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Sample records for c2 coronal densities

  1. A Survey of Coronal Cavity Density Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, J.; Gibson, S. E.

    2009-08-01

    Coronal cavities are common features of the solar corona that appear as darkened regions at the base of coronal helmet streamers in coronagraph images. Their darkened appearance indicates that they are regions of lowered density embedded within the comparatively higher density helmet streamer. Despite interfering projection effects of the surrounding helmet streamer (which we refer to as the cavity rim), Fuller et al. have shown that under certain conditions it is possible to use a Van de Hulst inversion of white-light polarized brightness (pB) data to calculate the electron density of both the cavity and cavity rim plasma. In this article, we apply minor modifications to the methods of Fuller et al. in order to improve the accuracy and versatility of the inversion process, and use the new methods to calculate density profiles for both the cavity and cavity rim in 24 cavity systems. We also examine trends in cavity morphology and how departures from the model geometry affect our density calculations. The density calculations reveal that in all 24 cases the cavity plasma has a flatter density profile than the plasma of the cavity rim, meaning that the cavity has a larger density depletion at low altitudes than it does at high altitudes. We find that the mean cavity density is over four times greater than that of a coronal hole at an altitude of 1.2 R sun and that every cavity in the sample is over twice as dense as a coronal hole at this altitude. Furthermore, we find that different cavity systems near solar maximum span a greater range in density at 1.2 R sun than do cavity systems near solar minimum, with a slight trend toward higher densities for systems nearer to solar maximum. Finally, we found no significant correlation of cavity density properties with cavity height—indeed, cavities show remarkably similar density depletions—except for the two smallest cavities that show significantly greater depletion.

  2. Density and Morphology of Coronal Prominence Cavities

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    Gibson, Sarah; Fuller, J.

    2009-05-01

    Coronal prominence cavities are fundamental parts of prominences. They hold clues to the magnetic structure of pre-CME equilibria, and better represent the coronal source of the expanding volume in CMEs and magnetic clouds than a prominence does alone. However, prominence cavities have not been nearly as comprehensively observed and studied as prominences. This is in part due to projection effects which can complicate interpretation of observations, and in part because spectroscopic diagnostic studies require targeted observations, which have only recently been attempted. I will present recent work using white-light observations of cavities to model the morphological and density properties of polar crown filament cavities, with projection effects taken into account. I will also comment on recent attempts to obtain spectral diagnostics of coronal prominence cavities, and will discuss the implications of all of these observations for cavity stability and thermal and magnetic properties.

  3. Observing the Unobservable? Modeling Coronal Cavity Densities

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    Fuller, J.; Gibson, S. E.; de Toma, G.; Fan, Y.

    2008-05-01

    Prominence cavities in coronal helmet streamers are readily detectable in white-light coronagraph images, yet their interpretation may be complicated by projection effects. In order to determine a cavity's density structure, it is essential to quantify the contribution of noncavity features along the line of sight. We model the coronal cavity as an axisymmetric torus that encircles the Sun at constant latitude and fit it to observations of a white-light cavity observed by the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO) MK4 coronagraph from 2006 January 25 to 30. We demonstrate that spurious noncavity contributions (including departures from axisymmetry) are minimal enough to be incorporated in a density analysis as conservatively estimated uncertainties in the data. We calculate a radial density profile for cavity material and for the surrounding helmet streamer (which we refer to as the "cavity rim") and find that the cavity density is depleted by a maximum of 40% compared to the surrounding helmet streamer at low altitudes (1.18 R⊙) but is consistently higher (double or more) than in coronal holes. We also find that the relative density depletion between cavity and surrounding helmet decreases as a function of height. We show that both increased temperature in the cavity relative to the surrounding helmet streamer and a magnetic flux rope configuration might lead to such a flattened density profile. Finally, our model provides general observational guidelines that can be used to determine when a cavity is sufficiently unobstructed to be a good candidate for plasma diagnostics.

  4. Variation in Coronal Activity from Solar Cycle 24 Minimum to Maximum Using Three-Dimensional Reconstructions of the Coronal Electron Density from STEREO/COR1

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    Wang, Tongjiang; Reginald, Nelson L.; Davila, Joseph M.; St. Cyr, O. Chris; Thompson, William T.

    2017-08-01

    Three-dimensional electron density distributions in the solar corona are reconstructed for 100 Carrington rotations (CR 2054 - 2153) during 2007/03 - 2014/08 using the spherically symmetric method from polarized white-light observations with the inner coronagraph (COR1) onboard the twin Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). These three-dimensional electron density distributions are validated by comparison with similar density models derived using other methods such as tomography and a magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model as well as using data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/ Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO)-C2. Uncertainties in the estimated total mass of the global corona are analyzed based on differences between the density distributions for COR1-A and -B. Long-term variations of coronal activity in terms of the global and hemispheric average electron densities (equivalent to the total coronal mass) reveal a hemispheric asymmetry during the rising phase of Solar Cycle 24, with the northern hemisphere leading the southern hemisphere by a phase shift of 7 - 9 months. Using 14 CR (≈13-month) running averages, the amplitudes of the variation in average electron density between Cycle 24 maximum and Cycle 23/24 minimum (called the modulation factors) are found to be in the range of 1.6 - 4.3. These modulation factors are latitudinally dependent, being largest in polar regions and smallest in the equatorial region. These modulation factors also show a hemispheric asymmetry: they are somewhat larger in the southern hemisphere. The wavelet analysis shows that the short-term quasi-periodic oscillations during the rising and maximum phases of Cycle 24 have a dominant period of 7 - 8 months. In addition, it is found that the radial distribution of the mean electron density for streamers at Cycle 24 maximum is only slightly larger (by ≈30%) than at cycle minimum.

  5. 3D Global Coronal Density Structure and Associated Magnetic Field near Solar Maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Kramar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of the coronal magnetic field is a crucial ingredient in understanding the nature of solar coronal dynamic phenomena at all scales. We employ STEREO/COR1 data obtained near maximum of solar activity in December 2012 (Carrington rotation, CR 2131 to retrieve and analyze the three-dimensional (3D coronal electron density in the range of heights from $1.5$ to $4 R_odot$ using a tomography method and qualitatively deduce structures of the coronal magnetic field. The 3D electron density analysis is complemented by the 3D STEREO/EUVI emissivity in 195 AA band obtained by tomography for the same CR period. We find that the magnetic field configuration during CR 2131 has a tendency to become radially open at heliocentric distances below $sim 2.5 R_odot$. We compared the reconstructed 3D coronal structures over the CR near the solar maximum to the one at deep solar minimum. Results of our 3D density reconstruction will help to constrain solar coronal field models and test the accuracy of the magnetic field approximations for coronal modeling.

  6. Modelling coronal electron density and temperature profiles based on solar magnetic field observations

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    Rodríguez Gómez, J. M.; Antunes Vieira, L. E.; Dal Lago, A.; Palacios, J.; Balmaceda, L. A.; Stekel, T.

    2017-10-01

    The density and temperature profiles in the solar corona are complex to describe, the observational diagnostics is not easy. Here we present a physics-based model to reconstruct the evolution of the electron density and temperature in the solar corona based on the configuration of the magnetic field imprinted on the solar surface. The structure of the coronal magnetic field is estimated from Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) based on magnetic field from both observational synoptic charts and a magnetic flux transport model. We use an emission model based on the ionization equilibrium and coronal abundances from CHIANTI atomic database 8.0. The preliminary results are discussed in details.

  7. Magnetism and charge density waves in R NiC2 (R =Ce,Pr,Nd )

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    Kolincio, Kamil K.; Roman, Marta; Winiarski, Michał J.; Strychalska-Nowak, Judyta; Klimczuk, Tomasz

    2017-06-01

    We have compared the magnetic, transport, galvanomagnetic, and specific-heat properties of CeNiC2, PrNiC2, and NdNiC2 to study the interplay between charge density waves (CDW) and magnetism in these compounds. The negative magnetoresistance in NdNiC2 is discussed in terms of the partial destruction of charge density waves and an irreversible phase transition stabilized by the field-induced ferromagnetic transformation is reported. For PrNiC2 we demonstrate that the magnetic field initially weakens the CDW state, due to the Zeeman splitting of conduction bands. However, the Fermi surface nesting is enhanced at a temperature related to the magnetic anomaly.

  8. Multiple charge density wave transitions in the antiferromagnets R NiC2 (R =Gd ,Tb)

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    Shimomura, S.; Hayashi, C.; Hanasaki, N.; Ohnuma, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Nakao, H.; Mizumaki, M.; Onodera, H.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray scattering and electrical resistivity measurements were performed on GdNiC2 and TbNiC2. We found a set of satellite peaks characterized by q1=(0.5 ,η ,0 ) below T1, at which the resistivity shows a sharp inflection, suggesting the charge density wave (CDW) formation. The value of η decreases with decreasing temperature below T1, and then a transition to a commensurate phase with q1 C=(0.5 ,0.5 ,0 ) takes place. The diffuse scattering observed above T1 indicates the presence of soft phonon modes associated with CDW instabilities at q1 and q2=(0.5 ,0.5 ,0.5 ) . The long-range order given by q2 is developed in addition to that given by q1 C in TbNiC2, while the short-range correlation with q2 persists even at 6 K in GdNiC2. The amplitude of the q1 C lattice modulation is anomalously reduced below an antiferromagnetic transition temperature TN in GdNiC2. In contrast, the q2 order vanishes below TN in TbNiC2. We demonstrate that R NiC2 (R = rare earth) compounds exhibit similarities with respect to their CDW phenomena, and discuss the effects of magnetic transitions on CDWs. We offer a possible displacement pattern of the modulated structure characterized by q1 C and q2 in terms of frustration.

  9. Modelling coronal electron density and temperature profiles of the Active Region NOAA 11855

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    Rodríguez Gómez, J. M.; Antunes Vieira, L. E.; Dal Lago, A.; Palacios, J.; Balmaceda, L. A.; Stekel, T.

    2017-10-01

    The magnetic flux emergence can help understand the physical mechanism responsible for solar atmospheric phenomena. Emerging magnetic flux is frequently related to eruptive events, because when emerging they can reconnected with the ambient field and release magnetic energy. We will use a physic-based model to reconstruct the evolution of the solar emission based on the configuration of the photospheric magnetic field. The structure of the coronal magnetic field is estimated by employing force-free extrapolation NLFFF based on vector magnetic field products (SHARPS) observed by HMI instrument aboard SDO spacecraft from Sept. 29 (2013) to Oct. 07 (2013). The coronal plasma temperature and density are described and the emission is estimated using the CHIANTI atomic database 8.0. The performance of the our model is compared to the integrated emission from the AIA instrument aboard SDO spacecraft in the specific wavelengths 171Å and 304Å.

  10. Spinal coronal profiles and proximal femur bone mineral density in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui-Qiang; Watanabe, Kota; Hosogane, Naobumi; Hikata, Tomohiro; Iwanami, Akio; Ishii, Ken; Nakamura, Masaya; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio

    2013-11-01

    Although the occurrence and progression of AIS has been linked to low bone mineral density (BMD), the relationships between spinal curvature and bilateral differences in proximal femur BMD are controversial. Few correlation studies have stratified patients by curve type. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationships between spinal coronal profile and bilateral differences in proximal femur BMD in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). This study included 67 patients with AIS who underwent posterior correction and fusion surgery between January 2009 and October 2011. The mean age at the time of surgery was 17.4 ± 4.1 years. Bilateral proximal femur BMD was measured before surgery by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. We compared the proximal femur BMDs by determining the bilateral BMD ratio (left proximal femur BMD divided by that of the right). We evaluated correlations between coronal parameters, obtained from preoperative radiographs, and the BMD ratio using Pearson's correlation analysis. Patients with Lenke type 1 curve (48; all with a right convex curve) had a mean bilateral proximal femur BMD ratio of 1.00 ± 0.04. Patients with Lenke type 5 curve (19; all with a left convex curve) had a mean bilateral proximal femur BMD ratio of 0.94 ± 0.04, indicating that the BMD in the proximal femur on the right side (concave) was greater than that in the left (convex). Coronal balance was significantly correlated with the BMD ratio in both the Lenke type 1 and type 5 groups, with a correlation coefficient of 0.46 and 0.50, respectively. The bilateral proximal femur BMD ratio was significantly correlated with the coronal balance in AIS patients. When the C7 plumb line was shifted toward one side, the BMD was greater in the contralateral proximal femur.

  11. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection effects on thermospheric density as inferred from International Space Station orbital data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendaza, T.; Blanco-Ávalos, J. J.; Martín-Torres, J.

    2017-11-01

    The solar activity induces long term and short term periodical variations in the dynamics and composition of Earth's atmosphere. The Sun also shows non periodical (i.e., impulsive) activity that reaches the planets orbiting around it. In particular, Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) reach Earth and interact with its magnetosphere and upper neutral atmosphere. Nevertheless, the interaction with the upper atmosphere is not well characterized because of the absence of regular and dedicated in situ measurements at high altitudes; thus, current descriptions of the thermosphere are based on semi empirical models. In this paper, we present the total neutral mass densities of the thermosphere retrieved from the orbital data of the International Space Station (ISS) using the General Perturbation Method, and we applied these densities to routinely compiled trajectories of the ISS in low Earth orbit (LEO). These data are explicitly independent of any atmospheric model. Our density values are consistent with atmospheric models, which demonstrates that our method is reliable for the inference of thermospheric density. We have inferred the thermospheric total neutral density response to impulsive solar activity forcing from 2001 to the end of 2006 and determined how solar events affect this response. Our results reveal that the ISS orbital parameters can be used to infer the thermospheric density and analyze solar effects on the thermosphere.

  12. Improved density profile measurements in the C-2U advanced beam-driven Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beall, M., E-mail: mbeall@trialphaenergy.com; Deng, B. H.; Gota, H. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    In the prior C-2 experiment, electron density was measured using a two-color 6-chord CO{sub 2}/HeNe interferometer. Analysis shows that high-frequency common mode phase noise can be reduced by a factor of 3 by constructing a reference chord. In the system upgrade from C-2 to C-2U a 4-chord far-infrared laser interferometer was developed, which demonstrated superior sensitivity (1 × 10{sup 16} m{sup −2} at >1 MHz bandwidth) and solved the under spatial sampling issue of the C-2 interferometer system. Improved density-profile measurement results are presented in this paper, including evidence of fast-ion modified density profile and stabilization of the n = 1 plasma wobble mode.

  13. Improved density profile measurements in the C-2U advanced beam-driven Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, M.; Deng, B. H.; Gota, H.

    2016-11-01

    In the prior C-2 experiment, electron density was measured using a two-color 6-chord CO2/HeNe interferometer. Analysis shows that high-frequency common mode phase noise can be reduced by a factor of 3 by constructing a reference chord. In the system upgrade from C-2 to C-2U a 4-chord far-infrared laser interferometer was developed, which demonstrated superior sensitivity (1 × 1016 m-2 at >1 MHz bandwidth) and solved the under spatial sampling issue of the C-2 interferometer system. Improved density-profile measurement results are presented in this paper, including evidence of fast-ion modified density profile and stabilization of the n = 1 plasma wobble mode.

  14. Improved density profile measurements in the C-2U advanced beam-driven Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, M; Deng, B H; Gota, H

    2016-11-01

    In the prior C-2 experiment, electron density was measured using a two-color 6-chord CO2/HeNe interferometer. Analysis shows that high-frequency common mode phase noise can be reduced by a factor of 3 by constructing a reference chord. In the system upgrade from C-2 to C-2U a 4-chord far-infrared laser interferometer was developed, which demonstrated superior sensitivity (1 × 1016 m-2 at >1 MHz bandwidth) and solved the under spatial sampling issue of the C-2 interferometer system. Improved density-profile measurement results are presented in this paper, including evidence of fast-ion modified density profile and stabilization of the n = 1 plasma wobble mode.

  15. Spin-flip reactions of Zr + C2H6 researched by relativistic density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yi; Chen, Xian-Yang; Qiu, Yi-Xiang; Wang, Shu-Guang

    2013-09-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) with relativistic corrections of zero-order regular approximation (ZORA) has been applied to explore the reaction mechanisms of ethane dehydrogenation by Zr atom with triplet and singlet spin-states. Among the complicated minimum energy reaction path, the available states involves three transition states (TS), and four stationary states (1) to (4) and one intersystem crossing with spin-flip (marked by -->): (3) Zr + C 2 H 6 → (3) Zr-CH 3 -CH 3 ((3)1) → (3)TS 1/2 → (3) ZrH-CH 2 -CH 3 ((3)2) → (3) TS 2/3 --> (1) ZrH2-CH2 = CH2 ((1) 3) → (1) TS 3/4 → (1) ZrH 3 -CH = CH 2 ((1)4). The minimum energy crossing point is determined with the help of the DFT fractional-occupation-number (FON) approach. The spin inversion leads the reaction pathway transferring from the triplet potential energy surface (PES) to the singlet's accompanying with the activation of the second C-H bond. The overall reaction is calculated to be exothermic by about 231 kJ mol(-1). Frequency and NBO analysis are also applied to confirm with the experimental observed data.

  16. Core and Wing Densities of Asymmetric Coronal Spectral Profiles: Implications for the Mass Supply of the Solar Corona

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    Patsourakos, S.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Young, P. R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent solar spectroscopic observations have shown that coronal spectral lines can exhibit asymmetric profiles, with enhanced emissions at their blue wings. These asymmetries correspond to rapidly upflowing plasmas at speeds exceeding approximately equal to 50 km per sec. Here, we perform a study of the density of the rapidly upflowing material and compare it with that of the line core that corresponds to the bulk of the plasma. For this task, we use spectroscopic observations of several active regions taken by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer of the Hinode mission. The density sensitive ratio of the Fe(sub XIV) lines at 264.78 and 274.20 Angstroms is used to determine wing and core densities.We compute the ratio of the blue wing density to the core density and find that most values are of order unity. This is consistent with the predictions for coronal nanoflares if most of the observed coronal mass is supplied by chromospheric evaporation driven by the nanoflares. However, much larger blue wing-to-core density ratios are predicted if most of the coronal mass is supplied by heated material ejected with type II spicules. Our measurements do not rule out a spicule origin for the blue wing emission, but they argue against spicules being a primary source of the hot plasma in the corona. We note that only about 40% of the pixels where line blends could be safely ignored have blue wing asymmetries in both Fe(sub XIV) lines. Anticipated sub-arcsecond spatial resolution spectroscopic observations in future missions could shed more light on the origin of blue, red, and mixed asymmetries.

  17. Contribution of thin slice (1 mm) oblique coronal proton density-weighted MR images for assessment of anteromedial and posterolateral bundle damage in anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokalp, Gokhan, E-mail: drgokhangokalp@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Demirag, Burak, E-mail: bdemirag@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Nas, Omer Fatih, E-mail: omerfatihnas@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Aydemir, Mehmet Fatih, E-mail: fatiha@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Yazici, Zeynep, E-mail: zyazici@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal 1 mm proton density-weighted (PDW) MR imaging of the knee for detection and grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), anteromedial bundle (AMB) and posterolateral bundle (PLB) injuries. Materials and methods: We prospectively assessed preoperative MR images of 50 patients (36 men, 14 women; age range, 18–62 years). First, we compared the diagnostic performance of routine sagittal (3 mm) and additional oblique coronal images (1 mm) for ACL tears. Then, we compared the tear types (AMB or PLB) and grade presumed from oblique coronal MR imaging with arthroscopy. Results: Arthroscopy revealed ACL tear in 24 (48%) patients. There was significant difference between sagittal images and arthroscopy results for ACL tear recognition (p < 0.001). No significant difference was detected for oblique coronal images when compared with arthroscopy results (p = 0.180). Sensitivity and specificity values for ACL tear diagnosis were 37.04% and 95.65% for sagittal images; 74.07% and 91.30% for oblique coronal images. There was no significant difference between arthroscopy and oblique coronal MR images in grading AMB and PLB injuries (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Addition of thin slice oblique coronal images to conventional sequences could better contribute to better verifying the presence of ACL tear and in determining its grade.

  18. Carbon monosulfide (CS) interaction with third-row maingroup dicarbides, C2X (X = K-Br): A density functional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Saroj K.

    2017-12-01

    We use density functional theory (DFT) to predict the chemical reactivity of CS molecule on third-row maingroup dicarbides, C2X (X = K-Br). An analysis of the frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) of bare C2X clusters suggests that carbon atoms of C2X clusters is the most active site for CS interaction. Using Bader's approach, the nature of interactions between CS molecule and the host C2X clusters has been studied by examining computational parameters at the bond critical points (BCPs) of the clusters. It is noted that, in all the clusters, ρ CC2X -CCS > 0.30 a.u. with negative ∇2ρC-C at BCPs of carbon atoms of both C2X and CS, indicating a shared-electron interaction between C2X and CS.

  19. Sensitivity of coronal loop sausage mode frequencies and decay rates to radial and longitudinal density inhomogeneities: a spectral approach

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    Cally, Paul S.; Xiong, Ming

    2018-01-01

    Fast sausage modes in solar magnetic coronal loops are only fully contained in unrealistically short dense loops. Otherwise they are leaky, losing energy to their surrounds as outgoing waves. This causes any oscillation to decay exponentially in time. Simultaneous observations of both period and decay rate therefore reveal the eigenfrequency of the observed mode, and potentially insight into the tubes’ nonuniform internal structure. In this article, a global spectral description of the oscillations is presented that results in an implicit matrix eigenvalue equation where the eigenvalues are associated predominantly with the diagonal terms of the matrix. The off-diagonal terms vanish identically if the tube is uniform. A linearized perturbation approach, applied with respect to a uniform reference model, is developed that makes the eigenvalues explicit. The implicit eigenvalue problem is easily solved numerically though, and it is shown that knowledge of the real and imaginary parts of the eigenfrequency is sufficient to determine the width and density contrast of a boundary layer over which the tubes’ enhanced internal densities drop to ambient values. Linearized density kernels are developed that show sensitivity only to the extreme outside of the loops for radial fundamental modes, especially for small density enhancements, with no sensitivity to the core. Higher radial harmonics do show some internal sensitivity, but these will be more difficult to observe. Only kink modes are sensitive to the tube centres. Variation in internal and external Alfvén speed along the loop is shown to have little effect on the fundamental dimensionless eigenfrequency, though the associated eigenfunction becomes more compact at the loop apex as stratification increases, or may even displace from the apex.

  20. Electron and Negative Ion Densities in C(2)F(6) and CHF(3) Containing Inductively Coupled Discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HEBNER,GREGORY A.; MILLER,PAUL A.

    1999-12-07

    Electron and negative ion densities have been measured in inductively coupled discharges containing C{sub 2}F{sub 6} and CHF{sub 3}. Line integrated electron density was determined using a microwave interferometer, negative ion densities were inferred using laser photodetachment spectroscopy, and electron temperature was determined using a Langmuir probe. For the range of induction powers, pressures and bias power investigated, the electron density peaked at 9 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} (line-integrated) or approximately 9 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. The negative ion density peaked at approximately 1.3 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. A maximum in the negative ion density as a function of induction coil power was observed. The maximum is attributed to a power dependent change in the density of one or more of the potential negative ion precursor species since the electron temperature did not depend strongly on power. The variation of photodetachment with laser wavelength indicated that the dominant negative ion was F{sup -}. Measurement of the decay of the negative ion density in the afterglow of a pulse modulated discharge was used to determine the ion-ion recombination rate for CF{sub 4}, C{sub 2}F{sub 6} and CHF{sub 3} discharges.

  1. Magnetic fields and coronal heating

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    Golub, L.; Maxson, C.; Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G. S.; Serio, S.

    1980-01-01

    General considerations concerning the scaling properties of magnetic-field-related coronal heating mechanisms are used to build a two-parameter model for the heating of closed coronal regions. The model predicts the way in which coronal temperature and electron density are related to photospheric magnetic field strength and the size of the region, using the additional constraint provided by the scaling law of Rosner, Tucker, and Vaiana. The model duplicates the observed scaling of total thermal energy content with total longitudinal flux; it also predicts a relation between the coronal energy density (or pressure) and the longitudinal field strength modified by the region scale size.

  2. Effect of air-drying on demineralized and on sound coronal human dentine: a study on density and on lesion shrinkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arends, J; Ruben, J

    1995-01-01

    Recently, several papers investigated the linear dimensional changes in dentine after air-drying. This paper pertains to weight changes, volume changes, and density changes caused by air-drying of sound and demineralized intact dentine. The densities of sound and artificially demineralized human coronal dentine were measured in the wet state and after various drying periods of up to 24 h. The volume was assessed either by means of a pyknometer (wet samples) or by means of dimension measurements. The air-drying experiments were done using a Mettler thermobalance at room temperature. The density of wet sound coronal dentine was found to be 2.24 +/- 0.12 g.cm-3; the value of wet demineralized dentine was about 1.6 g.cm-3. The data show that previously published density values of powdered sound dentine may have been influenced by powdering effects, air-drying, and air inclusion. In whole demineralized air-dried dentine, air inclusion can be very severe: up to 30% by volume. The results show furthermore that in demineralized dentine we have two drying stages: during the first one (up to about 10 min of air-drying), the lesions shrink about 23%, while a main part of the water in the lesion evaporates, and air is incorporated into the tissue; during the second stage (drying longer than 10 min), the lesions hardly shrink anymore, but water is evaporated mainly from underlying sound dentine, followed by air incorporation.

  3. Coronal magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jie; Bastian, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    This volume is a collection of research articles on the subject of the solar corona, and particularly, coronal magnetism. The book was motivated by the Workshop on Coronal Magnetism: Connecting Models to Data and the Corona to the Earth, which was held 21 - 23 May 2012 in Boulder, Colorado, USA. This workshop was attended by approximately 60 researchers. Articles from this meeting are contained in this topical issue, but the topical issue also contains contributions from researchers not present at the workshop. This volume is aimed at researchers and graduate students active in solar physics. Originally published in Solar Physics, Vol. 288, Issue 2, 2013 and Vol. 289, Issue 8, 2014.

  4. Coronal Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R. Cranmer

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Coronal holes are the darkest and least active regions of the Sun, as observed both on the solar disk and above the solar limb. Coronal holes are associated with rapidly expanding open magnetic fields and the acceleration of the high-speed solar wind. This paper reviews measurements of the plasma properties in coronal holes and how these measurements are used to reveal details about the physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. It is still unknown to what extent the solar wind is fed by flux tubes that remain open (and are energized by footpoint-driven wave-like fluctuations, and to what extent much of the mass and energy is input intermittently from closed loops into the open-field regions. Evidence for both paradigms is summarized in this paper. Special emphasis is also given to spectroscopic and coronagraphic measurements that allow the highly dynamic non-equilibrium evolution of the plasma to be followed as the asymptotic conditions in interplanetary space are established in the extended corona. For example, the importance of kinetic plasma physics and turbulence in coronal holes has been affirmed by surprising measurements from the UVCS instrument on SOHO that heavy ions are heated to hundreds of times the temperatures of protons and electrons. These observations point to specific kinds of collisionless Alfvén wave damping (i.e., ion cyclotron resonance, but complete theoretical models do not yet exist. Despite our incomplete knowledge of the complex multi-scale plasma physics, however, much progress has been made toward the goal of understanding the mechanisms ultimately responsible for producing the observed properties of coronal holes.

  5. Electro-Optical Properties and Structural Stability Perspectives of M3N and M2C2 (M = Sc, La) Clusters Encapsulated in B80 Fullerene: A Density Functional Theory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavifar, Zabiollah; Ershadifar, Mina; Farrokhnia, Abdolhadi

    2017-09-01

    In this work, the stability of metal nitride/carbide cluster borofullerenes, namely M3N@B80/M2C2@B80, by means of density functional theory (DFT) were evaluated. Detailed studies on M3N@B80/M2C2@B80 (M = Sc, La) series indicate that these structures have high thermodynamic and kinetic stability due to the large value of calculated embedding energies and highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (H-L) energy gaps which indicate that the Sc3N, Sc2C2, La3N and La2C2 clusters can form viable stable complexes with B80 fullerene. Our computations show the Sc3N@B80 borofullerene has the highest thermodynamic and kinetic stability and the obtained trend for thermodynamic stability is Sc3N@B80 > Sc2C2@B80 > La2C2@B80 > La3N@B80. This trend is nearly the same as obtained for the kinetic stability trend; Sc3N@B80 > Sc2C2@B80 > La3N@B80 > La2C2@B80. The H-L energy gap of Sc3N@B80 and Sc2C2@B80 are 1.45 eV and 1.39 eV respectively, much larger than La3@B80 (1.18 eV) and La2C2@B80 (1.13 eV), confirming that the nitride and carbide cluster borofullerenes have relatively high kinetic stability and could be isolated experimentally. Also, substitution of Sc with La metal in the nitride and carbide clusters imposes a noticeable influence on the stability and electronic properties of M3N@B80/M2C2@B80 structures. Analyses of electronic structure and nearest distance between clusters and fullerene reveal that both covalent and ionic interactions coexist between cluster and boron atoms. Especially in the case of La2C2@B80, the plausible electron configuration of it is [(La2C2)2-@B80 2+]. Additionally, the simulated adsorption spectra considered by means of time-dependent DFT calculations as well as circular dichroism spectra show some different absorption bands in a broad region, which is helpful to further experimental characterization. These results can promise some valuable assistance for the experimental synthesis of M3N/M2C2@B80 structures because of

  6. Electro-Optical Properties and Structural Stability Perspectives of M3N and M2C2 (M = Sc, La) Clusters Encapsulated in B80 Fullerene: A Density Functional Theory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavifar, Zabiollah; Ershadifar, Mina; Farrokhnia, Abdolhadi

    2018-01-01

    In this work, the stability of metal nitride/carbide cluster borofullerenes, namely M3N@B80/M2C2@B80, by means of density functional theory (DFT) were evaluated. Detailed studies on M3N@B80/M2C2@B80 (M = Sc, La) series indicate that these structures have high thermodynamic and kinetic stability due to the large value of calculated embedding energies and highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (H-L) energy gaps which indicate that the Sc3N, Sc2C2, La3N and La2C2 clusters can form viable stable complexes with B80 fullerene. Our computations show the Sc3N@B80 borofullerene has the highest thermodynamic and kinetic stability and the obtained trend for thermodynamic stability is Sc3N@B80 > Sc2C2@B80 > La2C2@B80 > La3N@B80. This trend is nearly the same as obtained for the kinetic stability trend; Sc3N@B80 > Sc2C2@B80 > La3N@B80 > La2C2@B80. The H-L energy gap of Sc3N@B80 and Sc2C2@B80 are 1.45 eV and 1.39 eV respectively, much larger than La3@B80 (1.18 eV) and La2C2@B80 (1.13 eV), confirming that the nitride and carbide cluster borofullerenes have relatively high kinetic stability and could be isolated experimentally. Also, substitution of Sc with La metal in the nitride and carbide clusters imposes a noticeable influence on the stability and electronic properties of M3N@B80/M2C2@B80 structures. Analyses of electronic structure and nearest distance between clusters and fullerene reveal that both covalent and ionic interactions coexist between cluster and boron atoms. Especially in the case of La2C2@B80, the plausible electron configuration of it is [(La2C2)2-@B80 2+]. Additionally, the simulated adsorption spectra considered by means of time-dependent DFT calculations as well as circular dichroism spectra show some different absorption bands in a broad region, which is helpful to further experimental characterization. These results can promise some valuable assistance for the experimental synthesis of M3N/M2C2@B80 structures because of

  7. Cryptanalysis of C2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghoff, Julia; Knudsen, Lars Ramkilde; Leander, Gregor

    2009-01-01

    We present several attacks on the block cipher C2, which is used for encrypting DVD Audio discs and Secure Digital cards. C2 has a 56 bit key and a secret 8 to 8 bit S-box. We show that if the attacker is allowed to choose the key, the S-box can be recovered in 2^24 C2 encryptions. Attacking the ...... bit key for a known S-box can be done in complexity 2^48. Finally, a C2 implementation with a 8 to 8 bit secret S-box (equivalent to 2048 secret bits) and a 56 bit secret key can be attacked in 2^53.5 C2 encryptions on average....

  8. Solar Coronal Plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannina Poletto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar plumes are thin long ray-like structures that project beyond the limb of the Sun polar regions, maintaining their identity over distances of several solar radii. Plumes have been first observed in white-light (WL images of the Sun, but, with the advent of the space era, they have been identified also in X-ray and UV wavelengths (XUV and, possibly, even in in situ data. This review traces the history of plumes, from the time they have been first imaged, to the complex means by which nowadays we attempt to reconstruct their 3-D structure. Spectroscopic techniques allowed us also to infer the physical parameters of plumes and estimate their electron and kinetic temperatures and their densities. However, perhaps the most interesting problem we need to solve is the role they cover in the solar wind origin and acceleration: Does the solar wind emanate from plumes or from the ambient coronal hole wherein they are embedded? Do plumes have a role in solar wind acceleration and mass loading? Answers to these questions are still somewhat ambiguous and theoretical modeling does not provide definite answers either. Recent data, with an unprecedented high spatial and temporal resolution, provide new information on the fine structure of plumes, their temporal evolution and relationship with other transient phenomena that may shed further light on these elusive features.

  9. Can coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjarska, M. S.; Vanninathan, K.; Doyle, J. G.

    2011-08-01

    Aims: The present study aims to provide observational evidence of whether coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures. Methods: We combine multi-instrument co-observations obtained with the SUMER/SoHO and with the EIS/SOT/XRT/Hinode. Results: The analysed three large spicules were found to be comprised of numerous thin spicules that rise, rotate, and descend simultaneously forming a bush-like feature. Their rotation resembles the untwisting of a large flux rope. They show velocities ranging from 50 to 250 kms-1. We clearly associated the red- and blue-shifted emissions in transition region lines not only with rotating but also with rising and descending plasmas. Our main result is that these spicules although very large and dynamic, are not present in the spectral lines formed at temperatures above 300 000 K. Conclusions: In this paper we present the analysis of three Ca ii H large spicules that are composed of numerous dynamic thin spicules but appear as macrospicules in lower resolution EUV images. We found no coronal counterpart of these and smaller spicules. We believe that the identification of phenomena that have very different origins as macrospicules is due to the interpretation of the transition region emission, and especially the He ii emission, wherein both chromospheric large spicules and coronal X-ray jets are present. We suggest that the recent observation of spicules in the coronal AIA/SDO 171 Å and 211 Å channels probably comes from the existence of transition region emission there. Movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Coronal rain in magnetic bipolar weak fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Fang, X.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We intend to investigate the underlying physics for the coronal rain phenomenon in a representative bipolar magnetic field, including the formation and the dynamics of coronal rain blobs. Methods: With the MPI-AMRVAC code, we performed three dimensional radiative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation with strong heating localized on footpoints of magnetic loops after a relaxation to quiet solar atmosphere. Results: Progressive cooling and in-situ condensation starts at the loop top due to radiative thermal instability. The first large-scale condensation on the loop top suffers Rayleigh-Taylor instability and becomes fragmented into smaller blobs. The blobs fall vertically dragging magnetic loops until they reach low-β regions and start to fall along the loops from loop top to loop footpoints. A statistic study of the coronal rain blobs finds that small blobs with masses of less than 1010 g dominate the population. When blobs fall to lower regions along the magnetic loops, they are stretched and develop a non-uniform velocity pattern with an anti-parallel shearing pattern seen to develop along the central axis of the blobs. Synthetic images of simulated coronal rain with Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly well resemble real observations presenting dark falling clumps in hot channels and bright rain blobs in a cool channel. We also find density inhomogeneities during a coronal rain "shower", which reflects the observed multi-stranded nature of coronal rain. Movies associated to Figs. 3 and 7 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  11. EFFECT OF AIR-DRYING ON DEMINERALIZED AND ON SOUND CORONAL HUMAN DENTIN - A STUDY ON DENSITY AND ON LESION SHRINKAGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ARENDS, J; RUBEN, J

    1995-01-01

    Recently, several papers investigated the linear dimensional changes in dentine after air-drying. This paper pertains to weight changes, volume changes, and density changes caused by air-drying of sound and demineralized intact dentine. The densities of sound and artificially demineralized human

  12. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS BY VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY OF THE CORONAL EMISSION LINE POLARIZATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramar, M. [Physics Department, The Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Lin, H. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 34 Ohia Ku Street, Pukalani, Maui, HI 96768 (United States); Tomczyk, S., E-mail: kramar@cua.edu, E-mail: lin@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: tomczyk@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory, 3080 Center Green Drive, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments.

  13. Coronal Waves and Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakariakov Valery M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Wave and oscillatory activity of the solar corona is confidently observed with modern imaging and spectral instruments in the visible light, EUV, X-ray and radio bands, and interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD wave theory. The review reflects the current trends in the observational study of coronal waves and oscillations (standing kink, sausage and longitudinal modes, propagating slow waves and fast wave trains, the search for torsional waves, theoretical modelling of interaction of MHD waves with plasma structures, and implementation of the theoretical results for the mode identification. Also the use of MHD waves for remote diagnostics of coronal plasma - MHD coronal seismology - is discussed and the applicability of this method for the estimation of coronal magnetic field, transport coefficients, fine structuring and heating function is demonstrated.

  14. C2 Agility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Dr. William; Alberts, David S.; Bernier, Francois

    Agility is the capability to successfully effect, cope with, and/or exploit changes in circumstances. While other factors will also influence outcomes, C2 Agility enables entities to effectively and efficiently employ the resources they have in a timely manner in a variety of missions and circums...

  15. Characteristics of Low-latitude Coronal Holes near the Maximum of Solar Cycle 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmeister, Stefan J.; Veronig, Astrid; Reiss, Martin A.; Temmer, Manuela [University of Graz, Institute of Physics, IGAM-Kanzelhöhe Observatory, Graz (Austria); Vennerstrom, Susanne [National Space Institute, DTU Space (Denmark); Vršnak, Bojan [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, Zagreb (Croatia); Heber, Bernd, E-mail: stefan.hofmeister@uni-graz.at [Universität Kiel, Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Kiel (Germany)

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the statistics of 288 low-latitude coronal holes extracted from SDO /AIA-193 filtergrams over the time range of 2011 January 01–2013 December 31. We analyze the distribution of characteristic coronal hole properties, such as the areas, mean AIA-193 intensities, and mean magnetic field densities, the local distribution of the SDO /AIA-193 intensity and the magnetic field within the coronal holes, and the distribution of magnetic flux tubes in coronal holes. We find that the mean magnetic field density of all coronal holes under study is 3.0 ± 1.6 G, and the percentaged unbalanced magnetic flux is 49 ± 16%. The mean magnetic field density, the mean unsigned magnetic field density, and the percentaged unbalanced magnetic flux of coronal holes depend strongly pairwise on each other, with correlation coefficients cc > 0.92. Furthermore, we find that the unbalanced magnetic flux of the coronal holes is predominantly concentrated in magnetic flux tubes: 38% (81%) of the unbalanced magnetic flux of coronal holes arises from only 1% (10%) of the coronal hole area, clustered in magnetic flux tubes with field strengths >50 G (10 G). The average magnetic field density and the unbalanced magnetic flux derived from the magnetic flux tubes correlate with the mean magnetic field density and the unbalanced magnetic flux of the overall coronal hole (cc>0.93). These findings give evidence that the overall magnetic characteristics of coronal holes are governed by the characteristics of the magnetic flux tubes.

  16. Study of the early phase of a Coronal Mass Ejection driven shock in EUV images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassati, Federica; Susino, Roberto; Mancuso, Salvatore; Bemporad, Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    The November 1st, 2014 prominence eruption (associated with a C2.7 class flare) resulted in a fast, partial-halo Coronal Mass Ejection (CME). During its early propagation, the CME produced a type II radio burst (seen by the Bruny Island Radio Spectrometer) starting around 04:57 UT when the front entered into the LASCO/C2 field of view (FOV) and the top of the CME front was at the heliocentric distance of about 2.5 R_{⊙}. In order to identify the source of the type II radio burst, we studied the kinematic of the eruption with EUV images acquired by SDO/AIA. Profiles of the observed EUV front speed have been compared with the Alfvén speed profiles derived by combining the plasma electron densities obtained from Emission Measure analysis and model magnetic fields extrapolated on the plane of the sky. Our results show that the northern half of the front became super-Alfvénic at approximately the same time when the type-II radio burst started. A comparison between the starting frequency of the type II emission and the frequencies corresponding to the coronal densities of the locations where the EUV front became super-Alfvénic suggests that the radio sources should be located in the northern flank of the front.

  17. Mechanisms of Coronal Heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Sun is a mysterious star. The high temperature of the chromosphere and corona present one of the most puzzling problems of solar physics. Observations show that the solar coronal heating problem is highly complex with many different facts. It is likely that different heating mechanisms are at work in solar corona.

  18. Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Kunow, H; Linker, J. A; Schwenn, R; Steiger, R

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that the Sun gravitationally controls the orbits of planets and minor bodies. Much less known, however, is the domain of plasma fields and charged particles in which the Sun governs a heliosphere out to a distance of about 15 billion kilometers. What forces activates the Sun to maintain this power? Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and their descendants are the troops serving the Sun during high solar activity periods. This volume offers a comprehensive and integrated overview of our present knowledge and understanding of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and their descendants, Interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs). It results from a series of workshops held between 2000 and 2004. An international team of about sixty experimenters involved e.g. in the SOHO, ULYSSES, VOYAGER, PIONEER, HELIOS, WIND, IMP, and ACE missions, ground observers, and theoreticians worked jointly on interpreting the observations and developing new models for CME initiations, development, and interplanetary propagation. The book provides...

  19. Coronal bright points associated with minifilament eruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Junchao; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Li, Haidong [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan, E-mail: hjcsolar@ynao.ac.cn [Also at Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. (China)

    2014-12-01

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) are small-scale, long-lived coronal brightenings that always correspond to photospheric network magnetic features of opposite polarity. In this paper, we subjectively adopt 30 CBPs in a coronal hole to study their eruptive behavior using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. About one-quarter to one-third of the CBPs in the coronal hole go through one or more minifilament eruption(s) (MFE(s)) throughout their lifetimes. The MFEs occur in temporal association with the brightness maxima of CBPs and possibly result from the convergence and cancellation of underlying magnetic dipoles. Two examples of CBPs with MFEs are analyzed in detail, where minifilaments appear as dark features of a cool channel that divide the CBPs along the neutral lines of the dipoles beneath. The MFEs show the typical rising movements of filaments and mass ejections with brightenings at CBPs, similar to large-scale filament eruptions. Via differential emission measure analysis, it is found that CBPs are heated dramatically by their MFEs and the ejected plasmas in the MFEs have average temperatures close to the pre-eruption BP plasmas and electron densities typically near 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}. These new observational results indicate that CBPs are more complex in dynamical evolution and magnetic structure than previously thought.

  20. Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegelmann, Thomas; Petrie, Gordon J. D.; Riley, Pete

    2017-09-01

    Coronal magnetic field models use photospheric field measurements as boundary condition to model the solar corona. We review in this paper the most common model assumptions, starting from MHD-models, magnetohydrostatics, force-free and finally potential field models. Each model in this list is somewhat less complex than the previous one and makes more restrictive assumptions by neglecting physical effects. The magnetohydrostatic approach neglects time-dependent phenomena and plasma flows, the force-free approach neglects additionally the gradient of the plasma pressure and the gravity force. This leads to the assumption of a vanishing Lorentz force and electric currents are parallel (or anti-parallel) to the magnetic field lines. Finally, the potential field approach neglects also these currents. We outline the main assumptions, benefits and limitations of these models both from a theoretical (how realistic are the models?) and a practical viewpoint (which computer resources to we need?). Finally we address the important problem of noisy and inconsistent photospheric boundary conditions and the possibility of using chromospheric and coronal observations to improve the models.

  1. Coronal Mass Ejections: Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. Webb

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Solar eruptive phenomena embrace a variety of eruptions, including flares, solar energetic particles, and radio bursts. Since the vast majority of these are associated with the eruption, development, and evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs, we focus on CME observations in this review. CMEs are a key aspect of coronal and interplanetary dynamics. They inject large quantities of mass and magnetic flux into the heliosphere, causing major transient disturbances. CMEs can drive interplanetary shocks, a key source of solar energetic particles and are known to be the major contributor to severe space weather at the Earth. Studies over the past decade using the data sets from (among others the SOHO, TRACE, Wind, ACE, STEREO, and SDO spacecraft, along with ground-based instruments, have improved our knowledge of the origins and development of CMEs at the Sun and how they contribute to space weather at Earth. SOHO, launched in 1995, has provided us with almost continuous coverage of the solar corona over more than a complete solar cycle, and the heliospheric imagers SMEI (2003 – 2011 and the HIs (operating since early 2007 have provided us with the capability to image and track CMEs continually across the inner heliosphere. We review some key coronal properties of CMEs, their source regions and their propagation through the solar wind. The LASCO coronagraphs routinely observe CMEs launched along the Sun-Earth line as halo-like brightenings. STEREO also permits observing Earth-directed CMEs from three different viewpoints of increasing azimuthal separation, thereby enabling the estimation of their three-dimensional properties. These are important not only for space weather prediction purposes, but also for understanding the development and internal structure of CMEs since we view their source regions on the solar disk and can measure their in-situ characteristics along their axes. Included in our discussion of the recent developments in CME

  2. Addendum to: Strength of the Solar Coronal Magnetic Field - A Comparison of Independent Estimates Using Contemporaneous Radio and White-Light Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Anshu; Ramesh, R.; Kathiravan, C.; Wang, T. J.

    2017-12-01

    This addendum uses an alternate fit for the electron density distribution N(r) (see Figure 1) and estimates the coronal magnetic field using the new model. We find that the estimates of the magnetic field are in close agreement using both the models. We have fit the N(r) distribution obtained from STEREO-A/COR1 and SOHO/LASCO-C2 using a fifth-order polynomial (see Figure 1). The expression can be written as N_{cor}(r) &= 1.43 × 109 r^{-5} - 1.91 × 109 r^{-4} + 1.07 × 109 r^{-3} - 2.87 × 108 r^{-2} + 3.76 × 107 r^{-1} - 1.91 × 106 , where N_{cor}(r) is in units of cm-3 and r is in units of R_{⊙}. The background coronal electron density is enhanced by a factor of 5.5 at 2.63 R_{⊙} during the coronal mass ejection (CME). The estimated coronal magnetic field strength (B) using radio data indicates that B(r) ≈(0.51 - 0.48) ± 0.02 G in the range r ≈2.65 - 2.82 R_{⊙}. The field strengths for STEREO-A/COR1 and SOHO/LASCO-C2 are ≈ 0.32 G at r ≈ 3.11 R_{⊙} and ≈ 0.12 G at r ≈ 4.40 R_{⊙}, respectively.

  3. Compact toroid injection into C-2U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Thomas; Gota, H.; Garate, E.; Asai, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Sekiguchi, J.; Putvinski, S.; Allfrey, I.; Beall, M.; Cordero, M.; Granstedt, E.; Kinley, J.; Morehouse, M.; Sheftman, D.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    Sustainment of an advanced neutral beam-driven FRC for a period in excess of 5 ms is the primary goal of the C-2U machine at Tri Alpha Energy. In addition, a criteria for long-term global sustainment of any magnetically confined fusion reactor is particle refueling. To this end, a magnetized coaxial plasma-gun has been developed. Compact toroids (CT) are to be injected perpendicular to the axial magnetic field of C-2U. To simulate this environment, an experimental test-stand has been constructed. A transverse magnetic field of B ~ 1 kG is established (comparable to the C-2U axial field) and CTs are fired across it. As a minimal requirement, the CT must have energy density greater than that of the magnetic field it is to penetrate, i.e., 1/2 ρv2 >=B2 / 2μ0 . This criteria is easily met and indeed the CTs traverse the test-stand field. A preliminary experiment on C-2U shows the CT also capable of penetrating into FRC plasmas and refueling is observed resulting in a 20 - 30% increase in total particle number per single-pulsed CT injection. Results from test-stand and C-2U experiments will be presented.

  4. An overview of coronal seismology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moortel, I

    2005-12-15

    The idea of exploiting observed oscillations as a diagnostic tool for determining the physical conditions of the coronal plasma was first suggested several decades ago (Roberts et al. 1984 Astrophys. J. 279, 857). Until recently, the application of this idea has been very limited by a lack of high-quality observations of coronal oscillations. However, during the last few years, this situation has changed dramatically, especially due to space-based observations by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer and waves and oscillations have now been observed in a wide variety of solar structures, such as coronal loops, polar plumes and prominences. This paper will briefly summarize MHD wave theory, which forms the basis for coronal seismology, as well as present an overview of the variety of recently observed waves and oscillations in the solar corona. The present state of coronal seismology will also be discussed. Currently, the uncertainty associated with the obtained parameters is still considerable and, hence, the results require a cautious interpretation. However, these examples do show that coronal seismology is rapidly being transformed from a theoretical possibility to a viable technique.

  5. Heating solar coronal holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E. N.

    1991-01-01

    It has been shown that the coronal hole, and the associated high-speed stream in the solar wind, are powered by a heat input of the order of 500,000 ergs/sq cm s, with most of the heat injected in the first 1-2 solar radii, and perhaps 100,000 ergs/sq cm s introduced at distances of several solar radii to provide the high speed of the issuing solar wind. The traditional view has been that this energy is obtained from Alfven waves generated in the subphotospheric convection, which dissipate as they propagate outward, converting the wave energy into heat. This paper reviews the generation of waves and the known wave dissipation mechanisms, to show that the necessary Alfven waves are not produced under the conditions presently understood to exist in the sun, nor would such waves dissipate significantly in the first 1-2 solar radii if they existed. Wave dissipation occurs only over distances of the order of 5 solar radii or more.

  6. Oblique Propagation and Dissipation of Alfven Waves in Coronal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 28; Issue 1 ... Sun: Alfvén waves; coronal holes; solar wind. ... For any propagation angle, the energy flux density and damping length scale also show a decrement in the source region of the solar wind (< 1.05 R⊙) where these may be one of the primary ...

  7. The Coronal Monsoon: Thermal Nonequilibrium Revealed by Periodic Coronal Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchère, Frédéric; Froment, Clara; Soubrié, Elie; Antolin, Patrick; Oliver, Ramon; Pelouze, Gabriel

    2018-02-01

    We report on the discovery of periodic coronal rain in an off-limb sequence of Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images. The showers are co-spatial and in phase with periodic (6.6 hr) intensity pulsations of coronal loops of the sort described by Auchère et al. and Froment et al. These new observations make possible a unified description of both phenomena. Coronal rain and periodic intensity pulsations of loops are two manifestations of the same physical process: evaporation/condensation cycles resulting from a state of thermal nonequilibrium. The fluctuations around coronal temperatures produce the intensity pulsations of loops, and rain falls along their legs if thermal runaway cools the periodic condensations down and below transition-region temperatures. This scenario is in line with the predictions of numerical models of quasi-steadily and footpoint heated loops. The presence of coronal rain—albeit non-periodic—in several other structures within the studied field of view implies that this type of heating is at play on a large scale.

  8. Key aspects of coronal heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2015-01-01

    We highlight 10 key aspects of coronal heating that must be understood before we can consider the problem to be solved. (1) All coronal heating is impulsive. (2) The details of coronal heating matter. (3) The corona is filled with elemental magnetic stands. (4) The corona is densely populated with current sheets. (5) The strands must reconnect to prevent an infinite build-up of stress. (6) Nanoflares repeat with different frequencies. (7) What is the characteristic magnitude of energy release? (8) What causes the collective behaviour responsible for loops? (9) What are the onset conditions for energy release? (10) Chromospheric nanoflares are not a primary source of coronal plasma. Significant progress in solving the coronal heating problem will require coordination of approaches: observational studies, field-aligned hydrodynamic simulations, large-scale and localized three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and possibly also kinetic simulations. There is a unique value to each of these approaches, and the community must strive to coordinate better. PMID:25897094

  9. Observational Analysis of Coronal Fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpeanu, D.-C.; Rachmeler, L; Mierla, Marilena

    2017-01-01

    Coronal fans (see Figure 1) are bright observational structures that extend to large distances above the solar surface and can easily be seen in EUV (174 angstrom) above the limb. They have a very long lifetime and can live up to several Carrington rotations (CR), remaining relatively stationary for many months. Note that they are not off-limb manifestation of similarly-named active region fans. The solar conditions required to create coronal fans are not well understood. The goal of this research was to find as many associations as possible of coronal fans with other solar features and to gain a better understanding of these structures. Therefore, we analyzed many fans and created an overview of their properties. We present the results of this statistical analysis and also a case study on the longest living fan.

  10. Coronal Mass Ejections An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    In times of growing technological sophistication and of our dependence on electronic technology, we are all affected by space weather. In its most extreme form, space weather can disrupt communications, damage and destroy spacecraft and power stations, and increase radiation exposure to astronauts and airline passengers. Major space weather events, called geomagnetic storms, are large disruptions in the Earth’s magnetic field brought about by the arrival of enormous magnetized plasma clouds from the Sun. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) contain billions of tons of plasma and hurtle through space at speeds of several million miles per hour. Understanding coronal mass ejections and their impact on the Earth is of great interest to both the scientific and technological communities. This book provides an introduction to coronal mass ejections, including a history of their observation and scientific revelations, instruments and theory behind their detection and measurement, and the status quo of theories describing...

  11. Working group 3: Coronal streamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Roger A.

    1994-10-01

    The working group on coronal streamers convened on the first day of the 2nd SOHO Workshop, which took place in Marciana Marina, Isola d'Elba, 27 September 1 October 1993. Recent progress in streamer observational techniques and theoretical modeling was reported. The contribution of streamers to the mass and energy supply for the solar wind was discussed. Moreover, the importance of thin electric current sheets for determining both the gross dynamical properties of streamers and the fine-scale filamentary structure within streamers, was strongly emphasized. Potential advances to our understanding of these areas of coronal physics that could be made by the contingent of instruments aboard SOHO were pointed out.

  12. Working group 1: Coronal streamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, R. A.

    1994-02-01

    The working group on coronal streamers convened on the first day of the 2nd SOHO Workshop, which took place in Marciana Marina, Isola d'Elba, 27 September--1 October 1993. Recent progress in streamer observational techniques and theoretical modeling was reported. The contribution of streamers to the mass and energy supply for the solar wind was discussed. Moreover, the importance of thin electric current sheets for determining both the gross dynamical properties of streamers and the fine-scale filamentary structure within streamers, was strongly emphasized. Potential advances to our understanding of these areas of coronal physics that could be made by the contingent of instruments aboard SOHO were shown.

  13. Isotope effect in acetylene C2H2 and C2D2 rotations on Cu(001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchadilova, Yulia E.; Tikhodeev, Sergei G.; Paulsson, Magnus; Ueba, Hiromu

    2014-04-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the elementary processes behind the scanning tunneling microscope controlled rotation of C2H2 and C2D2, isotopologues of a single acetylene molecule adsorbed on the Cu(001) surface, is given, with a focus on the isotope effects. With the help of density-functional theory we calculate the vibrational modes of C2H2 and C2D2 on Cu(001) and estimate the anharmonic couplings between them, using a simple strings-on-rods model. The probability of the elementary processes, nonlinear and combination band, is estimated using the Keldysh diagram technique. This allows us to clarify the main peculiarities and the isotope effects of the C2H2 and C2D2 on Cu(001) rotation, discovered in the pioneering work [B. C. Stipe et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 1263 (1998), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.81.1263], which have not been previously understood.

  14. Disturbed Zone and Piston Shock Ahead of Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eselevich, V.; Eselevich, M.

    2012-12-01

    The 2010 June 13 coronal mass ejection (CME) propagating toward the position angle P.A. ≈ 245° (measured counterclockwise from the Sun's north pole) was studied from the SDO/AIA and SOHO/LASCO C2, C3 data. We show that ahead of the CME frontal structure, as a result of its interaction with the undisturbed solar wind, a disturbed region (with an increased and disturbed plasma density), whose size increases as the CME travels away from the Sun, emerges gradually. Discontinuity formation at the disturbed zone front is observed in the narrow P.A. ≈ 245°-250° range. Its characteristics satisfy the properties of a piston collision shock. In the other directions relative to the CME motion axis (P.A. > 250° and P.A. piston shock formation ahead of a CME, which are as follows: (1) Shock formation ahead of a CME in a vicinity along its propagation axis may occur at various distances R = Ru from the Sun's center. Its formation is determined by fulfilling a local inequality u(R) > VA (R), where u(R) is a CME velocity relative to the surrounding solar wind and VA (R) is a local Alfvén velocity that is approximately equal to the velocity of fast magnetic sound in the solar corona. (2) At R ~ 10-15 R ⊙, one observes the formation of a new discontinuity δsstarf F Lt λ p wide at the head of the collision front. Within limits of error, δsstarf F does not depend on R and is determined to be δsstarf F ≈ 0.1-0.2 R ⊙ by the LASCO C3 spatial resolution and δsstarf F ≈ 0.03 R ⊙ for COR2. This discontinuity is identified with a collisionless shock.

  15. Exploring Coronal Structures with SOHO

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We applied advanced image enhancement techniques to explore in detail the characteristics of the small-scale structures and/or the low contrast structures in several Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) observed by SOHO. We highlight here the results from our studies of the morphology and dynamical evolution of CME ...

  16. ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE CORONAL MAGNETIC DECAY INDEX AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION SPEED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Yan; Liu Chang; Jing Ju; Wang Haimin, E-mail: yx2@njit.edu [Space Weather Research Lab, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    Numerical simulations suggest that kink and torus instabilities are two potential contributors to the initiation and prorogation of eruptive events. A magnetic parameter called the decay index (i.e., the coronal magnetic gradient of the overlying fields above the eruptive flux ropes) could play an important role in controlling the kinematics of eruptions. Previous studies have identified a threshold range of the decay index that distinguishes between eruptive and confined configurations. Here we advance the study by investigating if there is a clear correlation between the decay index and coronal mass ejection (CME) speed. Thirty-eight CMEs associated with filament eruptions and/or two-ribbon flares are selected using the H{alpha} data from the Global H{alpha} Network. The filaments and flare ribbons observed in H{alpha} associated with the CMEs help to locate the magnetic polarity inversion line, along which the decay index is calculated based on the potential field extrapolation using Michelson Doppler Imager magnetograms as boundary conditions. The speeds of CMEs are obtained from the LASCO C2 CME catalog available online. We find that the mean decay index increases with CME speed for those CMEs with a speed below 1000 km s{sup -1} and stays flat around 2.2 for the CMEs with higher speeds. In addition, we present a case study of a partial filament eruption, in which the decay indices show different values above the erupted/non-erupted part.

  17. C2 metabolism in Euglena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Masami

    2017-01-01

    Euglenoids are able to assimilate fatty acids and alcohols with various carbon-chain lengths, and ethanol is known to be one of the best carbon sources to support the growth of Euglena gracilis. Ethanol is first oxidized to acetate by the sequential reactions of alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase in the mitochondria, and then converted to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). Acetyl-CoA is metabolized through the glyoxylate cycle which is a modified tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in which isocitrate lyase (ICL) and malate synthase (MS) function to bypass the two decarboxylation steps of the TCA cycle, enabling the net synthesis of carbohydrates from C2 compounds. ICL and MS form a unique bifunctional enzyme localized in Euglena mitochondria, not in glyoxysome as in other eukaryotes. The unique glyoxylate and glycolate metabolism during photorespiration is also discussed in this chapter.

  18. Evolution of an equatorial coronal hole structure and the released coronal hole wind stream: Carrington rotations 2039 to 2050

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidrich-Meisner, Verena; Peleikis, Thies; Kruse, Martin; Berger, Lars; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2017-07-01

    Context. The Sun is a highly dynamic environment that exhibits dynamic behavior on many different timescales. Variability is observed both in closed and in open field line regions in the solar corona. In particular, coronal holes exhibit temporal and spatial variability. Signatures of these coronal dynamics are inherited by the coronal hole wind streams that originate in these regions and can effect the Earth's magnetosphere. Both the cause of the observed variabilities and how these translate to fluctuations in the in situ observed solar wind is not yet fully understood. Aims: During solar activity minimum the structure of the magnetic field typically remains stable over several Carrington rotations (CRs). But how stable is the solar magnetic field? Here, we address this question by analyzing the evolution of a coronal hole structure and the corresponding coronal hole wind stream emitted from this source region over 12 consecutive CRs in 2006. Methods: To this end, we link in situ observations of Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) with synoptic maps of Michelson Doppler imager (MDI) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) at the photospheric level through a combination of ballistic back-mapping and a potential field source surface (PFSS) approach. Together, these track the evolution of the open field line region that is identified as the source region of a recurring coronal hole wind stream. Under the assumptions of the freeze-in scenario for charge states in the solar wind, we derive freeze-in temperatures and determine the order in which the different charge state ratios of ion pairs appear to freeze-in. We call the combination of freeze-in temperatures derived from in situ observed ion density ratios and freeze-in order a minimal electron temperature profile and investigate its variability. Results: The in situ properties and the PFSS model together probe the lateral magnetic field

  19. The upgrade of the Thomson scattering system for measurement on the C-2/C-2U devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, K.; Schindler, T.; Kinley, J.; Deng, B.; Thompson, M. C. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The C-2/C-2U Thomson scattering system has been substantially upgraded during the latter phase of C-2/C-2U program. A Rayleigh channel has been added to each of the three polychromators of the C-2/C-2U Thomson scattering system. Onsite spectral calibration has been applied to avoid the issue of different channel responses at different spots on the photomultiplier tube surface. With the added Rayleigh channel, the absolute intensity response of the system is calibrated with Rayleigh scattering in argon gas from 0.1 to 4 Torr, where the Rayleigh scattering signal is comparable to the Thomson scattering signal at electron densities from 1 × 10{sup 13} to 4 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}. A new signal processing algorithm, using a maximum likelihood method and including detailed analysis of different noise contributions within the system, has been developed to obtain electron temperature and density profiles. The system setup, spectral and intensity calibration procedure and its outcome, data analysis, and the results of electron temperature/density profile measurements will be presented.

  20. Magnetic properties of HoCoC2, HoNiC2 and their solid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michor, H.; Steiner, S.; Schumer, A.; Hembara, M.; Levytskyy, V.; Babizhetskyy, V.; Kotur, B.

    2017-11-01

    Magnetic properties of single crystalline HoCoC2 and the evolution of magnetic and structural features in a series of polycrystalline solid solutions HoCo1-xNixC2 (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 1) are investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, magnetization, magnetic susceptibility and specific heat measurements. The crystal structures of all investigated samples refers to the CeNiC2-type structure (space group Amm 2 and Pearson symbol oS8). Non-isoelectronic substitution of Co by Ni causes a non-linear increase of the unit cell volume and especially a non-monotonous variation of the a and c lattice parameters as well as a pronounced reduction of the C-C bond length of carbon dimers. Temperature dependent magnetization and specific heat measurements reveal a crossover from a ferromagnetic for HoCoC2 with TC = 10.6 (1) K to an antiferromagnetic ground state for HoNiC2 with TN = 2.78 (6) K and a non-monotonous variation of the magnetic ordering temperature with a minimum at intermediate compositions. Crystalline electric field effects of HoCoC2 and HoNiC2 are analysed using combined thermodynamic and magnetic susceptibility data. The electrical resistivity of HoNiC2 displays a distinct anomaly near room temperature which indicates the formation of a charge density wave (CDW) state as earlier reported for several other rare earth nickel dicarbides.

  1. Spatial damping of propagating sausage waves in coronal cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ming-Zhe; Chen, Shao-Xia; Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Context. Sausage modes are important in coronal seismology. Spatially damped propagating sausage waves were recently observed in the solar atmosphere. Aims: We examine how wave leakage influences the spatial damping of sausage waves propagating along coronal structures modeled by a cylindrical density enhancement embedded in a uniform magnetic field. Methods: Working in the framework of cold magnetohydrodynamics, we solve the dispersion relation (DR) governing sausage waves for complex-valued, longitudinal wavenumber k at given real angular frequencies ω. For validation purposes, we also provide analytical approximations to the DR in the low-frequency limit and in the vicinity of ωc, the critical angular frequency separating trapped from leaky waves. Results: In contrast to the standing case, propagating sausage waves are allowed for ω much lower than ωc. However, while able to direct their energy upward, these low-frequency waves are subject to substantial spatial attenuation. The spatial damping length shows little dependence on the density contrast between the cylinder and its surroundings, and depends only weakly on frequency. This spatial damping length is of the order of the cylinder radius for ω ≲ 1.5vAi/a, where a and vAi are the cylinder radius and the Alfvén speed in the cylinder, respectively. Conclusions: If a coronal cylinder is perturbed by symmetric boundary drivers (e.g., granular motions) with a broadband spectrum, wave leakage efficiently filters out the low-frequency components.

  2. Evolving Coronal Holes and Interplanetary Erupting Stream ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The newborn coronal hole emerges on the Sun, owing to the changes in magnetic field configuration leading to the opening of closed magnetic structure into the corona. The fundamental activity for the onset of an erupting stream seems to be a transient opening of pre-existing closed magnetic structures into a new coronal ...

  3. Microwave Enhancement in Coronal Holes: Statistical Properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 21; Issue 3-4. Microwave Enhancement in Coronal Holes: Statistical Properties. Ν. Gopalswamy Κ. Shibasaki Μ. Salem. Session X – Cycle Variation in the Quiet Corona & Coronal Holes Volume 21 Issue 3-4 September-December 2000 pp 413-417 ...

  4. The Three-part Structure of a Filament-unrelated Solar Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H. Q.; Cheng, X.; Chen, Y.; Zhang, J.; Wang, B.; Li, L. P.; Li, B.; Hu, Q.; Li, G.

    2017-10-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) often exhibit the typical three-part structure in the corona when observed with white-light coronagraphs, i.e., the bright leading front, dark cavity, and bright core, corresponding to a high-low-high density sequence. As CMEs result from eruptions of magnetic flux ropes (MFRs), which can possess either lower (e.g., coronal-cavity MFRs) or higher (e.g., hot-channel MFRs) density compared to their surroundings in the corona, the traditional opinion regards the three-part structure as the manifestations of coronal plasma pileup (high density), coronal-cavity MFR (low density), and filament (high density) contained in the trailing part of MFR, respectively. In this paper, we demonstrate that filament-unrelated CMEs can also exhibit the classical three-part structure. The observations were made from different perspectives through an event that occurred on 2011 October 4. The CME cavity corresponds to the low-density zone between the leading front and the high-density core, and it is obvious in the low corona and gradually becomes fuzzy when propagating outward. The bright core corresponds to a high-density structure that is suggested to be an erupting MFR. The MFR is recorded from both edge-on and face-on perspectives, exhibiting different morphologies that are due to projection effects. We stress that the zone (MFR) with lower (higher) density in comparison to the surroundings can appear as the dark cavity (bright core) when observed through white-light coronagraphs, which is not necessarily the coronal-cavity MFR (erupted filament).

  5. Coronal Mass Ejections travel time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Carlos Roberto; Souza de Mendonça, Rafael Rodrigues; Dal Lago, Alisson; Echer, Ezequiel

    2017-10-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the main source of intense geomagnetic storms when they are earthward directed. Studying their travel time is a key-point to understand when the disturbance will be observed at Earth. In this work, we study the CME that originated the interplanetary disturbance observed on 2013/10/02. According to the observations, the CME that caused the interplanetary disturbance was ejected on 2013/09/29. We obtained the CME speed and estimate of the time of arrival at the Lagrangian Point L1 using the concept of expansion speed. We found that observed and estimated times of arrival of the shock differ between 2 and 23 hours depending on method used to estimate the radial speed.

  6. Mission Prospects: Remote Sensing of Coronal Suprathermal Seed Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, J.; Laming, J. M.; Ko, Y.

    2013-12-01

    A new perspective on the feasibility of remote sensing detection and characterization of suprathermal particles serving the role of seeds in solar energetic particle (SEP) acceleration has recently been achieved via a combination of theoretical (Laming et al. 2013 http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0004-637X/770/1/73) and experimental (Kohl et al. 2011 http://arxiv.org/abs/1104.3817, Moses et al. 2011 http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.896868) developments. The location, density and velocity distribution of these seed particles can now be established as science observing requirements for instrument specification. The most promising instrumentation for these observations is a UV coronal spectrometer. While the spectroscopic and spatial resolution of the one existing, spaceflight UV coronal spectrometer - SOHO UVCS - meets this specification; the effective area of this instrument is two orders of magnitude too low. Initial attempts at achieving increased effective area by directly scaling UVCS have not been successfully transitioned into flight programs (e.g. Gardner et al. 1999, 'Advanced Solar Coronal Explorer Mission (ASCE)', SPIE 3764, 134). With the recent development of instrument designs achieving the requisite increase in effective area within a volume envelope comparable to UVCS, the options for achieving a successful flight program have been increased. This work is supported in part by the Office of Naval Research/Naval Research Laboratory Basic Research (6.1) Program and NASA-DoD PR 12SHP12/2-0151.

  7. Ultraviolet Thomson Scattering from Direct-Drive Coronal Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henchen, R. J.; Goncharov, V. N.; Michel, D. T.; Follett, R. K.; Katz, J.; Froula, D. H.

    2013-10-01

    Ultraviolet (λ4 ω = 263 nm) Thomson scattering (TS) was used to probe ion-acoustic waves (IAW's) and electron plasma waves (EPW's) from direct-drive coronal plasmas. Fifty-nine drive beams (λ3 ω = 351 nm) illuminate a spherical target with a radius of ~860 μm. Advances in the ultraviolet (UV) TS diagnostic at the Omega Laser Facility provide the ability to detect deep UV photons (~190 nm) and allow access to scattered light from EPW's propagating near the 3 ω quarter-critical surface (~2.5 × 1021 cm-3) . A series of experiments studied the effects of ablator materials on coronal plasma conditions. Electron temperatures and densities were measured from 150 μm to 400 μm from the initial target surface. Standard CH shells were compared to three-layered shells consisting of Si doped CH, Si, and Be. Early analysis indicates that these multilayered targets have less hot-electron energy as a result of higher electron temperature in the coronal plasma. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  8. The Effect of Aerosols on Pluto's C2 Hydrocarbon Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luspay-Kuti, Adrienn; Mandt, Kathleen; Jessup, Kandis-Lea; Hue, Vincent; Kammer, Joshua; Filwett, Rachael; Hamel, Mark

    2017-10-01

    On July 14, 2015 the New Horizons spacecraft flew through the Pluto system, providing critical details about Pluto’s atmosphere. The vertical profiles of N2 and CH4, C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6 derived from New Horizons Alice transmission data allow the more accurate modeling of Pluto’s atmosphere than in the pre-New Horizons era, and help better understand the physical and photochemical processes in Pluto’s atmosphere. All the measured C2 hydrocarbon densities showed an unexpected inversion between ~100 and 400 km, which suggests that processes other than chemistry play an important role in shaping their vertical profiles. We present here a state-of-the-art Pluto Ion-Neutral-Photochemistry (Pluto INP) model that includes the condensation onto and incorporation into aerosol particles, and evaluate the dominant production and loss processes of C2 hydrocarbons with a special emphasis on the role of aerosol interaction. We found that in order to reproduce the C2 profiles measured by New Horizons, they must stick to and be permanently removed by aerosols - a process different from condensation. We determined through empirical fits to the New Horizons data that the sticking efficiency of C2 hydrocarbons and the stickiness of the aerosol particles are inversely related to the available aerosol surface area, which has been inferred from observation to increase as altitude decreases. This counterintuitive relationship between sticking efficiency and available aerosol surfaces indicates that similarly to Titan, Pluto’s aerosols must harden and become less sticky as they age. Such hardening with ageing is both necessary and sufficient to explain the vertical profiles of C2 hydrocarbons in Pluto’s atmosphere.

  9. Alfven wave trapping, network microflaring, and heating in solar coronal holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.; Suess, S. T.; Musielak, Z. E.; An, C.-H.

    1991-01-01

    Fresh evidence that much of the heating in coronal holes is provided by Alfven waves is presented. This evidence comes from examining the reflection of Alfven waves in an isothermal hydrostatic model coronal hole with an open magnetic field. Reflection occurs if the wavelength is as long as the order of the scale height of the Alfven velocity. For Alfven waves with periods of about 5 min, and for realistic density, magnetic field strength, and magnetic field spreading in the model, the waves are reflected back down within the model hole if the coronal temperature is only slightly less than 1.0 x 10 to the 6th K, but are not reflected and escape out the top of the model if the coronal temperature is only slightly greater than 1.0 x 10 to the 6th K. Because the spectrum of Alfven waves in real coronal holes is expected to peak around 5 min and the temperature is observed to be close to 1.0 x 10 to the 6th K, the sensitive temperature dependence of the trapping suggests that the temperature in coronal holes is regulated by heating by the trapped Alfven waves.

  10. Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Nisticò

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet events are selected by requiring at least some visibility in both COR1 and EUVI instruments. We report 15 jet events, and we discuss their main features. For one event, the uplift velocity has been determined as about 200 km s−1, while the deceleration rate appears to be about 0.11 km s−2, less than solar gravity. The average jet visibility time is about 30 min, consistent with jet observed in polar regions. On the basis of the present dataset, we provisionally conclude that there are not substantial physical differences between polar and equatorial coronal hole jets.

  11. Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zimbardo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet events are selected by requiring at least some visibility in both COR1 and EUVI instruments. We report 15 jet events, and we discuss their main features. For one event, the uplift velocity has been determined as about 200 km s−1, while the deceleration rate appears to be about 0.11 km s−2, less than solar gravity. The average jet visibility time is about 30 min, consistent with jet observed in polar regions. On the basis of the present dataset, we provisionally conclude that there are not substantial physical differences between polar and equatorial coronal hole jets.

  12. FORWARD: A toolset for multiwavelength coronal magnetometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eGibson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma -- i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  13. Heating by transverse waves in simulated coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampelas, K.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Antolin, P.

    2017-08-01

    Context. Recent numerical studies of oscillating flux tubes have established the significance of resonant absorption in the damping of propagating transverse oscillations in coronal loops. The nonlinear nature of the mechanism has been examined alongside the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, which is expected to manifest in the resonant layers at the edges of the flux tubes. While these two processes have been hypothesized to heat coronal loops through the dissipation of wave energy into smaller scales, the occurring mixing with the hotter surroundings can potentially hide this effect. Aims: We aim to study the effects of wave heating from driven and standing kink waves in a coronal loop. Methods: Using the MPI-AMRVAC code, we perform ideal, three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of both (a) footpoint driven and (b) free standing oscillations in a straight coronal flux tube, in the presence of numerical resistivity. Results: We have observed the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz eddies at the loop boundary layer of all three models considered here, as well as an increase of the volume averaged temperature inside the loop. The main heating mechanism in our setups was Ohmic dissipation, as indicated by the higher values for the temperatures and current densities located near the footpoints. The introduction of a temperature gradient between the inner tube and the surrounding plasma, suggests that the mixing of the two regions, in the case of hotter environment, greatly increases the temperature of the tube at the site of the strongest turbulence, beyond the contribution of the aforementioned wave heating mechanism. Three movies associated to Fig. 1 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Current systems of coronal loops in 3D MHD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnecke, J.; Chen, F.; Bingert, S.; Peter, H.

    2017-11-01

    Aims: We study the magnetic field and current structure associated with a coronal loop. Through this we investigate to what extent the assumptions of a force-free magnetic field break down and where they might be justified. Methods: We analyze a three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of the solar corona in an emerging active region with the focus on the structure of the forming coronal loops. The lower boundary of this simulation is taken from a model of an emerging active region. As a consequence of the emerging magnetic flux and the horizontal motions at the surface a coronal loop forms self-consistently. We investigate the current density along magnetic field lines inside (and outside) this loop and study the magnetic and plasma properties in and around this loop. The loop is defined as the bundle of field lines that coincides with enhanced emission in extreme UV. Results: We find that the total current along the emerging loop changes its sign from being antiparallel to parallel to the magnetic field. This is caused by the inclination of the loop together with the footpoint motion. Around the loop, the currents form a complex non-force-free helical structure. This is directly related to a bipolar current structure at the loop footpoints at the base of the corona and a local reduction of the background magnetic field (I.e., outside the loop) caused by the plasma flow into and along the loop. Furthermore, the locally reduced magnetic pressure in the loop allows the loop to sustain a higher density, which is crucial for the emission in extreme UV. The action of the flow on the magnetic field hosting the loop turns out to also be responsible for the observed squashing of the loop. Conclusions: The complex magnetic field and current system surrounding it can only be modeled in 3D MHD models where the magnetic field has to balance the plasma pressure. A one-dimensional coronal loop model or a force-free extrapolation cannot capture the current system

  15. Space weather and coronal mass ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Space weather has attracted a lot of attention in recent times. Severe space weather can disrupt spacecraft, and on Earth can be the cause of power outages and power station failure. It also presents a radiation hazard for airline passengers and astronauts. These ""magnetic storms"" are most commonly caused by coronal mass ejections, or CMES, which are large eruptions of plasma and magnetic field from the Sun that can reach speeds of several thousand km/s. In this SpringerBrief, Space Weather and Coronal Mass Ejections, author Timothy Howard briefly introduces the coronal mass ejection, its sc

  16. Energy conversion in the coronal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, P. C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Solar and stellar X-ray emission are the observed waste products of the interplay between magnetic fields and the motion of stellar plasma. Theoretical understanding of the process of coronal heating is of utmost importance, since the high temperature is what defines the corona in the first place. Most of the research described deals with the aspects of the several rivalling theories for coronal heating. The rest of the papers deal with processes of energy conversion related to flares.

  17. Composition of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurbuchen, T. H.; Weberg, M.; von Steiger, R.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Lepri, S. T.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the physical origin of plasmas that are ejected from the solar corona. To address this issue, we perform a comprehensive analysis of the elemental composition of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) using recently released elemental composition data for Fe, Mg, Si, S, C, N, Ne, and He as compared to O and H. We find that ICMEs exhibit a systematic abundance increase of elements with first ionization potential (FIP) less than 10 electronvolts, as well as a significant increase of Ne as compared to quasi-stationary solar wind. ICME plasmas have a stronger FIP effect than slow wind, which indicates either that an FIP process is active during the ICME ejection or that a different type of solar plasma is injected into ICMEs. The observed FIP fractionation is largest during times when the Fe ionic charge states are elevated above Q (sub Fe) is greater than 12.0. For ICMEs with elevated charge states, the FIP effect is enhanced by 70 percent over that of the slow wind. We argue that the compositionally hot parts of ICMEs are active region loops that do not normally have access to the heliosphere through the processes that give rise to solar wind. We also discuss the implications of this result for solar energetic particles accelerated during solar eruptions and for the origin of the slow wind itself.

  18. MULTIDIMENSIONAL MODELING OF CORONAL RAIN DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-07-10

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that capture the initial formation and long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host a chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes of physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into V-shaped features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views of blobs that evaporate in situ or are siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys of coronal rain showers in true multidimensional settings to connect parameterized heating prescriptions with rain statistics, ultimately allowing us to quantify the coronal heating input.

  19. Standardisation for C2-Simulation Interoperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    using: • National and NATO operational planning and execution tools: NATO ICC, TBMCS, JADOCS and a UAV ground control station ; • Various...an extensive hierarchy of battle space objects such as Organisations, Materiel, Facilities, Features, etc. This taxonomy contains approximately 150...Exploitation of C2‐Sim Interoperability Research to Support the UK Warfighter LtCol Bernardo Neto, Brazilian AF: C2-Simulation Studies in ITA‐GMU

  20. A Topological Model for C2 Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Many aspects of C2 are hard to quantify. Topology can be referred as a kind of qualitative math , not the math made of points as usual. Instead, it...like costs, resources and capabilities are important to better define the merit of an organization, understood as the congruence to its mission, and...an adequate mathe - matical construct to capture these higher dimensional relationships. 7. References 16th ICCRTS: Collective C2 in Multinational

  1. The effecf of non-costant initial matterial flow on coronal loop oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Hossein; Gheibi, Akbar

    2016-07-01

    The effecf of non-costant initial matterial flow on coronal loop oscillations We investigate The effecf of non-costant initial matterial flow on coronal loop osillations. The ideal linearized MHD equations in the presense of spatially variable fluid flow, costant magnetic field, longitudially strafied density, and adibatic process is reduced to a single ordinary differential equation for velocity potential. We showed that the plasma speed of oscillations is shifted by value of folw speed.In the case of rotational flow, the phase speed is a fuction of tube speed, but for irrotational flow the phase speed is equal to fast speed.

  2. Coroners and death certification law reform: the Coroners and Justice Act 2009 and its aftermath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Tom

    2010-10-01

    After considering various different options for half a decade, the last Government legislated in 2009 to reform the England and Wales coroner and death certification systems. The Coroners and Justice Act 2009 provides for the creation of a new Chief Coroner post to lead the jurisdiction and for local medical examiners to oversee a new death certification scheme applicable equally to burial and cremation cases. In October 2010 the new Government announced that it judges the main coroner reform to be unaffordable, will not proceed with it and plans to repeal the provisions. It intends to implement the new death certification arrangements, which is welcome. The decision to abort the main coroner reform in spite of longstanding and widespread recognition of the need for major change is deplorable though in line with other failures over the last century to properly modernise this neglected service.

  3. Dynamics of coronal rain and descending plasma blobs in solar prominences. I. Fully ionized case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, R.; Soler, R.; Terradas, J. [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Khodachenko, M. L., E-mail: ramon.oliver@uib.es [Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Schmiedlstrasse 6, A-8042 Graz (Austria)

    2014-03-20

    Observations of active regions and limb prominences often show cold, dense blobs descending with an acceleration smaller than that of free fall. The dynamics of these condensations falling in the solar corona is investigated in this paper using a simple fully ionized plasma model. We find that the presence of a heavy condensation gives rise to a dynamical rearrangement of the coronal pressure that results in the formation of a large pressure gradient that opposes gravity. Eventually this pressure gradient becomes so large that the blob acceleration vanishes or even points upward. Then, the blob descent is characterized by an initial acceleration phase followed by an essentially constant velocity phase. These two stages can be identified in published time-distance diagrams of coronal rain events. Both the duration of the first stage and the velocity attained by the blob increase for larger values of the ratio of blob to coronal density, for larger blob mass, and for smaller coronal temperature. Dense blobs are characterized by a detectable density growth (up to 60% in our calculations) and by a steepening of the density in their lower part, that could lead to the formation of a shock. They also emit sound waves that could be detected as small intensity changes with periods of the order of 100 s and lasting between a few and about 10 periods. Finally, the curvature of falling paths with large radii is only relevant when a very dense blob falls along inclined magnetic field lines.

  4. Coronal tissue loss in endodontically treated teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, A O; Shaba, O P; Dosumu, O O; Ajayi, D M

    2012-12-01

    To categorize the endodontically treated teeth according to the extent of coronal tissue loss in order to determine the appropriate restoration required. A two year descriptive study was done at the Conservative Clinic of the Department of Restorative Dentistry, Dental Centre, University College Hospital, Ibadan. Successful endodontically treated teeth were assessed and categorized according to the extent of tissue loss based on standard criteria proposed by Smith and Schuman. Two hundred and ninety endodontically treated teeth were assessed for success both clinically and radiographically. Eighty (27.6%) were anterior teeth, 78 (26.9%) were premolars while 132 (45.5%) were molars. Dental caries was found to be the most common (61.4%) indication for endodontic treatment and caused more coronal tissue damage (moderate and significant) when compared with other indications for endodontic treatment. Two hundred and twenty seven (78.3%) endodontically treated teeth had moderate coronal tissue loss, 41 (14.1%) had minimal damage while 22 (7.6%) had significant tissue damage. Dental caries was the most common indication for endodontic treatment of the posterior teeth while trauma was the most common indication for the anterior teeth. Majority of the endodontically treated teeth that were evaluated for tissue loss had moderate coronal tissue damage. It is therefore recommended that proper and prompt evaluation of the remaining coronal tooth tissue following successful endodontic treatment be carried out in order to determine the appropriate definitive restoration required that will be easy for the clinician and less expensive to the patients.

  5. Image-based reconstruction of the Newtonian dynamics of solar coronal ejecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Thompson, Barbara J.

    2016-10-01

    We present a new methodology for analyzing rising and falling dynamics of unstable coronal material as represented by high-cadence SDO AIA images. The technique involves an adaptive spatiotemporal tracking of propagating intensity gradients and their characterization in terms of time-evolving areas swept out by the position vector originated from the Sun disk center. The measured values of the areal velocity and acceleration are used to obtain quantitative information on the angular momentum and acceleration along the paths of the rising and falling coronal plasma. In the absence of other forces, solar gravitation results in purely ballistic motions consistent with the Kepler's second law; non-central forces such as the Lorentz force introduce non-zero torques resulting in more complex motions. The developed algorithms enable direct evaluation of the line-of-sight component of the net torque applied to a unit mass of the ejected coronal material which is proportional to the image-plane projection of the observed areal acceleration. The current implementation of the method cannot reliably distinguish torque modulations caused by the coronal force field from those imposed by abrupt changes of plasma mass density and nontrivial projection effects. However, it can provide valid observational constraints on the evolution of large-scale unstable magnetic topologies driving major solar-coronal eruptions as demonstrated in the related talk by B. Thompson et al.

  6. Oscillation of solar radio emission at coronal acoustic cut-off frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylaev, O. S.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Melnik, V. N.; Hanslmeier, A.; Panchenko, M.

    2017-05-01

    Recent SECCHI COR2 observations on board STEREO-A spacecraft have detected density structures at a distance of 2.5-15 R0 propagating with periodicity of about 90 min. The observations show that the density structures probably formed in the lower corona. We used the large Ukrainian radio telescope URAN-2 to observe type IV radio bursts in the frequency range of 8-32 MHz during the time interval of 08:15-11:00 UT on August 1, 2011. Radio emission in this frequency range originated at the distance of 1.5-2.5 R0 according to the Baumbach-Allen density model of the solar corona. Morlet wavelet analysis showed the periodicity of 80 min in radio emission intensity at all frequencies, which demonstrates that there are quasi-periodic variations of coronal density at all heights. The observed periodicity corresponds to the acoustic cut-off frequency of stratified corona at a temperature of 1 MK. We suggest that continuous perturbations of the coronal base in the form of jets/explosive events generate acoustic pulses, which propagate upwards and leave the wake behind oscillating at the coronal cut-off frequency. This wake may transform into recurrent shocks due to the density decrease with height, which leads to the observed periodicity in the radio emission. The recurrent shocks may trigger quasi-periodic magnetic reconnection in helmet streamers, where the opposite field lines merge and consequently may generate periodic density structures observed in the solar wind.

  7. Free Magnetic Energy and Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy; Moore, Ron; Falconer, David

    2012-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the coronal X-ray luminosity of an active region increases roughly in direct proportion to the total photospheric flux of the active region's magnetic field (Fisher et al. 1998). It is also observed, however, that the coronal luminosity of active regions of nearly the same flux content can differ by an order of magnitude. In this presentation, we analyze 10 active regions with roughly the same total magnetic flux. We first determine several coronal properties, such as X-ray luminosity (calculated using Hinode XRT), peak temperature (calculated using Hinode EIS), and total Fe XVIII emission (calculated using SDO AIA). We present the dependence of these properties on a proxy of the free magnetic energy of the active region

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic waves in coronal polar plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakariakov, Valery M

    2006-02-15

    Polar plumes are cool, dense, linear, magnetically open structures that arise from predominantly unipolar magnetic footpoints in the solar polar coronal holes. As the Alfvén speed is decreased in plumes in comparison with the surrounding medium, these structures are natural waveguides for fast and slow magnetoacoustic waves. The simplicity of the geometry of polar plumes makes them an ideal test ground for the study of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave interaction with solar coronal structures. The review covers recent observational findings of compressible and incompressible waves in polar plumes with imaging and spectral instruments, and interpretation of the waves in terms of MHD theory.

  9. Coronal Fractures of the Scaphoid: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutsky, David J; Herzberg, Guillaume; Shin, Alexander Y; Buijze, Geert A; Ring, David C; Mudgal, Chaitanya S; Leung, Yuen-Fai; Dumontier, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Coronal (or frontal plane) fractures of the scaphoid are distinctly uncommon. There are few published reports of coronal fractures of the scaphoid. This fracture is often missed on the initial X-ray films. A high index of suspicion should exist when there is a double contour of the proximal scaphoid pole on the anteroposterior X-ray view. A computed tomography scan is integral in making the diagnosis. Early recognition is key in salvaging the scaphoid fracture and in preventing articular damage. Level of Evidence IV. Retrospective case series.

  10. The Distributed Cognitive Components of C2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    force behind most C2 research. Kurt Lewin states that, “There is nothing so useful as a good theory” (1951, p. 169). This link provides the... Lewin , 1951) Lewin , K. (1951). Field theory in social science; selected theoretical papers. D. Cartwright (ed.). New York: Harper & Row. (Liang

  11. New C2 synchondrosal fracture classification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusin, Jerome A.; Ruess, Lynne [Department of Radiology, Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States); The Ohio State University College of Medicine and Public Health, Columbus, OH (United States); Daulton, Robert S. [Department of Radiology, Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Excessive cervical flexion-extension accompanying mild to severe impact injuries can lead to C2 synchondrosal fractures in young children. To characterize and classify C2 synchondrosal fracture patterns. We retrospectively reviewed imaging and medical records of children who were treated for cervical spine fractures at our institution between 1995 and 2014. We reviewed all fractures involving the five central C2 synchondroses with regard to patient demographics, mechanism of injury, fracture pattern, associated fractures and other injuries, treatment plans and outcome. Fourteen children had fractures involving the central C2 synchondroses. There were nine boys and five girls, all younger than 6 years. We found four distinct fracture patterns. Eleven complete fractures were further divided into four subtypes (a, b, c and d) based on degree of anterior displacement of the odontoid segment and presence of distraction. Nine of these 11 children had fractures through both odontoneural synchondroses and the odontocentral synchondrosis; one had fractures involving both neurocentral synchondroses and the odontoneural synchondrosis; one had fractures through bilateral odontoneural and bilateral neurocentral synchondroses. Three children had incomplete fractures, defined as a fracture through a single odontoneural synchondrosis with or without partial extension into either the odontocentral or the adjacent neurocentral synchondroses. All complete fractures were displaced or angulated. Four had associated spinal cord injury, including two contusions (subtype c fractures) and two fatal transections (subtype d fractures). Most children were treated with primary halo stabilization. Subtype c fractures required surgical fixation. We describe four patterns of central C2 synchondrosal fractures, including two unique patterns that have not been reported. We propose a classification system to distinguish these fractures and aid in treatment planning. (orig.)

  12. Very large array faraday rotation studies of the coronal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Jason Earl

    Knowledge of the coronal magnetic field is crucial for understanding (1) the heating mechanism(s) of the solar corona, (2) the acceleration of the fast solar wind, and (3) the structure and dynamics of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Observation of Faraday rotation (FR) is one of the best remote-sensing techniques for determining plasma properties in the corona and can provide information on the plasma structure of a CME shortly after launch, shedding light on the initiation process. I used the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to make sensitive Faraday rotation measurements to investigate the general plasma structure of the corona, properties of coronal plasma inhomogeneities and waves, and transients associated with coronal mass ejections. To enhance my measurements of FR transients, I also developed an algorithm in the Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA) package to mitigate ionospheric Faraday rotation. In August, 2011, I made FR observations at 5.0 and 6.1 GHz of the radio galaxy 3C 228 through the solar corona at heliocentric distances of 4.6-5.0 solar radii using the VLA. Observations at 5.0 GHz permit measurements deeper in the corona than previous VLA observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. These FR observations provided unique information on the magnetic field in this region of the corona. My data on 3C 228 provide two lines of sight (separated by 46 arcseconds, 33,000 km in the corona). I detected three periods during which there appeared to be a difference in the Faraday rotation measure between these two closely spaced lines of sight, which I used to estimate coronal currents; these values (ranging from 2.6 to 4.1 GA) are several orders of magnitude below that which is necessary for significant coronal heating (assuming the Spitzer resistivity). I also used the data to determine upper limits (3.3 and 6.4 rad/m2 along the two lines of sight) on FR fluctuations caused by coronal waves. These upper limits are comparable to and, thus, not inconsistent

  13. Three-Dimensional Morphology of a Coronal Prominence Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, S. E.; Kucera, T. A.; Rastawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hill, S.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional density model of coronal prominence cavities, and a morphological fit that has been tightly constrained by a uniquely well-observed cavity. Observations were obtained as part of an International Heliophysical Year campaign by instruments from a variety of space- and ground-based observatories, spanning wavelengths from radio to soft-X-ray to integrated white light. From these data it is clear that the prominence cavity is the limb manifestation of a longitudinally-extended polar-crown filament channel, and that the cavity is a region of low density relative to the surrounding corona. As a first step towards quantifying density and temperature from campaign spectroscopic data, we establish the three-dimensional morphology of the cavity. This is critical for taking line-of-sight projection effects into account, since cavities are not localized in the plane of the sky and the corona is optically thin. We have augmented a global coronal streamer model to include a tunnel-like cavity with elliptical cross-section and a Gaussian variation of height along the tunnel length. We have developed a semi-automated routine that fits ellipses to cross-sections of the cavity as it rotates past the solar limb, and have applied it to Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) observations from the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. This defines the morphological parameters of our model, from which we reproduce forward-modeled cavity observables. We find that cavity morphology and orientation, in combination with the viewpoints of the observing spacecraft, explains the observed variation in cavity visibility for the east vs. west limbs

  14. The Blob Connection: Searching for Low Coronal Signatures of Solar Post-CME Blobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanche, Nicole E.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Webb, David F.

    2016-11-01

    Bright linear structures, thought to be indicators of a current sheet (CS), are often seen in Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) white-light data in the wake of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In a subset of these post-CME structures, relatively bright blobs are seen moving outward along the rays. These blobs have been interpreted as consequences of the plasmoid instability in the CS, and can help us to understand the dynamics of the reconnection. We examine several instances, taken largely from the SOHO/LASCO CME-rays Catalog, where these blobs are clearly visible in white-light data. Using radially filtered, difference, wavelet enhanced, and multiscale Gaussian normalized images to visually inspect Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) data in multiple wavelengths, we look for signatures of material that correspond both temporally and spatially to the later appearance of the blobs in LASCO/C2. Constraints from measurements of the blobs allow us to predict the expected count rates in DN pixel-1 s-1 for each AIA channel. The resulting values would make the blobs bright enough to be detectable at 1.2 R ⊙. However, we do not see conclusive evidence for corresponding blobs in the AIA data in any of the events. We do the same calculation for the “cartwheel CME,” an event in which blobs were seen in X-rays, and find that our estimated count rates are close to those observed. We suggest several possibilities for the absence of the EUV blobs including the formation of the blob higher than the AIA field of view, blob coalescence, and overestimation of blob densities.

  15. MHD Modelling of Coronal Loops: Injection of High-Speed Chromospheric Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petralia, A.; Reale, F.; Orlando, S.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Observations reveal a correspondence between chromospheric type II spicules and bright upward-moving fronts in the corona observed in the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) band. However, theoretical considerations suggest that these flows are probably not the main source of heating in coronal magnetic loops. Aims. We investigate the propagation of high-speed chromospheric flows into coronal magnetic flux tubes and the possible production of emission in the EUV band. Methods. We simulated the propagation of a dense 104 K chromospheric jet upward along a coronal loop by means of a 2D cylindrical MHD model that includes gravity, radiative losses, thermal conduction, and magnetic induction. The jet propagates in a complete atmosphere including the chromosphere and a tenuous cool (approximately 0.8 MK) corona, linked through a steep transition region. In our reference model, the jet initial speed is 70 km per second, its initial density is 10(exp 11) per cubic centimeter, and the ambient uniform magnetic field is 10 G. We also explored other values of jet speed and density in 1D and different magnetic field values in 2D, as well as the jet propagation in a hotter (approximately 1.5 MK) background loop. Results. While the initial speed of the jet does not allow it to reach the loop apex, a hot shock-front develops ahead of it and travels to the other extreme of the loop. The shock front compresses the coronal plasma and heats it to about 10(exp 6) K. As a result, a bright moving front becomes visible in the 171 Angstrom channel of the SDO/AIA mission. This result generally applies to all the other explored cases, except for the propagation in the hotter loop. Conclusions. For a cool, low-density initial coronal loop, the post-shock plasma ahead of upward chromospheric flows might explain at least part of the observed correspondence between type II spicules and EUV emission excess.

  16. Solar Wind Associated with Near Equatorial Coronal Hole M ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-25

    May 25, 2015 ... coronal hole and solar wind. For both the wavelength bands, we also com- pute coronal hole radiative energy near the earth and it is found to be of similar order as that of solar wind energy. However, for the wavelength. 193 Å, owing to almost similar magnitudes of energy emitted by coronal hole and ...

  17. Exercising 'Race' Through the Coronation Physical Training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... through their concern with race. The Coronation Physical Training Competition fitted into this agenda. Despite betrayal by the English during the post South African War negotiations, Black political movements and individuals continued seeking means to prove themselves loyal subjects of the King. Black schools therefore ...

  18. Frontoorbital advancement in coronal suture craniosynostosis: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Surgical therapy of coronal craniosynostosis in the modern era has evolved with the adoption of frontoorbital advancement and forehead reshaping to correct the supraorbital rim recession and the abnormal form of the cranium. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of quantitative preoperative ...

  19. Frontoorbital advancement in coronal suture craniosynostosis: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The frontal bone was then removed as indicated. The most lateral aspect of the coronal suture was radically removed with rongeurs, including a part of the greater and lesser wings of the sphenoid bone. The frontal and temporal lobes of the brain were gently repositioned to allow for safe upper orbital osteotomies through ...

  20. Magnetic Topology of Coronal Hole Linkages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. A.; Lionello, R.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    In recent work, Antiochos and coworkers argued that the boundary between the open and closed field regions on the Sun can be extremely complex with narrow corridors of open ux connecting seemingly disconnected coronal holes from the main polar holes, and that these corridors may be the sources of the slow solar wind. We examine, in detail, the topology of such magnetic configurations using an analytical source surface model that allows for analysis of the eld with arbitrary resolution. Our analysis reveals three important new results: First, a coronal hole boundary can join stably to the separatrix boundary of a parasitic polarity region. Second, a single parasitic polarity region can produce multiple null points in the corona and, more important, separator lines connecting these points. Such topologies are extremely favorable for magnetic reconnection, because it can now occur over the entire length of the separators rather than being con ned to a small region around the nulls. Finally, the coronal holes are not connected by an open- eld corridor of finite width, but instead are linked by a singular line that coincides with the separatrix footprint of the parasitic polarity. We investigate how the topological features described above evolve in response to motion of the parasitic polarity region. The implications of our results for the sources of the slow solar wind and for coronal and heliospheric observations are discussed.

  1. Microflares as Possible Sources for Coronal Heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present a preliminary study of 27 microflares observed by Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) mission during July 2003 to August 2006. We found that all 27 microflares show the Fe-line feature peaking around 6.7 keV, which is an indicator of the presence of coronal plasma temperature ≥ 9 MK. On the other hand, the ...

  2. Mechanisms of Coronal Heating S. R. Verma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The Sun is a mysterious star. The high temperature of the chromosphere and corona present one of the most puzzling problems of solar physics. Observations show that the solar coronal heating problem is highly complex with many different facts. It is likely that different heating mechanisms are at work in solar ...

  3. Large-scale Globally Propagating Coronal Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Warmuth

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale, globally propagating wave-like disturbances have been observed in the solar chromosphere and by inference in the corona since the 1960s. However, detailed analysis of these phenomena has only been conducted since the late 1990s. This was prompted by the availability of high-cadence coronal imaging data from numerous spaced-based instruments, which routinely show spectacular globally propagating bright fronts. Coronal waves, as these perturbations are usually referred to, have now been observed in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Many findings have supported the “classical” interpretation of the disturbances: fast-mode MHD waves or shocks that are propagating in the solar corona. However, observations that seemed inconsistent with this picture have stimulated the development of alternative models in which “pseudo waves” are generated by magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of an expanding coronal mass ejection. This has resulted in a vigorous debate on the physical nature of these disturbances. This review focuses on demonstrating how the numerous observational findings of the last one and a half decades can be used to constrain our models of large-scale coronal waves, and how a coherent physical understanding of these disturbances is finally emerging.

  4. Command and Control (C2) Agility (Agilite du commandement et du controle (C2))

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Space Mapping Guide, an Enablers of Agility Checklist , and C2 Maneuver Guidelines and Procedures. • Develop systems and decision aids that support...called spider charts. The “arms” of the chart correspond to the same dimensions as the cube model for C2 maturity: distribution of decision rights

  5. NATO NEC C2 Maturity Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    goes beyond awareness and includes perceptions of a larger picture including cause and effect as well as temporal dynamics. See Understanding...Germany ( Saxony ) dur- ing 2002. It required an endeavour composed of local, state, and national organisations as well as a number of NGOs. 118...Conflicted C2 approach. In other words, the endeavour lacked a common picture of what had happened and what needed to be done which strongly impacted

  6. Hereditary deficiency of the second component of complement (C2) in man: correlation of C2 haemolytic activity with immunochemical measurements of C2 protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, S.; Klemperer, M. R.; Rosen, F. S.; Austen, K. F.; Kumate, J.

    1970-01-01

    Measurements of the nine components of complement in the serums of 16 members of a kindred have established the diagnosis of hereditary deficiency of the second component of complement (C2). The autosomal recessive mode of inheritance resembles that of previously described families with C2 deficiency. Both C2 activity determinations with a stoichiometric haemolytic assay and C2 protein measurements with electroimmunodiffusion against antibody monospecific for C2 detect the heterozygous deficient state. Antigenic analysis, in vitro reconstitution experiments, and the constant ratio of C2 function to C2 protein indicate that the C2 synthesized by heterozygotes is indistinguishable from normal human C2. Studies of neonatal homozygous deficient serum and maternal heterozygous deficient serum show that transplacental passage of C2 does not occur. C2 deficiency in this family is not associated with clinical defects in host resistance. ImagesFIG. 3 PMID:4987909

  7. Management of distal humeral coronal shear fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yari, Shahram S; Bowers, Nathan L; Craig, Miguel A; Reichel, Lee M

    2015-01-01

    Coronal shear fractures of the distal humerus are rare, complex fractures that can be technically challenging to manage. They usually result from a low-energy fall and direct compression of the distal humerus by the radial head in a hyper-extended or semi-flexed elbow or from spontaneous reduction of a posterolateral subluxation or dislocation. Due to the small number of soft tissue attachments at this site, almost all of these fractures are displaced. The incidence of distal humeral coronal shear fractures is higher among women because of the higher rate of osteoporosis in women and the difference in carrying angle between men and women. Distal humeral coronal shear fractures may occur in isolation, may be part of a complex elbow injury, or may be associated with injuries proximal or distal to the elbow. An associated lateral collateral ligament injury is seen in up to 40% and an associated radial head fracture is seen in up to 30% of these fractures. Given the complex nature of distal humeral coronal shear fractures, there is preference for operative management. Operative fixation leads to stable anatomic reduction, restores articular congruity, and allows initiation of early range-of-motion movements in the majority of cases. Several surgical exposure and fixation techniques are available to reconstruct the articular surface following distal humeral coronal shear fractures. The lateral extensile approach and fixation with countersunk headless compression screws placed in an anterior-to-posterior fashion are commonly used. We have found a two-incision approach (direct anterior and lateral) that results in less soft tissue dissection and better outcomes than the lateral extensile approach in our experience. Stiffness, pain, articular incongruity, arthritis, and ulnohumeral instability may result if reduction is non-anatomic or if fixation fails. PMID:25984515

  8. RECONNECTION-DRIVEN CORONAL-HOLE JETS WITH GRAVITY AND SOLAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K. [Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States); Pariat, E. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, Sorbonne Université, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France)

    2017-01-01

    Coronal-hole jets occur ubiquitously in the Sun's coronal holes, at EUV and X-ray bright points associated with intrusions of minority magnetic polarity. The embedded-bipole model for these jets posits that they are driven by explosive, fast reconnection between the stressed closed field of the embedded bipole and the open field of the surrounding coronal hole. Previous numerical studies in Cartesian geometry, assuming uniform ambient magnetic field and plasma while neglecting gravity and solar wind, demonstrated that the model is robust and can produce jet-like events in simple configurations. We have extended these investigations by including spherical geometry, gravity, and solar wind in a nonuniform, coronal hole-like ambient atmosphere. Our simulations confirm that the jet is initiated by the onset of a kink-like instability of the internal closed field, which induces a burst of reconnection between the closed and external open field, launching a helical jet. Our new results demonstrate that the jet propagation is sustained through the outer corona, in the form of a traveling nonlinear Alfvén wave front trailed by slower-moving plasma density enhancements that are compressed and accelerated by the wave. This finding agrees well with observations of white-light coronal-hole jets, and can explain microstreams and torsional Alfvén waves detected in situ in the solar wind. We also use our numerical results to deduce scaling relationships between properties of the coronal source region and the characteristics of the resulting jet, which can be tested against observations.

  9. Reconnection-Driven Coronal-Hole Jets with Gravity and Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpen, J. T.; Devore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Pariat, E.

    2017-01-01

    Coronal-hole jets occur ubiquitously in the Sun's coronal holes, at EUV and X-ray bright points associated with intrusions of minority magnetic polarity. The embedded-bipole model for these jets posits that they are driven by explosive, fast reconnection between the stressed closed field of the embedded bipole and the open field of the surrounding coronal hole. Previous numerical studies in Cartesian geometry, assuming uniform ambient magnetic field and plasma while neglecting gravity and solar wind, demonstrated that the model is robust and can produce jet-like events in simple configurations. We have extended these investigations by including spherical geometry,gravity, and solar wind in a nonuniform, coronal hole-like ambient atmosphere. Our simulations confirm that the jet is initiated by the onset of a kink-like instability of the internal closed field, which induces a burst of reconnection between the closed and external open field, launching a helical jet. Our new results demonstrate that the jet propagation is sustained through the outer corona, in the form of a traveling nonlinear Alfven wave front trailed by slower-moving plasma density enhancements that are compressed and accelerated by the wave. This finding agrees well with observations of white-light coronal-hole jets, and can explain microstreams and torsional Alfven waves detected in situ in the solar wind. We also use our numerical results to deduce scaling relationships between properties of the coronal source region and the characteristics of the resulting jet, which can be tested against observations.

  10. Genesis Solar Wind Interstream, Coronal Hole and Coronal Mass Ejection Samples: Update on Availability and Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, J. H.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Allums, K. K.

    2017-01-01

    Recent refinement of analysis of ACE/SWICS data (Advanced Composition Explorer/Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer) and of onboard data for Genesis Discovery Mission of 3 regimes of solar wind at Earth-Sun L1 make it an appropriate time to update the availability and condition of Genesis samples specifically collected in these three regimes and currently curated at Johnson Space Center. ACE/SWICS spacecraft data indicate that solar wind flow types emanating from the interstream regions, from coronal holes and from coronal mass ejections are elementally and isotopically fractionated in different ways from the solar photosphere, and that correction of solar wind values to photosphere values is non-trivial. Returned Genesis solar wind samples captured very different kinds of information about these three regimes than spacecraft data. Samples were collected from 11/30/2001 to 4/1/2004 on the declining phase of solar cycle 23. Meshik, et al is an example of precision attainable. Earlier high precision laboratory analyses of noble gases collected in the interstream, coronal hole and coronal mass ejection regimes speak to degree of fractionation in solar wind formation and models that laboratory data support. The current availability and condition of samples captured on collector plates during interstream slow solar wind, coronal hole high speed solar wind and coronal mass ejections are de-scribed here for potential users of these samples.

  11. Electronically Excited C2 from Laser Photodissociated C60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Scott, Carl D.; Nikolaev, Pavel; Smalley, Richard E.

    1999-01-01

    Spectral and transient emission measurements are made of radiation from products of laser excitation of buckminsterfullerene (C60) vapor diluted in argon at 973 K. The principal radiation is from the Swan band system of C2 and, at early times, also from a black body continuum. The C2 radiation is observed only when C60 is excited by green (532 nm) and not with IR (1064 nm) laser radiation at energy densities of about 1.5 J/square cm. Transient measurements indicate that there are two characteristic periods of decay of radiation. The first period, lasting about 2 micro seconds, has a characteristic decay time of about 0.3 micro seconds. The second period, lasting at least 50 micro seconds, has a characteristic decay time of about 5 micro seconds. These characteristic times are thought to be associated with cooling of C60 molecules or nanosized carbon particles during the early period; and with electronically excited C2 that is a decomposition product of laser excited C60, C58, ... molecules during the later period.

  12. N2C2M2 Experimentation and Validation: Understanding Its C2 Approaches and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    the organization and execution of the experiments, specifically, Col. Fernando Freire , LtCol. António Flambó, LtCol. José Martins, LtCol. Paulo ...of ELICIT Experimental Data. Paper presented at the 13th ICCRTS, Seattle, USA, 2008. [13.] Manso, Marco, and Paulo Nunes. ELICIT and the Future C2...detailed mapping between C2 CRM variables and ELICIT refer to: MANSO, Marco, and Paulo NUNES. ELICIT and the Future C2: Theoretical Foundations for the

  13. Coronal magnetic fields from multiple type II bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnappa, Vijayakumar; Raveesha, K. H.; Subramanian, K. R.

    Coronal magnetic fields from multiple type II bursts Vijayakumar H Doddamani1*, Raveesha K H2 and Subramanian3 1Bangalore University, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India 2CMR Institute of Technology, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India 3 Retd, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India Abstract Magnetic fields play an important role in the astrophysical processes occurring in solar corona. In the solar atmosphere, magnetic field interacts with the plasma, producing abundant eruptive activities. They are considered to be the main factors for coronal heating, particle acceleration and the formation of structures like prominences, flares and Coronal Mass Ejections. The magnetic field in solar atmosphere in the range of 1.1-3 Rsun is especially important as an interface between the photospheric magnetic field and the solar wind. Its structure and time dependent change affects space weather by modifying solar wind conditions, Cho (2000). Type II doublet bursts can be used for the estimation of the strength of the magnetic field at two different heights. Two type II bursts occur sometimes in sequence. By relating the speed of the type II radio burst to Alfven Mach Number, the Alfven speed of the shock wave generating type II radio burst can be calculated. Using the relation between the Alfven speed and the mean frequency of emission, the magnetic field strength can be determined at a particular height. We have used the relative bandwidth and drift rate properties of multiple type II radio bursts to derive magnetic field strengths at two different heights and also the gradient of the magnetic field in the outer corona. The magnetic field strength has been derived for different density factors. It varied from 1.2 to 2.5 gauss at a solar height of 1.4 Rsun. The empirical relation of the variation of the magnetic field with height is found to be of the form B(R) = In the present case the power law index ‘γ’ varied from -3 to -2 for variation of

  14. The Rest of the C2 Iceberg

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    exercise.2 As one would expect, however, there is much, much more to the C2 story in terms of who created the plan and whether it will contribute to...rigor to the air tasking process, and significant risks may arise if its contributions —and the reasons they were introduced in the first place—are not...http://www.dodccrp.org/. 28. Using three domains to approximate reality has many historical antecedents, includ- ing versions by Plato through J. F. C

  15. Formation and evolution of coronal rain observed by SDO/AIA on February 22, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashalomidze, Z.; Kukhianidze, V.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Oliver, R.; Shergelashvili, B.; Ramishvili, G.; Poedts, S.; De Causmaecker, P.

    2015-05-01

    acceleration of different coronal rain blobs might be due to the different values in the density ratio of blob to corona. All blobs leave trails, which might be a result of continuous cooling in their tails. Two movies attached to Fig. 1 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Two-color CO{sub 2}/HeNe laser interferometer for C-2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gornostaeva, O.; Deng, B. H.; Garate, E.; Gota, H.; Kinley, J.; Schroeder, J.; Tuszewski, M. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    A six-channel two-color interferometer has been developed for plasma electron density measurements in the C-2 field reversed configuration experiment. A CO{sub 2} laser is utilized as the main probe beams, while copropagating visible HeNe laser beams are mainly sensitive to vibration. Density measurements in C-2 plasmas have shown that this is a reliable turn-key system. The maximum residual phase noise after vibration compensation is less than {+-}5 deg., corresponding to a line integral density of 3x10{sup 18} m{sup -2}. The time resolution for routine operation is 2 {mu}s.

  17. Two-color CO2/HeNe laser interferometer for C-2 experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornostaeva, O; Deng, B H; Garate, E; Gota, H; Kinley, J; Schroeder, J; Tuszewski, M

    2010-10-01

    A six-channel two-color interferometer has been developed for plasma electron density measurements in the C-2 field reversed configuration experiment. A CO(2) laser is utilized as the main probe beams, while copropagating visible HeNe laser beams are mainly sensitive to vibration. Density measurements in C-2 plasmas have shown that this is a reliable turn-key system. The maximum residual phase noise after vibration compensation is less than ±5°, corresponding to a line integral density of 3×10(18) m(-2). The time resolution for routine operation is 2 μs.

  18. The Strength and Radial Profile of the Coronal Magnetic Field from the Standoff Distance of a Coronal Mass Ejection-Driven Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji

    2011-01-01

    We determine the coronal magnetic field strength in the heliocentric distance range 6-23 solar radii (Rs) by measuring the shock standoff distance and the radius of curvature of the flux rope during the 2008 March 25 coronal mass ejection imaged by white-light coronagraphs. Assuming the adiabatic index, we determine the Alfven Mach number, and hence the Alfven speed in the ambient medium using the measured shock speed. By measuring the upstream plasma density using polarization brightness images, we finally get the magnetic field strength upstream of the shock. The estimated magnetic field decreases from approximately 48 mG around 6 Rs to 8 mG at 23 Rs. The radial profile of the magnetic field can be described by a power law in agreement with other estimates at similar heliocentric distances.

  19. Coronal closed structures. IV - Hydrodynamical stability and response to heating perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, G.; Serio, S.; Vaiana, G. S.; Rosner, R.

    1982-01-01

    The response of magnetically confined atmospheres to perturbations in the temperature and density distribution, and the local heating rate by means of a one-dimensional time-dependent hydrodynamical code, which incorporates the full energy, momentum and mass conservation equations is studied. These studies extend the linear instability analysis of Habbal and Rosner (1979) into the finite-amplitude regime, and generalize the confined atmosphere models of Serio et al., to the time-dependent domain. The results show that closed coronal atmospheres are stable against finite-amplitude perturbations if the chromospheric response is taken into account; and observed correlated increases in coronal density and temperature can only be achieved under quiescent conditions by increasing the heat deposition rate relatively more in the chromosphere than in the corona.

  20. Overview of C-2U FRC Experimental Program and Plans for C-2W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, H.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Tajima, T.; Putvinski, S.; Tuszewski, M.; Dettrick, S.; Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.; Thompson, M. C.; Yang, X.; Cappello, M.; Ivanov, A. A.; TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    Tri Alpha Energy's experimental program has been focused on a demonstration of reliable field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation and sustainment, driven by fast ions via high-power neutral-beam (NB) injection. The world's largest compact-toroid experimental devices, C-2 and C-2U, have successfully produced a well-stabilized, sustainable FRC plasma state with NB injection (input power, PNB 10 + MW; 15 keV hydrogen) and end-on coaxial plasma guns. Remarkable improvements in confinement and stability of FRC plasmas have led to further improved fast-ion build up; thereby, an advanced beam-driven FRC state has been produced and sustained for up to 5 + ms (longer than all characteristic system time scales), only limited by hardware and electric supply constraints such as NB and plasma-gun power supplies. To further improve the FRC performance the C-2U device is being replaced by C-2W featuring higher injected NB power, longer pulse duration as well as enhanced edge-biasing systems and substantially upgraded divertors. Main C-2U experimental results and key features of C-2W will be presented. Tri Alpha Energy, Inc.

  1. C-2W Magnetic Measurement Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, T.; Thompson, M. C.; Griswold, M.; Knapp, K.; Koop, B.; Ottaviano, A.; Tobin, M.; TAE, Tri Alpha Energy, Inc. Team

    2017-10-01

    Commissioning and early operations are underway on C-2W, Tri Alpha Energy's new FRC experiment. The increased complexity level of this machine requires an equally enhanced diagnostic capability. A fundamental component of any magnetically confined fusion experiment is a firm understanding of the magnetic field itself. C-2W is outfitted with over 700 magnetic field probes, 550 internal and 150 external. Innovative in-vacuum annular flux loop / B-dot combination probes will provide information about plasma shape, size, pressure, energy, total temperature, and trapped flux when coupled with establish theoretical interpretations. The massive Mirnov array, consisting of eight rings of eight 3D probes, will provide detailed information about plasma motion, stability, and MHD modal content with the aid of singular value decomposition (SVD) analysis. Internal Rogowski probes will detect the presence of axial currents flowing in the plasma jet in multiple axial locations. Initial data from this array of diagnostics will be presented along with some interpretation and discussion of the analysis techniques used.

  2. Solar Coronal Jets: Observations, Theory, and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raouafi, N. E.; Patsourakos, S.; Pariat, E.; Young, P. R.; Sterling, A.; Savcheva, A.; Shimojo, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Devore, C. R.; Archontis, V.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Chromospheric and coronal jets represent important manifestations of ubiquitous solar transients, which may be the source of signicant mass and energy input to the upper solar atmosphere and the solar wind. While the energy involved in a jet-like event is smaller than that of nominal solar ares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), jets share many common properties with these major phenomena, in particular, the explosive magnetically driven dynamics. Studies of jets could, therefore, provide critical insight for understanding the larger, more complex drivers of the solar activity. On the other side of the size-spectrum, the study of jets could also supply important clues on the physics of transients closeor at the limit of the current spatial resolution such as spicules. Furthermore, jet phenomena may hint to basic process for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind; consequently their study gives us the opportunity to attack a broadrange of solar-heliospheric problems.

  3. Coronal Heating Observed with Hi-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy R.

    2013-01-01

    The recent launch of the High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) as a sounding rocket has offered a new, different view of the Sun. With approx 0.3" resolution and 5 second cadence, Hi-C reveals dynamic, small-scale structure within a complicated active region, including coronal braiding, reconnection regions, Alfven waves, and flows along active region fans. By combining the Hi-C data with other available data, we have compiled a rich data set that can be used to address many outstanding questions in solar physics. Though the Hi-C rocket flight was short (only 5 minutes), the added insight of the small-scale structure gained from the Hi-C data allows us to look at this active region and other active regions with new understanding. In this talk, I will review the first results from the Hi-C sounding rocket and discuss the impact of these results on the coronal heating problem.

  4. Nondissociative low energy electron attachment to C2Cl4:C2Cl4- ion lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, L.; Parthasarathy, R.; Dunning, F. B.

    2003-04-01

    The lifetimes of long-lived parent anions formed by nondissociative electron attachment to C2Cl4 are investigated using Rydberg atom techniques. The ions are created through electron transfer in collisions with K(np) Rydberg atoms and their lifetimes are measured using both time-of-flight techniques and a permanent magnet Penning trap designed specifically for heavy ion storage. The data show that low-energy electron attachment to C2Cl4 leads to the formation of C2Cl4- ions with a broad range of lifetimes extending from ˜3 to ˜130 μs, which is attributed to capture by molecules in different initial vibrational states.

  5. Development of Compact Toroid Injector for C-2 FRCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tadafumi; Sekiguchi, Junichi; Asai, Tomohiko; Gota, Hiroshi; Garate, Eusebio; Allfrey, Ian; Valentine, Travis; Smith, Brett; Morehouse, Mark; TAE Team

    2014-10-01

    Collaborative research project with Tri Alpha Energy has been started and we have developed a new compact toroid (CT) injector for the C-2 device, mainly for fueling field-reversed configurations (FRCs). The CT is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma-gun (MCPG), which consists of coaxial cylinder electrodes; a spheromak-like plasma is generated by discharge and pushed out from the gun by Lorentz force. The inner diameter of outer electrode is 83.1 mm and the outer diameter of inner electrode is 54.0 mm. The surface of the inner electrode is coated with tungsten in order to reduce impurities coming out from the electrode. The bias coil is mounted inside of the inner electrode. We have recently conducted test experiments and achieved a supersonic CT translation speed of up to ~100 km/s. Other typical plasma parameters are as follows: electron density ~ 5 × 1021 m-3, electron temperature ~ 40 eV, and the number of particles ~0.5-1.0 × 1019. The CT injector is now planned to be installed on C-2 and the first CT injection experiment will be conducted in the near future. The detailed MCPG design as well as the test experimental results will be presented.

  6. Characterization of the C-2W Plasma Guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Ami; Sokolov, Vladimir; Korepanov, Sergey; Osin, Dima; Player, Gabriel; TAE Team

    2017-10-01

    Previous use of coaxial arc discharge plasma guns on the C-2U device exhibited great success in plasma stabilization and improved confinement. On the C-2W experiment, arc discharge plasma guns will again be used to facilitate the electrical connection between the plasma core and the divertor electrodes in order to maintain the electrode edge biasing and induce E x B shear to control plasma rotation. Each plasma gun contains an internal solenoid used to shape the plasma stream. Characterization of electron density (ne) , electron temperature (Te) , floating potential (Vf) , and total plasma flux in an arc discharge lasting 6 ms without the internal solenoid are presented. A Langmuir probe located 27 cm axially outside of the plasma gun anode measures a bell-like radial ne profile with peak ne 1018 m-3 and Te 2 - 10 eV. Observed spectral lines of impurity ions provide an estimate of Te, and Balmer series line ratios of the main ion component are used to evaluate ne at both the probe location and near the plasma gun anode. A calorimeter measures the plasma flux to be constant and equivalent to 1 kA.

  7. Transequatorial Coronal Cloud Prominences Versus Transequatorial Channel Prominence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S. F.; Daga, K.

    2016-12-01

    Seven transequatorial channel prominences were identified in the McCauley et al. catalog of erupting prominences from June 2010 - Sep 2014 (2015 Solar Phys. 290, 1703). A comparable number of transequatorial coronal cloud prominences were identified in the Martin et al. study of coronal cloud prominences from May 2010 - April 2012 (IAU Symposium 320, 2016, p. 276). The similar locations of these two subsets of two primary prominence classifications make them nearly ideal candidates for comparison of their properties. Coronal rain is an integral dynamic in coronal cloud prominences whereas counterstreaming motion is characteristic of channel prominences. The two subsets are representative of the the differing magnetic structure, mass origin, evolution, and environmental properties of coronal cloud prominences and channel prominences in general. These samples illustrate how coronal cloud prominences require different models than channel prominences. However, both types of prominences appear to be dependent upon pre-existing environments that largely control their structure and dynamics.

  8. Magnetic Untwisting in Solar Jets that Go into the Outer Corona in Polar Coronal Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from 14 exceptionally high-reaching large solar jets observed in the polar coronal holes. EUV movies from SDO/AIA show that each jet is similar to many other similar-size and smaller jets that erupt in coronal holes, but each is exceptional in that it goes higher than most other jets, so high that it is observed in the outer corona beyond 2.2 R(sub Sun) in images from the SOHO/LASCO/C2 coronagraph. For these high-reaching jets, we find: (1) the front of the jet transits the corona below 2.2 R(sub Sun) at a speed typically several times the sound speed; (2) each jet displays an exceptionally large amount of spin as it erupts; (3) in the outer corona, most jets display oscillatory swaying having an amplitude of a few degrees and a period of order 1 hour. We conclude that these jets are magnetically driven, propose that the driver is a magnetic-untwisting wave that is grossly a large-amplitude (i.e., nonlinear) torsional Alfven wave that is put into the reconnected open magnetic field in the jet by interchange reconnection as the jet erupts, and estimate from the measured spinning and swaying that the magnetic-untwisting wave loses most of its energy in the inner corona below 2.2 R(sub Sun). From these results for these big jets, we reason that the torsional magnetic waves observed in Type-II spicules should dissipate in the corona in the same way and could thereby power much of the coronal heating in coronal holes.

  9. Magnetic topological analysis of coronal bright points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galsgaard, K.; Madjarska, M. S.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Huang, Z.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2017-10-01

    Context. We report on the first of a series of studies on coronal bright points which investigate the physical mechanism that generates these phenomena. Aims: The aim of this paper is to understand the magnetic-field structure that hosts the bright points. Methods: We use longitudinal magnetograms taken by the Solar Optical Telescope with the Narrowband Filter Imager. For a single case, magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager were added to the analysis. The longitudinal magnetic field component is used to derive the potential magnetic fields of the large regions around the bright points. A magneto-static field extrapolation method is tested to verify the accuracy of the potential field modelling. The three dimensional magnetic fields are investigated for the presence of magnetic null points and their influence on the local magnetic domain. Results: In nine out of ten cases the bright point resides in areas where the coronal magnetic field contains an opposite polarity intrusion defining a magnetic null point above it. We find that X-ray bright points reside, in these nine cases, in a limited part of the projected fan-dome area, either fully inside the dome or expanding over a limited area below which typically a dominant flux concentration resides. The tenth bright point is located in a bipolar loop system without an overlying null point. Conclusions: All bright points in coronal holes and two out of three bright points in quiet Sun regions are seen to reside in regions containing a magnetic null point. An as yet unidentified process(es) generates the brigh points in specific regions of the fan-dome structure. The movies are available at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Coronal Loops: Evolving Beyond the Isothermal Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Cirtain, J. W.; Allen, J. D.

    2002-05-01

    Are coronal loops isothermal? A controversy over this question has arisen recently because different investigators using different techniques have obtained very different answers. Analysis of SOHO-EIT and TRACE data using narrowband filter ratios to obtain temperature maps has produced several key publications that suggest that coronal loops may be isothermal. We have constructed a multi-thermal distribution for several pixels along a relatively isolated coronal loop on the southwest limb of the solar disk using spectral line data from SOHO-CDS taken on 1998 Apr 20. These distributions are clearly inconsistent with isothermal plasma along either the line of sight or the length of the loop, and suggested rather that the temperature increases from the footpoints to the loop top. We speculated originally that these differences could be attributed to pixel size -- CDS pixels are larger, and more `contaminating' material would be expected along the line of sight. To test this idea, we used CDS iron line ratios from our data set to mimic the isothermal results from the narrowband filter instruments. These ratios indicated that the temperature gradient along the loop was flat, despite the fact that a more complete analysis of the same data showed this result to be false! The CDS pixel size was not the cause of the discrepancy; rather, the problem lies with the isothermal approximation used in EIT and TRACE analysis. These results should serve as a strong warning to anyone using this simplistic method to obtain temperature. This warning is echoed on the EIT web page: ``Danger! Enter at your own risk!'' In other words, values for temperature may be found, but they may have nothing to do with physical reality. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NASA grant NAG5-9783. This research was funded in part by the NASA/TRACE MODA grant for Montana State University.

  11. Strength of the Solar Coronal Magnetic Field - A Comparison of Independent Estimates Using Contemporaneous Radio and White-Light Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Anshu; Ramesh, R.; Kathiravan, C.; Wang, T. J.

    2017-11-01

    We estimated the coronal magnetic field strength (B) during the 23 July 2016 coronal mass ejection (CME) event using i) the flux rope structure of the CME in the white-light coronagraph images and ii) the band-splitting in the associated type II burst. No models were assumed for the coronal electron density (N(r)) we used in the estimation. The results obtained with these two independent methods correspond to different heliocentric distances (r) in the range {≈} 2.5 - 4.5 R_{⊙}, but they show excellent consistency and could be fit with a single power-law distribution of the type B(r)=5.7r^{-2.6} G, which is applicable in that distance range. The power-law index ( i.e. -2.6) is in good agreement with the results obtained in previous studies by different methods.

  12. Extended phase diagram of R NiC2 family: Linear scaling of the Peierls temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Marta; Strychalska-Nowak, Judyta; Klimczuk, Tomasz; Kolincio, Kamil K.

    2018-01-01

    Physical properties for the late-lanthanide-based R NiC2 (R =Dy , Ho, Er, and Tm) ternary compounds are reported. All the compounds show antiferromagnetic ground state with the Néel temperature ranging from 3.4 K for HoNiC2 to 8.5 K for ErNiC2. The results of the transport and galvanomagnetic properties confirm a charge density wave state at and above room temperature with transition temperatures TCDW=284 , 335, 366, and 394 K for DyNiC2, HoNiC2, ErNiC2, and TmNiC2, respectively. The Peierls temperature TCDW scales linearly with the unit cell volume. A similar linear dependence has been observed for the temperature of the lock-in transition T1 as well. Beyond the intersection point of the trend lines, the lock-in transition is no longer observed. In this Rapid Communication we demonstrate an extended phase diagram for the R NiC2 family.

  13. A multi-channel coronal spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, D. A.; Orrall, F. Q.; Zane, R.

    1973-01-01

    We describe a new multi-channel coronal spectrophotometer system, presently being installed at Mees Solar Observatory, Mount Haleakala, Maui. The apparatus is designed to record and interpret intensities from many sections of the visible and near-visible spectral regions simultaneously, with relatively high spatial and temporal resolution. The detector, a thermoelectrically cooled silicon vidicon camera tube, has its central target area divided into a rectangular array of about 100,000 pixels and is read out in a slow-scan (about 2 sec/frame) mode. Instrument functioning is entirely under PDP 11/45 computer control, and interfacing is via the CAMAC system.

  14. FLARE-GENERATED TYPE II BURST WITHOUT ASSOCIATED CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magdalenic, J.; Marque, C.; Zhukov, A. N. [Solar-Terrestrial Center of Excellence, SIDC, Royal Observatory of Belgium, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Vrsnak, B. [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, Kaciceva 26, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Veronig, A., E-mail: Jasmina.Magdalenic@oma.be [IGAM/Kanzelhoehe Observatory, Institut of Physics, Universitaet Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2012-02-20

    We present a study of the solar coronal shock wave on 2005 November 14 associated with the GOES M3.9 flare that occurred close to the east limb (S06 Degree-Sign E60 Degree-Sign ). The shock signature, a type II radio burst, had an unusually high starting frequency of about 800 MHz, indicating that the shock was formed at a rather low height. The position of the radio source, the direction of the shock wave propagation, and the coronal electron density were estimated using Nancay Radioheliograph observations and the dynamic spectrum of the Green Bank Solar Radio Burst Spectrometer. The soft X-ray, H{alpha}, and Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager observations show that the flare was compact, very impulsive, and of a rather high density and temperature, indicating a strong and impulsive increase of pressure in a small flare loop. The close association of the shock wave initiation with the impulsive energy release suggests that the impulsive increase of the pressure in the flare was the source of the shock wave. This is supported by the fact that, contrary to the majority of events studied previously, no coronal mass ejection was detected in association with the shock wave, although the corresponding flare occurred close to the limb.

  15. Fast magnetohydrodynamic oscillations in an elliptical coronal arcade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, A. J.

    2006-09-01

    Aims.A model of a elliptically shaped coronal arcade with piecewise constant density is discussed to explore the effects of curvature on radially polarised fast modes. It is important to test whether the main results in the straight and cylindrical geometries can be extrapolated to these more complex equilibria. Methods: .An equilibrium model for a force-free, line-tied elliptical arcade is introduced and a partial differential equation is derived for the velocity perturbation of the fast modes, which is solved analytically. The properties of the modes are studied in terms of the dispersion relation, which depends on the eccentricity, the arcade width, and the density contrast. Results: .Modes mainly contained in the cavity below the arcade are also present, and have avoided crossings with the modes of the arcade. Even the fundamental mode becomes leaky due to curvature. Approximated relations are deduced for the frequency of the modes and the spatial structure is discussed, focusing on the different families through which a rich mode spectrum can be classified. Conclusions: .The different types of modes of the spectrum are described and its relevance to observations is discussed. The periods obtained in Cartesian geometry provide a reasonable approximation, but this geometry lacks some other key ingredients: the damping rates are different and some types of modes present in the elliptical geometry are not sustained in the straight slab.

  16. Coronal Magnetic Field Profiles from Shock-CME Standoff Distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Cairns, Iver H.; Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.

    2016-01-01

    Coronagraphs observe coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and driven shocks in white light images.From these observations the shocks speed and the shocks standoff distance from the CMEs leading edge can be derived. Using these quantities, theoretical relationships between the shocks Alfvenic Mach number MA and standoff distance, and empirical radial profiles for the solar wind velocity and number density, the radial magnetic field profile upstream of the shock can be calculated. These profiles cannot be measured directly. We test the accuracy of this method for estimating the radial magnetic field profile upstream of the shock by simulating a sample CME that occurred on 29 November 2013 using the three-dimensional (3-D) magnetohydrodynamic Block-Adaptive-Tree-Solar wind-Roe-Upwind-Scheme code, retrieving shock-CME standoff distances from the simulation, and comparing the estimated and simulated radial magnetic field profiles. We find good agreement between the two profiles (within +/-30%) between 1.8 and 10R.Our simulations confirm that a linear relationship exists between the standoff distance and the inverse compression ratio at the shock. We also find very good agreement between the empirical and simulated radial profiles of the number density and speed of the solar wind and inner corona.

  17. Comparison of fatigue strength of C2 pedicle screws, C2 pars screws, and a hybrid construct in C1-C2 fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Brian W; Shimer, Adam L; Chinthakunta, Suresh; Salloum, Kanaan; Ames, Christopher P; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Bucklen, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    A biomechanical study comparing the fatigue strength of different types of C2 fixation in a C1-C2 construct. To determine the pullout strength of a C2 pedicle screw and C2 pars screw after cyclical testing and differentiate differences in stiffness pre- and post-cyclical loading of 3 different C1-C2 fixations. Some surgeons use a short C2 pars screw in a C1-C2 construct, because it is less technically demanding and/or when the vertebral artery is high riding. Difference in construct stiffness between use of bilateral C2 pedicle screws, bilateral C2 pars screws, or a hybrid construct is unknown. Biomechanical testing was performed on 15 specimens. A bicortical C1 lateral mass screw was used in combination with 1 of 3 methods of C2 fixation: (1) bilateral long C2 pedicle screws (LL), (2) bilateral 14-mm C2 pars screws (SS), and (3) unilateral long C2 pedicle screw with a contralateral 14-mm C2 pars screw (LS). Each construct was subject to 16,000 cycles to simulate the immediate postoperative period. Changes in motion in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation were calculated. This was followed by pullout testing. The ability to limit range of motion significantly decreased after cyclical testing in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation for all 3 groups. After loading, the LL and LS groups had less percentage of increase in motion in flexion-extension and lateral bending than the SS group. Overall, the average pullout strength of a pedicle screw was 92% stronger than a pars screw. C2 pedicle screws have twice the pullout strength of C2 pars screws after cyclical loading. In cases in which the anatomy limits placement of bilateral C2 pedicle screws, a construct using a unilateral C2 pedicle screw with a contralateral short pars screw is a viable option and compares favorably with a bilateral C2 pedicle screw construct. N/A.

  18. Measurements of drift-wave-induced density and velocity fluctuations using high-speed passive impurity spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Takashi; Craig, D.; den Hartog, D. J.; Nornberg, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    Passive impurity spectroscopy is used to study high frequency ( 100 kHz) electron density and ion velocity fluctuations in the edge of MST reversed field pinch plasmas. When tearing modes are suppressed, stochastic transport is greatly reduced and microturbulence is anticipated to become important. Gyrokinetic simulations predict unstable trapped electron modes (TEM) in the edge region of these improved-confinement MST plasmas. Interferometry measurements reveal electron density fluctuations with wavenumbers, propagation direction, and a density-gradient threshold in good agreement with predictions for TEMs. These density fluctuations are also observed as emission fluctuations using a recently upgraded Ion Dynamics Spectrometer (IDS II) through edge passive C +2 measurements. The particle transport associated with TEMs will be evaluated directly by correlating the IDS-measured ion velocity and density fluctuations. The measurement is localized to the C +2 emission shell in the edge of the plasma, which is determined by a coronal charge-state balance model using ADAS. We used a large-throughput spectrometer originally developed for fast CHERS measurements and PMTs for light detection to achieve high time resolution. This work is supported by the US DOE.

  19. Relationship of EUV Irradiance Coronal Dimming Slope and Depth to Coronal Mass Ejection Speed and Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, James Paul; Woods, Thomas N.; Webb, David F.; Thompson, Barbara J.; Colaninno, Robin C.; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) coronal dimmings are often observed in response to solar eruptive events. These phenomena can be generated via several different physical processes. For space weather, the most important of these is the temporary void left behind by a coronal mass ejection (CME). Massive, fast CMEs tend to leave behind a darker void that also usually corresponds to minimum irradiance for the cooler coronal emissions. If the dimming is associated with a solar are, as is often the case, the are component of the irradiance light curve in the cooler coronal emission can be isolated and removed using simultaneous measurements of warmer coronal lines. We apply this technique to 37dimming events identified during two separate two-week periods in 2011, plus an event on 2010 August 7 analyzed in a previous paper, to parameterize dimming in terms of depth and slope. We provide statistics on which combination of wavelengths worked best for the flare-removal method, describe the fitting methods applied to the dimming light curves, and compare the dimming parameters with corresponding CME parameters of mass and speed. The best linear relationships found are nu(sub CME) [km/s] approx. equals 2.36 x 10 6 [km/%] x s(sub dim) [%/s] m(sub CME) [g] approx. equals 2.59 x 10(exp.15 [g/%] x the square root of d(sub dim) [%].These relationships could be used for space weather operations of estimating CME mass and speed using near-real-time irradiance dimming measurements.

  20. Analytical investigations on the Coronation Gospels manuscript

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceto, Maurizio; Agostino, Angelo; Fenoglio, Gaia; Idone, Ambra; Crivello, Fabrizio; Griesser, Martina; Kirchweger, Franz; Uhlir, Katharina; Puyo, Patricia Roger

    2017-01-01

    The Coronation Gospels or Krönungsevangeliar is a manuscript kept in Vienna at the Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien, datable to the end of VIII century A.D. and produced at Charlemagne court. It is an example of a purple codex, i.e. its parchment is coloured in purple. It has to be considered as one of the most important medieval codices, according to its use to take oath in the coronation ceremony of kings and emperors of the Holy Roman Empire up to 1792. In order to gather information of the manufacture of the manuscript and its present conservation state, a diagnostic investigation campaign has been carried out in situ with totally non-invasive techniques. X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (XRF), UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectrophotometry with optical fibres (FORS), spectrofluorimetry, optical microscopy and multispectral analysis have been applied in order to identify the colourants used in the decoration of the manuscript, with the main concern to the dye used to impart the purple hue to the parchment. The information collected was useful in order to address some of the questions raised by art historians concerning its history.

  1. Closed coronal structures. II - Generalized hydrostatic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serio, S.; Peres, G.; Vaiana, G. S.; Golub, L.; Rosner, R.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical computations of stationary solar coronal loop atmospheres are used to extend earlier analytical work. Two classes of loops are examined, namely symmetric loops with a temperature maximum at the top but now having a length greater than the pressure scale height and loops which have a local temperature minimum at the top. For the first class, new scaling laws are found which relate the base pressure and loop length to the base heating, the heating deposition scale height, and the pressure scale height. It is found that loops for which the length is greater than about two to three times the pressure scale height do not have stable solutions unless they have a temperature minimum at the top. Computed models with a temperature inversion at the top are permitted in a wider range of heating deposition scale height values than are loops with a temperature maximum at the top. These results are discussed in relation to observations showing a dependence of prominence formation and stability on the state of evolution of magnetic structures, and a general scenario is suggested for the understanding of loop evolution from emergence in active regions through the large-scale structure phase to opening in coronal holes.

  2. Featured Image: Waves in a Coronal Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-09-01

    The inset in this Solar Dynamics Observatory image shows a close-up view of a stunning coronal fan extending above the Suns atmosphere. These sweeping loops were observed on 7 March 2012 by a number of observatories, revealing the first known evidence of standing slow magnetoacoustic waves in cool coronal fan loops. The oscillations of the loops, studied in a recent article led by Vaibhav Pant (Indian Institute of Astrophysics), were triggered by blast waves that were generated by X-class flares from the distant active region AR 11429 (marked withthe yellow box at left). The overplotted X-ray curve in the top right corner of the image (click for the full view) shows the evolution of the flares that perturbed the footpoints of the loops. You can check out the video of the action below, and follow the link to the original article to read more about what these oscillations tell us about the Suns activity. CitationV. Pant et al 2017 ApJL 847 L5. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/aa880f

  3. A New Method for Coronal Magnetic Field Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sibaek; Choe, Gwang-Son; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Kim, Kap-Sung

    2017-08-01

    A precise way of coronal magnetic field reconstruction (extrapolation) is an indispensable tool for understanding of various solar activities. A variety of reconstruction codes have been developed so far and are available to researchers nowadays, but they more or less bear this and that shortcoming. In this paper, a new efficient method for coronal magnetic field reconstruction is presented. The method imposes only the normal components of magnetic field and current density at the bottom boundary to avoid the overspecification of the reconstruction problem, and employs vector potentials to guarantee the divergence-freeness. In our method, the normal component of current density is imposed, not by adjusting the tangential components of A, but by adjusting its normal component. This allows us to avoid a possible numerical instability that on and off arises in codes using A. In real reconstruction problems, the information for the lateral and top boundaries is absent. The arbitrariness of the boundary conditions imposed there as well as various preprocessing brings about the diversity of resulting solutions. We impose the source surface condition at the top boundary to accommodate flux imbalance, which always shows up in magnetograms. To enhance the convergence rate, we equip our code with a gradient-method type accelerator. Our code is tested on two analytical force-free solutions. When the solution is given only at the bottom boundary, our result surpasses competitors in most figures of merits devised by Schrijver et al. (2006). We have also applied our code to a real active region NOAA 11974, in which two M-class flares and a halo CME took place. The EUV observation shows a sudden appearance of an erupting loop before the first flare. Our numerical solutions show that two entwining flux tubes exist before the flare and their shackling is released after the CME with one of them opened up. We suggest that the erupting loop is created by magnetic reconnection between

  4. Magnetism Matters: Coronal Magnetometry Using Multi-Wavelength Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Sarah E.

    2015-08-01

    The solar coronal magnetic field is key both to solving fundamental problems in solar physics such as coronal heating and solar wind acceleration, and to predicting the internal magnetic structure and thus space-weather impact of coronal mass ejections. I will describe the current state of the art in coronal magnetometry, and present results from the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) at Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO), which since 2011 has taken polarimetric observations of the solar corona in the near-infrared on a near-daily basis. I will discuss work in progress that utilizes forward modeling to synthesize polarimetric data at multiple heights and vantage points, and at wavelengths from radio to infrared to visible to ultraviolet. The goal is to use such synthetic testbeds to determine the ideal set of observations for constraining the coronal magnetic field, and to establish a Data-Optimized Coronal Field Model (DOC-FM) that efficiently incorporates these data into global magnetic models. This work will provide essential tools and motivation for the planning and implementation of future coronal polarimetric projects and missions spanning a broad range of wavelengths.

  5. Magnetic Field in the Gravitationally Stratified Coronal Loops

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We study the effect of gravitational stratification on the estimation of magnetic fields in the coronal loops. By using the method of MHD seismology of kink waves for the estimation of magnetic field of coronal loops, we derive a new formula for the magnetic field considering the effect of gravitational ...

  6. Solar Cycle Variation of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-08-25

    Aug 25, 2010 ... Spörer's sunspot law at low latitudes (thus, no 'butterfly diagram'); how- ever, at high latitudes, there may be a poleward motion and an equator- ward motion from the rise to the maximum to the declining phases. Key words. Sun: activity, coronal mass ejections (CMEs). 1. Introduction. Interplanetary coronal ...

  7. Solar Wind Associated with Near Equatorial Coronal Hole

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We find a strong association between different parameters of coronal hole and solar wind. For both the wavelength bands, we also compute coronal hole radiative energy near the earth and it is found to be of similar order as that of solar wind energy. However, for the wavelength 193 Å, owing to almost similar magnitudes of ...

  8. Seismology of Transversely Oscillating Coronal Loops with Siphon Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terradas, J.; Arregui, I.; Verth, G.; Goossens, M.

    2011-03-01

    There are ubiquitous flows observed in the solar atmosphere of sub-Alfvénic speeds; however, after flaring and coronal mass ejection events flows can become Alfvénic. In this Letter, we derive an expression for the standing kink mode frequency due to siphon flow in coronal loops, valid for both low and high speed regimes. It is found that siphon flow introduces a linear, spatially dependent phase shift along coronal loops and asymmetric eigenfunctions. We demonstrate how this theory can be used to determine the kink and flow speed of oscillating coronal loops with reference to an observational case study. It is shown that the presence of siphon flow can cause the underestimation of magnetic field strength in coronal loops using the traditional seismological methods.

  9. Assessment of Coronal Radiographic Parameters of the Spine in the Treatment of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Karami

    2016-10-01

    Preoperative coronal balance is very important to make a balanced spine after surgery. Other parameters like Lenke classification or main thoracic overcorrection did not affect postoperative coronal decompensation.

  10. Bonding-restricted structure search for novel 2D materials with dispersed C2 dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cunzhi; Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian

    2016-07-12

    Currently, the available algorithms for unbiased structure searches are primarily atom-based, where atoms are manipulated as the elementary units, and energy is used as the target function without any restrictions on the bonding of atoms. In fact, in many cases such as nanostructure-assembled materials, the structural units are nanoclusters. We report a study of a bonding-restricted structure search method based on the particle swarm optimization (PSO) for finding the stable structures of two-dimensional (2D) materials containing dispersed C2 dimers rather than individual C atoms. The C2 dimer can be considered as a prototype of nanoclusters. Taking Si-C, B-C and Ti-C systems as test cases, our method combined with density functional theory and phonon calculations uncover new ground state geometrical structures for SiC2, Si2C2, BC2, B2C2, TiC2, and Ti2C2 sheets and their low-lying energy allotropes, as well as their electronic structures. Equally important, this method can be applied to other complex systems even containing f elements and other molecular dimers such as S2, N2, B2 and Si2, where the complex orbital orientations require extensive search for finding the optimal orientations to maximize the bonding with the dimers, predicting new 2D materials beyond MXenes (a family of transition metal carbides or nitrides) and dichalcogenide monolayers.

  11. Three-dimensional characteristics of solar coronal shocks determined from observations; Geometry, Kinematics, and Compression ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ryun Young; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the three-dimensional (3D) characteristics of coronal shocks associated with Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), in terms of geometry, kinematics, and density compression ratio, employing a new method we have developed. The method uses multi-viewpoint observations from the STEREO-A, -B and SOHO coronagraphs. The 3D structure and kinematics of coronal shock waves and the driving CMEs are derived separately using a forward modeling method. We analyze two CMEs that are observed as halos by the three spacecraft, and the peak speeds are over 2000 km s-1. From the 3D modeling, we find (1) the coronal shock waves are spherical apparently enclosing the Sun, in which the angular widths are much wider than those of CMEs (92° and 252° versus 58° and 91°), indicating shock waves are propagating away from the CMEs in the azimuthal directions, and (2) the speeds of the shock waves around the CME noses are comparable to those of the CME noses, but the speeds at the lateral flanks seem to be limited to the local fast magnetosonic speed. Applying our new method, we determine electron densities in the shock sheaths, the downstream-upstream density ratios, and the Mach numbers. We find (1) the sheath electron densities decrease with height in general but have the maximum near the CME noses, (2) the density ratios and Mach numbers also seem to depend on the position angle from the CME nose to the far-flank but are more or less constant in time, while the sheath electron densities and speeds decrease with time, because of the reduced local Alfven speed with height, and (3) the shocks could be supercritical in a wider spatial range, and it lasts longer, than those of what have been reported in the past. We conclude that the shock wave associated with an energetic CME is a phenomenon that is becoming a non-driven (blast-type), nearly freely propagating wave at the flank from a driven (bow- and/or piston-type) wave near the CME nose.

  12. Understanding Solar Coronal Heating through Atomic and Plasma Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Daniel Wolf; Arthanayaka, Thusitha; Bose, Sayak; Hahn, Michael; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory V.; Gekelman, Walter; Vincena, Steve

    2017-08-01

    Recent solar observations suggest that the Sun's corona is heated by Alfven waves that dissipate at unexpectedly low heights in the corona. These observations raise a number of questions. Among them are the problems of accurately quantifying the energy flux of the waves and that of describing the physical mechanism that leads to the wave damping. We are performing laboratory experiments to address both of these issues.The energy flux depends on the electron density, which can be measured spectroscopically. However, spectroscopic density diagnostics have large uncertainties, because they depend sensitively on atomic collisional excitation, de-excitation, and radiative transition rates for multiple atomic levels. Essentially all of these data come from theory and have not been experimentally validated. We are conducting laboratory experiments using the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that will provide accurate empirical calibrations for spectroscopic density diagnostics and which will also help to guide theoretical calculations.The observed rapid wave dissipation is likely due to inhomogeneities in the plasma that drive flows and currents at small length scales where energy can be more efficiently dissipated. This may take place through gradients in the Alfvén speed along the magnetic field, which causes wave reflection and generates turbulence. Alternatively, gradients in the Alfvén speed across the field can lead to dissipation through phase-mixing. Using the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at the University of California Los Angeles, we are studying both of these dissipation mechanisms in the laboratory in order to understand their potential roles in coronal heating.

  13. Scaling relationships for adsorption energies of C2 hydrocarbons on transition metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Glenn; Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Using density functional theory calculations we show that the adsorption energies for C2Hx-type adsorbates on transition metal surfaces scale with each other according to a simple bond order conservation model. This observation generalizes some recently recognized adsorption energy scaling laws f...

  14. Transgenic overexpression of Niemann-Pick C2 protein promotes cholesterol gallstone formation in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acuna, Mariana; Gonzalez-Hodar, Lila; Amigo, Ludwig; Castro, Juan; Gabriela Morales, M.; Cancino, Gonzalo I.; Groen, Albert K.; Young, Juan; Francisco Miquel, Juan; Zanlungo, Silvana

    Background & Aims: Niemann-Pick C2 (NPC2) is a lysosomal protein involved in the egress of low-density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol from lysosomes to other intracellular compartments. NPC2 has been detected in several tissues and is also secreted from the liver into bile. We have previously shown

  15. Center-to-Limb Variability of Hot Coronal EUV Emissions During Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, E. M. B.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Eparvier, F. G.; Epp, L.

    2018-02-01

    It is generally accepted that densities of quiet-Sun and active region plasma are sufficiently low to justify the optically thin approximation, and this is commonly used in the analysis of line emissions from plasma in the solar corona. However, the densities of solar flare loops are substantially higher, compromising the optically thin approximation. This study begins with a radiative transfer model that uses typical solar flare densities and geometries to show that hot coronal emission lines are not generally optically thin. Furthermore, the model demonstrates that the observed line intensity should exhibit center-to-limb variability (CTLV), with flares observed near the limb being dimmer than those occurring near disk center. The model predictions are validated with an analysis of over 200 flares observed by the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), which uses six lines, with peak formation temperatures between 8.9 and 15.8 MK, to show that limb flares are systematically dimmer than disk-center flares. The data are then used to show that the electron column density along the line of sight typically increases by 1.76 × 10^{19} cm^{-2} for limb flares over the disk-center flare value. It is shown that the CTLV of hot coronal emissions reduces the amount of ionizing radiation propagating into the solar system, and it changes the relative intensities of lines and bands commonly used for spectral analysis.

  16. Flux Accretion and Coronal Mass Ejection Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Brian

    2017-08-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the primary drivers of severe space weather disturbances in the heliosphere. The equations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) have been used to model the onset and, in some cases, the subsequent acceleration of ejections. Both observations and numerical modeling, however, suggest that magnetic reconnection likely plays a major role in most, if not all, fast CMEs. Here, we theoretically investigate the dynamical effects of accretion of magnetic flux onto a rising ejection by reconnection involving the ejection's background field. This reconnection alters the magnetic structure of the ejection and its environment, thereby modifying forces acting during the eruption, generically leading to faster acceleration of the CME. Our ultimate aim is to characterize changes in CME acceleration in terms of observable properties of magnetic reconnection, such as the amount of reconnected flux, deduced from observations of flare ribbons and photospheric magnetic fields.

  17. Turbulent resistive heating of solar coronal arches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, G.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility that coronal heating occurs by means of anomalous Joule heating by electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is examined, with consideration given to currents running from foot of a loop to the other. It is assumed that self-fields generated by the currents are absent and currents follow the direction of the magnetic field, allowing the plasma cylinder to expand radially. Ion and electron heating rates are defined within the cylinder, together with longitudinal conduction and convection, radiation and cross-field transport, all in terms of Coulomb and turbulent effects. The dominant force is identified as electrostatic ion cyclotron instability, while ion acoustic modes remain stable. Rapid heating from an initial temperature of 10 eV to 100-1000 eV levels is calculated, with plasma reaching and maintaining a temperature in the 100 eV range. Strong heating is also possible according to the turbulent Ohm's law and by resistive heating.

  18. Rate constant for the reaction C2H5 + HBr → C2H6 + Br.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, David M; Peng, Jingping; Goumri, A; Yuan, J; Marshall, Paul

    2012-06-21

    RRKM theory has been employed to analyze the kinetics of the title reaction, in particular, the once-controversial negative activation energy. Stationary points along the reaction coordinate were characterized with coupled cluster theory combined with basis set extrapolation to the complete basis set limit. A shallow minimum, bound by 9.7 kJ mol(-1) relative to C(2)H(5) + HBr, was located, with a very small energy barrier to dissociation to Br + C(2)H(6). The transition state is tight compared to the adduct. The influence of vibrational anharmonicity on the kinetics and thermochemistry of the title reaction were explored quantitatively. With adjustment of the adduct binding energy by ∼4 kJ mol(-1), the computed rate constants may be brought into agreement with most experimental data in the literature, including new room-temperature results described here. There are indications that at temperatures above those studied experimentally, the activation energy may switch from negative to positive.

  19. WAVE LEAKAGE AND RESONANT ABSORPTION IN A LOOP EMBEDDED IN A CORONAL ARCADE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rial, S.; Terradas, J.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L. [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122, Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Arregui, I., E-mail: samuel.rial@uib.es, E-mail: jaume.terradas@uib.es, E-mail: ramon.oliver@uib.es, E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.es, E-mail: iarregui@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2013-01-20

    We investigate the temporal evolution of impulsively generated perturbations in a potential coronal arcade with an embedded loop. For the initial configuration we consider a coronal loop, represented by a density enhancement, which is unbounded in the ignorable direction of the arcade. The linearized time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic equations have been numerically solved in field-aligned coordinates and the time evolution of the initial perturbations has been studied in the zero-{beta} approximation. For propagation constrained to the plane of the arcade, the considered initial perturbations do not excite trapped modes of the system. This weakness of the model is overcome by the inclusion of wave propagation in the ignorable direction. Perpendicular propagation produces two main results. First, damping by wave leakage is less efficient because the loop is able to act as a better wave trap of vertical oscillations. Second, the consideration of an inhomogeneous corona enables the resonant damping of vertical oscillations and the energy transfer from the interior of the loop to the external coronal medium.

  20. TWO-DIMENSIONAL CELLULAR AUTOMATON MODEL FOR THE EVOLUTION OF ACTIVE REGION CORONAL PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López Fuentes, Marcelo [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio, CONICET-UBA, CC. 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Klimchuk, James A., E-mail: lopezf@iafe.uba.ar [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We study a two-dimensional cellular automaton (CA) model for the evolution of coronal loop plasmas. The model is based on the idea that coronal loops are made of elementary magnetic strands that are tangled and stressed by the displacement of their footpoints by photospheric motions. The magnetic stress accumulated between neighbor strands is released in sudden reconnection events or nanoflares that heat the plasma. We combine the CA model with the Enthalpy Based Thermal Evolution of Loops model to compute the response of the plasma to the heating events. Using the known response of the X-Ray Telescope on board Hinode, we also obtain synthetic data. The model obeys easy-to-understand scaling laws relating the output (nanoflare energy, temperature, density, intensity) to the input parameters (field strength, strand length, critical misalignment angle). The nanoflares have a power-law distribution with a universal slope of –2.5, independent of the input parameters. The repetition frequency of nanoflares, expressed in terms of the plasma cooling time, increases with strand length. We discuss the implications of our results for the problem of heating and evolution of active region coronal plasmas.

  1. First-Principles Study of Vacancies in Ti3SiC2 and Ti3AlC2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available MAX phase materials have attracted increased attention due to their unique combination of ceramic and metallic properties. In this study, the properties of vacancies in Ti3AlC2 and Ti3SiC2, which are two of the most widely studied MAX phases, were investigated using first-principles calculations. Our calculations indicate that the stabilities of vacancies in Ti3SiC2 and Ti3AlC2 differ greatly from those previously reported for Cr2AlC. The order of the formation energies of vacancies is VTi(a > VTi(b > VC > VA for both Ti3SiC2 and Ti3AlC2. Although the diffusion barriers for Ti3SiC2 and Ti3AlC2 are similar (~0.95 eV, the properties of their vacancies are significantly different. Our results show that the vacancy–vacancy interaction is attractive in Ti3AlC2 but repulsive in Ti3SiC2. The introduction of VTi and VC vacancies results in the lattice constant c along the [0001] direction increasing for both Ti3SiC2 and Ti3AlC2. In contrast, the lattice constant c decreases significantly when VA are introduced. The different effect of VA on the lattice constants is explained by enhanced interactions of nearby Ti layers.

  2. Analysis list: NR2C2 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NR2C2 Blood,Liver,Uterus + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/tar...get/NR2C2.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/NR2C2.5.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/NR2C2.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/NR2C2.Blood....tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/NR2C2.Liver.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/NR2C2.Uterus.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg1

  3. First Use of Synoptic Vector Magnetograms for Global Nonlinear, Force-Free Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, T.; Wiegelmann, T.; Gosain, S.; MacNeice, P.; Pevtsov, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere is generally thought to provide the energy for much of the activity seen in the solar corona, such as flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), etc. To overcome the unavailability of coronal magnetic field measurements, photospheric magnetic field vector data can be used to reconstruct the coronal field. Currently, there are several modelling techniques being used to calculate three-dimensional field lines into the solar atmosphere. Aims. For the first time, synoptic maps of a photospheric-vector magnetic field synthesized from the vector spectromagnetograph (VSM) on Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) are used to model the coronal magnetic field and estimate free magnetic energy in the global scale. The free energy (i.e., the energy in excess of the potential field energy) is one of the main indicators used in space weather forecasts to predict the eruptivity of active regions. Methods. We solve the nonlinear force-free field equations using an optimization principle in spherical geometry. The resulting threedimensional magnetic fields are used to estimate the magnetic free energy content E(sub free) = E(sub nlfff) - E(sub pot), which is the difference of the magnetic energies between the nonpotential field and the potential field in the global solar corona. For comparison, we overlay the extrapolated magnetic field lines with the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations by the atmospheric imaging assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Results. For a single Carrington rotation 2121, we find that the global nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) magnetic energy density is 10.3% higher than the potential one. Most of this free energy is located in active regions.

  4. Seismology of transversely oscillating coronal loops with siphon flows

    OpenAIRE

    Terradas, J.; Arregui, I.; Verth, G.; Goossens, M.

    2011-01-01

    There are ubiquitous flows observed in the solar atmosphere of sub-Alfv\\'{e}nic speeds, however after flaring and coronal mass ejection events flows can become Alfv\\'{e}nic. In this Letter, we derive an expression for the standing kink mode frequency due to siphon flow in coronal loops, valid for both low and high speed regimes. It is found that siphon flow introduces a linear spatially dependent phase shift along coronal loops and asymmetric eigenfunctions. We demonstrate how this theory can...

  5. Case report: pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucencies revisited.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Counihan, K P

    2012-08-01

    Pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucency (PEIR) describes a radiolucent lesion located in the coronal dentine, just beneath the enamel-dentine junction of unerupted teeth. The prevalence of this lesion varies depending on the type and quality of radiographic exposure and age of patients used for assessment. The aetiology of pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucent lesions is not fully understood, but published clinical and histological evidence suggest that these lesions are resorptive in nature. Issues around the diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical management of this lesion are explored using previously unreported cases.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic waves and coronal seismology: an overview of recent results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moortel, Ineke; Nakariakov, Valery M

    2012-07-13

    Recent observations have revealed that magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves and oscillations are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere, with a wide range of periods. We give a brief review of some aspects of MHD waves and coronal seismology that have recently been the focus of intense debate or are newly emerging. In particular, we focus on four topics: (i) the current controversy surrounding propagating intensity perturbations along coronal loops, (ii) the interpretation of propagating transverse loop oscillations, (iii) the ongoing search for coronal (torsional) Alfvén waves, and (iv) the rapidly developing topic of quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flares.

  7. Heating of solar coronal holes by reflected Alfven waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.; Musielak, Z. E.; Suess, S. T.; An, C.-H.

    1992-01-01

    As a continuation of the work of Moore et al. (1991), who found evidence that coronal holes are heated by Alfven waves that are reflected back down within the coronal holes, this paper shows that to demonstrate this evidence, it is only necessary to consider a subset of the Moore et al. models, namely, those having radial magnetic field. Using these models, it is shown that the Alfven velocity is not constant in the atmosphere of coronal holes, but changes with height (or radius), causing downward reflection of all upward Alfven waves of sufficiently long wavelength (or period).

  8. Impact of the growing use of narrative verdicts by coroners on geographic variations in suicide: analysis of coroners' inquest data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, R; Hawton, K; Kapur, N; Bennewith, O; Gunnell, D

    2012-08-01

    Coroners' death certificates form the basis of suicide statistics in England and Wales. Recent increases in coroners' use of narrative verdicts may affect the reliability of local and national suicide rates. We used Ministry of Justice data on inquests held between 2008 and 2009 and Local Authority suicide data (2001-02 and 2008-09) to investigate variations between coroners in their use of narrative verdicts and the impact of these on suicide rates, using 'other' verdicts (79% of which are narratives) as a proxy for narrative verdicts. There was wide geographic variation in Coroners' use of 'other' (mainly narrative) verdicts--they comprised between 0 and 50% (median = 9%) of verdicts given by individual coroners in 2008-09. Coroners who gave more 'other' verdicts gave fewer suicide verdicts (r = - 0.41; P narratives the least. Variation in Coroners' use of narrative verdicts influences the validity of reported regional suicide rates. Small-area suicide rates, and changes in these rates over time in the last decade, should be interpreted with caution.

  9. C2H4 adsorption on Cu(210), revisited: bonding nature and coverage effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amino, Shuichi; Arguelles, Elvis; Agerico Diño, Wilson; Okada, Michio; Kasai, Hideaki

    2016-08-24

    With the aid of density functional theory (DFT)-based calculations, we investigate the adsorption of C2H4 on Cu(210). We found two C2H4 adsorption sites, viz., the top of the step-edge atom (S) and the long bridge between two step-edge atoms (SS) of Cu(210). The step-edge atoms on Cu(210) block the otherwise active terrace sites found on copper surfaces with longer step sizes. This results in the preference for π-bonded over di-σ-bonded C2H4. We also found two stable C2H4 adsorption orientations on the S- and SS-sites, viz., with the C2H4 C[double bond, length as m-dash]C bond parallel (fit) and perpendicular (cross) to [001]. Furthermore, we found that the three peaks observed in previous temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiment [Surf. Sci., 2011, 605, 934-940] could be attributed to C2H4 in the S-fit or S-cross, S-fit and S-cross-fit (S-cross and S-fit configurations that both exist in the same unit cell) configurations on Cu(210).

  10. Fluctuations in the solar wind that show scaling- MHD turbulence and coronal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, S. C.; Kiyani, K. H.; Hnat, B.; Nicol, R. M.; Wicks, R.

    2008-12-01

    In- situ spacecraft observations of plasma parameters are at minute (or below) resolution for intervals spanning the solar cycle and provide a large number of samples for statistical studies. These observations reveal that the power spectrum of the components of magnetic field typically has two characteristic features, an inertial range of turbulence over several orders of magnitude with approximately Kolmogorov power law and at lower frequencies, an approximately '1/f' energy containing range believed to be of direct coronal origin. On the other hand, the (much lower energy density) magnetic field magnitude power spectrum typically shows a single scaling range that spans these timescales. This is consistent with the idea that the power seen in the components, but not necessarily the magnitude, of magnetic field is dominated by Alfvenic turbulence in the evolving solar wind. Here, we use quantitative statistical techniques to explore the idea that the solar wind exhibits fluctuations over a broad range of timescales characteristic of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence evolving in the presence of structures of direct coronal origin. We find a strong correlation between the solar cycle variation in the scaling properties of magnetic energy density fluctuations and the magnetic complexity of the coronal magnetic fields. At solar maximum in the ecliptic, the magnetic energy density as seen by WIND and ACE shows a fractal signature, whereas at minimum it is multifractal. This is corroborated by ULLYSES polar observations at solar minimum in quiet, fast solar wind where again, multifractal scaling is found. High magnetic complexity in the corona then corresponds to fractal, rather than multifractal scaling in magnetic energy density seen at 1AU; remarkably, this fractal signature dominates the full dynamic range of observations, extending across timescales typically identified with both the '1/f' and 'inertial range'. Intervals when WIND and ACE simultaneously sample

  11. Sc3N and Sc2C2 encapsulated B40: Smarter than its carbon analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Esha V.; Roy, Debesh R.

    2016-10-01

    A detailed comparative investigation on the recently synthesised B40 and C40 along with their metal nitride (Sc3N)and carbide (Sc2C2) encapsulated endohedral fullerenes, is performed under density functional theory for the first time. The structures, electronic, thermodynamic and magnetic properties of all the considered compounds are explored in detail. The present study identifies borospherene (B40) and its encapsulated nitride (Sc3N@B40) and carbide (Sc2C2@B40) endohedral borofullerenes as the better candidates for future novel nano-applications compared to their carbon bucky ball analogues.

  12. Coronal Dynamics at Recent Total Solar Eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Lu, M.; Davis, A. B.; Demianski, M.; Rusin, V.; Saniga, M.; Seaton, D. B.; Lucas, R.; Babcock, B. A.; Dantowitz, R.; Gaintatzis, P.; Seeger, C. H.; Malamut, C.; Steele, A.

    2014-12-01

    Our composite images of the solar corona based on extensive imaging at the total solar eclipses of 2010 (Easter Island), 2012 (Australia), and 2013 (Gabon) reveal several coronal mass ejections and other changes in coronal streamers and in polar plumes. Our resultant spatial resolution is finer than that available in imaging from spacecraft, including that from SOHO/LASCO or STEREO. We trace the eruptions back to their footpoints on the sun using imaging from SDO and SWAP, and follow them upwards through the corona, measuring velocities. The high-resolution computer compositing by Miloslav Druckmüller and Hana Druckmüllerová (2010 and 2013) and Pavlos Gaintatzis (2012) allows comparison of our images with those taken at intervals of minutes or hours along the totality path. Williams College's 2013 eclipse expedition was supported in part by grant 9327-13 from National Geographic Society/Committee for Research and Exploration. Our work on the 2012 eclipse is supported in part by grant AGS-1047726 from Solar Terrestrial Research/NSF AGS. V.R. and M.S. were partially supported by the VEGA grant agency project 2/0098/10 and 2/0003/13 (Slovak Academy of Sciences) and Grant 0139-12 from NG/CRE, and Hana Druckmüllerová by grant 205/09/1469 of the Czech Science Foundation. M.L. was supported by Sigma Xi. C.M. was a Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium Summer Fellow, supported at Williams College by REU/NSF grant AST-1005024. Partial support was provided by U.S. Department of Defense's ASSURE program. J.M.P. thanks Caltech's Planetary Sciences Department for hospitality. Support for D.B.S. and SWAP came from PRODEX grant C90345 managed by ESA in collaboration with the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BELSPO) in support of the PROBA2/SWAP mission, and from the EC's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant 218816 (SOTERIA project, www.soteria-space.eu). SWAP is a project of the Centre Spatial de Liège and the Royal Observatory of Belgium funded by

  13. VLA Measurements of Faraday Rotation through Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Fischer, Patrick D.; Buffo, Jacob J.; Spangler, Steven R.

    2017-04-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large-scale eruptions of plasma from the Sun, which play an important role in space weather. Faraday rotation is the rotation of the plane of polarization that results when a linearly polarized signal passes through a magnetized plasma such as a CME. Faraday rotation is proportional to the path integral through the plasma of the electron density and the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field. Faraday-rotation observations of a source near the Sun can provide information on the plasma structure of a CME shortly after launch. We report on simultaneous white-light and radio observations made of three CMEs in August 2012. We made sensitive Very Large Array (VLA) full-polarization observations using 1 - 2 GHz frequencies of a constellation of radio sources through the solar corona at heliocentric distances that ranged from 6 - 15 R_{⊙}. Two sources (0842+1835 and 0900+1832) were occulted by a single CME, and one source (0843+1547) was occulted by two CMEs. In addition to our radioastronomical observations, which represent one of the first active hunts for CME Faraday rotation since Bird et al. ( Solar Phys., 98, 341, 1985) and the first active hunt using the VLA, we obtained white-light coronagraph images from the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) C3 instrument to determine the Thomson-scattering brightness [BT], providing a means to independently estimate the plasma density and determine its contribution to the observed Faraday rotation. A constant-density force-free flux rope embedded in the background corona was used to model the effects of the CMEs on BT and Faraday rotation. The plasma densities (6 - 22×103 cm^{-3}) and axial magnetic-field strengths (2 - 12 mG) inferred from our models are consistent with the modeling work of Liu et al. ( Astrophys. J., 665, 1439, 2007) and Jensen and Russell ( Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L02103, 2008), as well as previous CME Faraday-rotation observations by Bird et al

  14. Photospheric magnetic field of an eroded-by-solar-wind coronal mass ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, J.; Cid, C.; Saiz, E.; Guerrero, A.

    2017-10-01

    We have investigated the case of a coronal mass ejection that was eroded by the fast wind of a coronal hole in the interplanetary medium. When a solar ejection takes place close to a coronal hole, the flux rope magnetic topology of the coronal mass ejection (CME) may become misshapen at 1 AU as a result of the interaction. Detailed analysis of this event reveals erosion of the interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) magnetic field. In this communication, we study the photospheric magnetic roots of the coronal hole and the coronal mass ejection area with HMI/SDO magnetograms to define their magnetic characteristics.

  15. Cyclical Variation of the Quiet Corona and Coronal Holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recent advances in the understanding of the quiet corona and coronal holes are reviewed. The review is based on long-term accumulation of data from eclipse observations, coronagraph observations, helium 10830 Å spectroheliograms, and X-ray observations.

  16. Initiation and Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections P. F. Chen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , which is generated at the tachocline layer, emerges throughout the convection zone and the lower atmosphere into the tenuous corona. The coronal field keeps adjusting to a more and more complex magnetic structure in a quasi-steady way.

  17. [A study on the experiences of nurse coroners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin Sook; Park, In Sook

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the essential structure of the postmortem- examination experiences of nurse career coroners (forensic investigators), to have a profound understanding of their experiences, and ultimately to lay the foundation for nurses' entry into the field of forensic nursing. The subjects in this study were six coroners. After an in-depth interview from January to June 2007, the collected data were analyzed by Colaizzi as qualitative research. Four categories emerged from seven theme clusters. The four categories were: attracted by being dubbed a stabilized public official, a sense of achievement due to having clarified false death, self-confidence after distinguishing the victim and the wrongdoer, eternal developmental potential is seen. It is expected that this study will provide useful information for nurses who are interested in becoming coroners. It will be helpful for career nurses to extend their nursing science into emerging fields like coroners and select a follow-up career.

  18. Production planning and coronal stop deletion in spontaneous speech

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    James Tanner; Morgan Sonderegger; Michael Wagner

    2017-01-01

    .... We examine coronal stop deletion (CSD), a variable process conditioned by preceding and upcoming phonological context, in a corpus of spontaneous British English speech, as a means of investigating a number of variables associated with planning...

  19. 26 CFR 1.1402(c)-2 - Public office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Public office. 1.1402(c)-2 Section 1.1402(c)-2...) INCOME TAXES Tax on Self-Employment Income § 1.1402(c)-2 Public office. (a) In general—(1) General rule... public office does not constitute a trade or business. (2) Fee basis public officials—(i) In general. If...

  20. Coroner consistency - The 10-jurisdiction, 10-year, postcode lottery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclean, Maxwell

    2015-04-01

    The investigation and classification of deaths in England and Wales relies upon the application by medical practitioners of diverse reporting standards set locally by coroners and thereafter upon the effectively unconstrained decision process of those same coroners. The author has conducted extensive comparative analysis of Ministry of Justice data on reports to the coroner and their inquest and verdict returns alongside Office of National Statistics data pertaining to the numbers of registered deaths in equivalent local jurisdictions. Here, he analyses 10 jurisdictions characterised by almost identical inquest return numbers in 2011. Substantial variation was found in reporting rates to the coroner and in the profile of inquest verdicts. The range of deaths reported varied from 34% to 62% of all registered deaths. Likewise only 2 of the 10 jurisdictions shared the same ranking of proportions in which the six common verdicts were reached. Individual jurisdictions tended to be consistent over time in their use of verdicts. In all cases, proportionately more male deaths were reported to the coroner. Coroners generally seemed prima facie to be 'gendered' in their approach to verdicts; that is, they were consistently more likely to favour a particular verdict when dealing with a death, according to the sex of the deceased. The extent to which coroners seemed gendered varied widely. While similar services such as the criminal courts or the Crown Prosecution Service are subject to extensive national guidance in an attempt to constrain idiosyncratic decision making, there seems no reason why this should apply less to the process of death investigation and classification. Further analysis of coroners' local practices and their determinants seems necessary. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. Hunting for Stellar Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Heidi; Vida, Krisztián; Leitzinger, Martin; Odert, Petra; Kovács, Orsolya Eszter

    2017-10-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are explosive events that occur basically daily on the Sun. It is thought that these events play a crucial role in the angular momentum and mass loss of late-type stars, and also shape the environment in which planets form and live. Stellar CMEs can be detected in optical spectra in the Balmer lines, especially in Hα, as blue-shifted extra emission/absorption. To increase the detection probability one can monitor young open clusters, in which the stars are due to their youth still rapid rotators, and thus magnetically active and likely to exhibit a large number of CMEs. Using ESO facilities and the Nordic Optical Telescope we have obtained time series of multi-object spectroscopic observations of late-type stars in six open clusters with ages ranging from 15 Myrs to 300 Myrs. Additionally, we have studied archival data of numerous active stars. These observations will allow us to obtain information on the occurrence rate of CMEs in late-type stars with different ages and spectral types. Here we report on the preliminary outcome of our studies.

  2. Guided flows in coronal magnetic flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petralia, A.; Reale, F.; Testa, P.

    2018-01-01

    Context. There is evidence that coronal plasma flows break down into fragments and become laminar. Aims: We investigate this effect by modelling flows confined along magnetic channels. Methods: We consider a full magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of a solar atmosphere box with a dipole magnetic field. We compare the propagation of a cylindrical flow perfectly aligned with the field to that of another flow with a slight misalignment. We assume a flow speed of 200 km s-1 and an ambient magnetic field of 30 G. Results: We find that although the aligned flow maintains its cylindrical symmetry while it travels along the magnetic tube, the misaligned one is rapidly squashed on one side, becoming laminar and eventually fragmented because of the interaction and back-reaction of the magnetic field. This model could explain an observation made by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory of erupted fragments that fall back onto the solar surface as thin and elongated strands and end up in a hedge-like configuration. Conclusions: The initial alignment of plasma flow plays an important role in determining the possible laminar structure and fragmentation of flows while they travel along magnetic channels. Movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Coronal microleakage assessed by polymicrobial markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Leandro Rodrigues; Grimaudo, Nicholas J; Vertucci, Frank J

    2003-08-15

    Studies have shown significant bacterial leakage following exposure of sealed root canals to artificial and natural saliva. The objective of this study was to determine contamination via bacterial migration in artificial saliva in endodontically treated teeth using different obturation techniques and sealers. A total of 144 extracted, human mandibular anterior teeth were cleaned and shaped to a #40 master apical file using hand and rotary instrumentation. One hundred and twenty teeth were divided into two experimental groups. The teeth in Group 1 were obturated with gutta-percha using lateral compaction and five different sealers, and the teeth in Group 2 were obturated with gutta-percha using thermomechanical compaction and five different sealers. The remaining 24 teeth were prepared as positive and negative controls. All specimens, except the negative controls, were inoculated every five days with Anaerobic streptococci (NCTC 9891) related to Peptostreptococcus micros and Prevotella intermedia (ATCC 25611). The contamination onset time was continuously recorded and turbid broths cultured for bacteria identification. The controls behaved as expected. Regardless of the combination between obturation techniques and different sealers, all broths became turbid during this experiment. The correlation between the obturation techniques and the sealers revealed statistical significance using ANOVA (psealer allowed a slower rate of coronal-apical bacterial migration.

  4. Guided flows in coronal magnetic flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petralia, A.; Reale, F.; Testa, P.

    2017-12-01

    Context. There is evidence that coronal plasma flows break down into fragments and become laminar. Aims: We investigate this effect by modelling flows confined along magnetic channels. Methods: We consider a full magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of a solar atmosphere box with a dipole magnetic field. We compare the propagation of a cylindrical flow perfectly aligned with the field to that of another flow with a slight misalignment. We assume a flow speed of 200 km s-1 and an ambient magnetic field of 30 G. Results: We find that although the aligned flow maintains its cylindrical symmetry while it travels along the magnetic tube, the misaligned one is rapidly squashed on one side, becoming laminar and eventually fragmented because of the interaction and back-reaction of the magnetic field. This model could explain an observation made by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory of erupted fragments that fall back onto the solar surface as thin and elongated strands and end up in a hedge-like configuration. Conclusions: The initial alignment of plasma flow plays an important role in determining the possible laminar structure and fragmentation of flows while they travel along magnetic channels. Movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Behavior of Compact Toroid Injected into C-2U Confinement Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tadafumi; Roche, T.; Allrey, I.; Sekiguchi, J.; Asai, T.; Conroy, M.; Gota, H.; Granstedt, E.; Hooper, C.; Kinley, J.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T.; the TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    The compact toroid (CT) injector system has been developed for particle refueling on the C-2U device. A CT is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) and the typical ejected CT/plasmoid parameters are as follows: average velocity 100 km/s, average electron density 1.9 ×1015 cm-3, electron temperature 30-40 eV, mass 12 μg . To refuel particles into FC plasma the CT must penetrate the transverse magnetic field that surrounds the FRC. The kinetic energy density of the CT should be higher than magnetic energy density of the axial magnetic field, i.e., ρv2 / 2 >=B2 / 2μ0 , where ρ, v, and B are mass density, velocity, and surrounded magnetic field, respectively. Also, the penetrated CT's trajectory is deflected by the transverse magnetic field (Bz 1 kG). Thus, we have to estimate CT's energy and track the CT trajectory inside the magnetic field, for which we adopted a fast-framing camera on C-2U: framing rate is up to 1.25 MHz for 120 frames. By employing the camera we clearly captured the CT/plasmoid trajectory. Comparisons between the fast-framing camera and some other diagnostics as well as CT injection results on C-2U will be presented.

  6. Are chromospheric nanoflares a primary source of coronal plasma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimchuk, J. A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bradshaw, S. J., E-mail: James.A.Klimchuk@nasa.gov, E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    It has been suggested that the hot plasma of the solar corona comes primarily from impulsive heating events, or nanoflares, that occur in the lower atmosphere, either in the upper part of the ordinary chromosphere or at the tips of type II spicules. We test this idea with a series of hydrodynamic simulations. We find that synthetic Fe XII (195) and Fe XIV (274) line profiles generated from the simulations disagree dramatically with actual observations. The integrated line intensities are much too faint; the blueshifts are much too fast; the blue-red asymmetries are much too large; and the emission is confined to low altitudes. We conclude that chromospheric nanoflares are not a primary source of hot coronal plasma. Such events may play an important role in producing the chromosphere and powering its intense radiation, but they do not, in general, raise the temperature of the plasma to coronal values. Those cases where coronal temperatures are reached must be relatively uncommon. The observed profiles of Fe XII and Fe XIV come primarily from plasma that is heated in the corona itself, either by coronal nanoflares or a quasi-steady coronal heating process. Chromospheric nanoflares might play a role in generating waves that provide this coronal heating.

  7. New Evidence that Magnetoconvection Drives Solar–Stellar Coronal Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Moore, Ronald L.; Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Mail Code ST 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Thalmann, Julia K., E-mail: sanjivtiwari80@gmail.com [Institute of Physics/IGAM, University of Graz, Universittsplatz 5/II, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2017-07-10

    How magnetic energy is injected and released in the solar corona, keeping it heated to several million degrees, remains elusive. Coronal heating generally increases with increasing magnetic field strength. From a comparison of a nonlinear force-free model of the three-dimensional active region coronal field to observed extreme-ultraviolet loops, we find that (1) umbra-to-umbra coronal loops, despite being rooted in the strongest magnetic flux, are invisible, and (2) the brightest loops have one foot in an umbra or penumbra and the other foot in another sunspot’s penumbra or in unipolar or mixed-polarity plage. The invisibility of umbra-to-umbra loops is new evidence that magnetoconvection drives solar-stellar coronal heating: evidently, the strong umbral field at both ends quenches the magnetoconvection and hence the heating. Broadly, our results indicate that depending on the field strength in both feet, the photospheric feet of a coronal loop on any convective star can either engender or quench coronal heating in the loop’s body.

  8. Defect processes of M3AlC2 (M = V, Zr, Ta, Ti) MAX phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulos, S.-R. G.; Kelaidis, N.; Chroneos, A.

    2017-08-01

    The interest on the Mn+1AXn phases (M = early transition metal; A = group 13-16 element and X = C and/or N) stems from their combination of advantageous metallic and ceramic properties. Aluminium containing 312 MAX phases in particular are deemed to enhance high-temperature oxidation resistance. In the present study, we use density functional theory calculations to study the intrinsic defect processes of M3AlC2 MAX phases (M = V, Zr, Ta, Ti). The calculations reveal that Ti3AlC2 is the more radiation tolerant 312 MAX phase considered here. In Ti3AlC2 the carbon Frenkel reaction is the lowest energy defect process with 3.17 eV. Results are discussed in view of recent experimental and theoretical results of related systems.

  9. High pressure oxidation of C2H4/NO mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giménez-López, J.; Alzueta, M.U.; Rasmussen, C.T.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental and kinetic modeling study of the interaction between C2H4 and NO has been performed under flow reactor conditions in the intermediate temperature range (600–900K), high pressure (60bar), and for stoichiometries ranging from reducing to oxidizing conditions. The main reaction...... pathways of the C2H4/O2/NOx conversion, the capacity of C2H4 to remove NO, and the influence of the presence of NOx on the C2H4 oxidation are analyzed. Compared to the C2H4/O2 system, the presence of NOx shifts the onset of reaction 75–150K to lower temperatures. The mechanism of sensitization involves...... is removed. This removal is partly explained by the reaction C2H3+NO→HCN+CH2O. However, a second removal mechanism is active in the 700–850K range, which is not captured by the chemical kinetic model. With the present thermochemistry and kinetics, neither formation of nitro-hydrocarbons (CH3NO2, C2H3NO2, C2H...

  10. New Ti3C2 aerogel as promising negative electrode materials for asymmetric supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Zhang, Mingyi; Zhang, Xitian; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2017-10-01

    Novel 3D Ti3C2 aerogel has been first synthesized by a simple EDA-assisted self-assembly process. Its inside are channels and pores structure. The interconnected aerogel structure could efficiently restrain restacking of Ti3C2 flakes. Thus, it exhibits a large specific surface area as high as 176.3 m2 g-1. The electrochemical performances have been measured. The Ti3C2 aerogel achieves a quite high areal capacitance of 1012.5 mF cm-2 for the mass loading of 15 mg at a scan rate of 2 mV s-1 in 1 M KOH electrolyte. An asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) has been assembled by using the Ti3C2 aerogel electrode as the negative electrode and electrospinning carbon nanofiber film as the positive electrode. The device can deliver a high energy density of 120.0 μWh cm-2 and a maximum power density of 26123 μW cm-2. A lamp panel with nineteen red light-emitting diodes has been powered by two ASCs in series.

  11. Nanodust dynamics during a coronal mass ejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Czechowski

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of nanometer-sized grains (nanodust is strongly affected by electromagnetic forces. High-velocity nanodust was proposed as an explanation for the voltage bursts observed by STEREO. A study of nanodust dynamics based on a simple time-stationary model has shown that in the vicinity of the Sun the nanodust is trapped or, outside the trapped region, accelerated to high velocities. We investigate the nanodust dynamics for a time-dependent solar wind and magnetic field configuration in order to find out what happens to nanodust during a coronal mass ejection (CME. The plasma flow and the magnetic field during a CME are obtained by numerical simulations using a 3-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD code. The equations of motion for the nanodust particles are solved numerically, assuming that the particles are produced from larger bodies moving in near-circular Keplerian orbits within the circumsolar dust cloud. The charge-to-mass ratios for the nanodust particles are taken to be constant in time. The simulation is restricted to the region within 0.14 AU from the Sun. We find that about 35 % of nanodust particles escape from the computational domain during the CME, reaching very high speeds (up to 1000 km s−1. After the end of the CME the escape continues, but the particle velocities do not exceed 300 km s−1. About 30 % of all particles are trapped in bound non-Keplerian orbits with time-dependent perihelium and aphelium distances. Trapped particles are affected by plasma ion drag, which causes contraction of their orbits.

  12. Nanodust dynamics during a coronal mass ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czechowski, Andrzej; Kleimann, Jens

    2017-09-01

    The dynamics of nanometer-sized grains (nanodust) is strongly affected by electromagnetic forces. High-velocity nanodust was proposed as an explanation for the voltage bursts observed by STEREO. A study of nanodust dynamics based on a simple time-stationary model has shown that in the vicinity of the Sun the nanodust is trapped or, outside the trapped region, accelerated to high velocities. We investigate the nanodust dynamics for a time-dependent solar wind and magnetic field configuration in order to find out what happens to nanodust during a coronal mass ejection (CME). The plasma flow and the magnetic field during a CME are obtained by numerical simulations using a 3-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code. The equations of motion for the nanodust particles are solved numerically, assuming that the particles are produced from larger bodies moving in near-circular Keplerian orbits within the circumsolar dust cloud. The charge-to-mass ratios for the nanodust particles are taken to be constant in time. The simulation is restricted to the region within 0.14 AU from the Sun. We find that about 35 % of nanodust particles escape from the computational domain during the CME, reaching very high speeds (up to 1000 km s-1). After the end of the CME the escape continues, but the particle velocities do not exceed 300 km s-1. About 30 % of all particles are trapped in bound non-Keplerian orbits with time-dependent perihelium and aphelium distances. Trapped particles are affected by plasma ion drag, which causes contraction of their orbits.

  13. Forecasting Coronal Mass Ejections from Vector Magnetograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In a 17 vector magnetogram study of 12 bipolar active regions (Falconer, Moore, & Gary, 2002, ApJ in press), we correlated four quantitative global magnetic measures with the Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) productivity of the active region. The global measures included a measure of active region size, the total magnetic flux phi and three measures of an active region global nonpotentiality 1) the net current (I (sub N)), 2) the length of the strong-shear, strong-field main neutral line (L(sub SS)) and 3) and the normalized twist (alpha = muIN/PHI). The CME productivity was determined from YOHKOH/SXT observations, Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), and when possible Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment (SOHO/LASCO) observations within 12 days of the day of the magnetogram. We found that the three measures of global nonpotentiality (I(sub N), L(sub SS), alpha) were all well correlated (greater than 99% confidence level) with an active region's CME productivity. The sample size was to small to confirm if there was a statistical significant correlation of the globally nonscientist measures with future CME activity (i.e. from the date of the magnetogram forward). We are doubling our sample, and will report on the statistical significance of global nonpotentiality as a predictor of future CME productivity. The new active regions are all from the first year of the upgraded MSFC vector magnetograms. This work, is funded by NSF through the Space Weather Program, by NASA through the Living with the Star, Targeted Research and Technology, and by NASA Solar Physics Supporting Research and Technology Program. The upgrade to the MSFC vector magnetograph was supported by the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) mission.

  14. TEMPERATURE AND EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET INTENSITY IN A CORONAL PROMINENCE CAVITY AND STREAMER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucera, T. A. [NASA/GSFC, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gibson, S. E.; Schmit, D. J. [HAO/NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Landi, E. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Science, Space Research Building, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 (United States); Tripathi, D. [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag-4, Ganeshkhind, Pune University Campus, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2012-09-20

    We analyze the temperature and EUV line emission of a coronal cavity and surrounding streamer in terms of a morphological forward model. We use a series of iron line ratios observed with the Hinode Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) on 2007 August 9 to constrain temperature as a function of altitude in a morphological forward model of the streamer and cavity. We also compare model predictions to the EIS EUV line intensities and polarized brightness (pB) data from the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO) Mark 4 K-coronameter. This work builds on earlier analysis using the same model to determine geometry of and density in the same cavity and streamer. The fit to the data with altitude-dependent temperature profiles indicates that both the streamer and cavity have temperatures in the range 1.4-1.7 MK. However, the cavity exhibits substantial substructure such that the altitude-dependent temperature profile is not sufficient to completely model conditions in the cavity. Coronal prominence cavities are structured by magnetism so clues to this structure are to be found in their plasma properties. These temperature substructures are likely related to structures in the cavity magnetic field. Furthermore, we find that the model overestimates the EUV line intensities by a factor of 4-10, without overestimating pB. We discuss this difference in terms of filling factors and uncertainties in density diagnostics and elemental abundances.

  15. Purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of human synaptotagmin 1 C2A-C2B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, Miguel [Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0437 (United States); Fuson, Kerry L. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0437 (United States); Sutton, R. Bryan, E-mail: rbsutton@utmb.edu [Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0437 (United States); Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0437 (United States); Robert, J. Justin [Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0437 (United States); Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0437 (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Human synaptotagmin C2A-C2B has been expressed as a glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of this protein are reported here. Synaptotagmin acts as the Ca{sup 2+} sensor for neuronal exocytosis. The cytosolic domain of human synaptotagmin 1 is composed of tandem C2 domains: C2A and C2B. These C2 domains modulate the interaction of synaptotagmin with the phospholipid bilayer of the presynaptic terminus and effector proteins such as the SNARE complex. Human synaptotagmin C2A-C2B has been expressed as a glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of this protein are reported here. The crystals diffract to 2.7 Å and belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 82.37, b = 86.31, c = 140.2 Å. From self-rotation function analysis, there are two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure determination of the protein using this data is ongoing.

  16. C2 translaminar screw as the optimal choice for atlantoaxial dislocation with C2-C3 congenital fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fengjin; Ni, Bin; Li, Songkai; Yang, Jian; Guo, Xiang; Zhu, Zhuangchen

    2010-12-01

    The entry point and trajectory are very important for transarticular screw (TAS) and C2 pedicle screw (PDS) plantation. When the physical size is not large enough for the screw passing through, an accurate entry point is the most important point for successful screw insertion without vertebral artery (VA) injury and spinal cord injury. Once the laminas of C2 and C3 are fused, the normal anatomic mark might disappear and the insertion point would be hard to find. As a result, the complication of TAS or PDS implantation increases rapidly. We used C2 translaminar screws (TLSs) with C1 lateral mass screws as the optimal fixation for atlantoaxial dislocation in order to reduce the risk of VA injury and spinal cord injury. A 37-year-old woman with atlantoaxial dislocation due to obsolete odontoid fracture complained of neck pain and myelopathy. Preoperative CT reconstruction showed C2-C3 fusion and small size of C2 isthmus. The patient underwent posterior atlantoaxial fusion using C1 lateral mass screws and C2 TLSs. The posterior arch of atlas was removed for decompression and fusion was done at C1-C2 joints by grafting bone fragments from the posterior iliac crest. TLSs combined with C1 lateral mass screws might be a useful technique for patients with atlantoaxial dislocation and C2-C3 fusion, especially with small size of C2 isthmus. Also, the fusion of posterior elements between C2 and C3 might be a relative contraindication for TAS fixation.

  17. Coronal and apical sealing ability of a new endodontic cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Morvarid; Iravani, Maryam; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Asgary, Saeed

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This in vitro study aims to evaluate the coronal and apical sealing ability of gutta-percha (GP) root filling used with either mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), new endodontic cement (NEC) or AH26 as filler/sealers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty eight single-rooted extracted teeth were selected, decoronated and then instrumented. Samples were randomly divided into three experimental (n=12) and two control groups (n=6). In group 1, root canals were filled using lateral condensation technique (L); while single cone technique (S) was used for groups 2 and 3. AH26, MTA and NEC were the root canal sealer/fillers in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Samples were immersed in 1% methylene-blue dye and then independently centrifuged apically and coronally. The roots were split longitudinally and linear extent of dye penetration was measured with a stereomicroscope from apical and coronal directions. Data were analyzed using One-way ANOVA and T-test. RESULTS: No statistical differences in mean apical dye penetration between groups LGP/AH26, SGP/MTA and SGP/NEC were found; SGP/NEC group showed significantly less coronal dye penetration (P<0.001). CONCLUSION: Considering the limitations of this in vitro study, it was concluded that the simple single cone technique with NEC can provide favorable coronal and apical seal. PMID:23864871

  18. The Search for Stellar Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villadsen, Jacqueline Rose

    2017-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) may dramatically impact habitability and atmospheric composition of planets around magnetically active stars, including young solar analogs and many M dwarfs. Theoretical predictions of such effects are limited by the lack of observations of stellar CMEs. This thesis addresses this gap through a search for the spectral and spatial radio signatures of CMEs on active M dwarfs. Solar CMEs produce radio bursts with a distinctive spectral signature, narrow-band plasma emission that drifts to lower frequency as a CME expands outward. To search for analogous events on nearby stars, I worked on system design, software, and commissioning for the Starburst project, a wideband single-baseline radio interferometry backend dedicated to stellar observations. In addition, I led a survey of nearby active M dwarfs with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), detecting coherent radio bursts in 13 out of 23 epochs, over a total of 58 hours. This survey's ultra-wide bandwidth (0.23-6.0 GHz) dynamic spectroscopy, unprecedented for stellar observations, revealed diverse behavior in the time-frequency plane. Flare star UV Ceti produced complex, luminous events reminiscent of brown dwarf aurorae; AD Leo sustained long-duration, intense, narrow-band "storms"; and YZ CMi emitted a burst with substructure with rapid frequency drift, resembling solar Type III bursts, which are attributed to electrons moving at speeds of order 10% of the speed of light. To search for the spatial signature of CMEs, I led 8.5-GHz observations with the Very Long Baseline Array simultaneous to 24 hours of the VLA survey. This program detected non-thermal continuum emission from the stars in all epochs, as well as continuum flares on AD Leo and coherent bursts on UV Ceti, enabling measurement of the spatial offset between flaring and quiescent emission. These observations demonstrate the diversity of stellar transients that can be expected in time-domain radio surveys, especially

  19. C2 and C3 pain dermatomes in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, C E

    1991-07-01

    This report defines the C2 and C3 pain dermatomes by the distribution of: the hypalgesia clearing after surgical root decompression; the dysaesthesias produced by electrical root stimulation; and the hypalgesia produced by anaesthetic root block. The C2 pain dermatome, so defined, consists of an occipital parietal area 6-8 cm wide, ascending paramedially from the subocciput to the vertex. The C3 pain dermatome is a craniofacial area including the scalp around the ear, the pinna, the lateral cheek over the angle of the jaw, the submental region and the lateral and anterior aspects of the upper neck. These C2 and C3 pain dermatomes do not overlap and are smaller than the C2 and C3 tactile dermatomes described in the literature.

  20. Terahertz Spectroscopy of the Bending Vibrations of Acetylene 12C2H2 and 12C2D2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shanshan; Drouin, B.; Pearson, J.

    2009-12-01

    Several fundamental interstellar molecules, e.g., C2H2, CH4 and C3, are completely symmetric molecules and feature no permanent dipole moment and no pure rotation spectrum. As a result they have only previously been observed in the infrared. However, directly observing them with the rest of the molecular column especially when the source is spatially resolved would be very valuable in understanding chemical evolution. Vibrational difference bands provide a means to detect symmetric molecules with microwave precision using terahertz techniques. Herschel, SOFIA and ALMA have the potential to identify a number of vibrational difference bands of light symmetric species. This paper reports laboratory results on 12C2H2 and 12C2D2. Symmetric acetylene isotopologues have two bending modes, the trans bending and the cis bending. Their difference bands are allowed and occur in the microwave, terahertz, and far-infrared wavelengths, with band origins at 3500 GHz for 12C2H2 and 900 GHz for 12C2D2. Twenty 12C2H2 P branch high-J transitions and two hundred and fifty-one 12C2D2 P Q and R branch transitions have been measured in the 0.2 - 1.6 THz region with precision of 50 to 100 kHz. These lines were modeled together with prior data on the pure bending levels. Significantly improved molecular parameters were obtained for 12C2H2 and 12C2D2 with the combined data set, and new frequency and intensity predictions were made to support astrophysics applications. The research was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. S. Y. was supported by an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program, administrated by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through a contract with NASA.

  1. Organizational Change for Improved C2 in the Information Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-23

    FINAL 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Organizational Change for Improved C2 in the Information Age 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER... Organizational Change for Improved C2 in the Information Age by Todd A. Beltz CDR USN A paper submitted to the Faculty of the Naval War...reiterated that a SJFHQ is an important step in increasing the ability to respond to… the global security environment.1 This organizational change is an

  2. Simulation Technologies for C2IS Development & Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    reels; ces demiers sont modifies (p. ex. fausses balles) ou augmentes (p. ex. equipement laser) afin de permettre Ie realisme sans encourir les risques...Simulation technologies for C2 information system (C2IS) development & training project was known as 12kr before 2003. Briefly designated 2kq when...split off from l2kr in fiscal year 200 1-2002 to become l2kx, which later became project l5al Geospatial technologies for information decisions (GEO

  3. C2 Rising: A Historical View of Our Critical Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    of six.11 In 1937 Tukhachevskii even conceptualized these C2 functions performed in the air, where a bird’s-eye view would offer maximum awareness to...terminology. • F1, orient shooters: increase shooter/sensor SA and threat warn- ing by providing SA. Battle management and ISR fusion tasks in this...this era seem to stumble upon the need for high-functioning C2 systems. Carrier war rooms, nuclear reactor control rooms, the National Military

  4. Extreme-ultraviolet observations of global coronal wave rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attrill, G. D. R. [Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, Dstl Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP4 0JQ (United Kingdom); Long, D. M.; Green, L. M.; Harra, L. K.; Van Driel-Gesztelyi, L., E-mail: gdrattrill@dstl.gov.uk [University College London, Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-20

    We present evidence of global coronal wave rotation in EUV data from SOHO/EIT, STEREO/EUVI, and SDO/AIA. The sense of rotation is found to be consistent with the helicity of the source region (clockwise for positive helicity, anticlockwise for negative helicity), with the source regions hosting sigmoidal structures. We also study two coronal wave events observed by SDO/AIA where no clear rotation (or sigmoid) is observed. The selected events show supporting evidence that they all originate with flux rope eruptions. We make comparisons across this set of observations (both with and without clear sigmoidal structures). On examining the magnetic configuration of the source regions, we find that the nonrotation events possess a quadrupolar magnetic configuration. The coronal waves that do show a rotation originate from bipolar source regions.

  5. Solar transition region and coronal response to heating rate perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariska, John T.

    1987-01-01

    Observations of Doppler shifts in UV emission lines formed in the solar transition region show continual plasma downflows and impulsive plasma upflows. Using numerical simulations, the authors examine the conjecture that areas of downflowing plasma are the base regions of coronal loops in which the heating is gradually decreasing and that areas of upflowing plasma are the base regions of coronal loops in which the heating rate is gradually increasing. Beginning with a coronal loop in equilibrium, the heating rate is reduced on time scales of 100, 1000, and 2000 s to 10 percent and 1 percent of the initial value, and the loop is allowed to evolve to a new equilibrium. The heating rate for the cooled models is then increased back to the initial value on the same time scales. While significant mass motions do develop in the simulations, both the emission measure and the velocity at 100,000 K do not show the characteristics present in UV observations.

  6. Coronal Loop Evolution Observed with AIA and Hi-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulu-Moore, Fana; Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Kobayashi, K.; Korreck, K.; Golub, L.; Kuzin. S.; Walsh, R.; DeForest, C.; DePontieu, B.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Despite much progress toward understanding the dynamics of the solar corona, the physical properties of coronal loops are not yet fully understood. Recent investigations and observations from different instruments have yielded contradictory results about the true physical properties of coronal loops. In the past, the evolution of loops has been used to infer the loop substructure. With the recent launch of High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), this inference can be validated. In this poster we discuss the first results of loop analysis comparing AIA and Hi-C data. We find signatures of cooling in a pixel selected along a loop structure in the AIA multi-filter observations. However, unlike previous studies, we find that the cooling time is much longer than the draining time. This is inconsistent with previous cooling models.

  7. LONG-TERM SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF TIDAL DISRUPTION CANDIDATES SELECTED BY STRONG CORONAL LINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Chenwei; Wang Tinggui; Zhou Hongyan; Jiang Peng [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, University of Sciences and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Ferland, Gary [Department of Physics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Yuan Weimin, E-mail: twang@ustc.edu.cn [National Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Beijing (China)

    2013-09-01

    We present results of follow-up optical spectroscopic Multi-Mirror Telescope (MMT) observations of seven rare, extreme coronal line-emitting galaxies reported by Wang et al. Large variations in coronal lines are found in four objects, making them strong candidates for tidal disruption events (TDEs). For the four TDE candidates, all the coronal lines with ionization states higher than [Fe VII] disappear within 5-9 yr. The [Fe VII] line faded by a factor of about five in one object (J0952+2143) within 4 yr, whereas the line emerged in another two objects that previously did not show the line. A strong increment in the [O III] flux is observed, shifting the line ratios toward the loci of active galactic nuclei on the BPT diagram. Surprisingly, we detect a non-canonical [O III] {lambda}5007/[O III] {lambda}4959 ratio of {approx_equal} 2 in two objects, indicating a large column density of O{sup 2+} and thus probably optically thick gas. This result also requires a very large ionization parameter and a relatively soft ionizing spectral energy distribution (e.g., a blackbody with T < 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} K). Our observations can be explained as the echoing of a strong ultraviolet to soft X-ray flare caused by TDEs on molecular clouds in the inner parsecs of the galactic nuclei. Reanalyzing the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra reveals double-peaked or strongly blue-shouldered broad lines in three of the objects, which disappeared in the MMT spectra of two objects and faded by a factor of 10 in 8 yr in the remaining object with a decrease in both the line width and centroid offset. We interpret these broad lines as arising from decelerating biconical outflows. Our results demonstrate that the signatures of echoing can persist for as long as 10 yr and can be used to probe the gas environment in quiescent galactic nuclei.

  8. Excitation of flare-induced waves in coronal loops and the effects of radiative cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provornikova, Elena; Ofman, Leon; Wang, Tongjiang

    2018-01-01

    EUV imaging observations from several space missions (SOHO/EIT, TRACE, and SDO/AIA) have revealed a presence of propagating intensity disturbances in solar coronal loops. These disturbances are typically interpreted as slow magnetoacoustic waves. However, recent spectroscopic observations with Hinode/EIS of active region loops revealed that the propagating intensity disturbances are associated with intermittent plasma upflows (or jets) at the footpoints which are presumably generated by magnetic reconnection. For this reason, whether these disturbances are waves or periodic flows is still being studied. This study is aimed at understanding the physical properties of observed disturbances by investigating the excitation of waves by hot plasma injections from below and the evolution of flows and wave propagation along the loop. We expand our previous studies based on isothermal 3D MHD models of an active region to a more realistic model that includes full energy equation accounting for the effects of radiative losses. Computations are initialized with an equilibrium state of a model active region using potential (dipole) magnetic field, gravitationally stratified density and temperature obtained from the polytropic equation of state. We model an impulsive injection of hot plasma into the steady plasma outflow along the loops of different temperatures, warm (∼1 MK) and hot (∼6 MK). The simulations show that hot jets launched at the coronal base excite slow magnetoacoustic waves that propagate to high altitudes along the loops, while the injected hot flows decelerate rapidly with heights. Our results support that propagating disturbances observed in EUV are mainly the wave features. We also find that the effect of radiative cooling on the damping of slow-mode waves in 1-6 MK coronal loops is small, in agreement with the previous conclusion based on 1D MHD models.

  9. Thermal instabilities in magnetically confined plasmas - Solar coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbal, S. R.; Rosner, R.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal stability of confined solar coronal structures ('loops') is investigated, following both normal mode and a new, global instability analysis. It is demonstrated that: (1) normal mode analysis shows modes with size scales comparable to that of loops to be unstable, but to be strongly affected by the loop boundary conditions; (2) a global analysis, based upon variation of the total loop energy losses and gains, yields loop stability conditions for global modes dependent upon the coronal loop heating process, with magnetically coupled heating processes giving marginal stability. The connection between the present analysis and the minimum flux corona of Hearn is also discussed.

  10. Hydrostatic and dynamic models of solar coronal holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of a sequence of one-dimensional fluid flow models of the transition zone and the inner corona. A hydrostatic model atmosphere in reasonable agreement with observations of closed, large-scale coronal structures found in the quiet sun is considered and various physical effects are introduced, one at a time, observing the response of the model. As a result of the investigations, a model is developed of the plasma flow in a coronal hole. It is shown that the data severely circumscribe the allowable range of possible models.

  11. Automatic measurement of orbital volume in unilateral coronal synostosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Vedrana Andersen; Einarsson, Gudmundur; Darvann, Tron Andre

    2016-01-01

    Premature fusion of the coronal suture on one side of the calvaria (unilateral coronal synostosis, UCS) results in asymmetric craniofacial development and the deformation of the orbits. Often this necessitates surgery, where CT scanning is employed to obtain measures of the bony orbit. These meas...... segmentations. We obtain similar measures, as well as high Dice scores, compared to the experts. The run time for the proposed approach with a prototype implementation is around 3 minutes on a standard laptop, making the method suitable for rapid evaluation of orbital volume in UCS....

  12. Coronal seismology waves and oscillations in stellar coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, Alexander; Nakariakov, Valery M

    2012-01-01

    This concise and systematic account of the current state of this new branch of astrophysics presents the theoretical foundations of plasma astrophysics, magneto-hydrodynamics and coronal magnetic structures, taking into account the full range of available observation techniques -- from radio to gamma. The book discusses stellar loops during flare energy releases, MHD waves and oscillations, plasma instabilities and heating and charged particle acceleration. Current trends and developments in MHD seismology of solar and stellar coronal plasma systems are also covered, while recent p

  13. A generalized stoichiometric model of C3, C2, C2+C4, and C4 photosynthetic metabolism.

    OpenAIRE

    Bellasio, C.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of suppressing photorespiration in crops to maximize assimilation and yield is stimulating considerable interest among researchers looking to bioengineer carbon-concentrating mechanisms into C3 plants. However, detailed quantification of the biochemical activities in the bundle sheath is lacking. This work presents a general stoichiometric model for C3, C2, C2+C4, and C4 assimilation (SMA) in which energetics, metabolite traffic, and the different decarboxylating enzymes (NAD-depende...

  14. Two distinct RNase activities of CRISPR-C2c2 enable guide-RNA processing and RNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East-Seletsky, Alexandra; O'Connell, Mitchell R; Knight, Spencer C; Burstein, David; Cate, Jamie H D; Tjian, Robert; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-10-13

    Bacterial adaptive immune systems use CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins for RNA-guided nucleic acid cleavage. Although most prokaryotic adaptive immune systems generally target DNA substrates, type III and VI CRISPR systems direct interference complexes against single-stranded RNA substrates. In type VI systems, the single-subunit C2c2 protein functions as an RNA-guided RNA endonuclease (RNase). How this enzyme acquires mature CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) that are essential for immune surveillance and how it carries out crRNA-mediated RNA cleavage remain unclear. Here we show that bacterial C2c2 possesses a unique RNase activity responsible for CRISPR RNA maturation that is distinct from its RNA-activated single-stranded RNA degradation activity. These dual RNase functions are chemically and mechanistically different from each other and from the crRNA-processing behaviour of the evolutionarily unrelated CRISPR enzyme Cpf1 (ref. 11). The two RNase activities of C2c2 enable multiplexed processing and loading of guide RNAs that in turn allow sensitive detection of cellular transcripts.

  15. A generalized stoichiometric model of C3, C2, C2+C4, and C4 photosynthetic metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellasio, Chandra

    2017-01-01

    The goal of suppressing photorespiration in crops to maximize assimilation and yield is stimulating considerable interest among researchers looking to bioengineer carbon-concentrating mechanisms into C3 plants. However, detailed quantification of the biochemical activities in the bundle sheath is lacking. This work presents a general stoichiometric model for C3, C2, C2+C4, and C4 assimilation (SMA) in which energetics, metabolite traffic, and the different decarboxylating enzymes (NAD-dependent malic enzyme, NADP-dependent malic enzyme, or phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) are explicitly included. The SMA can be used to refine experimental data analysis or formulate hypothetical scenarios, and is coded in a freely available Microsoft Excel workbook. The theoretical underpinnings and general model behaviour are analysed with a range of simulations, including (i) an analysis of C3, C2, C2+C4, and C4 in operational conditions; (ii) manipulating photorespiration in a C3 plant; (iii) progressively upregulating a C2 shuttle in C3 photosynthesis; (iv) progressively upregulating a C4 cycle in C2 photosynthesis; and (v) manipulating processes that are hypothesized to respond to transient environmental inputs. Results quantify the functional trade-offs, such as the electron transport needed to meet ATP/NADPH demand, as well as metabolite traffic, inherent to different subtypes. The SMA refines our understanding of the stoichiometry of photosynthesis, which is of paramount importance for basic and applied research. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  16. ALMA imaging of C2H emission in the disk of NGC 1068

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Burillo, S.; Viti, S.; Combes, F.; Fuente, A.; Usero, A.; Hunt, L. K.; Martín, S.; Krips, M.; Aalto, S.; Aladro, R.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Casasola, V.; Henkel, C.; Querejeta, M.; Neri, R.; Costagliola, F.; Tacconi, L. J.; van der Werf, P. P.

    2017-12-01

    Aims: We study the feedback of star formation and nuclear activity on the chemistry of molecular gas in NGC 1068, a nearby (D = 14 Mpc) Seyfert 2 barred galaxy, by analyzing whether the abundances of key molecular species such as ethynyl (C2H), which is a classical tracer of photon dominated regions (PDR), change in the different environments of the disk of the galaxy. Methods: We used the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to map the emission of the hyperfine multiplet of C2H(N = 1-0) and its underlying continuum emission in the central r ≃ 35″ (2.5 kpc) region of the disk of NGC 1068 with a spatial resolution 1.̋0 × 0.̋7 (≃ 50-70 pc). We used maps of the dust continuum emission obtained at 349 GHz by ALMA to derive the H2 gas column densities and combined these with the C2H map at matched spatial resolution to estimate the fractional abundance of this species. We developed a set of time-dependent chemical models, which include shocks, gas-phase PDRs, and gas-grain chemical models to determine the origin of the C2H gas. Results: A sizeable fraction of the total C2H line emission is detected from the r ≃ 1.3 kpc starburst (SB) ring, which is a region that concentrates the bulk of the recent massive star formation in the disk traced by the Paα emission complexes imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). However, the brightest C2H emission originates from a r ≃ 200 pc off-centered circumnuclear disk (CND), where evidence of a molecular outflow has been previously found in other molecular tracers imaged by ALMA. We also detect significant emission that connects the CND with the outer disk in a region that probes the interface between the molecular disk and ionized gas outflow out to r ≃ 400 pc. We derived the fractional abundances of C2H (X(C2H)) assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions and a set of excitation temperatures (Tex) constrained by the previous multiline CO studies of the galaxy. Our estimates range from X(C2H) ≃ a

  17. Measurements of Plasma Power Losses in the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korepanov, Sergey; Smirnov, Artem; Garate, Eusebio; Donin, Alexandr; Kondakov, Alexey; Singatulin, Shavkat

    2013-10-01

    A high-confinement operating regime with plasma lifetimes significantly exceeding past empirical scaling laws was recently obtained by combining plasma gun edge biasing and tangential Neutral Beam Injection in the C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiment. To analyze the power balance in C-2, two new diagnostic instruments - the pyroelectric (PE) and infrared (IR) bolometers - were developed. The PE bolometer, designed to operate in the incident power density range from 0.1-100 W/cm2, is used to measure the radial power loss, which is dominated by charge-exchange neutrals and radiation. The IR bolometer, which measures power irradiated onto a thin metal foil inserted in the plasma, is designed for the power density range from 0.5-5 kW/cm2. The IR bolometer is used to measure the axial power loss from the plasma near the end divertors. The maximum measurable pulse duration of ~ 10 ms is limited by the heat capacitance of the IR detector. Both detectors have time resolution of about 10-100 μs and were calibrated in absolute units using a high power neutral beam. We present the results of first direct measurements of axial and radial plasma power losses in C-2.

  18. The behavior of transverse waves in nonuniform solar flux tubes. II. Implications for coronal loop seismology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, Roberto; Terradas, Jaume; Oliver, Ramón [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Goossens, Marcel, E-mail: roberto.soler@uib.es [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-02-01

    The seismology of coronal loops using observations of damped transverse oscillations in combination with results from theoretical models is a tool to indirectly infer physical parameters in the solar atmospheric plasma. Existing seismology schemes based on approximations of the period and damping time of kink oscillations are often used beyond their theoretical range of applicability. These approximations assume that the variation of density across the loop is confined to a nonuniform layer much thinner than the radius of the loop, but the results of the inversion problem often do not satisfy this preliminary hypothesis. Here, we determine the accuracy of the analytic approximations of the period and damping time, and the impact on seismology estimates when largely nonuniform loops are considered. We find that the accuracy of the approximations when used beyond their range of applicability is strongly affected by the form of the density profile across the loop, that is observationally unknown and so must be arbitrarily imposed as part of the theoretical model. The error associated with the analytic approximations can be larger than 50% even for relatively thin nonuniform layers. This error directly affects the accuracy of approximate seismology estimates compared to actual numerical inversions. In addition, assuming different density profiles can produce noncoincident intervals of the seismic variables in inversions of the same event. The ignorance about the true shape of density variation across the loop is an important source of error that may dispute the reliability of parameters seismically inferred assuming an ad hoc density profile.

  19. New techniques for the characterisation of dynamical phenomena in solar coronal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbrecht, E.

    2007-02-01

    During a total solar eclipse, a narrow strip of the Earth's surface is shielded completely by the Moon from the disk of the Sun. In this strip, the corona appears crown-like around the shade of the Moon. It was uncertain until the middle of the 20th century whether the corona was a solar phenomenon or if it was related to the Moon or whether it represented an artifact produced by the Earth's atmosphere. The answer to this question was provided by Grotrian (1939) and Edlèn (1942). Based on studies of iron emission lines, they suggested that the surface of the Sun is surrounded by a hot tenuous gas having a temperature of million degrees Kelvin and thus in a state of high ionization. This discovery was a result from spectroscopy, a field of research which started in 1666 with Sir Isaac Newton's observations of sunlight, dispersed by a prism. It is now clear that the hot solar corona is made of a low density plasma, highly structured by the magnetic field on length scales ranging from the Sun's diameter to the limit of angular resolution (e.g. Démoulin and Klein 2000). The need to resolve and study the corona down to such scales has determined a vigorous scientific and technological impulse toward the development of solar Ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray telescopes with high spatial and temporal resolution. With the advent of the satellite SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, see chapter 1), the picture of a quiet corona was definitely sent to the past. EUV (Extreme UV) image sequences of the lower solar corona revealed a finely structured medium constantly agitated by a wide variety of transients (e.g. Harrison 1998). Active regions consisting of large magnetic loops with enhanced temperature and density are observed, as well as "quiet" areas, coronal holes and numerous structures of different scales such as plumes, jets, spicules, X-ray bright points, blinkers, all structured by magnetic fields. Launched in 1998, the Transition Region And Coronal Explorer (TRACE

  20. High-cadence Hinode/XRT observations for studying coronal events with very short timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, David Eugene; Kobelski, Adam; Savage, Sabrina

    2017-08-01

    The Hinode X-Ray Telescope’s capability for high time cadence observations makes it an excellent tool for probing highly variable conditions in the corona, including wave-like activity, dynamic plasma motions, and short-duration transient events. XRT is capable of producing images at cadences faster than one image per 10 seconds, which is comparable to the energy release timescales, and/or ionization evolution timescales, predicted by a range of models of coronal activity. In the present work, we demonstrate XRT’s high-cadence capability through observations of active region AR 10923 (2006 November), with cadences of 6-20 seconds. The image sequences, made sequentially with multiple analysis filters, reveal many transient brightenings (i.e., microflares), for which we derive heating and cooling timescales. We also forward model the observed light curves to estimate the temperature, density, filling factors, and lengths of the observed loops. These estimates allow us to prioritize different heating mechanisms, and to better understand the unresolved structures within the observations. This study provides a test of capabilities, which have still not yet been fully utilized by the ten-year-old Hinode X-Ray Telescope, and thus provides a starting point for future investigations of short-timescale/high-frequency variations in coronal X-ray intensity.

  1. Realistic Modeling of Fast MHD Wave Trains in Coronal Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, Leon; Sun, Xudong

    2017-08-01

    Motivated by recent SDO/AIA observations we have developed realistic modeling of quasi-periodic, fast-mode propagating MHD wave trains (QFPs) using 3D MHD model initiated with potential magnetic field extrapolated from the solar coronal boundary. Localized quasi-periodic pulsations associated with C-class flares that drive the waves (as deduced from observations) are modeled with transverse periodic displacement of magnetic field at the lower coronal boundary. The modeled propagating speed and the form of the wave expansions matches the observed fast MHD waves speed >1000 km/s and topology. We study the parametric dependence of the amplitude, propagation, and damping of the waves for a range of key model parameters, such as the background temperature, density, and the location of the flaring site within the active region. We investigate the interaction of multiple QFP wave trains excited by adjacent flaring sources. We use the model results to synthesize EUV intensities in multiple AIA channels and obtain the model parameters that best reproduce the properties of observed QFPs, such as the recent DEM analysis. We discuss the implications of our modeling results for the seismological application of QFPs for the diagnostic of the active region field, flare pulsations, end estimate the energy flux carried by the waves.

  2. Coronal temperatures, heating, and energy flow in a polar region of the sun at solar maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withbroe, G. L.; Kohl, J. L.; Weiser, H.; Munro, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The profiles of resonantly scattered Lyman-alpha coronal radiation have been used to determine the hydrogen kinetic temperature from 1.5 to 4 solar radius from the center of the polar region of the corona observed in 1980 at solar maximum. Hydrogen temperatures derived from the line profiles were found to decrease with height from 1.2 million K at r = 1.5 solar radii to 600,000 K at r = 4 solar radius. Comparison of the measured kinetic temperatures with predictions from a semiempirical two-fluid model showed evidence of a small amount of heating or a nonthermal contribution to the motions of coronal protons between 1.5 and 4 solar radius. The widths of the profiles confirmed an upper limit of 110 + or - 15 km/s on the rms magnitude of the line-of-sight component of velocities between 1.5 and 4 solar radius. Density measurements obtained in situ in the solar wind in the ecliptic were used to locate the sources of low speed and high-speed winds in the polar region. An eclipse photograph of the corona at solar maximum is provided.

  3. Ultraviolet Thomson Scattering from Direct-Drive Coronal Plasmas in Multilayer Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henchen, R. J.; Goncharov, V. N.; Michel, D. T.; Follett, R. K.; Katz, J.; Froula, D. H.

    2014-10-01

    Ultraviolet (λ4 ω = 263 nm) Thomson scattering (TS) was used to probe ion-acoustic waves (IAW's) and electron plasma waves (EPW's) from direct-drive coronal plasmas. Fifty-nine drive beams (λ3 ω = 351 nm) illuminate a spherical target with a radius of ~ 860 μ m. A series of experiments studied the effect of higher electron temperature near the 3 ω quarter-critical surface (~ 2 . 5 ×1021 cm-3) on laser-plasma interactions resulting from a Si layer in the target. Electron temperatures and densities were measured from 150 to 400 μm from the initial target surface. Standard CH shells were compared to two-layered shells of CH and Si and three-layered shells of CH, Si, and CH. These multilayer targets have less hot-electron energy than standard CH shells as a result of higher electron temperature in the coronal plasmas. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  4. Comparative analysis of human and bovine teeth: radiographic density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Luis Oshiro Tanaka

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Since bovine teeth have been used as substitutes for human teeth in in vitro dental studies, the aim of this study was to compare the radiographic density of bovine teeth with that of human teeth to evaluate their usability for radiographic studies. Thirty bovine and twenty human teeth were cut transversally in 1 millimeter-thick slices. The slices were X-rayed using a digital radiographic system and an intraoral X-ray machine at 65 kVp and 7 mA. The exposure time (0.08 s and the target-sensor distance (40 cm were standardized for all the radiographs. The radiographic densities of the enamel, coronal dentin and radicular dentin of each slice were obtained separately using the "histogram" tool of Adobe Photoshop 7.0 software. The mean radiographic densities of the enamel, coronal dentin and radicular dentin were calculated by the arithmetic mean of the slices of each tooth. One-way ANOVA demonstrated statistically significant differences for the densities of bovine and human enamel (p 0.05. Based on the results, the authors concluded that: a the radiographic density of bovine enamel is significantly higher than that of human enamel; b the radiodensity of bovine coronal dentin is statistically lower than the radiodensity of human coronal dentin; bovine radicular dentin is also less radiodense than human radicular dentin, although this difference was not statistically significant; c bovine teeth should be used with care in radiographic in vitro studies.

  5. Curriculum for EPS Hockey E2-C2-juniors

    OpenAIRE

    Heinonen, Aleksi

    2017-01-01

    Coaching in hockey has changed in direction from coach-centered coaching to player-centered coaching. Nowadays it is more holistic; it is not just coaching tactics and trying to win games at all costs. The way of thinking has changed; instead of the former “what does a team need” way of thinking, nowadays it is more important to ask, “What does an individual need?” This thesis has been written for EPS Hockey E2-C2 juniors and E2-C2 coaches. The Executive Manager of EPS Hockey requested...

  6. A new way to convert Alfven waves into heat in solar coronal holes - Intermittent magnetic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.; Hammer, R.; Musielak, Z. E.; Suess, S. T.; An, C.-H.

    1992-01-01

    In our recent analysis of Alfven wave reflection in solar coronal holes, we found evidence that coronal holes are heated by reflected Alfven waves. This result suggests that the reflection is inherent to the process that dissipates these Alfven waves into heat. We propose a novel dissipation process that is driven by the reflection, and that plausibly dominates the heating in coronal holes.

  7. Cyclical Variation of the Quiet Corona and Coronal Holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    spectroheliograms obtained at Kitt Peak since the 1970s provides a proxy to the X- ray corona, with continuity and time span superior to X-ray observations. The rotation rate of coronal holes has been studied based on the helium 10830 Å spectroheliograms by Navarro-Peralta & Sanchez-Ibarra (1994), and by Insley et al.

  8. Microwave Enhancement in Coronal Holes: Statistical Properties Ν ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Astr. (2000) 21, 413 417. Microwave Enhancement in Coronal Holes: Statistical Properties. Ν. Gopalswamy1,2*, Κ. Shibasaki3, & Μ. Salem4. 1. Bldg 26, Room Gl, Code 682.3, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt MD, USA. 2 Center for Solar Physics and Space Weather, The Catholic University of America,. Washington DC 20064.

  9. African Culture and Communication Systems in the Coronation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African culture cannot be detached from the mode of communication of Africans. In this study, the writer examined the aspects of African culture communicated during the coronation of the 27th Ata Igala of Kogi State, North-central Nigeria. The study was motivated by the fact that the Ata, Idakwo Michael Ameh Oboni, rather ...

  10. Non-Equilibrium Ionization Effects Induced During Coronal Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, S.; Peres, G.; Reale, F.; Rosner, R.; Siegel, A.

    We present preliminary results of hydrodynamic modeling of flares occurring in plasma confined in coronal loops. Our analysis focuses on the deviations from ionization equilibrium on the population fractions of the most abundant elements in astrophysical plasmas, and on the possible implications for plasma diagnostics.

  11. Solar Coronal Plumes and the Fast Solar Wind

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Before the spectroscopic peculiarities in IPRs and plumes in Polar Coronal Holes (PCHs) can be further investigated with the instrument Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), it is mandatory to summarize the results of the ...

  12. Solar wind heavy ions from energetic coronal events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bame, S.J.

    1978-01-01

    Ions heavier than those of He can be resolved in the solar wind with electrostatic E/q analyzers when the local thermal temperatures are low. Ordinarily this condition prevails in the low speed solar wind found between high speed streams, i.e. the interstream, IS, solar wind. Various ions of O, Si and Fe are resolved in IS heavy ion spectra. Relative ion peak intensities indicate that the O ionization state is established in the IS coronal source regions at approx. 2.1 x 10/sup 6/K while the state of Fe is frozen in at approx. 1.5 x 10/sup 6/K farther out. Occasionally, anomalous spectra are observed in which the usually third most prominent ion peak, O/sup 8 +/, is depressed as are the Fe peaks ranging from Fe/sup 12 +/ to Fe/sup 7 +/. A prominent peak in the usual Si/sup 8 +/ position of IS spectra is self-consistently shown to be Fe/sup 16 +/. These features demonstrate that the ionization states were frozen in at higher than usual coronal temperatures. The source regions of these hot heavy ion spectra are identified as energetic coronal events including flares and nonflare coronal mass ejections. 24 references.

  13. RADIOLOGICAL TIPS Coronal views of the paediatric mandibular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We discuss 4 cases seen over the last 18 months at Red Cross War. Memorial Children's Hospital in an effort to highlight the importance of routinely reviewing coronal views of the mandibular condyle when interpreting trauma-related computerised tomography brain (CTB) studies in a paediatric setting. The mandible is the ...

  14. A Bayesian Approach to Period Searching in Solar Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Bryan; McKenzie, David

    2017-03-01

    We have applied a Bayesian generalized Lomb-Scargle period searching algorithm to movies of coronal loop images obtained with the Hinode X-ray Telescope (XRT) to search for evidence of periodicities that would indicate resonant heating of the loops. The algorithm makes as its only assumption that there is a single sinusoidal signal within each light curve of the data. Both the amplitudes and noise are taken as free parameters. It is argued that this procedure should be used alongside Fourier and wavelet analyses to more accurately extract periodic intensity modulations in coronal loops. The data analyzed are from XRT Observation Program #129C: “MHD Wave Heating (Thin Filters),” which occurred during 2006 November 13 and focused on active region 10293, which included coronal loops. The first data set spans approximately 10 min with an average cadence of 2 s, 2″ per pixel resolution, and used the Al-mesh analysis filter. The second data set spans approximately 4 min with a 3 s average cadence, 1″ per pixel resolution, and used the Al-poly analysis filter. The final data set spans approximately 22 min at a 6 s average cadence, and used the Al-poly analysis filter. In total, 55 periods of sinusoidal coronal loop oscillations between 5.5 and 59.6 s are discussed, supporting proposals in the literature that resonant absorption of magnetic waves is a viable mechanism for depositing energy in the corona.

  15. Standing Slow MHD Waves in Radiatively Cooling Coronal Loops ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the individual and combined effects of radiation and thermal conduction are studied by displaying the analytical solution numerically. Our discussions and conclusions are presented in Section 5. 2. The model and governing equations. We model a straight coronal loop, in which the magnetic field is uniform and in.

  16. Distribution of Latitudes and Speeds of Coronal Mass Ejections in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Distribution of latitudes and speeds of Coronal Mass Ejec- tions (CMEs) in the northern and southern hemispheres in cycle 23, from. September 1996 to December 2006, have been analyzed. By calculating the actual probability of the hemispheric distribution of the activity of the. CME, we find that a southern ...

  17. Heating coronal holes and accelerating the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E. N.

    1992-01-01

    The special energy requirements of a coronal hole combined with current knowledge of the limited dissipation of Alfven and fast mode MHD waves in the solar corona suggest a unique source of heat for the coronal hole. The near coronal hole requires approximately 3 - 4 x 10 exp 5 ergs/sq cm s, which can come only from the fluid jets, fast particles, and short period MHD waves from the network activity. The high speed streams of solar wind from coronal holes show that there is substantial heating, of 1 - 2 x 10 exp 5 ergs/sq cm s, beyond the sonic point in the wind, which can come only from the dissipation by thermal conduction of long period (approximately equal or greater than 100 sec) MHD waves from subphotospheric convection. Although the Alfven wave flux from the photosphere is generally taken for granted in the literature, we point out that it is a crucial phenomenon that has yet to be established on either a theoretical or observational scientific basis.

  18. Do slow shocks precede some coronal mass ejections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hundhausen, A.J.; Holzer, T.E.; Low, B.C.

    1987-10-01

    The observed speeds of coronal mass ejections are often below the estimated Alfven speed but above the sound speed for the background solar corona. This suggets that slow magnetohydrodynamic shocks may form as mass ejections sweep through the corona. We argue on the basis of the Rankine-Hugoniot relations and the propagation of small-amplitude slow mode waves that the shape of a slow shock front would be flattened (with respect to a sun-centered sphere) or perhaps even concave outward (from the sun) and thus present a very different appearance from the fast coronal shock waves that have been commonly modeled as wrapping around a mass ejection. The region behind a slow shock front standing just off the top of a coronal mass ejection would extend well out beyond the visible flanks of the ejection. The deflections of coronal structures that are commonly observed well outside of these flanks (and which are inconsistent with a fast shock wrapped around the mass ejection) are consistent with the presence of the slow shock, whether they lie in the enlarged postshock region or in a region still further beyond. Although the flattering of the tops of some mass ejections suggests our proposed slow shock configuration, a true test of its existence awaits formulation of quantitative models and detailed comparison with observations. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  19. The Enhanced Coronal Green Line Intensity and the Magnetic Field ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Sun: Corona—emergence of magnetic flux. Extended abstract. Ramesh, Nagabhushana and Varghese (1999) have shown that the green line intensity enhancement does not depend entirely on the strength of the underlying spot magnetic field though the coronal intensity enhanced feature is almost sure to occur at the.

  20. Microflares as Possible Sources for Coronal Heating Meera Gupta ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Solar flares: microflares, Fe-line feature—coronal heating. 1. Introduction. The solar corona is some 200 times .... standard OSPEX software in SolarSoft package. Fig. 1 shows, as an example, the light .... that the microflare reveals Fe line complex (red colour) peaking at 6.7 keV. However,. Fe/Ni line complex was not visible ...

  1. A new Dirac cone material: a graphene-like Be3C2 monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Yuan, Shijun; Li, Yunhai; Shi, Li; Wang, Jinlan

    2017-05-04

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials with Dirac cones exhibit rich physics and many intriguing properties, but the search for new 2D Dirac materials is still a current hotspot. Using the global particle-swarm optimization method and density functional theory, we predict a new stable graphene-like 2D Dirac material: a Be3C2 monolayer with a hexagonal honeycomb structure. The Dirac point occurs exactly at the Fermi level and arises from the merging of the hybridized pz bands of Be and C atoms. Most interestingly, this monolayer exhibits a high Fermi velocity in the same order of graphene. Moreover, the Dirac cone is very robust and retains even included spin-orbit coupling or external strain. These outstanding properties render the Be3C2 monolayer a promising 2D material for special electronics applications.

  2. Absolute calibration of neutron detectors on the C-2U advanced beam-driven FRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, R. M., E-mail: rmagee@trialphaenergy.com; Clary, R.; Korepanov, S.; Jauregui, F.; Allfrey, I.; Garate, E.; Valentine, T.; Smirnov, A. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    In the C-2U fusion energy experiment, high power neutral beam injection creates a large fast ion population that sustains a field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. The diagnosis of the fast ion pressure in these high-performance plasmas is therefore critical, and the measurement of the flux of neutrons from the deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion reaction is well suited to the task. Here we describe the absolute, in situ calibration of scintillation neutron detectors via two independent methods: firing deuterium beams into a high density gas target and calibration with a 2 × 10{sup 7} n/s AmBe source. The practical issues of each method are discussed and the resulting calibration factors are shown to be in good agreement. Finally, the calibration factor is applied to C-2U experimental data where the measured neutron rate is found to exceed the classical expectation.

  3. Absolute calibration of neutron detectors on the C-2U advanced beam-driven FRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, R. M.; Clary, R.; Korepanov, S.; Jauregui, F.; Allfrey, I.; Garate, E.; Valentine, T.; Smirnov, A.

    2016-11-01

    In the C-2U fusion energy experiment, high power neutral beam injection creates a large fast ion population that sustains a field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. The diagnosis of the fast ion pressure in these high-performance plasmas is therefore critical, and the measurement of the flux of neutrons from the deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion reaction is well suited to the task. Here we describe the absolute, in situ calibration of scintillation neutron detectors via two independent methods: firing deuterium beams into a high density gas target and calibration with a 2 × 107 n/s AmBe source. The practical issues of each method are discussed and the resulting calibration factors are shown to be in good agreement. Finally, the calibration factor is applied to C-2U experimental data where the measured neutron rate is found to exceed the classical expectation.

  4. Far infrared laser interferometry and polarimetry diagnostics for C-2W FRC experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Bihe; Rouillard, Mark; Feng, Ping; Beall, Michael; Settles, Greg; Snitchler, Greg; Ziaei, Shawn; TAE Team

    2017-10-01

    C-2W field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiments are focused to resolve major physics issues facing the future of FRC devices. To achieve these goals, it is essential to measure the plasma equilibrium dynamics and monitor plasma fluctuations. One of the critical diagnostics under development is a 14-chord three-wave far infrared (FIR) laser interferometry and polarimetry system, which can provide simultaneous high temporal resolution measurements of density and Faraday rotation profiles with high accuracy. It is based on the previous successful experience of FIR polarimetry and interferometry measurements in C-2U FRC plasmas. The physics considerations and the electro-opto-mechanical design and development of the system will be described, with discussions on challenges and solutions specific to diagnosing the high beta FRC plasmas. Initial experimental data will also be presented.

  5. Case report: pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucencies revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counihan, K P; O'Connell, A C

    2012-08-01

    Pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucency (PEIR) describes a radiolucent lesion located in the coronal dentine, just beneath the enamel-dentine junction of unerupted teeth. The prevalence of this lesion varies depending on the type and quality of radiographic exposure and age of patients used for assessment. The aetiology of pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucent lesions is not fully understood, but published clinical and histological evidence suggest that these lesions are resorptive in nature. Issues around the diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical management of this lesion are explored using previously unreported cases. Case 1: A ten-year-old girl attended for a routine check-up. An intra-coronal radiolucency in the unerupted lower right second premolar was an incidental finding on orthopantomograph (OPT). The tooth erupted and removal of enamel revealed a space filled with soft red tissue, unlike carious dentine in appearance. The tooth was restored with an indirect pulp cap, resin modified glass ionomer base and composite resin. Tissue from the lesion was removed for histopathological investigation. Root development continued to completion and the tooth remained asymptomatic and vital. Case 2: A six-year-old girl attended for her first dental visit. An intra-coronal radiolucency in a lower right first permanent molar was noted on baseline bitewing radiographs. The lesion was monitored and fissured sealed upon eruption. The lesion was monitored annually radiographically. The tooth remained symptom free for 5 years. The patient presented on an emergency basis having fractured the distolingual cusp overlying the lesion. There was no pain and the tooth was vital. The softened dentine was removed and the tooth was restored using a preformed metal crown. Case 3: A 12-year-old girl was referred for restoration of mandibular left second permanent molar. Clinically there was extensive occlusal destruction. Review of a previous OPT showed that an intra-coronal

  6. Impulsively Generated Wave Trains in Coronal Structures. I. Effects of Transverse Structuring on Sausage Waves in Pressureless Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui; Li, Bo; Chen, Shao-Xia; Xiong, Ming; Guo, Ming-Zhe

    2017-02-01

    The behavior of the axial group speeds of trapped sausage modes plays an important role in determining impulsively generated wave trains, which have often been invoked to account for quasi-periodic signals with quasi-periods of the order of seconds in a considerable number of coronal structures. We conduct a comprehensive eigenmode analysis, both analytically and numerically, on the dispersive properties of sausage modes in pressureless tubes with three families of continuous radial density profiles. We find a rich variety of the dependence on the axial wavenumber k of the axial group speed {v}{gr}. Depending on the density contrast and profile steepness as well as on the detailed profile description, the {v}{gr}{--}k curves either possess or do not possess cutoff wavenumbers, and they can behave in either a monotonical or non-monotonical manner. With time-dependent simulations, we further show that this rich variety of the group speed characteristics heavily influences the temporal evolution and Morlet spectra of impulsively generated wave trains. In particular, the Morlet spectra can look substantially different from the “crazy tadpoles” found for the much-studied discontinuous density profiles. We conclude that it is necessary to re-examine available high-cadence data to look for the rich set of temporal and spectral features that can be employed to discriminate between the unknown forms of the density distributions transverse to coronal structures.

  7. Studies of C-2U plasmas using Time-Resolved Multi-Chord Ion-Doppler Diagnostic (MCID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepak; Deng, Bihe; Zhai, Kan; Roche, Thomas; Granstedt, Erik; Thompson, Matthew; Tuszewski, Michel; The TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    C-2U has achieved steady-state operation of advanced beam-driven FRCs using neutral beam injection and edge biasing. To characterize this novel C-2U regime, MCID regularly measures time-resolved radial profiles of impurity ion emissivity, ion velocity, and ion temperature. Comparing thermal-ion temperatures with the pressure balance total temperatures provides the fast-ion pressure in the advanced beam-driven FRC state. Impurity ion measurement together with radial momentum balance yields radial profiles of electric field and electron current density. Such estimates were explored with Helium-mixed FRC plasmas on C-2, and are now performed by using indigenous Oxygen impurities in the advance beam-driven plasmas in C-2U. Conditions and dependence of possible ion heating via edge biasing are also explored. The detailed MCID setup for radial/axial profile measurements and data for multiple physics phenomena will be presented.

  8. Does Δm = ΔErest/c2?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redzic, Dragan V.

    2006-01-01

    We point out a logical possibility, based on special relativity, that the validity of Einstein's 1905 generalization, Δm = ΔErest/c2, might depend on how the energy of a body is defined in special relativity. The analysis is another illustration of the importance of Ockham's razor in special relativity.

  9. Chemical fractionations in meteorites. XI - C2 chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, R.; Richter, G. R.; Woodrow, A. B.; Anders, E.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of the compositions of 20 trace elements in the representative C2 chondrites Boriskino, Cold Bokkeveld, Erakot, Essebi, Haripura, Santa Cruz and Al Rais are reported. The contents of Ag, Au, Bi, Cd, Cs, Ge, In, Ir, Ni, Os, Pd, Rb, Re, Sb, Se, Sn, Te, Tl, U, and Zn were determined by radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The siderophile abundances of the C2 chondrites are found to be less uniform than those of other carbonaceous chondrites, while the C2R chondrite Al Rais is systematically lower in 12 volatiles than the C2M chondrites. Enrichment of Bi and Tl found in Erakot and Haripura indicate the possible presence of the late condensate mysterite. Volatile abundances are shown to agree with matrix contents for meteorites that have suffered little aqueous alteration, however to be 20-30% lower for the more altered meteorites. Finally, the decline of element abundance with volatility is shown to be consistent with the sigmoid curve explained by the two-component model.

  10. Heat tolerance of dairy lactococcal c2 phages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Cecilie Lykke Marvig; Basheer, Aideh; Neve, H.

    2011-01-01

    Nine Lactococcus lactis c2 phages propagated on different hosts were screened for thermal resistance in skimmed milk. Pronounced variations in thermal resistance were found. Three phages displayed high sensitivity towards heat resulting in >8 log reductions after 70 °C for 5 min, whereas the most...

  11. Invariant Nonrecurrent Fatou Components of Automorphisms of $C^2$

    OpenAIRE

    Jupiter, Daniel; Lilov, Krastio

    2003-01-01

    We examine invariant nonrecurrent Fatou components of automorphisms of $\\mathbb{C}^2$ in the case where all limit maps are constant. We show that except in special cases there cannot be more than one such limit map. We also briefly examine such Fatou components where the limit maps may be nonconstant. Lastly we present a few examples of such Fatou components.

  12. Tunable C2N Membrane for High Efficient Water Desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanmei; Li, Weifeng; Zhou, Hongcai; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhao, Mingwen

    2016-01-01

    Water scarcity represents one of the most serious global problems of our time and challenges the advancements in desalination techniques. Although water-filtering architectures based on graphene have greatly advanced the approach to high performance desalination membranes, the controlled-generation of nanopores with particular diameter is tricky and has stunted its wide applications. Here, through molecular dynamic simulations and first-principles calculations, we propose that the recently reported graphene-like carbon nitride (g-C2N) monolayer can serve as high efficient filters for water desalination. Taking the advantages of the intrisic nanoporous structure and excellent mechanical properties of g-C2N, high water transparency and strong salt filtering capability have been demonstrated in our simulations. More importantly, the “open” and “closed” states of the g-C2N filter can be precisely regulated by tensile strain. It is found that the water permeability of g-C2N is significantly higher than that reported for graphene filters by almost one order of magnitude. In the light of the abundant family of graphene-like carbon nitride monolayered materials, our results thus offer a promising approach to the design of high efficient filteration architectures. PMID:27384666

  13. 26 CFR 1.663(c)-2 - Rules of administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....663(c)-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX..., that a separate economic interest exists. (b) Computation of distributable net income for each separate share—(1) General rule. The amount of distributable net income for any share under section 663(c) is...

  14. Two Distinct RNase Activities of CRISPR-C2c2 Enable Guide RNA Processing and RNA Detection

    OpenAIRE

    East-Seletsky, Alexandra; O’Connell, Mitchell R.; Knight, Spencer C.; Burstein, David; Cate, Jamie H. D.; Tjian, Robert; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptive immune systems employ CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins for RNA-guided nucleic acid cleavage1,2. Although generally targeted to DNA substrates3–5, the Type III and Type VI CRISPR systems direct interference complexes against single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) substrates6–9. In Type VI systems, the single-subunit C2c2 protein functions as an RNA-guided RNA endonuclease9,10. How this enzyme a...

  15. Transoral vertebroplasty for a C2 aneurysmal bone cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brage, Liberto; Roldán, Héctor; Plata-Bello, Julio; Martel, Diego; García-Marín, Víctor

    2016-07-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts at the cervical spine represent a real challenge both diagnostically and therapeutically, especially in young patients. We present an unusual case of a C2 aneurysmal bone cyst expanding in the entire vertebral body in a girl successfully treated with a transoral vertebroplasty. This is a case report study. We report the case of a 17-year-old girl with a history of cervical pain and occipital headache after a car accident. Routine x-rays disclosed a C2 lesion. Her neurologic examination was normal. Computed tomography showed a lytic lesion occupying almost the entire body of the C2 vertebra. The cortical bone was intact but notably thinned. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic image with blood inside. Transoral vertebroplasty was selected among other surgical options for the following reasons: (1) to improve the clinical symptoms, and (2) to prevent future vertebral collapse with devastating neurologic consequences. Under general anesthesia and continuous neurophysiological monitoring, we conducted a fluoroscopic-guided transoral vertebroplasty through a Jamshidi needle. A cytology sample from the cystic lesion was taken through the needle. The blood smear showed no tumoral cellularity. There were no complications during surgery or postoperative infections. After 4 years of follow-up, the patient is pain-free and leads a normal life. Transoral vertebroplasty seems to be a direct, safe, and effective technique to stabilize cystic lesions that endanger the stability of C2 and to improve symptoms. Aneurysmal bone cysts should be included in the differential diagnosis of lytic lesions at the C2 vertebral body. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Physical Properties of C-Si Alloys in C2/m Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian-Kun; Chai, Chang-Chun; Fan, Qing-Yang; Yang, Yin-Tang

    2017-08-01

    Using the first principles calculations based on density functional theory, the crystal structure, elastic anisotropy, and electronic properties of carbon, silicon and their alloys (C 12 Si 4, C 8 Si 8, and C 4 Si 12 ) in a monoclinic structure (C2/m) are investigated. The calculated results such as lattice parameters, elastic constants, bulk modulus, and shear modulus of C 16 and Si 16 in C2/m structure are in good accord with previous work. The elastic constants show that C 16, Si 16, and their alloys in C2/m structure are mechanically stable. The calculated results of universal anisotropy index, compression and shear anisotropy percent factors indicate that C-Si alloys present elastic anisotropy, and C 8 Si 8 shows a greater anisotropy. The Poisson’s ratio and the B/G value show that C 8 Si 8 is ductile material and other four C-Si alloys are brittle materials. In addition, Debye temperature and average sound velocity are predicted utilizing elastic modulus and density of C-Si alloys. The band structure and the partial density of states imply that C 16 and Si 16 are indirect band gap semiconductors, while C 12 Si 4, C 8 Si 8, and C 4 Si 12 are semi-metallic alloys. Supported by the Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 61474089, Open Fund of Key Laboratory of Complex Electromagnetic Environment Science and Technology, China Academy of Engineering Physics under Grant No. 2015-0214. YY.K

  17. Three-Dimensional Structure and Energy Balance of a Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.-Y.; Raymond, J. C.; Ko, Y.-K.; Kim, K.-S.

    2009-01-01

    UVCS observed Doppler-shifted material of a partial halo coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2001 December 13. The observed ratio of [O VJ/O V] is a reliable density diagnostic important for assessing the state of the plasma. Earlier UVCS observations of CMEs found evidence that the ejected plasma is heated long after the eruption. This paper investigated the heating rates, which represent a significant fraction of the CME energy budget. The parameterized heating and radiative and adiabatic cooling have been used to evaluate the temperature evolution of the CME material with a time-dependent ionization state model. Continuous heating is required to match the UVCS observations. To match the O VI bright knots, a higher heating rate is required such that the heating energy is greater than the kinetic energy.

  18. EVIDENCE OF POSTERUPTION RECONNECTION ASSOCIATED WITH CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Pete; Linker, J. A.; Mikic, Z.; Odstracil, D.; Pizzo, V. J.; Webb, D. F.

    2002-01-01

    Using a coupled 2.5-dimensional, time-dependent MHD model of the solar corona and inner heliosphere, we have simulated the eruption and evolution of a coronal mass ejection containing a flux rope all the way from the Sun to 1 AU. Although idealized, we find that the simulation reproduces many generic features of magnetic clouds. In this paper we report on a new, intriguing aspect of these comparisons. Specifically, the results suggest that jetted outflow, driven by posteruptive reconnection underneath the flux rope, occurs and may remain intact out to 1 AU and beyond. We present an example of a magnetic cloud with precisely these signatures and show that the velocity perturbations are consistent with reconnection outflow. We suggest that other velocity and/or density enhancements observed trailing magnetic clouds may be signatures of such reconnection and, in some cases, may not be associated with prominence material, as has previously been suggested.

  19. Seismology of contracting and expanding coronal loops using damping of kink oscillations by mode coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, D. J.; Russell, A. J. B.; Anfinogentov, S. A.; Simões, P. J. A.; Goddard, C. R.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Fletcher, L.

    2017-10-01

    Aims: We extend recently developed seismological methods to analyse oscillating loops which feature a large initial shift in the equilibrium position and investigate additional observational signatures related to the loop environment and oscillation driver. Methods: We model the motion of coronal loops as a kink oscillation damped by mode coupling, accounting for any change in loop length and the possible presence of parallel harmonics in addition to the fundamental mode. We apply our model to a loop which rapidly contracts due to a post-flare implosion (SOL2012-03-09) and a loop with a large lateral displacement (SOL2012-10-20). Results: The seismological method is used to calculate plasma parameters of the oscillating loops including the transverse density profile, magnetic field strength, and phase mixing timescale. For SOL2012-03-09 the period of oscillation has a linear correlation with the contracting motion and suggests the kink speed remains constant during the oscillation. The implosion excitation mechanism is found to be associated with an absence of additional parallel harmonics. Conclusions: The improved Bayesian analysis of the coronal loop motion allows for accurate seismology of plasma parameters, and the evolution of the period of oscillation compared with the background trend can be used to distinguish between loop motions in the plane of the loop and those perpendicular to it. The seismologically inferred kink speed and density contrast imply sub-Alfvénic (MA = 0.16 ± 0.03) propagation of the magnetic reconfiguration associated with the implosion, as opposed to triggering by a wave propagating at the Alfvén speed.

  20. Quantification of osseous facial dysmorphology in untreated unilateral coronal synostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, A A; Kim, Y O; Eaton, A; Pilgram, T K; Marsh, J L; Zonneveld, F; Larsen, P; Kreiborg, S

    2000-08-01

    Unilateral coronal synostosis results in dysmorphology of the midface in addition to well-characterized cranial and orbital deformities. Because most American infants with this problem have undergone cranio-orbital surgery within their first year of life for the past 25 years, a paucity of data exist regarding the natural history of untreated unilateral coronal synostosis. In an attempt to remedy this void, an international search was conducted to identify computed tomography data sets of living individuals with untreated unilateral coronal synostosis; data were obtained from two European centers and one center in the United States. Results limited to the study of the midface are presented here. Digital data from high-resolution head computed tomography scans of 11 living, white individuals with untreated unilateral coronal synostosis were obtained from three craniofacial centers (in Denmark, The Netherlands, and the United States). Image volumes were constructed from each scan using ANALYZE biomedical imaging software. Fourteen pairs of three-dimensional distances were calculated on the ipsilateral (the side of the synostosis) and the contralateral (the side opposite to the synostosis) hemifaces using 11 osseous landmarks. The resulting measurements were expressed as a ratio of the ipsilateral: contralateral sides. Descriptive statistics were derived for the untreated unilateral coronal synostosis population and compared with analogous measurements performed on dried skulls. Age at computed tomography ranged from 1.1 to 21.1 years (mean, 6.6 years; median, 4.1 years). Twelve of the 14 measured distances differed by greater than 5 percent on the ipsilateral side, and all but one of these measurements were decreased on the ipsilateral side when compared with contralateral values. The results of this study support the following conclusions: (1) There are discrete and measurable differences in the facial morphology between patients with untreated unilateral coronal

  1. Discovery and Classification of DES15C2kyh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, M. L.; Filippenko, A. V.; Nugent, P.; Brout, D. J.; Gladney, L.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.; D'Andrea, C.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Childress, M.; Maartens, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Foley, R. J.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.; Schubnell, M.; Kessler, R.; Lasker, J.; Scolnic, D.

    2015-10-01

    We report optical spectroscopy of DES15C2kyh discovered by the Dark Energy Survey. The spectrum (340-1025nm) was obtained using LRIS on Keck-I. Object classification was performed using superfit (Howell et al, 2005, ApJ, 634, 1190) and SNID (Blondin & Tonry, 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024), the details of which are reported in the table below.

  2. An ab initio prediction study of the electronic structure and elastic properties of V3GeC2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guobing Ying

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The electronic structure and elastic properties of the ternary layered carbide V3GeC2 were investigated by the first-principle plane-wave pseudopotential total energy calculation method based on density functional theory. It is found that the computed P63/mmc lattice constants and internal coordinates are a = 2.9636 Å, c = 17.2256 Å and zV2 = 0.1325, zC = 0.5712, respectively. The predictable cohesive energy of V3GeC2 reflects that it could be a stable Mn+1AXn phase like Ti3GeC2 and V2GeC, while the band structure shows that the V3GeC2 has anisotropic electrical conductivity, with a high density of states at the Fermi energy. The V3GeC2 exhibits potential anisotropic elastic properties, as well as self-lubricating and ductile behaviour, related to the V–Ge bonds being relatively weaker than the V–C bonds.

  3. Inflows in the Inner White-light Corona: The Closing-down of Flux after Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, P.; Wang, Y.-M.

    2017-11-01

    During times of high solar activity, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph C2 coronagraph has recorded multitudes of small features moving inward through its 2{--}6 {R}⊙ field of view. These outer-coronal inflows, which are concentrated around the heliospheric current sheet, tend to be poorly correlated with individual coronal mass ejection (CME) events. Using running-difference movies constructed from Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory/COR1 coronagraph images taken during 2008-2014, we have identified large numbers of inward-moving features at heliocentric distances below 2 {R}⊙ , with the rate increasing with sunspot and CME activity. Most of these inner-coronal inflows are closely associated with CMEs, being observed during and in the days immediately following the eruptions. Here, we describe several examples of the pinching-off of tapered streamer structures in the wake of CMEs. This type of inflow event is characterized by a separation of the flow into incoming and outgoing components connected by a thin spike, which is interpreted as a continually elongating current sheet viewed edge-on; by the prior convergence of narrow rays toward the current sheet; and by a succession of collapsing loops that form a cusp-shaped structure at the base of the current sheet. The re-forming streamer overlies a growing post-eruption arcade that is visible in EUV images. These observations provide support for standard reconnection models for the formation/evolution of flux ropes during solar eruptive events. We suggest that inflow streams that occur over a relatively wide range of position angles result from the pinching-off of loop arcades whose axes are oriented parallel rather than perpendicular to the sky plane.

  4. Functional mapping of factor VIII C2 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellequer, Jean-Luc; Chen, Shu-wen W; Saboulard, Didier; Delcourt, Marc; Négrier, Claude; Plantier, Jean-Luc

    2011-07-01

    The factor VIII (FVIII) is a cofactor of the coagulation cascade. The FVIII C2 domain is a critical domain that participates in the interactions with the von Willebrand factor and the phospholipidic surfaces. To assess the importance of each residue of this domain in the maintenance of the structure and the function of FVIII, a number (n=139) of mutants were generated by substituting the original residues, from Ser2173 to Gly2325, by an alanine. Mutants were built within a complete B domain-deleted FVIII and expressed in COS-1 cells. Mutant antigen levels and procoagulant activities were measured. Two in silico analyses, a sliding average procedure and an analysis of the mutation energy cost were conducted in parallel on the FVIII structure. Both results were in agreement with the functional data, and illustrated the benefit of using such strategies prior to targeting specific residues in the aim of generating active recombinant molecules. The functional assays identify the residues that are important to maintaining the structure of the C2 domain, mainly those forming β-sheet, and those that can afford substitution, establishing a detailed functional relation with the available crystallographic data. This study provided a comprehensive functional mapping of the FVIII C2 domain and discussed the implication of specific residues in respect to the maintenance in the activity and structure stability, the efficiency in secretion, the binding to phospholipids and the formation of epitope.

  5. Physiological effects of the TASER C2 conducted energy weapon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauchem, James R; Seaman, Ronald L; Klages, Curtis M

    2009-01-01

    In previous studies, exposure to conducted energy weapons (CEWs) (such as TASER International's Advanced TASER X26 device) resulted in leg muscle contraction, acidosis, increased blood electrolytes, and other biochemical and physiological changes. In the current study, experiments were performed to examine the effects of exposures to TASER International's "C2" CEW, which is specifically marketed to civilian rather than law-enforcement users. Ten pigs (Sus scrofa) were sedated with an intramuscular injection of Telezol (tiletamine HCl and zolazepam HCl) and intubated. General anesthesia was maintained with an IV propofol infusion. Applications of the C2 device for 30 s resulted in extensive muscle contraction and significant increases in heart rate and hematocrit, and in blood levels of pCO2, lactate, glucose, and potassium, sodium, and calcium ions. Significant decreases were observed in blood oxygen saturation, pO2, and pH. Qualitatively, many of these changes were consistent with previous reports in the literature dealing with studies of muscle stimulation or exercise. The changes in blood pCO2, pO2, electrolytes, lactate, and pH, however, were greater than in a previous study of three repeated 5-s exposures to the X26 CEW commonly used by law-enforcement personnel. On the basis of the results, potential detrimental effects due to use of the "citizen-version" TASER C2 CEW may be more likely than limited intermittent applications of the X26 CEW.

  6. Multi-channel Doppler backscattering measurements in the C-2 field reversed configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, L; Ruskov, E; Deng, B H; Gota, H; Gupta, D; Tuszewski, M; Douglass, J; Peebles, W A; Binderbauer, M; Tajima, T

    2014-11-01

    A versatile heterodyne Doppler Backscattering (DBS) system is used to measure density fluctuation levels (in the wavenumber range kρs ≤ 50), and the toroidal E × B flow velocity in the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). Six tunable frequencies in three waveguide bands (26 GHz ≤ f ≤ 90 GHz) are launched using monostatic beam optics, via a quasi-optical beam combiner/polarizer and an adjustable parabolic focusing mirror (inside the vacuum enclosure) achieving Gaussian beam spot sizes of 3-5.5 cm at the X/O-mode cutoff. The DBS system covers plasma densities of 0.8 × 10(13) ≤ ne ≤ 1 × 10(14) cm(-3), and provides access to the FRC core (up to the field null) and across the FRC separatrix into the scrape-off layer plasma.

  7. Multi-channel Doppler backscattering measurements in the C-2 field reversed configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, L., E-mail: lschmitz@ucla.edu; Peebles, W. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Ruskov, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Deng, B. H.; Gota, H.; Gupta, D.; Tuszewski, M.; Douglass, J.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A versatile heterodyne Doppler Backscattering (DBS) system is used to measure density fluctuation levels (in the wavenumber range kρ{sub s} ≤ 50), and the toroidal E × B flow velocity in the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). Six tunable frequencies in three waveguide bands (26 GHz ≤ f ≤ 90 GHz) are launched using monostatic beam optics, via a quasi-optical beam combiner/polarizer and an adjustable parabolic focusing mirror (inside the vacuum enclosure) achieving Gaussian beam spot sizes of 3–5.5 cm at the X/O-mode cutoff. The DBS system covers plasma densities of 0.8 × 10{sup 13} ≤ n{sub e} ≤ 1 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}, and provides access to the FRC core (up to the field null) and across the FRC separatrix into the scrape-off layer plasma.

  8. Relation between incremental lines and tensile strength of coronal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Toshiko; Saito, Makoto; Yamamoto, Masato; Nishimura, Fumio; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    In one aspect, this study examined the tensile strength of coronal dentin, as a function of the location of incremental lines, in two types of teeth: human molar versus bovine incisor. In another aspect, tensile strength in coronal dentin was examined with tensile loading in two different orientations to the incremental lines: parallel versus perpendicular. There were four experimental groups in this study: HPa, human molar dentin with tensile orientation parallel to the incremental lines; HPe, human molar dentin with tensile orientation perpendicular to the incremental lines; BPa, bovine incisor dentin with tensile orientation parallel to the incremental lines; BPe, bovine incisor dentin with tensile orientation perpendicular to the incremental lines. Tensile strengths of the parallel group (HPa and BPa) were significantly higher (pdentin. However, there were no differences in anisotropy effect between the two tooth types.

  9. A Breakout Model for Solar Coronal Jets with Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyper, P. F.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2018-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed that many solar coronal jets involve the eruption of miniature versions of large-scale filaments. Such “mini-filaments” are observed to form along the polarity inversion lines of strong, magnetically bipolar regions embedded in open (or distantly closing) unipolar field. During the generation of the jet, the filament becomes unstable and erupts. Recently we described a model for these mini-filament jets, in which the well-known magnetic-breakout mechanism for large-scale coronal mass ejections is extended to these smaller events. In this work we use 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations to study in detail three realizations of the model. We show that the breakout-jet generation mechanism is robust and that different realizations of the model can explain different observational features. The results are discussed in relation to recent observations and previous jet models.

  10. Coronal and heliospheric imagers for solar wind phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Kevin F.; Bourdelle, Anthony; Davies, Jackie A.; Eyles, Chris J.; Griffin, Doug K.; Harrison, Richard A.; Richards, Tony R.; Rogers, J. Kevin; Tappin, S. James; Tosh, Ian A. J.; Waltham, Nick R.

    2015-09-01

    RAL Space is enhancing its program to lead the development of European capabilities in space-based visible-light coronal and heliospheric imaging instrumentation in the light of emerging opportunities such as the European Space Agency's Space Situational Awareness program and recent S2 small-mission call. Visible-light coronal and heliospheric imaging of solar wind phenomena, such as coronal mass ejections and interaction regions, is of critical importance to space weather studies, both operationally and in terms of enabling the underpinning science. This work draws on heritage from scientific instruments such as LASCO (Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph) on the SOHO spacecraft, SMEI (Solar Mass Ejection Imager) on the Coriolis spacecraft and the HI (Heliospheric Imager) instruments on STEREO. Such visible-light observation of solar wind structures relies on the detection of sunlight that has been Thomson-scattered by electrons (the so-called K-corona). The Thomson-scattered signal must be extracted from other signals that can be many orders of magnitude greater (such as that from the F-corona and the solar disc itself) and this places stringent constraints on stray-light rejection, as well as pointing stability and accuracy. We discuss the determination of instrument requirements, key design trade-offs and the evolution of base-line designs for the coronal and heliospheric regimes. We explain how the next generation of instruments will build on this heritage while also, in some cases, meeting the challenges on resources imposed on operational space weather imagers. In particular, we discuss the optical engineering challenges involved in the design of these instruments.

  11. Extended HXR Sources - Albedo Patches or Coronal Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    Extended HXR sources in the presence of compact footpoints have been reported based on visibility amplitudes from different detectors. Attempts have been made to determine the location and extent of these sources through direct imaging. Results of this work will be described for simulated sources and for specific flares at different solar longitudes, with a discussion of the possible nature of the extended sources as either albedo patches or coronal sources or a combination of the two.

  12. Acquisition of thin coronal sectional dataset of cadaveric liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Li; Liu, Shu Wei; Zhao, Zhen Mei; Tang, Yu Chun; Lin, Xiang Tao

    2014-04-01

    To obtain the thin coronal sectional anatomic dataset of the liver by using digital freezing milling technique. The upper abdomen of one Chinese adult cadaver was selected as the specimen. After CT and MRI examinations verification of absent liver lesions, the specimen was embedded with gelatin in stand erect position and frozen under profound hypothermia, and the specimen was then serially sectioned from anterior to posterior layer by layer with digital milling machine in the freezing chamber. The sequential images were captured by means of a digital camera and the dataset was imported to imaging workstation. The thin serial section of the liver added up to 699 layers with each layer being 0.2 mm in thickness. The shape, location, structure, intrahepatic vessels and adjacent structures of the liver was displayed clearly on each layer of the coronal sectional slice. CT and MR images through the body were obtained at 1.0 and 3.0 mm intervals, respectively. The methodology reported here is an adaptation of the milling methods previously described, which is a new data acquisition method for sectional anatomy. The thin coronal sectional anatomic dataset of the liver obtained by this technique is of high precision and good quality.

  13. MHD Modeling of Coronal Loops: the Transition Region Throat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarrasi, M.; Reale, F.; Orlando, S.; Mignone, A.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The expansion of coronal loops in the transition region may considerably influence the diagnostics of the plasma emission measure. The cross-sectional area of the loops is expected to depend on the temperature and pressure, and might be sensitive to the heating rate. Aims. The approach here is to study the area response to slow changes in the coronal heating rate, and check the current interpretation in terms of steady heating models. Methods. We study the area response with a time-dependent 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) loop model, including the description of the expanding magnetic field, coronal heating and losses by thermal conduction, and radiation from optically thin plasma. We run a simulation for a loop 50 Mm long and quasi-statically heated to about 4 millikelvin. Results. We find that the area can change substantially with the quasi-steady heating rate, e.g., by approx. 40% at 0.5 millikelvin as the loop temperature varies between 1 millikelvin and 4 millikelvin, and, therefore, affects the interpretation of the differential emission measure vs. temperature (DEM(T)) curves.

  14. MHD modeling of coronal loops: the transition region throat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarrasi, M.; Reale, F.; Orlando, S.; Mignone, A.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    Context. The expansion of coronal loops in the transition region may considerably influence the diagnostics of the plasma emission measure. The cross-sectional area of the loops is expected to depend on the temperature and pressure, and might be sensitive to the heating rate. Aims: The approach here is to study the area response to slow changes in the coronal heating rate, and check the current interpretation in terms of steady heating models. Methods: We study the area response with a time-dependent 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) loop model, including the description of the expanding magnetic field, coronal heating and losses by thermal conduction, and radiation from optically thin plasma. We run a simulation for a loop 50 Mm long and quasi-statically heated to about 4 MK. Results: We find that the area can change substantially with the quasi-steady heating rate, e.g., by ~40% at 0.5 MK as the loop temperature varies between 1 MK and 4 MK, and, therefore, affects the interpretation of the differential emission measure vs. temperature (DEM(T)) curves. The movie associated to Fig. 4 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. The rate of the reaction between C2H and C2H2 at interstellar temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, E.; Woon, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    The reaction between the radical C2H and the stable hydrocarbon C2H2 is one of the simplest neutral-neutral hydrocarbon reactions in chemical models of dense interstellar clouds and carbon-rich circumstellar shells. Although known to be rapid at temperatures > or = 300 K, the reaction has yet to be studied at lower temperatures. We present here ab initio calculations of the potential surface for this reaction and dynamical calculations to determine its rate at low temperature. Despite a small potential barrier in the exit channel, the calculated rate is large, showing that this reaction and, most probably, more complex analogs contribute to the formation of complex organic molecules in low-temperature sources.

  16. Wettability of Ti3SiC2 by Ag-Cu and Ag-Cu-Ti melts

    OpenAIRE

    Dezellus, Olivier; Voytovych, R.; Li A., P.-H.; Constantin, G.; Bosselet, F.; Viala, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Recently, the ternary carbide Ti3SiC2 has gained much attention due to its unique characteristics combining the properties of metals and ceramics (i.e., a low density, decent thermal and electrical conductivities, an excellent thermal shock resistance, a good machinability, damage tolerance, low friction and so on). The present study describes an investigation of the wettability in high vacuum of bulk Ti3SiC2 by a classical braze alloy based on the Ag-Cu-Ti system. Two...

  17. Downregulation of FoxC2 Increased Susceptibility to Experimental Colitis: Influence of Lymphatic Drainage Function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Felix; Potepalov, Sergey; Shehzahdi, Romana; Bernas, Michael; Witte, Marlys; Abreo, Fleurette; Traylor, James; Orr, Wayne A.; Tsunoda, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although inflammation-induced expansion of the intestinal lymphatic vasculature (lymphangiogenesis) is known to be a crucial event in limiting inflammatory processes, through clearance of interstitial fluid and immune cells, considerably less is known about the impact of an impaired lymphatic clearance function (as seen in inflammatory bowel diseases) on this cascade. We aimed to investigate whether the impaired intestinal lymphatic drainage function observed in FoxC2(+/−) mice would influence the course of disease in a model of experimental colitis. Methods: Acute dextran sodium sulfate colitis was induced in wild-type and haploinsufficient FoxC2(+/−) mice, and survival, disease activity, colonic histopathological injury, neutrophil, T-cell, and macrophage infiltration were evaluated. Functional and structural changes in the intestinal lymphatic vessel network were analyzed, including submucosal edema, vessel morphology, and lymphatic vessel density. Results: We found that FoxC2 downregulation in FoxC2(+/−) mice significantly increased the severity and susceptibility to experimental colitis, as displayed by lower survival rates, increased disease activity, greater histopathological injury, and elevated colonic neutrophil, T-cell, and macrophage infiltration. These findings were accompanied by structural (dilated torturous lymphatic vessels) and functional (greater submucosal edema, higher immune cell burden) changes in the intestinal lymphatic vasculature. Conclusions: These results indicate that sufficient lymphatic clearance plays a crucial role in limiting the initiation and perpetuation of experimental colitis and those disturbances in the integrity of the intestinal lymphatic vessel network could intensify intestinal inflammation. Future therapies might be able to exploit these processes to restore and maintain adequate lymphatic clearance function in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25822012

  18. Electronic spectroscopy of the jet-cooled arsenic dicarbide (C2As) free radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jie; Grimminger, Robert A; Sunahori, Fumie X; Clouthier, Dennis J

    2008-10-07

    The (2)Delta(r)-X (2)Pi(r) band system of the jet-cooled arsenic dicarbide (C(2)As) free radical has been recorded by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques in the 685-588 nm region. The radical was produced in a pulsed electric discharge jet using a precursor mixture of AsCl(3) vapor and methane in high pressure argon. A series of weak bands involving all three excited state vibrations was observed for both (12)C(2)As and (13)C(2)As. High-resolution spectra of the (2)Pi(12) component of the 0(0)(0) bands of both isotopomers were rotationally analyzed, leading to the conclusion that the upper state is (2)Delta with a small spin-orbit splitting (A = 2.78 cm(-1)). Ground and excited state molecular structures of r(0)(")(CC,ab initio) = 1.2933 A, r(0)(")(CAs) = 1.734(4) A and r(0)(')(CC,ab initio) = 1.2276 A, r(0)(')(CAs) = 1.830(3) A were derived from the B values and our density functional predictions of the C-C bond lengths. Single vibronic level emission spectra were recorded for many of the LIF bands and these were used to obtain the ground state vibrational frequencies and spin-orbit splittings. These data were satisfactorily fitted to a Renner-Teller model which gave (12)C(2)As parameters of epsilon = 0.695(8), omega(1) = 1704.8(20) cm(-1), omega(2) = 161.6(8) cm(-1), omega(3) = 663.6(12) cm(-1), and a spin-orbit constant A = 857.7(11) cm(-1).

  19. Downregulation of FoxC2 Increased Susceptibility to Experimental Colitis: Influence of Lymphatic Drainage Function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Felix; Potepalov, Sergey; Shehzahdi, Romana; Bernas, Michael; Witte, Marlys; Abreo, Fleurette; Traylor, James; Orr, Wayne A; Tsunoda, Ikuo; Alexander, Jonathan Steven

    2015-06-01

    Although inflammation-induced expansion of the intestinal lymphatic vasculature (lymphangiogenesis) is known to be a crucial event in limiting inflammatory processes, through clearance of interstitial fluid and immune cells, considerably less is known about the impact of an impaired lymphatic clearance function (as seen in inflammatory bowel diseases) on this cascade. We aimed to investigate whether the impaired intestinal lymphatic drainage function observed in FoxC2 mice would influence the course of disease in a model of experimental colitis. Acute dextran sodium sulfate colitis was induced in wild-type and haploinsufficient FoxC2 mice, and survival, disease activity, colonic histopathological injury, neutrophil, T-cell, and macrophage infiltration were evaluated. Functional and structural changes in the intestinal lymphatic vessel network were analyzed, including submucosal edema, vessel morphology, and lymphatic vessel density. We found that FoxC2 downregulation in FoxC2 mice significantly increased the severity and susceptibility to experimental colitis, as displayed by lower survival rates, increased disease activity, greater histopathological injury, and elevated colonic neutrophil, T-cell, and macrophage infiltration. These findings were accompanied by structural (dilated torturous lymphatic vessels) and functional (greater submucosal edema, higher immune cell burden) changes in the intestinal lymphatic vasculature. These results indicate that sufficient lymphatic clearance plays a crucial role in limiting the initiation and perpetuation of experimental colitis and those disturbances in the integrity of the intestinal lymphatic vessel network could intensify intestinal inflammation. Future therapies might be able to exploit these processes to restore and maintain adequate lymphatic clearance function in inflammatory bowel disease.

  20. The Abundance of C2H4 in the Circumstellar Envelope of IRC+10216.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonfría, J P; Hinkle, K H; Cernicharo, J; Richter, M J; Agúndez, M; Wallace, L

    2017-02-01

    High spectral resolution mid-IR observations of ethylene (C2H4) towards the AGB star IRC+10216 were obtained using the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). Eighty ro-vibrational lines from the 10.5 µm vibrational mode ν7 with J ≲ 30 were detected in absorption. The observed lines are divided into two groups with rotational temperatures of 105 and 400 K (warm and hot lines). The warm lines peak at ≃ -14 km s(-1) with respect to the systemic velocity, suggesting that they are mostly formed outwards from ≃ 20R⋆. The hot lines are centered at -10 km s(-1) indicating that they come from a shell between 10 and 20R⋆. 35% of the observed lines are unblended and can be fitted with a code developed to model the emission of a spherically symmetric circumstellar envelope. The analysis of several scenarios reveal that the C2H4 abundance relative to H2 in the range 5 - 20R⋆ is 6.9 × 10(-8) in average and it could be as high as 1.1 × 10(-7). Beyond 20R⋆, it is 8.2 × 10(-8). The total column density is (6.5 ± 3.0) × 10(15) cm(-2). C2H4 is found to be rotationally under local thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE) and vibrationally out of LTE. One of the scenarios that best reproduce the observations suggests that up to 25% of the C2H4 molecules at 20R⋆ could condense onto dust grains. This possible depletion would not influence significantly the gas acceleration although it could play a role in the surface chemistry on the dust grains.

  1. Theoretical study on the rate constants for the C2H5 + HBr --> C2H6 + Br reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Li; Li, Ze-Sheng; Liu, Jing-Yao; Xiao, Jing-Fa; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2004-02-01

    The reaction C(2)H(5) + HBr --> C(2)H(6) + Br has been theoretically studied over the temperature range from 200 to 1400 K. The electronic structure information is calculated at the BHLYP/6-311+G(d,p) and QCISD/6-31+G(d) levels. With the aid of intrinsic reaction coordinate theory, the minimum energy paths (MEPs) are obtained at the both levels, and the energies along the MEP are further refined by performing the single-point calculations at the PMP4(SDTQ)/6-311+G(3df,2p)//BHLYP and QCISD(T)/6-311++G(2df,2pd)//QCISD levels. The calculated ICVT/SCT rate constants are in good agreement with available experimental values, and the calculate results further indicate that the C(2)H(5) + HBr reaction has negative temperature dependence at T 850 K. The current work predicts that the kinetic isotope effect for the title reaction is inverse in the temperature range from 200 to 482 K, i.e., k(HBr)/k(DBr) < 1. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Morphology and Density Structure of Post-CME Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrsnak, B.; Poletto, G.; Vujic, E.; Vourlidas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Eruption of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is believed to drag and open the coronal magnetic field, presumably leading to the formation of a large-scale current sheet and field relaxation by magnetic reconnection. This paper analyzes the physical characteristics of ray-like coronal features formed in the aftermath of CMEs, to confirm whether interpreting such phenomena in terms of a reconnecting current sheet is consistent with observations. Methods: The study focuses on UVCS/SOHO and LASCO/SOHO measurements of the ray width, density excess, and coronal velocity field as a function of the radial distance. The morphology of the rays implies that they are produced by Petschek-like reconnection in the large-scale current sheet formed in the wake of CME. The hypothesis is supported by the flow pattern, often showing outflows along the ray, and sometimes also inflows into the ray. The inferred inflow velocities range from 3 to 30 km/s, and are consistent with the narrow opening-angle of rays, which add up to a few degrees. The density of rays is an order of magnitude higher than in the ambient corona. The model results are consistent with the observations, revealing that the main cause of the density excess in rays is a transport of the dense plasma from lower to higher heights by the reconnection outflow.

  3. Segmentation of photospheric magnetic elements corresponding to coronal features to understand the EUV and UV irradiance variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zender, J. J.; Kariyappa, R.; Giono, G.; Bergmann, M.; Delouille, V.; Damé, L.; Hochedez, J.-F.; Kumara, S. T.

    2017-09-01

    Context. The magnetic field plays a dominant role in the solar irradiance variability. Determining the contribution of various magnetic features to this variability is important in the context of heliospheric studies and Sun-Earth connection. Aims: We studied the solar irradiance variability and its association with the underlying magnetic field for a period of five years (January 2011-January 2016). We used observations from the Large Yield Radiometer (LYRA), the Sun Watcher with Active Pixel System detector and Image Processing (SWAP) on board PROBA2, the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Methods: The Spatial Possibilistic Clustering Algorithm (SPoCA) is applied to the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations obtained from the AIA to segregate coronal features by creating segmentation maps of active regions (ARs), coronal holes (CHs) and the quiet sun (QS). Further, these maps are applied to the full-disk SWAP intensity images and the full-disk (FD) HMI line-of-sight (LOS) magnetograms to isolate the SWAP coronal features and photospheric magnetic counterparts, respectively. We then computed full-disk and feature-wise averages of EUV intensity and line of sight (LOS) magnetic flux density over ARs/CHs/QS/FD. The variability in these quantities is compared with that of LYRA irradiance values. Results: Variations in the quantities resulting from the segmentation, namely the integrated intensity and the total magnetic flux density of ARs/CHs/QS/FD regions, are compared with the LYRA irradiance variations. We find that the EUV intensity over ARs/CHs/QS/FD is well correlated with the underlying magnetic field. In addition, variations in the full-disk integrated intensity and magnetic flux density values are correlated with the LYRA irradiance variations. Conclusions: Using the segmented coronal features observed in the EUV wavelengths as proxies to isolate the underlying

  4. C2-rational cubic spline involving tension parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    iИ1 ИfЕ122Y 128Ж; Е122Y 156Ж; Е150Y 184Ж; Е178Y 184Ж;. Е206Y 156Ж; Е206Y 128Ж; Е178Y 100Ж; Е150Y 100Ж;. Е122Y 72Ж; Е122Y 44Ж; Е150Y 16Ж; Е178Y 16Ж;. Е206Y 44Ж; Е206Y 72ЖgY we obtain the C2-rational cubic spline interpolant. Thus for different values of the tension parameters r and t, ...

  5. C2-domain containing calcium sensors in neuroendocrine secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinheiro, Paulo S; Houy, Sébastien; Sørensen, Jakob B

    2016-01-01

    to calcium, trigger the merger of cargo-filled vesicles with the plasma membrane. Low-affinity, fast-kinetics calcium sensors of the synaptotagmin family - especially synaptotagmin-1 and synaptotagmin-2 - are the main calcium sensors for fast exocytosis triggering in many cell types. Their functions extend...... the properties and possible interplay of (some of) the major C2-domain containing calcium sensors in calcium-triggered exocytosis. This article is part of a mini review series: "Synaptic Function and Dysfunction in Brain Diseases"....

  6. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Ethynyl Radical, C2H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Anh T.; Hall, Gregory; Sears, Trevor

    2016-06-01

    The ethynyl radical, C_2H, is a reactive intermediate important in various combustion processes and also widely observed in the interstellar medium. In spite of extensive previous spectroscopic studies, the characterization of the near infrared transitions from the tilde{X}2Σ+ state to the mixed vibrational overtone and tilde{A}2Π states is incomplete. A strong band of C_2H at 7064 cm-1 was first observed in a neon matrix and assigned as the tilde{A}2Π(002)1 - tilde{X}2Σ+ transition by Forney et al. Subsequent theoretical work of Tarroni and Carter attributed the strong absorptions in this region to transitions terminating in two upper states, each a mixture of vibrationally excited tilde{X} states and different zero-order tilde{A}-state bending levels: a 2Σ+ symmetry combination of tilde{X}(0,20,3) and tilde{A}(0,3,0)0κ and a 2Π symmetry combination of tilde{X}(0,31,3) and tilde{A}(0,0,2)1. Transitions to them from the zero point level of the tilde{X} state are calculated to differ in energy by less than 10 cm-1 and to be within a factor of two in intensity. Diode laser transient absorption was used to record Doppler-limited spectra between 7020 and 7130 cm-1, using 193 nm photolysis of CF_3C_2H as a source of C_2H. Two interleaved, rotationally resolved bands were observed, consistent with a 2Σ - 2Σ transition at 7088 cm-1 and a 2Π - 2Σ transition at 7108 cm-1, in good accord with the Tarroni and Carter calculation. Progress on the assignment and fitting of the spectra will be reported. Acknowledgements: Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory was carried out under Contract No. DE-SC0012704 with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, and supported by its Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. D. Forney, M.E. Jacox, and W.E. Thompson, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 170, 178 (1995). R. Tarroni and S. Carter, Mol. Phys. 102, 2167 (2004)

  7. Cellular uptake of Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin requires oligomerization and acidification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth, H; Blocker, D; Behlke, J; Bergsma-Schutter, W; Brisson, A; Benz, R; Aktories, K

    2000-01-01

    The actin-ADP-ribosylating binary Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin consists of two individual proteins, the binding/translocation component C2II and the enzyme component C2I. To elicit its cytotoxic action, C2II binds to a receptor on the cell surface and mediates cell entry of C2I via

  8. [(i-Bu2NH22C2O4]4.SnPh2C2O4.C2O4(SnPh32 and [(i-Bu2NH2 2C2O4]3.SnBu2C2O4: SYNTHESIS, INFRARED AND MOSSBAUER STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAYA SOW

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available [(i-Bu2NH22C2O4]4.SnPh2C2O4.C2O4(SnPh32 and [(i-Bu2NH22C2O4]3. SnBu2C2O4 have been synthesized and characterized by infrared and Mossbauer spectroscopies. The suggested structure are discrete (one being a two metallic components, the environments around the tin(IV centres being octahedral and pentagonal bipyramidal, the oxalate anions being monodentate, the cations linking through N-H….O hydrogen bonds the free oxygen atoms of the oxalate. The second metallic component of one of the structures is cis coordinated C2O4(SnPh32.

  9. Observations of the Coronal Mass Ejection with a Complex Acceleration Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, A. A.; Kirichenko, A. S.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Kuzin, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    We study the coronal mass ejection (CME) with a complex acceleration profile. The event occurred on 2009 April 23. It had an impulsive acceleration phase, an impulsive deceleration phase, and a second impulsive acceleration phase. During its evolution, the CME showed signatures of different acceleration mechanisms: kink instability, prominence drainage, flare reconnection, and a CME–CME collision. The special feature of the observations is the usage of the TESIS EUV telescope. The instrument could image the solar corona in the Fe 171 Å line up to a distance of 2 {R}ȯ from the center of the Sun. This allows us to trace the CME up to the LASCO/C2 field of view without losing the CME from sight. The onset of the CME was caused by kink instability. The mass drainage occurred after the kink instability. The mass drainage played only an auxiliary role: it decreased the CME mass, which helped to accelerate the CME. The first impulsive acceleration phase was caused by the flare reconnection. We observed the two-ribbon flare and an increase of the soft X-ray flux during the first impulsive acceleration phase. The impulsive deceleration and the second impulsive acceleration phases were caused by the CME–CME collision. The studied event shows that CMEs are complex phenomena that cannot be explained with only one acceleration mechanism. We should seek a combination of different mechanisms that accelerate CMEs at different stages of their evolution.

  10. Detection of Coronal Mass Ejections Using Multiple Features and Space-Time Continuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Yin, Jian-qin; Lin, Jia-ben; Feng, Zhi-quan; Zhou, Jin

    2017-07-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) release tremendous amounts of energy in the solar system, which has an impact on satellites, power facilities and wireless transmission. To effectively detect a CME in Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) C2 images, we propose a novel algorithm to locate the suspected CME regions, using the Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) method and taking into account the features of the grayscale and the texture. Furthermore, space-time continuity is used in the detection algorithm to exclude the false CME regions. The algorithm includes three steps: i) define the feature vector which contains textural and grayscale features of a running difference image; ii) design the detection algorithm based on the ELM method according to the feature vector; iii) improve the detection accuracy rate by using the decision rule of the space-time continuum. Experimental results show the efficiency and the superiority of the proposed algorithm in the detection of CMEs compared with other traditional methods. In addition, our algorithm is insensitive to most noise.

  11. High sensitivity far infrared laser diagnostics for the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, B. H., E-mail: bdeng@trialphaenergy.com; Beall, M.; Schroeder, J.; Settles, G.; Feng, P.; Kinley, J. S.; Gota, H.; Thompson, M. C. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A high sensitivity multi-channel far infrared laser diagnostics with switchable interferometry and polarimetry operation modes for the advanced neutral beam-driven C-2U field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas is described. The interferometer achieved superior resolution of 1 × 10{sup 16} m{sup −2} at >1.5 MHz bandwidth, illustrated by measurement of small amplitude high frequency fluctuations. The polarimetry achieved 0.04° instrument resolution and 0.1° actual resolution in the challenging high density gradient environment with >0.5 MHz bandwidth, making it suitable for weak internal magnetic field measurements in the C-2U plasmas, where the maximum Faraday rotation angle is less than 1°. The polarimetry resolution data is analyzed, and high resolution Faraday rotation data in C-2U is presented together with direct evidences of field reversal in FRC magnetic structure obtained for the first time by a non-perturbative method.

  12. High sensitivity far infrared laser diagnostics for the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, B H; Beall, M; Schroeder, J; Settles, G; Feng, P; Kinley, J S; Gota, H; Thompson, M C

    2016-11-01

    A high sensitivity multi-channel far infrared laser diagnostics with switchable interferometry and polarimetry operation modes for the advanced neutral beam-driven C-2U field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas is described. The interferometer achieved superior resolution of 1 × 1016 m-2 at >1.5 MHz bandwidth, illustrated by measurement of small amplitude high frequency fluctuations. The polarimetry achieved 0.04° instrument resolution and 0.1° actual resolution in the challenging high density gradient environment with >0.5 MHz bandwidth, making it suitable for weak internal magnetic field measurements in the C-2U plasmas, where the maximum Faraday rotation angle is less than 1°. The polarimetry resolution data is analyzed, and high resolution Faraday rotation data in C-2U is presented together with direct evidences of field reversal in FRC magnetic structure obtained for the first time by a non-perturbative method.

  13. The first high resolution image of coronal gas in a starbursting cool core cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sean

    2017-08-01

    Galaxy clusters represent a unique laboratory for directly observing gas cooling and feedback due to their high masses and correspondingly high gas densities and temperatures. Cooling of X-ray gas observed in 1/3 of clusters, known as cool-core clusters, should fuel star formation at prodigious rates, but such high levels of star formation are rarely observed. Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is a leading explanation for the lack of star formation in most cool clusters, and AGN power is sufficient to offset gas cooling on average. Nevertheless, some cool core clusters exhibit massive starbursts indicating that our understanding of cooling and feedback is incomplete. Observations of 10^5 K coronal gas in cool core clusters through OVI emission offers a sensitive means of testing our understanding of cooling and feedback because OVI emission is a dominant coolant and sensitive tracer of shocked gas. Recently, Hayes et al. 2016 demonstrated that synthetic narrow-band imaging of OVI emission is possible through subtraction of long-pass filters with the ACS+SBC for targets at z=0.23-0.29. Here, we propose to use this exciting new technique to directly image coronal OVI emitting gas at high resolution in Abell 1835, a prototypical starbursting cool-core cluster at z=0.252. Abell 1835 hosts a strong cooling core, massive starburst, radio AGN, and at z=0.252, it offers a unique opportunity to directly image OVI at hi-res in the UV with ACS+SBC. With just 15 orbits of ACS+SBC imaging, the proposed observations will complete the existing rich multi-wavelength dataset available for Abell 1835 to provide new insights into cooling and feedback in clusters.

  14. ROLE OF THE CORONAL ALFVÉN SPEED IN MODULATING THE SOLAR-WIND HELIUM ABUNDANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.-M., E-mail: yi.wang@nrl.navy.mil [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    The helium abundance He/H in the solar wind is relatively constant at ∼0.04 in high-speed streams, but varies in phase with the sunspot number in slow wind, from ∼0.01 at solar minimum to ∼0.04 at maximum. Suggested mechanisms for helium fractionation have included frictional coupling to protons and resonant interactions with high-frequency Alfvénic fluctuations. We compare He/H measurements during 1995–2015 with coronal parameters derived from source-surface extrapolations of photospheric field maps. We find that the near-Earth helium abundance is an increasing function of the magnetic field strength and Alfvén speed v {sub A} in the outer corona, while being only weakly correlated with the proton flux density. Throughout the solar cycle, fast wind is associated with short-term increases in v {sub A} near the source surface; resonance with Alfvén waves, with v {sub A} and the relative speed of α -particles and protons decreasing with increasing heliocentric distance, may then lead to enhanced He/H at 1 au. The modulation of helium in slow wind reflects the tendency for the associated coronal Alfvén speeds to rise steeply from sunspot minimum, when this wind is concentrated around the source-surface neutral line, to sunspot maximum, when the source-surface field attains its peak strengths. The helium abundance near the source surface may represent a balance between collisional decoupling from protons and Alfvén wave acceleration.

  15. Road density

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Road density is generally highly correlated with amount of developed land cover. High road densities usually indicate high levels of ecological disturbance. More...

  16. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Reale

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered, and therefore topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones which provide information on stellar loops are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses loop classification and populations, and then describes the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the concept of loops as multi-stranded structures. The following part of this section is devoted to the characteristics of the loop plasma and of its thermal structure in particular, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics and flows are illustrated. In the modeling section some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying some fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are distinguished between those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. Then, more specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC and impulsive (DC heating. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar X-ray emitting structures related to coronal loops is included and followed by conclusions and open questions.

  17. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Reale

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered and, therefore, topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones, which provide information on stellar loops are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses the classification, populations, and the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the loop stranded structure. The section continues with the thermal properties and diagnostics of the loop plasma, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics, hot and cool flows, and waves are illustrated. In the modeling section, some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are divided into those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. More specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC and impulsive (DC heating. Large-scale models including atmosphere boxes and the magnetic field are also discussed. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar coronal loops is followed by highlights and open questions.

  18. Structure and dynamics of the coronal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanHoven, Gerard; Schnack, Dalton D.

    1996-01-01

    The last few years have seen a marked increase in the sophistication of models of the solar corona. This has been brought about by a confluence of three key elements. First, the collection of high-resolution observations of the Sun, both in space and time, has grown tremendously. The SOHO (Solar Heliospheric Observatory) mission is providing additional correlated high-resolution magnetic, white-light and spectroscopic observations. Second, the power and availability of supercomputers has made two- and three-dimensional modeling routine. Third, the sophistication of the models themselves, both in their geometrical realism and in the detailed physics that has been included, has improved significantly. The support from our current Space Physics Theory grant has allowed us to exploit this confluence of capabilities. We have carried out direct comparisons between observations and models of the solar corona. The agreement between simulated coronal structure and observations has verified that the models are mature enough for detailed analysis, as we will describe. The development of this capability is especially timely, since observations obtained from three space missions that are underway (Ulysses, WIND and SOHO) offer an opportunity for significant advances in our understanding of the corona and heliosphere. Through this interplay of observations and theory we can improve our understanding of the Sun. Our achievements thus far include progress modeling the large-scale structure of the solar corona, three-dimensional models of active region fields, development of emerging flux and current, formation and evolution of coronal loops, and coronal heating by current filaments.

  19. Coronal pulp biomarker: A lesser known age estimation modality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smrithi D Veera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The evolving state of art digital technology currently available is opening new avenues in forensic odontology for age estimation methods which are subject to debate in terms of accuracy and precision. A study was carried to analyze efficacy and practical application for age estimation using digital panoramic radiographs on South Indian population. Aims and Objectives: 1. To study reduction of coronal pulp chamber using Tooth Coronal Index (TCI on panoramic radiographs and correlate with chronologic age. 2. To establish accuracy of digital panoramic radiographs as a simple, non-invasive tool. Materials and Methods: The study illustrates the potential value of a little known aging method. The study groups comprised a total of 100 subjects of both sexes in age range of 20 and 60 years each who were subjected to panoramic radiography. A panoramic radiographic examination using digital panoramic machine was conducted on selected individuals. The TCI was calibrated using AGFA computer software for accuracy and precision. The values obtained were subjected to regression analysis, results calculated and correlated with chronologic age. In the present study a population of known age was studied and subjected to digital panoramic radiographic examination. The correlation between reduction of coronal pulp cavity and chronological age was examined. TCI was computed for each tooth and regressed on real age. Statistical Analysis Used: Pearson correlation co-efficient was used to find the significance of relationship between age and TCI. Regression analysis has been used for predicting age using TCI for premolar and molar. Inaccuracy and bias have been determined to assess the precision of prediction equations. Results and Conclusion: Prediction potential of TCI comes down for ages above 50 years and is comfortably good below 50 years without much difference between premolars and molars. This study demonstrates the potential value of TCI for age

  20. The coronation of Christian monarchs: historical and sacramentological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legeyev Mikhail Viktorovich

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a history of inaugural ceremonies of the Christian monarchs reveals the origins of the rite of coronation. Specifically it is noted that there was a reception of the Old Testament tradition, when the Emperor before the accession to the Throne used the Holy oil or Myrrh (depending on the ethnic or confessional tradition. In addition, there was a so-called “churching” of social rituals, which existed in the Roman Empire and other pagan monarchies almost since the dawn of civilization. In summary, it is proved that the anointing on a Kingdom is one of the Church sacraments.

  1. VLA Measurements of Faraday Rotation through Coronal Mass Ejections

    OpenAIRE

    Kooi, Jason E.; Fischer, Patrick D.; Buffo, Jacob J.; Spangler, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large-scale eruptions of plasma from the Sun that play an important role in space weather. Faraday rotation (FR) is the rotation of the plane of polarization that results when a linearly polarized signal passes through a magnetized plasma such as a CME. FR observations of a source near the Sun can provide information on the plasma structure of a CME shortly after launch. We report on simultaneous white-light and radio observations made of three CMEs in August...

  2. Heating and Cooling of Coronal Loops with Turbulent Suppression of Parallel Heat Conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Nicolas; Emslie, A. Gordon; Horne, Duncan; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2018-01-01

    Using the “enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops” (EBTEL) model, we investigate the hydrodynamics of the plasma in a flaring coronal loop in which heat conduction is limited by turbulent scattering of the electrons that transport the thermal heat flux. The EBTEL equations are solved analytically in each of the two (conduction-dominated and radiation-dominated) cooling phases. Comparison of the results with typical observed cooling times in solar flares shows that the turbulent mean free path {λ }T lies in a range corresponding to a regime in which classical (collision-dominated) conduction plays at most a limited role. We also consider the magnitude and duration of the heat input that is necessary to account for the enhanced values of temperature and density at the beginning of the cooling phase and for the observed cooling times. We find through numerical modeling that in order to produce a peak temperature ≃ 1.5× {10}7 K and a 200 s cooling time consistent with observations, the flare-heating profile must extend over a significant period of time; in particular, its lingering role must be taken into consideration in any description of the cooling phase. Comparison with observationally inferred values of post-flare loop temperatures, densities, and cooling times thus leads to useful constraints on both the magnitude and duration of the magnetic energy release in the loop, as well as on the value of the turbulent mean free path {λ }T.

  3. On the variation of solar flare coronal X-ray source sizes with energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Bian, Nicolas H. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ Glasgow (United Kingdom); Emslie, A. Gordon, E-mail: n.jeffrey@physics.gla.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    Observations with RHESSI have enabled the detailed study of the structure of dense hard X-ray coronal sources in solar flares. The variation of source extent with electron energy has been discussed in the context of streaming of non-thermal particles in a one-dimensional cold target model and the results used to constrain both the physical extent of, and density within, the electron acceleration region. Here, we extend this investigation to a more physically realistic model of electron transport that takes into account the finite temperature of the ambient plasma, the initial pitch angle distribution of the accelerated electrons, and the effects of collisional pitch angle scattering. The finite temperature results in the thermal diffusion of electrons, which leads to the observationally inferred value of the acceleration region volume being an overestimate of its true value. The different directions of the electron trajectories, a consequence of both the non-zero injection pitch angle and scattering within the target, cause the projected propagation distance parallel to the guiding magnetic field to be reduced, so that a one-dimensional interpretation can overestimate the actual density by a factor of up to ∼6. The implications of these results for the determination of acceleration region properties (specific acceleration rate, filling factor, etc.) are discussed.

  4. Far infrared laser polarimetry and far forward scattering diagnostics for the C-2 field reversed configuration plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, B H; Kinley, J S; Knapp, K; Feng, P; Martinez, R; Weixel, C; Armstrong, S; Hayashi, R; Longman, A; Mendoza, R; Gota, H; Tuszewski, M

    2014-11-01

    A two-chord far infrared (FIR) laser polarimeter for high speed sub-degree Faraday rotation measurements in the C-2 field reversed configuration experiment is described. It is based on high power proprietary FIR lasers with line width of about 330 Hz. The exceptionally low intrinsic instrument phase error is characterized with figures of merit. Significant toroidal magnetic field with rich dynamics is observed. Simultaneously obtained density fluctuation spectra by far forward scattering are presented.

  5. The possible role of high-frequency waves in heating solar coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Lisa J.; Klimchuk, James A.; Sturrock, Peter A.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the role of high-frequency waves in the heating of solar active region coronal loops. We assume a uniform background magnetic field, and we introduce a density stratification in a direction perpendicular to this field. We focus on ion compressive viscosity as the damping mechanism of the waves. We incorporate viscosity self-consistently into the equations, and we derive a dispersion relation by adopting a slab model, where the density inside the slab is greater than that outside. Such a configuration supports two types of modes: surface waves and trapped body waves. In order to determine under what conditions these waves may contribute to the heating of active regions, we solve our dispersion relation for a range of densities, temperatures, magnetic field strengths, density ratios, wavevector magnitudes, wavevector ratios, and slab widths. We find that surface waves exhibit very small damping, but body waves can potentially damp at rates needed to balance radiative losses. However, the required frequencies of these body waves are very high. For example, the wave frequency must be at least 5.0/s for a slab density of 10(exp 9,5)/cc, a slab temperature of 10(exp 6,5) K, a field strength of 100 G, and a density ratio of 5. For a slab density of 10(exp 10)/cc, this frequency increases to 8.8/s. Although these frequencies are very high, there in no observational evidence to rule out their existence, and they may be generated both below the corona and at magnetic reconnection sites in the corona. However, we do find that, for slab densities of 10(exp 10)/cc or less, the dissipation of high-frequency waves will be insufficient to balance the radiative losses if the magnetic field strength exceeds roughly 200 G. Because the magnetic field is known to exceed 200 G in many active region loops, particularly low-lying loops and loops emanating from sunspots, it is unlikely that high-frequency waves can provide sufficient heating in these regions.

  6. The severity of basilar invagination and atlantoaxial dislocation correlates with sagittal joint inclination, coronal joint inclination, and craniocervical tilt: a description of new indexes for the craniovertebral junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, P Sarat; Goyal, Nishant; Chauhan, Avnish; Ansari, Abuzer; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar; Garg, Ajay

    2014-12-01

    Joint-distraction and intra-operative manipulation surgeries to correct basilar invagination (BI) and atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) are becoming standard procedures. However, current data are unable to aid in the understanding of normal and abnormal morphology of the C1/C2 joints. To study various aspects of C1/C2 joint morphology to create normative and patient data on joint abnormalities that could provide the surgeon with objective data for surgical planning and approach. Seventy patients (age, 15-45 years) were compared with an equal number of age- and sex-matched control subjects (age, 21.9±8.2 years) with irreducible BI and AAD from a developmental origin (May 2010-July 2013). Joint anatomy was studied with the use of thin-slice computed tomography scans. The joint parameters studied included sagittal joint inclination, craniocervical tilt, coronal joint inclination, surface area, joint overlap index, and joint reciprocity. The severity of BI and the severity of AAD were compared. Sagittal joint inclination and craniocervical tilt significantly correlated with both BI and AAD (P<.01). Coronal joint inclination correlated with BI (P=.2). The mean sagittal joint inclination value in control subjects was 87.15±5.65° and in patients with BI and AAD was 127.1±22.05°. The mean craniocervical tilt value in controls was 60.2±9.2° and in patients with BI and AAD was 84.0±15.1°. The mean coronal joint inclination value in control subjects was 110.3±4.23° and in patients with BI and AAD was 121.15±14.6°. This study has demonstrated for the first time the important role of joint orientation and its correlation with the severity of BI and AAD and has described new joint indexes.

  7. The role of C2-C7 and O-C2 angle in the development of dysphagia after cervical spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wei; Yu, Jie

    2013-06-01

    Dysphagia is a known complication of cervical surgery and may be prolonged or occasionally serious. A previous study showed that dysphagia after occipitocervical fusion was caused by oropharyngeal stenosis resulting from O-C2 (upper cervical lordosis) fixation in a flexed position. However, there have been few reports analyzing the association between the C2-C7 angle (middle-lower cervical lordosis) and postoperative dysphagia. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between cervical lordosis and the development of dysphagia after anterior and posterior cervical spine surgery (AC and PC). Three hundred fifty-four patients were reviewed in this retrospective clinical study, including 172 patients who underwent the AC procedure and 182 patients who had the PC procedure between June 2007 and May 2010. The presence and duration of postoperative dysphagia were recorded via face-to-face questioning or telephone interview performed at least 1 year after the procedure. Plain cervical radiographs before and after surgery were collected. The O-C2 angle and the C2-C7 angle were measured. Changes in the O-C2 angle and the C2-C7 angle were defined as dO-C2 angle = postoperative O-C2 angle - preoperative O-C2 angle and dC2-C7 angle = postoperative C2-C7 angle - preoperative C2-C7 angle. The association between postoperative dysphagia with dO-C2 angle and dC2-C7 angle was studied. Results showed that 12.8 % of AC and 9.4 % of PC patients reported dysphagia after cervical surgery. The dC2-C7 angle has considerable impact on postoperative dysphagia. When the dC2-C7 angle is greater than 5°, the chance of developing postoperative dysphagia is significantly greater. The dO-C2 angle, age, gender, BMI, operative time, blood loss, procedure type, revision surgery, most cephalic operative level, and number of operative levels did not significantly influence the incidence of postoperative dysphagia. No relationship was found between the dC2-C7 angle and the degree of

  8. Feasibility study of microwave electron heating on the C-2 field-reversed configuration device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaokang, E-mail: xyang@trialphaenergy.com; Ceccherini, Francesco; Dettrick, Sean; Binderbauer, Michl [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, CA 92688 (United States); Koehn, Alf [IGVP, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Petrov, Yuri [CompX, P.O. Box 2672, Del Mar, CA 92014 (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Different microwave heating scenarios for the C-2 plasmas have been investigated recently with use of both the Genray ray-racing code and the IPF-FDMC full-wave code, and the study was focused on the excitation of the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) with O-mode launch. For a given antenna position on C-2 and the fixed 2D plasma density and equilibrium field profiles, simulations have been done for six selected frequencies (2.45 GHz, 5 GHz, 8 GHz, 18 GHz, 28 GHz, and 50 GHz). Launch angles have been optimized for each case in order to achieve high coupling efficiencies to the EBW by the O-X-B mode conversion process and high power deposition. Results show that among those six frequencies, the case of 8 GHz is the most promising scenario, which has both high mode conversion efficiency (90%) and the relatively deeper power deposition.

  9. Phase equilibria and modeling of ammonium ionic liquid, C2NTf2, solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domańska, Urszula; Marciniak, Andrzej; Królikowski, Marek

    2008-01-31

    Novel quaternary ammonium ionic liquid, ethyl(2-hydroxyethyl)dimethylammonium bis(trifluomethylsulfonyl)imide (C2NTf2), has been prepared from N,N-dimethylethanolamine as a substrate. The paper includes a specific basic characterization of the synthesized compound by NMR and the basic thermophysical properties: the melting point, enthalpy of fusion, enthalpy of solid-solid phase transition, glass transition determined by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), temperature of decomposition, and water content. The density of the new compound was measured. The solid-liquid or liquid-liquid phase equilibria of binary mixtures containing {C2NTf2+water or an alcohol (propan-1-ol, butan-1-ol, hexan-1-ol, octan-1-ol, decan-1-ol), aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene), aliphatic hydrocarbons (n-hexane, n-octane), dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), or tetrahydrofuran (THF)} have been measured by a dynamic method in a wide range of temperatures from 230 to 430 K. These data were correlated by means of the nonrandom two-liquid (NRTL) equation utilizing temperature-dependent parameters derived from the solid-liquid or liquid-liquid equilibrium. From the solubility results, the negative value of the partition coefficient of ionic liquid in binary system octan-1-ol/water (log P) at 298.15 K has been calculated.

  10. Three-dimensional multi-fluid model of a coronal streamer belt with a tilted magnetic dipole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ofman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations of streamers in extreme ultraviolet (EUV emission with SOHO/UVCS show dramatic differences in line profiles and latitudinal variations in heavy ion emission compared to hydrogen Ly-α emission. In order to use ion emission observations of streamers as the diagnostics of the slow solar wind properties, an adequate model of a streamer including heavy ions is required. We extended a previous 2.5-D multi-species magnetohydrodynamics (MHD model of a coronal streamer to 3-D spherical geometry, and in the first approach we consider a tilted dipole configuration of the solar magnetic field. The aim of the present study is to test the 3-D results by comparing to previous 2.5-D model result for a 3-D case with moderate departure from azimuthal symmetry. The model includes O5+ ions with preferential empirical heating and allows for calculation of their density, velocity and temperature in coronal streamers. We present the first results of our 3-D multi-fluid model showing the parameters of protons, electrons and heavy ions (O5+ at the steady-state solar corona with a tilted steamer belt. We find that the 3-D results are in qualitative agreement with our previous 2.5-D model, and show longitudinal variation in the variables in accordance with the tilted streamer belt structure. Properties of heavy coronal ions obtained from the 3-D model together with EUV spectroscopic observations of streamers will help understanding the 3-D structures of streamers reducing line-of-sight integration ambiguities and identifying the sources of the slow solar wind in the lower corona. This leads to improved understanding of the physics of the slow solar wind.

  11. Anodized Ti3SiC2 As an Anode Material for Li-ion Microbatteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, Alexander T; Mashtalir, Olha; Naguib, Michael; Barsoum, Michel W; Gogotsi, Yury; Djenizian, Thierry

    2016-07-06

    We report on the synthesis of an anode material for Li-ion batteries by anodization of a common MAX phase, Ti3SiC2, in an aqueous electrolyte containing hydrofluoric acid (HF). The anodization led to the formation of a porous film containing anatase, a small quantity of free carbon, and silica. By varying the anodization parameters, various oxide morphologies were produced. The highest areal capacity was achieved by anodization at 60 V in an aqueous electrolyte containing 0.1 v/v HF for 3 h at room temperature. After 140 cycles performed at multiple applied current densities, an areal capacity of 380 μAh·cm(-2) (200 μA·cm(-2)) has been obtained, making this new material, free of additives and binders, a promising candidate as a negative electrode for Li-ion microbatteries.

  12. End loss analyzer system for measurements of plasma flux at the C-2U divertor electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griswold, M. E., E-mail: mgriswold@trialphaenergy.com; Korepanov, S.; Thompson, M. C. [Tri Alpha Energy, P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    An end loss analyzer system consisting of electrostatic, gridded retarding-potential analyzers and pyroelectric crystal bolometers was developed to characterize the plasma loss along open field lines to the divertors of C-2U. The system measures the current and energy distribution of escaping ions as well as the total power flux to enable calculation of the energy lost per escaping electron/ion pair. Special care was taken in the construction of the analyzer elements so that they can be directly mounted to the divertor electrode. An attenuation plate at the entrance to the gridded retarding-potential analyzer reduces plasma density by a factor of 60 to prevent space charge limitations inside the device, without sacrificing its angular acceptance of ions. In addition, all of the electronics for the measurement are isolated from ground so that they can float to the bias potential of the electrode, 2 kV below ground.

  13. C2 Fragmentation Energy of C60 Revisited: Theory Disagrees with Most Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boese, A. Daniel; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    1998-01-01

    Following our earlier work on the subject, we have carried out density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) calculations of the dissociation energy of the reaction C60 yields C58 + C2 using polarized basis sets and geometries optimized with DFT methods. The present theoretical results support an electronic fragmentation energy D(sub e) around 10-11 eV in disagreement with most experimental results that place the dissociation energy D(sub o) (including zero point energy) around 7-8 eV. The plausible errors remaining in the theoretical calculations are unlikely to account for this big difference (2-4 eV).

  14. Development of Spatial Heterodyne Spectroscopy Measurements for the C-2W Plasma Expansion Divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheftman, Daniel; Matsumoto, Tadafumi; Thompson, Matthew; Tri Alpha Energy Team

    2017-10-01

    Accurate operation and high performance of the open field line plasma surrounding the Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) is crucial to achieving the goals of successful temperature ramp up and confinement improvement on C-2W. Attributes such as the outflow velocity and temperature of charge exchange or impurity ions can be measured through spectroscopic methods. However, light throughput is severely limited due to the low plasma density inside the divertors where the plasma expands rapidly before terminating on biasing plates. A field widened spatial heterodyne spectrometer was developed in order to address the challenge of making accurate spectroscope measurements on the diffuse plasma. Design of a prototype of this spectrometer, including lab calibration and spectral line measurements performed on a compact toroid injector test stand, will be presented.

  15. Comparing Coronal Structure Predictions to CATE Eclipse Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Sarah A.; Citizen CATE Experiment 2017 Team

    2018-01-01

    The total solar eclipse of the sun on 21 August 2017 crossed the entire continental United States, giving the opportunity for millions of people to see this spectacular celestial event. The Citizen Continental America Telescopic Eclipse Experiment, or Citizen CATE, captured roughly 90 minutes of totality data from 62 identical setups along the path. Prior to the eclipse, the appearance of the corona was predicted using images from ground and satellite telescopes. The size of the coronal holes on the surface of the sun and the polar plumes extending out into the corona have been examined to predict the features in the corona during totality. By looking at trends in large-scale features, such as streamers, and long-lasting features, such as coronal holes, the atmosphere of the sun can be predicted with reasonable accuracy. This prediction is then compared to other forecast models and what was captured on eclipse day. This experiment imaged the total solar eclipse in 2016 and developed a prediction method extrapolating from the data gathered in Indonesia. The same prediction method was used to forecast the structures expected in the corona on 21 August 2017.

  16. Posterior coronal plating for tibial fractures: technique and advantages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montu Jain

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Tibial shaft fractures are straightforward to treat but when associated with soft tissue injury particularly at the nail entry/plate insertion site or there is significant comminution proximally or a large butterfly fragment/a second split component in the posterior coronal plane, it is a challenge to the treating surgeon. The aim of the present report is to describe the technique of posterior coronal plating in such a scenario and its advantages. Methods:Between July 2008 and June 2011, 12 patients were pro spectively treated by this approach using 4.5 mm broad dynamic compression plates. Results:The time of bony consolidation and full weight bearing averaged 21.7 weeks (range, 16-26 weeks. Patients were followed up for at least 24 months (range, 24-48 months. At 1 year postoper atively, no loss in reduction or alignment was observed. Mean Hospital for Lower Extremity Measurement Functional Score was 72.8 (range, 64-78. All patients were satisfied with their treatment outcomes. Conclusion:Direct posterior approach and fixation using prone position helps to visualise the fracture fragments and provide rigid fixation. The approach is simple and extensile easily, apart from advantages of less soft tissue and hardware problems compared to standard medial or lateral plating. Key words: Tibial fractures; Bone plates; Orthopedic procedures

  17. The Parker Problem and the Theory of Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, I. J. D.; Sneyd, A. D.

    2005-11-01

    To illustrate his theory of coronal heating, Parker initially considers the problem of disturbing a homogeneous vertical magnetic field that is line-tied across two infinite horizontal surfaces. It is argued that, in the absence of resistive effects, any perturbed equilibrium must be independent of z. As a result random footpoint perturbations give rise to magnetic singularities, which generate strong Ohmic heating in the case of resistive plasmas. More recently these ideas have been formalized in terms of a magneto-static theorem but no formal proof has been provided. In this paper we investigate the Parker hypothesis by formulating the problem in terms of the fluid displacement. We find that, contrary to Parker's assertion, well-defined solutions for arbitrary compressibility can be constructed which possess non-trivial z-dependence. In particular, an analytic treatment shows that small-amplitude Fourier disturbances violate the symmetry ∂z = 0 for both compact and non-compact regions of the (x, y) plane. Magnetic relaxation experiments at various levels of gas pressure confirm the existence and stability of the Fourier mode solutions. More general footpoint displacements that include appreciable shear and twist are also shown to relax to well-defined non-singular equilibria. The implications for Parker's theory of coronal heating are discussed.

  18. Automated Coronal Loop Identification Using Digital Image Processing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong K.; Gary, G. Allen; Newman, Timothy S.

    2003-01-01

    The results of a master thesis project on a study of computer algorithms for automatic identification of optical-thin, 3-dimensional solar coronal loop centers from extreme ultraviolet and X-ray 2-dimensional images will be presented. These center splines are proxies of associated magnetic field lines. The project is pattern recognition problems in which there are no unique shapes or edges and in which photon and detector noise heavily influence the images. The study explores extraction techniques using: (1) linear feature recognition of local patterns (related to the inertia-tensor concept), (2) parametric space via the Hough transform, and (3) topological adaptive contours (snakes) that constrains curvature and continuity as possible candidates for digital loop detection schemes. We have developed synthesized images for the coronal loops to test the various loop identification algorithms. Since the topology of these solar features is dominated by the magnetic field structure, a first-order magnetic field approximation using multiple dipoles provides a priori information in the identification process. Results from both synthesized and solar images will be presented.

  19. Comparing Coronal Discoloration Between AH26 and ZOE Sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare Jahromi, Maryam; Navabi, Amir Arsalan; Ekhtiari, Mahsa

    2011-01-01

    Intrinsic tooth discolorations after endodontic treatment are principally attributed to the composition of necrotic pulp tissue, hemorrhage within the pulp cavity, endodontic medicaments and/or filling materials. Residual sealer left in pulp chamber after obturation can cause discoloration. The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate coronal discoloration created by AH26 and ZOE sealers after four months. Fifty intact human extracted maxillary central incisors were employed. Access cavities were prepared in all samples and root canals were instrumented; coronal orifices were then sealed using self-cure glass ionomer. The teeth were divided into two experimental groups (n=20) according to utilized sealer in pulp chambers including AH26 and Dorifill (ZOE). The remaining 10 teeth served as negative and positive controls (n=5). The access cavities were sealed with self-cure glass ionomer. Teeth were kept in incubator for four month. Preliminary digital images of the teeth were taken and then compared with those related to 4-month follow-up. The images were assessed using Photoshop software. Data was analyzed using paired t-test and independent samples t-test. The teeth which were filled with AH26 sealer showed significantly greater discoloration than those filled with ZOE sealer (Dorifill) (Pdiscoloration of the crown compared to ZOE sealer. Despite the other disadvantage of AH26 sealer, it seems that Dorifill is more esthetically considerate.

  20. Cannabis, possible cardiac deaths and the coroner in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tormey, W P

    2012-01-10

    BACKGROUND: The elevated risk of triggering a myocardial infarction by smoking cannabis is limited to the first 2 h after smoking. AIM: To examine the possible role of cannabis in cardiac deaths. CASES AND RESULTS: From 3,193 coroners\\' cases over 2 years, there were 13 cases where the clinical information was compatible with a primary cardiac cause of death. An inquest was held in three cases. Myocardial infarction was the primary cause of death in 54%. Other causes were sudden adult death syndrome, sudden death in epilepsy, and poisoning by alcohol and diazepam. Cannabis was mentioned once only on a death certificate, but not as a cause of death. Blood delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-carboxylic acid was recorded in one case and in no case was plasma tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) measured. CONCLUSIONS: To attribute sudden cardiac death to cannabis, plasma THC should be measured in the toxicology screen in coroners\\' cases where urine cannabinoids are positive. A positive urine cannabinoids immunoassay alone is insufficient evidence in the linkage of acute cardiac death and cannabis.

  1. C-2-C market relations and word of mouth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grubor Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most market research focuses on business-to-business and business- to-consumer interactions to explain the structure and dynamics of the market. Meanwhile, negligible effort has been invested in researching consumer-to-consumer interaction and its impact on companies’ behaviour and purchase decision-making, which determines business performance. The greatest challenge for marketers at the beginning of the 21st century is this third relationship dimension, consumer-to-consumer interaction: how consumers influence each other’s attitudes, expectations, perceptions, preferences, satisfaction, loyalty, and purchasing decisions, and, importantly, the possibility of incorporating consumers into businesses’ marketing programmes. Despite the existence of a multitude of media and different forms of communication between businesses and the market, such as newspapers, periodicals, billboards, television etc., a considerable portion of information is communicated to consumers informally, mostly in the form of word-of-mouth. The information received by consumers through this communication form - from family and similar individuals -is very often accepted as more reliable and certain than information transmitted through formal communication channels. What is often neglected when studying the phenomenon of word-of-mouth communication is the fact that its efficiency and effect also depend on the type and character of the interaction between the consumers themselves. This paper aims to investigate the extent to which the nature of customer to-customer (C2C interaction influences the effect of word-of-mouth communication.

  2. Lung density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnett, E S; Webber, C E; Coates, G

    1977-01-01

    The density of a defined volume of the human lung can be measured in vivo by a new noninvasive technique. A beam of gamma-rays is directed at the lung and, by measuring the scattered gamma-rays, lung density is calculated. The density in the lower lobe of the right lung in normal man during quiet...... breathing in the sitting position ranged from 0.25 to 0.37 g.cm-3. Subnormal values were found in patients with emphsema. In patients with pulmonary congestion and edema, lung density values ranged from 0.33 to 0.93 g.cm-3. The lung density measurement correlated well with the findings in chest radiographs...... but the lung density values were more sensitive indices. This was particularly evident in serial observations of individual patients....

  3. Energetics of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability induced by transverse waves in twisted coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howson, T. A.; De Moortel, I.; Antolin, P.

    2017-11-01

    Aims: We quantify the effects of twisted magnetic fields on the development of the magnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) in transversely oscillating coronal loops. Methods: We modelled a fundamental standing kink mode in a straight, density-enhanced magnetic flux tube using the magnetohydrodynamics code, Lare3d. In order to evaluate the impact of an azimuthal component of the magnetic field, various degrees of twist were included within the flux tube's magnetic field. Results: The process of resonant absorption is only weakly affected by the presence of a twisted magnetic field. However, the subsequent evolution of the KHI is sensitive to the strength of the azimuthal component of the field. Increased twist values inhibit the deformation of the loop's density profile, which is associated with the growth of the instability. Despite this, much smaller scales in the magnetic field are generated when there is a non-zero azimuthal component present. Hence, the instability is more energetic in cases with (even weakly) twisted fields. Field aligned flows at the loop apex are established in a twisted regime once the instability has formed. Further, in the straight field case, there is no net vertical component of vorticity when integrated across the loop. However, the inclusion of azimuthal magnetic field generates a preferred direction for the vorticity which oscillates during the kink mode. Conclusions: The KHI may have implications for wave heating in the solar atmosphere due to the creation of small length scales and the generation of a turbulent regime. Whilst magnetic twist does suppress the development of the vortices associated with the instability, the formation of the KHI in a twisted regime will be accompanied by greater Ohmic dissipation due to the larger currents that are produced, even if only weak twist is present. The presence of magnetic twist will likely make the instability more difficult to detect in the corona, but will enhance its contribution

  4. Crown-ether linked ruthenium-coronates a new type of photostable electron transfer-sensitizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossmann, S.; Duerr, H. (Universitaet des Saarlandes, Saarbruecken (Germany))

    1992-07-01

    A new interesting class of Ru-coronates was prepared containing a cage tritopic ligand bound to Ru. They have a high photostability and the bimolecular electron transfer of cage complexes is demonstrated for the first time by employing the new Ru coronates in a sacrificial hydrogen producing system.

  5. Characteristics of Low-latitude Coronal Holes near the Maximum of Solar Cycle 24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmeister, Stefan J.; Veronig, Astrid; Reiss, Martin A.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the statistics of 288 low-latitude coronal holes extracted from SDO/AIA-193 filtergrams over the time range of 2011 January 01–2013 December 31. We analyze the distribution of characteristic coronal hole properties, such as the areas, mean AIA-193 intensities, and mean magnetic fie...

  6. Local variations in reporting deaths to the coroner in England and Wales: a postcode lottery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclean, Maxwell; Roach, Jason; Armitage, Rachel

    2013-11-01

    In England and Wales, doctors are charged with a responsibility either to report a death to the coroner or issue a medical certificate specifying cause of death. A lack of formal prescriptive or presumptive oversight has resulted in the promulgation by individual coroners of local reporting regimes. The study reported here identified overall and gendered variations in local reporting rates to coroners across the jurisdictions of England and Wales, consistent over time. Analysis was performed on Ministry of Justice (MOJ) data pertaining to the numbers and proportions of deaths reported to the coroner by jurisdiction over a 10-year period (2001-2010). Office of National Statistics (ONS) data provided the numbers of deaths registered in England and Wales over the same period to serve as a denominator for the calculation of proportions. Where coroner jurisdictions (and local authorities) had been amalgamated during this period, the combined reported and registered death figures have been included in line with the current jurisdiction areas. While reporting rates for individual jurisdictions were found to be stable over the 10-year period, wide local variations in reporting deaths to coroners were found with no obvious demographic explanation. The gender of the deceased was identified as a major factor in local variation. The decision to report a death to the coroner varies across jurisdictions. Implications for coronial investigations are discussed and the need for wider research into coroners' decision-making is proposed.

  7. Diagnostic values of coronal section with MPR method in magnetic resonance imaging of canal stenotic change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Mana; Haruhara, Shoutaro; Soh, Katsuhiro; Yokouchi, Junichi; Matsuda, Hiromichi; Inoue, Shingo; Kakizaki, Dai; Abe, Kimihiko (Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1990-03-01

    During a 2-year period, 300 patients were screened for canal stenotic change with surface-coil MR images, and T1-weighted coronal scan was performed on 65 patients with typical radiculopathy including 45 cases of lumbar disk herniation to evaluate the effectiveness of coronal section with MPR (multi-planar reconstruction) method in pre and post-operative assessment of canal stenotic change. Coronal section with MPR method in MRI of lumbar spine has advantages in patients with radiculopathy. Although it is as sensitive as myelography in detecting the pathological site, nerve root damage can be detected more obviously by MRI coronal section with MPR method than by myelography. As bilateral nerve roots and other contents of the foramen are figurized in the same image, the shift of the root and the decrease of the fat layer surrounding the roots can be more easily detected. Adding coronal imaging to MR examination is a viable alternative to pre-operative myelography. (author).

  8. Command Center Training Tool (C2T2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Phillip; Drucker, Nich; Mathews, Reejo; Stanton, Laura; Merkle, Ed

    2012-01-01

    This abstract presents the training approach taken to create a management-centered, experiential learning solution for the Virginia Port Authority's Port Command Center. The resultant tool, called the Command Center Training Tool (C2T2), follows a holistic approach integrated across the training management cycle and within a single environment. The approach allows a single training manager to progress from training design through execution and AAR. The approach starts with modeling the training organization, identifying the organizational elements and their individual and collective performance requirements, including organizational-specific performance scoring ontologies. Next, the developer specifies conditions, the problems, and constructs that compose exercises and drive experiential learning. These conditions are defined by incidents, which denote a single, multi-media datum, and scenarios, which are stories told by incidents. To these layered, modular components, previously developed meta-data is attached, including associated performance requirements. The components are then stored in a searchable library An event developer can create a training event by searching the library based on metadata and then selecting and loading the resultant modular pieces. This loading process brings into the training event all the previously associated task and teamwork material as well as AAR preparation materials. The approach includes tools within an integrated management environment that places these materials at the fingertips of the event facilitator such that, in real time, the facilitator can track training audience performance and resultantly modify the training event. The approach also supports the concentrated knowledge management requirements for rapid preparation of an extensive AAR. This approach supports the integrated training cycle and allows a management-based perspective and advanced tools, through which a complex, thorough training event can be developed.

  9. Trends in Strong Chemical Bonding in C2, CN, CN-, CO, N2, NO, NO+, and O2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2017-01-01

    The strong chemical bonds between C, N, and O play a central role in chemistry, and their formation and cleavage are critical steps in very many catalytic processes. The close-lying molecular orbital energies and large correlation effects pose a challenge to electronic structure calculations...... and have led to different bonding interpretations, most notably for C2. One way to approach this problem is by strict benchmark comparison of related systems. This work reports reference electronic structures and computed bond dissociation enthalpies D0 for C2, CN, CN-, CO, N2, NO, NO+, O2 and related...... systems C2+ and C2- at chemical accuracy (~1 kcal/mol or 4 kJ/mol) using CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV5Z, with additional benchmarks of HF, MP2, CCSD, explicitly correlated F12 methods, and four density functionals. Very large correlation and basis set effects are responsible for up to 93% of total D0. The order...

  10. Changes in the subgingival biofilm composition after coronally positioned flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadson Almeida Lima

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effects of coronally positioned flap (CPF on the subgingival biofilm composition. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-two subjects with gingival recessions were treated with CPF. Clinical parameters were assessed before and at 6 months after surgery. Subgingival biofilms were analyzed by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique for 40 bacterial species. RESULTS: Recession height, clinical attachment level and bleeding on probing improved significantly (p<0.05 at 6 months post-CPF. The proportions of 10 periodontal pathogens and the proportions of red and orange complexes decreased at 6 months. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, CPF can induce beneficial effects on the composition of the subgingival microbiota after 6 months.

  11. Magnetic Evolution of Mini-Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarbakhsh, L.; Alipour, N.; Safari, H.

    2016-03-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between mini-coronal mass ejections (mini-CMEs) and the evolution of their magnetic fluxes. An automatic detection algorithm was used to detect mini-dimmings in 171 Å images taken with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Using the difference images for the dimmings, 131 events that satisfied mini-CME signatures were selected. Changes in their magnetic structure using photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms taken with the Heliospheric and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on SDO were investigated. It was found that 27 % of the events had slight changes and 73 % showed considerable changes in magnetic flux. About 18 % of the magnetic structures evolved by cancellation and 38 % by complex flux changes.

  12. Einstein Observatory coronal temperatures of late-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Collura, A.; Sciortino, S.; Vaiana, G. S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented of a survey of the coronal temperatures of late-type stars using the Einstein Observatory IPC. The spectral analysis shows that the frequently found one- and two-temperature descriptions are mainly influenced by the SNR of the data and that models using continuous emission measure distributions can provide equally adequate and physically more meaningful and more plausible descriptions. Intrinsic differences in differential emission measure distributions are found for four groups of stars. M dwarfs generally show evidence for high-temperature gas in conjunction with lower-temperature material, while main-sequence stars of types F and G have the high-temperature component either absent or very weak. Very hot coronae without the lower-temperature component appearing in dwarf stars are evident in most of the giant stars studied. RS CVn systems show evidence for extremely hot coronae, sometimes with no accompanying lower-temperature material.

  13. Prominence condensation and magnetic levitation in a coronal loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoven, G.; Mok, Y.; Drake, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a model dynamic simulation of the formation and support of a narrow prominence at the apex of a coronal magnetic loop or arcade are described. The condensation process proceeds via an initial radiative cooling and pressure drop, and a secondary siphon flow from the dense chromospheric ends. The antibuoyancy effect as the prominence forms causes a bending of the confining magnetic field, which propagates toward the semirigid ends of the magnetic loop. Thus, a wide magnetic 'hammock' or well (of the normal-polarity Kippenhahn-Schlueter-type) is formed, which supports the prominence at or near the field apex. The simplicity of this 1.5-dimensional model, with its accompanying diagnostics, elucidates the various contributions to the nonlinear dynamics of prominence condensation and levitation.

  14. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections observed by MESSENGER and Venus Express

    CERN Document Server

    Good, S W

    2015-01-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) observed by the MESSENGER (MES) and Venus Express (VEX) spacecraft have been catalogued and analysed. The ICMEs were identified by a relatively smooth rotation of the magnetic field direction consistent with a flux rope structure, coinciding with a relatively enhanced magnetic field strength. A total of 35 ICMEs were found in the surveyed MES data (primarily from March 2007 to April 2012), and 84 ICMEs in the surveyed VEX data (from May 2006 to December 2013). The ICME flux rope configurations have been determined. Ropes with northward leading edges were about four times more common than ropes with southward leading edges, in agreement with a previously established solar cycle dependence. Ropes with low inclinations to the solar equatorial plane were about four times more common than ropes with high inclinations, possibly an observational effect. Left and right-handed ropes were observed in almost equal numbers. In addition, data from MES, VEX, STEREO-A, STEREO-B ...

  15. Geoeffectiveness of Coronal Mass Ejections in the SOHO Era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumbovic, M.; Devos, A.; Vrsnak, B.

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of the study is to determine the probability distributions of the geomagnetic Dst index as a function of the coronal mass ejection (CME) and solar flare parameters for the purpose of establishing a probabilistic forecast tool for the geomagnetic storm intensity. Several CME...... and flare parameters as well as the effect of successive-CME occurrence in changing the probability for a certain range of Dst index values, were examined. The results confirm some of already known relationships between remotely-observed properties of solar eruptive events and geomagnetic storms, namely...... the importance of initial CME speed, apparent width, source position, and the associated solar flare class. In this paper we quantify these relationships in a form to be used for space weather forecasting in future. The results of the statistical study are employed to construct an empirical statistical model...

  16. An ice-cream cone model for coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, X. H.; Wang, C. B.; Dou, X. K.

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we use an ice-cream cone model to analyze the geometrical and kinematical properties of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Assuming that in the early phase CMEs propagate with near-constant speed and angular width, some useful properties of CMEs, namely the radial speed (v), the angular width (α), and the location at the heliosphere, can be obtained considering the geometrical shapes of a CME as an ice-cream cone. This model is improved by (1) using an ice-cream cone to show the near real configuration of a CME, (2) determining the radial speed via fitting the projected speeds calculated from the height-time relation in different azimuthal angles, (3) not only applying to halo CMEs but also applying to nonhalo CMEs.

  17. Anterior ethmoidal artery evaluation on coronal CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Soraia Ale; Souza, Marcia Maria Ale de; Gregório, Luís Carlos; Ajzen, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    The anterior ethmoidal artery (AEA) is an important point for frontal and ethmoid sinuses surgery. CT scans can identify landmarks to help the surgeon find the AEA. To identify the landmarks of the AEA on the orbital medial wall and on the lateral wall of the olfactory fossa. and to correlate the presence of supraorbital ethmoidal cells with spotting the anterior ethmoidal artery canal. Retrospective review of 198 direct coronal paranasal sinuses computed tomography (CT) scans from August to December, 2006. Supraorbital pneumatization was seen in 35% (70 scans). The AEA canal was seen in 41% (81 scans). The anterior ethmoidal sulcus was seen in 98% (194 scans) and the anterior ethmoidal foramen was seen in all the scans (100%). The anterior ethmoidal foramen and the anterior ethmoidal sulcus were anatomical landmarks present in almost 100% of the scans studied. There was a correlation between the presence of supraorbital pneumatization and AEA canal visualization.

  18. Coronal Polarization of Pseudostreamers and the Solar Polar Field Reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmeler, L. A.; Guennou, C.; Seaton, D. B.; Gibson, S. E.; Auchere, F.

    2016-01-01

    The reversal of the solar polar magnetic field is notoriously hard to pin down due to the extreme viewing angle of the pole. In Cycle 24, the southern polar field reversal can be pinpointed with high accuracy due to a large-scale pseudostreamer that formed over the pole and persisted for approximately a year. We tracked the size and shape of this structure with multiple observations and analysis techniques including PROBA2/SWAP EUV images, AIA EUV images, CoMP polarization data, and 3D tomographic reconstructions. We find that the heliospheric field reversed polarity in February 2014, whereas in the photosphere, the last vestiges of the previous polar field polarity remained until March 2015. We present here the evolution of the structure and describe its identification in the Fe XII 1074nm coronal emission line, sensitive to the Hanle effect in the corona.

  19. TETHER-CUTTING RECONNECTION BETWEEN TWO SOLAR FILAMENTS TRIGGERING OUTFLOWS AND A CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Huadong; Zhang, Jun; Li, Leping [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Ma, Suli, E-mail: hdchen@nao.cas.cn [College of Science, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580 (China)

    2016-02-20

    Triggering mechanisms of solar eruptions have long been a challenge. A few previous case studies have indicated that preceding gentle filament merging via magnetic reconnection may launch following intense eruption, according to the tether-cutting (TC) model. However, the detailed process of TC reconnection between filaments has not been exhibited yet. In this work, we report the high-resolution observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) of TC reconnection between two sheared filaments in NOAA active region 12146. The TC reconnection commenced on ∼15:35 UT on 2014 August 29 and triggered an eruptive GOES C4.3-class flare ∼8 minutes later. An associated coronal mass ejection appeared in the field of view of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/LASCO C2 about 40 minutes later. Thanks to the high spatial resolution of IRIS data, bright plasma outflows generated by the TC reconnection are clearly observed, which moved along the subarcsecond fine-scale flux tube structures in the erupting filament. Based on the imaging and spectral observations, the mean plane-of-sky and line-of-sight velocities of the TC reconnection outflows are separately measured to be ∼79 and 86 km s{sup −1}, which derives an average real speed of ∼120 km s{sup −1}. In addition, it is found that spectral features, such as peak intensities, Doppler shifts, and line widths in the TC reconnection region are evidently enhanced compared to those in the nearby region just before the flare.

  20. Chromospheric and coronal variation across stellar activity cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Cedric; Miller, Brendan P.; Gallo, Elena; Wright, Jason; Isaacson, Howard T.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate cyclic chromospheric and coronal activity in main-sequence stars, using Ca II H and K core emission and X-ray luminosities, respectively. From a sample of 244 nearby stars with high-cadence Keck optical spectroscopy spanning up to 17 years (obtained for the California Planet Search program), we use automated sinusoid modeling and goodness-of-fit criteria to identify 33 stars with highly significant cyclic R'HK variability. The cycle periods are refined using mmag APT optical photometry. We also construct a comparison sample of 23 stars that show virtually no R'HK variability. The cyclic and flat stars have similar B-V and absolute magnitude distributions but the cyclic stars tend to be more active, with greater median R'HK values. We present new Swift/XRT observations of 10 cyclic stars and 1 flat star, totaling 32.6 ks; 5/11 are detected in this snapshot pilot survey. A comparison of their current-epoch X-ray luminosities to archival ROSAT values shows variation by a factor of 2-3 is common on decade-long timescales. Several stars also show suggestive evidence for X-ray variability on much shorter timescales, perhaps related to stellar rotation and coronal inhomogeneity or to small flares. We use the chromospheric activity cycles to calculate the phase of each X-ray observation. Additional Swift observations are ongoing and with this larger dataset we will measure the typical amplitude of cyclic X-ray variation. We discuss our initial results in the context of magnetic dynamo activity and consider the implications for exoplanet atmosphere heating and evaporation.

  1. Dextrocardia and coronal alignment of thoracic curve: a population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallroth, Kaj; Lohman, Martina; Heliövaara, Markku; Aromaa, Arpo; Knekt, Paul; Standertskjöld-Nordenstam, Carl-Gustaf

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the coronal alignment of the thoracic spine in persons with dextrocardia. Generally, the thoracic spine is slightly curved to the right. It has been suggested that the curve could be triggered by pulsation forces from the descending aorta. Since no population study has focused on the alignment of the thoracic spine in persons with situs inversus, dextrocardia, and right-sided descending aorta, we compared the radiographs of the thoracic spine in persons with dextrocardia to those having normal levocardia. Among 57,440 persons in a health survey, 11 cases of dextrocardia were identified through standard radiological screening. The miniature chest radiographs of eight persons were eligible for the present study. The study was carried out as a nested case-control study. Four individually matched (age, gender, and municipality) controls with levocardia were chosen for each case. Coronal alignment of the thoracic spine was analyzed without knowledge of whether the person had levo- or dextrocardia. A mild convexity to the left was found in all persons with dextrocardia and right-sided descending aorta (mean Cobb angle 6.6 degrees to the left, SD 2.9). Of the 32 normal levocardia persons, 29 displayed a convexity to the right, and the remaining three had a straight spine (mean Cobb angle 5.2 degrees to the right, SD 2.3). The difference (mean 11.8 degrees , SD 3.5) differed significantly from unity (P = 0.00003). In conclusion, it seems that a slight left convexity of the thoracic spine is frequent in dextrocardia. We assume that the effect of the repetitive pulsatile pressure of the descending thoracic aorta, and the mass effect of the heart may cause the direction of the convexity to develop opposite to the side of the aortic arch.

  2. Pseudo-automatic characterization of the morphological and kinematical properties of coronal mass ejections using a texture-based technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Carlos Roberto; Dal Lago, Alisson; Stenborg, Guillermo

    2013-05-01

    The white light coronagraphs onboard SOHO (LASCO-C2 and -C3) and most recently STEREO (SECCHI -COR1 and -COR2) have detected a myriad of coronal mass ejections (CME). They are a key component of space weather and under certain conditions they can become geo-effective, hence the importance of their kinematic characterization to help predict their effects. However, there is still a lot of debate on how to define the event boundaries for space weather purposes, which in turn makes it difficult to agree on their kinematic properties. That lack of agreement is reflected in both the manual and automated CME catalogs in existence. To contribute to a more objective definition and characterization of white-light coronagraph events, Goussies et al. (2010) introduced recently the concept of "texture of the event". Based on that property, they developed a supervised segmentation algorithm to allow the automatic tracking of dynamic events observed in the coronagraphs field of view, which is called CORonal SEgmentation Technique (CORSET). In this work, we have enhanced the capabilities of the algorithm by adding several new functionalities, namely the automatic computation of different morphological and kinematic parameters. We tested its performance on 57 well-studied limb CME events observed with the LASCO coronagraphs between 1997 and 2001, and compared the parameters obtained with those from three existent CME lists: two of them obtained from an observer-based detection and tracking method (i.e., two manual catalogs), and the other one based on the automated detection and characterization of the CME events (i.e., a fully automated catalog). We found that 51 events could be tracked and quantified in agreement with the CME definition. In general terms, the position angle, and the radial and expansion speeds are in agreement with the manual catalogs used for comparison. On the other hand, some discrepancies between CORSET and the automated catalog were found, which can be

  3. Broadband microwave sub-second pulsations in an expanding coronal loop of the 2011 August 10 flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészárosová, H.; Rybák, J.; Kashapova, L.; Gömöry, P.; Tokhchukova, S.; Myshyakov, I.

    2016-09-01

    Aims: We studied the characteristic physical properties and behavior of broadband microwave sub-second pulsations observed in an expanding coronal loop during the GOES C2.4 solar flare on 2011 August 10. Methods: The complex microwave dynamic spectrum and the expanding loop images were analyzed with the help of SDO/AIA/HMI, RHESSI, and the STEREO/SECCHI-EUVI data processing software, wavelet analysis methods, the GX Simulator tool, and the NAFE method. Results: We found sub-second pulsations and other different burst groups in the complex radio spectrum. The broadband (bandwidth about 1 GHz) sub-second pulsations (temporal period range 0.07-1.49 s, no characteristic dominant period) lasted 70 s in the frequency range 4-7 GHz. These pulsations were not correlated at their individual frequencies, had no measurable frequency drift, and zero polarization. In these pulsations, we found the signatures of fast sausage magnetoacoustic waves with the characteristic periods of 0.7 and 2 s. The other radio bursts showed their characteristic frequency drifts in the range of -262-520 MHz s-1. They helped us to derive average values of 20-80 G for the coronal magnetic field strength in the place of radio emission. It was revealed that the microwave event belongs to an expanding coronal loop with twisted sub-structures observed in the 131, 94, and 193 Å SDO/AIA channels. Their slit-time diagrams were compared with the location of the radio source at 5.7 GHz to realize that the EUV intensity of the expanding loop increased just before the radio source triggering. We reveal two EUV bidirectional flows that are linked with the start time of the loop expansion. Their positions were close to the radio source and propagated with velocities within a range of 30-117 km s-1. Conclusions: We demonstrate that periodic regime of the electron acceleration in a model of the quasi-periodic magnetic reconnection might be able to explain physical properties and behavior of the sub

  4. CORONAL MASS EJECTION RECONSTRUCTION FROM THREE VIEWPOINTS VIA SIMULATION MORPHING. I. THEORY AND EXAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazin, Richard A., E-mail: rfrazin@umich.edu [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    The problem of reconstructing the three-dimensional (3D) density distribution of a coronal mass ejection (CME) from three simultaneous coronagraph observations is timely in that the COR1 and COR2 coronagraphs on the dual-spacecraft STEREO mission complement the LASCO coronagraphs on the SOHO satellite and the Mk4 on Mauna Loa. While the separation angle between the STEREO spacecraft and the Earth depends on the time since the launch in 2006, the reconstruction problem is always severely underinformed. So far, all 3D reconstruction efforts have made use of relatively simple parameterized models in order to determine the 3D structure of the CME. Such approaches do not utilize the power of 3D MHD simulation to inform the reconstruction. This paper considers the situation in which a specific CME event observed in coronagraphs from three viewpoints is later simulated by solving MHD equations. The reconstruction is then subjected to an invertible morphological operator chosen so that morphed MHD simulation is most consistent with the three-viewpoint coronagraph data. The morphological operations are explained mathematically and synthetic examples are given. The practical application to reconstructing CMEs from STEREO and SOHO data is discussed.

  5. The effects of resistivity and viscosity on the Kelvin- Helmholtz instability in oscillating coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howson, T. A.; De Moortel, I.; Antolin, P.

    2017-06-01

    Aims: We investigate the effects of resistivity and viscosity on the onset and growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) in an oscillating coronal loop. Methods: We modelled a standing kink wave in a density-enhanced loop with the three dimensional (3D), resistive magnetohydrodynamics code, Lare3d. We conducted a parameter study on the viscosity and resistivity coefficients to examine the effects of dissipation on the KHI. Results: Enhancing the viscosity (ν) and resistivity (η) acts to suppress the KHI. Larger values of η and ν delay the formation of the instability and, in some cases, prevent the onset completely. This leads to the earlier onset of heating for smaller values of the transport coefficients. We note that viscosity has a greater effect on the development of the KHI than resistivity. Furthermore, when using anomalous resistivity, the Ohmic heating rate associated with the KHI may be greater than that associated with the phase mixing that occurs in an instability-suppressed regime (using uniform resistivity). Conclusions: From our study, it is clear that the heating rate crucially depends on the formation of small length scales (influenced by the numerical resolution) as well as the values of resistivity and viscosity. As larger values of the transport coefficients suppress the KHI, the onset of heating is delayed but the heating rate is larger. As increased numerical resolution allows smaller length scales to develop, the heating rate will be higher even for the same values of η and ν.

  6. DYNAMICS OF CORONAL RAIN AND DESCENDING PLASMA BLOBS IN SOLAR PROMINENCES. II. PARTIALLY IONIZED CASE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, R.; Soler, R.; Terradas, J. [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Zaqarashvili, T. V., E-mail: ramon.oliver@uib.es [Institute of Physics, IGAM, University of Graz, Universitätsplatz 5, 8010, Graz (Austria)

    2016-02-20

    Coronal rain clumps and prominence knots are dense condensations with chromospheric to transition region temperatures that fall down in the much hotter corona. Their typical speeds are in the range 30–150 km s{sup −1} and of the order of 10–30 km s{sup −1}, respectively, i.e., they are considerably smaller than free-fall velocities. These cold blobs contain a mixture of ionized and neutral material that must be dynamically coupled in order to fall together, as observed. We investigate this coupling by means of hydrodynamic simulations in which the coupling arises from the friction between ions and neutrals. The numerical simulations presented here are an extension of those of Oliver et al. to the partially ionized case. We find that, although the relative drift speed between the two species is smaller than 1 m s{sup −1} at the blob center, it is sufficient to produce the forces required to strongly couple charged particles and neutrals. The ionization degree has no discernible effect on the main results of our previous work for a fully ionized plasma: the condensation has an initial acceleration phase followed by a period with roughly constant velocity, and, in addition, the maximum descending speed is clearly correlated with the ratio of initial blob to environment density.

  7. The Influence of Coronal Mass Ejections on the Mass-loss Rates of Hot-Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherenkov, A.; Bisikalo, D.; Fossati, L.; Möstl, C.

    2017-09-01

    Hot-Jupiters are subject to extreme radiation and plasma flows coming from their host stars. Past ultraviolet Hubble Space Telescope observations, supported by hydrodynamic models, confirmed that these factors lead to the formation of an extended envelope, part of which lies beyond the Roche lobe. We use gas-dynamic simulations to study the impact of time variations in the parameters of the stellar wind, namely that of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), on the envelope of the typical hot-Jupiter HD 209458b. We consider three CMEs characterized by different velocities and densities, taking their parameters from typical CMEs observed for the Sun. The perturbations in the ram-pressure of the stellar wind during the passage of each CME tear off most of the envelope that is located beyond the Roche lobe. This leads to a substantial increase of the mass-loss rates during the interaction with the CME. We find that the mass lost by the planet during the whole crossing of a CME is of ≈1015 g, regardless of the CME taken into consideration. We also find that over the course of 1 Gyr, the mass lost by the planet because of CME impacts is comparable to that lost because of high-energy stellar irradiation.

  8. Low Bone Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your bone density ... people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine whether you ...

  9. Suicide and the Therapeutic Coroner: Inquests, Governance and the Grieving Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Tait

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study of English Coronial practice raises a number of questions about the role played by the Coroner within contemporary governance. Following observations at over 20 inquests into possible suicides and in-depth interviews with six Coroners, three preliminary issue emerged, all of which pointed to a broader and, in many ways, more significant issue. These preliminary issues are concerned with (1 the existence of considerable slippages between different Coroners over which deaths are likely to be classified as suicide; (2 the high standard of proof required and immense pressure faced by Coroners from family members at inquest to reach any verdict other than suicide, which significantly depresses likely suicide rates; and (3 Coroners feeling no professional obligation, either individually or collectively, to contribute to the production of consistent and useful social data regarding suicide, arguably rendering comparative suicide statistics relatively worthless. These concerns lead, ultimately, to the second more important question about the role expected of Coroners within social governance and within an effective, contemporary democracy. That is, are Coroners the principal officers in the public administration of death; or are they, first and foremost, a crucial part of the grieving process, one that provides important therapeutic interventions into the mental and emotional health of the community?

  10. Observations and Numerical Models of Solar Coronal Heating Associated with Spicules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontieu, B. De; Martinez-Sykora, J. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Org. A021S, Building 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Moortel, I. De [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); McIntosh, S. W. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States)

    2017-08-20

    Spicules have been proposed as significant contributors to the mass and energy balance of the corona. While previous observations have provided a glimpse of short-lived transient brightenings in the corona that are associated with spicules, these observations have been contested and are the subject of a vigorous debate both on the modeling and the observational side. Therefore, it remains unclear whether plasma is heated to coronal temperatures in association with spicules. We use high-resolution observations of the chromosphere and transition region (TR) with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and of the corona with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory to show evidence of the formation of coronal structures associated with spicular mass ejections and heating of plasma to TR and coronal temperatures. Our observations suggest that a significant fraction of the highly dynamic loop fan environment associated with plage regions may be the result of the formation of such new coronal strands, a process that previously had been interpreted as the propagation of transient propagating coronal disturbances. Our observations are supported by 2.5D radiative MHD simulations that show heating to coronal temperatures in association with spicules. Our results suggest that heating and strong flows play an important role in maintaining the substructure of loop fans, in addition to the waves that permeate this low coronal environment.

  11. Decay of Activity Complexes, Formation of Unipolar Magnetic Regions, and Coronal Holes in Their Causal Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubeva, E. M.; Mordvinov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The peculiar development of solar activity in the current cycle resulted in an asynchronous reversal of the Sun's polar fields. The asymmetry is also observed in the formation of polar coronal holes. A stable coronal hole was first formed at the South Pole, despite the later polar-field reversal there. The aim of this study is to understand the processes making this situation possible. Synoptic magnetic maps from the Global Oscillation Network Group and corresponding coronal-hole maps from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory are analyzed here to study the causal relationship between the decay of activity complexes, evolution of large-scale magnetic fields, and formation of coronal holes. Ensembles of coronal holes associated with decaying active regions and activity complexes are presented. These ensembles take part in global rearrangements of the Sun's open magnetic flux. In particular, the south polar coronal hole was formed from an ensemble of coronal holes that came into existence after the decay of multiple activity complexes observed during 2014.

  12. White-Light and Radioastronomical Remote-Sensing of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Spangler, Steven R.

    2017-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large-scale eruptions of plasma from the Sun that play an important role in space weather. Faraday rotation (FR) is the rotation of the plane of polarization that results when a linearly polarized signal passes through a magnetized plasma (such as a CME) and is proportional to the path integral through the plasma of the electron density and the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field. FR observations of a source near the Sun can provide information on the plasma structure of a CME shortly after launch; however, separating the contribution of the plasma density from the line-of-sight magnetic field is challenging.We report on simultaneous white-light and radio observations made of three CMEs in August 2012. We made radio observations using the Very Large Array (VLA) at 1 - 2 GHz frequencies of a "constellation" of radio sources through the solar corona at heliocentric distances that ranged from 6 - 15 solar radii: two sources (0842+1835 and 0900+1832) were occulted by a single CME and one source (0843+1547) was occulted by two CMEs. In addition to our radioastronomical observations, which represent one of the first active hunts for CME Faraday rotation since Bird et al. (1985) and the first active hunt using the VLA, we obtained white-light coronagraph images from the LASCO/C3 instrument to determine the Thomson scattering brightness (BT), providing a means to independently estimate the plasma density and determine its contribution to the observed Faraday rotation.A constant density force-free flux rope embedded in the background corona was used to model the effects of the CMEs on BT and FR and infer the plasma densities (6 - 22 x 103 cm-3) and axial magnetic field strengths (2 - 12 mG) for the three CMEs. A single flux rope model successfully reproduces the observed BT and FR profiles for 0842+1835 and 0900+1832; however 0843+1547 was occulted by two CMEs. Using the multiple viewpoints provided by LASCO/C3 and STEREO-A/COR2

  13. C2 emission features in the Red Rectangle. A combined observational laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehres, N.; Romanzin, C.; Linnartz, H.; van Winckel, H.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2010-07-01

    Context. The Red Rectangle proto-planetary nebula (HD 44179) is known for a number of rather narrow emission features superimposed on a broad extended red emission (ERE) covering the 5000-7500 Å regime. The origin of these emission features is unknown. Aims: The aim of the present work is to search for potential carriers by combining new observational and laboratory data. This also allows to interpret spectral emission features in terms of actual physical conditions like temperature and density constraints and to trace chemical processes in the outflows of the Red Rectangle. Methods: Observational spectra have been obtained with the EMMI-NTT at offsets of 3'', 6'', 7'', 11'', 16'' and 20'' distance to the central star HD 44179. The spectra are compared to the outcome of a time-gated laser induced fluorescence laboratory study of an expanding acetylene plasma using a special supersonic pin-hole discharge source. With this set-up the hydrocarbon chemistry in the Red Rectangle nebula is simulated under laboratory controlled conditions. The plasma source has the unique feature to generate electronically and vibrationally excited species at low rotational temperatures. The comparison is facilitated by a simple model for fluorescent emission in the nebula. Results: Two of the astronomically observed narrow emission bands can be assigned as originating from unresolved rovibronic progressions within the d3Π_g → a3Π_u Swan system of the C2 radical. The band appearance corresponds to a rotational temperature between 200 and 1000 K. The emission is driven by absorption in the C2 Phillips bands followed by intersystem crossing from the singlet to the triplet state and pumping in the Swan bands. Conclusions: These observations imply an active (photo)chemistry in the ejecta of the Red Rectangle. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile. Program ID: 080.C-0814(A).

  14. Pillar-Layered Metal-Organic Framework with Sieving Effect and Pore Space Partition for Effective Separation of Mixed Gas C2H2/C2H4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xu-Jia; Wei, Qin; Cai, Yue-Peng; Wu, Bing-Bing; Feng, Hai-Xing; Yu, Ying; Dong, Ren-Feng

    2017-08-30

    The removal of acetylene from the industrial feed gas to purify the ethylene is an important and challenging issue. The adsorption-based separation is a more environmentally friendly and cost-effective method compared to the current removal approaches such as partial hydrogenation and solvent extraction, while facing the challenge of developing materials with high C 2 H 2 /C 2 H 4 selectivity and C 2 H 2 capacity. Herein, by expanding mixed-metal organic frameworks (M'MOFs) structure with high C 2 H 2 /C 2 H 4 selectivity, we report a pillar-layered MOF, {[Cd 5 (MPCZ) 2 (BDC) 3 (NO 3 ) 2 (H 2 O) 4 ]·G} n (MECS-5), which not only inherits the sieving effects of M'MOF series but also develops its own characteristic-the 2D layer with expanding space and the plane pore-partition group to "cover" it. MECS-5 shows higher ideal adsorption solution theory C 2 H 2 /C 2 H 4 selectivity than the most reported MOFs, especially more than 5 times higher than MOF-74 series while displaying great enhancement in the C 2 H 2 capacity, more than 2 times higher compared to the M'MOF. The column breakthrough experiment further proves the possibility of MECS-5a for real industrial ethylene purification.

  15. Heating of solar coronal loops by resonant absorption of Alfven waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, William; Smith, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    Numerical calculations governing the efficiency of coronal loop heating by the resonant absorption of shear Alfven waves are reported. The loop structure is modeled by a class of axisymmetric force-free equilibria of a long straight cylinder, approximating a large aspect ratio loop. For a range of parameters characterizing the evolution of solar coronal loops, the absorption bandwidth falls in the frequency range of the photospheric motions due to granulation and p-modes. Resonant Alfven wave absorption is thus a viable mechanism for coronal loop heating.

  16. Non-adversarial justice and the coroner's court: a proposed therapeutic, restorative, problem-solving model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael S

    2008-12-01

    Increasingly courts are using new approaches that promote a more comprehensive resolution of legal problems, minimise any negative effects that legal processes have on participant wellbeing and/or that use legal processes to promote participant wellbeing. Therapeutic jurisprudence, restorative justice, mediation and problem-solving courts are examples. This article suggests a model for the use of these processes in the coroner's court to minimise negative effects of coroner's court processes on the bereaved and to promote a more comprehensive resolution of matters at issue, including the determination of the cause of death and the public health and safety promotion role of the coroner.

  17. Electronic, magnetic and transport properties of transition metal-doped holely C2N-h2D nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jing-Jing; Guo, Yan-Dong; Yan, Xiao-Hong; Zeng, Hong-Li

    2018-01-01

    A novel layered two-dimensional graphene-like material C2N-h2D with evenly distributed holes and nitrogen atoms has been synthesized via a bottom-up wet-chemical reaction [Nat. Commun. 6, 6486 (2015)]. The presence of holes provides a ground for further functionalization by doping. By performing a first-principles study, we have doped transition metals at the center of the holes of C2N-h2D nanoribbons and explored their doping effects on electronic, magnetic and transport properties. It is found that the doping can essentially regulate the electronic properties of C2N-h2D nanoribbons. The metallic zigzag ribbon is tuned into a semiconductor for Mn, Fe and Co-doped cases, but half-metal for Ni-doping. This transition is derived from the peculiar band morphology which has a big band gap between the edge state and the higher band, so when the energy of the edge state is reduced by the impurity state, the band gap falls too and crosses the Fermi level. In contrast, the pristine semiconducting armchair C2N-h2D nanoribbon is changed into metallic. Different from the zigzag case, its physical mechanism originates from the hybridization of 3 d orbitals of transition metal atoms and the p orbitals of carbon and nitrogen atoms which introduces several resonant peaks at the Fermi level in the density of states. Furthermore, the magnetic moments of all doped materials are enhanced compared to the pristine structures but decrease as the atomic number of the transition metal atom increases. And the spin polarization of armchair C2N-h2D nanoribbon is increased, while that of the zigzag structure is decreased except the Ni-doped one which is completely spin-polarized suggesting great prospects in the future of spintronics and nanoelectronics.

  18. CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS DERIVED FROM SIMULTANEOUS MICROWAVE AND EUV OBSERVATIONS AND COMPARISON WITH THE POTENTIAL FIELD MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyawaki, Shun; Nozawa, Satoshi [Department of Science, Ibaraki University, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Iwai, Kazumasa; Shibasaki, Kiyoto [Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Minamimaki, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Shiota, Daikou, E-mail: shunmi089@gmail.com [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan)

    2016-02-10

    We estimated the accuracy of coronal magnetic fields derived from radio observations by comparing them to potential field calculations and the differential emission measure measurements using EUV observations. We derived line-of-sight components of the coronal magnetic field from polarization observations of the thermal bremsstrahlung in the NOAA active region 11150, observed around 3:00 UT on 2011 February 3 using the Nobeyama Radioheliograph at 17 GHz. Because the thermal bremsstrahlung intensity at 17 GHz includes both chromospheric and coronal components, we extracted only the coronal component by measuring the coronal emission measure in EUV observations. In addition, we derived only the radio polarization component of the corona by selecting the region of coronal loops and weak magnetic field strength in the chromosphere along the line of sight. The upper limits of the coronal longitudinal magnetic fields were determined as 100–210 G. We also calculated the coronal longitudinal magnetic fields from the potential field extrapolation using the photospheric magnetic field obtained from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. However, the calculated potential fields were certainly smaller than the observed coronal longitudinal magnetic field. This discrepancy between the potential and the observed magnetic field strengths can be explained consistently by two reasons: (1) the underestimation of the coronal emission measure resulting from the limitation of the temperature range of the EUV observations, and (2) the underestimation of the coronal magnetic field resulting from the potential field assumption.

  19. Pressure-structure relationships in the 10 K layered carbide halide superconductor Y2C2I2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kyungsoo; Kremer, Reinhard K; Simon, Arndt; Marshall, William G; Muñoz, Alfonso

    2016-09-21

    The electronic structures of the 10 K layered yttrium carbide halide superconductor Y2C2I2 is characterized by bands of low dispersion and narrow peak-valley features in the electronic density of states at the Fermi level. In order to investigate to what extent the superconducting properties can be modified by external pressure we have studied the pressure dependence of the superconducting critical temperature and the crystal structure of Y2C2I2 to pressures of 7.4 GPa. Up to ~2.5 GPa we observe an increase of T c from 10 K to about 12 K. A structural phase transition from a 1s to a 3s stacking variant occurs at about 2.5 GPa above which T c rapidly decreases to a value of ~7.5 K at 7.5 GPa. Density functional calculations corroborate the structural phase transition to occur at a critical cell volume of ~270 Å(3) corresponding to a pressure of ~2.4 GPa, in good agreement with the experimental findings. The pressure dependence of T c and inter-atomic distances and angles are discussed with respect to the results of density functional calculations of the electronic and crystal structure.

  20. 26 CFR 40.6302(c)-2 - Special rules for September.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Special rules for September. 40.6302(c)-2 Section 40.6302(c)-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES EXCISE TAX PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS § 40.6302(c)-2 Special rules for September. (a) In general—(1) Separate deposits required...

  1. 26 CFR 1.381(c)(2)-1 - Earnings and profits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Earnings and profits. 1.381(c)(2)-1 Section 1.381(c)(2)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Insolvency Reorganizations § 1.381(c)(2)-1 Earnings and profits. (a) In...

  2. 26 CFR 1.661(c)-2 - Illustration of the provisions of section 661.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Illustration of the provisions of section 661. 1.661(c)-2 Section 1.661(c)-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Distribute Corpus § 1.661(c)-2 Illustration of the provisions of section 661. The provisions of section 661...

  3. Identification of coronal heating events in 3D simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanella, Charalambos; Gudiksen, Boris V.

    2017-07-01

    Context. The solar coronal heating problem has been an open question in the science community since 1939. One of the proposed models for the transport and release of mechanical energy generated in the sub-photospheric layers and photosphere is the magnetic reconnection model that incorporates Ohmic heating, which releases a part of the energy stored in the magnetic field. In this model many unresolved flaring events occur in the solar corona, releasing enough energy to heat the corona. Aims: The problem with the verification and quantification of this model is that we cannot resolve small scale events due to limitations of the current observational instrumentation. Flaring events have scaling behavior extending from large X-class flares down to the so far unobserved nanoflares. Histograms of observable characteristics of flares show powerlaw behavior for energy release rate, size, and total energy. Depending on the powerlaw index of the energy release, nanoflares might be an important candidate for coronal heating; we seek to find that index. Methods: In this paper we employ a numerical three-dimensional (3D)-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation produced by the numerical code Bifrost, which enables us to look into smaller structures, and a new technique to identify the 3D heating events at a specific instant. The quantity we explore is the Joule heating, a term calculated directly by the code, which is explicitly correlated with the magnetic reconnection because it depends on the curl of the magnetic field. Results: We are able to identify 4136 events in a volume 24 × 24 × 9.5 Mm3 (I.e., 768 × 786 × 331 grid cells) of a specific snapshot. We find a powerlaw slope of the released energy per second equal to αP = 1.5 ± 0.02, and two powerlaw slopes of the identified volume equal to αV = 1.53 ± 0.03 and αV = 2.53 ± 0.22. The identified energy events do not represent all the released energy, but of the identified events, the total energy of the largest events

  4. Trans trochanteric approach with coronal osteotomy of the great trochanter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffann Francois

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several surgical approaches could be used in hip arthroplasty or trauma surgery: anterior, anterolateral, lateral, posterior (with or without trochanterotomy, using or not an orthopedic reduction table. Subtrochanteric and extra-capsular trochanteric fractures (ECTF are usually treated by internal fixation with mandatory restrictions on weight bearing. Specific complications have been widely described. Mechanical failures are particularly high in unstable fractures. Hip fractures are a major public health issue with a mortality rate of 12%–23% at 1 year. An alternative option is to treat ECTF by total hip arthroplasty (THA to prevent decubitus complications, to help rapid recovery, and to permit immediate weight bearing as well as quick rehabilitation. However, specific risks of THA have to be considered such as dislocation or cardiovascular failure. The classical approach (anterior or posterior requires the opening of the joint and capsule, weakening hip stability and the repair of the great trochanter is sometimes hazardous. For 15 years, we have been treating unstable ECTF by THA with cementless stem, dual mobility cup (DMC, greater trochanter (GT reattachment, and a new surgical approach preserving capsule, going through the fracture and avoiding joint dislocation. Bombaci first described a similar approach in 2008; our trans fractural digastric approach (medial gluteus and lateral vastus is different. A coronal GT osteotomy is performed when there is no coronal fracture line. It allows easy access to the femoral neck and acetabulum. The THA is implanted without femoral internal rotation to avoid extra bone fragment displacement. With pre-operative planning, cup implantation is easy and stem positioning is adjusted referring to the top of the GT after trial reduction and preoperative planning. The longitudinal osteotomy and trochanteric fracture are repaired with wires and the digastric incision is closed. This variant of Bombaci

  5. Safety Issues and Neurological Improvement following C1- C2 Fusion using C1 Lateral Mass and C2 Pedicle Screw in Atlantoaxial Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MK Kwan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of instrumentation methods for C1-C2 fusion from the use of posterior wiring methods to transarticular screws and C1 lateral mass with C2 pedicle screw construct have improved fusion rates to almost 100%. However, the C1 lateral mass and C2 pedicle screw technique is technically demanding. This is a prospective review of a series of ten patients who was planned for C1-C2 fusion using C1 lateral mass and C2 pedicle screw technique between January 2007 and June 2009. The procedure was converted to occipital cervical fusion due to a fracture of a hypoplastic lateral mass-posterior arch complex in one patient and Gallie fusion due to a vertebral artery injury in another. Eight patients underwent the C1-C2 fusion using C1 lateral mass and C2 pedicle screw successfully without any complications. The union rate was 100% with an average union time of 5.3 months (range from 3 to 8 months. Postoperatively, the patients achieved an average of one Frankel grade neurological improvement. In conclusion, this technique provides an excellent union rate and good neurological recovery.

  6. The spectrum of the Dirac operator near zero virtuality for N[sub c] = 2 and chiral random matrix theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbaarschot, Jacobus (Department of Physics, SUNY, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States))

    1994-09-19

    We study the spectrum of the QCD Dirac operator near zero virtuality for N[sub c] =2. According to a universality argument, it can be described by a random matrix theory with the chiral structure of QCD, but with real matrix elements.Using results derived by Mehta and Mahoux and Nagao and Wadati, we are able to obtain an analytical result for the microscopic spectral density that in turn is the generating function for Leutwyler-Smilga type spectral sum rules. ((orig.))

  7. In situ optical emission study on the role of C2 in the synthesis of singlewalled carbon nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Motaung, DE

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available temporarily separated by 20 ns. The ablation process was done at a furnace temperature of 1273 K in a flow of argon gas at either 150 or 200 SCCM �SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP�. The pressure was varied �100, 400, and 600 Torr� for each... with the adiabatic expansion of the plume. We propose that the sharp drop in C2 intensity and the rise in electron density and electron temperature observed in this study are due to the accompanying rapid nucleation and growth of SWCNTs. © 2010 American Institute...

  8. Analysis of Protein-Lipid Interactions Using Purified C2 Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sancho, Jessica; Schapire, Arnaldo L; Botella, Miguel A; Rosado, Abel

    2016-01-01

    C2 domains (C2s) are regulatory protein modules identified in eukaryotic proteins targeted to cell membranes. C2s were initially characterized as independently folded Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipids binding domains; however, later studies have shown that C2s have evolutionarily diverged into Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent forms. These forms interact and regulate their affinity to diverse lipid species using different binding mechanisms. In this protocol we describe a biochemical approach to produce, purify, and solubilize functional C2 domains bound to GST for the identification of their putative Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent lipid-binding partners.

  9. A cluster of Enterovirus 71 subgenogroup C2 in a nursery school, Italy, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Maria Cristina; Tummolo, Fabio; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; De Conto, Flora; Chezzi, Carlo; Dodi, Icilio; Calderaro, Adriana

    2016-10-01

    During October 2014, enterovirus (EV) RNA was detected in the stools of four children attending the same class in a nursery school, and hospitalized with mild febrile and vomiting disease in Parma, Italy. Upon sequencing, the viruses were characterized as EV71 subgenogroup C2. Phylogenetic analysis of the four EV71 C2 viruses allowed the distinction of a diverging lineage within subgenogroup C2, containing the Italian EV71 C2 strains and viruses detected in France in 2013. The identification of an outbreak of EV71 C2 in Italy extended information on the geographic diffusion and clinical relevance of these viruses in Europe.

  10. Observation of mixed acetylene - Nitrous oxide trimers: Infrared spectra of C2H2-(N2O)2 and (C2H2)2-N2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheybani-Deloui, S.; Yousefi, M.; Norooz Oliaee, J.; McKellar, A. R. W.; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.

    2014-12-01

    Infrared spectra of the lowest energy isomers of C2H2-(N2O)2 and (C2H2)2-N2O were observed in the region of the ν1 fundamental band of the N2O monomer (∼2224 cm-1) using a tunable diode laser and/or a CW quantum cascade laser to probe a pulsed supersonic slit jet expansion. One infrared band was measured for each trimer. The band for C2H2-(N2O)2 corresponds to the out-of-phase vibrations of the pair of equivalent N2O monomers. It is blue shifted by about 10 cm-1 with respect to the free N2O monomer. The band for (C2H2)2-N2O is slightly less blue shifted (centered at 2232.81 cm-1). It can be simulated as a predominately a-type band. In addition to the normal isotopologues, the corresponding bands for C2D2-(N2O)2 and (C2D2)2-N2O were also observed. The structures of these trimers are similar to those of the lowest energy isomers of the analogous OCS - acetylene trimers reported previously, that is, a twisted barrel with C2 symmetry for C2H2-(N2O)2 and a distorted T-shaped acetylene dimer with a coplanar N2O beside the stem of the T for (C2H2)2-N2O. Here, we present our observation and experimental results, which agree well with calculations based on distributed multipole pair potentials.

  11. Two-dimensional equilibrium in coronal magnetostatic flux tubes: an accurate equilibrium solver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belien, A. J. C.; Poedts, S.; Goedbloed, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    To study linearized magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, continuous spectra, and instabilities in coronal magnetic flux tubes that are anchored in dense chromospheric and photospheric regions, a two-dimensional numerical code, called PARIS, has been developed. PARIS solves the pertinent nonlinear

  12. Clinical comparison of various esthetic restorative options for coronal build-up of primary anterior teeth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duhan, Himanshu; Pandit, Inder Kumar; Srivastava, Nikhil; Gugnani, Neeraj; Gupta, Monika; Kochhar, Gulsheen Kaur

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the clinical performance of composite, strip crowns, biological restoration, and composite with stainless steel band when used for the coronal build-up of anterior teeth...

  13. Heating of coronal plasma by anomalous current dissipation. [induced by solar magnetic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.; Golub, L.; Coppi, B.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that there exist heating mechanisms which connect the observed radiative properties of the inner corona in a simple way to the underlying solar magnetic field. The mechanisms considered involve the generation and consequent dissipation of coronal currents. It is argued that the spatially and temporally inhomogeneous nature of the erupting solar magnetic field is an essential element of coronal heating. Unlike heating theories conceived in the context of the 'homogeneous' corona, this class of current heating models incorporates the observed stochastic coronal structuring at the onset, and does not view it as a complication of an otherwise straightforward model. Attention is given to the generation of coronal currents, the flux-tube emergence, the gradual growth and decay of active regions, the energetics of current dissipation, current sheath geometry and heat transport, and anomalous current dissipation.

  14. Coronal tibial slope is associated with accelerated knee osteoarthritis: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Driban, Jeffrey B; Stout, Alina C; Duryea, Jeffrey; Lo, Grace H; Harvey, William F; Price, Lori Lyn; Ward, Robert J; Eaton, Charles B; Barbe, Mary F; Lu, Bing; McAlindon, Timothy E

    2016-01-01

    .... The geometry of an articular surface (e.g., coronal tibial slope), which is a determinant of altered joint biomechanics, may be an important risk factor for incident accelerated knee osteoarthritis...

  15. Even at 4 months, a labial is a good enough coronal, but not vice versa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Sho; Mazuka, Reiko; Cristia, Alejandrina; Fikkert, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have revealed an asymmetry tied to the perception of coronal place of articulation: participants accept a labial mispronunciation of a coronal target, but not vice versa. Whether or not this asymmetry is based on language-general properties or arises from language-specific experience has been a matter of debate. The current study suggests a bias of the first type by documenting an early, cross-linguistic asymmetry related to coronal place of articulation. Japanese and Dutch 4- and 6-month-old infants showed evidence of discrimination if they were habituated to a labial and then tested on a coronal sequence, but not vice versa. This finding has important implications for both phonological theories and infant speech perception research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Sun's Global Photospheric and Coronal Magnetic Fields: Observations and Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Mackay

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this review, our present day understanding of the Sun’s global photospheric and coronal magnetic fields is discussed from both observational and theoretical viewpoints. Firstly, the large-scale properties of photospheric magnetic fields are described, along with recent advances in photospheric magnetic flux transport models. Following this, the wide variety of theoretical models used to simulate global coronal magnetic fields are described. From this, the combined application of both magnetic flux transport simulations and coronal modeling techniques to describe the phenomena of coronal holes, the Sun’s open magnetic flux and the hemispheric pattern of solar filaments is discussed. Finally, recent advances in non-eruptive global MHD models are described. While the review focuses mainly on solar magnetic fields, recent advances in measuring and modeling stellar magnetic fields are described where appropriate. In the final section key areas of future research are identified.

  17. Progress on Using Image-Optimization to Improve Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Shaela; Davila, Joseph M.; Uritsky, Vadim M.

    2018-01-01

    Reliable measurements of the coronal magnetic field have proven to be very elusive. Over several decades, solar physicists have developed means of extrapolating photospheric magnetic field measurements into the corona and ultimately into the heliosphere. However, these methods can be very sensitive to the photospheric measurements, with a significant range of heliospheric conditions possible within the uncertainty of the photospheric magnetograms. Recently we have presented a method to obtain morphological information about the coronal magnetic field from coronagraph images, and to incorporate this information into a PFSS coronal magnetic field model via optimization. Here we will present details of the method and recent progress in its development, including a significant speed-up of the optimization process that allows the optimization of higher-resolution coronal models.

  18. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES AND CORONAL HEATING: UNIFYING EMPIRICAL AND MHD TURBULENCE MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, Igor V.; Van der Holst, Bart; Oran, Rona; Jin, Meng; Manchester, Ward B. IV; Gombosi, Tamas I. [Department of AOSS, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Downs, Cooper [Predictive Science Inc., 9990 Mesa Rim Road, Suite 170, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Roussev, Ilia I. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Evans, Rebekah M., E-mail: igorsok@umich.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Space Weather Lab, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-02-10

    We present a new global model of the solar corona, including the low corona, the transition region, and the top of the chromosphere. The realistic three-dimensional magnetic field is simulated using the data from the photospheric magnetic field measurements. The distinctive feature of the new model is incorporating MHD Alfven wave turbulence. We assume this turbulence and its nonlinear dissipation to be the only momentum and energy source for heating the coronal plasma and driving the solar wind. The difference between the turbulence dissipation efficiency in coronal holes and that in closed field regions is because the nonlinear cascade rate degrades in strongly anisotropic (imbalanced) turbulence in coronal holes (no inward propagating wave), thus resulting in colder coronal holes, from which the fast solar wind originates. The detailed presentation of the theoretical model is illustrated with the synthetic images for multi-wavelength EUV emission compared with the observations from SDO AIA and STEREO EUVI instruments for the Carrington rotation 2107.

  19. Terahertz Spectroscopy and Global Analysis of the Bending Vibrations of ^{12}C_2H_2 and ^{12}C_2D_2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shanshan; Drouin, Brian J.; Pearson, John C.; Pickett, Herbert M.; Lattanzi, Valerio; Walters, Adam

    2009-06-01

    Symmetric molecules have no permanent dipole moment and are undetectable by rotational spectroscopy. Their interstellar observations have previously been limited to mid-infrared vibration-rotation spectroscopy. Although relatively weak, vibrational difference bands provide a means for detection of non polar molecules by terahertz techniques with microwave precision. Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA have the potential to identify a number of difference bands of light symmetric species, e.g., C_2H_2, CH_4 and C_3. This paper reports the results of the laboratory study on ^{12}C_2H_2 and ^{12}C_2D_2. The symmetric isotopomers of acetylene have two bending modes, the trans bending ν_4 (^1{π}_g), and the cis bending ν_5 (^1{π}_u). For ^{12}C_2H_2, the two bending modes occur at 612 and 729 cm^{-1}, respectively. For ^{12}C_2D_2, the two bending modes occur at 511 and 538 cm^{-1}. The ν_5-ν_4 difference bands are allowed and occur in the microwave, terahertz, and far-infrared wavelengths, with band origins at 117 cm^{-1} (3500 GHz) for ^{12}C_2H_2 and 27 cm^{-1} (900 GHz) for ^{12}C_2D_2. Two hundred and fifty-one ^{12}C_2D_2 transitions, which are from ν_5-ν_4, (ν_5+ν_4)-2ν_4 and 2ν_5-(ν_5+ν_4) bands, have been measured in the 0.2-1.6 THz region, and 202 of them were observed for the first time. The precision of these measurements is estimated to be from 50 kHz to 100 kHz. A multistate analysis was carried out for the bending vibrational modes ν_4 and ν_5 of ^{12}C_2D_2, which includes the lines observed in this work and prior microwave, far-infrared and infrared data on the pure bending levels. Significantly improved molecular parameters were obtained for ^{12}C_2D_2 by adding the new measurements to the old data set which had only 10 lines with microwave measurement precision. The experiments on ^{12}C_2H_2 are in progress and ten P branch lines have been observed. We will present the ^{12}C_2H_2 results to date.

  20. An Innovative Approach for Management of Vertical Coronal Fracture in Molar: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambica Kathuria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike anterior teeth, acute exogenous trauma is an infrequent cause of posterior coronal vertical tooth fractures. Endodontic and restorative management of such fractures is a great challenge for the clinician. Newer advancements in adhesive techniques can provide successful intracoronal splinting of such teeth to reinforce the remaining tooth structure. This paper describes the diagnosis and management of a case of complicated vertical coronal fracture in mandibular first molar induced by a traffic accident.

  1. Plot inflation in Greater Weatherfield: Coronation Street in the 1990s

    OpenAIRE

    Smart, Billy

    2014-01-01

    This article outlines the substantial changes in production practice undergone by the long-running series Coronation Street between the late 1980s and late 1990s and attempts to explain how these changes affected the form of the programme. \\ud Coronation Street underwent two concurrent moments of change in 1989, transmitting three episodes a week, as opposed to two, and recording location scenes on videotape instead of on 16mm film. This change in recording technology enabled the programme to...

  2. Vertical axis dislocation with coronal fracture of the patella: A previously unreported injury pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Murphy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The patella usually dislocates laterally. Less commonly, intra-articular dislocation occurs about either the vertical or horizontal axis. Patellar fractures are generally transverse with varying degrees of comminution, and less frequently vertical in the sagittal plane. We present a 9-year follow-up of a previously undescribed coronal patellar fracture associated with vertical axis dislocation of the patella. The mechanism of this severe injury is described. Keywords: Trauma, Coronal patellar fracture, Vertical axis patellar dislocation, Mechanism of injury

  3. Coronal Hole and Solar Global Magnetic Field Evolution in 1976 - 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilenko, Irina A.; Tavastsherna, Ksenia S.

    2016-10-01

    We study the spatial-temporal evolution of a coronal hole and compare it with that of the solar global magnetic field in Cycles 21 - 23 (1976 - 2012). We also analyze the latitude-longitude distribution dynamics of coronal holes and the regularities in the global magnetic field associated with the solar polar field reversal. Polar and non-polar coronal hole populations are considered. The investigation reveals some temporal and spatial regularities in coronal hole distributions that match the global magnetic-field cycle evolution well. The results show that the non-polar coronal hole longitudinal distribution follows all configuration changes in the global magnetic-field structure. Reorganizations of the global magnetic field and coronal hole distributions occur simultaneously during a time interval of a few solar rotations. The cycle evolution of the non-polar coronal holes reflects the transition of the solar global magnetic field from the zonal structure to sectorial and vice versa. Two different types of waves of non-polar coronal holes are revealed from their latitudinal distribution. The first are short poleward waves. They trace the poleward motion of the unipolar photospheric magnetic fields from approximately 35° to the associated pole in each hemisphere and the redevelopment of a new-polarity polar CH. Although they start the poleward movement before the change of the polar magnetic field in the associated hemisphere, they reach the pole after the polar reversal. The other type of non-polar CH wave forms two sinusoidal branches associated with the positive- and negative-polarity magnetic fields. The complete period of the wave is equal to ≈268~CRs (22 years). These wave CHs arrive at high latitudes during declining phases when the new-polarity polar CHs are already completely formed.

  4. Acceleration of electrons outside flares - Coronal manifestation and possible origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raulin, J. P.; Kerdraon, A.; Klein, K.-L.; Trottet, G.; Willson, R. F.; Lang, K. R.

    1991-01-01

    Imaging observations at decimetric and metric wavelengths of the solar corona are used to investigate a short-lasting noise storm and the associated changes of the underlying active-region plasma. It is shown that a new source appears in the active region in close temporal and spatial coincidence with the onset of the noise storm in the middle corona. The onset of the noise storm is delayed at longer wavelengths. At a given wavelength, the noise-storm source undergoes a systematic slow movement with a significant component perpendicular to the magnetic-field lines above the active region. The observations are tentatively attributed to the emission of nonthermal electrons in a system of expanding coronal loops, the expansion being initiated by the appearance of the new 21-cm source in the low atmosphere. The derived velocity of expansion is about 80 to 150 km/s. The electrons emitting the noise storm cannot be provided by the high-energy tail of the Maxwellian in the new active region source, but originate either from a nonthermal population in this source or from acceleration at higher altitudes, in the structures which give rise to the noise storm.

  5. Particle Acceleration Due to Coronal Non-null Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threlfall, James; Neukirch, Thomas; Parnell, Clare Elizabeth

    2017-03-01

    Various topological features, for example magnetic null points and separators, have been inferred as likely sites of magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration in the solar atmosphere. In fact, magnetic reconnection is not constrained to solely take place at or near such topological features and may also take place in the absence of such features. Studies of particle acceleration using non-topological reconnection experiments embedded in the solar atmosphere are uncommon. We aim to investigate and characterise particle behaviour in a model of magnetic reconnection which causes an arcade of solar coronal magnetic field to twist and form an erupting flux rope, crucially in the absence of any common topological features where reconnection is often thought to occur. We use a numerical scheme that evolves the gyro-averaged orbit equations of single electrons and protons in time and space, and simulate the gyromotion of particles in a fully analytical global field model. We observe and discuss how the magnetic and electric fields of the model and the initial conditions of each orbit may lead to acceleration of protons and electrons up to 2 MeV in energy (depending on model parameters). We describe the morphology of time-dependent acceleration and impact sites for each particle species and compare our findings to those recovered by topologically based studies of three-dimensional (3D) reconnection and particle acceleration. We also broadly compare aspects of our findings to general observational features typically seen during two-ribbon flare events.

  6. Conditions for Coronal Observations at the Lijiang Observatory in 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, M. Y.; Liu, Y.; Elmhamdi, A.; Kordi, A. S.; Zhang, X. F.; Song, T. F.; Tian, Z. J.

    2018-01-01

    The sky brightness is a critical parameter for estimating the coronal observation conditions for a solar observatory. As part of a site-survey project in Western China, we measured the sky brightness continuously at the Lijiang Observatory in Yunnan province in 2011. A sky brightness monitor (SBM) was adopted to measure the sky brightness in a region extending from 4.5 to 7.0 apparent solar radii based on the experience of the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) site survey. Every month, the data were collected manually for at least one week. We collected statistics of the sky brightness at four bandpasses located at 450, 530, 890, and 940 nm. The results indicate that aerosol scattering is of great importance for the diurnal variation of the sky brightness. For most of the year, the sky brightness remains under 20 millionths per airmass before local Noon. On average, the sky brightness is less than 20 millionths, which accounts for 40.41% of the total observing time on a clear day. The best observation time is from 9:00 to 13:00 (Beijing time). The Lijiang Observatory is therefore suitable for coronagraphs investigating the structures and dynamics of the corona.

  7. Understanding the Physical Nature of Coronal "EIT Waves".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, D M; Bloomfield, D S; Chen, P F; Downs, C; Gallagher, P T; Kwon, R-Y; Vanninathan, K; Veronig, A M; Vourlidas, A; Vršnak, B; Warmuth, A; Žic, T

    2017-01-01

    For almost 20 years the physical nature of globally propagating waves in the solar corona (commonly called "EIT waves") has been controversial and subject to debate. Additional theories have been proposed over the years to explain observations that did not agree with the originally proposed fast-mode wave interpretation. However, the incompatibility of observations made using the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory with the fast-mode wave interpretation was challenged by differing viewpoints from the twin Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft and data with higher spatial and temporal resolution from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In this article, we reexamine the theories proposed to explain EIT waves to identify measurable properties and behaviours that can be compared to current and future observations. Most of us conclude that the so-called EIT waves are best described as fast-mode large-amplitude waves or shocks that are initially driven by the impulsive expansion of an erupting coronal mass ejection in the low corona.

  8. Coronal Mass Ejections: Models and Their Observational Basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. F. Chen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Coronal mass ejections (CMEs are the largest-scale eruptive phenomenon in the solar system, expanding from active region-sized nonpotential magnetic structure to a much larger size. The bulk of plasma with a mass of ∼10^11 – 10^13 kg is hauled up all the way out to the interplanetary space with a typical velocity of several hundred or even more than 1000 km s^-1, with a chance to impact our Earth, resulting in hazardous space weather conditions. They involve many other much smaller-sized solar eruptive phenomena, such as X-ray sigmoids, filament/prominence eruptions, solar flares, plasma heating and radiation, particle acceleration, EIT waves, EUV dimmings, Moreton waves, solar radio bursts, and so on. It is believed that, by shedding the accumulating magnetic energy and helicity, they complete the last link in the chain of the cycling of the solar magnetic field. In this review, I try to explicate our understanding on each stage of the fantastic phenomenon, including their pre-eruption structure, their triggering mechanisms and the precursors indicating the initiation process, their acceleration and propagation. Particular attention is paid to clarify some hot debates, e.g., whether magnetic reconnection is necessary for the eruption, whether there are two types of CMEs, how the CME frontal loop is formed, and whether halo CMEs are special.

  9. Coronal mass ejections and their sheath regions in interplanetary space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Kilpua

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs are large-scale heliospheric transients that originate from the Sun. When an ICME is sufficiently faster than the preceding solar wind, a shock wave develops ahead of the ICME. The turbulent region between the shock and the ICME is called the sheath region. ICMEs and their sheaths and shocks are all interesting structures from the fundamental plasma physics viewpoint. They are also key drivers of space weather disturbances in the heliosphere and planetary environments. ICME-driven shock waves can accelerate charged particles to high energies. Sheaths and ICMEs drive practically all intense geospace storms at the Earth, and they can also affect dramatically the planetary radiation environments and atmospheres. This review focuses on the current understanding of observational signatures and properties of ICMEs and the associated sheath regions based on five decades of studies. In addition, we discuss modelling of ICMEs and many fundamental outstanding questions on their origin, evolution and effects, largely due to the limitations of single spacecraft observations of these macro-scale structures. We also present current understanding of space weather consequences of these large-scale solar wind structures, including effects at the other Solar System planets and exoplanets. We specially emphasize the different origin, properties and consequences of the sheaths and ICMEs.

  10. Sheath-accumulating Propagation of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: takahasi@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607–8471 (Japan)

    2017-03-10

    Fast interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are the drivers of strong space weather storms such as solar energetic particle events and geomagnetic storms. The connection between the space-weather-impacting solar wind disturbances associated with fast ICMEs at Earth and the characteristics of causative energetic CMEs observed near the Sun is a key question in the study of space weather storms, as well as in the development of practical space weather prediction. Such shock-driving fast ICMEs usually expand at supersonic speeds during the propagation, resulting in the continuous accumulation of shocked sheath plasma ahead. In this paper, we propose a “sheath-accumulating propagation” (SAP) model that describes the coevolution of the interplanetary sheath and decelerating ICME ejecta by taking into account the process of upstream solar wind plasma accumulation within the sheath region. Based on the SAP model, we discuss (1) ICME deceleration characteristics; (2) the fundamental condition for fast ICMEs at Earth; (3) the thickness of interplanetary sheaths; (4) arrival time prediction; and (5) the super-intense geomagnetic storms associated with huge solar flares. We quantitatively show that not only the speed but also the mass of the CME are crucial for discussing the above five points. The similarities and differences between the SAP model, the drag-based model, and the“snow-plow” model proposed by Tappin are also discussed.

  11. Chromospheric and Coronal Wave Generation in a Magnetic Flux Sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yoshiaki; Steiner, Oskar; Hansteen, Viggo; Gudiksen, Boris; Wedemeyer, Sven; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-08-01

    Using radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar atmospheric layers from the upper convection zone to the lower corona, we investigate the self-consistent excitation of slow magneto-acoustic body waves (slow modes) in a magnetic flux concentration. We find that the convective downdrafts in the close surroundings of a two-dimensional flux slab “pump” the plasma inside it in the downward direction. This action produces a downflow inside the flux slab, which encompasses ever higher layers, causing an upwardly propagating rarefaction wave. The slow mode, excited by the adiabatic compression of the downflow near the optical surface, travels along the magnetic field in the upward direction at the tube speed. It develops into a shock wave at chromospheric heights, where it dissipates, lifts the transition region, and produces an offspring in the form of a compressive wave that propagates further into the corona. In the wake of downflows and propagating shock waves, the atmosphere inside the flux slab in the chromosphere and higher tends to oscillate with a period of ν ≈ 4 mHz. We conclude that this process of “magnetic pumping” is a most plausible mechanism for the direct generation of longitudinal chromospheric and coronal compressive waves within magnetic flux concentrations, and it may provide an important heat source in the chromosphere. It may also be responsible for certain types of dynamic fibrils.

  12. Areas of Polar Coronal Holes from 1996 Through 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Hess S. A.; Karna, N.; Pesnell, W. D.; Kirk, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Polar coronal holes (PCHs) trace the magnetic variability of the Sun throughout the solar cycle. Their size and evolution have been studied as proxies for the global magnetic field. We present measurements of the PCH areas from 1996 through 2010, derived from an updated perimeter-tracing method and two synoptic-map methods. The perimeter tracing method detects PCH boundaries along the solar limb, using full-disk images from the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory/Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (SOHO/EIT). One synoptic-map method uses the line-of-sight magnetic field from the SOHO/Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) to determine the unipolarity boundaries near the poles. The other method applies thresholding techniques to synoptic maps created from EUV image data from EIT. The results from all three methods suggest that the solar maxima and minima of the two hemispheres are out of phase. The maximum PCH area, averaged over the methods in each hemisphere, is approximately 6 % during both solar minima spanned by the data (between Solar Cycles 22/23 and 23/24). The northern PCH area began a declining trend in 2010, suggesting a downturn toward the maximum of Solar Cycle 24 in that hemisphere, while the southern hole remained large throughout 2010.

  13. The Breakout Model for Coronal Jets with Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyper, Peter; DeVore, C. Richard; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2016-05-01

    Coronal jets are impulsive, collimated plasma outflows originating low in the solar corona. Many of these events exhibit broad, curtain-like morphologies with helical structure and motions. Recently, Sterling et al. (2015) [doi:10.1038/nature14556] reported that such jets are associated with the eruption of small filaments and, therefore, are miniature versions of corona mass ejections (CMEs). This account differs from the traditional picture of jets, in that internal flare reconnection, rather than interchange reconnection with the external ambient magnetic field, creates the bright loops observed at the jet base. We present 3D simulations, performed with the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS), which demonstrate how the magnetic breakout mechanism generates mini-CME-type jets in a compact bipolar region energized by simple footpoint motions. Our numerical model captures the formation of the strongly sheared pre-jet filament structure, the post-jet flare-like loops and ribbons, and the curtain-like untwisting dynamics observed higher in the corona. We will discuss the significance of our new results for understanding solar EUV and X-ray jets and CMEs in general. NASA supported this research by awards to the NASA Postdoctoral Program (P.F.W.) and the LWS TR&T and H-SR programs (C.R.D. & S.K.A.).

  14. Sheath-accumulating Propagation of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari

    2017-03-01

    Fast interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are the drivers of strong space weather storms such as solar energetic particle events and geomagnetic storms. The connection between the space-weather-impacting solar wind disturbances associated with fast ICMEs at Earth and the characteristics of causative energetic CMEs observed near the Sun is a key question in the study of space weather storms, as well as in the development of practical space weather prediction. Such shock-driving fast ICMEs usually expand at supersonic speeds during the propagation, resulting in the continuous accumulation of shocked sheath plasma ahead. In this paper, we propose a “sheath-accumulating propagation” (SAP) model that describes the coevolution of the interplanetary sheath and decelerating ICME ejecta by taking into account the process of upstream solar wind plasma accumulation within the sheath region. Based on the SAP model, we discuss (1) ICME deceleration characteristics; (2) the fundamental condition for fast ICMEs at Earth; (3) the thickness of interplanetary sheaths; (4) arrival time prediction; and (5) the super-intense geomagnetic storms associated with huge solar flares. We quantitatively show that not only the speed but also the mass of the CME are crucial for discussing the above five points. The similarities and differences between the SAP model, the drag-based model, and the“snow-plow” model proposed by Tappin are also discussed.

  15. Regarding the detectability and measurement of coronal mass ejections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review I discuss the problems associated with the detection and measurement of coronal mass ejections (CMEs. CMEs are important phenomena both scientifically, as they play a crucial role in the evolution of the solar corona, and technologically, as their impact with the Earth leads to severe space weather activity in the form of magnetic storms. I focus on the observation of CMEs using visible white light imagers (coronagraphs and heliospheric imagers, as they may be regarded as the binding agents between different datasets and different models that are used to reconstruct them. Our ability to accurately measure CMEs observed by these imagers is hampered by many factors, from instrumental to geometrical to physical. Following a brief review of the history of CME observation and measurement, I explore the impediments to our ability to measure them and describe possible means for which we may be able to mitigate those impediments. I conclude with a discussion of the claim that we have reached the limit of the information that we can extract from the current generation of white light imagers, and discuss possible ways forward regarding future instrument capabilities.

  16. Coronal tooth discoloration and white mineral trioxide aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felman, Daniel; Parashos, Peter

    2013-04-01

    This study assessed and characterized discoloration when white MTA (wMTA) was placed in the coronal aspect of the root canal ex vivo and the influence of red blood cells on this discoloration. Canals were prepared from the apical aspect and restored with either wMTA + saline (n = 18), wMTA + blood (n = 18), or controls (n = 4 + 4) (blood or saline alone). Color was assessed according to the CIE L*a*b* color space using standardized digital photographs at 3 time points: baseline, day 1, and day 35. Statistical analysis was performed by using 1-way analysis of variance and a 2-sample t test with P teeth discolored when restored with wMTA, which was most prominent in the cervical third of the crown. The presence of blood within the canal adjacent to the setting wMTA exacerbated the discoloration (P = .03). wMTA induces the gray discoloration of the tooth crown, and the effect is compounded in the presence of blood. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Coronal mass ejections and their sheath regions in interplanetary space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpua, Emilia; Koskinen, Hannu E. J.; Pulkkinen, Tuija I.

    2017-11-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are large-scale heliospheric transients that originate from the Sun. When an ICME is sufficiently faster than the preceding solar wind, a shock wave develops ahead of the ICME. The turbulent region between the shock and the ICME is called the sheath region. ICMEs and their sheaths and shocks are all interesting structures from the fundamental plasma physics viewpoint. They are also key drivers of space weather disturbances in the heliosphere and planetary environments. ICME-driven shock waves can accelerate charged particles to high energies. Sheaths and ICMEs drive practically all intense geospace storms at the Earth, and they can also affect dramatically the planetary radiation environments and atmospheres. This review focuses on the current understanding of observational signatures and properties of ICMEs and the associated sheath regions based on five decades of studies. In addition, we discuss modelling of ICMEs and many fundamental outstanding questions on their origin, evolution and effects, largely due to the limitations of single spacecraft observations of these macro-scale structures. We also present current understanding of space weather consequences of these large-scale solar wind structures, including effects at the other Solar System planets and exoplanets. We specially emphasize the different origin, properties and consequences of the sheaths and ICMEs.

  18. Automatic Determination of the Conic Coronal Mass Ejection Model Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, A.; Oates, T.; Taktakishvili, A.

    2009-01-01

    Characterization of the three-dimensional structure of solar transients using incomplete plane of sky data is a difficult problem whose solutions have potential for societal benefit in terms of space weather applications. In this paper transients are characterized in three dimensions by means of conic coronal mass ejection (CME) approximation. A novel method for the automatic determination of cone model parameters from observed halo CMEs is introduced. The method uses both standard image processing techniques to extract the CME mass from white-light coronagraph images and a novel inversion routine providing the final cone parameters. A bootstrap technique is used to provide model parameter distributions. When combined with heliospheric modeling, the cone model parameter distributions will provide direct means for ensemble predictions of transient propagation in the heliosphere. An initial validation of the automatic method is carried by comparison to manually determined cone model parameters. It is shown using 14 halo CME events that there is reasonable agreement, especially between the heliocentric locations of the cones derived with the two methods. It is argued that both the heliocentric locations and the opening half-angles of the automatically determined cones may be more realistic than those obtained from the manual analysis

  19. Production planning and coronal stop deletion in spontaneous speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Tanner

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Many phonological processes can be affected by segmental context spanning word boundaries, which often lead to variable outcomes. This paper tests the idea that some of this variability can be explained by reference to production planning. We examine coronal stop deletion (CSD, a variable process conditioned by preceding and upcoming phonological context, in a corpus of spontaneous British English speech, as a means of investigating a number of variables associated with planning: Prosodic boundary strength, word frequency, conditional probability of the following word, and speech rate. From the perspective of production planning, (1 prosodic boundaries should affect deletion rate independently of following context; (2 given the locality of production planning, the effect of the following context should decrease at stronger prosodic boundaries; and (3 other factors affecting planning scope should modulate the effect of upcoming phonological material above and beyond the modulating effect of prosodic boundaries. We build a statistical model of CSD realization, using pause length as a quantitative proxy for boundary strength, and find support for these predictions. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that the locality of production planning constrains variability in speech production, and have practical implications for work on CSD and other variable processes.

  20. Additional merit of coronal STIR imaging for MR imaging of lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Back pain is a common clinical problem and is the frequent complaint for referral of lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Coronal short tau inversion recovery sequence (STIR can provide diagnostically significant information in small percentage of patients. Materials and Methods: MRI examinations of a total of 350 patients were retrospectively included in the study. MR sequences were evaluated in two settings. One radiologist evaluated sagittal and axial images only, while another radiologist evaluated all sequences, including coronal STIR sequence. After recording the diagnoses, we compared the MRI findings in two subsets of patients to evaluate additional merit of coronal STIR imaging. Results: With addition of coronal STIR imaging, significant findings were observed in 24 subjects (6.8%. Twenty-one of these subjects were considered to be normal on other sequences and in three subjects diagnosis was changed with the addition of coronal STIR. Additional diagnoses on STIR included sacroiliitis, sacroiliac joint degenerative disease, sacral stress/insufficiency fracture/Looser′s zones, muscular sprain and atypical appendicitis. Conclusion: Coronal STIR imaging can provide additional diagnoses in a small percentage of patients presenting for lumbar spine MRI for back pain. Therefore, it should be included in the routine protocol for MR imaging of lumbar spine.

  1. Additional merit of coronal STIR imaging for MR imaging of lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ranjana; Mittal, Puneet; Mittal, Amit; Mittal, Kapish; Gupta, Sharad; Kaur, Ravleen

    2015-01-01

    Back pain is a common clinical problem and is the frequent complaint for referral of lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Coronal short tau inversion recovery sequence (STIR) can provide diagnostically significant information in small percentage of patients. MRI examinations of a total of 350 patients were retrospectively included in the study. MR sequences were evaluated in two settings. One radiologist evaluated sagittal and axial images only, while another radiologist evaluated all sequences, including coronal STIR sequence. After recording the diagnoses, we compared the MRI findings in two subsets of patients to evaluate additional merit of coronal STIR imaging. With addition of coronal STIR imaging, significant findings were observed in 24 subjects (6.8%). Twenty-one of these subjects were considered to be normal on other sequences and in three subjects diagnosis was changed with the addition of coronal STIR. Additional diagnoses on STIR included sacroiliitis, sacroiliac joint degenerative disease, sacral stress/insufficiency fracture/Looser's zones, muscular sprain and atypical appendicitis. Coronal STIR imaging can provide additional diagnoses in a small percentage of patients presenting for lumbar spine MRI for back pain. Therefore, it should be included in the routine protocol for MR imaging of lumbar spine.

  2. FIP, FIT or MAD? Analysis of High Signal-to-Noise ASCA Spectra of Coronal Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Theodore

    2002-01-01

    ASCA (Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics) and EUVE (Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer) spectra of active late-type stars imply that Fe and other medium-Z elements may be 2-10 times less abundant in the coronae of these stars than in their photo-spheres (the MAD effect). These deficiencies may be related to the solar FIP (First Ionization Potential) effect, in which Fe and other low First Ionization Potential elements appear enriched in the solar corona over their photospheric values. The FIP effect is time variable. As part of this proposal, the K0-2 III star, 29 Draconis, was observed in X rays with the ASCA spacecraft in order to measure the coronal abundances of this star at three different stellar longitudes over its 31-day rotation cycle. The goal of the observations was to learn whether coronal abundances, and hence coronal magnetic structure, vary across the surface of 29 Draconis in phase with the motion of dark star-spots across its disk. A second task included in this project was a systematic reanalysis of 18-20 deep exposures of active coronal stars, which were extracted from the ASCA public archives. New thermal models were computed for each spectrum in order to derive coronal metal abundances for each star. The goal of this survey was to search for possible trends in coronal abundance with various stellar parameters such as rotation, chromospheric activity levels at ultraviolet and optical wavelengths, or evolutionary stage.

  3. Solar Coronal Loops Associated with Small-scale Mixed Polarity Surface Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitta, L. P.; Peter, H.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Gizon, L.; Hirzberger, J.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Noort, M. van [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Rodríguez, J. Blanco [Grupo de Astronomía y Ciencias del Espacio, Universidad de Valencia, E-46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Iniesta, J. C. Del Toro; Suárez, D. Orozco [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Apartado de Correos 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Schmidt, W. [Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik, Schöneckstr. 6, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Pillet, V. Martínez [National Solar Observatory, 3665 Discovery Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Knölker, M., E-mail: chitta@mps.mpg.de [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    How and where are coronal loops rooted in the solar lower atmosphere? The details of the magnetic environment and its evolution at the footpoints of coronal loops are crucial to understanding the processes of mass and energy supply to the solar corona. To address the above question, we use high-resolution line-of-sight magnetic field data from the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment instrument on the Sunrise balloon-borne observatory and coronal observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory of an emerging active region. We find that the coronal loops are often rooted at the locations with minor small-scale but persistent opposite-polarity magnetic elements very close to the larger dominant polarity. These opposite-polarity small-scale elements continually interact with the dominant polarity underlying the coronal loop through flux cancellation. At these locations we detect small inverse Y-shaped jets in chromospheric Ca ii H images obtained from the Sunrise Filter Imager during the flux cancellation. Our results indicate that magnetic flux cancellation and reconnection at the base of coronal loops due to mixed polarity fields might be a crucial feature for the supply of mass and energy into the corona.

  4. Multi-Wavelength Interferometry and Axial Polarimetry on C-2W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. J.; Dettrick, S. A.; Onofri, M.; TAE Team

    2017-10-01

    Tri Alpha Energy's C-2W device is operational and represents another major step in a progression of Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) confinement devices that have prolonged the lifetime, increased stability and added significant neutral-beam injection power to heat and sustain an FRC plasma. Crucial to plasma sustainment and increased lifetime is an understanding of the jet plasma and X-point dynamics. To address these issues, a two-color multi-chord tangentially viewing interferometer has been designed and installed at the high field (mirror) position of the machine. CO2 and mmwave sources at 10.6 and 1000 um cover the density ranges of the translating FRC and the jet plasma. The small major radius at this location also provides the possibility for near on-axis axial interferometry/polarimetry using a standalone 150 µm quantum cascade laser giving a measurement directly related to the amount of reversed flux in the FRC. Recent results from the jet interferometer and on-axis axial polarimetry results for simulated plasmas with ray tracing will be presented.

  5. Hierarchically Designed 3D Holey C2N Aerogels as Bifunctional Oxygen Electrodes for Flexible and Rechargeable Zn-Air Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Sambhaji S; Lee, Chi Ho; Yu, Jin-Young; Kim, Dong-Hyung; Lee, Sang Uck; Lee, Jung-Ho

    2018-01-23

    The future of electrochemical energy storage spotlights on the designed formation of highly efficient and robust bifunctional oxygen electrocatalysts that facilitate advanced rechargeable metal-air batteries. We introduce a scalable facile strategy for the construction of a hierarchical three-dimensional sulfur-modulated holey C2N aerogels (S-C2NA) as bifunctional catalysts for Zn-air and Li-O2 batteries. The S-C2NA exhibited ultrahigh surface area (∼1943 m2 g-1) and superb electrocatalytic activities with lowest reversible oxygen electrode index ∼0.65 V, outperforms the highly active bifunctional and commercial (Pt/C and RuO2) catalysts. Density functional theory and experimental results reveal that the favorable electronic structure and atomic coordination of holey C-N skeleton enable the reversible oxygen reactions. The resulting Zn-air batteries with liquid electrolytes and the solid-state batteries with S-C2NA air cathodes exhibit superb energy densities (958 and 862 Wh kg-1), low charge-discharge polarizations, excellent reversibility, and ultralong cycling lives (750 and 460 h) than the commercial Pt/C+RuO2 catalysts, respectively. Notably, Li-O2 batteries with S-C2NA demonstrated an outstanding specific capacity of ∼648.7 mA h g-1 and reversible charge-discharge potentials over 200 cycles, illustrating great potential for commercial next-generation rechargeable power sources of flexible electronics.

  6. Laser-induced resonant excitation of ethylene molecules in C2H4/C2H2/O2 reactions to enhance diamond deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, H.; Sun, J.; Han, Y. X.; Gebre, T.; Xie, Z. Q.; Zhao, M.; Lu, Y. F.

    2009-01-01

    Vibrational resonant excitation of ethylene (C2H4) molecules using a carbon dioxide laser was employed to promote reactions in precursors of ethylene, acetylene (C2H2), and oxygen to enhance diamond deposition. One of the vibrational modes (CH2 wag mode, v7) of the C2H4 molecules was selected to achieve the resonant excitation in the reactions. Optical emission spectroscopy was used to study the effects of laser resonant excitation on the reactions for diamond deposition. The optical emissions of CH and C2 species were enhanced with the laser excitation, indicating that there are more active species generated in the reactions. Thicknesses and grain sizes of the deposited films were increased correspondingly. Temperature calculations from the line set in the R-branch of CH emission spectra indicated that a nonthermal process is involved in the enhanced diamond deposition.

  7. Um estudo teórico relativo à não-linearidade da ligação de hidrogênio em sistemas heterocíclicos C2H4O-C2H2 e C2H4S-C2H2 A theoretical study about the non-linearity of the hydrogen bonding in the C2H4O-C2H2 and C2H4S-C2H2 heterocyclic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaz G. Oliveira

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available B3LYP/6-31G(d,p calculations were used to determine the optimized geometries of the C2H4O-C2H2 and C2H4S-C2H2 heterocyclic hydrogen-bonded complexes. Results of structural, rotational, electronic and vibrational parameters indicate that the hydrogen bonding is non-linear due to the pi bond of the acetylene interacting with the hydrogen atoms of the methyl groups of the three-membered rings. Moreover, the theoretical investigation showed that the non-linearity is much more intriguing, since there is a structural disjunction on the acetylene within the heterocyclic system.

  8. Torsional excitation in the 2CH vibrational overtone of the C2H2-CO2 and C2H2-N2O van der Waals complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauzin, C.; Didriche, K.; Földes, T.; Herman, M.

    2011-09-01

    Infrared spectra of the weakly-bound C2H2-CO2 and C2H2-N2O complexes in the region of the 2CH acetylene overtone band (∼1.52 µm) were recorded using CW-cavity ring down spectroscopy in a continuous supersonic expansion. A new, c-type combination band is observed in each case. The rotational analysis of low J, K lines is performed and rotational constants are obtained. The band origins are 40.491(2) and 40.778(2) cm-1 higher in energy than the 2CH excitation bands for C2H2-CO2 and C2H2-N2O, respectively. The combination band is assigned in each case as involving intermolecular torsional excitation combined to 2CH. The values of the torsional vibrational frequency and of the xCH/torsion anharmonicity constant are briefly discussed.

  9. Experimental and Modeling Study of the Temperature and Pressure Dependence of the Reaction C2H5 + O2 (+ M) → C2H5O2 (+ M).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ravi X; Luther, Klaus; Marowsky, Gerd; Rissanen, Matti P; Timonen, Raimo; Troe, Jürgen

    2015-07-16

    The reaction C2H5 + O2 (+ M) → C2H5O2 (+ M) was studied at 298 K at pressures of the bath gas M = Ar between 100 and 1000 bar. The transition from the falloff curve of an energy transfer mechanism to a high pressure range with contributions from the radical complex mechanism was observed. Further experiments were done between 188 and 298 K in the bath gas M = He at pressures in the range 0.7-2.0 Torr. The available data are analyzed in terms of unimolecular rate theory. An improved analytical representation of the temperature and pressure dependence of the rate constant is given for conditions where the chemical activation process C2H5 + O2 (+ M) → C2H4 + HO2 (+ M) is only of minor importance.

  10. Grafting of carboxyl groups using CO2/C2H4/Ar pulsed plasma: Theoretical modeling and XPS derivatization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manakhov, Anton; Kiryukhantsev-Korneev, Philip; Michlíček, Miroslav; Permyakova, Elizaveta; Dvořáková, Eva; Polčák, Josef; Popov, Zakhar; Visotin, Maxim; Shtansky, Dmitry V.

    2018-03-01

    The grafting of carboxyl groups enhances cell adhesion and can be used for immobilization of different biomolecules onto plasma-treated materials. The process, however, was not well optimized due to lack of clear understanding of the mechanisms of carboxylic group incorporation into plasma and their grafting to polymer surface. In this work the deposition of COOH plasma polymers from CO2/C2H4/Ar pulsed discharge has been studied depending on the gas mixture and duty cycle. We have demonstrated that the CO2/C2H4/Ar plasma with adjustable thickness of COOH functionalized layer and high stability of the grafted functions in water is a better solution for the COOH surface functionalization compared to the thoroughly analyzed CO2 plasma. The concentration of different carbon environments and the density of COOH groups have been measured by using chemical derivatization combined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It has been found that the CO2/C2H4/Ar plasma mainly contains ester groups (COOC), the COOH/COOC ratio being between 0.03 and 0.08. The water stability of the COOH groups was significantly higher compared to ester environment, so immersing in water for 24 h allowed to increase the COOH/COOC ratio by a factor of 3. The mechanisms of the CO2 molecule attachment to hydrocarbon chains on the polymer surface and those located inside the plasma were modeled using ab initio calculations.

  11. Electronic-structure origin of the anisotropic thermopower of nanolaminated Ti3SiC2 determined by polarized x-ray spectroscopy and Seebeck measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnuson, Martin; Mattesini, Maurizio; Van Nong, Ngo

    2012-01-01

    Nanolaminated materials exhibit characteristic magnetic, mechanical, and thermoelectric properties, with large contemporary scientific and technological interest. Here we report on the anisotropic Seebeck coefficient in nanolaminated Ti3SiC2 single-crystal thin films and trace the origin to aniso......Nanolaminated materials exhibit characteristic magnetic, mechanical, and thermoelectric properties, with large contemporary scientific and technological interest. Here we report on the anisotropic Seebeck coefficient in nanolaminated Ti3SiC2 single-crystal thin films and trace the origin...... value of 4–6 μV/K. Employing a combination of polarized angle-dependent x-ray spectroscopy and density functional theory we directly show electronic structure anisotropy in inherently nanolaminated Ti3SiC2 single-crystal thin films as a model system. The density of Ti 3d and C 2p states at the Fermi...... level in the basal ab plane is about 40% higher than along the c axis. The Seebeck coefficient is related to electron and hole-like bands close to the Fermi level, but in contrast to ground state density functional theory modeling, the electronic structure is also influenced by phonons that need...

  12. Evidence for a current sheet forming in the wake of a coronal mass ejection from multi-viewpoint coronagraph observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsourakos, S.; Vourlidas, A.

    2011-01-01

    Context. Ray-like features observed by coronagraphs in the wake of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are sometimes interpreted as the white light counterparts of current sheets (CSs) produced by the eruption. The 3D geometry of these ray-like features is largely unknown and its knowledge should clarify their association to the CS and place constraints on CME physics and coronal conditions. Aims: If these rays are related to field relaxation behind CMEs, therefore representing current sheets, then they should be aligned to the CME axis. With this study we test these important implications for the first time. Methods: An example of such a post-CME ray was observed by various coronagraphs, including these of the Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric investigation (SECCHI) onboard the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) twin spacecraft and the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The ray was observed in the aftermath of a CME which occurred on 9 April 2008. The twin STEREO spacecraft were separated by about 48° on that day. This significant separation combined with a third “eye” view supplied by LASCO allow for a truly multi-viewpoint observation of the ray and of the CME. We applied 3D forward geometrical modeling to the CME and to the ray as simultaneously viewed by SECCHI-A and B and by SECCHI-A and LASCO, respectively. Results: We found that the ray can be approximated by a rectangular slab, nearly aligned with the CME axis, and much smaller than the CME in both terms of thickness and depth (≈0.05 and 0.15 R⊙ respectively). The ray electron density and temperature were substantially higher than their values in the ambient corona. We found that the ray and CME are significantly displaced from the associated post-CME flaring loops. Conclusions: The properties and location of the ray are fully consistent with the expectations of the standard CME theories for post-CME current

  13. Theoretical prediction of new C-Si alloys in {\\boldsymbol{C}}2/{\\boldsymbol{m}}-20 structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiangyang; Chai, Changchun; Fan, Qingyang; Yang, Yintang

    2017-04-01

    We study structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of C20, Si20 and their alloys (C16Si4, C12Si8, C8Si12, and C4 {{Si}}16) in C2/m structure by using density functional theory (DFT) based on first-principles calculations. The obtained elastic constants and the phonon spectra reveal mechanical and dynamic stability. The calculated formation enthalpy shows that the C-Si alloys might exist at a specified high temperature scale. The ratio of B/G and Poisson’s ratio indicate that these C-Si alloys in C2/m-20 structure are all brittle. The elastic anisotropic properties derived by bulk modulus and shear modulus show slight anisotropy. In addition, the band structures and density of states are also depicted, which reveal that C20, C16Si4, and Si20 are indirect band gap semiconductors, while C8Si12 and C4Si16 are semi-metallic alloys. Notably, a direct band gap semiconductor (C12Si8) is obtained by doping two indirect band gap semiconductors (C20 and Si20). Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61474089) and the Open Fund of Key Laboratory of Complex Electromagnetic Environment Science and Technology, China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant No. 2015-0214.XY.K).

  14. Dynamics of C2 formation in laser-produced carbon plasma in helium environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Polek, M.

    2011-03-01

    We investigated the role of helium ambient gas on the dynamics of C2 species formation in laser-produced carbon plasma. The plasma was produced by focusing 1064 nm pulses from an Nd:YAG laser onto a carbon target. The emission from the C2 species was studied using optical emission spectroscopy, and spectrally resolved and integrated fast imaging. Our results indicate that the formation of C2 in the plasma plume is strongly affected by the pressure of the He gas. In vacuum, the C2 emission zone was located near the target and C2 intensity oscillations were observed both in axial and radial directions with increasing the He pressure. The oscillations in C2 intensity at higher pressures in the expanding plume could be caused by various formation zones of carbon dimers.

  15. Coronal MRI in the diagnosis of corona radiata infarcts adjacent to the lateral ventricles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Abe, Shin-e; Kanaya, Kiyoshi; Kubo, Hideki; Takasaki, Masaru (Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1992-04-01

    To clarify pathophysiology of vascular lesions in corona radiata infarcts adjacent to the body of the lateral ventricle (CRILV), 17 patients with CRILV were studied by using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Based on the coronal MR images obtained between the anterior and posterior commissures, the patients were divided into two groups: (I) the group having infarcts below a line extending from the upper edge of the insular cistern to the external angle of the lateral ventricle adjacent to the corpus callosum (n=11); and (II) the group having lesions above the line towards the centrum semiovale (n=6). Most of the patients in both groups were male and had hypertension. Symptoms were gradually deteriorated and stroke in the morning was frequent in both groups, althrough the time from onset to completion was longer in Group II than Group I. In comparing clinical manifestations in Groups I and II, pure motor hemiparesis was found in 5 and 3 patients, and sensorimotor stroke in 2 and one patients, respectively. Drowsiness was found in 2 for Group I, while aphasia occurred in 2 for Group II. In addition, pseudobular and asymptomatic palsy occurred in each one patient for Group I. Prognosis was favorable in both groups, except for 2 who died of aspiration pneumonia. In Group I, 11 infarcts were well-defined, less than 15 mm in diameter on CT scans and were sclerotic in the main arteries without obstruction on angiograms. In contrast, Group II had ill-defined, larger low-density areas on CT scans and trunk obstruction of the internal carotid or middle cerebral arteries on angiograms. SPECT scans showed diffuse defect in Group II, in contrast to normal to diffuse or multiple defects in Group I. In Group I, lacunar lesions seemed to be caused by ischemia of the perforators, and in Group II, terminal zone infarcts in the territory of the cortical branches or watershed infarcts seemd to be caused by main trunk obstruction. (N.K.).

  16. Plasma motions and non-thermal line broadening in flaring twisted coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordovskyy, M.; Kontar, E. P.; Browning, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Observation of coronal extreme ultra-violet (EUV) spectral lines sensitive to different temperatures offers an opportunity to evaluate the thermal structure and flows in flaring atmospheres. This, in turn, can be used to estimate the partitioning between the thermal and kinetic energies released in flares. Aims: Our aim is to forward-model large-scale (50-10 000 km) velocity distributions to interpret non-thermal broadening of different spectral EUV lines observed in flares. The developed models allow us to understand the origin of the observed spectral line shifts and broadening, and link these features to particular physical phenomena in flaring atmospheres. Methods: We use ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) to derive unstable twisted magnetic fluxtube configurations in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere. The evolution of these twisted fluxtubes is followed using resistive MHD with anomalous resistivity depending on the local density and temperature. The model also takes thermal conduction and radiative losses in the continuum into account. The model allows us to evaluate average velocities and velocity dispersions, which would be interpreted as non-thermal velocities in observations, at different temperatures for different parts of the models. Results: Our models show qualitative and quantitative agreement with observations. Thus, the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersions demonstrate substantial correlation with the temperature, increasing from about 20-30 km s-1 around 1 MK to about 200-400 km s-1 near 10-20 MK. The average LOS velocities also correlate with velocity dispersions, although they demonstrate a very strong scattering compared to the observations. We also note that near footpoints the velocity dispersions across the magnetic field are systematically lower than those along the field. We conclude that the correlation between the flow velocities, velocity dispersions, and temperatures are likely to indicate that the same heating

  17. Intermittency in MHD turbulence and coronal nanoflares modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Veltri

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available High resolution numerical simulations, solar wind data analysis, and measurements at the edges of laboratory plasma devices have allowed for a huge progress in our understanding of MHD turbulence. The high resolution of solar wind measurements has allowed to characterize the intermittency observed at small scales. We are now able to set up a consistent and convincing view of the main properties of MHD turbulence, which in turn constitutes an extremely efficient tool in understanding the behaviour of turbulent plasmas, like those in solar corona, where in situ observations are not available. Using this knowledge a model to describe injection, due to foot-point motions, storage and dissipation of MHD turbulence in coronal loops, is built where we assume strong longitudinal magnetic field, low beta and high aspect ratio, which allows us to use the set of reduced MHD equations (RMHD. The model is based on a shell technique in the wave vector space orthogonal to the strong magnetic field, while the dependence on the longitudinal coordinate is preserved. Numerical simulations show that injected energy is efficiently stored in the loop where a significant level of magnetic and velocity fluctuations is obtained. Nonlinear interactions give rise to an energy cascade towards smaller scales where energy is dissipated in an intermittent fashion. Due to the strong longitudinal magnetic field, dissipative structures propagate along the loop, with the typical speed of the Alfvén waves. The statistical analysis on the intermittent dissipative events compares well with all observed properties of nanoflare emission statistics. Moreover the recent observations of non thermal velocity measurements during flare occurrence are well described by the numerical results of the simulation model. All these results naturally emerge from the model dynamical evolution without any need of an ad-hoc hypothesis.

  18. Methods of Temperature and Emission Measure Determination of Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirtain, J. W.; Schmelz, J. T.; Martens, P. C. H.

    2002-05-01

    Recent observational results from both SOHO-EIT and TRACE indicate that coronal loops are isothermal along their length (axially). These results are obtained from a narrowband filter ratio method that assumes that the plasma is isothermal along the line of sight (radially). However, these temperatures vary greatly from those derived from differential emission measure (DEM) curves produced from spectral lines recorded by SOHO-CDS. The DEM results indicate that the loops are neither axially nor radially isothermal. This discrepancy was investigated by Schmelz et al. (2001). They chose pairs of iron lines from the same CDS data set to mimic the EIT and TRACE loop results. Ratios of different lines gave different temperatures, indicating that the plasma was not radially isothermal. In addition the results indicated that the loop was axially isothermal, even though the DEM analysis of the same data showed this result to be false. Here we have analyzed the EIT data for the CDS loop published by Schmelz et al. (2001). We took the ratios of the 171-to-195 and 195-to-284 filter data, and made temperature maps of the loop. The results indicate that the loop is axially isothermal, but different temperatures were found for each pair of filters. Both ratio techniques force the resultant temperature to lie within the range where the response functions (for filters) or the emissivity functions (for lines) overlap; isothermal loops are therefore a byproduct of the analysis. This conclusion strengthens support for the idea that temperature and emission measure results from filter ratio methods may be misleading or even drastically wrong. This research was funded in part by the NASA/TRACE MODA grant for Montana State University. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NASA grant NAG5-9783.

  19. Connecting speeds, directions and arrival times of 22 coronal mass ejections from the sun to 1 AU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Möstl, C.; Veronig, A. M.; Rollett, T.; Temmer, M.; Peinhart, V. [Kanzelhöhe Observatory-IGAM, Institute of Physics, University of Graz (Austria); Amla, K.; Hall, J. R.; Liewer, P. C.; De Jong, E. M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Colaninno, R. C. [Space Sciences Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); Davies, J. A.; Harrison, R. A. [RAL Space, Harwell Oxford, Didcot (United Kingdom); Lugaz, N.; Farrugia, C. J.; Galvin, A. B. [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Liu, Y. D. [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Luhmann, J. G. [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Vršnak, B., E-mail: christian.moestl@uni-graz.at [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, Kačićeva 26, HR-10000, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2014-06-01

    Forecasting the in situ properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from remote images is expected to strongly enhance predictions of space weather and is of general interest for studying the interaction of CMEs with planetary environments. We study the feasibility of using a single heliospheric imager (HI) instrument, imaging the solar wind density from the Sun to 1 AU, for connecting remote images to in situ observations of CMEs. We compare the predictions of speed and arrival time for 22 CMEs (in 2008-2012) to the corresponding interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) parameters at in situ observatories (STEREO PLASTIC/IMPACT, Wind SWE/MFI). The list consists of front- and backsided, slow and fast CMEs (up to 2700 km s{sup –1}). We track the CMEs to 34.9 ± 7.1 deg elongation from the Sun with J maps constructed using the SATPLOT tool, resulting in prediction lead times of –26.4 ± 15.3 hr. The geometrical models we use assume different CME front shapes (fixed-Φ, harmonic mean, self-similar expansion) and constant CME speed and direction. We find no significant superiority in the predictive capability of any of the three methods. The absolute difference between predicted and observed ICME arrival times is 8.1 ± 6.3 hr (rms value of 10.9 hr). Speeds are consistent to within 284 ± 288 km s{sup –1}. Empirical corrections to the predictions enhance their performance for the arrival times to 6.1 ± 5.0 hr (rms value of 7.9 hr), and for the speeds to 53 ± 50 km s{sup –1}. These results are important for Solar Orbiter and a space weather mission positioned away from the Sun-Earth line.

  20. The synthesis of [2-13C]2-nitropropane at room temperature and at atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Jacquemijns M; Zomer G

    1990-01-01

    In this report the synthesis of [2-13C]2-nitropropane at room temperature is described. [2-13C]Acetone was converted into the oxime with hydroxy hydrochloridelamine and sodium carbonate. Treatment with hypobromic acid resulted in 2-13C]2-bromo-2-nitropropane. Hydrogenation with sodium borohydride gave [2-13C]2-nitropropane in 14,3% overall yield.

  1. First observation of the M1 transition ψ(3686)→γη(c)(2S).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablikim, M; Achasov, M N; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; An, Z H; Bai, J Z; Ban, Y; Becker, J; Berger, N; Bertani, M; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Bytev, V; Cai, X; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, Y; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Feng, C Q; Ferroli, R B; Fu, C D; Fu, J L; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, B; Huang, G M; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y P; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jia, L K; Jiang, L L; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jing, F F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kavatsyuk, M; Kuehn, W; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Leung, J K C; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, N B; Li, Q J; Li, S L; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, X R; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Liao, X T; Liu, B J; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, C Y; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, H W; Liu, J P; Liu, K Y; Liu, Kai; Liu, Kun; Liu, P L; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X H; Liu, Y; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Q W; Lu, X R; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, H; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Morales Morales, C; Motzko, C; Muchnoi, N Yu; Nefedov, Y; Nicholson, C; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Park, J W; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prencipe, E; Pun, C S J; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schaefer, B D; Schulze, J; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, D H; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, X D; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Thorndike, E H; Tian, H L; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B Q; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, X F; Wang, X L; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, Q G; Wen, S P; Werner, M; Wiedner, U; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, S X; Wu, W; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, G M; Xu, H; Xu, Q J; Xu, X P; Xu, Y; Xu, Z R; Xue, F; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, T; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yu, L; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J G; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, T R; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y S; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, H S; Zhao, J W; Zhao, K X; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zheng, Z P; Zhong, B; Zhong, J; Zhou, L; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhu, C; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, X W; Zhu, Y M; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H; Zuo, J X

    2012-07-27

    Using a sample of 106×10(6) ψ(3686) events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII storage ring, we have made the first measurement of the M1 transition between the radially excited charmonium S-wave spin-triplet and the radially excited S-wave spin-singlet states: ψ(3686)→γη(c)(2S). Analyses of the processes ψ(3686)→γη(c)(2S) with η(c)(2S)→K(S)(0)K(±)π(∓) and K(+)K(-)π(0) give an η(c)(2S) signal with a statistical significance of greater than 10 standard deviations under a wide range of assumptions about the signal and background properties. The data are used to obtain measurements of the η(c)(2S) mass (M(η(c)(2S))=3637.6±2.9(stat)±1.6(syst) MeV/c(2)), width (Γ(η(c)(2S))=16.9±6.4(stat)±4.8(syst) MeV), and the product branching-fraction (B(ψ(3686)→γη(c)(2S))×B(η(c)(2S)→KKπ)=(1.30±0.20(stat)±0.30(syst))×10(-5)). Combining our result with a BABAR measurement of B(η(c)(2S)→KKπ), we find the branching fraction of the M1 transition to be B(ψ(3686)→γη(c)(2S))=(6.8±1.1(stat)±4.5(syst))×10(-4).

  2. A microporous metal-organic framework for selective C2H2 and CO2 separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Rong-Guang; Lin, Rui-Biao; Chen, Banglin

    2017-08-01

    A quartzlike metal-organic framework with interesting one dimensional channel has been synthesized. It exhibits considerable acetylene and carbon dioxide uptake of 41.5 and 24.6 cm3 g-1, respectively, and relatively high selectivity for separation of C2H2/C2H4, C2H2/CH4, CO2/CH4 and CO2/N2 at ambient condition.

  3. Increased frequency of left-handedness in patients with unilateral coronal synostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Albert K; Mulliken, John B; LaBrie, Richard A; Rogers, Gary F

    2009-05-01

    Left-handedness reportedly has been more common in persons with neurological afflictions (e.g., stroke) and malformations (e.g., cleft lip with or without cleft palate) that demonstrate marked unilateral involvement. Coronal synostosis is also more frequently unilateral, affecting the right side more commonly than the left. We sought to compare left-handedness in patients with unilateral coronal synostosis versus healthy controls. All patients aged 3 years or older with nonsyndromic unilateral coronal synostosis and healthy controls recruited by pediatricians blinded to the study. Prospective data obtained for all participants included age, gender, and handedness. In patients with unilateral coronal synostosis, the side of synostosis and age at surgery were documented. Left-handedness in the study and control groups was compared using chi-square analysis. Left-handedness also was analyzed in the study group according to side of fusion. Eighty-six patients with nonsyndromic unilateral coronal synostosis comprised the study group; there were 96 controls. The mean ages of the study (8.8 years) and control groups (9.8 years) were not statistically different (p > .05). There were more girls in the study group (67%) than in the control group (56%), but this difference was not statistically significant (p > .05). Left-handedness was documented in 30.2% of the study group and 11.4% of the control group (p Left-handedness was twice as common in patients with left versus right unilateral coronal synostosis (44.4% versus 20.4%; p Left-handedness is nearly three times more common in patients with unilateral coronal synostosis than in controls and four times more likely in patients with left-sided fusion.

  4. Decision-making in a death investigation: Emotion, families and the coroner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Gordon; Carpenter, Belinda; Quadrelli, Carol; Barnes, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The role of the coroner in common law countries such as Australia, England, Canada and New Zealand is to preside over death investigations where there is uncertainty as to the manner of death, a need to identify the deceased, a death of unknown cause, or a violent or unnatural death. The vast majority of these deaths are not suspicious and thus require coroners to engage with grieving families who have been thrust into a legal process through the misfortune of a loved one's sudden or unexpected death. In this research, 10 experienced coroners discussed how they negotiated the grief and trauma evident in a death investigation. In doing so, they articulated two distinct ways in which legal officers engaged with emotions, which are also evident in the literature. The first engages the script of judicial dispassion, articulating a hierarchical relationship between reason and emotion, while the second introduces an ethic of care via the principles of therapeutic jurisprudence, and thus offers a challenge to the role of emotion in the personae of the professional judicial officer. By using Hochschild's work on the sociology of emotions, this article discusses the various ways in which coroners manage the emotion of a death investigation through emotion work. While emotional distance may be an understandable response by coroners to the grief and trauma experienced by families and directed at cleaner coronial decision-making, the article concludes that coroners may be better served by offering emotions such as sympathy, consideration and compassion directly to the family in those situations where families are struggling to accept, or are resistant to, coroners' decisions.

  5. Analysis of the relationship between coronal and sagittal deformities in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Panpan; Yu, Miao; Liu, Xiao; Zhu, Bin; Liu, Xiaoguang; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-02-01

    To characterize the sagittal alignment of each Lenke type and investigate the relationship between coronal and sagittal deformities in adolescent idiopathic scoliotic (AIS) patients. A cohort of 184 subjects with AIS was retrospectively recruited. Radiographic data were measured and collected, including the Lenke types, Cobb angles of structural curves, and sagittal spino-pelvic parameters. Subjects were grouped according to their genders, Lenke curve types, lumbar modifiers and the amount of coronal structural curves. The sagittal alignment was then compared between the different groups, and correlation analysis was also taken between coronal and sagittal parameters. Besides, each subject's Roussouly type was decided and its distribution was compared among different Lenke types. The cohort included 59 males and 125 females, averagely aged at 15.5 ± 3.3 years old. Most sagittal parameters except thoracic kyphosis (TK) and pelvic tilt (PT) were similar among different Lenke types, while all the sagittal parameters were similar between males and females. The groups with different lumbar modifiers had similar sagittal parameters except TK, which was also true for the groups with different amounts of coronal curves. 42.4 % of the cohort belonged to Roussouly type 3, and the distribution of Roussouly types was comparable among all Lenke types. All sagittal parameters except C7 translation ratio were significantly different among Roussouly types (P < 0.05). Correlation analysis showed that main thoracic (MT) was negatively correlated with lumbar lordosis (LL, r = -0.324), sacral slope (r = -0.321) and spino-sacral angle (r = -0.363). Partial correlation analysis found that thoracolumbar/lumbar was negatively correlated with TK (r = -0.464) and LL (r = -0.422) when MT was controlled. The influence of coronal deformity on sagittal parameters was limited and mainly reflected in the deviation of TK. Most coronal and sagittal parameters were not significantly correlated, and

  6. Atmospheric chemistry of C2F5CHO: mechanism of the C2F5C(O)O-2+HO2 reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Hurley, MD; Wallington, TJ

    2003-01-01

    Smog chamber/FTIR techniques were used to study the gas-phase reaction of C2F5C(O) with HO2 radicals in 100-700 Torr of air, or O-2, diluent at 296 K. The reaction proceeds by two pathways leading to formation of C2F5C(O)OH and O-3 in ayield of 24 +/- 4% and C2F5C(O)O radicals, OH radicals and O-2...... in a yield of 76 +/- 4 The gas phase reaction of CnF2n+1C(O)O-2 with HO2 radicals offers a potential explanation for at least part of the observed environmental burden of fluorinated carboxylic acids, CnF2n+1C(O)OH. As part of this work an upper limit for the rate constant of reaction of Cl atorns with C2F5C......(O)OH at 296 K was determined; k(Cl + C2F5C(O)OH)

  7. Separatrix E × B Shear Flows and Turbulence Propagation in the C-2U FRC; Reflectometry Upgrades for C-2W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Lothar; Fulton, Daniel; Lau, Calvin; Holod, Ihor; Lin, Zhihong; Deng, Bihe; Gota, Hiroshi; Tajima, Toshihiko; Binderbauer, Michl; TAE Team

    2017-10-01

    Ion-scale modes were shown to be stable in the C-2/C-2U FRC core, in agreement with gyrokinetic simulation results, with a characteristic inverted toroidal wavenumber spectrum confirmed via Doppler Backscattering (DBS). Multi-scale turbulence (2 FRC core. Recent detailed analysis of turbulence interaction with large-scale E ×B flow near the FRC separatrix, via DBS, also confirm radial inward turbulence propagation, but the radial turbulence correlation length exhibits a pronounced minimum just outside the separatrix at all wavenumbers, indicating effective radial transport barrier formation. An advanced Doppler Backscattering diagnostic design for C-2W, and prospects for simultaneous measurements of magnetic fluctuations via Cross-Polarization Scattering (CPS) will be discussed.

  8. Future space missions and ground observatory for measurements of coronal magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineschi, Silvano; Gibson, Sarah; Bemporad, Alessandro; Zhukov, Andrei; Damé, Luc; Susino, Roberto; Larruquert, Juan

    2016-07-01

    This presentation gives an overview of the near-future perspectives for probing coronal magnetism from space missions (i.e., SCORE and ASPIICS) and ground-based observatory (ESCAPE). Spectro-polarimetric imaging of coronal emission-lines in the visible-light wavelength-band provides an important diagnostics tool of the coronal magnetism. The interpretation in terms of Hanle and Zeeman effect of the line-polarization in forbidden emission-lines yields information on the direction and strength of the coronal magnetic field. As study case, this presentation will describe the Torino Coronal Magnetograph (CorMag) for the spectro-polarimetric observation of the FeXIV, 530.3 nm, forbidden emission-line. CorMag - consisting of a Liquid Crystal (LC) Lyot filter and a LC linear polarimeter. The CorMag filter is part of the ESCAPE experiment to be based at the French-Italian Concordia base in Antarctica. The linear polarization by resonance scattering of coronal permitted line-emission in the ultraviolet (UV)can be modified by magnetic fields through the Hanle effect. Space-based UV spectro-polarimeters would provide an additional tool for the disgnostics of coronal magnetism. As a case study of space-borne UV spectro-polarimeters, this presentation will describe the future upgrade of the Sounding-rocket Coronagraphic Experiment (SCORE) to include new generation, high-efficiency UV polarizer with the capability of imaging polarimetry of the HI Lyman-α, 121.6 nm. SCORE is a multi-wavelength imager for the emission-lines, HeII 30.4 nm and HI 121.6 nm, and visible-light broad-band emission of the polarized K-corona. SCORE has flown successfully in 2009. The second lauch is scheduled in 2016. Proba-3 is the other future solar mission that would provide the opportunity of diagnosing the coronal magnetic field. Proba-3 is the first precision formation-flying mission to launched in 2019). A pair of satellites will fly together maintaining a fixed configuration as a 'large rigid

  9. Suppression of heating of coronal loops rooted in opposite polarity sunspot umbrae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Thalmann, Julia K.; Moore, Ronald L.; Panesar, Navdeep; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2016-05-01

    EUV observations of active region (AR) coronae reveal the presence of loops at different temperatures. To understand the mechanisms that result in hotter or cooler loops, we study a typical bipolar AR, near solar disk center, which has moderate overall magnetic twist and at least one fully developed sunspot of each polarity. From AIA 193 and 94 A images we identify many clearly discernible coronal loops that connect plage or a sunspot of one polarity to an opposite-polarity plage region. The AIA 94 A images show dim regions in the umbrae of the spots. To see which coronal loops are rooted in a dim umbral area, we performed a non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) modeling using photospheric vector magnetic field measurements obtained with the HMI onboard SDO. After validation of the NLFFF model by comparison of calculated model field lines and observed loops in AIA 193 and 94, we specify the photospheric roots of the model field lines. The model field then shows the coronal magnetic loops that arch from the dim umbral areas of the opposite polarity sunspots. Because these coronal loops are not visible in any of the coronal EUV and X-ray images of the AR, we conclude they are the coolest loops in the AR. This result suggests that the loops connecting opposite polarity umbrae are the least heated because the field in umbrae is so strong that the convective braiding of the field is strongly suppressed.We hypothesize that the convective freedom at the feet of a coronal loop, together with the strength of the field in the body of the loop, determines the strength of the heating. In particular, we expect the hottest coronal loops to have one foot in an umbra and the other foot in opposite-polarity penumbra or plage (coronal moss), the areas of strong field in which convection is not as strongly suppressed as in umbra. Many transient, outstandingly bright, loops in the AIA 94 movie of the AR do have this expected rooting pattern. We will also present another example of AR in

  10. Textural and mechanical characterization of C-S-H gels from hydration of synthetic T1-C3S, β-C2S and their blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolado, J. S.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The textural and mechanical characterization of C-S-H gels formed from the hydration of pure T1-C3S, β-C2S and their blends are studied by Nitrogen sorption and nanoindentation experiments. The surface area and nanoporosity of C-S-H gels formed from the hydration of β-C2S and the 30-70 (T1-C3S and β-C2S mixture are higher than those from hydration of T1-C3S, and 70-30, with the difference decreasing with hydration age. Such changes are well supported by findings of nanoindentation study, which shows the greater relative volume of C-S-H phases with lower densities in the β-C2S and the 30-70 pastes. With the increase in hydration age, the relative volume of C-S-H phases with higher densities increased at the expenses of those with lower density. Important quantitative correlations were found among these textural characteristics and the mean chain length, determined from 29Si magic-angle-spinning (MAS NMR, of the C-S-H gels.La caracterización textural y mecánica de geles C-S-H formados a partir de la hidratación de muestras puras de T1-C3S, ß-C2S y sus mezclas ha sido estudiada por medio de adsorción de nitrógeno y nanoindentación. El área superficial y la nano-porosidad de los geles formados durante la hidratación del ß-C2S y la mezcla 30-70 (T1-C3S- ß-C2S son mayores que los correspondientes a los geles del T1-C3S, y la mezcla 70-30; esta diferencia disminuye con el tiempo de hidratación. Estos cambios coinciden con los resultados de nanoindentación que indican un aumento de volumen relativo de las fases C-S-H con una densidad menor en el caso del ß-C2S y la mezcla 30-70. Al aumentar el tiempo de hidratación, el volumen relativo de fases C-S-H de mayor densidad aumenta a expensas de aquellas de menor densidad. Importantes correlaciones cuantitativas se establecen entre las características texturales y la longitud de cadena media del gel C-S-H, determinada mediante RMN-MAS de 29Si.

  11. Suicide prevention in mental health services: A qualitative analysis of coroners' reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Jenni; Crowe, Marie; Inder, Maree; Henaghan, Mark

    2017-05-11

    Suicide is a major concern for mental health nurses because of its clear correlation with mental illness. In New Zealand, coroners investigate all deaths that appear to be a result of suicide, and provide reports to mental health services (MHS). The aim of the present study was to investigate coronial recommendations to MHS in relation to suicide prevention and to examine clinical and family responses to these. The present study was a three-phase design: (i) analysis of coroners' recommendations related to suicide in MHS; (ii) interviews with clinicians for their response to the recommendations; and (iii) interviews with individuals working with families of consumers of MHS for their responses in relation to family-related recommendations. A qualitative content analysis was conducted on the recommendations from coroners, the interviews with clinical leaders, and the focus group for family workers. Coroners recommended that MHS should implement suicide-prevention strategies that would facilitate improved communication, risk containment, service delivery, and family involvement. Clinicians agreed with most recommendations, apart from those related to risk containment. Family workers endorsed the coronial perspective that family inclusion in MHS was suboptimal. Coroners, MHS, and mental health nurses need to consider the latest clinical evidence for suicide prevention. However, given the complexity of factors that influence suicide, it is important to be realistic about MHS role in preventing suicide, but ensure that MHS provide interventions for which there is evidence, including facilitating family participation and providing access to psychotherapies. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  12. On the Relation between the In Situ Properties and the Coronal Sources of the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; Landi, E.; Lepri, S. T.; Gilbert, J. A.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Fisk, L. A.; Raines, J. M.

    2017-09-01

    We categorize the types of solar wind using a new classification scheme based on the location of the wind’s coronal source regions in the solar atmosphere and near-solar heliosphere. We first trace the solar wind measured by ACE/SWEPAM and SWICS from 1998 to 2011 at 1 au back to a 2.5{R}{{s}} solar surface using ballistic mapping at constant proton speed; then we map them back to their magnetic footpoints on the 1{R}{{s}} solar surface via the potential field source surface (PFSS) model. Coronal structures are identified using a classification scheme based on the pixel brightness in the SOHO or STEREO EUV Carrington images. The angular distances between each mapped solar wind footpoint to the different coronal structure pixels are calculated and used as a criterion to identify the type of solar wind source region. Depending on the proximity of the solar wind footpoints to a given coronal or heliospheric structure, we classify the solar wind into six types: active region (AR), AR-boundary, quiet Sun (QS), coronal hole (CH), CH-boundary, and helmet-streamer associated wind. The in situ properties of these six types of solar winds are then examined and compared, and their solar cycle dependences are also discussed.

  13. A Self-consistent Model of the Coronal Heating and Solar Wind Acceleration Including Compressible and Incompressible Heating Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, Munehito; Yokoyama, Takaaki; Suzuki, Takeru K.

    2018-02-01

    We propose a novel one-dimensional model that includes both shock and turbulence heating and qualify how these processes contribute to heating the corona and driving the solar wind. Compressible MHD simulations allow us to automatically consider shock formation and dissipation, while turbulent dissipation is modeled via a one-point closure based on Alfvén wave turbulence. Numerical simulations were conducted with different photospheric perpendicular correlation lengths {λ }0, which is a critical parameter of Alfvén wave turbulence, and different root-mean-square photospheric transverse-wave amplitudes δ {v}0. For the various {λ }0, we obtain a low-temperature chromosphere, high-temperature corona, and supersonic solar wind. Our analysis shows that turbulence heating is always dominant when {λ }0≲ 1 {Mm}. This result does not mean that we can ignore the compressibility because the analysis indicates that the compressible waves and their associated density fluctuations enhance the Alfvén wave reflection and therefore the turbulence heating. The density fluctuation and the cross-helicity are strongly affected by {λ }0, while the coronal temperature and mass-loss rate depend weakly on {λ }0.

  14. Fast Response, vertically oriented graphene nanosheet electric double layer capacitors synthesized from C(2)H(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Minzhen; Outlaw, Ronald A; Quinlan, Ronald A; Premathilake, Dilshan; Butler, Sue M; Miller, John R

    2014-06-24

    The growth and electrical characteristics of vertically oriented graphene nanosheets grown by radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition from C2H2 feedstock on nickel substrates and used as electrodes in symmetric electric double layer capacitors (EDLC) are presented. The nanosheets exhibited 2.7 times faster growth rate and much greater specific capacitance for a given growth time than CH4 synthesized films. Raman spectra showed that the intensity ratio of the D band to G band versus temperature initially decreased to a minimum value of 0.45 at a growth temperature of 750 °C, but increased rapidly with further temperature increase (1.15 at 850 °C). The AC specific capacitance at 120 Hz of these EDLC devices increased in a linear fashion with growth temperature, up to 265 μF/cm(2) (2 μm high film, 850 °C with 10 min growth). These devices exhibited ultrafast frequency response: the frequency response at -45° phase angle reached over 20 kHz. Consistent with the increase in D band to G band ratio, the morphology of the films became less vertical, less crystalline, and disordered at substrate temperatures of 800 °C and above. This deterioration in morphology resulted in an increase in graphene surface area and defect density, which, in turn, contributed to the increased capacitance, as well as a slight decrease in frequency response. The low equivalent series resistance varied from 0.07 to 0.08 Ω and was attributed to the significant carbon incorporation into the Ni substrate.

  15. The synthesis of [2-13C]2-nitropropane at room temperature and at atmospheric pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacquemijns M; Zomer G

    1990-01-01

    In this report the synthesis of [2-13C]2-nitropropane at room temperature is described. [2-13C]Acetone was converted into the oxime with hydroxy hydrochloridelamine and sodium carbonate. Treatment with hypobromic acid resulted in 2-13C]2-bromo-2-nitropropane. Hydrogenation with sodium borohydride

  16. Structural investigation of the ZnSe(001)-c(2×2) surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weigand, W.; Müller, A.; Kilian, L.

    2003-01-01

    Zinc selenide is a model system for II-VI compound semiconductors. The geometric structure of the clean (001)-c(2x2) surface has recently been the subject of intense debate. We report here a surface x-ray-diffraction study on the ZnSe(001)-c(2x2) surface performed under ultrahigh vacuum using syn...

  17. 77 FR 40928 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; C2 Options Exchange, Incorporated; Order Granting Approval of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ... Board Options Exchange, Incorporated (``CBOE'') building in Chicago, Illinois.\\8\\ C2's main trading engine is located on the East Coast, thus there would be geographic diversity between the DRF and the... provides for geographic diversity between the DRF and C2's main trading system; references the written...

  18. Fast response dry-type artificial molecular muscles with [c2]daisy chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaso, Kazuhisa; Takashima, Yoshinori; Harada, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Hierarchically organized myosin and actin filaments found in biological systems exhibit contraction and expansion behaviours that produce work and force by consuming chemical energy. Inspired by these naturally occurring examples, we have developed photoresponsive wet- and dry-type molecular actuators built from rotaxane-based compounds known as [c2]daisy chains (specifically, [c2]AzoCD2 hydrogel and [c2]AzoCD2 xerogel). These actuators were prepared via polycondensation between four-armed poly(ethylene glycol) and a [c2]daisy chain based on α-cyclodextrin as the host component and azobenzene as a photoresponsive guest component. The light-induced actuation arises from the sliding motion of the [c2]daisy chain unit. Ultraviolet irradiation caused the gels to bend towards the light source. The response of the [c2]AzoCD2 xerogel, even under dry conditions, is very fast (7° every second), which is 10,800 times faster than the [c2]AzoCD2 hydrogel (7° every 3 h). In addition, the [c2]AzoCD2 xerogel was used as a crane arm to lift an object using ultraviolet irradiation to produce mechanical work.

  19. The transcriptional regulator c2h2 acceleratesmushroom formation in Agaricus bisporus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelkmans, Jordi F.; Vos, A.M.; Scholtmeijer, Karin; Hendrix, Ed; Baars, Johan J.P.; Gehrmann, T.; Reinders, M.J.T.; Lugones, Luis G.; Wösten, Han A.B.

    2016-01-01

    The Cys2His2 zinc finger protein gene c2h2 of Schizophyllum commune is involved in mushroom formation. Its inactivation results in a strain that is arrested at the stage of aggregate formation. In this study, the c2h2 orthologue of Agaricus bisporus was over-expressed in this white button mushroom

  20. The transcriptional regulator c2h2 accelerates mushroom formation in Agaricus bisporus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelkmans, J.F.; Vos, A.M.; Scholtmeijer, K; Hendrix, Eddy; Baars, Johan J; Gehrmann, Thies; Reinders, Marcel J; Lugones, L.G.; Wösten, HAB

    The Cys2His2 zinc finger protein gene c2h2 of Schizophyllum commune is involved in mushroom formation. Its inactivation results in a strain that is arrested at the stage of aggregate formation. In this study, the c2h2 orthologue of Agaricus bisporus was over-expressed in this white button mushroom

  1. The transcriptional regulator c2h2 accelerates mushroom formation in Agaricus bisporus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelkmans, Jordi F.; Vos, Aurin M.; Scholtmeijer, Karin; Hendrix, Ed; Baars, Johan J.P.; Gehrmann, Thies; Reinders, Marcel J.T.; Lugones, Luis G.; Wösten, Han A.B.

    2016-01-01

    The Cys2His2 zinc finger protein gene c2h2 of Schizophyllum commune is involved in mushroom formation. Its inactivation results in a strain that is arrested at the stage of aggregate formation. In this study, the c2h2 orthologue of Agaricus bisporus was over-expressed in this white button

  2. Data of evolutionary structure change: 15C8H-32C2B [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ain>H 15C8H FNIKD-TYMHW ...> GGG- EEEEture> ATOM 1815 CA PHE H 27 28.7...tryIDChain>32C2B YSISSDYAWNW ucture> EEture...pdbChain> 32C2B GYISY-SGSTS >EEEE - EEE...ce>AQIDPANGNTK >EEEE EEE> ATOM 2

  3. 26 CFR 31.3306(c)(2)-1 - Domestic service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Domestic service. 31.3306(c)(2)-1 Section 31.3306(c)(2)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... Domestic service. (a) In a private home. (1) Services of a household nature performed by an employee in or...

  4. Electron Attachment to C2 Fluorocarbon Radicals at High Temperature (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-28

    constant curve for C2F3. Figure 3 shows an extrap - olation of the electron attachment rate constant for C2F3 as a function of Tgas and Tel similar to...weight to the use of kinetic modeling to extrap - olate data taken over narrower ranges. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The project was funded by the United States Air

  5. Sintering behaviour and mechanical properties of Cr3C2–NiCr ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Cr3C2–NiCr cermets are used as metal cutting tools due to their relatively high hardness and low sin- tering temperatures. In this study, a powder mixture consisting of 75 wt% Cr3C2–25 wt% NiCr was sintered at four different temperatures and characterized for its microstructure and mechanical properties.

  6. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Test Systems § 866.5250 Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system. (a) Identification. A complement C1 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system is a device that consists of... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator...

  7. 26 CFR 1.652(c)-2 - Death of individual beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... distributable net income of the taxable year of the trust determines the extent to which the income required to... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Death of individual beneficiaries. 1.652(c)-2 Section 1.652(c)-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED...

  8. The Interaction of Successive Coronal Mass Ejections: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugaz, Noé; Temmer, Manuela; Wang, Yuming; Farrugia, Charles J.

    2017-04-01

    We present a review of the different aspects associated with the interaction of successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the corona and inner heliosphere, focusing on the initiation of series of CMEs, their interaction in the heliosphere, the particle acceleration associated with successive CMEs, and the effect of compound events on Earth's magnetosphere. The two main mechanisms resulting in the eruption of series of CMEs are sympathetic eruptions, when one eruption triggers another, and homologous eruptions, when a series of similar eruptions originates from one active region. CME - CME interaction may also be associated with two unrelated eruptions. The interaction of successive CMEs has been observed remotely in coronagraphs (with the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment - LASCO - since the early 2000s) and heliospheric imagers (since the late 2000s), and inferred from in situ measurements, starting with early measurements in the 1970s. The interaction of two or more CMEs is associated with complex phenomena, including magnetic reconnection, momentum exchange, the propagation of a fast magnetosonic shock through a magnetic ejecta, and changes in the CME expansion. The presence of a preceding CME a few hours before a fast eruption has been found to be connected with higher fluxes of solar energetic particles (SEPs), while CME - CME interaction occurring in the corona is often associated with unusual radio bursts, indicating electron acceleration. Higher suprathermal population, enhanced turbulence and wave activity, stronger shocks, and shock - shock or shock - CME interaction have been proposed as potential physical mechanisms to explain the observed associated SEP events. When measured in situ, CME - CME interaction may be associated with relatively well organized multiple-magnetic cloud events, instances of shocks propagating through a previous magnetic ejecta or more complex ejecta, when the characteristics of the individual eruptions

  9. Coronal Mass Ejections and Their Effect on the Venusian Nightglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, C. L.; Chanover, N.; Slanger, T. G.

    2012-12-01

    Earth, Venus, and Mars all formed close to the Sun under similar conditions and with similar materials. While having common origins of formation, they have very different atmospheres. These difference are due to various evolutionary paths taken by each planet, resulting in two CO2 dominated atmospheres and a one N2/O2 dominated atmosphere. In order to understand the processes that led to the evolution of these atmospheres we need to understand the present chemistry. Knowing the chemical reactions occurring in the mesosphere and ionosphere of these two types of atmospheres leads to a greater understanding of physical processes, such as winds and transport mechanisms. These chemical reactions can be determined by observing nightglow. Nightglow is caused by recombination of atoms into molecules, or electrons with ions, producing excited molecules and atoms, respectively. Venus has several strong nightglow features, one of which is the O(1S-1D) transition at 5577.3 Å (oxygen green line). This feature is known to be highly temporally variable. When it was first seen in 1999, it had an intensity greater than the terrestrial nightglow, but it was too weak to be detected after 2004. The reason for this variability, and the chemistry producing the emission, have both been poorly understood. Literature review of past observations show that a week prior to every detection, at least one high energy solar flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) occurred directed at Venus. Solar flares produce large amounts of extreme ultra violet light and charged particles. CMEs are large plasma ejections usually connected with solar flares. We propose that the oxygen green line emission is due to CME impacts from the Sun. The charged particles of the plasma can interact with the atmosphere of Venus to produce nightglow/aurora, where dissociative recombination of O2+ is the mostly likely source of O(1S). To test our hypothesis, we observed Venus as a Target of Opportunity with the ARCES high

  10. Recurrent coronal jets induced by repetitively accumulated electric currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y.; Démoulin, P.; Schmieder, B.; Ding, M. D.; Vargas Domínguez, S.; Liu, Y.

    2013-07-01

    periodically, in the current layer created between the emerging bipoles and the large-scale active region field. The periodic magnetic reconnection induced the observed recurrent coronal jets and the decrease of the vertical electric current magnitude. Two movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Cytoprotective Effect of Hispidin against Palmitate-Induced Lipotoxicity in C2C12 Myotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Myoung Park

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that Phellinus linteus, which produces hispidin and its derivatives, possesses antioxidant activities. In this study, we investigated whether hispidin has protective effects on palmitate-induced oxidative stress in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells. Our results showed that palmitate treatment in C2C12 myotubes increased ROS generation and cell death as compared with the control. However, pretreatment of hispidin for 8 h improved the survival of C2C12 myotubes against palmitate-induced oxidative stress via inhibition of intracellular ROS production. Hispidin also inhibited palmitate-induced apoptotic nuclear condensation in C2C12 myotubes. In addition, we found that hispidin can suppress cleavage of caspase-3, expression of Bax, and NF-κB translocation. Therefore, these results suggest that hispidin is capable of protecting C2C12 myotubes against palmitate-induced oxidative stress.

  12. Compression Myelopathy due to Proliferative Changes around C2 Pars Defects without Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tetsuya; Sakai, Toshinori; Tezuka, Fumitake; Abe, Mitsunobu; Yamashita, Kazuta; Takata, Yoichiro; Higashino, Kosaku; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    We report a case with compression myelopathy due to proliferative changes around the C2 pars defects without instability. A 69-year-old man presented with progressive clumsy hands and spastic gait. Plain radiographs showed bilateral spondylolysis (pars defects) at C2 and fusion between C2 and C3 spinous processes. Dynamic views revealed mobility through the pars defects, but there was no apparent instability. Computed tomography showed proliferative changes at the pars defects, which protruded into spinal canal. On magnetic resonance imaging, the spinal cord was compressed and intramedullary high signal change was found. A diagnosis of compression myelopathy due to proliferative changes around the C2 pars defects was made. We performed posterior decompression. Postoperatively, symptoms have been alleviated and images revealed sufficient decompression and no apparent instability. In patients with the cervical spondylolysis, myelopathy caused by instability or slippage have been periodically reported. The present case involving C2 spondylolysis is extremely rare.

  13. EXO70C2 is a key regulatory factor for optimal tip growth of pollen

    KAUST Repository

    Synek, Lukas

    2017-03-30

    The exocyst, an eukaryotic tethering complex, co-regulates targeted exocytosis as an effector of small GTPases in polarized cell growth. In land plants, several exocyst subunits are encoded by double or triple paralogs, culminating in tens of EXO70 paralogs. Out of 23 Arabidopsis EXO70 isoforms, we analyzed seven isoforms expressed in pollen. Genetic and microscopic analyses of single mutants in EXO70A2, C1, C2, F1, H3, H5, and H6 genes revealed that only a loss-of-function EXO70C2 allele resulted in a significant male-specific transmission defect (segregation 40%:51%:9%) due to aberrant pollen tube growth. Mutant pollen tubes grown in vitro exhibited enhanced growth rate and a decreased thickness of the tip cell wall, causing tip bursts. However, exo70C2 pollen tubes could frequently recover and restart their speedy elongation, resulting in a repetitive stop-and-go growth dynamics. A pollen-specific depletion of the closest paralog, EXO70C1, using ami-RNA in the exo70C2 mutant background resulted in a complete pollen-specific transmission defect, suggesting redundant functions of EXO70C1 and EXO70C2. Both EXO70C1 and EXO70C2, GFP-tagged and expressed under their native promoters, localized in the cytoplasm of pollen grains, pollen tubes, and also root trichoblast cells. Expression of EXO70C2-GFP complemented aberrant growth of exo70C2 pollen tubes. The absent EXO70C2 interactions with core exocyst subunits in the yeast two-hybrid assay, cytoplasmic localization, and genetic effect suggest an unconventional EXO70 function possibly as a regulator of exocytosis outside the exocyst complex. In conclusion, EXO70C2 is a novel factor contributing to the regulation of optimal tip growth of Arabidopsis pollen tubes.

  14. PI3K-C2α knockdown decreases autophagy and maturation of endocytic vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan M Merrill

    Full Text Available Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K family members are involved in diverse cellular fates including cell growth, proliferation, and survival. While many molecular details are known about the Class I and III PI3Ks, less is known about the Class II PI3Ks. To explore the function of all eight PI3K isoforms in autophagy, we knock down each gene individually and measure autophagy. We find a significant decrease in autophagy following siRNA-mediated PIK3C2A (encoding the Class 2 PI3K, PI3K-C2α knockdown. This defective autophagy is rescued by exogenous PI3K-C2α, but not kinase-dead PI3K-C2α. Using confocal microscopy, we probe for markers of endocytosis and autophagy, revealing that PI3K-C2α colocalizes with markers of endocytosis. Though endocytic uptake is intact, as demonstrated by transferrin labeling, PIK3C2A knockdown results in vesicle accumulation at the recycling endosome. We isolate distinct membrane sources and observe that PI3K-C2α interacts with markers of endocytosis and autophagy, notably ATG9. Knockdown of either PIK3C2A or ATG9A/B, but not PI3KC3, results in an accumulation of transferrin-positive clathrin coated vesicles and RAB11-positive vesicles at the recycling endosome. Taken together, these results support a role for PI3K-C2α in the proper maturation of endosomes, and suggest that PI3K-C2α may be a critical node connecting the endocytic and autophagic pathways.

  15. Conjoined bicondylar coronal plane fracture of the distal femur associated with incarcerated patella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishan, Rama; Saibaba, Balaji; Kumar, Vishal; Aggarwal, Sameer

    2016-05-20

    Conjoint bicondylar coronal plane fracture is a rare orthopaedic injury, associated with high-velocity trauma. The proposed mechanism is axially directed shear forces in a flexed knee. To the best of our literature search, only 2 cases of conjoint bicondylar coronal fracture have been published in English literature-1 each in adult and paediatric age group. Conjoint bicondylar coronal plane fracture with incarcerated patella has not yet been reported and hence this is the first report of its kind. We report on the clinical presentation, management and outcome of such a complex injury, along with a comprehensive, up-to-date literature review. Prompt open reduction and internal fixation coupled with early knee mobilisation is the key to achieve good functional outcome. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. Direct coronal computed tomography of the pelvis and the retroperitoneal space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umeyama, Tomokazu; Nemoto, Ryosuke; Nemoto, Shinichi (Tsukuba Univ., Sakura, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1983-05-01

    In comparison with ultrasonography, the disadvantage of the technique of computed tomography (CT) has been the relative lack of flexibility afforded by the single transverse plane of section. Therefore we developed direct coronal CT imaging of the pelvis and the retroperitoneal space by changing the position of the patient in the gantry. In comparison with transverse CT images we got some advantages in this method. In the case of bladder cancer, it was easy to detect the locality and stage of the tumors which arose from the posteriol wall or neck of the bladder. In the case of prostate cancer, it offered substantial information concerning the invasion of the tumor into the seminal vesicle and pelvic floor. In the case of retroperitoneal tumor we could evaluate the extension of the tumor more exactly. We emphasized the advantages of direct coronal CT, i.e., improved image quality, improved definition of coronal anatomy and shorter examination time.

  17. Pictorial essay of ultrasound-reconstructed coronal plane images of the uterus in different uterine pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigore, Mihaela; Grigore, Anamaria; Gafitanu, Dumitru; Furnica, Cristina

    2017-12-11

    Imaging in the major planes (horizontal, coronal, and sagittal) of the uterus is important for determining anatomy and allowing the findings to be standardized, and for evaluating and diagnosing different pathological conditions in clinical practice. Examination of the coronal plane is an important step in identifying uterine pathologies and their relationships to the endometrial canal. Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound reveals the normal anatomy better and improves the depiction of abnormal anatomy, as the coronal plane of the uterus can easily be obtained using 3D reconstruction techniques. Our pictorial essay demonstrates that adding 3D ultrasound to a routine gynecological workup can be beneficial for clinicians, enabling a precise diagnosis to be made. In addition, the volumes obtained and stored by 3D ultrasound can allow students or residents to become more familiar with normal and abnormal pelvic structures. Clin. Anat, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Observing the Unobservable: identification and Characterization of Stealth Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Huys, Elke

    2016-01-01

    In this doctoral thesis we study stealth CMEs: solar coronal mass ejections that are clearly observed in coronagraph data but do not show significant low-coronal or on-disk signatures of eruption. This lack of coronal signatures makes it challenging to determine their source region and predict their trajectory throughout interplanetary space. Combining PROBA2/SWAP data with that of other instruments, we identify 40 such events and investigate their properties both observationally and statistically. We find that our sample size is insufficient to determine the scaling law for the CME angular width reliably. We therefore analyze in general what the effect is of a limited sample size on the estimation of a power law parameter. Armed with this knowledge, we return to our sample of stealth CMEs, re-analyze the power law for their angular widths and compare the results to the power law found for normal CMEs.

  19. Observing the Unobservable: Identification and Characterisation of Stealth Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Huys, Elke; Seaton, Daniel B.; Poedts, Stefaan; Berghmans, David

    2016-05-01

    I will present my doctoral thesis research on stealth CMEs: solar coronal mass ejections that are clearly observed in coronagraph data but do not show significant low-coronal or on-disk signatures of eruption. This lack of coronal signatures makes it challenging to determine their source region and predict their trajectory throughout interplanetary space. We identified 40 such events and investigated their properties both observationally and statistically. We found that our sample size was insufficient to determine the scaling law for the CME angular width reliably. We therefore analyzed in general what the effect is of a limited sample size on the estimation of a power law parameter. Armed with this knowledge, we returned to our sample of stealth CMEs, re-analyzed the power law for their angular widths and compared the results to the power law found for normal CMEs.

  20. X-ray reflectivity studies of cPLA2{alpha}-C2 domains adsorbed onto Langmuir monolayers of SOPC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Málková, Sárka; Long, Fei; Stahelin, Robert V; Pingali, Sai V; Murray, Diana; Cho, Wonhwa; Schlossman, Mark L

    2005-09-01

    X-ray reflectivity is used to study the interaction of C2 domains of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)alpha-C2) with a Langmuir monolayer of 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SOPC) supported on a buffered aqueous solution containing Ca(2+). The reflectivity is analyzed in terms of the known crystallographic structure of cPLA(2)alpha-C2 domains and a slab model representing the lipid layer to yield an electron density profile of the lipid layer and bound C2 domains. This new method of analysis determines the angular orientation and penetration depth of the cPLA(2)alpha-C2 domains bound to the SOPC monolayer, information not available from the standard slab model analysis of x-ray reflectivity. The best-fit orientation places the protein-bound Ca(2+) ions within 1 A of the lipid phosphate group (with an accuracy of +/-3 A). Hydrophobic residues of the calcium-binding loops CBL1 and CBL3 penetrate deepest into the lipid layer, with a 2 A penetration into the tailgroup region. X-ray measurements with and without the C2 domain indicate that there is a loss of electrons in the headgroup region of the lipid monolayer upon binding of the domains. We suggest that this is due to a loss of water molecules bound to the headgroup. Control experiments with a non-calcium buffer and with domain mutants confirm that the cPLA(2)alpha-C2 binding to the SOPC monolayer is Ca(2+)-dependent and that the hydrophobic residues in the calcium-binding loops are critical for membrane binding. These results indicate that an entropic component (due to water loss) as well as electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions contributes to the binding mechanism.

  1. X-Ray Reflectivity Studies of cPLA2α-C2 Domains Adsorbed onto Langmuir Monolayers of SOPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Málková, Šárka; Long, Fei; Stahelin, Robert V.; Pingali, Sai V.; Murray, Diana; Cho, Wonhwa; Schlossman, Mark L.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray reflectivity is used to study the interaction of C2 domains of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2α-C2) with a Langmuir monolayer of 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SOPC) supported on a buffered aqueous solution containing Ca2+. The reflectivity is analyzed in terms of the known crystallographic structure of cPLA2α-C2 domains and a slab model representing the lipid layer to yield an electron density profile of the lipid layer and bound C2 domains. This new method of analysis determines the angular orientation and penetration depth of the cPLA2α-C2 domains bound to the SOPC monolayer, information not available from the standard slab model analysis of x-ray reflectivity. The best-fit orientation places the protein-bound Ca2+ ions within 1 Å of the lipid phosphate group (with an accuracy of ±3 Å). Hydrophobic residues of the calcium-binding loops CBL1 and CBL3 penetrate deepest into the lipid layer, with a 2 Å penetration into the tailgroup region. X-ray measurements with and without the C2 domain indicate that there is a loss of electrons in the headgroup region of the lipid monolayer upon binding of the domains. We suggest that this is due to a loss of water molecules bound to the headgroup. Control experiments with a non-calcium buffer and with domain mutants confirm that the cPLA2α-C2 binding to the SOPC monolayer is Ca2+-dependent and that the hydrophobic residues in the calcium-binding loops are critical for membrane binding. These results indicate that an entropic component (due to water loss) as well as electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions contributes to the binding mechanism. PMID:15994899

  2. Direct measurements of rate constants for the reactions of CH3 radicals with C2H6, C2H4, and C2H2 at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peukert, S L; Labbe, N J; Sivaramakrishnan, R; Michael, J V

    2013-10-10

    The shock tube technique has been used to study the reactions CH3 + C2H6 → C2H4 + CH4 + H (1), CH3 + C2H4 → Products + H (2), and CH3 + C2H2 → Products + H (3). Biacetyl, (CH3CO)2, was used as a clean high temperature thermal source for CH3-radicals for all the three reactions studied in this work. For reaction 1, the experiments span a T-range of 1153 K ≤ T ≤ 1297 K, at P ~ 0.4 bar. The experiments on reaction 2 cover a T-range of 1176 K ≤ T ≤ 1366 K, at P ~ 1.0 bar, and those on reaction 3 a T-range of 1127 K ≤ T ≤ 1346 K, at P ~ 1.0 bar. Reflected shock tube experiments performed on reactions 1-3, monitored the formation of H-atoms with H-atom Atomic Resonance Absorption Spectrometric (ARAS). Fits to the H-atom temporal profiles using an assembled kinetics model were used to make determinations for k1, k2, and k3. In the case of C2H6, the measurements of [H]-atoms were used to derive direct high-temperature rate constants, k1, that can be represented by the Arrhenius equation k1(T) = 5.41 × 10(-12) exp(-6043 K/T) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1) (1153 K ≤ T ≤ 1297 K) for the only bimolecular process that occurs, H-atom abstraction. TST calculations based on ab initio properties calculated at the CCSD(T)/CBS//M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory show excellent agreement, within ±20%, of the measured rate constants. For the reaction of CH3 with C2H4, the present rate constant results, k2', refer to the sum of rate constants, k(2b) + k(2c), from two competing processes, addition-elimination, and the direct abstraction CH3 + C2H4 → C3H6 + H (2b) and CH3 + C2H4 → C2H2 + H + CH4 (2c). Experimental rate constants for k2' can be represented by the Arrhenius equation k2'(T) = 2.18 × 10(-10) exp(-11830 K/T) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1) (1176 K ≤ T ≤ 1366 K). The present results are in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. The present study provides the only direct measurement for the high-temperature rate constants for these channels

  3. Force limited random vibration testing: the computation of the semi-empirical constant $C(2) $ C 2 for a real test article and unknown supporting structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijker, J. J.; Ellenbroek, M. H. M.; Boer, A. de

    2015-09-01

    To prevent over-testing of the test-item during random vibration testing Scharton proposed and discussed the force limited random vibration testing (FLVT) in a number of publications. Besides the random vibration specification, the total mass and the turn-over frequency of the test article (load), C^2 is a very important parameter for FLVT. A number of computational methods to estimate C^2 are described in the literature, i.e. the simple and the complex two degree of freedom system, STDFS and CTDFS, respectively. The motivation of this work is to evaluate the method for the computation of a realistic value of C^2 to perform a representative random vibration test based on force limitation, when the description of the supporting structure (source) is more or less unknown. Marchand discussed the formal description of obtaining C^2, using the maximum PSD of the acceleration and maximum PSD of the force, both at the interface between test article and supporting structure. Stevens presented the coupled systems modal approach (CSMA), where simplified asparagus patch models (parallel-oscillator representation) of load and source are connected. The asparagus patch model consists of modal effective masses and spring stiffnesses associated with the natural frequencies. When the random acceleration vibration specification is given the CSMA method is suitable to compute the value of the parameter C^2. When no mathematical model of the source can be made available, estimations of the value C^2 can be find in literature. In this paper a probabilistic mathematical representation of the unknown source is proposed, such that the asparagus patch model of the source can be approximated. The chosen probabilistic design parameters have a uniform distribution. The computation of the value C^2 can be done in conjunction with the CSMA method, knowing the apparent mass of the load and the random acceleration specification at the interface between load and source, respectively. Data of two

  4. Trends and variations in CO, C2H6, and HCN in the Southern Hemisphere point to the declining anthropogenic emissions of CO and C2H6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Jones

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the carbon monoxide (CO, ethane (C2H6 and hydrogen cyanide (HCN partial columns (from the ground to 12 km derived from measurements by ground-based solar Fourier Transform Spectroscopy at Lauder, New Zealand (45° S, 170° E, and at Arrival Heights, Antarctica (78° S, 167° E, from 1997 to 2009. Significant negative trends are calculated for all species at both locations, based on the daily-mean observed time series, namely CO (−0.94 ± 0.47% yr−1, C2H6 (−2.37 ± 1.18% yr−1 and HCN (−0.93 ± 0.47% yr−1 at Lauder and CO (−0.92 ± 0.46% yr−1, C2H6 (−2.82 ± 1.37% yr−1 and HCN (−1.41 ± 0.71% yr−1 at Arrival Heights. The uncertainties reflect the 95% confidence limits. However, the magnitudes of the trends are influenced by the anomaly associated with the 1997–1998 El Niño Southern Oscillation event at the beginning of the time series reported. We calculate trends for each month from 1997 to 2009 and find negative trends for all months. The largest monthly trends of CO and C2H6 at Lauder, and to a lesser degree at Arrival Heights, occur during austral spring during the Southern Hemisphere tropical and subtropical biomass burning period. For HCN, the largest monthly trends occur in July and August at Lauder and around November at Arrival Heights. The correlations between CO and C2H6 and between CO and HCN at Lauder in September to November, when the biomass burning maximizes, are significantly larger that those in other seasons. A tropospheric chemistry-climate model is used to simulate CO, C2H6, and HCN partial columns for the period of 1997–2009, using interannually varying biomass burning emissions from GFED3 and annually periodic but seasonally varying emissions from both biogenic and anthropogenic sources. The model-simulated partial columns of these species compare well with the measured partial columns and the model accurately reproduces seasonal cycles of all three species at both locations. However

  5. Hinode/XRT and Stereo Observations of the May 2007 Coronal Wave-cme-dimming Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attrill, Gemma; Engell, A. J.; Wills-Davey, M. J.; Grigis, P.; Testa, P.

    2009-05-01

    We report observations of the first diffuse coronal wave detected by Hinode/XRT. The event occurred near the West solar limb on 23 May 2007, originating from active region (AR) 10956. The bright emission expanded both to the East and South of the AR. We combine the XRT results with data from STEREO (B) and a potential magnetic field extrapolation to understand the global magnetic field connectivity. We consider that the brightenings seen to the East and South of the source AR are generated by different physical processes, due to the distinct magnetic environments in these regions. We attribute the brightening to the East of the AR to compression and channelling of the plasma along large-scale loops. The brightening to the South of the AR expands across the quiet Sun, making the southern component a likely candidate for a classical diffuse coronal wave. We analyse the bright front in STEREO/EUVI 171, 195 and 284 A images, as well as in XRT data, finding it to be largely co-spatial in all bandpasses. The expansion velocity of the diffuse bright front is 250 (± 85) km/s. We also exploit the near-limb properties of this event by combining STEREO/COR1 and EUVI data to derive a full picture of the low-coronal development of the eruption. The COR1 data show that the southern-most outer edge of the CME is progressively displaced southward. The core coronal dimmings map to the bright core of the CME; the secondary coronal dimmings map to the CME cavity; and the diffuse coronal "wave” maps to the outermost edge of the expanding CME shell. The analysis of this near-limb event has implications for understanding earlier eruptions originating from the same AR. In particular, we present a new analysis of the 19 May 2007 event. NASA grants NNX09AB11G and NNH07AB97C supported this work.

  6. The Coronal Analysis of SHocks and Waves (CASHeW) framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozarev, Kamen A.; Davey, Alisdair; Kendrick, Alexander; Hammer, Michael; Keith, Celeste

    2017-11-01

    Coronal bright fronts (CBF) are large-scale wavelike disturbances in the solar corona, related to solar eruptions. They are observed (mostly in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light) as transient bright fronts of finite width, propagating away from the eruption source location. Recent studies of individual solar eruptive events have used EUV observations of CBFs and metric radio type II burst observations to show the intimate connection between waves in the low corona and coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven shocks. EUV imaging with the atmospheric imaging assembly instrument on the solar dynamics observatory has proven particularly useful for detecting large-scale short-lived CBFs, which, combined with radio and in situ observations, holds great promise for early CME-driven shock characterization capability. This characterization can further be automated, and related to models of particle acceleration to produce estimates of particle fluxes in the corona and in the near Earth environment early in events. We present a framework for the coronal analysis of shocks and waves (CASHeW). It combines analysis of NASA Heliophysics System Observatory data products and relevant data-driven models, into an automated system for the characterization of off-limb coronal waves and shocks and the evaluation of their capability to accelerate solar energetic particles (SEPs). The system utilizes EUV observations and models written in the interactive data language. In addition, it leverages analysis tools from the SolarSoft package of libraries, as well as third party libraries. We have tested the CASHeW framework on a representative list of coronal bright front events. Here we present its features, as well as initial results. With this framework, we hope to contribute to the overall understanding of coronal shock waves, their importance for energetic particle acceleration, as well as to the better ability to forecast SEP events fluxes.

  7. Toward the Direct Measurement of Coronal Magnetic Fields: An Airborne Infrared Spectrometer for Eclipse Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samra, J.; DeLuca, E. E.; Golub, L.; Cheimets, P.

    2014-12-01

    The solar magnetic field enables the heating of the corona and provides its underlying structure. Energy stored in coronal magnetic fields is released in flares and coronal mass ejections (CME) and provides the ultimate source of energy for space weather. Therefore, direct measurements of the coronal magnetic field have significant potential to enhance understanding of coronal dynamics and improve solar forecasting models. Of particular interest are observations of coronal field lines in the transitional region between closed and open flux systems, providing important information on the origin of the slow solar wind. While current instruments routinely observe only the photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields, a proposed airborne spectrometer will take a step toward the direct observation of coronal fields by measuring plasma emission in the infrared at high spatial and spectral resolution. The targeted lines are four forbidden magnetic dipole transitions between 2 and 4 μm. The airborne system will consist of a telescope, grating spectrometer, and pointing/stabilization system to be flown on the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) during the August 2017 total solar eclipse. The project incorporates several optical engineering challenges, centered around maintaining adequate spectral and spatial resolution in a compact and inexpensive package and on a moving platform. Design studies are currently underway to examine the tradeoffs between various optical geometries and control strategies for the pointing/stabilization system. The results will be presented and interpreted in terms of the consequences for the scientific questions. In addition, results from a laboratory prototype and simulations of the final system will be presented.

  8. The Coronal Analysis of SHocks and Waves (CASHeW framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozarev Kamen A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronal bright fronts (CBF are large-scale wavelike disturbances in the solar corona, related to solar eruptions. They are observed (mostly in extreme ultraviolet (EUV light as transient bright fronts of finite width, propagating away from the eruption source location. Recent studies of individual solar eruptive events have used EUV observations of CBFs and metric radio type II burst observations to show the intimate connection between waves in the low corona and coronal mass ejection (CME-driven shocks. EUV imaging with the atmospheric imaging assembly instrument on the solar dynamics observatory has proven particularly useful for detecting large-scale short-lived CBFs, which, combined with radio and in situ observations, holds great promise for early CME-driven shock characterization capability. This characterization can further be automated, and related to models of particle acceleration to produce estimates of particle fluxes in the corona and in the near Earth environment early in events. We present a framework for the coronal analysis of shocks and waves (CASHeW. It combines analysis of NASA Heliophysics System Observatory data products and relevant data-driven models, into an automated system for the characterization of off-limb coronal waves and shocks and the evaluation of their capability to accelerate solar energetic particles (SEPs. The system utilizes EUV observations and models written in the interactive data language. In addition, it leverages analysis tools from the SolarSoft package of libraries, as well as third party libraries. We have tested the CASHeW framework on a representative list of coronal bright front events. Here we present its features, as well as initial results. With this framework, we hope to contribute to the overall understanding of coronal shock waves, their importance for energetic particle acceleration, as well as to the better ability to forecast SEP events fluxes.

  9. How can we ensure that the coroner's autopsy is not an invasion of human rights?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadbeatter, Stephen; James, Ryk

    2018-01-01

    Despite public inquiries, and some changes to legislation following high-profile multiple homicides that were not detected by autopsy, coroners continue to rely largely on the autopsy. Regardless of the extent of quality failings and excess deaths at some hospitals, not detected through the coroner system, the autopsy is scarcely used by hospitals to monitor standards and educate. To explore when a compulsory medicolegal autopsy should, and should not, be used. Two hundred and thirty-six cases referred to a senior coroner were evaluated by pathologists with long experience of forensic, coronial and hospital autopsies, using detailed antecedent medical and circumstantial information: after their advice, the senior coroner decided what kind of autopsy provided sufficient information for his purposes. In nearly 40% (n=88) of deaths where the senior coroner accepted jurisdiction, issues raised could be resolved through analysis of medical records and antecedent information, supplemented only by detailed external examination of the body. Timely provision of sufficient information allows informed decisions about the requirement for, and nature and extent of, medical investigations into a death: unnecessary post mortem dissection is avoided, protecting the rights, under Articles 8 and 9 of the Human Rights Act 1998, of the bereaved to privacy, family life and religious practice. Although improvements in healthcare can undoubtedly result from detailed coroners' inquiries, those deaths where the matters investigated relate only to the accuracy of a natural cause of death or sit with a healthcare provider's internal quality assurance, should be investigated by the healthcare system in collaboration with the bereaved. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Observations of Coronal Streamers in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Measurements made with the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory can be used to determine physical parameters in the solar corona such as hydrogen and ion kinetic temperatures, electron densities, and absolute elemental abundances. Hydrogen and ion outflow ...

  11. Radiological factors affecting post-operative global coronal balance in Lenke 5 C scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Ajoy Prasad; Suresh, Subramani; Aiyer, Siddharth N; Kanna, Rishi; Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan

    2017-12-01

    Lenke 5 C curves are frequently associated with clinically and radiological coronal imbalance. Appropriate selection of proximal and distal levels of fusion is essential to ensure good coronal balance (CB). We aimed to evaluate radiological factors associated with (I) global CB in the early post-operative period; (II) late decompensation of CB; and (III) favourable spontaneous correction of CB on long term follow up. Twenty-three Lenke type 5C scoliosis cases treated with selective posterior lumbar instrumentation were retrospectively evaluated. Pre-operative, early post-operative and late post-operative (>2 years) whole length radiographs were analysed. Cobb's angle, lumbar lordosis, coronal imbalance, lower instrumented vertebra (LIV) tilt and translation and upper instrumented vertebra (UIV) tilt and translation were measured. The proximal and distal fusion levels were noted and correlated with post-operative CB. There were 21 females and 2 males with a mean follow up of 36 months. The mean pre-operative cobb angle was 55°±13.26°, which corrected to 14.7°±8.84° and was maintained on follow up. Eight patients had early post-operative coronal imbalance with spontaneous resolution seen in six cases on long term follow-up. At final follow-up, four cases had coronal imbalance (persistent imbalance since early post-operative period =2; late decompensation =2). In cases with early imbalance 5/8 cases had a pre-operative LIV tilt of ≥25°. All four patients with coronal imbalance at final follow-up had pre-operative LIV tilt ≥25°. Radiographic parameters which correlated with post-operative coronal imbalance were pre-operative LIV tilt (r=0.64, P=0.001), pre-operative LIV translation (r=0.696, Poperative UIV translation (r=0.44, P=0.030), post-operative LIV tilt (r=0.804, Poperative UIV tilt (r=0.62, P=0.001). In Lenke 5C scoliosis, a pre-operative LIV tilt ≥25° significantly correlates with post-operative global coronal imbalance. Increasing UIV tilt may

  12. Models of transition region and coronal plasma in solar loop structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J. C.; Rosner, R.

    1981-01-01

    The theory of coronal loops was developed and the simple version of the theory and observations are compared. It is shown that the gross properties of the confined corona can be understood by considering simple hydrostatic equilibrium models. By observing the corona it is apparent that hydrostatic models are seriously inadequate. It is suggested that observations of intensity fluctuations, of persistent up and down flows, of relatively cool matter residing at coronal heights, of apparent spatial co-mingling of hot plasmas at quite different temperatures, need a more sophisticated modeling.

  13. Evidence of suppressed heating of coronal loops rooted in opposite polarity sunspot umbrae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Thalmann, Julia K.; Winebarger, Amy R.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Moore, Ronald

    2015-04-01

    Observations of active region (AR) coronae in different EUV wavelengths reveal the presence of various loops at different temperatures. To understand the mechanisms that result in hotter or cooler loops, we study a typical bipolar AR, near solar disk center, which has moderate overall magnetic twist and at least one fully developed sunspot of each polarity. From AIA 193 and 94 A images we identify many clearly discernible coronal loops that connect opposite-polarity plage or a sunspot to a opposite-polarity plage region. The AIA 94 A images show dim regions in the umbrae of the spots. To see which coronal loops are rooted in a dim umbral area, we performed a non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) modeling using photospheric vector magnetic field measurements obtained with the Heliosesmic Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard SDO. After validation of the NLFFF model by comparison of calculated model field lines and observed loops in AIA 193 and 94 A, we specify the photospheric roots of the model field lines. The model field then shows the coronal magnetic loops that arch from the dim umbral area of the positive-polarity sunspot to the dim umbral area of a negative-polarity sunspot. Because these coronal loops are not visible in any of the coronal EUV and X-ray images of the AR, we conclude they are the coolest loops in the AR. This result suggests that the loops connecting opposite polarity umbrae are the least heated because the field in umbrae is so strong that the convective braiding of the field is strongly suppressed.From this result, we further hypothesize that the convective freedom at the feet of a coronal loop, together with the strength of the field in the body of the loop, determines the strength of the heating. In particular, we expect the hottest coronal loops to have one foot in an umbra and the other foot in opposite-polarity penumbra or plage (coronal moss), the areas of strong field in which convection is not as strongly suppressed as in umbrae. Many

  14. Pharmaceutical Activation or Genetic Absence of ClC-2 Alters Tight Junctions During Experimental Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Younggeon; Pridgen, Tiffany A; Blikslager, Anthony T

    2015-12-01

    We have previously reported that the ClC-2 chloride channel has an important role in regulation of tight junction barrier function during experimental colitis, and the pharmaceutical ClC-2 activator lubiprostone initiates intestinal barrier repair in ischemic-injured intestine. Thus, we hypothesized that pharmaceutical ClC-2 activation would have a protective and therapeutic effect in murine models of colitis, which would be absent in ClC-2 mice. We administered lubiprostone to wild-type or ClC-2 mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) or 2, 4, 5-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis. We determined the severity of colitis and assessed intestinal permeability. Selected tight junction proteins were analyzed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence/confocal microscopy, whereas proliferative and differentiated cells were examined with special staining and immunohistochemistry. Oral preventive or therapeutic administration of lubiprostone significantly reduced the severity of colitis and reduced intestinal permeability in both DSS and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis. Preventive treatment with lubiprostone induced significant recovery of the expression and distribution of selected sealing tight junction proteins in mice with DSS-induced colitis. In addition, lubiprostone reduced crypt proliferation and increased the number of differentiated epithelial cells. Alternatively, when lubiprostone was administered to ClC-2 mice, the protective effect against DSS colitis was limited. This study suggests a central role for ClC-2 in restoration of barrier function and tight junction architecture in experimental murine colitis, which can be therapeutically targeted with lubiprostone.

  15. The infrared spectrum of the Ne-C2D2 complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.; McKellar, A. R. W.; Fernández, Berta; Farrelly, David

    2015-11-01

    Infrared spectra of Ne-C2D2 are observed in the region of the ν3 fundamental band (asymmetric C-D stretch, ≈2440 cm-1) using a tunable optical parametric oscillator to probe a pulsed supersonic slit jet expansion from a cooled nozzle. Like helium-acetylene, this system lies close to the free rotor limit, making analysis tricky because stronger transitions tend to pile up close to monomer (C2D2) rotation-vibration transitions. Assignments are aided by predicted rotational energies calculated from a published ab initio intermolecular potential energy surface. The analysis extends up to the j = 3←2 band, where j labels C2D2 rotation within the dimer, and is much more complete than the limited infrared assignments previously reported for Ne-C2H2 and Ne-C2HD. Two previous microwave transitions within the j = 1 state of Ne-C2D2 are reassigned. Coriolis model fits to the theoretical levels and to the spectrum are compared. Since the variations observed as a function of C2D2 vibrational excitation are comparable to those noted between theory and experiment, it is evident that more detailed testing of theory will require vibrational averaging over the acetylene intramolecular modes.

  16. Chemical pressure in SmNiC(2-x)B(x) compounds: evidence of a quantum critical behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, F; Mendivil, L F; Escamilla, R

    2014-11-12

    We studied the effect of carbon substituted by boron on polycrystalline samples of SmNiC(2) in the B content range 0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.200. The structural parameters were determined from x-ray measurements by Rietveld analysis. The structural analysis shows that the cell volume increases as the B content increases indicating that the substitution produces an internal pressure. The samples were studied by resistance as a function of temperature from room temperature down to 2 K. The transition temperature of the charge density wave, TCDW = 148 K, decreases with an increment of B until the transition vanishes in the resistance measurements. At the same time, the ferromagnetic transition temperature changes showing a tiny dome with the B content, with a maximum transition temperature of ∼ 23.1 K. In addition, the resistance behaviour above the charge density wave is linear in temperature and this behaviour persists until the charge density wave disappears, suggesting that the system is a non-Fermi liquid. The resulting temperature--boron content phase--diagram indicates a quantum critical behaviour.

  17. Jet outflow and open field line measurements on the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheftman, D., E-mail: dsheftman@trialphaenergy.com; Gupta, D.; Roche, T.; Thompson, M. C. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688-7010 (United States); Giammanco, F.; Conti, F.; Marsili, P.; Moreno, C. D. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    Knowledge and control of the axial outflow of plasma particles and energy along open-magnetic-field lines are of crucial importance to the stability and longevity of the advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma. An overview of the diagnostic methods used to perform measurements on the open field line plasma on C-2U is presented, including passive Doppler impurity spectroscopy, microwave interferometry, and triple Langmuir probe measurements. Results of these measurements provide the jet ion temperature and axial velocity, electron density, and high frequency density fluctuations.

  18. Jet outflow and open field line measurements on the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheftman, D; Gupta, D; Roche, T; Thompson, M C; Giammanco, F; Conti, F; Marsili, P; Moreno, C D

    2016-11-01

    Knowledge and control of the axial outflow of plasma particles and energy along open-magnetic-field lines are of crucial importance to the stability and longevity of the advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma. An overview of the diagnostic methods used to perform measurements on the open field line plasma on C-2U is presented, including passive Doppler impurity spectroscopy, microwave interferometry, and triple Langmuir probe measurements. Results of these measurements provide the jet ion temperature and axial velocity, electron density, and high frequency density fluctuations.

  19. Endocytosis‒Mediated Invasion and Pathogenicity of Streptococcus agalactiae in Rat Cardiomyocyte (H9C2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Pooja

    Full Text Available Streptococcus agalactiae infection causes high mortality in cardiovascular disease (CVD patients, especially in case of setting prosthetic valve during cardiac surgery. However, the pathogenesis mechanism of S. agalactiae associate with CVD has not been well studied. Here, we have demonstrated the pathogenicity of S. agalactiae in rat cardiomyocytes (H9C2. Interestingly, both live and dead cells of S. agalactiae were uptaken by H9C2 cells. To further dissect the process of S. agalactiae internalization, we chemically inhibited discrete parts of cellular uptake system in H9C2 cells using genistein, chlorpromazine, nocodazole and cytochalasin B. Chemical inhibition of microtubule and actin formation by nocodazole and cytochalasin B impaired S. agalactiae internalization into H9C2 cells. Consistently, reverse‒ transcription PCR (RT‒PCR and quantitative real time‒PCR (RT-qPCR analyses also detected higher levels of transcripts for cytoskeleton forming genes, Acta1 and Tubb5 in S. agalactiae‒infected H9C2 cells, suggesting the requirement of functional cytoskeleton in pathogenesis. Host survival assay demonstrated that S. agalactiae internalization induced cytotoxicity in H9C2 cells. S. agalactiae cells grown with benzyl penicillin reduced its ability to internalize and induce cytotoxicity in H9C2 cells, which could be attributed with the removal of surface lipoteichoic acid (LTA from S. agalactiae. Further, the LTA extracted from S. agalactiae also exhibited dose‒dependent cytotoxicity in H9C2 cells. Taken together, our data suggest that S. agalactiae cells internalized H9C2 cells through energy‒dependent endocytic processes and the LTA of S. agalactiae play major role in host cell internalization and cytotoxicity induction.

  20. ClC-2 chloride channels contribute to HTC cell volume homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, R M; Smith, R L; Feranchak, A P; Clayton, G H; Doctor, R B; Fitz, J G

    2001-03-01

    Membrane Cl(-) channels play an important role in cell volume homeostasis and regulation of volume-sensitive cell transport and metabolism. Heterologous expression of ClC-2 channel cDNA leads to the appearance of swelling-activated Cl(-) currents, consistent with a role in cell volume regulation. Since channel properties in heterologous models are potentially modified by cellular background, we evaluated whether endogenous ClC-2 proteins are functionally important in cell volume regulation. As shown by whole cell patch clamp techniques in rat HTC hepatoma cells, cell volume increases stimulated inwardly rectifying Cl(-) currents when non-ClC-2 currents were blocked by DIDS (100 microM). A cDNA closely homologous with rat brain ClC-2 was isolated from HTC cells; identical sequence was demonstrated for ClC-2 cDNAs in primary rat hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. ClC-2 mRNA and membrane protein expression was demonstrated by in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot. Intracellular delivery of antibodies to an essential regulatory domain of ClC-2 decreased ClC-2-dependent currents expressed in HEK-293 cells. In HTC cells, the same antibodies prevented activation of endogenous Cl(-) currents by cell volume increases or exposure to the purinergic receptor agonist ATP and delayed HTC cell volume recovery from swelling. These studies provide further evidence that mammalian ClC-2 channel proteins are functional and suggest that in HTC cells they contribute to physiological changes in membrane Cl(-) permeability and cell volume homeostasis.

  1. β‐Taxilin participates in differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakane, Hiroshi; Makiyama, Tomohiko; Nogami, Satoru; Horii, Yukimi [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Graduate school of Medicine, Dokkyo Medical University, 880 Kitakobayashi, Mibu-town, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan); Akasaki, Kenji [Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, Fukuyama, Hiroshima 729-0292 (Japan); Shirataki, Hiromichi, E-mail: hiro-sh@dokkyomed.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Graduate school of Medicine, Dokkyo Medical University, 880 Kitakobayashi, Mibu-town, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan)

    2016-07-15

    Myogenesis is required for the development of skeletal muscle. Accumulating evidence indicates that the expression of several genes are upregulated during myogenesis and these genes play pivotal roles in myogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying myogenesis is not fully understood. In this study, we found that β-taxilin, which is specifically expressed in the skeletal muscle and heart tissues, was progressively expressed during differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotubes, prompting us to investigate the role of β-taxilin in myogenesis. In C2C12 cells, knockdown of β-taxilin impaired the fusion of myoblasts into myotubes, and decreased the diameter of myotubes. We also found that β-taxilin interacted with dysbindin, a coiled-coil-containing protein. Knockdown of dysbindin conversely promoted the fusion of myoblasts into myotubes and increased the diameter of myotubes in C2C12 cells. Furthermore, knockdown of dysbindin attenuated the inhibitory effect of β-taxilin depletion on myotube formation of C2C12 cells. These results demonstrate that β-taxilin participates in myogenesis through suppressing the function of dysbindin to inhibit the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotubes. - Highlights: • β‐Taxilin is progressively expressed during differentiation of C2C12 cell. • Knockdown of β-taxilin impaired C2C12 myotube formation. • β‐Taxilin interacted with dysbindin. • Knockdown of dysbindin promoted C2C12 myotube formation. • The function of β-taxilin in C2C12 myotube formation depends on dysbindin.

  2. Physical Properties of the SKYLAB North Polar Coronal Hole with an Extended Base and its MHD Self-Consistent Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, S.; Ocania, G.

    1991-04-01

    RESUMEN Con base en las observaciones del Skylab del Sol en rayos X que permitieron r la forma de la frontera del hoyo coronal del polo norte y en las observaciones de l 'z que permitieron derivar un perfil de densidad para el flujo de viento solar (IC ese hoyo, Murno yjackson (1977) concluyeron que se requiere una adici6n t l clc energfa al flujo hasta al menos 5 R8. En este trabajo, recalculamos los perfiles de y de temperatura para el mismo hoyo pero considerando una frontera Cs mas ancha en la base, de acuerdo con las observaciones del coron6metro-K del IIAO, los espectroheliogramas en EUV del OSO-7 y las fotografias de la corona solar cerca de los 4 E)()O A. Se tomaron tambien las incertidumbres en el perfil de densidad electr6nica inl & a las observaciones de luz blanca y se consideraron diversos valores posibles dCl fl 'jo (lC masa 1 UA. Encontramos que las diferencias introducidas no son suficientes par clcsc' la necesidad de una energetizaci6n extensa del viento solar, pero una dC las s posibles muestra una concordancia muy buena con el modelado MHD (l( l flujo con el unico t6rmino adicional de la fuerza de Lorentz en la ecuaci6n de # (). ABSTRACT Based on the near to the Sun boundary of the Skylab north polar coroi ' l estimated from the AS & E X-ray photographs and on the density profile fi-C)I white light data, Munro and Jackson (1977) concluded that substantial energy the solar wind flux is required up to at least 5 Rs. In this paper we recalculate `eloci y and temperature profiles for the same hole but considering a different bo ' ry for flux tube which is larger at its base, according to the HAO K- obser"' (i()I0 , the OSO-7 EUV spectroheliograms and pictures of the solar 4500 A. è take into account the uncertainties inherent in the white light observations () electron density profile and consider different possible values of the solar I .' fltix at 1 AU. We that the differences introduced are not sufficient to discard ii y of an extended

  3. The principal conductance in Giardia lamblia trophozoites possesses functional properties similar to the mammalian ClC-2 current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Galindo, Eloy G; Rodríguez-Elías, Julio C; Ramírez-Herrera, Mario A; Sánchez-Chapula, José A; Navarro-Polanco, Ricardo A

    2014-05-01

    The human intestinal pathogen Giardia lamblia is a flagellated unicellular protozoan with pronounced medical and biological relevance. However, the basic physiology of Giardia trophozoites has been sparsely studied, especially the electrical and ionic properties of their cellular membrane which are virtually unknown. In this study, we were able to record and characterize the macroscopic ionic currents of Giardia trophozoite membrane by electrophysiological methods of the patch clamp technique. Giardia trophozoites showed a high current density (∼600 pA/pF at -140 mV) that was activated upon hyperpolarization. This current was carried by a chloride-selective channel (I Cl-G) and it was the most important determinant of the membrane potential in Giardia trophozoites. Moreover, this conductance was able to carry other halide anions and the sequence of permeability was Br(-) > Cl(-) ≈ I(-) ≫ F(-). Besides the voltage-dependent inward-rectifying nature of I Cl-G, its activation and deactivation kinetics were comparable to those observed in ClC-2 channels. Extracellular pH modified the voltage-dependent properties of I Cl-G, shifting the activation curve from a V 1/2 = -79 ± 1 mV (pH 7.4) to -93 ± 2 mV (pH 8.4) and -112 ± 2 mV (pH 5.4). Furthermore, the maximal amplitude of I Cl-G measured at -100 mV showed dependence to external pH in a bell-shaped fashion reported only for ClC-2 channels. Therefore, our results suggest that I Cl-G possesses several functional properties similar to the mammalian ClC-2 channels.

  4. A long look at MCG-5-23-16 with NuSTAR. I. relativistic reflection and coronal properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoghbi, Abderahmen; Matt, G; Miller, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    between the cutoff energy and both the hard X-ray flux and spectral index. The measurements imply that the coronal plasma is not at the runaway electron-positron pair limit, and instead contains mostly electrons. The observed variability in the coronal properties is driven by a variable optical depth...

  5. Classification of DES16C2nm as a SLSN at z=1.998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbany, L.; D'Andrea, C.; Prajs, S.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Ponder, K.; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S.; Forster, F.; Hamuy, M.; Prieto, Jose Luis; Schubnell, M.; Kessler, R.; Lasker, J.; Scolnic, D.; Brout, D. J.; Gladney, L.; March, M.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; Macaulay, E.; Nichol, R.; Childress, M.; Maartens, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.; Aldering, G.; Gupta, R.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Foley, R. J.; Pan, Y.-C.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Papadopoulos, A.; Morganson, E.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.

    2016-11-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of DES16C2nm as a superluminous supernova (SLSN) discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (ATEL #4668). DES16C2nm was discovered in the first epoch of DES Y4, on 22 August 2016 at R.A. = 03:40:14.83, Decl = -29:05:53.5 with i = 23.2 mag. DES16C2nm has a non-detection in the final epoch of DES Y3 on 08 February 2016.

  6. Identification of the fatty acid activation site on human ClC-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuppoletti, John; Tewari, Kirti P; Chakrabarti, Jayati; Malinowska, Danuta H

    2017-06-01

    Fatty acids (including lubiprostone and cobiprostone) are human ClC-2 (hClC-2) Cl- channel activators. Molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this activation were examined. Role of a four-amino acid PKA activation site, RGET691, of hClC-2 was investigated using wild-type (WT) and mutant (AGET, RGEA, and AGAA) hClC-2 expressed in 293EBNA cells as well as involvement of PKA, intracellular cAMP concentration ([cAMP]i), EP2, or EP4 receptor agonist activity. All fatty acids [lubiprostone, cobiprostone, eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), oleic acid, and elaidic acid] caused significant rightward shifts in concentration-dependent Cl- current activation (increasing EC50s) with mutant compared with WT hClC-2 channels, without changing time and voltage dependence, current-voltage rectification, or methadone inhibition of the channel. As with lubiprostone, cobiprostone activation of hClC-2 occurred with PKA inhibitor (myristoylated protein kinase inhibitor) present or when using double PKA activation site (RRAA655/RGEA691) mutant. Cobiprostone did not activate human CFTR. Fatty acids did not increase [cAMP]i in hClC-2/293EBNA or T84 cells. Using T84 CFTR knockdown cells, cobiprostone increased hClC-2 Cl- currents without increasing [cAMP]i, while PGE2 and forskolin-IBMX increased both. Fatty acids were not agonists of EP2 or EP4 receptors. L-161,982, a supposed EP4-selective inhibitor, had no effect on lubiprostone-activated hClC-2 Cl- currents but significantly decreased T84 cell barrier function measured by transepithelial resistance and fluorescent dextran transepithelial movement. The present findings show that RGET691 of hClC-2 (possible binding site) plays an important functional role in fatty acid activation of hClC-2. PKA, [cAMP]i, and EP2 or EP4 receptors are not involved. These studies provide the molecular basis for fatty acid regulation of hClC-2. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Hot coronal loop oscillations observed with SUMER: Examples and statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. J.; Solanki, S. K.; Curdt, W.; Innes, D. E.; Dammasch, I. E.; Kliem, B.

    2003-08-01

    to be triggered by micro- or subflares near a footpoint, as revealed in one example with SXR image observations. However other mechanisms cannot as yet be ruled out. Some oscillations showed phase propagation along the slit in one or both directions with apparent speeds in the range of 8-102 km s-1, together with distinctly different intensity and line width distributions along the slit. These features can be explained by the excitation of the oscillation at a footpoint of an inhomogeneous coronal loop, e.g. a loop with fine structure. Table \\ref{osctab} and Appendices A and B are only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  8. Flux pinning mechanism and H{sub c2}-anisotropy in melanin doped bulk MgB{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahabuddin Shah, M., E-mail: mshahabuddin@ksu.edu.sa; Shahabuddin, Mohammed; Alzayed, Nasser S.; Parakkandy, Jafar M.

    2014-06-15

    Highlights: • Melanin doping enhances superconducting properties of MgB{sub 2}. • Grain boundary pinning is the dominant pinning mechanism in melanin doped MgB{sub 2}. • Experimental J{sub c} data could be very closely fitted using Percolation model. • Anisotropy is reduced due to melanin doping resulting in increase in J{sub c} in high field. • Pinning force maximum is suppressed due to melanin doping. - Abstract: Flux pinning mechanism in melanin doped MgB{sub 2} superconductor has been studied using a scaling law proposed by Dew-Hughes and another method proposed by Eisterer. Our experimental data could be fitted very closely by the aforementioned scaling law. The fitting parameters, the positions of peaks b{sub peak} and k = b{sub peak}/b{sub n} confirm a grain-boundary pinning in the 10% melanin doped sample, while the undoped sample consists of mixed pinning. Furthermore, percolation theory was utilized under grain-boundary approximation to investigate the role of H{sub c2}-anisotropy in the critical current density, and its dependence on applied field as well as temperature. The H{sub c2}-anisotropy decreases with melanin doping resulting in the increase of J{sub c} in high field. There is suppression of flux pinning maximum due to melanin doping, which is found to be the main reason for the degradation of low-field J{sub c}.

  9. Effect of higher implant density on curve correction in dystrophic thoracic scoliosis secondary to neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Yuan, Xinxin; Sha, Shifu; Liu, Zhen; Zhu, Weiguo; Qiu, Yong; Wang, Bin; Yu, Yang; Zhu, Zezhang

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to investigate how implant density affects radiographic results and clinical outcomes in patients with dystrophic scoliosis secondary to neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1). METHODS A total of 41 patients with dystrophic scoliosis secondary to NF1 who underwent 1-stage posterior correction between June 2011 and December 2013 were included. General information about patients was recorded, as were preoperative and postoperative scores from Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-22 questionnaires. Pearson correlation analysis was used to analyze the associations among implant density, coronal Cobb angle correction rate and correction loss at last follow-up, change of sagittal curve, and apical vertebral translation. Patients were then divided into 2 groups: those with low-density and those with high-density implants. Independent-sample t-tests were used to compare demographic data, radiographic findings, and clinical outcomes before surgery and at last follow-up between the groups. RESULTS Significant correlations were found between the implant density and the coronal correction rate of the main curve (r = 0.505, p 0.05 for all). CONCLUSIONS Although no significant differences between the high- and low-density groups were found in any of the SRS-22 domains at final follow-up, higher implant density was correlated with superior coronal correction and less postoperative correction loss in patients with dystrophic NF1-associated scoliosis.

  10. Optical properties of functionalized Ti3C2T2 (T = F, O, OH MXene: First-principles calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Berdiyorov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Role of surface termination on the dielectric and optical properties of Ti3C2T2 (T = F, O, OH MXene is studied using first-principles density functional theory. The results show that the surface functionalization has a significant impact on the optical properties of the MXene. For example, in the visible range of the spectrum, the oxidized sample shows larger absorption, whereas surface fluorination results in weaker absorption as compared to pristine MXene. In the ultraviolet energy range, all functional groups lead to the enhancement of both absorption and reflectivity of the material. Dielectric properties of MXene are also sensitive to the surface functionalization. Our findings demonstrate the importance of surface termination on the optical properties of the MXene.

  11. Commentary on the Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun II. Insight Relative to Coronal Rain and Splashdown Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Coronal rain represents blobs of solar material with a width of ∼ 300 km and a length of ∼ 700 km which are falling from the active region of the corona towards the solar surface along loop-like paths. Conversely, coronal showers are com prised of much larger bulks of matter, or clumps of solar rain. Beyond coronal rain and showers, the expulsion of solar matter from the surface, whether through flares, pro minences, or coronal mass ejections, can result in massive disruptions which have bee n observed to rise far into the corona, return towards the Sun, and splashdown onto the phot osphere. The existence of coronal rain and the splashdown of mass ejections onto the so lar surface constitute the twenty-third and twenty-fourth lines of evidence that the S un is condensed matter.

  12. Type II collagen C2C epitope in human synovial fluid and serum after knee injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumahashi, N; Swärd, P; Larsson, S

    2015-01-01

    ). Serum was collected from 71 of the knee injured patients. Synovial fluid from 8 knee-healthy subjects was used as reference. C2C was quantified by immunoassay and structural injury was determined from magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the injured knee acquired 1-38 days after injury (n = 98......). Additional joint injury biomarker results were from earlier investigations of the same samples. RESULTS: Synovial fluid C2C concentrations were higher in injured knees than in knees of reference subjects from 1 day up to 7 years after injury. C2C concentrations in synovial fluid and serum were correlated (r......PURPOSE: Investigate in a cross-sectional study time-dependent changes of synovial fluid type II collagen epitope C2C concentrations after knee injury and correlate to other joint injury biomarkers. METHODS: Synovial fluid samples were aspirated between 0 days and 7 years after injury (n = 235...

  13. Cognitive Works Aids for C2 Planning: Actionable Information to Support Operational Decision Making

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wampler, Jeffrey; Whitaker, Randall; Roth, Emilie; Scott, Ronald; Stilson, Mona; Thomas-Meyers, Gina

    2005-01-01

    .... This paper describes a design for a global mission planning C2 work aid. The discussion describes a cognitive based design approach to developing work aids called Work Centered Support Systems (WCSS...

  14. Phytoecdysteroid C2-hydroxylase is microsomal in spinach, Spinacia oleracea L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakrim, Ahmed; Guittard, Emilie; Maria, Annick; De Virville, Jacques Davy; Lafont, René; Takvorian, Najat

    2009-12-01

    An enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of phytoecdysteroids, the C2-hydroxylase, has been investigated in spinach, Spinacia oleracea. This enzyme is microsomal and its K(m) has been determined using 2-deoxy-20-hydroxyecdysone as substrate (K(m)=3.72 microM). It is much more efficient with 2-deoxy-20-hydroxyecdysone than with 2-deoxyecdysone and, conversely, the C20-hydroxylase is more active on 2-deoxyecdysone than on ecdysone. These data support the conclusion that C20-hydroxylation precedes C2-hydroxylation. The C2-hydroxylase is inhibited by high concentrations of 20E. Substrate specificity and subcellular localization of C2-hydroxylase differ between plants and insects, and these data, as well as those previously reported on other biosynthetic steps, show the great difference between plant and insect ecdysteroid biosynthetic pathways and suggest an independent origin for the pathways in both kingdoms. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Work-Centered Design and Evaluation of a C2 Visualization Aid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roth, Emilie; Scott, Ronald; Kazmierczak, Tom; Whitaker, Randall; Stilson, Mona; Thomas-Meyers, Gina; Wampler, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    .... We have been developing and applying work-centered design and evaluation methodologies to design advanced visualization and support tools intended to more effectively support C2 cognitive and collaborative work...

  16. Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of C2H2Oxidation at High Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez, Jorge Gimenez; Rasmussen, Christian Tihic; Hashemi, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    diagram for C2H3 + O2 by Goldsmith et al. and on new ab initio calculations, respectively. The C2H2 + HO2 reaction involves nine pressure- and temperature-dependent product channels, with formation of triplet CHCHO being dominant under most conditions. The barrier to reaction for C2H2 + O2 was found...... to be more than 50 kcal mol−1 and predictions of the initiation temperature were not sensitive to this reaction. Experiments were conducted with C2H2/O2 mixtures highly diluted in N2 in a high-pressure flow reactor at 600–900 K and 60 bar, varying the reaction stoichiometry from very lean to fuel...

  17. Overview of the C-2W Field-Reversed Configuration Experiment Diagnostic Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Matthew; Schindler, Tania; Gota, Hiroshi; Putvinski, Sergei; Tuszewski, Michel; Binderbauer, Michl; TAE, Tri Alpha Energy Team

    2017-10-01

    Tri Alpha Energy (TAE) studies the evolution of advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas sustained by neutral-beam injection. Operations recently commenced on the C-2W device, which focuses on FRC heating and diamagnetic current build up. Data on the FRC plasma is provided by an initial suite of diagnostics including magnetic sensors, interferometry, fast imaging cameras, Thomson scattering, and spectroscopy. Many more sophisticated diagnostics are also in preparation and commissioning: reflectometry, neutral particle analyzers, multi-chord FIR polarimetry, end loss analyzers, impurity and majority ion CHERS, FIDA, and 100 channel bolometers with proprietary compact local data acquisition. While many of these diagnostic systems were first implemented for the earlier C-2 and C-2U experiments, most had major upgrades for C-2W. TAE's diagnostics development program also works on novel systems including new ways to measure FRC internal magnetic fields.

  18. Fully-kinetic Ion Simulation of Global Electrostatic Turbulent Transport in C-2U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Daniel; Lau, Calvin; Bao, Jian; Lin, Zhihong; Tajima, Toshiki; TAE Team

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the nature of particle and energy transport in field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas is a crucial step towards an FRC-based fusion reactor. The C-2U device at Tri Alpha Energy (TAE) achieved macroscopically stable plasmas and electron energy confinement time which scaled favorably with electron temperature. This success led to experimental and theoretical investigation of turbulence in C-2U, including gyrokinetic ion simulations with the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC). A primary objective of TAE's new C-2W device is to explore transport scaling in an extended parameter regime. In concert with the C-2W experimental campaign, numerical efforts have also been extended in A New Code (ANC) to use fully-kinetic (FK) ions and a Vlasov-Poisson field solver. Global FK ion simulations are presented. Future code development is also discussed.

  19. Felix Spectroscopy of Likely Astronomical Molecular Ions: HC_3O^+, C_2H_3CNH^+, and C_2H_5CNH^+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorwirth, Sven; Asvany, Oskar; Brünken, Sandra; Jusko, Pavol; Schlemmer, Stephan; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; McCarthy, Michael C.

    2017-06-01

    Infrared signatures of three molecular ions of relevance to the interstellar medium and planetary atmospheres have been detected at the Free Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments, FELIX, at Radboud University (Nijmegen, The Netherlands) in combination with the 4K FELion 22-pole ion trap facility. Mid-infrared vibrational modes of protonated tricarbon monoxide, HC_3O^+, protonated vinyl cyanide, C_2H_3CNH^+, and protonated ethyl cyanide, C_2H_5CNH^+, were detected using resonant photodissociation of the respective Ne-complexes by monitoring the depletion of their cluster mass signal as a function of wavenumber. The infrared fingerprints compare very favorably with results from high-level quantum-chemical calculations performed at the CCSD(T) level of theory.

  20. Nd2[MoC2] and RE2[WC2], RE=Ce, Pr, Nd: New carbometalates with Pr2[MoC2] structure type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enkhtsetseg Dashjav, Yurii Prots, Guido Kreiner, Walter Schnelle, Frank R. Wagner and Rüdiger Kniep

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Four new ternary rare-earth-metal carbometalates, Nd2[MoC2] and RE2[WC2] with RE=Ce, Pr, Nd, have been synthesized by argon arc melting and subsequent heat treatment at 1170 K for 30 days. They crystallize with the Pr2[MoC2] structure type with isolated C4− species and are typical carbometalates with (i low metal-to-carbon ratio, (ii tetrahedral coordination of the transition metals (T by carbon, and (iii a polyanionic network ∞2[(TC26-]. According to resistivity measurements the compounds are bad metals. Volume chemistry and magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate Pr3+, Nd3+, and Ce4+ species, respectively. In the latter case, the additional electron is not transferred to the polyanionic network, instead it mainly populates the Ce partial structure.