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Sample records for c2 coronal densities

  1. A SURVEY OF CORONAL CAVITY DENSITY PROFILES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronal cavities are common features of the solar corona that appear as darkened regions at the base of coronal helmet streamers in coronagraph images. Their darkened appearance indicates that they are regions of lowered density embedded within the comparatively higher density helmet streamer. Despite interfering projection effects of the surrounding helmet streamer (which we refer to as the cavity rim), Fuller et al. have shown that under certain conditions it is possible to use a Van de Hulst inversion of white-light polarized brightness (pB) data to calculate the electron density of both the cavity and cavity rim plasma. In this article, we apply minor modifications to the methods of Fuller et al. in order to improve the accuracy and versatility of the inversion process, and use the new methods to calculate density profiles for both the cavity and cavity rim in 24 cavity systems. We also examine trends in cavity morphology and how departures from the model geometry affect our density calculations. The density calculations reveal that in all 24 cases the cavity plasma has a flatter density profile than the plasma of the cavity rim, meaning that the cavity has a larger density depletion at low altitudes than it does at high altitudes. We find that the mean cavity density is over four times greater than that of a coronal hole at an altitude of 1.2 Rsun and that every cavity in the sample is over twice as dense as a coronal hole at this altitude. Furthermore, we find that different cavity systems near solar maximum span a greater range in density at 1.2 Rsun than do cavity systems near solar minimum, with a slight trend toward higher densities for systems nearer to solar maximum. Finally, we found no significant correlation of cavity density properties with cavity height-indeed, cavities show remarkably similar density depletions-except for the two smallest cavities that show significantly greater depletion.

  2. An atlas of coronal electron density at 5Rs I: Data processing and calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, Huw

    2015-01-01

    Tomography of the solar corona can provide cruicial constraints for models of the low corona, unique information on changes in coronal structure and rotation rates, and a valuable boundary condition for models of the heliospheric solar wind. This is the first of a series of three papers which aim to create a set of maps of the coronal density over an extended period (1996-present). The papers will describe the data processing and calibration (this paper), the tomography method (\\paperii) and resulting atlas of coronal electron density at a height of 5\\Rs\\ between years 1996-2014 (\\paperiii). This first paper presents a detailed description of data processing and calibration for the Large-Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) C2 instrument onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the COR2 instruments of the Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) package aboard the Solar Terrestial Relations Observatory (STEREO) A \\& B spacecraft. The methodology includes...

  3. Inferring the Coronal Density Irregularity from EUV Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the density structure of the solar corona is important for modeling both coronal heating and the solar wind. Direct measurements are difficult because of line-of-sight integration and possible unresolved structures. We present a new method for quantifying such structure using density-sensitive EUV line intensities to derive a density irregularity parameter, a relative measure of the amount of structure along the line of sight. We also present a simple model to relate the inferred irregularities to physical quantities, such as the filling factor and density contrast. For quiet Sun regions and interplume regions of coronal holes, we find a density contrast of at least a factor of three to ten and corresponding filling factors of about 10-20%. Our results are in rough agreement with other estimates of the density structures in these regions. The irregularity diagnostic provides a useful relative measure of unresolved structure in various regions of the corona.

  4. Electron temperature and density relationships in coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, C. M.; Phillips, J. L.; Balogh, A.

    1995-01-01

    We examine 10 coronal mass ejections from the in-ecliptic portion of the Ulysses mission. Five of these CMEs are magnetic clouds. In each case we observe an inverse relationship between electron temperature and density. For protons this relationship is less clear. Earlier work has shown a similar inverse relationship for electrons inside magnetic clouds and interpreted it to mean that the polytropic index governing the expansion of electrons is less than unity. This requires electrons to be heated as the CME expands. We offer an alternative view that the inverse relationship between electron temperature and density is caused by more rapid cooling of the denser plasma through collisions. More rapid cooling of denser plasma has been shown for 1 AU measurements in the solar wind. As evidence for this hypothesis we show that the denser plasma inside the CMEs tends to be more isotropic indicating a different history of collisions for the dense plasma. Thus, although the electron temperature inside CMEs consistently shows an inverse correlation with the density, this is not an indication of the polytropic index of the plasma but instead supports the idea of collisional modification of the electrons during their transit from the sun.

  5. 3D Distribution of the Coronal Electron Density and its Evolution with Solar Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Reginald, Nelson Leslie; Davila, Joseph M.; St. Cyr, Orville Chris

    2016-05-01

    The variability of the solar white-light corona and its connection to the solar activity has been studied for more than a half century. It is widely accepted that the temporal variation of the total radiance of the K-corona follows the solar cycle pattern (e.g., correlated with sunspot number). However, the origin of this variation and its relationships with regard to coronal mass ejections and the solar wind are yet to be clearly understood. We know that the COR1-A and –B instruments onboard the STEREO spacecraft have continued to perform high-cadence (5 min) polarized brightness measurements from two different vantage points over a long period of time that encompasses the solar minimum of Solar Cycle 23 to the solar maximum of Solar Cycle 24. This extended period of polarized brightness measurements can now be used to reconstruct 3D electron density distributions of the corona between the heliocentric heights of 1.5-4.0 solar radii. In this study we have constructed the 3D coronal density models for 100 Carrington rotations (CRs) from 2007 to 2014 using the spherically symmetric inversion (SSI) method. The validity of these 3D density models is verified by comparing with similar 3D density models created by other means such as tomography, MHD modeling, and 2D density distributions inverted from the polarized brightness images from LASCO/C2 instrument onboard the SOHO spacecraft. When examining the causes for the temporal variation of the global electron content we find that its increase from the solar minimum to maximum depends on changes to both the total area and mean density of coronal streamers. We also find that the global and hemispheric electron contents show quasi-periodic variations with a period of 8-9 CRs during the ascending and maximum phases of Solar Cycle 24 through wavelet analysis. In addition, we also explore any obvious relationships between temporal variation of the global electron content with the photospheric magnetic flux, total mass of

  6. 3D Global Coronal Density Structure and Associated Magnetic Field near Solar Maximum

    CERN Document Server

    Kramar, Maxim; Lin, Haosheng

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of the coronal magnetic field is a crucial ingredient in understanding the nature of solar coronal dynamic phenomena at all scales. We employ STEREO/COR1 data obtained near maximum of solar activity in December 2012 (Carrington rotation, CR 2131) to retrieve and analyze the three-dimensional (3D) coronal electron density in the range of heights from $1.5$ to $4\\ \\mathrm{R}_\\odot$ using a tomography method and qualitatively deduce structures of the coronal magnetic field. The 3D electron density analysis is complemented by the 3D STEREO/EUVI emissivity in 195 \\AA \\ band obtained by tomography for the same CR period. We find that the magnetic field configuration during CR 2131 has a tendency to become radially open at heliocentric distances below $\\sim 2.5 \\ \\mathrm{R}_\\odot$. We compared the reconstructed 3D coronal structures over the CR near the solar maximum to the one at deep solar minimum. Results of our 3D density reconstruction will help to constrain solar coronal field models and test the a...

  7. Improved density profile measurements in the C-2U advanced beam-driven FRC plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Michael; Deng, B. H.; Schroeder, Jon; Settles, Greg; Kinley, John; Gota, Hiroshi; Thompson, Matt; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    The goal of Tri Alpha Energy's C-2U experiment is to demonstrate FRC sustainment via neutral beam injection. Accurate equilibrium profiles are essential for determining optimum operating regimes and studying physics phenomena. Electron density profiles in C-2 were measured by a CO2/HeNe laser interferometer. All C-2 chords were located below the machine axis causing difficulties due to spatial under-sampling in case of vertical plasma motion. As part of C-2U, additional chords were added above the axis and a complimentary 4-chord far-infrared (FIR) interferometer was developed. The FIR system is based on 2 HCOOH lasers optically pumped by a CO2 laser. This upgrade allowed for higher density resolution and broad spectral bandwidth. Results of improved density profile measurement will be presented, including fast ion effects. Plasma wobble is also characterized via density centroid measurements.

  8. 3D Coronal Density Reconstruction and Retrieving the Magnetic Field Structure during Solar Minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Kramar, M; Mikić, Z; Davila, J

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of the coronal magnetic field is a crucial ingredient in understanding the nature of solar coronal phenomena at all scales. We employed STEREO/COR1 data obtained during a deep minimum of solar activity in February 2008 (Carrington rotation CR 2066) to retrieve and analyze the three-dimensional (3D) coronal electron density in the range of heights from 1.5 to 4 Rsun using a tomography method. With this, we qualitatively deduced structures of the coronal magnetic field. The 3D electron density analysis is complemented by the 3D STEREO/EUVI emissivity in the 195 A band obtained by tomography for the same CR. A global 3D MHD model of the solar corona was used to relate the reconstructed 3D density and emissivity to open/closed magnetic field structures. We show that the density maximum locations can serve as an indicator of current sheet position, while the locations of the density gradient maximum can be a reliable indicator of coronal hole boundaries. We find that the magnetic field configuration du...

  9. Hypovalency--a kinetic-energy density description of a 4c-2e bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2009-06-01

    A bond descriptor based on the kinetic energy density, the localized-orbital locator (LOL), is used to characterize the nature of the chemical bond in electron deficient multi-center bonds. The boranes B(2)H(6), B(4)H(4), B(4)H(10), [B(6)H(6)](2-), and [B(6)H(7)](-) serve as prototypical examples of hypovalent 3c-2e and 4c-2e bonding. The kinetic energy density is derived from a set of Kohn-Sham orbitals obtained from pure density functional calculations (PBE/TZVP), and the topology of LOL is analyzed in terms of (3,-3) attractors (Gamma). The B-B-B and B-H-B 3c-2e, and the B-B-H-B 4c-2e bonding situations are defined by their own characteristic LOL profiles. The presence of one attractor in relation to the three or four atoms that are engaged in electron deficient bonding provides sufficient indication of the type of 3c-2e or 4c-2e bond present. For the 4c-2e bond in [B(6)H(7)](-) the LOL analysis is compared to results from an experimental QTAIM study. PMID:19452076

  10. Model comparison for the density structure across solar coronal waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Arregui, I; Ramos, A Asensio

    2015-01-01

    The spatial variation of physical quantities, such as the mass density, across solar atmospheric waveguides governs the timescales and spatial scales for wave damping and energy dissipation. The direct measurement of the spatial distribution of density, however, is difficult and indirect seismology inversion methods have been suggested as an alternative. We applied Bayesian inference, model comparison, and model-averaging techniques to the inference of the cross-field density structuring in solar magnetic waveguides using information on periods and damping times for resonantly damped magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) transverse kink oscillations. Three commonly employed alternative profiles were used to model the variation of the mass density across the waveguide boundary. Parameter inference enabled us to obtain information on physical quantities such as the Alfv\\'en travel time, the density contrast, and the transverse inhomogeneity length scale. The inference results from alternative density models were compared a...

  11. The Density of Coronal Null Points from Hinode and MDI

    CERN Document Server

    Longcope, Dana; DeForest, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic null points can be located numerically in a potential field extrapolation or their average density can be estimated from the Fourier spectrum of a magnetogram. We use both methods to compute the null point density from a quiet Sun magnetogram made with Hinode's NFI and from magnetograms from SOHO's MDI in both its high-resolution and low-resolution modes. All estimates of the super-chromospheric column density (z>1.5 Mm) agree with one another and with the previous measurements: 0.003 null points per square Mm of solar surface.

  12. Coronal mass ejections over solar cycle 23 and 24 from LASCO-C2 white-light images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Philippe; Barlyaeva, Tatiana; Boclet, Brice

    2016-07-01

    It is now well established that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) play a major role in the heliosphere, starting from the corona to interplanetary space and interacting with planets. The almost uninterrupted observations by the LASCO coronagraph onboard SOHO since January 1996 have allowed an unprecedented view of CMEs over almost two solar cycles 23 and 24. The ARTEMIS-II catalog based on their automatic detection on high-quality calibrated synoptic maps of the corona offers a dataset free of selection effects. It is thus possible to perform an unbiased statistical analysis of their properties and investigate how they evolve with solar activity. We will present an extended comparison of their properties during the two solar cycles 23 and 24 emphasizing the differences. We will further compare them with those of the standard indices of solar activity such as the international sunspot number (SSN), the sunspot area (SSA) and the radio flux at 10.7 cm (F10.7) as well as those of their potential progenitors, flares and eruptive prominences, in order to ascertain their connection, and we will consider the two hemispheres separately whenever possible.

  13. Unenhanced MDCT in Suspected Urolithiasis: Improved Stone Detection and Density Measurements Using Coronal Maximum-Intensity-Projection Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Michael T.; Hsu, Margaret; McGahan, John P.; Wilson, Machelle; Lamba, Ramit

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to determine whether coronal maximum-intensity-projection (MIP) reformations improve urinary tract stone detection and density measurements compared with routine axial and coronal images. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty-five consecutive patients who underwent MDCT for suspected urolithiasis were included. Two radiologists independently determined the number of stones on 5-, 3-, and 1.25-mm axial, 5- and 3-mm coronal, and 5-mm coronal MIP images. The reference standard was obtained by consensus review using all six datasets. Stone density was determined for all calculi 4 mm or larger on all datasets. RESULTS There were a total of 115 stones. Reader 1 identified 111 (96.5%), 112 (97.4%), 97 (84.3%), 102 (88.7%), 99 (86.1%), and 85 (73.9%) stones and reader 2 identified 105 (91.3%), 102 (88.7%), 85 (73.9%), 89 (77.4%), 89 (77.4%), and 76 (66.1%) stones on the MIP, 1.25-mm axial, 3-mm axial, 3-mm coronal, 5-mm coronal, and 5-mm axial images, respectively. Both readers identified more stones on the MIP images than on the 3- or 5-mm axial or coronal images (p < 0.0001). The mean difference in stone attenuation compared with the thin axial images was significantly less for the MIP images (44.6 HU) compared with 3-mm axial (235 HU), 3-mm coronal (309 HU), and 5-mm coronal (329.6 HU) or axial images (347.8 HU) (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION Coronal MIP reformations allow more accurate identification and density measurements of urinary tract stones compared with routine axial and coronal reformations. PMID:24147474

  14. On the influence of CMEs on the global 3-D coronal electron density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kramar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to analize the influence of a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME on the coronal streamer belt, we made 3-D reconstructions of the electron density in the corona at heliospheric distances from 1.5 to 4 R for periods before and after a CME occured. The reconstructions were performed using a tomography technique. We studied two CME cases: (i a slow CME on 1 June 2008; (ii two fast CMEs on 31 December 2007 and 2 January 2008. For the first case of slow CME, it was found: (i the potential magnetic field configuration in the CME initiation region before the CME does not agree with the coronal density structure while after the CME the agreement between the field and density is much better. This could be manifistation of that that the field was non-potential before the CME and after the CME the field relaxes towards a more potential state. (ii It was shown that the dimming caused by the slow CME is not due to rotation of the corona and a line-of-sight (LOS effect but a streamer blow out effect took place.

  15. Ground state C2 density measurement in carbon plume using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temporal evolution and spatial distribution of C2 molecules produced by laser ablation of a graphite target is studied using optical emission spectroscopy, dynamic imaging and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) investigations. We observe peculiar bifurcation of carbon plume into two parts; stationary component close to the target surface and a component moving away from the target surface which splits further in two parts as the plume expands. The two distinct plumes are attributed to recombination of carbon species and formation of nanoparticles. The molecular carbon C2 moves with a faster velocity and dies out at ∼ 800 ns whereas the clusters of nanoparticle move with a slower velocity due to their higher mass and can be observed even after 1600 ns. C2 molecules in the d3Πg state were probed for laser-induced fluorescence during ablation of graphite using the Swan (0,0) band at 516.5 nm. The fluorescence spectrum and images of fluorescence d3Πg - a3Πu(0,1)(λ = 563.5 nm) are recorded using a spectrograph attached to the ICCD camera. To get absolute ground state C2 density from fluorescence images, the images are calibrated using complimentary absorption experiment. This study qualitatively helps to get optimum conditions for nanoparticle formation using the laser ablation of graphite target and hence deducing optimum conditions for thin film deposition.

  16. THE INFLUENCE OF NUMERICAL RESOLUTION ON CORONAL DENSITY IN HYDRODYNAMIC MODELS OF IMPULSIVE HEATING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the numerical spatial resolution in models of the solar corona and corona/chromosphere interface is examined for impulsive heating over a range of magnitudes using one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. It is demonstrated that the principal effect of inadequate resolution is on the coronal density. An underresolved loop typically has a peak density of at least a factor of two lower than a resolved loop subject to the same heating, with larger discrepancies in the decay phase. The temperature for underresolved loops is also lower indicating that lack of resolution does not 'bottle up' the heat flux in the corona. Energy is conserved in the models to under 1% in all cases, indicating that this is not responsible for the low density. Instead, we argue that in underresolved loops the heat flux 'jumps across' the transition region to the dense chromosphere from which it is radiated rather than heating and ablating transition region plasma. This emphasizes the point that the interaction between corona and chromosphere occurs only through the medium of the transition region. Implications for three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic coronal models are discussed.

  17. Coronal electron density distributions estimated from CMEs, DH type II radio bursts, and polarized brightness measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Ok; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Jin-Yi; Lee, Kyoung-Sun; Kim, R.-S.

    2016-04-01

    We determine coronal electron density distributions (CEDDs) by analyzing decahectometric (DH) type II observations under two assumptions. DH type II bursts are generated by either (1) shocks at the leading edges of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) or (2) CME shock-streamer interactions. Among 399 Wind/WAVES type II bursts (from 1997 to 2012) associated with SOHO/LASCO (Large Angle Spectroscopic COronagraph) CMEs, we select 11 limb events whose fundamental and second harmonic emission lanes are well identified. We determine the lowest frequencies of fundamental emission lanes and the heights of leading edges of their associated CMEs. We also determine the heights of CME shock-streamer interaction regions. The CEDDs are estimated by minimizing the root-mean-square error between the heights from the CME leading edges (or CME shock-streamer interaction regions) and DH type II bursts. We also estimate CEDDs of seven events using polarized brightness (pB) measurements. We find the following results. Under the first assumption, the average of estimated CEDDs from 3 to 20 Rs is about 5-fold Saito's model (NSaito(r)). Under the second assumption, the average of estimated CEDDs from 3 to 10 Rs is 1.5-fold NSaito(r). While the CEDDs obtained from pB measurements are significantly smaller than those based on the first assumption and CME flank regions without streamers, they are well consistent with those on the second assumption. Our results show that not only about 1-fold NSaito(r) is a proper CEDD for analyzing DH type II bursts but also CME shock-streamer interactions could be a plausible origin for generating DH type II bursts.

  18. Stirring Coronal Spaghetti: Exploring Multiple Interactions Between MHD Waves and Density Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2016-05-01

    The solar corona has been revealed in the past few decades to be a highly dynamic nonequilibrium plasma environment. Both the loop-filled coronal base and the extended acceleration region of the solar wind appear to be strongly turbulent, and models that invoke the dissipation of incompressible Alfvenic fluctuations have had some success in explaining the heating. However, many of these models neglect the mounting evidence that density and pressure variations may play an important role in the mass and energy balance of this system. In this presentation I will briefly review observations of both compressible and incompressible MHD fluctuations in the corona and solar wind, and discuss future prospects with DKIST. I will also attempt to outline the many ways that these different fluctuation modes have been proposed to interact with one another -- usually with an eye on finding ways to enhance their dissipation and heating. One under-appreciated type of interaction is the fact that Alfven waves will undergo multiple reflections and refractions in a "background plasma" filled with localized density fluctuations. It is becoming increasingly clear that models must not only include the effects of longitudinal variability (e.g., magnetoacoustic waves and pulse-like jets) but also transverse "striations" that appear naturally in a structured magnetic field with small-scale footpoint variability. Future off-limb observations, such as those with DKIST's Cryo-NIRSP instrument, will be crucial for providing us with a detailed census of MHD waves and their mutual interactions in the corona.

  19. Measurements of neutral density profiles using a deuterium Balmer-alpha diagnostic in the C-2 FRC plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) device, low neutral density outside the FRC separatrix is required to minimize the charge exchange loss of fast particles. Titanium gettering is used in C-2 to reduce the wall recycling and keep the neutral density low in plasma edge. The measurements of neutral density radial profile are desirable to understand the plasma recycling and the effects of titanium gettering. These measurements are also needed to study the interaction of neutral beams with FRC plasma and confinement of fast ions. Diagnostic based on absolute deuterium Balmer-alpha (D-alpha) radiation measurements is developed and deployed on C-2 device to measure the radial profile of neutral density. Simultaneous measurements of electron density and temperature are done using CO2 interferometer, Thomson scattering, and triple probes diagnostics along with absolute D-alpha radiation. Abel inversion was performed to get the time dependent radial profile of the local D-alpha emission density. Neutral density profiles are obtained under different machine conditions of titanium deposition.

  20. Latitudinal variability of large-scale coronal temperature and its association with the density and the global magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhathakurta, M.; Fisher, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we utilize the latitiude distribution of the coronal temperature during the period 1984-1992 that was derived in a paper by Guhathakurta et al, 1993, utilizing ground-based intensity observations of the green (5303 A Fe XIV) and red (6374 A Fe X) coronal forbidden lines from the National Solar Observatory at Sacramento Peak, and establish it association with the global magnetic field and the density distributions in the corona. A determination of plasma temperature, T, was estimated from the intensity ratio Fe X/Fe XIV (where T is inversely proportional to the ratio), since both emission lines come from ionized states of Fe, and the ratio is only weakly dependent on density. We observe that there is a large-scale organization of the inferred coronal temperature distribution that is associated with the large-scale, weak magnetic field structures and bright coronal features; this organization tends to persist through most of the magnetic activity cycle. These high-temperature structures exhibit time-space characteristics which are similar to those of the polar crown filaments. This distribution differs in spatial and temporal characterization from the traditional picture of sunspot and active region evolution over the range of the sunspot cycle, which are manifestations of the small-scale, strong magnetic field regions.

  1. Core and Wing Densities of Asymmetric Coronal Spectral Profiles: Implications for the Mass Supply of the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsourakos, S.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Young, P. R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent solar spectroscopic observations have shown that coronal spectral lines can exhibit asymmetric profiles, with enhanced emissions at their blue wings. These asymmetries correspond to rapidly upflowing plasmas at speeds exceeding approximately equal to 50 km per sec. Here, we perform a study of the density of the rapidly upflowing material and compare it with that of the line core that corresponds to the bulk of the plasma. For this task, we use spectroscopic observations of several active regions taken by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer of the Hinode mission. The density sensitive ratio of the Fe(sub XIV) lines at 264.78 and 274.20 Angstroms is used to determine wing and core densities.We compute the ratio of the blue wing density to the core density and find that most values are of order unity. This is consistent with the predictions for coronal nanoflares if most of the observed coronal mass is supplied by chromospheric evaporation driven by the nanoflares. However, much larger blue wing-to-core density ratios are predicted if most of the coronal mass is supplied by heated material ejected with type II spicules. Our measurements do not rule out a spicule origin for the blue wing emission, but they argue against spicules being a primary source of the hot plasma in the corona. We note that only about 40% of the pixels where line blends could be safely ignored have blue wing asymmetries in both Fe(sub XIV) lines. Anticipated sub-arcsecond spatial resolution spectroscopic observations in future missions could shed more light on the origin of blue, red, and mixed asymmetries.

  2. The solar wind as seen by SOHO/SWAN since 1996: comparison with SOHO/LASCO C2 coronal densities

    OpenAIRE

    Lallement, Rosine; Quemerais, Eric; Lamy, Philippe; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Ferron, Stephane; Schmidt, Walter

    2010-01-01

    We update the SOHO/SWAN H Lyman-alpha brightness analysis to cover the 1996-2008 time interval. A forward model applied to the intensity maps provides the latitude and time dependence of the interstellar Hydrogen ionisation rate over more than a full solar cycle. The hydrogen ionisation, being almost entirely due to charge-exchange with solar wind ions, reflects closely the solar wind flux. Our results show that the solar wind latitudinal structure during the present solar minimum is striking...

  3. The calculation of coronal magnetic field and density of nonthermal electrons in the 2003 October 27 microwave burst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Li Huang; Jian-Ping Li; Qi-Wu Song

    2013-01-01

    Based on Dulk and Marsh's approximate theory about nonthermal gyrosynchrotron radiation,one simple impulsive microwave burst with a loop-like structure is selected for radio diagnostics of the coronal magnetic field and column density of nonthermal electrons,which are calculated from the brightness temperature,polarization degree,and spectral index,as well as the turnover frequency,observed by using the Nobeyama Radioheliograph and the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters,respectively.Very strong variations (up to one or two orders of magnitude) of the calculated transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields with respect to the line-of-sight,as well as the calculated electron column density,appear in the looptop and footpoint sources during the burst.The absolute magnitude and varied range of the transverse magnetic field are evidently larger than those of the longitudinal magnetic field.The time evolution of the transverse magnetic field is always anti-correlated with that of the longitudinal magnetic field,but positively correlated with that of the electron column density.These results strongly support the idea that quantifying the energy released in a flare depends on a reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field,especially for the transverse magnetic field,and they are basically consistent with the recent theoretical and observational studies on the photospheric magnetic field in solar flares.

  4. Contribution of thin slice (1 mm) oblique coronal proton density-weighted MR images for assessment of anteromedial and posterolateral bundle damage in anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokalp, Gokhan, E-mail: drgokhangokalp@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Demirag, Burak, E-mail: bdemirag@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Nas, Omer Fatih, E-mail: omerfatihnas@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Aydemir, Mehmet Fatih, E-mail: fatiha@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Yazici, Zeynep, E-mail: zyazici@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal 1 mm proton density-weighted (PDW) MR imaging of the knee for detection and grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), anteromedial bundle (AMB) and posterolateral bundle (PLB) injuries. Materials and methods: We prospectively assessed preoperative MR images of 50 patients (36 men, 14 women; age range, 18–62 years). First, we compared the diagnostic performance of routine sagittal (3 mm) and additional oblique coronal images (1 mm) for ACL tears. Then, we compared the tear types (AMB or PLB) and grade presumed from oblique coronal MR imaging with arthroscopy. Results: Arthroscopy revealed ACL tear in 24 (48%) patients. There was significant difference between sagittal images and arthroscopy results for ACL tear recognition (p < 0.001). No significant difference was detected for oblique coronal images when compared with arthroscopy results (p = 0.180). Sensitivity and specificity values for ACL tear diagnosis were 37.04% and 95.65% for sagittal images; 74.07% and 91.30% for oblique coronal images. There was no significant difference between arthroscopy and oblique coronal MR images in grading AMB and PLB injuries (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Addition of thin slice oblique coronal images to conventional sequences could better contribute to better verifying the presence of ACL tear and in determining its grade.

  5. A statistical study of high coronal densities from X-ray line-ratios of Mg XI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, G. A.; Lemen, J. R.; Strong, K. T.

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray line-ratio density diagnostic was applied to 50 Mg XI spectra of flaring active regions on the sun recorded by the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on the SMM. The plasma density is derived from R, the flux ratio of the forbidden to intercombination lines of the He-like ion, Mg XI. The R ratio for Mg XI is only density sensitive when the electron density exceeds a critical value (about 10 to the 12th/cu cm), the low-density limit (LDL). This theoretical value of the low-density limit is uncertain as it depends on complex atomic theory. Reported coronal densities above 10 to the 12th/cu cm are uncommon. In this study, the distribution of R ratio values about the LDL is estimated and the empirical values are derived for the 1st and 2nd moments of this distribution from 50 Mg XI spectra. From these derived parameters, the percentage of observations is derived which indicated densities above this limit.

  6. Contribution of thin slice (1 mm) oblique coronal proton density-weighted MR images for assessment of anteromedial and posterolateral bundle damage in anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal 1 mm proton density-weighted (PDW) MR imaging of the knee for detection and grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), anteromedial bundle (AMB) and posterolateral bundle (PLB) injuries. Materials and methods: We prospectively assessed preoperative MR images of 50 patients (36 men, 14 women; age range, 18–62 years). First, we compared the diagnostic performance of routine sagittal (3 mm) and additional oblique coronal images (1 mm) for ACL tears. Then, we compared the tear types (AMB or PLB) and grade presumed from oblique coronal MR imaging with arthroscopy. Results: Arthroscopy revealed ACL tear in 24 (48%) patients. There was significant difference between sagittal images and arthroscopy results for ACL tear recognition (p 0.05). Conclusion: Addition of thin slice oblique coronal images to conventional sequences could better contribute to better verifying the presence of ACL tear and in determining its grade

  7. Preparation of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films using high-density pulsed plasmas of Ar/C2H2 and Ne/C2H2 mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Takashi; Kamata, Hikaru

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films are prepared using reactive high-density pulsed plasmas of Ar/C2H2 and Ne/C2H2 mixture in the total pressure range from 0.5 to 2 Pa. The plasmas are produced using a reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) system. A negative pulse voltage of ‑500 V is applied to the substrate for a period of 15 µs in the afterglow mode. The growth rate does not strongly depend on the type of ambient gas but it markedly increases to about 2.7 µm/h at a C2H2 fraction of 10% and a total pressure of 2 Pa with increasing C2H2 fraction. The marked increase in the growth rate means that the HiPIMS system can be regarded as a plasma source for the chemical vapor deposition process. The hardness of the films prepared by Ne/C2H2 plasmas is somewhat higher than that of the films prepared by Ar/C2H2 plasmas under the same operating conditions, and the difference becomes larger as the pressure increases. The hardness of the films prepared by Ne/C2H2 plasmas ranges between 11 and 18 GPa. In the Raman spectra, two very broad overlapping bands are assigned as the G (graphite) and D (disorder) bands. The peak position of the G band is roughly independent of the total pressure, whereas the FWHM of the G peak decreases with increasing total pressure as a whole.

  8. Radiative power and electron cooling rates for oxygen in steady-state and transient plasmas at densities beyond the coronal limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a time-dependent, collisional-radiative model to calculate radiative power and electron cooling rates for oxygen at intermediate densities (1016 cm-3 less than or equal to n/sub e/ less than or equal to 1020 cm-3) where the usual coronal approximation is not valid. Large differences from coronal values are predicted. The behavior of the steady-state radiative power loss coefficient, L/sub Z, is investigated as the electron density is increased. Generalized power loss coefficients applicable to transient plasmas are derived and applied to ionizing and recombining oxygen plasmas. Time-dependent effects are found to play a large role both in terms of the total radiated power and the net electron energy loss rate. 41 refs., 11 figs

  9. Radio range measurements of coronal electron densities at 13 and 3.6 centimeter wavelengths during the 1985 solar conjunction of Voyager 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John D.; Krisher, Timothy P.; Borutzki, Susan E.; Connally, Michael J.; Eshe, Paula M.; Hotz, Henry B.; Kinslow, Scott; Kursinski, Emil R.; Light, Luann Brown; Matousek, Steven E.; Moyd, Katherine I.; Roth, Duane C.; Sweetnam, Donald N.; Taylor, Anthony H.; Tyler, G. Leonard; Gresh, Donna L.; Rosen, Paul A.

    1987-12-01

    Radio range measurements were generated by the Deep Space Network at two wavelengths (3.6 and 13 cm) during the solar conjunction of the Voyager 2 spacecraft in 1985 December. The difference in range at the two wavelengths provides a direct measurement of the integrated electron density along the ray path between Earth stations and the spacecraft. Derived electron density profiles on ingress and egress between 7 and 40 solar radii revealed a surprising asymmetry in the radial power-law dependence of the coronal electron density.

  10. Relativistic correction of (v/c)2 to the collective Thomson scattering for high-temperature high-density plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Chen-Fan-Fu; Zheng Jian; Zhao Bin

    2011-01-01

    Collective Thomson scattering is theoretically investigated with the inclusion of the relativistic correction of (v/c)2.The correction is rather small for the plasma parameters inferred from the spectra of the thermal electron plasma waves in the plasma. Since the full formula of the corrected result is rather complicated,a simplified one is derived for practical use,which is shown to be in good agreement with the un-simplified one.

  11. High-temperature differential emission measure and altitude variations in the temperature and density of solar flare coronal X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Natasha; Dennis, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The detailed knowledge of plasma heating and acceleration region properties presents a major observational challenge in solar flare physics. Using the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), the high temperature differential emission measure, DEM(T), and the energy-dependent spatial structure of solar flare coronal sources are studied quantitatively. The altitude of the coronal X-ray source is observed to increase with energy by ~+0.2 arcsec/keV between 10 and 25 keV. Although an isothermal model can fit the thermal X-ray spectrum observed by RHESSI, such a model cannot account for the changes in altitude, and multi-thermal coronal sources are required where the temperature increases with altitude. For the first time, we show how RHESSI imaging information can be used to constrain the DEM(T) of a flaring plasma. We develop a thermal bremsstrahlung X-ray emission model with inhomogeneous temperature and density distributions to simultaneously reproduce: i) DEM(T), ii) altitude as a function of ...

  12. Radio range measurements of coronal electron densities at 13 and 3.6 centimeter wavelengths during the 1988 solar conjunction of Voyager 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisher, T. P.; Anderson, J. D.; Morabito, D. D.; Asmar, S. W.; Borutzki, S. E.; Delitsky, M. L.; Densmore, A. C.; Eshe, P. M.; Lewis, G. D.; Maurer, M. J.; Roth, D. C.; Son, Y. H.; Spilker, T. R.; Sweetnam, D. N.; Taylor, A. H.; Tyler, G. L.; Gresh, D. L.; Rosen, P. A.

    1991-07-01

    Radio range measurements of total solar plasma delay obtained during the solar conjunction of the Voyager 2 spacecraft in December 1988, which occurred near solar maximum activity in the 11 yr cycle are reported. The radio range measurements were generated by the Deep Space Network at two wavelengths on the downlink from the spacecraft: 3.6 and 13 cm. A direct measurement of the integrated electron density along the ray path between the earth stations and the spacecraft was obtained by differencing the range at the two wavelengths. Coronal electron density profiles have been derived during ingress and egress of the ray path, which approached the sun to within 5 solar radii. At 10 solar radii, the derived density profiles yield 34079 + or - 611/cu cm on ingress and 49688 + or - 983/cu cm on egress. These density levels are significantly higher than observed near previous solar maxima.

  13. Coupled cluster and density functional studies on geometries and energies of excited C2v states of ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grein, Friedrich

    2009-03-01

    The performance of single-determinant methods for finding geometries and energies of excited states is tested on the ozone molecule. Geometries for low-lying singlet and triplet states of ozone were optimized by CCSD(T) and density functional theory (DFT) (with BPW91 functional) methods. DFT geometries were found to lie close to CCSD(T) values. Most CCSD(T) and DFT geometries and energies are in good agreement with available experimental and recent high-level theoretical values, with deviations lying within 0.02 Å, 2°, and 0.3 eV. An exception is the 1 B12 state, having a larger deviation of bond distance and energy. A multiconfigurational treatment is required for this state. DFT geometry optimizations and calculations of vibrational frequencies were extended to higher states, covering over 30 excited states of ozone, with adiabatic excitation energies up to about 6 eV. Calculated harmonic frequencies showed several states, including 1 B12, to be saddle points. Multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) bending potentials for first and second singlet and triplet states were used in verifying the CCSD(T) and DFT geometries and for locating additional minima. For first states, DFT bending potentials are compared with MRCI potentials. As a criterion for the quality of single-determinant geometries and energies of excited states, comparison of their vertical excitation energies with MRCI or time-dependent DFT values is recommended.

  14. A statistical study of coronal densities from X-ray line ratios of helium-like ions - Ne IX and Mg XI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, G. A.; Lemen, J. R.; Strong, K. T.

    1988-01-01

    Since the repair of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft, the Flat Crystal Spectrometer (FCS) has recorded many high temperature spectra of helium-like ions under a wide variety of coronal conditions including active regions, long duration events, compact events, and double flares. The plasma density and temperature are derived from the ratios R and G, where R = f/i, G = (f + i)/r, and r, f, and i denote the resonance, forbidden, and intercombination line fluxes. A new method for obtaining the density and temperature for events observed with the FCS aboard SMM is presented. The results for these events are presented and compared to earlier results, and the method is evaluated based on these comparisons.

  15. (3x1)-Br/Pt(110) structure and the charge-density-wave-assisted c(2x2) to (3x1) phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After our recent report on the formation of a (3x1) charge-density-wave phase in the quasi-one-dimensional system Br/Pt(110) we present a detailed investigation of the c(2x2) implies (3x1) transition in the Br/Pt(110) adsorption system. This includes the atomic structure of the (3x1) phase as determined by quantitative low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and density functional theory calculations. While in the parent c(2x2) phase with coverage Θ=1/2 ML the Br atoms occupy every second short-bridge site on the unreconstructed (1x1)-Pt(110) surface, the adatoms in the (3x1) phase at coverage Θ=2/3 ML reside in every third short-bridge and long-bridge sites. Charge densities and vertical relaxations of the Pt atoms forming the short- and long-bridge sites are different, thus yielding a modulation of both, the charge and the position of the outermost Pt atoms with a period of three nearest-neighbor spacings. For 1/2 ML<Θ≤0.58 ML LEED intensity and scanning tunneling microscope (STM) measurements reveal the nucleation of (3x1) islands surrounded by areas with a local coverage of 1/2 ML. Within the latter areas the STM measurements indicate dynamical fluctuations of the Br positions at room temperature. In the time average every short-bridge site is sampled by the mobile Br atoms, but in the neighborhood of (3x1) islands every third short-bridge site seems to be preferentially occupied

  16. Global Coronal Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, P F

    2016-01-01

    After the {\\em Solar and Heliospheric Observatory} ({\\em SOHO}) was launched in 1996, the aboard Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) observed a global coronal wave phenomenon, which was initially named "EIT wave" after the telescope. The bright fronts are immediately followed by expanding dimmings. It has been shown that the brightenings and dimmings are mainly due to plasma density increase and depletion, respectively. Such a spectacular phenomenon sparked long-lasting interest and debates. The debates were concentrated on two topics, one is about the driving source, and the other is about the nature of this wavelike phenomenon. The controversies are most probably because there may exist two types of large-scale coronal waves that were not well resolved before the {\\em Solar Dynamics Observatory} ({\\em SDO}) was launched: one is a piston-driven shock wave straddling over the erupting coronal mass ejection (CME), and the other is an apparently propagating front, which may correspond to the CME frontal...

  17. Electron density in the quiet solar coronal transition region from SoHO/SUMER measurements of S VI line radiance and opacity

    CERN Document Server

    Buchlin, E

    2009-01-01

    Context: The sharp temperature and density gradients in the coronal transition region are a challenge for models and observations. Aims: We set out to get linearly- and quadratically-weighted average electron densities in the region emitting the S VI lines, using the observed opacity and the emission measure of these lines. Methods: We analyze SoHO/SUMER spectroscopic observations of the S VI lines, using the center-to-limb variations and radiance ratios to derive the opacity. We also use the Emission Measure derived from radiance at disk center. Results: We get an opacity at S VI line center of the order of 0.05. The resulting average electron density is 2.4 10^16 m^-3 at T = 2 10^5 K. This value is higher than the values obtained from radiance measurements. Conversely, taking a classical value for the density leads to a too high value of the thickness of the emitting layer. Conclusions: The pressure derived from the Emission Measure method compares well with previous determinations and implies a low opacity...

  18. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of narrow coronal mass ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Dobrzycka, D; Biesecker, D A; Li, J; Ciaravella, A

    2003-01-01

    We present Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) observations of 5 narrow coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that were among 15 narrow CMEs originally selected by Gilbert et al. (2001). Two events (1999 March 27, April 15) were "structured", i.e. in white light data they exhibited well defined interior features, and three (1999 May 9, May 21, June 3) were "unstructured", i.e. appeared featureless. In UVCS data the events were seen as 4-13 deg wide enhancements of the strongest coronal lines HI Ly-alpha and OVI (1032,1037 A). We derived electron densities for several of the events from the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) C2 white light observations. They are comparable to or smaller than densities inferred for other CMEs. We modeled the observable properties of examples of the structured (1999 April 15) and unstructured (1999 May 9) narrow CMEs at different heights in the corona between 1.5 and 2 R(Sun). The derived electron temperatures, densities and outflow speeds are similar for those two ty...

  19. Coronal Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R. Cranmer

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Coronal holes are the darkest and least active regions of the Sun, as observed both on the solar disk and above the solar limb. Coronal holes are associated with rapidly expanding open magnetic fields and the acceleration of the high-speed solar wind. This paper reviews measurements of the plasma properties in coronal holes and how these measurements are used to reveal details about the physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. It is still unknown to what extent the solar wind is fed by flux tubes that remain open (and are energized by footpoint-driven wave-like fluctuations, and to what extent much of the mass and energy is input intermittently from closed loops into the open-field regions. Evidence for both paradigms is summarized in this paper. Special emphasis is also given to spectroscopic and coronagraphic measurements that allow the highly dynamic non-equilibrium evolution of the plasma to be followed as the asymptotic conditions in interplanetary space are established in the extended corona. For example, the importance of kinetic plasma physics and turbulence in coronal holes has been affirmed by surprising measurements from the UVCS instrument on SOHO that heavy ions are heated to hundreds of times the temperatures of protons and electrons. These observations point to specific kinds of collisionless Alfvén wave damping (i.e., ion cyclotron resonance, but complete theoretical models do not yet exist. Despite our incomplete knowledge of the complex multi-scale plasma physics, however, much progress has been made toward the goal of understanding the mechanisms ultimately responsible for producing the observed properties of coronal holes.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of a Streamer Beside a Realistic Coronal Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, S. T.; Wu, S. T.; Wang, A. H.; Poletto, G.

    1994-01-01

    Existing models of coronal streamers establish their credibility and act as the initial state for transients. The models have produced satisfactory streamer simulations, but unsatisfactory coronal hole simulations. This is a consequence of the character of the models and the boundary conditions. The models all have higher densities in the magnetically open regions than occur in coronal holes (Noci, et al., 1993).

  1. The influence of C2H2 and dust formation on the time dependence of metastable argon density in pulsed plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanovic, Ilija; Sadeghi, Nader; Winter, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Diode laser absorption at 772.38 nm is used to measure the time resolved density of Ar*(3 P 2) metastable atoms in a capacitively coupled radio-frequency (RF) discharge running in argon/acetylene mixture at 0.1 mbar. The RF power is pulsed at 100 Hz and the density of Ar*(3 P 2) atoms in the 5 ms ON time and in the afterglow are recorded. Different plasma conditions, namely: 1) pure argon, 2) argon + 7% acetylene before powder formation, 3) argon + 7% acetylene after dust particle...

  2. C2 Agility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Dr. William; Alberts, David S.; Bernier, Francois;

    circumstances. SAS-085 was formed to improve the understanding of C2 Agility and assess its importance to NATO. SAS-085 accomplished these objectives by articulating the principles of C2 Agility, in the form of a C2 Agility Conceptual Model, substantially validating this model and establishing the importance of...

  3. Density function theoretical study on the complex involved in Th atom-activated C–C bond in C2H6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing-Qing, Wang; Peng, Li; Tao, Gao; Hong-Yan, Wang; Bing-Yun, Ao

    2016-06-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to investigate the reactivity of Th atom toward ethane C–C bond activation. A comprehensive description of the reaction mechanisms leading to two different reaction products is presented. We report a complete exploration of the potential energy surfaces by taking into consideration different spin states. In addition, the intermediate and transition states along the reaction paths are characterized. Total, partial, and overlap population density of state diagrams and analyses are also presented. Furthermore, the natures of the chemical bonding of intermediate and transition states are studied by using topological method combined with electron localization function (ELF) and Mayer bond order. Infrared spectrum (IR) is obtained and further discussed based on the optimized geometries. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21371160, 21401173, and 11364023).

  4. A Type II Radio Burst without a Coronal Mass Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Su, W; Ding, M D; Chen, P F; Sun, J Q

    2015-01-01

    Type II radio bursts are thought to be a signature of coronal shocks. In this paper, we analyze a short-lived type II burst that started at 07:40 UT on 2011 February 28. By carefully checking white-light images, we find that the type II radio burst is not accompanied by a coronal mass ejection, only with a C2.4 class flare and narrow jet. However, in the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), we find a wave-like structure that propagated at a speed of $\\sim$ 600 km s$^{-1}$ during the burst. The relationship between the type II radio burst and the wave-like structure is in particular explored. For this purpose, we first derive the density distribution under the wave by the differential emission measure (DEM) method, which is used to restrict the empirical density model. We then use the restricted density model to invert the speed of the shock that produces the observed frequency drift rate in the dynamic spectrum. The ...

  5. Time-dependent density-functional study of the ionization and fragmentation of C2H2 and H2 by strong circularly polarized laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russakoff, Arthur; Varga, Kálmán

    2015-11-01

    The ionization and fragmentation dynamics of acetylene and the hydrogen molecule driven by strong short circularly polarized laser pulses are investigated within the framework of the time-dependent density-functional theory coupled with the Ehrenfest dynamics. The effects of alignment are considered and the dynamics is compared to that driven by linearly polarized pulses. It is found that the coupled ion-electron dynamics of both molecules driven by circularly polarized pulses follows the enhanced ionization mechanism, as was found in previous theoretical studies with linearly polarized pulses. A moderate localization asymmetry in the ionization dynamics of the hydrogen molecule was also found, in qualitative agreement with previous experimental investigations.

  6. Coronal heating via nanoflares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been recently proposed that the coronae of single late-type main sequence stars represent the radiative output from a large number of tiny energy release events, the so-called nanoflares. Although this suggestion is attractive and order of magnitude estimates of the physical parameters involved in the process are consistent with available data, nanoflares have not yet been observed and theoretical descriptions of these phenomena are still very crude. In this paper we examine the temporal behavior of a magnetic flux tube subject to the repeated occurrence of energy release events, randomly distributed in time, and we show that an originally empty cool loop may, in fact, reach typical coronal density and temperature values via nanoflare heating. By choosing physical parameters appropriate to solar conditions we also explore the possibilities for observationally detecting nanoflares. Although the Sun is the only star where nanoflares might be observed, present instrumentation appears to be inadequate for this purpose

  7. Cryptanalysis of C2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghoff, Julia; Knudsen, Lars Ramkilde; Leander, Gregor; Matusiewicz, Krystian

    We present several attacks on the block cipher C2, which is used for encrypting DVD Audio discs and Secure Digital cards. C2 has a 56 bit key and a secret 8 to 8 bit S-box. We show that if the attacker is allowed to choose the key, the S-box can be recovered in 2^24 C2 encryptions. Attacking the 56...... bit key for a known S-box can be done in complexity 2^48. Finally, a C2 implementation with a 8 to 8 bit secret S-box (equivalent to 2048 secret bits) and a 56 bit secret key can be attacked in 2^53.5 C2 encryptions on average....

  8. Cryptanalysis of C2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghoff, Julia; Knudsen, Lars Ramkilde; Leander, Gregor;

    2009-01-01

    We present several attacks on the block cipher C2, which is used for encrypting DVD Audio discs and Secure Digital cards. C2 has a 56 bit key and a secret 8 to 8 bit S-box. We show that if the attacker is allowed to choose the key, the S-box can be recovered in 2^24 C2 encryptions. Attacking the 56...... bit key for a known S-box can be done in complexity 2^48. Finally, a C2 implementation with a 8 to 8 bit secret S-box (equivalent to 2048 secret bits) and a 56 bit secret key can be attacked in 2^53.5 C2 encryptions on average....

  9. The Coron System

    OpenAIRE

    Kaytoue, Mehdi; Marcuola, Florent; Napoli, Amedeo; Szathmary, Laszlo; Villerd, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Coron is a domain and platform independent, multi-purposed data mining toolkit, which incorporates not only a rich collection of data mining algorithms, but also allows a number of auxiliary operations. To the best of our knowledge, a data mining toolkit designed specifically for itemset extraction and association rule generation like Coron does not exist elsewhere. Coron also provides support for preparing and filtering data, and for interpreting the extracted units of knowledge.

  10. Intrinsic Instability of Coronal Streamers

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Y; Song, H Q; Shi, Q Q; Feng, S W; Xia, L D; 10.1088/0004-637X/691/2/1936

    2009-01-01

    Plasma blobs are observed to be weak density enhancements as radially stretched structures emerging from the cusps of quiescent coronal streamers. In this paper, it is suggested that the formation of blobs is a consequence of an intrinsic instability of coronal streamers occurring at a very localized region around the cusp. The evolutionary process of the instability, as revealed in our calculations, can be described as follows: (1) through the localized cusp region where the field is too weak to sustain the confinement, plasmas expand and stretch the closed field lines radially outward as a result of the freezing-in effect of plasma-magnetic field coupling; the expansion brings a strong velocity gradient into the slow wind regime providing the free energy necessary for the onset of a subsequent magnetohydrodynamic instability; (2) the instability manifests itself mainly as mixed streaming sausage-kink modes, the former results in pinches of elongated magnetic loops to provoke reconnections at one or many loc...

  11. Can coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures?

    OpenAIRE

    Madjarska, M. S.; Vanninathan, K.; Doyle, J. G.

    2011-01-01

    We aim with the present study to provide observational evidences on whether coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures. We combine multi-instrument co-observations obtained with the SUMER/SoHO and with the EIS/SOT/XRT/Hinode. The analysed three large spicules were found to be comprised of numerous thin spicules which rise, rotate and descend simultaneously forming a bush-like feature. Their rotation resembles the untwisting of a large flux rope. They show velocities ranging from 50 to 2...

  12. The C2-hydrocarbon link in cometary comae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, M.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Hutsemekers, D.; Jehin, E.; Manfroid, J.; Muinonen, K.; Oszkiewicz, D. A.; Schulz, R.; Stuewe, J.

    2012-09-01

    Comet 8P/Tuttle was the target of an ESO multiwavelength observing campaign in 2008. Observations of the spatial distribution of C2 and C3 were obtained, as well as simultaneous direct detections of the C2 parent species C2H2 and C2H6. We combine these observations to investigate the origin of cometary C2. The observed C2 column densities are inconsistent with a production of C2 from C2H2, C2H6, and C3. Based on a photochemical model, we quantitatively discuss the influence of further potential C2 parent species. The assumption of C4H2 as an additional C2 parent species in comet 8P/Tuttle provides the best explanation for the observed C2 column densities.

  13. CORONAL SEISMOLOGY USING EIT WAVES: ESTIMATION OF THE CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH IN THE QUIET SUN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronal EIT waves have been observed for many years. The nature of EIT waves is still contentious, however, there is strong evidence that some of them might be fast magnetosonic waves, or at least have a fast magnetosonic wave component. The fast magnetosonic wave speed is formed from two components; the Alfven speed (magnetic) and the sound speed (thermal). By making measurements of the wave speed, coronal density and temperature it is possible to calculate the quiet-Sun coronal magnetic field strength through coronal seismology. In this paper, we investigate an EIT wave observed on 2009 February 13 by the SECCHI/EUVI instruments on board the STEREO satellites. The wave epicenter was observed at disk center in the STEREO B (Behind) satellite. At this time, the STEREO satellites were separated by approximately 90 deg., and as a consequence the STEREO A (Ahead) satellite observed the wave on the solar limb. These observations allowed us to make accurate speed measurements of the wave. The background coronal density was derived through Hinode/Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer observations of the quiet Sun and the temperature was estimated through the narrow temperature response in the EUVI bandpasses. The density, temperature, and speed measurements allowed us to estimate the quiet-Sun coronal magnetic field strength to be approximately 0.7 ± 0.7 G.

  14. Coronal density diagnostics with Helium-like triplets CHANDRA--LETGS observations of Algol, Capella, Procyon, Eps Eri, Alpha Cen A&B, UX Ari, AD Leo, YY Gem, and HR1099

    CERN Document Server

    Ness, J U; Burwitz, V; Mewe, R; Raassen, A J J; Van der Meer, R L J; Predehl, P; Brinkman, A C

    2002-01-01

    We present an analysis of ten cool stars (Algol, Capella, Procyon, Eps Eri, Alpha Cen A&B, UX Ari, AD Leo, YY Gem, and HR1099) observed with the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (LETGS) on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory. This sample contains all cools stars observed with the LETGS presently available to us with integration times sufficiently long to warrant a meaningful spectral analysis. Our sample comprises inactive, moderately active, and hyperactive stars and samples the bulk part of activity levels encountered in coronal X-ray sources. We use the LETGS spectra to carry out density and temperature diagnostics with an emphasis on the H-like and the He-like ions. We find a correlation between line flux ratios of the Lyman-Alpha and He-like resonance lines with the mean X-ray surface flux. We determine densities using the He-like triplets. For active stars we find no significant deviations from the low-density limit for the ions of Ne, Mg, and Si, while the measured line ratios for the i...

  15. Can coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjarska, M. S.; Vanninathan, K.; Doyle, J. G.

    2011-08-01

    Aims: The present study aims to provide observational evidence of whether coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures. Methods: We combine multi-instrument co-observations obtained with the SUMER/SoHO and with the EIS/SOT/XRT/Hinode. Results: The analysed three large spicules were found to be comprised of numerous thin spicules that rise, rotate, and descend simultaneously forming a bush-like feature. Their rotation resembles the untwisting of a large flux rope. They show velocities ranging from 50 to 250 kms-1. We clearly associated the red- and blue-shifted emissions in transition region lines not only with rotating but also with rising and descending plasmas. Our main result is that these spicules although very large and dynamic, are not present in the spectral lines formed at temperatures above 300 000 K. Conclusions: In this paper we present the analysis of three Ca ii H large spicules that are composed of numerous dynamic thin spicules but appear as macrospicules in lower resolution EUV images. We found no coronal counterpart of these and smaller spicules. We believe that the identification of phenomena that have very different origins as macrospicules is due to the interpretation of the transition region emission, and especially the He ii emission, wherein both chromospheric large spicules and coronal X-ray jets are present. We suggest that the recent observation of spicules in the coronal AIA/SDO 171 Å and 211 Å channels probably comes from the existence of transition region emission there. Movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Solar Coronal Plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannina Poletto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar plumes are thin long ray-like structures that project beyond the limb of the Sun polar regions, maintaining their identity over distances of several solar radii. Plumes have been first observed in white-light (WL images of the Sun, but, with the advent of the space era, they have been identified also in X-ray and UV wavelengths (XUV and, possibly, even in in situ data. This review traces the history of plumes, from the time they have been first imaged, to the complex means by which nowadays we attempt to reconstruct their 3-D structure. Spectroscopic techniques allowed us also to infer the physical parameters of plumes and estimate their electron and kinetic temperatures and their densities. However, perhaps the most interesting problem we need to solve is the role they cover in the solar wind origin and acceleration: Does the solar wind emanate from plumes or from the ambient coronal hole wherein they are embedded? Do plumes have a role in solar wind acceleration and mass loading? Answers to these questions are still somewhat ambiguous and theoretical modeling does not provide definite answers either. Recent data, with an unprecedented high spatial and temporal resolution, provide new information on the fine structure of plumes, their temporal evolution and relationship with other transient phenomena that may shed further light on these elusive features.

  17. Physical Conditions of Coronal Plasma at the transit of a Shock driven by a Coronal Mass Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Bemporad, A; Mancuso, S

    2015-01-01

    We report here on the determination of plasma physical parameters across a shock driven by a Coronal Mass Ejection using White Light (WL) coronagraphic images and Radio Dynamic Spectra (RDS). The event analyzed here is the spectacular eruption that occurred on June 7th 2011, a fast CME followed by the ejection of columns of chromospheric plasma, part of them falling back to the solar surface, associated with a M2.5 flare and a type-II radio burst. Images acquired by the SOHO/LASCO coronagraphs (C2 and C3) were employed to track the CME-driven shock in the corona between 2-12 R$_\\odot$ in an angular interval of about 110$^\\circ$. In these intervals we derived 2-Dimensional (2D) maps of electron density, shock velocity and shock compression ratio, and we measured the shock inclination angle with respect to the radial direction. Under plausible assumptions, these quantities were used to infer 2D maps of shock Mach number $M_\\text{A}$ and strength of coronal magnetic fields at the shock's heights. We found that i...

  18. Stellar Flares and Coronal Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Guedel, M.

    2003-01-01

    Coronal structure and coronal heating are intimately related in magnetically active stars. Coronal structure is commonly inferred from radio interferometry and from eclipse and rotational modulation studies. We discuss to what extent flares may be responsible for coronal structure and global observable properties in magnetically active stars.

  19. EFFECT OF AIR-DRYING ON DEMINERALIZED AND ON SOUND CORONAL HUMAN DENTIN - A STUDY ON DENSITY AND ON LESION SHRINKAGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ARENDS, J; RUBEN, J

    1995-01-01

    Recently, several papers investigated the linear dimensional changes in dentine after air-drying. This paper pertains to weight changes, volume changes, and density changes caused by air-drying of sound and demineralized intact dentine. The densities of sound and artificially demineralized human cor

  20. Coronal Waves and Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakariakov Valery M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Wave and oscillatory activity of the solar corona is confidently observed with modern imaging and spectral instruments in the visible light, EUV, X-ray and radio bands, and interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD wave theory. The review reflects the current trends in the observational study of coronal waves and oscillations (standing kink, sausage and longitudinal modes, propagating slow waves and fast wave trains, the search for torsional waves, theoretical modelling of interaction of MHD waves with plasma structures, and implementation of the theoretical results for the mode identification. Also the use of MHD waves for remote diagnostics of coronal plasma - MHD coronal seismology - is discussed and the applicability of this method for the estimation of coronal magnetic field, transport coefficients, fine structuring and heating function is demonstrated.

  1. Mechanisms of Coronal Heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. R. Verma

    2006-06-01

    The Sun is a mysterious star. The high temperature of the chromosphere and corona present one of the most puzzling problems of solar physics. Observations show that the solar coronal heating problem is highly complex with many different facts. It is likely that different heating mechanisms are at work in solar corona. Recent observations show that Magnetic Carpet is a potential candidate for solar coronal heating.

  2. Can coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures?

    CERN Document Server

    Madjarska, M S; Doyle, J G

    2011-01-01

    We aim with the present study to provide observational evidences on whether coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures. We combine multi-instrument co-observations obtained with the SUMER/SoHO and with the EIS/SOT/XRT/Hinode. The analysed three large spicules were found to be comprised of numerous thin spicules which rise, rotate and descend simultaneously forming a bush-like feature. Their rotation resembles the untwisting of a large flux rope. They show velocities ranging from 50 to 250 km/s. We clearly associated the red- and blue-shifted emissions in transition region lines with rotating but also with rising and descending plasmas, respectively. Our main result is that these spicules although very large and dynamic, show no presence in spectral lines formed at temperatures above 300 000 K. The present paper brings out the analysis of three Ca II H large spicules which are composed of numerous dynamic thin spicules but appear as macrospicules in EUV lower resolution images. We found no coronal counte...

  3. Density-dependent regulation of fecundity in Syngamus trachea infrapopulations in semi-naturally occurring ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) and wild Carrion Crows (Corvus corone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gethings, O J; Sage, R B; Leather, S R

    2016-05-01

    Previous work has highlighted increased opportunities for the transmission of Syngamus trachea within pheasant release pens, due in part to high levels of environmental contamination around communal areas. Despite this, the distribution of adult worms within their definitive hosts is not significantly different from predicted distributions under Taylor's power law. Therefore, density-dependent processes are probably acting to regulate S. trachea population dynamics. Patterns of nematode fecundity were investigated in a semi-naturally occurring population of ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) and a wild population of carrion crows (Corvus carone). Worm length was a reliable indicator of nematode fecundity, and a negative association between mean worm length and mean worm burden was identified within both the species. The stunting of worms at greater parasite densities was present in both immunologically naïve and previously exposed pheasants, so is unlikely to be a function of age-dependent acquired immunity. Interestingly, the effect of parasite crowding in the crow population explained more of the variation in mean worm length, apparently driven by a greater mean worm burden when compared with pheasants. The findings of the present study suggest that fecundity is a function of parasite density, i.e. parasite-mediated competition and not host-mediated heterogeneities in immunocompetence. PMID:26932519

  4. Solar Wind Associated with Near Equatorial Coronal Hole

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Hegde; K. M. Hiremath; Vijayakumar H. Doddamani; Shashanka R. Gurumath

    2015-09-01

    Present study probes temporal changes in the area and radiative flux of near equatorial coronal hole associated with solar wind parameters such as wind speed, density, magnetic field and temperature. Using high temporal resolution data from SDO/AIA for the two wave-lengths 193 Å and 211 Å, area and radiative flux of coronal holes are extracted and are examined for the association with high speed solar wind parameters. We find a strong association between different parameters of coronal hole and solar wind. For both the wavelength bands, we also compute coronal hole radiative energy near the earth and it is found to be of similar order as that of solar wind energy. However, for the wavelength 193 Å, owing to almost similar magnitudes of energy emitted by coronal hole and energy due to solar wind, it is conjectured that solar wind might have originated around the same height where 193 Å line is formed in the corona.

  5. Solar Wind Associated with Near Equatorial Coronal Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, M.; Hiremath, K. M.; Doddamani, Vijayakumar H.; Gurumath, Shashanka R.

    2015-09-01

    Present study probes temporal changes in the area and radiative flux of near equatorial coronal hole associated with solar wind parameters such as wind speed, density, magnetic field and temperature. Using high temporal resolution data from SDO/AIA for the two wavelengths 193 Å and 211 Å, area and radiative flux of coronal holes are extracted and are examined for the association with high speed solar wind parameters. We find a strong association between different parameters of coronal hole and solar wind. For both the wavelength bands, we also compute coronal hole radiative energy near the earth and it is found to be of similar order as that of solar wind energy. However, for the wavelength 193 Å, owing to almost similar magnitudes of energy emitted by coronal hole and energy due to solar wind, it is conjectured that solar wind might have originated around the same height where 193 Å line is formed in the corona.

  6. Ion–Cyclotron Resonance Frequency Interval Dependence on the O VI Ion Number Density in the North Polar Coronal Hole 1.5–3 Region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Özgür Gültekin; Emine Rızaoǧlu; K. Gediz Akdeniz

    2013-12-01

    The frequency intervals in which O VI ions get in resonance with ion–cyclotron waves are calculated using the kinetic model, for the latest six values found in literature on O VI ion number densities in the 1.5–3 region of the NPCH. It is found that the common resonance interval is 1.5 kHz to 3 kHz. The -variations of wave numbers necessary for the above calculations are evaluated numerically, solving the cubic dispersion relation with the dielectric response derived from the quasi-linear Vlasov equation for the left-circularly polarized ion-cyclotron waves.

  7. Episodic coronal heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Dixon, W. W.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Antiochos, S. K.

    1990-01-01

    A study is made of the observational consequences of the hypothesis that there is no steady coronal heating, the solar corona instead being heated episodically, such that each short burst of heating is followed by a long period of radiative cooling. The form of the resulting contribution to the differential emission measure (DEM), and to a convenient related function (the differential energy flux, DEF) is calculated. Observational data for the quiet solar atmosphere indicate that the upper branch of the DEM, corresponding to temperatures above 100,000 K, can be interpreted in terms of episodic energy injection at coronal temperatures.

  8. Episodic coronal heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study is made of the observational consequences of the hypothesis that there is no steady coronal heating, the solar corona instead being heated episodically, such that each short burst of heating is followed by a long period of radiative cooling. The form of the resulting contribution to the differential emission measure (DEM), and to a convenient related function (the differential energy flux, DEF) is calculated. Observational data for the quiet solar atmosphere indicate that the upper branch of the DEM, corresponding to temperatures above 100,000 K, can be interpreted in terms of episodic energy injection at coronal temperatures. 22 refs

  9. Standing sausage modes in coronal loops with plasma flow

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic waves are important for diagnosing the physical parameters of coronal plasmas. Field-aligned flows appear frequently in coronal loops.We examine the effects of transverse density and plasma flow structuring on standing sausage modes trapped in coronal loops, and examine their observational implications. We model coronal loops as straight cold cylinders with plasma flow embedded in a static corona. An eigen-value problem governing propagating sausage waves is formulated, its solutions used to construct standing modes. Two transverse profiles are distinguished, one being the generalized Epstein distribution (profile E) and the other (N) proposed recently in Nakariakov et al.(2012). A parameter study is performed on the dependence of the maximum period $P_\\mathrm{max}$ and cutoff length-to-radius ratio $(L/a)_{\\mathrm{cutoff}}$ in the trapped regime on the density parameters ($\\rho_0/\\rho_\\infty$ and profile steepness $p$) and flow parameters (magnitude $U_0$ and profile steepness $u$). For e...

  10. Coronal Diagnostics from Cometary Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryans, Paul; Pesnell, William D; Seaton, Daniel B; West, Matthew J

    2014-06-01

    The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission observed from sungrazing comets as they pass through the solar atmosphere can be used to infer the properties of the corona. In this paper we will discuss several of these properties that can be estimated from the EUV observations of Comet Lovejoy from AIA/SDO and SWAP/PROBA2. The longevity of the emission allows us to constrain the coronal electron density through which the comet passes. We will also discuss how dispersion of the emitting cometary material we can be used to estimate the local Alfven speed in the corona. Finally, measuring the deformation of the magnetic field as it is impacted by the comet can be used to estimate the magnetic field strength in this location. In the absence of the comet, none of these parameters are directly measurable in the corona. Sungrazing comets are thus unique probes of the solar atmosphere.

  11. Solar jet-coronal hole collision and a related coronal mass ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Du, Guohui; Li, Chuanyang

    2016-01-01

    Jets are defined as impulsive, well-collimated upflows, occurring in different layers of the solar atmosphere with different scales. Their relationship with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), another type of solar impulsive events, remains elusive. Using the high-quality imaging data of AIA/SDO, here we show a well-observed coronal jet event, in which part of the jets, with the embedding coronal loops, runs into a nearby coronal hole (CH) and gets bounced towards the opposite direction. This is evidenced by the flat-shape of the jet front during its interaction with the CH and the V-shaped feature in the time-slice plot of the interaction region. About a half-hour later, a CME initially with a narrow and jet-like front is observed by the LASCO C2 coronagraph, propagating along the direction of the post-collision jet. We also observe some 304 A dark material flowing from the jet-CH interaction region towards the CME. We thus suggest that the jet and the CME are physically connected, with the jet-CH collision and t...

  12. Solar Jet-Coronal Hole Collision and a Closely Related Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Du, Guohui; Li, Chuanyang

    2016-03-01

    Jets are defined as impulsive, well-collimated upflows, occurring in different layers of the solar atmosphere with different scales. Their relationship with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), another type of solar impulsive events, remains elusive. Using high-quality imaging data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/Solar Dynamics Observatory, we show a well-observed coronal jet event, in which the part of the jet with embedding coronal loops runs into a nearby coronal hole (CH) and gets bounced in the opposite direction. This is evidenced by the flat shape of the jet front during its interaction with the CH and the V-shaped feature in the time-slice plot of the interaction region. About a half-hour later, a CME with an initially narrow and jet-like front is observed by the LASCO C2 coronagraph propagating along the direction of the post-collision jet. We also observe some 304 Å dark material flowing from the jet-CH interaction region toward the CME. We thus suggest that the jet and the CME are physically connected, with the jet-CH collision and the large-scale magnetic topology of the CH being important in defining the eventual propagating direction of this particular jet-CME eruption.

  13. Coronal bright points associated with minifilament eruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) are small-scale, long-lived coronal brightenings that always correspond to photospheric network magnetic features of opposite polarity. In this paper, we subjectively adopt 30 CBPs in a coronal hole to study their eruptive behavior using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. About one-quarter to one-third of the CBPs in the coronal hole go through one or more minifilament eruption(s) (MFE(s)) throughout their lifetimes. The MFEs occur in temporal association with the brightness maxima of CBPs and possibly result from the convergence and cancellation of underlying magnetic dipoles. Two examples of CBPs with MFEs are analyzed in detail, where minifilaments appear as dark features of a cool channel that divide the CBPs along the neutral lines of the dipoles beneath. The MFEs show the typical rising movements of filaments and mass ejections with brightenings at CBPs, similar to large-scale filament eruptions. Via differential emission measure analysis, it is found that CBPs are heated dramatically by their MFEs and the ejected plasmas in the MFEs have average temperatures close to the pre-eruption BP plasmas and electron densities typically near 109 cm–3. These new observational results indicate that CBPs are more complex in dynamical evolution and magnetic structure than previously thought.

  14. Spectroscopic Diagnostics of Polar Coronal Plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Wilhelm, K; Dwivedi, B N

    2009-01-01

    Polar coronal plumes seen during solar eclipses can now be studied with space-borne telescopes and spectrometers. We briefly discuss such observations from space with a view to understanding their plasma characteristics. Using these observations, especially from SUMER/SOHO, but also from EUVI/STEREO, we deduce densities, temperatures, and abundance anomalies in plumes and inter-plume regions, and discuss their implications for better understanding of these structures in the Sun's atmosphere.

  15. Evolving Coronal Holes and Interplanetary Erupting Stream Disturbances

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajendra Shelke

    2006-06-01

    Coronal holes and interplanetary disturbances are important aspects of the physics of the Sun and heliosphere. Interplanetary disturbances are identified as an increase in the density turbulence compared with the ambient solar wind. Erupting stream disturbances are transient large-scale structures of enhanced density turbulence in the interplanetary medium driven by the high-speed flows of low-density plasma trailing behind for several days. Here, an attempt has been made to investigate the solar cause of erupting stream disturbances, mapped by Hewish & Bravo (1986) from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements made between August 1978 and August 1979 at 81.5 MHz. The position of the sources of 68 erupting stream disturbances on the solar disk has been compared with the locations of newborn coronal holes and/or the areas that have been coronal holes previously. It is found that the occurrence of erupting stream disturbances is linked to the emergence of newcoronal holes at the eruption site on the solar disk. A coronal hole is indicative of a radial magnetic field of a predominant magnetic polarity. The newborn coronal hole emerges on the Sun, owing to the changes in magnetic field configuration leading to the opening of closed magnetic structure into the corona. The fundamental activity for the onset of an erupting stream seems to be a transient opening of pre-existing closed magnetic structures into a new coronal hole, which can support high-speed flow trailing behind the compression zone of the erupting stream for several days.

  16. The coronal fricative problem

    OpenAIRE

    Dinnsen, Daniel A.; Dow, Michael C.; GIERUT, JUDITH A.; Morrisette, Michele L.; Christopher R. Green

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines a range of predicted versus attested error patterns involving coronal fricatives (e.g. [s, z, θ, ð]) as targets and repairs in the early sound systems of monolingual English-acquiring children. Typological results are reported from a cross-sectional study of 234 children with phonological delays (ages 3 years; 0 months to 7;9). Our analyses revealed different instantiations of a putative developmental conspiracy within and across children. Supplemental longitudinal evidenc...

  17. Coronal Waves and Oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Nakariakov Valery M.; Verwichte Erwin

    2005-01-01

    Wave and oscillatory activity of the solar corona is confidently observed with modern imaging and spectral instruments in the visible light, EUV, X-ray and radio bands, and interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave theory. The review reflects the current trends in the observational study of coronal waves and oscillations (standing kink, sausage and longitudinal modes, propagating slow waves and fast wave trains, the search for torsional waves), theoretical modelling of interactio...

  18. Coronal hole dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamics of high speed streams of solar plasma emanating from a coronal hole is investigated by use of a two-fluid model with polytropic equations of state. Steady outflow is considered along a flow tube which has a radial orientation with respect to the Sun, and a cross-sectional area proportional to r sup(s) where r is the heliocentric radius and s is a divergence parameter (>=2). The equations of continuity, momentum and state may be used to obtain a single, nonlinear, ordinary differential equation for the outflow velocity, and the problem reduces to the numerical solution of three pairs of simultaneous algebraic equations. It is found that the velocity profiles are generally highly dependent on the divergence parameter s, as well as the polytropic indices. Numerical results are given for a variety of cases most relevant to the solar corona. As s increases from 2, the value appropriate to the purely spherically symmetric expansion, the outflow velocity increases throughout the range from the coronal base out to infinity, over a certain parameter range. Although the terminal outflow speed for s > 2 may be far in excess of the purely spherically symmetric value, it is found that high speed streams emanating from coronal holes cannot be accounted for by geometrical effects alone. The results may have important applications in the general theory of stellar winds

  19. Nonlinear Processes in Coronal Heating and Slow Solar Wind Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Rappazzo, A F

    2010-01-01

    This work consists of two parts: the first devoted to the study of the heating of the magnetically confined Solar Corona, and the second to the acceleration of the Slow Solar Wind. Direct 3D reduced MHD simulations are presented. They model the heating of coronal loops in the solar atmosphere via the tangling of coronal field lines by photospheric footpoints motions within the framework of the "Parker scenario". We have derived scalings of physical quantities with loop length, and the ratio of photospheric to coronal Alfven velocities. The development of a turbulent dynamics makes the dissipation rate independent of the Reynolds number. The dynamics in physical space are desribed by weak turbulence, which develops when an MHD system is embedded in a strong axial magnetic field. The slow wind originates in and around the coronal streamer belt. The LASCO instrument onboard the SOHO spacecraft has observed plasma density enhancements forming beyond the cusp of a helmet streamer. Previous theoretical models for t...

  20. Compact toroid injection into C-2U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Thomas; Gota, H.; Garate, E.; Asai, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Sekiguchi, J.; Putvinski, S.; Allfrey, I.; Beall, M.; Cordero, M.; Granstedt, E.; Kinley, J.; Morehouse, M.; Sheftman, D.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    Sustainment of an advanced neutral beam-driven FRC for a period in excess of 5 ms is the primary goal of the C-2U machine at Tri Alpha Energy. In addition, a criteria for long-term global sustainment of any magnetically confined fusion reactor is particle refueling. To this end, a magnetized coaxial plasma-gun has been developed. Compact toroids (CT) are to be injected perpendicular to the axial magnetic field of C-2U. To simulate this environment, an experimental test-stand has been constructed. A transverse magnetic field of B ~ 1 kG is established (comparable to the C-2U axial field) and CTs are fired across it. As a minimal requirement, the CT must have energy density greater than that of the magnetic field it is to penetrate, i.e., 1/2 ρv2 >=B2 / 2μ0 . This criteria is easily met and indeed the CTs traverse the test-stand field. A preliminary experiment on C-2U shows the CT also capable of penetrating into FRC plasmas and refueling is observed resulting in a 20 - 30% increase in total particle number per single-pulsed CT injection. Results from test-stand and C-2U experiments will be presented.

  1. The Multithermal and Multi-stranded Nature of Coronal Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolin, P.; Vissers, G.; Pereira, T. M. D.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; Scullion, E.

    2015-06-01

    We analyze coordinated observations of coronal rain in loops, spanning chromospheric, transition region (TR), and coronal temperatures with sub-arcsecond spatial resolution. Coronal rain is found to be a highly multithermal phenomenon with a high degree of co-spatiality in the multi-wavelength emission. EUV darkening and quasi-periodic intensity variations are found to be strongly correlated with coronal rain showers. Progressive cooling of coronal rain is observed, leading to a height dependence of the emission. A fast-slow two-step catastrophic cooling progression is found, which may reflect the transition to optically thick plasma states. The intermittent and clumpy appearance of coronal rain at coronal heights becomes more continuous and persistent at chromospheric heights just before impact, mainly due to a funnel effect from the observed expansion of the magnetic field. Strong density inhomogeneities of 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 2-0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 5 are found, in which a transition from temperatures of 105 to 104 K occurs. The 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 2-0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 8 width of the distribution of coronal rain is found to be independent of temperature. The sharp increase in the number of clumps at the coolest temperatures, especially at higher resolution, suggests that the bulk distribution of the rain remains undetected. Rain clumps appear organized in strands in both chromospheric and TR temperatures. We further find structure reminiscent of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) thermal mode (also known as entropy mode), thereby suggesting an important role of thermal instability in shaping the basic loop substructure. Rain core densities are estimated to vary between 2 × 1010 and 2.5× {{10}11} cm-3, leading to significant downward mass fluxes per loop of 1-5 × 109 g s-1, thus suggesting a major role in the chromosphere-corona mass cycle.

  2. DVB-C2: Ready-PlugFest-Go

    OpenAIRE

    Hasse, Philipp; Schaaf, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    DVB-C2 is the 3rd member of the DVB family of second generation transmission systems. Both the DVB-C2 Technical Specification (EN 302 769) [1] and the DVB-C2 Implementation Guidelines (TS 102 991) [2] have been approved by ETSI in 2011 in its current version. The two major building blocks of DVB-C2 are the LDPC (Low Density Parity Check) FEC (Forward Error Correction) Code and the OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplex) modulation scheme. Using DVB-C2, cable operators will be able to i...

  3. Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

    OpenAIRE

    Nisticò, G.; V. Bothmer; S. Patsourakos; Zimbardo, G.

    2010-01-01

    Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet e...

  4. Coronal Plumes in the Fast Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velli, Marco; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    The expansion of a coronal hole filled with a discrete number of higher density coronal plumes is simulated using a time-dependent two-dimensional code. A solar wind model including an exponential coronal heating function and a flux of Alfven waves propagating both inside and outside the structures is taken as a basic state. Different plasma plume profiles are obtained by using different scale heights for the heating rates. Remote sensing and solar wind in situ observations are used to constrain the parameter range of the study. Time dependence due to plume ignition and disappearance is also discussed. Velocity differences of the order of approximately 50 km/s, such as those found in microstreams in the high-speed solar wind, may be easily explained by slightly different heat deposition profiles in different plumes. Statistical pressure balance in the fast wind data may be masked by the large variety of body and surface waves which the higher density filaments may carry, so the absence of pressure balance in the microstreams should not rule out their interpretation as the extension of coronal plumes into interplanetary space. Mixing of plume-interplume material via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability seems to be possible within the parameter ranges of the models defined here, only at large di stances from the Sun, beyond 0.2-0.3 AU. Plasma and composition measurements in the inner heliosphere, such as those which will become available with Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, should therefore definitely be able to identify plume remnants in the solar wind.

  5. nido-C2B9H112-碳硼烷异构体结构和稳定性的密度泛函研究%Density functional theory study on the structures and stabilities of nido-C2B9H112-carborane isomers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏洪源; 孙志忠; 李传友; 罗顺忠

    2014-01-01

    采用密度泛函方法对11顶点巢式碳硼烷C2B9H112-异构体进行了几何结构优化,分析了稳定性、电荷分布及分子轨道.结果表明,9个异构体都有对应的稳定构型,保持了巢式骨架结构.C取代开口五元环上B的异构体更稳定,且随取代数目增加和C原子间距增加而增加,C-C键和C-B键作用增强.C取代内层B使异构体稳定性降低,C C键和C-B键长随之增长.负电荷主要集中在C原子上,开口五元环上的C原子上负电荷要比内层C原子更多,成为亲核取代反应中心.异构体分子前线轨道具有和η5-C5H5-相似的π键性质,ΔELUMO-HOMO反映的化学稳定性与结构能量稳定性趋势一致.

  6. The role of active region coronal magnetic field in determining coronal mass ejection propagation direction

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Rui; Dai, Xinghua; Yang, Zhongwei; Huang, Chong; Hu, Huidong

    2015-01-01

    We study the role of the coronal magnetic field configuration of an active region in determining the propagation direction of a coronal mass ejection (CME). The CME occurred in the active region 11944 (S09W01) near the disk center on 2014 January 7 and was associated with an X1.2 flare. A new CME reconstruction procedure based on a polarimetric technique is adopted, which shows that the CME changed its propagation direction by around 28$^\\circ$ in latitude within 2.5 R$_\\odot$ and 43$^\\circ$ in longitude within 6.5 R$_\\odot$ with respect to the CME source region. This significant non-radial motion is consistent with the finding of M$\\ddot{o}$stl et al. (2015). We use nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) and potential field source surface (PFSS) extrapolation methods to determine the configurations of the coronal magnetic field. We also calculate the magnetic energy density distributions at different heights based on the extrapolations. Our results show that the active region coronal magnetic field has a strong ...

  7. The multi-thermal and multi-stranded nature of coronal rain

    CERN Document Server

    Antolin, P; Pereira, T M D; van der Voort, L Rouppe; Scullion, E

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we analyse coordinated observations spanning chromospheric, TR and coronal temperatures at very high resolution which reveal essential characteristics of thermally unstable plasmas. Coronal rain is found to be a highly multi-thermal phenomenon with a high degree of co-spatiality in the multi-wavelength emission. EUV darkening and quasi-periodic intensity variations are found to be strongly correlated to coronal rain showers. Progressive cooling of coronal rain is observed, leading to a height dependence of the emission. A fast-slow two-step catastrophic cooling progression is found, which may reflect the transition to optically thick plasma states. The intermittent and clumpy appearance of coronal rain at coronal heights becomes more continuous and persistent at chromospheric heights just before impact, mainly due to a funnel effect from the observed expansion of the magnetic field. Strong density inhomogeneities on spatial scales of 0.2"-0.5" are found, in which TR to chromospheric temperature ...

  8. EUV and Coronagraphic Observations of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Durgesh Tripathi

    2006-06-01

    The Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) and Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) onboard Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) provide us with unprecedented multi-wavelength observations helping us to understand different dynamic phenomena on the Sun and in the corona. In this paper we discuss the association between post-eruptive arcades (PEAs) detected by EIT and white-light coronal mass ejections (CMEs) detected by LASCO/C2 telescope.

  9. The Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczyk, S.; Landi, E.; Zhang, J.; Lin, H.; DeLuca, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of coronal and chromospheric magnetic fields are arguably the most important observables required for advances in our understanding of the processes responsible for coronal heating, coronal dynamics and the generation of space weather that affects communications, GPS systems, space flight, and power transmission. The Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory (COSMO) is a proposed ground-based suite of instruments designed for routine study of coronal and chromospheric magnetic fields and their environment, and to understand the formation of coronal mass ejections (CME) and their relation to other forms of solar activity. This new facility will be operated by the High Altitude Observatory of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (HAO/NCAR) with partners at the University of Michigan, the University of Hawaii and George Mason University in support of the solar and heliospheric community. It will replace the current NCAR Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (http://mlso.hao.ucar.edu). COSMO will enhance the value of existing and new observatories on the ground and in space by providing unique and crucial observations of the global coronal and chromospheric magnetic field and its evolution. The design and current status of the COSMO will be reviewed.

  10. The coronal fricative problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnsen, Daniel A.; Dow, Michael C.; Gierut, Judith A.; Morrisette, Michele L.; Green, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines a range of predicted versus attested error patterns involving coronal fricatives (e.g. [s, z, θ, ð]) as targets and repairs in the early sound systems of monolingual English-acquiring children. Typological results are reported from a cross-sectional study of 234 children with phonological delays (ages 3 years; 0 months to 7;9). Our analyses revealed different instantiations of a putative developmental conspiracy within and across children. Supplemental longitudinal evidence is also presented that replicates the cross-sectional results, offering further insight into the life-cycle of the conspiracy. Several of the observed typological anomalies are argued to follow from a modified version of Optimality Theory with Candidate Chains (McCarthy, 2007). PMID:24790247

  11. The coronal fricative problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnsen, Daniel A; Dow, Michael C; Gierut, Judith A; Morrisette, Michele L; Green, Christopher R

    2013-07-01

    This paper examines a range of predicted versus attested error patterns involving coronal fricatives (e.g. [s, z, θ, ð]) as targets and repairs in the early sound systems of monolingual English-acquiring children. Typological results are reported from a cross-sectional study of 234 children with phonological delays (ages 3 years; 0 months to 7;9). Our analyses revealed different instantiations of a putative developmental conspiracy within and across children. Supplemental longitudinal evidence is also presented that replicates the cross-sectional results, offering further insight into the life-cycle of the conspiracy. Several of the observed typological anomalies are argued to follow from a modified version of Optimality Theory with Candidate Chains (McCarthy, 2007). PMID:24790247

  12. Dynamical behaviour in coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisch, Bernhard M.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid variability has been found in two active region coronal loops observed by the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) and the Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS) onboard the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). There appear to be surprisingly few observations of the short-time scale behavior of hot loops, and the evidence presented herein lends support to the hypothesis that coronal heating may be impulsive and driven by flaring.

  13. Invariant subvarieties of the 3-tensor space C^2C^2C^2

    OpenAIRE

    AGAOKA, Yoshio

    1994-01-01

    We classify G-invariant subvarieties of the 3-tensor space C^2C^2C^2 that are defined by polynomials with degree≤6,where G=GL(2,C)×GL(2,C)×GL(2,C). We also calculate the character fo S^p(C^2C^2C^2), determine the generators of each irreducible component of S^p(C^2C^2C^2), and obtain some curious identities between them that play a fundamental role in classifying invariant subvarieties.

  14. Fast Collisionless Reconnection Condition and Self-Organization of Solar Coronal Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A

    2007-01-01

    I propose that solar coronal heating is a self-regulating process that keeps the coronal plasma roughly marginally collisionless. The self-regulating mechanism is based on the interplay of two effects. First, plasma density controls coronal energy release via the transition between the slow collisional Sweet--Parker regime and the fast collisionless reconnection regime. This transition takes place when the Sweet--Parker layer becomes thinner than the characteristic collisionless reconnection scale. I present a simple criterion for this transition in terms of the upstream plasma density and magnetic field and the global length of the reconnection layer. Second, coronal energy release by reconnection raises the ambient plasma density via chromospheric evaporation and this, in turn, temporarily inhibits subsequent reconnection involving the newly-reconnected loops. Over time, however, radiative cooling gradually lowers the density again below the critical value and fast reconnection again becomes possible. As a ...

  15. Evidence for the Reversal of Magnetic Field Polarity in Coronal Streamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Richard

    1996-01-01

    Faraday rotation observations are unique amongst radio occultation measurements in that they respond to magnetic field in addition to electron density, making it possible to probe the coronal magnetic field.

  16. Coronal Seismology: Inferring Magnetic Fields and Exploring Damping Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAteer, R. T. James; Ireland, Jack

    2015-08-01

    Recent observations in extreme ultra-violet wavelengths have shown that the solar corona oscillates at many different spatial sizes and temporal size scales. However, much remains unknown about many of these oscillations; they are intermittent for unknown reasons, appear on some coronal features and not on other, similar, neighboring features, and may (or may not) be magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave modes. Definitive causes of the structure and origins of these oscillations are still largely lacking. Here, we use automated oscillation detection routines to study a large sample of oscillations, inferring physical mechanisms as to how and why the corona varies.First, we measure the oscillation content of different physical regions on the Sun in SDO AIA data, using two different automated oscillation detection algorithms. This shows a power-law distribution in oscillatory frequency, disagreeing with strong historical assumptions about the nature of coronal heating and coronal seismology. We show how such disagreements can be reconciled by using a power-law background for oscillatory signals.Second we use coronal seismology to provide a means to infer coronal plasma parameters and to differentiate between potential damping mechanisms. Recent sets of kink-mode observations (usually 5-8 loops) have come insights into how the coronal is structured and how it evolves. We present a complex set of flare-induced, off-limb, coronal kink-mode oscillations of almost 100 loops. These display a spread of periods, amplitudes, and damping times, allowing us to probe the spatial distribution of these parameters for the first time. Both Fourier and Wavelet routines are used to automatically extract and characterize these oscillations. An initial period of P~500s, results in an inferred coronal magnetic field of B~20G. The decrease in the oscillation period of the loop position corresponds to a drop in number density inside the coronal loop, as predicted by MHD. As the the period drops

  17. AGN coronal emission models - I. The predicted radio emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raginski, I.; Laor, Ari

    2016-06-01

    Accretion discs in active galactic nucleus (AGN) may be associated with coronal gas, as suggested by their X-ray emission. Stellar coronal emission includes radio emission, and AGN corona may also be a significant source for radio emission in radio quiet (RQ) AGN. We calculate the coronal properties required to produce the observed radio emission in RQ AGN, either from synchrotron emission of power-law (PL) electrons, or from cyclosynchrotron emission of hot mildly relativistic thermal electrons. We find that a flat spectrum, as observed in about half of RQ AGN, can be produced by corona with a disc or a spherical configuration, which extends from the innermost regions out to a pc scale. A spectral break to an optically thin power-law emission is expected around 300-1000 GHz, as the innermost corona becomes optically thin. In the case of thermal electrons, a sharp spectral cut-off is expected above the break. The position of the break can be measured with very long baseline interferometry observations, which exclude the cold dust emission, and it can be used to probe the properties of the innermost corona. Assuming equipartition of the coronal thermal energy density, the PL electrons energy density, and the magnetic field, we find that the energy density in a disc corona should scale as ˜R-1.3, to get a flat spectrum. In the spherical case the energy density scales as ˜R-2, and is ˜4 × 10-4 of the AGN radiation energy density. In Paper II we derive additional constraints on the coronal parameters from the Gudel-Benz relation, Lradio/LX-ray ˜ 10- 5, which RQ AGN follow.

  18. Stellar Coronae with \\textit{XMM-Newton} RGS. I. Coronal Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Güdel, M; Den Boggende, A J F; Brinkman, A C; Den Herder, J W A; Kaastra, J S; Mewe, R; Raassen, A J J; De Vries, C; Behar, E; Cottam, J; Kahn, S M; Paerels, F B S; Peterson, J M; Rasmussen, A P; Sako, M; Branduardi-Raymont, G; Sakelliou, I; Erd, Christian

    2000-01-01

    First results from high-resolution coronal spectroscopy with the {\\it XMM-Newton} Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) are reviewed. Five stellar systems (HR 1099, Capella, Procyon, YY Gem, AB Dor) have been observed. The emphasis of the present paper is on overall coronal structure. Elemental abundances in {\\it active stars} are found to be `anomalous' in the sense that they tend to increase with increasing First Ionization Potential (FIP - i.e., signifying an inverse FIP effect). Coronal densities are measured at levels of a few times $10^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$ for cooler plasma, although there are indications for very high densities in the hotter plasma components.

  19. Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Observations of Coronal Streamers in the SOHO Era

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Leonard Strachan

    2008-03-01

    Measurements made with the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory can be used to determine physical parameters in the solar corona such as hydrogen and ion kinetic temperatures, electron densities, and absolute elemental abundances. Hydrogen and ion outflow velocities can be determined by combining the UV spectroscopic measurements with white light polarized brightness measurements. These combined measurements can be used to reveal physical characteristics of coronal streamers. To date we have studied plasma properties, such as the variation of plasma outflows in quiescent streamers, primarily in classic helmet streamers at solar minimum. Outflows have not been observed in the centers of coronal streamers suggesting that these are closed magnetic field regions.We propose to study all of the coronal streamers in the UVCS synoptic dataset in order to investigate different types of streamers and their long-term evolution.

  20. The Nature of CME-Flare Associated Coronal Dimming

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, J X

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by coronal dimming evident in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray observations. The locations of dimming are sometimes considered to map footpoints of the erupting flux rope. As the emitting material expands in the corona, the decreased plasma density leads to reduced emission observed in spectral and irradiance measurements. Therefore, signatures of dimming may reflect properties of CMEs in the early phase of its eruption. In this study, we analyze the event of flare, CME, and coronal dimming on December 26, 2011. We use the data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on Solar Dynamics Observatories (SDO) for disk observations of the dimming, and analyze images taken by EUVI, COR1, and COR2 onboard the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatories to obtain the height and velocity of the associated CMEs observed at the limb. We also measure magnetic reconnection rate from flare observations. Dimming occurs in a few locations next to the flare ribbons,...

  1. Transverse, Propagating Velocity Perturbations in Solar Coronal Loops

    CERN Document Server

    De Moortel, I; Wright, A N; Hood, A W

    2015-01-01

    This short review paper gives an overview of recently observed transverse, propagating velocity perturbations in coronal loops. These ubiquitous perturbations are observed to undergo strong damping as they propagate. Using 3D numerical simulations of footpoint-driven transverse waves propagating in a coronal plasma with a cylindrical density structure, in combination with analytical modelling, it is demonstrated that the observed velocity perturbations can be understood in terms of coupling of different wave modes in the inhomogeneous boundaries of the loops. Mode coupling in the inhomogeneous boundary layers of the loops leads to the coupling of the transversal (kink) mode to the azimuthal (Alfven) mode, observed as the decay of the transverse kink oscillations. Both the numerical and analytical results show the spatial profile of the damped wave has a Gaussian shape to begin with, before switching to exponential decay at large heights. In addition, recent analysis of CoMP (Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter)...

  2. First-principle Calculation of the Properties of Ti3SiC2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The electronic and structural properties for Ti3SiC2 were studied using the first-principle calculation method. By using the calculated band structure and density of states, the high electrical conductivity of Ti3SiC2 are explained.The bonding character of Ti3SiC2 is analyzed in the map of charge density distribution.

  3. SAUSAGE OSCILLATIONS OF CORONAL PLASMA STRUCTURES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dependence of the period of sausage oscillations of coronal loops on length together with the depth and steepness of the radial profile are determined. We performed a parametric study of linear axisymmetric fast magnetoacoustic (sausage) oscillations of coronal loops modeled as a field-aligned low-β plasma cylinder with a smooth inhomogeneity of the plasma density in the radial direction. The density decreases smoothly in the radial direction. Sausage oscillations are impulsively excited by a perturbation of the radial velocity, localized at the cylinder axis and with a harmonic dependence on the longitudinal coordinate. The initial perturbation results in either a leaky or a trapped sausage oscillation, depending upon whether the longitudinal wavenumber is smaller or greater than a cutoff value, respectively. The period of the sausage oscillations was found to always increase with increasing longitudinal wavelength, with the dependence saturating in the long-wavelength limit. Deeper and steeper radial profiles of the Alfvén speed correspond to more efficient trapping of sausage modes: the cutoff value of the wavelength increases with the steepness and the density (or Alfvén speed) contrast ratio. In the leaky regime, the period is always longer than the period of a trapped mode of a shorter wavelength in the same cylinder. For shallow density profiles and shorter wavelengths, the period increases with wavelength. In the long-wavelength limit, the period becomes independent of the wavelength and increases with the depth and steepness of the radial profile of the Alfvén speed.

  4. Coronal Mass Ejections An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    In times of growing technological sophistication and of our dependence on electronic technology, we are all affected by space weather. In its most extreme form, space weather can disrupt communications, damage and destroy spacecraft and power stations, and increase radiation exposure to astronauts and airline passengers. Major space weather events, called geomagnetic storms, are large disruptions in the Earth’s magnetic field brought about by the arrival of enormous magnetized plasma clouds from the Sun. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) contain billions of tons of plasma and hurtle through space at speeds of several million miles per hour. Understanding coronal mass ejections and their impact on the Earth is of great interest to both the scientific and technological communities. This book provides an introduction to coronal mass ejections, including a history of their observation and scientific revelations, instruments and theory behind their detection and measurement, and the status quo of theories describing...

  5. Coronal Fourier power spectra: implications for coronal seismology and coronal heating

    CERN Document Server

    Ireland, Jack; Inglis, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of regions of the solar corona are investigated using Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 171\\AA\\ and 193\\AA\\ data. The coronal emission from the quiet Sun, coronal loop footprints, coronal moss, and from above a sunspot is studied. It is shown that the mean Fourier power spectra in these regions can be described by a power law at lower frequencies that tails to flat spectrum at higher frequencies, plus a Gaussian-shaped contribution that varies depending on the region studied. This Fourier spectral shape is in contrast to the commonly-held assumption that coronal time-series are well described by the sum of a long time-scale background trend plus Gaussian-distributed noise, with some specific locations also showing an oscillatory signal. The implications of this discovery to the field of coronal seismology and the automated detections of oscillations are discussed. The power law contribution to the shape of the Fourier power spectrum is interpreted as being due to the summation of a distribution ...

  6. Effects of Coronal Mass Ejections on Distant Coronal Streamers

    CERN Document Server

    Filippov, B; Srivastava, A K; Martsenyuk, O

    2014-01-01

    The effects of a large coronal mass ejection (CME) on a solar coronal streamer located roughly 90 degrees from the main direction of the CME propagation observed on January 2, 2012 by the SOHO/LASCO coronagraph are analyzed. Radial coronal streamers undergo some bending when CMEs pass through the corona, even at large angular distances from the streamers. The phenomenon resembles a bending wave traveling along the streamer. Some researchers interpret these phenomena as the effects of traveling shocks generated by rapid CMEs, while others suggest they are waves excited inside the streamers by external impacts. The analysis presented here did not find convincing arguments in favor of either of these interpretations. It is concluded that the streamer behavior results from the effect of the magnetic field of a moving magnetic rope associated with the coronal ejection. The motion of the large-scale magnetic rope away from the Sun changes the surrounding magnetic field lines in the corona, and these changes resembl...

  7. A Solar Coronal Jet Event Triggers A Coronal Mass Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jiajia; Shen, Chenglong; Liu, Kai; Pan, Zonghao; Wang, S

    2015-01-01

    We present the multi-point and multi-wavelength observation and analysis on a solar coronal jet and coronal mass ejection (CME) event in this paper. Employing the GCS model, we obtained the real (three-dimensional) heliocentric distance and direction of the CME and found it propagate in a high speed over 1000 km/s . The jet erupted before and shared the same source region with the CME. The temporal and spacial relation- ship between them guide us the possibility that the jet triggered the CME and became its core. This scenario could promisingly enrich our understanding on the triggering mechanism of coronal mass ejections and their relations with coronal large-scale jets. On the other hand, the magnetic field configuration of the source region observed by the SDO/HMI instrument and the off- limb inverse Y-shaped configuration observed by SDO/AIA 171 A passband, together provide the first detailed observation on the three-dimensional reconnection process of large-scale jets as simulated in Pariat et al. 2009. ...

  8. Magnetic Field in the Gravitationally Stratified Coronal Loops

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. N. Dwivedi; A. K. Srivastava

    2015-03-01

    We study the effect of gravitational stratification on the estimation of magnetic fields in the coronal loops. By using the method of MHD seismology of kink waves for the estimation of magnetic field of coronal loops, we derive a new formula for the magnetic field considering the effect of gravitational stratification. The fast-kink wave is a potential diagnostic tool for the estimation of magnetic field in fluxtubes. We consider the eleven kink oscillation cases observed by TRACE between July 1998 and June 2001. We calculate magnetic field in the stratified loops (str) and compare them with the previously calculated absolute magnetic field (abs). The gravitational stratification efficiently affects the magnetic field estimation in the coronal loops as it affects also the properties of kink waves. We find ≈22% increment in the magnetic field for the smallest ( = 72 Mm) while ≈42% increment in the absolute magnetic field for the longest ( = 406 Mm) coronal loops. The magnetic fields str and abs also increase with the number density, if the loop length does not vary much. The increment in the magnetic field due to gravitational stratification is small at the lower number densities, however, it is large at the higher number densities. We find that damping time of kink waves due to phase-mixing is less in the case of gravitationally stratified loops compared to nonstratified ones. This indicates the more rapid damping of kink waves in the stratified loops. In conclusion, we find that the gravitational stratification efficiently affects the estimation of magnetic field and damping time estimation especially in the longer coronal loops.

  9. The dynamics of coronal magnetic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis is made of the evolution of coronal magnetic fields due to the interaction with the solar wind. An analysis of the formation of coronal streamers, arising as a result of the stretching of bipolar fields, is given. Numerical simulations of the formation of coronal streamers are presented. Fast-mode shocks as triggers of microturbulence in the solar corona are discussed

  10. Low-Coronal Sources of Stealth CMEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzate, Nathalia; Morgan, Huw

    2016-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are eruptions in the solar atmosphere, which expand and propagate into space. They are generally associated with eruptive phenomena in the lower corona such as solar flares, filament eruptions, EUV waves or jets, known as low-coronal signatures (LCS). Recent studies have observed CMEs without a LCS and these have been referred to as stealth CMEs. Through new image processing applied to EUV images we find clear evidence of LCS leading to stealth CMEs. In this work, the new processing methods are applied to some of the data identified to contain stealth CMEs in previous studies to investigate the possible existence of observable LCS. The LCS of stealth CMEs are fairly sizeable yet faint eruptions with structure consistent with a rising flux tube, possibly formed higher in the corona in regions of weaker magnetic field. We believe these flux tubes are formed mostly in polar regions due to the larger shear resulting from the more slowly rotating lower atmosphere below the more rapidly rotating corona. This would allow the formation of large flux tubes in weaker field regions, leading to low-energy and low-density flux tube eruptions

  11. Exploring Coronal Structures with SOHO

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Μ. Karovska; Β. Wood; J. Chen; J. Cook; R. Howard

    2000-09-01

    We applied advanced image enhancement techniques to explore in detail the characteristics of the small-scale structures and/or the low contrast structures in several Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) observed by SOHO. We highlight here the results from our studies of the morphology and dynamical evolution of CME structures in the solar corona using two instruments on board SOHO: LASCO and EIT.

  12. An equatorial coronal hole at solar minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromage, B. J. I.; DelZanna, G.; DeForest, C.; Thompson, B.; Clegg, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    The large transequatorial coronal hole that was observed in the solar corona at the end of August 1996 is presented. It consists of a north polar coronal hole called the 'elephant's trunk or tusk'. The observations of this coronal hole were carried out with the coronal diagnostic spectrometer onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The magnetic field associated with the equatorial coronal hole is strongly connected to that of the active region at its base, resulting in the two features rotating at almost the same rate.

  13. The resonant damping of fast magnetohydrodynamic oscillations in a system of two coronal slabs

    CERN Document Server

    Arregui, Inigo; Oliver, Ramon; Ballester, Jose Luis

    2007-01-01

    Observations of transversal coronal loop oscillations very often show the excitation and damping of oscillations in groups of coronal loops rather than in individual and isolated structures. We present results on the oscillatory properties (periods, damping rates, and spatial distribution of perturbations) for resonantly damped oscillations in a system of two inhomogeneous coronal slabs and compare them to the properties found in single slab loop models. A system of two identical coronal loops is modeled, in Cartesian geometry, as being composed by two density enhancements. The linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave equations for oblique propagation of waves are solved and the damping of the different solutions, due to the transversal inhomogeneity of the density profile, is computed. The physics of the obtained results is analyzed by an examination of the perturbed physical variables. We find that, due to the interaction between the loops, the normal modes of oscillation present in a single slab split into sy...

  14. Unresolved fine-scale structure in solar coronal loop-tops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scullion, E.; Van der Voort, L. Rouppe; Wedemeyer, S. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Antolin, P., E-mail: scullie@tcd.ie [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2014-12-10

    New and advanced space-based observing facilities continue to lower the resolution limit and detect solar coronal loops in greater detail. We continue to discover even finer substructures within coronal loop cross-sections, in order to understand the nature of the solar corona. Here, we push this lower limit further to search for the finest coronal loop substructures, through taking advantage of the resolving power of the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope/CRisp Imaging Spectro-Polarimeter (CRISP), together with co-observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA). High-resolution imaging of the chromospheric Hα 656.28 nm spectral line core and wings can, under certain circumstances, allow one to deduce the topology of the local magnetic environment of the solar atmosphere where its observed. Here, we study post-flare coronal loops, which become filled with evaporated chromosphere that rapidly condenses into chromospheric clumps of plasma (detectable in Hα) known as a coronal rain, to investigate their fine-scale structure. We identify, through analysis of three data sets, large-scale catastrophic cooling in coronal loop-tops and the existence of multi-thermal, multi-stranded substructures. Many cool strands even extend fully intact from loop-top to footpoint. We discover that coronal loop fine-scale strands can appear bunched with as many as eight parallel strands within an AIA coronal loop cross-section. The strand number density versus cross-sectional width distribution, as detected by CRISP within AIA-defined coronal loops, most likely peaks at well below 100 km, and currently, 69% of the substructure strands are statistically unresolved in AIA coronal loops.

  15. A magnetohydrodynamic theory of coronal loop transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, T.

    1982-01-01

    The physical and geometrical characteristics of solar coronal loop transients are described in an MHD model based on Archimedes' MHD buoyancy force. The theory was developed from interpretation of coronagraphic data, particularly from Skylab. The brightness of a loop is taken to indicate the electron density, and successive pictures reveal the electron enhancement in different columns. The forces which lift the loop off the sun surface are analyzed as an MHD buoyancy force affecting every mass element by imparting an inertial force necessary for heliocentrifugal motion. Thermal forces are responsible for transferring the ambient stress to the interior of the loop to begin the process. The kinematic and hydrostatic buoyancy overcome the gravitational force, and a flux rope can then curve upward, spiralling like a corkscrew with varying cross section around the unwinding solar magnetic field lines.

  16. The coronal structure of active regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A four-parameter model which assumes a Gaussian dependence of both temperature and pressure on distance from center is used to fit the compact part of coronal active regions as observed in X-ray photographs from a rocket experiment. The four parameters are the maximum temperature Tsub(M), the maximum pressure Psub(M)=2Nsub(M)kTsub(M), the width of the pressure distribution sigmasub(P), and the width of the temperature distribution sigmasub(T)=αsup(1/2)sigmasub(P). The maximum temperature Tsub(M) ranges from 2.2 to 2.8x106K, and the maximum density Nsub(M) from 2 to 9x109cm-3. The range of sigmasub(P) is from 2 to 4x109 cm and that of α from 2 to 7. (Auth.)

  17. C2H observations toward the Orion Bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Z.; Ossenkopf, V.; Van der Tak, F. F. S.; Faure, A.; Makai, Z.; Bergin, E. A.

    2015-06-01

    Context. The ethynyl radical (C2H) is one of the first radicals to be detected in the interstellar medium. Its higher rotational transitions have recently become available with the Herschel Space Observatory. Aims: We aim to constrain the physical parameters of the C2H emitting gas toward the Orion Bar. Methods: We analyze the C2H line intensities measured toward the Orion Bar CO+ Peak and Herschel/HIFI maps of C2H, CH, and HCO+ and a NANTEN map of [Ci]. We interpret the observed C2H emission using the combination of Herschel/HIFI and NANTEN data with radiative transfer and PDR models. Results: Five rotational transitions of C2H (from N = 6-5 up to N = 10-9) have been detected in the HIFI frequency range toward the CO+ peak of the Orion Bar. Based on the five detected C2H transitions, a single component rotational diagram analysis gives a rotation temperature of ~64 K and a beam-averaged C2H column density of 4 × 1013 cm-2. The rotational diagram is also consistent with a two-component fit, resulting in rotation temperatures of 43 ± 0.2 K and 123 ± 21 K and in beam-averaged column densities of ~8.3 × 1013 cm-2 and ~2.3 × 1013 cm-2 for the three lower-N and for the three higher-N transitions, respectively. The measured five rotational transitions cannot be explained by any single parameter model. According to a non-LTE model, most of the C2H column density produces the lower-N C2H transitions and traces a warm (Tkin ~ 100-150 K) and dense (n(H2) ~ 105-106 cm-3) gas. A small fraction of the C2H column density is required to reproduce the intensity of the highest-N transitions (N = 9-8 and N = 10-9) originating in a high-density (n(H2) ~5 × 106 cm-3) hot (Tkin ~ 400 K) gas. The total beam-averaged C2H column density in the model is 1014 cm-2. A comparison of the spatial distribution of C2H to those of CH, HCO+, and [Ci] shows the best correlation with CH. Conclusions: Both the non-LTE radiative transfer model and a simple PDR model representing the Orion Bar

  18. Numerical Simulation of DC Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlburg, Russell B.; Einaudi, G.; Taylor, Brian D.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry; Rappazzo, A. F.; Velli, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Recent research on observational signatures of turbulent heating of a coronal loop will be discussed. The evolution of the loop is is studied by means of numerical simulations of the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations using the HYPERION code. HYPERION calculates the full energy cycle involving footpoint convection, magnetic reconnection, nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. The footpoints of the loop magnetic field are convected by random photospheric motions. As a consequence the magnetic field in the loop is energized and develops turbulent nonlinear dynamics characterized by the continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets: energy is deposited at small scales where heating occurs. Dissipation is non-uniformly distributed so that only a fraction of thecoronal mass and volume gets heated at any time. Temperature and density are highly structured at scales which, in the solar corona, remain observationally unresolved: the plasma of the simulated loop is multi thermal, where highly dynamical hotter and cooler plasma strands are scattered throughout the loop at sub-observational scales. Typical simulated coronal loops are 50000 km length and have axial magnetic field intensities ranging from 0.01 to 0.04 Tesla. To connect these simulations to observations the computed number densities and temperatures are used to synthesize the intensities expected in emission lines typically observed with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. These intensities are then employed to compute differential emission measure distributions, which are found to be very similar to those derived from observations of solar active regions.

  19. CORON: A Framework for Levelwise Itemset Mining Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Szathmary, Laszlo; Napoli, Amedeo

    2005-01-01

    CORON is a framework for levelwise algorithms that are designed to find frequent and/or frequent closed itemsets in binary contexts. Datasets can be very different in size, number of objects, number of attributes, density, etc. As there is no one best algorithm for arbitrary datasets, we want to give a possibility for users to try different algorithms and choose the one that best suits their needs.

  20. Numerical simulations of transverse oscillations in radiatively cooling coronal loops

    OpenAIRE

    Magyar, N.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Marcu, A.

    2015-01-01

    We aim to study the influence of radiative cooling on the standing kink oscillations of a coronal loop. Using the FLASH code, we solved the 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations. Our model consists of a straight, density enhanced and gravitationally stratified magnetic flux tube. We perturbed the system initially, leading to a transverse oscillation of the structure, and followed its evolution for a number of periods. A realistic radiative cooling is implemented. Results are compared to avai...

  1. Search for potential minimum positions in metal-organic hybrids, (C2H5NH3)2CuCl4 and (C6H5CH2CH2NH3)2CuCl4, by using density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ab-initio density functional theory analysis was applied to metal-organic hybrids, (C2H5NH3)2CuCl4 (EA) and (C6H5CH2CH2NH3)2CuCl4 (PEA), in order to estimate possible muons stopping positions. Six potential minimum positions and eight ones were revealed in PA and PEA, respectively. Those potential minimum positions can be regarded as initial stopping positions of injected muons. All of expected potential minimum points in EA were near and around the apical Cl and the CuCl2 plane of the CuCl6 octahedra. Instead, in the case of PEA, two of eight positions were close to the phenyl ring giving a possibility that there would be muon states which couple surrounding electrons via a radical formation

  2. VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY FOR THE CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD. II. HANLE EFFECT MEASUREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of saturated coronal Hanle effect vector tomography or the application of vector tomographic inversion techniques to reconstruct the three-dimensional magnetic field configuration of the solar corona using linear polarization measurements of coronal emission lines. We applied Hanle effect vector tomographic inversion to artificial data produced from analytical coronal magnetic field models with equatorial and meridional currents and global coronal magnetic field models constructed by extrapolation of real photospheric magnetic field measurements. We tested tomographic inversion with only Stokes Q, U, electron density, and temperature inputs to simulate observations over large limb distances where the Stokes I parameters are difficult to obtain with ground-based coronagraphs. We synthesized the coronal linear polarization maps by inputting realistic noise appropriate for ground-based observations over a period of two weeks into the inversion algorithm. We found that our Hanle effect vector tomographic inversion can partially recover the coronal field with a poloidal field configuration, but that it is insensitive to a corona with a toroidal field. This result demonstrates that Hanle effect vector tomography is an effective tool for studying the solar corona and that it is complementary to Zeeman effect vector tomography for the reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field

  3. Ponderomotive Acceleration in Coronal Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlburg, R B; Taylor, B D; Obenschain, K

    2016-01-01

    Ponderomotive acceleration has been asserted to be a cause of the First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect, the by now well known enhancement in abundance by a factor of 3-4 over photospheric values of elements in the solar corona with FIP less than about 10 eV. It is shown here by means of numerical simulations that ponderomotive acceleration occurs in solar coronal loops, with the appropriate magnitude and direction, as a "byproduct" of coronal heating. The numerical simulations are performed with the HYPERION code, which solves the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations including nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. Numerical simulations of a coronal loops with an axial magnetic field from 0.005 Teslas to 0.02 Teslas and lengths from 25000 km to 75000 km are presented. In the simulations the footpoints of the axial loop magnetic field are convected by random, large-scale motions. There is a continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets...

  4. Fluorescent vibration-rotation excitation of cometary C2

    OpenAIRE

    Gredel, R.; Dishoeck, van, E.F.; Black, J. H.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical equilibrium equations that determine the population densities of the energy levels in cometary C2 molecules due to fluorescent excitation are examined in detail. The adopted model and molecular parameters are discussed, and a theoretical estimate is made of the two intercombination transition moments. From the theoretical population densities in the various rotational levels, flux ratios and synthetic emission profiles are calculated as functions of the a 3Pi(u) - X 1Sigma(g)+...

  5. Coronal seismology of flare-excited longitudinal slow magnetoacoustic waves in hot coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.; Ofman, L.; Sun, X.; Provornikova, E. A.; Davila, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The flare-excited longitudinal intensity oscillations in hot flaring loops have been recently detected by SDO/AIA in 94 and 131 bandpasses. These oscillations show similar physical properties (such as period, decay time, and trigger) as those slow-mode standing waves previously detected by the SOHO/SUMER spectrometer in Doppler shift of flare lines formed above 6 MK. The multi-wavelength AIA observations with high spatio-temporal resolution and wide temperature coverage enable us to measure both thermal and wave properties of the oscillating hot plasma with unprecedented accuracy. These new measurements can be used to diagnose the complicated energy transport processes in flare plasma by a technique called coronal seismology based on the combination of observations and MHD wave theory. From a detailed case study we have found evidence for thermal conduction suppression in hot loops by measuring the polytropic index and analyzing the phase relationship between the temperature and density wave signals. This result is not only crucial for better understanding the wave dissipation mechanism but also provides an alternative mechanism to explain the puzzles of long-duration events and X-ray loop-top sources which show much slower cooling than expected by the classical Spitzer conductive cooling. This finding may also shed a light on the coronal heating problem because weak thermal conductivity implies slower cooling of hot plasma in nanoflares, so increasing the average coronal temperature for the same heating rate. We will discuss the effects of thermal conduction suppression on the wave damping and loop cooling based on MHD simulations.

  6. Low-latitude coronal holes, decaying active regions and global coronal magnetic structure

    CERN Document Server

    Petrie, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    We study the relationship between decaying active region magnetic fields, coronal holes and the global coronal magnetic structure using Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG) synoptic magnetograms, Solar Terrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) extreme ultra-violet (EUV) synoptic maps and coronal potential-field source-surface (PFSS) models. We analyze 14 decaying regions and associated coronal holes occurring between early 2007 and late 2010, four from cycle 23 and 10 from cycle 24. We investigate the relationship between asymmetries in active regions' positive and negative magnetic intensities, asymmetric magnetic decay rates, flux imbalances, global field structure and coronal hole formation. Whereas new emerging active regions caused changes in the large-scale coronal field, the coronal fields of the 14 decaying active regions only opened under the condition that the global coronal structure remained almost unchanged. This was because the dominant slowly-varying, low-order multipoles prevented opposin...

  7. Interpretation of the coronal magnetic field configuration of the Sun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Li; Xing Li; Hui Yu

    2012-01-01

    The origin of the heliospheric magnetic flux on the Sun,and hence the origin of the solar wind,is a topic of hot debate.While the prevailing view is that the solar wind originates from outside the coronal streamer helmets,there also exists the suggestion that the open magnetic field spans a far wider region.Without the definitive measurement of the coronal magnetic field,it is difficult to unambiguously resolve the conflict between the two scenarios.We present two 2-dimensional,Alfvénic-turbulence-based models of the solar corona and solar wind,one with and the other without a closed magnetic field region in the inner corona.The purpose of the latter model is to test whether it is possible to realize a picture suggested by polarimetric measurements of the corona using the Fe ⅩⅢ 10747(A) line,where open magnetic field lines seem to penetrate the streamer base.The boundary conditions at the coronal base are able to account for important observational constraints,especially those on the magnetic flux distribution.Interestingly,the two models provide similar polarized brightness (pB) distributions in the field of view (FOV) of SOHO/LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs.In particular,a dome-shaped feature is present in the C2 FOV even for the model without a closed magnetic field.Moreover,both models fit the Ulysses data scaled to 1 AU equally well.We suggest that:1) The pB observations cannot be safely taken as a proxy for the magnetic field topology,as is often implicitly assumed.2) The Ulysses measurements,especially the one showing a nearly uniform distribution with heliocentric latitude of the radial magnetic field,do not rule out the ubiquity of open magnetic fields on the Sun.

  8. EUV Coronal Dimming and its Relationship to Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, James

    2016-05-01

    As a coronal mass ejection (CME) departs from the inner solar atmosphere, it leaves behind a void. This region of depleted plasma results in a corresponding decrease in coronal emissions that can be observed by instruments tuned to measure the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) part of the electromagnetic spectrum. These coronal dimmings can be observed with EUV imagers and EUV spectral irradiance instruments. Onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) provide complementary observations; together they can be used to obtain high spatial and spectral resolution. AIA provides information about the location, extent, and spatial evolution of the dimming while EVE data are important to understand plasma temperature evolution. Concurrent processes with similar timescales to mass-loss dimming also impact the observations, which makes a deconvolution method necessary for the irradiance time series in order to have a “clean” mass-loss dimming light curve that can be parameterized and compared with CME kinematics. This presentation will first provide background on these various physical processes and the deconvolution method developed. Two case studies will then be presented, followed by a semi-statistical study (~30 events) to establish a correlation between dimming and CME parameters. In particular, the slope of the deconvolved irradiance dimming light curve is representative of the CME speed, and the irradiance dimming depth can serve as a proxy for CME mass. Finally, plans and early results from a more complete statistical study of all dimmings in the SDO era, based on an automated detection routine using EVE data, will be described and compared with independently derived dimmings automatically detected with AIA data.

  9. Coronal Pseudo-Streamer and Bipolar Streamer Observed by SOHO/UVCS in March 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Abbo, Lucia; Riley, Pete; Wang, Yi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The last solar minimum is characterized by several peculiar aspects and by the presence of a complex magnetic topology with two different kinds of coronal streamers: pseudo-streamers and bipolar streamers. Pseudo-streamers or unipolar streamer are coronal structures which separate coronal holes of the same polarity, without a current sheet in the outer corona; unlike bipolar streamer that separate coronal holes of opposite magnetic polarity. In this study, two examples of these structures have been identified in the period of Carrington rotation 2067, by applying a potential-field source-surface extrapolation of the photospheric field measurements. We present a spectroscopic analysis of a pseudo-streamer and a bipolar streamer observed in the period 12-17 March 2008 at high spectral and spatial resolution by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS; Kohl et al., 1995) onboard Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The solar wind plasma parameters, such as kinetic temperature, electron density and ou...

  10. THERMAL SIGNATURES OF TETHER-CUTTING RECONNECTIONS IN PRE-ERUPTION CORONAL FLUX ROPES: HOT CENTRAL VOIDS IN CORONAL CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Y. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, 3080 Center Green Drive, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2012-10-10

    Using a three-dimensional MHD simulation, we model the quasi-static evolution and the onset of eruption of a coronal flux rope. The simulation begins with a twisted flux rope emerging at the lower boundary and pushing into a pre-existing coronal potential arcade field. At a chosen time the emergence is stopped with the lower boundary taken to be rigid. Then the coronal flux rope settles into a quasi-static rise phase during which an underlying, central sigmoid-shaped current layer forms along the so-called hyperbolic flux tube (HFT), a generalization of the X-line configuration. Reconnections in the dissipating current layer effectively add twisted flux to the flux rope and thus allow it to rise quasi-statically, even though the magnetic energy is decreasing as the system relaxes. We examine the thermal features produced by the current layer formation and the associated 'tether-cutting' reconnections as a result of heating and field aligned thermal conduction. It is found that a central hot, low-density channel containing reconnected, twisted flux threading under the flux rope axis forms on top of the central current layer. When viewed in the line of sight roughly aligned with the hot channel (which is roughly along the neutral line), the central current layer appears as a high-density vertical column with upward extensions as a {sup U-}shaped dense shell enclosing a central hot, low-density void. Such thermal features have been observed within coronal prominence cavities. Our MHD simulation suggests that they are the signatures of the development of the HFT topology and the associated tether-cutting reconnections, and that the central void grows and rises with the reconnections, until the flux rope reaches the critical height for the onset of the torus instability and dynamic eruption ensues.

  11. THERMAL SIGNATURES OF TETHER-CUTTING RECONNECTIONS IN PRE-ERUPTION CORONAL FLUX ROPES: HOT CENTRAL VOIDS IN CORONAL CAVITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a three-dimensional MHD simulation, we model the quasi-static evolution and the onset of eruption of a coronal flux rope. The simulation begins with a twisted flux rope emerging at the lower boundary and pushing into a pre-existing coronal potential arcade field. At a chosen time the emergence is stopped with the lower boundary taken to be rigid. Then the coronal flux rope settles into a quasi-static rise phase during which an underlying, central sigmoid-shaped current layer forms along the so-called hyperbolic flux tube (HFT), a generalization of the X-line configuration. Reconnections in the dissipating current layer effectively add twisted flux to the flux rope and thus allow it to rise quasi-statically, even though the magnetic energy is decreasing as the system relaxes. We examine the thermal features produced by the current layer formation and the associated 'tether-cutting' reconnections as a result of heating and field aligned thermal conduction. It is found that a central hot, low-density channel containing reconnected, twisted flux threading under the flux rope axis forms on top of the central current layer. When viewed in the line of sight roughly aligned with the hot channel (which is roughly along the neutral line), the central current layer appears as a high-density vertical column with upward extensions as a U-shaped dense shell enclosing a central hot, low-density void. Such thermal features have been observed within coronal prominence cavities. Our MHD simulation suggests that they are the signatures of the development of the HFT topology and the associated tether-cutting reconnections, and that the central void grows and rises with the reconnections, until the flux rope reaches the critical height for the onset of the torus instability and dynamic eruption ensues.

  12. Thermal Signatures of Tether-cutting Reconnections in Pre-eruption Coronal Flux Ropes: Hot Central Voids in Coronal Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Y.

    2012-10-01

    Using a three-dimensional MHD simulation, we model the quasi-static evolution and the onset of eruption of a coronal flux rope. The simulation begins with a twisted flux rope emerging at the lower boundary and pushing into a pre-existing coronal potential arcade field. At a chosen time the emergence is stopped with the lower boundary taken to be rigid. Then the coronal flux rope settles into a quasi-static rise phase during which an underlying, central sigmoid-shaped current layer forms along the so-called hyperbolic flux tube (HFT), a generalization of the X-line configuration. Reconnections in the dissipating current layer effectively add twisted flux to the flux rope and thus allow it to rise quasi-statically, even though the magnetic energy is decreasing as the system relaxes. We examine the thermal features produced by the current layer formation and the associated "tether-cutting" reconnections as a result of heating and field aligned thermal conduction. It is found that a central hot, low-density channel containing reconnected, twisted flux threading under the flux rope axis forms on top of the central current layer. When viewed in the line of sight roughly aligned with the hot channel (which is roughly along the neutral line), the central current layer appears as a high-density vertical column with upward extensions as a "U"-shaped dense shell enclosing a central hot, low-density void. Such thermal features have been observed within coronal prominence cavities. Our MHD simulation suggests that they are the signatures of the development of the HFT topology and the associated tether-cutting reconnections, and that the central void grows and rises with the reconnections, until the flux rope reaches the critical height for the onset of the torus instability and dynamic eruption ensues.

  13. Spatial damping of propagating sausage waves in coronal cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ming-Zhe; Chen, Shao-Xia; Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Context. Sausage modes are important in coronal seismology. Spatially damped propagating sausage waves were recently observed in the solar atmosphere. Aims: We examine how wave leakage influences the spatial damping of sausage waves propagating along coronal structures modeled by a cylindrical density enhancement embedded in a uniform magnetic field. Methods: Working in the framework of cold magnetohydrodynamics, we solve the dispersion relation (DR) governing sausage waves for complex-valued, longitudinal wavenumber k at given real angular frequencies ω. For validation purposes, we also provide analytical approximations to the DR in the low-frequency limit and in the vicinity of ωc, the critical angular frequency separating trapped from leaky waves. Results: In contrast to the standing case, propagating sausage waves are allowed for ω much lower than ωc. However, while able to direct their energy upward, these low-frequency waves are subject to substantial spatial attenuation. The spatial damping length shows little dependence on the density contrast between the cylinder and its surroundings, and depends only weakly on frequency. This spatial damping length is of the order of the cylinder radius for ω ≲ 1.5vAi/a, where a and vAi are the cylinder radius and the Alfvén speed in the cylinder, respectively. Conclusions: If a coronal cylinder is perturbed by symmetric boundary drivers (e.g., granular motions) with a broadband spectrum, wave leakage efficiently filters out the low-frequency components.

  14. Spatial damping of propagating sausage waves in coronal cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Ming-Zhe; Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Sausage modes are important in coronal seismology. Spatially damped propagating sausage waves were recently observed in the solar atmosphere. We examine how wave leakage influences the spatial damping of sausage waves propagating along coronal structures modeled by a cylindrical density enhancement embedded in a uniform magnetic field. Working in the framework of cold magnetohydrodynamics, we solve the dispersion relation (DR) governing sausage waves for complex-valued longitudinal wavenumber $k$ at given real angular frequencies $\\omega$. For validation purposes, we also provide analytical approximations to the DR in the low-frequency limit and in the vicinity of $\\omega_{\\rm c}$, the critical angular frequency separating trapped from leaky waves. In contrast to the standing case, propagating sausage waves are allowed for $\\omega$ much lower than $\\omega_{\\rm c}$. However, while able to direct their energy upwards, these low-frequency waves are subject to substantial spatial attenuation. The spatial damping ...

  15. Numerical simulations of transverse oscillations in radiatively cooling coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Norbert; Van Doorsselaere, Tom; Marcu, Alexandru

    2016-05-01

    We aim to study the influence of radiative cooling on the standing kink oscillations of coronal loops. To solve the 3D MHD ideal problem, we use the FLASH code. Our model consists of a straight, density enhanced and gravitationally stratified magnetic flux tube. We perturbed the system initially, leading to a transverse oscillation of the structure, and followed its evolution for a number of periods. A realistic radiative cooling is implemented. Results are compared to available analytical theory. We find that in the linear regime (i.e. low amplitude perturbation and slow cooling) the obtained period and damping time are in good agreement with theory. The cooling leads to an amplification of the oscillation amplitude. However, the difference between the cooling and non-cooling cases is small (around 6% after 6 oscillations). In high amplitude runs with realistic cooling, instabilities deform the loop, leading to increased damping. In this case, the difference between cooling and non-cooling is still negligible at around 12%. A set of simulations with higher density loops are also performed, to explore what happens when the cooling takes place in a very short time (t cool ≈ 100 s). In this case, the difference in amplitude after nearly 3 oscillation periods for the low amplitude case is 21% between cooling and non-cooling cases. We strengthen the results of previous analytical studies that state that the amplification due to cooling is ineffective, and its influence on the oscillation characteristics is small, at least for the cases shown here. Furthermore, the presence of a relatively strong damping in the high amplitude runs even in the fast cooling case indicates that it is unlikely that cooling could alone account for the observed, flare-related undamped oscillations of coronal loops. These results may be significant in the field of coronal seismology, allowing its application to coronal loop oscillations with observed fading-out or cooling behaviour.

  16. Anomalous transmission of a coronal "EIT wave" through a nearby coronal hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, David; Perez-Suarez, David; Valori, Gherardo

    2016-05-01

    Observations of reflection at coronal hole boundaries and transmission through the coronal hole suggest that "EIT waves" may be interpreted as freely--propagating wave--pulses initially driven by the rapid expansion of a coronal mass ejection (CME) in the low corona. An "EIT wave" observed on 2012 July 07 is seen to impact an adjacent coronal hole. However, rather than reappearing at the far edge of the coronal hole as with previous observations, the "EIT wave" was subsequently observed to reappear ~360 Mm away in the quiet Sun. The non-typical evolution of the "EIT wave" is examined using a combination of observations of the eruption from SDO/AIA and STEREO-A/EUVI as well as extrapolations of the global magnetic field. The observed "jump" in position of the "EIT wave" is shown to be due to the wave pulse traveling along hot coronal loops connecting the edge of the coronal hole with the quiet Sun.

  17. Blind Stereoscopy of the Coronal Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J; Malanushenko, Anna

    2015-01-01

    We test the feasibility of 3D coronal-loop tracing in stereoscopic EUV image pairs, with the ultimate goal of enabling efficient 3D reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field that drives flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We developed an automated code designed to perform triangulation of coronal loops in pairs (or triplets) of EUV images recorded from different perspectives. The automated (or blind) stereoscopy code includes three major tasks: (i) automated pattern recognition of coronal loops in EUV images, (ii) automated pairing of corresponding loop patterns from two different aspect angles, and (iii) stereoscopic triangulation of 3D loop coordinates. We perform tests with simulated stereoscopic EUV images and quantify the accuracy of all three procedures. In addition we test the performance of the blind stereoscopy code as a function of the spacecraft-separation angle and as a function of the spatial resolution. We also test the sensitivity to magnetic non-potentiality. The automated code develo...

  18. EIT waves and coronal magnetic field diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic field in the solar lower atmosphere can be measured by the use of the Zeeman and Hanle effects. By contrast, the coronal magnetic field well above the solar surface, which directly controls various eruptive phenomena, can not be precisely measured with the traditional techniques. Several attempts are being made to probe the coronal magnetic field, such as force-free extrapolation based on the photospheric magnetograms, gyroresonance radio emissions, and coronal seismology based on MHD waves in the corona. Compared to the waves trapped in the localized coronal loops, EIT waves are the only global-scale wave phenomenon, and thus are the ideal tool for the coronal global seismology. In this paper, we review the observations and modelings of EIT waves, and illustrate how they can be applied to probe the global magnetic field in the corona.

  19. The Inconvenient Truth About Coronal Dimmings

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Scott W

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the occurrence of a coronal dimming using a combination of high resolution spectro-polarimetric, spectral and broadband images which span from the deep photosphere into the corona. These observations reinforce the belief that coronal dimmings, or transient coronal holes as they are also known, are indeed the locations of open magnetic flux in the corona resulting from the launch of a CME. We will see that, as open magnetic regions, they must act just as coronal holes and be sources of the fast solar wind, but only temporarily. An inescapable question therefore arises - what impact does this source of fast wind have on the propagation and in-flight characteristics of the CME that initiates the coronal dimming in the first place?

  20. Coronal energy input and dissipation in a solar active region 3D MHD model

    CERN Document Server

    Bourdin, Philippe-A; Peter, Hardi

    2015-01-01

    Context. We have conducted a 3D MHD simulation of the solar corona above an active region in full scale and high resolution, which shows coronal loops, and plasma flows within them, similar to observations. Aims. We want to find the connection between the photospheric energy input by field-line braiding with the coronal energy conversion by Ohmic dissipation of induced currents. Methods. To this end we compare the coronal energy input and dissipation within our simulation domain above different fields of view, e.g. for a small loops system in the active region (AR) core. We also choose an ensemble of field lines to compare, e.g., the magnetic energy input to the heating per particle along these field lines. Results. We find an enhanced Ohmic dissipation of currents in the corona above areas that also have enhanced upwards-directed Poynting flux. These regions coincide with the regions where hot coronal loops within the AR core are observed. The coronal density plays a role in estimating the coronal temperatur...

  1. Determination of the Coronal Magnetic Field by Hot Loop Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, T; Qiu, J; Wang, Tongjiang; Innes, Davina E.; Qiu, Jiong

    2006-01-01

    We apply a new method to determine the magnetic field in coronal loops using observations of coronal loop oscillations. We analyze seven Doppler shift oscillation events detected by SUMER in the hot flare line Fe XIX to obtain oscillation periods of these events. The geometry, temperature, and electron density of the oscillating loops are measured from coordinated multi-channel soft X-ray imaging observations from SXT. All the oscillations are consistent with standing slow waves in their fundamental mode. The parameters are used to calculate the magnetic field of coronal loops based on MHD wave theory. For the seven events, the plasma $\\beta$ is in the range 0.15-0.91 with a mean of 0.33$\\pm$0.26, and the estimated magnetic field varies between 21-61 G with a mean of 34$\\pm$14 G. With background emission subtracted, the estimated magnetic field is reduced by 9%-35%. The maximum backgroud subtraction gives a mean of 22$\\pm$13 G in the range 12-51 G. We discuss measurement uncertainties and the prospect of dete...

  2. The Nature of CME-flare-Associated Coronal Dimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, J. X.; Qiu, J.

    2016-07-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by coronal dimming that is evident in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray observations. The locations of dimming are sometimes considered to map footpoints of the erupting flux rope. As the emitting material expands in the corona, the decreased plasma density leads to reduced emission observed in spectral and irradiance measurements. Therefore, signatures of dimming may reflect the properties of CMEs in the early phase of their eruption. In this study, we analyze the event of flare, CME, and coronal dimming on 2011 December 26. We use the data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory for disk observations of the dimming, and analyze images taken by EUVI, COR1, and COR2 on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory to obtain the height and velocity of the associated CMEs observed at the limb. We also measure the magnetic reconnection rate from flare observations. Dimming occurs in a few locations next to the flare ribbons, and it is observed in multiple EUV passbands. Rapid dimming starts after the onset of fast reconnection and CME acceleration, and its evolution tracks the CME height and flare reconnection. The spatial distribution of dimming exhibits cores of deep dimming with a rapid growth, and their light curves are approximately linearly scaled with the CME height profile. From the dimming analysis we infer the process of the CME expansion, and estimate properties of the CME.

  3. Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zimbardo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet events are selected by requiring at least some visibility in both COR1 and EUVI instruments. We report 15 jet events, and we discuss their main features. For one event, the uplift velocity has been determined as about 200 km s−1, while the deceleration rate appears to be about 0.11 km s−2, less than solar gravity. The average jet visibility time is about 30 min, consistent with jet observed in polar regions. On the basis of the present dataset, we provisionally conclude that there are not substantial physical differences between polar and equatorial coronal hole jets.

  4. Recent advances in coronal heating

    CERN Document Server

    De Moortel, Ineke

    2015-01-01

    The solar corona, the tenuous outer atmosphere of the Sun, is orders of magnitude hotter than the solar surface. This 'coronal heating problem' requires the identification of a heat source to balance losses due to thermal conduction, radiation and (in some locations) convection. The review papers in this Theo Murphy meeting issue present an overview of recent observational findings, large- and small-scale numerical modelling of physical processes occurring in the solar atmosphere and other aspects which may affect our understanding of the proposed heating mechanisms. At the same time, they also set out the directions and challenges which must be tackled by future research. In this brief introduction, we summarize some of the issues and themes which reoccur throughout this issue.

  5. About the magnetic origin of Chromospheric Spicules and Coronal Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutchmy, S.; Filippov, B.; Tavabi, E.

    2012-06-01

    Observations of jet- like phenomena near the solar limb are reported for a long time, first in Hα (Secchi observations of spicules in the 1870 ies), and after, from eclipse high resolution coronal images taken in white-light (1920-1973) as spiky structures. EUV jets were reported in the 70 ies from rocket and space-borne CIV filtergrams and finally X-EUV jets were reported from SXT observations of Yohkoh and from EIT and CDS SoHO observations. There is now little doubt that they are of magnetic origin although no magnetic field measurements exist for these regions and thermo-dynamical models are still work out. New observations of both spicules and jets with the SOT/SXT of Hinode were subjected to an analysis showing the influence of the null point(s) of the magnetic field. The collective behavior of the H CaII SOT(Hinode) time sequences of processed with the Madmax operator images of limb spicules show the torsional effects which were partly suggested before from the interpretation of high resolution limb spectra taken on Russian coronagraphs and the VTT at SacPeak. 100 s and shorter period waves are recorded. We propose a reconnection process occurring at the top of an emerging twisted flux tube for explaining some peculiarities of the spicular eruptions and possibly, as a viable mechanism for explaining the SXR jet eruptions. The result of a numerical 3D modeling illustrates this erupting mechanism although the behavior of the magneto-plasma structure near a null point, as shown by coronal filtergrams, does not necessary imply reconnections, especially the case of jets making a long coronal ray we observed in white-light with Lasco C2.

  6. Space weather and coronal mass ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Space weather has attracted a lot of attention in recent times. Severe space weather can disrupt spacecraft, and on Earth can be the cause of power outages and power station failure. It also presents a radiation hazard for airline passengers and astronauts. These ""magnetic storms"" are most commonly caused by coronal mass ejections, or CMES, which are large eruptions of plasma and magnetic field from the Sun that can reach speeds of several thousand km/s. In this SpringerBrief, Space Weather and Coronal Mass Ejections, author Timothy Howard briefly introduces the coronal mass ejection, its sc

  7. The evolution of plasma parameters on a coronal source surface at 2.3 Rs during solar minimum

    OpenAIRE

    Strachan, Leonard; Panasyuk, Alexander V.; Kohl, John L.; Lamy, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    We analyze data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory to produce global maps of coronal outflow velocities and densities in the regions where the solar wind is undergoing acceleration. The maps use UV and white light coronal data obtained from the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer and the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph, respectively, and a Doppler dimming analysis to determine the mean outflow velocities. The outflow velocities are defined on a sphere at 2.3 Rs from Sun-center...

  8. Antibacterial Activity of Ti3C2Tx MXene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Kashif; Helal, Mohamed; Ali, Adnan; Ren, Chang E; Gogotsi, Yury; Mahmoud, Khaled A

    2016-03-22

    MXenes are a family of atomically thin, two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides and carbonitrides with many attractive properties. Two-dimensional Ti3C2Tx (MXene) has been recently explored for applications in water desalination/purification membranes. A major success indicator for any water treatment membrane is the resistance to biofouling. To validate this and to understand better the health and environmental impacts of the new 2D carbides, we investigated the antibacterial properties of single- and few-layer Ti3C2Tx MXene flakes in colloidal solution. The antibacterial properties of Ti3C2Tx were tested against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) by using bacterial growth curves based on optical densities (OD) and colonies growth on agar nutritive plates. Ti3C2Tx shows a higher antibacterial efficiency toward both Gram-negative E. coli and Gram-positive B. subtilis compared with graphene oxide (GO), which has been widely reported as an antibacterial agent. Concentration dependent antibacterial activity was observed and more than 98% bacterial cell viability loss was found at 200 μg/mL Ti3C2Tx for both bacterial cells within 4 h of exposure, as confirmed by colony forming unit (CFU) and regrowth curve. Antibacterial mechanism investigation by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay indicated the damage to the cell membrane, which resulted in release of cytoplasmic materials from the bacterial cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) dependent and independent stress induction by Ti3C2Tx was investigated in two separate abiotic assays. MXenes are expected to be resistant to biofouling and offer bactericidal properties. PMID:26909865

  9. Determination of Coronal Mass Ejection physical parameters from combination of polarized visible light and UV Lyman-$\\alpha$ observations

    CERN Document Server

    Susino, R

    2016-01-01

    Visible-light observations of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) performed with coronagraphs and heliospheric imagers (in primis on board the SOHO and STEREO missions) have offered so far the best way to study the kinematics and geometrical structure of these fundamental events. Nevertheless, it has been widely demonstrated that only combination of multi-wavelength data (including X-ray spectra, EUV images, EUV-UV spectra, and radio dynamic spectra) can provide complete information on the plasma temperature and density distributions, non-thermal motions, magnetic fields, and other physical parameters, for both CMEs and CME-related phenomena. In this work, we analyze three CMEs by combining simultaneous data acquired in the polarized visible light by the LASCO-C2 coronagraph and in the UV H I Lyman-$\\alpha$ line (1216 \\AA) by the UVCS spectrometer, in order to estimate the CME plasma electron density (using the polarization-ratio technique to infer the 3D structure of the CME) and temperature (from the comparison b...

  10. Sausage Waves in Transversely Nonuniform Monolithic Coronal Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopin, I.; Nagorny, I.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate fast sausage waves in a monolithic coronal magnetic tube, modeled as a local density inhomogeneity with a continuous radial profile. This work is a natural extension of our previous results, obtained for a slab loop model for the case of cylindrical geometry. Using Kneser’s oscillating theorem, we provided the criteria for the existence of trapped and leaky wave regimes as a function of the profile features. For a number of density profiles there are only trapped modes for the entire range of longitudinal wave numbers. The phase speed of these modes tends toward the external Alfvén speed in the long wavelength limit. The generalized results were supported by the analytic solution of the wave equation for the specific density profiles. The approximate Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin solutions allowed us to obtain the desired dispersion relations and to study their properties as a function of the profile parameters. The multicomponent quasi-periodic pulsations in flaring loops, observed on 2001 May 2 and 2002 July 3, are interpreted in terms of the transversely fundamental trapped fast sausage mode with several longitudinal harmonics in a smooth coronal waveguide.

  11. Intense laser induced field ionization of C2H2, C2H4,and C2H6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Lirong; JI Na; XONG Yijia; TANG Xiaoping; KONG Fan'ao

    2003-01-01

    Using HOMO Field Ionization Model, the tunneling probabilities and the theoretical threshold intensities of the field ionizations of acetylene, ethylene, and ethane in intense laser field are calculated. C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6 were irradiated by 800 nm, 100 fs laser pulses with the intensity range of 1013-1014 W/cm2. A TOF-mass spectrometer was coupled to the laser system and used to experimentally investigate the field ionization of these molecules. The experimental ionization threshold intensities are obtained. The calculating results of the three molecules agree well with the experimental results, indicating that HOMO Field Ionization Model is valid for the ionization of polyatomic molecules in intense laser field.

  12. Microwave Enhancement in Coronal Holes: Statistical Properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ν. Gopalswamy; Κ. Shibasaki; Μ. Salem

    2000-09-01

    We report on the statistical properties of the microwave enhancement (brightness temperature, area, fine structure, life time and magnetic field strength) in coronal holes observed over a period of several solar rotations.

  13. MHD Waves in the coronal holes

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, D

    2015-01-01

    Coronal holes are the dark patches in the solar corona associated with relatively cool, less dense plasma and unipolar fields. The fast component of the solar wind emanates from these regions. Several observations reveal the presence of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in coronal holes which are believed to play a key role in the acceleration of fast solar wind. The recent advent of high-resolution instruments had brought us many new insights on the properties of MHD waves in coronal holes which are reviewed in this article. The advances made in the identification of compressive slow MHD waves in both polar and equatorial coronal holes, their possible connection with the recently discovered high- speed quasi-periodic upflows, their dissipation, and the detection of damping in Alfven waves from the spectral line width variation are discussed in particular.

  14. Multidimensional modeling of coronal rain dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, X; Keppens, R

    2013-01-01

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations which capture the initial formation and the long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in-situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match with modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into $V$-shaped like features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views on blobs which evaporate in situ, or get siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys o...

  15. Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

    CERN Document Server

    Nistico', G; Patsourakos, S; Zimbardo, G

    2010-01-01

    Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet events are selected by requiring at least some visibility in both COR1 and EUVI instruments. We report 15 jet events, and we discuss their main features. For one event, the uplift velocity has been determined as about 200 km/s, while the deceleration rate appears to be about 0.11 km/s2, less than solar gravity. The average jet visibility time is about 30 minutes, consistent with jet observed in polar regions. On the basis of the present dataset, we provisionally conclude that there are not substantial physical differences between polar and eq...

  16. MULTIDIMENSIONAL MODELING OF CORONAL RAIN DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-07-10

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that capture the initial formation and long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host a chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes of physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into V-shaped features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views of blobs that evaporate in situ or are siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys of coronal rain showers in true multidimensional settings to connect parameterized heating prescriptions with rain statistics, ultimately allowing us to quantify the coronal heating input.

  17. MULTIDIMENSIONAL MODELING OF CORONAL RAIN DYNAMICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that capture the initial formation and long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host a chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes of physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into V-shaped features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views of blobs that evaporate in situ or are siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys of coronal rain showers in true multidimensional settings to connect parameterized heating prescriptions with rain statistics, ultimately allowing us to quantify the coronal heating input.

  18. C2H as a PDR tracer: a case study toward the Orion Bar

    CERN Document Server

    Nagy, Z; Van der Tak, F F S; Faure, A; Makai, Z; Bergin, E A

    2014-01-01

    We study the spatial distribution and abundance of C2H in the prototypical high UV-illumination PDR, the Orion Bar. We analyse Herschel/HIFI maps of C2H, CH, and HCO+, and a NANTEN map of [CI]. We interpret the observed C2H emission using the combination of Herschel/HIFI and NANTEN data with radiative transfer and PDR models. Five rotational transitions of C2H (from N=6-5 up to N=10-9) have been detected in the HIFI frequency range toward the CO+ peak of the Orion Bar. Based on the five detected C2H transitions, a rotation diagram analysis gives a rotation temperature of 67 K and a C2H column density of 5x10^13 cm^-2. A non-LTE radiative transfer model with a C2H column density of 10^14 cm^-2, an H2 volume density of 10^6 cm^-3, a kinetic temperature of 400 K, and an electron density of 10 cm^-3 is required to fit the two highest rotational transitions of C2H. This model gives a reasonable fit to the lower-N transitions as well, however, the N=6-5,...,8-7 transitions are more consistent with lower kinetic tem...

  19. The break-down of Coronal equilibrium in lithium impurity transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport equations for lithium impurities in the Pfirsch-Schlueter regime are derived to the lowest order in aspect ratio. These equations are solved for the deviations of the impurity density distributions from the values obtained through the Coronal equilibrium model. It is observed that the deviations, being negligible near the core, increase very rapidly towards the wall. Numerical illustrations for two different sets of parameters which can be considered as those of the present and future generation Tokamaks are presented and the dependence of the validity of Coronal equilibrium on various system parameters are discussed. (orig.)

  20. The Global Coronal Structure Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Leon

    1998-02-01

    During the past year we have completed the changeover from the NIXT program to the new TXI sounding rocket program. The NIXT effort, aimed at evaluating the viability of the remaining portions of the NIXT hardware and design, has been finished and the portions of the NIXT which are viable and flightworthy, such as filters, mirror mounting hardware, electronics and telemetry interface systems, are now part of the new rocket payload. The backup NIXT multilayer-coated x-ray telescope and its mounting hardware have been completely fabricated and are being stored for possible future use in the TXI rocket. The H-alpha camera design is being utilized in the TXI program for real-time pointing verification and control via telemetry. A new H-alpha camera has been built, with a high-resolution RS170 CCD camera output. Two papers, summarizing scientific results from the NIXT rocket program, have been written and published this year: 1. "The Solar X-ray Corona," by L. Golub, Astrophysics and Space Science, 237, 33 (1996). 2. "Difficulties in Observing Coronal Structure," Keynote Paper, Proceedings STEPWG1 Workshop on Measurements and Analyses of the Solar 3D Magnetic Field, Solar Physics, 174, 99 (1997).

  1. Electronic structure investigation of Ti3AlC2, Ti3SiC2, and Ti3GeC2 by soft-X-ray emission spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Magnuson, Martin; Palmquist, Jens-Petter; Mattesini, M.; Li, Sa; Ahuja, Rajeev; Eriksson, Olle; Emmerlich, Jens; Wilhelmsson, Ola; Eklund, Per; Högberg, Hans; Hultman, Lars; Jansson, Ulf

    2011-01-01

    The electronic structures of epitaxially grown films of Ti3AlC2 , Ti3SiC2 , and Ti3GeC2 have been investigated by bulk-sensitive soft x-ray emission spectroscopy. The measured high-resolution Ti L , C K , Al L , Si L , and Ge M emission spectra are compared with ab initio density-functional theory including core-to-valence dipole matrix elements. A qualitative agreement between experiment and theory is obtained. A weak covalent Ti-Al bond is manifested by a pronounced shoulder in the Ti L emi...

  2. Myostatin stimulates, not inihibits, C2C12 myoblast proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Buel D; Wiedeback, Benjamin D; Hoversten, Knut E; Jackson, Melissa F; Walker, Ryan G; Thompson, Thomas B

    2014-03-01

    The immortal C2C12 cell line originates from dystrophic mouse thigh muscle and has been used to study the endocrine control of muscle cell growth, development, and function, including those actions regulated by myostatin. Previous studies suggest that high concentrations of recombinant myostatin generated in bacteria inhibit C2C12 proliferation and differentiation. Recombinant myostatin generated in eukaryotic systems similarly inhibits the proliferation of primary myosatellite cells, but consequently initiates, rather than inhibits, their differentiation and is bioactive at far lower concentrations. Our studies indicate that 2 different sources of recombinant myostatin made in eukaryotes stimulate, not inhibit, C2C12 proliferation. This effect occurred at different cell densities and serum concentrations and in the presence of IGF-I, a potent myoblast mitogen. This stimulatory effect was comparable to that obtained with TGFβ1, a related factor that also inhibits primary myosatellite cell proliferation. Attenuating the myostatin/activin (ie, Acvr2b) and TGFβ1 receptor signaling pathways with the Alk4/5 and Alk5 inhibitors, SB431542 and SB505142, respectively, similarly attenuated proliferation induced by serum, myostatin or TGFβ1 and in a dose-dependent manner. In serum-free medium, both myostatin and TGFβ1 stimulated Smad2 phosphorylation, but not that of Smad3, and a Smad3 inhibitor (SIS3) only inhibited proliferation in cells cultured in high serum. Thus, myostatin and TGFβ1 stimulate C2C12 proliferation primarily via Smad2. These results together question the physiological relevance of the C2C12 model and previous studies using recombinant myostatin generated in bacteria. They also support the alternative use of primary myosatellite cells and recombinant myostatin generated in eukaryotes. PMID:24424069

  3. Infrared intensities and optical constants of crystalline C 2H 4 and C 2D 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, G.; Ospina, M. J.; Khanna, R. K.

    Infrared absorption spectra of several thin films of C 2H 4 and C 2D 4 at ˜55 K were investigated at ˜0.6 cm -1 resolution. The integrated band intensities of the infrared active fundamental modes were obtained by a linear fit of the integrated absorbances vs film thickness. An iterative Kramers—Kronig analysis of the absorption data was carried out to obtain the complex refractive indices of crystalline C 2H 4 and C 2D 4 in the regions of absorption bands.

  4. Parallel-cascade-based mechanisms for heating solar coronal loops: test against observations

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Bo; Li, Xing; Xia, Li-Dong

    2014-01-01

    The heating of solar coronal loops is at the center of the problem of coronal heating. Given that the origin of the fast solar wind has been tracked down to atmospheric layers with transition region or even chromospheric temperatures, it is worthy attempting to address whether the mechanisms proposed to provide the basal heating of the solar wind apply to coronal loops as well. We extend the loop studies based on a classical parallel-cascade scenario originally proposed in the solar wind context by considering the effects of loop expansion, and perform a parametric study to directly contrast the computed loop densities and electron temperatures with those measured by TRACE and YOHKOH/SXT. This comparison yields that with the wave amplitudes observationally constrained by SUMER measurements, while the computed loops may account for a significant fraction of SXT loops, they seem too hot when compared with TRACE loops. Lowering the wave amplitudes does not solve this discrepancy, introducing magnetic twist will ...

  5. Observational Signatures of Coronal Loop Heating and Cooling Driven by Footpoint Shuffling

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlburg, R B; Taylor, B D; Ugarte-Urra, I; Warren, H P; Rappazzo, A F; Velli, M

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of a coronal loop is studied by means of numerical simulations of the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations using the HYPERION code. The footpoints of the loop magnetic field are advected by random motions. As a consequence the magnetic field in the loop is energized and develops turbulent nonlinear dynamics characterized by the continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets: energy is deposited at small scales where heating occurs. Dissipation is non-uniformly distributed so that only a fraction of the coronal mass and volume gets heated at any time. Temperature and density are highly structured at scales which, in the solar corona, remain observationally unresolved: the plasma of our simulated loop is multi-thermal, where highly dynamical hotter and cooler plasma strands are scattered throughout the loop at sub-observational scales. Numerical simulations of coronal loops of 50000 km length and axial magnetic field intensities ranging from 0.01...

  6. Coronal hole boundaries at small scales: III. EIS and SUMER views

    CERN Document Server

    Madjarska, M S; Doyle, J G; Subramanian, S

    2012-01-01

    We report on the plasma properties of small-scale transient events identified in the quiet Sun, coronal holes and their boundaries. We use spectroscopic co-observations from SUMER/SoHO and EIS/Hinode combined with high cadence imaging data from XRT/Hinode. We measure Doppler shifts using single and multiple Gauss fits of transition region and coronal lines as well as electron densities and temperatures. We combine co-temporal imaging and spectroscopy to separate brightening expansions from plasma flows. The transient brightening events in coronal holes and their boundaries were found to be very dynamical producing high density outflows at large speeds. Most of these events represent X-ray jets from pre-existing or newly emerging coronal bright points at X-ray temperatures. The average electron density of the jets is logNe ~ 8.76 cm^-3 while in the flaring site it is logNe ~ 9.51 cm^-3. The jet temperatures reach a maximum of 2.5 MK but in the majority of the cases the temperatures do not exceed 1.6 MK. The fo...

  7. Dynamics of coronal rain and descending plasma blobs in solar prominences. I. Fully ionized case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations of active regions and limb prominences often show cold, dense blobs descending with an acceleration smaller than that of free fall. The dynamics of these condensations falling in the solar corona is investigated in this paper using a simple fully ionized plasma model. We find that the presence of a heavy condensation gives rise to a dynamical rearrangement of the coronal pressure that results in the formation of a large pressure gradient that opposes gravity. Eventually this pressure gradient becomes so large that the blob acceleration vanishes or even points upward. Then, the blob descent is characterized by an initial acceleration phase followed by an essentially constant velocity phase. These two stages can be identified in published time-distance diagrams of coronal rain events. Both the duration of the first stage and the velocity attained by the blob increase for larger values of the ratio of blob to coronal density, for larger blob mass, and for smaller coronal temperature. Dense blobs are characterized by a detectable density growth (up to 60% in our calculations) and by a steepening of the density in their lower part, that could lead to the formation of a shock. They also emit sound waves that could be detected as small intensity changes with periods of the order of 100 s and lasting between a few and about 10 periods. Finally, the curvature of falling paths with large radii is only relevant when a very dense blob falls along inclined magnetic field lines.

  8. New C2 synchondrosal fracture classification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excessive cervical flexion-extension accompanying mild to severe impact injuries can lead to C2 synchondrosal fractures in young children. To characterize and classify C2 synchondrosal fracture patterns. We retrospectively reviewed imaging and medical records of children who were treated for cervical spine fractures at our institution between 1995 and 2014. We reviewed all fractures involving the five central C2 synchondroses with regard to patient demographics, mechanism of injury, fracture pattern, associated fractures and other injuries, treatment plans and outcome. Fourteen children had fractures involving the central C2 synchondroses. There were nine boys and five girls, all younger than 6 years. We found four distinct fracture patterns. Eleven complete fractures were further divided into four subtypes (a, b, c and d) based on degree of anterior displacement of the odontoid segment and presence of distraction. Nine of these 11 children had fractures through both odontoneural synchondroses and the odontocentral synchondrosis; one had fractures involving both neurocentral synchondroses and the odontoneural synchondrosis; one had fractures through bilateral odontoneural and bilateral neurocentral synchondroses. Three children had incomplete fractures, defined as a fracture through a single odontoneural synchondrosis with or without partial extension into either the odontocentral or the adjacent neurocentral synchondroses. All complete fractures were displaced or angulated. Four had associated spinal cord injury, including two contusions (subtype c fractures) and two fatal transections (subtype d fractures). Most children were treated with primary halo stabilization. Subtype c fractures required surgical fixation. We describe four patterns of central C2 synchondrosal fractures, including two unique patterns that have not been reported. We propose a classification system to distinguish these fractures and aid in treatment planning. (orig.)

  9. New C2 synchondrosal fracture classification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusin, Jerome A.; Ruess, Lynne [Department of Radiology, Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States); The Ohio State University College of Medicine and Public Health, Columbus, OH (United States); Daulton, Robert S. [Department of Radiology, Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Excessive cervical flexion-extension accompanying mild to severe impact injuries can lead to C2 synchondrosal fractures in young children. To characterize and classify C2 synchondrosal fracture patterns. We retrospectively reviewed imaging and medical records of children who were treated for cervical spine fractures at our institution between 1995 and 2014. We reviewed all fractures involving the five central C2 synchondroses with regard to patient demographics, mechanism of injury, fracture pattern, associated fractures and other injuries, treatment plans and outcome. Fourteen children had fractures involving the central C2 synchondroses. There were nine boys and five girls, all younger than 6 years. We found four distinct fracture patterns. Eleven complete fractures were further divided into four subtypes (a, b, c and d) based on degree of anterior displacement of the odontoid segment and presence of distraction. Nine of these 11 children had fractures through both odontoneural synchondroses and the odontocentral synchondrosis; one had fractures involving both neurocentral synchondroses and the odontoneural synchondrosis; one had fractures through bilateral odontoneural and bilateral neurocentral synchondroses. Three children had incomplete fractures, defined as a fracture through a single odontoneural synchondrosis with or without partial extension into either the odontocentral or the adjacent neurocentral synchondroses. All complete fractures were displaced or angulated. Four had associated spinal cord injury, including two contusions (subtype c fractures) and two fatal transections (subtype d fractures). Most children were treated with primary halo stabilization. Subtype c fractures required surgical fixation. We describe four patterns of central C2 synchondrosal fractures, including two unique patterns that have not been reported. We propose a classification system to distinguish these fractures and aid in treatment planning. (orig.)

  10. GLOBAL CORONAL SEISMOLOGY IN THE EXTENDED SOLAR CORONA THROUGH FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY STEREO SECCHI COR1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present global coronal seismology for the first time, which allows us to determine inhomogeneous magnetic field strength in the extended corona. From the measurements of the propagation speed of a fast magnetosonic wave associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME) and the coronal background density distribution derived from the polarized radiances observed by the STEREO SECCHI COR1, we determined the magnetic field strengths along the trajectories of the wave at different heliocentric distances. We found that the results have an uncertainty less than 40%, and are consistent with values determined with a potential field model and reported in previous works. The characteristics of the coronal medium we found are that (1) the density, magnetic field strength, and plasma β are lower in the coronal hole region than in streamers; (2) the magnetic field strength decreases slowly with height but the electron density decreases rapidly so that the local fast magnetosonic speed increases while plasma β falls off with height; and (3) the variations of the local fast magnetosonic speed and plasma β are dominated by variations in the electron density rather than the magnetic field strength. These results imply that Moreton and EIT waves are downward-reflected fast magnetosonic waves from the upper solar corona, rather than freely propagating fast magnetosonic waves in a certain atmospheric layer. In addition, the azimuthal components of CMEs and the driven waves may play an important role in various manifestations of shocks, such as type II radio bursts and solar energetic particle events

  11. Synthesis of 1-C2H3 theophylline and 3-C2H3 theophylline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes a three step-selective deuteration method of 1-methyl and 3-methylxanthine, after protection of the N-7 position by chloromethylpivalate and alkylation by trideuteromethyl iodide ; yielding 1-C2H3 and 3-C2H3 theophylline. (author)

  12. The redshifted footpoints of coronal loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. E. Dammasch

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The physics of coronal loops holds the key to understanding coronal heating and the flow of mass and energy in the region. However, the energy source, structure maintenance and mass balance in coronal loops are not yet fully understood. Observations of blue- and redshifted emissions have repeatedly been used in the construction of loop models. But observations and interpretations of line shifts have been widely debated. Here we present detailed SUMER observations, which clearly show a steady downflow in both footpoints of coronal loops observed at transition region (TR and lower corona temperatures. We also show and quantify a correlation existing between this Doppler shift and the spectral radiance. Our results indicate a strong correlation which holds from the chromosphere to the lower corona. We suggest that the downflow in the footpoints may be a common phenomenon on all scales, which could explain, why on a statistical basis bright pixels tend to be more redshifted. We conclude by presenting interpretation of such results and their implications in the light of a viable coronal loop model. The observation of steady downflow in redshifted footpoints seems to be in conflict with impulsive heating.

  13. On the sintering behaviour of steel bonded TiC-Cr3C2 and TiC-Cr3C2-WC mixed carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powder mixtures of TiC+Cr3C2 and TiC+Cr3C2 + WC were hot pressed to nearly full density. The lattice parameter of the resulting cubic mixed crystal decreases linearly with increasing additions of Cr3C2 and (Cr3C2+WC 1:1). Microhardness increases with Cr3C2 content up to 20 wt.%. By addition of WC, microhardness is increased further and reaches a maximum value of approx. 38 000 MN/m2 for 20 wt.% Cr3C2 and 20 wt.% WC. From these solid solutions powder compositions of Ferro-TiC type were produced by milling with 55 wt.% Fe and 0.4 wt.% C. The sintering behaviour of these powders was studied in a vacuum dilatometer. The pronounced increase of shrinkage by Cr3C2 and higher amounts of Cr3C2+WC dissolved in TiC previous to binder phase melting is attributed to the increased solubility of the carbide in solid iron. Presintering at 7000C in hydrogen has a negative influence on sintering activity and requires much higher temperatures for complete densification during subsequent vacuum sintering. (orig.)

  14. Effect of Thermal Conduction on Acoustic Waves in Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, T. J.

    2006-05-01

    The influence of classical (Spitzer) thermal conduction on longitudinal acoustic waves in a coronal loop is determined through an idealized but exactly solvable model. The model consists of an isothermal, stratified (constant gravity) atmosphere in which a monochromatic acoustic wave, traveling in the direction of decreasing density, is imposed throughout the lower half of the atmosphere. Based on the linearized equations of motion, the complete steady state (t-->∞) solution is obtained. In addition to the imposed driving wave, the solution also contains reflected and transmitted acoustic and thermal conduction waves. The mode transformation and mixing occurs in the vicinity of the atmospheric layer where the gas pressure passes through a critical value set by the magnitude of the thermal conduction and other model parameters. For 5 minute waves in a million degree loop, this critical pressure is on the order of 8×10-4 in cgs units. Since the apex gas pressure of many coronal loops of current interest is thought to be comfortably in excess of this value, mode mixing and transformation is not likely to be a relevant factor for understanding acoustic waves in these structures. On the other hand, enhanced thermal conductivity as a result of plasma instabilities, for example, could revive the importance of this mechanism for coronal loops. If this mixing layer is present, the calculations show that the pair of thermal conduction waves invariably gains the overwhelming majority of the energy flux of the incoming acoustic wave. This energy is rapidly dissipated in the neighborhood of the mixing layer.

  15. Is There a Quadruple Bond in C2?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, David Wilian Oliveira; Nascimento, Marco Antonio Chaer

    2016-05-10

    The chemical structure of the ground state of C2 has been the subject of intense debate after the suggestion that the molecule could exhibit a "fourth" covalent bond. In this paper, we investigate this problem explicitly avoiding all the points of conflict from the previous papers to show that there is no quadruple bond in C2. The generalized product function energy partitioning (GPF-EP) method has been applied to calculate the interference energy (IE) that accounts for the formation of covalent bonds for each bond of the molecule. The IE analysis shows that for the standard σ and π bonds interference exhibits the expected behavior, while for the "fourth" bond interference is a destabilizing factor. To make sure this could not be attributed to a new kind of bond, we performed an equivalent analysis for the (3)Σ(-) excited state of C3 molecule in which similar "bonding" occurs between the two ending carbon atoms. We also show that the difference in force constants of C2 and acetylene can be rationalized in terms of the amount of charge density in the internuclear region by looking at the changes in the overlaps between orbitals along the bond axis. PMID:27045682

  16. Internal Magnetic Field Measurement on C-2 FRC Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, Hiroshi; Knapp, Kurt; Deng, Bihe; Thompson, Matthew; Tuszewski, Michel; van Drie, Alan

    2010-11-01

    Three-axis internal magnetic probes are being developed to measure simultaneously Bz, Bt and Br of a field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma from the geometric axis (r=0) to outside of the separatrix in C-2. The probe assembly consists of 30 commercial chip-inductors (10 different radial positions of each field-component with 5 cm apart), OD˜0.25'' stainless-steel tube with 5-mil wall for the vacuum boundary, and interlocking Boron-Nitride jackets as a plasma facing material. In C-2, it is important to understand field-structure of FRC plasma during translation and colliding two-FRCs in the confinement section as well as the equilibrium/quiescent phase. With 6-chord interferometry located in the midplane of C-2, the internal structure of FRC can be compared and discussed by using a rigid-rotor profile model for the field and the density of FRCs. The preliminary result of internal field measurements will be presented at the meeting as well as the detailed probe design.

  17. Free Magnetic Energy and Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy; Moore, Ron; Falconer, David

    2012-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the coronal X-ray luminosity of an active region increases roughly in direct proportion to the total photospheric flux of the active region's magnetic field (Fisher et al. 1998). It is also observed, however, that the coronal luminosity of active regions of nearly the same flux content can differ by an order of magnitude. In this presentation, we analyze 10 active regions with roughly the same total magnetic flux. We first determine several coronal properties, such as X-ray luminosity (calculated using Hinode XRT), peak temperature (calculated using Hinode EIS), and total Fe XVIII emission (calculated using SDO AIA). We present the dependence of these properties on a proxy of the free magnetic energy of the active region

  18. SUMER Observations of Coronal-Hole Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Klaus

    2012-11-01

    Observations of emission lines in the vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range with calibrated instrumentation provide crucial information on the prevailing plasma temperatures in the solar atmosphere. Coronal-hole temperatures measured by the SUMER spectrometer on SOHO will be presented in this contribution. Electron temperatures can be estimated from the formation temperatures of the observed emission lines. Line-ratio and emission-measure analyses, however, offer higher accuracies. Typical electron temperatures at altitudes of H<200 Mm in coronal holes are below 1 MK in bright structures—the coronal plumes—with higher values in darker areas—the inter-plume regions. Line-width measurements yield effective ion temperatures, which are much higher than the electron temperatures. Observations of line profiles emitted from species with different masses allow a separation of the effective temperatures into ion temperatures and unresolved non-thermal motions along the line of sight.

  19. The structure and evolution of coronal holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy, A. F.; Krieger, A. S.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    Soft X-ray observations of coronal holes are analyzed to determine the structure, temporal evolution, and rotational properties of those features as well as possible mechanisms which may account for their almost rigid rotational characteristics. It is shown that coronal holes are open features with a divergent magnetic-field configuration resulting from a particular large-scale magnetic-field topology. They are apparently formed when the successive emergence and dispersion of active-region fields produce a swath of unipolar field founded by fields of opposite polarity, and they die when large-scale field patterns emerge which significantly distort the original field configuration. Two types of holes are described (compact and elongated), and three possible rotation mechanisms are considered: a rigidly rotating subphotospheric phenomenon, a linking of high and low latitudes by closed field lines, and an interaction between moving coronal material and open field lines.

  20. Sunquake Generation by Coronal Magnetic Restructuring

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Alexander J B; Leake, James E; Hudson, Hugh S

    2016-01-01

    Sunquakes are the surface signatures of acoustic waves in the Sun's interior that are produced by some but not all flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). This letter explores a mechanism for sunquake generation by the magnetic field changes that occur during flares and CMEs, using MHD simulations with a semiempirical FAL-C atmosphere to demonstrate the generation of acoustic waves in the interior in response to changing magnetic tilt in the corona. We find that Alfv\\'en-sound resonance combined with the ponderomotive force produces acoustic waves in the interior with sufficient energy to match sunquake observations when the magnetic field angle changes by the order of 10 degrees in a region where the coronal field strength is a few hundred gauss or more. The most energetic sunquakes are produced when the coronal field is strong, while the variation of magnetic field strength with height and the timescale of the tilt change are of secondary importance.

  1. Simulating coronal condensation dynamics in 3D

    CERN Document Server

    Moschou, S P; Xia, C; Fang, X

    2015-01-01

    We present numerical simulations in 3D settings where coronal rain phenomena take place in a magnetic configuration of a quadrupolar arcade system. Our simulation is a magnetohydrodynamic simulation including anisotropic thermal conduction, optically thin radiative losses, and parametrised heating as main thermodynamical features to construct a realistic arcade configuration from chromospheric to coronal heights. The plasma evaporation from chromospheric and transition region heights eventually causes localised runaway condensation events and we witness the formation of plasma blobs due to thermal instability, that evolve dynamically in the heated arcade part and move gradually downwards due to interchange type dynamics. Unlike earlier 2.5D simulations, in this case there is no large scale prominence formation observed, but a continuous coronal rain develops which shows clear indications of Rayleigh-Taylor or interchange instability, that causes the denser plasma located above the transition region to fall do...

  2. Interchange Reconnection and Coronal Hole Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, J. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Lynch, B. J.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of magnetic reconnection between open and closed field, (often referred to as "interchange" reconnection), on the dynamics and topology of coronal hole boundaries. The most important and most prevalent 3D topology of the interchange process is that of a small-scale bipolar magnetic field interacting with a large-scale background field. We determine the evolution of such a magnetic topology by numerical solution of the fully 3D MHD equations in spherical coordinates. First, we calculate the evolution of a small-scale bipole that initially is completely inside an open field region and then is driven across a coronal hole boundary by photospheric motions. Next the reverse situation is calculated in which the bipole is initially inside the closed region and driven toward the coronal hole boundary. In both cases we find that the stress imparted by the photospheric motions results in deformation of the separatrix surface between the closed field of the bipole and the background field, leading to rapid current sheet formation and to efficient reconnection. When the bipole is inside the open field region, the reconnection is of the interchange type in that it exchanges open and closed field. We examine, in detail, the topology of the field as the bipole moves across the coronal hole boundary, and find that the field remains well-connected throughout this process. Our results imply that open flux cannot penetrate deeply into the closed field region below a helmet streamer and, hence, support the quasi-steady models in which open and closed flux remain topologically distinct. Our results also support the uniqueness hypothesis for open field regions as postulated by Antiochos et al. We discuss the implications of this work for coronal observations. Subject Headings: Sun: corona Sun: magnetic fields Sun: reconnection Sun: coronal hole

  3. Coronal Fractures of the Scaphoid: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutsky, David J; Herzberg, Guillaume; Shin, Alexander Y; Buijze, Geert A; Ring, David C; Mudgal, Chaitanya S; Leung, Yuen-Fai; Dumontier, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Coronal (or frontal plane) fractures of the scaphoid are distinctly uncommon. There are few published reports of coronal fractures of the scaphoid. This fracture is often missed on the initial X-ray films. A high index of suspicion should exist when there is a double contour of the proximal scaphoid pole on the anteroposterior X-ray view. A computed tomography scan is integral in making the diagnosis. Early recognition is key in salvaging the scaphoid fracture and in preventing articular damage. Level of Evidence IV. Retrospective case series. PMID:27574573

  4. Fluorescent vibration-rotation excitation of cometary C2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredel, Roland; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Black, John H.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical equilibrium equations that determine the population densities of the energy levels in cometary C2 molecules due to fluorescent excitation are examined in detail. The adopted model and molecular parameters are discussed, and a theoretical estimate is made of the two intercombination transition moments. From the theoretical population densities in the various rotational levels, flux ratios and synthetic emission profiles are calculated as functions of the a 3Pi(u) - X 1Sigma(g)+ and the c 3Sigma(u)+ - X 3Sigma(g)+ intercombination transition moments. The influence of each of these two transitions separately on the vibrational and rotational excitation temperatures is investigated. The observed emission spectra of the (0,0) Swan band in Comet Halley are presented and compared to the synthetic profiles.

  5. A STUDY OF A FAILED CORONAL MASS EJECTION CORE ASSOCIATED WITH AN ASYMMETRIC FILAMENT ERUPTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present multi-wavelength observations of an asymmetric filament eruption and associated coronal mass ejection (CME) and coronal downflows on 2012 June 17 and 18 from 20:00-05:00 UT. We use SDO/AIA and STEREO-B/SECCHI observations to understand the filament eruption scenario and its kinematics, while LASCO C2 observations are analyzed to study the kinematics of the CME and associated downflows. SDO/AIA limb observations show that the filament exhibits a whipping-like asymmetric eruption. STEREO/EUVI disk observations reveal a two-ribbon flare underneath the southeastern part of the filament that most probably occurred due to reconnection processes in the coronal magnetic field in the wake of the filament eruption. The whipping-like filament eruption later produces a slow CME in which the leading edge and the core propagate, with an average speed of ≈540 km s–1 and ≈126 km s–1, respectively, as observed by the LASCO C2 coronagraph. The CME core formed by the eruptive flux rope shows outer coronal downflows with an average speed of ≈56 km s–1 after reaching ≈4.33 R☉. Initially, the core decelerates at ≈48 m s–2. The plasma first decelerates gradually up to a height of ≈4.33 R☉ and then starts accelerating downward. We suggest a self-consistent model of a magnetic flux rope representing the magnetic structure of the CME core formed by an eruptive filament. This rope loses its previous stable equilibrium when it reaches a critical height. With some reasonable parameters, and inherent physical conditions, the model describes the non-radial ascending motion of the flux rope in the corona, its stopping at some height, and thereafter its downward motion. These results are in good agreement with observations.

  6. The Relation between EIT Waves and Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, P F

    2009-01-01

    More and more evidence indicates that "EIT waves" are strongly related to coronal mass ejections (CMEs). However, it is still not clear how the two phenomena are related to each other. We investigate a CME event on 1997 September 9, which was well observed by both EUV imaging telescope (EIT) and the high-cadence MK3 coronagraph at Mauna Loa Solar Observatory, and compare the spatial relation between the "EIT wave" fronts and the CME leading loops. It is found that "EIT wave" fronts are co-spatial with the CME leading loops, and the expanding EUV dimmings are co-spatial with the CME cavity. It is also found that the CME stopped near the boundary of a coronal hole, a feature common to observations of "EIT waves". It is suggested that "EIT waves"/dimmings are the EUV counterparts of the CME leading loop/cavity, based on which we propose that, as in the case of "EIT waves", CME leading loops are apparently-moving density enhancements that are generated by successive stretching (or opening-up) of magnetic loops.

  7. Three-Dimensional Morphology of a Coronal Prominence Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, S. E.; Kucera, T. A.; Rastawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hill, S.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; Rachmeler, L.; Reeves, K. K.; Schmieder, B.; Schmit, D. J.; Seaton, D. B.; Sterling, A. C.; Tripathi, D.; Williams, D. R.; Zhang, M.

    2010-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional density model of coronal prominence cavities, and a morphological fit that has been tightly constrained by a uniquely well-observed cavity. Observations were obtained as part of an International Heliophysical Year campaign by instruments from a variety of space- and ground-based observatories, spanning wavelengths from radio to soft-X-ray to integrated white light. From these data it is clear that the prominence cavity is the limb manifestation of a longitudinally-extended polar-crown filament channel, and that the cavity is a region of low density relative to the surrounding corona. As a first step towards quantifying density and temperature from campaign spectroscopic data, we establish the three-dimensional morphology of the cavity. This is critical for taking line-of-sight projection effects into account, since cavities are not localized in the plane of the sky and the corona is optically thin. We have augmented a global coronal streamer model to include a tunnel-like cavity with elliptical cross-section and a Gaussian variation of height along the tunnel length. We have developed a semi-automated routine that fits ellipses to cross-sections of the cavity as it rotates past the solar limb, and have applied it to Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) observations from the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. This defines the morphological parameters of our model, from which we reproduce forward-modeled cavity observables. We find that cavity morphology and orientation, in combination with the viewpoints of the observing spacecraft, explains the observed variation in cavity visibility for the east vs. west limbs

  8. Two-color CO2/HeNe laser interferometer for C-2 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A six-channel two-color interferometer has been developed for plasma electron density measurements in the C-2 field reversed configuration experiment. A CO2 laser is utilized as the main probe beams, while copropagating visible HeNe laser beams are mainly sensitive to vibration. Density measurements in C-2 plasmas have shown that this is a reliable turn-key system. The maximum residual phase noise after vibration compensation is less than ±5 deg., corresponding to a line integral density of 3x1018 m-2. The time resolution for routine operation is 2 μs.

  9. Role of Magnetic Carpet in Coronal Heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. R. Verma; Diksha Chaudhary

    2008-03-01

    One of the fundamental questions in solar physics is how the solar corona maintains its high temperature of several million Kelvin above photosphere with a temperature of 6000 K. Observations show that solar coronal heating problem is highly complex with many different facts. It is likely that different heating mechanisms are at work in the solar corona. The separate kinds of coronal loops may also be heated by different mechanisms. Using data from instruments onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and from the more recent Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) scientists have identified small regions of mixed polarity, termed magnetic carpet contributing to solar activity on a short time scale. Magnetic loops of all sizes rise into the solar corona, arising from regions of opposite magnetic polarity in the photosphere. Energy released when oppositely directed magnetic fields meet in the corona is one likely cause for coronal heating. There is enough energy coming up from the loops of the “magnetic carpet” to heat the corona to its known temperature.

  10. OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193Å images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial (∼0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to ∼15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 Å channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 1023 erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

  11. Coronal Behavior Before the Large Flare Onset

    CERN Document Server

    Imada, Shinsuke; Kusano, Kanya

    2014-01-01

    Flares are a major explosive event in our solar system. They are often followed by coronal mass ejection that has a potential to trigger the geomagnetic storms. There are various studies aiming to predict when and where the flares are likely to occur. Most of these studies mainly discuss the photospheric and chromospheric activity before the flare onset. In this paper we study the coronal features before the famous large flare occurrence on December 13th, 2006. Using the data from Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) /Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), we discuss the coronal features in the large scale (~ a few 100 arcsec) before the flare onset. Our findings are as follows: 1) The upflows in and around active region start growing from ~10 to 30 km /s a day before the flare. 2) The expanding coronal loops are clearly observed a few hours before the flare. 3) Soft X-ray and EUV intensity are gradually reduced. 4) The upflows are f...

  12. Observing coronal nanoflares in active region moss

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Paola; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; DeLuca, Ed; Hansteen, Viggo; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Golub, Leon; Kobayashi, Ken; Korreck, Kelly; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig; Title, Alan; Weber, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial (~0.3-0.4 arcsec) and temporal (5.5s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to ~15s, significantly shorter than the minute scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by SDO/AIA in the 94A channel, and by Hinode/XRT. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few $10^{23}rg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C...

  13. MAGNETIC TOPOLOGY OF CORONAL HOLE LINKAGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent work, Antiochos and coworkers argued that the boundary between the open and closed field regions on the Sun can be extremely complex with narrow corridors of open flux connecting seemingly disconnected coronal holes from the main polar holes and that these corridors may be the sources of the slow solar wind. We examine, in detail, the topology of such magnetic configurations using an analytical source surface model that allows for analysis of the field with arbitrary resolution. Our analysis reveals three new important results. First, a coronal hole boundary can join stably to the separatrix boundary of a parasitic polarity region. Second, a single parasitic polarity region can produce multiple null points in the corona and, more important, separator lines connecting these points. It is known that such topologies are extremely favorable for magnetic reconnection, because they allow this process to occur over the entire length of the separators rather than being confined to a small region around the nulls. Finally, the coronal holes are not connected by an open-field corridor of finite width, but instead are linked by a singular line that coincides with the separatrix footprint of the parasitic polarity. We investigate how the topological features described above evolve in response to the motion of the parasitic polarity region. The implications of our results for the sources of the slow solar wind and for coronal and heliospheric observations are discussed.

  14. Radio signatures of interplanetary coronal mass ejections

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krupař, Vratislav; Santolík, Ondřej; Maksimovic, M.; Souček, Jan; Krupařová, Oksana

    Weihai: Shandong University, 2015. s. 114. [Solar Wind 14. 22.06.2015-26.06.2015, Weihai] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : magnetosphere * coronal mass ejection Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://sw14.csp.escience.cn/dct/page/65580

  15. The Inconvenient Truth About Coronal Dimmings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Scott W.

    2009-03-01

    We investigate the occurrence of a coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven coronal dimming using unique high-resolution spectral images of the corona from the Hinode spacecraft. Over the course of the dimming event, we observe the dynamic increase of nonthermal line broadening in the 195.12 Å emission line of Fe XII as the corona opens. As the corona begins to close, refill and brighten, we see a reduction of the nonthermal broadening toward the pre-eruption level. We propose that the dynamic evolution of the nonthermal broadening is the result of the growth of Alfvén wave amplitudes in the magnetically open rarefied dimming region, compared to the dense closed corona prior to the CME. We suggest, based on this proposition, that, as open magnetic regions, coronal dimmings must act just as coronal holes and be sources of the fast solar wind, but only temporarily. Further, we propose that such a rapid transition in the thermodynamics of the corona to a solar wind state may have an impulsive effect on the CME that initiates the observed dimming. This last point, if correct, poses a significant physical challenge to the sophistication of CME modeling and capturing the essence of the source region thermodynamics necessary to correctly ascertain CME propagation speeds, etc.

  16. THE INCONVENIENT TRUTH ABOUT CORONAL DIMMINGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the occurrence of a coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven coronal dimming using unique high-resolution spectral images of the corona from the Hinode spacecraft. Over the course of the dimming event, we observe the dynamic increase of nonthermal line broadening in the 195.12 A emission line of Fe XII as the corona opens. As the corona begins to close, refill and brighten, we see a reduction of the nonthermal broadening toward the pre-eruption level. We propose that the dynamic evolution of the nonthermal broadening is the result of the growth of Alfven wave amplitudes in the magnetically open rarefied dimming region, compared to the dense closed corona prior to the CME. We suggest, based on this proposition, that, as open magnetic regions, coronal dimmings must act just as coronal holes and be sources of the fast solar wind, but only temporarily. Further, we propose that such a rapid transition in the thermodynamics of the corona to a solar wind state may have an impulsive effect on the CME that initiates the observed dimming. This last point, if correct, poses a significant physical challenge to the sophistication of CME modeling and capturing the essence of the source region thermodynamics necessary to correctly ascertain CME propagation speeds, etc.

  17. Using coronal seismology to estimate the magnetic field strength in a realistic coronal model

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Coronal seismology is extensively used to estimate properties of the corona, e.g. the coronal magnetic field strength are derived from oscillations observed in coronal loops. We present a three-dimensional coronal simulation including a realistic energy balance in which we observe oscillations of a loop in synthesised coronal emission. We use these results to test the inversions based on coronal seismology. From the simulation of the corona above an active region we synthesise extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission from the model corona. From this we derive maps of line intensity and Doppler shift providing synthetic data in the same format as obtained from observations. We fit the (Doppler) oscillation of the loop in the same fashion as done for observations to derive the oscillation period and damping time. The loop oscillation seen in our model is similar to imaging and spectroscopic observations of the Sun. The velocity disturbance of the kink oscillation shows an oscillation period of 52.5s and a damping tim...

  18. WHAT CAN WE LEARN ABOUT SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS, CORONAL DIMMINGS, AND EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET JETS THROUGH SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar eruptions, particularly coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jets, have rarely been investigated with spectroscopic observations. We analyze several data sets obtained by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode and find various types of flows during CMEs and jet eruptions. CME-induced dimming regions are found to be characterized by significant blueshift and enhanced line width by using a single Gaussian fit, while a red-blue (RB) asymmetry analysis and an RB-guided double Gaussian fit of the coronal line profiles indicate that these are likely caused by the superposition of a strong background emission component and a relatively weak (∼10%), high-speed (∼100 km s–1) upflow component. This finding suggests that the outflow velocity in the dimming region is probably of the order of 100 km s–1, not ∼20 km s–1 as reported previously. These weak, high-speed outflows may provide a significant amount of mass to refill the corona after the eruption of CMEs, and part of them may experience further acceleration and eventually become solar wind streams that can serve as an additional momentum source of the associated CMEs. Density and temperature diagnostics of the dimming region suggest that dimming is primarily an effect of density decrease rather than temperature change. The mass losses in dimming regions as estimated from different methods are roughly consistent with each other, and they are 20%-60% of the masses of the associated CMEs. With the guide of RB asymmetry analysis, we also find several temperature-dependent outflows (speed increases with temperature) immediately outside the (deepest) dimming region. These outflows may be evaporation flows that are caused by the enhanced thermal conduction or nonthermal electron beams along reconnecting field lines, or induced by the interaction between the opened field lines in the dimming region and the closed loops in the surrounding plage region. In an erupted CME loop and an

  19. Oblique Propagation and Dissipation of Alfv´en Waves in Coronal Holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. K. Srivastava; B. N. Dwivedi

    2007-03-01

    We investigate the effect of viscosity and magnetic diffusivity on the oblique propagation and dissipation of Alfvén waves with respect to the normal outward direction, making use of MHD equations, density, temperature and magnetic field structure in coronal holes and underlying magnetic funnels. We find reduction in the damping length scale, group velocity and energy flux density as the propagation angle of Alfvén waves increases inside the coronal holes. For any propagation angle, the energy flux density and damping length scale also show a decrement in the source region of the solar wind (< 1.05 R⊙) where these may be one of the primary energy sources, which can convert the inflow of the solar wind into the outflow. In the outer region (> 1.21 R⊙), for any propagation angle, the energy flux density peaks match with the peaks of MgX 609.78 Å and 624.78 Å linewidths observed from the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on SOHO and the non-thermal velocity derived from these observations, justify the observed spectroscopic signature of the Alfvén wave dissipation.

  20. Investigation on Methane Decomposition and the Formation of C2 Hydrocarbons in DC Discharge Plasma byEmission Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺建勋; 韩媛媛; 高爱华; 周引穗; 陆治国

    2004-01-01

    The IR emission spectra of methane were measured under DC glow discharge conditions. The distinct difference in time between methane decomposition and C2 hydrocarbons formation was specially pointed out. C2 hydrocarbons formed at the end of methane decomposition. The optimum condition for C2 hydrocarbon formation was studied and the optimum combination between electric current density and methane input quantity was suggested. The appropriate reaction conditions for methane decomposition and C2 hydrocarbons formation are different, so high yield of C2 hydrocarbons will be probably obtained when different conditions are taken.

  1. Observational Signatures of Coronal Loop Heating and Cooling Driven by Footpoint Shuffling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Einaudi, G.; Taylor, B. D.; Ugarte-Urra, I.; Warren, H. P.; Rappazzo, A. F.; Velli, M.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of a coronal loop is studied by means of numerical simulations of the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations using the HYPERION code. The footpoints of the loop magnetic field are advected by random motions. As a consequence, the magnetic field in the loop is energized and develops turbulent nonlinear dynamics characterized by the continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets: energy is deposited at small scales where heating occurs. Dissipation is nonuniformly distributed so that only a fraction of the coronal mass and volume gets heated at any time. Temperature and density are highly structured at scales that, in the solar corona, remain observationally unresolved: the plasma of our simulated loop is multithermal, where highly dynamical hotter and cooler plasma strands are scattered throughout the loop at sub-observational scales. Numerical simulations of coronal loops of 50,000 km length and axial magnetic field intensities ranging from 0.01 to 0.04 T are presented. To connect these simulations to observations, we use the computed number densities and temperatures to synthesize the intensities expected in emission lines typically observed with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode. These intensities are used to compute differential emission measure distributions using the Monte Carlo Markov Chain code, which are very similar to those derived from observations of solar active regions. We conclude that coronal heating is found to be strongly intermittent in space and time, with only small portions of the coronal loop being heated: in fact, at any given time, most of the corona is cooling down.

  2. The plasma structure of coronal hole solar wind: Origins and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    2016-06-01

    Whereas slow solar wind is known to be highly structured, the fast (coronal hole origin) wind is usually considered to be homogeneous. Using measurements from Helios 1 + 2, ACE, Wind, and Ulysses, structure in the coronal hole origin solar wind is examined from 0.3 AU to 2.3 AU. Care is taken to collect and analyze intervals of "unperturbed coronal hole plasma." In these intervals, solar wind structure is seen in the proton number density, proton temperature, proton specific entropy, magnetic field strength, magnetic field to density ratio, electron heat flux, helium abundance, heavy-ion charge-state ratios, and Alfvenicity. Typical structure amplitudes are factors of 2, far from homogeneous. Variations are also seen in the solar wind radial velocity. Using estimates of the motion of the solar wind origin footpoint on the Sun for the various spacecraft, the satellite time series measurements are converted to distance along the photosphere. Typical variation scale lengths for the solar wind structure are several variations per supergranule. The structure amplitude and structure scale sizes do not evolve with distance from the Sun from 0.3 to 2.3 AU. An argument is quantified that these variations are the scale expected for solar wind production in open magnetic flux funnels in coronal holes. Additionally, a population of magnetic field foldings (switchbacks, reversals) in the coronal hole plasma is examined: this population evolves with distance from the Sun such that the magnetic field is mostly Parker spiral aligned at 0.3 AU and becomes more misaligned with distance outward.

  3. THE C2 OXIDATIVE PHOTOSYNTHETIC CARBON CYCLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, N. E.

    1997-06-01

    The C2 oxidative photosynthetic carbon cycle plus the C3 reductive photosynthetic carbon cycle coexist. Both are initiated by Rubisco, use about equal amounts of energy, must regenerate RuBP, and result in exchanges of CO2 and O2 to establish rates of net photosynthesis, CO2 and O2 compensation points, and the ratio of CO2 and O2 in the atmosphere. These concepts evolved from research on O2 inhibition, glycolate metabolism, leaf peroxisomes, photorespiration, 18O2/16O2 exchange, CO2 concentrating processes, and a requirement for the oxygenase activity of Rubisco. Nearly 80 years of research on these topics are unified under the one process of photosynthetic carbon metabolism and its self-regulation. PMID:15012254

  4. Periodic Variations in the Coronal Green Line Intensity and their Connection with the White-light Coronal Structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Milan Minarovjech; Milan Rybansky; Vojtech Rusin

    2000-09-01

    We present an analysis of short time-scale intensity variations in the coronal green line as obtained with high time resolution observations. The observed data can be divided into two groups. The first one shows periodic intensity variations with a period of 5 min. the second one does not show any significant intensity variations. We studied the relation between regions of coronal intensity oscillations and the shape of whitelight coronal structures. We found that the coronal green-line oscillations occur mainly in regions where open white-light coronal structures are located.

  5. Numerical simulations of transverse oscillations in radiatively cooling coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Magyar, N; Marcu, A

    2015-01-01

    We aim to study the influence of radiative cooling on the standing kink oscillations of a coronal loop. Using the FLASH code, we solved the 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations. Our model consists of a straight, density enhanced and gravitationally stratified magnetic flux tube. We perturbed the system initially, leading to a transverse oscillation of the structure, and followed its evolution for a number of periods. A realistic radiative cooling is implemented. Results are compared to available analytical theory. We find that in the linear regime (i.e. low amplitude perturbation and slow cooling) the obtained period and damping time are in good agreement with theory. The cooling leads to an amplification of the oscillation amplitude. However, the difference between the cooling and non-cooling cases is small (around 6% after 6 oscillations). In high amplitude runs with realistic cooling, instabilities deform the loop, leading to increased damping. In this case, the difference between cooling and non-cooling...

  6. Diagnostics of the Coronal Hole and the adjacent Quiet Sun by The Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS)

    CERN Document Server

    Kayshap, P; Srivastava, A K

    2014-01-01

    A comparison between a Coronal Hole (CH) and the adjacent Quiet-Sun (QS) has been performed using spectroscopic diagnostics of Hinode/ the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). Coronal funnels play an important role in the formation and propagation of the nascent fast solar wind. Applying Gaussian fitting procedures to the observed line profiles, Doppler velocity, intensity, line width (FWHM) and electron density have been estimated over CH and adjacent QS region of a North Polar Coronal Hole (NPCH). The aim of this study is to identify the coronal funnels based on spectral signatures. Excess width regions (excess FWHM above a threshold level) have been identified in QS and CH. The plasma flow inversion (average red-shifts changing to blue-shifts at a specific height) in CH and excess width regions of QS take place at ~ 5.01$\\times$10$^{5}$ K. Furthermore, high density concentration in excess width regions of QS provides an indication that these regions are the footprints of coronal funnels. We have also found that...

  7. Coronal magnetic fields from multiple type II bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnappa, Vijayakumar; Raveesha, K. H.; Subramanian, K. R.

    Coronal magnetic fields from multiple type II bursts Vijayakumar H Doddamani1*, Raveesha K H2 and Subramanian3 1Bangalore University, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India 2CMR Institute of Technology, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India 3 Retd, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India Abstract Magnetic fields play an important role in the astrophysical processes occurring in solar corona. In the solar atmosphere, magnetic field interacts with the plasma, producing abundant eruptive activities. They are considered to be the main factors for coronal heating, particle acceleration and the formation of structures like prominences, flares and Coronal Mass Ejections. The magnetic field in solar atmosphere in the range of 1.1-3 Rsun is especially important as an interface between the photospheric magnetic field and the solar wind. Its structure and time dependent change affects space weather by modifying solar wind conditions, Cho (2000). Type II doublet bursts can be used for the estimation of the strength of the magnetic field at two different heights. Two type II bursts occur sometimes in sequence. By relating the speed of the type II radio burst to Alfven Mach Number, the Alfven speed of the shock wave generating type II radio burst can be calculated. Using the relation between the Alfven speed and the mean frequency of emission, the magnetic field strength can be determined at a particular height. We have used the relative bandwidth and drift rate properties of multiple type II radio bursts to derive magnetic field strengths at two different heights and also the gradient of the magnetic field in the outer corona. The magnetic field strength has been derived for different density factors. It varied from 1.2 to 2.5 gauss at a solar height of 1.4 Rsun. The empirical relation of the variation of the magnetic field with height is found to be of the form B(R) = In the present case the power law index ‘γ’ varied from -3 to -2 for variation of

  8. X-Ray Emission Spectra of Ni-Like Gold Ions under Coronal Plasma Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Jiao-Long; ZHAO Gang; YUAN Jian-Min

    2005-01-01

    @@ The strong x-ray line emission of n = 4 → n =3 and n = 5 → n =3 transitions of Ni-like Au has been investigated under a coronal plasma condition. A complete set of atomic data, including energy level, transition probability and collision strength, has been obtained to simulate the emission spectra. Under a typical coronal equilibrium (electron temperature of 2500eV and density of 1.0 × 1015), the predicted strongest line is due to the transition of (3d-3 2 4f5/2)1 → (3d10)0. Extensive studies show that the relative intensity is insensitive to temperature and density over a wide plasma condition.

  9. Diffuse Objects Extraction in Coronal Holes Using Active Contour Means Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Tajik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of active contour models (Snakes for the segmentation of diffuse objects from coronal holes on the sun imaging telescope by means of active contour. In this paper the partition is less important and the focus is on the extraction of diffuse objects, namely coronal holes in EIT (Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope images. Coronal holes are regions of low-density plasma on the sun that have magnetic fields that open freely into interplanetary space. The proposed method is based on level set evolution. Since an active contour is a dynamic spline that can be adjusted to fit onto the boundary of the object based on energy minimization, and this method independent of selective region which we want to extract, hence using this method improved the result of segmentation. In addition to extracting diffuse objects of coronal holes, a new work that has been done to improve results, is that speed algorithm by implementing two methods: Reinitialization and Narrow band which related to the level set method has been used. Received images from satellites have large size so this method is very effective on these images.

  10. Development of Compact Toroid Injector for C-2 FRCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tadafumi; Sekiguchi, Junichi; Asai, Tomohiko; Gota, Hiroshi; Garate, Eusebio; Allfrey, Ian; Valentine, Travis; Smith, Brett; Morehouse, Mark; TAE Team

    2014-10-01

    Collaborative research project with Tri Alpha Energy has been started and we have developed a new compact toroid (CT) injector for the C-2 device, mainly for fueling field-reversed configurations (FRCs). The CT is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma-gun (MCPG), which consists of coaxial cylinder electrodes; a spheromak-like plasma is generated by discharge and pushed out from the gun by Lorentz force. The inner diameter of outer electrode is 83.1 mm and the outer diameter of inner electrode is 54.0 mm. The surface of the inner electrode is coated with tungsten in order to reduce impurities coming out from the electrode. The bias coil is mounted inside of the inner electrode. We have recently conducted test experiments and achieved a supersonic CT translation speed of up to ~100 km/s. Other typical plasma parameters are as follows: electron density ~ 5 × 1021 m-3, electron temperature ~ 40 eV, and the number of particles ~0.5-1.0 × 1019. The CT injector is now planned to be installed on C-2 and the first CT injection experiment will be conducted in the near future. The detailed MCPG design as well as the test experimental results will be presented.

  11. Magnetic Properties of Metric Noise Storms Associated with Coronal Mass Ejections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Yuan Wen; Jing-Xiu Wang; Yu-Zong Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Using Nan(c)ay Radioheliograph (NRH) imaging observations, combined with SOHO/Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) magnetogram observations and coronal magnetic field extrapolation, we studied the magnetic nature of metric noise storms that are associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Four events are selected: the events of 2000 July 14,2001 April 26, 2002 August 16 and 2001 March 28. The identified noise storm sources cover or partially cover the active regions (ARs), but the centers of storm sources are offset from the ARs. Using extrapolated magnetic field lines, we find that the noise storm sources trace the boundary between the open and closed field lines. We demonstrate that the disappearance of noise storm source is followed by the appearance of the burst source. The burst sources spread on the solar disk and their distributions correspond to the extent of the CME in LASCO C2 field of view. All the SOHO/Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) dimmings associated with noise storm sources are located at the periphery of noise storms where the magnetic lines of force were previously closed and low-lying. When the closed field becomes partially or fully open, the basic configurations of noise storm sources are changed, then the noise storm sources are no longer observed. These observations provide the information that the variations of noise storms manifest the restructuring or reconfiguring of the coronal magnetic field.

  12. Observation of coronal loop torsional oscillation

    CERN Document Server

    Zaqarashvili, T V

    2003-01-01

    We suggest that the global torsional oscillation of solar coronal loop may be observed by the periodical variation of a spectral line width. The amplitude of the variation must be maximal at the velocity antinodes and minimal at the nodes of the torsional oscillation. Then the spectroscopic observation as a time series at different heights above the active region at the solar limb may allow to determine the period and wavelength of global torsional oscillation and consequently the Alfv{\\'e}n speed in corona. From the analysis of early observation (Egan & Schneeberger \\cite{egan}) we suggest the value of coronal Alfv{\\'e}n speed as $\\sim 500 {\\rm km}{\\cdot}{\\rm s}^{-1}$.

  13. Sinonasal polyposis: investigation by direct coronal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate the typical clinical and CT features of sinonasal polyposis, we reviewed the clinical records and preoperative direct coronal CT scans of 35 patients with surgically proven disease. Symptoms included progressive nasal stuffiness (100 %), rhinorrhea (69 %), facial pain (60 %), headache (43 %) and anosmia (17 %). We found associations with rhinitis (46 %), asthma (29 %) and aspirin sensitivity (9 %). Coronal CT features included polypoid masses in the nasal cavity (91 %), partial or complete pansinus opacification (90 %), enlargement of infundibula (89 %), bony attenuation of the ethmoid trabeculae (63 %) and nasal septum (37 %), opacified ethmoid sinuses with convex lateral walls (51 %) and air-fluid levels (43 %). The latter feature correlated with symptoms and signs of acute sinusitis in only 40 % of patients. Recognition of sinonasal polyposis is important to the endoscopic surgeon since it can be the most troubling sinonasal inflammatory disease to manage due to its aggressive nature and tendency to recur despite appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  14. Microflares as Possible Sources for Coronal Heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meera Gupta; Rajmal Jain; Jayshree Trivedi; A. P. Mishra

    2008-03-01

    We present a preliminary study of 27 microflares observed by Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) mission during July 2003 to August 2006. We found that all 27 microflares show the Fe-line feature peaking around 6.7 keV, which is an indicator of the presence of coronal plasma temperature ≥ 9 MK. On the other hand, the spectra of microflares showhybrid model of thermal and non-thermal emission, which further supports them as possible sources of coronal heating. Our results based on the analysis show that the energy relapsed by the microflares is good enough for heating of the active corona. We discuss our results in the light of the hybrid model of microflares production.

  15. On Tripolar Magnetic Reconnection and Coronal Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, K; Lohani, N K; Pandey, Kumud; Narain, Udit

    2003-01-01

    Using recent data for the photosphere-chromosphere region of the solar atmosphere the magnetic reconnection in tripolar geometry has been investigated through the procedure of Sturrock (1999). Particular attention has been given to the width of the reconnecting region, wave number of the rapidly growing tearing mode, island length scales, frequency of MHD fluctuations, tearing mode growth rate, energy dissipation rate and minimum magnetic field strength required to heat chromospheric plasma to coronal temperatures. It is found that small length scales are formed in the upper chromosphere. The maximum growth rate of tearing mode instability coincides with the peak in the energy dissipation rate both of which occur in the upper chromosphere at the same height. It is realized that the distribution of magnetic field with height is essential for a better understanding of the coronal heating problem.

  16. Geometrical Properties of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremades, Hebe; Bothmer, Volker

    Based on the SOHO/LASCO dataset, a collection of "structured" coronal mass ejections (CMEs) has been compiled within the period 1996-2002, in order to analyze their three-dimensional configuration. These CME events exhibit white-light fine structures, likely indicative of their possible 3D topology. From a detailed investigation of the associated low coronal and photospheric source regions, a generic scheme has been deduced, which considers the white-light topology of a CME projected in the plane of the sky as being primarily dependent on the orientation and position of the source region's neutral line on the solar disk. The obtained results imply that structured CMEs are essentially organized along a symmetry axis, in a cylindrical manner. The measured dimensions of the cylinder's base and length yield a ratio of 1.6. These CMEs seem to be better approximated by elliptic cones, rather than by the classical ice cream cone, characterized by a circular cross section.

  17. Solar Coronal Jets: Observations, Theory, and Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Raouafi, N E; Pariat, E; Young, P R; Sterling, A C; Savcheva, A; Shimojo, M; Moreno-Insertis, F; DeVore, C R; Archontis, V; Török, T; Mason, H; Curdt, W; Meyer, K; Dalmasse, K; Matsui, Y

    2016-01-01

    Coronal jets represent important manifestations of ubiquitous solar transients, which may be the source of significant mass and energy input to the upper solar atmosphere and the solar wind. While the energy involved in a jet-like event is smaller than that of "nominal" solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), jets share many common properties with these phenomena, in particular, the explosive magnetically driven dynamics. Studies of jets could, therefore, provide critical insight for understanding the larger, more complex drivers of the solar activity. On the other side of the size-spectrum, the study of jets could also supply important clues on the physics of transients close or at the limit of the current spatial resolution such as spicules. Furthermore, jet phenomena may hint to basic process for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind; consequently their study gives us the opportunity to attack a broad range of solar-heliospheric problems.

  18. Sunquake Generation by Coronal Magnetic Restructuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, A. J. B.; Mooney, M.; Leake, J. E.; Hudson, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections are powered by major restructurings of the coronal magnetic field, which appear to strongly perturb the magnetic field in the photosphere as well. Could the associated Lorentz forces generate sunquakes, as suggested by Hudson et al. 2008? Here, we present the first MHD simulations of sunquake generation by magnetic field perturbations, and explore the details of this mechanism. The downgoing magnetic field change is modelled as an Alfven wave, which propagates into the lower atmosphere. When it reaches the vicinity of the beta=1 layer (where the Alfven and sound speeds are equal), non-linear coupling excites a downgoing acoustic wave, which we interpret as a sunquake. The amplitude of the acoustic wave increases nonlinearly with the amplitude of the magnetic perturbation, reaching a limit where around 35% of the injected Poynting flux is transferred to the seismic wave - enough energy to match sunquake observations.

  19. Solar Coronal Jets: Observations, Theory, and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raouafi, N. E.; Patsourakos, S.; Pariat, E.; Young, P. R.; Sterling, A. C.; Savcheva, A.; Shimojo, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; DeVore, C. R.; Archontis, V.; Török, T.; Mason, H.; Curdt, W.; Meyer, K.; Dalmasse, K.; Matsui, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Coronal jets represent important manifestations of ubiquitous solar transients, which may be the source of significant mass and energy input to the upper solar atmosphere and the solar wind. While the energy involved in a jet-like event is smaller than that of "nominal" solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), jets share many common properties with these phenomena, in particular, the explosive magnetically driven dynamics. Studies of jets could, therefore, provide critical insight for understanding the larger, more complex drivers of the solar activity. On the other side of the size-spectrum, the study of jets could also supply important clues on the physics of transients close or at the limit of the current spatial resolution such as spicules. Furthermore, jet phenomena may hint to basic process for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind; consequently their study gives us the opportunity to attack a broad range of solar-heliospheric problems.

  20. Solar Energetic Particles: Sampling Coronal Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1998-05-01

    In the large solar energetic particle (SEP) events, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) drive shock waves out through the corona that accelerate elements of the ambient material to MeV energies in a fairly democratic, temperature-independent manner. These events provide the most complete source of information on element abundances in the corona. Relative abundances of 22 elements from H through Zn display the well-known dependence on the first ionization potential (FIP) that distinguishes coronal and photospheric material. For most elements, the main abundance variations depend upon the gyrofrequency, and hence on the charge-to-mass ratio, Q/A, of the ion. Abundance variations in the dominant species, H and He, are not Q/A dependent, presumably because of non-linear wave-particle interactions of H and He during acceleration. Impulsive flares provide a different sample of material that confirms the Ne:Mg:Si and He/C abundances in the corona.

  1. Relationship of EUV Irradiance Coronal Dimming Slope and Depth to Coronal Mass Ejection Speed and Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, James Paul; Webb, David F; Thompson, Barbara J; Colaninno, Robin C; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) coronal dimmings are often observed in response to solar eruptive events. These phenomena can be generated via several different physical processes. For space weather, the most important of these is the temporary void left behind by a coronal mass ejection (CME). Massive, fast CMEs tend to leave behind a darker void that also usually corresponds to minimum irradiance for the cooler coronal emissions. If the dimming is associated with a solar flare, as is often the case, the flare component of the irradiance light curve in the cooler coronal emission can be isolated and removed using simultaneous measurements of warmer coronal lines. We apply this technique to 37 dimming events identified during two separate two-week periods in 2011, plus an event on 2010 August 7 analyzed in a previous paper, to parameterize dimming in terms of depth and slope. We provide statistics on which combination of wavelengths worked best for the flare-removal method, describe the fitting methods applied to t...

  2. TV Review: Coronation Street - Surrogacy in Weatherfield

    OpenAIRE

    Blyth, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The British TV soap opera, Coronation Street, has become an established national institution since the first episode was screened in December 1960. It is on several nights each week and is set in 'Weatherfield', a fictional working class neighbourhood in Manchester. One of the programme's many plots this year has focused on a surrogacy arrangement made between intending parents Isabelle (Izzy) and Gary and their friend, Tina. This being 'soapland', there are various sub-plots. As a result...

  3. Coronal Mass Ejections of Solar Cycle 23

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nat Gopalswamy

    2006-06-01

    I summarize the statistical, physical, and morphological properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) of solar cycle 23, as observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission. The SOHO data is by far the most extensive data, which made it possible to fully establish the properties of CMEs as a phenomenon of utmost importance to Sun–Earth connection as well as to the heliosphere. I also discuss various subsets of CMEs that are of primary importance for their impact on Earth.

  4. A Mechanism for Coronal Hole Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, D A N

    2008-01-01

    Bald patches are magnetic topologies in which the magnetic field is concave up over part of a photospheric polarity inversion line. A bald patch topology is believed to be the essential ingredient for filament channels and is often found in extrapolations of the observed photospheric field. Using an analytic source-surface model to calculate the magnetic topology of a small bipolar region embedded in a global magnetic dipole field, we demonstrate that although common in closed-field regions close to the solar equator, bald patches are unlikely to occur in the open-field topology of a coronal hole. Our results give rise to the following question: What happens to a bald patch topology when the surrounding field lines open up? This would be the case when a bald patch moves into a coronal hole, or when a coronal hole forms in an area that encompasses a bald patch. Our magnetostatic models show that, in this case, the bald patch topology almost invariably transforms into a null point topology with a spine and a fa...

  5. EIT Observations of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurman, J. B.; Fisher, Richard B. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Before the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), we had only the sketchiest of clues as to the nature and topology of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) below 1.1 - 1.2 solar radii. Occasionally, dimmings (or 'transient coronal holes') were observed in time series of soft X-ray images, but they were far less frequent than CME's. Simply by imaging the Sun frequently and continually at temperatures of 0.9 - 2.5 MK we have stumbled upon a zoo of CME phenomena in this previously obscured volume of the corona: (1) waves, (2) dimmings, and (3) a great variety of ejecta. In the three and a half years since our first observations of coronal waves associated with CME's, combined Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) and extreme ultra-violet imaging telescope (EIT) synoptic observations have become a standard prediction tool for space weather forecasters, but our progress in actually understanding the CME phenomenon in the low corona has been somewhat slower. I will summarize the observations of waves, hot (> 0.9 MK) and cool ejecta, and some of the interpretations advanced to date. I will try to identify those phenomena, analysis of which could most benefit from the spectroscopic information available from ultraviolet coronograph spectrometer (UVCS) observations.

  6. Frequency of coronal transients and solar activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Altitude Observatory's white light coronagraph aboard Skylab observed some 110 coronal transients - rapid changes in appearance of the corona - during its 227 days of operation. The longitudes of the origins of these transients were not distributed uniformly around the solar surface (51 of the 100 events observed in seven solar rotations arose from a single quadrant of longitude). Further, the frequency of transient production from each segment of the solar surface was well correlated with the sunspot number and Ca II plage (area x brightness) index in the segment, rotation by rotation. This correlation implies that transients occur more often above strong photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields, that is, in regions where the coronal magnetic field is stronger and, perhaps, more variable. This pattern of occurrence is consistent with the belief that the forces propelling transient material outward are, primarily, magnetic. A quantitative relation between transient production from an area and the Zuerich sunspot number appropriate to that area is derived, and it is speculated that the relation is independent of phase in the solar activity cycle. If true, the Sun may give rise to as many as 100 white light coronal transients per month at solar cycle maximum. (Auth.)

  7. Optical coronal polarization and solar dust ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations of the outer solar corona on the Java island were carried out on June 11, 1983, at a 30-km altitude using a B-15 balloon. At 5325, 5965, 7200, and 8015 A, data on polarizations in a field of 5 deg x 5 deg centered nearly on the sun were obtained. Our contour maps of polarization are the first of the two-dimensional polarization distribution covering wide area. An excess of polarization at the four wavelengths was found in the ecliptic plane and at the location of a coronal streamer. High polarization at the coronal streamer is caused mainly by coronal electrons, but dust grains in the region out of the ecliptic plane contribute also in a few percent to the high polarization degree in this streamer. It is confirmed by additional data that there is a peak in the polarization excess in the ecliptic between 4(R solar) and 5(R solar) as already reported by Isobe et al. (1985; AAA 40.074.053). This excess is considered to be due to an enhanced distribution of dust in a ring or a thick wide band around the sun. (author)

  8. KELVIN-HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITY OF A CORONAL STREAMER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shear-flow-driven instability can play an important role in energy transfer processes in coronal plasma. We present for the first time the observation of a kink-like oscillation of a streamer that is probably caused by the streaming kink-mode Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). The wave-like behavior of the streamer was observed by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment C2 and C3 on board the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory. The observed wave had a period of about 70-80 minutes, and its wavelength increased from 2 R☉ to 3 R☉ in about 1.5 hr. The phase speeds of its crests and troughs decreased from 406 ± 20 to 356 ± 31 km s–1 during the event. Within the same heliocentric range, the wave amplitude also appeared to increase with time. We attribute the phenomena to the MHD KHI, which occurs at a neutral sheet in a fluid wake. The free energy driving the instability is supplied by the sheared flow and sheared magnetic field across the streamer plane. The plasma properties of the local environment of the streamer were estimated from the phase speed and instability threshold criteria

  9. A Filament-Associated Halo Coronal Mass Ejection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    There are only a few observations published so far that show the initiation of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and illustrate the magnetic changes in the surface origin of a CME. Any attempt to connect a CME with its local solar activities is meaningful. In this paper we present a clear instance of a halo CME initiation. A careful analysis of magnetograms shows that the only obvious magnetic changes in the surface region of the CME is a magnetic flux cancellation underneath a quiescent filament. The early disturbance was seen as the slow upward motion in segments of the quiescent filament. Four hours later, the filament was accelerated to about 50 km s-1 and erupted. While a small part of the material in the filament was ejected into the upper corona, most of the mass was transported to a nearby region. About forty minutes later, the transported mass was also ejected partially to the upper corona. The eruption of the filament triggered a two-ribbon flare, with post-flare loops connecting the flare ribbons. A halo CME, which is inferred to be associated with the eruptive filament, was observed from LASCO/C2 and C3. The halo CME contained two CME events, each event corresponded to a partial mass ejection of the filament. We suggest that the magnetic reconnection at the lower atmosphere is responsible for the filament eruption and the halo CME.

  10. Technique to Measure the Coronal Electron Temperature and Radial Flow Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginald, N. L.; Davila, J. M.; St Cyr, O. C.

    2011-12-01

    During the March 2006 total solar eclipse we conducted an imaging experiment using the Imaging Spectrograph of Coronal Electrons (ISCORE) to determine the coronal electron temperature and its radial flow speed in the low solar corona. This technique required taking images of the solar eclipse through four broadband filters centered at 385.0, 398.7, 410.0 and 423.3 nm. The K-coronal temperature is determined from intensity ratios from the 385.0 and 410.0 nm filters, and the K-coronal radial flow speed is determined from intensity ratios from the 398.7 and 423.3 nm filters. The theoretical model for this technique assumes a symmetric corona devoid of any features like streamers that might alter the coronal symmetry. The model also requires an isothermal temperature and a uniform outflow speed all along the line of sight. We will call this the Constant Parameter Thomson Scattering Model (CPTSM). The latter assumption may sound unreasonable but in the symmetric corona with rapid fall of the electron density with height in the solar corona, the major contributions to the K-coronal intensity along a given line of sight comes from the plasma properties in the vicinity of the plane of the sky. But the pressing question is how is the derived plasma properties by ISCORE compare with the nature of the true corona. For this we turn to the CORHEL model by Predictive Science Inc. which used magnetogram data to create a realistic model of the solar corona that are made available through the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at GSFC. That team has consistently produced the expected coronal image days prior to many total eclipses where the major coronal features from their model matched actual coronal image on the day of the eclipse. Using the CORHEL model data we have calculated the K-coronal intensities at 385.0, 398.7, 410.0 and 423.3 nm using the electron density, plasma temperature (assumed to be electron temperature) and the flow speeds of the plasma along the line

  11. Atmospheric studies of C2 white dwarfs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    Model atmosphere and line formation calculations for the delta nu = + 1 Swan bands of the C2 molecule are presented for seven white dwarfs and are compared to high resolution optical spectra. Limits on the C-12 to C-13 ratio are computed for highly pressure broadened lines and are used to analyze the observed spectra for any sign of absorption by the (C-12)(C-13) molecule. The metal abundances in cool white dwarf atmospheres and the usefulness of the determination of the C-12 to C-13 ratio are discussed. The line center shift and the pressure broadening are used to determine a value for the van der Waals interaction constant, C6. This is done using a detailed line modelling program which explicitly includes approximately 2000 rotational transition lines within the vibrational bands, in conjunction with atmospheric models calculated by the LUCIFER atmosphere modelling program. The isotopic shift of the vibrational and rotational lines is also included in the model to compare the detectability of various C-12 to C-13 ratios. The line models fit the observed spectra with varying degrees of accuracy. One star, WD0548-001, shows an unusually small pressure shift and broadening for the high pressures that the atmospheric model predicts. The results show that only in the hottest stars with the least pressure broadened lines in this study can the isotopic effect be seen. With the data available, the best limit on the C-12 to C-13 ratio is a minimum of 40 for WD0856 + 331. The models show that even for very high signal to noise data, the isotopic shift in the Swan bands in very cool white dwarfs would be difficult to separate from the pressure broadening effects. It is shown that the isotopic ratio is high enough to rule out the possibility that the carbon is a relic from previous CNO burning.

  12. Atmospheric studies of C2 white dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Model atmosphere and line formation calculations for the delta nu = + 1 Swan bands of the C2 molecule are presented for seven white dwarfs and are compared to high resolution optical spectra. Limits on the C-12 to C-13 ratio are computed for highly pressure broadened lines and are used to analyze the observed spectra for any sign of absorption by the (C-12)(C-13) molecule. The metal abundances in cool white dwarf atmospheres and the usefulness of the determination of the C-12 to C-13 ratio are discussed. The line center shift and the pressure broadening are used to determine a value for the van der Waals interaction constant, C6. This is done using a detailed line modelling program which explicitly includes approximately 2000 rotational transition lines within the vibrational bands, in conjunction with atmospheric models calculated by the LUCIFER atmosphere modelling program. The isotopic shift of the vibrational and rotational lines is also included in the model to compare the detectability of various C-12 to C-13 ratios. The line models fit the observed spectra with varying degrees of accuracy. One star, WD0548-001, shows an unusually small pressure shift and broadening for the high pressures that the atmospheric model predicts. The results show that only in the hottest stars with the least pressure broadened lines in this study can the isotopic effect be seen. With the data available, the best limit on the C-12 to C-13 ratio is a minimum of 40 for WD0856 + 331. The models show that even for very high signal to noise data, the isotopic shift in the Swan bands in very cool white dwarfs would be difficult to separate from the pressure broadening effects. It is shown that the isotopic ratio is high enough to rule out the possibility that the carbon is a relic from previous CNO burning

  13. Coronal heating in coupled photosphere-chromosphere-coronal systems: turbulence and leakage

    CERN Document Server

    Verdini, Andrea; Velli, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Coronal loops act as resonant cavities for low frequency fluctuations that are transmitted from the deeper layers of the solar atmosphere and are amplified in the corona, triggering nonlinear interactions. However trapping is not perfect, some energy leaks down to the chromosphere, thus limiting the turbulence development and the associated heating. We consider the combined effects of turbulence and leakage in determining the energy level and associated heating rate in models of coronal loops which include the chromosphere and transition region. We use a piece-wise constant model for the Alfven speed and a Reduced MHD - Shell model to describe the interplay between turbulent dynamics in the direction perpendicular to the mean field and propagation along the field. Turbulence is sustained by incoming fluctuations which are equivalent, in the line-tied case, to forcing by the photospheric shear flows. While varying the turbulence strength, we compare systematically the average coronal energy level (E) and dissi...

  14. Standing Slow-Mode Waves in Hot Coronal Loops: Observations, Modeling, and Coronal Seismology

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Tongjiang

    2010-01-01

    Strongly damped Doppler shift oscillations are observed frequently associated with flarelike events in hot coronal loops. In this paper, a review of the observed properties and the theoretical modeling is presented. Statistical measurements of physical parameters (period, decay time, and amplitude) have been obtained based on a large number of events observed by SOHO/SUMER and Yohkoh/BCS. Several pieces of evidence are found to support their interpretation in terms of the fundamental standing longitudinal slow mode. The high excitation rate of these oscillations in small- or micro-flares suggest that the slow mode waves are a natural response of the coronal plasma to impulsive heating in closed magnetic structure. The strong damping and the rapid excitation of the observed waves are two major aspects of the waves that are poorly understood, and are the main subject of theoretical modeling. The slow waves are found mainly damped by thermal conduction and viscosity in hot coronal loops. The mode coupling seems ...

  15. Recent VLA Observations of Coronal Faraday Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Fischer, P. D.; Buffo, J. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Proposed mechanisms for coronal heating and acceleration of the fast solar wind, such as Joule heating by coronal currents or dissipation of Alfvén waves, depend on the magnetic field structure and plasma characteristics of the corona within heliocentric distances of 5 solar radii. Faraday rotation observations can provide unique information on the magnetic field in this region of the corona. We report on sensitive full-polarization observations of the radio galaxy 3C228 through the solar corona at heliocentric distances of 4.6 - 5.0 solar radii. The observations were made with the VLA in August of 2011. We performed these observations at 5.0 and 6.1 GHz (each with a bandwidth of 128 MHz), permitting measurements deeper in the corona than previous VLA observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. While the measured Faraday rotation was lower than our a priori expectations, we can understand the magnitude of the observed Faraday rotation in terms of observed properties of the corona on the day of observation. For coronal remote sensing, an advantage of using extended extragalactic radio sources such as 3C228 is that such observations provide multiple lines of sight through the corona. Our data provide two lines of sight (separated by 46″, 33,000 km in the corona), one to a northern hotspot and the other to a southern hotspot with fractional polarizations of 14% and 8% respectively. We detected three periods over the eight-hour observing session during which there appeared to be a difference in the Faraday rotation between these two closely spaced lines of sight. These measurements yield an estimate of 2 - 4 GA for coronal currents. We did not directly detect rotation measure fluctuations. Our data impose upper limits on rotation measure fluctuations caused by coronal waves. The observed upper limits were 3.3 and 6.4 rad/m2 and are comparable to and not inconsistent with some models for Alfvén wave heating. This research was supported at the University of Iowa by grants ATM09

  16. The role of active region coronal magnetic field in determining coronal mass ejection propagation direction

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Ying D.; Dai, Xinghua; Yang, Zhongwei; Huang, Chong; Hu, Huidong

    2015-01-01

    We study the role of the coronal magnetic field configuration of an active region in determining the propagation direction of a coronal mass ejection (CME). The CME occurred in the active region 11944 (S09W01) near the disk center on 2014 January 7 and was associated with an X1.2 flare. A new CME reconstruction procedure based on a polarimetric technique is adopted, which shows that the CME changed its propagation direction by around 28$^\\circ$ in latitude within 2.5 R$_\\odot$ and 43$^\\circ$ ...

  17. 3D Coronal Slow Modes: Towards 3D Seismology

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, M. S.; Walsh, R. W.; Plunkett, S.

    2009-01-01

    On 2008 January 10, the twin Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) A and B spacecraft conducted a high time cadence study of the solar corona with the Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI) instruments with the aim of investigating coronal dynamics. Observations of the three-dimensional propagation of waves within active region coronal loops and a measurement of the true coronal slow mode speed are obtained. Intensity oscillations with a period of approximately 12 minutes are observed t...

  18. SMA observations of C2H in High-Mass Star Forming Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Xue-Jian; Zhang, Qizhou; Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Li, Juan; Gao, Yu; Gu, Qiusheng

    2015-01-01

    C$_2$H is a representative hydrocarbon that is abundant and ubiquitous in the interstellar medium (ISM). To study its chemical properties, we present Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of the C$_2$H $N=3-2$ and HC$_3$N $J=30-29$ transitions and the 1.1 mm continuum emission toward four OB cluster-forming regions, AFGL 490, ON 1, W33 Main, and G10.6-0.4, which cover a bolometric luminosity range of $\\sim$10$^3$--10$^6$ $L_{\\odot}$. We found that on large scales, the C$_2$H emission traces the dense molecular envelope. However, for all observed sources, the peaks of C$_2$H emission are offset by several times times 10$^4$ AU from the peaks of 1.1 mm continuum emission, where the most luminous stars are located. By comparing the distribution and profiles of C$_2$H hyperfine lines and the 1.1 mm continuum emission, we find that the C$_2$H column density (and abundance) around the 1.1 mm continuum peaks is lower than those in the ambient gas envelope. Chemical models suggest that C$_2$H might be transformed to...

  19. Computed tomography myelography with coronal and oblique coronal views for diagnosis of nerve root avulsion in brachial plexus injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a new computed tomography (CT) myelography technique with coronal and oblique coronal views to demonstrate the status of the cervical nerve rootlets that are involved in brachial plexus injury. We discuss the usefulness of this technique for the diagnosis of nerve root avulsion compared with that of CT myelography with axial view. CT myelography was performed with enhancement of the cervical subarachnoid space by using a contrast medium. Subsequently, coronal and oblique coronal reconstructions were created. The results of CT myelography were evaluated and classified in the presence of pseudomeningocele, intradural ventral nerve rootlets, and intradural dorsal nerve rootlets. The diagnosis was based on the findings of extraspinal surgical exploration with or without spinal evoked potential measurements and choline acetyltransferase activity measurement in 25 patients and recovery by a natural course in 3 patients. The diagnostic accuracies of CT myelography with coronal and oblique coronal views and that with axial view were compared and correlated with the surgical findings or natural course in 57 cervical roots in 28 patients. Coronal and oblique coronal views were superior to axial views in the visualization of the rootlets and orientation of the exact level of the root. They showed 100% sensitivity, 96% specificity, and 98% diagnostic accuracy (26 true-positive findings, 27 true-negative findings, none false-positive findings, and one false-negative findings) for diagnosing root avulsion. No statistically significant difference was observed between the coronal and oblique coronal views and the axial views. The information obtained using coronal and oblique coronal slice CT myelography enabled the assessment of the rootlets of the brachial plexus and provided valuable data for deciding the appropriate treatment strategy, namely, exploration, nerve repair, or primary reconstruction. (author)

  20. Evidence linking coronal transients to the evolution of coronal holes. [solar X-ray observations on Skylab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, D. F.; Nolte, J. T.; Solodyna, C. V.; Mcintosh, P. S.

    1978-01-01

    The positions of X-ray coronal transients outside of active regions observed during Skylab were superposed on H-alpha synoptic charts and coronal hole boundaries for seven solar rotations. A detailed spatial association between the transients and neutral lines was confirmed. It was found that most of the transients were related to large-scale changes in coronal hole area and tended to occur on the borders of evolving equatorial holes.

  1. FLARE-GENERATED TYPE II BURST WITHOUT ASSOCIATED CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magdalenic, J.; Marque, C.; Zhukov, A. N. [Solar-Terrestrial Center of Excellence, SIDC, Royal Observatory of Belgium, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Vrsnak, B. [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, Kaciceva 26, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Veronig, A., E-mail: Jasmina.Magdalenic@oma.be [IGAM/Kanzelhoehe Observatory, Institut of Physics, Universitaet Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2012-02-20

    We present a study of the solar coronal shock wave on 2005 November 14 associated with the GOES M3.9 flare that occurred close to the east limb (S06 Degree-Sign E60 Degree-Sign ). The shock signature, a type II radio burst, had an unusually high starting frequency of about 800 MHz, indicating that the shock was formed at a rather low height. The position of the radio source, the direction of the shock wave propagation, and the coronal electron density were estimated using Nancay Radioheliograph observations and the dynamic spectrum of the Green Bank Solar Radio Burst Spectrometer. The soft X-ray, H{alpha}, and Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager observations show that the flare was compact, very impulsive, and of a rather high density and temperature, indicating a strong and impulsive increase of pressure in a small flare loop. The close association of the shock wave initiation with the impulsive energy release suggests that the impulsive increase of the pressure in the flare was the source of the shock wave. This is supported by the fact that, contrary to the majority of events studied previously, no coronal mass ejection was detected in association with the shock wave, although the corresponding flare occurred close to the limb.

  2. Double-antibody radioimmunoassay for staphylococcal enterotoxin C2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive double-antibody radioimmunoassay for staphylococcal enterotoxin C2 is described. The assay procedure employs anti-rabbit gamma globulin, prepared in goats, to precipitate the antigen-antibody complex of enterotoxin C2 and anti-enterotoxin C2. The test is sensitive to 100 pg of enterotoxin

  3. 2D cellular automaton model for the evolution of active region coronal plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Fuentes, Marcelo López

    2016-01-01

    We study a 2D cellular automaton (CA) model for the evolution of coronal loop plasmas. The model is based on the idea that coronal loops are made of elementary magnetic strands that are tangled and stressed by the displacement of their footpoints by photospheric motions. The magnetic stress accumulated between neighbor strands is released in sudden reconnection events or nanoflares that heat the plasma. We combine the CA model with the Enthalpy Based Thermal Evolution of Loops (EBTEL) model to compute the response of the plasma to the heating events. Using the known response of the XRT telescope on board Hinode we also obtain synthetic data. The model obeys easy to understand scaling laws relating the output (nanoflare energy, temperature, density, intensity) to the input parameters (field strength, strand length, critical misalignment angle). The nanoflares have a power-law distribution with a universal slope of -2.5, independent of the input parameters. The repetition frequency of nanoflares, expressed in t...

  4. Plasma sloshing in pulse-heated solar and stellar coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Reale, F

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that coronal heating is highly intermittent, and flares are the high energy extreme. The properties of the heat pulses are difficult to constrain. Here hydrodynamic loop modeling shows that several large amplitude oscillations (~ 20% in density) are triggered in flare light curves if the duration of the heat pulse is shorter that the sound crossing time of the flaring loop. The reason is that the plasma has not enough time to reach pressure equilibrium during the heating and traveling pressure fronts develop. The period is a few minutes for typical solar coronal loops, dictated by the sound crossing time in the decay phase. The long period and large amplitude make these oscillations different from typical MHD waves. This diagnostic can be applied both to observations of solar and stellar flares and to future observations of non-flaring loops at high resolution.

  5. Solar coronal magnetic fields derived using seismology techniques applied to omnipresent sunspot waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jess, D B; Ryans, R S I; Christian, D J; Keys, P H; Mathioudakis, M; Mackay, D H; Prasad, S Krishna; Banerjee, D; Grant, S D T; Yau, S; Diamond, C

    2016-01-01

    Sunspots on the surface of the Sun are the observational signatures of intense manifestations of tightly packed magnetic field lines, with near-vertical field strengths exceeding 6,000 G in extreme cases. It is well accepted that both the plasma density and the magnitude of the magnetic field strength decrease rapidly away from the solar surface, making high-cadence coronal measurements through traditional Zeeman and Hanle effects difficult since the observational signatures are fraught with low-amplitude signals that can become swamped with instrumental noise. Magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) techniques have previously been applied to coronal structures, with single and spatially isolated magnetic field strengths estimated as 9-55 G. A drawback with previous MHD approaches is that they rely on particular wave modes alongside the detectability of harmonic overtones. Here we show, for the first time, how omnipresent magneto-acoustic waves, originating from within the underlying sunspot and propagating radially outwa...

  6. Plasma Sloshing in Pulse-heated Solar and Stellar Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, F.

    2016-08-01

    There is evidence that coronal heating is highly intermittent, and flares are the high energy extreme. The properties of the heat pulses are difficult to constrain. Here, hydrodynamic loop modeling shows that several large amplitude oscillations (∼20% in density) are triggered in flare light curves if the duration of the heat pulse is shorter than the sound crossing time of the flaring loop. The reason for this is that the plasma does not have enough time to reach pressure equilibrium during heating, and traveling pressure fronts develop. The period is a few minutes for typical solar coronal loops, dictated by the sound crossing time in the decay phase. The long period and large amplitude make these oscillations different from typical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. This diagnostic can be applied both to observations of solar and stellar flares and to future observations of non-flaring loops at high resolution.

  7. Coronal Loops: Evolving Beyond the Isothermal Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Cirtain, J. W.; Allen, J. D.

    2002-05-01

    Are coronal loops isothermal? A controversy over this question has arisen recently because different investigators using different techniques have obtained very different answers. Analysis of SOHO-EIT and TRACE data using narrowband filter ratios to obtain temperature maps has produced several key publications that suggest that coronal loops may be isothermal. We have constructed a multi-thermal distribution for several pixels along a relatively isolated coronal loop on the southwest limb of the solar disk using spectral line data from SOHO-CDS taken on 1998 Apr 20. These distributions are clearly inconsistent with isothermal plasma along either the line of sight or the length of the loop, and suggested rather that the temperature increases from the footpoints to the loop top. We speculated originally that these differences could be attributed to pixel size -- CDS pixels are larger, and more `contaminating' material would be expected along the line of sight. To test this idea, we used CDS iron line ratios from our data set to mimic the isothermal results from the narrowband filter instruments. These ratios indicated that the temperature gradient along the loop was flat, despite the fact that a more complete analysis of the same data showed this result to be false! The CDS pixel size was not the cause of the discrepancy; rather, the problem lies with the isothermal approximation used in EIT and TRACE analysis. These results should serve as a strong warning to anyone using this simplistic method to obtain temperature. This warning is echoed on the EIT web page: ``Danger! Enter at your own risk!'' In other words, values for temperature may be found, but they may have nothing to do with physical reality. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NASA grant NAG5-9783. This research was funded in part by the NASA/TRACE MODA grant for Montana State University.

  8. Coronal Heating, Spicules, and Solar-B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Porter, Jason; Hathaway, David; Yamauchi, Yohei

    2003-01-01

    Falconer et al. investigated the heating of the quiet corona by measuring the increase of coronal luminosity with the amount of the magnetic flux in the underlying network at solar minimum when there were no active regions on the face of the Sun. The coronal luminosity was measured from Fe IX/X - Fe XII pairs of coronal images from SOHO/EIT, under the assumption that practically all of the coronal luminosity in these very quiet regions came from plasma in the temperature range 0.9 x 10(exp 6) K is less than or equal to T is less than or equal to 1.3 x 10(exp 6) K. The network magnetic flux content was measured from SOHO/MDI magnetograms. It was found that luminosity of the corona in these quiet regions increased roughly in proportion to the square root of the magnetic flux content of the network and roughly in proportion to the length of the perimeter of the network flux clumps. From 1) this result; 2) the observed occurrence of many fine-scale explosive events (e.g., spicules) at the edges of network flux clumps; and 3) a demonstration that it is energetically feasible for the heating of the corona in quiet regions to be driven by explosions of granule-sized sheared-core magnetic bipoles embedded in the edges of the network flux clumps, Falconer et al. infer that in quiet regions that are not influenced by active regions the corona is mainly heated by such magnetic activity in the edges of the network flux clumps. From their observational results together with their feasibility analysis, Falconer et al. predict that 1) At the edges of the network flux clumps there are many transient sheared core bipoles of the size and lifetime of granules and having transverse field strengths greater than approx. 100 G; 2) Approx. 30 of these bipoles are present per supergranule; and 3) Most spicules are produced by explosions of these bipoles. The photospheric vector magnetograms, chromospheric filtergrams, and EUV spectra from Solar-B are expected to have sufficient sensitivity

  9. Coronal Heating versus Solar Wind Acceleration

    OpenAIRE

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2004-01-01

    Parker's initial insights from 1958 provided a key causal link between the heating of the solar corona and the acceleration of the solar wind. However, we still do not know what fraction of the solar wind's mass, momentum, and energy flux is driven by Parker-type gas pressure gradients, and what fraction is driven by, e.g., wave-particle interactions or turbulence. SOHO has been pivotal in bringing these ideas back to the forefront of coronal and solar wind research. This paper reviews our cu...

  10. The Inconvenient Truth About Coronal Dimmings

    OpenAIRE

    McIntosh, Scott W.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the occurrence of a CME-driven coronal dimming using unique high resolution spectral images of the corona from the Hinode spacecraft. Over the course of the dimming event we observe the dynamic increase of non-thermal line broadening in the 195.12Angstrom emission line of Fe XII as the corona opens. As the corona begins to close, refill and brighten, we see a reduction of the non-thermal broadening towards the pre-eruption level. We propose that the dynamic evolution of non-the...

  11. 3D MHD modeling of twisted coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Reale, F; Guarrasi, M; Mignone, A; Peres, G; Hood, A W; Priest, E R

    2016-01-01

    We perform MHD modeling of a single bright coronal loop to include the interaction with a non-uniform magnetic field. The field is stressed by random footpoint rotation in the central region and its energy is dissipated into heating by growing currents through anomalous magnetic diffusivity that switches on in the corona above a current density threshold. We model an entire single magnetic flux tube, in the solar atmosphere extending from the high-beta chromosphere to the low-beta corona through the steep transition region. The magnetic field expands from the chromosphere to the corona. The maximum resolution is ~30 km. We obtain an overall evolution typical of loop models and realistic loop emission in the EUV and X-ray bands. The plasma confined in the flux tube is heated to active region temperatures (~3 MK) after ~2/3 hr. Upflows from the chromosphere up to ~100 km/s fill the core of the flux tube to densities above 10^9 cm^-3. More heating is released in the low corona than the high corona and is finely ...

  12. Equilibrium models of coronal loops that involve curvature and buoyancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindman, Bradley W. [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States); Jain, Rekha, E-mail: hindman@solarz.colorado.edu [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-01

    We construct magnetostatic models of coronal loops in which the thermodynamics of the loop is fully consistent with the shape and geometry of the loop. This is achieved by treating the loop as a thin, compact, magnetic fibril that is a small departure from a force-free state. The density along the loop is related to the loop's curvature by requiring that the Lorentz force arising from this deviation is balanced by buoyancy. This equilibrium, coupled with hydrostatic balance and the ideal gas law, then connects the temperature of the loop with the curvature of the loop without resorting to a detailed treatment of heating and cooling. We present two example solutions: one with a spatially invariant magnetic Bond number (the dimensionless ratio of buoyancy to Lorentz forces) and the other with a constant radius of the curvature of the loop's axis. We find that the density and temperature profiles are quite sensitive to curvature variations along the loop, even for loops with similar aspect ratios.

  13. Equilibrium Models of Coronal Loops That Involve Curvature and Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindman, Bradley W.; Jain, Rekha

    2013-12-01

    We construct magnetostatic models of coronal loops in which the thermodynamics of the loop is fully consistent with the shape and geometry of the loop. This is achieved by treating the loop as a thin, compact, magnetic fibril that is a small departure from a force-free state. The density along the loop is related to the loop's curvature by requiring that the Lorentz force arising from this deviation is balanced by buoyancy. This equilibrium, coupled with hydrostatic balance and the ideal gas law, then connects the temperature of the loop with the curvature of the loop without resorting to a detailed treatment of heating and cooling. We present two example solutions: one with a spatially invariant magnetic Bond number (the dimensionless ratio of buoyancy to Lorentz forces) and the other with a constant radius of the curvature of the loop's axis. We find that the density and temperature profiles are quite sensitive to curvature variations along the loop, even for loops with similar aspect ratios.

  14. Equilibrium models of coronal loops that involve curvature and buoyancy

    CERN Document Server

    Hindman, Bradley W

    2013-01-01

    We construct magnetostatic models of coronal loops in which the thermodynamics of the loop is fully consistent with the shape and geometry of the loop. This is achieved by treating the loop as a thin, compact, magnetic fibril that is a small departure from a force-free state. The density along the loop is related to the loop's curvature by requiring that the Lorentz force arising from this deviation is balanced by buoyancy. This equilibrium, coupled with hydrostatic balance and the ideal gas law, then connects the temperature of the loop with the curvature of the loop without resorting to a detailed treatment of heating and cooling. We present two example solutions: one with a spatially invariant magnetic Bond number (the dimensionless ratio of buoyancy to Lorentz forces) and the other with a constant radius of curvature of the loop's axis. We find that the density and temperature profiles are quite sensitive to curvature variations along the loop, even for loops with similar aspect ratios.

  15. Mutually Unbiasedness between Maximally Entangled Bases and Unextendible Maximally Entangled Systems in C2C^{2k}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Nan, Hua; Tao, Yuan-Hong; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2016-02-01

    The mutually unbiasedness between a maximally entangled basis (MEB) and an unextendible maximally entangled system (UMES) in the bipartite system C2C^{2k} (k>1) are introduced and discussed first in this paper. Then two mutually unbiased pairs of a maximally entangled basis and an unextendible maximally entangled system are constructed; lastly, explicit constructions are obtained for mutually unbiased MEB and UMES in C2⊗ C4 and C2⊗ C8, respectively.

  16. “Two-step” technique with OsiriX™ to evaluate feasibility of C2 pedicle for surgical fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Luis Miguel Sousa; d’Almeida, Gonçalo Neto; Cabral, José

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgical treatment of craniovertebral junction pathology has evolved considerably in recent decades with the implementation of short atlanto-axial fixation techniques, notwhithstanding increasing neurovascular risks. Also, there is strong evidence that fixation of C2 anatomical pedicle has the best biomechanical profile of the entire cervical spine. However, it is often difficult and misleading, to evaluate anatomical bony and vascular anomalies using the three orthogonal planes (axial, coronal, and sagittal) of CT. Objectives: The authors describe an innovative and simple technique to evaluate the feasibility of C2 pedicle for surgical screw fixation using preoperative planning with the free DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) software OsiriX™. Materials and Methods: The authors report the applicatin of this novel technique in 5 cases (3 traumatic, 1 Os Odontoideum, and 1 complex congenital malformation) collected from our general case series of the Department in the last 5 years. Results: In this proof of concept study, the pre-operative analysis with the two-step tecnique was detrimental for choosing the surgical tecnique. Detailed post-operative analysis confirmed correct position of C2 screws without cortical breach. There were no complications or mortality reported. Conclusion: This two-step technique is an easy and reliable way to determine the feasibility of C2 pedicle for surgical fixation. The detailed tridimensional radiological preoperative evaluation of craniovertebral junction anatomy is critical to the sucess and safety of this surgeries, and can avoid, to certain degree, expensive intra-operative tridimensional imaging facilities.

  17. Semi-metallic Be5C2 monolayer global minimum with quasi-planar pentacoordinate carbons and negative Poisson's ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Li, Feng; Li, Yafei; Chen, Zhongfang

    2016-01-01

    Designing new materials with novel topological properties and reduced dimensionality is always desirable for material innovation. Here we report the design of a two-dimensional material, namely Be5C2 monolayer on the basis of density functional theory computations. In Be5C2 monolayer, each carbon atom binds with five beryllium atoms in almost the same plane, forming a quasi-planar pentacoordinate carbon moiety. Be5C2 monolayer appears to have good stability as revealed by its moderate cohesive energy, positive phonon modes and high melting point. It is the lowest-energy structure with the Be5C2 stoichiometry in two-dimensional space and therefore holds some promise to be realized experimentally. Be5C2 monolayer is a gapless semiconductor with a Dirac-like point in the band structure and also has an unusual negative Poisson's ratio. If synthesized, Be5C2 monolayer may find applications in electronics and mechanics. PMID:27139572

  18. Semi-metallic Be5C2 monolayer global minimum with quasi-planar pentacoordinate carbons and negative Poisson's ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Li, Feng; Li, Yafei; Chen, Zhongfang

    2016-05-01

    Designing new materials with novel topological properties and reduced dimensionality is always desirable for material innovation. Here we report the design of a two-dimensional material, namely Be5C2 monolayer on the basis of density functional theory computations. In Be5C2 monolayer, each carbon atom binds with five beryllium atoms in almost the same plane, forming a quasi-planar pentacoordinate carbon moiety. Be5C2 monolayer appears to have good stability as revealed by its moderate cohesive energy, positive phonon modes and high melting point. It is the lowest-energy structure with the Be5C2 stoichiometry in two-dimensional space and therefore holds some promise to be realized experimentally. Be5C2 monolayer is a gapless semiconductor with a Dirac-like point in the band structure and also has an unusual negative Poisson's ratio. If synthesized, Be5C2 monolayer may find applications in electronics and mechanics.

  19. The structure of C2b, a fragment of complement component C2 produced during C3 convertase formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of C2b has been determined at 1.8 Å resolution, which reveals the arrangement of its three complement control protein (CCP) modules. A model for complement component C2 is presented and its conformational changes during the C3-convertase formation are also discussed. The second component of complement (C2) is a multi-domain serine protease that provides catalytic activity for the C3 and C5 convertases of the classical and lectin pathways of human complement. The formation of these convertases requires the Mg2+-dependent binding of C2 to C4b and the subsequent cleavage of C2 by C1s or MASP2, respectively. The crystal structure of full-length C2 is not yet available, although the structure of its C-terminal catalytic segment C2a has been determined. The crystal structure of the N-terminal segment C2b of C2 determined to 1.8 Å resolution presented here reveals the arrangement of its three CCP domains. The domains are arranged differently compared with most other CCP-domain assemblies, but their arrangement is similar to that found in the Ba part of the full-length factor B structure. The crystal structures of C2a, C2b and full-length factor B are used to generate a model for C2 and a discussion of the domain association and possible interactions with C4b during formation of the C4b–C2 complex is presented. The results of this study also suggest that upon cleavage by C1s, C2a domains undergo conformational rotation while bound to C4b and the released C2b domains may remain folded together similar to as observed in the intact protein

  20. The structure of C2b, a fragment of complement component C2 produced during C3 convertase formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, Vengadesan [Center for Biophysical Sciences and Engineering, School of Optometry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Xu, Yuanyuan [Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Macon, Kevin [Center for Biophysical Sciences and Engineering, School of Optometry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Volanakis, John E. [Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Narayana, Sthanam V. L., E-mail: narayana@uab.edu [Center for Biophysical Sciences and Engineering, School of Optometry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2009-03-01

    The crystal structure of C2b has been determined at 1.8 Å resolution, which reveals the arrangement of its three complement control protein (CCP) modules. A model for complement component C2 is presented and its conformational changes during the C3-convertase formation are also discussed. The second component of complement (C2) is a multi-domain serine protease that provides catalytic activity for the C3 and C5 convertases of the classical and lectin pathways of human complement. The formation of these convertases requires the Mg{sup 2+}-dependent binding of C2 to C4b and the subsequent cleavage of C2 by C1s or MASP2, respectively. The crystal structure of full-length C2 is not yet available, although the structure of its C-terminal catalytic segment C2a has been determined. The crystal structure of the N-terminal segment C2b of C2 determined to 1.8 Å resolution presented here reveals the arrangement of its three CCP domains. The domains are arranged differently compared with most other CCP-domain assemblies, but their arrangement is similar to that found in the Ba part of the full-length factor B structure. The crystal structures of C2a, C2b and full-length factor B are used to generate a model for C2 and a discussion of the domain association and possible interactions with C4b during formation of the C4b–C2 complex is presented. The results of this study also suggest that upon cleavage by C1s, C2a domains undergo conformational rotation while bound to C4b and the released C2b domains may remain folded together similar to as observed in the intact protein.

  1. What can we learn about solar coronal mass ejections, coronal dimmings, and Extreme-Ultraviolet jets through spectroscopic observations?

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Hui; Xia, Lidong; He, Jiansen; Wang, Xin

    2012-01-01

    We analyze several data sets obtained by Hinode/EIS and find various types of flows during CMEs and EUV jet eruptions. CME-induced dimming regions are found to be characterized by significant blueshift and enhanced line width by using a single Gaussian fit. While a red-blue (RB) asymmetry analysis and a RB-guided double Gaussian fit of the coronal line profiles indicate that these are likely caused by the superposition of a strong background emission component and a relatively weak (~10%) high-speed (~100 km s-1) upflow component. This finding suggests that the outflow velocity in the dimming region is probably of the order of 100 km s-1, not ~20 km s-1 as reported previously. Density and temperature diagnostics suggest that dimming is primarily an effect of density decrease rather than temperature change. The mass losses in dimming regions as estimated from different methods are roughly consistent with each other and they are 20%-60% of the masses of the associated CMEs. With the guide of RB asymmetry analys...

  2. Interplanetary Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2011-01-01

    Although more than ten thousand coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are produced during each solar cycle at the Sun, only a small fraction hits the Earth. Only a small fraction of the Earth-directed CMEs ultimately arrive at Earth depending on their interaction with the solar wind and other large-scale structures such as coronal holes and CMEs. The interplanetary propagation is essentially controlled by the drag force because the propelling force and the solar gravity are significant only near the Sun. Combined remote-sensing and in situ observations have helped us estimate the influence of the solar wind on the propagation of CMEs. However, these measurements have severe limitations because the remote-sensed and in-situ observations correspond to different portions of the CME. Attempts to overcome this problem are made in two ways: the first is to model the CME and get the space speed of the CME, which can be compared with the in situ speed. The second method is to use stereoscopic observation so that the remote-sensed and in-situ observations make measurements on the Earth-arriving part of CMEs. The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) mission observed several such CMEs, which helped understand the interplanetary evolution of these CMEs and to test earlier model results. This paper discusses some of these issues and updates the CME/shock travel time estimates for a number of CMEs.

  3. Coronal Heating versus Solar Wind Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Cranmer, S R

    2004-01-01

    Parker's initial insights from 1958 provided a key causal link between the heating of the solar corona and the acceleration of the solar wind. However, we still do not know what fraction of the solar wind's mass, momentum, and energy flux is driven by Parker-type gas pressure gradients, and what fraction is driven by, e.g., wave-particle interactions or turbulence. SOHO has been pivotal in bringing these ideas back to the forefront of coronal and solar wind research. This paper reviews our current understanding of coronal heating in the context of the acceleration of the fast and slow solar wind. For the fast solar wind, a recent model of Alfven wave generation, propagation, and non-WKB reflection is presented and compared with UVCS, SUMER, radio, and in-situ observations at the last solar minimum. The derived fractions of energy and momentum addition from thermal and nonthermal processes are found to be consistent with various sets of observational data. For the more chaotic slow solar wind, the relative rol...

  4. Particle Heating Resulting from Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Suman; Sundar De, Syam; Guha, Gautam

    2016-07-01

    Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) is a continuous phenomena occurring from the entire solar coronal zone responsible for the outflow of solar masses, viz., protons, electrons, neutrons and solar wind in the form of plasma. These perturb the Earth's atmosphere via magnetopause. Very high temperature plasma generator in the solar atmosphere produces huge magnetic dipoles with intense magnetic field. It traps the energetic charged particles released from the solar corona. These particles gyrate along the magnetic field lines and are gradually elongated outwards from the Sun. Due to this, the field lines get detached at some critical limit thereby enhancing the magnetic reconnection with the interplanetary magnetic field releasing huge energy in the form of X-rays and γ-rays. This perturbs the Earth's atmosphere. In this work, the situation has been investigated by momentum balance equation, energy balance equation along with the equations of continuity and states. From the analyses, the dispersive nature of the thermospheric medium is studied. Variation of normalized electron temperature with dimensionless time has been critically contemplated. The altitude dependent electric field in the medium is also investigated.

  5. Inference of Magnetic Field in the Coronal Streamer Invoking Kink Wave Motions generated by Multiple EUV Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, A K; Ofman, Leon; Dwivedi, B N

    2016-01-01

    Using MHD seismology by observed kink waves, the magnetic field profile of a coronal streamer has been investigated. STEREO-B/EUVI temporal image data on 7 March 2012 shows an evolution of two consecutive EUV waves that interact with the footpoint of a coronal streamer evident in the co-spatial and co-temporal STEREO-B/COR-I observations. The evolution of EUV waves is clearly evident in STEREO-B/EUVI, and its energy exchange with coronal streamer generates kink oscillations. We estimate the phase velocities of the kink wave perturbations by tracking it at different heights of the coronal streamer. We also estimate the electron densities inside and outside the streamer using SSI of polarized brightness images in STEREO-B/COR-1 observations. Taking into account the MHD theory of kink waves in a cylindrical waveguide, their observed properties at various heights, and density contrast of the streamer, we estimate the radial profile of magnetic field within this magnetic structure. Both the kink waves diagnose the...

  6. Stellar Coronal Response to Differential Rotation and Flux Emergence

    CERN Document Server

    Gibb, G P S; Jardine, M M; Yeates, A R

    2016-01-01

    We perform a numerical parameter study to determine what effect varying differential rotation and flux emergence has on a star's non-potential coronal magnetic field. In particular we consider the effects on the star's surface magnetic flux, open magnetic flux, mean azimuthal field strength, coronal free magnetic energy, coronal heating and flux rope eruptions. To do this, we apply a magnetic flux transport model to describe the photospheric evolution, and couple this to the non-potential coronal evolution using a magnetofrictional technique. A flux emergence model is applied to add new magnetic flux onto the photosphere and into the corona. The parameters of this flux emergence model are derived from the solar flux emergence profile, however the rate of emergence can be increased to represent higher flux emergence rates than the Sun's. Overall we find that flux emergence has a greater effect on the non-potential coronal properties compared to differential rotation, with all the aforementioned properties incr...

  7. Circumstellar C2, CN, and CH+ in the optical spectra of post-AGB stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bakker, E J; Waters, L B F M; Schoenmaker, T; Bakker, Eric J.; Dishoeck, Ewine F. van; Schoenmaker, Ton

    1996-01-01

    We present optical high-resolution spectra of a sample of sixteen post-AGB stars and IRC +10216. Of the post-AGB stars, ten show C2 Phillips and Swan and CN Red System absorption, one CH+ emission, one CH+ absorption, and four without any molecules. We find typically Trot=43-399, 155-202, and 18-50 K, log N = 14.90-15.57, 14.35, and 15.03-16.47 cm-2 for C2, CH+, and CN respectively, and 0.620. The presence of C2 and CN absorption is correlated with cold dust (Tdust300K). All objects with the unidentified 21mum emission feature exhibit C2 and CN absorption, but not all objects with C2 and CN detections exhibit a 21mum feature. The derived expansion velocity, ranging from 5 to 44 km/s, is the same as that derived from CO millimeter line emission. This unambiguously proves that these lines are of circumstellar origin and are formed in the AGB ejecta (circumstellar shell expelled during the preceding AGB phase). Furthermore there seems to be a relation between the C2 molecular column density and the expansion vel...

  8. Methane Conversion to C2 Hydrocarbons Using Glow Discharge Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Miao; CHEN Jierong

    2007-01-01

    The infrared emission spectra of methane, H', CH and C2 hydrocarbons in natural gas were measured. The process of methane decomposition and C2 hydrocarbons formation was investigated. The experiment showed that the time and conditions of methane decomposition and C2 hydrocarbons formation were different. Methane conversion rate increased with the increase in the current and decrease in the amount of methane. Furthermore, an examination of the reaction mechanisms revealed that free radicals played an important role in the chain reaction.

  9. 26 CFR 1.1402(c)-2 - Public office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... respect to the functions of a public office of a State or a political subdivision thereof in any period in... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Public office. 1.1402(c)-2 Section 1.1402(c)-2...) INCOME TAXES Tax on Self-Employment Income § 1.1402(c)-2 Public office. (a) In general—(1) General...

  10. Long Term Spectral Evolution of Tidal Disruption Candidates Selected by Strong Coronal Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Chenwei; Ferland, Gary; Yuan, Weimin; Zhou, Hongyan; Jiang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    We present results of follow-up optical spectroscopic observations of seven rare, extreme coronal line emitting galaxies reported by Wang et al. (2012) with Multi-Mirror Telescope (MMT). Large variations in coronal lines are found in four objects, making them strong candidates of tidal disruption events (TDE). For the four TDE candidates, all the coronal lines with ionization status higher than [Fe VII] disappear within 5-9 years. The [Fe VII] faded by a factor of about five in one object (J0952+2143) within 4 years, whereas emerged in other two without them previously. A strong increment in the [O III] flux is observed, shifting the line ratios towards the loci of active galactic nucleus on the BPT diagrams. Surprisingly, we detect a non-canonical [O III]5007/[O III]4959 2 in two objects, indicating a large column density of O$^{2+}$ and thus probably optical thick gas. This also requires a very large ionization parameter and relatively soft ionizing spectral energy distribution (e.g. blackbody with $T < ...

  11. Coronal hole boundaries evolution at small scales. III. EIS and SUMER views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjarska, M. S.; Huang, Z.; Doyle, J. G.; Subramanian, S.

    2012-09-01

    Context. We report on the plasma properties of small-scale transient events identified in the quiet Sun, coronal holes and their boundaries. Aims: We aim at deriving the physical characteristics of events that were identified as small-scale transient brightenings in XRT images. Methods: We used spectroscopic co-observations from SUMER/SoHO and EIS/Hinode combined with high-cadence imaging data from XRT/Hinode. We measured Doppler shifts using single and multiple Gaussian fits of the transition region and coronal lines as well as electron densities and temperatures. We combined co-temporal imaging and spectroscopy to separate brightening expansions from plasma flows. Results: The transient brightening events in coronal holes and their boundaries were found to be very dynamical, producing high-density outflows at high speeds. Most of these events represent X-ray jets from pre-existing or newly emerging coronal bright points at X-ray temperatures. The average electron density of the jets is log10 Ne ≈ 8.76 cm-3 while in the flaring site it is log10 Ne ≈ 9.51 cm-3. The jet temperatures reach a maximum of 2.5 MK but in the majority of the cases the temperatures do not exceed 1.6 MK. The footpoints of jets have maximum temperatures of 2.5 MK, though in a single event scanned a minute after the flaring the measured temperature was 12 MK. The jets are produced by multiple microflaring in the transition region and corona. Chromospheric emission was only detected in their footpoints and was only associated with downflows. The Doppler shift measurements in the quiet Sun transient brightenings confirmed that these events do not produce jet-like phenomena. The plasma flows in these phenomena remain trapped in closed loops. Conclusions: We can conclude that the dynamic day-by-day and even hour-by-hour small-scale evolution of coronal hole boundaries reported in Paper I is indeed related to coronal bright points. The XRT observations reported in Paper II revealed that these

  12. C2c2 is a single-component programmable RNA-guided RNA-targeting CRISPR effector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudayyeh, Omar O; Gootenberg, Jonathan S; Konermann, Silvana; Joung, Julia; Slaymaker, Ian M; Cox, David B T; Shmakov, Sergey; Makarova, Kira S; Semenova, Ekaterina; Minakhin, Leonid; Severinov, Konstantin; Regev, Aviv; Lander, Eric S; Koonin, Eugene V; Zhang, Feng

    2016-08-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated genes (Cas) adaptive immune system defends microbes against foreign genetic elements via DNA or RNA-DNA interference. We characterize the class 2 type VI CRISPR-Cas effector C2c2 and demonstrate its RNA-guided ribonuclease function. C2c2 from the bacterium Leptotrichia shahii provides interference against RNA phage. In vitro biochemical analysis shows that C2c2 is guided by a single CRISPR RNA and can be programmed to cleave single-stranded RNA targets carrying complementary protospacers. In bacteria, C2c2 can be programmed to knock down specific mRNAs. Cleavage is mediated by catalytic residues in the two conserved Higher Eukaryotes and Prokaryotes Nucleotide-binding (HEPN) domains, mutations of which generate catalytically inactive RNA-binding proteins. These results broaden our understanding of CRISPR-Cas systems and suggest that C2c2 can be used to develop new RNA-targeting tools. PMID:27256883

  13. TIME EVOLUTION OF CORONAL MAGNETIC HELICITY IN THE FLARING ACTIVE REGION NOAA 10930

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the three-dimensional (3D) magnetic field topology and its long-term evolution associated with the X3.4 flare of 2006 December 13, we investigate the coronal relative magnetic helicity in the flaring active region (AR) NOAA 10930 during the time period of December 8-14. The coronal helicity is calculated based on the 3D nonlinear force-free magnetic fields reconstructed by the weighted optimization method of Wiegelmann, and is compared with the amount of helicity injected through the photospheric surface of the AR. The helicity injection is determined from the magnetic helicity flux density proposed by Pariat et al. using Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager magnetograms. The major findings of this study are the following. (1) The time profile of the coronal helicity shows a good correlation with that of the helicity accumulation by injection through the surface. (2) The coronal helicity of the AR is estimated to be -4.3 x 1043 Mx2 just before the X3.4 flare. (3) This flare is preceded not only by a large increase of negative helicity, -3.2 x 1043 Mx2, in the corona over ∼1.5 days but also by noticeable injections of positive helicity through the photospheric surface around the flaring magnetic polarity inversion line during the time period of the channel structure development. We conjecture that the occurrence of the X3.4 flare is involved with the positive helicity injection into an existing system of negative helicity.

  14. COMBINING PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND CORONAL HEATING VIA DATA-CONSTRAINED CALCULATIONS OF NANOFLARES IN CORONAL LOOPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We model nanoflare heating of extrapolated active-region coronal loops via the acceleration of electrons and protons in Harris-type current sheets. The kinetic energy of the accelerated particles is estimated using semi-analytical and test-particle-tracing approaches. Vector magnetograms and photospheric Doppler velocity maps of NOAA active region 09114, recorded by the Imaging Vector Magnetograph, were used for this analysis. A current-free field extrapolation of the active-region corona was first constructed. The corresponding Poynting fluxes at the footpoints of 5000 extrapolated coronal loops were then calculated. Assuming that reconnecting current sheets develop along these loops, we utilized previous results to estimate the kinetic energy gain of the accelerated particles. We related this energy to nanoflare heating and macroscopic loop characteristics. Kinetic energies of 0.1-8 keV (for electrons) and 0.3-470 keV (for protons) were found to cause heating rates ranging from 10–6 to 1 erg s–1 cm–3. Hydrodynamic simulations show that such heating rates can sustain plasma in coronal conditions inside the loops and generate plasma thermal distributions that are consistent with active-region observations. We concluded the analysis by computing the form of X-ray spectra generated by the accelerated electrons using the thick-target approach. These spectra were found to be in agreement with observed X-ray spectra, thus supporting the plausibility of our nanoflare-heating scenario.

  15. Bayesian Magnetohydrodynamic Seismology of Coronal Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Arregui, Inigo

    2011-01-01

    We perform a Bayesian parameter inference in the context of resonantly damped transverse coronal loop oscillations. The forward problem is solved in terms of parametric results for kink waves in one-dimensional flux tubes in the thin tube and thin boundary approximations. For the inverse problem, we adopt a Bayesian approach to infer the most probable values of the relevant parameters, for given observed periods and damping times, and to extract their confidence levels. The posterior probability distribution functions are obtained by means of Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations, incorporating observed uncertainties in a consistent manner. We find well localized solutions in the posterior probability distribution functions for two of the three parameters of interest, namely the Alfven travel time and the transverse inhomogeneity length-scale. The obtained estimates for the Alfven travel time are consistent with previous inversion results, but the method enables us to additionally constrain the transverse inho...

  16. Kinematical properties of coronal mass ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Temmer, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most dynamic phenomena in our solar system. They abruptly disrupt the continuous outflow of solar wind by expelling huge clouds of magnetized plasma into interplanetary space with velocities enabling to cross the Sun-Earth distance within a few days. Earth-directed CMEs may cause severe geomagnetic storms when their embedded magnetic fields and the shocks ahead compress and reconnect with the Earth's magnetic field. The transit times and impacts in detail depend on the initial CME velocity, size, and mass, as well as on the conditions and coupling processes with the ambient solar wind flow in interplanetary space. The observed CME parameters may be severly affected by projection effects and the constant changing environmental conditions are hard to derive. This makes it difficult to fully understand the physics behind CME evolution, preventing to do a reliable forecast of Earth-directed events. This short review focusing on observational data, shows recent methods which w...

  17. Waiting Time Distribution of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chin-Teh Yeh; Ming-De Ding; Peng-Fei Chen

    2005-01-01

    Inspired by the finding that the large waiting time of solar flares presents a power-law distribution, we investigate the waiting time distribution (WTD) of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). SOHO/LASCO CME observations from 1996 to 2003 are used in this study. It is shown that the observed CMEs have a similar power-law behavior to the flares, with an almost identical power-law index. This strongly supports the viewpoint that solar flares and CMEs are different manifestations of the same physical process. We have also investigated separately the WTDs of fast-type and slow-type CMEs and found that their indices are identical, which imply that both types of CME-5-originate from the same physical mechanism.

  18. Magnetic structure of Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    We present several models of the magnetic structure of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs). First, we model CMEs as expanding force-free magnetic structures. While keeping the internal magnetic field structure of the stationary solutions, expansion leads to complicated internal velocities and rotation, while the field structures remain force-free. Second, expansion of a CME can drive resistive dissipation within the CME changing the ionization states of different ions. We fit in situ measurements of ion charge states to the resistive spheromak solutions. Finally, we consider magnetic field structures of fully confined stable magnetic clouds containing both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields and having no surface current sheets. Expansion of such clouds may lead to sudden onset of reconnection events.

  19. A Model for Stealth Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Benjamin J.; Masson, Sophie; Li, Yan; DeVore, C. Richard; Luhmann, Janet; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Fisher, George H.

    2016-05-01

    Stealth coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are events in which there are almost no observable signatures of the CME eruption in the low corona but often a well-resolved slow flux rope CME observed in the coronagraph data. We present results from a three-dimensional numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of the 2008 June 1-2 slow streamer blowout CME that Robbrecht et al. [2009] called “the CME from nowhere.” We model the global coronal structure using a 1.4 MK isothermal solar wind and a low-order potential field source surface representation of the Carrington Rotation 2070 magnetogram synoptic map. The bipolar streamer belt arcade is energized by simple shearing flows applied in the vicinity of the helmet streamer’s polarity inversion line. The slow expansion of the energized helmet-streamer arcade results in the formation of a radial current sheet. The subsequent onset of expansion-driven flare reconnection initiates the stealth CME while gradually releasing ~1.5E+30 erg of stored magnetic energy over the 20+ hour eruption duration. We show the energy flux available for flare heating and flare emission during the eruption is approximately two orders of magnitude below the energy flux required to heat the ambient background corona, thus confirming the “stealth” character of the 2008 June 1-2 CME’s lack of observable on disk signatures. We also present favorable comparisons between our simulation results and the multi-viewpoint SOHO-LASCO and STEREO-SECCHI coronagraph observations of the pre-eruption streamer structure and the initiation and evolution of the stealth streamer blowout CME.

  20. Parameters of the Magnetic Flux inside Coronal Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Abramenko, Valentina; Watanabe, Hiroko

    2009-01-01

    Parameters of magnetic flux distribution inside low-latitude coronal holes (CHs) were analyzed. A statistical study of 44 CHs based on Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/MDI full disk magnetograms and SOHO/EIT 284\\AA images showed that the density of the net magnetic flux, $B_{{\\rm net}}$, does not correlate with the associated solar wind speeds, $V_x$. Both the area and net flux of CHs correlate with the solar wind speed and the corresponding spatial Pearson correlation coefficients are 0.75 and 0.71, respectively. A possible explanation for the low correlation between $B_{{\\rm net}}$ and $V_x$ is proposed. The observed non-correlation might be rooted in the structural complexity of the magnetic field. As a measure of complexity of the magnetic field, the filling factor, $ f(r)$, was calculated as a function of spatial scales. In CHs, $f(r)$ was found to be nearly constant at scales above 2 Mm, which indicates a monofractal structural organization and smooth temporal evolution. The magnitude of the fi...

  1. UV TRANSIENT BRIGHTENINGS ASSOCIATED WITH A CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we analyze transient UV brightenings in spectra acquired by SOHO/UltraViolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on 2003 June 2 in association with a coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred at the West limb of the Sun at 08:54 UT. Brightenings have been observed in lines from cool (C III, O VI), intermediate (Si VIII, Si XII), and high ([Fe XVIII]) temperature ions over about 7 hr from the CME. Brightenings in cool lines are interpreted in terms of mini-ejections that appear at the time of, and after, the passage of the CME front through the UVCS slit. We give here their temperature and density and we point out that, assuming a spherical shape, a few of these mini-CMEs can provide a mass comparable to that quoted for typical CMEs. Hot lines, like the [Fe XVIII] line at 974.9 A which shows up in the CME associated current sheet (CS), undergo transient brightness as well, but hot lines brightenings are more difficult to interpret. We propose here a scenario where they are signatures of the passage through the UVCS slit of plasmoids similar to those observed in the filamentary CS of the magnetotail that form as a consequence of the tearing-mode instability or of a time-dependent Petschek-type reconnection.

  2. Forecasting coronal mass ejections at 1 AU using Heliospheric Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moestl, C.; Amla, K.; Temmer, M.; Hall, J. R.; Liewer, P. C.; De Jong, E. M.; Davies, J.; Lugaz, N.; Rollett, T.; Veronig, A.; Liu, Y.; Farrugia, C. J.; Luhmann, J. G.; Galvin, A. B.; Zhang, T.

    2012-12-01

    We study the feasibility of using a Heliospheric Imager (HI) instrument, such as STEREO/HI, for space weather forecasting of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) at 1 AU. We compare the predictions for speed and arrival time for ~15 ICME events, each observed remotely by one STEREO spacecraft, to the speed and arrival time observed at in situ observatories. We use three different models with varying ICME geometry, from point-like (Fixed-Phi) to a circle with a given width (Self-Similar-Expansion) to a very wide circle (Harmonic Mean). The models are fitted to density tracks on HI Jmaps with the SolarSoft SATPLOT tool. All these techniques assume constant ICME speed and direction. Partly, the configuration mimics the situation of a single HI observatory parked at the L4 or L5 point in the Sun-Earth system. We discuss problems associated with this study, such as CME-CME interactions leading to complicated Jmaps. For assessing the accuracy of these predictions we look at in situ data by Wind/ACE, STEREO-A/B, and Venus Express and MESSENGER. We also look at the ratio of prediction lead time to its accuracy, and see if there is a preferred value for the ICME width.

  3. Global Energetics of Solar Flares: IV. Coronal Mass Ejection Energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J

    2016-01-01

    This study entails the fourth part of a global flare energetics project, in which the mass $m_{\\mathrm{cme}}$, kinetic energy $E_{\\mathrm{kin}}$, and the gravitational potential energy $E_{\\mathrm{grav}}$ of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is measured in 399 M and X-class flare events observed during the first 3.5 yrs of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission, using a new method based on the EUV dimming effect. The EUV dimming is modeled in terms of a radial adiabatic expansion process, which is fitted to the observed evolution of the total emission measure of the CME source region. The model derives the evolution of the mean electron density, the emission measure, the bulk plasma expansion velocity, the mass, and the energy in the CME source region. The EUV dimming method is truly complementary to the Thomson scattering method in white light, which probes the CME evolution in the heliosphere at $r > 2 R_{\\odot}$, while the EUV dimming method tracks the CME launch in the corona. We compare the CME paramet...

  4. Holographic Dark Energy Model with Time Varying G as Well as c 2 Parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Bharat; Ansari, M.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we study a holographic dark energy model with time varying gravitational constant G as well as holographic parameter c 2 in flat FRW space-time geometry. We obtain the evolution of equation of state parameter and the exact differential equation, which determine the evolution of the dark energy density based on varying G and c 2 parameter. Also, we determine the deceleration parameter to explain the expansion of the universe. Further, we study the validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics in this scenario. Finally, we find out a cosmological implication of our work by evaluating the holographic dark energy equation of state for low red-shifts containing both varying G and c 2 parameter corrections.

  5. Case report: pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucencies revisited.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Counihan, K P

    2012-08-01

    Pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucency (PEIR) describes a radiolucent lesion located in the coronal dentine, just beneath the enamel-dentine junction of unerupted teeth. The prevalence of this lesion varies depending on the type and quality of radiographic exposure and age of patients used for assessment. The aetiology of pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucent lesions is not fully understood, but published clinical and histological evidence suggest that these lesions are resorptive in nature. Issues around the diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical management of this lesion are explored using previously unreported cases.

  6. CORONAL THICK TARGET HARD X-RAY EMISSIONS AND RADIO EMISSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeongwoo [Physics Department, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Lim, Daye; Choe, G. S.; Kim, Kap-Sung [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Minhwan [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-20

    A distinctive class of hard X-ray (HXR) sources located in the corona was recently found, which implies that the collisionally thick target model (CTTM) applies even to the corona. We investigated whether this idea can be independently verified by microwave radiations which have been known as the best companion to HXRs. This study is conducted on the GOES M2.3 class flare which occurred on 2002 September 9 and was observed by the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and the Owens Valley Solar Array. Interpreting the observed energy-dependent variation of HXR source size under the CTTM, the coronal density should be as high as 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} over a distance of up to 12''. To explain the cutoff feature of the microwave spectrum at 3 GHz, however, we require a density no higher than 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. Additional constraints must be placed on the temperature and magnetic field of the coronal source in order to reproduce the microwave spectrum as a whole. First, a spectral feature called the Razin suppression requires a magnetic field in a range of 250-350 G along with high viewing angles around 75 Degree-Sign . Second, to avoid excess fluxes at high frequencies due to the free-free emission that was not observed, we need a high temperature {>=}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} K. These two microwave spectral features, Razin suppression and free-free emissions, become more significant at regions of high thermal plasma density and are essential for validating and determining additional parameters of the coronal HXR sources.

  7. THE EVOLUTION OF PLASMA PARAMETERS ON A CORONAL SOURCE SURFACE AT 2.3 R{sub Sun} DURING SOLAR MINIMUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, L.; Panasyuk, A. V.; Kohl, J. L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Lamy, P., E-mail: lstrachan@cfa.harvard.edu [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, UMR6110 CNRS/Universite de Provence, 38 rue Frederic Joliot-Curie, 13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France)

    2012-01-20

    We analyze data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory to produce global maps of coronal outflow velocities and densities in the regions where the solar wind is undergoing acceleration. The maps use UV and white light coronal data obtained from the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer and the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph, respectively, and a Doppler dimming analysis to determine the mean outflow velocities. The outflow velocities are defined on a sphere at 2.3 R{sub Sun} from Sun-center and are organized by Carrington Rotations during the solar minimum period at the start of solar cycle 23. We use the outflow velocity and density maps to show that while the solar minimum corona is relatively stable during its early stages, the shrinkage of the north polar hole in the later stages leads to changes in both the global areal expansion of the coronal hole and the derived internal flux tube expansion factors of the solar wind. The polar hole areal expansion factor and the flux tube expansion factors (between the coronal base and 2.3 R{sub Sun }) start out as super-radial but then they become more nearly radial as the corona progresses away from solar minimum. The results also support the idea that the largest flux tube expansion factors are located near the coronal hole/streamer interface, at least during the deepest part of the solar minimum period.

  8. Physics of laser fusion. Vol. I. Theory of the coronal plasma in laser-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This monograph deals with the physics of the coronal region in laser fusion targets. The corona consists of hot plasma which has been evaporated from the initially solid target during laser heating. It is in the corona that the laser light is absorbed by the target, and the resulting thermal energy is conducted toward cold high-density regions, where ablation occurs. The topics to be discussed are theoretical mechanisms for laser light absorption and reflection, hot-electron production, and the physics of heat conduction in laser-produced plasmas. An accompanying monograph by H. Ahlstrom (Vol.II) reviews the facilities, diagnostics, and data from recent laser fusion experiments

  9. Physics of laser fusion. Vol. I. Theory of the coronal plasma in laser-fusion targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, C.E.

    1981-12-01

    This monograph deals with the physics of the coronal region in laser fusion targets. The corona consists of hot plasma which has been evaporated from the initially solid target during laser heating. It is in the corona that the laser light is absorbed by the target, and the resulting thermal energy is conducted toward cold high-density regions, where ablation occurs. The topics to be discussed are theoretical mechanisms for laser light absorption and reflection, hot-electron production, and the physics of heat conduction in laser-produced plasmas. An accompanying monograph by H. Ahlstrom (Vol.II) reviews the facilities, diagnostics, and data from recent laser fusion experiments.

  10. Ethynyl (C2H) in massive star formation: Tracing the initial conditions?

    CERN Document Server

    Beuther, H; Henning, T; Linz, H

    2008-01-01

    APEX single-dish observations at sub-millimeter wavelengths toward a sample of massive star-forming regions reveal that C2H is almost omni-present toward all covered evolutionary stages from Infrared Dark Clouds via High-Mass Protostellar Objects to Ultracompact HII regions. High-resolution data from the Submillimeter Array toward one hot-core like High-Mass Protostellar Object show a shell-like distribution of C2H with a radius of ~9000AU around the central submm peak position. These observed features are well reproduced by a 1D cloud model with power-law density and temperature distributions and a gas-grain chemical network. The reactive C2H radical (ethynyl) is abundant from the onset of massive star formation, but later it is rapidly transformed to other molecules in the core center. In the outer cloud regions the abundance of C2H remains high due to constant replenishment of elemental carbon from CO being dissociated by the interstellar UV photons. We suggest that C2H may be a molecule well suited to stu...

  11. Anomalous-plasmoid-ejection-induced secondary magnetic reconnection: modeling solar flares and coronal mass ejections by laser–plasma experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanli; Dong; Dawei; Yuan; Shoujun; Wang; Xun; Liu; Yutong; Li; Xiaoxuan; Lin; Huigang; Wei; Jiayong; Zhong; Shaoen; Jiang; Yongkun; Ding; Bobin; Jiang; Kai; Du; Yongjian; Tang; Mingyang; Yu; Xiantu; He; Neng; Hua; Zhanfeng; Qiao; Kuixi; Huang; Ming; Chen; Jianqiang; Zhu; Gang; Zhao; Zhengming; Sheng; Jie; Zhang

    2013-01-01

    The driving mechanism of solar flares and coronal mass ejections is a topic of ongoing debate, apart from the consensus that magnetic reconnection plays a key role during the impulsive process. While present solar research mostly depends on observations and theoretical models, laboratory experiments based on high-energy density facilities provide the third method for quantitatively comparing astrophysical observations and models with data achieved in experimental settings.In this article, we show laboratory modeling of solar flares and coronal mass ejections by constructing the magnetic reconnection system with two mutually approaching laser-produced plasmas circumfused of self-generated megagauss magnetic fields. Due to the Euler similarity between the laboratory and solar plasma systems, the present experiments demonstrate the morphological reproduction of flares and coronal mass ejections in solar observations in a scaled sense,and confirm the theory and model predictions about the current-sheet-born anomalous plasmoid as the initial stage of coronal mass ejections, and the behavior of moving-away plasmoid stretching the primary reconnected field lines into a secondary current sheet conjoined with two bright ridges identified as solar flares.

  12. Coronal Response to an EUV Wave from DEM Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanninathan, K.; Veronig, A. M.; Dissauer, K.; Madjarska, M. S.; Hannah, I. G.; Kontar, E. P.

    2015-10-01

    Extreme-Ultraviolet (EUV) waves are globally propagating disturbances that have been observed since the era of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Exteme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope instrument. Although the kinematics of the wave front and secondary wave components have been widely studied, there is not much known about the generation and plasma properties of the wave. In this paper we discuss the effect of an EUV wave on the local plasma as it passes through the corona. We studied the EUV wave, generated during the 2011 February 15 X-class flare/coronal mass ejection event, using Differential Emission Measure diagnostics. We analyzed regions on the path of the EUV wave and investigated the local density and temperature changes. From our study we have quantitatively confirmed previous results that during wave passage the plasma visible in the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 171 Å channel is getting heated to higher temperatures corresponding to AIA 193 and 211 Å channels. We have calculated an increase of 6%-9% in density and 5%-6% in temperature during the passage of the EUV wave. We have compared the variation in temperature with the adiabatic relationship and have quantitatively demonstrated the phenomenon of heating due to adiabatic compression at the wave front. However, the cooling phase does not follow adiabatic relaxation but shows slow decay indicating slow energy release being triggered by the wave passage. We have also identified that heating is taking place at the front of the wave pulse rather than at the rear. Our results provide support for the case that the event under study here is a compressive fast-mode wave or a shock.

  13. Hot plasma associated with a coronal mass ejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze coordinated observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on board Hinode of an X-ray Plasma Ejection (XPE) that occurred during the coronal mass ejection (CME) event of 2008 April 9. The XPE was trailing the CME core from behind, following the same trajectory, and could be identified both in EIS and XRT observations. Using the EIS spectrometer, we have determined the XPE plasma parameters, measuring the electron density, thermal distribution, and elemental composition. We have found that the XPE composition and electron density were very similar to those of the pre-event active region plasma. The XPE temperature was higher, and its thermal distribution peaked at around 3 MK; also, typical flare lines were absent from EIS spectra, indicating that any XPE component with temperatures in excess of 5 MK was likely either faint or absent. We used XRT data to investigate the presence of hotter plasma components in the XPE that could have gone undetected by EIS and found that—if at all present—these components have small emission measure values and their temperature is in the 8-12.5 MK range. The very hot plasma found in earlier XPE observations obtained by Yohkoh seems to be largely absent in this CME, although plasma ionization timescales may lead to non-equilibrium ionization effects that could make bright lines from ions formed in a 10 MK plasma not detectable by EIS. Our results supersede the XPE findings of Landi et al., who studied the same event with older response functions for the XRT Al-poly filter; the differences in the results stress the importance of using accurate filter response functions.

  14. Birth, life, and death of a solar coronal plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze a solar polar-coronal-hole (CH) plume over its entire ≈40 hr lifetime, using high-resolution Solar Dynamic Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) data. We examine (1) the plume's relationship to a bright point (BP) that persists at its base, (2) plume outflows and their possible contribution to the solar wind mass supply, and (3) the physical properties of the plume. We find that the plume started ≈2 hr after the BP first appeared and became undetectable ≈1 hr after the BP disappeared. We detected radially moving radiance variations from both the plume and from interplume regions, corresponding to apparent outflow speeds ranging over ≈(30-300) km s–1 with outflow velocities being higher in the 'cooler' AIA 171 Å channel than in the 'hotter' 193 Å and 211 Å channels, which is inconsistent with wave motions; therefore, we conclude that the observed radiance variations represent material outflows. If they persist into the heliosphere and plumes cover ≈10% of a typical CH area, these flows could account for ≈50% of the solar wind mass. From a differential emission measure analysis of the AIA images, we find that the average electron temperature of the plume remained approximately constant over its lifetime, at T e ≈ 8.5 × 105 K. Its density, however, decreased with the age of the plume, being about a factor of three lower when the plume faded compared to when it was born. We conclude that the plume died due to a density reduction rather than to a temperature decrease.

  15. Birth, life, and death of a solar coronal plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pucci, Stefano; Romoli, Marco [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Firenze, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Poletto, Giannina [INAF-Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Sterling, Alphonse C., E-mail: stpucci@arcetri.astro.it [Space Science Office, NASA/MSFC, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We analyze a solar polar-coronal-hole (CH) plume over its entire ≈40 hr lifetime, using high-resolution Solar Dynamic Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) data. We examine (1) the plume's relationship to a bright point (BP) that persists at its base, (2) plume outflows and their possible contribution to the solar wind mass supply, and (3) the physical properties of the plume. We find that the plume started ≈2 hr after the BP first appeared and became undetectable ≈1 hr after the BP disappeared. We detected radially moving radiance variations from both the plume and from interplume regions, corresponding to apparent outflow speeds ranging over ≈(30-300) km s{sup –1} with outflow velocities being higher in the 'cooler' AIA 171 Å channel than in the 'hotter' 193 Å and 211 Å channels, which is inconsistent with wave motions; therefore, we conclude that the observed radiance variations represent material outflows. If they persist into the heliosphere and plumes cover ≈10% of a typical CH area, these flows could account for ≈50% of the solar wind mass. From a differential emission measure analysis of the AIA images, we find that the average electron temperature of the plume remained approximately constant over its lifetime, at T {sub e} ≈ 8.5 × 10{sup 5} K. Its density, however, decreased with the age of the plume, being about a factor of three lower when the plume faded compared to when it was born. We conclude that the plume died due to a density reduction rather than to a temperature decrease.

  16. Purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of human synaptotagmin 1 C2A-C2B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human synaptotagmin C2A-C2B has been expressed as a glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of this protein are reported here. Synaptotagmin acts as the Ca2+ sensor for neuronal exocytosis. The cytosolic domain of human synaptotagmin 1 is composed of tandem C2 domains: C2A and C2B. These C2 domains modulate the interaction of synaptotagmin with the phospholipid bilayer of the presynaptic terminus and effector proteins such as the SNARE complex. Human synaptotagmin C2A-C2B has been expressed as a glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of this protein are reported here. The crystals diffract to 2.7 Å and belong to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 82.37, b = 86.31, c = 140.2 Å. From self-rotation function analysis, there are two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure determination of the protein using this data is ongoing

  17. Turbulent Coronal Heating Mechanisms: Coupling of Dynamics and Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlburg, R B; Rappazzo, A F; Velli, M

    2012-01-01

    Context. Photospheric motions shuffle the footpoints of the strong axial magnetic field that threads coronal loops giving rise to turbulent nonlinear dynamics characterized by the continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets where energy is deposited at small-scales and the heating occurs. Previous studies show that current sheets thickness is orders of magnitude smaller than current state of the art observational resolution (~700 km). Aim. In order to understand coronal heating and interpret correctly observations it is crucial to study the thermodynamics of such a system where energy is deposited at unresolved small-scales. Methods. Fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations are carried out to understand the thermodynamics of coronal heating in the magnetically confined solar corona. Results. We show that temperature is highly structured at scales below observational resolution and nonhomogeneously distributed so that only a fraction of the coronal mass and ...

  18. Anticipating the Geoeffectiveness of Coronal Mass Ejections Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are responsible for some of the most severe space weather at Earth. Major geomagnetic storms arise when CMEs carry large amounts of...

  19. The coronal magnetic field reversal observed by the SOLARC instrument

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    High-sensitivity measurements for mapping coronal magnetic field have become possible since the recent development of infrared detection techniques. One urgent task that arises from the routine infrared observations is to interpret what the Stokes signals could indicate for coronal magnetic fields. It is the first time for us to successfully reveal the coronal field structure above a simple and stable sunspot on the photosphere using profiles of full Stokes parameters. In this paper, the author further points out the deficiency in any conclusions/judgements just based on incomplete polarization data. A magnetic flux reversal feature, observed from circular polarization data, may correspond to one or more coronal tubes with their front or farside arching apex there, more complicated than people imagined before. To exactly locate the infrared radiation sources, we need both circular and linear polarization data for an integrated analysis of them.

  20. Cyclical Variation of the Quiet Corona and Coronal Holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Takashi Sakurai

    2000-09-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the quiet corona and coronal holes are reviewed. The review is based on long-term accumulation of data from eclipse observations, coronagraph observations, helium 10830 Å spectroheliograms, and X-ray observations.

  1. Broadband microwave sub-second pulsations in an expanding coronal loop of the 2011 August 10 flare

    CERN Document Server

    Meszarosova, Hana; Kashapova, Larisa; Gomory, Peter; Tokhchukova, Susanna; Myshyakov, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    We studied the characteristic physical properties and behavior of broadband microwave sub-second pulsations observed in an expanding coronal loop during the GOES C2.4 solar flare on 2011 August 10. We found sub-second pulsations and other different burst groups in the complex radio spectrum. The broadband (bandwidth about 1 GHz) sub-second pulsations (temporal period range 0.07-1.49 s, no characteristic dominant period) lasted 70 s in the frequency range 4-7 GHz. These pulsations were not correlated at their individual frequencies, had no measurable frequency drift, and zero polarization. In these pulsations, we found the signatures of fast sausage magnetoacoustic waves with the characteristic periods of 0.7 and 2 s. The other radio bursts showed their characteristic frequency drifts in the range of -262-520 MHz/s. They helped us to derive average values of 20-80 G for the coronal magnetic field strength in the place of radio emission. It was revealed that the microwave event belongs to an expanding coronal l...

  2. TiC2 : A New Two-Dimensional Sheet beyond MXenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tianshan; Zhang, Shunhong; Guo, Yaguang; Wang, Qian

    MXenes are attracting attention due to their rich chemistry and intriguing properties. Here a new type of metal-carbon-based sheet composed of transition metal centers and C2 dimers rather than individual C atoms is designed. Taking the Ti system as a test case, density functional theory calculations combined with a thermodynamic analysis uncover the thermal and dynamic stability of the sheet, as well as a metallic band structure, anisotropic Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio, a high heat capacity, and a large Debye stiffness. Moreover, the TiC2 sheet has excellent Li storage capacity with a small migration barrier, a lower mass density compared with standard MXenes, and better chemical stability as compared to the MXene Ti2C sheet. When Ti is replaced with other transition metal centers, diverse new MC2 sheets containing C =C dimers can be formed, the properties of which merit further investigation.

  3. Lifetime of C2Cl4- ions produced by nondissociative electron attachment to C2Cl4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lifetimes of long-lived C2Cl4- ions formed by Rydberg electron transfer in K(np)/C2Cl4 collisions are investigated using a Penning ion trap. Measurements at high n, n≥30, show that low-energy electron attachment to C2Cl4 leads to the production of C2Cl4- ions with a broad range of lifetimes that extends up to at least 1 ms. This is attributed to capture by molecules in different initial vibrational states. At low n, internal-to-translational energy transfer in postattachment interactions between the product K+ and C2Cl4- ions becomes important and leads to a substantial increase in ion lifetimes

  4. Coronal Activity and Extended Solar Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altrock, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Wilson et al. (1988, Nature 333, 748) discussed a number of solar parameters, which appear at high latitudes and gradually migrate towards the equator, merging with the sunspot "butterfly diagram". They found that this concept had been identified by earlier investigators extending back to 1957. They named this process the "Extended Solar Cycle" (ESC). Altrock (1997, Solar Phys. 170, 411) found that this process continued in Fe XIV 530.3 nm emission features. In cycles 21 - 23 solar maximum occurred when the number of Fe XIV emission regions per day > 0.19 (averaged over 365 days and both hemispheres) first reached latitudes 18°, 21° and 21°, for an average of 20° ± 1.7°. Other recent studies have shown that Torsional Oscillation (TO) negative-shear zones are co-located with the ESC from at least 50° down to the equator and also in the zones where the Rush to the Poles occur. These phenomena indicate that coronal activity occurring up to 50° and higher latitudes is related to TO shear zones, another indicator that the ESC is an important solar process. Another high-latitude process, which appears to be connected with the ESC, is the "Rush to the Poles" ("Rush") of polar crown prominences and their associated coronal emission, including Fe XIV. The Rush is is a harbinger of solar maximum (cf. Altrock, 2003, Solar Phys. 216, 343). Solar maximum in cycles 21 - 23 occurred when the center line of the Rush reached a critical latitude. These latitudes were 76°, 74° and 78°, respectively, for an average of 76° ± 2°. Applying the above conclusions to Cycle 24 is difficult due to the unusual nature of this cycle. Cycle 24 displays an intermittent "Rush" that is only well-defined in the northern hemisphere. In 2009 an initial slope of 4.6°/yr was found in the north, compared to an average of 9.4 ± 1.7 °/yr in the previous three cycles. This early fit to the Rush would have reached 76° at 2014.6. However, in 2010 the slope increased to 7.5°/yr (an increase

  5. Exploración del modelo coronal MHD de Uchida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francile, C.; Castro, J. I.; Flores, M.

    We present an analysis of the MHD model of an isothermal solar corona with radially symmetrical magnetic field and gravity. The solution in the approximation "WKB" was presented by Uchida (1968). The model is ex- plored for different coronal conditions and heights of initial perturbation to study the propagation of coronal waves and reproduce the observed char- acteristics of phenomena such as Moreton waves. Finally we discuss the obtained results. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  6. chi_{c1} and chi_{c2} decay angular distributions at the Fermilab Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Kniehl, Bernd A; Palisoc, C P

    2003-01-01

    We consider the hadroproduction of chi_{c1} and chi_{c2} mesons and their subsequent radiative decays to J/psi mesons and photons in the factorization formalism of nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics, and study the decay angular distributions, by means of helicity density matrices, in view of their sensitivity to color-octet processes. We present numerical results appropriate for the Fermilab Tevatron.

  7. Cross-point coronal plasma dynamics in two- and four-wire x-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of the late time diode gap formation in two- and four-wire tungsten x-pinches using an 80 kA, 50 ns current pulse are presented. Quantitative measurements of the coronal plasma density are recovered using interferometry simultaneously with laser shadowgraphy. Axial expansion of the gap occurs at ∼106 cm/s for both two- and four-wire systems and is likely to be driven by an axial JxB force resulting from radial current flow in the plasma minidiode ''electrodes.'' Radial density profiles suggest repinching of the low density plasma occurs after the main pinch resulting in secondary x-ray emission peak >10 ns after the first, which is recorded with a pair of pin diodes.

  8. Coronal Dynamics at Recent Total Solar Eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Lu, M.; Davis, A. B.; Demianski, M.; Rusin, V.; Saniga, M.; Seaton, D. B.; Lucas, R.; Babcock, B. A.; Dantowitz, R.; Gaintatzis, P.; Seeger, C. H.; Malamut, C.; Steele, A.

    2014-12-01

    Our composite images of the solar corona based on extensive imaging at the total solar eclipses of 2010 (Easter Island), 2012 (Australia), and 2013 (Gabon) reveal several coronal mass ejections and other changes in coronal streamers and in polar plumes. Our resultant spatial resolution is finer than that available in imaging from spacecraft, including that from SOHO/LASCO or STEREO. We trace the eruptions back to their footpoints on the sun using imaging from SDO and SWAP, and follow them upwards through the corona, measuring velocities. The high-resolution computer compositing by Miloslav Druckmüller and Hana Druckmüllerová (2010 and 2013) and Pavlos Gaintatzis (2012) allows comparison of our images with those taken at intervals of minutes or hours along the totality path. Williams College's 2013 eclipse expedition was supported in part by grant 9327-13 from National Geographic Society/Committee for Research and Exploration. Our work on the 2012 eclipse is supported in part by grant AGS-1047726 from Solar Terrestrial Research/NSF AGS. V.R. and M.S. were partially supported by the VEGA grant agency project 2/0098/10 and 2/0003/13 (Slovak Academy of Sciences) and Grant 0139-12 from NG/CRE, and Hana Druckmüllerová by grant 205/09/1469 of the Czech Science Foundation. M.L. was supported by Sigma Xi. C.M. was a Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium Summer Fellow, supported at Williams College by REU/NSF grant AST-1005024. Partial support was provided by U.S. Department of Defense's ASSURE program. J.M.P. thanks Caltech's Planetary Sciences Department for hospitality. Support for D.B.S. and SWAP came from PRODEX grant C90345 managed by ESA in collaboration with the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BELSPO) in support of the PROBA2/SWAP mission, and from the EC's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant 218816 (SOTERIA project, www.soteria-space.eu). SWAP is a project of the Centre Spatial de Liège and the Royal Observatory of Belgium funded by

  9. THE FIRST STRAY LIGHT CORRECTED EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGES OF SOLAR CORONAL HOLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronal holes are the source regions of the fast solar wind, which fills most of the solar system volume near the cycle minimum. Removing stray light from extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images of the Sun's corona is of high astrophysical importance, as it is required to make meaningful determinations of temperatures and densities of coronal holes. EUV images tend to be dominated by the component of the stray light due to the long-range scatter caused by the microroughness of telescope mirror surfaces, and this component has proven very difficult to measure in pre-flight characterization. In-flight characterization heretofore has proven elusive due to the fact that the detected image is simultaneously nonlinear in two unknown functions: the stray light pattern and the true image that would be seen by an ideal telescope. Using a constrained blind deconvolution technique that takes advantage of known zeros in the true image provided by a fortuitous lunar transit, we have removed the stray light from solar images seen by the EUVI instrument on STEREO-B in all four filter bands (171, 195, 284, and 304 Å). Uncertainty measures of the stray light corrected images, which include the systematic error due to misestimation of the scatter, are provided. It is shown that in EUVI, stray light contributes up to 70% of the emission in coronal holes seen on the solar disk, which has dramatic consequences for diagnostics of temperature and density and therefore estimates of key plasma parameters such as the plasma β and ion-electron collision rates.

  10. Why are halo coronal mass ejections faster?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Min Zhang; Yang Guo; Peng-Fei Chen; Ming-De Ding; Cheng Fang

    2010-01-01

    Halo coronal mass ejections(CMEs)have been to be significantly faster than normal CMEs,which is a long-standing puzzle.In order to solve the puzzle,we first investigate the observed properties of 31 limb CMEs that clearly display loopshaped frontal loops.The observational results show a strong tendency that slower CMEs are weaker in white-light intensity.Then,we perform a Monte Carlo simulation of 20000 artificial limb CMEs that have an average velocity of~523 km s-1.The Thomson scattering of these events is calculated when they are assumed to be observed as limb and halo events,respectively.It is found that the white-light intensity of many slow CMEs becomes remarkably reduced when they turn from being viewed as a limb event to being viewed as a halo event.When the intensity is below the background solar wind fluctuation,it is assumed that they would be missed by coronagraphs.The average velocity of"detectable"halo CMEs is~922 km s-1,very close to the observed value.This also indicates that wider events are more likely to be recorded.The results soundly suggest that the higher average velocity of halo CMEs is due to that a majority of slow events and some of narrow fast events carrying less material are so faint that they are blended with the solar wind fluctuations,and therefore are not observed.

  11. Multiscale Modeling of Solar Coronal Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is widely believed to be the primary process by which the magnetic field releases energy to plasma in the Sun's corona. For example, in the breakout model for the initiation of coronal mass ejections/eruptive flares, reconnection is responsible for the catastrophic destabilizing of magnetic force balance in the corona, leading to explosive energy release. A critical requirement for the reconnection is that it have a "switch-on' nature in that the reconnection stays off until a large store of magnetic free energy has built up, and then it turn on abruptly and stay on until most of this free energy has been released. We discuss the implications of this requirement for reconnection in the context of the breakout model for CMEs/flares. We argue that it imposes stringent constraints on the properties of the flux breaking mechanism, which is expected to operate in the corona on kinetic scales. We present numerical simulations demonstrating how the reconnection and the eruption depend on the effective resistivity, i.e., the effective Lundquist number, and propose a model for incorporating kinetic flux-breaking mechanisms into MHO calculation of CMEs/flares.

  12. A coronal wave as CME footprint

    CERN Document Server

    Delannée, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    I report a coronal wave observed in Fexii, soft X-ray, and Halpha on November 6, 2006, jointly with a CME and a flare to show the spatial and temporal relation of the wave and the CME. I also take advantage of the spectral resolution of the wave to obtain an approximation of its temperature. Finally, I compare the magnetic field topology to the wave location. The observations in two band passes show bright fronts that are co-spatial when observed at the same time, therefore I believe that the same wave is observed in different band passes. The wave front is not observable in Halpha, but just in Fexii and in soft X-ray, indicating that the temperature of the wave front is slightly higher than the chromospheric temperature. The ratio of emission through two SXI filters gives a temperature of 7 10^6 K for the wave front. The northern-most edge of the CME footprint related to this wave corresponds to the last location of the wave on the limb. The image processing reveals stationary brightenings produced on the pa...

  13. Magnetic flux supplement to coronal bright points

    CERN Document Server

    Mou, Chaozhou; Xia, Lidong; Madjarska, Maria S; Li, Bo; Fu, Hui; Jiao, Fangran; Hou, Zhenyong

    2015-01-01

    Coronal bright points (BPs) are associated with magnetic bipolar features (MBFs) and magnetic cancellation. Here, we investigate how BP-associated MBFs form and how the consequent magnetic cancellation occurs. We analyse longitudinal magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager to investigate the photospheric magnetic flux evolution of 70 BPs. From images taken in the 193 A passband of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) we dermine that the BPs' lifetimes vary from 2.7 to 58.8 hours. The formation of the BP MBFs is found to involve three processes, namely emergence, convergence and local coalescence of the magnetic fluxes. The formation of a MBF can involve more than one of these processes. Out of the 70 cases, flux emergence is the main process of a MBF buildup of 52 BPs, mainly convergence is seen in 28, and 14 cases are associated with local coalescence. For MBFs formed by bipolar emergence, the time difference between the flux emergence and the BP appearance in the AIA 193 \\AA\\ passband varie...

  14. Surface Flux Emergence and Coronal Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang

    2016-05-01

    Among various active regions, delta-sunspots of aggregated spots of opposite polarities, are of particular interest due to their high productivity in energetic and recurrent eruptive events, such as X-class flares and homologous eruptions. We here study the formation of such complex magnetic structures by numerical simulations of magnetic flux emergence from the convection zone into the corona in an active-region scale domain. In our simulation, two pairs of bipolar sunspots form on the surface, originating from two buoyant segments of a single subsurface twisted flux rope. Expansion and rotation of the emerging fields in the two bipoles drive the two opposite polarities into each other with apparent rotating motion, producing a compact delta-sunspot with a sharp polarity inversion line (PIL). The formation of the delta-sunspot in such a realistic-scale domain produces emerging patterns similar to those formed in observations, e.g. the inverted polarity against Hale’s law, the curvilinear motion of the spot, strong transverse field with highly sheared magnetic and velocity fields at the PIL. Strong current builds up at the PIL, giving rise to reconnection, which produces a complex coronal magnetic connectivity with non-potential fields in the delta-spot overlaid by more relaxed fields connecting the two polarities at the two ends.

  15. Myostatin Stimulates, Not Inihibits, C2C12 Myoblast Proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Rodgers, Buel D.; Wiedeback, Benjamin D.; Hoversten, Knut E.; Jackson, Melissa F; Walker, Ryan G.; Thompson, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    The immortal C2C12 cell line originates from dystrophic mouse thigh muscle and has been used to study the endocrine control of muscle cell growth, development, and function, including those actions regulated by myostatin. Previous studies suggest that high concentrations of recombinant myostatin generated in bacteria inhibit C2C12 proliferation and differentiation. Recombinant myostatin generated in eukaryotic systems similarly inhibits the proliferation of primary myosatellite cells, but con...

  16. Nonrigid spherical real analytic hypersurfaces in C^2

    OpenAIRE

    Merker, Joel

    2009-01-01

    A Levi nondegenerate real analytic hypersurface M of C^2 represented in local coordinates (z, w) in C^2 by a complex defining equation of the form w = Theta (z, \\bar z, \\bar w) which satisfies an appropriate reality condition, is spherical if and only if its complex graphing function Theta satisfies an explicitly written sixth-order polynomial complex partial differential equation. In the rigid case (known before), this system simplifies considerably, but in the general nonrigid case, its com...

  17. Assessment of the relationship between odontogenic maxillary sinusitis and findings in the ostiomeatal unit on coronal CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ostiomeatal unit (OMU) incorporates the maxillary sinus ostium, infundibulum, uncinate process, hiatus semilunaris ethmoid bulla, middle turbinate and middle meatus. The maxillary ostium is located in the superior portion of the medial maxillary wall and drains into the posterior aspect of the ethmoid infundibulum. The detailed anatomy of the OMU as displayed by CT provides a road map for surgeons prior to endoscopic sinus surgery. However, little attention has been paid to the relationship between the OMU and odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. This study examined the relationship between the osteomeatal unit and odontogenic maxillary sinusitis using coronal CT images. Materials consisted of 100 abnormal maxillary sinuses in 100 odontgenic maxillary sinusitis patients. Using coronal images, mucosal abnormalities were examined by grading expansion of the low density area, which represents the mucous membranes in the maxillary sinuses. Findings were classified into 3 types and the correlation between obstruction of the maxillary ostium and thickening of other sinonasal sinuses was examined. Results of the grading were as follows: 25 maxillary sinuses were graded as type 1, 22 maxillary sinuses as type 2, and 53 maxillary sinuses as type 3. On pattern analysis using coronal CT images, there were significant differences in obstruction of the maxillary ostium based on thickening of the mucous membranes of the odontgenic maxillary sinusitis (p<0.01); also there was a correlation between thickening of the mucous membranes of the ethmoid sinuses and thickening of the mucous membranes of the odontgenic maxillary sinusitis (p<0.01). Thickening of the mucous membranes of both the ethmoid sinuses and frontal sinuses was well correlated with obstruction of the maxillary ostium on coronal CT images (p<0.05). However, there was no correlation between obstruction of the maxillary ostium and sphenoid sinuses. Our study indicates that the severity of odontogenic maxillary

  18. Acid-base actuation of [c2]daisy chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lei; Hmadeh, Mohamad; Wu, Jishan; Olson, Mark A; Spruell, Jason M; Trabolsi, Ali; Yang, Ying-Wei; Elhabiri, Mourad; Albrecht-Gary, Anne-Marie; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2009-05-27

    A versatile synthetic strategy, which was conceived and employed to prepare doubly threaded, bistable [c2]daisy chain compounds, is described. Propargyl and 1-pentenyl groups have been grafted onto the stoppers of [c2]daisy chain molecules obtained using a template-directed synthetic protocol. Such [c2]daisy chain molecules undergo reversible extension and contraction upon treatment with acid and base, respectively. The dialkyne-functionalized [c2]daisy chain (AA) was subjected to an [AA+BB] type polymerization with an appropriate diazide (BB) to afford a linear, mechanically interlocked, main-chain polymer. The macromolecular properties of this polymer were characterized by chronocoulometry, size exclusion chromatography, and static light-scattering analysis. The acid-base switching properties of both the monomers and the polymer have been studied in solution, using (1)H NMR spectroscopy, UV/vis absorption spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. The experimental results demonstrate that the functionalized [c2]daisy chains, along with their polymeric derivatives, undergo quantitative, efficient, and fully reversible switching processes in solution. Kinetics measurements demonstrate that the acid/base-promoted extension/contraction movements of the polymeric [c2]daisy chain are actually faster than those of its monomeric counterpart. These observations open the door to correlated molecular motions and to changes in material properties. PMID:19419175

  19. Coronal Heating and the Magnetic Flux Content of the Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Previously, from analysis of SOHO/EIT coronal images in combination with Kitt Peak magnetograms (Falconer et al 1998, ApJ, 501, 386-396), we found that the quiet corona is the sum of two components: the e-scale corona and the coronal network. The large-scale corona consists of all coronal-temperature (T approx. 10(exp 6) K) structures larger than supergranules (>approx.30,000 km). The coronal network (1) consists of all coronal-temperature structures smaller than supergranules, (2) is rooted in and loosely traces the photospheric magnetic network, (3) has its brightest features seated on polarity dividing fines (neutral lines) in the network magnetic flux, and (4) produces only about 5% of the total coronal emission in quiet regions. The heating of the coronal network is apparently magnetic in origin. Here, from analysis of EIT coronal images of quiet regions in combination with magnetograms of the same quiet regions from SOHO/MDI and from Kitt Peak, we examine the other 95% of the quiet corona and its relation to the underlying magnetic network. We find: (1) Dividing the large-scale corona into its bright and dim halves divides the area into bright "continents" and dark "oceans" having spans of 2-4 supergranules. (2) These patterns are also present in the photospheric magnetograms: the network is stronger under the bright half and weaker under the dim half. (3) The radiation from the large-scale corona increases roughly as the cube root of the magnetic flux content of the underlying magnetic network. In contrast, Fisher et A (1998, ApJ, 508, 985-998) found that the coronal radiation from an active region increases roughly linearly with the magnetic flux content of the active region. We assume, as is widely held, that nearly all of the large-scale corona is magnetically rooted in the network. Our results, together with the result of Fisher et al (1999), suggest that either the coronal heating in quiet regions has a large non-magnetic component, or, if the heating

  20. A survey of the 5C2 region with the Westerbork synthesis radio telescope at 1415 MHz (the third Westerbork survey), ch. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 5C2 region, observed originally with the Cambridge One-Mile Telescope at 408 MHz, has been reobserved at l4l5 MHz. The resulting source list contains 238 sources with attenuated flux densities exceeding the catalogue limit of 6.25 m.f.u. Out of a total of 190 5C2 sources (i.e. all 5C2 sources within the 10 dB attenuation contour of the present survey), 128 were detected with flux densities above the catalogue limit. Another 22 5C2 sources were detected with flux densities below the catalogue limit. A discussion is given of the procedures used for determining source parameters. Special attention has been given to the determination of flux density and angular size as well as to the question of completeness of the source list as a function of flux density and angular size

  1. Transport simulations of a density limit in radiation-dominated tokamak discharges: II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The procedures developed previously to simulate the radiatively induced tokamak density limit are used to examine in more detail the scaling of the density limit. It is found that the maximum allowable density increases with auxiliary power and decreases with impurity concentration. However, it is demonstrated that there is little dependence of the density limit on plasma elongation. These trends are consistent with experimental results. Our previous work used coronal equilibrium impurities; the primary result of that paper was that the maximum density increases with current when peaked profiles are assumed. Here, this behavior is shown to occur with a coronal nonequilibrium impurity as well. 26 refs., 4 figs

  2. "Two-step" technique with OsiriXTM to evaluate feasibility of C2 pedicle for surgical fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel Sousa Marques

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical treatment of craniovertebral junction pathology has evolved considerably in recent decades with the implementation of short atlanto-axial fixation techniques, notwhithstanding increasing neurovascular risks. Also, there is strong evidence that fixation of C2 anatomical pedicle has the best biomechanical profile of the entire cervical spine. However, it is often difficult and misleading, to evaluate anatomical bony and vascular anomalies using the three orthogonal planes (axial, coronal, and sagittal of CT. Objectives: The authors describe an innovative and simple technique to evaluate the feasibility of C2 pedicle for surgical screw fixation using preoperative planning with the free DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine software OsiriX TM . Materials and Methods: The authors report the applicatin of this novel technique in 5 cases (3 traumatic, 1 Os Odontoideum, and 1 complex congenital malformation collected from our general case series of the Department in the last 5 years. Results: In this "proof of concept" study, the pre-operative analysis with the "two-step" tecnique was detrimental for choosing the surgical tecnique. Detailed post-operative analysis confirmed correct position of C2 screws without cortical breach. There were no complications or mortality reported. Conclusion: This "two-step" technique is an easy and reliable way to determine the feasibility of C2 pedicle for surgical fixation. The detailed tridimensional radiological preoperative evaluation of craniovertebral junction anatomy is critical to the sucess and safety of this surgeries, and can avoid, to certain degree, expensive intra-operative tridimensional imaging facilities.

  3. THE HYDRODYNAMIC EVOLUTION OF IMPULSIVELY HEATED CORONAL LOOPS: EXPLICIT ANALYTICAL APPROXIMATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We derive simple analytical approximations (in explicit form) for the hydrodynamic evolution of the electron temperature T(s, t) and electron density n(s, t), for one-dimensional coronal loops that are subject to impulsive heating with subsequent cooling. Our analytical approximations are derived from first principles, using (1) the hydrodynamic energy balance equation, (2) the loop scaling laws of Rosner-Tucker-Vaiana and Serio, (3) the Neupert effect, and (4) the Jakimiec relationship. We compare our analytical approximations with 56 numerical cases of time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations from a parametric study of Tsiklauri et al., covering a large parameter space of heating rates, heating timescales, heating scale heights, loop lengths, for both footpoint and apex heating, mostly applicable to flare conditions. The average deviations from the average temperature and density values are typically ∼20% for our analytical expressions. The analytical approximations in explicit form provide an efficient tool to mimic time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations, to model observed soft X-rays and extreme-ultraviolet light curves of heated and cooling loops in the solar corona and in flares by forward fitting, to model microflares, to infer the coronal heating function from light curves of multi-wavelength observations, and to provide physical models of differential emission measure distributions for solar and stellar flares, coronae, and irradiance.

  4. Correlation of Coronal Plasma Properties and Solar Magnetic Field in a Decaying Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Young, Peter R.; Muglach, Karin; Warren, Harry P.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio

    2016-08-01

    We present the analysis of a decaying active region observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode during 2009 December 7–11. We investigated the temporal evolution of its structure exhibited by plasma at temperatures from 300,000 to 2.8 million degrees, and derived the electron density, differential emission measure, effective electron temperature, and elemental abundance ratios of Si/S and Fe/S (as a measure of the First Ionization Potential (FIP) Effect). We compared these coronal properties to the temporal evolution of the photospheric magnetic field strength obtained from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory Michelson Doppler Imager magnetograms. We find that, while these coronal properties all decreased with time during this decay phase, the largest change was at plasma above 1.5 million degrees. The photospheric magnetic field strength also decreased with time but mainly for field strengths lower than about 70 Gauss. The effective electron temperature and the FIP bias seem to reach a “basal” state (at 1.5 × 106 K and 1.5, respectively) into the quiet Sun when the mean photospheric magnetic field (excluding all areas physical properties are all positively correlated with each other and the correlation is the strongest in the high-temperature plasma. Such correlation properties should be considered in the quest for our understanding of how the corona is heated. The variations in the elemental abundance should especially be considered together with the electron temperature and density.

  5. CME Interaction with Coronal Holes and Their Interplanetary Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.

    2008-01-01

    A significant number of interplanetary (IP) shocks (-17%) during cycle 23 were not followed by drivers. The number of such "driverless" shocks steadily increased with the solar cycle with 15%, 33%, and 52% occurring in the rise, maximum, and declining phase of the solar cycle. The solar sources of 15% of the driverless shocks were very close the central meridian of the Sun (within approx.15deg), which is quite unexpected. More interestingly, all the driverless shocks with their solar sources near the solar disk center occurred during the declining phase of solar cycle 23. When we investigated the coronal environment of the source regions of driverless shocks, we found that in each case there was at least one coronal hole nearby suggesting that the coronal holes might have deflected the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) away from the Sun-Earth line. The presence of abundant low-latitude coronal holes during the declining phase further explains why CMEs originating close to the disk center mimic the limb CMEs, which normally lead to driverless shocks due to purely geometrical reasons. We also examined the solar source regions of shocks with drivers. For these, the coronal holes were located such that they either had no influence on the CME trajectories. or they deflected the CMEs towards the Sun-Earth line. We also obtained the open magnetic field distribution on the Sun by performing a potential field source surface extrapolation to the corona. It was found that the CMEs generally move away from the open magnetic field regions. The CME-coronal hole interaction must be widespread in the declining phase, and may have a significant impact on the geoeffectiveness of CMEs.

  6. Chemical transitions for interstellar C2 and CN in cloud envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federman, S. R.; Strom, C. J.; Lambert, D. L.; Cardelli, Jason A.; Smith, V. V.; Joseph, C. L.

    1994-01-01

    Observations were made of absorption from CH, C2, and CN toward moderately reddened stars in Sco, OB2, Ceo OB3, and Taurus/Auriga. For these directions, most of the reddening is associated with a single cloud complex, for example, the rho Ophiuchus molecular cloud, and as a result, the observations probe moderately dense material. When combined with avaliable data for nearby directions, the survey provides the basis for a comprehensive analysis of the chemistry for these species. The chemical transitions affecting C2 and CN in cloud envelopes were analyzed. The depth into a cloud at which a transition takes place was characterized by tau(sub uv), the grain optical depth at 1000 A. One transition at tau(sub uv) approx. = 2, which arises from, the conversion of C(+) into CO, affects the chemistries for both molecules because of the key role this ion plays. A second one involving production terms in the CN chemistry occurs at tau(sub uv) of approx. = 3; neutral reactions which C2 and CH is more important at larger values for tau(sub uv). The transition from photodissociation to chemical destruction takes place at tau(sub uv) approx. = 4.5 for C2 and CN. The observational data for stars in Sco OB2, Cep OB3, and Taurus/Auriga were studied with chemical rate equations containing the most important production and destruction mechanisms. Because the sample of stars in Sco OB2 includes sight lines with A(sub v) ranging from 1-4 mag, sight lines dominated by photochemistry could be analyzed separately from those controlled by gas-phase destruction. The analysis yielded values for two poorly known rate constants for reactions involved in the production of CN; the reactions are C2 + N yields CN + C and C(+) + NH yields all products. The other directions were analyzed with the inferred values. The predicted column densities for C2 and CN agree with the observed values to better than 50%, and in most instances 20%. When combining the estimates for density and temperature derived

  7. Detection of Interstellar C_2 and C_3 in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Welty, Daniel E; Lehner, Nicolas; Black, John H

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection of absorption from interstellar C_2 and C_3 toward the moderately reddened star Sk 143, located in the near 'wing' region of the SMC, in optical spectra obtained with the ESO VLT/UVES. These detections of C_2 (rotational levels J=0-8) and C_3 (J=0-12) absorption in the SMC are the first beyond our Galaxy. The total abundances of C_2 and C_3 (relative to H_2) are similar to those found in diffuse Galactic molecular clouds -- as previously found for CH and CN -- despite the significantly lower average metallicity of the SMC. Analysis of the rotational excitation of C_2 yields an estimated kinetic temperature T_k ~ 25 K and a moderately high total hydrogen density n_H ~ 870 cm^-3 -- compared to the T_01 ~ 45 K and n_H ~ 85-300 cm^-3 obtained from H_2. The populations of the lower rotational levels of C_3 are consistent with an excitation temperature of about 34 K.

  8. Probing Coronal Mass Ejections with Faraday Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Steven R.; Fischer, P. D.; Kooi, J. E.; Buffo, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are one of the most important solar phenomena in affecting conditions on Earth. There is not a consensus as to the physical mechanisms responsible for ejecting CME material from the solar atmosphere. Measurements that specify basic physical properties close to the Sun, when the CME is still evolving, should be useful in determining the correct theoretical model. One of the best observational techniques is that of Faraday rotation, a rotation in the plane of polarization of radio waves when propagating through a magnetized medium like the corona. The importance of Faraday rotation in determining the structure and evolutionary history of CMEs was discussed in Liu et al (ApJ 665, 1439, 2007). In this paper, we report Faraday rotation observations of ``constellations'' of background extragalactic radio sources near the Sun on three days in August, 2012, with the intention of observing a source occulted by a CME. Observations were made with the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. We made polarization measurements at 6 frequencies between 1.31 and 1.94 GHz. On August 2, 2012, a CME clearly visible on the LASCO C3 coronagraph occulted a radio source from our sample, 0843+1547. Preliminary data analysis shows a Faraday rotation transient for 0843+1547 which appears to be associated with the CME. The Faraday rotation measure changes from nearly 0 before CME passage, to a value of about -12 radians/square-meter before declining after CME passage. We will discuss the interpretation of these data in terms of models for CME structure, as well as the status of our observations of other sources on August 2, and on other days. This work was supported at the University of Iowa by grant ATM09-56901.

  9. Magnetic Reconnection in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermo, R. L.; Opher, M.; Drake, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a ubiquitous phenomenon in many varied space and astrophysical plasmas, and as such plays an important role in the dynamics of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). It is widely regarded that reconnection is instrumental in the formation and ejection of the initial CME flux rope, but reconnection also continues to affect the dynamics as it propagates through the interplanetary medium. For example, reconnection on the leading edge of the ICME, by which it interacts with the interplanetary medium, leads to flux erosion. However, recent in situ observations by Gosling et al. found signatures of reconnection exhausts in the interior. In light of this data, we consider the stability properties of systems with this flux rope geometry with regard to their minimum energy Taylor state. Variations from this state will result in the magnetic field relaxing back towards the minimum energy state, subject to the constraints that the toroidal flux and magnetic helicity remain invariant. In reversed field pinches, this relaxation is mediated by reconnection in the interior of the system, as has been shown theoretically and experimentally. By treating the ICME flux rope in a similar fashion, we show analytically that the the elongation of the flux tube cross section in the latitudinal direction will result in a departure from the Taylor state. The resulting relaxation of the magnetic field causes reconnection to commence in the interior of the ICME, in agreement with the observations of Gosling et al. We present MHD simulations in which reconnection initiates at a number of rational surfaces, and ultimately produces a stochastic magnetic field. If the time scales for this process are shorter than the propagation time to 1 AU, this result explains why many ICME flux ropes no longer exhibit the smooth, helical flux structure characteristic of a magnetic cloud.

  10. Release of C2 Radicals after the Deep Impact Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, R.; Stüwe, J. A.; Erd, C.; Martin, D.; Smit, H.

    We present the results of investigating the coma of comet 9P/Tempel 1 in C2 and continuum, before and after the Deep Impact event of 4 July 2005. A jet-like coma feature was produced by the impact, and its temporal evolution in morphology and brightness has been compared for the dust and gas coma. It shows that the feature remains visible in the dust coma for several days, whereas in the C2 coma it is visible only on the image taken 15.8 hours after the impact and has vanished when the coma was observed again in the following night. The observational evidence strongly supports that the C2 in the feature observed on 4 July 2005 was produced from fresh dust particles released by the outburst and forming an extended source for the production of the C2 radical. This indicates that the disintegration of C2-bearing dust species can directly be observed during the non-steady state conditions present immediately after outbursts and/or nucleus splitting.

  11. Superconductivity in non-centrosymmetric ThCoC2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconductivity in compounds whose crystal structure lacks inversion symmetry are known to display intriguing properties that deviate from conventional BCS superconducting behavior. Here we report magnetization, resistivity, and heat capacity measurements on polycrystalline samples of ThCoC2, which has been reported to crystallize in the non-centrosymmetric CeNiC2 prototype structure, and show clear evidence of bulk superconductivity in ThCoC2 with a critical temperature of Tc = 2.65 K. From the specific heat data we find a Sommerfeld coefficient of γ = 8.38 mJ mol−1 K−2 and a Debye temperature of ΘD = 449 K. Interestingly the Hc2 superconducting phase diagram displays positive curvature, and the specific heat at low temperature deviates from conventional exponential temperature dependence, which is suggestive of possible unconventional superconducting behavior in ThCoC2, similar to that seen in the isostructural and isoelectronic non-centrosymmetric superconductor LaNiC2. (paper)

  12. High pressure oxidation of C2H4/NO mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giménez-López, J.; Alzueta, M.U.; Rasmussen, C.T.;

    2011-01-01

    An experimental and kinetic modeling study of the interaction between C2H4 and NO has been performed under flow reactor conditions in the intermediate temperature range (600–900K), high pressure (60bar), and for stoichiometries ranging from reducing to oxidizing conditions. The main reaction...... reaction HOCH2CH2OO+NO→CH2OH+CH2O+NO2, which pushes a complex system of partial equilibria towards products. This is a confirmation of the findings of Doughty et al. [3] for a similar system at atmospheric pressure. Under reducing conditions and temperatures above 700K, a significant fraction of the NOx is...... pathways of the C2H4/O2/NOx conversion, the capacity of C2H4 to remove NO, and the influence of the presence of NOx on the C2H4 oxidation are analyzed. Compared to the C2H4/O2 system, the presence of NOx shifts the onset of reaction 75–150K to lower temperatures. The mechanism of sensitization involves the...

  13. Deriving Coronal Magnetic Fields Using Parametric Transformation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, G. A.

    2001-05-01

    When plasma β >1 then the gas pressure dominates over the magnetic pressure. This ratio as a function along the coronal magnetic field lines varies from β > 1 in the photosphere at the base of the field lines, to β 1 in the upper corona. Almost all magnetic field extrapolations do not or cannot take into account the full range of β . They essentially assume β 1 regions. We use a basic parametric representation of the magnetic field lines such that the field lines can be manipulated to match linear features in the EUV and SXR coronal images in a least squares sense. This research employs free-form deformation mathematics to generate the associated coronal magnetic field. In our research program, the complex magnetic field topology uses Parametric Transformation Analysis (PTA) which is a new and innovative method to describe the coronal fields that we are developing. In this technique the field lines can be viewed as being embedded in a plastic medium, the frozen-in-field-line concept. As the medium is deformed the field lines are similarly deformed. However the advantage of the PTA method is that the field line movement represents a transformation of one magnetic field solution into another magnetic field solution. When fully implemented, this method will allow the resulting magnetic field solution to fully match the magnetic field lines with EUV/SXR coronal loops by minimizing the differences in direction and dispersion of a collection of PTA magnetic field lines and observed field lines. The derived magnetic field will then allow β > 1 regions to be included, the electric currents to be calculated, and the Lorentz force to be determined. The advantage of this technique is that the solution is (i) independent of the upper and side boundary conditions, (ii) allows non-vanishing magnetic forces, and (iii) provides a global magnetic field solution, which contains high- and low- β regimes and maximizes the similarity between the field lines structure and all the

  14. Standing Slow MHD Waves in Radiatively Cooling Coronal Loops

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. S. Al-Ghafri

    2015-06-01

    The standing slow magneto-acoustic oscillations in cooling coronal loops are investigated. There are two damping mechanisms which are considered to generate the standing acoustic modes in coronal magnetic loops, namely, thermal conduction and radiation. The background temperature is assumed to change temporally due to optically thin radiation. In particular, the background plasma is assumed to be radiatively cooling. The effects of cooling on longitudinal slow MHD modes is analytically evaluated by choosing a simple form of radiative function, that ensures the temperature evolution of the background plasma due to radiation, coincides with the observed cooling profile of coronal loops. The assumption of low-beta plasma leads to neglecting the magnetic field perturbation and, eventually, reduces the MHD equations to a 1D system modelling longitudinal MHD oscillations in a cooling coronal loop. The cooling is assumed to occur on a characteristic time scale, much larger than the oscillation period that subsequently enables using the WKB theory to study the properties of standing wave. The governing equation describing the time-dependent amplitude of waves is obtained and solved analytically. The analytically derived solutions are numerically evaluated to give further insight into the evolution of the standing acoustic waves. We find that the plasma cooling gives rise to a decrease in the amplitude of oscillations. In spite of the reduction in damping rate caused by rising the cooling, the damping scenario of slow standing MHD waves strongly increases in hot coronal loops.

  15. Magnetic Evolution and Temperature Variation in a Coronal Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jingxiu; Wang, Haimin

    2007-01-01

    We have explored the magnetic flux evolution and temperature variation in a coronal-hole region, using Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) deep magnetograms and {\\it SOHO}/EIT images observed from 2005 October 10 to 14. For comparison, we also investigated a neighboring quiet region of the Sun. The coronal hole evolved from its mature stage to its disappearance during the observing period. We have obtained the following results: (1) When the coronal hole was well developed on October 10, about 60 % of the magnetic flux was positive. The EUV brightness was 420 counts pixel$^{-1}$, and the coronal temperature, estimated from the line ratio of the EIT 195 {\\AA} and 171 {\\AA} images, was 1.07 MK. (2) On October 14, when the coronal hole had almost disappeared, 51 % of the magnetic flux was positive, the EUV radiance was 530 counts pixel$^{-1}$, and the temperature was 1.10 MK. (3) In the neighboring quiet region, the fraction of positive flux varied between 0.49 and 0.47. The EUV brightness displayed an irregular v...

  16. Solar wind helium and hydrogen structure near the heliospheric current sheet - A signal of coronal streamers at 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrini, G.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.

    1981-01-01

    Solar wind flow properties associated with very low helium to hydrogen abundance ratios have been observed with Los Alamos instruments on IMP 6, 7, and 8 during 1971-1978. A characteristic pattern has been discovered consisting of correlated interplanetary field reversals, high plasma density, low and nearly identical H(+) and He(2+) bulk velocities, low H(+) and He(2+) kinetic temperatures, and minima in their ratios. Because coronal streamers straddle the current sheet close to the sun, the pattern discovered is the 'signal' of a coronal streamer at 1 AU. A superposed epoch analysis of 74 well-defined sector boundary crossings provides verification of the above correlation featuring a pronounced minimum in the helium to hydrogen abundance ratio at the sector boundary passage.

  17. Transition probability data for seven band systems of C2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coo, D. M.; Nicholls, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Absolute transition-probability parameters are reported for seven band systems of the C2 molecule. These include all the known C2 band systems in the spectral region between 0.2 and 1.2 microns with the exception of the Messerle-Krauss system. To obtain the data, absolute intensities of selected spectral regions were measured behind the incident shock wave in a combustion-driven shock tube containing 85% Ar and 15% C2H2. These measurements were converted into electronic transition moments by a synthetic spectrum analysis. The electronic transition moments were then used to determine extensive tables of the transition-probability parameters for each of the band systems measured.

  18. Intrinsic geometric structure of c = -2 quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambjørn, J.; Anagnostopoulos, K. N.; Ichihara, T.; Jensen, L.; Kawamoto, N.; Watabiki, Y.; Yotsuji, K.

    1998-04-01

    We couple c = -2 matter to 2-dimensional gravity within the gramework of dynamical triangulations. We use a very fast algorithm, special to the c = -2 case, in order to test scaling of correlation functions defined in terms of geodesic distance and we determine the fractal dimension dH with high accuracy. We find dH = 3.58(4), consistent with a prediction coming from the study of diffusion in the context of Liouville theory, and that the quantum space-time possesses the same fractal properties at all distance scales similarly to the case of pure gravity.

  19. LONG-TERM SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF TIDAL DISRUPTION CANDIDATES SELECTED BY STRONG CORONAL LINES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results of follow-up optical spectroscopic Multi-Mirror Telescope (MMT) observations of seven rare, extreme coronal line-emitting galaxies reported by Wang et al. Large variations in coronal lines are found in four objects, making them strong candidates for tidal disruption events (TDEs). For the four TDE candidates, all the coronal lines with ionization states higher than [Fe VII] disappear within 5-9 yr. The [Fe VII] line faded by a factor of about five in one object (J0952+2143) within 4 yr, whereas the line emerged in another two objects that previously did not show the line. A strong increment in the [O III] flux is observed, shifting the line ratios toward the loci of active galactic nuclei on the BPT diagram. Surprisingly, we detect a non-canonical [O III] λ5007/[O III] λ4959 ratio of ≅ 2 in two objects, indicating a large column density of O2+ and thus probably optically thick gas. This result also requires a very large ionization parameter and a relatively soft ionizing spectral energy distribution (e.g., a blackbody with T 4 K). Our observations can be explained as the echoing of a strong ultraviolet to soft X-ray flare caused by TDEs on molecular clouds in the inner parsecs of the galactic nuclei. Reanalyzing the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra reveals double-peaked or strongly blue-shouldered broad lines in three of the objects, which disappeared in the MMT spectra of two objects and faded by a factor of 10 in 8 yr in the remaining object with a decrease in both the line width and centroid offset. We interpret these broad lines as arising from decelerating biconical outflows. Our results demonstrate that the signatures of echoing can persist for as long as 10 yr and can be used to probe the gas environment in quiescent galactic nuclei

  20. Inference of Magnetic Field in the Coronal Streamer Invoking Kink Wave Motions generated by Multiple EUV Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A. K.; Singh, Talwinder; Ofman, Leon; Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the observations from Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) of an oscillating coronal streamer. STEREO-B Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging (EUVI) temporal data on 7 March 2012 shows an evolution of two consecutive EUV waves that interact with footpoint of a coronal streamer clearly evident in the co-spatial and co-temporal STEREO-B/COR-1 observations. The waves are observed in the STEREO-B/EUVI too, and its apparent energy exchange with coronal streamer generates kink oscillations. We apply the methodology of MHD seismology of the observed waves and determine the magnetic field profile of the coronal streamer. In particular, we estimate the phase velocities of the kink wave perturbations by tracking them at different heights. We also estimate electron densities inside and outside the streamer using spherically symmetric inversion of polarized brightness images in STEREO-B/COR-1. We detect two large scale kink wave oscillations that diagnose exponentially decaying radial profiles of magnetic field in streamer up to 3 solar radii. Within the limit of observational and systematic uncertainties, we find that magnetic field of streamer varies slowly at various heights, although its nature always remains exponentially decaying with height. It is seen that during evolution of second kink motion in streamer, it increases in brightness (thus mass density), and also in areal extent slightly, which may be associated with decreased photospheric magnetic flux at footpoint of streamer. As a result, magnetic field profile produced by second kink wave is reduced within streamer compared to the one diagnosed by the first one.

  1. Feasibility study of microwave electron heating on the C-2 field-reversed configuration device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaokang; Koehn, Alf; Petrov, Yuri; Ceccherini, Francesco; Dettrick, Sean; Binderbauer, Michl

    2015-12-01

    Different microwave heating scenarios for the C-2 plasmas have been investigated recently with use of both the Genray ray-racing code and the IPF-FDMC full-wave code, and the study was focused on the excitation of the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) with O-mode launch. For a given antenna position on C-2 and the fixed 2D plasma density and equilibrium field profiles, simulations have been done for six selected frequencies (2.45 GHz, 5 GHz, 8 GHz, 18 GHz, 28 GHz, and 50 GHz). Launch angles have been optimized for each case in order to achieve high coupling efficiencies to the EBW by the O-X-B mode conversion process and high power deposition. Results show that among those six frequencies, the case of 8 GHz is the most promising scenario, which has both high mode conversion efficiency (90%) and the relatively deeper power deposition.

  2. RHESSI AND SDO/AIA OBSERVATIONS OF THE CHROMOSPHERIC AND CORONAL PLASMA PARAMETERS DURING A SOLAR FLARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations are an important diagnostic of various plasma parameters of the solar atmosphere during solar flares. Soft X-ray and EUV observations often show coronal sources near the top of flaring loops, while hard X-ray emission is mostly observed from chromospheric footpoints. Combining RHESSI with simultaneous Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations, it is possible for the first time to determine the density, temperature, and emission profile of the solar atmosphere over a wide range of heights during a flare, using two independent methods. Here we analyze a near limb event during the first of three hard X-ray peaks. The emission measure, temperature, and density of the coronal source is found using soft X-ray RHESSI images while the chromospheric density is determined using RHESSI visibility analysis of the hard X-ray footpoints. A regularized inversion technique is applied to AIA images of the flare to find the differential emission measure (DEM). Using DEM maps, we determine the emission and temperature structure of the loop, as well as the density, and compare it with RHESSI results. The soft X-ray and hard X-ray sources are spatially coincident with the top and bottom of the EUV loop, but the bulk of the EUV emission originates from a region without cospatial RHESSI emission. The temperature analysis along the loop indicates that the hottest plasma is found near the coronal loop-top source. The EUV observations suggest that the density in the loop legs increases with increasing height while the temperature remains constant within uncertainties.

  3. Features of calcaneonavicular coalition on coronal computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To determine the findings of calcaneonavicular coalition on coronal CT.Design. We retrospectively reviewed the CT scans of 14 calcaneonavicular coalitions in eight patients. All coalitions were visible on the axial scans, and the diagnosis was confirmed by surgery in five patients. These CT scans were compared with scans of ten normal feet.Results. We identified two features of calcaneonavicular coalition on coronal CT: lateral bridging (an abnormal bony mass lateral to the head of the talus) and rounding of the talus. All eight patients demonstrated at least one of these two findings.Conclusion. Although calcaneonavicular coalition is best seen on axial CT scans of the feet, there are two abnormalities, lateral bridging and rounding of the head of the talus, which should suggest the diagnosis on coronal CT scans. (orig.)

  4. Flux Rope Formation Preceding Coronal Mass Ejection Onset

    CERN Document Server

    Green, L M

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the evolution of a sigmoidal (S shaped) active region toward eruption, which includes a coronal mass ejection (CME) but leaves part of the filament in place. The X-ray sigmoid is found to trace out three different magnetic topologies in succession: a highly sheared arcade of coronal loops in its long-lived phase, a bald-patch separatrix surface (BPSS) in the hours before the CME, and the first flare loops in its major transient intensity enhancement. The coronal evolution is driven by photospheric changes which involve the convergence and cancellation of flux elements under the sigmoid and filament. The data yield unambiguous evidence for the existence of a BPSS, and hence a flux rope, in the corona prior to the onset of the CME.

  5. Damping of Slow Magnetoacoustic Waves in an Inhomogeneous Coronal Plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nagendra Kumar; Pradeep Kumar; Shiv Singh; Anil Kumar

    2008-03-01

    We study the propagation and dissipation of slow magnetoacoustic waves in an inhomogeneous viscous coronal loop plasma permeated by uniform magnetic field. Only viscosity and thermal conductivity are taken into account as dissipative processes in the coronal loop. The damping length of slow-mode waves exhibit varying behaviour depending upon the physical parameters of the loop in an active region AR8270 observed by TRACE. The wave energy flux associated with slow magnetoacoustic waves turns out to be of the order of 106 erg cm-2 s-1 which is high enough to replace the energy lost through optically thin coronal emission and the thermal conduction belowto the transition region. It is also found that only those slow-mode waves which have periods more than 240 s provide the required heating rate to balance the energy losses in the solar corona. Our calculated wave periods for slow-mode waves nearly match with the oscillation periods of loop observed by TRACE.

  6. Study of impurity behaviour in non-coronal equilibrium state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Fa-Yin; Shi Bing-Ren

    2007-01-01

    A physical model of analysing the behaviour of impurities out of coronal equilibrium in tokamak plasmas has been proposed. Through solving the time-dependent rate equations including the effects of atomic processes and the particle transport losses, the ionization state distribution is obtained for a range of low Z impurities such as helium, carbon,oxygen and argon. By using the ionization state distribution of these impurities, the radiation rate coefficients and the mean charge state changing with plasma temperature are calculated. The results show that the mean charge stateis sensitively dependent on the parameter neτ, and this is the reason why the radiation power of impurities under non-coronal equilibrium conditions is several orders of magnitude higher than that under coronal equilibrium condition.

  7. A data driven kinetic approach to coronal heating

    CERN Document Server

    Toutountzi, A; Isliker, H; Moraitis, K; Georgoulis, M; Chintzoglou, G

    2016-01-01

    Coronal heating through the explosive release of magnetic energy remains an open problem in solar physics. Several one-dimensional hydrodynamical models have been developed over the last decade, using simple approaches for the way energy is deposited and transported in the coronal plasma, namely by inserting 'nanoflares' in the form of 'hot spots' at random sites and times. Our aim in this work is to investigate the problem from a different perspective. With the help of a nonlinear force-free extrapolation method we reconstruct the coronal magnetic field of a well-studied solar active region using an observed photospheric vector magnetogram of the region as the required boundary condition. We then determine the locations, energy contents, and volumes of unstable areas within the active-region corona. These areas include strong gradients in the magnetic field and are naturally connected to three-dimensional current sheets. The statistical distributions of these volumes, their fractal structure and correspondin...

  8. Magnetic reconnection between a solar filament and nearby coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Leping; Peter, Hardi; Priest, Eric; Chen, Huadong; Guo, Lijia; Chen, Feng; Mackay, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection, the rearrangement of magnetic field topology, is a fundamental physical process in magnetized plasma systems all over the universe1,2. Its process is difficult to be directly observed. Coronal structures, such as coronal loops and filament spines, often sketch the magnetic field geometry and its changes in the solar corona3. Here we show a highly suggestive observation of magnetic reconnection between an erupting solar filament and its nearby coronal loops, resulting in changes in connection of the filament. X-type structures form when the erupting filament encounters the loops. The filament becomes straight, and bright current sheets form at the interfaces with the loops. Many plasmoids appear in these current sheets and propagate bi-directionally. The filament disconnects from the current sheets, which gradually disperse and disappear, reconnects to the loops, and becomes redirected to the loop footpoints. This evolution of the filament and the loops suggests successive magnetic recon...

  9. FLUX ROPE FORMATION PRECEDING CORONAL MASS EJECTION ONSET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze the evolution of a sigmoidal (S-shaped) active region toward eruption, which includes a coronal mass ejection (CME) but leaves part of the filament in place. The X-ray sigmoid is found to trace out three different magnetic topologies in succession: a highly sheared arcade of coronal loops in its long-lived phase, a bald-patch separatrix surface (BPSS) in the hours before the CME, and the first flare loops in its major transient intensity enhancement. The coronal evolution is driven by photospheric changes which involve the convergence and cancellation of flux elements under the sigmoid and filament. The data yield unambiguous evidence for the existence of a BPSS, and hence a flux rope, in the corona prior to the onset of the CME.

  10. Shock Formation of Slow Magnetosonic Waves in Coronal Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Suess, Steven T.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the height of shock formation in coroner plumes for slow magnetosonic waves. The models take into account plume geometric spreading, heat conduction and radiative damping. The wave parameters as well as the spreading functions of the plumes and the base magnetic field strengths are given by empirical constraints mostly from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (SOHO/UVCS). Our models show that shock formation occurs at low coronal heights, i.e., within 1.3 solar radius, depending on the model parameters. The shock formation is calculated using the well-established wave breaking condition given by the intersection of C+ characteristics in the space-time plane. Our models show that shock heating by slow magnetosonic waves is expected to be relevant at most heights in solar coronal plumes, although slow magnetosonic waves are most likely not a solely operating energy supply mechanism.

  11. Coronal Seismology and the Propagation of Acoustic Waves Along Coronal Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Klimchuk, J A; De Moortel, I

    2004-01-01

    We use a combination of analytical theory, numerical simulation, and data analysis to study the propagation of acoustic waves along coronal loops. We show that the intensity perturbation of a wave depends on a number of factors, including dissipation of the wave energy, pressure and temperature gradients in the loop atmosphere, work action between the wave and a flow, and the sensitivity properties of the observing instrument. In particular, the scale length of the intensity perturbation varies directly with the dissipation scale length (i.e., damping length) and the scale lengths of pressure, temperature, and velocity. We simulate wave propagation in three different equilibrium loop models and find that dissipation and pressure and temperature stratification are the most important effects in the low corona where the waves are most easily detected. Velocity effects are small, and cross-sectional area variations play no direct role for lines-of-sight that are normal to the loop axis. The intensity perturbation...

  12. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop Hα macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T ∼ 104 - 105 K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  13. Eruptions that Drive Coronal Jets in a Solar Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Akiyama, Sachiko; Yashiro, Seiji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2016-01-01

    Solar coronal jets are common in both coronal holes and in active regions (e.g., Shibata et al. 1992, Shimojo et al. 1996, Cirtain et al. 2007. Savcheva et al. 2007). Recently, Sterling et al. (2015), using data from Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA, found that coronal jets originating in polar coronal holes result from the eruption of small-scale filaments (minifilaments). The jet bright point (JBP) seen in X-rays and hotter EUV channels off to one side of the base of the jet's spire develops at the location where the minifilament erupts, consistent with the JBPs being miniature versions of typical solar flares that occur in the wake of large-scale filament eruptions. Here we consider whether active region coronal jets also result from the same minifilament-eruption mechanism, or whether they instead result from a different mechanism (e.g. Yokoyama & Shibata 1995). We present observations of an on-disk active region (NOAA AR 11513) that produced numerous jets on 2012 June 30, using data from SDO/AIA and HMI, and from GOES/SXI. We find that several of these active region jets also originate with eruptions of miniature filaments (size scale 20'') emanating from small-scale magnetic neutral lines of the region. This demonstrates that active region coronal jets are indeed frequently driven by minifilament eruptions. Other jets from the active region were also consistent with their drivers being minifilament eruptions, but we could not confirm this because the onsets of those jets were hidden from our view. This work was supported by funding from NASA/LWS, NASA/HGI, and Hinode. A full report of this study appears in Sterling et al. (2016).

  14. Investigation of Compton profiles of NO and C2H2%NO与C2H2的康普顿轮廓研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马永朋; 赵小利; 刘亚伟; 徐龙泉; 康旭; 倪冬冬; 闫帅; 朱林繁; 杨科

    2015-01-01

    The Compton profiles of nitric oxide and acetylene molecules have been determined at an incident photon energy of 20 keV. Compton profile measurements are carried out with the beamline BL15U1 at the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). A dedicated gas cell is used, in which diffuse scattering is effectively suppressed. By considering that the statistical accuracy of 0.2%at pz ≈0 is achieved, the Compton profiles of NO and C2H2 determined in this paper can serve as the experimental benchmark data. Furthermore, the density functional theory (DFT) and HF calculation for different basis sets are used to calculate the Compton profiles of nitric oxide and acetylene. It is found that the DFT calculations with the diffuse basis sets are closer to the experimental results, indicating that the electronic density distribution of nitric oxide is more diffuse. For acetylene, the HF calculation is of better agreement with the experimental result. To better understand Compton profiles, we have compared them with distributions of electron density by theoretical calculation. There are clear correspondences between them: diffuse distribution is related to the localized profile and complex structure in electron density distribution, which also shows a subtle structure in profile. The present Compton profiles of nitric oxide and acetylene molecules achieved by synchrotron radiation are the most accurate up to now, as far as we know.%基于第三代同步辐射光源,在20 keV的入射X射线能量下测量了NO与C2H2分子的康普顿轮廓.考虑到本次实验结果在pz ≈0附近的统计精度达到了0.2%,本文报道的NO和C2H2的康普顿轮廓可以作为严格检验理论的实验基准.除此之外,还分别采用HF方法及密度泛函方法选用不同的基组计算了NO与C2 H2康普顿轮廓.通过对比实验结果与理论计算,发现对于NO分子,加入弥散函数基组理论计算结果与实验符合更好,说明NO分子基态的电子分布较为弥散.对于C

  15. Hot prominence detected in the core of a coronal mass ejection: Analysis of SOHO/UVCS Lα and SOHO/LASCO visible-light observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzel, P.; Susino, R.; Jejčič, S.; Bemporad, A.; Anzer, U.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The paper deals with the physics of erupting prominences in the core of coronal mass ejections (CME). Aims: We determine the physical parameters of an erupting prominence embedded in the core of a CME using SOHO/UVCS hydrogen Lα and Lβ lines and SOHO/LASCO visible light observations. In particular we analyze the CME event observed on August 2, 2000. We develop the non-LTE (NLTE; i.e. considering departures from the local thermodynamic equilibrium - LTE) spectral diagnostics based on Lα and visible light observations. Methods: Our method is based on 1D NLTE modeling of eruptive prominences and takes into account the effect of large flow velocities, which reach up to 300 km s-1 for the studied event (the so-called Doppler dimming). The NLTE radiative-transfer method can be used for both optically thin and thick prominence structures. We combine spectroscopic UVCS observations of an erupting prominence in the core of a CME with visible light images from LASCO-C2 in order to derive the geometrical parameters like projected thickness and velocity, together with the effective temperature and column density of electrons. These are then used to constrain our NLTE radiative transfer modeling which provides the kinetic temperature, microturbulent velocity, gas pressure, ionization degree, the line opacities, and the prominence effective thickness (geometrical filling factor). Results: Analysis was made for 69 observational points (spatial pixels) inside the whole erupting prominence. Roughly one-half of them show a non-negligible Lα optical thickness for flow velocity 300 km s-1 and about one-third for flow velocity 150 km s-1. All pixels with Lατ0 ≤ 0.3 have been considered for further analysis, which is presented in the form of statistical distributions (histograms) of various physical quantities such as the kinetic temperature, gas pressure, and electron density for two representative flow velocities (150 and 300 km s-1) and non-zero microturbulence. For

  16. Self-organized braiding in solar coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, M. A.; Asgari-Targhi, M.; Deluca, E. E.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the evolution of braided solar coronal loops. We assume that coronal loops consist of several internal strands which twist and braid about each other. Reconnection between the strands leads to small flares and heating of the loop to x-ray temperatures. Using a method of generating and releasing braid structure similar to a forest fire model, we show that the reconnected field lines evolve to a self-organised critical state. In this state, the frequency distributions of coherent braid sequences as well as flare energies follow power law distributions. We demonstrate how the presence of net helicity in the loop alters the distribution laws.

  17. Coronal seismology waves and oscillations in stellar coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, Alexander; Nakariakov, Valery M

    2012-01-01

    This concise and systematic account of the current state of this new branch of astrophysics presents the theoretical foundations of plasma astrophysics, magneto-hydrodynamics and coronal magnetic structures, taking into account the full range of available observation techniques -- from radio to gamma. The book discusses stellar loops during flare energy releases, MHD waves and oscillations, plasma instabilities and heating and charged particle acceleration. Current trends and developments in MHD seismology of solar and stellar coronal plasma systems are also covered, while recent p

  18. More of the Inconvenient Truth About Coronal Dimmings

    OpenAIRE

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Burkepile, Joan; Leamon, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    We continue the investigation of a CME-driven coronal dimming from December 14 2006 using unique high resolution imaging of the chromosphere and corona from the Hinode spacecraft. Over the course of the dimming event we observe the dynamic increase of non-thermal line broadening of multiple emission lines as the CME is released and the corona opens; reaching levels seen in coronal holes. As the corona begins to close, refill and brighten, we see a reduction of the non-thermal broadening towar...

  19. Tunable C2N Membrane for High Efficient Water Desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanmei; Li, Weifeng; Zhou, Hongcai; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhao, Mingwen

    2016-07-01

    Water scarcity represents one of the most serious global problems of our time and challenges the advancements in desalination techniques. Although water-filtering architectures based on graphene have greatly advanced the approach to high performance desalination membranes, the controlled-generation of nanopores with particular diameter is tricky and has stunted its wide applications. Here, through molecular dynamic simulations and first-principles calculations, we propose that the recently reported graphene-like carbon nitride (g-C2N) monolayer can serve as high efficient filters for water desalination. Taking the advantages of the intrisic nanoporous structure and excellent mechanical properties of g-C2N, high water transparency and strong salt filtering capability have been demonstrated in our simulations. More importantly, the “open” and “closed” states of the g-C2N filter can be precisely regulated by tensile strain. It is found that the water permeability of g-C2N is significantly higher than that reported for graphene filters by almost one order of magnitude. In the light of the abundant family of graphene-like carbon nitride monolayered materials, our results thus offer a promising approach to the design of high efficient filteration architectures.

  20. Tunable C2N Membrane for High Efficient Water Desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanmei; Li, Weifeng; Zhou, Hongcai; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhao, Mingwen

    2016-01-01

    Water scarcity represents one of the most serious global problems of our time and challenges the advancements in desalination techniques. Although water-filtering architectures based on graphene have greatly advanced the approach to high performance desalination membranes, the controlled-generation of nanopores with particular diameter is tricky and has stunted its wide applications. Here, through molecular dynamic simulations and first-principles calculations, we propose that the recently reported graphene-like carbon nitride (g-C2N) monolayer can serve as high efficient filters for water desalination. Taking the advantages of the intrisic nanoporous structure and excellent mechanical properties of g-C2N, high water transparency and strong salt filtering capability have been demonstrated in our simulations. More importantly, the “open” and “closed” states of the g-C2N filter can be precisely regulated by tensile strain. It is found that the water permeability of g-C2N is significantly higher than that reported for graphene filters by almost one order of magnitude. In the light of the abundant family of graphene-like carbon nitride monolayered materials, our results thus offer a promising approach to the design of high efficient filteration architectures. PMID:27384666

  1. New boundary conditions for the c=-2 ghost system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate a novel boundary condition for the bc system with central charge c=-2. Its boundary state is constructed and tested in detail. It appears to give rise to the first example of a local logarithmic boundary sector within a bulk theory whose Virasoro zero modes are diagonalizable. (orig.)

  2. Why is the Bond Multiplicity in C2 so Elusive?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cooper, D.L.; Penotti, F.E.; Ponec, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1053, SI (2015), s. 189-194. ISSN 2210-271X Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : bond multiplicity in C2 * spin correlation matrices * full GVB and spin-coupled Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.545, year: 2014

  3. Palladium-catalysed direct C-2 methylation of indoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Daoquan; Cheng, Xiuzhi; Gao, Yadong; Yang, Panpan; Ding, Yousong; Jiang, Chao

    2016-08-21

    A direct C-2 methylation reaction of indoles bearing a readily removable N-2-pyrimidyl moiety as a site-specific directing group has been developed with a palladium catalyst. This reaction relied on the use of KF to promote efficient methylation. A moderate to good yield was achieved in a range of indole substrates. PMID:27424955

  4. THE NUCLEOTIDE RECEPTORS ON MOUSE C2C12 MYOTUBES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HENNING, RH; NELEMANS, A; VANDENAKKER, J; DENHERTOG, A

    1992-01-01

    1 The response of C2C12 mouse myotubes to stimulation with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and other nucleotides was studied by measuring changes in membrane potential. 2 A transient hyperpolarization followed by a slowly declining depolarization of the cells was observed in the presence of ATP (10-mu-

  5. New boundary conditions for the c=-2 ghost system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creutzig, T. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Quella, T. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). KdV Inst. for Mathematics; Schomerus, V. [Center for Mathematical Physics, Hamburg (Germany)]|[King' s College London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mathematics

    2006-12-15

    We investigate a novel boundary condition for the bc system with central charge c=-2. Its boundary state is constructed and tested in detail. It appears to give rise to the first example of a local logarithmic boundary sector within a bulk theory whose Virasoro zero modes are diagonalizable. (orig.)

  6. Simulace přenosu DVB-C2

    OpenAIRE

    Chovaneček, Libor

    2011-01-01

    Tématem této diplomové práce je simulace přenosu DVB-C2. V první části se práce zaměřuje především na teorii, kde popisuje rozdíly mezi digitálním a analogovým televizním vysíláním. Jsou zde popsány principy fungování systémů DVB-C a DVB-C2 se zaměřením na kanálové kódování a modulaci. Druhá část práce popisuje program pro přenos dat v systému DVB-C2, který byl vytvořen v programovacím prostředí MATLAB. V závěrečné části práce jsou uvedeny výsledky simulací přenosu systému DVB-C2 a jejich por...

  7. Thermochemical study of the molecule BaC2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The enthalpy of the reaction Ba(g)+2C(graph.) = BaC2(g) has been determined by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry over a barium alloy with noble metals contained in a graphite cell. The value ΔH/sup circle-open/0 = 252.5 +- 11.5kJ mol-1 has been obtained from second- and third-law evaluations of the equilibrium vapor in the temperature range 1778--2286 K. This reaction enthalpy has been combined with ancillary literature data to derive the following thermodynamic properties in kJ mol-1 of gaseous BaC2: the atomization energy, Δ/sub at/H/sup circle-open/0 , 1180.9 +- 12.2; the standard heat of formation, Δ/sub f/H/sup circle-open/298 , 437.1 +- 14.2; the enthalpy of sublimation of BaC2(s), Δ/sub sub/H/sup circle-open/298 , 511.2 +- 17.1; and the bond dissociation energy, D/sup circle-open/0 (Ba--C2), 581.7 +- 14.8. The results are discussed with regard to their possible significance in reactor technology

  8. Variations of the 3-D coronal magnetic field associated with the X3.4-class solar flare event of AR 10930

    CERN Document Server

    He, Han; Yan, Yihua; Chen, P F; Fang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The variations of the 3-D coronal magnetic fields associated with the X3.4-class flare of active region 10930 are studied in this paper. The coronal magnetic field data are reconstructed from the photospheric vector magnetograms obtained by the Hinode satellite and using the nonlinear force-free field extrapolation method developed in our previous work (He et al., 2011). The 3-D force-free factor $\\alpha$, 3-D current density, and 3-D magnetic energy density are employed to analyze the coronal data. The distributions of $\\alpha$ and current density reveal a prominent magnetic connectivity with strong negative $\\alpha$ values and strong current density before the flare. This magnetic connectivity extends along the main polarity inversion line and is found to be totally broken after the flare. The distribution variation of magnetic energy density reveals the redistribution of magnetic energy before and after the flare. In the lower space of the modeling volume the increase of magnetic energy dominates, and in t...

  9. Are there double layers in solar coronal transition region that accelerate ions originating solar wind?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N.

    2013-12-01

    gravity. The CTR double layers are analogous to the terrestrial auroral double layers that form at the zigzag transition between the dense ionospheric cold plasma and the hot plasma in the auroral density cavities. In the latter case, the hot electrons in the ionosphere result from backscattered hot electrons mirroring in the Earth's magnetic field. The mirroring of hot coronal electrons penetrating into the chromosphere may provide an additional source of the minor hot electron population in the upper chromosphere, in addition to the reconnection.

  10. New techniques for the characterisation of dynamical phenomena in solar coronal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbrecht, E.

    2007-02-01

    During a total solar eclipse, a narrow strip of the Earth's surface is shielded completely by the Moon from the disk of the Sun. In this strip, the corona appears crown-like around the shade of the Moon. It was uncertain until the middle of the 20th century whether the corona was a solar phenomenon or if it was related to the Moon or whether it represented an artifact produced by the Earth's atmosphere. The answer to this question was provided by Grotrian (1939) and Edlèn (1942). Based on studies of iron emission lines, they suggested that the surface of the Sun is surrounded by a hot tenuous gas having a temperature of million degrees Kelvin and thus in a state of high ionization. This discovery was a result from spectroscopy, a field of research which started in 1666 with Sir Isaac Newton's observations of sunlight, dispersed by a prism. It is now clear that the hot solar corona is made of a low density plasma, highly structured by the magnetic field on length scales ranging from the Sun's diameter to the limit of angular resolution (e.g. Démoulin and Klein 2000). The need to resolve and study the corona down to such scales has determined a vigorous scientific and technological impulse toward the development of solar Ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray telescopes with high spatial and temporal resolution. With the advent of the satellite SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, see chapter 1), the picture of a quiet corona was definitely sent to the past. EUV (Extreme UV) image sequences of the lower solar corona revealed a finely structured medium constantly agitated by a wide variety of transients (e.g. Harrison 1998). Active regions consisting of large magnetic loops with enhanced temperature and density are observed, as well as "quiet" areas, coronal holes and numerous structures of different scales such as plumes, jets, spicules, X-ray bright points, blinkers, all structured by magnetic fields. Launched in 1998, the Transition Region And Coronal Explorer (TRACE

  11. Z-effective from Bremsstrahlung Emission in the C-2*FRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garate, Eusebio; Bolte, Nathan; Gupta, Deepak; Gota, Hiroshi; Allfrey, Ian; Kinley, John; Knapp, Kurt; TAE Team

    2014-10-01

    An absolutely-calibrated 12-chord Bremsstrahlung array has been implemented on C-2 and is being used to infer Z-effective profiles and line-averaged values. Electron-ion Bremsstrahlung light at a given wavelength is a function of electron temperature, electron density, and the average ionic charge, Z-effective. Electron density is measured with interferometry and electron temperature is measured directly with Thompson scattering or is inferred by pressure balance. Custom band-pass filters at 523.4 nm were chosen to avoid line-radiation. Z-effective radial profiles show a peak near the separatrix and line-averaged values show an increase in time. For shots where density and temperature profiles were available, Z-effective inside the separatrix was found to be 1.28 for the first ms. These data suggest that C-2 FRC's do not suffer from high levels of edge-light contamination, which allows Z-effective monitoring with a single chord. M. W. Binderbauer, High Performance Field Reversed Configurations (APS DPP 2014 Invited Talk).

  12. Sintering behaviour and mechanical properties of Cr3C2–NiCr cermets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Özer; Y K Tür

    2013-10-01

    Cr3C2–NiCr cermets are used as metal cutting tools due to their relatively high hardness and low sintering temperatures. In this study, a powder mixture consisting of 75 wt% Cr3C2–25 wt% NiCr was sintered at four different temperatures and characterized for itsmicrostructure and mechanical properties. The highest relative density obtained was 97% when sintered at 1350 °C. As the relative density increased, elastic modulus, transverse rupture strength, fracture toughness and hardness of the samples reached to a maximum of 314 GPa, 810 MPa, 10.4 MPa.m1/2 and 11.3 GPa, respectively. However, sintering at 1400 °C caused further grain growth and pore coalescence which resulted in decreasing density and degradation of all mechanical properties. Fracture surface investigation showed that the main failure mechanism was the intergranular fracture of ceramic phase accompanied by the ductile fracture of the metal phase which deformed plastically during crack propagation and enhanced the fracture toughness.

  13. A new way to convert Alfven waves into heat in solar coronal holes - Intermittent magnetic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.; Hammer, R.; Musielak, Z. E.; Suess, S. T.; An, C.-H.

    1992-01-01

    In our recent analysis of Alfven wave reflection in solar coronal holes, we found evidence that coronal holes are heated by reflected Alfven waves. This result suggests that the reflection is inherent to the process that dissipates these Alfven waves into heat. We propose a novel dissipation process that is driven by the reflection, and that plausibly dominates the heating in coronal holes.

  14. Realistic Modeling of SDO/AIA-discovered Coronal Fast MHD Wave Trains in Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, Leon; Liu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution EUV observations by space telescopes have provided plenty of evidence for coronal MHD waves in active regions. In particular, SDO/AIA discovered quasi-periodic, fast-mode propagating MHD wave trains (QFPs), which can propagate at speeds of ~1000 km/s perpendicular to the magnetic field. Such waves can provide information on the energy release of their associated flares and the magnetized plasma structure of the active regions. Before we can use these waves as tools for coronal seismology, 3D MHD modeling is required for disentangling observational ambiguities and improving the diagnostic accuracy. We present new results of observationally contained models of QFPs using our recently upgraded radiative, thermally conductive, visco-resistive 3D MHD code. The waves are excited by time-depended boundary conditions constrained by the spatial (localized) and quasi-periodic temporal evolution of a C-class flare typically associated with QFPs. We investigate the excitation, propagation, and damping of the waves for a range of key model parameters, such as the background temperature, density, magnetic field structure, and the location of the flaring site within the active region. We synthesize EUV intensities in multiple AIA channels and then obtain the model parameters that best reproduce the properties of observed QFPs. We discuss the implications of our model results for the seismological application of QFPs and for understanding the dynamics of their associated flares.

  15. Characteristics of coronal shock waves and solar type 2 radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, G.; Classen, H.-T.

    1995-01-01

    In the solar corona shock waves generated by flares and/or coronal mass ejections can be observed by radio astronomical methods in terms of solar type 2 radio bursts. In dynamic radio spectra they appear as emission stripes slowly drifting from high to low frequencies. A sample of 25 solar type 2 radio bursts observed in the range of 40 - 170 MHz with a time resolution of 0.1 s by the new radiospectrograph of the Astrophvsikalisches Institut Potsdam in Tremsdorf is statistically investigated concerning their spectral features, i.e, drift rate, instantaneous bandwidth, and fundamental harmonic ratio. In-situ plasma wave measurements at interplanetary shocks provide the assumption that type 2 radio radiation is emitted in the vicinity of the transition region of shock waves. Thus, the instantaneous bandwidth of a solar type 2 radio burst would reflect the density jump across the associated shock wave. Comparing the inspection of the Rankine-Hugoniot relations of shock waves under coronal circumstances with those obtained from the observational study, solar type 2 radio bursts should be regarded to be generated by weak supercritical, quasi-parallel, fast magnetosonic shock waves in the corona.

  16. Effects of field-aligned flows on standing kink and sausage modes supported by coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, S -X; Xia, L -D; Chen, Y -J; Yu, H

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental standing modes and their overtones play an important role in coronal seismology. We examine how a significant field-aligned flow affects standing modes supported by coronal loops, modeled here as cold magnetic slabs. Of particular interest are the period ratios of the fundamental to its $(n-1)$-th overtone ($P_1/nP_n$) for both kink and sausage modes, and the threshold half-width-to-length ratio for sausage modes. For standing kink modes, the flow significantly reduces $P_1/nP_n$ in general, the effect being particularly strong for larger $n$ and when the density contrast $\\rho_0/\\rho_e$ between loops and their surroundings is weak. That said, even when $\\rho_0/\\rho_e$ approaches infinity, this effect is still substantial, reducing the minimal $P_1/nP_n$ by up to 13.7% (24.5%) for $n=2$ ($n=4$) relative to the static case, when the Alfv\\'en Mach number $M_A$ reaches 0.8 where $M_A$ measures the loop flow speed in units of the internal Alfv\\'en speed. For standing sausage modes, though not negligib...

  17. Jets in Coronal Holes: Hinode Observations and Three-dimensional Computer Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Insertis, F.; Galsgaard, K.; Ugarte-Urra, I.

    2008-02-01

    Recent observations of coronal hole areas with the XRT and EIS instruments on board the Hinode satellite have shown with unprecedented detail the launching of fast, hot jets away from the solar surface. In some cases these events coincide with episodes of flux emergence from beneath the photosphere. In this Letter we show results of a three-dimensional numerical experiment of flux emergence from the solar interior into a coronal hole and compare them with simultaneous XRT and EIS observations of a jet-launching event that accompanied the appearance of a bipolar region in MDI magnetograms. The magnetic skeleton and topology that result in the experiment bear a strong resemblance to linear force-free extrapolations of the SOHO/MDI magnetograms. A thin current sheet is formed at the boundary of the emerging plasma. A jet is launched upward along the open reconnected field lines with values of temperature, density, and velocity in agreement with the XRT and EIS observations. Below the jet, a split-vault structure results with two chambers: a shrinking one containing the emerged field loops and a growing one with loops produced by the reconnection. The ongoing reconnection leads to a horizontal drift of the vault-and-jet structure. The timescales, velocities, and other plasma properties in the experiment are consistent with recent statistical studies of this type of event made with Hinode data.

  18. Jets in coronal holes: Hinode observations and 3D computer modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Moreno-Insertis, F; Ugarte-Urra, I

    2007-01-01

    Recent observations of coronal hole areas with the XRT and EIS instruments onboard the Hinode satellite have shown with unprecedented detail the launching of fast, hot jets away from the solar surface. In some cases these events coincide with episodes of flux emergence from beneath the photosphere. In this letter we show results of a 3D numerical experiment of flux emergence from the solar interior into a coronal hole and compare them with simultaneous XRT and EIS observations of a jet-launching event that accompanied the appearance of a bipolar region in MDI magnetograms. The magnetic skeleton and topology that result in the experiment bear a strong resemblance to linear force-fee extrapolations of the SOHO/MDI magnetograms. A thin current sheet is formed at the boundary of the emerging plasma. A jet is launched upward along the open reconnected field lines with values of temperature, density and velocity in agreement with the XRT and EIS observations. Below the jet, a split-vault structure results with two ...

  19. Search for the isomers of C2H3NO and C2H3NS in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etim, Emmanuel; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Das, Ankan; Gorai, Prasanta; Arunan, Elangannan

    2016-07-01

    With about 40% of all the known interstellar and circumstellar molecules having their isomeric analogues as known astromolecules, isomerism remains one of the leading themes in interstellar chemistry. In this regard, the recent detection of methyl isocyanate (with a number of isomeric analogues) in the Sgr B2(N) giant molecular cloud opens a new window for the possible astronomical detection of other C_2H_3NO isomers. The present work looks at the possibility of detecting other isomers of methyl isocyanate by considering different factors such as thermodynamic stability of the different isomers with respect to the Energy, Stability and Abundance (ESA) relationship, effect of interstellar hydrogen bonding with respect to the formation these isomers on the surface of the interstellar dust grains, possible formation routes for these isomers, spectroscopic parameters for potential astromolecules among these isomers, chemical modeling among other studies. The same studies are repeated for the C_2H_3NS isomers which are the isoelectroninc analogues of the C_2H_3NO isomers taking into account the unique chemistry of S and O-containing interstellar molecular species. Among the C_2H_3NS isomers, methyl isothiocyanate remains the most potential candidate for astronomical observation.

  20. Synthesis of triple (13C2, 15N), single (14C), and double (14C2) labeled trimetrexate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method was developed for the synthesis of triple (13C2, 14N) labeled trimetrexate. A method for single carbon-14 labeled synthesis is also described. Modifications of the triple labeled synthesis with carbon-14 produced a doubled carbon-14 labeled trimetrexate. (author)

  1. The behavior of transverse waves in nonuniform solar flux tubes. II. Implications for coronal loop seismology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, Roberto; Terradas, Jaume; Oliver, Ramón [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Goossens, Marcel, E-mail: roberto.soler@uib.es [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-02-01

    The seismology of coronal loops using observations of damped transverse oscillations in combination with results from theoretical models is a tool to indirectly infer physical parameters in the solar atmospheric plasma. Existing seismology schemes based on approximations of the period and damping time of kink oscillations are often used beyond their theoretical range of applicability. These approximations assume that the variation of density across the loop is confined to a nonuniform layer much thinner than the radius of the loop, but the results of the inversion problem often do not satisfy this preliminary hypothesis. Here, we determine the accuracy of the analytic approximations of the period and damping time, and the impact on seismology estimates when largely nonuniform loops are considered. We find that the accuracy of the approximations when used beyond their range of applicability is strongly affected by the form of the density profile across the loop, that is observationally unknown and so must be arbitrarily imposed as part of the theoretical model. The error associated with the analytic approximations can be larger than 50% even for relatively thin nonuniform layers. This error directly affects the accuracy of approximate seismology estimates compared to actual numerical inversions. In addition, assuming different density profiles can produce noncoincident intervals of the seismic variables in inversions of the same event. The ignorance about the true shape of density variation across the loop is an important source of error that may dispute the reliability of parameters seismically inferred assuming an ad hoc density profile.

  2. Reflection of Propagating Slow Magneto-acoustic Waves in Hot Coronal Loops: Multi-instrument Observations and Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Sudip; Yuan, Ding; Fang, Xia; Banerjee, Dipankar; Pant, Vaibhav; Van Doorsselaere, Tom

    2016-09-01

    Slow MHD waves are important tools for understanding coronal structures and dynamics. In this paper, we report a number of observations from the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on board HINODE and Solar Dynamic Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) of reflecting longitudinal waves in hot coronal loops. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this kind as seen from the XRT and simultaneously with the AIA. The wave appears after a micro-flare occurs at one of the footpoints. We estimate the density and temperature of the loop plasma by performing differential emission measure (DEM) analysis on the AIA image sequence. The estimated speed of propagation is comparable to or lower than the local sound speed, suggesting it to be a propagating slow wave. The intensity perturbation amplitude, in every case, falls very rapidly as the perturbation moves along the loop and eventually vanishes after one or more reflections. To check the consistency of such reflection signatures with the obtained loop parameters, we perform a 2.5D MHD simulation, which uses the parameters obtained from our observation as inputs, and perform forward modeling to synthesize AIA 94 Å images. Analyzing the synthesized images, we obtain the same properties of the observables as for the real observation. From the analysis we conclude that a footpoint heating can generate a slow wave which then reflects back and forth in the coronal loop before fading. Our analysis of the simulated data shows that the main agent for this damping is anisotropic thermal conduction.

  3. Data-driven coronal evolutionary model of active region 11944.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazachenko, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent availability of systematic measurements of vector magnetic fields and Doppler velocities has allowed us to utilize a data-driven approach for modeling observed active regions (AR), a crucial step for understanding the nature of solar flare initiation. We use a sequence of vector magnetograms and Dopplergrams from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard the SDO to drive magnetofrictional (MF) model of the coronal magnetic field in the the vicinity of AR 11944, where an X1.2 flare on January 7 2014 occurred. To drive the coronal field we impose a time-dependent boundary condition based on temporal sequences of magnetic and electric fields at the bottom of the computational domain, i.e. the photosphere. To derive the electric fields we use a recently improved poloidal-toroidal decomposition (PTD), which we call the ``PTD-Doppler-FLCT-Ideal'' or PDFI technique. We investigate the results of the simulated coronal evolution, compare those with EUV observations from Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and discuss what we could learn from them. This work is a a collaborative effort from the UC Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory (SSL), Stanford University, and Lockheed-Martin and is a part of Coronal Global Evolutionary (CGEM) Model, funded jointly by NASA and NSF.

  4. Competition between shock and turbulent heating in coronal loop system

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Takuma

    2016-01-01

    2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are performed with high spatial resolution in order to distinguish between competing models of the coronal heating problem. A single coronal loop powered by Alfv\\'{e}n waves excited in the photosphere is the target of the present study. The coronal structure is reproduced in our simulations as a natural consequence of the transportation and dissipation of Alfv\\'{e}n waves. Further, the coronal structure is maintained as the spatial resolution is changed from 25 to 3 km, although the temperature at the loop top increases with the spatial resolution. The heating mechanisms change gradually across the magnetic canopy at a height of 4 Mm. Below the magnetic canopy, both the shock and the MHD turbulence are dominant heating processes. Above the magnetic canopy, the shock heating rate reduces to less than 10 % of the total heating rate while the MHD turbulence provides significant energy to balance the radiative cooling and thermal conduction loss or gain. The i...

  5. Closed Field Coronal Heating Models Inspired by Wave Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, C.; Lionello, R.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J.; Velli, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    To simulate the energy balance of coronal plasmas on macroscopic scales, we often require the specification of the coronal heating mechanism in some functional form. To go beyond empirical formulations and to build a more physically motivated heating function, we investigate the wave-turbulence dissipation (WTD) phenomenology for the heating of closed coronal loops. To do so, we employ an implementation of non-WKB equations designed to capture the large-scale propagation, reflection, and dissipation of wave turbulence along a loop. The parameter space of this model is explored by solving the coupled WTD and hydrodynamic equations in 1D for an idealized loop, and the relevance to a range of solar conditions is established by computing solutions for several hundred loops extracted from a realistic 3D coronal field. Due to the implicit dependence of the WTD heating model on loop geometry and plasma properties along the loop and at the footpoints, we find that this model can significantly reduce the number of free parameters when compared to traditional empirical heating models, and still robustly describe a broad range of quiet-sun and active region conditions. The importance of the self-reflection term in producing realistic heating scale heights and thermal non-equilibrium cycles is discussed, and preliminary 3D thermodynamic MHD simulations using this formulation are presented. Research supported by NASA and NSF.

  6. Interplanetary type II radio bursts and coronal mass ejections

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krupař, Vratislav; Santolík, Ondřej; Maksimovic, M.; Souček, Jan; Krupařová, Oksana

    Gent: URSI, 2015. H03.1. [URSI Atlantic Radio Science Conference (AT-RASC) /1st. 18.03.2014-22.03.2015, Gran Canaria] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : coronal mass ejections * plasmas Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  7. Merging of coronal and heliospheric numerical two dimensional MHD models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Odstrčil, Dušan; Linker, J. A.; Lionello, R.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.; Pizzo, J. V.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 107, A12 (2002), s. SSH14-1 - SSH14-11. ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : coronal mass ejection * interplanetary shock * numerical MHD simulation Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.245, year: 2002

  8. Competition between shock and turbulent heating in coronal loop system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuma

    2016-08-01

    2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are performed with high spatial resolution in order to distinguish between competing models of the coronal heating problem. A single coronal loop powered by Alfvén waves excited in the photosphere is the target of the present study. The coronal structure is reproduced in our simulations as a natural consequence of the transportation and dissipation of Alfvén waves. Further, the coronal structure is maintained as the spatial resolution is changed from 25 to 3 km, although the temperature at the loop top increases with the spatial resolution. The heating mechanisms change gradually across the magnetic canopy at a height of 4 Mm. Below the magnetic canopy, both the shock and the MHD turbulence are dominant heating processes. Above the magnetic canopy, the shock heating rate reduces to less than 10 % of the total heating rate while the MHD turbulence provides significant energy to balance the radiative cooling and thermal conduction loss or gain. The importance of compressibility shown in the present study would significantly impact on the prospects of successful MHD turbulence theory in the solar chromosphere.

  9. Online Trading C2C Operators Fight for Number One

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAVID HENDRICKSON

    2006-01-01

    @@ Whether shopping casually or searching for some obscure, hard to find item, more and more Chinese are logging online and turning to customer-to-customer (C2C) network operators for their trading needs rather than bother with the hassles of conventional buying and selling. Proof is in the numbers. A leading technology, new media, and telecom watchdog, Analysys International reports that China's C2C market users more than doubled in 2005 to 37.87 million, while the sector's total transaction value increased from 4.16 billion yuan in 2004, to 13.9billion yuan (US$1.74 billion). Supplanted by a web surfing pool of 100 million and counting, they are trends that Analysys and other industry groups expect will continue in China for some time, fundamentally transforming how the country's independent traders do business.

  10. A rare Cervical Nerve Root, C2-C3 Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh Chordia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas, neurilemmomas or neurinomas are benign nerve sheath tumors deriving from Schwann cells that occur in the head and neck region in 25-45% of cases 1 .About 10% of schwannoma that occur in the head and neck region generally originate from the vagus or sympathetic nervous system, those arising from C2 nerve root are extremely rare. 2 Preoperative imaging studies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and computed tomography (CT are used to distinguish its location and origin. The treatment of schwannoma is surgical resection, with several surgical modalities have been introduced to preserve the neurological function. We present a rare case of Cervical nerve (C2-C3 root schwannoma of 70 years old male who presented with lateral neck swelling with no neurological deficit ,swelling which also had intervertebral part was removed successfully through neck incision with no post-operative neurological symptoms

  11. Effect of sintering temperature on the preparation of Cu-Ti3SiC2 metal matrix composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tungwai L.Ngai; Wei Zheng; Yuanyuan Li

    2013-01-01

    Ti3SiC2 has the potential to replace graphite as reinforcing particles in Cu matrix composites for applications in brush, electrical contacts and electrode materials. In this paper the fabrication of Cu-Ti3SiC2 metal matrix composites prepared by warm compaction powder metallurgy forming and spark plasma sintering (SPS) was studied. The stability of Ti3SiC2 at different sintering temperatures was also studied. The present experimental results indicate that the reinforcing particles in Cu-Ti3SiC2 composites are not stable at and above 800 1C. The decomposition of Ti3SiC2 will lead to the formation of TiC and/or other carbides and TiSi2. If purity is the major concern, the processing and servicing temperatures of the Cu-Ti3SiC2 composite should be limited to 750 1C or lower. The composites prepared by warm compaction forming and SPS sintering at 750 1C have lower density when compared with the composites prepared by SPS sintering at 950 1C, but their electrical resistivity values are very close to each other and even lower.

  12. Isotope analysis of carbon by C2 molecule spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made on inert gas mixture (He, Ne, Ar) with carbon-containing components (CO, CO2, CH4) under conditions of variation of mixture pressure in discharge tube, of carbon-containing components contents and the rate of gas flow through the discharge tube. The use of C2 molecule spectrum enabled to develope the spectroscopic techniques for determination of carbon isotope ratio. The method is universal with respect to molecular form of carbon-containing substance

  13. GRADUAL INFLATION OF ACTIVE-REGION CORONAL ARCADES BUILDING UP TO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pre-coronal mass ejection (pre-CME) structure is of great importance to understanding the origin of CMEs, which, however, has been largely unknown for CMEs originating from active regions. In this paper, we investigate this issue using the wavelet-enhanced EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) observations combined with the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph, Michelson Doppler Imager, and GOES soft X-ray observations. Selected for studying are 16 active-region coronal arcades whose gradual inflation lead up to CMEs. Twelve of them clearly build upon post-eruptive arcades resulting from a preceding eruption; the remaining four are located high in the corona in the first place and/or have existed for days. The observed inflation lasts for 8.7 ± 4.1 hr, with the arcade rising from 1.15 ± 0.06 Rsun to 1.36 ± 0.07 Rsun within the EIT field of view (FOV). The rising speed is less than 5 km s-1 most of the time. Only at the end of this quasi-static stage does it increase to tens of kilometers per second over tens of minutes. The arcade then erupts out of the EIT FOV as a CME with similar morphology. This pre-CME structure is apparently unaffected by the flares occurring during its quasi-static inflation phase, but is closely coupled with the flare occurring during its acceleration phase. For four events that are observed on the disk, it is found that the gradual inflation of the arcade is accompanied by significant helicity injection from the photosphere. In particular, a swirling structure, which is reminiscent of a magnetic flux rope, was observed in one of the arcades over 4 hr prior to the subsequent CME, and the growth of the arcade is associated with the injection of helicity of opposite sign into the active region via flux emergence. We propose a four-phase evolution paradigm for the observed CMEs, i.e., a quasi-static inflation phase which corresponds to the buildup of magnetic free energy in the corona, followed by the frequently observed three-phase paradigm

  14. Modelling of c-C2H4O formation on grain surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Occhiogrosso, A; Ward, M D; Price, S D

    2012-01-01

    Despite its potential reactivity due to ring strain, ethylene oxide (c-C2H4O) is a complex molecule that seems to be stable under the physical conditions of an interstellar dense core; indeed it has been detected towards several high-mass star forming regions with a column density of the order of 10e13cm-2 (Ikeda et al. 2001). To date, its observational abundances cannot be reproduced by chemical models and this may be due to the significant contribution played by its chemistry on grain surfaces. Recently, Ward and Price (2011) have performed experiments in order to investigate the surface formation of ethylene oxide starting with oxygen atoms and ethylene ice as reactants. We present a chemical model which includes the most recent experimental results from Ward and Price (2011) on the formation of c-C2H4O. We study the influence of the physical parameters of dense cores on the abundances of c-C2H4O. We verify that ethylene oxide can indeed be formed during the cold phase (when the ISM dense cores are formed)...

  15. V18P9C2. A complex phosphide carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V18P9C2 crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pmma with the lattice parameters a = 17.044(3), b = 3.2219(7), and c = 13.030(2) Aa, Z = 2. The crystal structure is composed of 19 symmetry-independent atoms. The crystal structure is considered as a network formed by the transition metal atoms exhibiting cubic, trigonal prismatic, and octahedral voids centered by V, P, and C atoms, respectively. Vice versa, the V and P atoms form a three-dimensional network. The two CV6 octahedra are edge- and corner-connected to chains running parallel to [010]. The five unique P atoms are trigonal prismatically coordinated by V atoms with one to three faces capped again by a V atom. The V atoms have mainly cubic environments formed solely by V or by V and P atoms. V18P9C2 exhibits some structural relations to other compounds of the ternary system V-P-C as well as to other intermetallic phases. Despite the low carbon content, V18P9C2 is considered as a ternary compound rather than an interstitially stabilized (binary) phosphide in view of its special structural features.

  16. Latitudinal Dependence of Coronal Hole-Associated Fast Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; Landi, E.

    2014-05-01

    The fast solar wind can have at least two different coronal sources: high-latitude, polar coronal holes (PCH) and low-latitude, equatorial coronal holes (ECH). The in-situ differences in the PCH and ECH winds have not been well studied, nor have the differences in their evolution over the solar cycles. Ulysses' 19 years of observations from 1990 to 2009, combined with ACE observations from 1998 to the present, provide us with measurements of solar wind properties that span two entire solar cycles, which allow us to study the in-situ properties and evolution of the coronal hole-associated solar wind at different latitudes. In this work, we focus on the PCH and ECH solar winds during the minima between solar cycles 22-23 and 23-24. We use data from SWICS, SWOOPS, and VHM/FGM on board Ulysses, and SWICS, SWEPAM, and MAG on board ACE to analyze the proton dynamics, heavy ion composition, elemental abundance, and magnetic field properties of the PCH wind and ECH wind, with a special focus on their differences during the recent two solar minima. We also include the slow and hot, streamer-associated (ST) wind as a reference in the comparison. The comparison of PCH and ECH wind shows that: 1) the in-situ properties of ECH and PCH winds are significantly different during the two solar minima, and 2) the two types of coronal hole-associated solar wind respond differently to changes in solar activity strength from cycle 23 to cycle 24.

  17. Towards a Data-Optimized Coronal Magnetic Field Model (DOC-FM): statistical method for diagnosing the coronal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmasse, Kevin; Nychka, Doug; Gibson, Sarah; Fan, Yuhong; Flyer, Natasha

    2016-05-01

    Knowing the 3D coronal magnetic field prior to the trigger of a CME is one of the key features for predicting their geomagnetic effect. Since the magnetic field is essentially measured at the photosphere, one must rely on reconstruction models to obtain the 3D magnetic field in the corona. Hence, obtaining an accurate model of the real 3D coronal magnetic field is one of the cornerstones for precise Space Weather Forecasting. In this work, we propose a new method for data-constrained reconstruction of the 3D coronal magnetic field. Model-data fitting is achieved by optimizing a user-specified log-likelihood, quantifying the difference between a dataset (including e.g. polarization, extreme-ultraviolet emission, X-ray emission) and its synthetic analogue. The synthetic data is produced by forward calculations applied to a 3D magnetic model that depends upon a finite set of parameters. After introducing the method, we present its validation on a synthetic test bed consisting of a coronal magnetic flux rope assumed to depend on three parameters, i.e. latitude, longitude, and tilt angle. A specific value of each parameter is used to generate a ground truth and the corresponding synthetic data. We show that our method performs well and the best-fit parameters provide a good approximation of the ground-truth parameters. We discuss future plans for validation and application of our method to solar observations.

  18. The Relation between Coronal Holes and Coronal Mass Ejections during the Rise, Maximum, and Declining Phases of Solar Cycle 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, A. A.; Gopalswamy, N; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.; Jung, H.

    2012-01-01

    We study the interaction between coronal holes (CHs) and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using a resultant force exerted by all the coronal holes present on the disk and is defined as the coronal hole influence parameter (CHIP). The CHIP magnitude for each CH depends on the CH area, the distance between the CH centroid and the eruption region, and the average magnetic field within the CH at the photospheric level. The CHIP direction for each CH points from the CH centroid to the eruption region. We focus on Solar Cycle 23 CMEs originating from the disk center of the Sun (central meridian distance =15deg) and resulting in magnetic clouds (MCs) and non-MCs in the solar wind. The CHIP is found to be the smallest during the rise phase for MCs and non-MCs. The maximum phase has the largest CHIP value (2.9 G) for non-MCs. The CHIP is the largest (5.8 G) for driverless (DL) shocks, which are shocks at 1 AU with no discernible MC or non-MC. These results suggest that the behavior of non-MCs is similar to that of the DL shocks and different from that of MCs. In other words, the CHs may deflect the CMEs away from the Sun-Earth line and force them to behave like limb CMEs with DL shocks. This finding supports the idea that all CMEs may be flux ropes if viewed from an appropriate vantage point.

  19. Electronic properties of freestanding Ti3C2Tx MXene monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the electrical characterization of single MXene Ti3C2Tx flakes (where T is a surface termination) and demonstrate the metallic nature of their conductivities. We also show that the carrier density can be modulated by an external gate voltage. The density of free carriers is estimated to be 8 ± 3 × 1021 cm−3 while their mobility is estimated to be 0.7 ± 0.2 cm2/V s. Electrical measurements, in the presence of a magnetic field, show a small, but clearly discernable, quadratic increase in conductance at 2.5 K

  20. Multi-channel Doppler backscattering measurements in the C-2 field reversed configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, L., E-mail: lschmitz@ucla.edu; Peebles, W. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Ruskov, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Deng, B. H.; Gota, H.; Gupta, D.; Tuszewski, M.; Douglass, J.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A versatile heterodyne Doppler Backscattering (DBS) system is used to measure density fluctuation levels (in the wavenumber range kρ{sub s} ≤ 50), and the toroidal E × B flow velocity in the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). Six tunable frequencies in three waveguide bands (26 GHz ≤ f ≤ 90 GHz) are launched using monostatic beam optics, via a quasi-optical beam combiner/polarizer and an adjustable parabolic focusing mirror (inside the vacuum enclosure) achieving Gaussian beam spot sizes of 3–5.5 cm at the X/O-mode cutoff. The DBS system covers plasma densities of 0.8 × 10{sup 13} ≤ n{sub e} ≤ 1 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}, and provides access to the FRC core (up to the field null) and across the FRC separatrix into the scrape-off layer plasma.

  1. On the nature of transverse coronal waves revealed by wavefront dislocations

    CERN Document Server

    Ariste, A López; Arregui, I; Khomenko, E; Collados, M

    2015-01-01

    Coronal waves are an important aspect of the dynamics of the plasma in the corona. Wavefront dislocations are topological features of most waves in nature and also of magnetohydrodynamic waves. Are there dislocations in coronal waves? The finding and explanation of dislocations may shed light on the nature and characteristics of the propagating waves, their interaction in the corona and in general on the plasma dynamics. We positively identify dislocations in coronal waves observed by the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP) as singularities in the Doppler shifts of emission coronal lines. We study the possible singularities that can be expected in coronal waves and try to reproduce the observed dislocations in terms of localization and frequency of appearance. The observed dislocations can only be explained by the interference of a kink and a sausage wave modes propagating with different frequencies along the coronal magnetic field. In the plane transverse to the propagation, the cross-section of the osc...

  2. Periods and damping rates of fast sausage oscillations in multi-shelled coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shao-Xia; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Standing sausage modes are important in interpreting quasi-periodic pulsations in the lightcurves of solar flares. Their periods and damping times play an important role in seismologically diagnosing key parameters like the magnetic field strength in regions where flare energy is released. Usually such applications are based on theoretical results neglecting unresolved fine structures in magnetized loops. However, the existence of fine structuring is suggested on both theoretical and observational grounds. Adopting the framework of cold magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), we model coronal loops as magnetized cylinders with a transverse equilibrium density profile comprising a monolithic part and a modulation due to fine structuring in the form of concentric shells. The equation governing the transverse velocity perturbation is solved with an initial-value-problem approach, and the effects of fine structuring on the periods $P$ and damping times $\\tau$ of global, leaky, standing sausage modes are examined. A parameter...

  3. Coronal rain in magnetic arcades: Rebound shocks, Limit cycles, and Shear flows

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, X; Keppens, R; Van Doorsselaere, T

    2015-01-01

    We extend our earlier multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations of coronal rain occurring in magnetic arcades with higher resolution, grid-adaptive computations covering a much longer ($>6$ hour) timespan. We quantify how in-situ forming blob-like condensations grow along and across field lines and show that rain showers can occur in limit cycles, here demonstrated for the first time in 2.5D setups. We discuss dynamical, multi-dimensional aspects of the rebound shocks generated by the siphon inflows and quantify the thermodynamics of a prominence-corona-transition-region like structure surrounding the blobs. We point out the correlation between condensation rates and the cross-sectional size of loop systems where catastrophic cooling takes place. We also study the variations of the typical number density, kinetic energy and temperature while blobs descend, impact and sink into the transition region. In addition, we explain the mechanisms leading to concurrent upflows while the blobs descend. As a resu...

  4. Self-similar expansion of solar coronal mass ejections: Implications for Lorentz self-force driving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine the propagation of several coronal mass ejections (CMEs) with well-observed flux rope signatures in the field of view of the SECCHI coronagraphs on board the STEREO satellites using the graduated cylindrical shell fitting method of Thernisien et al. We find that the manner in which they propagate is approximately self-similar; i.e., the ratio (κ) of the flux rope minor radius to its major radius remains approximately constant with time. We use this observation of self-similarity to draw conclusions regarding the local pitch angle (γ) of the flux rope magnetic field and the misalignment angle (χ) between the current density J and the magnetic field B. Our results suggest that the magnetic field and current configurations inside flux ropes deviate substantially from a force-free state in typical coronagraph fields of view, validating the idea of CMEs being driven by Lorentz self-forces.

  5. Plasma motions and non-thermal line broadening in flaring twisted coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Gordovskyy, Mykola; Browning, Philippa

    2015-01-01

    Observation of coronal EUV spectral lines offers an opportunity to evaluate the thermal structure and flows in flaring atmospheres. This, in turn, can be used to estimate the partitioning between the thermal and kinetic energies released in flares. Our aim is to forward-model large-scale (50-10000 km) velocity distributions in order to interpret non-thermal broadening of different spectral EUV lines observed in flares. The developed models allow us to understand the origin of the observed spectral line shifts and broadening, and link these features to particular physical phenomena in flaring atmospheres. We use ideal MHD to derive unstable twisted magnetic fluxtube configurations in a gravitationally-stratified atmosphere. The evolution of these twisted fluxtubes is followed using resistive MHD, with anomalous resistivity depending on the local density and temperature. The model also takes into account the thermal conduction and radiative losses. The model allows us to evaluate average velocities and velocity...

  6. Three-Dimensional Simulations of Tearing and Intermittency in Coronal Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Wyper, P F; Karpen, J T; Lynch, B J

    2016-01-01

    Observations of coronal jets increasingly suggest that local fragmentation and intermittency play an important role in the dynamics of these events. In this work we investigate this fragmentation in high-resolution simulations of jets in the closed-field corona. We study two realizations of the embedded-bipole model, whereby impulsive helical outflows are driven by reconnection between twisted and untwisted field across the domed fan plane of a magnetic null. We find that the reconnection region fragments following the onset of a tearing-like instability, producing multiple magnetic null points and flux-rope structures within the current layer. The flux ropes formed within the weak-field region in the center of the current layer are associated with "blobs" of density enhancement that become filamentary threads as the flux ropes are ejected from the layer, whereupon new flux ropes form behind them. This repeated formation and ejection of flux ropes provides a natural explanation for the intermittent outflows, ...

  7. Space Based Observations of Coronal Cavities in Conjunction with the Total Solar Eclipse of July 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, T. A.; Berger, T. E.; Boerner, P.; Dietzel, M.; Druckmuller, M.; Gibson, S. E.; Habbal, S. R.; Morgan, H.; Reeves, K. K.; Schmit, D. J.; Seaton, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    In conjunction with the total solar eclipse on July 11, 2010 we coordinated a campaign between ground and space based observations. Our specific goal was to augment the ground based measurement of coronal prominence cavity temperatures made using iron lines in the IR (Habbal et al. 2010 ApJ 719 1362) with measurements performed by space based instruments. Included in the campaign were Hinode/EIS, XRT and SOT, PROBA2/SWAP, SDO/AIA, SOHO/CDS and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI, in addition to the ground based IR measurements. We plan to use a combination of line ratio and forward modeling techniques to investigate the density and temperature structure of the cavities at that time.

  8. Coronal Magnetography of a Simulated Solar Active Region from Microwave Imaging Spectropolarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhitao; Fleishman, Gregory D; White, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    We have simulated the Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array (EOVSA) radio images generated at multiple frequencies from a model solar active region, embedded in a realistic solar disk model, and explored the resulting datacube for different spectral analysis schemes to evaluate the potential for realizing one of EOVSA's most important scientific goals--coronal magnetography. In this paper, we focus on modeling the gyroresonance and free-free emission from an on-disk solar active region model with realistic complexities in electron density, temperature and magnetic field distribution. We compare the magnetic field parameters extrapolated from the image datacube along each line of sight after folding through the EOVSA instrumental profile with the original (unfolded) parameters used in the model. We find that even the most easily automated, image-based analysis approach (Level 0) provides reasonable quantitative results, although they are affected by systematic effects due to finite sampling in the Fourier (uv) pla...

  9. Three-Dimensional Structure and Energy Balance of a Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.-Y.; Raymond, J. C.; Ko, Y.-K.; Kim, K.-S.

    2009-01-01

    UVCS observed Doppler-shifted material of a partial halo coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2001 December 13. The observed ratio of [O VJ/O V] is a reliable density diagnostic important for assessing the state of the plasma. Earlier UVCS observations of CMEs found evidence that the ejected plasma is heated long after the eruption. This paper investigated the heating rates, which represent a significant fraction of the CME energy budget. The parameterized heating and radiative and adiabatic cooling have been used to evaluate the temperature evolution of the CME material with a time-dependent ionization state model. Continuous heating is required to match the UVCS observations. To match the O VI bright knots, a higher heating rate is required such that the heating energy is greater than the kinetic energy.

  10. Vapor-hydrate phases equilibrium of (CH4+C2H6)and (CH4+C2H4) systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Qinglan; Chen Guangjin; Zhang Lingwei

    2008-01-01

    Separation of the (C1 + C2) hydrocarbon system is of importance in natural gas processing and ethylene production. However it is the bottleneck because of its high refrigeration energy consumption,and needs to be urgently addressed. The technology of separating gas mixtures by forming hydrate could be used to separate (C1 + C2) gas mixtures at around 0 ℃ and has attracted increasing attention worldwide. In this paper, investigation of vapor-hydrate two-phase equilibrium was carried out for (C1+ C2) systems with and without tetrahydrofuran (THF). The compositions of vapor and hydrate phases under phase equilibrium were studied with model algorithm when structure Ⅰ and structure Ⅱ hydrates coexisted for the (methane + ethane) system. The average deviation between the modeled and actual mole fractions of ethane in hydrate and vapor phases was 0.55%, and that of ethylene was 5.7% when THF was not added. The average deviation of the mole fraction of ethane in vapor phase was 11.46% and ethylene was 7.38% when THF was added. The test results showed that the proposed algorithm is practicable.

  11. Morphology and Density Structure of Post-CME Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrsnak, B.; Poletto, G.; Vujic, E.; Vourlidas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Eruption of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is believed to drag and open the coronal magnetic field, presumably leading to the formation of a large-scale current sheet and field relaxation by magnetic reconnection. This paper analyzes the physical characteristics of ray-like coronal features formed in the aftermath of CMEs, to confirm whether interpreting such phenomena in terms of a reconnecting current sheet is consistent with observations. Methods: The study focuses on UVCS/SOHO and LASCO/SOHO measurements of the ray width, density excess, and coronal velocity field as a function of the radial distance. The morphology of the rays implies that they are produced by Petschek-like reconnection in the large-scale current sheet formed in the wake of CME. The hypothesis is supported by the flow pattern, often showing outflows along the ray, and sometimes also inflows into the ray. The inferred inflow velocities range from 3 to 30 km/s, and are consistent with the narrow opening-angle of rays, which add up to a few degrees. The density of rays is an order of magnitude higher than in the ambient corona. The model results are consistent with the observations, revealing that the main cause of the density excess in rays is a transport of the dense plasma from lower to higher heights by the reconnection outflow.

  12. Low-frequency observations of drifting, non-thermal continuum radio emission associated with the solar coronal mass ejections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-frequency (80 MHz) imaging and spectral (≈85-20 MHz) observations of moving type IV radio bursts associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from the Sun on three different days are reported. The estimated drift speed of the bursts is in the range ≈150-500 km s–1. We find that all three bursts are most likely due to second harmonic plasma emission from the enhanced electron density in the associated white-light CMEs. The derived maximum magnetic field strength of the latter is B ≈ 4 G at a radial distance of r ≈ 1.6 R ☉.

  13. Local symmetries of finite type hypersurfaces in C2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KOL(AR) Martin

    2006-01-01

    The first part of this paper gives a complete description of local automorphism groups for Levi degenerate hypersurfaces of finite type in C2. It is also proved that, with the exception of hypersurfaces of the form v = |z|k, local automorphisms are always determined by their 1-jets. Using this result, the second part describes special normal forms which by an additional normalization eliminate the nonlinear symmetries of the model and allows to decide effectively about local equivalence of two hypersurfaces given in this normal form.

  14. Polynomials with general C^2-fibers are variables. I

    OpenAIRE

    Kaliman, Shulim

    1999-01-01

    Suppose that X' is a smooth affine algebraic variety of dimension 3 with H_3(X')=0 which is a UFD and whose invertible functions are constants. Suppose that Z is a Zariski open subset of X which has a morphism p : Z -> U into a curve U such that all fibers of p are isomorphic to C^2. We prove that X' is isomorphic to C^3 iff none of irreducible components of X'-Z has non-isolated singularities. Furthermore, if X' is C^3 then p extends to a polynomial on C^3 which is linear in a suitable coord...

  15. Evolution of the biochemistry of the photorespiratory C2 cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, M; Fernie, A R; Espie, G S; Kern, R; Eisenhut, M; Reumann, S; Bauwe, H; Weber, A P M

    2013-07-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis would not be possible without photorespiration in the present day O2 -rich atmosphere. It is now generally accepted that cyanobacteria-like prokaryotes first evolved oxygenic photosynthesis, which was later conveyed via endosymbiosis into a eukaryotic host, which then gave rise to the different groups of algae and streptophytes. For photosynthetic CO2 fixation, all these organisms use RubisCO, which catalyses both the carboxylation and the oxygenation of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. One of the reaction products of the oxygenase reaction, 2-phosphoglycolate (2PG), represents the starting point of the photorespiratory C2 cycle, which is considered largely responsible for recapturing organic carbon via conversion to the Calvin-Benson cycle (CBC) intermediate 3-phosphoglycerate, thereby detoxifying critical intermediates. Here we discuss possible scenarios for the evolution of this process toward the well-defined 2PG metabolism in extant plants. While the origin of the C2 cycle core enzymes can be clearly dated back towards the different endosymbiotic events, the evolutionary scenario that allowed the compartmentalised high flux photorespiratory cycle is uncertain, but probably occurred early during the algal radiation. The change in atmospheric CO2 /O2 ratios promoting the acquisition of different modes for inorganic carbon concentration mechanisms, as well as the evolutionary specialisation of peroxisomes, clearly had a dramatic impact on further aspects of land plant photorespiration. PMID:23198988

  16. Is it Possible to Use the Green Coronal Line Instead of X rays to Cancel an Effect of the Coronal Emissivity Deficit in Estimation of the Prominence Total Mass from Decrease of the EUV-corona Intensities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, P.; Heinzel, P.; Jejčič, S.; Rybák, J.; Kotrč, P.; Fárník, F.; Kupryakov, Yu. A.; Deluca, E. E.; Golub, L.; Jibben, P. R.; Anzer, U.; Tlatov, A. G..; Guseva, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Total masses of six quiescent prominences observed from April through June 2011 were estimated using multi-spectral observations (in EUV, X-rays, Hα, and Ca II H). The method for the total mass estimation is based on the fact that the intensity of the EUV solar corona at wavelengths below 912 Å is reduced at a prominence by the absorption in resonance continua (photoionisation) of hydrogen and possibly by helium and subsequently an amount of absorbed radiation is proportional to the column density of hydrogen and helium plasma. Moreover, the deficit of the coronal emissivity in volume occupied by the cool prominence plasma also contributes to the intensity decrease. The observations in X-rays which are not absorbed by the prominence plasma, allow us to separate these two mechanisms from each other. The X-ray observations of XRT onboard the Hinode satellite made with the Al-mesh focal filter were used because the X-ray coronal radiation formed in plasma of temperatures of the order of 106 K was registered and EUV spectral lines occurring in the 193, 211 and 335 Å channels of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of the Solar Dynamics Observatory satellite are also formed at such temperatures. Unfortunately, the Al-mesh filter has a secondary peak of the transmittance at around 171 Å which causes a contribution from the EUV corona to the measured data of up to 11 % in the quiet corona. Thus, absorption in prominence plasma influences XRT X-ray data when using the Al-mesh filter. On the other hand, other X-ray XRT filters are more sensitive to plasma of much higher temperatures (log T of the order of 7), thus observations using these filters cannot be used together with the AIA observations in the method for mass estimations. This problem could be solved using observations in the green coronal line instead of X-rays. Absorption of the green coronal line by a prominence plasma is negligible and this line is formed at temperatures of the order of 106 K. We compare values

  17. Sausage oscillations of coronal plasma slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsey, C.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Fludra, A.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Sausage oscillations are observed in plasma non-uniformities of the solar corona as axisymmetric perturbations of the non-uniformity. Often, these non-uniformities can be modelled as field-aligned slabs of the density enhancement. Aims: We perform parametric studies of sausage oscillations of plasma slabs, aiming to determine the dependence of the oscillation period on its parameters, and the onset of leaky and trapped regimes of the oscillations. Methods: Slabs with smooth transverse profiles of the density of a zero-beta plasma are perturbed by an impulsive localised perturbation of the sausage symmetry. In particular, the slab can contain an infinitely thin current sheet in its centre. The initial value problem is then solved numerically. The numerical results are subject to spectral analysis. The results are compared with analytical solutions for a slab with a step-function profile and also with sausage oscillations of a plasma cylinder. Results: We established that sausage oscillations in slabs generally have the same properties as in plasma cylinders. In the trapped regime, the sausage oscillation period increases with the increase in the longitudinal wavelength. In the leaky regime, the dependence of the period on the wavelength experiences saturation, and the period becomes independent of the wavelength in the long-wavelength limit. In the leaky regime the period is always longer than in the trapped regime. The sausage oscillation period in a slab is always longer than in a cylinder with the same transverse profile. In slabs with steeper transverse profiles, sausage oscillations have longer periods. The leaky regime occurs at shorter wavelengths in slabs with smoother profiles.

  18. MR imaging of the anterior cruciate ligament. Value of thin slice direct oblique coronal technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The value of the thin slice direct oblique coronal technique, which is parallel to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), was assessed in the evaluation of ACL injury in comparison with conventional oblique sagittal and coronal images. A thin slice direct oblique coronal technique was developed and applied clinically to 62 patients after conventional oblique sagittal and coronal images had been obtained. MR images of these 62 patients (24 with tears and 38 without tears) with an arthroscopic correlation were evaluated by three radiologists who were unaware of the arthroscopic results. The diagnostic accuracy of these new images was compared with that of oblique sagittal and coronal images by ROC analysis. Conventional oblique sagittal and coronal images for the diagnosis of ACL tears revealed accuracies of 82%, 84%, and 84%, sensitivities of 92%, 92%, and 96% and specificities of 76%, 79%, and 76% for the three reviewers, respectively. On thin slice direct oblique coronal images, specificities of 97%, 97%, and 97%, sensitivities of 96%, 96%, and 96%, and accuracies of 97%, 97%, and 97% were obtained, respectively. Diagnostic ability was significantly better with direct oblique coronal images (mean area under the ROC curve [Az]=0.99) than with conventional oblique sagittal and coronal images (Az=0.91) (p<0.05). The addition of thin slice direct oblique coronal images significantly improved specificity and accuracy in the diagnosis of ACL tears. (author)

  19. MR imaging of the anterior cruciate ligament. Value of thin slice direct oblique coronal technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katahira, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Mutsumasa [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Otsuka, Nobuko; Koga, Yukunori; Fukumoto, Tetsuya; Nomura, Kazutoshi

    2001-02-01

    The value of the thin slice direct oblique coronal technique, which is parallel to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), was assessed in the evaluation of ACL injury in comparison with conventional oblique sagittal and coronal images. A thin slice direct oblique coronal technique was developed and applied clinically to 62 patients after conventional oblique sagittal and coronal images had been obtained. MR images of these 62 patients (24 with tears and 38 without tears) with an arthroscopic correlation were evaluated by three radiologists who were unaware of the arthroscopic results. The diagnostic accuracy of these new images was compared with that of oblique sagittal and coronal images by ROC analysis. Conventional oblique sagittal and coronal images for the diagnosis of ACL tears revealed accuracies of 82%, 84%, and 84%, sensitivities of 92%, 92%, and 96% and specificities of 76%, 79%, and 76% for the three reviewers, respectively. On thin slice direct oblique coronal images, specificities of 97%, 97%, and 97%, sensitivities of 96%, 96%, and 96%, and accuracies of 97%, 97%, and 97% were obtained, respectively. Diagnostic ability was significantly better with direct oblique coronal images (mean area under the ROC curve [Az]=0.99) than with conventional oblique sagittal and coronal images (Az=0.91) (p<0.05). The addition of thin slice direct oblique coronal images significantly improved specificity and accuracy in the diagnosis of ACL tears. (author)

  20. Validation Of The Coronal Thick Target Source Model

    CERN Document Server

    Fleishman, Gregory D; Nita, Gelu N; Gary, Dale E

    2015-01-01

    We present detailed 3D modeling of a dense, coronal thick target X-ray flare using the GX Simulator tool, photospheric magnetic measurements, and microwave imaging and spectroscopy data. The developed model offers a remarkable agreement between the synthesized and observed spectra and images in both X-ray and microwave domains, which validates the entire model. The flaring loop parameters are chosen to reproduce the emission measure, temperature, and the nonthermal electron distribution at low energies derived from the X-ray spectral fit, while the remaining parameters, unconstrained by the X-ray data, are selected such as to match the microwave images and total power spectra. The modeling suggests that the accelerated electrons are trapped in the coronal part of the flaring loop, but away from where the magnetic field is minimal, and, thus, demonstrates that the data are clearly inconsistent with electron magnetic trapping in the weak diffusion regime mediated by the Coulomb collisions. Thus, the modeling su...

  1. On The Fourier And Wavelet Analysis Of Coronal Time Series

    CERN Document Server

    Auchère, F; Bocchialini, K; Buchlin, E; Solomon, J

    2016-01-01

    Using Fourier and wavelet analysis, we critically re-assess the significance of our detection of periodic pulsations in coronal loops. We show that the proper identification of the frequency dependence and statistical properties of the different components of the power spectra provies a strong argument against the common practice of data detrending, which tends to produce spurious detections around the cut-off frequency of the filter. In addition, the white and red noise models built into the widely used wavelet code of Torrence & Compo cannot, in most cases, adequately represent the power spectra of coronal time series, thus also possibly causing false positives. Both effects suggest that several reports of periodic phenomena should be re-examined. The Torrence & Compo code nonetheless effectively computes rigorous confidence levels if provided with pertinent models of mean power spectra, and we describe the appropriate manner in which to call its core routines. We recall the meaning of the default c...

  2. Coronal Structures as Tracers of Sub-Surface Processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alexei A. PevtSOV; Richard C. Canfield

    2000-09-01

    The solar corona - one of the most spectacular celestial shows and yet one of the most challenging puzzles - exhibits a spectrum of structures related to both the quiet Sun and active regions. In spite of dramatic differences in appearance and physical processes, all these structures share a common origin: they are all related to the solar magnetic field. The origin of the field is beneath the turbulent convection zone, where the magnetic field is not a master but a slave, and one can wonder how much the coronal magnetic field ``remembers" its dynamo origin. Surprisingly, it does. We will describe several observational phenomena that indicate a close relationship between coronal and sub-photospheric processes.

  3. Energetic characterisation and statistics of solar coronal brightenings

    CERN Document Server

    Joulin, Vincent; Solomon, Jacques; Guennou, Chloé

    2016-01-01

    To explain the high temperature of the corona, much attention has been paid to the distribution of energy in dissipation events. Indeed, if the event energy distribution is steep enough, the smallest, unobservable events could be the largest contributors to the total energy dissipation in the corona. Previous observations have shown a wide distribution of energies but remain inconclusive about the precise slope. Furthermore, these results rely on a very crude estimate of the energy. On the other hand, more detailed spectroscopic studies of structures such as coronal bright points do not provide enough statistical information to derive their total contribution to heating. We aim at getting a better estimate of the distributions of the energy dissipated in coronal heating events using high-resolution, multi-channel Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) data. To estimate the energies corresponding to heating events and deduce their distribution, we detect brightenings in five EUV channels of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembl...

  4. Quasi-Periodic Oscillation of a Coronal Bright Point

    CERN Document Server

    Samanta, Tanmoy; Tian, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Coronal bright points (BPs) are small-scale luminous features seen in the solar corona. Quasi-periodic brightenings are frequently observed in the BPs and are generally linked with underneath magnetic flux changes. We study the dynamics of a BP seen in the coronal hole using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) images, the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) magnetogram on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and spectroscopic data from the newly launched Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). The detailed analysis shows that the BP evolves throughout our observing period along with changes in underlying photospheric magnetic flux and shows periodic brightenings in different EUV and FUV images. With highest possible spectral and spatial resolution of IRIS, we attempted to identify the sources of these oscillations. IRIS sit and stare observation provided a unique opportunity to study the time evolution of one foot point of the BP as the slit position crossed it. We noticed enhanced line prof...

  5. Role of Coronal Mass Ejections in the Heliospheric Hale Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, M. J.; Schwardron, N. A.; Crooker, N. U.; Hughes, W. J.; Spence, H. E.

    2007-01-01

    The 11-year solar cycle variation in the heliospheric magnetic field strength can be explained by the temporary buildup of closed flux released by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). If this explanation is correct, and the total open magnetic flux is conserved, then the interplanetary-CME closed flux must eventually open via reconnection with open flux close to the Sun. In this case each CME will move the reconnected open flux by at least the CME footpoint separation distance. Since the polarity of CME footpoints tends to follow a pattern similar to the Hale cycle of sunspot polarity, repeated CME eruption and subsequent reconnection will naturally result in latitudinal transport of open solar flux. We demonstrate how this process can reverse the coronal and heliospheric fields, and we calculate that the amount of flux involved is sufficient to accomplish the reversal within the 11 years of the solar cycle.

  6. Coronal Rotation at Solar Minimum from UV Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, S.

    2008-01-01

    UVCS/SOHO observations have been analyzed to reconstruct intensity time series of the O VI 1032 A and H 11216 A spectral lines at different coronal heliolatitudes from 1.5 to 3.0 solar radii from Sun center. Evidence was found for coronal differential rotation that differs significantly from that of the photospheric plasma. The study of the latitudinal variation shows that the UV corona decelerates toward the photospheric rates from the equator up to the poleward boundary 2 of the midlatitude streamers, reaching a peak of 28.16+/-0.20 days around +30 from the equator at 1.5 solar radii, while a less evident peak is observed in the northern hemisphere. This result suggests a real north-south rotational asymmetry as a consequence of different activity and weak coupling between the magnetic fields of the two hemispheres. The study of the radial rotation profiles shows that the corona is rotating almost rigidly with height.

  7. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Reale, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent sections: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered, and therefore topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones which provide information on stellar loops) are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses loop classification and populations, and then describes the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the concept of loops as multi-stranded structures. The following part of this section is devoted to the characteristics of the loop plasma, and of its thermal structure in particular, according to the classification into...

  8. The Interaction between Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and Coronal Holes (CHs) during the Solar Cycle 23 and its Geomagnetic Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Amaal; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2016-07-01

    The interactions between the two large scale phenomena, coronal holes (CHs) and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) maybe considered as one of the most important relations that having a direct impact not only on space weather but also on the relevant plasma physics. Many observations have shown that throughout their propagation from the Sun to interplanetary space, CMEs interact with the heliospheric structures (e.g., other CMEs, Corotating interaction regions (CIRs), helmet streamers, and CHs). Such interactions could enhance the southward magnetic field component, which has important implications for geomagnetic storm generation. These interactions imply also a significant energy and momentum transfer between the interacting systems where magnetic reconnection is taking place. When CHs deflect CMEs away from or towards the Sun-Earth line, the geomagnetic response of the CME is highly affected. Gopalswamy et al. [2009] have addressed the deflection of CMEs due to the existence of CHs that are in close proximity to the eruption regions. They have shown that CHs can act as magnetic barriers that constrain CMEs propagation and can significantly affect their trajectories. Here, we study the interaction between coronal holes (CHs) and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using a resultant force exerted by all coronal holes present on the disk and is defined as the coronal hole influence parameter (CHIP). The CHIP magnitude for each CH depends on the CH area, the distance between the CH centroid and the eruption region, and the average magnetic field within the CH at the photospheric level. The CHIP direction for each CH points from the CH centroid to the eruption region. We focus on Solar Cycle 23 CMEs originating from the disk center of the Sun (central meridian distance data sets of observations of CMEs and their interplanetary counterparts; known as interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs). There are 2 subsets of ICMEs: magnetic cloud (MC) and non-magnetic cloud (non-MC) ICMEs. MCs are

  9. X-ray Reflectivity Studies of cPLA?-C2 Domains Adsorbed onto Langmuir Monolayers of SOPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghothamachar,B.; Dudley, M.; Dalmau, R.; Schlesser, R.; Sitar, Z.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray reflectivity is used to study the interaction of C2 domains of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA{sub 2{alpha}}-C2) with a Langmuir monolayer of 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SOPC) supported on a buffered aqueous solution containing Ca{sup 2+}. The reflectivity is analyzed in terms of the known crystallographic structure of cPLA2{alpha}-C2 domains and a slab model representing the lipid layer to yield an electron density profile of the lipid layer and bound C2 domains. This new method of analysis determines the angular orientation and penetration depth of the cPLA{sub 2{alpha}}-C2 domains bound to the SOPC monolayer, information not available from the standard slab model analysis of x-ray reflectivity. The best-fit orientation places the protein-bound Ca{sup 2+} ions within 1 Angstrom of the lipid phosphate group (with an accuracy of {+-}3 Angstroms). Hydrophobic residues of the calcium-binding loops CBL1 and CBL3 penetrate deepest into the lipid layer, with a 2 Angstrom penetration into the tailgroup region. X-ray measurements with and without the C2 domain indicate that there is a loss of electrons in the headgroup region of the lipid monolayer upon binding of the domains. We suggest that this is due to a loss of water molecules bound to the headgroup. Control experiments with a non-calcium buffer and with domain mutants confirm that the cPLA{sub 2{alpha}}-C2 binding to the SOPC monolayer is Ca{sup 2+}-dependent and that the hydrophobic residues in the calcium-binding loops are critical for membrane binding. These results indicate that an entropic component (due to water loss) as well as electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions contributes to the binding mechanism.

  10. Combining Models of Coronal Mass Ejections and Solar Dynamos

    OpenAIRE

    Warnecke, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    Observations show that Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are associated with twisted magnetic flux configurations. Conventionally, CMEs are modeled by shearing and twisting the footpoints of a certain distribution of magnetic flux at the solar surface and letting it evolve at the surface. Of course, the surface velocities and magnetic field patterns should ultimately be obtained from realistic simulations of the solar convection zone where the field is generated by dynamo action. Therefore, a uni...

  11. On the "Extended" Solar Cycle in Coronal Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbrecht, E.; Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Rich, N. B.

    2010-06-01

    Butterfly diagrams (latitude-time plots) of coronal emission show a zone of enhanced brightness that appears near the poles just after solar maximum and migrates toward lower latitudes; a bifurcation seems to occur at sunspot minimum, with one branch continuing to migrate equatorward with the sunspots of the new cycle and the other branch heading back to the poles. The resulting patterns have been likened to those seen in torsional oscillations and have been taken as evidence for an extended solar cycle lasting over ~17 yr. In order to clarify the nature of the overlapping bands of coronal emission, we construct butterfly diagrams from green-line simulations covering the period 1967-2009 and from 19.5 nm and 30.4 nm observations taken with the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope during 1996-2009. As anticipated from earlier studies, we find that the high-latitude enhancements mark the footpoint areas of closed loops with one end rooted outside the evolving boundaries of the polar coronal holes. The strong underlying fields were built up over the declining phase of the cycle through the poleward transport of active-region flux by the surface meridional flow. Rather than being a precursor of the new-cycle sunspot activity zone, the high-latitude emission forms a physically distinct, U-shaped band that curves upward again as active-region fields emerge at midlatitudes and reconnect with the receding polar-hole boundaries. We conclude that the so-called extended cycle in coronal emission is a manifestation not of early new-cycle activity, but of the poleward concentration of old-cycle trailing-polarity flux by meridional flow.

  12. Coronal Microleakage for Readymade and Hand Mixed Temporary Filling Materials

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the sealing ability of the readymade temporary filling and hand mixed materials by assessing coronal microleakage. MATERIALS AND METHODS Standardized access cavities were prepared in 80 intact human permanent premolar teeth. They were divided randomly into four experimental groups (n=20). The teeth were restored using one of the temporary materials including Cavisol, Litrak, Zinc phosphate cement, Zinconol (IRM). Thermocycling wa...

  13. Stellar coronal magnetic fields and star-planet interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Lanza, A. F.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence of magnetic interaction between late-type stars and close-in giant planets is provided by the observations of stellar hot spots rotating synchronously with the planets and showing an enhancement of chromospheric and X-ray fluxes. We investigate star-planet interaction in the framework of a magnetic field model of a stellar corona, considering the interaction between the coronal field and that of a planetary magnetosphere moving through the corona. The energy budget of the star-planet...

  14. Extended HXR Sources - Albedo Patches or Coronal Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    Extended HXR sources in the presence of compact footpoints have been reported based on visibility amplitudes from different detectors. Attempts have been made to determine the location and extent of these sources through direct imaging. Results of this work will be described for simulated sources and for specific flares at different solar longitudes, with a discussion of the possible nature of the extended sources as either albedo patches or coronal sources or a combination of the two.

  15. Longitudinal magnetohydrodynamics oscillations in dissipative, cooling coronal loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the effect of cooling on standing slow magnetosonic waves in coronal magnetic loops. The damping mechanism taken into account is thermal conduction that is a viable candidate for dissipation of slow magnetosonic waves in coronal loops. In contrast to earlier studies, here we assume that the characteristic damping time due to thermal conduction is not small, but arbitrary, and can be of the order of the oscillation period, i.e., a temporally varying plasma is considered. The approximation of low-beta plasma enables us to neglect the magnetic field perturbation when studying longitudinal waves and consider, instead, a one-dimensional motion that allows a reliable first insight into the problem. The background plasma temperature is assumed to be decaying exponentially with time, with the characteristic cooling timescale much larger than the oscillation period. This assumption enables us to use the WKB method to study the evolution of the oscillation amplitude analytically. Using this method we obtain the equation governing the oscillation amplitude. The analytical expressions determining the wave properties are evaluated numerically to investigate the evolution of the oscillation frequency and amplitude with time. The results show that the oscillation period increases with time due to the effect of plasma cooling. The plasma cooling also amplifies the amplitude of oscillations in relatively cool coronal loops, whereas, for very hot coronal loop oscillations the damping rate is enhanced by the cooling. We find that the critical point for which the amplification becomes dominant over the damping is in the region of 4 MK. These theoretical results may serve as impetus for developing the tools of solar magneto-seismology in dynamic plasmas.

  16. Energetic characterisation and statistics of solar coronal brightenings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joulin, V.; Buchlin, E.; Solomon, J.; Guennou, C.

    2016-07-01

    Context. To explain the high temperature of the corona, much attention has been paid to the distribution of energy in dissipation events. Indeed, if the event energy distribution is steep enough, the smallest, unobservable events could be the largest contributors to the total energy dissipation in the corona. Previous observations have shown a wide distribution of energies but remain inconclusive about the precise slope. Furthermore, these results rely on a very crude estimate of the energy. On the other hand, more detailed spectroscopic studies of structures such as coronal bright points do not provide enough statistical information to derive their total contribution to heating. Aims: We aim at getting a better estimate of the distributions of the energy dissipated in coronal heating events using high-resolution, multi-channel extreme ultraviolet (EUV) data. Methods: To estimate the energies corresponding to heating events and deduce their distribution, we detected brightenings in five EUV channels of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We combined the results of these detections and used maps of temperature and emission measure derived from the same observations to compute the energies. Results: We obtain distributions of areas, durations, intensities, and energies (thermal, radiative, and conductive) of events. These distributions are power laws and we also find power-law correlations between event parameters. Conclusions: The energy distributions indicate that the energy from a population of events like the ones we detect represents a small contribution to the total coronal heating, even when extrapolating to smaller scales. The main explanations for this are how heating events can be extracted from observational data, and the incomplete knowledge of the thermal structure and processes in the coronal plasma attainable from available observations. Two movies attached to Fig. 3 are available in electronic form at

  17. Simulations of Filament Channel Formation in a Coronal Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knizhnik, Kalman; DeVore, C. Richard; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2016-05-01

    A major unanswered problem in solar physics has been explaining the presence of sheared filament channels above photospheric polarity inversion lines (PILs) and the simultaneous lack of structure in the ‘loop’ portion of the coronal magnetic field. The shear inherent in filament channels represents not only a form of magnetic energy, but also magnetic helicity. As a result, models of filament channel formation need to explain not only why helicity is observed above PILs, but also why it is apparently not observed anywhere else in the corona. Previous results (Knizhnik, Antiochos & DeVore, 2015) have suggested that any helicity injected into the coronal field inverse-cascades in scale, a process known as magnetic helicity condensation (Antiochos, 2013). In this work, we present high resolution numerical simulations of photospheric helicity injection into a coronal magnetic field that contains both a PIL and a coronal hole (CH). We show conclusively that the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity terminates at the PIL, resulting in the formation of highly sheared filament channels and a smooth, untwisted corona. We demonstrate that even though magnetic helicity is injected throughout the flux system, it accumulates only at the PIL, where it manifests itself in the form of highly sheared filament channels, while any helicity obtained by the CH is ejected out of the system. We show that the formation of filament channels is both qualitatively and quantitatively in agreement with observations and discuss the implications of our simulations for observations.This work was supported by the NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship, LWS TR&T and H-SR Programs.

  18. ARE HALO-LIKE SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS MERELY A MATTER OF GEOMETRIC PROJECTION EFFECTS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Ryun-Young; Zhang, Jie [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MSN 6A2, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA. (United States); Vourlidas, Angelos, E-mail: ryunyoung.kwon@gmail.com [The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723, USA. (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the physical nature of halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs) based on the stereoscopic observations from the two STEREO spacecraft, Ahead and Behind (hereafter A and B), and the SOHO spacecraft. Sixty-two halo CMEs occurred as observed by SOHO LASCO C2 for the three-year period from 2010 to 2012 during which the separation angles between SOHO and STEREO were nearly 90°. In such quadrature configuration, the coronagraphs of STEREO, COR2-A and -B, showed the side view of those halo CMEs seen by C2. It has been widely believed that the halo appearance of a CME is caused by the geometric projection effect, i.e., a CME moves along the Sun-observer line. In other words, it would appear as a non-halo CME if viewed from the side. However, to our surprise, we found that 41 out of 62 events (66%) were observed as halo CMEs by all coronagraphs. This result suggests that a halo CME is not just a matter of the propagating direction. In addition, we show that a CME propagating normal to the line of sight can be observed as a halo CME due to the associated fast magnetosonic wave or shock front. We conclude that the apparent width of CMEs, especially halos or partial halos is driven by the existence and the extent of the associated waves or shocks and does not represent an accurate measure of the CME ejecta size. This effect needs to be taken into careful consideration in space weather predictions and modeling efforts.

  19. Theoretical investigations on SiC2 siligraphene as promising metal-free catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Huilong; Lin, Bin; Gilmore, Keith; Hou, Tingjun; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Li, Youyong

    2015-12-01

    The design and discovery of high-performance metal-free catalytic materials for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysis is vital for the development of fuel cells. By performing density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we investigate the potential applications of SiC2 siligraphene (g-SiC2) as metal-free ORR catalyst. The g-SiC2 exhibits higher adsorption affinity for the O2 molecule and other ORR intermediates than the traditional Pt (111), and shows good tolerance against CO poisoning. The detailed LH and ER mechanisms in catalyzing ORR by g-SiC2 are simulated and discussed, both in acidic and alkaline environment. We find that, in alkaline environment, the g-SiC2 presents a very low activation barrier (0.16 eV) for the rate determining step (RDS) and shows no overpotential at the equilibrium potential. Our theoretical simulations validate that the siligraphene with alternatively arranged Si and C atoms holds great potential as ORR catalyst in alkaline environment.

  20. Validation of the Coronal Thick Target Source Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Xu, Yan; Nita, Gelu N.; Gary, Dale E.

    2016-01-01

    We present detailed 3D modeling of a dense, coronal thick-target X-ray flare using the GX Simulator tool, photospheric magnetic measurements, and microwave imaging and spectroscopy data. The developed model offers a remarkable agreement between the synthesized and observed spectra and images in both X-ray and microwave domains, which validates the entire model. The flaring loop parameters are chosen to reproduce the emission measure, temperature, and the nonthermal electron distribution at low energies derived from the X-ray spectral fit, while the remaining parameters, unconstrained by the X-ray data, are selected such as to match the microwave images and total power spectra. The modeling suggests that the accelerated electrons are trapped in the coronal part of the flaring loop, but away from where the magnetic field is minimal, and, thus, demonstrates that the data are clearly inconsistent with electron magnetic trapping in the weak diffusion regime mediated by the Coulomb collisions. Thus, the modeling supports the interpretation of the coronal thick-target sources as sites of electron acceleration in flares and supplies us with a realistic 3D model with physical parameters of the acceleration region and flaring loop.

  1. Interpretation of the coronal magnetic field configuration of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Bo; Yu, Hui

    2012-01-01

    The origin of the heliospheric magnetic flux on the Sun, and hence the origin of the solar wind, is a topic of hot debate.While the prevailing view is that the solar wind originates from outside coronal streamer helmets, there also exists the suggestion that the open magnetic field spans a far wider region.Without the definitive measurement of the coronal magnetic field, it is difficult to resolve the conflict between the two scenarios without doubt.We present two 2-dimensional, Alfv\\'enic-turbulence-based models of the solar corona and solar wind, one with and the other without a closed magnetic field region in the inner corona.The purpose of the latter model is to test whether it is possible to realize a picture suggested by polarimetric measurements of the corona using the FeXIII 10747\\AA\\ line, where open magnetic field lines seem to penetrate the streamer base.The boundary conditions at the coronal base are able to account for important observational constraints, especially those on the magnetic flux dis...

  2. Intermediate Inclinations of Type 2 Coronal-Line Forest AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, Marvin; Crenshaw, Michael; Glidden, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Coronal-Line Forest Active Galactic Nuclei (CLiF AGN) are remarkable in the sense that they have a rich spectrum of dozens of coronal emission lines (e.g. [FeVII], [FeX] and [NeV]) in their spectra. Rose, Elvis & Tadhunter (2015) suggest that the inner obscuring torus wall is the most likely location of the coronal line region in CLiF AGN, and the unusual strength of the forbidden high ionization lines is due to a specific AGN-torus inclination angle. Here we test this suggestion using mid-IR colours (4.6$\\mu$m-22$\\mu$m) from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) for the CLiF AGN. We use the Fischer et al. (2014) result that showed that as the AGN-torus inclination becomes more face on, the Spitzer 5.5$\\mu$m to 30$\\mu$m colours become bluer. We show that the [W2-W4] colours for the CLiF AGN ($\\langle$[W2-W4]$\\rangle$ = 5.92$\\pm$0.12) are intermediate between SDSS type 1 ($\\langle$[W2-W4]$\\rangle$ = 5.22$\\pm$0.01) and type 2 AGN ($\\langle$[W2-W4]$\\rangle$ = 6.35$\\pm$0.03). This implies that the AG...

  3. Solar coronal plumes and the fast solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Dwivedi, B N

    2015-01-01

    The spectral profiles of the coronal Ne viii line at 77 nm have different shapes in quiet-Sun regions and coronal holes (CHs). A single Gaussian fit of the line profile provides an adequate approximation in quiet-Sun areas, whereas a strong shoulder on the long-wavelength side is a systematic feature in CHs. Although this has been noticed since 1999, no physical reason for the peculiar shape could be given. In an attempt to identify the cause of this peculiarity, we address three problems that could not be conclusively resolved in a review article by a study team of the International Space Science Institute (ISSI; Wilhelm et al. 2011) : (1) The physical processes operating at the base and inside of plumes as well as their interaction with the solar wind (SW). (2) The possible contribution of plume plasma to the fast SW streams. (3) The signature of the first-ionization potential (FIP) effect between plumes and inter-plume regions (IPRs). Before the spectroscopic peculiarities in IPRs and plumes in polar coron...

  4. Signature of mass supply to quiet coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, H; Marsch, E; He, J -S; Zhou, G -Q; 10.1051/0004-6361:20078813

    2009-01-01

    Aims. The physical implication of large blue shift of Ne viii in the quiet Sun region is investigated in this paper. Methods. We compare the significant Ne viii blue shifts, which are visible as large blue patches on the Doppler-shift map of a middlelatitude quiet-Sun region observed by SUMER, with the coronal magnetic-field structures as reconstructed from a simultaneous photospheric magnetogram by means of a force-free-field extrapolation. Results. We show for the first time that coronal funnels also exist in the quiet Sun. The region studied contains several small funnels that originate from network lanes, expand with height and finally merge into a single wide open-field region. However, the large blue shifts of the Ne viii line are not generally associated with funnels. A comparison between the projections of coronal loops onto the solar x−y-plane and the Ne viii dopplergram indicates that there are some loops that reveal large Ne viii blue shifts in both legs, and some loops with upflow in one...

  5. Effect of coronal structure on loop oscillations: exponential profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, A. J.; Donnelly, G. R.; Roberts, B.

    2007-12-01

    Aims:The role of longitudinal structuring of the surrounding corona on the modes of oscillation of a coronal magnetic flux tube was studied in Donnelly et al. (2006) for a piecewise uniform profile. Here we investigate whether a more realistic continuous exponential profile changes the conclusions drawn from that paper. Methods: A partial differential equation is derived for the total pressure perturbation of the fast modes, which is then decomposed by separation of variables. The longitudinal part is solved numerically, obtaining a dispersion relation. These results are supported by an analytical investigation in terms of Bessel functions of purely imaginary order. Results: Structure in the interior of the loop shifts the frequencies of the modes (and may trap higher harmonics), an effect which can be understood by taking an averaged profile with a suitable weight. Structure in the environment modifies only slightly the frequencies, but displaces the cutoff frequency. The shift due to the structure in the fundamental period is small, but the ratio between the periods of the fundamental mode and its harmonics can be used to probe the structure. Conclusions: The results support our previous study in a more realistic, continuously varying profile and provide limits to the conclusions drawn in coronal seismology if an unstructured loop is used. Also, the ratio between the period of the fundamental kink (even) mode and its first (odd) harmonic is proven as an extra seismological tool for coronal loops.

  6. Projection effects in coronal dimmings and associated EUV wave event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissauer, Karin; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid; Vanninathan, Kamalam; Magdalenic, Jasmina

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the high-speed (v > 1000 km s‑1) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with an X1.2 flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) from NOAA active region 11283. This EUV wave features peculiar on-disk signatures, in particular we observe an intermittent "disappearance" of the front for 120 s in SDO/AIA 171, 193, 211 Å data, whereas the 335 Å filter, sensitive to hotter plasmas (T˜ 2.5 MK), shows a continuous evolution of the wave front. We exploit the multi-point quadrature position of SDO and STEREO-A, to make a thorough analysis of the EUV wave evolution, with respect to its kinematics and amplitude evolution. We identify on-disk coronal dimming regions in SDO/AIA, reminiscent of core dimmings, that have no corresponding on-disk dimming signatures in STEREO-A/EUVI. Reconstructing the SDO line-of-sight (LOS) direction in STEREO-A clearly shows that the observed SDO on-disk dimming areas are not the footprints of the erupting fluxrope but result from decreased emission from the expanding CME body integrated along the LOS. In this context, we conclude that the intermittent disappearance of the EUV wave in the AIA 171, 193, 211 Å filters, which are channels sensitive to plasma with temperatures below ˜ 2 MK is also caused by such LOS integration effects. These observations clearly demonstrate that single-view image data provide us with limited insight to correctly interpret coronal features.

  7. Projection effects in coronal dimmings and associated EUV wave event

    CERN Document Server

    Dissauer, Karin; Veronig, Astrid M; Vanninathan, Kamalam; Magdalenić, Jasmina

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the high-speed ($v >$ 1000 km s$^{-1}$) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with an X1.2 flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) from NOAA active region 11283 on 2011 September 6 (SOL2011-09-06T22:12). This EUV wave features peculiar on-disk signatures, in particular we observe an intermittent "disappearance" of the front for 120 s in SDO/AIA 171, 193, 211 {\\AA} data, whereas the 335 {\\AA} filter, sensitive to hotter plasmas (T$\\sim$2.5 MK), shows a continuous evolution of the wave front. The eruption was also accompanied by localized coronal dimming regions. We exploit the multi-point quadrature position of SDO and STEREO-A, to make a thorough analysis of the EUV wave evolution, with respect to its kinematics and amplitude evolution and reconstruct the SDO line-of-sight (LOS) direction of the identified coronal dimming regions in STEREO-A. We show that the observed intensities of the dimming regions in SDO/AIA depend on the structures that are lying along their LOS and are the combination ...

  8. AGN Coronal Emission models I. The Predicted Radio Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Raginski, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Accretion discs in AGN may be associated with coronal gas, as suggested by their X-ray emission. Stellar coronal emission includes radio emission, and AGN corona may also be a significant source for radio emission in radio quiet (RQ) AGN. We calculate the coronal properties required to produce the observed radio emission in RQ AGN, either from synchrotron emission of power-law (PL) electrons, or from cyclo-synchrotron emission of hot mildly-relativistic thermal electrons. We find that a flat spectrum, as observed in about half of RQ AGN, can be produced by corona with a disc or a spherical configuration, which extends from the innermost regions out to a pc scale. A spectral break to an optically thin power-law emission is expected around 300-1000 GHz, as the innermost corona becomes optically thin. In case of thermal electrons, a sharp spectral cutoff is expected above the break. The position of the break can be measured with VLBI observations, which exclude the cold dust emission, and it can be used to probe...

  9. More of the Inconvenient Truth About Coronal Dimmings

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Scott W; Leamon, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    We continue the investigation of a CME-driven coronal dimming from December 14 2006 using unique high resolution imaging of the chromosphere and corona from the Hinode spacecraft. Over the course of the dimming event we observe the dynamic increase of non-thermal line broadening of multiple emission lines as the CME is released and the corona opens; reaching levels seen in coronal holes. As the corona begins to close, refill and brighten, we see a reduction of the non-thermal broadening towards the pre-eruption level. The dynamic evolution of non-thermal broadening is consistent with the expected change of Alfven wave amplitudes in the magnetically open rarefied dimming region, compared to the dense closed corona prior to the CME. The presented data reinforce the belief that coronal dimmings must be temporary sources of the fast solar wind. It is unclear if such a rapid transition in the thermodynamics of the corona to a solar wind state has an effect on the CME itself.

  10. More of the Inconvenient Truth About Coronal Dimmings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, S. W.; Burkepile, J.; Leamon, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    We continue the investigation of a CME-driven coronal dimming from December 14 2006 using unique high resolution imaging of the chromosphere and corona from the Hinode spacecraft. Over the course of the dimming event we observe the dynamic increase of non-thermal line broadening of multiple emission lines as the CME is released and the corona opens; reaching levels seen in coronal holes. As the corona begins to close, refill and brighten, we see a reduction of the non-thermal broadening towards the pre-eruption level. The dynamic evolution of non-thermal broadening is consistent with the expected change of Alfvén wave amplitudes in the magnetically open rarefied dimming region, compared to the dense closed corona prior to the CME. The presented data reinforce the belief that coronal dimmings must be temporary sources of the fast solar wind. It is unclear if such a rapid transition in the thermodynamics of the corona to a solar wind state has an effect on the CME itself.

  11. An Impulsive Heating Model for the Evolution of Coronal Loops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Feng; Wei-Qun Gan

    2006-01-01

    It was suggested by Parker that the solar corona is heated by many small energy release events generally called microflares or nanoflares. More and more observations showed flows and intensity variations in nonflaring loops. Both theories and observations have indicated that the heating of coronal loops should actually be unsteady. Using SOLFTM (Solar Flux Tube Model), we investigate the hydrodynamics of coronal loops undergoing different manners of impulsive heating with the same total energy deposition. The half length of the loops is 110 Mm, a typical length of active region loops. We divide the loops into two categories: loops that experience catastrophic cooling and loops that do not. It is found that when the nanoflare heating sources are in the coronal part, the loops are in non-catastrophic-cooling state and their evolutions are similar. When the heating is localized below the transition region, the loops evolve in quite different ways. It is shown that with increasing number of heating pulses and inter-pulse time, the catastrophic cooling is weakened, delayed, or even disappears altogether.

  12. Tether-cutting Reconnection between Two Solar Filaments Triggering Outflows and a Coronal Mass Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Huadong; Li, Leping; Ma, Suli

    2016-01-01

    Triggering mechanisms of solar eruptions have long been a challenge. A few previous case studies have indicated that preceding gentle filament merging via magnetic reconnection may launch following intense eruption, according with the tether-cutting (TC) model. However, detailed process of TC reconnection between filaments has not been exhibited yet. In this work, we report the high resolution observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) of TC reconnection between two sheared filaments in NOAA active region 12146. The TC reconnection commenced since 15:35 UT on 2014 August 29 and triggered an eruptive GOES C4.3-class flare 8 minutes later. An associated coronal mass ejection appeared in the field of view of SOHO/LASCO C2 about 40 minutes later. Thanks to the high spatial resolution of IRIS data, bright plasma outflows generated by the TC reconnection are clearly observed, which moved along the subarcsecond fine-scale flux tube structures in the erupting filament. Based on the imaging and...

  13. Superdiffusive motion of membrane-targeting C2 domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnola, Grace; Nepal, Kanti; Schroder, Bryce W.; Peersen, Olve B.; Krapf, Diego

    2015-12-01

    Membrane-targeting domains play crucial roles in the recruitment of signalling molecules to the plasma membrane. For most peripheral proteins, the protein-to-membrane interaction is transient. After proteins dissociate from the membrane they have been observed to rebind following brief excursions in the bulk solution. Such membrane hops can have broad implications for the efficiency of reactions on membranes. We study the diffusion of membrane-targeting C2 domains using single-molecule tracking in supported lipid bilayers. The ensemble-averaged mean square displacement (MSD) exhibits superdiffusive behaviour. However, traditional time-averaged MSD analysis of individual trajectories remains linear and does not reveal superdiffusion. Our observations are explained in terms of bulk excursions that introduce jumps with a heavy-tail distribution. These hopping events allow proteins to explore large areas in a short time. The experimental results are shown to be consistent with analytical models of bulk-mediated diffusion and numerical simulations.

  14. The quantum space-time of c = -2 gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambjørn, J.; Anagnostopoulos, K.; Ichihara, T.; Jensen, L.; Kawamoto, N.; Watabiki, Y.; Yotsuji, K.

    1998-02-01

    We study the fractal structure of space-time of two-dimensional quantum gravity coupled to c = -2 conformal matter by means of computer simulations. We find that the intrinsic Hausdorff dimension dH = 3.58 ± 0.04. This result supports the conjecture dH = -2 α1/ α-1, where αn is the gravitational dressing exponent of a spinless primary field of conformal weight ( n + 1, n + 1), and it disfavours the alternative prediction dH = 2/| γ|. On the other hand, ˜ r2 n for n > 1 with good accuracy, i.e. the boundary length l has an anomalous dimension relative to the area of the surface.

  15. Detailed Studies of Hydrocarbon Radicals: C2H Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittig, Curt

    2014-10-06

    A novel experimental technique was examined whose goal was the ejection of radical species into the gas phase from a platform (film) of cold non-reactive material. The underlying principle was one of photo-initiated heat release in a stratum that lies below a layer of CO2 or a layer of amorphous solid water (ASW) and CO2. A molecular precursor to the radical species of interest is deposited near or on the film's surface, where it can be photo-dissociated. It proved unfeasible to avoid the rampant formation of fissures, as opposed to large "flakes." This led to many interesting results, but resulted in our aborting the scheme as a means of launching cold C2H radical into the gas phase. A journal article resulted that is germane to astrophysics but not combustion chemistry.

  16. A solar type II radio burst from coronal mass ejection-coronal ray interaction: Simultaneous radio and extreme ultraviolet imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simultaneous radio and extreme ultraviolet (EUV)/white-light imaging data are examined for a solar type II radio burst occurring on 2010 March 18 to deduce its source location. Using a bow-shock model, we reconstruct the three-dimensional EUV wave front (presumably the type-II-emitting shock) based on the imaging data of the two Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory spacecraft. It is then combined with the Nançay radio imaging data to infer the three-dimensional position of the type II source. It is found that the type II source coincides with the interface between the coronal mass ejection (CME) EUV wave front and a nearby coronal ray structure, providing evidence that the type II emission is physically related to the CME-ray interaction. This result, consistent with those of previous studies, is based on simultaneous radio and EUV imaging data for the first time.

  17. Thermosphere and geomagnetic response to interplanetary coronal mass ejections observed by ACE and GRACE: Statistical results

    CERN Document Server

    Krauss, S; Veronig, A M; Baur, O; Lammer, H

    2015-01-01

    For the period July 2003 to August 2010, the interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) catalogue maintained by Richardson and Cane lists 106 Earth-directed events, which have been measured in-situ by plasma and field instruments onboard the ACE satellite. We present a statistical investigation of the Earth's thermospheric neutral density response by means of accelerometer measurements collected by the GRACE satellites, which are available for 104 ICMEs in the data set, and its relation to various geomagnetic indices and characteristic ICME parameters such as the impact speed, southward magnetic field strength (Bz). The majority of ICMEs causes a distinct density enhancement in the thermosphere, with up to a factor of eight compared to the pre-event level. We find high correlations between ICME Bz and thermospheric density enhancements (~0.9), while the correlation with the ICME impact speed is somewhat smaller (~0.7). The geomagnetic indices revealing the highest correlations are Dst and SYM-H (~0.9), the l...

  18. Field Topology Analysis of a Long-lasting Coronal Sigmoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savcheva, A. S.; van Ballegooijen, A. A.; DeLuca, E. E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first field topology analysis based on nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) models of a long-lasting coronal sigmoid observed in 2007 February with the X-Ray Telescope on Hinode. The NLFFF models are built with the flux rope insertion method and give the three-dimensional coronal magnetic field as constrained by observed coronal loop structures and photospheric magnetograms. Based on these models, we have computed horizontal maps of the current and the squashing factor Q for 25 different heights in the corona for all six days of the evolution of the region. We use the squashing factor to quantify the degree of change of the field line linkage and to identify prominent quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs). We discuss the major properties of these QSL maps and devise a way to pick out important QSLs since our calculation cannot reach high values of Q. The complexity in the QSL maps reflects the high degree of fragmentation of the photospheric field. We find main QSLs and current concentrations that outline the flux rope cavity and that become characteristically S-shaped during the evolution of the sigmoid. We note that, although intermittent bald patches exist along the length of the sigmoid during its whole evolution, the flux rope remains stable for several days. However, shortly after the topology of the field exhibits hyperbolic flux tubes (HFT) on February 7 and February 12 the sigmoid loses equilibrium and produces two B-class flares and associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The location of the most elevated part of the HFT in our model coincides with the inferred locations of the two flares. Therefore, we suggest that the presence of an HFT in a coronal magnetic configuration may be an indication that the system is ready to erupt. We offer a scenario in which magnetic reconnection at the HFT drives the system toward the marginally stable state. Once this state is reached, loss of equilibrium occurs via the torus instability, producing a CME.

  19. FIELD TOPOLOGY ANALYSIS OF A LONG-LASTING CORONAL SIGMOID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savcheva, A. S. [Astronomy Department, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; DeLuca, E. E., E-mail: savcheva@bu.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We present the first field topology analysis based on nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) models of a long-lasting coronal sigmoid observed in 2007 February with the X-Ray Telescope on Hinode. The NLFFF models are built with the flux rope insertion method and give the three-dimensional coronal magnetic field as constrained by observed coronal loop structures and photospheric magnetograms. Based on these models, we have computed horizontal maps of the current and the squashing factor Q for 25 different heights in the corona for all six days of the evolution of the region. We use the squashing factor to quantify the degree of change of the field line linkage and to identify prominent quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs). We discuss the major properties of these QSL maps and devise a way to pick out important QSLs since our calculation cannot reach high values of Q. The complexity in the QSL maps reflects the high degree of fragmentation of the photospheric field. We find main QSLs and current concentrations that outline the flux rope cavity and that become characteristically S-shaped during the evolution of the sigmoid. We note that, although intermittent bald patches exist along the length of the sigmoid during its whole evolution, the flux rope remains stable for several days. However, shortly after the topology of the field exhibits hyperbolic flux tubes (HFT) on February 7 and February 12 the sigmoid loses equilibrium and produces two B-class flares and associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The location of the most elevated part of the HFT in our model coincides with the inferred locations of the two flares. Therefore, we suggest that the presence of an HFT in a coronal magnetic configuration may be an indication that the system is ready to erupt. We offer a scenario in which magnetic reconnection at the HFT drives the system toward the marginally stable state. Once this state is reached, loss of equilibrium occurs via the torus instability, producing a CME.

  20. FIELD TOPOLOGY ANALYSIS OF A LONG-LASTING CORONAL SIGMOID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the first field topology analysis based on nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) models of a long-lasting coronal sigmoid observed in 2007 February with the X-Ray Telescope on Hinode. The NLFFF models are built with the flux rope insertion method and give the three-dimensional coronal magnetic field as constrained by observed coronal loop structures and photospheric magnetograms. Based on these models, we have computed horizontal maps of the current and the squashing factor Q for 25 different heights in the corona for all six days of the evolution of the region. We use the squashing factor to quantify the degree of change of the field line linkage and to identify prominent quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs). We discuss the major properties of these QSL maps and devise a way to pick out important QSLs since our calculation cannot reach high values of Q. The complexity in the QSL maps reflects the high degree of fragmentation of the photospheric field. We find main QSLs and current concentrations that outline the flux rope cavity and that become characteristically S-shaped during the evolution of the sigmoid. We note that, although intermittent bald patches exist along the length of the sigmoid during its whole evolution, the flux rope remains stable for several days. However, shortly after the topology of the field exhibits hyperbolic flux tubes (HFT) on February 7 and February 12 the sigmoid loses equilibrium and produces two B-class flares and associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The location of the most elevated part of the HFT in our model coincides with the inferred locations of the two flares. Therefore, we suggest that the presence of an HFT in a coronal magnetic configuration may be an indication that the system is ready to erupt. We offer a scenario in which magnetic reconnection at the HFT drives the system toward the marginally stable state. Once this state is reached, loss of equilibrium occurs via the torus instability, producing a CME.

  1. Repeated Structures Found After the Solar Maximum in the Butterfly Diagrams of Coronal Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, M. Y.; Storini, M.

    2003-09-01

    The influence of the solar cycle evolution on the coronal hole space-time distribution is well known, for polar as well as for equatorial isolated sources of high speed solar wind. Among them the long-lived coronal holes occurrence from the sunspot cycle 21 on is investigated, using the coronal hole catalogue based on HeI (1083 nm) observations (Sanchez-Ibarra and Barraza-Paredes). In at least these two solar cycles (n. 21 and n. 22) a similar structure in the latitude-time diagram of coronal holes is found. The area occurs shortly after the solar maximum at around ~35° heliolatitude and consists of over several Carrington Rotations stable coronal holes (>5 Carr. Rot.s). The diagonal disappears 2-3 years later at the helioequator. Furthermore, the analysis results in a close relation between long-lived isolated coronal holes and the soft X-class flares.

  2. Analysis and Modeling of Coronal Holes Observed by CORONAS-1. 1; Morphology and Magnetic Field Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obridko, Vladmir; Formichev, Valery; Kharschiladze, A. F.; Zhitnik, Igor; Slemzin, Vladmir; Hathaway, David H.; Wu, Shi T.

    1998-01-01

    Two low-latitude coronal holes observed by CORONAS-1 in April and June 1994 are analyzed together with magnetic field measurements obtained from Wilcox and Kitt Peak Solar Observatories. To estimate the comparable temperature of these two coronal holes, the YOHKOH observations are also utilized. Using this information, we have constructed three-dimensional magnetic field lines to illustrate the geometrical configuration of these coronal holes. The calculated synoptic maps are used to determine the existence of closed and open field regions of the hole. Finally, we have correlated the characteristics of two coronal holes with observed solar wind speed. We found that the brighter coronal hole has high speed solar wind, and the dimmer coronal hole has low speed solar wind.

  3. Optimizing Global Coronal Magnetic Field Models Using Image-based Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Shaela I.; Davila, Joseph M.; Uritsky, Vadim

    2016-04-01

    The coronal magnetic field directly or indirectly affects a majority of the phenomena studied in the heliosphere. It provides energy for coronal heating, controls the release of coronal mass ejections, and drives heliospheric and magnetospheric activity, yet the coronal magnetic field itself has proven difficult to measure. This difficulty has prompted a decades-long effort to develop accurate, timely, models of the field—an effort that continues today. We have developed a method for improving global coronal magnetic field models by incorporating the type of morphological constraints that could be derived from coronal images. Here we report promising initial tests of this approach on two theoretical problems, and discuss opportunities for application.

  4. Optimizing Global Coronal Magnetic Field Models Using Image-Based Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Shaela I; Uritsky, Vadim M

    2015-01-01

    The coronal magnetic field directly or indirectly affects a majority of the phenomena studied in space physics. It provides energy for coronal heating, controls the release of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and drives heliospheric and magnetospheric activity, yet the coronal magnetic field itself has proven difficult to measure. This difficulty has prompted a decades-long effort to develop accurate, timely, models of the field - an effort that continues today. We have developed a method for improving global coronal magnetic field models by incorporating the type of morphological constraints which could be derived from coronal images. Here we report promising initial tests of this approach on two theoretical problems, and discuss opportunities for application.

  5. NO TRACE LEFT BEHIND: STEREO OBSERVATION OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION WITHOUT LOW CORONAL SIGNATURES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of high-quality synoptic observations of the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) and visible corona during the SOHO mission has advanced our understanding of the low corona manifestations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The EUV imager/white light coronagraph connection has been proven so powerful, it is routinely assumed that if no EUV signatures are present when a CME is observed by a coronagraph, then the event must originate behind the visible limb. This assumption carries strong implications for space weather forecasting but has not been put to the test. This paper presents the first detailed analysis of a frontside, large-scale CME that has no obvious counterparts in the low corona as observed in EUV and Hα wavelengths. The event was observed by the SECCHI instruments onboard the STEREO mission. The COR2A coronagraph observed a slow flux-rope-type CME, while an extremely faint partial halo was observed in COR2B. The event evolved very slowly and is typical of the streamer-blowout CME class. EUVI A 171 A images show a concave feature above the east limb, relatively stable for about two days before the eruption, when it rises into the coronagraphic fields and develops into the core of the CME. None of the typical low corona signatures of a CME (flaring, EUV dimming, filament eruption, waves) were observed in the EUVI B images, which we attribute to the unusually large height from which the flux rope lifted off. This interpretation is supported by the CME mass measurements and estimates of the expected EUV dimming intensity. Only thanks to the availability of the two viewpoints we were able to identify the likely source region. The event originated along a neutral line over the quiet-Sun. No active regions were present anywhere on the visible (from STEREO B) face of the disk. Leaving no trace behind on the solar disk, this observation shows unambiguously that a CME eruption does not need to have clear on-disk signatures. Also it sheds light on the

  6. FORWARD MODELING CAVITY DENSITY: A MULTI-INSTRUMENT DIAGNOSTIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermodynamic properties of coronal prominence cavities present a unique probe into the energy and mass budget of prominences. Using a three-dimensional morphological model, we forward model the polarization brightness and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) emission of a cavity and its surrounding streamer. Using a genetic algorithm, we find the best-fit density model by comparing the models to Mauna Loa Solar Observatory MK4 and Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer data. The effect of temperature variations on the derived density is also measured. We have measured the density inside a cavity down to 1.05 Rsun with height-dependent error bars. Our forward modeling technique compensates for optically thin projection effects. This method provides a complementary technique to traditional line ratio diagnostics that is useful for diffuse off-limb coronal structures.

  7. Morphology and density of post-CME current sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Vršnak, B; Vujić, E; Vourlidas, A; Ko, Y -K; Raymond, J C; Ciaravella, A; Žic, T; Webb, D F; Bemporad, A; Landini, F; Schettino, G; Jacobs, C; Suess, S T

    2009-01-01

    Eruption of a coronal mass ejection (CME) drags and "opens" the coronal magnetic field, presumably leading to the formation of a large-scale current sheet and the field relaxation by magnetic reconnection. We analyze physical characteristics of ray-like coronal features formed in the aftermath of CMEs, to check if the interpretation of this phenomenon in terms of reconnecting current sheet is consistent with the observations. The study is focused on measurements of the ray width, density excess, and coronal velocity field as a function of the radial distance. The morphology of rays indicates that they occur as a consequence of Petschek-like reconnection in the large scale current sheet formed in the wake of CME. The hypothesis is supported by the flow pattern, often showing outflows along the ray, and sometimes also inflows into the ray. The inferred inflow velocities range from 3 to 30 km s$^{-1}$, consistent with the narrow opening-angle of rays, adding up to a few degrees. The density of rays is an order o...

  8. Coron : Plate-forme d'extraction de connaissances dans les bases de donn\\'ees

    CERN Document Server

    Ducatel, Baptiste; Marcuola, Florent; Napoli, Amedeo; Szathmary, Laszlo

    2011-01-01

    Coron is a domain and platform independent, multi-purposed data mining toolkit, which incorporates not only a rich collection of data mining algorithms, but also allows a number of auxiliary operations. To the best of our knowledge, a data mining toolkit designed specifically for itemset extraction and association rule generation like Coron does not exist elsewhere. Coron also provides support for preparing and filtering data, and for interpreting the extracted units of knowledge.

  9. Phase equilibria and modeling of ammonium ionic liquid, C2NTf2, solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domańska, Urszula; Marciniak, Andrzej; Królikowski, Marek

    2008-01-31

    Novel quaternary ammonium ionic liquid, ethyl(2-hydroxyethyl)dimethylammonium bis(trifluomethylsulfonyl)imide (C2NTf2), has been prepared from N,N-dimethylethanolamine as a substrate. The paper includes a specific basic characterization of the synthesized compound by NMR and the basic thermophysical properties: the melting point, enthalpy of fusion, enthalpy of solid-solid phase transition, glass transition determined by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), temperature of decomposition, and water content. The density of the new compound was measured. The solid-liquid or liquid-liquid phase equilibria of binary mixtures containing {C2NTf2+water or an alcohol (propan-1-ol, butan-1-ol, hexan-1-ol, octan-1-ol, decan-1-ol), aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene), aliphatic hydrocarbons (n-hexane, n-octane), dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), or tetrahydrofuran (THF)} have been measured by a dynamic method in a wide range of temperatures from 230 to 430 K. These data were correlated by means of the nonrandom two-liquid (NRTL) equation utilizing temperature-dependent parameters derived from the solid-liquid or liquid-liquid equilibrium. From the solubility results, the negative value of the partition coefficient of ionic liquid in binary system octan-1-ol/water (log P) at 298.15 K has been calculated. PMID:18179194

  10. Feasibility study of microwave electron heating on the C-2 field-reversed configuration device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different microwave heating scenarios for the C-2 plasmas have been investigated recently with use of both the Genray ray-racing code and the IPF-FDMC full-wave code, and the study was focused on the excitation of the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) with O-mode launch. For a given antenna position on C-2 and the fixed 2D plasma density and equilibrium field profiles, simulations have been done for six selected frequencies (2.45 GHz, 5 GHz, 8 GHz, 18 GHz, 28 GHz, and 50 GHz). Launch angles have been optimized for each case in order to achieve high coupling efficiencies to the EBW by the O-X-B mode conversion process and high power deposition. Results show that among those six frequencies, the case of 8 GHz is the most promising scenario, which has both high mode conversion efficiency (90%) and the relatively deeper power deposition

  11. Feasibility study of microwave electron heating on the C-2 field-reversed configuration device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaokang, E-mail: xyang@trialphaenergy.com; Ceccherini, Francesco; Dettrick, Sean; Binderbauer, Michl [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, CA 92688 (United States); Koehn, Alf [IGVP, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Petrov, Yuri [CompX, P.O. Box 2672, Del Mar, CA 92014 (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Different microwave heating scenarios for the C-2 plasmas have been investigated recently with use of both the Genray ray-racing code and the IPF-FDMC full-wave code, and the study was focused on the excitation of the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) with O-mode launch. For a given antenna position on C-2 and the fixed 2D plasma density and equilibrium field profiles, simulations have been done for six selected frequencies (2.45 GHz, 5 GHz, 8 GHz, 18 GHz, 28 GHz, and 50 GHz). Launch angles have been optimized for each case in order to achieve high coupling efficiencies to the EBW by the O-X-B mode conversion process and high power deposition. Results show that among those six frequencies, the case of 8 GHz is the most promising scenario, which has both high mode conversion efficiency (90%) and the relatively deeper power deposition.

  12. Simulation of nanoparticle coagulation in radio-frequency capacitively coupled C2H2 discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A self-consistent fluid model is employed to investigate the coagulation stage of nanoparticle formation, growth, charging, and transport in a radio-frequency capacitively coupled parallel-plate acetylene (C2H2) discharge. In our simulation, the distribution of neutral species across the electrode gap is determined by mass continuity, momentum balance, and energy balance equations. Since a thermal gradient in the gas temperature induced by the flow of the neutral gas, a careful study of the thermophoretic force on the spatial distribution of the nanoparticle density profiles is indispensable. In the present paper, we mainly focus on the influences of the gas flow rate, voltage, and gas pressure on the spatial distribution of the nanoparticle density. It appears that the resulting density profile of the 10-nm particles experiences a significant shift towards the upper showerhead electrode once the neutral equations are applied, and a serious shift is observed when increasing the gas flow rate. Thus, the flow of neutral gas can strongly influence the spatial distribution of the particles in the plasma. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  13. Road density

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Road density is generally highly correlated with amount of developed land cover. High road densities usually indicate high levels of ecological disturbance. More...

  14. Clinical evaluation of lumbosacral nerve root and lateral stenosis using coronal MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR imaging has been used more frequently to study the lumber spine and is becoming the modality of choice in the assessment of patient with low back pain. Using a new technique of coronal and half coronal scan with MR imaging, it was possible to visualize L4, L5 and S1 nerve roots accurately. We described the MR findings of lateral stenosis using this technique. Several characteristic MR findings were identified, and the most important one was nerve root impingement in the intervertebral foramen. We consider that coronal and half coronal scan with MR imaging is useful in diagnosis of lateral stenosis. (author)

  15. Biomechanical impact of C2 pedicle screw length in an atlantoaxial fusion construct

    OpenAIRE

    Risheng Xu; Mohamad Bydon; Mohamed Macki; Belkoff, Stephen M.; Langdale, Evan R.; Kelly McGovern; Jean-Paul Wolinsky; Gokalsan, Ziya L.; Ali Bydon

    2014-01-01

    Background: Posterior, atlantoaxial (AA) fusions of the cervical spine may include either standard (26 mm) or short (16 mm) C2 pedicle screws. This manuscript focused on an in vitro biomechanical comparison of standard versus short C2 pedicle screws to perform posterior C1-C2 AA fusions. Methods: Twelve human cadaveric spines underwent C1 lateral mass screw and standard C2 pedicle screw (n = 6) versus short C2 pedicle screw (n = 6) fixation. Six additional controls were not instrumented. ...

  16. Biomechanical comparison of pedicle screws versus spinous process screws in C2 vertebra A cadaveric study

    OpenAIRE

    Guan-yi Liu; Lu Mao; Rong-ming Xu; Wei-hu Ma

    2014-01-01

    Background: Biomechanical studies have shown C2 pedicle screw to be the most robust in insertional torque and pullout strength. However, C2 pedicle screw placement is still technically challenging. Smaller C2 pedicles or medial localization of the vertebral artery may preclude safe C2 pedicle screw placement in some patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the pullout strength of spinous process screws with pedicle screws in the C2. Materials and Methods: Eight fresh human cadav...

  17. Lung density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnett, E S; Webber, C E; Coates, G;

    1977-01-01

    The density of a defined volume of the human lung can be measured in vivo by a new noninvasive technique. A beam of gamma-rays is directed at the lung and, by measuring the scattered gamma-rays, lung density is calculated. The density in the lower lobe of the right lung in normal man during quiet...

  18. Preparation and Kinetics of the Thermal Decomposition of Nanosized CuC2O4-ZnC2O4·2H2O

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Donghua; HUANG Lianrong; TANG Wanjun

    2006-01-01

    The physical mixture of nanosized CuC2O4-ZnC2O4 · 2H2O,as precursors of CuO-ZnO, have been prepared by the one-step solid state reaction method at room temperature. The thermal decomposition processes taking place in the solid state oxalate mixture of nanometer CuC2 O4-ZnC2O4 · 2H2O have been studied in static air using TG, DSC, XRD and TEM techniques. TEM showed that the grain size of the decomposition product is 5-15 nm. The values of the activation energy Ea were determined using the isoconversional procedure of KAS method and the Ozawa method. The most possible mechanism function f(α) of the thermal decompositions of nanosized CuC2O4-ZnC2O4·2H2O are defined using the comparative method, function models of the decomposition of CuC2O4 and ZnC2O4 follow the same mechanism function "Avrami-Erofeev equation". The pre-exponential factor A is obtained on the basis of Eα and f(α), thus the thermal analysis kinetic triplet of the decompositions of nanosized CuC2 O4 -ZnC2O4·2H2O are determined.

  19. FIRST THREE-DIMENSIONAL RECONSTRUCTIONS OF CORONAL LOOPS WITH THE STEREO A+B SPACECRAFT. III. INSTANT STEREOSCOPIC TOMOGRAPHY OF ACTIVE REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we develop a novel three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction method of the coronal plasma of an active region by combining stereoscopic triangulation of loops with density and temperature modeling of coronal loops with a filling factor equivalent to tomographic volume rendering. Because this method requires only a stereoscopic image pair in multiple temperature filters, which are sampled within ∼1 minute with the recent STEREO/EUVI instrument, this method is about four orders of magnitude faster than conventional solar rotation-based tomography. We reconstruct the 3D density and temperature distribution of active region NOAA 10955 by stereoscopic triangulation of 70 loops, which are used as a skeleton for a 3D field interpolation of some 7000 loop components, leading to a 3D model that reproduces the observed fluxes in each stereoscopic image pair with an accuracy of a few percents (of the average flux) in each pixel. With the stereoscopic tomography we infer also a differential emission measure distribution over the entire temperature range of T ∼ 104-107, with predictions for the transition region and hotter corona in soft X-rays. The tomographic 3D model provides also large statistics of physical parameters. We find that the extreme-ultraviolet loops with apex temperatures of Tm ∼m ∼ 4-7 MK are near-hydrostatic. The new 3D reconstruction model is fully independent of any magnetic field data and is promising for future tests of theoretical magnetic field models and coronal heating models.

  20. C-2-C market relations and word of mouth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grubor Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most market research focuses on business-to-business and business- to-consumer interactions to explain the structure and dynamics of the market. Meanwhile, negligible effort has been invested in researching consumer-to-consumer interaction and its impact on companies’ behaviour and purchase decision-making, which determines business performance. The greatest challenge for marketers at the beginning of the 21st century is this third relationship dimension, consumer-to-consumer interaction: how consumers influence each other’s attitudes, expectations, perceptions, preferences, satisfaction, loyalty, and purchasing decisions, and, importantly, the possibility of incorporating consumers into businesses’ marketing programmes. Despite the existence of a multitude of media and different forms of communication between businesses and the market, such as newspapers, periodicals, billboards, television etc., a considerable portion of information is communicated to consumers informally, mostly in the form of word-of-mouth. The information received by consumers through this communication form - from family and similar individuals -is very often accepted as more reliable and certain than information transmitted through formal communication channels. What is often neglected when studying the phenomenon of word-of-mouth communication is the fact that its efficiency and effect also depend on the type and character of the interaction between the consumers themselves. This paper aims to investigate the extent to which the nature of customer to-customer (C2C interaction influences the effect of word-of-mouth communication.

  1. Evaluation of absorber worth measurements in SNEAK 12C2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the difficulties encountered in former evaluations of the absorber experiments in SNEAK 12C, a re-evaluation had been performed. It was found that the difficulties were caused by the use of erroneous number densities for the absorbers on one side and by an incorrect modelling of the buffer and driver zones, surrounding the test zone, on the other. After correction of the absorber number densities and by application of three-dimensional calculational methods, consistent results could be obtained. The calculation-to-experiment values (C/E) are now in the range of 0.85 to 0.90 and are sufficiently close to the values for the uranium core SNEAK 12A (0.89 to 0.93)

  2. Reexamination of the coronal index of solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybanský, M.; Rušin, V.; Minarovjech, M.; Klocok, L.; Cliver, E. W.

    2005-08-01

    The coronal index (CI) of solar activity is the irradiance of the Sun as a star in the coronal green line (Fe XIV, 530.3 nm or 5303 Å). It is derived from ground-based observations of the green corona made by the network of coronal stations (currently Kislovodsk, Lomnický Štít, Norikura, and Sacramento Peak). The CI was introduced by Rybanský (1975) to facilitate comparison of ground-based green line measurements with satellite-based extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray observations. The CI since 1965 is based on the Lomnický Štít photometric scale; the CI was extended to earlier years by Rybanský et al. (1994) based on cross-calibrations of Lomnický Štít data with measurements made at Pic du Midi and Arosa. The resultant 1939-1992 CI had the interesting property that its value at the peak of the 11-year cycle increased more or less monotonically from cycle 18 through cycle 22 even though the peak sunspot number of cycle 20 exhibited a significant local minimum between that of cycles 19 and 21. Rušin and Rybanský (2002) recently showed that the green line intensity and photospheric magnetic field strength were highly correlated from 1976 to 1999. Since the photospheric magnetic field strength is highly correlated with sunspot number, the lack of close correspondence between the sunspot number and the CI from 1939 to 2002 is puzzling. Here we show that the CI and sunspot number are highly correlated only after 1965, calling the previously-computed coronal index for earlier years (1939-1965) into question. We can use the correlation between the CI and sunspot number (also the 2800 MHz radio flux and the cosmic ray intensity) to recompute daily values of the CI for years before 1966. In fact, this method can be used to obtain CI values as far back as we have reliable sunspot observations (˜1850). The net result of this exercise is a CI that closely tracks the sunspot number at all times. We can use the sunspot-CI relationship (for 1966-2002) to identify

  3. Photobiomodulation Protects and Promotes Differentiation of C2C12 Myoblast Cells Exposed to Snake Venom

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Aline; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Cogo, José Carlos; Zamuner, Stella Regina

    2016-01-01

    Background Snakebites is a neglected disease and in Brazil is considered a serious health problem, with the majority of the snakebites caused by the genus Bothrops. Antivenom therapy and other first-aid treatments do not reverse local myonecrose which is the main sequel caused by the envenomation. Several studies have shown the effectiveness of low level laser (LLL) therapy in reducing local myonecrosis induced by Bothropic venoms, however the mechanism involved in this effect is unknown. In this in vitro study, we aimed to analyze the effect of LLL irradiation against cytotoxicity induced by Bothrops jararacussu venom on myoblast C2C12 cells. Methodology C2C12 were utilized as a model target and were incubated with B. jararacussu venom (12.5 μg/mL) and immediately irradiated with LLL at wavelength of red 685 nm or infrared 830 nm with energy density of 2.0, 4.6 and 7.0 J/cm2. Effects of LLL on cellular responses of venom-induced cytotoxicity were examined, including cell viability, measurement of cell damage and intra and extracellular ATP levels, expression of myogenic regulatory factors, as well as cellular differentiation. Results In non-irradiated cells, the venom caused a decrease in cell viability and a massive release of LDH and CK levels indicating myonecrosis. Infrared and red laser at all energy densities were able to considerably decrease venom-induced cytotoxicity. Laser irradiation induced myoblasts to differentiate into myotubes and this effect was accompanied by up regulation of MyoD and specially myogenin. Moreover, LLL was able to reduce the extracellular while increased the intracellular ATP content after venom exposure. In addition, no difference in the intensity of cytotoxicity was shown by non-irradiated and irradiated venom. Conclusion LLL irradiation caused a protective effect on C2C12 cells against the cytotoxicity caused by B. jararacussu venom and promotes differentiation of these cells by up regulation of myogenic factors. A modulatory

  4. Modeling the Global Distribution of Plasma Parameters on Coronal Source Surface for Different Solar Phases Using 1AU Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Shen, F.; Feng, X.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we have developed an empirical model of the global distribution of plasma parameters on the coronal source surface (at 2.5 solar radii (Rs) in our study) by analyzing observations from Ulysses and OMNI data. We use this model to construct the global map of source surface plasma for four typical Carrington Rotations (CRs) during different phases of solar activity, and analyze the basic characteristics of the distribution. A simple validation of the model is made by comparing the density and velocity distribution with the pB-inversed density and Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model velocity. The preliminary results show that our model gives reasonable large scale distribution of source surface plasma parameters at different phases of solar activity.

  5. Role of transients in the sustainability of solar coronal plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raouafi, N.-E. [The John Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723-6099 (United States); Stenborg, G., E-mail: NourEddine.Raouafi@jhuapl.edu [SPACS, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We report on the role of small-scale, transient magnetic activity in the formation and evolution of solar coronal plumes. Three plumes within equatorial coronal holes are analyzed over the span of several days based on the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 171 Å and 193 Å images and SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager line-of-sight magnetograms. The focus is on the role of transient structures at the footpoints in sustaining coronal plumes for relatively long periods of time (i.e., several days). The appearance of plumes is a gradual and lengthy process. In some cases, the initial stages of plume formation are marked by the appearance of pillar-like structures whose footpoints are the sources of transient brightenings. In addition to nominal jets occurring prior to and during the development of plumes, the data show that a large number of small jets (i.e., {sup j}etlets{sup )} and plume transient bright points (PTBPs) occur on timescales of tens of seconds to a few minutes. These features are the result of quasi-random cancellations of fragmented and diffuse minority magnetic polarity with the dominant unipolar magnetic field concentration over an extended period of time. They unambiguously reflect a highly dynamical evolution at the footpoints and are seemingly the main energy source for plumes. This suggests a tendency for plumes to be dependent on the occurrence of transients (i.e., jetlets, and PTBPs) resulting from low-rate magnetic reconnection. The decay phase of plumes is characterized by gradual fainting and multiple rejuvenations as a result of the dispersal of the unipolar magnetic concentration and its precipitation into multiple magnetic centers.

  6. Eastward deflection of fast coronal mass ejecta in interplanetary space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work has shown that a bidirectional solar wind electron heat flux is one of the more prominent signatures of a coronal mass ejection event in the solar wind at 1 AU. Using ISEE 3 solar wind electron measurements obtained during 1978 and 1979, we have used this signature to identify the fast coronal mass ejecta driving 19 interplanetary shocks. In 17 of the 19 shock events an eastward deflection of the ejection plasma (apparent arrival from west of the sun) was observed. The average eastward deflection for all of the events was ∼30, corresponding to a typical transverse velocity of ∼25 km/s. Usually an oppositely directed (i.e., westward) flow deflection of comparable magnitude was observed within the compressed ambient plasma ahead of the ejecta. The sense of these deflections: first westward within the compressed ambient plasma and then eastward within the ejecta: is the same as is observed near the leading edges of quasi-stationary, corotating high speed streams. However, in contrast to the case of corotating streams, the west-east flow reversal does not coincide with a local maximum in static pressure. No consistent flow deflection pattern perpendicular to the ecliptic has been observed for these events, and no similar deflections have been observed for ejecta (bidirectional electron heat flux events) traveling at the same speed as or slower than the ambient plasma ahead. We suggest that the preferred eastward deflection of these fast coronal mass ejecta is a consequence of solar rotation and the spiral geometry of the ambient solar wind. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  7. Coronal Heating and the Magnetic Flux Content of the Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.; Falconer, D. A.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.

    2003-05-01

    We investigate the heating of the quiet corona by measuring the increase of coronal luminosity with the amount of magnetic flux in the underlying network at solar minimum when there were no active regions on the face of the Sun. The coronal luminosity is measured from Fe IX/X-Fe XII pairs of coronal images from SOHO/EIT. The network magnetic flux content is measured from SOHO/MDI magnetograms. We find that the luminosity of the corona in our quiet regions increases roughly in proportion to the square root of the magnetic flux content of the network and roughly in proportion to the length of the perimeter of the network magnetic flux clumps. From (1) this result, (2) other observations of many fine-scale explosive events at the edges of network flux clumps, and (3) a demonstration that it is energetically feasible for the heating of the corona in quiet regions to be driven by explosions of granule-sized sheared-core magnetic bipoles embedded in the edges of network flux clumps, we infer that in quiet regions that are not influenced by active regions the corona is mainly heated by such magnetic activity in the edges of the network flux clumps. Our observational results together with our feasibility analysis allow us to predict that (1) at the edges of the network flux clumps there are many transient sheared-core bipoles of the size and lifetime of granules and having transverse field strengths > 100 G, (2) 30 of these bipoles are present per supergranule, and (3) most spicules are produced by explosions of these bipoles. This work was supported by NASA's Office of Space Science through its Solar and Heliospheric Physics Supporting Research and Technology Program and its Sun-Earth Connection Guest Investigator Program.

  8. Role of transients in the sustainability of solar coronal plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the role of small-scale, transient magnetic activity in the formation and evolution of solar coronal plumes. Three plumes within equatorial coronal holes are analyzed over the span of several days based on the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 171 Å and 193 Å images and SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager line-of-sight magnetograms. The focus is on the role of transient structures at the footpoints in sustaining coronal plumes for relatively long periods of time (i.e., several days). The appearance of plumes is a gradual and lengthy process. In some cases, the initial stages of plume formation are marked by the appearance of pillar-like structures whose footpoints are the sources of transient brightenings. In addition to nominal jets occurring prior to and during the development of plumes, the data show that a large number of small jets (i.e., jetlets) and plume transient bright points (PTBPs) occur on timescales of tens of seconds to a few minutes. These features are the result of quasi-random cancellations of fragmented and diffuse minority magnetic polarity with the dominant unipolar magnetic field concentration over an extended period of time. They unambiguously reflect a highly dynamical evolution at the footpoints and are seemingly the main energy source for plumes. This suggests a tendency for plumes to be dependent on the occurrence of transients (i.e., jetlets, and PTBPs) resulting from low-rate magnetic reconnection. The decay phase of plumes is characterized by gradual fainting and multiple rejuvenations as a result of the dispersal of the unipolar magnetic concentration and its precipitation into multiple magnetic centers.

  9. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, Fabio

    2014-07-01

    Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered and, therefore, topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones, which provide information on stellar loops) are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses the classification, populations, and the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the loop stranded structure. The section continues with the thermal properties and diagnostics of the loop plasma, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics, hot and cool flows, and waves are illustrated. In the modeling section, some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are divided into those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. More specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC) and impulsive (DC) heating. Large-scale models including atmosphere boxes and the magnetic field are also discussed. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar coronal loops is followed by highlights and open questions.

  10. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Reale

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered and, therefore, topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones, which provide information on stellar loops are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses the classification, populations, and the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the loop stranded structure. The section continues with the thermal properties and diagnostics of the loop plasma, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics, hot and cool flows, and waves are illustrated. In the modeling section, some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are divided into those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. More specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC and impulsive (DC heating. Large-scale models including atmosphere boxes and the magnetic field are also discussed. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar coronal loops is followed by highlights and open questions.

  11. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Reale

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered, and therefore topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones which provide information on stellar loops are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses loop classification and populations, and then describes the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the concept of loops as multi-stranded structures. The following part of this section is devoted to the characteristics of the loop plasma and of its thermal structure in particular, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics and flows are illustrated. In the modeling section some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying some fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are distinguished between those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. Then, more specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC and impulsive (DC heating. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar X-ray emitting structures related to coronal loops is included and followed by conclusions and open questions.

  12. Effect of C–O Bonding on the Stability and Energetics of High-Energy Nitrogen-Carbon Molecules N10C2 and N16C2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas L. Strout

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecules consisting of nitrogen have been the subject of much attention due to their potential as high-energy materials. Complex molecules consisting entirely of nitrogen can be subject to rapid decomposition, and therefore other atoms are incorporated into the structure to enhance stability. Previous studies have explored the incorporation of carbon atoms into otherwise all-nitrogen cages molecules. The current study involves two such cages, N10C2 and N16C2, whose structures are derived from N12 and N18, respectively. The N10C2 and N16C2 cages in this study are modified by bonding groups O3 and CO3 to determine the effect on the relative energies between the isomers and on the thermodynamic energy release properties. Energetic trends for N10C2 and N16C2 are calculated and discussed.

  13. Cloning and characterization of an apolipoprotein C2 promoter in the mouse central nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoyang Li; Bing Du; Shengyang Li; Xiangchuan Lv; Shenglai Zhou; Yang Yu; Wei Wang; Zhihong Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoprotein C2 is an important member of the apolipoprotein C family, and is a potent activator of lipoprotein lipase. In the central nervous system, apolipoprotein C2 plays an important role in the catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Studies into the exact regulatory mechanism of mouse apolipoprotein C2 expression have not been reported. In this study, seven luciferase expression vectors, which contained potential mouse apolipoprotein C2 gene promoters, were constructed and co-transfected with pRL-TK into HEK293T cells to investigate apolipoprotein C2 promoter activity. Luciferase assays indicated that the apolipoprotein C2 promoter region was mainly located in the +104 bp to +470 bp region. The activity of the different lengths of apolipoprotein C2 promoter region varied. This staggered negative-positive-negative arrangement indicates the complex regulation of apolipoprotein C2 expression and provides important clues for elucidating the regulatory mechanism of apolipoprotein C2 gene transcription.

  14. DRIVING CURRENTS FOR FLUX ROPE CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a method for measuring electrical currents enclosed by flux rope structures that are ejected within solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Such currents are responsible for providing the Lorentz self-force that propels CMEs. Our estimates for the driving current are based on measurements of the propelling force obtained using data from the LASCO coronagraphs aboard the SOHO satellite. We find that upper limits on the currents enclosed by CMEs are typically around 1010 A. We estimate that the magnetic flux enclosed by the CMEs in the LASCO field of view is a few times 1021 Mx.

  15. 3D reconstruction methods of coronal structures by radio observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Bastian, T. S.; White, Stephen M.

    1992-11-01

    The ability to carry out the three dimensional (3D) reconstruction of structures in the solar corona would represent a major advance in the study of the physical properties in active regions and in flares. Methods which allow a geometric reconstruction of quasistationary coronal structures (for example active region loops) or dynamic structures (for example flaring loops) are described: stereoscopy of multi-day imaging observations by the VLA (Very Large Array); tomography of optically thin emission (in radio or soft x-rays); multifrequency band imaging by the VLA; and tracing of magnetic field lines by propagating electron beams.

  16. Projection effects in coronal dimmings and associated EUV wave event

    OpenAIRE

    Dissauer, Karin; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid M.; Vanninathan, Kamalam; Magdalenić, Jasmina

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the high-speed ($v >$ 1000 km s$^{-1}$) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with an X1.2 flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) from NOAA active region 11283 on 2011 September 6 (SOL2011-09-06T22:12). This EUV wave features peculiar on-disk signatures, in particular we observe an intermittent "disappearance" of the front for 120 s in SDO/AIA 171, 193, 211 {\\AA} data, whereas the 335 {\\AA} filter, sensitive to hotter plasmas (T$\\sim$2.5 MK), shows a continuous evolution of ...

  17. A scenario of planet erosion by coronal radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz-Forcada, J.; Ribas, I.; Micela, G.; Pollock, A.M.T.; Garcia-Alvarez, D.; Solano, E.; Eiroa, C.

    2010-01-01

    Context: According to theory, high-energy emission from the coronae of cool stars can severely erode the atmospheres of orbiting planets. No observational tests of the long term effects of erosion have yet been made. Aims: To analyze the current distribution of planetary mass with X-ray irradiation of the atmospheres in order to make an observational assessment of the effects of erosion by coronal radiation. Methods: We study a large sample of planet-hosting stars with XMM-Newton, Chandra and...

  18. Spatial Relationship between Solar Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    OpenAIRE

    Yashiro, S.; G. Michalek; Akiyama, S; Gopalswamy, N.; Howard, R. A.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the spatial relationship between solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed during 1996-2005 inclusive. We identified 496 flare-CME pairs considering limb flares (distance from central meridian > 45 deg) with soft X-ray flare size > C3 level. The CMEs were detected by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). We investigated the flare positions with respect to the CME span for the events with X-class...

  19. Geoeffectiveness of Coronal Mass Ejections in the SOHO Era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumbovic, M.; Devos, A.; Vrsnak, B.;

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of the study is to determine the probability distributions of the geomagnetic Dst index as a function of the coronal mass ejection (CME) and solar flare parameters for the purpose of establishing a probabilistic forecast tool for the geomagnetic storm intensity. Several CME...... and flare parameters as well as the effect of successive-CME occurrence in changing the probability for a certain range of Dst index values, were examined. The results confirm some of already known relationships between remotely-observed properties of solar eruptive events and geomagnetic storms, namely...... for predicting the probability of the geomagnetic storm intensity based on remote solar observations of CMEs and flares....

  20. Ulysses magnetic field observations of fluctuations within polar coronal flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbury, T.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R. J.; Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The Ulysses spacecraft has gathered data from within flows from the Sun's southern polar coronal hole, the first in situ measurement of this region. We present a brief analysis of the heliospheric magnetic field data from this region, using a fractal method. As is the case near the ecliptic, estimated spectral exponents are near 5/3 on spacecraft scales of seconds to minutes. On longer time scales, however, there appears to be a significantly different population in polar flows, which is similar to that found by the Helios spacecraft in fast solar wind flows at 0.3 AU.