; Horejsi, Vaclav; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    2007-01-01

    EL mice have been used as a model of epilepsy, whereas ASK mice are an epilepsy-resistant variant originating from a colony of EL mice. Mast cell-dependent anaphylaxis is easily inducible by stimulation with IgE and Ag in ASK mice, whereas EL mice are resistant to such stimuli. In this study we have characterized mast cells derived from these two strains. ASK mast cells proliferated more vigorously than EL cells in response to IL-3 and stem cell factor. Although ASK mast cells degranulated less vigorously than EL mast cells upon stimulation with IgE and Ag, ASK cells produced and secreted several-fold more TNF-alpha and IL-2 than EL cells. Consistent with the similarities of these ASK and EL mast cell responses with phenotypes of lyn(-/-) and wild-type mast cells, respectively, Lyn activity was reduced in ASK cells. In addition to the impaired Lyn activity, ASK cells just like lyn(-/-) cells exhibited reduced Syk activity, prolonged activation of ERK and JNK, and enhanced activation of Akt. Furthermore, the lipid raft-resident transmembrane adaptor protein Cbp/PAG that associates with Lyn was hypophosphorylated in ASK cells. Importantly, similar to lyn(-/-) cells, Fyn was hyperactivated in ASK cells. Therefore, these results are consistent with the notion that Lyn-dependent phosphorylation of Cbp/PAG negatively regulates Src family kinases. This study also suggests that reduced activity of Lyn, a negative regulator of mast cell activation, underlies the susceptibility of ASK mice to anaphylaxis and implies that dysregulation of Lyn and other Src family kinases contributes to epileptogenesis.

  2. ADAM10 overexpression shifts lympho- and myelopoiesis by dysregulating site 2/site 3 cleavage products of Notch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, David R; Saleem, Sheinei J; Kang, Dae-Joong; Subler, Mark A; Conrad, Daniel H

    2011-04-01

    Although the physiological consequences of Notch signaling in hematopoiesis have been extensively studied, the differential effects of individual notch cleavage products remain to be elucidated. Given that ADAM10 is a critical regulator of Notch and that its deletion is embryonically lethal, we generated mice that overexpress ADAM10 (ADAM10 transgenic [A10Tg]) at early stages of lympho- and myeloid development. Transgene expression resulted in abrogated B cell development, delayed T cell development in the thymus, and unexpected systemic expansion of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells, also known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Mixed bone marrow reconstitution assays demonstrated that transgene expression altered hematopoiesis via a cell-intrinsic mechanism. Consistent with previously reported observations, we hypothesized that ADAM10 overexpression dysregulated Notch by uncoupling the highly regulated proteolysis of Notch receptors. This was confirmed using an in vitro model of hematopoiesis via culturing A10Tg hematopoietic Lineage(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+) cells with OP-9 stromal cells in the presence or absence of Delta-like 1, a primary ligand for Notch. Blockade of the site 2 (S2) and site 3 (S3) cleavage of the Notch receptor demonstrated differential effects on hematopoiesis. OP9-DL1 cultures containing the ADAM10 inhibitor (S2 cleavage site) enhanced and rescued B cell development from wild-type and A10Tg Lineage(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+) cells, respectively. In contrast, blockade of γ-secretase at the S3 cleavage site induced accumulation of the S2 product and consequently prevented B cell development and resulted in myeloid cell accumulation. Collectively, these findings indicate that the differential cleavage of Notch into S2 and S3 products regulated by ADAM10 is critical to hematopoietic cell-fate determination.

  3. Fear conditioning and early life vulnerabilities: two distinct pathways of emotional dysregulation and brain dysfunction in PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth A. Lanius

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The newly proposed criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-V include dysregulation of a variety of emotional states including fear, anger, guilt, and shame, in addition to dissociation and numbing. Consistent with these revisions, we postulate two models of emotion dysregulation in PTSD in which fear is not the prevailing emotion but is only one of several components implicated in a dysregulated emotional system that also mediates problems regulating anger, guilt, shame, dissociation, and numbing.We discuss whether there is a relationship between fear and other emotion regulation systems that may help further our understanding of PTSD and its underlying neurocircuitry. Two pathways describing the relationship between fear and other emotion regulation systems in PTSD are proposed. The first pathway describes emotion dysregulation as an outcome of fear conditioning through stress sensitization and kindling. The second pathway views emotion dysregulation as a distal vulnerability factor and hypothesizes a further exacerbation of fear and other emotion regulatory problems, including the development of PTSD after exposure to one or several traumatic event(s later in life. Future research and treatment implications are discussed.

  4. Comprehensive analysis of differential co-expression patterns reveal transcriptional dysregulation mechanism and identify novel prognostic lncRNAs in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Z

    2017-06-01

    , which were differentially co-expressed with the two lncRNAs, might also have the predictive capacity. Our findings will enhance the understanding of ESCC transcriptional dysregulation from a view of cross-link of lncRNA and mRNA, and the two-lncRNA combination may serve as a novel prognostic biomarker for clinical applications of ESCC. Keywords: ESCC, differential co-expression analysis, differential regulation analysis, dysregulation, lncRNA, prognostic biomarker

  5. Preclinical Activity of ARQ 087, a Novel Inhibitor Targeting FGFR Dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Terence G; Yu, Yi; Eathiraj, Sudharshan; Wang, Yunxia; Savage, Ronald E; Lapierre, Jean-Marc; Schwartz, Brian; Abbadessa, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) signaling through amplifications, mutations, and gene fusions has been implicated in a broad array of cancers (e.g. liver, gastric, ovarian, endometrial, and bladder). ARQ 087 is a novel, ATP competitive, small molecule, multi-kinase inhibitor with potent in vitro and in vivo activity against FGFR addicted cell lines and tumors. Biochemically, ARQ 087 exhibited IC50 values of 1.8 nM for FGFR2, and 4.5 nM for FGFR1 and 3. In cells, inhibition of FGFR2 auto-phosphorylation and other proteins downstream in the FGFR pathway (FRS2α, AKT, ERK) was evident by the response to ARQ 087 treatment. Cell proliferation studies demonstrated ARQ 087 has anti-proliferative activity in cell lines driven by FGFR dysregulation, including amplifications, fusions, and mutations. Cell cycle studies in cell lines with high levels of FGFR2 protein showed a positive relationship between ARQ 087 induced G1 cell cycle arrest and subsequent induction of apoptosis. In addition, ARQ 087 was effective at inhibiting tumor growth in vivo in FGFR2 altered, SNU-16 and NCI-H716, xenograft tumor models with gene amplifications and fusions. ARQ 087 is currently being studied in a phase 1/2 clinical trial that includes a sub cohort for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma patients with confirmed FGFR2 gene fusions (NCT01752920).

  6. Glucose dysregulation and hepatic steatosis in obese adolescents: is there a link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cali, Anna M G; De Oliveira, Ana Mayra; Kim, Hyeonjin; Chen, Shu; Reyes-Mugica, Miguel; Escalera, Sandra; Dziura, James; Taksali, Sara E; Kursawe, Romy; Shaw, Melissa; Savoye, Mary; Pierpont, Bridget; Constable, R Todd; Caprio, Sonia

    2009-06-01

    Fatty liver is increasingly common in obese adolescents. We determined its association with glucose dysregulation in 118 (37M/81F) obese adolescents of similar age and percent total fat. Fast-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and simple MRI were used to quantify hepatic fat content and abdominal fat distribution. All subjects had a standard oral glucose tolerance test. Insulin sensitivity was estimated by the Matsuda Index and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. Baseline total and high molecular weight (HMW)-adiponectin and interleukin (IL)-6 levels were measured. The cohort was stratified according to tertiles of hepatic fat content. Whereas age and %fat were comparable across tertiles, ethnicity differed in that fewer Blacks and more Whites and Hispanics were in the moderate and high category of hepatic fat fraction (HFF). Visceral and the visceral-to-subcutaneous fat ratio increased and insulin sensitivity decreased across tertiles. Two-hour plasma glucose rose with increasing hepatic steatosis (P < 0.008). 73.7% of the subjects in the high HFF had the metabolic syndrome compared to 19.5% and 30.6%, respectively, in the low and moderate categories. Both total and HMW-adiponectin decreased, and IL-6 increased with increasing hepatic steatosis. In obese adolescents, independent of total fat, increasing severity of fatty liver is associated with glucose dysregulation, metabolic syndrome, and with a proinflammatory milieu.

  7. Dysregulation of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling in Mouse Models of Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Kimberly M; Klann, Eric; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro; Zukin, R Suzanne

    2015-10-14

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of a diverse array of cellular processes, including cell growth, proliferation, autophagy, translation, and actin polymerization. Components of the mTOR cascade are present at synapses and influence synaptic plasticity and spine morphogenesis. A prevailing view is that the study of mTOR and its role in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) will elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which mTOR regulates neuronal function under physiological and pathological conditions. Although many ASDs arise as a result of mutations in genes with multiple molecular functions, they appear to converge on common biological pathways that give rise to autism-relevant behaviors. Dysregulation of mTOR signaling has been identified as a phenotypic feature common to fragile X syndrome, tuberous sclerosis complex 1 and 2, neurofibromatosis 1, phosphatase and tensin homolog, and potentially Rett syndrome. Below are a summary of topics covered in a symposium that presents dysregulation of mTOR as a unifying theme in a subset of ASDs.

  8. Dysregulation of Apoptotic Signaling in Cancer: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plati, Jessica; Bucur, Octavian; Khosravi-Far, Roya

    2010-01-01

    Apoptosis is a tightly regulated cell suicide program that plays an essential role in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis by eliminating unnecessary or harmful cells. Defects in this native defense mechanism promote malignant transformation and frequently confer chemoresistance to transformed cells. Indeed, the evasion of apoptosis has been recognized as a hallmark of cancer. Given that multiple mechanisms function at many levels to orchestrate the regulation of apoptosis, a multitude of opportunities for apoptotic dysregulation are present within the intricate signaling network of cell. Several of the molecular mechanisms by which cancer cells are protected from apoptosis have been elucidated. These advances have facilitated the development of novel apoptosis-inducing agents that have demonstrated single-agent activity against various types of cancers cells and/or sensitized resistant cancer cells to conventional cytotoxic therapies. Herein, we will highlight several of the central modes of apoptotic dysregulation found in cancer. We will also discuss several therapeutic strategies that aim to reestablish the apoptotic response, and thereby eradicate cancer cells, including those that demonstrate resistance to traditional therapies. PMID:18459149

  9. Graphene Oxide Dysregulates Neuroligin/NLG-1-Mediated Molecular Signaling in Interneurons in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, He; Li, Huirong; Wang, Dayong

    2017-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) can be potentially used in many medical and industrial fields. Using assay system of Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified the NLG-1/Neuroligin-mediated neuronal signaling dysregulated by GO exposure. In nematodes, GO exposure significantly decreased the expression of NLG-1, a postsynaptic cell adhesion protein. Loss-of-function mutation of nlg-1 gene resulted in a susceptible property of nematodes to GO toxicity. Rescue experiments suggested that NLG-1 could act in AIY interneurons to regulate the response to GO exposure. In the AIY interneurons, PKC-1, a serine/threonine protein kinase C (PKC) protein, was identified as the downstream target for NLG-1 in the regulation of response to GO exposure. LIN-45, a Raf protein in ERK signaling pathway, was further identified as the downstream target for PKC-1 in the regulation of response to GO exposure. Therefore, GO may dysregulate NLG-1-mediated molecular signaling in the interneurons, and a neuronal signaling cascade of NLG-1-PKC-1-LIN-45 was raised to be required for the control of response to GO exposure. More importantly, intestinal RNAi knockdown of daf-16 gene encoding a FOXO transcriptional factor in insulin signaling pathway suppressed the resistant property of nematodes overexpressing NLG-1 to GO toxicity, suggesting the possible link between neuronal NLG-1 signaling and intestinal insulin signaling in the regulation of response to GO exposure.

  10. Indirect effects of smoking motives on adolescent anger dysregulation and smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischel, Emily R; Leen-Feldner, Ellen W; Knapp, Ashley A; Bilsky, Sarah A; Ham, Lindsay; Lewis, Sarah

    2014-12-01

    Cigarette smoking is one of the leading causes of disease and death in the United States, and smoking typically begins in adolescence. It is therefore important to understand factors that relate to increased risk for cigarette smoking during this stage of development. Adolescence is a period when emotion regulatory capacities are still emerging and a common affective state to be regulated is anger, which adult research has linked to nicotine use. Drawing from work suggesting that negative affect reduction motives are one of the most common reasons for cigarette smoking, the current study was designed to evaluate the indirect effects of negative affect reduction motives on the relation between anger dysregulation and nicotine use within a sample of 119 treatment-seeking adolescents enrolled in group-based residential therapy. Results were generally consistent with hypotheses, suggesting significant indirect effects of negative affect reduction smoking motives on the relation between anger dysregulation and smoking outcomes. Findings are discussed in terms of negative affect reduction motives for cigarette use in the context of anger regulation among youths.

  11. Anger as comorbid factor for interpersonal problems and emotional dysregulation in patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña, Eva; Quiles, Yolanda; Martín, Nuria; del Pilar Salorio, Ma

    2014-01-01

    This work was undertaken to analyze general levels of anger in patients with eating disorders (ED) compared to a normative group, diagnosis-dependent differences in expressing anger, and the relation between anger dimensions and specific items of the Eating Disorder Inventory, third revision (EDI-3) (emotional dysregulation, interpersonal deficit, low self-esteem, and asceticism) and body mass index (BMI). The study participants were 58 women with a diagnosis of ED hospitalized at the Reina Sofia General University Hospital in Murcia. The women had a mean age of 25.68 (SD=7.00) years. The distribution of ED diagnoses was 27.58% anorexia nervosa with food restriction (AN-R), 15.51% anorexia nervosa with purging (AN-P), 41.37% bulimia nervosa (BN), and 15.51% eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS). ED was evaluated using the EDI-3 and anger was assessed with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-2 (STAXI-2). The general anger levels of the patients with ED were higher than those of the normative group compared. Patients diagnosed of AN-R had significantly higher scores than patients diagnosed of BN on the internal control of anger scale. The emotional dysregulation, interpersonal deficit, low self-esteem, and asceticism scales correlated significantly with different anger dimensions. No significant relation was found between body mass index (BMI) and anger. These results show the importance of including anger management in any therapeutic approach to EDs.

  12. Childhood adversities as risk factors for alexithymia and other aspects of affect dysregulation in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooiman, Cornelis G; van Rees Vellinga, Sonja; Spinhoven, Philip; Draijer, Nel; Trijsburg, Rutger W; Rooijmans, Harry G M

    2004-01-01

    Affect regulation is assumed to be a biologically based function that can become disrupted by inadequate parenting and by traumatic experiences. We studied the relation between the perceived parental parenting style, and sexual and physical abuse, with alexithymia, dissociation, anxiety and depression. In a cross-sectional study psychiatric outpatients were administered a structured interview on childhood physical and sexual abuse and they completed a number of questionnaires about the parenting styles of their parents, and about alexithymia, dissociation and mood pathology. Maternal and paternal parenting styles were moderately correlated with alexithymia and depression. The paternal parenting style was also correlated with dissociation. Optimal parenting of one of the parents had a buffering effect on the degree of alexithymia, but not on the severity of other forms of affect dysregulation. The effect of sexual or physical abuse did not add to that of parental parenting style in terms of predicting affect dysregulation. However, a positively perceived maternal parenting style was found to have a buffering effect in terms of the degree of alexithymia, if sexual abuse had also taken place. Perceived parenting does appear to be of some significance in the development of alexithymia. Optimal parenting of one of the parents may protect against the development of alexithymia when the parenting of the other parent is perceived as non-optimal. However, it is likely that other factors besides parental care and sexual or physical abuse play an important role in the development of an adequate affect regulation. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  13. Dysregulation of Corticostriatal Connectivity in Huntington’s Disease: A Role for Dopamine Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Rebec, George V.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant communication between striatum, the main information processing unit of the basal ganglia, and cerebral cortex plays a critical role in the emergence of Huntington’s disease (HD), a fatal monogenetic condition that typically strikes in the prime of life. Although both striatum and cortex undergo substantial cell loss over the course of HD, corticostriatal circuits become dysfunctional long before neurons die. Understanding the dysfunction is key to developing effective strategies for treating a progressively worsening triad of motor, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms. Cortical output neurons drive striatal activity through the release of glutamate, an excitatory amino acid. Striatal outputs, in turn, release γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) and exert inhibitory control over downstream basal ganglia targets. Ample evidence from transgenic rodent models points to dysregulation of corticostriatal glutamate transmission along with corresponding changes in striatal GABA release as underlying factors in the HD behavioral phenotype. Another contributor is dysregulation of dopamine (DA), a modulator of both glutamate and GABA transmission. In fact, pharmacological manipulation of DA is the only currently available treatment for HD symptoms. Here, we review data from animal models and human patients to evaluate the role of DA in HD, including DA interactions with glutamate and GABA within the context of dysfunctional corticostriatal circuitry. PMID:27983564

  14. Endogenous opioidergic dysregulation of pain in fibromyalgia: a PET and fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrepf, Andrew; Harper, Daniel E; Harte, Steven E; Wang, Heng; Ichesco, Eric; Hampson, Johnson P; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Clauw, Daniel J; Harris, Richard E

    2016-10-01

    Endogenous opioid system dysfunction potentially contributes to chronic pain in fibromyalgia (FM), but it is unknown if this dysfunction is related to established neurobiological markers of hyperalgesia. We previously reported that µ-opioid receptor (MOR) availability was reduced in patients with FM as compared with healthy controls in several pain-processing brain regions. In the present study, we compared pain-evoked functional magnetic resonance imaging with endogenous MOR binding and clinical pain ratings in female opioid-naive patients with FM (n = 18) using whole-brain analyses and regions of interest from our previous research. Within antinociceptive brain regions, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (r = 0.81, P 0.67; all P < 0.02), reduced MOR availability was associated with decreased pain-evoked neural activity. Additionally, reduced MOR availability was associated with lower brain activation in the nucleus accumbens (r = 0.47, P = 0.050). In many of these regions, pain-evoked activity and MOR binding potential were also associated with lower clinical affective pain ratings. These findings are the first to link endogenous opioid system tone to regional pain-evoked brain activity in a clinical pain population. Our data suggest that dysregulation of the endogenous opioid system in FM could lead to less excitation in antinociceptive brain regions by incoming noxious stimulation, resulting in the hyperalgesia and allodynia commonly observed in this population. We propose a conceptual model of affective pain dysregulation in FM.

  15. Preclinical Activity of ARQ 087, a Novel Inhibitor Targeting FGFR Dysregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Terence G.; Yu, Yi; Eathiraj, Sudharshan; Wang, Yunxia; Savage, Ronald E.; Lapierre, Jean-Marc; Schwartz, Brian; Abbadessa, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) signaling through amplifications, mutations, and gene fusions has been implicated in a broad array of cancers (e.g. liver, gastric, ovarian, endometrial, and bladder). ARQ 087 is a novel, ATP competitive, small molecule, multi-kinase inhibitor with potent in vitro and in vivo activity against FGFR addicted cell lines and tumors. Biochemically, ARQ 087 exhibited IC50 values of 1.8 nM for FGFR2, and 4.5 nM for FGFR1 and 3. In cells, inhibition of FGFR2 auto-phosphorylation and other proteins downstream in the FGFR pathway (FRS2α, AKT, ERK) was evident by the response to ARQ 087 treatment. Cell proliferation studies demonstrated ARQ 087 has anti-proliferative activity in cell lines driven by FGFR dysregulation, including amplifications, fusions, and mutations. Cell cycle studies in cell lines with high levels of FGFR2 protein showed a positive relationship between ARQ 087 induced G1 cell cycle arrest and subsequent induction of apoptosis. In addition, ARQ 087 was effective at inhibiting tumor growth in vivo in FGFR2 altered, SNU-16 and NCI-H716, xenograft tumor models with gene amplifications and fusions. ARQ 087 is currently being studied in a phase 1/2 clinical trial that includes a sub cohort for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma patients with confirmed FGFR2 gene fusions (NCT01752920). PMID:27627808

  16. Meta-Analysis of Multiple Sclerosis Microarray Data Reveals Dysregulation in RNA Splicing Regulatory Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraboschi, Elvezia Maria; Cardamone, Giulia; Rimoldi, Valeria; Gemmati, Donato; Spreafico, Marta; Duga, Stefano; Soldà, Giulia; Asselta, Rosanna

    2015-09-30

    Abnormalities in RNA metabolism and alternative splicing (AS) are emerging as important players in complex disease phenotypes. In particular, accumulating evidence suggests the existence of pathogenic links between multiple sclerosis (MS) and altered AS, including functional studies showing that an imbalance in alternatively-spliced isoforms may contribute to disease etiology. Here, we tested whether the altered expression of AS-related genes represents a MS-specific signature. A comprehensive comparative analysis of gene expression profiles of publicly-available microarray datasets (190 MS cases, 182 controls), followed by gene-ontology enrichment analysis, highlighted a significant enrichment for differentially-expressed genes involved in RNA metabolism/AS. In detail, a total of 17 genes were found to be differentially expressed in MS in multiple datasets, with CELF1 being dysregulated in five out of seven studies. We confirmed CELF1 downregulation in MS (p=0.0015) by real-time RT-PCRs on RNA extracted from blood cells of 30 cases and 30 controls. As a proof of concept, we experimentally verified the unbalance in alternatively-spliced isoforms in MS of the NFAT5 gene, a putative CELF1 target. In conclusion, for the first time we provide evidence of a consistent dysregulation of splicing-related genes in MS and we discuss its possible implications in modulating specific AS events in MS susceptibility genes.

  17. Dysregulation in level of goal and action identification across psychological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Goals, events, and actions can be mentally represented within a hierarchical framework that ranges from more abstract to more concrete levels of identification. A more abstract level of identification involves general, superordinate, and decontextualized mental representations that convey the meaning of goals, events, and actions, “why” an action is performed, and its purpose, ends, and consequences. A more concrete level of identification involves specific and subordinate mental representations that include contextual details of goals, events, and actions, and the specific “how” details of an action. This review considers three lines of evidence for considering that dysregulation of level of goal/action identification may be a transdiagnostic process. First, there is evidence that different levels of identification have distinct functional consequences and that in non-clinical samples level of goal/action identification appears to be regulated in a flexible and adaptive way to match the level of goal/action identification to circumstances. Second, there is evidence that level of goal/action identification causally influences symptoms and processes involved in psychological disorders, including emotional response, repetitive thought, impulsivity, problem solving and procrastination. Third, there is evidence that the level of goal/action identification is biased and/or dysregulated in certain psychological disorders, with a bias towards more abstract identification for negative events in depression, GAD, PTSD, and social anxiety. PMID:20579789

  18. In Utero Nutritional Manipulation Provokes Dysregulated Adipocytokines Production in F1 Offspring in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervat Y. Hanafi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intrauterine environment plays a pivotal role in the origin of fatal diseases such as diabetes. Diabetes and obesity are associated with low-grade inflammatory state and dysregulated adipokines production. This study aims to investigate the effect of maternal obesity and malnutrition on adipokines production (adiponectin, leptin, and TNF-α in F1 offspring in rats. Materials and Methods. Wistar rats were allocated in groups: F1 offspring of control mothers under control diet (CF1-CD and under high-fat diet (CF1-HCD, F1 offspring of obese mothers under CD (OF1-CD and under HCD (OF1-HCD, and F1 offspring of malnourished mothers under CD (MF1-CD and under HCD (MF1-HCD. Every 5 weeks postnatally, blood samples were obtained for biochemical analysis. Results. At the end of the 30-week follow-up, OF1-HCD and MF1-HCD exhibited hyperinsulinemia, moderate dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and impaired glucose homeostasis compared to CF1-CD and CF1-HCD. OF1-HCD and MF1-HCD demonstrated low serum levels of adiponectin and high levels of leptin compared to CF1-CD and CF1-HCD. OF1-CD, OF1-HCD, and MF1-HCD had elevated serum levels of TNF-α compared to CF1-CD and CF1-HCD (p<0.05. Conclusion. Maternal nutritional manipulation predisposes the offspring to development of insulin resistance in their adult life, probably via instigating dysregulated adipokines production.

  19. Commingling effect of gynoid and android fat patterns on cardiometabolic dysregulation in normal weight American adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okosun, I S; Seale, J P; Lyn, R

    2015-05-18

    To determine the independent and commingling effect of android and gynoid percent fat (measured using Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry) on cardiometabolic dysregulation in normal weight American adults. The 2005-2006 data (n=1802) from the United States National Health and Nutritional Examination Surveys (NHANES) were used in this study. Associations of android percent fat, gynoid percent fat and their joint occurrence with risks of cardiometabolic risk factors were estimated using prevalence odds ratios from logistic regression analyses. Android-gynoid percent fat ratio was more highly correlated with cardiometabolic dysregulation than android percent fat, gynoid percent fat or body mass index. Commingling of android and gynoid adiposities was associated with much greater odds of cardiometabolic risk factors than either android or gynoid adiposities. Commingling of android and gynoid adiposities was associated with 1.75 (95% confidence interval (CI)=1.42-2.93), 1.48 (95% CI=1.32-1.91), 1.61 (95% CI=1.50-1.89), 3.56 (95% CI=2.91-4.11) and 1.86 (95% CI=1.49-1.96) increased odds of elevated glucose, elevated blood pressure, elevated low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, elevated triglyceride and low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, respectively. Normal weight subjects who present with both android and gynoid adiposities should be advised of the associated health risks. Both android and gynoid fat accumulations should be considered in developing public health strategies for reducing cardiometabolic disease risk in normal weight subjects.

  20. No role for mast cells in obesity-related metabolic dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindřich Chmelař

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Obesity-related adipose tissue (AT inflammation that promotes metabolic dysregulation is associated with increased AT mast cell numbers. Mast cells are potent inducers of inflammatory responses and could potentially contribute to obesity-induced AT inflammation and metabolic dysregulation. Conflicting findings were reported on obesity-related metabolic dysfunction in mast cell-deficient mice, thus creating a controversy that has not been resolved up to date. Whereas traditional Kit hypomorphic mast cell-deficient strains featured reduced diet-induced obesity and diabetes, a Kit-independent model of mast cell deficiency, Cpa3Cre/+ mice, displayed no alterations in obesity and insulin sensitivity. Herein, we analyzed diet-induced obesity in Mcpt5-Cre R-DTA mice, in which the lack of mast cells is caused by a principle different from mast cell deficiency in Cpa3Cre/+ mice or Kit mutations. We observed no difference between mast cell-deficient and –proficient mice in diet-induced obesity with regards to weight gain, glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, metabolic parameters, hepatic steatosis and AT or liver inflammation. We conclude that mast cells play no essential role in obesity and related pathologies.

  1. Preoccupied attachment and emotional dysregulation: specific aspects of borderline personality disorder or general dimensions of personality pathology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lori N; Kim, Yookyung; Nolf, Kimberly A; Hallquist, Michael N; Wright, Aidan G C; Stepp, Stephanie D; Morse, Jennifer Q; Pilkonis, Paul A

    2013-08-01

    Emotional dysregulation and impaired attachment are seen by many clinical researchers as central aspects of borderline personality disorder (BPD). Alternatively, these constructs may represent general impairments in personality that are nonspecific to BPD. Using multitraitmultimethod models, the authors examined the strength of associations among preoccupied attachment, difficulties with emotion regulation, BPD features, and features of two other personality disorders (i.e., antisocial and avoidant) in a combined psychiatric outpatient and community sample of adults. Results suggested that preoccupied attachment and difficulties with emotion regulation shared strong positive associations with each other and with each of the selected personality disorders. However, preoccupied attachment and emotional dysregulation were more strongly related to BPD features than to features of other personality disorders. Findings suggest that although impairments in relational and emotional domains may underlie personality pathology in general, preoccupied attachment and emotional dysregulation also have specificity for understanding core difficulties in those with BPD.

  2. Positive metacognitions about Internet use: The mediating role in the relationship between emotional dysregulation and problematic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Silvia; Caplan, Scott E; Fioravanti, Giulia

    2016-08-01

    The present study hypothesized that two specific positive metacognitions about Internet use (i.e. the belief that Internet use is useful in regulating negative emotions and the belief that it affords greater controllability) mediate the association between emotional dysregulation and problematic Internet use (PIU). A total of 293 undergraduate university students (male 48.4%; mean age=21.73+2.17) participated in the study. The assessed structural model produced adequate fit to the data (χ(2)=203.76; df=81; pInternet use was found. The presence of a direct relationship between emotional dysregulation and PIU was also detected. Moreover, the study found that emotional dysregulation might drive symptoms of PIU to a greater extent than high negative emotionality.

  3. Cumulative Childhood Trauma and Adult Sexual Satisfaction: Mediation by Affect Dysregulation and Sexual Anxiety in Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigras, Noémie; Daspe, Marie-Ève; Godbout, Natacha; Briere, John; Sabourin, Stéphane

    2017-05-19

    Childhood cumulative trauma (CCT) refers to an amalgam of childhood maltreatment experiences that can lead to a range of symptoms and problems in adulthood. The current study examined an integrative model of CCT for its relevance to psychosexual adjustment in adult survivors. A total of 620 participants aged 18 years and over completed a questionnaire assessing early life experiences, affect dysregulation, sexual anxiety, and sexual satisfaction. Path analyses confirmed the hypothesis that CCT is associated with affect dysregulation and sexual anxiety that, in turn, predict lower levels of sexual satisfaction. The validity of this mediational model was demonstrated for different operationalizations of CCT. The results suggested that sex therapists, who are likely to encounter CCT survivors in their practice, should consider targeting affect dysregulation in their efforts to decrease sexual anxiety and increase sexual satisfaction.

  4. Genetic and environmental factors underlying comorbid bulimic behaviours and alcohol use disorders: a moderating role for the dysregulated personality cluster?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slane, Jennifer D; Klump, Kelly L; McGue, Matthew; Iacono, G

    2014-05-01

    Women with bulimia nervosa (BN) frequently have co-occurring alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Studies of shared genetic transmission of these disorders have been mixed. Personality heterogeneity among individuals with BN may explain discrepant findings. Cluster analysis has characterized women with BN in groups on the basis of personality profiles. One group, the Dysregulated cluster, characterized largely by behavioural disinhibition and emotional dysregulation may be more closely linked etiologically to AUDs. This study examined whether genetic associations between BN and AUDs are the strongest among the Dysregulated cluster. Symptoms of BN and AUDs were assessed in female twins at ages 17 and 25 years from the Minnesota Twin Family Study. Personality clusters were defined using the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire. Twin moderation models suggested small-to-moderate common genetic transmission between BN and AUDs. However, shared genetic effects did not differ by personality cluster. Findings suggest that personality clusters are unlikely to account for inconsistent findings regarding their shared aetiology.

  5. An Experimental Examination of the Interaction between Mood Induction Task and Personality Psychopathology on State Emotion Dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren M. Borges

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available While emotion dysregulation has been investigated as a key variable in the development and persistence of personality psychopathology, few studies have explored state emotion dysregulation among individuals with personality disorders (PDs. The current study addresses this void in the literature through a laboratory investigation of state emotion dysregulation among participants with and without PDs. To facilitate this goal, participants were matched to pairs based on similar personality features and were randomized to one of two behavioral analogues; either the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task-Computerized (PASAT-C or an interpersonally based mood induction. As hypothesized, PD participants in the PASAT-C reported significantly more difficulty with impulsivity and emotion regulation strategies. Contrary to expectations, the PD group in the interpersonal task demonstrated significantly less difficulty with non-acceptance of emotion and emotional clarity and significantly greater positive affect compared to non-PD participants. Implications for these findings and directions for future research are discussed.

  6. A microRNA network dysregulated in asthma controls IL-6 production in bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Nunez, Rocio T; Bondanese, Victor P; Louafi, Fethi; Francisco-Garcia, Ana S; Rupani, Hitasha; Bedke, Nicole; Holgate, Stephen; Howarth, Peter H; Davies, Donna E; Sanchez-Elsner, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are short non-coding single stranded RNAs that regulate gene expression. While much is known about the effects of individual microRNAs, there is now growing evidence that they can work in co-operative networks. MicroRNAs are known to be dysregulated in many diseases and affect pathways involved in the pathology. We investigated dysregulation of microRNA networks using asthma as the disease model. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by bronchial hyperresponsiveness and airway remodelling. The airway epithelium is a major contributor to asthma pathology and has been shown to produce an excess of inflammatory and pro-remodelling cytokines such as TGF-β, IL-6 and IL-8 as well as deficient amounts of anti-viral interferons. After performing microRNA arrays, we found that microRNAs -18a, -27a, -128 and -155 are down-regulated in asthmatic bronchial epithelial cells, compared to cells from healthy donors. Interestingly, these microRNAs are predicted in silico to target several components of the TGF-β, IL-6, IL-8 and interferons pathways. Manipulation of the levels of individual microRNAs in bronchial epithelial cells did not have an effect on any of these pathways. Importantly, knock-down of the network of microRNAs miR-18a, -27a, -128 and -155 led to a significant increase of IL-8 and IL-6 expression. Interestingly, despite strong in silico predictions, down-regulation of the pool of microRNAs did not have an effect on the TGF-β and Interferon pathways. In conclusion, using both bioinformatics and experimental tools we found a highly relevant potential role for microRNA dysregulation in the control of IL-6 and IL-8 expression in asthma. Our results suggest that microRNAs may have different roles depending on the presence of other microRNAs. Thus, interpretation of in silico analysis of microRNA function should be confirmed experimentally in the relevant cellular context taking into account interactions with other micro

  7. A microRNA network dysregulated in asthma controls IL-6 production in bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio T Martinez-Nunez

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are short non-coding single stranded RNAs that regulate gene expression. While much is known about the effects of individual microRNAs, there is now growing evidence that they can work in co-operative networks. MicroRNAs are known to be dysregulated in many diseases and affect pathways involved in the pathology. We investigated dysregulation of microRNA networks using asthma as the disease model. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by bronchial hyperresponsiveness and airway remodelling. The airway epithelium is a major contributor to asthma pathology and has been shown to produce an excess of inflammatory and pro-remodelling cytokines such as TGF-β, IL-6 and IL-8 as well as deficient amounts of anti-viral interferons. After performing microRNA arrays, we found that microRNAs -18a, -27a, -128 and -155 are down-regulated in asthmatic bronchial epithelial cells, compared to cells from healthy donors. Interestingly, these microRNAs are predicted in silico to target several components of the TGF-β, IL-6, IL-8 and interferons pathways. Manipulation of the levels of individual microRNAs in bronchial epithelial cells did not have an effect on any of these pathways. Importantly, knock-down of the network of microRNAs miR-18a, -27a, -128 and -155 led to a significant increase of IL-8 and IL-6 expression. Interestingly, despite strong in silico predictions, down-regulation of the pool of microRNAs did not have an effect on the TGF-β and Interferon pathways. In conclusion, using both bioinformatics and experimental tools we found a highly relevant potential role for microRNA dysregulation in the control of IL-6 and IL-8 expression in asthma. Our results suggest that microRNAs may have different roles depending on the presence of other microRNAs. Thus, interpretation of in silico analysis of microRNA function should be confirmed experimentally in the relevant cellular context taking into account interactions

  8. The Dysregulation Profile in middle childhood and adolescence across reporters: factor structure, measurement invariance, and links with self-harm and suicidal ideation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.F. Deutz (Marike); S.B. Geeraert (Sanne Barbara); A.L. Van Baar (Anneloes); M. Deković (Maja); P.J. Prinzie (Peter)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractRecently, a phenotype of severe dysregulation, the Dysregulation Profile (DP), has been identified. DP consists of elevated scores on the Anxious/Depressed (AD), Aggressive Behavior (AGG) and Attention Problems (AP) scales of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), Teacher Report Form (TRF)

  9. The Dysregulation Profile in middle childhood and adolescence across reporters: factor structure, measurement invariance, and links with self-harm and suicidal ideation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deutz, Marike; Geeraerts, Sanne; van Baar, Anneloes; Dekovic, Maja; Prinzie, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a phenotype of severe dysregulation, the Dysregulation Profile (DP), has been identified. DP consists of elevated scores on the Anxious/Depressed (AD), Aggressive Behavior (AGG) and Attention Problems (AP) scales of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), Teacher Report Form (TRF), or Youth S

  10. The Dysregulation Profile in middle childhood and adolescence across reporters: factor structure, measurement invariance, and links with self-harm and suicidal ideation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deutz, Marike; Geeraerts, Sanne; van Baar, Anneloes; Dekovic, Maja; Prinzie, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a phenotype of severe dysregulation, the Dysregulation Profile (DP), has been identified. DP consists of elevated scores on the Anxious/Depressed (AD), Aggressive Behavior (AGG) and Attention Problems (AP) scales of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), Teacher Report Form (TRF), or Youth

  11. The Dysregulation Profile in middle childhood and adolescence across reporters: factor structure, measurement invariance, and links with self-harm and suicidal ideation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.F. Deutz (Marike); S.B. Geeraert (Sanne Barbara); A.L. Van Baar (Anneloes); M. Deković (Maja); P.J. Prinzie (Peter)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractRecently, a phenotype of severe dysregulation, the Dysregulation Profile (DP), has been identified. DP consists of elevated scores on the Anxious/Depressed (AD), Aggressive Behavior (AGG) and Attention Problems (AP) scales of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), Teacher Report Form

  12. The Dysregulation Profile in middle childhood and adolescence across reporters: factor structure, measurement invariance, and links with self-harm and suicidal ideation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deutz, Marike; Geeraerts, Sanne; van Baar, Anneloes; Dekovic, Maja; Prinzie, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a phenotype of severe dysregulation, the Dysregulation Profile (DP), has been identified. DP consists of elevated scores on the Anxious/Depressed (AD), Aggressive Behavior (AGG) and Attention Problems (AP) scales of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), Teacher Report Form (TRF), or Youth S

  13. Successful treatment of dopamine dysregulation syndrome with dopamine D2 partial agonist antipsychotic drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizushima Jin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS consists of a series of complications such as compulsive use of dopaminergic medications, aggressive or hypomanic behaviors during excessive use, and withdrawal states characterized by dysphoria and anxiety, caused by long-term dopaminergic treatment in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD. Although several ways to manage DDS have been suggested, there has been no established treatment that can manage DDS without deterioration of motor symptoms. In this article, we present a case of PD in whom the administration of the dopamine D2 partial agonistic antipsychotic drug aripiprazole improved DDS symptoms such as craving and compulsive behavior without worsening of motor symptoms. Considering the profile of this drug as a partial agonist at D2 receptors, it is possible that it exerts its therapeutic effect on DDS by modulating the dysfunctional dopamine system.

  14. Complex Psychological Trauma and Self-Dysregulation: A Theory Synthesis for Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kristen R

    2016-01-01

    Complex psychological trauma is a phenomenon resulting from severe interpersonal trauma that can negatively affect how individuals experience health care. However, few theories conceptualizing complex trauma exist, and it has received only limited attention in the nursing literature. The purpose of this theory synthesis was to organize two theories of (a) self-regulation and (b) self-dysregulation following complex psychological trauma into a single conceptual framework for use in nursing practice. This article used the theory synthesis approach described by Walker and Avant. The theory has potential to advance nursing science by helping nurses and other health professionals understand how trauma can alter self-regulatory processes and result in unique challenges in care delivery. It also has potential to prevent retraumatization of trauma survivors at the hands of health care providers.

  15. The immunogenetics of immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X linked (IPEX) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Hennezel, Eva; Bin Dhuban, Khalid; Torgerson, Troy; Piccirillo, Ciriaco A; Piccirillo, Ciriaco

    2012-05-01

    Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X linked (IPEX) syndrome is a rare disorder in humans caused by germ-line mutations in the FOXP3 gene, a master transcriptional regulator for the development of CD4 regulatory T (Treg) cells. This T cell subset has global inhibitory functions that maintain immune homeostasis and mediate self-tolerance. Treg developmental deficiency or dysfunction is a hallmark of IPEX. It leads to severe, multi-organ, autoimmune phenomena including enteropathy, chronic dermatitis, endocrinopathy and other organ-specific diseases such as anaemia, thrombocytopenia, hepatitis and nephritis. In this review, the genetic, immunological and clinical characteristics of IPEX syndrome are described, and the impact of heritable mutations on the function of Treg cells highlighted.

  16. Adaptive immunity to Anaplasma pathogens and immune dysregulation: implications for bacterial persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Wendy C.

    2012-01-01

    Anaplasma marginale is an obligate intraerythrocytic bacterium that infects ruminants, and notably causes severe economic losses in cattle worldwide. A. phagocytophilum infects neutrophils and causes disease in many mammals, including ruminants, dogs, cats, horses, and humans. Both bacteria cause persistent infection – infected cattle never clear A. marginale and A. phagocytophilum can also cause persistent infection in ruminants and other animals for several years. This review describes correlates of the protective immune response to these two pathogens as well as subversion and dysregulation of the immune response following infection that likely contribute to long-term persistence. I also compare the immune dysfunction observed with intraerythrocytic A. marginale to that observed in other models of chronic infection resulting in high antigen loads, including malaria, a disease caused by another intraerythrocytic pathogen. PMID:22226382

  17. Memory and synaptic plasticity are impaired by dysregulated hippocampal O-GlcNAcylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong Ryoul; Song, Seungju; Hwang, Hongik; Jung, Jung Hoon; Kim, Su-Jeong; Yoon, Sora; Hur, Jin-Hoe; Park, Jae-Il; Lee, Cheol; Nam, Dougu; Seo, Young-Kyo; Kim, Joung-Hun; Rhim, Hyewhon; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2017-01-01

    O-GlcNAcylated proteins are abundant in the brain and are associated with neuronal functions and neurodegenerative diseases. Although several studies have reported the effects of aberrant regulation of O-GlcNAcylation on brain function, the roles of O-GlcNAcylation in synaptic function remain unclear. To understand the effect of aberrant O-GlcNAcylation on the brain, we used Oga+/− mice which have an increased level of O-GlcNAcylation, and found that Oga+/− mice exhibited impaired spatial learning and memory. Consistent with this result, Oga+/− mice showed a defect in hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Oga heterozygosity causes impairment of both long-term potentiation and long-term depression due to dysregulation of AMPA receptor phosphorylation. These results demonstrate a role for hyper-O-GlcNAcylation in learning and memory. PMID:28368052

  18. Polyvagal Theory and developmental psychopathology: emotion dysregulation and conduct problems from preschool to adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchaine, Theodore P; Gatzke-Kopp, Lisa; Mead, Hilary K

    2007-02-01

    In science, theories lend coherence to vast amounts of descriptive information. However, current diagnostic approaches in psychopathology are primarily atheoretical, emphasizing description over etiological mechanisms. We describe the importance of Polyvagal Theory toward understanding the etiology of emotion dysregulation, a hallmark of psychopathology. When combined with theories of social reinforcement and motivation, Polyvagal Theory specifies etiological mechanisms through which distinct patterns of psychopathology emerge. In this paper, we summarize three studies evaluating autonomic nervous system functioning in children with conduct problems, ages 4-18. At all age ranges, these children exhibit attenuated sympathetic nervous system responses to reward, suggesting deficiencies in approach motivation. By middle school, this reward insensitivity is met with inadequate vagal modulation of cardiac output, suggesting additional deficiencies in emotion regulation. We propose a biosocial developmental model of conduct problems in which inherited impulsivity is amplified through social reinforcement of emotional lability. Implications for early intervention are discussed.

  19. Dysregulation of JAM-A plays an important role in human tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chen; Lu, Funian; Chen, Hongxia; Zhao, Xianda; Sun, Jun; Chen, Honglei

    2014-01-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) is a transmembrane protein that belongs to the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily. Evidence determines that JAM-A plays a role in numerous cellular processes, including tight junction assembly, leukocyte migration, platelet activation, angiogenesis and virus binding. Recent research suggests that JAM-A is dysregulated in various cancers and is vital for tumor progression. JAM-A is implicated in carcinogenesis via different signal pathways such as TGF-β1 signaling. Furthermore, JAM-A expression in cancers is usually associated with certain outcome of patients and might be a prognostic indicator. In this review, the correlation between JAM-A expression and human cancers will be described.

  20. Longitudinal associations between infections and atopic disorders across childhood and dysregulated adrenocortical functioning in early adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttle, Paula L; Serbin, Lisa A; Martin-Storey, Alexa; Stack, Dale M; Schwartzman, Alex E

    2014-07-01

    The present study sought to determine if exposure to common childhood medical problems (i.e., infections and atopic disorders [e.g., allergies, asthma]) may dysregulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Longitudinal data from 96 youth were used to examine this possibility. Medical records were drawn from government databases indicating the frequency of visits to healthcare facilities for infections and atopic disorders from infancy to early adolescence. During early adolescence, participants provided salivary cortisol samples from awakening until bedtime over 2 consecutive days. Individuals with a history of increased number visits for infections across childhood displayed elevated levels of cortisol at awakening whereas individuals with childhood histories of visits for atopic disorders displayed blunted diurnal cortisol slopes. These findings build on previous research documenting associations between infections and atopic disorders and cortisol by identifying longitudinal linkages from early health problems to later HPA axis functioning.

  1. Resilience dysregulation in major depressive disorder: focus on glutamatergic imbalance and microglial activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réus, Gislaine Z; de Moura, Airam B; Silva, Ritele H; Resende, Wilson R; Quevedo, João

    2017-06-30

    Many studies have been shown an important role of glutamatergic system as well microglial activation in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Experimental and clinical data suggest that attenuation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor function exerts antidepressant effects. Glutamatergic system is involved with memory establishment and function, and it regulates plasticity in the brain. Microglial cells play pivotal role to the brain functions; however, under chronic inflammation status microglial could be turn activated and increase the pro-inflammatory cytokines. In humans most resistant to the development of psychiatric disorders, including MDD, are observed a greater degree of resilience resulting from stress. Less resilience is associated with neuroendocrine and neuroinflammatory markers, as well as with glutamatergic system dysregulation. Thus, this review we highlighted findings from literature identifying the function of glutamatergic system, microglial activation and inflammation in resilience. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Heat-shock protein dysregulation is associated with functional and pathological TDP-43 aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsiang-Yu; Hou, Shin-Chen; Way, Tzong-Der; Wong, Chi-Huey; Wang, I.-Fan

    2013-11-01

    Conformational disorders are involved in various neurodegenerative diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the major contributors to neurodegenerative disease; however, ROS that affect the structural changes in misfolded disease proteins have yet to be well characterized. Here we demonstrate that the intrinsic propensity of TDP-43 to aggregate drives the assembly of TDP-43-positive stress granules and soluble toxic TDP-43 oligomers in response to a ROS insult via a disulfide crosslinking-independent mechanism. Notably, ROS-induced TDP-43 protein assembly correlates with the dynamics of certain TDP-43-associated chaperones. The heat-shock protein (HSP)-90 inhibitor 17-AAG prevents ROS-induced TDP-43 aggregation, alters the type of TDP-43 multimers and reduces the severity of pathological TDP-43 inclusions. In summary, our study suggests that a common mechanism could be involved in the pathogenesis of conformational diseases that result from HSP dysregulation.

  3. Epigenetic remodelling and dysregulation of DLGAP4 is linked with early-onset cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Hansen, Claus; Kim, Hyung-Goo

    2014-01-01

    Genome instability, epigenetic remodelling and structural chromosomal rearrangements are hallmarks of cancer. However, the coordinated epigenetic effects of constitutional chromosomal rearrangements that disrupt genes associated with congenital neurodevelopmental diseases are poorly understood....... To understand the genetic-epigenetic interplay at breakpoints of chromosomal translocations disrupting CG-rich loci, we quantified epigenetic modifications at DLGAP4 (SAPAP4), a key post-synaptic density 95 (PSD95) associated gene, truncated by the chromosome translocation t(8;20)(p12;q11.23), co......-segregating with cerebellar ataxia in a five-generation family. We report significant epigenetic remodelling of the DLGAP4 locus triggered by the t(8;20)(p12;q11.23) translocation and leading to dysregulation of DLGAP4 expression in affected carriers. Disruption of DLGAP4 results in monoallelic hypermethylation...

  4. Overexpression of Psoriasin (S100A7) Contributes to Dysregulated Differentiation in Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Anna-Karin; Vegfors, Jenny; Eding, Cecilia Bivik; Enerbäck, Charlotta

    2017-04-06

    Psoriasin, which is highly expressed in psoriasis, is encoded by a gene located within the epidermal differentiation complex. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of endogenous psoriasin on disturbed keratinocyte differentiation in psoriasis. Immunohistochemical staining revealed a gradient of psoriasin expression in the psoriatic epidermis with highest expression in the suprabasal, differentiated layers. Induction of keratinocyte differentiation caused concurrent expression of psoriasin and the differentiation marker involucrin. The differentiation-induced psoriasin expression was found to be mediated by the protein kinase C pathway. The downregulation of psoriasin expression by small interfering RNA revealed that psoriasin mediates the expression of involucrin, desmoglein 1, transglutaminase 1 and CD24 in normal differentiation. The lentivirus-mediated overexpression of psoriasin, mimicking the psoriatic milieu, gave rise to an altered regulation of differentiation genes and an expression pattern reminiscent of that in psoriatic epidermis. These findings suggest that psoriasin contributes to the dysregulated differentiation process in the psoriasis epidermis.

  5. Pancreatic Islet Protein Complexes and Their Dysregulation in Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Helle Krogh; Gudmundsdottir, Valborg; Brunak, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex disease that involves multiple genes. Numerous risk loci have already been associated with T2D, although many susceptibility genes remain to be identified given heritability estimates. Systems biology approaches hold potential for discovering novel T2D genes...... associated with diabetic phenotypes through heterogeneous evidence sources, including genetic variation, methylation, and gene expression in islets. The analysis specifically revealed ten T2D candidate genes with probable roles in islets (ANPEP, HADH, FAM105A, PDLIM4, PDLIM5, MAP2K4, PPP2R5E, SNX13, GNAS...... give rise to diabetic phenotypes. The complex nature of T2D ultimately prompts an understanding of the individual patients at the network biology level. We present the foundation for such work by exposing a subset of the global interactome that is dysregulated in T2D and consequently provides a good...

  6. Dysregulation of neurogenesis by neuroinflammation: key differences in neurodevelopmental and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lir-Wan Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic neurogenesis is the process of generating neurons, the functional units of the brain. Because of its sensitivity to adverse intrauterine environment such as infection, dysregulation of this process has emerged as a key mechanism underlying many neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Adult neurogenesis, although is restricted to a few neurogenic niches, plays pivotal roles in brain plasticity and repair. Increasing evidence suggests that impairments in adult neurogenesis are involved in major neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. A hallmark feature of these brain disorders is neuroinflammation, which can either promote or inhibit neurogenesis depending upon the context of brain microenvironment. In this review paper, we present evidence from both experimental and human studies to show a complex picture of relationship between these two events, and discussed potential factors contributing to different or even opposing actions of neuroinflammation on neurogenesis in neurodevelopmental and neurological disorders.

  7. Molecular dysregulation of renal development:Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark Daniel Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) occur in approximately 1 in 500 foetal ultrasound examinations. The CAKUT phenotype can involve varying degrees of renal dysplasia, renal hypoplasia, urinary tract obstruction, ureteropelvic anomalies such as megaureter, ureteral atresia, ectopic ureteral orifice, and duplex collecting system The nephrogenic (mesenchymal) and the ductogenic (ureteric) events are regulated by transcription factors, proto-oncogenes and growth factors in a complex fashion. Dysregulation of specific molecular pathways has been implicated as a primary mechanism for CAKUT. This review will attempt to clarify the molecular basis of CAKUT by focusing on these key developmental pathways. First, however, an examination of normal metanephric kidney development is necessary. Furthermore, clinical aspects of CAKUT, including prenatal diagnosis and current treatments, will be introduced. Through the critical evaluation of a range of diverse scientific literature, it is hoped that an overview of the current status of this important area of developmental anatomy is achieved.

  8. Targets of polyamine dysregulation in major depression and suicide: Activity-dependent feedback, excitability, and neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limon, Agenor; Mamdani, Firoza; Hjelm, Brooke E; Vawter, Marquis P; Sequeira, Adolfo

    2016-07-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a leading cause of disability worldwide characterized by altered neuronal activity in brain regions involved in the control of stress and emotion. Although multiple lines of evidence suggest that altered stress-coping mechanisms underlie the etiology of MDD, the homeostatic control of neuronal excitability in MDD at the molecular level is not well established. In this review, we examine past and current evidence implicating dysregulation of the polyamine system as a central factor in the homeostatic response to stress and the etiology of MDD. We discuss the cellular effects of abnormal metabolism of polyamines in the context of their role in sensing and modulation of neuronal, electrical, and synaptic activity. Finally, we discuss evidence supporting an allostatic model of depression based on a chronic elevation in polyamine levels resulting in self-sustained stress response mechanisms maintained by maladaptive homeostatic mechanisms.

  9. Molecular dysregulation of renal development: Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Daniel Wilson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT occur in approximately 1 in 500 foetal ultrasound examinations. The CAKUT phenotype can involve varying degrees of renal dysplasia, renal hypoplasia, urinary tract obstruction, ureteropelvic anomalies such as megaureter, ureteral atresia, ectopic ureteral orifice, and duplex collecting system The nephrogenic (mesenchymal and the ductogenic (ureteric events are regulated by transcription factors, proto-oncogenes and growth factors in a complex fashion. Dysregulation of specific molecular pathways has been implicated as a primary mechanism for CAKUT. This review will attempt to clarify the molecular basis of CAKUT by focusing on these key developmental pathways. First, however, an examination of normal metanephric kidney development is necessary. Furthermore, clinical aspects of CAKUT, including prenatal diagnosis and current treatments, will be introduced. Through the critical evaluation of a range of diverse scientific literature, it is hoped that an overview of the current status of this important area of developmental anatomy is achieved.

  10. Normal weight obesity: a risk factor for cardiometabolic dysregulation and cardiovascular mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Corral, Abel; Somers, Virend K.; Sierra-Johnson, Justo; Korenfeld, Yoel; Boarin, Simona; Korinek, Josef; Jensen, Michael D.; Parati, Gianfranco; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Aims We hypothesized that subjects with a normal body mass index (BMI), but high body fat (BF) content [normal weight obesity (NWO)], have a higher prevalence of cardiometabolic dysregulation and are at higher risk for cardiovascular (CV) mortality. Methods and results We analysed 6171 subjects >20 years of age from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) and the NHANES III mortality study, whose BMI was within the normal range (18.5–24.9 kg/m2), and who underwent a complete evaluation that included body composition assessment, blood measurements, and assessment of CV risk factors. Survival information was available for >99% of the subjects after a median follow-up of 8.8 years. We divided our sample using sex-specific tertiles of BF%. The highest tertile of BF (>23.1% in men and >33.3% in women) was labelled as NWO. When compared with the low BF group, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in subjects with NWO was four-fold higher (16.6 vs. 4.8%, P < 0.0001). Subjects with NWO also had higher prevalence of dyslipidaemia, hypertension (men), and CV disease (women). After adjustment, women with NWO showed a significant 2.2-fold increased risk for CV mortality (HR = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.03–4.67) in comparison to the low BF group. Conclusion Normal weight obesity, defined as the combination of normal BMI and high BF content, is associated with a high prevalence of cardiometabolic dysregulation, metabolic syndrome, and CV risk factors. In women, NWO is independently associated with increased risk for CV mortality. PMID:19933515

  11. Congenital and environmental factors associated with adipocyte dysregulation as defects of insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Ping; Chung, Fu-Mei; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Lee, Yau-Jiunn

    2007-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome refers to insulin resistance and its associated cluster of related cardiovascular metabolic risk factors including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and central obesity. Although many hypotheses and facts have been proposed to explain the interaction between genetic and environmental causes of this syndrome, the primary etiology of the metabolic syndrome is adipose tissue dysregulation. Firstly, the thrifty genotype and phenotype hypothesis may explain the endemic increase in type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in developing countries and elucidates the congenital susceptibility and environmental triggering of the metabolic syndrome. Secondly, over-nutrition leads to fatty acid (FA) accumulation in adipocytes and to an overflow to ectopic fat storage organs. This causes functional changes in adipocytes shifting the intra-cellular metabolic pathway toward insulin resistance. Thirdly, obese subjects exhibit increased fat cell size and over-secretion of biologic adipocytokines. Fourthly, failure to adequately develop adipose tissue mass, as seen in lipodystrophy cases, causes severe insulin resistance and diabetes. Lastly, similar to human type 2 diabetes, Psammonys obesus, a desert rat which feeds mainly on low-calorie vegetation, develops the metabolic syndrome when given a diet of calorie rich food. The above evidence indicates adipocyte dysregulation and secretion of FA as well as certain molecules from overloaded adipocytes/adipokines contribute to the pathogenesis of impaired insulin secretion and insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, a pro-inflammatory state and promote progression of atherosclerosis. The metabolic syndrome is a modern disease resulting adipocyte dysmetabolism resulting from the paradox of the slow human evolution combined with rapid environmental changes.

  12. Cell-specific dysregulation of microRNA expression in obese white adipose tissue.

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    Oger, Frédérik; Gheeraert, Celine; Mogilenko, Denis; Benomar, Yacir; Molendi-Coste, Olivier; Bouchaert, Emmanuel; Caron, Sandrine; Dombrowicz, David; Pattou, François; Duez, Hélène; Eeckhoute, Jérome; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Obesity is characterized by the excessive accumulation of dysfunctional white adipose tissue (WAT), leading to a strong perturbation of metabolic regulations. However, the molecular events underlying this process are not fully understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs acting as posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression in multiple tissues and organs. However, their expression and roles in WAT cell subtypes, which include not only adipocytes but also immune, endothelial, and mesenchymal stem cells as well as preadipocytes, have not been characterized. Design/Results: By applying differential miRNome analysis, we demonstrate that the expression of several miRNAs is dysregulated in epididymal WAT from ob/ob and high-fat diet-fed mice. Adipose tissue-specific down-regulation of miR-200a and miR-200b and the up-regulation of miR-342-3p, miR-335-5p, and miR-335-3p were observed. Importantly, a similarly altered expression of miR-200a and miR-200b was observed in obese diabetic patients. Furthermore, cell fractionation of mouse adipose tissue revealed that miRNAs are differentially expressed in adipocytes and in subpopulations from the stromal vascular fraction. Finally, integration of transcriptomic data showed that bioinformatically predicted miRNA target genes rarely showed anticorrelated expression with that of targeting miRNA, in contrast to experimentally validated target genes. Taken together, our data indicate that the dysregulated expression of miRNAs occurs in distinct cell types and is likely to affect cell-specific function(s) of obese WAT.

  13. Metabolic Dysregulation after Neutron Exposures Expected from an Improvised Nuclear Device.

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    Laiakis, Evagelia C; Wang, Yi-Wen; Young, Erik F; Harken, Andrew D; Xu, Yanping; Smilenov, Lubomir; Garty, Guy Y; Brenner, David J; Fornace, Albert J

    2017-07-01

    The increased threat of terrorism across the globe has raised fears that certain groups will acquire and use radioactive materials to inflict maximum damage. In the event that an improvised nuclear device (IND) is detonated, a potentially large population of victims will require assessment for radiation exposure. While photons will contribute to a major portion of the dose, neutrons may be responsible for the severity of the biologic effects and cellular responses. We investigated differences in response between these two radiation types by using metabolomics and lipidomics to identify biomarkers in urine and blood of wild-type C57BL/6 male mice. Identification of metabolites was based on a 1 Gy dose of radiation. Compared to X rays, a neutron spectrum similar to that encountered in Hiroshima at 1-1.5 km from the epicenter induced a severe metabolic dysregulation, with perturbations in amino acid metabolism and fatty acid β-oxidation being the predominant ones. Urinary metabolites were able to discriminate between neutron and X rays on day 1 as well as day 7 postirradiation, while serum markers showed such discrimination only on day 1. Free fatty acids from omega-6 and omega-3 pathways were also decreased with 1 Gy of neutrons, implicating cell membrane dysfunction and impaired phospholipid metabolism, which should otherwise lead to release of those molecules in circulation. While a precise relative biological effectiveness value could not be calculated from this study, the results are consistent with other published studies showing higher levels of damage from neutrons, demonstrated here by increased metabolic dysregulation. Metabolomics can therefore aid in identifying global perturbations in blood and urine, and effectively distinguishing between neutron and photon exposures.

  14. Autoimmune dysregulation and purine metabolism in adenosine deaminase (ADA-deficiency

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    Aisha Vanessa Sauer

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Genetic defects in the adenosine deaminase (ADA gene are among the most common causes for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID. ADA-SCID patients suffer from lymphopenia, severely impaired cellular and humoral immunity, failure to thrive and recurrent infections. Currently available therapeutic options for this otherwise fatal disorder include bone marrow transplantation (BMT, enzyme replacement therapy with bovine ADA (PEG-ADA or hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy (HSC-GT. Although varying degrees of immune reconstitution can be achieved by these treatments, breakdown of tolerance is a major concern in ADA-SCID. Immune dysregulation such as autoimmune hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, hemolytic anemia, and immune thrombocytopenia are frequently observed in milder forms of the disease. However, several reports document similar complications also in patients on long-term PEG-ADA and after BMT or GT treatment.A skewed repertoire and decreased immune functions have been implicated in autoimmunity observed in certain B-cell and/or T-cell immunodeficiencies, but it remains unclear to what extent specific mechanisms of tolerance are affected in ADA deficiency. Herein we provide an overview about ADA-SCID and the autoimmune manifestations reported in these patients before and after treatment. We also assess the value of the ADA-deficient mouse model as a useful tool to study both immune and metabolic disease mechanisms. With focus on regulatory T and B cells we discuss the lymphocyte subpopulations particularly prone to contribute to the loss of self-tolerance and onset of autoimmunity in ADA deficiency. Moreover we address which aspects of immune dysregulation are specifically related to alterations in purine metabolism caused by the lack of ADA and the subsequent accumulation of metabolites with immunomodulatory properties.

  15. Interactions of the gasotransmitters contribute to microvascular tone (dysregulation in the preterm neonate.

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    Rebecca M Dyson

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulphide (H2S, nitric oxide (NO, and carbon monoxide (CO are involved in transitional microvascular tone dysregulation in the preterm infant; however there is conflicting evidence on the interaction of these gasotransmitters, and their overall contribution to the microcirculation in newborns is not known. The aim of this study was to measure the levels of all 3 gasotransmitters, characterise their interrelationships and elucidate their combined effects on microvascular blood flow.90 preterm neonates were studied at 24h postnatal age. Microvascular studies were performed by laser Doppler. Arterial COHb levels (a measure of CO were determined through co-oximetry. NO was measured as nitrate and nitrite in urine. H2S was measured as thiosulphate by liquid chromatography. Relationships between levels of the gasotransmitters and microvascular blood flow were assessed through partial correlation controlling for the influence of gestational age. Structural equation modelling was used to examine the combination of these effects on microvascular blood flow and derive a theoretical model of their interactions.No relationship was observed between NO and CO (p = 0.18, r = 0.18. A positive relationship between NO and H2S (p = 0.008, r = 0.28 and an inverse relationship between CO and H2S (p = 0.01, r = -0.33 exists. Structural equation modelling was used to examine the combination of these effects on microvascular blood flow. The model with the best fit is presented.The relationships between NO and H2S, and CO and H2S may be of importance in the preterm newborn, particularly as NO levels in males are associated with higher H2S levels and higher microvascular blood flow and CO in females appears to convey protection against vascular dysregulation. Here we present a theoretical model of these interactions and their overall effects on microvascular flow in the preterm newborn, upon which future mechanistic studies may be based.

  16. Dysregulation of the autonomous nervous system in patients with temporomandibular disorder: a pupillometric study.

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    Annalisa Monaco

    Full Text Available The role of the autonomic nervous system (ANS was recently investigated in Temporomandibular disorders (TMD. Several authors argue that in subjects with TMD there is a dysregulation of ANS. Recent literature support that Pupillometry is a simple non-invasive tool to study ANS. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between TMD and ANS activity using pupillometry recording in Infrared light at rest Mandible Position (RP; Infrared light at Forced Habitual Occlusion (FHO; Yellow-green light at RP; Yellow-green light at FHO. Forty female subjects were enrolled: 20 case patients showed TMD based on the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD, and 20 control patients, aged matched, had no signs or symptoms of TMD. Statistical analysis was performed on average pupil size. Ratio between pupil size in FHO and RP (FHO/RP ratio and yellow-green and infrared (light/darkness ratio lighting were carried out. Within group differences of pupil size and of "ratio" were analyzed using a paired t test, while differences of pupil size between groups were tested using an unpaired t test. Statistical comparisons between groups showed no significant differences of absolute values of pupil dimension in RP and FHO, both in yellow-green and in infrared lighting. In addition, there were no significant differences within groups comparing RP and FHO in yellow-green light. In within group comparison of pupil size, differences between RP and FHO were significant in infrared conditions. Control subjects increased, whereas TMD patients decreased pupil size at FHO in infrared lightening. FHO/RP ratio in darkness and light/darkness ratio in RP were significantly different between groups. Taken together, these data suggest that TMD subjects have an impairment of the sympathetic-adrenergic component of the ANS to be activated under stress. The present study provides preliminary pupillometric data confirming that adrenergic function is dysregulated in patients with

  17. The Impact of Age-Related Dysregulation of the Angiotensin System on Mitochondrial Redox Balance

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    Ramya eVajapey

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with the accumulation of various deleterious changes in cells. According to the free radical and mitochondrial theory of aging, mitochondria initiate most of the deleterious changes in aging and govern life span. The failure of mitochondrial reduction-oxidation (redox homeostasis and the formation of excessive free radicals are tightly linked to dysregulation in the Renin Angiotensin System (RAS. A main rate-controlling step in RAS is renin, an enzyme that hydrolyzes angiotensinogen to generate angiotensin I. Angiotensin I is further converted to Angiotensin II (Ang II by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE. Ang II binds with equal affinity to two main angiotensin receptors—type 1 (AT1R and type 2 (AT2R. The binding of Ang II to AT1R activates NADPH oxidase, which leads to increased generation of cytoplasmic reactive oxygen species (ROS. This Ang II-AT1R–NADPH-ROS signal triggers the opening of mitochondrial KATP channels and mitochondrial ROS production in a positive feedback loop. Furthermore, RAS has been implicated in the decrease of many of ROS scavenging enzymes, thereby leading to detrimental levels of free radicals in the cell.AT2R is less understood, but evidence supports an anti-oxidative and mitochondria-protective function for AT2R. The overlap between age related changes in RAS and mitochondria, and the consequences of this overlap on age-related diseases are quite complex. RAS dysregulation has been implicated in many pathological conditions due to its contribution to mitochondrial dysfunction. Decreased age-related, renal and cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction was seen in patients treated with angiotensin receptor blockers. The aim of this review is to: (a report the most recent information elucidating the role of RAS in mitochondrial redox hemostasis and (b discuss the effect of age-related activation of RAS on generation of free radicals.

  18. Dysregulation of peripheral endocannabinoid levels in hyperglycemia and obesity: Effect of high fat diets.

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    Matias, Isabel; Petrosino, Stefania; Racioppi, Alessandro; Capasso, Raffaele; Izzo, Angelo A; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2008-04-16

    Increasing evidence indicates that endocannabinoid (EC) signalling is dysregulated during hyperglycemia and obesity, particularly at the level of anandamide (AEA) and/or 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) concentrations in tissues involved in the control of energy intake and processing, such as the liver, white adipose tissue and pancreas. Here we review this previous evidence and provide new data on the possible dysregulation of EC levels in organs with endocrine function (adrenal glands and thyroid), involved in energy expenditure (brown adipose tissue and skeletal muscle), or affected by the consequences of metabolic disorders (heart and kidney), obtained from mice fed for 3, 8 and 14 weeks with two different high fat diets (HFDs), with different fatty acid compositions and impact on fasting glucose levels. Statistically significant elevations (in the skeletal muscle, heart and kidney) or reductions (in the thyroid) of the levels of either AEA or 2-AG, or both, were found. Depending on the diet, these changes preceded or accompanied the development of overt obesity and/or hyperglycemia. In the adrenal gland, first a reduction and then an elevation of EC levels were observed. In the brown fat, a very early elevation of both AEA and 2-AG normalized levels was observed with one of the diets, whereas delayed decreases were explained by an increase of the amount of fat tissue weight induced by the HFDs. The potential implications of these and previous findings in the general framework of the proposed roles of the EC system in the control of metabolic, endocrine and cardiovascular and renal functions are discussed.

  19. Dysregulation of multiple facets of glycogen metabolism in a murine model of Pompe disease.

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    Kristin M Taylor

    Full Text Available Pompe disease, also known as glycogen storage disease (GSD type II, is caused by deficiency of lysosomal acid α-glucosidase (GAA. The resulting glycogen accumulation causes a spectrum of disease severity ranging from a rapidly progressive course that is typically fatal by 1 to 2 years of age to a slower progressive course that causes significant morbidity and early mortality in children and adults. The aim of this study is to better understand the biochemical consequences of glycogen accumulation in the Pompe mouse. We evaluated glycogen metabolism in heart, triceps, quadriceps, and liver from wild type and several strains of GAA(-/- mice. Unexpectedly, we observed that lysosomal glycogen storage correlated with a robust increase in factors that normally promote glycogen biosynthesis. The GAA(-/- mouse strains were found to have elevated glycogen synthase (GS, glycogenin, hexokinase, and glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P, the allosteric activator of GS. Treating GAA(-/- mice with recombinant human GAA (rhGAA led to a dramatic reduction in the levels of glycogen, GS, glycogenin, and G-6-P. Lysosomal glycogen storage also correlated with a dysregulation of phosphorylase, which normally breaks down cytoplasmic glycogen. Analysis of phosphorylase activity confirmed a previous report that, although phosphorylase protein levels are identical in muscle lysates from wild type and GAA(-/- mice, phosphorylase activity is suppressed in the GAA(-/- mice in the absence of AMP. This reduction in phosphorylase activity likely exacerbates lysosomal glycogen accumulation. If the dysregulation in glycogen metabolism observed in the mouse model of Pompe disease also occurs in Pompe patients, it may contribute to the observed broad spectrum of disease severity.

  20. Dysregulation of chemo-cytokine production in schizophrenic patients versus healthy controls

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    Di Giannantonio Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The exact cause of schizophrenia is not known, although several aetiological theories have been proposed for the disease, including developmental or neurodegenerative processes, neurotransmitter abnormalities, viral infection and immune dysfunction or autoimmune mechanisms. Growing evidence suggests that specific cytokines and chemokines play a role in signalling the brain to produce neurochemical, neuroendocrine, neuroimmune and behavioural changes. A relationship between inflammation and schizophrenia was supported by abnormal cytokines production, abnormal concentrations of cytokines and cytokine receptors in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid in schizophrenia. Since the neuropathology of schizophrenia has recently been reported to be closely associated with microglial activation we aimed to determined whether spontaneous or LPS-induced peripheral blood mononuclear cell chemokines and cytokines production is dysregulated in schizophrenic patients compared to healthy subjects. We enrolled 51 untreated first-episode schizophrenics (SC and 40 healthy subjects (HC and the levels of MCP-1, MIP-1α, IL-8, IL-18, IFN-γ and RANTES were determined by Elisa method in cell-free supernatants of PBMC cultures. Results In the simultaneous quantification we found significantly higher levels of constitutively and LPS-induced MCP-1, MIP-1α, IL-8 and IL-18, and lower RANTES and IFNγ levels released by PBMC of SC patients compared with HC. In ten SC patients receiving therapy with risperidone, olanzapine or clozapine basal and LPS-induced production of RANTES and IL-18 was increased, while both basal and LPS-induced MCP-1 production was decreased. No statistically significant differences were detected in serum levels after therapy. Conclusion The observation that in schizophrenic patients the PBMC production of selected chemo-cytokines is dysregulated reinforces the hypothesis that the peripheral cyto-chemokine network is involved in the

  1. Circadian dysregulation of clock genes: clues to rapid treatments in major depressive disorder.

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    Bunney, B G; Li, J Z; Walsh, D M; Stein, R; Vawter, M P; Cartagena, P; Barchas, J D; Schatzberg, A F; Myers, R M; Watson, S J; Akil, H; Bunney, W E

    2015-02-01

    Conventional antidepressants require 2-8 weeks for a full clinical response. In contrast, two rapidly acting antidepressant interventions, low-dose ketamine and sleep deprivation (SD) therapy, act within hours to robustly decrease depressive symptoms in a subgroup of major depressive disorder (MDD) patients. Evidence that MDD may be a circadian-related illness is based, in part, on a large set of clinical data showing that diurnal rhythmicity (sleep, temperature, mood and hormone secretion) is altered during depressive episodes. In a microarray study, we observed widespread changes in cyclic gene expression in six regions of postmortem brain tissue of depressed patients matched with controls for time-of-death (TOD). We screened 12 000 transcripts and observed that the core clock genes, essential for controlling virtually all rhythms in the body, showed robust 24-h sinusoidal expression patterns in six brain regions in control subjects. In MDD patients matched for TOD with controls, the expression patterns of the clock genes in brain were significantly dysregulated. Some of the most robust changes were seen in anterior cingulate (ACC). These findings suggest that in addition to structural abnormalities, lesion studies, and the large body of functional brain imaging studies reporting increased activation in the ACC of depressed patients who respond to a wide range of therapies, there may be a circadian dysregulation in clock gene expression in a subgroup of MDDs. Here, we review human, animal and neuronal cell culture data suggesting that both low-dose ketamine and SD can modulate circadian rhythms. We hypothesize that the rapid antidepressant actions of ketamine and SD may act, in part, to reset abnormal clock genes in MDD to restore and stabilize circadian rhythmicity. Conversely, clinical relapse may reflect a desynchronization of the clock, indicative of a reactivation of abnormal clock gene function. Future work could involve identifying specific small

  2. Direct phenotypical and functional dysregulation of primary human B cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type 1 in vitro.

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    Ana Judith Perisé-Barrios

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 induces a general dysregulation of immune system. Dysregulation of B cell compartment is generally thought to be induced by HIV-related immune activation and lymphopenia. However, a direct influence of HIV-1 particles on B cells was recently proposed as the third pathway of B cells dysregulation. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the direct and specific consequences of HIV-1 contact on activation, survival, proliferation and phenotype of primary B cells in vitro. Moreover, we examined expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID mRNA that is responsible for class switch recombination (CSR and somatic hypermutation (SHM. Here, we report that changes observed in cellular proliferation, phenotypes and activation of B cells could be caused by direct contact between HIV-1 particles and primary B cells in vitro. Finally, direct HIV-1-derived B cells activation led to the increase of AID mRNA expression and its subsequent CSR function was detected in vitro. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We showed that HIV-1 could directly induce primary B cells dysregulation triggering phenotypical and functional abilities of B cells in vitro that could explain in some extent early B-cell abnormalities in HIV disease.

  3. Blockade of Angiotensin II type-1 receptor reduces oxidative stress in adipose tissue and ameliorates adipocytokine dysregulation.

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    Kurata, A; Nishizawa, H; Kihara, S; Maeda, N; Sonoda, M; Okada, T; Ohashi, K; Hibuse, T; Fujita, K; Yasui, A; Hiuge, A; Kumada, M; Kuriyama, H; Shimomura, I; Funahashi, T

    2006-11-01

    Dysregulated production of adipocytokines may be involved in the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease (CKD) associated with metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of treatment with angiotensin II (Ang II) type-1 receptor blocker (ARB) on the regulation of adipocytokines. Olmesartan, an ARB, significantly blunted the age- and body weight-associated falls in plasma adiponectin both in genetically and diet-induced obese mice, without affecting body weight, but had no effect on plasma adiponectin levels in lean mice. Olmesartan also ameliorated dysregulation of adipocytokines in obesity, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and serum amyloid A3. Olmesartan significantly reduced reactive oxygen species originating from accumulated fat and attenuated the expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phospho hydrogenase oxidase subunits in adipose tissue. In cultured adipocytes, olmesartan acted as an antioxidant and improved adipocytokine dysregulation. Our results indicate that blockade of Ang II receptor ameliorates adipocytokine dysregulation and that such action is mediated, at least in part, by targeting oxidative stress in obese adipose tissue. Ang II signaling and subsequent oxidative stress in adipose tissue may be potential targets for the prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in metabolic syndrome and also in metabolic syndrome-based CKD.

  4. Emotion dysregulation mediates the influence of relationship difficulties on non-suicidal self-injury behavior in young adults.

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    Yurkowski, Kim; Martin, Jodi; Levesque, Christine; Bureau, Jean-François; Lafontaine, Marie-France; Cloutier, Paula

    2015-08-30

    This study examined associations between relationship difficulties with parents and peers and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Particular emphasis was placed on examining mediating pathways through emotion dysregulation, as per commonly accepted theory. Participants were 1153 university students (905 females; Mage=19.35 years, S.D.=1.49); 79 of these participants had engaged in NSSI during the previous 6 months (63 females, Mage=19.35 years, S.D.=1.51). Participants completed questionnaires assessing NSSI, quality of relationships with parents and peers, and emotion dysregulation. Hierarchical logistic regressions suggest that the quality of parent-child relationships has a greater impact on the prediction of NSSI engagement than the quality of peer relationships. Results of a structural equation model showed that feelings of alienation in both parent and peer relationships had indirect effects on NSSI through deficits in emotion regulation (ER). Results suggest the importance of examining emotion dysregulation in association with NSSI, and that both parent and peer relationships are implicated in NSSI engagement through emotion regulation deficits. Important clinical implications regarding the need to acknowledge both emotion dysregulation and interpersonal difficulties when treating NSSI in young adults are discussed.

  5. Emotion dysregulation mediates the relationship between trauma exposure, post-migration living difficulties and psychological outcomes in traumatized refugees.

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    Nickerson, Angela; Bryant, Richard A; Schnyder, Ulrich; Schick, Matthis; Mueller, Julia; Morina, Naser

    2015-03-01

    While emotion dysregulation represents an important mechanism underpinning psychological responses to trauma, little research has investigated this in refugees. In the current study, we examined the mediating role of emotion dysregulation in the relationship between refugee experiences (trauma and living difficulties) and psychological outcomes. Participants were 134 traumatized treatment-seeking refugees who completed measures indexing trauma exposure, post-migration living difficulties, difficulties in emotion regulation, posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and explosive anger. Findings revealed distinctive patterns of emotion dysregulation associated with each of these psychological disorders. Results also indicated that emotion regulation difficulties mediated the association between both trauma and psychological symptoms, and living difficulties and psychological symptoms. Limitations include a cross-sectional design and the use of measures that had not been validated across all cultural groups in this study. These findings underscore the key role of emotion dysregulation in psychological responses of refugees, and highlight potential directions for treatment interventions for traumatized refugees. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Moderate voluntary exercise attenuates the metabolic syndrome in melanocortin-4 receptor-deficient rats showing central dopaminergic dysregulation

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    Silvana Obici

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: Central dopamine dysregulation during VWR reinforces the link between MC4R function and molecular and behavioral responding to rewards. The data also suggest that exercise can be a successful lifestyle intervention in MC4R-haploinsufficient individuals despite reduced positive reinforcement during exercise training.

  7. Deficits in Attention to Emotional Stimuli Distinguish Youth with Severe Mood Dysregulation from Youth with Bipolar Disorder

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    Rich, Brendan A.; Brotman, Melissa A.; Dickstein, Daniel P.; Mitchell, Derek G. V.; Blair, R. James R.; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Studying attention in the context of emotional stimuli may aid in differentiating pediatric bipolar disorder (BD) from severe mood dysregulation (SMD). SMD is characterized by chronic irritability, arousal, and hyper-reactivity; SMD youth frequently receive a BD diagnosis although they do not meet DSM-IV criteria for BD because they lack manic…

  8. Soluble CD93 Is Involved in Metabolic Dysregulation but Does Not Influence Carotid Intima-Media Thickness

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    Strawbridge, Rona J.; Hilding, Agneta; Silveira, Angela; Osterholm, Cecilia; Sennblad, Bengt; McLeod, Olga; Tsikrika, Panagiota; Foroogh, Fariba; Tremoli, Elena; Baldassarre, Damiano; Veglia, Fabrizio; Rauramaa, Rainer; Smit, Andries J.; Giral, Phillipe; Kurl, Sudhir; Mannarino, Elmo; Grossi, Enzo; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Humphries, Steve E.; de Faire, Ulf; Ostenson, Claes-Goran; Maegdefessel, Lars; Hamsten, Anders; Backlund, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease are complex disorders involving metabolic and inflammatory mechanisms. Here we investigated whether sCD93, a group XIV c-type lectin of the endosialin family, plays a role in metabolic dysregulation or carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). Although no assoc

  9. Does school mobility place elementary school children at risk for lower math achievement? The mediating role of cognitive dysregulation.

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    Friedman-Krauss, Allison H; Raver, C Cybele

    2015-12-01

    Children growing up in poverty have a higher likelihood of exposure to multiple forms of adversity that jeopardize their chances of academic success. The current paper identifies school mobility, or changing schools, as 1 such poverty-related risk. Using a sample of low-income, predominantly ethnic-minority children (n = 381) in Chicago, this study tests the hypothesis that repeatedly changing schools during the 5-year period between Head Start (preschool) and third grade is a potent predictor of children's math achievement in fourth grade and that children's cognitive dysregulation serves as a mechanism through which school mobility may negatively affect children's math achievement. Hierarchical linear models controlling for baseline child and family characteristics (including children's early math and dysregulation measured during Head Start) revealed an inverse relation between the number of times low-income children changed schools between preschool and third grade and children's math achievement on state standardized tests in fourth grade. Furthermore, frequently changing schools (3 or 4 school changes over the same time period) was positively associated with teacher-reported cognitive dysregulation in third grade and negatively associated with children's math achievement in fourth grade. Evidence for the role of children's cognitive dysregulation as a partial statistical mediator was found for the relation between frequently changing schools and math achievement, even after accounting for baseline risk. Results are discussed in terms of school policies, practices, and intervention strategies to prevent the disruptive and potentially stressful experiences of school mobility for young, low-income children.

  10. Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Abnormalities in Brain Structure in Children with Severe Mood Dysregulation or Bipolar Disorder

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    Adleman, Nancy E.; Fromm, Stephen J.; Razdan, Varun; Kayser, Reilly; Dickstein, Daniel P.; Brotman, Melissa A.; Pine, Daniel S.; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is debate as to whether chronic irritability (operationalized as severe mood dysregulation, SMD) is a developmental form of bipolar disorder (BD). Although structural brain abnormalities in BD have been demonstrated, no study compares neuroanatomy among SMD, BD, and healthy volunteers (HV) either cross-sectionally or over time.…

  11. Immune dysregulation in offspring of a bipolar parent. Altered serum levels of immune growth factors at adolescent age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, J.G.; Mesman, E.; de Wit, H.; Wijkhuijs, AJM; Nolen, W. A.; Drexhage, H. A.; Hillegers, M. H. J.

    Immune dysregulation plays a role in the vulnerability for mood disorders. Immune growth factors, such as Stem Cell Factor (SCF), Insulin-like Growth Factor-Binding Protein-2 (IGF-BP2), Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF), IL-7 and sCD25 have repeatedly been reported altered in patients with mood

  12. Aetiological pathways to Borderline Personality Disorder symptoms in early adolescence: childhood dysregulated behaviour, maladaptive parenting and bully victimisation.

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    Winsper, Catherine; Hall, James; Strauss, Vicky Y; Wolke, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    Developmental theories for the aetiology of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) suggest that both individual features (e.g., childhood dysregulated behaviour) and negative environmental experiences (e.g., maladaptive parenting, peer victimisation) may lead to the development of BPD symptoms during adolescence. Few prospective studies have examined potential aetiological pathways involving these two factors. We addressed this gap in the literature using data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). We assessed mother-reported childhood dysregulated behaviour at 4, 7 and 8 years using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ); maladaptive parenting (maternal hitting, punishment, and hostility) at 8 to 9 years; and bully victimisation (child and mother report) at 8, 9 and 10 years. BPD symptoms were assessed at 11 years using the UK Childhood Interview for DSM-IV BPD. Control variables included adolescent depression (assessed with the Short Moods and Feelings Questionnaire-SMFQ) and psychotic symptoms (assessed with the Psychosis-Like Symptoms Interview-PLIKS) at 11 to 14 years, and mother's exposure to family adversity during pregnancy (assessed with the Family Adversity Scale-FAI). In unadjusted logistic regression analyses, childhood dysregulated behaviour and all environmental risk factors (i.e., family adversity, maladaptive parenting, and bully victimisation) were significantly associated with BPD symptoms at 11 years. Within structural equation modelling controlling for all associations simultaneously, family adversity and male sex significantly predicted dysregulated behaviour across childhood, while bully victimisation significantly predicted BPD, depression, and psychotic symptoms. Children displaying dysregulated behaviour across childhood were significantly more likely to experience maladaptive parenting (β = 0.075, p < 0.001) and bully victimisation (β = 0.327, p < 0.001). Further, there was a

  13. MicroRNA-mediated dysregulation of neural developmental genes in HPRT deficiency: clues for Lesch–Nyhan disease?

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    Guibinga, Ghiabe-Henri; Hrustanovic, Gorjan; Bouic, Kathryn; Jinnah, Hyder A.; Friedmann, Theodore

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the purine biosynthetic enzyme hypoxanthine–guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) cause the intractable neurodevelopmental Lesch–Nyhan disease (LND) associated with aberrant development of brain dopamine pathways. In the current study, we have identified an increased expression of the microRNA miR181a in HPRT-deficient human dopaminergic SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Among the genes potentially regulated by miR181a are several known to be required for neural development, including Engrailed1 (En1), Engrailed2 (En2), Lmx1a and Brn2. We demonstrate that these genes are down-regulated in HPRT-deficient SH-SY5Y cells and that over-expression of miR181a significantly reduces endogenous expression of these genes and inhibits translation of luciferase plasmids bearing the En1/2 or Lmx1a 3′UTR miRNA-binding elements. Conversely, inhibition of miR181a increases the expression of these genes and enhances translation of luciferase constructs bearing the En1/2 and Lmx1a 3′UTR miRNA-binding sequences. We also demonstrate that key neurodevelopmental genes (e.g. Nurr1, Pitx3, Wnt1 and Mash1) known to be functional partners of Lmx1a and Brn2 are also markedly down-regulated in SH-SY5Y cells over-expressing miR181a and in HPRT-deficient cells. Our findings in SH-SY5Y cells demonstrate that HPRT deficiency is accompanied by dysregulation of some of the important pathways that regulate the development of dopaminergic neurons and dopamine pathways and that this defect is associated with and possibly due at least partly to aberrant expression of miR181a. Because aberrant expression of miR181a is not as apparent in HPRT-deficient LND fibroblasts, the relevance of the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells to human disease remains to be proven. Nevertheless, we propose that these pleiotropic neurodevelopment effects of miR181a may play a role in the pathogenesis of LND. PMID:22042773

  14. MicroRNA-mediated dysregulation of neural developmental genes in HPRT deficiency: clues for Lesch-Nyhan disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibinga, Ghiabe-Henri; Hrustanovic, Gorjan; Bouic, Kathryn; Jinnah, Hyder A; Friedmann, Theodore

    2012-02-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the purine biosynthetic enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) cause the intractable neurodevelopmental Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) associated with aberrant development of brain dopamine pathways. In the current study, we have identified an increased expression of the microRNA miR181a in HPRT-deficient human dopaminergic SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Among the genes potentially regulated by miR181a are several known to be required for neural development, including Engrailed1 (En1), Engrailed2 (En2), Lmx1a and Brn2. We demonstrate that these genes are down-regulated in HPRT-deficient SH-SY5Y cells and that over-expression of miR181a significantly reduces endogenous expression of these genes and inhibits translation of luciferase plasmids bearing the En1/2 or Lmx1a 3'UTR miRNA-binding elements. Conversely, inhibition of miR181a increases the expression of these genes and enhances translation of luciferase constructs bearing the En1/2 and Lmx1a 3'UTR miRNA-binding sequences. We also demonstrate that key neurodevelopmental genes (e.g. Nurr1, Pitx3, Wnt1 and Mash1) known to be functional partners of Lmx1a and Brn2 are also markedly down-regulated in SH-SY5Y cells over-expressing miR181a and in HPRT-deficient cells. Our findings in SH-SY5Y cells demonstrate that HPRT deficiency is accompanied by dysregulation of some of the important pathways that regulate the development of dopaminergic neurons and dopamine pathways and that this defect is associated with and possibly due at least partly to aberrant expression of miR181a. Because aberrant expression of miR181a is not as apparent in HPRT-deficient LND fibroblasts, the relevance of the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells to human disease remains to be proven. Nevertheless, we propose that these pleiotropic neurodevelopment effects of miR181a may play a role in the pathogenesis of LND.

  15. Prevalence and Correlates of Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder Among Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rachel H B; Timmins, Vanessa; Collins, Jordan; Scavone, Antonette; Iskric, Adam; Goldstein, Benjamin I

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence and correlates of disruptive mood dysregulation disorder phenotype (DMDDP) in a clinical population of adolescents with bipolar disorder (BD). DMDD criteria were modified and applied to a sample of 116 adolescents with BD-I (n = 30), BD-II (n = 46) or BD-not otherwise specified (NOS) (n = 40) from a tertiary teaching hospital. Diagnoses were determined via the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Aged Children, Present and Lifetime version (KSADS-PL). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) DMDD Criteria A-G were derived from the KSADS oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) screening interview and supplement, as well as narrative summaries. Chi-square analyses or t tests (p adolescents because of missing data from the ODD supplement. Twenty-five percent of the remainder (27/108) met criteria for DMDDP. DMDDP was not associated with BD subtype or with family history of BD. In univariate analyses, after controlling for age, sex, and race, DMDDP was associated with lower functioning, increased family conflict, assault history, and attention deficit and/or hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (FDR adjusted p values: disorder and medication use approached significance (adjusted p = 0.05). In logistic regression, DMDDP was independently associated with greater parent-reported family conflict (odds ratio [OR] 1.17; confidence interval [CI- 1.06-1.30; p = 0.001) and greater functional impairment (OR 0.89; CI 0.82-0.97; p = 0.006). DMDDP was also associated with a threefold increase in ADHD, although ADHD was only marginally significant (OR 3.3; CI 0.98-10.94; p = 0.05). Despite the positioning of DMDD as phenotypically and biologically distinct from BD, these phenotypes commonly overlap in clinical settings. This overlap is not explained by BD-NOS or by nonfamilial BD. The association of ADHD with DMDDP in this sample draws into question whether

  16. NASA 14 Day Undersea Missions: A Short-Duration Spaceflight Analog for Immune System Dysregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, B. E.; Stowe, R. P.; Mehta, S. K.; Quiriarte, H.; Pierson, D. L.; Sams, C. F.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Spaceflight-associated immune dysregulation (SAID) occurs during spaceflight and may represent specific clinical risks for exploration-class missions. An appropriate ground analog for spaceflight-associated immune dysregulation would offer a platform for ground-evaluation of various potential countermeasures. This study evaluated the NASA Undersea Mission Operations ( NEEMO ), consisting of 14 day undersea deployment at the Aquarius station, as an analog for SAID. Sixteen Aquanauts from missions NEEMO-12, 13 and 14 participated in the study. RESULTS Mid-mission alterations leukocyte distribution occurred, including granulocytosis and elevations in central-memory CD8+ T-cells. General T cell function was reduced during NEEMO missions in roughly 50% of subjects. Secreted cytokines profiles were evaluated following whole blood stimulation with CD3/CD28 (T cells) or LPS (monocytes). T cell production of IFNg, IL-5, IL-10, IL-2, TNFa and IL-6 were all reduced before and during the mission. Conversely, monocyte production of TNFa, IL-10, IL-6, IL-1b and IL-8 were elevated during mission, moreso at the MD-14 timepoint. Antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) viral capsid antigen and early antigen were increased in approximately 40% of the subjects. Changes in EBV tetramer-positive CD8+ T-cells exhibited a variable pattern. Antibodies against Cytomegalovirus (CMV) were marginally increased during the mission. Herpesvirus reactivation was determined by PCR. EBV viral load was generally elevated at L-6. Higher levels of salivary EBV were found during the NEEMO mission than before and after as well as than the healthy controls. No VZV or CMV was found in any pre, during and after NEEMO mission or control samples. Plasma cortisol was elevated at L-6. CONCLUSION Unfortunately, L-6 may be too near to mission start to be an appropriate baseline measurement. The general immune changes in leukocyte distribution, T cell function, cytokine production, virus specific

  17. Diabetes-associated dysregulation of O-GlcNAcylation in rat cardiac mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Partha S.; Ma, Junfeng; Hart, Gerald W.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated mitochondrial O-GlcNAcylation caused by hyperglycemia, as occurs in diabetes, significantly contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction and to diabetic cardiomyopathy. However, little is known about the enzymology of mitochondrial O-GlcNAcylation. Herein, we investigated the enzymes responsible for cycling O-GlcNAc on mitochondrial proteins and studied the mitochondrial transport of UDP-GlcNAc. Analyses of purified rat heart mitochondria from normal and streptozocin-treated diabetic rats show increased mitochondrial O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and a concomitant decrease in the mito-specific O-GlcNAcase (OGA). Strikingly, OGT is mislocalized in cardiac mitochondria from diabetic rats. Interaction of OGT and complex IV observed in normal rat heart mitochondria is visibly reduced in diabetic samples, where OGT is mislocalized to the matrix. Live cell OGA activity assays establish the presence of O-GlcNAcase within the mitochondria. Furthermore, we establish that the inner mitochondrial membrane transporter, pyrimidine nucleotide carrier, transports UDP-GlcNAc from the cytosol to the inside of the mitochondria. Knockdown of this transporter substantially lowers mitochondrial O-GlcNAcylation. Inhibition of OGT or OGA activity within neonatal rat cardiomyocytes significantly affects energy production, mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial oxygen consumption. These data suggest that cardiac mitochondria not only have robust O-GlcNAc cycling, but also that dysregulation of O-GlcNAcylation likely plays a key role in mitochondrial dysfunction associated with diabetes. PMID:25918408

  18. Dysregulation of temperature and liver cytokine gene expression in immunodeficient wasted mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States); Ling-Indeck, L.; Weaver, P. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States). Dept. of Pathology; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Strezoska, V.; Heckert, B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Woloschak, G.E. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States). Dept. of Pathology]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology

    1995-04-25

    Wasted mice bear the spontaneous autosomal recessive mutation wst/wst; this genotype is associated with weight loss beginning at 21 days of age, neurologic dysfunction, immunodeficiency at mucosal sites, and increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation. The pathology underlying the disease symptoms is unknown. Experiments reported here were designed to examine thermoregulation and liver expression of specific cytokines in wasted mice and in littermate and parental controls. Our experiments found that wasted mice begin to show a drop in body temperature at 21-23 days following birth, continuing until death at the age of 28 days. Concomitant with that, livers from wasted mice expressed increased amounts of mRNAs specific for cytokines IL,6 and IL-1, the acute phase reactant C-reactive protein, c-jun, and apoptosis-associated Rp-8 when compared to littermate and parental control animals. Levels of {beta}-transforming growth factor (TGF), c-fos, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and ornithine amino transferase (OAT) transcripts were the same in livers from wasted mice and controls. These results suggest a relationship between an acute phase reactant response in wasted mice and temperature dysregulation.

  19. Dysregulation of TIM-3-galectin-9 pathway in the cystic fibrosis airways.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vega-Carrascal, Isabel

    2012-02-01

    The T-cell Ig and mucin domain-containing molecules (TIMs) have emerged as promising therapeutic targets to correct abnormal immune function in several autoimmune and chronic inflammatory conditions. It has been reported that proinflammatory cytokine dysregulation and neutrophil-dominated inflammation are the main causes of morbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF). However, the role of TIM receptors in CF has not been investigated. In this study, we demonstrated that TIM-3 is constitutively overexpressed in the human CF airway, suggesting a link between CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function and TIM-3 expression. Blockade of CFTR function with the CFTR inhibitor-172 induced an upregulation of TIM-3 and its ligand galectin-9 in normal bronchial epithelial cells. We also established that TIM-3 serves as a functional receptor in bronchial epithelial cells, and physiologically relevant concentrations of galectin-9 induced TIM-3 phosphorylation, resulting in increased IL-8 production. In addition, we have demonstrated that both TIM-3 and galectin-9 undergo rapid proteolytic degradation in the CF lung, primarily because of neutrophil elastase and proteinase-3 activity. Our results suggest a novel intrinsic defect that may contribute to the neutrophil-dominated immune response in the CF airways.

  20. Repeated verum but not placebo acupuncture normalizes connectivity in brain regions dysregulated in chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, Natalia; Gollub, Randy L; Kong, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture, an ancient East Asian therapy, is aimed at rectifying the imbalance within the body caused by disease. Studies evaluating the efficacy of acupuncture with neuroimaging tend to concentrate on brain regions within the pain matrix, associated with acute pain. We, however, focused on the effect of repeated acupuncture treatment specifically on brain regions known to support functions dysregulated in chronic pain disorders. Transition to chronic pain is associated with increased attention to pain, emotional rumination, nociceptive memory and avoidance learning, resulting in brain connectivity changes, specifically affecting the periaqueductal gray (PAG), medial frontal cortex (MFC) and bilateral hippocampus (Hpc). We demonstrate that the PAG-MFC and PAG-Hpc connectivity in patients with chronic pain due to knee osteoarthritis indeed correlates with clinical severity scores and further show that verum acupuncture-induced improvement in pain scores (compared to sham) is related to the modulation of PAG-MFC and PAG-Hpc connectivity in the predicted direction. This study shows that repeated verum acupuncture might act by restoring the balance in the connectivity of the key pain brain regions, altering pain-related attention and memory.

  1. Crosstalk between adipocytes and immune cells in adipose tissue inflammation and metabolic dysregulation in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jin Young; Park, Yoon Jeong; Ham, Mira; Kim, Jae Bum

    2014-05-01

    Recent findings, notably on adipokines and adipose tissue inflammation, have revised the concept of adipose tissues being a mere storage depot for body energy. Instead, adipose tissues are emerging as endocrine and immunologically active organs with multiple effects on the regulation of systemic energy homeostasis. Notably, compared with other metabolic organs such as liver and muscle, various inflammatory responses are dynamically regulated in adipose tissues and most of the immune cells in adipose tissues are involved in obesity-mediated metabolic complications, including insulin resistance. Here, we summarize recent findings on the key roles of innate (neutrophils, macrophages, mast cells, eosinophils) and adaptive (regulatory T cells, type 1 helper T cells, CD8 T cells, B cells) immune cells in adipose tissue inflammation and metabolic dysregulation in obesity. In particular, the roles of natural killer T cells, one type of innate lymphocyte, in adipose tissue inflammation will be discussed. Finally, a new role of adipocytes as antigen presenting cells to modulate T cell activity and subsequent adipose tissue inflammation will be proposed.

  2. Dysregulation of adipose glutathione peroxidase 3 in obesity contributes to local and systemic oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun Sok; Kim, A Young; Choi, Jin Woo; Kim, Min; Yasue, Shintaro; Son, Hee Jung; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Park, Kyong Soo; Kim, Jae Bum

    2008-09-01

    Glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) accounts for the major antioxidant activity in the plasma. Here, we demonstrate that down-regulation of GPx3 in the plasma of obese subjects is associated with adipose GPx3 dysregulation, resulting from the increase of inflammatory signals and oxidative stress. Although GPx3 was abundantly expressed in kidney, lung, and adipose tissue, we observed that GPx3 expression was reduced selectively in the adipose tissue of several obese animal models as decreasing plasma GPx3 level. Adipose GPx3 expression was greatly suppressed by prooxidative conditions such as high levels of TNFalpha and hypoxia. In contrast, the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine and the antidiabetic drug rosiglitazone increased adipose GPx3 expression in obese and diabetic db/db mice. Moreover, GPx3 overexpression in adipocytes improved high glucose-induced insulin resistance and attenuated inflammatory gene expression whereas GPx3 neutralization in adipocytes promoted expression of proinflammatory genes. Taken together, these data suggest that suppression of GPx3 expression in the adipose tissue of obese subjects might constitute a vicious cycle to expand local reactive oxygen species accumulation in adipose tissue potentially into systemic oxidative stress and obesity-related metabolic complications.

  3. SMRT-GPS2 corepressor pathway dysregulation coincides with obesity-linked adipocyte inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubal, Amine; Clément, Karine; Fan, Rongrong; Ancel, Patricia; Pelloux, Veronique; Rouault, Christine; Veyrie, Nicolas; Hartemann, Agnes; Treuter, Eckardt; Venteclef, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Low-grade chronic inflammation is a major characteristic of obesity and results from deregulated white adipose tissue function. Consequently, there is interest in identifying the underlying regulatory mechanisms and components that drive adipocyte inflammation. Here, we report that expression of the transcriptional corepressor complex subunits GPS2 and SMRT was significantly reduced in obese adipose tissue, inversely correlated to inflammatory status, and was restored upon gastric bypass surgery-induced weight loss in morbid obesity. These alterations correlated with reduced occupancy of the corepressor complex at inflammatory promoters, providing a mechanistic explanation for elevated inflammatory transcription. In support of these correlations, RNAi-mediated depletion of GPS2 and SMRT from cultured human adipocytes promoted derepression of inflammatory transcription and elevation of obesity-associated inflammatory markers, such as IL-6 and MCP-1. Furthermore, we identified a regulatory cascade containing PPARγ and TWIST1 that controlled the expression of GPS2 and SMRT in human adipocytes. These findings were clinically relevant, because treatment of diabetic obese patients with pioglitazone, an antidiabetic and antiinflammatory PPARγ agonist, restored expression of TWIST1, GPS2, and SMRT in adipose tissue. Collectively, our findings identify alterations in a regulatory transcriptional network in adipocytes involving the dysregulation of a specific corepressor complex as among the initiating events promoting adipose tissue inflammation in human obesity.

  4. Evidence for Dysregulation of Axonal Growth and Guidance in the Etiology of ASD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn eMcFadden

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Current theories concerning the cause of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs have converged on the concept of abnormal development of brain connectivity. This concept is supported by accumulating evidence from functional imaging, DTI, and high definition fiber tracking (HDFT studies which suggest altered microstructure in the axonal tracts connecting cortical areas may underly many of the cognitive manifestations of ASD. Additionally, large-scale genomic studies implicate numerous gene candidates known or suspected to mediate neuritic outgrowth and axonal guidance in fetal and perinatal life. Neuropathological observations in postmortem ASD brain samples further support this model and include subtle disturbances of cortical lamination and subcortical axonal morphology. Of note is the relatively common finding of poor differentiation of the gray-white junction associated with an excess superficial white matter or interstitial neurons (INs. INs are thought to be remnants of the fetal subplate, a transient structure which plays a key role in the guidance and morphogenesis of thalamocortical and cortico-cortical connections and the organization of cortical columnar architecture. While not discounting the importance of synaptic dysfunction in the etiology of ASD, this paper will briefly review the cortical abnormalities and genetic evidence supporting a model of dysregulated axonal growth and guidance as key developmental processes underlying the clinical manifestations of ASD.

  5. Dysregulation of dimethylargininedimethylaminohydrolase/asymmetric dimethylarginine pathway in rat type II diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ying-Ling; Aoyama, Sae; Ohata, Miyuki; Otsuka, Nami; Shiokawa, Hidemi; Tomono, Susumu; Fujiwara, Yukio; Kanazawa, Hiroaki; Miyoshi, Noriyuki; Ohshima, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    An impaired generation of nitric oxide has been associated with diabetic renal disease. In order to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms into how nitric oxide synthesis is impaired in diabetic renal disease, we examined changes in activities and expressions of some renal enzymes involved in nitric oxide production during the development of diabetic nephropathy in type II diabetic Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats. Ten-week old Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (n = 40) and control Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats (n = 20) were given drinking water containing 20% sucrose to accelerate the development of diabetic nephropathy. Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats developed diabetic nephropathy in an age-dependent manner. Renal nitric oxide synthase activities in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats gradually declined with the progression of diabetic mellitus and were significantly lower than those of age-matched Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats after 22 weeks of age. The lower activities of renal nitric oxide synthase in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats were correlated with relatively higher levels of renal free asymmetric dimethylarginine, an endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, and were also correlated with decreased activities of dimethylargininedimethylaminohydrolase which metabolizes asymmetric dimethylarginine to citrulline. These results imply that dimethylargininedimethylaminohydrolase dysregulation may play an important role in the development of diabetic nephropathy by increasing asymmetric dimethylarginine levels, which leads to inhibition of renal nitric oxide synthesis.

  6. Dysregulation of dimethylargininedimethylaminohydrolase/asymmetric dimethylarginine pathway in rat type II diabetic nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ying-Ling; Aoyama, Sae; Ohata, Miyuki; Otsuka, Nami; Shiokawa, Hidemi; Tomono, Susumu; Fujiwara, Yukio; Kanazawa, Hiroaki; Miyoshi, Noriyuki; Ohshima, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    An impaired generation of nitric oxide has been associated with diabetic renal disease. In order to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms into how nitric oxide synthesis is impaired in diabetic renal disease, we examined changes in activities and expressions of some renal enzymes involved in nitric oxide production during the development of diabetic nephropathy in type II diabetic Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats. Ten-week old Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (n = 40) and control Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats (n = 20) were given drinking water containing 20% sucrose to accelerate the development of diabetic nephropathy. Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats developed diabetic nephropathy in an age-dependent manner. Renal nitric oxide synthase activities in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats gradually declined with the progression of diabetic mellitus and were significantly lower than those of age-matched Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats after 22 weeks of age. The lower activities of renal nitric oxide synthase in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats were correlated with relatively higher levels of renal free asymmetric dimethylarginine, an endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, and were also correlated with decreased activities of dimethylargininedimethylaminohydrolase which metabolizes asymmetric dimethylarginine to citrulline. These results imply that dimethylargininedimethylaminohydrolase dysregulation may play an important role in the development of diabetic nephropathy by increasing asymmetric dimethylarginine levels, which leads to inhibition of renal nitric oxide synthesis. PMID:22962534

  7. Transcriptome Analysis Identifies the Dysregulation of Ultraviolet Target Genes in Human Skin Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yao; Kim, Arianna L; Du, Rong; Liu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a major risk factor for both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. In addition to its mutagenic effect, UVR can also induce substantial transcriptional instability in skin cells affecting thousands of genes, including many cancer genes, suggesting that transcriptional instability may be another important etiological factor in skin photocarcinogenesis. In this study, we performed detailed transcriptomic profiling studies to characterize the kinetic changes in global gene expression in human keratinocytes exposed to different UVR conditions. We identified a subset of UV-responsive genes as UV signature genes (UVSGs) based on 1) conserved UV-responsiveness of this subset of genes among different keratinocyte lines; and 2) UV-induced persistent changes in their mRNA levels long after exposure. Interestingly, 11 of the UVSGs were shown to be critical to skin cancer cell proliferation and survival. Through computational Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, we demonstrated that a significant portion of the UVSGs were dysregulated in human skin squamous cell carcinomas, but not in other human malignancies. This highlights the potential and specificity of the UVSGs in clinical diagnosis of UV damage and stratification of skin cancer risk.

  8. Aggregation of scaffolding protein DISC1 dysregulates phosphodiesterase 4 in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Motomasa; Ishizuka, Koko; Nekooki-Machida, Yoko; Endo, Ryo; Takashima, Noriko; Sasaki, Hideyuki; Komi, Yusuke; Gathercole, Amy; Huston, Elaine; Ishii, Kazuhiro; Hui, Kelvin Kai-Wan; Kurosawa, Masaru; Kim, Sun-Hong; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Takimoto, Eiki; Houslay, Miles D; Sawa, Akira

    2017-04-03

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a polyglutamine (polyQ) disease caused by aberrant expansion of the polyQ tract in Huntingtin (HTT). While motor impairment mediated by polyQ-expanded HTT has been intensively studied, molecular mechanisms for nonmotor symptoms in HD, such as psychiatric manifestations, remain elusive. Here we have demonstrated that HTT forms a ternary protein complex with the scaffolding protein DISC1 and cAMP-degrading phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) to regulate PDE4 activity. We observed pathological cross-seeding between DISC1 and mutant HTT aggregates in the brains of HD patients as well as in a murine model that recapitulates the polyQ pathology of HD (R6/2 mice). In R6/2 mice, consequent reductions in soluble DISC1 led to dysregulation of DISC1-PDE4 complexes, aberrantly increasing the activity of PDE4. Importantly, exogenous expression of a modified DISC1, which binds to PDE4 but not mutant HTT, normalized PDE4 activity and ameliorated anhedonia in the R6/2 mice. We propose that cross-seeding of mutant HTT and DISC1 and the resultant changes in PDE4 activity may underlie the pathology of a specific subset of mental manifestations of HD, which may provide an insight into molecular signaling in mental illness in general.

  9. Immune dysregulation mediated by the oral microbiome: potential link to chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, C; Kramer, C; Genco, C A

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an inflammatory disorder characterized by the progressive formation of plaque in coronary arteries, termed atherosclerosis. It is a multifactorial disease that is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Although a number of risk factors have been associated with disease progression, the underlying inflammatory mechanisms contributing to atherosclerosis remain to be fully delineated. Within the last decade, the potential role for infection in inflammatory plaque progression has received considerable interest. Microbial pathogens associated with periodontal disease have been of particular interest due to the high levels of bacteremia that are observed after routine dental procedures and every day oral activities, such as tooth brushing. Here, we explore the potential mechanisms that may explain how periodontal pathogens either directly or indirectly elicit immune dysregulation and consequently progressive inflammation manifested as atherosclerosis. Periodontal pathogens have been shown to contribute directly to atherosclerosis by disrupting endothelial cell function, one of the earliest indicators of cardiovascular disease. Oral infection is thought to indirectly induce elevated production of inflammatory mediators in the systemic circulation. Recently, a number of studies have been conducted focusing on how disruption of the gut microbiome influences the systemic production of proinflammatory cytokines and consequently exacerbation of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. It is clear that the immune mechanisms leading to atherosclerotic plaque progression, by oral infection, are complex. Understanding the immune pathways leading to disease progression is essential for the future development of anti-inflammatory therapies for this chronic disease.

  10. Hemagglutinin from the H5N1 virus activates Janus kinase 3 to dysregulate innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs cause severe disease in humans. There are no effective vaccines or antiviral therapies currently available to control fatal outbreaks due in part to the lack of understanding of virus-mediated immunopathology. In our study, we used hemagglutinin (HA of H5N1 virus to investigate the related signaling pathways and their relationship to dysregulated innate immune reaction. We found the HA of H5N1 avian influenza triggered an abnormal innate immune signalling in the pulmonary epithelial cells, through an unusual process involving activation of Janus kinase 3 (JAK3 that is exclusively associated with γc chain and is essential for signaling via all γc cytokine receptors. By using a selective JAK3 inhibitor and JAK3 knockout mice, we have, for the first time, demonstrated the ability to target active JAK3 to counteract injury to the lungs and protect immunocytes from acute hypercytokinemia -induced destruction following the challenge of H5N1 HA in vitro and in vivo. On the basis of the present data, it appears that the efficacy of selective JAK3 inhibition is likely based on its ability to block multiple cytokines and protect against a superinflammatory response to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs attack. Our findings highlight the potential value of selective JAK3 inhibitor in treating the fatal immunopathology caused by H5N1 challenge.

  11. Relating the bipolar spectrum to dysregulation of behavioural activation: a perspective from dynamical modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno Steinacher

    Full Text Available Bipolar Disorders affect a substantial minority of the population and result in significant personal, social and economic costs. Understanding of the causes of, and consequently the most effective interventions for, this condition is an area requiring development. Drawing upon theories of Bipolar Disorder that propose the condition to be underpinned by dysregulation of systems governing behavioural activation or approach motivation, we present a mathematical model of the regulation of behavioural activation. The model is informed by non-linear, dynamical principles and as such proposes that the transition from "non-bipolar" to "bipolar" diagnostic status corresponds to a switch from mono- to multistability of behavioural activation level, rather than an increase in oscillation of mood. Consistent with descriptions of the behavioural activation or approach system in the literature, auto-activation and auto-inhibitory feedback is inherent within our model. Comparison between our model and empirical, observational data reveals that by increasing the non-linearity dimension in our model, important features of Bipolar Spectrum disorders are reproduced. Analysis from stochastic simulation of the system reveals the role of noise in behavioural activation regulation and indicates that an increase of nonlinearity promotes noise to jump scales from small fluctuations of activation levels to longer lasting, but less variable episodes. We conclude that further research is required to relate parameters of our model to key behavioural and biological variables observed in Bipolar Disorder.

  12. International differences in the links between obesity and physiological dysregulation: the United States, England, and Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasunilashorn, Sarinnapha; Kim, Jung Ki; Crimmins, Eileen M

    2013-01-01

    Excess weight has generally been associated with adverse health outcomes; however, the link between overweight and health outcomes may vary with socioeconomic, cultural, and epidemiological conditions. We examine associations of weight with indicators of biological risk in three nationally representative populations: the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, and the Social Environment and Biomarkers of Aging Study in Taiwan. Indicators of biological risk were compared for obese (defined using body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference) and normal weight individuals aged 54+. Generally, obesity in England was associated with elevated risk for more markers examined; obese Americans also had elevated risks except that they did not have elevated blood pressure (BP). Including waist circumference in our consideration of BMI indicated different links between obesity and waist size across countries; we found higher physiological dysregulation among those with high waist but normal BMI compared to those with normal waist and normal BMI. Americans had the highest levels of biological risk in all weight/waist groups. Cross-country variation in biological risk associated with obesity may reflect differences in health behaviors, lifestyle, medication use, and culture.

  13. MicroRNA function and dysregulation in bone tumors: the evidence to date.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Micro ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA segments that have a role in the regulation of normal cellular development and proliferation including normal osteogenesis. They exert their effects through inhibition of specific target genes at the post-transcriptional level. Many miRNAs have altered expression levels in cancer (either increased or decreased depending on the specific miRNA). Altered miRNA expression profiles have been identified in several malignancies including primary bone tumors such as osteosarcoma and Ewing\\'s sarcoma. It is thought that they may function as tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes and hence when dysregulated contribute to the initiation and progression of malignancy. miRNAs are also thought to have a role in the development of bone metastases in other malignancies. In addition, evidence increasingly suggests that miRNAs may play a part in determining the response to chemotherapy in the treatment of osteosarcoma. These molecules are readily detectable in tissues, both fresh and formalin fixed paraffin embedded and, more recently, in blood. Although there are fewer published studies regarding circulating miRNA profiles, they appear to reflect changes in tissue expression. Thus miRNAs may serve as potential indicators of disease presence but more importantly, may have a role in disease characterization or as potential therapeutic targets. This review gives a brief overview of miRNA biochemistry and explores the evidence to date implicating these small molecules in the pathogenesis of bone tumors.

  14. Serum proteomics reveals systemic dysregulation of innate immunity in type 1 diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Mueller, Patricia W.; Rewers, Marian; Atkinson, Mark A.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2013-01-14

    Using global liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based proteomics analyses, we identified 24 serum proteins significantly variant between those with type 1 diabetes and healthy controls. Functionally, these proteins represent innate immune responses, the activation cascade of complement, inflammatory responses and blood coagulation. Targeted verification analyses were performed on 52 surrogate peptides representing these proteins with serum samples from an antibody standardization program cohort of 100 healthy control and 50 type 1 diabetic subjects, and 16 peptides were verified having very good discriminating power, with areas under the receiver operator characteristic curve ≥ 0.8. Further validation with blinded serum samples from an independent cohort (10 healthy control and 10 type 1 diabetic) demonstrated that peptides from platelet basic protein and C1 inhibitor achieved both 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for classification of samples. The disease specificity of these proteins was assessed using serum from 50 age matched type 2 diabetic individuals, and a subset of proteins, particularly C1 inhibitor were exceptionally good discriminators between these two forms of diabetes. The panel of biomarkers distinguishing those with type 1 diabetes from healthy control and type 2 diabetes suggests dysregulated innate immune responses may be associated with the development of this disorder.

  15. Dopaminergic Dysregulation in Mice Selectively Bred for Excessive Exercise or Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehrenberg, Derrick L.; Gordon, Ryan; Hua, Kunjie; Garland, Theodore; Pomp, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Dysregulation of the dopamine system is linked to various aberrant behaviors, including addiction, compulsive exercise, and hyperphagia leading to obesity. The goal of the present experiments was to determine how dopamine contributes to the expression of opposing phenotypes, excessive exercise and obesity. We hypothesized that similar alterations in dopamine and dopamine-related gene expression may underly obesity and excessive exercise, as competing traits for central reward pathways. Moreover, we hypothesized that selective breeding for high levels of exercise or obesity may have influenced genetic variation controlling these pathways, manifesting as opposing complex traits. Dopamine, dopamine-related peptide concentrations, and gene expression were evaluated in dorsal striatum (DS) and nucleus accumbens (NA) of mice from lines selectively bred for high rates of wheel running (HR) or obesity (M16), and the non-selected ICR strain from which these lines were derived. HPLC analysis showed significantly greater neurotransmitter concentrations in DS and NA of HR mice compared to M16 and ICR. Microarray analysis showed significant gene expression differences between HR and M16 compared to ICR in both brain areas, with changes revealed throughout the dopamine pathway including D1 and D2 receptors, associated G-proteins (eg. Golf), and adenylate cyclase (eg. Adcy5). The results suggest similar modifications within the dopamine system may contribute to the expression of opposite phenotypes in mice, demonstrating that alterations within central reward pathways can contribute to both obesity and excessive exercise. PMID:20156488

  16. Allicin Induces Calcium and Mitochondrial Dysregulation Causing Necrotic Death in Leishmania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María J Corral

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Allicin has shown antileishmanial activity in vitro and in vivo. However the mechanism of action underlying its antiproliferative effect against Leishmania has been virtually unexplored. In this paper, we present the results obtained in L.infantum and a mechanistic basis is proposed.Exposure of the parasites to allicin led to high Ca2+ levels and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS, collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced production of ATP and elevation of cytosolic ROS. The incubation of the promastigotes with SYTOX Green revealed that decrease of ATP was not associated with plasma membrane permeabilization. Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI staining indicated that allicin did not induce phospholipids exposure on the plasma membrane. Moreover, DNA agarose gel electrophoresis and TUNEL analysis demonstrated that allicin did not provoke DNA fragmentation. Analysis of the cell cycle with PI staining showed that allicin induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase.We conclude that allicin induces dysregulation of calcium homeostasis and oxidative stress, uncontrolled by the antioxidant defense of the cell, which leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and a bioenergetic catastrophe leading to cell necrosis and cell cycle arrest in the premitotic phase.

  17. Dysregulation of TIM-3-galectin-9 pathway in the cystic fibrosis airways.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vega-Carrascal, Isabel

    2011-03-01

    The T-cell Ig and mucin domain-containing molecules (TIMs) have emerged as promising therapeutic targets to correct abnormal immune function in several autoimmune and chronic inflammatory conditions. It has been reported that proinflammatory cytokine dysregulation and neutrophil-dominated inflammation are the main causes of morbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF). However, the role of TIM receptors in CF has not been investigated. In this study, we demonstrated that TIM-3 is constitutively overexpressed in the human CF airway, suggesting a link between CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function and TIM-3 expression. Blockade of CFTR function with the CFTR inhibitor-172 induced an upregulation of TIM-3 and its ligand galectin-9 in normal bronchial epithelial cells. We also established that TIM-3 serves as a functional receptor in bronchial epithelial cells, and physiologically relevant concentrations of galectin-9 induced TIM-3 phosphorylation, resulting in increased IL-8 production. In addition, we have demonstrated that both TIM-3 and galectin-9 undergo rapid proteolytic degradation in the CF lung, primarily because of neutrophil elastase and proteinase-3 activity. Our results suggest a novel intrinsic defect that may contribute to the neutrophil-dominated immune response in the CF airways.

  18. Overexpression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase is associated with lipid dysregulation and insulin resistance in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jiyoung; Rho, Ho Kyung; Kim, Kang Ho; Choe, Sung Sik; Lee, Yun Sok; Kim, Jae Bum

    2005-06-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) produces cellular NADPH, which is required for the biosynthesis of fatty acids and cholesterol. Although G6PD is required for lipogenesis, it is poorly understood whether G6PD in adipocytes is involved in energy homeostasis, such as lipid and glucose metabolism. We report here that G6PD plays a role in adipogenesis and that its increase is tightly associated with the dysregulation of lipid metabolism and insulin resistance in obesity. We observed that the enzymatic activity and expression levels of G6PD were significantly elevated in white adipose tissues of obese models, including db/db, ob/ob, and diet-induced obesity mice. In 3T3-L1 cells, G6PD overexpression stimulated the expression of most adipocyte marker genes and elevated the levels of cellular free fatty acids, triglyceride, and FFA release. Consistently, G6PD knockdown via small interfering RNA attenuated adipocyte differentiation with less lipid droplet accumulation. Surprisingly, the expression of certain adipocytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha and resistin was increased, whereas that of adiponectin was decreased in G6PD overexpressed adipocytes. In accordance with these results, overexpression of G6PD impaired insulin signaling and suppressed insulin-dependent glucose uptake in adipocytes. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that aberrant increase of G6PD in obese and/or diabetic subjects would alter lipid metabolism and adipocytokine expression, thereby resulting in failure of lipid homeostasis and insulin resistance in adipocytes.

  19. Heart rate and blood pressure control in obesity - how to detect early dysregulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javorka, Michal; Turianikova, Zuzana; Tonhajzerova, Ingrid; Lazarova, Zuzana; Czippelova, Barbora; Javorka, Kamil

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is accompanied by many severe complications including various cardiovascular disorders. An impairment of cardiovascular control by autonomic nervous system could be one of the possible links between obesity and cardiovascular complications development. The aim of this study was to compare spontaneous heart rate and systolic blood pressure oscillations reflecting cardiovascular autonomic control of young obese subjects with normal control subjects by linear and nonlinear methods and to find sensitive markers of early autonomic dysregulation. Continuous recordings of beat-to-beat systolic blood pressure and RR intervals from ECG were obtained from 40 obese subjects (25 female, age 14·2 [13·1-16·1] (median [interquartile range]) years) and gender and age matched non-obese control subjects. In addition to linear measures (time and frequency domain), we performed recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) and multiscale entropy analysis for both signals. While no significant differences in heart rate and systolic blood pressure dynamics were detected by linear measures and MSE, analysis of recurrence plots from RR intervals time series showed significant differences - indices trapping time and maximal length of vertical from RQA were significantly higher in obese compared to control group. We conclude that heart rate and blood pressure control by autonomic nervous system in young obese subjects is relatively well preserved. However, novel RQA-related measures are able to detect early subtle abnormalities in cardiac autonomic control in obese subjects indicating decreased signal complexity. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Green Tea Polyphenols Control Dysregulated Glutamate Dehydrogenase in Transgenic Mice by Hijacking the ADP Activation Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Changhong; Li, Ming; Chen, Pan; Narayan, Srinivas; Matschinsky, Franz M.; Bennett, Michael J.; Stanley, Charles A.; Smith, Thomas J. (CH-PA); (UPENN); (Danforth)

    2012-05-09

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate and, in animals, is extensively regulated by a number of metabolites. Gain of function mutations in GDH that abrogate GTP inhibition cause the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia syndrome (HHS), resulting in increased pancreatic {beta}-cell responsiveness to leucine and susceptibility to hypoglycemia following high protein meals. We have previously shown that two of the polyphenols from green tea (epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin gallate (ECG)) inhibit GDH in vitro and that EGCG blocks GDH-mediated insulin secretion in wild type rat islets. Using structural and site-directed mutagenesis studies, we demonstrate that ECG binds to the same site as the allosteric regulator, ADP. Perifusion assays using pancreatic islets from transgenic mice expressing a human HHS form of GDH demonstrate that the hyperresponse to glutamine caused by dysregulated GDH is blocked by the addition of EGCG. As observed in HHS patients, these transgenic mice are hypersensitive to amino acid feeding, and this is abrogated by oral administration of EGCG prior to challenge. Finally, the low basal blood glucose level in the HHS mouse model is improved upon chronic administration of EGCG. These results suggest that this common natural product or some derivative thereof may prove useful in controlling this genetic disorder. Of broader clinical implication is that other groups have shown that restriction of glutamine catabolism via these GDH inhibitors can be useful in treating various tumors. This HHS transgenic mouse model offers a highly useful means to test these agents in vivo.

  1. Treatment Options for the Cardinal Symptoms of Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourian, Leon; LeBoeuf, Amélie; Breton, Jean-Jacques; Cohen, David; Gignac, Martin; Labelle, Réal; Guile, Jean-Marc; Renaud, Johanne

    2015-01-01

    DSM-5 has added a new developmentally appropriate child and adolescent mood disorder subtype called disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD). The core features of DMDD are temper outbursts (manifested by either verbal rages and/or physical aggression) and unrelenting irritability or anger. Currently, the literature is lacking a thorough review of the possible treatment options for the cardinal symptoms constituting DMDD. The objective of this article is to provide a thorough review of peer-reviewed studies on the subject of pharmacological treatment options for children and adolescents with the cardinal symptoms of DMDD. Relevant articles for this study were obtained through Pubmed, Medline, PsychINFO and PsychINDEXplus using the key words: "adolescents," "children," "paediatric," "youth," "irritability," "temper outbursts," "aggression," "rage," "disruptive behaviour," "treatment," "dysphoria," "autism," "mental retardation/intellectual disability," "impulsivity," "ADHD," "oppositional defiant disorder," and "conduct disorder." A total of 823 studies were generated; only English studies focusing on pharmacological treatment were retained. Currently there are no established guidelines or thorough reviews summarizing the treatment of DMDD. Pharmacotherapeutic treatment options of both aggression and chronic irritability include: antidepressants/selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, mood stabilizers, psychostimulants, antipsychotics, and alpha-2 agonists. Treatment options of severe, persistent irritability in youth are numerous, and a consensual treatment algorithm has not yet emerged from the literature. Further studies and clinical trials are warranted to determine efficacious and safe treatment modalities.

  2. Lack of the Lysosomal Membrane Protein, GLMP, in Mice Results in Metabolic Dysregulation in Liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Yi Kong

    Full Text Available Ablation of glycosylated lysosomal membrane protein (GLMP, formerly known as NCU-G1 has been shown to cause chronic liver injury which progresses into liver fibrosis in mice. Both lysosomal dysfunction and chronic liver injury can cause metabolic dysregulation. Glmp gt/gt mice (formerly known as Ncu-g1gt/gt mice were studied between 3 weeks and 9 months of age. Body weight gain and feed efficiency of Glmp gt/gt mice were comparable to wild type siblings, only at the age of 9 months the Glmp gt/gt siblings had significantly reduced body weight. Reduced size of epididymal fat pads was accompanied by hepatosplenomegaly in Glmp gt/gt mice. Blood analysis revealed reduced levels of blood glucose, circulating triacylglycerol and non-esterified fatty acids in Glmp gt/gt mice. Increased flux of glucose, increased de novo lipogenesis and lipid accumulation were detected in Glmp gt/gt primary hepatocytes, as well as elevated triacylglycerol levels in Glmp gt/gt liver homogenates, compared to hepatocytes and liver from wild type mice. Gene expression analysis showed an increased expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and lipogenesis in Glmp gt/gt liver compared to wild type. Our findings are in agreement with the metabolic alterations observed in other mouse models lacking lysosomal proteins, and with alterations characteristic for advanced chronic liver injury.

  3. The NGF Metabolic Pathway in the CNS and its Dysregulation in Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iulita, M Florencia; Cuello, A Claudio

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that individuals with Down syndrome develop Alzheimer's disease neuropathology by middle age. Both in Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome, this is accompanied by the atrophy of NGF-dependent cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain. An NGF trophic compromise in Alzheimer's disease had been early suspected. This hypothesis was discarded with the finding of unaltered NGF mRNA synthesis and of increased NGF precursor levels (proNGF) in postmortem Alzheimer's disease brains. The possibility of an NGF trophic disconnection has been recently revisited at the light of a newly discovered extracellular NGF metabolic pathway; where proNGF is released in an activity-dependent manner and converted by plasmin to mature NGF in the extracellular space. Mature NGF is ultimately degraded by the metalloprotease MMP-9. This pathway has been shown to be compromised in Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome brains, thus reviving the trophic factor hypothesis to explain the atrophy of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in these disorders. This chapter will discuss the physiological role of NGF and its biological significance to cholinergic neurons of the CNS, and present the evidence for a dysregulation of the NGF metabolism in Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome.

  4. Repeated verum but not placebo acupuncture normalizes connectivity in brain regions dysregulated in chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Egorova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture, an ancient East Asian therapy, is aimed at rectifying the imbalance within the body caused by disease. Studies evaluating the efficacy of acupuncture with neuroimaging tend to concentrate on brain regions within the pain matrix, associated with acute pain. We, however, focused on the effect of repeated acupuncture treatment specifically on brain regions known to support functions dysregulated in chronic pain disorders. Transition to chronic pain is associated with increased attention to pain, emotional rumination, nociceptive memory and avoidance learning, resulting in brain connectivity changes, specifically affecting the periaqueductal gray (PAG, medial frontal cortex (MFC and bilateral hippocampus (Hpc. We demonstrate that the PAG–MFC and PAG–Hpc connectivity in patients with chronic pain due to knee osteoarthritis indeed correlates with clinical severity scores and further show that verum acupuncture-induced improvement in pain scores (compared to sham is related to the modulation of PAG–MFC and PAG–Hpc connectivity in the predicted direction. This study shows that repeated verum acupuncture might act by restoring the balance in the connectivity of the key pain brain regions, altering pain-related attention and memory.

  5. Serum proteomics reveals systemic dysregulation of innate immunity in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qibin; Fillmore, Thomas L; Schepmoes, Athena A; Clauss, Therese R W; Gritsenko, Marina A; Mueller, Patricia W; Rewers, Marian; Atkinson, Mark A; Smith, Richard D; Metz, Thomas O

    2013-01-14

    Using global liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based proteomics analyses, we identified 24 serum proteins that were significantly variant between those with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and healthy controls. Functionally, these proteins represent innate immune responses, the activation cascade of complement, inflammatory responses, and blood coagulation. Targeted verification analyses were performed on 52 surrogate peptides representing these proteins, with serum samples from an antibody standardization program cohort of 100 healthy control and 50 type 1 diabetic subjects. 16 peptides were verified as having very good discriminating power, with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve ≥ 0.8. Further validation with blinded serum samples from an independent cohort (10 healthy control and 10 type 1 diabetics) demonstrated that peptides from platelet basic protein and C1 inhibitor achieved both 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for classification of samples. The disease specificity of these proteins was assessed using sera from 50 age-matched type 2 diabetic individuals, and a subset of proteins, C1 inhibitor in particular, were exceptionally good discriminators between these two forms of diabetes. The panel of biomarkers distinguishing those with T1D from healthy controls and those with type 2 diabetes suggests that dysregulated innate immune responses may be associated with the development of this disorder.

  6. The alternative complement pathway is dysregulated in patients with chronic heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahini, Negar; Michelsen, Annika E.; Nilsson, Per H.; Ekholt, Karin; Gullestad, Lars; Broch, Kaspar; Dahl, Christen P.; Aukrust, Pål; Ueland, Thor; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Yndestad, Arne; Louwe, Mieke C.

    2017-01-01

    The complement system, an important arm of the innate immune system, is activated in heart failure (HF). We hypothesized that HF patients are characterized by an imbalance of alternative amplification loop components; including properdin and complement factor D and the alternative pathway inhibitor factor H. These components and the activation product, terminal complement complex (TCC), were measured in plasma from 188 HF patients and 67 age- and sex- matched healthy controls by enzyme immunoassay. Our main findings were: (i) Compared to controls, patients with HF had significantly increased levels of factor D and TCC, and decreased levels of properdin, particularly patients with advanced clinical disorder (i.e., NYHA functional class IV), (ii) Levels of factor D and properdin in HF patients were correlated with measures of systemic inflammation (i.e., C-reactive protein), neurohormonal deterioration (i.e., Nt-proBNP), cardiac function, and deteriorated diastolic function, (iii) Low levels of factor H and properdin were associated with adverse outcome in univariate analysis and for factor H, this was also seen in an adjusted model. Our results indicate that dysregulation of circulating components of the alternative pathway explain the increased degree of complement activation and is related to disease severity in HF patients. PMID:28195242

  7. Dysregulation of long noncoding RNAs in mouse testes and spermatozoa after exposure to cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fengxin; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yunhui; Zhang, Yunwen; Hao, Qingyun; Zhang, Xiaoning

    2017-02-26

    There is increasing evidence that cadmium (Cd) exposure can cause male subfertility and even complete infertility in mammals. Long noncoding (lnc) RNAs are critical for spermatogenesis, and their dysregulation might lead to male infertility. However, whether they are involved in Cd-induced subfertility is unknown. Here we found that intraperitoneal exposure to Cd in mice led to male subfertility indicated by reductions in testicular sperm production and motility, and by abnormal morphology. Testicular and sperm RNAs were used to investigate lncRNA expression profiles by strand-specific RNA sequencing at the transcriptome level to help determine any RNA-related mechanisms in Cd-induced subfertility. The Cd-treated testes and spermatozoa exhibited aberrant expression profiles for lncRNAs and mRNAs. Of the lncRNAs, there were 139 with upregulated expression and 174 with downregulated expression in testes; in contrast, 685 were upregulated and 375 were downregulated in spermatozoa. For mRNA expression, 214 were upregulated and 226 were downregulated in testes; 272 were upregulated and 111 were downregulated in spermatozoa. Gene ontology and pathway analyses showed that the functions of differentially expressed lncRNA targets and mRNAs were closely linked with many processes involved in spermatogenesis. Additionally, many newly identified lncRNAs showed inducible expression, suggesting that they might be good candidate markers for Cd-induced male reproductive toxicity. This study provides a preliminary database for further exploring lncRNA-related mechnisms in male infertility induced by Cd.

  8. ADAMTS2 gene dysregulation in T/myeloid mixed phenotype acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tota, Giuseppina; Coccaro, Nicoletta; Zagaria, Antonella; Anelli, Luisa; Casieri, Paola; Cellamare, Angelo; Minervini, Angela; Minervini, Crescenzio Francesco; Brunetti, Claudia; Impera, Luciana; Carluccio, Paola; Cumbo, Cosimo; Specchia, Giorgina; Albano, Francesco

    2014-12-16

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemias (MPAL) include acute leukemias with blasts that express antigens of more than one lineage, with no clear evidence of myeloid or lymphoid lineage differentiation. T/myeloid (T/My) MPAL not otherwise specified (NOS) is a rare leukemia that expresses both T and myeloid antigens, accounting for less than 1% of all leukemias but 89% of T/My MPAL. From a molecular point of view, very limited data are available on T/My MPAL NOS. In this report we describe a T/My MPAL NOS case with a complex rearrangement involving chromosomes 5 and 14, resulting in overexpression of the ADAM metallopeptidase with thrombospondin type 1 motif, 2 (ADAMTS2) gene due to its juxtaposition to the T cell receptor delta (TRD) gene segment. Detailed molecular cytogenetic characterization of the complex rearrangement in the reported T/My MPAL case allowed us to observe ADAMTS2 gene overexpression, identifying a molecular marker that may be useful for monitoring minimal residual disease. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of gene dysregulation due to a chromosomal rearrangement in T/My MPAL NOS.

  9. Neurofibromin deficiency-associated transcriptional dysregulation suggests a novel therapy for tibial pseudoarthrosis in NF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paria, Nandina; Cho, Tae-Joon; Choi, In Ho; Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Kayembe, Kay; Mao, Rong; Margraf, Rebecca L; Obermosser, Gerlinde; Oxendine, Ila; Sant, David W; Song, Mi Hyun; Stevenson, David A; Viskochil, David H; Wise, Carol A; Kim, Harry K W; Rios, Jonathan J

    2014-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in NF1. Among the earliest manifestations is tibial pseudoarthrosis and persistent nonunion after fracture. To further understand the pathogenesis of pseudoarthrosis and the underlying bone remodeling defect, pseudoarthrosis tissue and cells cultured from surgically resected pseudoarthrosis tissue from NF1 individuals were analyzed using whole-exome and whole-transcriptome sequencing as well as genomewide microarray analysis. Genomewide analysis identified multiple genetic mechanisms resulting in somatic biallelic NF1 inactivation; no other genes with recurring somatic mutations were identified. Gene expression profiling identified dysregulated pathways associated with neurofibromin deficiency, including phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. Unlike aggressive NF1-associated malignancies, tibial pseudoarthrosis tissue does not harbor a high frequency of somatic mutations in oncogenes or other tumor-suppressor genes, such as p53. However, gene expression profiling indicates that pseudoarthrosis tissue has a tumor-promoting transcriptional pattern, despite lacking tumorigenic somatic mutations. Significant overexpression of specific cancer-associated genes in pseudoarthrosis highlights a potential for receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors to target neurofibromin-deficient pseudoarthrosis and promote proper bone remodeling and fracture healing.

  10. Calcium dysregulation contributes to neurodegeneration in FTLD patient iPSC-derived neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Keiko; Sahara, Naruhiko; Kanaan, Nicholas M.; Tsukita, Kayoko; Kondo, Takayuki; Kutoku, Yumiko; Ohsawa, Yutaka; Sunada, Yoshihide; Kawakami, Koichi; Hotta, Akitsu; Yawata, Satoshi; Watanabe, Dai; Hasegawa, Masato; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Suhara, Tetsuya; Higuchi, Makoto; Inoue, Haruhisa

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene MAPT encoding tau, a microtubules-associated protein, cause a subtype of familial neurodegenerative disorder, known as frontotemporal lobar degeneration tauopathy (FTLD-Tau), which presents with dementia and is characterized by atrophy in the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain. Although induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has facilitated the investigation of phenotypes of FTLD-Tau patient neuronal cells in vitro, it remains unclear how FTLD-Tau patient neurons degenerate. Here, we established neuronal models of FTLD-Tau by Neurogenin2-induced direct neuronal differentiation from FTLD-Tau patient iPSCs. We found that FTLD-Tau neurons, either with an intronic MAPT mutation or with an exonic mutation, developed accumulation and extracellular release of misfolded tau followed by neuronal death, which we confirmed by correction of the intronic mutation with CRISPR/Cas9. FTLD-Tau neurons showed dysregulation of the augmentation of Ca2+ transients evoked by electrical stimulation. Chemogenetic or pharmacological control of neuronal activity-relevant Ca2+ influx by the introduction of designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADDs) or by the treatment with glutamate receptor blockers attenuated misfolded tau accumulation and neuronal death. These data suggest that neuronal activity may regulate neurodegeneration in tauopathy. This FTLD-Tau model provides mechanistic insights into tauopathy pathogenesis and potential avenues for treatments. PMID:27721502

  11. Dysregulation of microRNA-219 promotes neurodegeneration through post-transcriptional regulation of tau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa-Maria, Ismael; Alaniz, Maria E.; Renwick, Neil; Cela, Carolina; Fulga, Tudor A.; Van Vactor, David; Tuschl, Thomas; Clark, Lorraine N.; Shelanski, Michael L.; McCabe, Brian D.; Crary, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Tau is a highly abundant and multifunctional brain protein that accumulates in neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), most commonly in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and primary age-related tauopathy. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been linked to neurodegeneration; however, it is not clear whether miRNA dysregulation contributes to tau neurotoxicity. Here, we determined that the highly conserved brain miRNA miR-219 is downregulated in brain tissue taken at autopsy from patients with AD and from those with severe primary age-related tauopathy. In a Drosophila model that produces human tau, reduction of miR-219 exacerbated tau toxicity, while overexpression of miR-219 partially abrogated toxic effects. Moreover, we observed a bidirectional modulation of tau levels in the Drosophila model that was dependent on miR-219 expression or neutralization, demonstrating that miR-219 regulates tau in vivo. In mammalian cellular models, we found that miR-219 binds directly to the 3′-UTR of the tau mRNA and represses tau synthesis at the post-transcriptional level. Together, our data indicate that silencing of tau by miR-219 is an ancient regulatory mechanism that may become perturbed during neurofibrillary degeneration and suggest that this regulatory pathway may be useful for developing therapeutics for tauopathies. PMID:25574843

  12. Age of Trauma Onset and HPA Axis Dysregulation Among Trauma-Exposed Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, Kate Ryan; Vargas, Ivan; Geiss, Elisa G; Lopez-Duran, Nestor L

    2015-12-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA axis) is a pathway through which childhood trauma may increase risk for negative health outcomes. The HPA axis is sensitive to stress throughout development; however, few studies have examined whether timing of exposure to childhood trauma is related to differences in later HPA axis functioning. Therefore, we examined the association between age of first trauma and HPA axis functioning among adolescents, and whether these associations varied by sex. Parents of 97 youth (aged 9-16 years) completed the Early Trauma Inventory (ETI), and youth completed the Socially-Evaluated Cold-Pressor Task (SECPT). We measured salivary cortisol response to the SECPT, the cortisol awakening response, and diurnal regulation at home across 2 consecutive weekdays. Exposure to trauma during infancy related to delayed cortisol recovery from peak responses to acute stress, d = 0.23 to 0.42. Timing of trauma exposure related to diverging patterns of diurnal cortisol regulation for males, d = 0.55, and females, d = 0.57. Therefore, the HPA axis may be susceptible to developing acute stress dysregulation when exposed to trauma during infancy, whereas the consequences within circadian cortisol regulation may occur in the context of later trauma exposure and vary by sex. Further investigations are warranted to characterize HPA axis sensitivity to exposure to childhood trauma across child development.

  13. Dysregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor in actinic keratosis and squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Shannon R; Endo-Munoz, Liliana; Gaffney, Daniel C; Saunders, Nicholas A; Simpson, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a receptor tyrosine kinase. Its correct function is required for normal skin development and homeostasis, while dysregulation of EGFR signalling results in cellular hyper-proliferation and defects in differentiation, leading to impaired wound healing, the development of psoriasis-like lesions, structural and functional defects of hair follicles and tumourigenesis. Actinic keratosis, which is also known as solar keratosis, develops in sun-exposed areas of the skin. These are often called 'premalignant lesions' and are said to represent early squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in situ, although debate over their classification continues. Anti-EGFR therapies have been approved for the treatment of several malignancies and are undergoing trials for others [1], including advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC). However, a number of questions remain regarding the treatment of CSCC with anti-EGFR inhibitors. A lower number of CSCC tumours are EGFR positive in comparison to other types of tumours, such as head and neck SCC (HNSCC), and it has been suggested that patients should be selected on the basis of high tumour EGFR expression. However, there are reports of patients with tumours showing no EGFR-positive staining responding to anti-EGFR therapy. EGFR is an oncogenic driver in many tumours. Does it drive the transformation of actinic keratosis to a tumourigenic phenotype? Many such questions remain, and here, we discuss the role of EGFR in SCC and its functions during the different stages of skin cancer development. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. SMRT-GPS2 corepressor pathway dysregulation coincides with obesity-linked adipocyte inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubal, Amine; Clément, Karine; Fan, Rongrong; Ancel, Patricia; Pelloux, Veronique; Rouault, Christine; Veyrie, Nicolas; Hartemann, Agnes; Treuter, Eckardt; Venteclef, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Low-grade chronic inflammation is a major characteristic of obesity and results from deregulated white adipose tissue function. Consequently, there is interest in identifying the underlying regulatory mechanisms and components that drive adipocyte inflammation. Here, we report that expression of the transcriptional corepressor complex subunits GPS2 and SMRT was significantly reduced in obese adipose tissue, inversely correlated to inflammatory status, and was restored upon gastric bypass surgery–induced weight loss in morbid obesity. These alterations correlated with reduced occupancy of the corepressor complex at inflammatory promoters, providing a mechanistic explanation for elevated inflammatory transcription. In support of these correlations, RNAi-mediated depletion of GPS2 and SMRT from cultured human adipocytes promoted derepression of inflammatory transcription and elevation of obesity-associated inflammatory markers, such as IL-6 and MCP-1. Furthermore, we identified a regulatory cascade containing PPARγ and TWIST1 that controlled the expression of GPS2 and SMRT in human adipocytes. These findings were clinically relevant, because treatment of diabetic obese patients with pioglitazone, an antidiabetic and antiinflammatory PPARγ agonist, restored expression of TWIST1, GPS2, and SMRT in adipose tissue. Collectively, our findings identify alterations in a regulatory transcriptional network in adipocytes involving the dysregulation of a specific corepressor complex as among the initiating events promoting adipose tissue inflammation in human obesity. PMID:23221346

  15. Relating the bipolar spectrum to dysregulation of behavioural activation: a perspective from dynamical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinacher, Arno; Wright, Kim A

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar Disorders affect a substantial minority of the population and result in significant personal, social and economic costs. Understanding of the causes of, and consequently the most effective interventions for, this condition is an area requiring development. Drawing upon theories of Bipolar Disorder that propose the condition to be underpinned by dysregulation of systems governing behavioural activation or approach motivation, we present a mathematical model of the regulation of behavioural activation. The model is informed by non-linear, dynamical principles and as such proposes that the transition from "non-bipolar" to "bipolar" diagnostic status corresponds to a switch from mono- to multistability of behavioural activation level, rather than an increase in oscillation of mood. Consistent with descriptions of the behavioural activation or approach system in the literature, auto-activation and auto-inhibitory feedback is inherent within our model. Comparison between our model and empirical, observational data reveals that by increasing the non-linearity dimension in our model, important features of Bipolar Spectrum disorders are reproduced. Analysis from stochastic simulation of the system reveals the role of noise in behavioural activation regulation and indicates that an increase of nonlinearity promotes noise to jump scales from small fluctuations of activation levels to longer lasting, but less variable episodes. We conclude that further research is required to relate parameters of our model to key behavioural and biological variables observed in Bipolar Disorder.

  16. Calcium dysregulation, and lithium treatment to forestall Alzheimer's disease - a merging of hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, James

    2014-03-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations are tightly regulated, and elevated levels sustained over periods of time can cause cellular deterioration. The putative role of dysregulated intracellular Ca(2+) in Alzheimer's disease had led to the hypothesis that controlling intracellular Ca(2+) may forestall cognitive decline. Lithium has been shown to reduce intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. Two well-characterized neuronal targets of lithium that may affect intracellular Ca(2+) levels are N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and inositol monophosphatase (IMP). Results from a recent single-center placebo-controlled randomized trial suggest that long-term lithium treatment at subtherapeutic doses may have the potential to delay the progression of disease, and observational studies have shown that lithium reduces the prevalence of dementia in subjects with bipolar disorder on long-term lithium therapy. I am advancing the hypothesis that lithium may protect against cognitive decline by stabilizing intracellular Ca(2+) through a dual, synergistic mechanism of targeting both extracellular and intracellular sites, via antagonizing NMDA-receptors and inhibiting IMP. Insights derived from this hypothesis could lead to an improved understanding of the molecular pathology of Alzheimer's disease, and have implications on the evaluation and use of therapeutics that alter intracellular Ca(2+) levels.

  17. Calpain-6 confers atherogenicity to macrophages by dysregulating pre-mRNA splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonami, Kazuo; Hata, Shoji; Aiuchi, Toshihiro; Lei, Xiao-Feng; Kim-Kaneyama, Joo-ri; Takeya, Motohiro; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Kurihara, Hiroki; Miyazaki, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages contribute to the development of atherosclerosis through pinocytotic deposition of native LDL–derived cholesterol in macrophages in the vascular wall. Inhibiting macrophage-mediated lipid deposition may have protective effects in atheroprone vasculature, and identifying mechanisms that potentiate this process may inform potential therapeutic interventions for atherosclerosis. Here, we report that dysregulation of exon junction complex–driven (EJC-driven) mRNA splicing confers hyperpinocytosis to macrophages during atherogenesis. Mechanistically, we determined that inflammatory cytokines induce an unconventional nonproteolytic calpain, calpain-6 (CAPN6), which associates with the essential EJC-loading factor CWC22 in the cytoplasm. This association disturbs the nuclear localization of CWC22, thereby suppressing the splicing of target genes, including those related to Rac1 signaling. CAPN6 deficiency in LDL receptor–deficient mice restored CWC22/EJC/Rac1 signaling, reduced pinocytotic deposition of native LDL in macrophages, and attenuated macrophage recruitment into the lesions, generating an atheroprotective phenotype in the aorta. In macrophages, the induction of CAPN6 in the atheroma interior limited macrophage movements, resulting in a decline in cell clearance from the lesions. Consistent with this finding, we observed that myeloid CAPN6 contributed to atherogenesis in a murine model of bone marrow transplantation. Furthermore, macrophages from advanced human atheromas exhibited increased CAPN6 induction and impaired CWC22 nuclear localization. Together, these results indicate that CAPN6 promotes atherogenicity in inflamed macrophages by disturbing CWC22/EJC systems. PMID:27525442

  18. Hepatocellular alterations and dysregulation of oncogenic pathways in the liver of transgenic mice overexpressing growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquet, Johanna G; Freund, Thomas; Martinez, Carolina S; González, Lorena; Díaz, María E; Micucci, Giannina P; Zotta, Elsa; Boparai, Ravneet K; Bartke, Andrzej; Turyn, Daniel; Sotelo, Ana I

    2013-04-01

    Growth hormone (GH) overexpression throughout life in transgenic mice is associated with the development of liver tumors at old ages. The preneoplastic pathology observed in the liver of young adult GH-overexpressing mice is similar to that present in humans at high risk of hepatic cancer. To elucidate the molecular pathogenesis underlying the pro-oncogenic liver pathology induced by prolonged exposure to elevated GH levels, the activation and expression of several components of signal transduction pathways that have been implicated in hepatocellular carcinogenesis were evaluated in the liver of young adult GH-transgenic mice. In addition, males and females were analyzed in parallel in order to evaluate sexual dimorphism. Transgenic mice from both sexes exhibited hepatocyte hypertrophy with enlarged nuclear size and exacerbated hepatocellular proliferation, which were higher in males. Dysregulation of several oncogenic pathways was observed in the liver of GH-overexpressing transgenic mice. Many signaling mediators and effectors were upregulated in transgenic mice compared with normal controls, including Akt2, NFκB, GSK3β, β-catenin, cyclin D1, cyclin E, c-myc, c-jun and c-fos. The molecular alterations described did not exhibit sexual dimorphism in transgenic mice except for higher gene expression and nuclear localization of cyclin D1 in males. We conclude that prolonged exposure to GH induces in the liver alterations in signaling pathways involved in cell growth, proliferation and survival that resemble those found in many human tumors.

  19. Cell cycle networks link gene expression dysregulation, mutation, and brain maldevelopment in autistic toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramparo, Tiziano; Lombardo, Michael V; Campbell, Kathleen; Barnes, Cynthia Carter; Marinero, Steven; Solso, Stephanie; Young, Julia; Mayo, Maisi; Dale, Anders; Ahrens-Barbeau, Clelia; Murray, Sarah S; Lopez, Linda; Lewis, Nathan; Pierce, Karen; Courchesne, Eric

    2015-12-14

    Genetic mechanisms underlying abnormal early neural development in toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) remain uncertain due to the impossibility of direct brain gene expression measurement during critical periods of early development. Recent findings from a multi-tissue study demonstrated high expression of many of the same gene networks between blood and brain tissues, in particular with cell cycle functions. We explored relationships between blood gene expression and total brain volume (TBV) in 142 ASD and control male toddlers. In control toddlers, TBV variation significantly correlated with cell cycle and protein folding gene networks, potentially impacting neuron number and synapse development. In ASD toddlers, their correlations with brain size were lost as a result of considerable changes in network organization, while cell adhesion gene networks significantly correlated with TBV variation. Cell cycle networks detected in blood are highly preserved in the human brain and are upregulated during prenatal states of development. Overall, alterations were more pronounced in bigger brains. We identified 23 candidate genes for brain maldevelopment linked to 32 genes frequently mutated in ASD. The integrated network includes genes that are dysregulated in leukocyte and/or postmortem brain tissue of ASD subjects and belong to signaling pathways regulating cell cycle G1/S and G2/M phase transition. Finally, analyses of the CHD8 subnetwork and altered transcript levels from an independent study of CHD8 suppression further confirmed the central role of genes regulating neurogenesis and cell adhesion processes in ASD brain maldevelopment.

  20. Dysregulation of the long non-coding RNA transcriptome in a Rett syndrome mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petazzi, Paolo; Sandoval, Juan; Szczesna, Karolina; Jorge, Olga C; Roa, Laura; Sayols, Sergi; Gomez, Antonio; Huertas, Dori; Esteller, Manel

    2013-07-01

    Mecp2 is a transcriptional repressor protein that is mutated in Rett syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder that is the second most common cause of mental retardation in women. It has been shown that the loss of the Mecp2 protein in Rett syndrome cells alters the transcriptional silencing of coding genes and microRNAs. Herein, we have studied the impact of Mecp2 impairment in a Rett syndrome mouse model on the global transcriptional patterns of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Using a microarray platform that assesses 41,232 unique lncRNA transcripts, we have identified the aberrant lncRNA transcriptome that is present in the brain of Rett syndrome mice. The study of the most relevant lncRNAs altered in the assay highlighted the upregulation of the AK081227 and AK087060 transcripts in Mecp2-null mice brains. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated the Mecp2 occupancy in the 5'-end genomic loci of the described lncRNAs and its absence in Rett syndrome mice. Most importantly, we were able to show that the overexpression of AK081227 mediated by the Mecp2 loss was associated with the downregulation of its host coding protein gene, the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit Rho 2 (Gabrr2). Overall, our findings indicate that the transcriptional dysregulation of lncRNAs upon Mecp2 loss contributes to the neurological phenotype of Rett syndrome and highlights the complex interaction between ncRNAs and coding-RNAs.

  1. Green tea polyphenols control dysregulated glutamate dehydrogenase in transgenic mice by hijacking the ADP activation site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changhong; Li, Ming; Chen, Pan; Narayan, Srinivas; Matschinsky, Franz M; Bennett, Michael J; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2011-09-30

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate and, in animals, is extensively regulated by a number of metabolites. Gain of function mutations in GDH that abrogate GTP inhibition cause the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia syndrome (HHS), resulting in increased pancreatic β-cell responsiveness to leucine and susceptibility to hypoglycemia following high protein meals. We have previously shown that two of the polyphenols from green tea (epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin gallate (ECG)) inhibit GDH in vitro and that EGCG blocks GDH-mediated insulin secretion in wild type rat islets. Using structural and site-directed mutagenesis studies, we demonstrate that ECG binds to the same site as the allosteric regulator, ADP. Perifusion assays using pancreatic islets from transgenic mice expressing a human HHS form of GDH demonstrate that the hyperresponse to glutamine caused by dysregulated GDH is blocked by the addition of EGCG. As observed in HHS patients, these transgenic mice are hypersensitive to amino acid feeding, and this is abrogated by oral administration of EGCG prior to challenge. Finally, the low basal blood glucose level in the HHS mouse model is improved upon chronic administration of EGCG. These results suggest that this common natural product or some derivative thereof may prove useful in controlling this genetic disorder. Of broader clinical implication is that other groups have shown that restriction of glutamine catabolism via these GDH inhibitors can be useful in treating various tumors. This HHS transgenic mouse model offers a highly useful means to test these agents in vivo.

  2. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate inhibits herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 replication, and its activity may be mediated through dysregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Min; Chen, Yu; Cheng, Lin; Chu, Ying; Song, Hong-Yong; Wu, Zhi-Wei

    2013-08-01

    Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) is widely used as an antioxidant or an NF-κB inhibitor. It has been reported to inhibit the replication of human rhinoviruses, poliovirus, coxsackievirus, and influenza virus. In this paper, we report that PDTC could inhibit the replication of herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2). PDTC suppressed the expression of HSV-1 and HSV-2 viral immediate early (IE) and late (membrane protein gD) genes and the production of viral progeny. This antiviral property was mediated by the dithiocarbamate moiety of PDTC and required the presence of Zn(2+). Although PDTC could potently block reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, it was found that this property did not contribute to its anti-HSV activity. PDTC showed no activity in disrupting the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation induced by viral infection that was vital for the virus's propagation. We found that PDTC modulated cellular ubiquitination and, furthermore, influenced HSV-2-induced IκB-α degradation to inhibit NF-κB activation and enhanced PML stability in the nucleus, resulting in the inhibition of viral gene expression. These results suggested that the antiviral activity of PDTC might be mediated by its dysregulation of the cellular ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS).

  3. Dysregulation of brain reward systems in eating disorders: neurochemical information from animal models of binge eating, bulimia nervosa, and anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avena, Nicole M; Bocarsly, Miriam E

    2012-07-01

    Food intake is mediated, in part, through brain pathways for motivation and reinforcement. Dysregulation of these pathways may underlay some of the behaviors exhibited by patients with eating disorders. Research using animal models of eating disorders has greatly contributed to the detailed study of potential brain mechanisms that many underlie the causes or consequences of aberrant eating behaviors. This review focuses on neurochemical evidence of reward-related brain dysfunctions obtained through animal models of binge eating, bulimia nervosa, or anorexia nervosa. The findings suggest that alterations in dopamine (DA), acetylcholine (ACh) and opioid systems in reward-related brain areas occur in response to binge eating of palatable foods. Moreover, animal models of bulimia nervosa suggest that while bingeing on palatable food releases DA, purging attenuates the release of ACh that might otherwise signal satiety. Animal models of anorexia nervosa suggest that restricted access to food enhances the reinforcing effects of DA when the animal does eat. The activity-based anorexia model suggests alterations in mesolimbic DA and serotonin occur as a result of restricted eating coupled with excessive wheel running. These findings with animal models complement data obtained through neuroimaging and pharmacotherapy studies of clinical populations. Information on the neurochemical consequences of the behaviors associated with these eating disorders will be useful in understanding these complex disorders and may inform future therapeutic approaches, as discussed here. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Central Control of Food Intake'. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A laboratory-based examination of responses to social rejection in borderline personality disorder: the mediating role of emotion dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon-Gordon, Katherine L; Gratz, Kim L; Breetz, Alisa; Tull, Matthew

    2013-04-01

    This study sought to build upon existing research on interpersonal sensitivity in borderline personality disorder (BPD) by examining whether emotion dysregulation mediates the relationship between BPD and cognitive and emotional responses to social rejection. Participants with (n = 53) and without (n = 34) BPD reported on levels of negative affect and threat to four social needs (perceived control, belonging, selfesteem, and meaningful existence) in response to a laboratory-based social ostracism task (Cyberball). Results revealed heightened interpersonal (rejection) sensitivity among BPD (vs. non-BPD) participants, as evidenced by heightened threat to all social needs and nonspecific distress (although not overall negative affect) in response to the task. Furthermore, both overall emotion dysregulation and the specific dimensions involving emotion modulation strategies, emotional clarity, and the control of behaviors when distressed mediated the relationship between BPD status and several cognitive (threats to meaningful existence, belonging, and self-esteem) and emotional (nonspecific distress) responses to the task.

  5. Light enhances learned fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warthen, Daniel M; Wiltgen, Brian J; Provencio, Ignacio

    2011-08-16

    The ability to learn, remember, and respond to emotional events is a powerful survival strategy. However, dysregulated behavioral and physiological responses to these memories are maladaptive. To fully understand learned fear and the pathologies that arise during response malfunction we must reveal the environmental variables that influence learned fear responses. Light, a ubiquitous environmental feature, modulates cognition and anxiety. We hypothesized that light modulates responses to learned fear. Using tone-cued fear conditioning, we found that light enhances behavioral responses to learned fear in C57BL/6J mice. Mice in light freeze more in response to a conditioned cue than mice in darkness. The absence of significant freezing during a 2-wk habituation period and during intertrial intervals indicated that light specifically modulates freezing to the learned acoustic cue rather than the context of the experimental chamber. Repeating our assay in two photoreceptor mutant models, Pde6b(rd1/rd1) and Opn4(-/-) mice, revealed that light-dependent enhancement of conditioned fear is driven primarily by the rods and/or cones. By repeating our protocol with an altered lighting regimen, we found that lighting conditions acutely modulate responses when altered between conditioning and testing. This is manifested either as an enhancement of freezing when light is added during testing or as a depression of freezing when light is removed during testing. Acute enhancement, but not depression, requires both rod/cone- and melanopsin-dependent photoreception. Our results demonstrate a modulation by light of behavioral responses to learned fear.

  6. Autonomic Dysregulation, Cognitive Impairment, and Symptoms of Psychosis as an Unusual Presentation in an Anti-Aquaporin 4-Positive Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabel M. Ruiter

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We present the unusual case of a patient with an aquaporin 4 antibody-seropositive neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder who presented with autonomic dysregulation, cognitive impairment, and symptoms of psychosis. Only a few previous cases have been described with similar psychiatric symptoms. Brain MRI showed an abnormal hyperintense T2 signal of the hypothalamus and, to a lesser extent, a minor hyperintense signal of the right optic nerve. Her symptoms and MR abnormalities improved after high-dose methylprednisolone.

  7. Autonomic Dysregulation, Cognitive Impairment, and Symptoms of Psychosis as an Unusual Presentation in an Anti-Aquaporin 4-Positive Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiter, Annabel M.; Meilof, Jan F.; Somanje-Bolweg, Rosemarijn R.J.; van Gorsel, Erik; Kalkers, Nynke F.

    2017-01-01

    We present the unusual case of a patient with an aquaporin 4 antibody-seropositive neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder who presented with autonomic dysregulation, cognitive impairment, and symptoms of psychosis. Only a few previous cases have been described with similar psychiatric symptoms. Brain MRI showed an abnormal hyperintense T2 signal of the hypothalamus and, to a lesser extent, a minor hyperintense signal of the right optic nerve. Her symptoms and MR abnormalities improved after high-dose methylprednisolone. PMID:28413400

  8. The effect of autonomous and controlled motives on eating dysregulation: Implications for individuals classified as underweight, overweight or obese

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Jemma; Standage, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Controlled and autonomous motivational factors from self-determination theory have previously been highlighted as key factors in eating regulation. The present study examined controlled motives as an overarching motivational factor in eating dysregulation and examined its effects on dieting behaviour for those who are underweight, overweight or obese. Objective: To examine whether the influence of controlled motives on dieting behaviour would be moderated by body mass index (BMI...

  9. Childhood traumatization by primary caretaker and affect dysregulation in patients with borderline personality disorder and somatoform disorder

    OpenAIRE

    van Dijke, Annemiek; Ford, Julian D.; van der Hart, Onno; Van Son, Maarten J.M.; van der Heijden, Peter G. M.; Bühring, Martina

    2011-01-01

    Affect regulation is often compromised as a result of early life interpersonal traumatization and disruption in caregiving relationships like in situations where the caretaker is emotionally, sexually or physically abusing the child. Prior studies suggest a clear relationship between early childhood attachment-related psychological trauma and affect dysregulation. We evaluated the relationship of retrospectively recalled childhood traumatization by primary caretaker(s) (TPC) and affect dysreg...

  10. Effect of Methylphenidate on Emotional Dysregulation in Children With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder + Oppositional Defiant Disorder/Conduct Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Ayse; Akyol Ardic, Ulku; Ercan, Eyup Sabri

    2017-04-01

    Emotional dysregulation (ED) is a frequent feature of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It can be observed as a dysregulation profile or a deficient emotional self-regulation (DESR) profile. Oppositional defiant disorder/conduct disorder (ODD/CD) comorbidity is prevalent in ADHD and known to be related with ED. The first-line treatment of ADHD includes psychostimulants, but their effects on ED are not well studied. This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of methylphenidate (MPH) treatment on ED in ADHD + ODD/CD cases. A total of 118 ADHD + ODD/CD patients with a mean age of 9.0 ± 1.9 years were treated with MPH for 1 year. Also, parents of cases were recruited for a parent-training program, which initiated after first month of MPH treatment. Symptom severity was assessed at baseline and 12th month by Turgay Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition-Based Child and Adolescent Behavior Disorders Screening and Rating Scale-Parent Form, Children Depression Inventory, Child Behavior Checklist 4-18 years, and Parental Acceptance and Rejection Questionnaire-Mother Form. Emotional dysregulation (DESR + DP) was present in 85.6% of cases. Conduct disorder was significantly higher in patients with DP, whereas ODD was significantly higher in the DESR and non-ED groups (P < 0.0001). Symptoms of ADHD and ED were significantly improved with 1-year of MPH treatment (P < 0.05). The improvement in ED was independent of improvement in ADHD symptoms and parent training (P < 0.05). Emotional dysregulation is highly prevalent in disruptive behavioral disorders as ODD and CD, which are comorbid with ADHD. The MPH treatment is effective on ED independently from other clinical determinants.

  11. An Anti-Inflammatory Sterol Decreases Obesity-Related Inflammation-Induced Insulin Resistance and Metabolic Dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris L. Reading

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity-related inflammation-induced insulin resistance and metabolic dysregulation were investigated in retrospective analysis of placebo hematologic and metabolic laboratory data from trials associated with increasing chronic low-grade inflammation and body mass index. Studies included healthy subjects and those with progressive stages of metabolic dysregulation, including type 2 diabetes mellitus with uncontrolled hemoglobin A1c. Intrasubject variances in erythroid and metabolic values increased with metabolic dysregulation. Random effects were demonstrated in treatment-naïve diabetes for erythroid, glucose, and HbA1c fluctuations. The anti-inflammatory insulin sensitizer, HE3286, was tested for its ability to decrease obesity-related inflammation-induced insulin resistance and metabolic dysregulation in diabetes. HE3286 significantly decreased erythroid and metabolic variances and improved 1,5-anhydroglucitol (a surrogate of postprandial glucose compared to the placebo group. HE3286 HbA1c decrease correlated with weight loss and inversely with baseline monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 in metformin-treated diabetics. Normalization of HbA1c to the 84-day average hemoglobin revealed that HE3286 HbA1c decrease correlated with high baseline MCP-1 and MCP-1 decrease in treatment-naïve diabetics. HE3286 decreased insulin resistance, increased the frequency of decreased day 84 HbA1c in metformin-treated subjects, and decreased day 112 HbA1c in treatment-naïve diabetics. HE3286 may be useful to restore metabolic homeostasis in type 2 diabetes.

  12. Chlorogenic acid from honeysuckle improves hepatic lipid dysregulation and modulates hepatic fatty acid composition in rats with chronic endotoxin infusion

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid as a natural hydroxycinnamic acid has protective effect for liver. Endotoxin induced metabolic disorder, such as lipid dysregulation and hyperlipidemia. In this study, we investigated the effect of chlorogenic acid in rats with chronic endotoxin infusion. The Sprague-Dawley rats with lipid metabolic disorder (LD group) were intraperitoneally injected endotoxin. And the rats of chlorogenic acid-LD group were daily received chlorogenic acid by intragastric administration. In ch...

  13. Dysregulated DNA Methyltransferase 3A Upregulates IGFBP5 to Suppress Trophoblast Cell Migration and Invasion in Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuanhui; Li, Ting; Huang, Xiaojie; Xu, Xianghong; Zhou, Xinyao; Jia, Linyan; Zhu, Jingping; Xie, Dandan; Wang, Kai; Zhou, Qian; Jin, Liping; Zhang, Jiqin; Duan, Tao

    2017-02-01

    Preeclampsia is a unique multiple system disorder during human pregnancy, which affects ≈5% to 8% of pregnancies. Its risks and complications have become the major causes of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Although abnormal placentation to which DNA methylation dysregulation is always linked is speculated to be one of the reasons causing preeclampsia, the underlying mechanisms still remain elusive to date. Here we revealed that aberrant DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) plays a critical role in preeclampsia. Our results show that the expression and localization of DNMT3A are dysregulated in preeclamptic placenta. Moreover, knockdown of DNMT3A obviously inhibits trophoblast cell migration and invasion. Mechanistically, IGFBP5 (insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5), known as a suppressor, is upregulated by decreased DNMT3A because of promoter hypomethylation. Importantly, IGFBP5 downregulation can rescue the defects caused by DNMT3A knockdown, thereby, consolidating the significance of IGFBP5 in the downstream of DNMT3A in trophoblast. Furthermore, we detected low promoter methylation and high protein expression of IGFBP5 in the clinical samples of preeclamptic placenta. Collectively, our study suggests that dysregulation of DNMT3A and IGFBP5 is relevant to preeclampsia. Thus, we propose that DNMT3A and IGFBP5 can serve as potential markers and targets for the clinical diagnosis and therapy of preeclampsia. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. The Effectiveness of the Unified Protocol on Emotional Dysregulation and Cognitive Emotion Regulation Strategies in Patients with Psychosomatic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Mazaheri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The unified treatment approach (UP is an emotion-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy in which the main object of treatment is emotional processes. The aim of the present research was to examine the effectiveness of The Unified Protocol (UP on emotional dysregulation and cognitive emotion regulation strategies in patients with psychosomatic disorders. Methods: Emotion-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (ECBT, a unified treatment, with 12 weekly group sessions of 2 hours, was presented to 14 patients with psychosomatic complaints at the Subspecialty Center of Psychiatry in Isfahan in 2013. Pre- and post-intervention assessments were done by means of the self-report tests of Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS and Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ. Results: Significant reductions in post-test scores of total emotional dysregulation (P < 0.01 as well as the factors of non-acceptance (P < 0.05 and strategy (P < 0.01 were seen, while the other factors (goal, impulse, awareness, and clarity did not change. Moreover, a significant reduction was observed in the catastrophizing strategy score (P < 0.05, in comparison with other cognitive strategies. Conclusion: This pilot study including 14 patients with psychosomatic disorders indicates that the Unified treatment approach is an effective treatment in improvement of emotional dysregulation and in reduction of utilizing maladaptive cognitive strategies.

  15. Dimensions of emotion dysregulation in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: A conceptual review of the empirical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Jason M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Engel, Scott G; Gordon, Kathryn H; Kaye, Walter H; Mitchell, James E

    2015-08-01

    Several existing conceptual models and psychological interventions address or emphasize the role of emotion dysregulation in eating disorders. The current article uses Gratz and Roemer's (2004) multidimensional model of emotion regulation and dysregulation as a clinically relevant framework to review the extant literature on emotion dysregulation in anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Specifically, the dimensions reviewed include: (1) the flexible use of adaptive and situationally appropriate strategies to modulate the duration and/or intensity of emotional responses, (2) the ability to successfully inhibit impulsive behavior and maintain goal-directed behavior in the context of emotional distress, (3) awareness, clarity, and acceptance of emotional states, and (4) the willingness to experience emotional distress in the pursuit of meaningful activities. The current review suggests that both AN and BN are characterized by broad emotion regulation deficits, with difficulties in emotion regulation across the four dimensions found to characterize both AN and BN, although a small number of more specific difficulties may distinguish the two disorders. The review concludes with a discussion of the clinical implications of the findings, as well as a summary of limitations of the existing empirical literature and suggestions for future research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dimensions of Emotion Dysregulation in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa: A Conceptual Review of the Empirical Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Jason M.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Engel, Scott G.; Gordon, Kathryn H.; Kaye, Walter H.; Mitchell, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Several existing conceptual models and psychological interventions address or emphasize the role of emotion dysregulation in eating disorders. The current article uses Gratz and Roemer’s (2004) multidimensional model of emotion regulation and dysregulation as a clinically relevant framework to review the extant literature on emotion dysregulation in anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Specifically, the dimensions reviewed include: (1) the flexible use of adaptive and situationally appropriate strategies to modulate the duration and/or intensity of emotional responses, (2) the ability to successfully inhibit impulsive behavior and maintain goal-directed behavior in the context of emotional distress, (3) awareness, clarity, and acceptance of emotional states, and (4) the willingness to experience emotional distress in the pursuit of meaningful activities. The current review suggests that both AN and BN are characterized by broad emotion regulation deficits, with difficulties in emotion regulation across the four dimensions found to characterize both AN and BN, although a small number of more specific difficulties may distinguish the two disorders. The review concludes with a discussion of the clinical implications of the findings, as well as a summary of limitations of the existing empirical literature and suggestions for future research. PMID:26112760

  17. Prediction of Smoking, Alcohol, Drugs, and Psychoactive Drugs Abuse Based on Emotional Dysregulation and Child Abuse Experience in People with Borderline Personality Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M GannadiFarnood

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This research was an attempt to predict the tendency of people having borderline personality traits to smoking, drinking alcohol, and taking psychoactive drugs based on emotional dysregulation and child abuse. Method: This study employed a correlation method which is categorized in descriptive category. A sample including 600 male and female bachelor students of Tabriz University was selected by cluster sampling. Then, high risk behaviors scale, Emotional dysregulation Scale, Child abuse scale, and borderline personality scale (STB were distributed among this group. Findings: Stepwise multiple regression analysis suggested that emotional dysregulation and child abuse significantly predicted varying degrees of smoking, drug, and alcohol usage. Conclusion: The research findings suggest the basic role of initial biological vulnerability in terms of emotional regulation (dysregulation and invalidating family environment (child abuse in the prediction of catching the disorder of borderline personality traits and producing high riskbehaviorssuch as alcohol drink and drug usage.

  18. Explicating the role of emotion dysregulation in risky behaviors: A review and synthesis of the literature with directions for future research and clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Nicole H.; Sullivan, Tami P.; Tull, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Extant literature provides support for emotion dysregulation as a transdiagnostic construct with relevance to the pathogenesis and treatment of numerous psychiatric difficulties and maladaptive behaviors, including risky, self-destructive, and health-compromising behaviors (e.g., substance use, risky sexual behavior). The aim of the present review is to synthesize theory and empirical research on the relationship between emotion dysregulation and risky behaviors. In addition, we highlight cutting-edge approaches for investigating the emotion dysregulation-risky behavior, including examination of the role of positive emotional experiences and inclusion of context-dependent and physiological assessments. Finally, we note the relevance of the emotion dysregulation-risky behavior relation to intervention efforts aimed at reducing risky behaviors. PMID:25705711

  19. Depressive Symptoms, Emotion Dysregulation, and Bulimic Symptoms in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes: Varying Interactions at Diagnosis and During Transition to Insulin Pump Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young-Hyman, Deborah L; Peterson, Claire M; Fischer, Sarah; Markowitz, Jessica T; Muir, Andrew B; Laffel, Lori M

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the associations between depressive symptoms, emotion dysregulation and bulimic symptoms in youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the context of the diagnosis and treatment of T1D. Study participants were 103 youth in 2 distinct groups: newly diagnosed (New) or transitioning to pump therapy (continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion [CSII]; "Pump"), who completed questionnaires regarding symptoms of depression, emotion dysregulation, and bulimia. Glycemic control (A1c), height, weight, and questionnaires were evaluated within 10 days of diagnosis (n = 58) or at education/clinic visit before starting insulin utilizing CSII (n = 45). In the newly diagnosed group, only depression accounted for significant variance in bulimia scores (β = .47, P symptoms and emotion dysregulation were associated with greater bulimic symptoms. Depressive symptoms and emotion dysregulation, an indicator of poor coping/behavioral control, could help explain adoption of disordered eating behaviors in youth with T1D who are transitioning to pump therapy.

  20. Dysregulation in Youth with Anxiety Disorders: Relationship to Acute and 7- to 19- Year Follow-Up Outcomes of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporino, Nicole E; Herres, Joanna; Kendall, Philip C; Wolk, Courtney Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    This study evaluated the impact of dysregulation across cognitive, affective, and behavioral domains on acute and 7- to 19-year follow-up outcomes of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety, and explored dysregulation as a predictor of psychopathology and impairment in young adulthood among individuals who received anxiety treatment as youth. Participants (N = 64; 50 % female, 83 % non-Hispanic White) from two randomized clinical trials completed a follow-up assessment 7-19 years later. Latent profile analysis identified dysregulation based on Anxious/Depressed, Attention Problems, and Aggressive Behavior scores on the Child Behavior Checklist. Although pretreatment dysregulation was not related to acute or follow-up outcomes for anxiety diagnoses that were the focus of treatment, dysregulation predicted an array of non-targeted psychopathology at follow-up. Among youth with a principal anxiety disorder, the effects of CBT (Coping Cat) appear to be robust against broad impairments in self-regulation. However, youth with a pretreatment dysregulation profile likely need follow-up to monitor for the emergence of other disorders.

  1. Rapid-onset obesity, hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction, autonomic dysregulation and neuroendocrine tumor syndrome with a homogenous enlargement of the pituitary gland: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljabban, Lama; Kassab, Lina; Bakoura, Nour Alhuda; Alsalka, Mohammad Fayez; Maksoud, Ismaeil

    2016-11-22

    Rapid-onset obesity with hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction, and autonomic dysregulation syndrome is a rare pediatric disorder with a variable sequence of clinical presentations, undefined etiology, and high risk of mortality. Our patient presented an unusual course of the disease accompanied by a homogenous mild enlargement of her pituitary gland with an intact pituitary-endocrine axis which, to the best of our knowledge, represents a new finding in rapid-onset obesity with hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction, and autonomic dysregulation syndrome. We present a documented case of a 4 years and 8-month-old Syrian Arabic girl with a distinctive course of signs and symptoms of rapid-onset obesity with hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction, and autonomic dysregulation syndrome accompanied by mature ganglioneuroma in her chest, a homogenous mild enlargement of her pituitary gland, generalized cortical brain atrophy, and seizures. Three months after her first marked symptoms were noted she had a sudden progression of severe respiratory distress that ended with her death. The findings of this case could increase our understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms of rapid-onset obesity with hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction, and autonomic dysregulation, and place more emphases on pediatricians to consider rapid-onset obesity with hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction, and autonomic dysregulation syndrome whenever early rapid onset of obesity, associated with any malfunction, is observed in children. This knowledge could be lifesaving for children with rapid-onset obesity with hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction, and autonomic dysregulation syndrome.

  2. The role of lipid dysregulation and vascular risk factors in glaucomatous retrobulbar circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Modrzejewska

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate selected lipid-related and vascular factors and their effect on retrobulbar hemodynamics in glaucoma. Fifty-six patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG [POAG group; mean age 68.32 years (SD±0.21] and 54 patients in control group [CG, mean age 68.1 years (SD±5.34] were examined. Peak systolic velocity, end-diastolic velocity, mean velocity, pulsatility index, and resistive index of the ophthalmic artery, the central retinal artery and the posterior ciliary arteries were measured by Color Doppler Imaging. Selected lipid-related, systemic and local vascular parameters were evaluated. Statistical methods included Shapiro-Wilk, Student-t and Mann-Whitney U tests, and Spearman rank correlations. In POAG group systolic arterial blood pressure, diastolic arterial blood pressure, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-ch, and intraocular pressure were significantly higher; while ocular perfusion pressure, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-ch and diastolic ocular perfusion pressure were significantly lower (p≤0.05. Color Doppler Imaging confirmed blood flow abnormalities in all investigated arteries. In addition, significant correlations of HDL-ch, LDL-ch and triglycerides (TG with peak systolic velocity, end-diastolic velocity and mean velocity were found in individual arteries (p≤0.05. Also, significant associations of systolic arterial blood pressure, ocular perfusion pressure, systolic oclular perfusion pressure and diastolic ocular perfusion pressure with peak systolic velocity, end-diastolic velocity, mean velocity and resistive index were revealed in the posterior ciliary arteries (p≤0.05. Dysregulation of lipid-related and vascular factors, as well as statistical correlation between the above and retrobulbar blood flow indices, might imply their role in vasoconstrictive processes during glaucomatous endotheliopathy.

  3. Humoral Dysregulation Associated with Increased Systemic Inflammation among Injection Heroin Users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Piepenbrink

    Full Text Available Injection drug use is a growing major public health concern. Injection drug users (IDUs have a higher incidence of co-morbidities including HIV, Hepatitis, and other infections. An effective humoral response is critical for optimal homeostasis and protection from infection; however, the impact of injection heroin use on humoral immunity is poorly understood. We hypothesized that IDUs have altered B cell and antibody profiles.A comprehensive systems biology-based cross-sectional assessment of 130 peripheral blood B cell flow cytometry- and plasma- based features was performed on HIV-/Hepatitis C-, active heroin IDUs who participated in a syringe exchange program (n = 19 and healthy control subjects (n = 19. The IDU group had substantial polydrug use, with 89% reporting cocaine injection within the preceding month. IDUs exhibited a significant, 2-fold increase in total B cells compared to healthy subjects, which was associated with increased activated B cell subsets. Although plasma total IgG titers were similar between groups, IDUs had significantly higher IgG3 and IgG4, suggestive of chronic B cell activation. Total IgM was also increased in IDUs, as well as HIV Envelope-specific IgM, suggestive of increased HIV exposure. IDUs exhibited numerous features suggestive of systemic inflammation, including significantly increased plasma sCD40L, TNF-α, TGF-α, IL-8, and ceramide metabolites. Machine learning multivariate analysis distilled a set of 10 features that classified samples based on group with absolute accuracy.These results demonstrate broad alterations in the steady-state humoral profile of IDUs that are associated with increased systemic inflammation. Such dysregulation may impact the ability of IDUs to generate optimal responses to vaccination and infection, or lead to increased risk for inflammation-related co-morbidities, and should be considered when developing immune-based interventions for this growing population.

  4. Adipose tissue–specific dysregulation of angiotensinogen by oxidative stress in obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Sadanori; Kozuka, Chisayo; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Yasue, Shintaro; Ishii-Yonemoto, Takako; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Yuji; Noguchi, Michio; Kusakabe, Toru; Tomita, Tsutomu; Fujikura, Junji; Ebihara, Ken; Hosoda, Kiminori; Sakaue, Hiroshi; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Ham, Mira; Lee, Yun Sok; Kim, Jae Bum; Saito, Yoshihiko; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2010-01-01

    Adipose tissue expresses all components of the renin-angiotensin system including angiotensinogen (AGT). Recent studies have highlighted a potential role of AGT in adipose tissue function and homeostasis. However, some controversies surround the regulatory mechanisms of AGT in obese adipose tissue. In this context, we here demonstrated that the AGT messenger RNA (mRNA) level in human subcutaneous adipose tissue was significantly reduced in obese subjects as compared with nonobese subjects. Adipose tissue AGT mRNA level in obese mice was also lower as compared with their lean littermates; however, the hepatic AGT mRNA level remained unchanged. When 3T3-L1 adipocytes were cultured for a long period, the adipocytes became hypertrophic with a marked increase in the production of reactive oxygen species. Expression and secretion of AGT continued to decrease during the course of adipocyte hypertrophy. Treatment of the 3T3-L1 and primary adipocytes with reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide) or tumor necrosis factor α caused a significant decrease in the expression and secretion of AGT. On the other hand, treatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine suppressed the decrease in the expression and secretion of AGT in the hypertrophied 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Finally, treatment of obese db/db mice with N-acetyl cysteine augmented the expression of AGT in the adipose tissue, but not in the liver. The present study demonstrates for the first time that oxidative stress dysregulates AGT in obese adipose tissue, providing a novel insight into the adipose tissue–specific interaction between the regulation of AGT and oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of obesity. PMID:20045538

  5. Adipose tissue-specific dysregulation of angiotensinogen by oxidative stress in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Sadanori; Kozuka, Chisayo; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Yasue, Shintaro; Ishii-Yonemoto, Takako; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Yuji; Noguchi, Michio; Kusakabe, Toru; Tomita, Tsutomu; Fujikura, Junji; Ebihara, Ken; Hosoda, Kiminori; Sakaue, Hiroshi; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Ham, Mira; Lee, Yun Sok; Kim, Jae Bum; Saito, Yoshihiko; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2010-09-01

    Adipose tissue expresses all components of the renin-angiotensin system including angiotensinogen (AGT). Recent studies have highlighted a potential role of AGT in adipose tissue function and homeostasis. However, some controversies surround the regulatory mechanisms of AGT in obese adipose tissue. In this context, we here demonstrated that the AGT messenger RNA (mRNA) level in human subcutaneous adipose tissue was significantly reduced in obese subjects as compared with nonobese subjects. Adipose tissue AGT mRNA level in obese mice was also lower as compared with their lean littermates; however, the hepatic AGT mRNA level remained unchanged. When 3T3-L1 adipocytes were cultured for a long period, the adipocytes became hypertrophic with a marked increase in the production of reactive oxygen species. Expression and secretion of AGT continued to decrease during the course of adipocyte hypertrophy. Treatment of the 3T3-L1 and primary adipocytes with reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide) or tumor necrosis factor alpha caused a significant decrease in the expression and secretion of AGT. On the other hand, treatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine suppressed the decrease in the expression and secretion of AGT in the hypertrophied 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Finally, treatment of obese db/db mice with N-acetyl cysteine augmented the expression of AGT in the adipose tissue, but not in the liver. The present study demonstrates for the first time that oxidative stress dysregulates AGT in obese adipose tissue, providing a novel insight into the adipose tissue-specific interaction between the regulation of AGT and oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of obesity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dysregulation of soluble epoxide hydrolase and lipidomic profiles in anorexia nervosa

    KAUST Repository

    Shih, P. B.

    2015-03-31

    Individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) restrict eating and become emaciated. They tend to have an aversion to foods rich in fat. Because epoxide hydrolase 2 (EPHX2) was identified as a novel AN susceptibility gene, and because its protein product, soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), converts bioactive epoxides of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) to the corresponding diols, lipidomic and metabolomic targets of EPHX2 were assessed to evaluate the biological functions of EPHX2 and their role in AN. Epoxide substrates of sEH and associated oxylipins were measured in ill AN, recovered AN and gender- and race-matched controls. PUFA and oxylipin markers were tested as potential biomarkers for AN. Oxylipin ratios were calculated as proxy markers of in vivo sEH activity. Several free- and total PUFAs were associated with AN diagnosis and with AN recovery. AN displayed elevated n-3 PUFAs and may differ from controls in PUFA elongation and desaturation processes. Cytochrome P450 pathway oxylipins from arachidonic acid, linoleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid and docosahexaenoic acid PUFAs are associated with AN diagnosis. The diol:epoxide ratios suggest the sEH activity is higher in AN compared with controls. Multivariate analysis illustrates normalization of lipidomic profiles in recovered ANs. EPHX2 influences AN risk through in vivo interaction with dietary PUFAs. PUFA composition and concentrations as well as sEH activity may contribute to the pathogenesis and prognosis of AN. Our data support the involvement of EPHX2-associated lipidomic and oxylipin dysregulations in AN, and reveal their potential as biomarkers to assess responsiveness to future intervention or treatment.

  7. Immune dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX syndrome: a paradigm of immunodeficiency with autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica eBarzaghi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Immune dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX syndrome is a rare monogenic primary immunodeficiency (PID due to mutations of FOXP3, a key transcription factor for naturally occurring (n regulatory T (Treg cells. The dysfunction of Treg cells is the main pathogenic event leading to the multi-organ autoimmunity that characterizes IPEX syndrome, a paradigm of genetically determined PID with autoimmunity. IPEX has a severe early onset and can become rapidly fatal within the first year of life regardless of the type and site of the mutation. The initial presenting symptoms are severe enteritis and/or type 1 diabetes mellitus, alone or in combination with eczema and elevated serum IgE. Other autoimmune symptoms, such as hypothyroidism, cytopenia, hepatitis, nephropathy, arthritis, and alopecia, can develop in patients who survive the initial acute phase.The current therapeutic options for IPEX patients are limited. Supportive and replacement therapies combined with pharmacological immunosuppression are required to control symptoms at onset. However, these procedures can allow only a reduction of the clinical manifestations without a permanent control of the disease. The only known effective cure for IPEX syndrome is haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but it is always limited by the availability of a suitable donor and the lack of specific guidelines for bone marrow transplant in the context of this disease.This review aims to summarize the clinical histories and genomic mutations of the IPEX patients described in the literature to date. We will focus on the clinical and immunological features that allow differential diagnosis of IPEX syndrome and distinguish it from other PID with autoimmunity. The efficacy of the current therapies will be reviewed, and possible innovative approaches, based on the latest highlights of the pathogenesis to treat this severe primary autoimmune disease of childhood, will be discussed.

  8. Dysregulation of leptin signaling in Alzheimer disease: evidence for neuronal leptin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonda, David J; Stone, Jeremy G; Torres, Sandy L; Siedlak, Sandra L; Perry, George; Kryscio, Richard; Jicha, Gregory; Casadesus, Gemma; Smith, Mark A; Zhu, Xiongwei; Lee, Hyoung-Gon

    2014-01-01

    Leptin signaling has received considerable attention in the Alzheimer disease (AD) field. Within the past decade, the peptide hormone has been demonstrated to attenuate tau hyperphosphorylation in neuronal cells and to be modulated by amyloid-β. Moreover, a role in neuroprotection and neurogenesis within the hippocampus has been shown in animal models. To further characterize the association between leptin signaling and vulnerable regions in AD, we assessed the profile of leptin and the leptin receptor in AD and control patients. We analyzed leptin levels in CSF, and the concentration and localization of leptin and leptin receptor in the hippocampus. Significant elevations in leptin levels in both CSF and hippocampal tissue of AD patients, compared with age-matched control cases, indicate a physiological up-regulation of leptin in AD. However, the level of leptin receptor mRNA decreased in AD brain and the leptin receptor protein was localized to neurofibrillary tangles, suggesting a severe discontinuity in the leptin signaling pathway. Collectively, our results suggest that leptin resistance in the hippocampus may play a role in the characteristic changes associated with the disease. These findings are the first to demonstrate such dysregulated leptin-signaling circuitry and provide novel insights into the possible role of aberrant leptin signaling in AD. In this study, increased leptin was found in CSF and hippocampus in Alzheimer disease indicating its physiological up-regulation, yet leptin receptor mRNA was decreased and leptin receptor protein was localized to neurofibrillary tangles, suggesting a discontinuity in the leptin signaling pathway. The lack of leptin signaling within degenerating neurons may represent a novel neuronal leptin resistance in Alzheimer disease. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  9. Dysregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway in upper tract urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munari, Enrico; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Faraj, Sheila; Chaux, Alcides; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Hicks, Jessica; Meeker, Alan; Nonomura, Norio; Netto, George J

    2013-12-01

    Upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) accounts for 5% to 10% of all urothelial carcinomas. Despite many shared features, key clinical and molecular genetic differences between upper tract and bladder urothelial carcinomas are becoming apparent. We have previously demonstrated alterations of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in bladder carcinoma with a potential impact on biological behavior. In the current study, we evaluated the expression status and prognostic significance of mTOR pathway members in UTUC. Archival formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues from 99 primary UTUCs were retrieved from one of the authors' institution. Tissue microarrays were constructed with triplicate tumor samples and paired nonneoplastic urothelium. Tissue microarrays were analyzed using immunohistochemistry for mTOR pathway members: PTEN, phos-AKT, phos-mTOR, phos-S6, phos-4EBP1, and related markers p27 and c-MYC; correlation with clinicopathologic parameters and outcome was performed. We found significantly lower expression of PTEN, phos-AKT, phos-mTOR, phos-S6, phos-4EBP1, p27, and c-MYC in UTUC compared with paired benign urothelium (P < .0005). We found a strong positive correlation between PTEN and phos-AKT. Moderate correlation was observed between phos-mTOR and phos-S6, PTEN and p27, phos-AKT and p27, phos-S6 and p27, phos-mTOR and c-MYC, phos-S6 and c-MYC, and p27 and c-MYC. None of the evaluated biomarkers were associated with increased hazard ratios for tumor recurrence or for cancer-specific mortality, when adjusting for relevant clinicopathologic variables. Dysregulation of the mTOR pathway was observed in UTUC compared with normal urothelium, implicating a potential pathogenic role in tumor development. In our cohort, expression of the evaluated biomarkers had no prognostic value.

  10. Dysregulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway in chromophobe renal cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaux, Alcides; Albadine, Roula; Schultz, Luciana; Hicks, Jessica; Carducci, Michael A; Argani, Pedram; Allaf, Mohamad; Netto, George J

    2013-10-01

    Targeted therapy in advanced clear cell renal cell carcinomas (RCC) is now an established modality. The latter is in stark contrast to non-clear cell subtypes. We explored the translational support for the use of antagonists of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the vascular endothelial growth factor pathways in chromophobe RCC. The immunoexpression of PTEN, phos-AKT, phosphorylated S6 (phos-S6), 4EBP1, p27, c-MYC, and HIF-1α was evaluated in 33 patients with chromophobe RCC who were treated by partial/radical nephrectomy without adjuvant therapy. PTEN was lower in tumor than in normal kidney (P<.001), and loss of PTEN expression was found in 67% of the tumors. In tumor tissues, phos-S6 and 4EBP1 were higher than in normal kidney (P≤.005). Conversely, scores of p27 were lower in tumor than in normal kidney (P<.001). Finally, scores of phos-AKT, c-MYC, and HIF-1α were not significantly different in tumor and in normal kidney. Overall mortality and cancer-specific mortality were 9% and 0%, respectively. Multifocal tumors had higher levels of PTEN, phos-AKT, and HIF-1α (P≤.01). None of the clinicopathologic variables (age, ethnicity, gender, pT stage, tumor size, multifocality, and positive surgical margins) was associated with outcome. Similarly, none of the tested biomarkers predicted overall mortality, either in unadjusted or adjusted Cox regression models. In summary, our study provides new evidence of dysregulation of the mTOR pathway in chromophobe RCC. Immunohistochemistry for mTOR pathway and hypoxia-induced pathway members lacked prognostic significance in our cohort.<