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Sample records for c10 cysteine protease

  1. The dissemination of C10 cysteine protease genes in Bacteroides fragilis by mobile genetic elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kagawa Todd F

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C10 family of cysteine proteases includes enzymes that contribute to the virulence of bacterial pathogens, such as SpeB in Streptococcus pyogenes. The presence of homologues of cysteine protease genes in human commensal organisms has not been examined. Bacteroides fragilis is a member of the dominant Bacteroidetes phylum of the human intestinal microbiota, and is a significant opportunistic pathogen. Results Four homologues of the streptococcal virulence factor SpeB were identified in the B. fragilis genome. These four protease genes, two were directly contiguous to open reading frames predicted to encode staphostatin-like inhibitors, with which the protease genes were co-transcribed. Two of these protease genes are unique to B. fragilis 638R and are associated with two large genomic insertions. Gene annotation indicated that one of these insertions was a conjugative Tn-like element and the other was a prophage-like element, which was shown to be capable of excision. Homologues of the B. fragilis C10 protease genes were present in a panel of clinical isolates, and in DNA extracted from normal human faecal microbiota. Conclusions This study suggests a mechanism for the evolution and dissemination of an important class of protease in major members of the normal human microbiota.

  2. The dissemination of C10 cysteine protease genes in Bacteroides fragilis by mobile genetic elements

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thornton, Roibeard F

    2010-04-23

    Abstract Background The C10 family of cysteine proteases includes enzymes that contribute to the virulence of bacterial pathogens, such as SpeB in Streptococcus pyogenes. The presence of homologues of cysteine protease genes in human commensal organisms has not been examined. Bacteroides fragilis is a member of the dominant Bacteroidetes phylum of the human intestinal microbiota, and is a significant opportunistic pathogen. Results Four homologues of the streptococcal virulence factor SpeB were identified in the B. fragilis genome. These four protease genes, two were directly contiguous to open reading frames predicted to encode staphostatin-like inhibitors, with which the protease genes were co-transcribed. Two of these protease genes are unique to B. fragilis 638R and are associated with two large genomic insertions. Gene annotation indicated that one of these insertions was a conjugative Tn-like element and the other was a prophage-like element, which was shown to be capable of excision. Homologues of the B. fragilis C10 protease genes were present in a panel of clinical isolates, and in DNA extracted from normal human faecal microbiota. Conclusions This study suggests a mechanism for the evolution and dissemination of an important class of protease in major members of the normal human microbiota.

  3. Cysteine proteases as potential antigens in antiparasitic DNA vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Buchmann, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner.......En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner....

  4. The effect of environmental conditions on expression of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron C10 protease genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Roibeard F; Murphy, Elizabeth C; Kagawa, Todd F; O'Toole, Paul W; Cooney, Jakki C

    2012-09-03

    Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron are members of the normal human intestinal microbiota. However, both organisms are capable of causing opportunistic infections, during which the environmental conditions to which the bacteria are exposed change dramatically. To further explore their potential for contributing to infection, we have characterized the expression in B. thetaiotaomicron of four homologues of the gene encoding the C10 cysteine protease SpeB, a potent extracellular virulence factor produced by Streptococcus pyogenes. We identified a paralogous set of genes (btp genes) in the B. thetaiotaomicron genome, that were related to C10 protease genes we recently identified in B. fragilis. Similar to C10 proteases found in B. fragilis, three of the B. thetaiotaomicron homologues were transcriptionally coupled to genes encoding small proteins that are similar in structural architecture to Staphostatins, protease inhibitors associated with Staphopains in Staphylococcus aureus. The expression of genes for these C10 proteases in both B. fragilis and B. thetaiotaomicron was found to be regulated by environmental stimuli, in particular by exposure to oxygen, which may be important for their contribution to the development of opportunistic infections. Genes encoding C10 proteases are increasingly identified in operons which also contain genes encoding proteins homologous to protease inhibitors. The Bacteroides C10 protease gene expression levels are responsive to different environmental stimuli suggesting they may have distinct roles in the bacterial-host interaction.

  5. The effect of environmental conditions on expression of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron C10 protease genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thornton Roibeard F

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron are members of the normal human intestinal microbiota. However, both organisms are capable of causing opportunistic infections, during which the environmental conditions to which the bacteria are exposed change dramatically. To further explore their potential for contributing to infection, we have characterized the expression in B. thetaiotaomicron of four homologues of the gene encoding the C10 cysteine protease SpeB, a potent extracellular virulence factor produced by Streptococcus pyogenes. Results We identified a paralogous set of genes (btp genes in the B. thetaiotaomicron genome, that were related to C10 protease genes we recently identified in B. fragilis. Similar to C10 proteases found in B. fragilis, three of the B. thetaiotaomicron homologues were transcriptionally coupled to genes encoding small proteins that are similar in structural architecture to Staphostatins, protease inhibitors associated with Staphopains in Staphylococcus aureus. The expression of genes for these C10 proteases in both B. fragilis and B. thetaiotaomicron was found to be regulated by environmental stimuli, in particular by exposure to oxygen, which may be important for their contribution to the development of opportunistic infections. Conclusions Genes encoding C10 proteases are increasingly identified in operons which also contain genes encoding proteins homologous to protease inhibitors. The Bacteroides C10 protease gene expression levels are responsive to different environmental stimuli suggesting they may have distinct roles in the bacterial-host interaction.

  6. Hordeum vulgare cysteine protease heterologous expressed in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben Bach

    During germination of barley seeds, the mobilization of protein is essential and Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins [1]. Cysteine proteases exist as pro-enzyme until activated through reduction...... of the active site cysteines and via removal of the pro-domain. The complement of cysteine proteases is comprehensive and for detailed studies of the individual components of this complement, a fast and efficient eukaryotic expression platform is highly desirable. One of the key cysteine proteases in Barley...

  7. The Cysteine Protease–Cysteine Protease Inhibitor System Explored in Soybean Nodule Development

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    Marian Dorcas Quain

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Almost all protease families have been associated with plant development, particularly senescence, which is the final developmental stage of every organ before cell death. Proteolysis remobilizes and recycles nitrogen from senescent organs that is required, for example, seed development. Senescence-associated expression of proteases has recently been characterized using large-scale gene expression analysis seeking to identify and characterize senescence-related genes. Increasing activities of proteolytic enzymes, particularly cysteine proteases, are observed during the senescence of legume nodules, in which a symbiotic relationship between the host plant and bacteria (Rhizobia facilitate the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen. It is generally considered that cysteine proteases are compartmentalized to prevent uncontrolled proteolysis in nitrogen-fixing nodules. In addition, the activities of cysteine proteases are regulated by endogenous cysteine protease inhibitors called cystatins. These small proteins form reversible complexes with cysteine proteases, leading to inactivation. However, very little is currently known about how the cysteine protease-cysteine protease inhibitor (cystatin system is regulated during nodule development. Moreover, our current understanding of the expression and functions of proteases and protease inhibitors in nodules is fragmented. To address this issue, we have summarized the current knowledge and techniques used for studying proteases and their inhibitors including the application of “omics” tools, with a particular focus on changes in the cysteine protease-cystatin system during nodule development.

  8. Midgut cysteine protease-inhibiting activity in Trichoplusia ni protects the peritrophic membrane from degradation by plant cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changyou; Song, Xiaozhao; Li, Guoxun; Wang, Ping

    2009-10-01

    The action of plant cysteine proteases on the midgut peritrophic membrane (PM) of a polyphagous herbivorous lepidopteran, Trichoplusia ni, was studied. Proteins in PMs isolated from T. ni larvae were confirmed to be highly resistant to the serine proteinases trypsin and chymotrypsin, but were susceptible to degradation by plant cysteine proteases, which is consistent with the known molecular and biochemical characteristics of the T. ni PM proteins. However, the PM proteins were not degraded by plant cysteine proteases in larvae or in the presence of larval midgut fluid in vitro. With further biochemical analysis, cysteine protease-inhibiting activity was identified in the midgut fluid of T. ni larvae. The cysteine protease-inhibiting activity was heat resistant and active in the tested pH range from 6.0 to 10.0, but could be suppressed by thiol reducing reagents or reduced by treatment with catalase. In addition to T. ni, cysteine protease-inhibiting activity was also identified from two other polyphagous Lepidoptera species, Helicoverpa zea and Heliothis virescens. In conclusion, results from this study uncovered that herbivorous insects may counteract the attack of plant cysteine proteases on the PM by inhibiting the potentially insecticidal cysteine proteases from plants in the digestive tract. However, the biochemical identity of the cysteine protease-inhibiting activity in midgut fluid has yet to be identified.

  9. Differential expression of cysteine protease inhibitor (CPI) gene of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2012-03-08

    Mar 8, 2012 ... A cDNA clone which encodes a cysteine protease inhibitor gene, named PsCPI, has been identified in. Polygonum ... Keywords: Polygonum sibiricum Laxm., Polygonum sibiricum Laxm cysteine protease inhibitor, rapid amplification of .... Plasmids containing the insert were purified (Promega minipreps) ...

  10. Heterologous expression of Hordeum vulgare cysteine protease in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben B

    Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins during germination. Several Cysteine proteases have been identified in barley. One of the key enzymes, Hordeum vulgare endoprotease B2 (HvEPB2) was cloned...

  11. Structure-Function of Falcipains: Malarial Cysteine Proteases

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    Kailash C. Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that cysteine proteases play essential role in malaria parasites; therefore an obvious area of investigation is the inhibition of these enzymes to treat malaria. Studies with cysteine protease inhibitors and manipulating cysteine proteases genes have suggested a role for cysteine proteases in hemoglobin hydrolysis. The best characterized Plasmodium cysteine proteases are falcipains, which are papain family enzymes. Falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 are major hemoglobinases of P. falciparum. Structural and functional analysis of falcipains showed that they have unique domains including a refolding domain and a hemoglobin binding domain. Overall, the complexes of falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 with small and macromolecular inhibitors provide structural insight to facilitate the design or modification of effective drug treatment against malaria. Drug development targeting falcipains should be aided by a strong foundation of biochemical and structural studies.

  12. Cathepsin B-like cysteine proteases confer intestinal cysteine protease activity in Haemonchus contortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shompole, S; Jasmer, D P

    2001-01-26

    Cathepsin B-like cysteine protease genes (cbls) constitute large multigene families in parasitic and nonparasitic nematodes. Although expressed in the intestine of some nematodes, the biological and biochemical functions of the CBL proteins remain unresolved. Di- and tetra-oligopeptides were used as fluorogenic substrates and irreversible/competitive inhibitors to establish CBL functions in the intestine of the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus. Cysteine protease activity was detected against diverse substrates including the cathepsin B/L substrate FR, the caspase 1 substrate YVAD, the cathepsin B substrate RR, but not the CED-3 (caspase 3) substrate DEVD. The pH at which maximum activity was detected varied according to substrate and ranged from pH 5.0 to 7.0. Individual CBLs were affinity isolated using FA and YVAD substrates. pH influenced CBL affinity isolation in a substrate-specific manner that paralleled pH effects on individual substrates. N-terminal sequencing identified two isolated CBLs as H. contortus GCP-7 (33 kDa) and AC-4 (37 kDa). N termini of each began at a position consistent with proregion cleavage and protease activation. Isolation of the GCP-7 band by each peptide was preferentially inhibited when competed with a diazomethane-conjugated inhibitor, Z-FA-CHN(2), demonstrating one functional difference among CBLs and among inhibitors. Substrate-based histological analysis placed CBLs on the intestinal microvilli. Data indicate that CBLs are responsible for cysteine protease activity described from H. contortus intestine. Results also support a role of CBLs in nutrient digestion.

  13. Plant cysteine proteases that evoke itch activate protease-activated receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, V.B.; Lerner, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bromelain, ficin and papain are cysteine proteases from plants that produce itch upon injection into skin. Their mechanism of action has not been considered previously. Objectives To determine the mechanism by which these proteases function. Methods The ability of these proteases to activate protease-activated receptors was determined by ratiometric calcium imaging. Results We show here that bromelain, ficin and papain activate protease-activated receptors 2 and 4. Conclusions Bromelain, ficin and papain function as signalling molecules and activate protease-activated receptors. Activation of these receptors is the likely mechanism by which these proteases evoke itch. PMID:20491769

  14. Isolation and characterization of a cysteine protease of freesia corms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikoba, Tetsuya; Okubo, Michiko; Arima, Kazunari; Yonezawa, Hiroo

    2002-02-01

    A protease, freesia protease (FP)-A, was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from regular freesia (Freesia reflacta) corms in harvest time. The Mr of FP-A was estimated to be 24 k by SDS-PAGE. The optimum pH of the enzyme was 8.0 using a casein substrate. These enzymes were strongly inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoic acid but not by phenylmethane-sulfonylfluoride and EDTA. These results indicate that FP-A belongs to the cysteine proteases. The amino terminal sequence of FP-A was similar to that of papain, and the sequences was regarded to the conservative residues of cysteine protease. From the hydrolysis of peptidyl-p-NAs, the specificity of FP-A was found to be broad. It was thought that FP-A was a new protease from freesia corms.

  15. Schistosomiasis mansoni: novel chemotherapy using a cysteine protease inhibitor.

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    Maha-Hamadien Abdulla

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a chronic, debilitating parasitic disease infecting more than 200 million people and is second only to malaria in terms of public health importance. Due to the lack of a vaccine, patient therapy is heavily reliant on chemotherapy with praziquantel as the World Health Organization-recommended drug, but concerns over drug resistance encourage the search for new drug leads.The efficacy of the vinyl sulfone cysteine protease inhibitor K11777 was tested in the murine model of schistosomiasis mansoni. Disease parameters measured were worm and egg burdens, and organ pathology including hepato- and splenomegaly, presence of parasite egg-induced granulomas in the liver, and levels of circulating alanine aminotransferase activity as a marker of hepatocellular function. K11777 (25 mg/kg twice daily [BID], administered intraperitoneally at the time of parasite migration through the skin and lungs (days 1-14 postinfection [p.i.], resulted in parasitologic cure (elimination of parasite eggs in five of seven cases and a resolution of other disease parameters. K11777 (50 mg/kg BID, administered at the commencement of egg-laying by mature parasites (days 30-37 p.i., reduced worm and egg burdens, and ameliorated organ pathology. Using protease class-specific substrates and active-site labeling, one molecular target of K11777 was identified as the gut-associated cathepsin B1 cysteine protease, although other cysteine protease targets are not excluded. In rodents, dogs, and primates, K11777 is nonmutagenic with satisfactory safety and pharmacokinetic profiles.The significant reduction in parasite burden and pathology by this vinyl sulfone cysteine protease inhibitor validates schistosome cysteine proteases as drug targets and offers the potential of a new direction for chemotherapy of human schistosomiasis.

  16. Differential expression of cysteine protease inhibitor (CPI) gene of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cDNA clone which encodes a cysteine protease inhibitor gene, named PsCPI, has been identified in Polygonum sibiricum Laxm. by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends method (RACE). Analysis of the nucleotide sequence reveals that the PsCPI gene cDNA clone consists of 437 bp, containing 38 bp in the 5' ...

  17. Reaction mechanism of O-acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    enzyme inhibitors is an important approach in me- dicinal chemistry.3 Especially, ... inhibitors. So, the aim of the present study is to cal- culate the energy barrier for the reaction mechanism of O-acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases by employing B3LYP and B3PW91 ... and B3PW91/6-31 + G* levels of theory. The topo-.

  18. Targeted expression of cystatin restores fertility in cysteine protease induced male sterile tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Pawan; Subhashini, Mranu; Singh, Naveen Kumar; Ahmed, Israr; Trishla, Shalibhadra; Kirti, P B

    2016-05-01

    Fertility restoration in male sterile plants is an essential requirement for their utilization in hybrid seed production. In an earlier investigation, we have demonstrated that the targeted expression of a cysteine protease in tapetal cell layer resulted in complete male sterility in tobacco transgenic plants. In the present investigation, we have used a cystatin gene, which encodes for a cysteine protease inhibitor, from a wild peanut, Arachis diogoi and developed a plant gene based restoration system for cysteine protease induced male sterile transgenic tobacco plants. We confirmed the interaction between the cysteine protease and a cystatin of the wild peanut, A. diogoi through in silico modeling and yeast two-hybrid assay. Pollen from primary transgenic tobacco plants expressing cystatin gene under the tapetum specific promoter- TA29 restored fertility on cysteine protease induced male sterile tobacco plants developed earlier. This has confirmed the in vivo interaction of cysteine protease and cystatin in the tapetal cells, and the inactivation of cysteine protease and modulation of its negative effects on pollen fertility. Both the cysteine protease and cystatin genes are of plant origin in contrast to the analogous barnase-barstar system that deploys genes of prokaryotic origin. Because of the deployment of genes of plant origin, this system might not face biosafety problems in developing hybrids in food crops. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Peptidyl cyclopropenones: Reversible inhibitors, irreversible inhibitors, or substrates of cysteine proteases?

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Meital; Bretler, Uriel; Albeck, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    Peptidyl cyclopropenones were previously introduced as selective cysteine protease reversible inhibitors. In the present study we synthesized one such peptidyl cyclopropenone and investigated its interaction with papain, a prototype cysteine protease. A set of kinetics, biochemical, HPLC, MS, and 13C-NMR experiments revealed that the peptidyl cyclopropenone was an irreversible inhibitor of the enzyme, alkylating the catalytic cysteine. In parallel, this cyclopropenone also behaved as an alter...

  20. Cysteine proteases: Modes of activation and future prospects as pharmacological targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia eVerma

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria and parasite to the higher organisms (mammals. Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases and metallo-proteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a pro-domain (regulatory and a mature domain (catalytic. The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein-protein interactions (PPIs and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases.

  1. Cysteine protease activation and apoptosis in Murine norovirus infection

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    Ettayebi Khalil

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noroviruses are the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis. Because a suitable in vitro culture system for the human virus has yet to be developed, many basic details of the infection process are unknown. Murine norovirus (MNV serves as a model system for the study of norovirus infection. Recently it was shown that infection of RAW 264.7 cells involved a novel apoptotic pathway involving survivin. Results Using a different set of approaches, the up-regulation of caspases, DNA condensation/fragmentation, and membrane blebbing, all of which are markers of apoptosis, were confirmed. Live cell imaging and activity-based protein profiling showed that activation of caspase-like proteases occurred within two hours of infection, followed by morphological changes to the cells. MNV infection in the presence of caspase inhibitors proceeded via a distinct pathway of rapid cellular necrosis and reduced viral production. Affinity purification of activity-based protein profiling targets and identification by peptide mass fingerprinting showed that the cysteine protease cathepsin B was activated early in infection, establishing this protein as an upstream activator of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Conclusion This work adds cathepsin B to the noncanonical programmed cell death induced by MNV, and provides data suggesting that the virus may induce apoptosis to expand the window of time for viral replication. This work also highlights the significant power of activity-based protein profiling in the study of viral pathogenesis.

  2. [Genetic variation and clustal analysis of Trichomonas vaginalis cysteine proteases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wan-Zhong; Li, Zhi; Zhao, Liang; Lun, Zhao-Rong

    2008-06-30

    To clone the genes coding for cysteine proteases (CPs, TvCPs) from Trichomonas vaginalis and to analyze their genetic variations with the related sequences from NCBI database (GenBank) and T. vaginalis Genome Project database from The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR). TvCP genes were amplified using PCR, and inserted into vector pET28b or pBS-T. The recombinant plasmids were then transformed to Escherichia coli BL21 or Topl0 strain. The recombinant plasmids were used for sequencing. Homologous TvCP genes were blasted based on NCBI GenBank and TIGR T. vaginalis Genome Project database. The sequences of cloned TvCP genes were aligned and clustered by Clustal X (1.83 version) with retrieved sequences. Comparisons of amino acids among cathepsin L-like TvCPs, human L-like cathepsins and papaya papain were performed using DNAstar software, and their phylogenic tree was constructed based on neighbor-joining method using Clustal X. Two TvCP3 clones and one TvCP2 had a high identity of more than 99% with their responding TvCPs. Three clones of TvCP4 genes, GZ-CP4-clone 1-3, belonged to two members of a family showing a high percentage identity of more than 97.5% with the sequences of TvCP4 genes from databases (GenBank and TIGR) both at amino acid and nucleotide levels. Nine homologous TvCP4 pro-enzymes with 304 amino acids and other two members with deletions of N-terminal sequence existed in T. vaginalis sharing a similarity of 62.3-96.7% amino acids, which may evolve by means of gene replication and deletion. TvCP1-4, TvCP12, TvCP25 and CP65 had an identity of 61-88.2% at amino acid levels. So far, all reported sequences of C1 family from T. vaginalis belonged to capanthesin L-like subfamily with the same enzymatic active sites, conserved cysteine residues and similar structural features such as ERFNIN-like motif in pro-enzyme region, suggesting that they might result from gene duplication and mutations. TvCPs belong to cathepsin L-like family with genetic diversity

  3. Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cysteine proteases: heterologous expression, purification and characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben Bach

    2011-01-01

    During germination of barley seeds, mobilization of protein is essential and cysteine proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins. Cysteine proteases exist as pro-enzyme and is activated through reduction of the active...... site cysteines and by removal of the pro-domain. The complement of cysteine proteases is comprehensive and for detailed studies of the individual components of this complement, a fast and efficient eukaryotic expression platform is highly desirable. A cDNA clone of the barley key cysteine endoprotease...... B2 (HvEPB2) was ligated into the Pichia pastoris expression vector pPICZ Aα and electrotransformed into Pichia pastoris strain KM71H. Heterologous protein production was induced with 2% MeOH and maximum yield were obtained after 4 days where the supernatant was harvested. Purification of HvEPB2 from...

  4. A Kunitz-type cysteine protease inhibitor from cauliflower and Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halls, C.E.; Rogers, S. W.; Ouffattole, M.

    2006-01-01

    A Kunitz-type protease inhibitor co-purified from cauliflower florets with a granulin domain cysteine protease that cleaved barley proaleurain to yield a molecular form the same size as that for mature aleurain. The purified cauliflower protease required treatment with SDS detergent to become...... active. This observation raised the question of whether the protease inhibitor might have the ability to interact with the granulin domain protease. Here we express an Arabidopsis homolog of the protease inhibitor as a recombinant protein and demonstrate that it is a potent inhibitor of the recombinant...... proaleurain maturation protease and of papain when assayed at pH 4.5 but not at pH 6.3. In a pull-down assay, the inhibitor bound tightly to papain, but only weakly to the aspartate protease pepsin. When the cauliflower protease inhibitor was transiently expressed in tobacco suspension culture protoplasts...

  5. Isolation and molecular characterization of cathepsin L-like cysteine protease cDNAs from Western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, A.G.J.; Jongsma, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Cysteine proteases are predominant in thrips guts (TGs) and, therefore, a suitable target for selecting effective protease inhibitors against western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis). We report the isolation of four full-length cysteine protease cDNA clones from thrips in a two-step PCR

  6. Inhibitory Properties of Cysteine Protease Pro-Peptides from Barley Confer Resistance to Spider Mite Feeding

    OpenAIRE

    Santamaria, M. Estrella; Arnaiz, Ana; Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Martinez, Manuel; Diaz, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    C1A plant cysteine proteases are synthesized as pre-pro-enzymes that need to be processed to become active by the pro-peptide claves off from its cognate enzyme. These pro-sequences play multifunctional roles including the capacity to specifically inhibit their own as well as other C1A protease activities from diverse origin. In this study, it is analysed the potential role of C1A pro-regions from barley as regulators of cysteine proteases in target phytophagous arthropods (coleopteran and ac...

  7. Characterization of cysteine protease-like genes in the striped rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhao-Yu; Wan, Pin-Jun; Li, Guo-Qing; Xia, Yong-Gui; Han, Zhao-Jun

    2014-02-01

    The striped rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker), is a major pest for rice production in China and the rest of Southeast Asia. Chemical control is the main means to alleviate losses due to this pest, which causes serious environmental pollution. An effective and environmentally friendly approach is needed for the management of the striped rice stem borer. Cysteine proteases in insects could be useful targets for pest management either through engineering plant protease inhibitors, targeting insect digestive cysteine proteases, or through RNA interference-based silencing of cysteine proteases, disrupting developmental regulation of insects. In this study, eight cysteine protease-like genes were identified and partially characterized. The genes CCO2 and CCL4 were exclusively expressed in the larval gut, and their expression was affected by the state of nutrition in the insect. The expression of CCL2, CCL3, and CCO1 was significantly affected by the type of host plant, suggesting a role in host plant - insect interactions. Our initial characterization of the striped rice stem borer cysteine protease-like genes provides a foundation for further research on this important group of genes in this major insect pest of rice.

  8. Identification of Semicarbazones, Thiosemicarbazones and Triazine Nitriles as Inhibitors of Leishmania mexicana Cysteine Protease CPB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Jörg; Noack, Sandra; Marhöfer, Richard J.; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Coombs, Graham H.; Selzer, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine proteases of the papain superfamily are present in nearly all eukaryotes. They play pivotal roles in the biology of parasites and inhibition of cysteine proteases is emerging as an important strategy to combat parasitic diseases such as sleeping sickness, Chagas’ disease and leishmaniasis. Homology modeling of the mature Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB2.8 suggested that it differs significantly from bovine cathepsin B and thus could be a good drug target. High throughput screening of a compound library against this enzyme and bovine cathepsin B in a counter assay identified four novel inhibitors, containing the warhead-types semicarbazone, thiosemicarbazone and triazine nitrile, that can be used as leads for antiparasite drug design. Covalent docking experiments confirmed the SARs of these lead compounds in an effort to understand the structural elements required for specific inhibition of CPB2.8. This study has provided starting points for the design of selective and highly potent inhibitors of L. mexicana cysteine protease CPB that may also have useful efficacy against other important cysteine proteases. PMID:24146999

  9. Identification of semicarbazones, thiosemicarbazones and triazine nitriles as inhibitors of Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Schröder

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases of the papain superfamily are present in nearly all eukaryotes. They play pivotal roles in the biology of parasites and inhibition of cysteine proteases is emerging as an important strategy to combat parasitic diseases such as sleeping sickness, Chagas' disease and leishmaniasis. Homology modeling of the mature Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB2.8 suggested that it differs significantly from bovine cathepsin B and thus could be a good drug target. High throughput screening of a compound library against this enzyme and bovine cathepsin B in a counter assay identified four novel inhibitors, containing the warhead-types semicarbazone, thiosemicarbazone and triazine nitrile, that can be used as leads for antiparasite drug design. Covalent docking experiments confirmed the SARs of these lead compounds in an effort to understand the structural elements required for specific inhibition of CPB2.8. This study has provided starting points for the design of selective and highly potent inhibitors of L. mexicana cysteine protease CPB that may also have useful efficacy against other important cysteine proteases.

  10. Purification and characterization of a cysteine protease from corms of freesia, Freesia reflacta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, M; Yonezawa, H; Uchikoba, T

    1997-09-01

    A protease (freesia protease B) has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from corms of freesia, Freesia reflacta by five steps of chromatography. Its M(r) was estimated to be about 26,000 by SDS-PAGE. The optimum pH of the enzyme was 6.0-7.0 at 30 degrees C using casein as a substrate. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoic acid but not by phenylmethanesulphonylfluoride and EDTA. These results indicate that freesia protease B is a cysteine protease. Nine sites of oxidized insulin B-chain were cleaved by freesia protease B in 24 h of hydrolysis. The four cleavage sites among them resembled those of papain. From the digestion of five peptidyl substrates the specificity of freesia protease B was found to be approximately broad, but the preferential cleavage sites were negatively charged residues at P1 positions. Freesia protease B preferred also the large hydrophobic amino acid residues at the P2 position, in a similar manner to papain. The amino terminal sequence of freesia protease B was identical with those of papain in regard to the conservative residues of cysteine protease.

  11. Cysteine protease involving in autophagosomal degradation of mitochondria during encystation of Acanthamoeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Eun-Kyung; Hong, Yeonchul; Chung, Dong-Il; Kong, Hyun-Hee

    2012-10-01

    Using the microarray to identify encystation mediating factors, significantly higher expression of a cysteine protease gene was observed in cysts, compared with trophozoites. Results of real-time PCR analysis also showed a magnificent increase of cysteine protease levels during encystation of Acanthamoeba. We named the gene cyst specific cysteine protease (cscp) of Acanthamoeba. The purified recombinant protein of CSCP showed activities of papain and cathepsin B against the substrates. During encystation, EGFP fused CSCP showed colocalization with LysoTracker, an autophagosome marker, in transiently transfected amoeba. Amoeba transfected with siRNA against cscp was unable to form mature cysts. Undigested mitochondria in vacuole like structures were observed in cscp siRNA treated cells by transmission electron microscopy. These results provide evidence of the important role of CSCP in autophagosomal degradation of cell constituents, particularly mitochondria, during encystation of Acanthamoeba. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cysteine Protease (Capparin from Capsules of Caper (Capparis spinosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasar Demir

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteases are enzymes that perform very important functions in organisms and are used for a variety of objectives in vitro. In recent years, proteases have been used for clinical, pharmaceutical (alimentary digestion, anti-inflammatory, etc. and industrial applications (cheese production, meat tenderizing, leather tanning. In this research, a protease has been purified from capsules of caper (Capparis spinosa and characterized. Caper plants have been used for food and medicine since ancient times. The plant grows abundantly in certain regions of Turkey. Ammonium sulphate fractionation and a CM Sephadex column were used for purification of the enzyme. The purification enzyme has an optimum pH=5.0 and its optimum temperature was 60 °C. The vmax and Km values determined by Lineweaver-Burk graphics were 1.38 μg/(L·min and 0.88 μg/L, respectively. The purification degree and the molecular mass of the enzyme (46 kDa were determined by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration chromatography. It was investigated whether the purified and characterized protease could cause milk to congeal or digest chicken and cow meat. The results show that protease can be used for industrial production.

  13. Cysteine protease inhibitor of Schistosoma japonicum - A parasite-derived negative immunoregulatory factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; He, Baohua; Hou, Wei; He, Li

    2017-03-01

    Studies have shown that cysteine protease inhibitors from some parasites have immunosuppressive effects on the host. We previously have cloned a novel cysteine protease inhibitor from Schistosoma japonicum and purified its recombinant version (protein named rSj-C). Its possible inhibitory effect on the host immune response has not been described.This study shows that rSj-C inhibits lysosomal cysteine protease of murine dendritic cells (DCs). After DCs were incubated with rSj-C and then with soluble adult worm antigen (AWA) of S. japonicum, the mean fluorescence intensity of MHC class II antigens on the surface of DCs decreased significantly by flow cytometry. These results indirectly proved that rSj-C can suppress exogenous-antigen presentation by DCs. The flow cytometric assay revealed that in comparison with control groups, the proportion of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells among CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells of Schistosom-infected mice increased significantly 8 weeks after the infected mice were injected with rSj-C (p ˂ 0.05). Additionally, the expression levels of cytokines IL-4 and TGF-β produced by T cells increased significantly as compared with these levels in the normal group (p ˂ 0.05). These results clearly show that the cysteine protease inhibitor from S. japonicum is a new parasite-derived immunosuppressive factor.

  14. Relative contribution of matrix metalloprotease and cysteine protease activities to cytokine-stimulated articular cartilage degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, B C; Henriksen, K; Wulf, H

    2006-01-01

    in vivo in CK null mice. CONCLUSION: Inhibition of MMP activity reduced both proteoglycan loss and type II collagen degradation. In contrast, inhibition of cysteine proteases resulted in an increase rather than a decrease in MMP derived fragments of collagen type II degradation, CTX-II, suggesting altered...

  15. Detection of cysteine protease in Taenia solium-induced brain granulomas in naturally infected pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mkupasi, Ernatus Martin; Sikasunge, Chummy Sikalizyo; Ngowi, Helena Aminiel

    2013-01-01

    In order to further characterize the immune response around the viable or degenerating Taenia solium cysts in the pig brain, the involvement of cysteine protease in the immune evasion was assessed. Brain tissues from 30 adult pigs naturally infected with T. solium cysticercosis were subjected to ...

  16. Novel Aza Peptide Inhibitors and Active-Site Probes of Papain-Family Cysteine Proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhelst, Steven H.L.; Witte, Martin D.; Arastu-Kapur, Shirin; Fonovic, Marko; Bogyo, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Recent characterization of multiple classes of functionalized azapeptides as effective covalent inhibitors of cysteine proteases prompted us to investigate O-acyl hydroxamates and their azapeptide analogues for use as activity-based probes (ABPs). We report here a new class of azaglycine-containing

  17. Effects of cysteine protease inhibitors on oviposition rate of the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annadana, S.; Peters, J.; Jongsma, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Proteolytic activity in whole insect extracts of the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, was found to belong predominantly to the class of cysteine proteases. The pH optimum of the general proteolytic activity was determined to be 3.5, which is low when compared to other insects using

  18. Cleavage of desmin by cysteine proteases: Calpains and cathepsin B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline; Jacobsen, S.; Purslow, P.P.

    2004-01-01

    a sequential C-terminal degradation pattern characteristic of this dipeptylpeptidase. The substrate primary structure was not found to be essential for regulation of the proteolytic activity of the cysteine peptidases studied. However, the degradation patterns obtained imply that calpains are involved...... in degradation of desmin early post-mortem, targeting the non-helical region of the desmin molecule and resulting in depolymerisation and initial disorganisation of the intermediate filament structures of the muscle cell....

  19. Heterologous expression of the plant cysteine protease bromelain and its inhibitor in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luniak, Nora; Meiser, Peter; Burkart, Sonja; Müller, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    Expression of proteases in heterologous hosts remains an ambitious challenge due to severe problems associated with digestion of host proteins. On the other hand, proteases are broadly used in industrial applications and resemble promising drug candidates. Bromelain is an herbal drug that is medicinally used for treatment of oedematous swellings and inflammatory conditions and consists in large part of proteolytic enzymes. Even though various experiments underline the requirement of active cysteine proteases for biological activity, so far no investigation succeeded to clearly clarify the pharmacological mode of action of bromelain. The potential role of proteases themselves and other molecules of this multi-component extract currently remain largely unknown or ill defined. Here, we set out to express several bromelain cysteine proteases as well as a bromelain inhibitor molecule in order to gain defined molecular entities for subsequent studies. After cloning the genes from its natural source Ananas comosus (pineapple plant) into Pichia pastoris and subsequent fermentation and purification, we obtained active protease and inhibitor molecules which were subsequently biochemically characterized. Employing purified bromelain fractions paves the way for further elucidation of pharmacological activities of this natural product. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:54-65, 2017. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  20. Cysteine and Aspartyl Proteases Contribute to Protein Digestion in the Gut of Freshwater Planaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise S Goupil

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Proteases perform numerous vital functions in flatworms, many of which are likely to be conserved throughout the phylum Platyhelminthes. Within this phylum are several parasitic worms that are often poorly characterized due to their complex life-cycles and lack of responsiveness to genetic manipulation. The flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea, or planaria, is an ideal model organism to study the complex role of protein digestion due to its simple life cycle and amenability to techniques like RNA interference (RNAi. In this study, we were interested in deconvoluting the digestive protease system that exists in the planarian gut. To do this, we developed an alcohol-induced regurgitation technique to enrich for the gut enzymes in S. mediterranea. Using a panel of fluorescent substrates, we show that this treatment produces a sharp increase in proteolytic activity. These enzymes have broad yet diverse substrate specificity profiles. Proteomic analysis of the gut contents revealed the presence of cysteine and metallo-proteases. However, treatment with class-specific inhibitors showed that aspartyl and cysteine proteases are responsible for the majority of protein digestion. Specific RNAi knockdown of the cathepsin B-like cysteine protease (SmedCB reduced protein degradation in vivo. Immunohistochemistry and whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH confirmed that the full-length and active forms of SmedCB are found in secretory cells surrounding the planaria intestinal lumen. Finally, we show that the knockdown of SmedCB reduces the speed of tissue regeneration. Defining the roles of proteases in planaria can provide insight to functions of conserved proteases in parasitic flatworms, potentially uncovering drug targets in parasites.

  1. Cysteine and Aspartyl Proteases Contribute to Protein Digestion in the Gut of Freshwater Planaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goupil, Louise S.; Ivry, Sam L.; Hsieh, Ivy; Suzuki, Brian M.; Craik, Charles S.; O’Donoghue, Anthony J.; McKerrow, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Proteases perform numerous vital functions in flatworms, many of which are likely to be conserved throughout the phylum Platyhelminthes. Within this phylum are several parasitic worms that are often poorly characterized due to their complex life-cycles and lack of responsiveness to genetic manipulation. The flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea, or planaria, is an ideal model organism to study the complex role of protein digestion due to its simple life cycle and amenability to techniques like RNA interference (RNAi). In this study, we were interested in deconvoluting the digestive protease system that exists in the planarian gut. To do this, we developed an alcohol-induced regurgitation technique to enrich for the gut enzymes in S. mediterranea. Using a panel of fluorescent substrates, we show that this treatment produces a sharp increase in proteolytic activity. These enzymes have broad yet diverse substrate specificity profiles. Proteomic analysis of the gut contents revealed the presence of cysteine and metallo-proteases. However, treatment with class-specific inhibitors showed that aspartyl and cysteine proteases are responsible for the majority of protein digestion. Specific RNAi knockdown of the cathepsin B-like cysteine protease (SmedCB) reduced protein degradation in vivo. Immunohistochemistry and whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH) confirmed that the full-length and active forms of SmedCB are found in secretory cells surrounding the planaria intestinal lumen. Finally, we show that the knockdown of SmedCB reduces the speed of tissue regeneration. Defining the roles of proteases in planaria can provide insight to functions of conserved proteases in parasitic flatworms, potentially uncovering drug targets in parasites. PMID:27501047

  2. Biochemical and molecular characterisation of Tetrahymena thermophila extracellular cysteine proteases

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    Tiedtke Arno

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last decades molecular biologic techniques have been developed to alter the genome and proteome of Tetrahymena thermophila thereby providing the basis for recombinant protein expression including functional human enzymes. The biotechnological potential of Tetrahymena has been proved in numerous publications, demonstrating fast growth, high biomass, fermentation in ordinary bacterial/yeast equipment, up-scalability, existence of cheap and chemical defined media. For these reasons Tetrahymena offers promising opportunities for the development of a high expression system. Yet optimised high yield strains with protease deficiency such as commonly used in yeast and bacterial systems are not available. Results This work presents the molecular identification of predominant proteases secreted into the medium by Tetrahymena thermophila. A one-step purification of the proteolytic enzymes is described. Conclusion The information provided will allow silencing of protease activity by either knock out methods or by Tetrahymena specific antisense-ribosome-techniques. This will facilitate the next step in the advancement of this exciting organism for recombinant protein production.

  3. Entamoeba histolytica HM1:IMSS: hemoglobin-degrading neutral cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Luna, J J; Negrete, E; Reyes, M; de la Garza, M

    1998-05-01

    Entamoeba histolytica HMI:IMSS trophozoites were able to utilize human hemoglobin but not hemin as a sole iron source to grow in vitro. Proteases from crude extracts of E. histolytica degraded human, porcine, and bovine hemoglobins at pH 7.0. These proteolytic activities were found by electrophoresis in SDS-polyacrylamide gels copolymerized with hemoglobin, with apparent molecular weights of 116, 82, and 21 kDa, the 82-kDa protein being the most active protease against this substrate. The proteases were classified in the cysteine group since the activities were inhibited by l-trans-epoxysuccinylleucylamido(4-guanidino)butane, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, iodoacetate, and N-ethylmaleimide and activated with dithiothreitol. Other pathogenic strains of E. histolytica showed the same pattern of hemoglobinases. These hemoglobin-degrading proteases could be playing an important role in iron acquisition by E. histolytica.

  4. A parasite cysteine protease is key to host protein degradation and iron acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Theresa C; Mackey, Zachary B; Fetter, Richard D; Choe, Youngchool; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; Zhou, Min; Craik, Charles S; Caffrey, Conor R; McKerrow, James H

    2008-10-24

    Cysteine proteases of the Clan CA (papain) family are the predominant protease group in primitive invertebrates. Cysteine protease inhibitors arrest infection by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei. RNA interference studies implicated a cathepsin B-like protease, tbcatB, as a key inhibitor target. Utilizing parasites in which one of the two alleles of tbcatb has been deleted, the key role of this protease in degradation of endocytosed host proteins is delineated. TbcatB deficiency results in a decreased growth rate and dysmorphism of the flagellar pocket and the subjacent endocytic compartment. Western blot and microscopic analysis indicate that deficiency in tbcatB results in accumulation of both host and parasite proteins, including the lysosomal marker p67. A critical function for parasitism is the degradation of host transferrin, which is necessary for iron acquisition. Substrate specificity analysis of recombinant tbcatB revealed the optimal peptide cleavage sequences for the enzyme and these were confirmed experimentally using FRET-based substrates. Degradation of transferrin was validated by SDS-PAGE and the specific cleavage sites identified by N-terminal sequencing. Because even a modest deficiency in tbcatB is lethal for the parasite, tbcatB is a logical target for the development of new anti-trypanosomal chemotherapy.

  5. Inhibitory properties of cysteine protease pro-peptides from barley confer resistance to spider mite feeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Estrella Santamaria

    Full Text Available C1A plant cysteine proteases are synthesized as pre-pro-enzymes that need to be processed to become active by the pro-peptide claves off from its cognate enzyme. These pro-sequences play multifunctional roles including the capacity to specifically inhibit their own as well as other C1A protease activities from diverse origin. In this study, it is analysed the potential role of C1A pro-regions from barley as regulators of cysteine proteases in target phytophagous arthropods (coleopteran and acari. The in vitro inhibitory action of these pro-sequences, purified as recombinant proteins, is demonstrated. Moreover, transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing different fragments of HvPap-1 barley gene containing the pro-peptide sequence were generated and the acaricide function was confirmed by bioassays conducted with the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae. Feeding trials resulted in a significant reduction of leaf damage in the transgenic lines expressing the pro-peptide in comparison to non-transformed control and strongly correlated with an increase in mite mortality. Additionally, the analysis of the expression levels of a selection of potential mite targets (proteases and protease inhibitors revealed a mite strategy to counteract the inhibitory activity produced by the C1A barley pro-prodomain. These findings demonstrate that pro-peptides can control mite pests and could be applied as defence proteins in biotechnological systems.

  6. Inhibitory properties of cysteine protease pro-peptides from barley confer resistance to spider mite feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, M Estrella; Arnaiz, Ana; Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Martinez, Manuel; Diaz, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    C1A plant cysteine proteases are synthesized as pre-pro-enzymes that need to be processed to become active by the pro-peptide claves off from its cognate enzyme. These pro-sequences play multifunctional roles including the capacity to specifically inhibit their own as well as other C1A protease activities from diverse origin. In this study, it is analysed the potential role of C1A pro-regions from barley as regulators of cysteine proteases in target phytophagous arthropods (coleopteran and acari). The in vitro inhibitory action of these pro-sequences, purified as recombinant proteins, is demonstrated. Moreover, transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing different fragments of HvPap-1 barley gene containing the pro-peptide sequence were generated and the acaricide function was confirmed by bioassays conducted with the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae. Feeding trials resulted in a significant reduction of leaf damage in the transgenic lines expressing the pro-peptide in comparison to non-transformed control and strongly correlated with an increase in mite mortality. Additionally, the analysis of the expression levels of a selection of potential mite targets (proteases and protease inhibitors) revealed a mite strategy to counteract the inhibitory activity produced by the C1A barley pro-prodomain. These findings demonstrate that pro-peptides can control mite pests and could be applied as defence proteins in biotechnological systems.

  7. 2-D zymographic analysis of Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. Italica) florets proteases: follow up of cysteine protease isotypes in the course of post-harvest senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossano, Rocco; Larocca, Marilena; Riccio, Paolo

    2011-09-01

    Zymographic analysis of Broccoli florets (Brassica oleracea L. var. Italica) revealed the presence of acidic metallo-proteases, serine proteases and cysteine proteases. Under conditions which were denaturing for the other proteases, the study was restricted to cysteine proteases. 2-D zymography, a technique that combines IEF and zymography was used to show the presence of 11 different cysteine protease spots with molecular mass of 44 and 47-48kDa and pIs ranging between 4.1 and 4.7. pI differences could be ascribed to different degrees of phosphorylation that partly disappeared in the presence of alkaline phosphatase. Post-harvest senescence of Broccoli florets was characterized by decrease in protein and chlorophyll contents and increase of protease activity. In particular, as determined by 2-D zymography, the presence of cysteine protease clearly increased during senescence, a finding that may represent a useful tool for the control of the aging process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Sweet potato cysteine proteases SPAE and SPCP2 participate in sporamin degradation during storage root sprouting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsien-Jung; Liang, Shu-Hao; Huang, Guan-Jhong; Lin, Yaw-Huei

    2015-08-15

    Sweet potato sporamins are trypsin inhibitors and exhibit strong resistance to digestion by pepsin, trypsin and chymotrypsin. In addition, they constitute the major storage proteins in the sweet potato and, after degradation, provide nitrogen as a nutrient for seedling regrowth in sprouting storage roots. In this report, four cysteine proteases-one asparaginyl endopeptidase (SPAE), two papain-like cysteine proteases (SPCP1 and SPCP2), and one granulin-containing cysteine protease (SPCP3)-were studied to determine their association with sporamin degradation in sprouting storage roots. Sporamin degradation became significant in the flesh of storage roots starting from week 4 after sprouting and this correlated with expression levels of SPAE and SPCP2, but not of SPCP1 and SPCP3. In the outer flesh near the skin, sporamin degradation was more evident and occurred earlier than in the inner flesh of storage roots. Degradation of sporamins in the outer flesh was inversely correlated with the distance of the storage root from the sprout. Exogenous application of SPAE and SPCP2, but not SPCP3, fusion proteins to crude extracts of the outer flesh (i.e., extracted from a depth of 0.3cm and within 2cm of one-week-old sprouts) promoted in vitro sporamin degradation in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment of SPAE and SPCP2 fusion proteins at 95°C for 5min prior to their application to the crude extracts reduced sporamin degradation. These data show that sweet potato asparaginyl endopeptidase SPAE and papain-like cysteine protease SPCP2 participate in sporamin degradation during storage root sprouting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Potential involvement of Brugia malayi cysteine proteases in the maintenance of the endosymbiotic relationship with Wolbachia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Lustigman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Brugia malayi, a parasitic nematode that causes lymphatic filariasis, harbors endosymbiotic intracellular bacteria, Wolbachia, that are required for the development and reproduction of the worm. The essential nature of this endosymbiosis led to the development of anti-Wolbachia chemotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of human filarial infections. Our study is aimed at identifying specific proteins that play a critical role in this endosymbiotic relationship leading to the identification of potential targets in the adult worms. Filarial cysteine proteases are known to be involved in molting and embryogenesis, processes shown to also be Wolbachia dependent. Based on the observation that cysteine protease transcripts are differentially regulated in response to tetracycline treatment, we focused on defining their role in symbiosis. We observe a bimodal regulation pattern of transcripts encoding cysteine proteases when in vitro tetracycline treated worms were examined. Using tetracycline-treated infertile female worms and purified embryos we established that the first peak of the bimodal pattern corresponds to embryonic transcripts while the second takes place within the hypodermis of the adult worms. Localization studies of the native proteins corresponding to Bm-cpl-3 and Bm-cpl-6 indicate that they are present in the area surrounding Wolbachia, and, in some cases, the proteins appear localized within the bacteria. Both proteins were also found in the inner bodies of microfilariae. The possible role of these cysteine proteases during development and endosymbiosis was further characterized using RNAi. Reduction in Bm-cpl-3 and Bm-cpl-6 transcript levels was accompanied by hindered microfilarial development and release, and reduced Wolbachia DNA levels, making these enzymes strong drug target candidates.

  10. Biochemical properties of a novel cysteine protease of Plasmodium vivax, vivapain-4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung-Kuk Na

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Multiple cysteine proteases of malaria parasites are required for maintenance of parasite metabolic homeostasis and egress from the host erythrocyte. In Plasmodium falciparum these proteases appear to mediate the processing of hemoglobin and aspartic proteases (plasmepsins in the acidic food vacuole and the hydrolysis of erythrocyte structural proteins at neutral pH. Two cysteine proteases, vivapain (VX-2 and VX-3 have been characterized in P. vivax, but comprehensive studies of P. vivax cysteine proteases remain elusive.We characterized a novel cysteine protease of P. vivax, VX-4, of which orthologs appears to have evolved differentially in primate plasmodia with strong cladistic affinity toward those of rodent Plasmodium. Recombinant VX-4 demonstrated dual substrate specificity depending on the surrounding micro-environmental pH. Its hydrolyzing activity against benzyloxycarbonyl-Leu-Arg-4-methyl-coumaryl-7-amide (Z-Leu-Arg-MCA and Z-Phe-Arg-MCA was highest at acidic pH (5.5, whereas that against Z-Arg-Arg-MCA was maximal at neutral pH (6.5-7.5. VX-4 preferred positively charged amino acids and Gln at the P1 position, with less strict specificity at P3 and P4. P2 preferences depended on pH (Leu at pH 5.5 and Arg at pH 7.5. Three amino acids that delineate the S2 pocket were substituted in VX-4 compared to VX-2 and VX-3 (Ala90, Gly157 and Glu180. Replacement of Glu180 abolished activity against Z-Arg-Arg-MCA at neutral pH, indicating the importance of this amino acid in the pH-dependent substrate preference. VX-4 was localized in the food vacuoles and cytoplasm of the erythrocytic stage of P. vivax. VX-4 showed maximal activity against actin at neutral pH, and that against P. vivax plasmepsin 4 and hemoglobin was detected at neutral/acidic and acidic pH, respectively.VX-4 demonstrates pH-dependent substrate switching, which might offer an efficient mechanism for the specific cleavage of different substrates in different intracellular

  11. Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum cysteine proteases by the sugarcane cystatin CaneCPI-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Pollyana M S; El Chamy Maluf, Sarah; Azevedo, Mauro F; Paschoalin, Thaysa; Budu, Alexandre; Bagnaresi, Piero; Henrique-Silva, Flávio; Soares-Costa, Andrea; Gazarini, Marcos L; Carmona, Adriana K

    2017-12-27

    Malaria is a disease caused by Plasmodium parasites that affects hundreds of millions of people. Plasmodium proteases are involved in invasion, erythrocyte egress and degradation of host proteins. Falcipains are well-studied cysteine peptidases located in P. falciparum food vacuoles that participate in hemoglobin degradation. Cystatins are natural cysteine protease inhibitors that are implicated in a wide range of regulatory processes. Here, we report that a cystatin from sugarcane, CaneCPI-4, is selectively internalized into P. falciparum infected erythrocytes and is not processed by the parasite proteolytic machinery. Furthermore, we demonstrated the inhibition of P. falciparum cysteine proteases by CaneCPI-4, suggesting that it can exert inhibitory functions inside the parasites. The inhibition of the proteolytic activity of parasite cells is specific to this cystatin, as the addition of an anti-CaneCPI-4 antibody completely abolished the inhibition. We extended the studies to recombinant falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 and demonstrated that CaneCPI-4 strongly inhibits these enzymes, with IC50 values of 12nM and 42nM, respectively. We also demonstrated that CaneCPI-4 decreased the hemozoin formation in the parasites, affecting the parasitemia. Taken together, this study identified a natural molecule as a potential antimalarial that specifically targets falcipains and also contributes to a better understanding of macromolecule acquisition by Plasmodium falciparum infected RBCs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cysteine proteases from the Asclepiadaceae plants latex exhibited thrombin and plasmin like activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaprasad, H V; Riyaz, M; Venkatesh Kumar, R; Dharmappa, K K; Tarannum, Shaista; Siddesha, J M; Rajesh, R; Vishwanath, B S

    2009-10-01

    In the present study we evaluated the presence of cysteine protease from the latex of four plants Asclepias curassavica L., Calotropis gigantea R.Br., Pergularia extensa R.Br. and Cynanchum puciflorum R.Br. belongs to the family Asclepiadaceae. Cysteine proteases from these plants latex exhibited both thrombin and plasmin like activities. Latex enzyme fraction in a concentration dependent manner induced the formation of clot in citrated blood plasma. Direct incubation of fibrinogen with latex enzyme fraction resulted in the formation of fibrin clot similar to thrombin enzyme. However prolonged incubation resulted in degradation of the formed fibrin clot suggesting plasmin like activity. Latex enzyme fraction preferentially hydrolyzed Aalpha and Bbeta chains of fibrinogen to form fibrin clot. Latex enzyme fraction also hydrolyzed the subunits of fully cross linked fibrin efficiently, the order of hydrolysis was alpha-polymer > alpha-chains > beta-chain and gamma-gamma dimer. Cysteine proteases from all the four Asclepiadaceae plants latex exhibited similar action on fibrinogen and fibrin. This study scientifically validate the use of plant latex in stop bleeding and wound healing by traditional healers all over the world.

  13. Kininogens: More than cysteine protease inhibitors and kinin precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalmanach, Gilles; Naudin, Clément; Lecaille, Fabien; Fritz, Hans

    2010-11-01

    Two kininogens are found in mammalian sera: HK (high molecular weight kininogen) and LK (low molecular weight kininogen) with the exception of the rat which encompasses a third kininogen, T-Kininogen (TK). Kininogens are multifunctional glycosylated molecules related to cystatins (clan IH, family I25). They harbor three cystatin domains but only two of them are tight-binding inhibitors of cysteine cathepsins. HK and LK, but not TK, are precursors of potent peptide hormones, the kinins, which are released proteolytically by tissue and plasma kallikreins. Besides these classical features novel functions of kininogens have been recently discovered; they are described in the second part of this review. HKa, which corresponds to the kinin-free two-chain HK and its isolated domain D5 (kininostatin), possesses angiostatic and pro-apoptotic properties, inhibits the proliferation of endothelial cells and participates in the regulation of angiogenesis. Moreover, some HK-derived peptides display potent and broad-spectrum microbicidal properties against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and thus may offer a promising alternative to conventional antibiotic therapy. Of seminal interest, a kininogen-derived peptide inhibits activation of the contact phase system of coagulation and protects mice with invasive Streptococcus pyogenes infection from pulmonary lesions. On the other hand, TK is a biomarker of aging at the end of lifespan of elderly rats. However, although TK has been initially identified as an acute phase reactant, and earlier known as alpha-l-acute phase globulin, the increase of TK in liver and plasma is not known to relate to any inflammatory event during the senescence process. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Biochemical and molecular characterization of senescence-related cysteine protease-cystatin complex from spinach leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Akemi; Matsushima, Shuhei; Satoh, Masashi; Hayasaka, Satoshi; Yoshimatsu, Katsuhiko; Shioi, Yuzo

    2011-02-01

    Cysteine proteases (CPs) with N-succinyl-Leu-Tyr-4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide (Suc-LY-MCA) cleavage activity were investigated in green and senescent leaves of spinach. The enzyme activity was separated into two major and several faint minor peaks by hydrophobic chromatography. These peaks were conventionally designated as CP1, CP2 and CP3, according to their order of elution. From the analyses of molecular mass, subunit structure, amino acid sequences and cDNA cloning, CP2 was a monomer complex (SoCP-CPI) (51 kDa) composed of a 41-kDa core protein, SoCP (Spinacia oleracea cysteine protease), and 14-kDa cystatin, a cysteine protease inhibitor (CPI), while CP3 was a trimer complex (SoCP-CPI)(3) (151 kDa) of the same subunits as SoCP-CPI and showed a wider range of specificity toward natural substrates than SoCP-CPI. Trimer (SoCP-CPI)(3) was irreversibly formed from monomers through association. The results of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that mRNAs of CPI and SoCP are hardly expressed in green leaves, but they are coordinately expressed in senescent leaves, suggesting that these proteases involve in senescence. Purified recombinant CPI had strong inhibitory activity against trimer SoCP, (SoCP)(3) , which had a cystatin deleted with K(i) value of 1.33 × 10(-9) M. After treatment of the enzyme with a succinate buffer (pH 5) at the most active pH of the enzyme, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and activity analyses showed that cystatin was released from both monomer SoCP-CPI and trimer (SoCP-CPI)(3) complexes with a concomitant activation. Thus, the removal of a cystatin is necessary to activate the enzyme activity.

  15. Purification and characterization of cysteine protease from germinating cotyledons of horse gram

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    Rao Sridhar K

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteolytic enzymes play central role in the biochemical mechanism of germination and intricately involved in many aspects of plant physiology and development. To study the mechanism of protein mobilization, undertaken the task of purifying and characterizing proteases, which occur transiently in germinating seeds of horse gram. Results Cysteine protease (CPRHG was purified to homogeneity with 118 fold by four step procedure comprising Crude extract, (NH42SO4 fractionation, DEAE-Cellulose and CM-sephacel chromatography from the 2 day germinating cotyledons of horse gram (Macrotyloma uniflorum (Lam. Verdc.. CPRHG is a monomer with molecular mass of 30 k Da, was determined by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. The purified enzyme on IEF showed two isoforms having pI values of 5.85 and 6.1. CPRHG composed of high content of aspartic acid, glutamic acid and serine. The enzyme activity was completely inhibited by pCMB, iodoacetate and DEPC indicating cysteine and histidine residues at the active site. However, on addition of sulfhydryl reagents (cysteine, dithiothreitol, glutathione and beta-ME reverse the strong inhibition by pCMB. The enzyme is fairly stable toward pH and temperature. Immunoblot analysis shows that the enzyme synthesized as zymogen (preproenzyme with 81 kDa and processed to a 40 kDa proenzyme which was further degraded to give 30 kDa active enzyme. Conclusion It appears that the newly synthesized protease is inactive, and activation takes place during germination. CPRHG has a broad substrate specificity and stability in pH, temperature, etc. therefore, this protease may turn out to be an efficient choice for the pharmaceutical, medicinal, food, and biotechnology industry.

  16. Characterization of two cysteine proteases secreted by Blastocystis ST7, a human intestinal parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Texier, Catherine; Poirier, Philippe; Viscogliosi, Eric; Tan, Kevin S W; Delbac, Frédéric; El Alaoui, Hicham

    2012-09-01

    Blastocystis spp. are unicellular anaerobic intestinal parasites of both humans and animals and the most prevalent ones found in human stool samples. Their association with various gastrointestinal disorders raises the questions of its pathogenicity and of the molecular mechanisms involved. Since secreted proteases are well-known to be implicated in intestinal parasite virulence, we intended to determine whether Blastocystis spp. possess such pathogenic factors. In silico analysis of the Blastocystis subtype 7 (ST7) genome sequence highlighted 22 genes coding proteases which were predicted to be secreted. We characterized the proteolytic activities in the secretory products of Blastocystis ST7 using specific protease inhibitors. Two cysteine proteases, a cathepsin B and a legumain, were identified in the parasite culture supernatant by gelatin zymographic SDS-PAGE gel and MS/MS analysis. These proteases might act on intestinal cells and disturb gut function. This work provides serious molecular candidates to link Blastocystis spp. and intestinal disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Calpain-like: A Ca(2+) dependent cystein protease in Entamoeba histolytica cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy, Virginia Sánchez; Flores, Olivia Medel; García, Consuelo Gómez; Maya, Yesenia Chávez; Fernández, Tania Domínguez; Pérez Ishiwara, D Guillermo

    2015-12-01

    Entamoeba histolytica programmed cell death (PCD) induced by G418 is characterized by the release of important amounts of intracellular calcium from reservoirs. Nevertheless, no typical caspases have been detected in the parasite, the PCD phenotype is inhibited by the cysteine protease inhibitor E-64. These results strongly suggest that Ca(2+)-dependent proteases could be involved in PCD. In this study, we evaluate the expression and activity of a specific dependent Ca(2+) protease, the calpain-like protease, by real-time quantitative PCR (RTq-PCR), Western blot assays and a enzymatic method during the induction of PCD by G418. Alternatively, using cell viability and TUNEL assays, we also demonstrated that the Z-Leu-Leu-Leu-al calpain inhibitor reduced the rate of cell death. The results demonstrated 4.9-fold overexpression of calpain-like gene 1.5 h after G418 PCD induction, while calpain-like protein increased almost two-fold with respect to basal calpain-like expression after 3 h of induction, and calpain activity was found to be approximately three-fold higher 6 h after treatment compared with untreated trophozoites. Taken together, these results suggest that this Ca(2+)-dependent protease could be involved in the executory phase of PCD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Thrombin like activity of Asclepias curassavica L. latex: action of cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaprasad, H V; Rajesh, R; Nanda, B L; Dharmappa, K K; Vishwanath, B S

    2009-05-04

    To validate the scientific basis of plant latex to stop bleeding on fresh cuts. Cysteine protease(s) from Asclepias curassavica (Asclepiadaceae) plant latex was assessed for pro-coagulant and thrombin like activities. A waxy material from the latex of Asclepias curassavica latex was removed by freezing and thawing. The resulted latex enzyme fraction was assayed for proteolytic activity using denatured casein as substrate. Its coagulant activity and thrombin like activity were determined using citrated plasma and pure fibrinogen, respectively. Inhibition studies were performed using specific protease inhibitors to know the type of protease. The latex enzyme fraction exhibited strong proteolytic activity when compared to trypsin and exerted pro-coagulant action by reducing plasma clotting time from 195 to 58 s whereas trypsin reduced clotting time marginally from 195 to 155 s. The pro-coagulant activity of this enzyme fraction was exerted by selectively hydrolyzing A alpha and B beta subunits of fibrinogen to form fibrin clot when pure fibrinogen was used as substrate as assessed by fibrinogen-agarose plate method and fibrinogen polymerization assay. Trypsin failed to induce any fibrin clot under similar conditions. The electrophoretic pattern of latex enzyme fraction-induced fibrin clot was very much similar to that of thrombin-induced fibrin clot and mimic thrombin like action. The proteolytic activity including thrombin like activity of Asclepias curassavica latex enzyme fraction was completely inhibited by iodoaceticacid (IAA). Cysteine proteases from Asclepias curassavica latex exhibited strong pro-coagulant action and were found to be specific in its action (Thrombin like). This could be the basis for the use of plant latex in pharmacological applications that justify their use as folk medicine.

  19. Papain-like cysteine proteases in Carica papaya: lineage-specific gene duplication and expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Sharma, Anupma; Niewiara, Marie Jamille; Singh, Ratnesh; Ming, Ray; Yu, Qingyi

    2018-01-06

    Papain-like cysteine proteases (PLCPs), a large group of cysteine proteases structurally related to papain, play important roles in plant development, senescence, and defense responses. Papain, the first cysteine protease whose structure was determined by X-ray crystallography, plays a crucial role in protecting papaya from herbivorous insects. Except the four major PLCPs purified and characterized in papaya latex, the rest of the PLCPs in papaya genome are largely unknown. We identified 33 PLCP genes in papaya genome. Phylogenetic analysis clearly separated plant PLCP genes into nine subfamilies. PLCP genes are not equally distributed among the nine subfamilies and the number of PLCPs in each subfamily does not increase or decrease proportionally among the seven selected plant species. Papaya showed clear lineage-specific gene expansion in the subfamily III. Interestingly, all four major PLCPs purified from papaya latex, including papain, chymopapain, glycyl endopeptidase and caricain, were grouped into the lineage-specific expansion branch in the subfamily III. Mapping PLCP genes on chromosomes of five plant species revealed that lineage-specific expansions of PLCP genes were mostly derived from tandem duplications. We estimated divergence time of papaya PLCP genes of subfamily III. The major duplication events leading to lineage-specific expansion of papaya PLCP genes in subfamily III were estimated at 48 MYA, 34 MYA, and 16 MYA. The gene expression patterns of the papaya PLCP genes in different tissues were assessed by transcriptome sequencing and qRT-PCR. Most of the papaya PLCP genes of subfamily III expressed at high levels in leaf and green fruit tissues. Tandem duplications played the dominant role in affecting copy number of PLCPs in plants. Significant variations in size of the PLCP subfamilies among species may reflect genetic adaptation of plant species to different environments. The lineage-specific expansion of papaya PLCPs of subfamily III might

  20. Tigutcystatin, a cysteine protease inhibitor from Triatoma infestans midgut expressed in response to Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buarque, Diego S.; Spindola, Leticia M.N. [Department of Biochemistry, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, 04044-020 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Martins, Rafael M. [Biology of Host Parasite Interactions Unit, Institute Pasteur, 75015 Paris (France); Braz, Gloria R.C. [Department of Biochemistry, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-909 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tanaka, Aparecida S., E-mail: Tanaka.bioq@epm.br [Department of Biochemistry, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, 04044-020 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Tigutcystatin inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi cysteine proteases with high specificity. {yields} Tigutcystatin expression is up-regulated in response to T. cruzi infection. {yields} It is the first cysteine proteases inhibitor characterized from a triatomine insect. -- Abstract: The insect Triatoma infestans is a vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. A cDNA library was constructed from T. infestans anterior midgut, and 244 clones were sequenced. Among the EST sequences, an open reading frame (ORF) with homology to a cystatin type 2 precursor was identified. Then, a 288-bp cDNA fragment encoding mature cystatin (lacking signal peptide) named Tigutcystatin was cloned fused to a N-terminal His tag in pET-14b vector, and the protein expressed in Escherichia coli strain Rosetta gami. Tigutcystatin purified and cleaved by thrombin to remove His tag presented molecular mass of 11 kDa and 10,137 Da by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, respectively. Purified Tigutcystatin was shown to be a tight inhibitor towards cruzain, a T. cruzi cathepsin L-like enzyme (K{sub i} = 3.29 nM) and human cathepsin L (K{sub i} = 3.78 nM). Tissue specific expression analysis showed that Tigutcystatin was mostly expressed in anterior midgut, although amplification in small intestine was also detected by semi quantitative RT-PCR. qReal time PCR confirmed that Tigutcystatin mRNA is significantly up-regulated in anterior midgut when T. infestans is infected with T. cruzi. Together, these results indicate that Tigutcystatin may be involved in modulation of T. cruzi in intestinal tract by inhibiting parasite cysteine proteases, which represent the virulence factors of this protozoan.

  1. The role of NH4Cl and cysteine proteases in Human Papillomavirus type 16 infection

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    Meneses Patricio I

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The infectious pathway of the non-enveloped Human Papillomavirus Type 16 (HPV16 includes binding to the cell surface, clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and penetration into an endosome. HPV16 infection was shown to decrease in the presence of the lysosomotrophic neutralizing agent ammonium chloride (NH4Cl. NH4Cl neutralizes acidic endo-lysosome compartments, thus suggesting that pH was responsible for PV capsid conformational changes leading endosome escape. Results However, our data suggested that NH4Cl blocked infection by preventing the movement of PV viral particles from the early endosome to the caveosome as was shown for JC virus 12. We have confirmed that HPV 16 infection requires the trafficking of reporter-virions to the caveosome as is the case for BPV1 34. In this manuscript we propose that the observed decrease in infection of PV in the presence of NH4Cl was due to a loss of movement of reporter-virions to caveosomes. We also demonstrate that cysteine proteases are involved in the infectious process, and that cathepsin B treatment of viral particles was shown to overcome the block of infection observed in the presence of furin inhibition. We confirmed the need for cathepsin B in HPV16 infection using cathepsin B null mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Conclusion We present data that suggest HPV16 infection is in part mediated by cysteine proteases, and that NH4Cl blocks the intracellular trafficking of infectious viral particles. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration that cysteine proteases influence the infection of a non-enveloped virus.

  2. Bromelain, a cysteine protease from pineapple (Ananas comosus) stem, is an inhibitor of fungal plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, B; Hernández, M; Segundo, B S

    2012-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of bromelain, a cysteine protease isolated from pineapple (Ananas comosus), on growth of several agronomically important fungal pathogens. Purification of bromelain from pineapple stems was carried out by chromatography techniques, and its antimicrobial activity was tested against the fungal pathogens Fusarium verticillioides, Fusarium oxysporum and Fusarium proliferatum by broth microdilution assay. A concentration of 0.3 μmol l(-1) of bromelain was sufficient for 90% growth inhibition of F. verticillioides. The capability of bromelain to inhibit fungal growth is related to its proteolytic activity. The study demonstrates that stem bromelain exhibits a potent antifungal activity against phytopathogens and suggests its potential use as an effective agent for crop protection. The results support the use of a natural protease that accumulates at high levels in pineapple stems as alternative to the use of chemical fungicides for crop protection. © 2012 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. On Blastocystis secreted cysteine proteases: a legumain-activated cathepsin B increases paracellular permeability of intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourrisson, C; Wawrzyniak, I; Cian, A; Livrelli, V; Viscogliosi, E; Delbac, F; Poirier, P

    2016-11-01

    Blastocystis spp. pathogenic potential remains unclear as these anaerobic parasitic protozoa are frequently isolated from stools of both symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects. In silico analysis of the whole genome sequence of Blastocystis subtype 7 revealed the presence of numerous proteolytic enzymes including cysteine proteases predicted to be secreted. To assess the potential impact of proteases on intestinal cells and gut function, we focused our study on two cysteine proteases, a legumain and a cathepsin B, which were previously identified in Blastocystis subtype 7 culture supernatants. Both cysteine proteases were produced as active recombinant proteins. Activation of the recombinant legumain was shown to be autocatalytic and triggered by acidic pH, whereas proteolytic activity of the recombinant cathepsin B was only recorded after co-incubation with the legumain. We then measured the diffusion of 4-kDa FITC-labelled dextran across Caco-2 cell monolayers following exposition to either Blastocystis culture supernatants or each recombinant protease. Both Blastocystis culture supernatants and recombinant activated cathepsin B induced an increase of Caco-2 cell monolayer permeability, and this effect was significantly inhibited by E-64, a specific cysteine protease inhibitor. Our results suggest that cathepsin B might play a role in pathogenesis of Blastocystis by increasing intestinal cell permeability.

  4. Sequence comparison, molecular modeling, and network analysis predict structural diversity in cysteine proteases from the Cape sundew, Drosera capensis

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    Carter T. Butts

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carnivorous plants represent a so far underexploited reservoir of novel proteases with potentially useful activities. Here we investigate 44 cysteine proteases from the Cape sundew, Drosera capensis, predicted from genomic DNA sequences. D. capensis has a large number of cysteine protease genes; analysis of their sequences reveals homologs of known plant proteases, some of which are predicted to have novel properties. Many functionally significant sequence and structural features are observed, including targeting signals and occluding loops. Several of the proteases contain a new type of granulin domain. Although active site residues are conserved, the sequence identity of these proteases to known proteins is moderate to low; therefore, comparative modeling with all-atom refinement and subsequent atomistic MD-simulation is used to predict their 3D structures. The structure prediction data, as well as analysis of protein structure networks, suggest multifarious variations on the papain-like cysteine protease structural theme. This in silico methodology provides a general framework for investigating a large pool of sequences that are potentially useful for biotechnology applications, enabling informed choices about which proteins to investigate in the laboratory.

  5. Iron-Binding Protein Degradation by Cysteine Proteases of Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Castillo, Moisés; Ramírez-Rico, Gerardo; Serrano-Luna, Jesús; Shibayama, Mineko

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri causes acute and fulminant primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. This microorganism invades its host by penetrating the olfactory mucosa and then traveling up the mesaxonal spaces and crossing the cribriform plate; finally, the trophozoites invade the olfactory bulbs. During its invasion, the protozoan obtains nutrients such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and cationic ions (e.g., iron, calcium, and sodium) from the host. However, the mechanism by which these ions are obtained, particularly iron, is poorly understood. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of N. fowleri to degrade iron-binding proteins, including hololactoferrin, transferrin, ferritin, and hemoglobin. Zymography assays were performed for each substrate under physiological conditions (pH 7 at 37°C) employing conditioned medium (CM) and total crude extracts (TCEs) of N. fowleri. Different degradation patterns with CM were observed for hololactoferrin, transferrin, and hemoglobin; however, CM did not cause ferritin degradation. In contrast, the TCEs degraded only hololactoferrin and transferrin. Inhibition assays revealed that cysteine proteases were involved in this process. Based on these results, we suggest that CM and TCEs of N. fowleri degrade iron-binding proteins by employing cysteine proteases, which enables the parasite to obtain iron to survive while invading the central nervous system.

  6. Iron-Binding Protein Degradation by Cysteine Proteases of Naegleria fowleri

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    Moisés Martínez-Castillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Naegleria fowleri causes acute and fulminant primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. This microorganism invades its host by penetrating the olfactory mucosa and then traveling up the mesaxonal spaces and crossing the cribriform plate; finally, the trophozoites invade the olfactory bulbs. During its invasion, the protozoan obtains nutrients such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and cationic ions (e.g., iron, calcium, and sodium from the host. However, the mechanism by which these ions are obtained, particularly iron, is poorly understood. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of N. fowleri to degrade iron-binding proteins, including hololactoferrin, transferrin, ferritin, and hemoglobin. Zymography assays were performed for each substrate under physiological conditions (pH 7 at 37°C employing conditioned medium (CM and total crude extracts (TCEs of N. fowleri. Different degradation patterns with CM were observed for hololactoferrin, transferrin, and hemoglobin; however, CM did not cause ferritin degradation. In contrast, the TCEs degraded only hololactoferrin and transferrin. Inhibition assays revealed that cysteine proteases were involved in this process. Based on these results, we suggest that CM and TCEs of N. fowleri degrade iron-binding proteins by employing cysteine proteases, which enables the parasite to obtain iron to survive while invading the central nervous system.

  7. Cwp84, a Clostridium difficile cysteine protease, exhibits conformational flexibility in the absence of its propeptide

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    Bradshaw, William J. [University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Public Health England, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG (United Kingdom); Roberts, April K.; Shone, Clifford C. [Public Health England, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG (United Kingdom); Acharya, K. Ravi, E-mail: bsskra@bath.ac.uk [University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-19

    Two structures of Cwp84, a cysteine protease from the S-layer of C. difficile, are presented after propeptide cleavage. They reveal the movement of three loops, two in the active-site groove and one on the surface of the lectin-like domain, exposing a hydrophobic pocket. In recent decades, the global healthcare problems caused by Clostridium difficile have increased at an alarming rate. A greater understanding of this antibiotic-resistant bacterium, particularly with respect to how it interacts with the host, is required for the development of novel strategies for fighting C. difficile infections. The surface layer (S-layer) of C. difficile is likely to be of significant importance to host–pathogen interactions. The mature S-layer is formed by a proteinaceous array consisting of multiple copies of a high-molecular-weight and a low-molecular-weight S-layer protein. These components result from the cleavage of SlpA by Cwp84, a cysteine protease. The structure of a truncated Cwp84 active-site mutant has recently been reported and the key features have been identified, providing the first structural insights into the role of Cwp84 in the formation of the S-layer. Here, two structures of Cwp84 after propeptide cleavage are presented and the three conformational changes that are observed are discussed. These changes result in a reconfiguration of the active site and exposure of the hydrophobic pocket.

  8. Identification of a cysteine protease closely related to interleukin-1 beta-converting enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucheu, C; Blanchet, A M; Collard-Dutilleul, V; Lalanne, J L; Diu-Hercend, A

    1996-02-15

    The present study describes the identification and molecular cloning of a new member of the interleukin-1 beta-converting enzyme (ICE) family denoted transcript Y (TY). TY is very closely related to both ICE (51% amino acid identity) and a protein named transcript X (TX) (75% amino acid identity) that we recently identified [Faucheu, C., Diu, A., Chan, A.W.E., Blanchet, A.-M., Miossec, C., Hervé, F.,Collard-Dutilleul, V., Gu, Y., Aldape, R., Lippke, J., Rocher, C., Su, M.S.-S., Livingston, D.J., Hercend, T. & Lalanne, J.-L. (1995) EMBO J. 14, 1914-1922]. The amino acids that are implicated in both the ICE catalytic site and in the PI aspartate-binding pocket are conserved in TY. Within the ICE gene family, TY belongs to a subfamily of proteins closely related to the prototype ICE protein. Using transfection experiments into mammalian cells, we demonstrate that TY has protease activity on its own precursor and that this activity is dependent on the presence of a cysteine residue at position 245. However, despite the close similarity between TY and ICE active sites, TY fails to process the interleukin-1 beta precursor. In addition, as already observed for ICE and TX, TY is able to induce apoptosis when overexpressed in COS cells. TY therefore represents a new member of the growing family of apoptosis-inducing ICE-related cysteine proteases.

  9. Penduliflorain I: A cysteine protease isolated from Hohenbergia penduliflora (A.Rich.) Mez (Bromeliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, A; Carvajal, C; Trejo, S; Torres, M J; Martin, M I; Lorenzo, J C; Natalucci, C L; Hernández, M

    2010-05-01

    Penduliflorain I, a new plant endopeptidase, was isolated and characterized from Hohenbergia penduliflora. Crude extract was obtained from stems. A partially purified enzyme preparation was obtained by ethanol precipitation. This preparation showed maximum activity between pH 7.5 and 8.5, was stable at ionic strength (20% decrease in proteolytic activity could be detected after 2 h in 0.4 M sodium chloride solution), and exhibited high thermal stability (inactivation required heating for 20 min at 75 degrees C). Inhibition and activation assays indicated the cysteine nature of the enzymatic preparation. Penduliflorain I was purified by anion exchange chromatography (Q-Sepharose HP) by FPLC system. Homogeneity was confirmed by mass spectroscopy. Molecular mass of the enzyme was 23 412.847 Da (MALDI-TOF-MS). Kinetic parameters were determined for PFLNA (K (m) = 0.3227 mM and k (cat) = 4.27 s(-1)). The N-terminal sequence (AVPQSIDWRDYGAVTTDKNQ) of isolated protease showed considerable similarity to other cysteine proteases obtained from stems or fruits of different Bromeliaceae species.

  10. Relative contribution of matrix metalloprotease and cysteine protease activities to cytokine-stimulated articular cartilage degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondergaard, B C; Henriksen, K; Wulf, H; Oestergaard, S; Schurigt, U; Bräuer, R; Danielsen, I; Christiansen, C; Qvist, P; Karsdal, M A

    2006-08-01

    Both matrix metalloprotease (MMP) activity and cathepsin K (CK) activity have been implicated in cartilage turnover. We investigated the relative contribution of MMP activity and CK activity in cartilage degradation using ex vivo and in vivo models. Bovine articular cartilage explants were stimulated with oncostatin M (OSM) 10 ng/ml and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) 20 ng/ml in the presence or absence of the broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor GM6001 and the cysteine protease inhibitor, E64. Cartilage degradation was evaluated in the conditioned medium by glycosaminoglycans (GAG), hydroxyproline, and cross-linked C-telopeptide fragments of type II collagen (CTX-II), which were compared to immunohistochemical evaluations of proteoglycans and CTX-II. We assessed MMP expression by gelatine zymography and CK expression by immunohistochemistry. In vivo, CTX-II release was measured from CK-deficient mice. OSM and TNF-alpha combined induced significant (Pdegradation products measured by hydroxyproline and CTX-II compared to vehicle control. The cytokines potently induced MMP expression, assessed by zymography, and CK expression investigated by immunohistochemistry. Inhibition of MMP activity completely abrogated hydroxyproline and CTX-II release (Pdegradation. In contrast, inhibition of cysteine proteases resulted in an increase rather than a decrease in MMP derived fragments of collagen type II degradation, CTX-II, suggesting altered collagen metabolism.

  11. Cysteine Protease Profiles of the Medicinal Plant Calotropis procera R. Br. revealed by de novo transcriptome analysis.

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    Chang Woo Kwon

    Full Text Available Calotropis procera R. Br., a traditional medicinal plant in India, is a promising source of commercial proteases, because the cysteine proteases from the plant exhibit high thermo-stability, broad pH optima, and plasma-clotting activity. Though several proteases such as Procerain, Procerain B, CpCp-1, CpCp-2, and CpCp-3 have been isolated and characterized, the information of their transcripts is limited to cDNAs encoding their mature peptides. Due to this limitation, in this study, to determine the cDNA sequences encoding full open reading frame of these cysteine proteases, transcripts were sequenced with an Illumina Hiseq2000 sequencer. A total of 171,253,393 clean reads were assembled into 106,093 contigs with an average length of 1,614 bp and an N50 of 2,703 bp, and 70,797 contigs with an average length of 1,565 bp and N50 of 2,082 bp using Trinity and Velvet-Oases software, respectively. Among these contigs, we found 20 unigenes related to papain-like cysteine proteases by BLASTX analysis against a non-redundant NCBI protein database. Our expression analysis revealed that the cysteine protease contains an N-terminal pro-peptide domain (inhibitor region, which is necessary for correct folding and proteolytic activity. It was evident that expression yields using an inducible T7 expression system in Escherichia coli were considerably higher with the pro-peptide domain than without the domain, which could contribute to molecular cloning of the Calotropis procera protease as an active form with correct folding.

  12. Cysteine Protease Profiles of the Medicinal Plant Calotropis procera R. Br. revealed by de novo transcriptome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Chang Woo; Park, Kyung-Min; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk; Kim, Myoung-Dong; Shin, Sang Woon; Je, Yeon Ho; Chang, Pahn-Shick

    2015-01-01

    Calotropis procera R. Br., a traditional medicinal plant in India, is a promising source of commercial proteases, because the cysteine proteases from the plant exhibit high thermo-stability, broad pH optima, and plasma-clotting activity. Though several proteases such as Procerain, Procerain B, CpCp-1, CpCp-2, and CpCp-3 have been isolated and characterized, the information of their transcripts is limited to cDNAs encoding their mature peptides. Due to this limitation, in this study, to determine the cDNA sequences encoding full open reading frame of these cysteine proteases, transcripts were sequenced with an Illumina Hiseq2000 sequencer. A total of 171,253,393 clean reads were assembled into 106,093 contigs with an average length of 1,614 bp and an N50 of 2,703 bp, and 70,797 contigs with an average length of 1,565 bp and N50 of 2,082 bp using Trinity and Velvet-Oases software, respectively. Among these contigs, we found 20 unigenes related to papain-like cysteine proteases by BLASTX analysis against a non-redundant NCBI protein database. Our expression analysis revealed that the cysteine protease contains an N-terminal pro-peptide domain (inhibitor region), which is necessary for correct folding and proteolytic activity. It was evident that expression yields using an inducible T7 expression system in Escherichia coli were considerably higher with the pro-peptide domain than without the domain, which could contribute to molecular cloning of the Calotropis procera protease as an active form with correct folding.

  13. Identification of the cysteine protease Amb a 11 as a novel major allergen from short ragweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouley, Julien; Groeme, Rachel; Le Mignon, Maxime; Jain, Karine; Chabre, Henri; Bordas-Le Floch, Véronique; Couret, Marie-Noëlle; Bussières, Laetitia; Lautrette, Aurélie; Naveau, Marie; Baron-Bodo, Véronique; Lombardi, Vincent; Mascarell, Laurent; Batard, Thierry; Nony, Emmanuel; Moingeon, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    Allergy to pollen from short ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) is a serious and expanding health problem in the United States and in Europe. We sought to investigate the presence of undescribed allergens in ragweed pollen. Ragweed pollen proteins were submitted to high-resolution gel electrophoresis and tested for IgE reactivity by using sera from 92 American or European donors with ragweed allergy. Pollen transcriptome sequencing, mass spectrometry (MS), and recombinant DNA technologies were applied to characterize new IgE-binding proteins. High-resolution IgE immunoblotting experiments revealed that 50 (54%) of 92 patients with ragweed allergy were sensitized to a 37-kDa allergen distinct from Amb a 1. The full-length cDNA sequence for this molecule was obtained by means of PCR cloning after MS sequencing of the protein combined with ragweed pollen RNA sequencing. The purified allergen, termed Amb a 11, was fully characterized by MS and confirmed to react with IgEs from 66% of patients. This molecule is a 262-amino-acid thiol protease of the papain family expressed as a combination of isoforms and glycoforms after proteolytic removal of N- and C-terminal propeptides from a proform. Three-dimensional modeling revealed a high structural homology with known cysteine proteases, including the mite Der p 1 allergen. The protease activity of Amb a 11, as well as its capacity to activate basophils from patients with ragweed allergy, were confirmed. The production of a nonglycosylated recombinant form of Amb a 11 in Escherichia coli established that glycosylation is not required for IgE binding. We identified the cysteine protease Amb a 11 as a new major allergen from ragweed pollen. Given the similar physicochemical properties shared by the 2 major allergens, we hypothesize that part of the allergenic activity previously ascribed to Amb a 1 is rather borne by Amb a 11. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  14. Specific cysteine protease inhibitors act as deterrents of Western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) in transgenic potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Outchkourov, N.S.; Kogel, de J.; Bruin, de A.; Abrahamson, M.; Jongsma, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the effects of the accumulation of cysteine protease inhibitors on the food preferences of adult female western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), were investigated. Representative members of the cystatin and thyropin gene families (stefin A, cystatin C, kininogen

  15. Structure of the Mature Streptococcal Cysteine Protease Exotoxin mSpeB in Its Active Dimeric Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Johan G; Dagil, Robert; Niclasen, Louise Meinert

    2009-01-01

    Invasive infections of Streptococcus pyogenes are dependent on the cysteine protease streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B. Previous structures of the enzyme have not disclosed the proper active-site configuration. Here, the crystal structure of the mature enzyme is presented to 1.55 A, disclosing...

  16. Host Plants Indirectly Influence Plant Virus Transmission by Altering Gut Cysteine Protease Activity of Aphid Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Patricia V; Ghanim, Murad; Alexander, Mariko; Rebelo, Ana Rita; Santos, Rogerio S; Orsburn, Benjamin C; Gray, Stewart; Cilia, Michelle

    2017-04-01

    The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae , is a vector of the Potato leafroll virus (PLRV, Luteoviridae), transmitted exclusively by aphids in a circulative manner. PLRV transmission efficiency was significantly reduced when a clonal lineage of M. persicae was reared on turnip as compared with the weed physalis, and this was a transient effect caused by a host-switch response. A trend of higher PLRV titer in physalis-reared aphids as compared with turnip-reared aphids was observed at 24 h and 72 h after virus acquisition. The major difference in the proteomes of these aphids was the up-regulation of predicted lysosomal enzymes, in particular the cysteine protease cathepsin B (cathB), in aphids reared on turnip. The aphid midgut is the site of PLRV acquisition, and cathB and PLRV localization were starkly different in midguts of the aphids reared on the two host plants. In viruliferous aphids that were reared on turnip, there was near complete colocalization of cathB and PLRV at the cell membranes, which was not observed in physalis-reared aphids. Chemical inhibition of cathB restored the ability of aphids reared on turnip to transmit PLRV in a dose-dependent manner, showing that the increased activity of cathB and other cysteine proteases at the cell membrane indirectly decreased virus transmission by aphids. Understanding how the host plant influences virus transmission by aphids is critical for growers to manage the spread of virus among field crops. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Structural Insights of the Cysteine Protease Heynein from Induction and Characterization of Non-native Intermediate States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basant K. Patel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases are vital to cell physiology and many plants secrete these proteases for defense purposes. Many recent studies have reported unusually high stabilities for several plant cysteine proteases which possibly enable these proteases to function under adverse environmental conditions. Here, we have examined the conformational features of a new plant cysteine protease heynein using spectroscopic tools to understand the basis for its robust functional stability. The studies revealed structural integrity over a wide range of pH (2.5-12.0, temperature (65 oC and urea (8M. However, at pH 2.0, the protein gets acid-unfolded (UA -state with exposed hydrophobic patches, which upon addition of more protons (pH 0.5 or anions (0.5 M KCl and 0.2 M Na2 SO4 yields conformationally distinct refolded intermediates respectively termed: A-, I 1 - and I 2 -states. Strikingly, a high methanol level drives the UA -state into a predominantly -sheet rich conformation (O-state. We observed three-state unfolding kinetics of the I 2 -state by urea, possibly suggesting presence of two domains in the heynein molecule.

  18. N-Benzyl-1,10-Phenanthroline Derivatives and Cysteine Protease Inhibitor E64

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahardika Agus Wijayanti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Potential new targets for antimalarial chemotherapy include parasite proteases, which are required for several cellular functions during the Plasmodium falciparum life cycle. Four new derivatives of N-alkyl and N-benzyl-1,10-phenanthroline have been synthesized. Those are (1-N-methyl-1,10-phenanthrolinium sulfate, (1-N-ethyl-1,10-phenanthrolinium sulfate, (1-N-benzyl-1,10-phenanthrolinium chloride, and (1-N-benzyl-1,10-phenanthrolinium iodide. Those compounds had potential antiplasmodial activity with IC50 values from 260.42 to 465.38 nM. Cysteine proteinase inhibitor E64 was used to investigate the mechanism of action of N-alkyl and N-benzyl-1,10-phenanthroline derivatives. A modified fixed-ratio isobologram method was used to study the in vitro interactions between the new compounds with either E64 or chloroquine. The interaction between N-alkyl and N-benzyl-1,10-phenanthroline derivatives and E64 was additive as well as their interactions with chloroquine were also additive. Antimalarial mechanism of chloroquine is mainly on the inhibition of hemozoin formation. As the interaction of chloroquine and E64 was additive, the results indicated that these new compounds had a mechanism of action by inhibiting Plasmodium proteases.

  19. Exploring hemostatic and thrombolytic potential of heynein - A cysteine protease from Ervatamia heyneana latex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uday, Priyanka; Maheshwari, M; Sharanappa, P; Nafeesa, Zohara; Kameshwar, Vivek Hamse; Priya, B S; Nanjunda Swamy, S

    2017-03-06

    The latex of Ervatamia heyneana (Wall.) T. Cooke plant has been used for wound healing and various skin diseases by Indian tribes and folklore. To validate the scientific basis of heynein - a key protease of Ervatamia heyneana, in hemostasis and wound healing process. The latex from E. heyneana was processed and subjected to two step purification. The purified heynein was assayed for proteolytic activity using casein as substrate and also attested by zymography. The inhibition studies confirmed the nature of heynein. Pure fibrinogen was used for fibrinogenolytic activity and citrated plasma was used for coagulant and fibrinolytic activities. The edema inducing action and hemorrhagic activity of heynein were assessed on mice model. The purified heynein exhibited proteolytic activity, which was confirmed by caseinolytic assay and zymography. The inhibition studies confirmed heynein to be a cysteine protease. Heynein showed complete hydrolysis of all the three subunits of human fibrinogen (Aα, Bβ, γ). It exhibited strong pro-coagulant activity by reducing plasma clotting time from 248 to 39s at 40µg concentration. Heynein cleaved α polymer subunit in fibrin clot and did not induce edema and hemorrhage in mice models. The non-hemorrhagic nature was supported with histopathological studies of skin samples. Heynein displays strong pro-coagulant action associated with fibrin(ogen)olytic activity. This provides basis for the observed pharmacological action of Ervatamia heyneana and thereby justifies its use in folk medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Expression, characterization, and cellular localization of knowpains, papain-like cysteine proteases of the Plasmodium knowlesi malaria parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Prasad

    Full Text Available Papain-like cysteine proteases of malaria parasites degrade haemoglobin in an acidic food vacuole to provide amino acids for intraerythrocytic parasites. These proteases are potential drug targets because their inhibitors block parasite development, and efforts are underway to develop chemotherapeutic inhibitors of these proteases as the treatments for malaria. Plasmodium knowlesi has recently been shown to be an important human pathogen in parts of Asia. We report expression and characterization of three P. knowlesi papain-like proteases, termed knowpains (KP2-4. Recombinant knowpains were produced using a bacterial expression system, and tested for various biochemical properties. Antibodies against recombinant knowpains were generated and used to determine their cellular localization in parasites. Inhibitory effects of the cysteine protease inhibitor E64 were assessed on P. knowlesi culture to validate drug target potential of knowpains. All three knowpains were present in the food vacuole, active in acidic pH, and capable of degrading haemoglobin at the food vacuolar pH (≈5.5, suggesting roles in haemoglobin degradation. The proteases showed absolute (KP2 and KP3 to moderate (KP4 preference for peptide substrates containing leucine at the P2 position; KP4 preferred arginine at the P2 position. While the three knowpains appear to have redundant roles in haemoglobin degradation, KP4 may also have a role in degradation of erythrocyte cytoskeleton during merozoite egress, as it displayed broad substrate specificity and was primarily localized at the parasite periphery. Importantly, E64 blocked erythrocytic development of P. knowlesi, with enlargement of food vacuoles, indicating inhibition of haemoglobin hydrolysis and supporting the potential for inhibition of knowpains as a strategy for the treatment of malaria. Functional expression and characterization of knowpains should enable simultaneous screening of available cysteine protease

  1. Giardia duodenalis Surface Cysteine Proteases Induce Cleavage of the Intestinal Epithelial Cytoskeletal Protein Villin via Myosin Light Chain Kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Bhargava

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis infections are among the most common causes of waterborne diarrhoeal disease worldwide. At the height of infection, G. duodenalis trophozoites induce multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells that contribute to the development of diarrhoeal disease. To date, our understanding of pathophysiological processes in giardiasis remains incompletely understood. The present study reveals a previously unappreciated role for G. duodenalis cathepsin cysteine proteases in intestinal epithelial pathophysiological processes that occur during giardiasis. Experiments first established that Giardia trophozoites indeed produce cathepsin B and L in strain-dependent fashion. Co-incubation of G. duodenalis with human enterocytes enhanced cathepsin production by Assemblage A (NF and S2 isolates trophozoites, but not when epithelial cells were exposed to Assemblage B (GSM isolate trophozoites. Direct contact between G. duodenalis parasites and human intestinal epithelial monolayers resulted in the degradation and redistribution of the intestinal epithelial cytoskeletal protein villin; these effects were abolished when parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases were inhibited. Interestingly, inhibition of parasite proteases did not prevent degradation of the intestinal tight junction-associated protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1, suggesting that G. duodenalis induces multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells. Finally, this study demonstrates that G. duodenalis-mediated disruption of villin is, at least, in part dependent on activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK. Taken together, this study indicates a novel role for parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases in the pathophysiology of G. duodenalis infections.

  2. Crystal structure of the cysteine protease inhibitor 2 from Entamoeba histolytica: Functional convergence of a common protein fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casados-Vázquez, Luz E.; Lara-González, Samuel; Brieb, Luis G. (LNGB-Mexico)

    2012-04-18

    Cysteine proteases (CP) are key pathogenesis and virulence determinants of protozoan parasites. Entamoeba histolytica contains at least 50 cysteine proteases; however, only three (EhCP1, EhCP2 and EhCP5) are responsible for approximately 90% of the cysteine protease activity in this parasite. CPs are expressed as inactive zymogens. Because the processed proteases are potentially cytotoxic, protozoan parasites have developed mechanisms to regulate their activity. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases (ICP) of the chagasin-like inhibitor family (MEROPS family I42) were recently identified in bacteria and protozoan parasites. E. histolytica contains two ICP-encoding genes of the chagasin-like inhibitor family. EhICP1 localizes to the cytosol, whereas EhICP2 is targeted to phagosomes. Herein, we report two crystal structures of EhICP2. The overall structure of EhICP2 consists of eight {beta}-strands and closely resembles the immunoglobulin fold. A comparison between the two crystal forms of EhICP2 indicates that the conserved BC, DE and FG loops form a flexible wedge that may block the active site of CPs. The positively charged surface of the wedge-forming loops in EhICP2 contrasts with the neutral surface of the wedge-forming loops in chagasin. We postulate that the flexibility and positive charge observed in the DE and FG loops of EhICP2 may be important to facilitate the initial binding of this inhibitor to the battery of CPs present in E. histolytica.

  3. In vivo inhibition of cysteine proteases provides evidence for the involvement of 'senescence-associated vacuoles' in chloroplast protein degradation during dark-induced senescence of tobacco leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Cristian A; Costa, María Lorenza; Martínez, Dana E; Mohr, Christina; Humbeck, Klaus; Guiamet, Juan J

    2013-11-01

    Breakdown of leaf proteins, particularly chloroplast proteins, is a massive process in senescing leaves. In spite of its importance in internal N recycling, the mechanism(s) and the enzymes involved are largely unknown. Senescence-associated vacuoles (SAVs) are small, acidic vacuoles with high cysteine peptidase activity. Chloroplast-targeted proteins re-localize to SAVs during senescence, suggesting that SAVs might be involved in chloroplast protein degradation. SAVs were undetectable in mature, non-senescent tobacco leaves. Their abundance, visualized either with the acidotropic marker Lysotracker Red or by green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence in a line expressing the senescence-associated cysteine protease SAG12 fused to GFP, increased during senescence induction in darkness, and peaked after 2-4 d, when chloroplast dismantling was most intense. Increased abundance of SAVs correlated with higher levels of SAG12 mRNA. Activity labelling with a biotinylated derivative of the cysteine protease inhibitor E-64 was used to detect active cysteine proteases. The two apparently most abundant cysteine proteases of senescing leaves, of 40kDa and 33kDa were detected in isolated SAVs. Rubisco degradation in isolated SAVs was completely blocked by E-64. Treatment of leaf disks with E-64 in vivo substantially reduced degradation of Rubisco and leaf proteins. Overall, these results indicate that SAVs contain most of the cysteine protease activity of senescing cells, and that SAV cysteine proteases are at least partly responsible for the degradation of stromal proteins of the chloroplast.

  4. Purification, biochemical characterization and antioxidant property of ZCPG, a cysteine protease from Zingiber montanum rhizome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamir, Kizukala; Seshagirirao, Kottapalli

    2018-01-01

    Zingiber montanum cysteine protease glycoprotein (ZCPG) was purified to homogeneity by DEAE- cellulose and Sephadex G50 resulting in sixteen fold purification and total activity of 39.4U/mg. ZCPG presented a prominent single peak in HPLC chromatogram with an estimated molecular weight of 48kDa on native PAGE. SDS-PAGE gave two subunits of ∼24.3 and ∼24.6kDa showing its heterodimeric form. Protein sequencing was studied by MALDI-TOF MS/MS. Isoelectrofocusing exhibited two isoforms with pI values of 4.8 and 5.1. Analysis of the total carbohydrate by GC-MS/MS showed the presence of glucose, mannose, fucose and xylose. The pH and temperature optimum were 9 and 60°C respectively while Km and Vmax values were 0.5±0.03μg and 13.73±2.07U/ml respectively. ZCPG was strongly inhibited by NEM indicating the cysteine-type. Substrates such as casein, azocasein, gelatin, BSA and haemoglobin showed high relative activity. Metal ions of CuCl2, CoCl2, HgCl2 and ZnCl2 showed partial inhibition at 1mM concentration. Furthermore, ZCPG exhibited promising antioxidant activity in biochemical systems as well as THP-1 cells. These findings suggested, ZCPG with significant antioxidant activity might have potential applications in therapeutic and food industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Complete amino acid sequence of ananain and a comparison with stem bromelain and other plant cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K L; Albee, K L; Bernasconi, R J; Edmunds, T

    1997-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of ananain (EC3.4.22.31) and stem bromelain (3.4.22.32), two cysteine proteases from pineapple stem, are similar yet ananain and stem bromelain possess distinct specificities towards synthetic peptide substrates and different reactivities towards the cysteine protease inhibitors E-64 and chicken egg white cystatin. We present here the complete amino acid sequence of ananain and compare it with the reported sequences of pineapple stem bromelain, papain and chymopapain from papaya and actinidin from kiwifruit. Ananain is comprised of 216 residues with a theoretical mass of 23464 Da. This primary structure includes a sequence insert between residues 170 and 174 not present in stem bromelain or papain and a hydrophobic series of amino acids adjacent to His-157. It is possible that these sequence differences contribute to the different substrate and inhibitor specificities exhibited by ananain and stem bromelain. PMID:9355753

  6. Heparin modulates the endopeptidase activity of Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease cathepsin L-Like rCPB2.8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner A S Judice

    Full Text Available Cysteine protease B is considered crucial for the survival and infectivity of the Leishmania in its human host. Several microorganism pathogens bind to the heparin-like glycosaminoglycans chains of proteoglycans at host-cell surface to promote their attachment and internalization. Here, we have investigated the influence of heparin upon Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease rCPB2.8 activity.THE DATA ANALYSIS REVEALED THAT THE PRESENCE OF HEPARIN AFFECTS ALL STEPS OF THE ENZYME REACTION: (i it decreases 3.5-fold the k 1 and 4.0-fold the k -1, (ii it affects the acyl-enzyme accumulation with pronounced decrease in k 2 (2.7-fold, and also decrease in k 3 (3.5-fold. The large values of ΔG  =  12 kJ/mol for the association and dissociation steps indicate substantial structural strains linked to the formation/dissociation of the ES complex in the presence of heparin, which underscore a conformational change that prevents the diffusion of substrate in the rCPB2.8 active site. Binding to heparin also significantly decreases the α-helix content of the rCPB2.8 and perturbs the intrinsic fluorescence emission of the enzyme. The data strongly suggest that heparin is altering the ionization of catalytic (Cys(25-S(-/(His(163-Im(+ H ion pair of the rCPB2.8. Moreover, the interaction of heparin with the N-terminal pro-region of rCPB2.8 significantly decreased its inhibitory activity against the mature enzyme.Taken together, depending on their concentration, heparin-like glycosaminoglycans can either stimulate or antagonize the activity of cysteine protease B enzymes during parasite infection, suggesting that this glycoconjugate can anchor parasite cysteine protease at host cell surface.

  7. Expression of a barley cystatin gene in maize enhances resistance against phytophagous mites by altering their cysteine-proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Carrillo Gil, Laura; Martinez Muñoz, Manuel; Ramessar, Koreen; Cambra Marin, Ines; Castañera, Pedro; Ortego, Felix; Diaz Rodriguez, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Phytocystatins are inhibitors of cysteine-proteases from plants putatively involved in plant defence based on their capability of inhibit heterologous enzymes. We have previously characterised the whole cystatin gene family members from barley (HvCPI-1 to HvCPI-13). The aim of this study was to assess the effects of barley cystatins on two phytophagous spider mites, Tetranychus urticae and Brevipalpus chilensis. The determination of proteolytic activity profile in both mite species showed the...

  8. Cathepsin B cysteine protease gene is upregulated during leaf senescence and exhibits differential expression behavior in response to phytohormones in Picrorhiza kurrooa Royle ex Benth.

    OpenAIRE

    Jai Parkash; Sanjeeta Kashyap; Shruti Kirti; Anil Kumar Singh; Som Dutt

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal importance of Picrorhiza (Picrorhiza kurrooa Royle ex Benth — an herb of western Himalayan region) and its endangered status in Red Data Book presses an urgent need for intensive R&D interventions towards ensuring its availability for the medicinal use, its sustainability and improvement. The present study was conducted on cathepsin B cysteine protease in Picrorhiza. Cathepsin B cysteine protease has been reported to function in diverse processes such as senescence, abscission, prog...

  9. Degradation of fibrinogen and collagen by staphopains, cysteine proteases released from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohbayashi, Takehisa; Irie, Atsushi; Murakami, Yoji; Nowak, Magdalena; Potempa, Jan; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Shinohara, Masanori; Imamura, Takahisa

    2011-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequently isolated pathogen in gram-positive sepsis often complicated by a blood clotting disorder, and is the leading cause of infective endocarditis induced by bacterial destruction of endocardial tissues. The bacterium secretes cysteine proteases referred to as staphopain A (ScpA) and staphopain B (SspB). To investigate virulence activities of staphopains pertinent to clotting disorders and tissue destruction, we examined their effects on collagen, one of the major tissue components, and on plasma clotting. Both staphopains prolonged the partial thromboplastin time of plasma in a dose- and activity-dependent manner, with SspB being threefold more potent than ScpA. Staphopains also prolonged the thrombin time of both plasma and fibrinogen, indicating that these enzymes can cause impaired plasma clotting through fibrinogen degradation. Whereas SspB cleaved the fibrinogen Aα-chain at the C-terminal region very efficiently, ScpA degraded it rather slowly. This explains the superior ability of the former enzyme to impair fibrinogen clottability. Enzymically active staphopains, at concentrations as low as 10 nM, degraded collagen with comparable efficiency. These results show novel virulence activities of staphopains in degrading fibrinogen and collagen, and suggest an involvement of staphopains in the clotting impairment and tissue destruction caused by staphylococcal infection.

  10. Expression of a pathogen-induced cysteine protease (AdCP) in tapetum results in male sterility in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Pawan; Singh, Naveen Kumar; Kumar, Dilip; Vijayan, Sambasivam; Ahmed, Israr; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2014-06-01

    Usable male sterility systems have immense potential in developing hybrid varieties in crop plants, which can also be used as a biological safety containment to prevent horizontal transgene flow. Barnase-Barstar system developed earlier was the first approach to engineer male sterility in plants. In an analogous situation, we have evolved a system of inducing pollen abortion and male sterility in transgenic tobacco by expressing a plant gene coding for a protein with known developmental function in contrast to the Barnase-Barstar system, which deploys genes of prokaryotic origin, i.e., from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. We have used a plant pathogen-induced gene, cysteine protease for inducing male sterility. This gene was identified in the wild peanut, Arachis diogoi differentially expressed when it was challenged with the late leaf spot pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata. Arachis diogoi cysteine protease (AdCP) was expressed under the strong tapetum-specific promoter (TA29) and tobacco transformants were generated. Morphological and histological analysis of AdCP transgenic plants showed ablated tapetum and complete pollen abortion in three transgenic lines. Furthermore, transcript analysis displayed the expression of cysteine protease in these male sterile lines and the expression of the protein was identified in western blot analysis using its polyclonal antibody raised in the rabbit system.

  11. Homology modeling, molecular docking and MD simulation studies to investigate role of cysteine protease from Xanthomonas campestris in degradation of Aβ peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanavade, Maruti J; Jalkute, Chidambar B; Barage, Sagar H; Sonawane, Kailas D

    2013-12-01

    Cysteine protease is known to degrade amyloid beta peptide which is a causative agent of Alzheimer's disease. This cleavage mechanism has not been studied in detail at the atomic level. Hence, a three-dimensional structure of cysteine protease from Xanthomonas campestris was constructed by homology modeling using Geno3D, SWISS-MODEL, and MODELLER 9v7. All the predicted models were analyzed by PROCHECK and PROSA. Three-dimensional model of cysteine protease built by MODELLER 9v7 shows similarity with human cathepsin B crystal structure. This model was then used further for docking and simulation studies. The molecular docking study revealed that Cys17, His87, and Gln88 residues of cysteine protease form an active site pocket similar to human cathepsin B. Then the docked complex was refined by molecular dynamic simulation to confirm its stable behavior over the entire simulation period. The molecular docking and MD simulation studies showed that the sulfhydryl hydrogen atom of Cys17 of cysteine protease interacts with carboxylic oxygen of Lys16 of Aβ peptide indicating the cleavage site. Thus, the cysteine protease model from X. campestris having similarity with human cathepsin B crystal structure may be used as an alternate approach to cleave Aβ peptide a causative agent of Alzheimer's disease. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cysteine proteases and acid phosphatases contribute to Tetrahymena spp. pathogenicity in guppies, Poecilia reticulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowitz, M Pimenta; Ofir, R; Golan-Goldhirsh, A; Zilberg, D

    2009-12-03

    Systemic tetrahymenosis caused by the protozoan parasite Tetrahymena spp. is a serious problem in guppy (Poecilia reticulata) farms worldwide. There is no therapeutic solution for the systemic form of this disease. Guppies severely infected with Tetrahymena spp. were imported by a commercial ornamental fish farm and brought to our laboratory. Tetrahymena sp. (Tet-NI) was isolated and in vitro cultured. Isolates maintained in culture for different time periods (as reflected by different numbers of passages in culture) were analyzed-Tet-NI 1, 4, 5 and 6, with Tet-NI 1 being cultured for the longest period (about 15 months, 54 passages) and Tet-NI 6 for the shortest (2.5 months, 10 passages). Controlled internal infection was successfully achieved by IP injection with most isolates, except for Tet-NI 1 which produced no infection. The isolate Tet-NI 6 induced the highest infection rates in internal organs (80% vs. 50% and 64% for Tet-NI 4 and 5, respectively) and mortality rates (67% vs. 20% and 27% for Tet-NI 4 and 5, respectively, and 6.7% for Tet-NI 1). The correlation between pathogenicity and Tetrahymena enzymatic activity was studied. Electrophoretic analyses revealed at least two bands of gelanolytic activity in Tet-NI 4 and 5, three bands in Tet-NI 6, and no activity in Tet-NI 1. Total inhibition of gelanolytic activity was observed after pretreatment of Tet-NI 6 with E-64, a highly selective cysteine protease inhibitor. Using hemoglobin as a substrate, Tet-NI 6 had two bands of proteolytic activity and no bands were observed in Tet-NI 1. A correlation was observed between pathogenicity and acid phosphatase activities (analyzed by commercial fluorescence kit) for Tet-NI 1 and Tet-NI 6.

  13. Compatibility in the Ustilago maydis-maize interaction requires inhibition of host cysteine proteases by the fungal effector Pit2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, André N; Ziemann, Sebastian; Treitschke, Steffi; Aßmann, Daniela; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2013-02-01

    The basidiomycete Ustilago maydis causes smut disease in maize, with large plant tumors being formed as the most prominent disease symptoms. During all steps of infection, U. maydis depends on a biotrophic interaction, which requires an efficient suppression of plant immunity. In a previous study, we identified the secreted effector protein Pit2, which is essential for maintenance of biotrophy and induction of tumors. Deletion mutants for pit2 successfully penetrate host cells but elicit various defense responses, which stops further fungal proliferation. We now show that Pit2 functions as an inhibitor of a set of apoplastic maize cysteine proteases, whose activity is directly linked with salicylic-acid-associated plant defenses. Consequently, protease inhibition by Pit2 is required for U. maydis virulence. Sequence comparisons with Pit2 orthologs from related smut fungi identified a conserved sequence motif. Mutation of this sequence caused loss of Pit2 function. Consequently, expression of the mutated protein in U. maydis could not restore virulence of the pit2 deletion mutant, indicating that the protease inhibition by Pit2 is essential for fungal virulence. Moreover, synthetic peptides of the conserved sequence motif showed full activity as protease inhibitor, which identifies this domain as a new, minimal protease inhibitor domain in plant-pathogenic fungi.

  14. Compatibility in the Ustilago maydis-maize interaction requires inhibition of host cysteine proteases by the fungal effector Pit2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André N Mueller

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The basidiomycete Ustilago maydis causes smut disease in maize, with large plant tumors being formed as the most prominent disease symptoms. During all steps of infection, U. maydis depends on a biotrophic interaction, which requires an efficient suppression of plant immunity. In a previous study, we identified the secreted effector protein Pit2, which is essential for maintenance of biotrophy and induction of tumors. Deletion mutants for pit2 successfully penetrate host cells but elicit various defense responses, which stops further fungal proliferation. We now show that Pit2 functions as an inhibitor of a set of apoplastic maize cysteine proteases, whose activity is directly linked with salicylic-acid-associated plant defenses. Consequently, protease inhibition by Pit2 is required for U. maydis virulence. Sequence comparisons with Pit2 orthologs from related smut fungi identified a conserved sequence motif. Mutation of this sequence caused loss of Pit2 function. Consequently, expression of the mutated protein in U. maydis could not restore virulence of the pit2 deletion mutant, indicating that the protease inhibition by Pit2 is essential for fungal virulence. Moreover, synthetic peptides of the conserved sequence motif showed full activity as protease inhibitor, which identifies this domain as a new, minimal protease inhibitor domain in plant-pathogenic fungi.

  15. Crystal Structures of TbCatB and rhodesain, potential chemotherapeutic targets and major cysteine proteases of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain D Kerr

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei is the etiological agent of Human African Trypanosomiasis, an endemic parasitic disease of sub-Saharan Africa. TbCatB and rhodesain are the sole Clan CA papain-like cysteine proteases produced by the parasite during infection of the mammalian host and are implicated in the progression of disease. Of considerable interest is the exploration of these two enzymes as targets for cysteine protease inhibitors that are effective against T. brucei.We have determined, by X-ray crystallography, the first reported structure of TbCatB in complex with the cathepsin B selective inhibitor CA074. In addition we report the structure of rhodesain in complex with the vinyl-sulfone K11002.The mature domain of our TbCat*CA074 structure contains unique features for a cathepsin B-like enzyme including an elongated N-terminus extending 16 residues past the predicted maturation cleavage site. N-terminal Edman sequencing reveals an even longer extension than is observed amongst the ordered portions of the crystal structure. The TbCat*CA074 structure confirms that the occluding loop, which is an essential part of the substrate-binding site, creates a larger prime side pocket in the active site cleft than is found in mammalian cathepsin B-small molecule structures. Our data further highlight enhanced flexibility in the occluding loop main chain and structural deviations from mammalian cathepsin B enzymes that may affect activity and inhibitor design. Comparisons with the rhodesain*K11002 structure highlight key differences that may impact the design of cysteine protease inhibitors as anti-trypanosomal drugs.

  16. Role of cysteine-protease CGHC motifs of ER-60, a protein disulfide isomerase, in hepatic apolipoprotein B100 degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Angela C; Qiu, Wei; Zhang, Rianna; Urade, Reiko; Adeli, Khosrow

    2013-09-01

    Apolipoprotein B100 (apoB), the structural component of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), is susceptible to misfolding and subsequent degradation by several intracellular pathways. ER-60, which has been implicated in apoB degradation, is a protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) that forms or rearranges disulfide bonds in substrate proteins and also possesses cysteine protease activity. To determine which ER-60 function is important for apoB degradation, adenoviruses encoding wild-type human ER-60 or a mutant form of human ER-60 (C60A, C409A) that lacked cysteine protease activity were overexpressed in HepG2 cells. Overexpression of wild-type ER-60 in HepG2 cells promoted apoB degradation and impaired apoB secretion, but mutant ER-60 overexpression did not. In McArdle RH-7777 cells, VLDL secretion was markedly inhibited following overexpression of wild-type but not mutant ER-60, an effect that could be blocked by oleate treatment. Mutant ER-60 was not trapped on apoB as it was with the control substrate tapasin, suggesting that ER-60's role in apoB degradation is likely unrelated to its protein disulfide isomerase activity. Thus, ER-60 may participate in apoB degradation by acting as a cysteine protease. We postulate that apoB cleavage by ER-60 within the ER lumen could facilitate proteasomal degradation of the C-terminus of translocationally-arrested apoB. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cysteine protease antigens cleave CD123, the α subunit of murine IL-3 receptor, on basophils and suppress IL-3-mediated basophil expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikado, Hideto [Atopy (Allergy) Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko [Laboratory of Proteomics and Biomolecular Science, BioMedical Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko [Atopy (Allergy) Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Takai, Toshiro, E-mail: t-takai@juntendo.ac.jp [Atopy (Allergy) Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Th2 type immune responses are essential for protective immunity against parasites and play crucial roles in allergic disorders. Helminth parasites secrete a variety of proteases for their infectious cycles including for host entry, tissue migration, and suppression of host immune effector cell function. Furthermore, a number of pathogen-derived antigens, as well as allergens such as papain, belong to the family of cysteine proteases. Although the link between protease activity and Th2 type immunity is well documented, the mechanisms by which proteases regulate host immune responses are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the cysteine proteases papain and bromelain selectively cleave the α subunit of the IL-3 receptor (IL-3Rα/CD123) on the surface of murine basophils. The decrease in CD123 expression on the cell surface, and the degradation of the extracellular domain of recombinant CD123 were dependent on the protease activity of papain and bromelain. Pre-treatment of murine basophils with papain resulted in inhibition of IL-3-IL-3R signaling and suppressed IL-3- but not thymic stromal lymphopoietin-induced expansion of basophils in vitro. Our unexpected findings illuminate a novel mechanism for the regulation of basophil functions by protease antigens. Because IL-3 plays pivotal roles in the activation and proliferation of basophils and in protective immunity against helminth parasites, pathogen-derived proteases might contribute to the pathogenesis of infections by regulating IL-3-mediated functions in basophils. - Highlights: • We identified the murine IL3R as a novel target of papain-family cysteine proteases. • Papain-family cysteine proteases cleaved IL3Rα/CD123 on murine basophils. • Papain suppressed IL3- but not TSLP-induced expansion of murine basophils. • The inactivation of IL3R might be a strategy for pathogens to suppress host immunity.

  18. A role in immunity for Arabidopsis cysteine protease RD21, the ortholog of the tomato immune protease C14.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Shindo

    Full Text Available Secreted papain-like Cys proteases are important players in plant immunity. We previously reported that the C14 protease of tomato is targeted by cystatin-like EPIC proteins that are secreted by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans (Pinf during infection. C14 has been under diversifying selection in wild potato species coevolving with Pinf and reduced C14 levels result in enhanced susceptibility for Pinf. Here, we investigated the role C14-EPIC-like interactions in the natural pathosystem of Arabidopsis with the oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa. In contrast to the Pinf-solanaceae pathosystem, the C14 orthologous protease of Arabidopsis, RD21, does not evolve under diversifying selection in Arabidopsis, and rd21 null mutants do not show phenotypes upon compatible and incompatible Hpa interactions, despite the evident lack of a major leaf protease. Hpa isolates express highly conserved EPIC-like proteins during infections, but it is unknown if these HpaEPICs can inhibit RD21 and one of these HpaEPICs even lacks the canonical cystatin motifs. The rd21 mutants are unaffected in compatible and incompatible interactions with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, but are significantly more susceptible for the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, demonstrating that RD21 provides immunity to a necrotrophic pathogen.

  19. Cysteine protease inhibitors effectively reduce in vivo levels of brain beta-amyloid related to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Vivian; Kindy, Mark; Hook, Gregory

    2007-02-01

    Abnormal accumulation of neurotoxic beta-amyloid peptides (Abeta) in brain represents a key factor in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Identification of small molecules that effectively reduce brain levels of Abeta is important for development of Abeta-lowering agents for AD. In this study, we demonstrate that in vivo Abeta levels in brain are significantly reduced by the cysteine protease inhibitor E64d and the related CA074Me inhibitor, which inhibits cathepsin B. Direct infusion of these inhibitors into brains of guinea pigs resulted in reduced levels of Abeta by 50-70% after 30 days of treatment. Substantial decreases in Abeta also occurred after only 7 days of inhibitor infusion, with a reduction in both Abeta40 and Abeta42 peptide forms. A prominent decrease in Abeta peptides was observed in brain synaptosomal nerve terminal preparations after CA074Me treatment. Analyses of APP-derived proteolytic fragments showed that CA074Me reduced brain levels of the CTFbeta fragment, and increased amounts of the sAPPalpha fragment. These results suggest that CA074Me inhibits Abeta production by modulating APP processing. Animals appeared healthy after treatment with these inhibitors. These results, showing highly effective in vivo decreases in brain Abeta levels by these cysteine protease inhibitors, indicate the feasibility of using related compounds for lowering Abeta in AD.

  20. Isolation and characterization of a gene encoding a polyethylene glycol-induced cysteine protease in common wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Qing-Wei; Wang, Cai-Xiang; Li, Xu-Yan; Guo, Zhi-Ai; Jing, Rui-Lian; Zhao, Jun; Chang, Xiao-Ping

    2010-09-01

    Plant cysteine protease (CP) genes are induced by abiotic stresses such as drought, yet their functions remain largely unknown. We isolated the full-length cDNA encoding a Triticum aestivum CP gene, designated TaCP, from wheat by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. Sequence analysis revealed that TaCP contains an open reading frame encoding a protein of 362 amino acids, which is 96% identical to barley cysteine protease HvSF42. The TaCP transcript level in wheat seedlings was upregulated during polyethylene glycol (PEG) stress, with a peak appearing around 12 h after treatment. TaCP expression level increased rapidly with NaCl treatment at 48 h. TaCP responded strongly to low temperature (4 degree C) treatment from 1 h post-treatment and reached a peak of about 40-fold at 72 h. However, it showed only a very slight response to abscisic acid (ABA). More than one copy of TaCP was present in each of the three genomes of hexaploid wheat and its diploid donors. TaCP fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP) was located in the plasma membrane of onion epidermis cells. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing TaCP showed stronger drought tolerance and higher CP activity under water-stressed conditions than wild-type Arabidopsis plants. The results suggest that TaCP plays a role in tolerance to water deficit.

  1. Expression of a barley cystatin gene in maize enhances resistance against phytophagous mites by altering their cysteine-proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Laura; Martinez, Manuel; Ramessar, Koreen; Cambra, Inés; Castañera, Pedro; Ortego, Felix; Díaz, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Phytocystatins are inhibitors of cysteine-proteases from plants putatively involved in plant defence based on their capability of inhibit heterologous enzymes. We have previously characterised the whole cystatin gene family members from barley (HvCPI-1 to HvCPI-13). The aim of this study was to assess the effects of barley cystatins on two phytophagous spider mites, Tetranychus urticae and Brevipalpus chilensis. The determination of proteolytic activity profile in both mite species showed the presence of the cysteine-proteases, putative targets of cystatins, among other enzymatic activities. All barley cystatins, except HvCPI-1 and HvCPI-7, inhibited in vitro mite cathepsin L- and/or cathepsin B-like activities, HvCPI-6 being the strongest inhibitor for both mite species. Transgenic maize plants expressing HvCPI-6 protein were generated and the functional integrity of the cystatin transgene was confirmed by in vitro inhibitory effect observed against T. urticae and B. chilensis protein extracts. Feeding experiments impaired on transgenic lines performed with T. urticae impaired mite development and reproductive performance. Besides, a significant reduction of cathepsin L-like and/or cathepsin B-like activities was observed when the spider mite fed on maize plants expressing HvCPI-6 cystatin. These findings reveal the potential of barley cystatins as acaricide proteins to protect plants against two important mite pests.

  2. The majority of 9,729 group A streptococcus strains causing disease secrete SpeB cysteine protease: pathogenesis implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Randall J; Raghuram, Anjali; Cantu, Concepcion; Hartman, Meredith H; Jimenez, Francisco E; Lee, Susan; Ngo, Ashley; Rice, Kelsey A; Saddington, Deborah; Spillman, Hannaka; Valson, Chandni; Flores, Anthony R; Beres, Stephen B; Long, S Wesley; Nasser, Waleed; Musser, James M

    2015-12-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS), the causative agent of pharyngitis and necrotizing fasciitis, secretes the potent cysteine protease SpeB. Several lines of evidence suggest that SpeB is an important virulence factor. SpeB is expressed in human infections, protects mice from lethal challenge when used as a vaccine, and contributes significantly to tissue destruction and dissemination in animal models. However, recent descriptions of mutations in genes implicated in SpeB production have led to the idea that GAS may be under selective pressure to decrease secreted SpeB protease activity during infection. Thus, two divergent hypotheses have been proposed. One postulates that SpeB is a key contributor to pathogenesis; the other, that GAS is under selection to decrease SpeB during infection. In order to distinguish between these alternative hypotheses, we performed casein hydrolysis assays to measure the SpeB protease activity secreted by 6,775 GAS strains recovered from infected humans. The results demonstrated that 84.3% of the strains have a wild-type SpeB protease phenotype. The availability of whole-genome sequence data allowed us to determine the relative frequencies of mutations in genes implicated in SpeB production. The most abundantly mutated genes were direct transcription regulators. We also sequenced the genomes of 2,954 GAS isolates recovered from nonhuman primates with experimental necrotizing fasciitis. No mutations that would result in a SpeB-deficient phenotype were identified. Taken together, these data unambiguously demonstrate that the great majority of GAS strains recovered from infected humans secrete wild-type levels of SpeB protease activity. Our data confirm the important role of SpeB in GAS pathogenesis and help end a long-standing controversy. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Purification and biochemical characterization of a novel thermostable serine alkaline protease from Aeribacillus pallidus C10: a potential additive for detergents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Vildan; Baltaci, Mustafa Ozkan; Ozgencli, Ilknur; Sisecioglu, Melda; Adiguzel, Ahmet; Adiguzel, Gulsah

    2017-12-01

    An extracellular thermostable alkaline serine protease enzyme from Aeribacillus pallidus C10 (GenBank No: KC333049), was purified 4.85 and 17. 32-fold with a yield of 26.9 and 19.56%, respectively, through DE52 anion exchange and Probond affinity chromatography. The molecular mass of the enzyme was determined through sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), with approximately 38.35 kDa. The enzyme exhibited optimum activity at pH 9 and at temperature 60 °C. It was determined that the enzyme had remained stable at the range of pH 7.0-10.0, and that it had preserved more than 80% of its activity at a broad temperature range (20-80 °C). The enzyme activity was found to retain more than 70% and 55% in the presence of organic solvents and commercial detergents, respectively. In addition, it was observed that the enzyme activity had increased in the presence of 5% SDS. KM and Vmax values were calculated as 0.197 mg/mL and 7.29 μmol.mL-1.min-1, respectively.

  4. Cystatins - Extra- and intracellular cysteine protease inhibitors: High-level secretion and uptake of cystatin C in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, Hanna; Bjarnadottir, Maria; Vogel, Lotte

    2010-01-01

    Cystatins are present in mammals, birds, fish, insects, plants, fungi and protozoa and constitute a large protein family, with most members sharing a cysteine protease inhibitory function. In humans 12 functional cystatins exist, forming three groups based on molecular organisation and distribution...... signal peptides) for cellular export following translation. Results indicating existence of systems for significant internalisation of type 2 cystatins from the extracellular to intracellular compartments are reviewed. Data showing that human neuroblastoma cell lines generally secrete high levels......, but also contain high amounts of cystatin C are presented. Culturing of these cells in medium containing cystatin C at concentrations found in body fluids resulted in increased intracellular cystatin C, as a result of an uptake process. At immunofluorescence cytochemistry a pronounced vesicular cystatin C...

  5. Modulation of endogenous Cysteine Protease Inhibitor (ICP) 1 expression in Entamoeba histolytica affects amoebic adhesion to Extracellular Matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Ah; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Min, Arim; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2015-02-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an enteric tissue-invading protozoan parasite that causes amoebic colitis and occasionally liver abscess in humans. During tissue invasion, amoebic adhesion to host components is an important event for host cell death leading to successful invasion and infection. Among amoebic virulence factors, Gal/GalNAc lectin is known to be major adhesion factor to host cells. In this study, we investigated the role of amoebic secreted CP (Cysteine Proteases) in amoebic adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) protein using CP inhibitor and E. histolytica strains in which the endogenous inhibitor of cysteine protease (ICP) 1 gene was overexpressed (ICP1(+)) or repressed by antisense small RNA-mediated gene silencing (ICP1(-)). We found that pretreatment of wild-type amoebae with CP inhibitor E64, or thiol-group modifiers such as diamide and N-Ethylmaleimide resulted in a significant decrease in adhesion to laminin and collagen ECM proteins. Furthermore, ICP1(+) strain, with a reduction of secreted CP activity, exhibited reduced ability by 40% to adhere to laminin. In contrast, ICP1(-) strain, with a 1.9-fold increase of secreted CP activity, showed a two-fold increase in amoebic adherence to laminin compared to the control strain. In addition, total amount of secreted CP5 was decreased in ICP1(+) amoeba. Conversely, total amount of secreted CP1 and mature-form CP5 were increased in ICP1(-) amoeba. We also found that ICP1 was secreted into extracellular milieu. These results suggest that secreted CP activity by E. histolytica may be an important factor affecting adhesion to host proteins, and regulation of CP secretion by ICP plays a major role in pathogenesis. This study provides insight into the CP-mediated tissue pathogenesis in amoeba-invaded lesions during human amoebiasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chalcones isolated from Angelica keiskei inhibit cysteine proteases of SARS-CoV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Young; Ko, Jin-A; Kim, Dae Wook; Kim, Young Min; Kwon, Hyung-Jun; Jeong, Hyung Jae; Kim, Cha Young; Park, Ki Hun; Lee, Woo Song; Ryu, Young Bae

    2016-01-01

    Two viral proteases of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), a chymotrypsin-like protease (3CL(pro)) and a papain-like protease (PL(pro)) are attractive targets for the development of anti-SARS drugs. In this study, nine alkylated chalcones (1-9) and four coumarins (10-13) were isolated from Angelica keiskei, and the inhibitory activities of these constituents against SARS-CoV proteases (3CL(pro) and PL(pro)) were determined (cell-free/based). Of the isolated alkylated chalcones, chalcone 6, containing the perhydroxyl group, exhibited the most potent 3CL(pro) and PL(pro) inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 11.4 and 1.2 µM. Our detailed protein-inhibitor mechanistic analysis of these species indicated that the chalcones exhibited competitive inhibition characteristics to the SARS-CoV 3CL(pro), whereas noncompetitive inhibition was observed with the SARS-CoV PL(pro).

  7. Cysteine protease 30 (CP30) contributes to adhesion and cytopathogenicity in feline Tritrichomonas foetus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, Emily N. [Univ. of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine, Knoxville, TN (United States); Giannone, Richard [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kania, Stephen A. [The Univ. of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine, Knoxville, TN (United States); Tolbert, M. Katherine [Univ. of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Tritrichomonas foetus (T. foetus) is a flagellated protozoan parasite that is recognized as a significant cause of diarrhea in domestic cats with a prevalence rate as high as 30%. No drugs have been shown to consistently eliminate T. foetus infection in all cats. Cysteine proteases (CPs) have been identified as mediators of T. foetus-induced adhesion-dependent cytotoxicity to the intestinal epithelium. These CPs represent novel targets for the treatment of feline trichomonosis. However, cats also produce CPs that are part of life-critical systems. Thus, parasitic CPs need to be selectively targeted to reduce the potential for host toxicity. Previous studies have demonstrated the importance of a specific CP, CP30, in mediating bovine and human trichomonad cytopathogenicity. This CP has also recently been identified in feline T. foetus, although the function of this protease in the feline genotype remains unknown. Furthermore, the study objectives were to characterize the presence of CP30 in feline T. foetus isolates and to evaluate the effect of targeted inhibition of CP30 on feline T. foetus-induced adhesion dependent cytotoxicity.

  8. Cathepsin B-like cysteine proteases and Caenorhabditis elegans homologues dominate gene products expressed in adult Haemonchus contortus intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmer, D P; Roth, J; Myler, P J

    2001-09-03

    Proteins expressed by nematode intestinal cells are potential targets for parasite control by immune or chemical based strategies. To expand our knowledge on nematode intestinal proteins, expressed sequence tags were generated for 131 cDNA clones from the intestine of adult female Haemonchus contortus. An estimated 55 distinct protein genes or gene families were identified. Predicted proteins represented diverse functions. Several predicted polypeptides were related to H. contortus proteins implicated in inducing protective immunity against challenge infections of this parasite. The dominant intestinal transcripts were represented by cathepsin B-like cysteine protease genes (cbl) (17% of protein coding expressed sequence tags (ESTs) analyzed). An estimated 11 previously undescribed cbl genes were identified, doubling the recognized members of this gene family. Multiple C-type lectin sequences were identified. Other notable sequences included a predicted Y-box binding protein, serine/threonine kinases and a cyclin E-like sequence. Predicted protein homologues were found in Caenorhabditis elegans for all but one H. contortus sequence (99%), while fewer homologues from other parasitic nematodes were found. Many of the proteases, lipase and C-type lectin homologues in C. elegans had apparent signal peptides, suggesting that they are secreted. Several gene products had no obvious similarity outside the phylum Nematoda. The ESTs identified intestinal genes with potential application to immune control, understanding of basic intestinal regulatory processes and refinement of nematode genomic resources.

  9. Identification, Characterization and Down-Regulation of Cysteine Protease Genes in Tobacco for Use in Recombinant Protein Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishor Duwadi

    Full Text Available Plants are an attractive host system for pharmaceutical protein production. Many therapeutic proteins have been produced and scaled up in plants at a low cost compared to the conventional microbial and animal-based systems. The main technical challenge during this process is to produce sufficient levels of recombinant proteins in plants. Low yield is generally caused by proteolytic degradation during expression and downstream processing of recombinant proteins. The yield of human therapeutic interleukin (IL-10 produced in transgenic tobacco leaves was found to be below the critical level, and may be due to degradation by tobacco proteases. Here, we identified a total of 60 putative cysteine protease genes (CysP in tobacco. Based on their predicted expression in leaf tissue, 10 candidate CysPs (CysP1-CysP10 were selected for further characterization. The effect of CysP gene silencing on IL-10 accumulation was examined in tobacco. It was found that the recombinant protein yield in tobacco could be increased by silencing CysP6. Transient expression of CysP6 silencing construct also showed an increase in IL-10 accumulation in comparison to the control. Moreover, CysP6 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, suggesting that ER may be the site of IL-10 degradation. Overall results suggest that CysP6 is important in determining the yield of recombinant IL-10 in tobacco leaves.

  10. Molecular characterization of hepatitis E virus ORF1 gene supports a papain-like cysteine protease (PCP)-domain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvez, Mohammad Khalid

    2013-12-26

    Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) ORF1 encodes the nonstructural polyprotein wherein a role of PCP-domain in ORF1 proteolysis and/or RNA replication still remains contested. A series of ORF1 mutants of HEV-SAR55 replicon were constructed and tested for viability in S10-3 cells. Six of PCP-'cysteine' (C457A, C459A, C471A, C472A, C481A and C483A) and three 'histidine' (H443L, H497L and H590L) mutants were lethal. Further, a highly conserved 'glycine-triad' (G815-G816-G817) in downstream X-domain, homologous to rubella virus protease-substrate (G1299-G1300-G1301) was identified where two of X-mutants (G816V and G817V) turned lethal. However, all ORF1 sequential nucleotide-mutants conserving the amino acids were viable, which clearly showed post-translational regulation of HEV replication by PCP- and X-domains. Moreover, while vector-expressed ORF1-fusion polyprotein yielded a ~191 kDa band in vitro, it produced ~78 and ~35 kDa fragments ex vivo. Collectively, the indispensability and functional effects of 'PCP-catalytic' and 'X-substrate' residues on HEV replication strongly supported a viral protease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. SmCL3, a gastrodermal cysteine protease of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Dvorák

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma are platyhelminth parasites that infect 200 million people worldwide. Digestion of nutrients from the host bloodstream is essential for parasite development and reproduction. A network of proteolytic enzymes (proteases facilitates hydrolysis of host hemoglobin and serum proteins.We identified a new cathepsin L termed SmCL3 using PCR strategies based on S. mansoni EST sequence data. An ortholog is present in Schistosoma japonicum. SmCL3 was heterologously expressed as an active enzyme in the yeast, Pichia pastoris. Recombinant SmCL3 has a broad pH activity range against peptidyl substrates and is inhibited by Clan CA protease inhibitors. Consistent with a function in degrading host proteins, SmCL3 hydrolyzes serum albumin and hemoglobin, is localized to the adult gastrodermis, and is expressed mainly in those life stages infecting the mammalian host. The predominant form of SmCL3 in the parasite exists as a zymogen, which is unusual for proteases. This zymogen includes an unusually long prodomain with alpha helical secondary structure motifs. The striking specificity of SmCL3 for amino acids with large aromatic side chains (Trp and Tyr at the P2 substrate position, as determined with positional scanning-synthetic combinatorial library, is consistent with a molecular model that shows a large and deep S2 pocket. A sequence similarity network (SSN view clusters SmCL3 and other cathepsins L in accordance with previous large-scale phylogenetic analyses that identify six super kingdoms.SmCL3 is a gut-associated cathepsin L that may contribute to the network of proteases involved in degrading host blood proteins as nutrients. Furthermore, this enzyme exhibits some unusual sequence and biophysical features that may result in additional functions. The visualization of network inter-relationships among cathepsins L suggests that these enzymes are suitable 'marker sequences' for inclusion in future phylogenetic analyses.

  12. Density functional theory and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study of cysteine protease inhibition by nitrile-based inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Visser, Sam; Quesne, Matthew; Ward, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Cysteine protease enzymes are important for human physiology and catalyze key protein degradation pathways. These enzymes react via a nucleophilic reaction mechanism that involves a cysteine residue and the proton of a proximal histidine. Particularly efficient inhibitors of these enzymes are nitrile-based, however, the details of the catalytic reaction mechanism currently are poorly understood. To gain further insight into the inhibition of these molecules, we have performed a combined density functional theory and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study on the reaction of a nitrile-based inhibitor with the enzyme active site amino acids. We show here that small perturbations to the inhibitor structure can have dramatic effects on the catalysis and inhibition processes. Thus, we investigated a range of inhibitor templates and show that specific structural changes reduce the inhibitory efficiency by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, as the reaction takes place on a polar surface, we find strong differences between the DFT and QM/MM calculated energetics. In particular, the DFT model led to dramatic distortions from the starting structure and the convergence to a structure that would not fit the enzyme active site. In the subsequent QM/MM study we investigated the use of mechanical versus electronic embedding on the kinetics, thermodynamics and geometries along the reaction mechanism. We find minor effects on the kinetics of the reaction but large geometric and thermodynamics differences as a result of inclusion of electronic embedding corrections. The work here highlights the importance of model choice in the investigation of this biochemical reaction mechanism.

  13. Purification and characterization of bleomycin hydrolase, which represents a new family of cysteine proteases, from rat skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, A; Higuchi, D; Yamamoto, T; Nakamura, Y; Masuda, Y; Hirabayashi, T; Nakaya, K

    1996-01-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) hydrolase, which hydrolyzes the carboxyamide bond in the beta-amino-alanine moiety, was purified from newborn rat skin. The enzyme was purified 2,500-fold over the crude extract to apparent homogeneity in five steps in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol: 45-55% ammonium sulfate fractionation, followed by chromatographies on Sephacryl S-200, DEAE-cellulofine, Phe-Superose, and Mono Q ion-exchange. The native enzyme had a molecular mass of 280 kDa according to gel filtration. The subunit molecular mass was estimated as 48 kDa by SDS-PAGE, indicating that the enzyme was comprised of six identical subunits. The amino acid sequence of its NH2-terminus was determined to be acetyl-Met-Asn-Asn-Ala-Gly-Leu-Asn-Ser-Glu-Lys-, which was not found in the amino acid sequence database. The optimum pH of the enzyme was 7.5 with pepleomycin (PLM). The Km and Vmax values were 2.1 mM and 6.8 mu mol center dot mg-1 center dot h-1 for PLM, and 1.8 mM and 7.2 mu mol center dot mg-1 center dot h-1 for BLM-A2, respectively. The enzyme activity was inhibited by iodoacetic acid, N-ethylmaleinimide (NEM), and p-chloromercuribenzoic acid (pCMB) as well as divalent cations such as Cu2+, Cd2+, Hg2+, and Zn2+. It was effectively inhibited by a cysteine protease inhibitor E-64. However, cystatins A and C did not inhibit the activity. BLM hydrolase exhibited broad aminopeptidase substrate specificity towards aminoacyl-beta-naphthylamides such as basic, neutral, and hydrophobic amino acid residues, as well as acidic residues. These results indicated that BLM hydrolase represents a new family of cysteine proteases. Western blotting and immunohistochemical analyses showed that BLM hydrolase is ubiquitous in various rat tissues but at low levels in lung and adult skin tissues, suggesting that this enzyme plays an important role in the metabolism of antibiotics.

  14. Inhibitory effects of bromelain, a cysteine protease derived from pineapple stem (Ananas comosus), on intestinal motility in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrelli, F; Capasso, R; Severino, B; Fiorino, F; Aviello, G; De Rosa, G; Mazzella, M; Romano, B; Capasso, F; Fasolino, I; Izzo, A A

    2011-08-01

    Bromelain (BR) is a cysteine protease with inhibitory effects on intestinal secretion and inflammation. However, its effects on intestinal motility are largely unexplored. Thus, we investigated the effect of this plant-derived compound on intestinal contractility and transit in mice. Contractility in vitro was evaluated by stimulating the mouse isolated ileum, in an organ bath, with acetylcholine, barium chloride, or electrical field stimulation. Motility in vivo was measured by evaluating the distribution of an orally administered fluorescent marker along the small intestine. Transit was also evaluated in pathophysiologic states induced by the pro-inflammatory compound croton oil or by the diabetogenic agent streptozotocin. Bromelain inhibited the contractions induced by different spasmogenic compounds in the mouse ileum with similar potency. The antispasmodic effect was reduced or counteracted by the proteolytic enzyme inhibitor, gabexate (15 × 10(-6)  mol L(-1) ), protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) antagonist, N(1) -3-methylbutyryl-N(4) -6-aminohexanoyl-piperazine (10(-4) mol L(-1) ), phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, neomycin (3 × 10(-3) mol L(-1) ), and phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor, rolipram (10(-6)  mol L(-1) ). In vivo, BR preferentially inhibited motility in pathophysiologic states in a PAR-2-antagonist-sensitive manner. Our data suggest that BR inhibits intestinal motility - preferentially in pathophysiologic conditions - with a mechanism possibly involving membrane PAR-2 and PLC and PDE4 as intracellular signals. Bromelain could be a lead compound for the development of new drugs, able to normalize the intestinal motility in inflammation and diabetes. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Maturation and degradation of beta-galactosidase in the post-Golgi compartment are regulated by cathepsin B and a non-cysteine protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura-Oho, Y; Zhang, S; Callahan, J W; Murata, M; Oshima, A; Suzuki, Y

    1997-12-15

    Lysosomal beta-galactosidase precursor is processed to a mature form and associated with protective protein in lysosomes. In this study we used two cysteine protease proinhibitors, E64-d for cathepsins B, S, H, and L, and CA074Me for cathepsin B. They are converted intracellularly to active forms, E-64c and CA074, respectively. Both active compounds inhibited maturation of the exogenous beta-galactosidase precursor, but E-64c did not inhibit further degradation to an inactive 50-kDa product. We concluded that cathepsin B participated exclusively in maturation of beta-galactosidase, and a non-cysteine protease was involved in further degradation and inactivation of the enzyme molecule.

  16. The structure of the cysteine protease and lectin-like domains of Cwp84, a surface layer-associated protein from Clostridium difficile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, William J. [University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Public Health England, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG (United Kingdom); Kirby, Jonathan M. [Public Health England, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG (United Kingdom); Thiyagarajan, Nethaji [University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Chambers, Christopher J.; Davies, Abigail H. [University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Public Health England, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG (United Kingdom); Roberts, April K.; Shone, Clifford C. [Public Health England, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG (United Kingdom); Acharya, K. Ravi, E-mail: bsskra@bath.ac.uk [University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    The crystal structure of Cwp84, an S-layer protein from Clostridium difficile is presented for the first time. The cathepsin L-like fold of cysteine protease domain, a newly observed ‘lectin-like’ domain and several other features are described. Clostridium difficile is a major problem as an aetiological agent for antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. The mechanism by which the bacterium colonizes the gut during infection is poorly understood, but undoubtedly involves a myriad of components present on the bacterial surface. The mechanism of C. difficile surface-layer (S-layer) biogenesis is also largely unknown but involves the post-translational cleavage of a single polypeptide (surface-layer protein A; SlpA) into low- and high-molecular-weight subunits by Cwp84, a surface-located cysteine protease. Here, the first crystal structure of the surface protein Cwp84 is described at 1.4 Å resolution and the key structural components are identified. The truncated Cwp84 active-site mutant (amino-acid residues 33–497; C116A) exhibits three regions: a cleavable propeptide and a cysteine protease domain which exhibits a cathepsin L-like fold followed by a newly identified putative carbohydrate-binding domain with a bound calcium ion, which is referred to here as a lectin-like domain. This study thus provides the first structural insights into Cwp84 and a strong base to elucidate its role in the C. difficile S-layer maturation mechanism.

  17. Identification and characterization of MOR-CP, a cysteine protease induced by ozone and developmental senescence in maize (Zea mays L.) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rafiq; Zuily-Fodil, Yasmine; Passaquet, Chantal; Bethenod, Olivier; Roche, Romain; Repellin, Anne

    2014-08-01

    Among the different classes of endoproteases, cysteine proteases are consistently associated with senescence, defense signaling pathways and cellular responses to abiotic stresses. The objectives of this work were to study the effects of various concentrations of ozone on gene expression and enzymatic activity for papain-like cysteine proteases (PLCPs), in the leaves of maize plants grown under field conditions. Leaves from ranks 12 and 10 (cob leaf) were harvested regularly over a long-term artificial ozone fumigation experiment (50 d). Tissues were tested for transcriptional and activity changes concerning cysteine proteases, using qRT-PCR for the newly identified ozone-responsive PLCP gene (Mor-CP) and synthetic oligopeptide Boc-Val-Leu-Lys-AMC as a PLCP-specific substrate, respectively. Results showed that developmental senescence induced a significant and progressive rise in CP activity, only in the older leaves 10 and had no effect on Mor-CP gene expression levels. On the other hand, ozone dramatically enhanced Mor-CP mRNA levels and global PLCP enzymatic activity in leaves 12 and 10, particularly toward the end of the treatment. Ozone impact was more pronounced in the older leaves 10. Together, these observations concurred to conclude that ozone stress enhances natural senescence processes, such as those related to proteolysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mutation of Asn-475 in the Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus nsP2 Cysteine Protease Leads to a Self-Inhibited State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Jaimee R; Mickey, Matthew J; Hu, Xin; Marugan, Juan J; Legler, Patricia M

    2017-11-28

    The alphaviral nsP2 cysteine protease of the Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a validated antiviral drug target. Clan CN proteases contain a cysteine protease domain that is intimately packed with an S-adenosyl-l-methionine-dependent RNA methyltransferase (SAM MTase) domain. Within a cleft formed at the interface of these two domains, the peptide substrate is thought to bind. The nucleophilic cysteine can be found within a conserved motif, 475NVCWAK480, which differs from that of papain (22CGSCWAFS29). Mutation of the motif residue, N475, to alanine unexpectedly produced a self-inhibited state in which the N-terminal residues flipped into the substrate-binding cleft. Notably, the N-terminal segment was not hydrolyzed-consistent with a catalytically incompetent state. The N475A mutation resulted in a 70-fold decrease in kcat/Km. A side chain-substrate interaction was predicted by the structure; the S701A mutation led to a 17-fold increase in Km. An Asn at the n-2 position relative to the Cys was also found in the coronaviral papain-like proteases/deubiquitinases (PLpro) of the SARS and MERS viruses, and in several papain-like human ubiquitin specific proteases (USP). The large conformational change in the N475A variant suggests that Asn-475 plays an important role in stabilizing the N-terminal residues and in orienting the carbonyl during nucleophilic attack but does not directly hydrogen bond the oxyanion. The state trapped in crystallo is an unusual result of site-directed mutagenesis but reveals the role of this highly conserved Asn and identifies key substrate-binding contacts that may be exploited by peptide-like inhibitors.

  19. Suppression of the cysteine protease, aleurain, delays floret senescence in Brassica oleracea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, J R; Ryan, D J; Watson, L M; Hedderley, D; Christey, M C; Braun, R H; Coupe, S A

    2005-03-01

    An aleurain-like protein, BoCP5, is up-regulated during harvest-induced senescence in broccoli floret and leaf tissue. BoCP5 is most closely related to an Arabidopsis protein (91%, AAF43041) and has 71% identity to barley aleurain (P05167). The mRNA for this gene accumulates within 6 h after harvest in broccoli florets, and its expression is reduced in tissue that has been held in senescence-delaying treatments (e.g. water, sucrose feeding, controlled atmosphere). The gene is also expressed in leaves during aging-related and harvest-induced senescence. Analysis of protein bands that cross-react with antibodies raised to the bacterial BoCP5 fusion protein, revealed prominent immunoreactive bands at ca. 26, 28, 31, and 38 kD in floret tissue. The 31 kD band was absent in protein extracts from leaf tissue. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was used to produce transgenic broccoli plants with down-regulated BoCP5. A reduction in the postharvest expression of BoCP5 in floret tissue was achieved for four transgenic lines in the current study. In three of these lines postharvest floret senescence (yellowing) was delayed, and florets contained significantly greater chlorophyll levels during postharvest storage at 20 degrees C than wild-type plants. Line 4 showed the greatest down-regulation of BoCP5, and in this line postharvest protease activity remained at pre-harvest levels, and the yield of soluble proteins extracted from florets after harvest was significantly greater than that of wild-type tissue.

  20. Transgenic soybean plants overexpressing O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase accumulate enhanced levels of cysteine and Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor in seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Seok; Chronis, Demosthenis; Juergens, Matthew; Schroeder, Amy C; Hyun, Seung Won; Jez, Joseph M; Krishnan, Hari B

    2012-01-01

    Soybeans provide an excellent source of protein in animal feed. Soybean protein quality can be enhanced by increasing the concentration of sulfur-containing amino acids. Previous attempts to increase the concentration of sulfur-containing amino acids through the expression of heterologous proteins have met with limited success. Here, we report a successful strategy to increase the cysteine content of soybean seed through the overexpression of a key sulfur assimilatory enzyme. We have generated several transgenic soybean plants that overexpress a cytosolic isoform of O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS). These transgenic soybean plants exhibit a four- to tenfold increase in OASS activity when compared with non-transformed wild-type. The OASS activity in the transgenic soybeans was significantly higher at all the stages of seed development. Unlike the non-transformed soybean plants, there was no marked decrease in the OASS activity even at later stages of seed development. Overexpression of cytosolic OASS resulted in a 58-74% increase in protein-bound cysteine levels compared with non-transformed wild-type soybean seeds. A 22-32% increase in the free cysteine levels was also observed in transgenic soybeans overexpressing OASS. Furthermore, these transgenic soybean plants showed a marked increase in the accumulation of Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor, a cysteine-rich protein. The overall increase in soybean total cysteine content (both free and protein-bound) satisfies the recommended levels required for the optimal growth of monogastric animals.

  1. The importance of pH in regulating the function of the Fasciola hepatica cathepsin L1 cysteine protease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Lowther

    Full Text Available The helminth parasite Fasciola hepatica secretes cathepsin L cysteine proteases to invade its host, migrate through tissues and digest haemoglobin, its main source of amino acids. Here we investigated the importance of pH in regulating the activity and functions of the major cathepsin L protease FheCL1. The slightly acidic pH of the parasite gut facilitates the auto-catalytic activation of FheCL1 from its inactive proFheCL1 zymogen; this process was approximately 40-fold faster at pH 4.5 than at pH 7.0. Active mature FheCL1 is very stable at acidic and neutral conditions (the enzyme retained approximately 45% activity when incubated at 37 degrees C and pH 4.5 for 10 days and displayed a broad pH range for activity peptide substrates and the protein ovalbumin, peaking between pH 5.5 and pH 7.0. This pH profile likely reflects the need for FheCL1 to function both in the parasite gut and in the host tissues. FheCL1, however, could not cleave its natural substrate Hb in the pH range pH 5.5 and pH 7.0; digestion occurred only at pH

  2. The Tr-cp 14 cysteine protease in white clover (Trifolium repens) is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and is associated with programmed cell death during development of tracheary elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulisch, Maria; Asp, Torben; Krupinska, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine proteases are known to be associated with programmed cell death, developmental senescence and some types of pathogen and stress-induced responses. In the present study, we have characterized the cysteine protease Tr-cp 14 in white clover (Trifolium repens). Tr-cp 14 belongs to the C1A....... Immunogold studies suggest that the protease prior to the burst of the vacuole was associated to the ER cisternae. After disruption of the tonoplast, it was found in the cytoplasm, and, in later stages, associated with disintegrating material dispersed throughout the cell....

  3. A naturally occurring plant cysteine protease possesses remarkable toxicity against insect pests and synergizes Bacillus thuringiensis toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinidi Mohan

    Full Text Available When caterpillars feed on maize (Zea maize L. lines with native resistance to several Lepidopteran pests, a defensive cysteine protease, Mir1-CP, rapidly accumulates at the wound site. Mir1-CP has been shown to inhibit caterpillar growth in vivo by attacking and permeabilizing the insect's peritrophic matrix (PM, a structure that surrounds the food bolus, assists in digestion and protects the midgut from microbes and toxins. PM permeabilization weakens the caterpillar defenses by facilitating the movement of other insecticidal proteins in the diet to the midgut microvilli and thereby enhancing their toxicity. To directly determine the toxicity of Mir1-CP, the purified recombinant enzyme was directly tested against four economically significant Lepidopteran pests in bioassays. Mir1-CP LC(50 values were 1.8, 3.6, 0.6, and 8.0 ppm for corn earworm, tobacco budworm, fall armyworm and southwestern corn borer, respectively. These values were the same order of magnitude as those determined for the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Bt-CryIIA. In addition to being directly toxic to the larvae, 60 ppb Mir1-CP synergized sublethal concentrations of Bt-CryIIA in all four species. Permeabilization of the PM by Mir1-CP probably provides ready access to Bt-binding sites on the midgut microvilli and increases its activity. Consequently, Mir1-CP could be used for controlling caterpillar pests in maize using non-transgenic approaches and potentially could be used in other crops either singly or in combination with Bt-toxins.

  4. Synthetic siRNAs effectively target cystein protease 12 and α-actinin transcripts in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravaee, Roya; Ebadi, Parimah; Hatam, Gholamreza; Vafafar, Arghavan; Ghahramani Seno, Mohammad Mahdi

    2015-10-01

    The flagellated protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis (T. vaginalis) causes trichomoniasis, a reproductive tract infection, in humans. Trichomoniasis is the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. In addition to direct consequences such as infertility and abortion, there are indications that trichomoniasis favours development of prostate cancer and it has also been associated with increased risk of spreading human immunodeficiency virus and papillomavirus infections. Reports from around the world show that the rate of drug resistance in T. vaginalis is increasing, and therefore new therapeutic approaches have to be developed. Studying molecular biology of T. vaginalis will be quite helpful in identifying new drugable targets. RNAi is a powerful technique which allows biologist to specifically target gene products (i.e. mRNA) helping them in unravelling gene functions and biology of systems. However, due to lack of some parts of the required intrinsic RNAi machinery, the RNAi system is not functional in all orders of life. Here, by using synthetic siRNAs targeting two genes, i.e. α-actinin and cystein protease 12 (cp12), we demonstrate T. vaginalis cells are amenable to RNAi experiments conducted by extrinsic siRNAs. Electroporation of siRNAs targeting α-actinin or cp12 into T. vaginalis cells resulted in, respectively, 48-67% and 33-72% downregulation of the cognate transcripts compared to the T. vaginalis cells received siRNAs targeting GL2 luciferase as a control. This finding is helpful in that it demonstrates the potential of using extrinsically induced RNAi in studies on molecular biology of T. vaginalis such as those aiming at identifying new drug targets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 'Pergularain e I'--a plant cysteine protease with thrombin-like activity from Pergularia extensa latex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaprasad, Holenarasipura V; Rajaiah, Rajesh; Frey, Brigitte M; Frey, Felix J; Vishwanath, Bannikuppe S

    2010-03-01

    Pergularain e I, a cysteine protease with thrombin-like activity, was purified by ion exchange chromatography from the latex of Pergularia extensa. Its homogeneity was characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), native PAGE and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The molecular mass of pergularain e I by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) was found to be 23.356 kDa and the N-terminal sequence is L-P-H-D-V-E. Pergularain e I is a glycoprotein containing approximately 20% of carbohydrate. Pergularain e I constituted 6.7% of the total protein with a specific activity of 9.5 units/mg/min with a 2.11-fold increased purity. Proteolytic activity of the pergularain e I was completely inhibited by iodoacetic acid (IAA). Pergularain e I exhibited procoagulant activity with citrated plasma and fibrinogen similar to thrombin. Pergularain e I increases the absorbance of fibrinogen solution in concentration-dependent and time-dependent manner. At 10 microg concentration, an absorbance of 0.48 was reached within 10 min of incubation time. Similar absorbance was observed when 0.2 NIH units of thrombin were used. Thrombin-like activity of pergularain e I is because of the selective hydrolysis of A alpha and B beta chains of fibrinogen and gamma-chain was observed to be insusceptible to hydrolysis. Molecular masses of the two peptide fragments released from fibrinogen due to the hydrolysis by pergularain e I at 5-min incubation time were found to be 1537.21 and 1553.29 and were in close agreement with the molecular masses of 16 amino acid sequence of fibrinopeptide A and 14 amino acid sequence of fibrinopeptide B, respectively. Prolonged fibrinogen-pergularain e I incubation releases additional peptides and their sequence comparison of molecular masses of the released peptides suggested that pergularain e I hydrolyzes specifically after arginine residues. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd

  6. Toward the discovery of inhibitors of babesipain-1, a Babesia bigemina cysteine protease: in vitro evaluation, homology modeling and molecular docking studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Bianca; Antunes, Sandra; Gonçalves, Lídia M.; Domingos, Ana; Gomes, José R. B.; Gomes, Paula; Teixeira, Cátia

    2013-09-01

    Babesia bigemina is a protozoan parasite that causes babesiosis, a disease with a world-wide distribution in mammals, principally affecting cattle and man. The unveiling of the genome of B. bigemina is a project in active progress that has already revealed a number of new targets with potential interest for the design of anti-babesiosis drugs. In this context, babesipain-1 has been identified as a proteolytically active enzyme whose three-dimensional structure has not been resolved yet, but which is known to be inhibited by cysteine proteases inhibitors such as E64, ALLN, leupeptin, and vinyl sulfones. In this work, we introduce (1) a homology model of babesipain-1; (2) a comparison between babesipain-1 and falcipain-2, a cysteine protease of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum; (3) in vitro data for babesipain-1 inhibition by HEDICINs and HECINs, previously reported as modest inhibitors of falcipain-2; and (4) the docked binding conformations of HEDICINs and HECINs in the model of babesipain-1. HEDICINs presented similar preferred binding conformations for both babesipain-1 and falcipain-2. However, in vitro bioassay shows that HEDICINs and HECINs are better inhibitors of babesipain-1 than of falcipain-2, which could be explained by observed differences between the active pockets of these proteins in silico. Results presented herein provide a valuable contribution to future computer-aided molecular design of new babesipain-1 inhibitors.

  7. Procerain B, a cysteine protease from Calotropis procera, requires N-terminus pro-region for activity: cDNA cloning and expression with pro-sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandana, Vidhyadhar; Singh, Sushant; Singh, Abhay Narayan; Dubey, Vikash Kumar

    2014-11-01

    We have previously reported isolation and characterization of a novel plant cysteine protease, Procerain B, from the latex of Calotropis procera. Our initial attempts for active recombinant Procerain B in Escherichiacoli expression system was not successful. The reason for inactive enzyme production was attributed to the absence of 5' pro-region in the Procerain B cDNA that may be involved in proper folding and production of mature active protein. The current manuscript reports the cloning of full length Procerain B for the production of the active protein. The complete cDNA sequence of Procerain B with pro-region sequence was obtained by using RNA ligase mediated rapid amplification of 5' cDNA ends (RLM-RACE). The N-terminus pro-sequence region consists of 127 amino acids and characterized as the member of inhibitory I29 family. Further the three dimensional structure of full length Procerain B was modelled by homology modelling using X-ray crystal structure of procaricain (PDB ID: 1PCI). N-terminus pro-sequence of full length Procerain B runs along the active site cleft. Full length Procerain B was expressed in prokaryotic system and activated in vitro at pH 4.0. This is the first study reporting the production of active recombinant cysteine protease from C.procera. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. TcCYPR04, a Cacao Papain-Like Cysteine-Protease Detected in Senescent and Necrotic Tissues Interacts with a Cystatin TcCYS4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Thyago Hermylly Santana; Freitas, Ana Camila Oliveira; Andrade, Bruno Silva; Sousa, Aurizangela Oliveira de; Santiago, André da Silva; Koop, Daniela Martins; Gramacho, Karina Peres; Alvim, Fátima Cerqueira; Micheli, Fabienne; Pirovani, Carlos Priminho

    2015-01-01

    The interaction amongst papain-like cysteine-proteases (PLCP) and their substrates and inhibitors, such as cystatins, can be perceived as part of the molecular battlefield in plant-pathogen interaction. In cacao, four cystatins were identified and characterized by our group. We identified 448 proteases in cacao genome, whereof 134 were cysteine-proteases. We expressed in Escherichia coli a PLCP from cacao, named TcCYSPR04. Immunoblottings with anti-TcCYSPR04 exhibited protein increases during leaf development. Additional isoforms of TcCYSPR04 appeared in senescent leaves and cacao tissues infected by Moniliophthora perniciosa during the transition from the biotrophic to the saprophytic phase. TcCYSPR04 was induced in the apoplastic fluid of Catongo and TSH1188 cacao genotypes, susceptible and resistant to M. perniciosa, respectively, but greater intensity and additional isoforms were observed in TSH1188. The fungal protein MpNEP induced PLCP isoform expression in tobacco leaves, according to the cross reaction with anti-TcCYSPR04. Several protein isoforms were detected at 72 hours after treatment with MpNEP. We captured an active PLCP from cacao tissues, using a recombinant cacao cystatin immobilized in CNBr-Sepharose. Mass spectrometry showed that this protein corresponds to TcCYSPR04. A homology modeling was obtained for both proteins. In order to become active, TcCYSPR04 needs to lose its inhibitory domain. Molecular docking showed the physical-chemical complementarities of the interaction between the cacao enzyme and its inhibitor. We propose that TcCYSPR04 and its interactions with cacao cystatins are involved in the senescence and necrosis events related to witches' broom symptoms. This molecular interaction may be the target for future interventions to control witches' broom disease.

  9. TcCYPR04, a Cacao Papain-Like Cysteine-Protease Detected in Senescent and Necrotic Tissues Interacts with a Cystatin TcCYS4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thyago Hermylly Santana Cardoso

    Full Text Available The interaction amongst papain-like cysteine-proteases (PLCP and their substrates and inhibitors, such as cystatins, can be perceived as part of the molecular battlefield in plant-pathogen interaction. In cacao, four cystatins were identified and characterized by our group. We identified 448 proteases in cacao genome, whereof 134 were cysteine-proteases. We expressed in Escherichia coli a PLCP from cacao, named TcCYSPR04. Immunoblottings with anti-TcCYSPR04 exhibited protein increases during leaf development. Additional isoforms of TcCYSPR04 appeared in senescent leaves and cacao tissues infected by Moniliophthora perniciosa during the transition from the biotrophic to the saprophytic phase. TcCYSPR04 was induced in the apoplastic fluid of Catongo and TSH1188 cacao genotypes, susceptible and resistant to M. perniciosa, respectively, but greater intensity and additional isoforms were observed in TSH1188. The fungal protein MpNEP induced PLCP isoform expression in tobacco leaves, according to the cross reaction with anti-TcCYSPR04. Several protein isoforms were detected at 72 hours after treatment with MpNEP. We captured an active PLCP from cacao tissues, using a recombinant cacao cystatin immobilized in CNBr-Sepharose. Mass spectrometry showed that this protein corresponds to TcCYSPR04. A homology modeling was obtained for both proteins. In order to become active, TcCYSPR04 needs to lose its inhibitory domain. Molecular docking showed the physical-chemical complementarities of the interaction between the cacao enzyme and its inhibitor. We propose that TcCYSPR04 and its interactions with cacao cystatins are involved in the senescence and necrosis events related to witches' broom symptoms. This molecular interaction may be the target for future interventions to control witches' broom disease.

  10. Biochemical characterization, cDNA cloning, and molecular modeling of araujiain aII, a papain-like cysteine protease from Araujia angustifolia latex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obregón, Walter D; Lufrano, Daniela; Liggieri, Constanza S; Trejo, Sebastián A; Vairo-Cavalli, Sandra E; Avilés, Francesc X; Priolo, Nora S

    2011-08-01

    Araujiain aII, the protease with highest specific activity purified from latex of Araujia angustifolia (Apocynaceae), shows optimum proteolytic activity at alkaline pH, and it is completely inhibited by the irreversible inhibitor of cysteine proteases trans-epoxysucciny-L: -leucyl-amido(4-guanidino) butane. It exhibits esterolytic activity on several N-α-Cbz-amino acid p-nitrophenyl esters with a preference for Gln, Ala, and Gly derivatives. Kinetic enzymatic assays were performed with the thiol proteinase substrate p-Glu-Phe-Leu-p-nitroanilide (K (m) = 0.18 ± 0.03 mM, k (cat) = 1.078 ± 0.055 s(-1), k (cat)/K (m) = 5.99 ± 0.57 s(-1) mM(-l)). The enzyme has a pI value above 9.3 and a molecular mass of 23.528 kDa determined by mass spectrometry. cDNA of the peptidase was obtained by reverse transcription-PCR starting from total RNA isolated from latex. The deduced amino acid sequence was confirmed by peptide mass fingerprinting analysis. The N-terminus of the mature protein was determined by automated sequencing using Edman's degradation and compared with the sequence deduced from cDNA. The full araujiain aII sequence was thus obtained with a total of 213 amino acid residues. The peptidase, as well as other Apocynaceae latex peptidases, is a member of the subfamily C1A of cysteine proteases. The enzyme belongs to the alpha + beta class of proteins, with two disulfide bridges (Cys22-Cys63 and Cys56-Cys95) in the alpha domain, and another one (Cys150-Cys201) in the beta domain, as was suggested by molecular modeling.

  11. A protein extract and a cysteine protease inhibitor enriched fraction from Jatropha curcas seed cake have in vitro anti-Toxoplasma gondii activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, A M S; Carvalho, L P; Melo, E J T; Costa, H P S; Vasconcelos, I M; Oliveira, J T A

    2015-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a parasite of great medical and veterinary importance that has worldwide distribution and causes toxoplasmosis. There are few treatments available for toxoplasmosis and the search for plant extracts and compounds with anti-Toxoplasma activity is of utmost importance for the discovery of new active drugs. The objective of this study was to investigate the action of a protein extract and a protease inhibitor enriched fraction from J. curcas seed cake on developing tachyzoites of T. gondii-infected Vero cells. The protein extract (JcCE) was obtained after solubilization of the J. curcas seed cake with 100 mM sodium borate buffer, pH 10, centrifugation and dialysis of the resulting supernatant with the extracting buffer. JcCE was used for the in vitro assays of anti-Toxoplasma activity at 0.01, 0.1, 0.5, 1.5, 3.0 and 5.0 mg/ml concentration for 24 h. The results showed that JcCE reduced the percentage of infection and the number of intracellular parasites, but had no effect on the morphology of Vero cells up to 3.0 mg/mL. The cysteine protease inhibitor enriched fraction, which was obtained after chromatography of JcCE on Sephadex G-75 and presented a unique protein band following SDS-PAGE, reduced both the number of T. gondii infected cells and intracellular parasites. These results suggest that both JcCE and the cysteine protease inhibitor enriched fraction interfere with the intracellular growth of T. gondii. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. TcCYPR04, a Cacao Papain-Like Cysteine-Protease Detected in Senescent and Necrotic Tissues Interacts with a Cystatin TcCYS4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Thyago Hermylly Santana; Freitas, Ana Camila Oliveira; Andrade, Bruno Silva; de Sousa, Aurizangela Oliveira; Santiago, André da Silva; Koop, Daniela Martins; Gramacho, Karina Peres; Alvim, Fátima Cerqueira; Micheli, Fabienne; Pirovani, Carlos Priminho

    2015-01-01

    The interaction amongst papain-like cysteine-proteases (PLCP) and their substrates and inhibitors, such as cystatins, can be perceived as part of the molecular battlefield in plant-pathogen interaction. In cacao, four cystatins were identified and characterized by our group. We identified 448 proteases in cacao genome, whereof 134 were cysteine-proteases. We expressed in Escherichia coli a PLCP from cacao, named TcCYSPR04. Immunoblottings with anti-TcCYSPR04 exhibited protein increases during leaf development. Additional isoforms of TcCYSPR04 appeared in senescent leaves and cacao tissues infected by Moniliophthora perniciosa during the transition from the biotrophic to the saprophytic phase. TcCYSPR04 was induced in the apoplastic fluid of Catongo and TSH1188 cacao genotypes, susceptible and resistant to M. perniciosa, respectively, but greater intensity and additional isoforms were observed in TSH1188. The fungal protein MpNEP induced PLCP isoform expression in tobacco leaves, according to the cross reaction with anti-TcCYSPR04. Several protein isoforms were detected at 72 hours after treatment with MpNEP. We captured an active PLCP from cacao tissues, using a recombinant cacao cystatin immobilized in CNBr-Sepharose. Mass spectrometry showed that this protein corresponds to TcCYSPR04. A homology modeling was obtained for both proteins. In order to become active, TcCYSPR04 needs to lose its inhibitory domain. Molecular docking showed the physical-chemical complementarities of the interaction between the cacao enzyme and its inhibitor. We propose that TcCYSPR04 and its interactions with cacao cystatins are involved in the senescence and necrosis events related to witches’ broom symptoms. This molecular interaction may be the target for future interventions to control witches' broom disease. PMID:26641247

  13. Comparative assessment of substrates and activity based probes as tools for non-invasive optical imaging of cysteine protease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Galia; Weimer, Robby M; Edgington, Laura E; Adams, Walter; Bogyo, Matthew

    2009-07-28

    Recent advances in the field of non-invasive optical imaging have included the development of contrast agents that report on the activity of enzymatic targets associated with disease pathology. In particular, proteases have proven to be ideal targets for development of optical sensors for cancer. Recently developed contrast agents for protease activity include both small peptides and large polymer-based quenched fluorescent substrates as well as fluorescently labeled activity based probes (ABPs). While substrates produce a fluorescent signal as a result of processing by a protease, ABPs are retained at the site of proteolysis due to formation of a permanent covalent bond with the active site catalytic residue. Both methods have potential advantages and disadvantages yet a careful comparison of substrates and ABPs has not been performed. Here we present the results of a direct comparison of commercially available protease substrates with several recently described fluorescent ABPs in a mouse model of cancer. The results demonstrate that fluorescent ABPs show more rapid and selective uptake into tumors as well as overall brighter signals compared to substrate probes. These data suggest that the lack of signal amplification for an ABP is offset by the increased kinetics of tissue uptake and prolonged retention of the probes once bound to a protease target. Furthermore, fluorescent ABPs can be used as imaging reagents with similar or better results as the commercially available protease substrates.

  14. Comparative assessment of substrates and activity based probes as tools for non-invasive optical imaging of cysteine protease activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galia Blum

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the field of non-invasive optical imaging have included the development of contrast agents that report on the activity of enzymatic targets associated with disease pathology. In particular, proteases have proven to be ideal targets for development of optical sensors for cancer. Recently developed contrast agents for protease activity include both small peptides and large polymer-based quenched fluorescent substrates as well as fluorescently labeled activity based probes (ABPs. While substrates produce a fluorescent signal as a result of processing by a protease, ABPs are retained at the site of proteolysis due to formation of a permanent covalent bond with the active site catalytic residue. Both methods have potential advantages and disadvantages yet a careful comparison of substrates and ABPs has not been performed. Here we present the results of a direct comparison of commercially available protease substrates with several recently described fluorescent ABPs in a mouse model of cancer. The results demonstrate that fluorescent ABPs show more rapid and selective uptake into tumors as well as overall brighter signals compared to substrate probes. These data suggest that the lack of signal amplification for an ABP is offset by the increased kinetics of tissue uptake and prolonged retention of the probes once bound to a protease target. Furthermore, fluorescent ABPs can be used as imaging reagents with similar or better results as the commercially available protease substrates.

  15. Novel cathepsin B and cathepsin B-like cysteine protease of Naegleria fowleri excretory-secretory proteins and their biochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinyoung; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Yang, Hee-Jong; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Park, Sun; Kim, Kyongmin; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2014-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri causes a lethal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in humans and experimental animals, which leads to death within 7-14 days. Cysteine proteases of parasites play key roles in nutrient uptake, excystment/encystment, host tissue invasion, and immune evasion. In this study, we cloned N. fowleri cathepsin B (nfcpb) and cathepsin B-like (nfcpb-L) genes from our cDNA library of N. fowleri. The full-length sequences of genes were 1,038 and 939 bp (encoded 345 and 313 amino acids), and molecular weights were 38.4 and 34 kDa, respectively. Also, nfcpb and nfcpb-L showed a 56 and 46 % identity to Naegleria gruberi cathepsin B and cathepsin B-like enzyme, respectively. Recombinant NfCPB (rNfCPB) and NfCPB-L (rNfCPB-L) proteins were expressed by the pEX5-NT/TOPO vector that was transformed into Escherichia coli BL21, and they showed 38.4 and 34 kDa bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blot analysis using their respective antibodies. Proteolytic activity of refolded rNfCPB and rNfCPB-L was maximum at a pH of 4.5, and the most effective substrate was Z-LR-MCA. rNfCPB and rNfCPB-L showed proteolytic activity for several proteins such as IgA, IgG, IgM, collagen, fibronectin, hemoglobin, and albumin. These results suggested that NfCPB and NfCPB-L cysteine protease are important components of the N. fowleri ESP, and they may play important roles in host tissue invasion and immune evasion as pathogens that cause N. fowleri PAM.

  16. Characterisation of adult green lacewing (Chrysoperla carnea) digestive physiology: impact of a cysteine protease inhibitor and a synthetic pyrethroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Evan A; Ferry, Natalie; Jouanin, Lise; Romeis, Jörg; Gatehouse, Angharad M R

    2010-03-01

    In spite of concern regarding potential non-target effects of GM crops, few studies have compared GM pest control with conventional methods. The impacts of cypermethrin and oilseed rape expressing oryzacystatin-1 (OC-1) were compared in this study on the predator Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens). Adults fed purified rOC-1 showed a subtle shift in digestive protease profile, with an increasing reliance on serine proteases (chymotrypsin), increase in aspartic proteases and a slight reduction in elastase activity. Although there were no effects on mortality, onset of oviposition was delayed; however, once egg production commenced, egg laying and hatching success rates were comparable with those of controls. Oryzacystatin-1 expressed in pollen showed no detrimental effects. Cypermethrin had no effect on mortality owing to high levels of non-specific esterase activity resulting in partial breakdown of the insecticide. In spite of this, there was a significant delay in onset of oviposition and a significant reduction in egg production and viability. This study demonstrates the potential for pest management to impact on predators, but importantly it highlights the ability of the predator to detoxify/respond to treatments with different modes of action. In this case, exposure to an insecticide carried a greater fitness cost than exposure to a protease inhibitor expressed in transgenic crops.

  17. Modification of calcite crystal morphology by designed phosphopeptides and primary structures and substrate specifities of the cysteine proteases mexicain and chymomexicain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Zhirui

    In order to better understand the mechanism of biomineralization, we have undertaken to synthesize polypeptide model compounds of well-defined structure that can interact with specific faces of calcite and alter its crystal morphology. These peptides were designed based on the structure of alpha-helical winter flounder antifreeze polypeptide HPLC-6. In these peptides, from one to three of the threonine residues in HPLC-6 were substituted by phosphoserine or phosphotyrosine. CD spectra show that all the peptides have virtually the same alpha-helicity, i.e., about 90% at 4°C and 50% at 25°C. However, only peptides which contain at least two phosphate groups spaced 16.8-A apart can modify the crystal morphology of the calcite. The newly developed surface has been tentatively identified as the (001) basal face. Molecular modeling indicates that the spacing of phosphate groups allows for a good match with crystal lattice ions on the (001) plane. Another peptide, CBP-3D, in which the three threonine residues in HPLC-6 were substituted by aspartic acids, appears to bind only to {104} rhombohedral faces of calcite. These experiments suggest that conformation and orientation of the binding ligands in the peptide are important factors governing the mutual recognition of crystal surface and proteins. The complete amino acid sequences of the cysteine proteases mexicain and chymomexicain, isolated from the latex of the plant Pileus mexicanus , were determined by Edman degradation of proteolytic fragments. Mexicain and chymomexicain show-high sequence homology to the papain family of cysteine protease. Mexicain and chymomexicain are monomeric polypeptides, with molecular masses of 23,762 Da and 23,694 Da, respectively, and both contain three deduced disulfide bonds. The proteolytic substrate specificities of mexicain and chymomexicain were studied by digesting a series of synthetic peptides and analyzing the fragments by mass spectrometry. The two proteases showed virtually

  18. Characterization of the Entire Cystatin Gene Family in Barley and Their Target Cathepsin L-Like Cysteine-Proteases, Partners in the Hordein Mobilization during Seed Germination1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Manuel; Cambra, Ines; Carrillo, Laura; Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Diaz, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    Plant cystatins are inhibitors of cysteine-proteases of the papain C1A and legumain C13 families. Cystatin data from multiple plant species have suggested that these inhibitors act as defense proteins against pests and pathogens and as regulators of protein turnover. In this study, we characterize the entire cystatin gene family from barley (Hordeum vulgare), which contain 13 nonredundant genes, and identify and characterize their target enzymes, the barley cathepsin L-like proteases. Cystatins and proteases were expressed and purified from Escherichia coli cultures. Each cystatin was found to have different inhibitory capability against barley cysteine-proteases in in vitro inhibitory assays using specific substrates. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that inhibitors and enzymes present a wide variation in their messenger RNA expression patterns. Their transcripts were mainly detected in developing and germinating seeds, and some of them were also expressed in leaves and roots. Subcellular localization of cystatins and cathepsin L-like proteases fused to green fluorescent protein demonstrated the presence of both protein families throughout the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi complex. Proteases and cystatins not only colocalized but also interacted in vivo in the plant cell, as revealed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. The functional relationship between cystatins and cathepsin L-like proteases was inferred from their common implication as counterparts of mobilization of storage proteins upon barley seed germination. The opposite pattern of transcription expression in gibberellin-treated aleurones presented by inhibitors and enzymes allowed proteases to specifically degrade B, C, and D hordeins stored in the endosperm of barley seeds. PMID:19759340

  19. Dispersal of Group A streptococcal biofilms by the cysteine protease SpeB leads to increased disease severity in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Kristie L; Roberts, Amity L; Holder, Robert C; Reid, Sean D

    2011-04-25

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a Gram-positive human pathogen best known for causing pharyngeal and mild skin infections. However, in the 1980's there was an increase in severe GAS infections including cellulitis and deeper tissue infections like necrotizing fasciitis. Particularly striking about this elevation in the incidence of severe disease was that those most often affected were previously healthy individuals. Several groups have shown that changes in gene content or regulation, as with proteases, may contribute to severe disease; yet strains harboring these proteases continue to cause mild disease as well. We and others have shown that group A streptococci (MGAS5005) reside within biofilms both in vitro and in vivo. That is to say that the organism colonizes a host surface and forms a 3-dimensional community encased in a protective matrix of extracellular protein, DNA and polysaccharide(s). However, the mechanism of assembly or dispersal of these structures is unclear, as is the relationship of these structures to disease outcome. Recently we reported that allelic replacement of the streptococcal regulator srv resulted in constitutive production of the streptococcal cysteine protease SpeB. We further showed that the constitutive production of SpeB significantly decreased MGAS5005Δsrv biofilm formation in vitro. Here we show that mice infected with MGAS5005Δsrv had significantly larger lesion development than wild-type infected animals. Histopathology, Gram-staining and immunofluorescence link the increased lesion development with lack of disease containment, lack of biofilm formation, and readily detectable levels of SpeB in the tissue. Treatment of MGAS5005Δsrv infected lesions with a chemical inhibitor of SpeB significantly reduced lesion formation and disease spread to wild-type levels. Furthermore, inactivation of speB in the MGAS5005Δsrv background reduced lesion formation to wild-type levels. Taken together, these data suggest a mechanism by which

  20. Survey of the rubber tree genome reveals a high number of cysteine protease-encoding genes homologous to Arabidopsis SAG12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhi; Liu, Jianting; Yang, Lifu; Xie, Guishui

    2017-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana SAG12, a senescence-specific gene encoding a cysteine protease, is widely used as a molecular marker for the study of leaf senescence. To date, its potential orthologues have been isolated from several plant species such as Brassica napus and Nicotiana tabacum. However, little information is available in rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis), a rubber-producing plant of the Euphorbiaceae family. This study presents the identification of SAG12-like genes from the rubber tree genome. Results showed that an unexpected high number of 17 rubber orthologues with a single intron were found, contrasting the single copy with two introns in Arabidopsis. The gene expansion was also observed in another two Euphorbiaceae plants, castor bean (Ricinus communis) and physic nut (Jatropha curcas), both of which contain 8 orthologues. In accordance with no occurrence of recent whole-genome duplication (WGD) events, most duplicates in castor and physic nut were resulted from tandem duplications. In contrast, the duplicated HbSAG12H genes were derived from tandem duplications as well as the recent WGD. Expression analysis showed that most HbSAG12H genes were lowly expressed in examined tissues except for root and male flower. Furthermore, HbSAG12H1 exhibits a strictly senescence-associated expression pattern in rubber tree leaves, and thus can be used as a marker gene for the study of senescence mechanism in Hevea.

  1. Cloning and expression of cDNA encoding a cysteine protease inhibitor from clamworm and its possible use in managing Anoplophora glabripennis Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengnan; Guo, Daosen; Zhao, Boguang; Ye, Jianling; Tian, Jie; Ren, Wenqing; Ju, Yunwei; Cui, Peng; Li, Ronggui

    2010-08-01

    A cDNA encoding cysteine protease inhibitor (CPI) was isolated from the cDNA library of clamworm Perinereis aibuhitensis Grube. The deduced amino acid sequence analysis showed that the protein had 51%, 48%, and 48% identity with Zgc:153129 from Danio rerio, cystatin B from Theromyzon tessulatum and ChainA, stefin B tetramer from Homo sapiens, respectively. The gene was cloned into the intracellular expression vector pET-15b and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant CPI (PA-CPI) was purified by affinity chromatography on Ni-charged resin and ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose FF. The relative molecular mass of PA-CPI was 16 KDa deduced by SDS-PAGE. Activity analysis showed that the recombinant protein could inhibit the proteolytic activity of papain. A constitutive and secretive expression vector was also constructed, and the cDNA encoding CPI was subcloned into the vector for extracellular expression. Western blotting analysis results showed that the PA-CPI was secreted into the medium. Bioassay demonstrated that E. coli DH5alpha harboring pUC18ompAcat-CPI showed a significant difference in mortality to the Asian longhorned beetle Anoplophora glabripennis compared with untransformed E. coli DH5alpha and control.

  2. mRNA sequences for Haemonchus contortus intestinal cathepsin B-like cysteine proteases display an extreme in abundance and diversity compared with other adult mammalian parasitic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmer, Douglas P; Mitreva, Makedonka Dautova; McCarter, James P

    2004-10-01

    Cathepsin B-like cysteine protease (cbl) genes produce the most abundant mRNAs ( approximately 16%) detected in the adult female intestine of the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus. CBL enzymes appear to digest host proteins and are vaccine candidates for immune control of H. contortus and potentially other parasitic nematodes. Hence, it is important to quantify the extent of diversity of H. contortuscbl genes. Here, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were used to assess both the size and diversity of the H. contortuscbl gene family. Contig analysis of 686 cbl ESTs from a USA isolate resolved 123 clusters. ESTs were grouped into discrete sets and analyzed using an additive model. Discovery of new cbl clusters increased with each set and reached a terminal rate of about 1 per 10 ESTs. The extreme diversity was unique to cbls relative to other genes investigated and was ascribed to specific cbl clades. Sixty percent of cbl clusters from a UK isolate were shared with those identified in the USA isolate, suggesting conservation of cbl gene repertoires across regions, although minor to moderate geographic variation cannot be excluded. Sequence comparisons also suggested high potential for antigenic diversity among CBL proteins, which is relevant to vaccine strategies. Compared to other parasitic nematodes of mammals, the extreme abundance and diversity of intestinal cbl transcripts appear to be relative specializations for H. contortus. Therefore, adaptations related to nutrient acquisition may vary markedly among these parasitic nematodes.

  3. Down regulation of a matrix degrading cysteine protease cathepsin L, by acetaldehyde: role of C/EBPα.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyaz A Mir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The imbalance between extra cellular matrix (ECM synthesis and degradation is critical aspect of various hepatic pathologies including alcohol induced liver fibrosis. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of acetaldehyde on expression of an extra cellular matrix degrading protease cathepsin L (CTSL in HepG2 cells. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: We measured the enzymatic activity, protein and, mRNA levels of CTSL in acetaldehyde treated and untreated cells. The binding of CAAT enhancer binding protein α (C/EBP α to CTSL promoter and its key role in the transcription from this promoter and conferring responsiveness to acetaldehyde was established by site directed mutagenesis, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays and siRNA technology. Acetaldehyde treatment significantly decreased CTSL activity and protein levels in HepG2 cells. A similar decrease in the mRNA levels and promoter activity was also observed. This decrease by acetaldehyde was attributed to the fall in the liver enriched transcription factor C/EBP α levels and it's binding to the CTSL promoter. Mutagenesis of C/EBP α binding motifs revealed the key role of this factor in CTSL transcription as well as conferring responsiveness to acetaldehyde. The siRNA mediated silencing of the C/EBP α expression mimicked the effect of acetaldehyde on CTSL levels and its promoter activity. It also abolished the responsiveness of this promoter to acetaldehyde. CONCLUSION: Acetaldehyde down regulates the C/EBP α mediated CTSL expression in hepatic cell lines. The decreased expression of CTSL may at least in part contribute to ECM deposition in liver which is a hallmark of alcoholic liver fibrosis.

  4. Brain pyroglutamate amyloid-β is produced by cathepsin B and is reduced by the cysteine protease inhibitor E64d, representing a potential Alzheimer's disease therapeutic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Gregory; Yu, Jin; Toneff, Thomas; Kindy, Mark; Hook, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    Pyroglutamate amyloid-β peptides (pGlu-Aβ) are particularly pernicious forms of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) present in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. pGlu-Aβ peptides are N-terminally truncated forms of full-length Aβ peptides (flAβ(1-40/42)) in which the N-terminal glutamate is cyclized to pyroglutamate to generate pGlu-Aβ(3-40/42). β-secretase cleavage of amyloid-β precursor protein (AβPP) produces flAβ(1-40/42), but it is not yet known whether the β-secretase BACE1 or the alternative β-secretase cathepsin B (CatB) participate in the production of pGlu-Aβ. Therefore, this study examined the effects of gene knockout of these proteases on brain pGlu-Aβ levels in transgenic AβPPLon mice, which express AβPP isoform 695 and have the wild-type (wt) β-secretase activity found in most AD patients. Knockout or overexpression of the CatB gene reduced or increased, respectively, pGlu-Aβ(3-40/42), flAβ(1-40/42), and pGlu-Aβ plaque load, but knockout of the BACE1 gene had no effect on those parameters in the transgenic mice. Treatment of AβPPLon mice with E64d, a cysteine protease inhibitor of CatB, also reduced brain pGlu-Aβ(3-42), flAβ(1-40/42), and pGlu-Aβ plaque load. Treatment of neuronal-like chromaffin cells with CA074Me, an inhibitor of CatB, resulted in reduced levels of pGlu-Aβ(3-40) released from the activity-dependent, regulated secretory pathway. Moreover, CatB knockout and E64d treatment has been previously shown to improve memory deficits in the AβPPLon mice. These data illustrate the role of CatB in producing pGlu-Aβ and flAβ that participate as key factors in the development of AD. The advantages of CatB inhibitors, especially E64d and its derivatives, as alternatives to BACE1 inhibitors in treating AD patients are discussed.

  5. Conformational changes induced by detergents during the refolding of chemically denatured cysteine protease ppEhCP-B9 from Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamudio-Prieto, Olga; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia; Arroyo, Rossana; Ortega-López, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    EhCP-B9, a cysteine protease (CP) involved in Entamoeba histolytica virulence, is a potential target for disease diagnosis and drug design. After purification from inclusion bodies produced in Escherichia coli, the recombinant EhCP-B9 precursor (ppEhCP-B9) can be refolded using detergents as artificial chaperones. However, the conformational changes that occur during ppEhCP-B9 refolding remain unknown. Here, we comprehensively describe conformational changes of ppEhCP-B9 that are induced by various chemical detergents acting as chaperones, including non-ionic, zwitterionic, cationic and anionic surfactants. We monitored the effect of detergent concentration and incubation time on the secondary and tertiary structures of ppEhCP-B9 using fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. In the presence of non-ionic and zwitterionic detergents, ppEhCP-B9 adopted a β-enriched structure (ppEhCP-B9(β1)) without proteolytic activity at all detergent concentrations and incubation times evaluated. ppEhCP-B9 also exhibits a β-rich structure in low concentrations of ionic detergents, but at concentrations above the critical micelle concentration (CMC), the protein acquires an α+β structure, similar to that of papain but without proteolytic activity (ppEhCP-B9(α+β1)). Interestingly, only within a narrow range of experimental conditions in which SDS concentrations were below the CMC, ppEhCP-B9 refolded into a β-sheet rich structure (ppEhCP-B9(β2)) that slowly transforms into a different type of α+β conformation that exhibited proteolytic activity (ppEhCP-B9(α+β2)) suggesting that enzymatic activity is gained as slow transformation occurs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative analysis of immune effects in mice model: Clonorchis sinensis cysteine protease generated from recombinant Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhanshuai; Tang, Zeli; Shang, Mei; Zhao, Lu; Zhou, Lina; Kong, Xiangzhan; Lin, Zhipeng; Sun, Hengchang; Chen, Tingjin; Xu, Jin; Li, Xuerong; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2017-07-01

    Clonorchiasis remains a nonnegligible public health problem in endemic areas. Cysteine protease of Clonorchis sinensis (CsCP) plays indispensable roles in the parasitic physiology and pathology, and has been exploited as a promising drug and vaccine candidate. In recent years, development of spore-based vaccines against multiple pathogens has attracted many investigators' interest. In previous studies, the recombinant Escherichia coli (BL21) and Bacillus subtilis spores expressing CsCP have been successfully constructed, respectively. In this study, the immune effects of CsCP protein purified from recombinant BL21 (rCsCP) and B. subtilis spores presenting CsCP (B.s-CsCP) in Balb/c mice model were conducted with comparative analysis. Levels of specific IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a were significantly increased in sera from both rCsCP and B.s-CsCP intraperitoneally immunized mice. Additionally, recombinant spores expressing abundant fusion CsCP (0.03125 pg/spore) could strongly enhance the immunogenicity of CsCP with significantly higher levels of IgG and isotypes. Compared with rCsCP alone, intraperitoneal administration of mice with spores expressing CsCP achieved a better effect of fighting against C. sinensis infection by slowing down the process of fibrosis. Our results demonstrated that a combination of Th1/Th2 immune responses could be elicited by rCsCP, while spores displaying CsCP prominently induced Th1-biased specific immune responses, and the complex cytokine network maybe mediates protective immune responses against C. sinensis. This work further confirmed that the usage of B. subtilis spores displaying CsCP is an effective way to against C. sinensis.

  7. Epicutaneous Administration of Papain Induces IgE and IgG Responses in a Cysteine Protease Activity-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Iida

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: We demonstrated that the epicutaneous administration of protease not only disrupted skin barrier function, but also induced IgE and IgG responses in a manner dependent on its protease activity. These results suggest that protease activity contained in environmental sources contributes to sensitization through an epicutaneous route.

  8. Cysteine proteases of pathogenic organisms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robinson, Mark W; Dalton, J. P

    2011-01-01

    .... Written by leading researchers from Europe, Australia and North America, this book is essential reading for students and professionals interested in human medicine and infectious disease research...

  9. Site-specific O-Glycosylation on the MUC2 Mucin Protein Inhibits Cleavage by the Porphyromonas gingivalis Secreted Cysteine Protease (RgpB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Post, Sjoerd; Subramani, Durai B; Bäckström, Malin

    2013-01-01

    The colonic epithelial surface is protected by an inner mucus layer that the commensal microflora cannot penetrate. We previously demonstrated that Entamoeba histolytica secretes a protease capable of dissolving this layer that is required for parasite penetration. Here, we asked whether there ar......The colonic epithelial surface is protected by an inner mucus layer that the commensal microflora cannot penetrate. We previously demonstrated that Entamoeba histolytica secretes a protease capable of dissolving this layer that is required for parasite penetration. Here, we asked whether...

  10. Effect of the selective and non-selective cysteine protease inhibitors on the intracellular processing of interleukin 6 by HEPG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppard, J V; Knap, A K

    1999-09-01

    The effects were measured and compared of three nonselective cysteine cathepsin inhibitors (leupeptin, trans-Epoxy-succinyl-L-Leucylamido(4-guanidino)-butane (E-64), and Z-Phe-Ala-CH2F) and a selective cathepsin B inhibitor, CA074Me, on the intracellular processing of 125I-labeled human recombinant Interleukin 6 (IL-6) by HepG2 cells. The uptake and processing of 125I-IL-6 by cells treated with inhibitors was followed over a 7-h period. All inhibitors caused an increased residence time of IL-6 inside the cell and a corresponding decrease in the output of non-trichloroacetic acid-precipitable fragments of radiolabeled protein. Maximal effect was achieved with leupeptin at 200 microM, with which the rate of IL-6 digestion was reduced to 50% that of control cells. The specific inhibitor CA074Me was the least effective in slowing the intracellular processing of IL-6. The effects of all of the inhibitors on the production of haptoglobin, either stimulated by IL-6 or basal, was negligible over a similar time period, indicating continued cell viability. The data from this model suggest that cathepsin inhibitors would not interfere with lysosomal processing to an extent which would prohibit the development of selective and potent cathepsin inhibitors for the treatment of diseases in which individual cysteine cathepsins play clearly pathophysiological roles.

  11. Calpain inhibitors and antioxidants act synergistically to prevent cell necrosis: effects of the novel dual inhibitors (cysteine protease inhibitor and antioxidant) BN 82204 and its pro-drug BN 82270.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignol, Bernadette; Auvin, Serge; Carré, Denis; Marin, Jean-Grégoire; Chabrier, Pierre-Etienne

    2006-08-01

    Cell death is a common feature observed in neurodegenerative disorders, and is often associated with calpain activation and overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study investigated the use of calpain inhibitors and antioxidants in combination to protect cells against necrosis. Maitotoxin (MTX), which induces a massive influx of calcium, was used to provoke neuronal cell death. This toxin increased, in a concentration-dependent manner, both calpain activity and ROS formation. Calpain inhibitors or antioxidants inhibited MTX-induced necrosis only marginally (below 20%), whereas their association protected against cell death by 40-66% in a synergistic manner. BN 82204, which possesses both calpain-cathepsin L inhibitory and antioxidant properties, and its acetylated pro-drug BN 82270, totally protected cells at 100 microm. The pro-drug BN 82270, which had better cell penetration, was twice as effective as the active principle BN 82204 in protecting glioma C6 or neuroblastoma SHSY5Y cells against death. These results suggest the potential therapeutic relevance of using a single molecule with multiple activities (cysteine protease inhibitor/antioxidant), and warrant further in vivo investigations in models of neuronal disorders.

  12. Use of flow cytometry for the adhesion analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes mutant strains to epithelial cells: investigation of the possible role of surface pullulanase and cysteine protease, and the transcriptional regulator Rgg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finne Jukka

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flow cytometry based adherence assay is a potentially powerful but little used method in the study of bacterial binding to host structures. We have previously characterized a glycoprotein-binding activity in Streptococcus pyogenes called 'strepadhesin' binding to thyroglobulin, submaxillar mucin, fetuin and asialofetuin. We have identified surface-associated pullulanase (PulA and cysteine protease (SpeB as carriers of strepadhesin activity. In the present paper, we investigated the use of flow cytometry as a method to study the binding of Rgg, SpeB and PulA knock-out strains to cultured human epithelial cells. Results Streptococcal mutants were readily labelled with CFDA-SE and their binding to epithelial cells could be effectively studied by flow cytometry. A strain deficient in Rgg expression showed increased binding to the analyzed epithelial cell lines of various origin. Inactivation of SpeB had no effect on the adhesion, while PulA knock-out strains displayed decreased binding to the cell lines. Conclusion These results suggest that the flow cytometric assay is a valuable tool in the analysis of S. pyogenes adherence to host cells. It appears to be an efficient and sensitive tool for the characterization of interactions between the bacteria and the host at the molecular level. The results also suggest a role for Rgg regulated surface molecules, like PulA, in the adhesion of S. pyogenes to host cells.

  13. Antibacterial Activities of Glycyrrhiza gabra Linn. (Licorice Root Extract against Porphyromonas gingivalis rand Its Inhibitory Effects on Cysteine Proteases and Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suttipalin Suwannakul

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the antibacterial activity of licorice root extract. Objective: To investigate the antimicrobial and anti-proteolytic activities of root extract on Porphyromonas gingivalis in both planktonics and bioflm cells. Methods: Glycyrrhiza glabra (G. glabra roots were extracted by 95% ethanol freeze dried and kept at -20˚C prior experiments. P.gingvalis (ATCC 33277 were cultured and used for experiments. Determination of antibacterial activities of G.glabra extracts (lico rice against P.gingvalis planktonic the MIC and MBC were evaluated by agar well diffusion, broth microdilution, and time-killing methods. The crystal violet assay was used to assess the bioflm growth inhibition and the disruption of established bioflm. The Arg - specifc proteolytic activities were analyzed using the chromogenic substrates assays using N-benzoyl-DL-arginine-4-nitroanilide hydrochloride and N-(p-tosyl-Gly Pro-Lys 4-nitroanilide acetate salt to assess the enzymatic inhibition effects of the extracts compared with the controls. Results: The licorice root extract had antimicrobial activities on P.gingivalis with MIC and MBC of 62.5µg/ml and 25 µg/ml respectively. The assay showed that Licorice root extronidazole. Licorice root extract also had effect on P.gingivalis bioflms. Quantifcation by crystal violate staining showed the reduction of bioflm mass in the presence of Licorice root extract. The Arg-and Kgp- proteases activities were also inhibited by the extract in dose dependent manner. Conclusion: The results suggested that licorice root extract may has potential therapeutics values as a candidate for periodontal disease

  14. Brain Pyroglutamate Amyloid-Beta is Produced by Cathepsin B and is Reduced by the Cysteine Protease Inhibitor E64d, Representing a Potential Alzheimer’s Disease Therapeutic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Gregory; Yu, Jin; Toneff, Thomas; Kindy, Mark; Hook, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    Pyroglutamate amyloid-β peptides (pGlu-Aβ) are particularly pernicious forms of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) present in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brains. pGlu-Aβ peptides are N-terminally truncated forms of full-length Aβ peptides (flAβ(1-40/42)) in which the N-terminal glutamate is cyclized to pyroglutamate to generate pGlu-Aβ(3-40/42). β-secretase cleavage of amyloid-β precursor protein (AβPP) produces flAβ(1-40/42), but it is not yet known whether the β-secretase BACE1 or the alternative β-secretase cathepsin B (CatB) participate in the production of pGlu-Aβ. Therefore, this study examined the effects of gene knockout of these proteases on brain pGlu-Aβ levels in transgenic AβPPLon mice, which express AβPP isoform 695 and have the wild-type (wt) β-secretase activity found in most AD patients. Knockout or overexpression of the CatB gene reduced or increased, respectively, pGlu-Aβ(3-40/42), flAβ(1-40/42), and pGlu-Aβ plaque load, but knockout of the BACE1 gene had no effect on those parameters in the transgenic mice. Treatment of AβPPLon mice with E64d, a cysteine protease inhibitor of CatB, also reduced brain pGlu-Aβ(3-42), flAβ(1-40/42), and pGlu-Aβ plaque load. Treatment of neuronal-like chromaffin cells with CA074Me, an inhibitor of CatB, resulted in reduced levels of pGlu-Aβ(3-40) released from the activity-dependent, regulated secretory pathway. Moreover, CatB knockout and E64d treatment has been previously shown to improve memory deficits in the AβPPLon mice. These data illustrate the role of CatB in producing pGlu-Aβ and flAβ that participate as key factors in the development of AD. The advantages of CatB inhibitors, especially E64d and its derivatives, as alternatives to BACE1 inhibitors in treating AD patients are discussed. PMID:24595198

  15. Activation of ADAM 12 protease by copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loechel, F; Wewer, Ulla M.

    2001-01-01

    Conversion of latent proteases to the active form occurs by various mechanisms characteristic for different protease families. Here we report that the disintegrin metalloprotease ADAM 12-S is activated by Cu(II). Copper activation is distinct from the cysteine switch component of latency: elimina......Conversion of latent proteases to the active form occurs by various mechanisms characteristic for different protease families. Here we report that the disintegrin metalloprotease ADAM 12-S is activated by Cu(II). Copper activation is distinct from the cysteine switch component of latency......: elimination of the ADAM 12 cysteine switch by a point mutation in the propeptide had no effect on copper activation, whereas mutation of an unpaired cysteine residue in the catalytic domain resulted in a mutant form of ADAM 12-S that was insensitive to copper. This suggests a multi-step activation mechanism...... for ADAM 12 involving both furin cleavage and copper binding....

  16. Identification of BALB/c Immune Markers Correlated with a Partial Protection to Leishmania infantum after Vaccination with a Rationally Designed Multi-epitope Cysteine Protease A Peptide-Based Nanovaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agallou, Maria; Margaroni, Maritsa; Athanasiou, Evita; Toubanaki, Dimitra K; Kontonikola, Katerina; Karidi, Konstantina; Kammona, Olga; Kiparissides, Costas; Karagouni, Evdokia

    2017-01-01

    Through their increased potential to be engaged and processed by dendritic cells (DCs), nanovaccines consisting of Poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with both antigenic moieties and adjuvants are attractive candidates for triggering specific defense mechanisms against intracellular pathogens. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and prophylactic potential of a rationally designed multi-epitope peptide of Leishmania Cysteine Protease A (CPA160-189) co-encapsulated with Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) in PLGA NPs against L. infantum in BALB/c mice and identify immune markers correlated with protective responses. The DCs phenotypic and functional features exposed to soluble (CPA160-189, CPA160-189+MPLA) or encapsulated in PLGA NPs forms of peptide and adjuvant (PLGA-MPLA, PLGA-CPA160-189, PLGA-CPA160-189+MPLA) was firstly determined using BALB/c bone marrow-derived DCs. The most potent signatures of DCs maturation were obtained with the PLGA-CPA160-189+MPLA NPs. Subcutaneous administration of PLGA-CPA160-189+MPLA NPs in BALB/c mice induced specific anti-CPA160-189 cellular and humoral immune responses characterized by T cells producing high amounts of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNFα and IgG1/IgG2a antibodies. When these mice were challenged with 2x107 stationary phase L. infantum promastigotes, they displayed significant reduced hepatic (48%) and splenic (90%) parasite load at 1 month post-challenge. This protective phenotype was accompanied by a strong spleen lymphoproliferative response and high levels of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNFα versus low IL-4 and IL-10 secretion. Although, at 4 months post-challenge, the reduced parasite load was preserved in the liver (61%), an increase was detected in the spleen (30%), indicating a partial vaccine-induced protection. This study provide a basis for the development of peptide-based nanovaccines against leishmaniasis, since it reveals that vaccination with well-defined Leishmania MHC

  17. Oral delivery of Bacillus subtilis spores expressing cysteine protease of Clonorchis sinensis to grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus): Induces immune responses and has no damage on liver and intestine function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zeli; Sun, Hengchang; Chen, TingJin; Lin, Zhipeng; Jiang, Hongye; Zhou, Xinyi; Shi, Cunbin; Pan, Houjun; Chang, Ouqin; Ren, Pengli; Yu, Jinyun; Li, Xuerong; Xu, Jin; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2017-05-01

    Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) is a fish-borne trematode. Human can be infected by ingestion of C. sinensis metacercariae parasitized in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). For induction of effective oral immune responses, spores of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) WB600 were utilized as vehicle to delivery CsCP (cysteine protease of C. sinensis) cooperated with CotC (B.s-CotC-CP), one of coat proteins, to the gastrointestinal tract. After routine culture of 8-12 h in LB medium, B. subtilis containing CotC-CsCP was transferred into the sporulation culture medium. SDS-PAGE, western blotting and the growth curve indicated that the best sporulation time of recombinant WB600 was 24-30 h at 37 °C with continuous shaking (250 rpm). Grass carp were fed with three levels of B.s-CotC-CP (1 × 10 6 , 1 × 10 7 , and 1 × 10 8  CFU g -1 ) incorporated in the basal pellets diet. The commercial pellets or supplemented with spores just expressing CotC (1 × 10 7  CFU g -1 ) were served as control diet. Our results showed that grass carp orally immunized with the feed-based B.s-CotC-CP developed a strong specific immune response with significantly (P subtilis spores appeared to show no sign of toxicity or damage in grass carp. Our cercariae challenge experiments suggested that oral administration of spores expressing CsCP could develop an effective protection against C. sinensis in fish body. Therefore, this study demonstrated that the feed-based recombinant spores could trigger high levels of mucosal and humoral immunity, and would be a promising candidate vaccine against C. sinensis metacercariae formation in freshwater fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of proteases and protease inhibitors in Heterodera glycines cysts obtained from laboratory and field populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteases and proteases inhibitors were evaluated in a number of preparations of Heterodera glycines cysts obtained from glasshouse cultures (GH) and field (LR) populations. Using a FRET-peptide library comprising 512 peptide substrate pools that detect 4 endoprotease types (aspartic, cysteine, meta...

  19. Bacterial Cysteine-Inducible Cysteine Resistance Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takumi, Kazuhiro; Nonaka, Gen

    2016-05-01

    Cysteine donates sulfur to macromolecules and occurs naturally in many proteins. Because low concentrations of cysteine are cytotoxic, its intracellular concentration is stringently controlled. In bacteria, cysteine biosynthesis is regulated by feedback inhibition of the activities of serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) and is also regulated at the transcriptional level by inducing the cysteine regulon using the master regulator CysB. Here, we describe two novel cysteine-inducible systems that regulate the cysteine resistance of Pantoea ananatis, a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae that shows great potential for producing substances useful for biotechnological, medical, and industrial purposes. One locus, designated ccdA(formerly PAJ_0331), encodes a novel cysteine-inducible cysteine desulfhydrase (CD) that degrades cysteine, and its expression is controlled by the transcriptional regulator encoded byccdR(formerly PAJ_0332 orybaO), located just upstream of ccdA The other locus, designated cefA (formerly PAJ_3026), encodes a novel cysteine-inducible cysteine efflux pump that is controlled by the transcriptional regulator cefR(formerly PAJ_3027), located just upstream of cefA To our knowledge, this is the first example where the expression of CD and an efflux pump is regulated in response to cysteine and is directly involved in imparting resistance to excess levels of cysteine. We propose that ccdA and cefA function as safety valves that maintain homeostasis when the intra- or extracellular cysteine concentration fluctuates. Our findings contribute important insights into optimizing the production of cysteine and related biomaterials by P. ananatis Because of its toxicity, the bacterial intracellular cysteine level is stringently regulated at biosynthesis. This work describes the identification and characterization of two novel cysteine-inducible systems that regulate, through degradation and efflux, the cysteine

  20. Secreted proteases from dermatophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monod, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Dermatophytes are highly specialized pathogenic fungi that exclusively infect the stratum corneum, nails or hair, and it is evident that secreted proteolytic activity is important for their virulence. Endo- and exoproteases-secreted by dermatophytes are similar to those of species of the genus Aspergillus. However, in contrast to Aspergillus spp., dermatophyte-secreted endoproteases are multiple and are members of two large protein families, the subtilisins (serine proteases) and the fungalysins (metalloproteases). In addition, dermatophytes excrete sulphite as a reducing agent. In the presence of sulphite, disulphide bounds of the keratin substrate are directly cleaved to cysteine and S-sulphocysteine, and reduced proteins become accessible for further digestion by various endo- and exoproteases secreted by the fungi. Sulphitolysis is likely to be an essential step in the digestion of compact keratinized tissues which precedes the action of all proteases.

  1. Differential suppression by protease inhibitors and cytokines of apoptosis induced by wild-type p53 and cytotoxic agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Lotem, J; Sachs, L.

    1996-01-01

    Apoptosis induced in myeloid leukemic cells by wild-type p53 was suppressed by different cleavage-site directed protease inhibitors, which inhibit interleukin-1 beta-converting enzyme-like, granzyme B and cathepsins B and L proteases. Apoptosis was also suppressed by the serine and cysteine protease inhibitor N-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethylketone (TPCK) [corrected], but not by other serine or cysteine protease inhibitors including N alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethylketone (TLCK), E64, ...

  2. Purification and characterisation of a protease (tamarillin) from tamarillo fruit

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zhao

    2018-02-16

    A protease from tamarillo fruit (Cyphomandra betacea Cav.) was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation and diethylaminoethyl-Sepharose chromatography. Protease activity was determined on selected peak fractions using a casein substrate. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis showed that the peak with the highest protease activity consisted of one protein of molecular mass ca. 70 kDa. The protease showed optimal activity at pH 11 and 60°C. It was sensitive to phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride while ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and p-chloromercuribenzoic acid had little effect on its activity, indicating that this enzyme was a serine protease. Hg2+ strongly inhibited enzyme activity, possibly due to formation of mercaptide bonds with the thiol groups of the protease, suggesting that some cysteine residues may be located close to the active site. De novo sequencing strongly indicated that the protease was a subtilisin-like alkaline serine protease. The protease from tamarillo has been named \\'tamarillin\\'.

  3. Protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a polypeptide exhibiting a protease inhibitory activity and uses of said polypeptide in methods for inhibiting, directly or indirectly, one or more proteases of the blood clotting cascade. The invention also relates to use of said polypeptide as a pharmaceutical e...

  4. Processing Proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Anders Sebastian Rosenkrans

    Processing proteases are proteases which proteolytically activate proteins and peptides into their biologically active form. Processing proteases play an important role in biotechnology as tools in protein fusion technology. Fusion strategies where helper proteins or peptide tags are fused...... to the protein of interest are an elaborate method to optimize expression or purification systems. It is however critical that fusion proteins can be removed and processing proteases can facilitate this in a highly specific manner. The commonly used proteases all have substrate specificities to the N......-terminal of the scissile bond, leaving C-terminal fusions to have non-native C-termini after processing. A solution yielding native C-termini would allow novel expression and purification systems for therapeutic proteins and peptides.The peptidyl-Lys metallopeptidase (LysN) of the fungus Armillaria mellea (Am) is one...

  5. Supermarket Proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagar, William G.; Bullerwell, Lornie D.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory activity on enzymes. Uses common items found in the supermarket that contain protease enzymes, such as contact lens cleaner and meat tenderizer. Demonstrates the digestion of gelatin proteins as part of enzymatic reactions. (Author/SOE)

  6. Cysteine cathepsin activity suppresses osteoclastogenesis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edgington-Mitchell, L.E.; Rautela, J.; Duivenvoorden, H.M.; Jayatilleke, K.M.; Linden, W.A. van der; Verdoes, M.; Bogyo, M.; Parker, B.S.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsin proteases contribute to many normal cellular functions, and their aberrant activity within various cell types can contribute to many diseases, including breast cancer. It is now well accepted that cathepsin proteases have numerous cell-specific functions within the tumor

  7. Protease inhibitors targeting coronavirus and filovirus entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanchen; Vedantham, Punitha; Lu, Kai; Agudelo, Juliet; Carrion, Ricardo; Nunneley, Jerritt W; Barnard, Dale; Pöhlmann, Stefan; McKerrow, James H; Renslo, Adam R; Simmons, Graham

    2015-04-01

    In order to gain entry into cells, diverse viruses, including Ebola virus, SARS-coronavirus and the emerging MERS-coronavirus, depend on activation of their envelope glycoproteins by host cell proteases. The respective enzymes are thus excellent targets for antiviral intervention. In cell culture, activation of Ebola virus, as well as SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can be accomplished by the endosomal cysteine proteases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and cathepsin B (CTSB). In addition, SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can use serine proteases localized at the cell surface, for their activation. However, it is currently unclear which protease(s) facilitate viral spread in the infected host. We report here that the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777, ((2S)-N-[(1E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]-2-{[(E)-4-methylpiperazine-1-carbonyl]amino}-3-phenylpropanamide) and closely-related vinylsulfones act as broad-spectrum antivirals by targeting cathepsin-mediated cell entry. K11777 is already in advanced stages of development for a number of parasitic diseases, such as Chagas disease, and has proven to be safe and effective in a range of animal models. K11777 inhibition of SARS-CoV and Ebola virus entry was observed in the sub-nanomolar range. In order to assess whether cysteine or serine proteases promote viral spread in the host, we compared the antiviral activity of an optimized K11777-derivative with that of camostat, an inhibitor of TMPRSS2 and related serine proteases. Employing a pathogenic animal model of SARS-CoV infection, we demonstrated that viral spread and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV is driven by serine rather than cysteine proteases and can be effectively prevented by camostat. Camostat has been clinically used to treat chronic pancreatitis, and thus represents an exciting potential therapeutic for respiratory coronavirus infections. Our results indicate that camostat, or similar serine protease inhibitors, might be an effective option for treatment of SARS and

  8. Role of Proteases in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash C. Pandey

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is generally associated with progressive destruction of airways and lung parenchyma. Various factors play an important role in the development and progression of COPD, like imbalance of proteases, environmental and genetic factors and oxidative stress. This review is specifically focused on the role of proteases and their imbalance in COPD. There are three classes (serine, mettalo, and cysteine of proteases involved in COPD. In serine proteases, neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase-3 are involved in destruction of alveolar tissue. Matrix-mettaloproteinase-9, 12, 13, plays an influential role in severity of COPD. Among cysteine proteases, caspase-3, caspases-8 and caspase-9 play an important role in controlling apoptosis. These proteases activities can be regulated by inhibitors like α-1-antitrypsin, neutrophil elastase inhibitor, and leukocyte protease inhibitor. Studies suggest that neutrophil elastase may be a therapeutic target for COPD, and specific inhibitor against this enzyme has potential role to control the disease. Current study suggests that Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV is a potential marker for COPD. Since the expression of proteases and its inhibitors play an important role in COPD pathogenesis, therefore, it is worth investigating the role of proteases and their regulation. Understanding the biochemical basis of COPD pathogenesis using advanced tools in protease biochemistry and aiming toward translational research from bench-to-bedside will have great impact to deal with this health problem.

  9. Cysteine cathepsins and extracellular matrix degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonović, Marko; Turk, Boris

    2014-08-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are normally found in the lysosomes where they are involved in intracellular protein turnover. Their ability to degrade the components of the extracellular matrix in vitro was first reported more than 25years ago. However, cathepsins were for a long time not considered to be among the major players in ECM degradation in vivo. During the last decade it has, however, become evident that abundant secretion of cysteine cathepsins into extracellular milieu is accompanying numerous physiological and disease conditions, enabling the cathepsins to degrade extracellular proteins. In this review we will focus on cysteine cathepsins and their extracellular functions linked with ECM degradation, including regulation of their activity, which is often enhanced by acidification of the extracellular microenvironment, such as found in the bone resorption lacunae or tumor microenvironment. We will further discuss the ECM substrates of cathepsins with a focus on collagen and elastin, including the importance of that for pathologies. Finally, we will overview the current status of cathepsin inhibitors in clinical development for treatment of ECM-linked diseases, in particular osteoporosis. Cysteine cathepsins are among the major proteases involved in ECM remodeling, and their role is not limited to degradation only. Deregulation of their activity is linked with numerous ECM-linked diseases and they are now validated targets in a number of them. Cathepsins S and K are the most attractive targets, especially cathepsin K as a major therapeutic target for osteoporosis with drugs targeting it in advanced clinical trials. Due to their major role in ECM remodeling cysteine cathepsins have emerged as an important group of therapeutic targets for a number of ECM-related diseases, including, osteoporosis, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Matrix-mediated cell behaviour and properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All

  10. Molecular model of the specificity pocket of the hepatitis C virus protease: implications for substrate recognition.

    OpenAIRE

    Pizzi, E; Tramontano, A; Tomei, L; La Monica, N; Failla, C; Sardana, M; Wood, T; De Francesco, R

    1994-01-01

    We have built a model of the specificity pocket of the protease of hepatitis C virus on the basis of the known structures of trypsin-like serine proteases and of the conservation pattern of the protease sequences among various hepatitis C strains. The model allowed us to predict that the substrate of this protease should have a cysteine residue in position P1. This hypothesis was subsequently proved by N-terminal sequencing of two products of the protease. The success of this "blind" test inc...

  11. Delay of Iris flower senescence by protease inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pak, C.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2005-01-01

    asterisk inside a circle sign Visible senescence of the flag tepals in Iris x hollandica (cv. Blue Magic) was preceded by a large increase in endoprotease activity. Just before visible senescence about half of total endoprotease activity was apparently due to cysteine proteases, somewhat less than

  12. Occurrence and properties of proteases in plant latices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domsalla, André; Melzig, Matthias F

    2008-06-01

    Proteases appear to play key roles in the regulation of biological processes in plants, such as the recognition of pathogens and pests and the induction of effective defence responses. On the other side these enzymes are able to activate protease-activated receptors (PARs) and in that way to act as agents with pharmacological and toxicological significance. An important source of plant proteases used in traditional medicine and industry is latex. Over 110 latices of different plant families are known to contain at least one proteolytic enzyme. Most of them belong to the cysteine or serine endopeptidases family and only one to the aspartatic endopeptidases family. This review focuses on the characterization of proteases found in latices of several plant families (Apocynaceae, Asclepiadaceae, Asteraceae, Caricaceae, Convolvulaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Moraceae), and summarizes the known chemical and biological properties of the isolated proteases as well as their importance in pharmacology and toxicology.

  13. Cloning and characterization of a novel cysteine protease gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    The amplified product was purified (Tiangen,. China) and cloned into the pGEM-T easy vector (Promega,. USA) followed by sequencing. 2.4 3′-RACE of HbCP1. The 3′-ready cDNA was synthesized by reversely transcribing 1 μg total RNA with 3′-CDS primer A (provided in the kit). The 3′-rapid amplification of cDNA ...

  14. Cloning and characterization of a novel cysteine protease gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    State Key Laboratory of Tropical Crop Biotechnology, Institute of Tropical Biosciences and Biotechnology, Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences, Haikou 571101, China; Key Laboratory of Ministry of Agriculture for Tropical Crops Physiology, Institute of Rubber, Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural ...

  15. Characterization of Fibrinolytic Proteases from Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk Ho Choi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : This study was undertaken to identify fibrinolytic proteases from Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus venom and to characterize a major fibrinolytic protease purified from the venom. Methods: The venom was subjected to chromatography using columns of Q-Sepharose and Sephadex G-75. The molecular weights of fibrinolytic proteases showing fibrinolytic zone in fibrin plate assay were determined in SDS-PAGE (Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis The effects of inhibitors and metal ions on fibrinolytic protease and the proteolysis patterns of fibrinogen, gelatin, and bovine serum albumin were investigated. Results : 1 The fibrinolytic fractions of the three peaks isolated from Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus venom contained two polypeptides of 46 and 59 kDa and three polypeptides of 32, 18, and 15 kDa and a major polypeptide of 54 kDa, respectively. 2 The fibrinolytic activity of the purified protease of 54 kDA was inhibited by metal chelators, such as EDTA, EGTA, and 1,10-phenanthroline, and disulfhydryl-reducing compounds, such as dithiothreitol and cysteine. 3 Calcium chloride promoted the fibrinolytic activity of the protease, but mercuric chloride and cobalt(II chloride inhibited it. 4 The fibrinolytic protease cleaved preferentially A-chain and slowly B-chain of fibrinogen. It also hydrolyzed gelatin but not bovine serum albumin. Conclusions: The Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus venom contained more than three fibrinolytic proteases. The major fibrinolytic protease was a metalloprotease which hydrolyzed both fibrinogen and gelatin, but not bovine serum albumin.

  16. Protease Inhibitors from Plants with Antimicrobial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonkyung Park

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial proteins (peptides are known to play important roles in the innate host defense mechanisms of most living organisms, including plants, insects, amphibians and mammals. They are also known to possess potent antibiotic activity against bacteria, fungi, and even certain viruses. Recently, the rapid emergence of microbial pathogens that are resistant to currently available antibiotics has triggered considerable interest in the isolation and investigation of the mode of action of antimicrobial proteins (peptides. Plants produce a variety of proteins (peptides that are involved in the defense against pathogens and invading organisms, including ribosome-inactivating proteins, lectins, protease inhibitors and antifungal peptides (proteins. Specially, the protease inhibitors can inhibit aspartic, serine and cysteine proteinases. Increased levels of trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors correlated with the plants resistance to the pathogen. Usually, the purification of antimicrobial proteins (peptides with protease inhibitor activity was accomplished by salt-extraction, ultrafiltration and C18 reverse phase chromatography, successfully. We discuss the relation between antimicrobial and anti-protease activity in this review. Protease inhibitors from plants potently inhibited the growth of a variety of pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains and are therefore excellent candidates for use as the lead compounds for the development of novel antimicrobial agents.

  17. Cysteine degradation gene yhaM, encoding cysteine desulfidase, serves as a genetic engineering target to improve cysteine production in Escherichia coli

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gen Nonaka; Kazuhiro Takumi

    2017-01-01

    .... Owing to its cytotoxicity, bacterial intracellular levels of cysteine are stringently controlled via several modes of regulation, including cysteine degradation by cysteine desulfhydrases and cysteine desulfidases...

  18. Analysis list: C10orf12 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available C10orf12 + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/C10orf12.1.t...sv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/C10orf12.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/k...yushu-u/hg19/target/C10orf12.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/C10orf12..tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/.gml ...

  19. Molecular model of the specificity pocket of the hepatitis C virus protease: implications for substrate recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, E; Tramontano, A; Tomei, L; La Monica, N; Failla, C; Sardana, M; Wood, T; De Francesco, R

    1994-02-01

    We have built a model of the specificity pocket of the protease of hepatitis C virus on the basis of the known structures of trypsin-like serine proteases and of the conservation pattern of the protease sequences among various hepatitis C strains. The model allowed us to predict that the substrate of this protease should have a cysteine residue in position P1. This hypothesis was subsequently proved by N-terminal sequencing of two products of the protease. The success of this "blind" test increases our confidence in the overall correctness of our proposed alignment of the enzyme sequence with those of other proteases of known structure and constitutes a first step in the construction of a complete model of the viral protease domain.

  20. Preparation and Characterization of Cysteine Adducts of Deoxynivalenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanic, Ana; Uhlig, Silvio; Solhaug, Anita; Rise, Frode; Wilkins, Alistair L; Miles, Christopher O

    2016-06-15

    Conjugation with the biologically relevant thiol glutathione is one of the metabolic pathways for the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) in wheat. The occurrence of putative DON-cysteine conjugates has also been shown in wheat, likely in part as a result of degradation of the glutathione conjugates. It was reported that thiols react in vitro with DON at two positions: reversibly at C-10 of the α,β-unsaturated ketone and irreversibly at C-13 of the epoxy group. We synthesized pure DON-cysteine adducts and made analytical standards using quantitative NMR experiments. Compounds were characterized using NMR and LC-HRMS/MS and tested in vitro for toxicity. Cysteine conjugates were much less toxic than DON at the same concentration, and LC-HRMS analysis demonstrated that there was no detectable metabolism of the conjugates in human monocytes or human macrophages.

  1. Separation of native and truncated forms of poliovirus protease 3C produced in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Polgár, L; ERDÉLYI, F.; Hajnal, E; Löw, M.; Gráf, L; Korant, B D

    1993-01-01

    Poliovirus protease 3C is a cysteine enzyme that is essential for the processing of the viral precursor polyprotein containing structural proteins and enzymes, including the protease itself. We have constructed the plasmid pSD/PV3C which produced protease 3C as inclusion bodies when expressed in Escherichia coli. In addition to the full-length protease, a truncated form was also generated, starting from an internal initiation site (Met-27). The enzyme was renatured by dilution of a 6 M guanid...

  2. Identification, classification and expression pattern analysis of sugarcane cysteine proteinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Coelho Correa

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases are peptidyl hydrolyses dependent on a cysteine residue at the active center. The physical and chemical properties of cysteine proteases have been extensively characterized, but their precise biological functions have not yet been completely understood, although it is known that they are involved in a number of events such as protein turnover, cancer, germination, programmed cell death and senescence. Protein sequences from different cysteine proteinases, classified as members of the E.C.3.4.22 sub-sub-class, were used to perform a T-BLAST-n search on the Brazilian Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags project (SUCEST data bank. Sequence homology was found with 76 cluster sequences that corresponded to possible cysteine proteinases. The alignments of these SUCEST clusters with the sequence of cysteine proteinases of known origins provided important information about the classification and possible function of these sugarcane enzymes. Inferences about the expression pattern of each gene were made by direct correlation with the SUCEST cDNA libraries from which each cluster was derived. Since no previous reports of sugarcane cysteine proteinases genes exists, this study represents a first step in the study of new biochemical, physiological and biotechnological aspects of sugarcane cysteine proteases.Proteinases cisteínicas são peptidil-hidrolases dependentes de um resíduo de cisteína em seu sítio ativo. As propriedades físico-químicas destas proteinases têm sido amplamente caracterizadas, entretanto suas funções biológicas ainda não foram completamente elucidadas. Elas estão envolvidas em um grande número de eventos, tais como: processamento e degradação protéica, câncer, germinação, morte celular programada e processos de senescência. Diferentes proteinases cisteínicas, classificadas pelo Comitê de Nomenclatura da União Internacional de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular (IUBMB como pertencentes à sub

  3. Collagen degradation in the abdominal aneurysm: a conspiracy of matrix metalloproteinase and cysteine collagenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Hussien, Hazem; Soekhoe, Ratna G V; Weber, Ekkehard; von der Thüsen, Jan H; Kleemann, Robert; Mulder, Adri; van Bockel, J Hajo; Hanemaaijer, Roeland; Lindeman, Jan H N

    2007-03-01

    Growth and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) result from increased collagen turnover. Collagen turnover critically depends on specific collagenases that cleave the triple helical region of fibrillar collagen. As yet, the collagenases responsible for collagen degradation in AAAs have not been identified. Increased type I collagen degradation products confirmed collagen turnover in AAAs (median values: cysteine collagenases cathepsin K, L, and S as the principle collagenases in growing and ruptured AAAs. Except for modestly increased MMP-14 mRNA levels, collagenase expression was similar in growing and ruptured AAAs (anterior-lateral wall). Evaluation of posttranslational regulation of protease activity showed a threefold increase in MMP-8, a fivefold increase in cathepsins K and L, and a 30-fold increase in cathepsin S activation in growing and ruptured AAAs. The presence of the osteoclastic proton pump indicated optimal conditions for extracellular cysteine protease activity. Protease inhibitor mRNA expression was similar in AAAs and controls, but AAA protein levels of cystatin C, the principle cysteine protease inhibitor, were profoundly reduced (>80%). We found indications that this secondary deficiency relates to cystatin C degradation by (neutrophil-derived) proteases.

  4. Hieronymain I, a new cysteine peptidase isolated from unripe fruits of Bromelia hieronymi Mez (Bromeliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Mariela A; Pardo, Marcelo F; Caffini, Néstor O; López, Laura M I

    2003-02-01

    A new peptidase, named hieronymain I, was purified to homogeneity from unripe fruits of Bromelia hieronymi Mez (Bromeliaceae) by acetone fractionation followed by cation exchange chromatography (FPLC) on CM-Sepharose FF. Homogeneity of the enzyme was confirmed by mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF), isoelectric focusing, and SDS-PAGE. Hieronymain is a basic peptidase (pI > 9.3) and its molecular mass was 24,066 Da. Maximum proteolytic activity on casein (>90% of maximum activity) was achieved at pH 8.5-9.5. The enzyme was completely inhibited by E-64 and iodoacetic acid and activated by the addition of cysteine; these results strongly suggest that the isolated protease should be included within the cysteine group. The N-terminal sequence of hieronymain (ALPESIDWRAKGAVTEVKRQDG) was compared with 25 plant cysteine proteases that showed more than 50% of identity.

  5. HIV protease inhibitor resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, Annemarie M.J.; Fun, Axel; Nijhuis, Monique

    2017-01-01

    HIV protease is pivotal in the viral replication cycle and directs the formation of mature infectious virus particles. The development of highly specific HIV protease inhibitors (PIs), based on thorough understanding of the structure of HIV protease and its substrate, serves as a prime example of

  6. cDNA cloning and molecular modeling of procerain B, a novel cysteine endopeptidase isolated from Calotropis procera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhay Narayan; Yadav, Prity; Dubey, Vikash Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Procerain B, a novel cysteine protease (endopeptidase) isolated from Calotropis procera belongs to Asclepiadaceae family. Purification of the enzyme, biochemical characterization and potential applications are already published by our group. Here, we report cDNA cloning, complete amino acid sequencing and molecular modeling of procerain B. The derived amino acid sequence showed high sequence homology with other papain like plant cysteine proteases of peptidase C1A superfamily. The three dimensional structure of active procerain B was modeled by homology modeling using X-ray crystal structure of actinidin (PDB ID: 3P5U), a cysteine protease from the fruits of Actinidia arguta. The structural aspect of the enzyme is also discussed.

  7. cDNA cloning and molecular modeling of procerain B, a novel cysteine endopeptidase isolated from Calotropis procera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhay Narayan Singh

    Full Text Available Procerain B, a novel cysteine protease (endopeptidase isolated from Calotropis procera belongs to Asclepiadaceae family. Purification of the enzyme, biochemical characterization and potential applications are already published by our group. Here, we report cDNA cloning, complete amino acid sequencing and molecular modeling of procerain B. The derived amino acid sequence showed high sequence homology with other papain like plant cysteine proteases of peptidase C1A superfamily. The three dimensional structure of active procerain B was modeled by homology modeling using X-ray crystal structure of actinidin (PDB ID: 3P5U, a cysteine protease from the fruits of Actinidia arguta. The structural aspect of the enzyme is also discussed.

  8. Sperm Proteases that May Be Involved in the Initiation of Sperm Motility in the Newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misato Yokoe

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A protease of sperm in the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster that is released after the acrosome reaction (AR is proposed to lyse the sheet structure on the outer surface of egg jelly and release sperm motility-initiating substance (SMIS. Here, we found that protease activity in the sperm head was potent to widely digest substrates beneath the sperm. The protease activity measured by fluorescein thiocarbamoyl-casein digestion was detected in the supernatant of the sperm after the AR and the activity was inhibited by 4-(2-aminoethyl benzenesulfonyl fluoride (AEBSF, an inhibitor for serine or cysteine protease, suggesting the release of serine and/or cysteine proteases by AR. In an in silico analysis of the testes, acrosins and 20S proteasome were identified as possible candidates of the acrosomal proteases. We also detected another AEBSF-sensitive protease activity on the sperm surface. Fluorescence staining with AlexaFluor 488-labeled AEBSF revealed a cysteine protease in the principal piece; it is localized in the joint region between the axial rod and undulating membrane, which includes an axoneme and produces powerful undulation of the membrane for forward sperm motility. These results indicate that AEBSF-sensitive proteases in the acrosome and principal piece may participate in the initiation of sperm motility on the surface of egg jelly.

  9. Proteases decode the extracellular matrix cryptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Vallet, Sylvain D

    2016-03-01

    The extracellular matrix is comprised of 1100 core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins and of glycosaminoglycans. This structural scaffold contributes to the organization and mechanical properties of tissues and modulates cell behavior. The extracellular matrix is dynamic and undergoes constant remodeling, which leads to diseases if uncontrolled. Bioactive fragments, called matricryptins, are released from the extracellular proteins by limited proteolysis and have biological activities on their own. They regulate numerous physiological and pathological processes such as angiogenesis, cancer, diabetes, wound healing, fibrosis and infectious diseases and either improve or worsen the course of diseases depending on the matricryptins and on the molecular and biological contexts. Several protease families release matricryptins from core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins both in vitro and in vivo. The major proteases, which decrypt the extracellular matrix, are zinc metalloproteinases of the metzincin superfamily (matrixins, adamalysins and astacins), cysteine proteinases and serine proteases. Some matricryptins act as enzyme inhibitors, further connecting protease and matricryptin fates and providing intricate regulation of major physiopathological processes such as angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. They strengthen the role of the extracellular matrix as a key player in tissue failure and core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins as important therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  10. Live Cell Imaging and Profiling of Cysteine Cathepsin Activity Using a Quenched Activity-Based Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgington-Mitchell, Laura E; Bogyo, Matthew; Verdoes, Martijn

    2017-01-01

    Since protease activity is highly regulated by structural and environmental influences, the abundance of a protease often does not directly correlate with its activity. Because in most of the cases it is the activity of a protease that gives rise to its biological relevance, tools to report on this activity are of great value to the research community. Activity-based probes (ABPs) are small molecule tools that allow for the monitoring and profiling of protease activities in complex biological systems. The class of fluorescent quenched ABPs (qABPs), being intrinsically "dark" and only emitting fluorescence after reaction with the target protease, are ideally suited for imaging techniques such as small animal noninvasive fluorescence imaging and live cell fluorescence microscopy. An additional powerful characteristic of qABPs is their covalent and irreversible modification of the labeled protease, enabling in-depth target characterization. Here we describe the synthesis of a pan-cysteine cathepsin qABP BMV109 and the application of this probe to live cell fluorescence imaging and fluorescent SDS-PAGE cysteine cathepsin activity profiling.

  11. Cysteine proteinases and cystatins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeliana S. Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describeds the definition, localization, functions and examples of cysteine proteinases and their protein inhibitors in vertebrate, non-vertebrate animals and plants. These inhibitors are related with defense mechanisms of plant against pests. It also describes the factors involved in the specific cysteine proteinase-cystatin interaction and high degree of affinity and large specificity in this interaction which are not only represented by the compatibility between amino acid residues of the active site involved in catalysis, but also of all amino acid residues that participante in the enzyme-inhibitor interaction.Nesta revisão foram descritas definições, localizações, funções e exemplos de proteinases cisteínicas e suas proteinas inibidoras em animais vertebrados e invertebrados e plantas. Tratamos principalmente com aqueles inibidores que são relatados com o mecanismo de defesa da planta contra pestes. Em adição, comentamos sobre recentes trabalhos que contribuíram para uma melhor compreenção dos fatores envolvidos na interação específica proteinase cisteínica-cistatina. Por outro lado, chamamos atenção para o alto grau de afinidade e grande especificidade na interação que não são apenas representadas pela compatibilidade entre os residuos de aminoácidos do sítio ativo envolvidos na catalise, mas também de todos os resíduos de aminoácidos que participam da interação enzima-inibidor.

  12. Recovery of serine protease inhibitor from fish roes by polyethylene glycol precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Ji Lee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The fractionation of serine protease inhibitor (SPI from fish roe extracts was carried out using polyethylene glycol-4000 (PEG4000 precipitation. The protease inhibitory activity of extracts and PEG fractions from Alaska pollock (AP, bastard halibut (BH, skipjack tuna (ST, and yellowfin tuna (YT roes were determined against target proteases. All of the roe extracts showed inhibitory activity toward bromelain (BR, chymotrypsin (CH, trypsin (TR, papain-EDTA (PED, and alcalase (AL as target proteases. PEG fractions, which have positive inhibitory activity and high recovery (%, were the PEG1 fraction (0–5 %, w/v against cysteine proteases (BR and PA and the PEG4 fraction (20–40 %, w/v against serine proteases (CH and TR. The strongest specific inhibitory activity toward CH and TR of PEG4 fractions was AP (9278 and 1170 U/mg followed by ST (6687 and 2064 U/mg, YT (3951 and 1536 U/mg, and BH (538 and 98 U/mg. The inhibitory activity of serine protease in extracts and PEG fractions from fish roe was stronger than that of cysteine protease toward common casein substrate. Therefore, SPI is mainly distributed in fish roe and PEG fractionation effectively isolated the SPI from fish roes.

  13. Novel fungal protease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buxton, F.; Jarai, G.; Visser, J.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a novel DNA sequence coding for an Aspergillus serine protease of the subtilisin-type, an Aspergillus serine protease of the subtilisin-type per se and a method for the preparation thereof. The invention further concerns a novel Aspergillus mutant strain defective in a

  14. Haemonchus contortus: identification of proteases with diverse characteristics in adult worm excretory-secretory products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanu, F N; Rurangirwa, F R; McGuire, T C; Jasmer, D P

    1993-11-01

    Host tissue penetration and feeding by helminth parasites may be mediated by both mechanical processes and histolytic products released by the parasites. To investigate potential histolytic products released by adult Haemonchus contortus worms, proteases in excretory-secretory (ES) products were analyzed. The optimum activity of ES proteases was at pH 5.0, although activity was observed over a wide range of pH tested (pH 3.0-9.0). Four protease bands were observed on gelatin-containing polyacrylamide gels, with estimated molecular weights (M(r)) of 32, 35, 38, and 40 kDa. Proteases of 32 and 35 kDa were active at pH 5.0-8.0, while activity of the 38- and 40-kDa proteases was inhibited at pH 8.0. Based on inhibitor studies, the four proteases identified on gelatin-containing polyacrylamide gels were classified as cysteine proteases. Evidence was also obtained that indicated the presence of aspartic and metalloprotease activities in ES products, but these activities were not detected in gels. The diversity of adult H. contortus ES proteases may indicate variable functional requirements for the proteases. Further characterization of ES proteases will facilitate evaluation of their potential application in immunotherapeuti control of disease.

  15. The active adenovirus protease is the intact L3 23K protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, A; Kemp, G

    1993-07-01

    The L3 23K protein was isolated from adenovirus type 2 and shown to cleave purified substrates, confirming that this protein is the adenovirus protease. Separate antisera, prepared against the amino- and carboxy-terminal regions of the 23K protein react with active protease, demonstrating that, contrary to previous reports, zymogen activation is not involved in the regulation of this enzyme. Molecular exclusion chromatography indicated that the protease is active as a monomer. Purified protease was shown to be inhibited by Zn2+ and Cu2+ and by some, but not all, recognized cysteine protease inhibitors, indicating participation of a thiol group and providing additional support to the suggestion that regulation of the enzyme involves a form of thiol-disulphide interchange.

  16. Fermentative Production of Cysteine by Pantoea ananatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takumi, Kazuhiro; Ziyatdinov, Mikhail Kharisovich; Samsonov, Viktor; Nonaka, Gen

    2017-03-01

    Cysteine is a commercially important amino acid; however, it lacks an efficient fermentative production method. Due to its cytotoxicity, intracellular cysteine levels are stringently controlled via several regulatory modes. Managing its toxic effects as well as understanding and deregulating the complexities of regulation are crucial for establishing the fermentative production of cysteine. The regulatory modes include feedback inhibition of key metabolic enzymes, degradation, efflux pumps, and the transcriptional regulation of biosynthetic genes by a master cysteine regulator, CysB. These processes have been extensively studied using Escherichia coli for overproducing cysteine by fermentation. In this study, we genetically engineered Pantoea ananatis, an emerging host for the fermentative production of bio-based materials, to identify key factors required for cysteine production. According to this and our previous studies, we identified a major cysteine desulfhydrase gene, ccdA (formerly PAJ_0331), involved in cysteine degradation, and the cysteine efflux pump genes cefA and cefB (formerly PAJ_3026 and PAJ_p0018, respectively), which may be responsible for downregulating the intracellular cysteine level. Our findings revealed that ccdA deletion and cefA and cefB overexpression are crucial factors for establishing fermentative cysteine production in P. ananatis and for obtaining a higher cysteine yield when combined with genes in the cysteine biosynthetic pathway. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of cysteine production in P. ananatis, which has fundamental implications for establishing overproduction in this microbe.IMPORTANCE The efficient production of cysteine is a major challenge in the amino acid fermentation industry. In this study, we identified cysteine efflux pumps and degradation pathways as essential elements and genetically engineered Pantoea ananatis, an emerging host for the fermentative production of bio-based materials, to establish

  17. Salmon blood plasma: effective inhibitor of protease-laden Pacific whiting surimi and salmon mince.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Matthew R; Park, Jae W

    2015-06-01

    The effect of salmon plasma (SP) from Chinook salmon on proteolytic inhibition was investigated. SP was found to inhibit both cysteine and serine proteases as well as protease extracted from Pacific whiting muscle. SP was found to contain a 55kDa cysteine protease inhibitor through SDS-PAGE inhibitor staining. Freeze dried salmon plasma (FSP) and salmon plasma concentrated by ultrafiltration (CSP) were tested for their ability to inhibit autolysis in Pacific whiting surimi and salmon mince at concentrations of 0.25%, 0.5%, 1%, and 2%. Pacific whiting surimi autolysis was inhibited by an average of 89% regardless of concentration while inhibition of salmon mince autolysis increased with concentration (psalmon mince autolysis (p<0.05). Serine protease inhibition decreased when SP heated above 40°C but was stable across a broad NaCl and pH range. Cysteine protease inhibitors exhibited good temperature, NaCl, and pH stability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A biochemical comparison of proteases from pathogenic naegleria fowleri and non-pathogenic Naegleria gruberi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Luna, Jesús; Cervantes-Sandoval, Isaac; Tsutsumi, Victor; Shibayama, Mineko

    2007-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri is the etiologic agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Proteases have been suggested to be involved in tissue invasion and destruction during infection. We analyzed and compared the complete protease profiles of total crude extract and conditioned medium of both pathogenic N. fowleri and non-pathogenic Naegleria gruberi trophozoites. Using SDS-PAGE, we found differences in the number and molecular weight of proteolytic bands between the two strains. The proteases showed optimal activity at pH 7.0 and 35 degrees C for both strains. Inhibition assays showed that the main proteolytic activity in both strains is due to cysteine proteases although serine proteases were also detected. Both N. fowleri and N. gruberi have a variety of different protease activities at different pH levels and temperatures. These proteases may allow the amoebae to acquire nutrients from different sources, including those from the host. Although, the role of the amoebic proteases in the pathogenesis of PAM is not clearly defined, it seems that proteases and other molecules of the parasite as well as those from the host, could be participating in the damage to the human central nervous system.

  19. Visceral hypersensitivity in inflammatory bowel diseases and irritable bowel syndrome: The role of proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceuleers, Hannah; Van Spaendonk, Hanne; Hanning, Nikita; Heirbaut, Jelena; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; Joossens, Jurgen; Augustyns, Koen; De Man, Joris G; De Meester, Ingrid; De Winter, Benedicte Y

    2016-12-21

    Proteases, enzymes catalyzing the hydrolysis of peptide bonds, are present at high concentrations in the gastrointestinal tract. Besides their well-known role in the digestive process, they also function as signaling molecules through the activation of protease-activated receptors (PARs). Based on their chemical mechanism for catalysis, proteases can be classified into several classes: serine, cysteine, aspartic, metallo- and threonine proteases represent the mammalian protease families. In particular, the class of serine proteases will play a significant role in this review. In the last decades, proteases have been suggested to play a key role in the pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity, which is a major factor contributing to abdominal pain in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases and/or irritable bowel syndrome. So far, only a few preclinical animal studies have investigated the effect of protease inhibitors specifically on visceral sensitivity while their effect on inflammation is described in more detail. In our accompanying review we describe their effect on gastrointestinal permeability. On account of their promising results in the field of visceral hypersensitivity, further research is warranted. The aim of this review is to give an overview on the concept of visceral hypersensitivity as well as on the physiological and pathophysiological functions of proteases herein.

  20. Bacterial proteases and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing....... These extracellular proteases are activated in complex cascades involving auto-processing and proteolytic maturation. Thus, proteolysis has been adopted by bacterial pathogens at multiple levels to ensure the success of the pathogen in contact with the human host....

  1. Comparison of two cysteine endopeptidases from Pseudananas macrodontes (Morr.) Harms (Bromeliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, L M; Sequeiros, C; Trejo, S A; Pardo, M F; Caffini, N O; Natalucci, C L

    2001-05-01

    The properties of two cysteine peptidases (macrodontain I and II) isolated from fruits of Pseudananas macrodontes have been compared. The enzymes showed optimum pH ranges near neutrality and were inhibited by E-64 and other cysteine peptidase inhibitors. Molecular masses were 23459 and 23703 kDa, the isoelectric points were 6.1 and 5.9, and the Km values were 13.4 and 8.9 microM (Bz-Phe-Val-Arg-AMC) for macrodontain I and II, respectively. N-alpha-CBZ-L-amino acid p-nitrophenyl esters were tested for both enzymes. The N-terminal sequences of both proteases differed slightly and showed high sequence similarity to other pineapple stem-derived cysteine endopeptidases.

  2. A selective Chemosensor for Cysteine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of important cellular functions including detoxification and metabolism.1 Variation in the physiological level of thiols such as cysteine (Cys), homocysteine (Hcy), and glutathione (GSH) is linked to a number of diseases associated with leucocyteloss, psoriasis, liver damage, slow growth, hair depigmentation, edema, lethargy, ...

  3. Plasma Membrane Repair Is Regulated Extracellularly by Proteases Released from Lysosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Castro-Gomes

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells rapidly repair wounds on their plasma membrane. Resealing is Ca(2+-dependent, and involves exocytosis of lysosomes followed by massive endocytosis. Extracellular activity of the lysosomal enzyme acid sphingomyelinase was previously shown to promote endocytosis and wound removal. However, whether lysosomal proteases released during cell injury participate in resealing is unknown. Here we show that lysosomal proteases regulate plasma membrane repair. Extracellular proteolysis is detected shortly after cell wounding, and inhibition of this process blocks repair. Conversely, surface protein degradation facilitates plasma membrane resealing. The abundant lysosomal cysteine proteases cathepsin B and L, known to proteolytically remodel the extracellular matrix, are rapidly released upon cell injury and are required for efficient plasma membrane repair. In contrast, inhibition of aspartyl proteases or RNAi-mediated silencing of the lysosomal aspartyl protease cathepsin D enhances resealing, an effect associated with the accumulation of active acid sphingomyelinase on the cell surface. Thus, secreted lysosomal cysteine proteases may promote repair by facilitating membrane access of lysosomal acid sphingomyelinase, which promotes wound removal and is subsequently downregulated extracellularly by a process involving cathepsin D.

  4. Protease activation involved in resistance of human cells to x-ray cell killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hong-Chang; Takahashi, Shuji; Karata, Kiyonobu; Kita, Kazuko; Suzuki, Nobuo [Chiba Univ., Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    Little is known of proteases that play roles in the early steps of X-ray irradiation response. In the present study, we first searched for proteases whose activity is induced in human RSa-R cells after X-ray irradiation. The activity was identified as fibrinolytic, using {sup 125}I-labeled fibrin as a substrate. Protease samples were prepared by lysation of cells with a buffer containing MEGA-8. RSa-R cells showed an increased level of protease activity 10 min after X-ray (up to 3 Gy) irradiation. We next examined whether this protease inducibility is causally related with the X-ray susceptibility of cells. Leupeptin, a serine-cysteine protease inhibitor, inhibited the protease activity in samples obtained from X-ray-irradiated RSa-R cells. Treatment of RSa-R cells with the inhibitor before and after X-ray irradiation resulted in an increased susceptibility of the cells to X-ray cell killing. However, the treatment of cells with other inhibitors tested did not modulate the X-ray susceptibility. These results suggest that leupeptin-sensitive proteases are involved in the resistance of human cells to X-ray cell killing. (author)

  5. Bifunctional Probes of Cathepsin Protease Activity and pH Reveal Alterations in Endolysosomal pH during Bacterial Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanman, L.E.; Linden, W.A. van der; Verdoes, M.; Bogyo, M.

    2016-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are lysosomal proteases involved in regulation of both normal cellular processes and disease. Biochemical studies with peptide substrates indicate that cathepsins have optimal activity at acidic pH and highly attenuated activity at neutral pH. In contrast, there is mounting

  6. Cysteine degradation gene yhaM, encoding cysteine desulfidase, serves as a genetic engineering target to improve cysteine production in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Nonaka, Gen; Takumi, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Cysteine is an important amino acid for various industries; however, there is no efficient microbial fermentation-based production method available. Owing to its cytotoxicity, bacterial intracellular levels of cysteine are stringently controlled via several modes of regulation, including cysteine degradation by cysteine desulfhydrases and cysteine desulfidases. In Escherichia coli, several metabolic enzymes are known to exhibit cysteine degradative activities, however, their specificity and p...

  7. An endogenous inhibitor of cysteine cathepsin B from brain tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.L. Lyanna

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomes are the key degradative compartments of the cell in which the processes of protein degradation take place. Lysosomal cathepsins, which are enclosed in the lysosomes, help to maintain the homeostasis of the cell’s metabolism by participating in the degradation of heterophagic and autophagic material. When breaking down the integrity of lysosomal membranes the cathepsins are released into the cytosol and initiate the development of numerous pathological states. Breakdown in the control of protease activity leads to undesired and unregulated proteolysis. This is a cause of many diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, viral infections, cataracts etc. For this reason inhibitors of proteases have the potential to provide successful treatment for a wide range of diseases. Cathepsin B is one of the most abundant and ubiquitously expressed cysteine peptidases of the papain family. It is implicated in a number of pathological states including: inflammatory diseases of the airways, bone and joint disorders, acute pancreatitis, tumour metastasis, Alzheimer’s disease and ischemic neuronal death. The study of specific inhibitors for cathepsin B is considered important for chemotherapy and treatments of other diseases. This article represents part of a complex study of the lysosomal proteolytic-antiproteolytic system and its breakdown in the process of illness. In this article we present a scheme for extraction, purification and characterization of endogenous inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine cathepsin B. The cathepsin inhibitor was purified to homogeneity from the human neocortex. The purification was carried out in several successive stages: ammonium sulfate precipitation, followed by gel-filtration on Sephadex G-150, and ion exchange chromatography using DEAE-Sephadex A-75, followed by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. Throughout the purification procedure, cathepsin inhibitory activity was controlled against the substrate p

  8. Fermentative Production of Cysteine by Pantoea ananatis

    OpenAIRE

    Takumi, Kazuhiro; Ziyatdinov, Mikhail Kharisovich; Samsonov, Viktor; Nonaka, Gen

    2017-01-01

    Cysteine is a commercially important amino acid; however, it lacks an efficient fermentative production method. Due to its cytotoxicity, intracellular cysteine levels are stringently controlled via several regulatory modes. Managing its toxic effects as well as understanding and deregulating the complexities of regulation are crucial for establishing the fermentative production of cysteine. The regulatory modes include feedback inhibition of key metabolic enzymes, degradation, efflux pumps, a...

  9. HvPap-1 C1A Protease Participates Differentially in the Barley Response to a Pathogen and an Herbivore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Velasco-Arroyo, Blanca; Santamaria, M. Estrella; Diaz, Isabel; Martinez, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Co-evolutionary processes in plant–pathogen/herbivore systems indicate that protease inhibitors have a particular value in biotic interactions. However, little is known about the defensive role of their targets, the plant proteases. C1A cysteine proteases are the most abundant enzymes responsible for the proteolytic activity during different processes like germination, development and senescence in plants. To identify and characterize C1A cysteine proteases of barley with a potential role in defense, mRNA and protein expression patterns were analyzed in response to biotics stresses. A barley cysteine protease, HvPap-1, previously related to abiotic stresses and grain germination, was particularly induced by flagellin or chitosan elicitation, and biotic stresses such as the phytopathogenic fungus Magnaporthe oryzae or the phytophagous mite Tetranychus urticae. To elucidate the in vivo participation of this enzyme in defense, transformed barley plants overexpressing or silencing HvPap-1 encoding gene were subjected to M. oryzae infection or T. urticae infestation. Whereas overexpressing plants were less susceptible to the fungus than silencing plants, the opposite behavior occurred to the mite. This unexpected result highlights the complexity of the regulatory events leading to the response to a particular biotic stress. PMID:28955371

  10. HvPap-1 C1A Protease Participates Differentially in the Barley Response to a Pathogen and an Herbivore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Diaz-Mendoza

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Co-evolutionary processes in plant–pathogen/herbivore systems indicate that protease inhibitors have a particular value in biotic interactions. However, little is known about the defensive role of their targets, the plant proteases. C1A cysteine proteases are the most abundant enzymes responsible for the proteolytic activity during different processes like germination, development and senescence in plants. To identify and characterize C1A cysteine proteases of barley with a potential role in defense, mRNA and protein expression patterns were analyzed in response to biotics stresses. A barley cysteine protease, HvPap-1, previously related to abiotic stresses and grain germination, was particularly induced by flagellin or chitosan elicitation, and biotic stresses such as the phytopathogenic fungus Magnaporthe oryzae or the phytophagous mite Tetranychus urticae. To elucidate the in vivo participation of this enzyme in defense, transformed barley plants overexpressing or silencing HvPap-1 encoding gene were subjected to M. oryzae infection or T. urticae infestation. Whereas overexpressing plants were less susceptible to the fungus than silencing plants, the opposite behavior occurred to the mite. This unexpected result highlights the complexity of the regulatory events leading to the response to a particular biotic stress.

  11. Structure of the lysine specific protease Kgp from Porphyromonas gingivalis, a target for improved oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Michael A; Seers, Christine A; Michell, Belinda J; Feil, Susanne C; Huq, N Laila; Cross, Keith J; Reynolds, Eric C; Parker, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis. Gingipains, the principle virulence factors of P. gingivalis are multidomain, cell-surface proteins containing a cysteine protease domain. The lysine specific gingipain, Kgp, is a critical virulence factor of P. gingivalis. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of the lysine-specific protease domain of Kgp to 1.6 Å resolution. The structure provides insights into the mechanism of substrate specificity and catalysis. © 2014 The Protein Society.

  12. Philibertain g I, the most basic cysteine endopeptidase purified from the latex of Philibertia gilliesii Hook. et Arn. (Apocynaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeiros, C; Torres, M J; Trejo, S A; Esteves, J L; Natalucci, C L; López, L M I

    2005-11-01

    A new papain-like cysteine peptidase isolated from latex of Philibertia gilliesii Hook. et Arn., Apocynaceae (formerly Asclepiadaceae) has been purified and characterized. The enzyme, named philibertain g I, is the most basic component present in latex extracts and was purified by acetone fractionation followed by cation exchange chromatography (SP-Sepharose HR) using FPLC system. Homogeneity was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and mass spectroscopy (MS). Molecular mass of the enzyme was 23,530 Da (MALDI-TOF MS), its isoelectric point was >10.25, and maximum proteolytic activity (casein) was achieved at pH 7-8. The new protease was inhibited by E-64 a cysteine peptidases inhibitor. Km was 0.15 mM, using PFLNA as substrate. The N-terminal sequence of philibertain g I (LPASVDWRKEGAVLPIRHQGQCG) was compared with those of twenty plant proteases. Philibertain g I showed the higher degree of identity (73%) with caricain, one of the Carica papaya endopepetidases.

  13. Three low molecular weight cysteine proteinase inhibitors of human seminal fluid: purification and enzyme kinetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vikash Kumar; Chhikara, Nirmal; Gill, Kamaldeep; Dey, Sharmistha; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2013-08-01

    The cystatins form a superfamily of structurally related proteins with highly conserved structural folds. They are all potent, reversible, competitive inhibitors of cysteine proteinases (CPs). Proteins from this group present differences in proteinase inhibition despite their high level of structural similarities. In this study, three cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CPIs) of low molecular weight were isolated from human seminal fluid (HSF) by affinity chromatography on carboxymethyl (CM)-papain-Sepharose column, purified using various chromatographic procedures and checked for purity on sodium-dodecyl PAGE (SDS-PAGE). Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization-time-of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) identified these proteins as cystatin 9, cystatin SN, and SAP-1 (an N-terminal truncated form of cystatin S). All three CPIs suppressed the activity of papain potentially and showed remarkable heat stability. Interestingly SAP-1 also inhibits the activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin, and PSA (prostate specific antigen) and acts as a cross-class protease inhibitor in in vitro studies. Using Surface Plasmon Resonance, we have also observed that SAP-1 shows a significant binding with all these proteases. These studies suggest that SAP-1 is a cross-class inhibitor that may regulate activity of various classes of proteases within the reproductive systems. To our knowledge, this is the first report about purification of CPIs from HSF; the identification of such proteins could provide better insights into the physiological processes and offer intimation for further research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Distinct properties of proteases and nucleases in the gut, salivary gland and saliva of southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomate, Purushottam R; Bonning, Bryony C

    2016-06-10

    Stink bugs negatively impact numerous plant species of agricultural and horticultural importance. While efforts to develop effective control measures are underway, the unique digestive physiology of these pests presents a significant hurdle for either protein- or nucleotide-based management options. Here we report the comparative biochemical and proteomic characterization of proteases and nucleases from the gut, salivary gland and saliva of the southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula. The pH optimum for protease activity was acidic (5 to 6) in the gut with the primary proteases being cysteine proteases, and alkaline (8 to 9) in the saliva and salivary gland with the primary proteases being serine proteases. The serine proteases in saliva differ biochemically from trypsin and chymotrypsin, and the cathepsins in the gut and saliva showed distinct properties in inhibitor assays. Nuclease activity (DNase, RNase, dsRNase) was concentrated in the salivary gland and saliva with negligible activity in the gut. The most abundant proteins of the gut (530) and salivary gland (631) identified by proteomic analysis included four gut proteases along with eight proteases and one nuclease from the salivary gland. Understanding of N. viridula digestive physiology will facilitate the design of new strategies for management of this significant pest.

  15. Orchestration of an uncommon maturation cascade of the house dust mite protease allergen quartet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Eve eDumez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In more than 20% of the world population, sensitization to house dust mite (HDM allergens triggers typical allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis and asthma. Amongst the 23 mite allergen groups hitherto identified, groups 1 are cysteine proteases belonging to the papain-like family whereas groups 3, 6 and 9 are serine proteases displaying trypsin, chymotrypsin and collagenolytic activities, respectively. While these proteases are more likely to be involved in the mite digestive system, they also play critical roles in the initiation and in the chronicity of the allergic response notably through the activation of innate immune pathways. All these allergenic proteases are expressed in mite as inactive precursor form. Until recently, the exact mechanisms of their maturation into active proteases remained to be fully elucidated. Recent breakthroughs in the understanding of the activation mechanisms of mite allergenic protease precursors have highlighted an uncommon and unique maturation pathway orchestrated by group 1 proteases that tightly regulates the proteolytic activities of groups 1, 3, 6 and 9 through complex intra- or intermolecular mechanisms. This review presents and discusses the currently available knowledge of the activation mechanisms of group 1, 3, 6 and 9 allergens of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus laying special emphasis on their localization, regulation and interconnection.

  16. Protease production by Staphylococcus epidermidis and its effect on Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandecandelaere, Ilse; Depuydt, Pieter; Nelis, Hans J; Coenye, Tom

    2014-04-01

    Due to the resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to several antibiotics, treatment of S. aureus infections is often difficult. As an alternative to conventional antibiotics, the field of bacterial interference is investigated. Staphylococcus epidermidis produces a serine protease (Esp) which inhibits S. aureus biofilm formation and which degrades S. aureus biofilms. In this study, we investigated the protease production of 114 S. epidermidis isolates, obtained from biofilms on endotracheal tubes (ET). Most of the S. epidermidis isolates secreted a mixture of serine, cysteine and metalloproteases. We found a link between high protease production by S. epidermidis and the absence of S. aureus in ET biofilms obtained from the same patient. Treating S. aureus biofilms with the supernatant (SN) of the most active protease producing S. epidermidis isolates resulted in a significant biomass decrease compared to untreated controls, while the number of metabolically active cells was not affected. The effect on the biofilm biomass was mainly due to serine proteases. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms treated with the SN of protease producing S. epidermidis were thinner with almost no extracellular matrix. An increased survival of Caenorhabditis elegans, infected with S. aureus Mu50, was observed when the SN of protease positive S. epidermidis was added. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Inhibition of the growth of colorado potato beetle larvae by macrocypins, protease inhibitors from the parasol mushroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smid, Ida; Gruden, Kristina; Buh Gašparič, Meti; Koruza, Katarina; Petek, Marko; Pohleven, Jure; Brzin, Jože; Kos, Janko; Zel, Jana; Sabotič, Jerica

    2013-12-26

    Proteins from higher fungi have attracted interest because of their exceptional characteristics. Macrocypins, cysteine protease inhibitors from the parasol mushroom Macrolepiota procera , were evaluated for their adverse effects and their mode of action on the major potato pest Colorado potato beetle (CPB, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say). They were shown to reduce larval growth when expressed in potato or when their recombinant analogues were added to the diet. Macrocypins target a specific set of digestive cysteine proteases, intestains. Additionally, protein-protein interaction analysis revealed potential targets among other digestive enzymes and proteins related to development and primary metabolism. No effect of dietary macrocypins on gene expression of known adaptation-related digestive enzymes was observed in CPB guts. Macrocypins are the first fungal protease inhibitors to be reported as having a negative effect on growth and development of CPB larvae and could also be evaluated as control agents for other pests.

  18. A redox switch shapes the Lon protease exit pore to facultatively regulate proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishii, Wataru; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Muramatsu, Tomonari; Kojima, Masaki; Kihara, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    The Lon AAA+ protease degrades damaged or misfolded proteins in its intramolecular chamber. Its activity must be precisely controlled, but the mechanism by which Lon is regulated in response to different environments is not known. Facultative anaerobes in the Enterobacteriaceae family, mostly symbionts and pathogens, encounter both anaerobic and aerobic environments inside and outside the host's body, respectively. The bacteria characteristically have two cysteine residues on the Lon protease (P) domain surface that unusually form a disulfide bond. Here we show that the cysteine residues act as a redox switch of Lon. Upon disulfide bond reduction, the exit pore of the P-domain ring narrows by ∼30%, thus interrupting product passage and decreasing activity by 80%; disulfide bonding by oxidation restores the pore size and activity. The redox switch (E°' = -227 mV) is appropriately tuned to respond to variation between anaerobic and aerobic conditions, thus optimizing the cellular proteolysis level for each environment.

  19. Nucleic Acid Aptamers Against Proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, D M; Andersen, L M; Bøtkjær, Kenneth Alrø

    2011-01-01

    Proteases are potential or realized therapeutic targets in a wide variety of pathological conditions. Moreover, proteases are classical subjects for studies of enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms. We here review the literature on nucleic acid aptamers selected with proteases as targets. Designing...... small molecule protease inhibitors of sufficient specificity has proved a daunting task. Aptamers seem to represent a promising alternative. In our review, we concentrate on biochemical mechanisms of aptamer selection, proteinaptamer recognition, protease inhibition, and advantages of aptamers...... for pharmacological intervention with pathophysiological functions of proteases. Aptamers can be selected so that they bind their targets highly specifically and with affinities corresponding to K(D) values in the nM range. Aptamers can be selected so that they recognize their targets conformation...

  20. Clp chaperone-proteases: structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Wolfgang; Maglica, Zeljka; Weber-Ban, Eilika

    2009-11-01

    Clp proteases are the most widespread energy-dependent proteases in bacteria. Their two-component architecture of protease core and ATPase rings results in an inventory of several Clp protease complexes that often coexist. Here, we present insights into Clp protease function, from their assembly to substrate recruitment and processing, and how this is coupled to the expense of energy.

  1. Cysteine sensing by plasmons of silver nanocubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elfassy, Eitan, E-mail: eitan.elfassi@gmail.com; Mastai, Yitzhak, E-mail: Yitzhak.Mastai@biu.ac.il; Salomon, Adi, E-mail: adi.salomon@biu.ac.il

    2016-09-15

    Noble metal nanoparticles are considered to be valuable nanostructures in the field of sensors due to their spectral response sensitivity to small changes in the surrounding refractive index which enables them to detect a small amount of molecules. In this research, we use silver nanocubes of about 50 nm length to detect low concentrations of cysteine, a semi-essential amino acid. Following cysteine adsorption onto the nanocubes, a redshift in the plasmonic modes was observed, enabling the detection of cysteine down to 10 µM and high sensitivity of about 125 nm/RIU (refractive index units). Furthermore, we found that multilayer adsorption of cysteine leads to the stabilization of the silver nanocubes. The cysteine growth onto the nanocubes was also characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). - Highlights: • Silver nanocubes (50 nm length) are used to detect low concentrations of cysteine. • A redshift in the plasmonic modes was observed following cysteine adsorption onto the nanocubes. • The cysteine growth onto the nanocubes is also characterized by TEM.

  2. Cysteine degradation gene yhaM, encoding cysteine desulfidase, serves as a genetic engineering target to improve cysteine production in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Gen; Takumi, Kazuhiro

    2017-12-01

    Cysteine is an important amino acid for various industries; however, there is no efficient microbial fermentation-based production method available. Owing to its cytotoxicity, bacterial intracellular levels of cysteine are stringently controlled via several modes of regulation, including cysteine degradation by cysteine desulfhydrases and cysteine desulfidases. In Escherichia coli, several metabolic enzymes are known to exhibit cysteine degradative activities, however, their specificity and physiological significance for cysteine detoxification via degradation are unclear. Relaxing the strict regulation of cysteine is crucial for its overproduction; therefore, identifying and modulating the major degradative activity could facilitate the genetic engineering of a cysteine-producing strain. In the present study, we used genetic screening to identify genes that confer cysteine resistance in E. coli and we identified yhaM, which encodes cysteine desulfidase and decomposes cysteine into hydrogen sulfide, pyruvate, and ammonium. Phenotypic characterization of a yhaM mutant via growth under toxic concentrations of cysteine followed by transcriptional analysis of its response to cysteine showed that yhaM is cysteine-inducible, and its physiological role is associated with resisting the deleterious effects of cysteine in E. coli. In addition, we confirmed the effects of this gene on the fermentative production of cysteine using E. coli-based cysteine-producing strains. We propose that yhaM encodes the major cysteine-degrading enzyme and it has the most significant role in cysteine detoxification among the numerous enzymes reported in E. coli, thereby providing a core target for genetic engineering to improve cysteine production in this bacterium.

  3. Negative effect of combined cysteine and glutathione in soy lecithin-based extender on post-thawed ram spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhandi, Mahdi; Sharafi, Mohsen

    2015-09-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of combined cysteine and glutathione in soy lecithin-based semen extender on post-thawed ram sperm quality. A total of 28 ejaculates were collected twice a week (from four rams) during breeding season. In each replicate, semen samples (n = 4, one ejaculate for each ram) were pooled and divided into three equal parts, and each part was diluted with one of following extender: (1) soy lecithin-based extender containing no cysteine and no glutathione (C0-G0), (2) soy lecithin-based extender containing cysteine (5 mM) and glutathione (5 mM) (C5-G5), and (3) soy lecithin-based extender containing cysteine (10 mM) and glutathione (10 mM) (C10-G10). After freeze-thawing process, motility and velocity parameters, plasma membrane integrity and functionality, mitochondrial activity, and apoptosis features of spermatozoa were evaluated. The obtained results showed that total and progressive motility, plasma membrane integrity and functionality, and live post-thawed spermatozoa was lower in C10-G10 extender compared to C0-G0 and C5-G5 extenders (P 0.05). In conclusion, it seems that high concentration of combined cysteine and glutathione in soy lecithin-based semen extender has a detrimental effect of post-thawed ram sperm quality.

  4. Basis Tetrapeptides as Potent Intracellular Inhibitors of type A Botulinum Neurotoxin Protease Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, M.; Swaminathan, S.; Oyler, G.; Ahmed, S. A.

    2011-01-21

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent of all toxins that cause flaccid muscle paralysis leading to death. They are also potential biothreat agents. A systematic investigation of various short peptide inhibitors of the BoNT protease domain with a 17-residue peptide substrate led to arginine-arginine-glycine-cysteine having a basic tetrapeptide structure as the most potent inhibitor. When assayed in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT), the inhibitory effect was drastically reduced. Replacing the terminal cysteine with one hydrophobic residue eliminated the DTT effect but with two hydrophobic residues made the pentapeptide a poor inhibitor. Replacing the first arginine with cysteine or adding an additional cysteine at the N terminus did not improve inhibition. When assessed using mouse brain lysates, the tetrapeptides also inhibited BoNT/A cleavage of the endogenous SNAP-25. The peptides penetrated the neuronal cell lines, N2A and BE(2)-M17, without adversely affecting metabolic functions as measured by ATP production and P-38 phosphorylation. Biological activity of the peptides persisted within cultured chick motor neurons and rat and mouse cerebellar neurons for more than 40 h and inhibited BoNT/A protease action inside the neurons in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Our results define a tetrapeptide as the smallest peptide inhibitor in the backdrop of a large substrate protein of 200+ amino acids having multiple interaction regions with its cognate enzyme. The inhibitors should also be valuable candidates for drug development.

  5. Cysteine cathepsins are essential in lysosomal degradation of α-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlinchey, Ryan P; Lee, Jennifer C

    2015-07-28

    A cellular feature of Parkinson's disease is cytosolic accumulation and amyloid formation of α-synuclein (α-syn), implicating a misregulation or impairment of protein degradation pathways involving the proteasome and lysosome. Within lysosomes, cathepsin D (CtsD), an aspartyl protease, is suggested to be the main protease for α-syn clearance; however, the protease alone only generates amyloidogenic C terminal-truncated species (e.g., 1-94, 5-94), implying that other proteases and/or environmental factors are needed to facilitate degradation and to avoid α-syn aggregation in vivo. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, to our knowledge, we report the first peptide cleavage map of the lysosomal degradation process of α-syn. Studies of purified mouse brain and liver lysosomal extracts and individual human cathepsins demonstrate a direct involvement of cysteine cathepsin B (CtsB) and L (CtsL). Both CtsB and CtsL cleave α-syn within its amyloid region and circumvent fibril formation. For CtsD, only in the presence of anionic phospholipids can this protease cleave throughout the α-syn sequence, suggesting that phospholipids are crucial for its activity. Taken together, an interplay exists between α-syn conformation and cathepsin activity with CtsL as the most efficient under the conditions examined. Notably, we discovered that CtsL efficiently degrades α-syn amyloid fibrils, which by definition are resistant to broad spectrum proteases. This work implicates CtsB and CtsL as essential in α-syn lysosomal degradation, establishing groundwork to explore mechanisms to enhance their cellular activity and levels as a potential strategy for clearance of α-syn.

  6. Proteochemometric modeling of HIV protease susceptibility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lapins, Maris; Eklund, Martin; Spjuth, Ola; Prusis, Peteris; Wikberg, Jarl E S

    2008-01-01

    .... Therefore, we used proteochemometrics to model the susceptibility of HIV to protease inhibitors in current use, utilizing descriptions of the physico-chemical properties of mutated HIV proteases...

  7. Mannheimia haemolytica A2 secretes different proteases into the culture medium and in outer membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Rico, Gerardo; Martínez-Castillo, Moisés; González-Ruíz, Cynthia; Luna-Castro, Sarahí; de la Garza, Mireya

    2017-12-01

    Respiratory diseases in ruminants have a significantly negative impact on the worldwide economy. The bacterium Mannheimia haemolytica is involved in pneumonic infections in bovine and ovine. In gram-negative bacteria, six secretion systems related to the colonization process and host tissue damage have been reported. In addition, in the last two decades, the production of outer membrane vesicles has been studied as a different bacterial strategy to release virulence factors, such as exotoxins, lipopolysaccharides, and proteases. However, in M. haemolytica serotype A2, protease secretion and release in vesicles have not been reported as virulence mechanisms. The aim of this work was to identify proteases released into the culture supernatant and in vesicles of M. haemolytica A2. Our results showed evident differences in the molecular mass and activity of proteases present in culture supernatants and outer membrane vesicles based on zymography assays. The biochemical characterization of M. haemolytica proteases revealed that the main types were cysteine and metalloproteases. A specific metalloprotease of 100 kDa was active in the culture supernatants, but it was not active and was found in low quantities in vesicles. Proteases could be an important virulence factor during the infectious pneumonic process led by M. haemolytica. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of NADPH oxidase versus neutrophil proteases in antimicrobial host defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Robert Vethanayagam

    Full Text Available NADPH oxidase is a crucial enzyme in mediating antimicrobial host defense and in regulating inflammation. Patients with chronic granulomatous disease, an inherited disorder of NADPH oxidase in which phagocytes are defective in generation of reactive oxidant intermediates (ROIs, suffer from life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections. The mechanisms by which NADPH oxidase mediate host defense are unclear. In addition to ROI generation, neutrophil NADPH oxidase activation is linked to the release of sequestered proteases that are posited to be critical effectors of host defense. To definitively determine the contribution of NADPH oxidase versus neutrophil serine proteases, we evaluated susceptibility to fungal and bacterial infection in mice with engineered disruptions of these pathways. NADPH oxidase-deficient mice (p47(phox-/- were highly susceptible to pulmonary infection with Aspergillus fumigatus. In contrast, double knockout neutrophil elastase (NE(-/-×cathepsin G (CG(-/- mice and lysosomal cysteine protease cathepsin C/dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI-deficient mice that are defective in neutrophil serine protease activation demonstrated no impairment in antifungal host defense. In separate studies of systemic Burkholderia cepacia infection, uniform fatality occurred in p47(phox-/- mice, whereas NE(-/-×CG(-/- mice cleared infection. Together, these results show a critical role for NADPH oxidase in antimicrobial host defense against A. fumigatus and B. cepacia, whereas the proteases we evaluated were dispensable. Our results indicate that NADPH oxidase dependent pathways separate from neutrophil serine protease activation are required for host defense against specific pathogens.

  9. Evaluation of polyphenols from Broussonetia papyrifera as coronavirus protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Young; Yuk, Heung Joo; Ryu, Hyung Won; Lim, Su Hwan; Kim, Kyung Su; Park, Ki Hun; Ryu, Young Bae; Lee, Woo Song

    2017-12-01

    The current study was designed to assess the inhibitory activity of Broussonetia papyrifera-derived polyphenols against 3-chymotrypsin-like and papain-like coronavirus cysteine proteases. The isolated compounds were broussochalcone B (1), broussochalcone A (2), 4-hydroxyisolonchocarpin (3), papyriflavonol A (4), 3'-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)-3',4,7-trihydroxyflavane (5), kazinol A (6), kazinol B (7), broussoflavan A (8), kazinol F (9), and kazinol J (10). All polyphenols were more potent against papain-like protease (PLpro) than against 3-chymotripsin-like protease (3CLpro); therefore, we investigated their structural features that were responsible for this selectivity. Compound 4 was the most potent inhibitor of PLpro with an IC50 value of 3.7 μM. The active compounds displayed kinetic behaviors, and the binding constants of their interaction with PLpro were determined from surface plasmon resonance analysis. Our results suggest B. papyrifera constituents as promising candidates for development into potential anti-coronaviral agents.

  10. A Phytophthora palmivora extracellular cystatin-like protease inhibitor targets papain to contribute to virulence on papaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumtow, Rebecca; Wu, Dongliang; Uchida, Janice; Tian, Miaoying

    2017-10-25

    Papaya fruits, stems and leaves are rich in papain, a cysteine protease that has been shown to mediate plant defense against pathogens and insects. Yet the oomycete Phytophthora palmivora is a destructive pathogen that infects all parts of papaya plants, suggesting that it has evolved cysteine protease inhibitors to inhibit papain to enable successful infection. Out of five putative cystatin-like extracellular protease inhibitors (PpalEPICs) from P. palmivora transcriptomic sequence data, PpalEPIC8 appeared to be unique to P. palmivora and was highly induced during infection of papaya. Purified recombinant PpalEPIC8 strongly inhibited papain enzyme activity, suggesting that it is a functional cysteine protease inhibitor. Homozygous PpalEPIC8 mutants were generated using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT). Increased papain sensitivity of in vitro growth and reduced pathogenicity during infection of papaya fruits were observed for the mutants compared with the wild-type strain, suggesting that PpalEPIC8 indeed plays a role in P. palmivora virulence by inhibiting papain. This study provided genetic evidence demonstrating that plant-pathogenic oomycetes secrete cystatins as important weapons to invade plants. It also established an effective gene editing system for P. palmivora by the combined use of CRISPR/Cas9 and AMT, which is expected to be applicable to other oomycetes.

  11. SjAPI, the first functionally characterized Ascaris-type protease inhibitor from animal venoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongyun Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Serine protease inhibitors act as modulators of serine proteases, playing important roles in protecting animal toxin peptides from degradation. However, all known serine protease inhibitors discovered thus far from animal venom belong to the Kunitz-type subfamily, and whether there are other novel types of protease inhibitors in animal venom remains unclear. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, by screening scorpion venom gland cDNA libraries, we identified the first Ascaris-type animal toxin family, which contains four members: Scorpiops jendeki Ascaris-type protease inhibitor (SjAPI, Scorpiops jendeki Ascaris-type protease inhibitor 2 (SjAPI-2, Chaerilus tricostatus Ascaris-type protease inhibitor (CtAPI, and Buthus martensii Ascaris-type protease inhibitor (BmAPI. The detailed characterization of Ascaris-type peptide SjAPI from the venom gland of scorpion Scorpiops jendeki was carried out. The mature peptide of SjAPI contains 64 residues and possesses a classical Ascaris-type cysteine framework reticulated by five disulfide bridges, different from all known protease inhibitors from venomous animals. Enzyme and inhibitor reaction kinetics experiments showed that recombinant SjAPI was a dual function peptide with α-chymotrypsin- and elastase-inhibiting properties. Recombinant SjAPI inhibited α-chymotrypsin with a Ki of 97.1 nM and elastase with a Ki of 3.7 μM, respectively. Bioinformatics analyses and chimera experiments indicated that SjAPI contained the unique short side chain functional residues "AAV" and might be a useful template to produce new serine protease inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To our knowledge, SjAPI is the first functionally characterized animal toxin peptide with an Ascaris-type fold. The structural and functional diversity of animal toxins with protease-inhibiting properties suggested that bioactive peptides from animal venom glands might be a new source of protease inhibitors, which will accelerate the

  12. Identification of a novel host-specific IgG protease in Streptococcus phocae subsp. phocae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungelrath, Viktoria; Wohlsein, Jan Christian; Siebert, Ursula; Stott, Jeffrey; Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Baums, Christoph G; Seele, Jana

    2017-03-01

    Streptococcus (S.) phocae subsp. phocae causes bronchopneumonia and septicemia in a variety of marine mammals. Especially in harbor seals infected with phocine distemper virus it plays an important role as an opportunistic pathogen. This study was initiated by the detection of IgG cleavage products in Western blot analysis after incubation of bacterial supernatant with harbor seal serum. Hence, the objectives of this study were the identification and characterization of a secreted IgG cleaving protease in S. phocae subsp. phocae isolated from marine mammals. To further identify the responsible factor of IgG cleavage a protease inhibitor profile was generated. Inhibition of the IgG cleaving activity by iodoacetamide and Z-LVG-CHN2 indicated that a cysteine protease is involved. Moreover, an anti-IdeS antibody directed against the IgG endopeptidase IdeS of S. pyogenes showed cross reactivity with the putative IgG protease of S. phocae subsp. phocae. The IgG cleaving factor of S. phocae subsp. phocae was identified through an inverse PCR approach and designated IdeP (Immunoglobulin G degrading enzyme of S. phocae subsp. phocae) in analogy to the cysteine protease IdeS. Notably, recombinant (r) IdeP is a host and substrate specific protease as it cleaves IgG from grey and harbor seals but not IgG from harbor porpoises or non-marine mammals. The identification of IdeP represents the first description of a protein in S. phocae subsp. phocae involved in immune evasion. Furthermore, the fact that IdeP cleaves solely IgG of certain marine mammals reflects functional adaption of S. phocae subsp. phocae to grey and harbor seals as its main hosts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    OpenAIRE

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-01-01

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelai...

  14. Identification and characterization of bacterial cysteine dioxygenases: a new route of cysteine degradation for eubacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominy, John E; Simmons, Chad R; Karplus, P Andrew; Gehring, Amy M; Stipanuk, Martha H

    2006-08-01

    In metazoa and fungi, the catabolic dissimilation of cysteine begins with its sulfoxidation to cysteine sulfinic acid by the enzyme cysteine dioxygenase (CDO). In these organisms, CDO plays an important role in the homeostatic regulation of steady-state cysteine levels and provides important oxidized metabolites of cysteine such as sulfate and taurine. To date, there has been no experimental evidence for the presence of CDO in prokaryotes. Using PSI-BLAST searches and crystallographic information about the active-site geometry of mammalian CDOs, we identified a total of four proteins from Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, and Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) that shared low overall identity to CDO (13 to 21%) but nevertheless conserved important active-site residues. These four proteins were heterologously expressed and purified to homogeneity by a single-step immobilized metal affinity chromatography procedure. The ability of these proteins to oxidize cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid was then compared against recombinant rat CDO. The kinetic data strongly indicate that these proteins are indeed bona fide CDOs. Phylogenetic analyses of putative bacterial CDO homologs also indicate that CDO is distributed among species within the phyla of Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria. Collectively, these data suggest that a large subset of eubacteria is capable of cysteine sulfoxidation. Suggestions are made for how this novel pathway of cysteine metabolism may play a role in the life cycle of the eubacteria that have it.

  15. House dust mite major allergens Der p 1 and Der p 5 activate human airway-derived epithelial cells by protease-dependent and protease-independent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timmerman J André B

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract House dust mite allergens (HDM cause bronchoconstriction in asthma patients and induce an inflammatory response in the lungs due to the release of cytokines, chemokines and additional mediators. The mechanism how HDM components achieve this is largely unknown. The objective of this study was to assess whether HDM components of Dermatophagoides pteronissinus with protease activity (Der p 1 and unknown enzymatic activity (Der p 2, Der p 5 induce biological responses in a human airway-derived epithelial cell line (A549, and if so, to elucidate the underlying mechanism(s of action. A549 cells were incubated with HDM extract, Der p 1, recombinant Der p 2 and recombinant Der p 5. Cell desquamation was assessed by microscopy. The proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and IL-8, were measured by ELISA. Intracellular Ca2+ levels were assessed in A549 cells and in mouse fibroblasts expressing the human protease activated receptor (PAR1, PAR2 or PAR4. HDM extract, Der p 1 and Der p 5 dose-dependently increased the production of IL-6 and IL-8. Added simultaneously, Der p 1 and Der p 5 further increased the production of IL-6 and IL-8. The action of Der p 1 was blocked by cysteine-protease inhibitors, while that of Der p 5 couldn't be blocked by either serine- or cysteine protease inhibitors. Der p 5 only induced cell shrinking, whereas HDM extract and Der p1 also induced cell desquamation. Der p 2 had no effect on A549 cells. Der p 1's protease activity causes desquamation and induced the release of IL6 and IL-8 by a mechanism independent of Ca2+ mobilisation and PAR activation. Der p 5 exerts a protease-independent activation of A549 that involves Ca2+ mobilisation and also leads to the production of these cytokines. Together, our data indicate that allergens present in HDM extracts can trigger protease-dependent and protease-independent signalling pathways in A549 cells.

  16. Protease-Sensitive Synthetic Prions

    OpenAIRE

    Colby, David W.; Wain, Rachel; Baskakov, Ilia V.; Legname, Giuseppe; Palmer, Christina G.; Nguyen, Hoang-Oanh B.; Lemus, Azucena; Cohen, Fred E.; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2010-01-01

    Prions arise when the cellular prion protein (PrPC) undergoes a self-propagating conformational change; the resulting infectious conformer is designated PrPSc. Frequently, PrPSc is protease-resistant but protease-sensitive (s) prions have been isolated in humans and other animals. We report here that protease-sensitive, synthetic prions were generated in vitro during polymerization of recombinant (rec) PrP into amyloid fibers. In 22 independent experiments, recPrP amyloid preparations, but no...

  17. Partial Purification and Characterization of Extracellular Protease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbial proteases have wide industrial applications and proteases of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have received special attention because of their importance in the ... The crude protease had temperature and pH optima of 28 oC and 4.0 respectively thus indicating that the enzyme is a mesophilic and acidic protease.

  18. Co-evolution of insect proteases and plant protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongsma, Maarten A; Beekwilder, Jules

    2011-08-01

    Plants are at the basis of the food chain, but there is no such thing as a "free lunch" for herbivores. To promote reproductive success, plants evolved multi-layered defensive tactics to avoid or discourage herbivory. To the detriment of plants, herbivores, in turn, evolved intricate strategies to find, eat, and successfully digest essential plant parts to raise their own offspring. In this battle the digestive tract is the arena determining final victory or defeat as measured by growth or starvation of the herbivore. Earlier, specific molecular opponents were identified as proteases and inhibitors: digestive proteases of herbivores evolved structural motifs to occlude plant protease inhibitors, or alternatively, the insects evolved proteases capable of specifically degrading the host plant inhibitors. In response plant inhibitors evolved hyper-variable and novel protein folds to remain active against potential herbivores. At the level of protease regulation in herbivorous insects, it was shown that inhibition-insensitive digestive proteases are up-regulated when sensitive proteases are inhibited. The way this regulation operates in mammals is known as negative feedback by gut-luminal factors, so-called 'monitor peptides' that are sensitive to the concentration of active enzymes. We propose that regulation of gut enzymes by endogenous luminal factors has been an open invitation to plants to "hijack" this regulation by evolving receptor antagonists, although yet these plant factors have not been identified. In future research the question of the co-evolution of insect proteases and plant inhibitors should, therefore, be better approached from a systems level keeping in mind that evolution is fundamentally opportunistic and that the plant's fitness is primarily improved by lowering the availability of essential amino acids to an herbivore by any available mechanism.

  19. Activity Assays for Rhomboid Proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunova, E; Strisovsky, K; Lemieux, M J

    2017-01-01

    Rhomboids are ubiquitous intramembrane serine proteases that are involved in various signaling pathways. This fascinating class of proteases harbors an active site buried within the lipid milieu. High-resolution structures of the Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG with various inhibitors revealed the catalytic mechanism for rhomboid-mediated proteolysis; however, a quantitative characterization was lacking. Assessing an enzyme's catalytic parameters is important for understanding the details of its proteolytic reaction and regulatory mechanisms. To assay rhomboid protease activity, many challenges exist such as the lipid environment and lack of known substrates. Here, we summarize various enzymatic assays developed over the last decade to study rhomboid protease activity. We present detailed protocols for gel-shift and FRET-based assays, and calculation of KM and Vmax to measure catalytic parameters, using detergent solubilized rhomboids with TatA, the only known substrate for bacterial rhomboids, and the model substrate fluorescently labeled casein. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Crystal Structure of Mammalian Cysteine dioxygenase: A Novel Mononuclear Iron Center for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons,C.; Liu, Q.; Huang, Q.; Hao, Q.; Begley, T.; Karplus, P.; Stipanuk, M.

    2006-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a mononuclear iron-dependent enzyme responsible for the oxidation of cysteine with molecular oxygen to form cysteinesulfinate. This reaction commits cysteine to either catabolism to sulfate and pyruvate or to the taurine biosynthetic pathway. Cysteine dioxygenase is a member of the cupin superfamily of proteins. The crystal structure of recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase has been determined to 1.5 Angstroms resolution, and these results confirm the canonical cupin {beta}-sandwich fold and the rare cysteinyl-tyrosine intramolecular crosslink (between Cys93 and Tyr157) seen in the recently reported murine cysteine dioxygenase structure. In contrast to the catalytically inactive mononuclear Ni(II) metallocenter present in the murine structure, crystallization of a catalytically competent preparation of rat cysteine dioxygenase revealed a novel tetrahedrally coordinated mononuclear iron center involving three histidines (His86, His88, and His140) and a water molecule. Attempts to acquire a structure with bound ligand using either co-crystallization or soaks with cysteine revealed the formation of a mixed disulfide involving Cys164 near the active site, which may explain previously observed substrate inhibition. This work provides a framework for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in thiol dioxygenation and sets the stage for exploring the chemistry of both the novel mononuclear iron center and the catalytic role of the cysteinyl-tyrosine linkage.

  1. Reconstruction of Cysteine Biosynthesis Using Engineered Cysteine-Free and Methionine-Free Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kendrick; Fujishima, Kosuke; Abe, Nozomi; Nakahigashi, Kenji; Endy, Drew; Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Ten of the proteinogenic amino acids can be generated abiotically while the remaining thirteen require biology for their synthesis. Paradoxically, the biosynthesis pathways observed in nature require enzymes that are made with the amino acids they produce. For example, Escherichia coli produces cysteine from serine via two enzymes that contain cysteine. Here, we substituted alternate amino acids for cysteine and also methionine, which is biosynthesized from cysteine, in serine acetyl transferase (CysE) and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (CysM). CysE function was rescued by cysteine-and-methionine-free enzymes and CysM function was rescued by cysteine-free enzymes. Structural modeling suggests that methionine stabilizes CysM and is present in the active site of CysM. Cysteine is not conserved among CysE and CysM protein orthologs, suggesting that cysteine is not functionally important for its own synthesis. Engineering biosynthetic enzymes that lack the amino acids being synthesized provides insights into the evolution of amino acid biosynthesis and pathways for bioengineering.

  2. Three-dimensional cultures modeling premalignant progression of human breast epithelial cells: role of cysteine cathepsins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Stefanie R; Sameni, Mansoureth; Blum, Galia; Bogyo, Matthew; Sloane, Bonnie F; Moin, Kamiar

    2012-12-01

    The expression of the cysteine protease cathepsin B is increased in early stages of human breast cancer.To assess the potential role of cathepsin B in premalignant progression of breast epithelial cells, we employed a 3D reconstituted basement membrane overlay culture model of MCF10A human breast epithelial cells and isogenic variants that replicate the in vivo phenotypes of hyper plasia(MCF10AneoT) and atypical hyperplasia (MCF10AT1). MCF10A cells developed into polarized acinar structures with central lumens. In contrast, MCF10AneoT and MCF10AT1 cells form larger structures in which the lumens are filled with cells. CA074Me, a cell-permeable inhibitor selective for the cysteine cathepsins B and L,reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis of MCF10A, MCF10AneoT and MCF10AT1 cells in 3D culture. We detected active cysteine cathepsins in the isogenic MCF10 variants in 3D culture with GB111, a cell-permeable activity based probe, and established differential inhibition of cathepsin B in our 3D cultures. We conclude that cathepsin B promotes proliferation and premalignant progression of breast epithelial cells. These findings are consistent with studies by others showing that deletion of cathepsin B in the transgenic MMTV-PyMT mice, a murine model that is predisposed to development of mammary cancer, reduces malignant progression.

  3. Cysteine Biosynthesis Controls Serratia marcescens Phospholipase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark T; Mitchell, Lindsay A; Mobley, Harry L T

    2017-08-15

    Serratia marcescens causes health care-associated opportunistic infections that can be difficult to treat due to a high incidence of antibiotic resistance. One of the many secreted proteins of S. marcescens is the PhlA phospholipase enzyme. Genes involved in the production and secretion of PhlA were identified by screening a transposon insertion library for phospholipase-deficient mutants on phosphatidylcholine-containing medium. Mutations were identified in four genes (cyaA, crp, fliJ, and fliP) that are involved in the flagellum-dependent PhlA secretion pathway. An additional phospholipase-deficient isolate harbored a transposon insertion in the cysE gene encoding a predicted serine O-acetyltransferase required for cysteine biosynthesis. The cysE requirement for extracellular phospholipase activity was confirmed using a fluorogenic phospholipase substrate. Phospholipase activity was restored to the cysE mutant by the addition of exogenous l-cysteine or O-acetylserine to the culture medium and by genetic complementation. Additionally, phlA transcript levels were decreased 6-fold in bacteria lacking cysE and were restored with added cysteine, indicating a role for cysteine-dependent transcriptional regulation of S. marcescens phospholipase activity. S. marcescenscysE mutants also exhibited a defect in swarming motility that was correlated with reduced levels of flhD and fliA flagellar regulator gene transcription. Together, these findings suggest a model in which cysteine is required for the regulation of both extracellular phospholipase activity and surface motility in S. marcescensIMPORTANCESerratia marcescens is known to secrete multiple extracellular enzymes, but PhlA is unusual in that this protein is thought to be exported by the flagellar transport apparatus. In this study, we demonstrate that both extracellular phospholipase activity and flagellar function are dependent on the cysteine biosynthesis pathway. Furthermore, a disruption of cysteine biosynthesis

  4. Biochemical characterization of a halophilic, alkalithermophilic protease from Alkalibacillus sp. NM-Da2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Hamed, Asmaa R; Abo-Elmatty, Dina M; Wiegel, Juergen; Mesbah, Noha M

    2016-11-01

    An extracellular, halophilic, alkalithermophilic serine protease from the halo-alkaliphilic Alkalibacillus sp. NM-Da2 was purified to homogeneity by ethanol precipitation and anion-exchange chromatography. The purified protease was a monomeric enzyme with an approximate molecular mass of 35 kDa and exhibited maximal activity at 2.7 M NaCl, pH55 °C 9 and 56 °C. The protease showed great temperature stability, retaining greater than 80 % of initial activity after 2 h incubation at 55 °C. The protease was also extremely pH tolerant, retaining 80 % of initial activity at pH55 °C 10.5 after 30 min incubation. Protease hydrolyzed complex substrates, displaying activity on yeast extract, tryptone, casein, gelatin and peptone. Protease activity was inhibited at casein concentrations greater than 1.2 mg/mL. The enzyme was stable and active in 40 % (v/v) solutions of isopropanol, ethanol and benzene and was stable in the presence of the polysorbate surfactant Tween 80. Activity was stimulated with the oxidizing agent hydrogen peroxide. Inhibition with phenyl methylsulfonylfluoride indicates it is a serine protease. Synthetic saline wastewater treated with the protease showed 50 % protein removal after 5 h. Being halophilic, alkaliphilic and thermophilic, in addition to being resistant to organic solvents, this protease has potential for various applications in biotechnological and pharmaceutical industries.

  5. Protease inhibitors and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-01

    A new generation of protease inhibitors is entering studies. Abbott Lab's ABT-378 and Pharmacia/Upjohn's PNU-140690 are beginning clinical studies and both are designed to overcome resistance problems. Several companies are developing new compounds to inhibit reverse transcriptase, such as Bristol-Myers Squibb's lobucavir and Hoechst/Bayer's HBY097. Calanolide A, which will soon begin trials, has a different resistance pattern than other non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, which may be an important advantage. Several groups are developing compounds to inhibit the HIV zinc finger, such as Parke-Davis' compound, CI-1012; and a Dutch company who is developing Azodicarbonamide, a drug currently in phase I/II trials for people with advanced disease in Europe. HIV drugs to date have not been successful in blocking viral fusion. However, three new fusion inhibitors are showing promise within the laboratory: Pentafuside (currently in phase I trials), Fuji ImmunoPharmaceuticals' FP-21399 (currently in phase I trials), and ISIS Pharmaceuticals' ISIS 5320. A new class of drugs known as integrase inhibitors has been of interest to pharmaceutical companies for the past several years; only one drug, Aronex Pharmaceuticals' Zintevir, has reached phase I/II trials.

  6. Engineered multidomain cysteine protease inhibitors yield resistance against western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) in greenhouse trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Outchkourov, N.S.; Kogel, de W.J.; Wiegers, G.L.; Abrahamson, M.; Jongsma, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), cause very large economic damage on a variety of field and greenhouse crops. In this study, plant resistance against thrips was introduced into transgenic potato plants through the expression of novel,

  7. Host plants indirectly influence plant virus transmission by altering gut cysteine protease activity of aphid vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luteoviridae), transmitted exclusively by aphids in a circulative manner. PLRV transmission efficiency was significantly reduced when a clonal lineage of M. persicae was reared on turnip as compared to the weed physalis, a transient effect caused by a host-switch response. A trend of higher PLRV tit...

  8. On Terminal Alkynes That Can React with Active-Site Cysteine Nucleophiles in Proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekkebus, R.; van Kasteren, S.I.; Kulathu, Y.; Scholten, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313939780; Berlin, I.; Geurink, P.P.; de Jong, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326795960; Goerdayal, S.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/310935113; Neefjes, J.; Heck, A.J.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/105189332; Komander, D.; Ovaa, H.

    2013-01-01

    Active-site directed probes are powerful in studies of enzymatic function. We report an active-site directed probe based on a warhead so far considered unreactive. By replacing the C-terminal carboxylate of ubiquitin (Ub) with an alkyne functionality, a selective reaction with the active-site

  9. Effects of Cysteine Proteases on the Structural and Mechanical Properties of Collagen Fibers*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Preety; Du, Xin; Sharma, Vidhu; Lamour, Guillaume; Castro, Mickael; Li, Hongbin; Brömme, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Excessive cathepsin K (catK)-mediated turnover of fibrillar type I and II collagens in bone and cartilage leads to osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. However, little is known about how catK degrades compact collagen macromolecules. The present study is aimed to explore the structural and mechanical consequences of collagen fiber degradation by catK. Mouse tail type I collagen fibers were incubated with either catK or non-collagenase cathepsins. Methods used include scanning electron microscopy, protein electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy, and tensile strength testing. Our study revealed evidence of proteoglycan network degradation, followed by the progressive disassembly of macroscopic collagen fibers into primary structural elements by catK. Proteolytically released GAGs are involved in the generation of collagenolytically active catK-GAG complexes as shown by AFM. In addition to their structural disintegration, a decrease in the tensile properties of fibers was observed due to the action of catK. The Young's moduli of untreated collagen fibers versus catK-treated fibers in dehydrated conditions were 3.2 ± 0.68 GPa and 1.9 ± 0.65 GPa, respectively. In contrast, cathepsin L, V, B, and S revealed no collagenase activity, except the disruption of proteoglycan-GAG interfibrillar bridges, which slightly decreased the tensile strength of fibers. PMID:23297404

  10. Streptococcal Cysteine Protease-Mediated Cleavage of Desmogleins Is Involved in the Pathogenesis of Cutaneous Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Sumitomo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes is responsible for a wide variety of cutaneous infections ranging from superficial impetigo to fulminant invasive necrotizing fasciitis. Dysfunction of desmosomes is associated with the pathogenesis of cutaneous diseases. We identified streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB as a proteolytic factor that cleaves the extracellular domains of desmoglein 1 and 3. In an epicutaneous infection model, lesional skin infected with an speB deletion mutant were significantly smaller as compared to those caused by the wild-type strain. Furthermore, immunohistological analysis indicated cleavage of desmogleins that developed around the invasion site of the wild-type strain. In contrast, the speB mutant was preferentially found on the epidermis surface layer. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that SpeB-mediated degradation of desmosomes has a pathogenic role in development of S. pyogenes cutaneous infection.

  11. A New Class of Serine and Cysteine Protease Inhibitor with Chemotherapeutic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    on Bruker WM-250, Avance -300 or Avance -400 instruments. Spectra were calibrated using TMS (8 = 0.00 ppm) for 1H NMR and CDC13 (8 = 77.0 ppm) or CD3OD...General Methods. NMR spectra were recorded on Bruker WM-250, Avance -300 or Avance -400 instruments. Spectra were calibrated using TMS (8 = 0.00 ppm) for ’H

  12. Antimicrobial activity of a honeybee (Apis cerana) venom Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo Yeon; Lee, Kwang Sik; Zou, Feng Ming; Wan, Hu; Choi, Yong Soo; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Kwon, Hyung Wook; Je, Yeon Ho; Jin, Byung Rae

    2013-12-15

    Insect-derived Kazal-type serine protease inhibitors exhibit thrombin, elastase, plasmin, proteinase K, or subtilisin A inhibition activity, but so far, no functional roles for bee-derived Kazal-type serine protease inhibitors have been identified. In this study, a bee (Apis cerana) venom Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor (AcKTSPI) that acts as a microbial serine protease inhibitor was identified. AcKTSPI contained a single Kazal domain that displayed six conserved cysteine residues and a P1 threonine residue. AcKTSPI was expressed in the venom gland and was present as a 10-kDa peptide in bee venom. Recombinant AcKTSPI Kazal domain (AcKTSPI-Kd) expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells demonstrated inhibitory activity against subtilisin A (Ki 67.03 nM) and proteinase K (Ki 91.53 nM), but not against α-chymotrypsin or trypsin, which implies a role for AcKTSPI as a microbial serine protease inhibitor. However, AcKTSPI-Kd exhibited no detectable inhibitory effects on factor Xa, thrombin, tissue plasminogen activator, or elastase. Additionally, AcKTSPI-Kd bound directly to Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus thuringiensis, Beauveria bassiana, and Fusarium graminearum but not to Escherichia coli. Consistent with these findings, AcKTSPI-Kd showed antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria and antifungal activity against both plant-pathogenic and entomopathogenic fungi. These findings constitute molecular evidence that AcKTSPI acts as an inhibitor of microbial serine proteases. This paper provides a novel view of the antimicrobial functions of a bee venom Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The yeast autophagy protease Atg4 is regulated by thioredoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Marchand, Christophe H; Crespo, José L; Lemaire, Stéphane D

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a membrane-trafficking process whereby double-membrane vesicles called autophagosomes engulf and deliver intracellular material to the vacuole for degradation. Atg4 is a cysteine protease with an essential function in autophagosome formation. Mounting evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species may play a role in the control of autophagy and could regulate Atg4 activity but the precise mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we showed that reactive oxygen species activate autophagy in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and unraveled the molecular mechanism by which redox balance controls Atg4 activity. A combination of biochemical assays, redox titrations, and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that Atg4 is regulated by oxidoreduction of a single disulfide bond between Cys338 and Cys394. This disulfide has a low redox potential and is very efficiently reduced by thioredoxin, suggesting that this oxidoreductase plays an important role in Atg4 regulation. Accordingly, we found that autophagy activation by rapamycin was more pronounced in a thioredoxin mutant compared with wild-type cells. Moreover, in vivo studies indicated that Cys338 and Cys394 are required for the proper regulation of autophagosome biogenesis, since mutation of these cysteines resulted in increased recruitment of Atg8 to the phagophore assembly site. Thus, we propose that the fine-tuning of Atg4 activity depending on the intracellular redox state may regulate autophagosome formation.

  14. 21 CFR 582.5271 - Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cysteine. 582.5271 Section 582.5271 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1...

  15. (DHA) and L-cysteine supplementation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACER

    2012-02-21

    Feb 21, 2012 ... The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of docosahexaenoic acid and L-cysteine supplementation on qualities of cryopreserved boar semen. A total of 30 ejaculates from 10 Yorkshire boars were included in the study. The semen was cryopreserved in lactose egg yolk base extender.

  16. Synthetic cyclohexenyl chalcone natural products possess cytotoxic activities against prostate cancer cells and inhibit cysteine cathepsins in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb Majumdar, Ishita; Devanabanda, Arvind; Fox, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Jacob; Cong, Huan; Porco, John A; Weber, Horst C

    2011-12-16

    A number of cyclohexenyl chalcone Diels-Alder natural products possess promising biological properties including strong cytotoxicity in various human cancer cells. Herein, we show that natural products in this class including panduratin A and nicolaioidesin C inhibit cysteine cathepsins as indicated by protease profiling assays and cell-free cathepsin L enzyme assays. Owing to the critical roles of cathepsins in the biology of human tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis, these findings should pave the way for development of novel antitumor agents for use in clinical settings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Preliminary functional characterization, cloning and primary sequence of Fastuosain, a cysteine peptidase isolated from fruits of Bromelia fastuosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Hamilton; Leopoldino, Andréia M; Tajara, Eloiza H; Greene, Lewis J; Faça, Vitor M; Mateus, Rogério P; Ceron, Carlos R; de Souza Judice, Wagner A; Julianod, Luiz; Bonilla-Rodriguez, Gustavo O

    2006-01-01

    The present work reports the characterization of Fastuosain, a novel cysteine protease of 25kDa, purified from the unripe fruits of Bromelia fastuosa, a wild South American Bromeliaceae. Proteolytic activity, measured using casein and synthetic substrates, was dependent on the presence of thiol reagents, having maximum activity at pH 7.0. The present work reports cDNA cloning of Fastuosain; cDNA was amplified by PCR using specific primers. The product was 1096pb long. Mature fastuosain has 217 residues, and with the proregion has a total length of 324 residues. Its primary sequence showed high homology with ananain(74%), stem bromelain (66%) and papain (44%).

  18. Determining cysteine oxidation status using differential alkylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Birgit; Yoo, Chris B.; Collins, Christopher J.; Gibson, Bradford W.

    2004-08-01

    Oxidative damage to proteins plays a major role in aging and in the pathology of many degenerative diseases. Under conditions of oxidative stress, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can modify key redox sensitive amino acid side chains leading to altered biological activities or structures of the targeted proteins. This in turn can affect signaling or regulatory control pathways as well as protein turnover and degradation efficiency in the proteasome. Cysteine residues are particularly susceptible to oxidation, primarily through reversible modifications (e.g., thiolation and nitrosylation), although irreversible oxidation can lead to products that cannot be repaired in vivo such as sulfonic acid. This report describes a strategy to determine the overall level of reversible cysteine oxidation using a stable isotope differential alkylation approach in combination with mass spectrometric analysis. This method employs 13C-labeled alkylating reagents, such as N-ethyl-[1,4-13C2]-maleimide, bromo-[1,2-13C2]-acetic acid and their non-labeled counterparts to quantitatively assess the level of cysteine oxidation at specific sites in oxidized proteins. The differential alkylation protocol was evaluated using standard peptides and proteins, and then applied to monitor and determine the level of oxidative damage induced by diamide, a mild oxidant. The formation and mass spectrometric analysis of irreversible cysteine acid modification will also be discussed as several such modifications have been identified in subunits of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes. This strategy will hopefully contribute to our understanding of the role that cysteine oxidation plays in such chronic diseases such as Parkinson's disease, where studies in animal and cell models have shown oxidative damage to mitochondrial Complex I to be a specific and early target.

  19. A Serendipitous Formation of a Cysteine-bridged Disaccharide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine bearing free carboxylic acid and sulfhydryl groups was glycosylated with 1,2,3,4,6-Penta-O-acetyl-β- D-glucopyranoside in the presence of SnCl4 as a promoter to give the S-glycosylated cysteine in 64%yield. However, when excess donor was used, a previously unreported cysteine-bridged ...

  20. Septicemia caused by cysteine-dependent Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Yuen, K Y; Seto, W H; Tsui, K H; Hui, W T

    1990-01-01

    A case of septicemia and urinary tract infection caused by cysteine-dependent Escherichia coli in a 70-year-old woman with bilateral staghorn calculi is described. This is the second report of a cysteine-dependent E. coli bacteremia. The bacterium was falsely susceptible to ampicillin and co-trimoxazole when tested on a medium without cysteine supplement.

  1. A novel human protease similar to the interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme induces apoptosis in transfected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucheu, C; Diu, A; Chan, A W; Blanchet, A M; Miossec, C; Hervé, F; Collard-Dutilleul, V; Gu, Y; Aldape, R A; Lippke, J A

    1995-05-01

    We have identified a novel cDNA encoding a protein (named TX) with > 50% overall sequence identity with the interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme (ICE) and approximately 30% sequence identity with the ICE homologs NEDD-2/ICH-1L and CED-3. A computer homology model of TX was constructed based on the X-ray coordinates of the ICE crystal recently published. This model suggests that TX is a cysteine protease, with the P1 aspartic acid substrate specificity retained. Transfection experiments demonstrate that TX is a protease which is able to cleave itself and the p30 ICE precursor, but not to generate mature IL-1 beta from pro-IL-1 beta. In addition, this protein induces apoptosis in transfected COS cells. TX therefore delineates a new member of the growing Ice/ced-3 gene family coding for proteases with cytokine processing activity or involved in programmed cell death.

  2. Partial Purification and Characterization of Extracellular Protease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    ABSTRACT: Microbial proteases have wide industrial applications and proteases of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) ... the food and dairy industry. ..... Sumantha, A., Larroche, C. and Pandey, A. (2006). Microbiology and industrial biotechnology of food-grade proteases: a perspective. Food. Technology and Biotechnology ...

  3. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  4. Optimization of alkaline protease production from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... A protease producing bacteria was isolated from meat waste contaminated soil and identified as. Pseudomonas ... Key words: Alkaline protease, casein agar, meat waste contaminated soil, Pseudomonas fluorescens. INTRODUCTION ... advent of new frontiers in biotechnology, the spectrum of protease ...

  5. X-ray structure at 1.75 resolution of a norovirus 3C protease linked to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Jon [University of Southampton, England; Coates, Leighton [ORNL; Hussey, Robert [University of Southampton, England

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses are recognized universally as the most important cause of human epidemic non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Viral replication requires a 3C cysteine protease that cleaves a 200kDa viral polyprotein into its constituent functional proteins. Here we describe the X-ray structure of the Southampton norovirus 3C protease (SV3CP) bound to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor (MAPI) which has been refined at 1.75 resolution, following initial MAD phasing with a selenomethionine derivative. The inhibitor, acetyl-Glu-Phe-Gln-Leu-Gln-X, based on a 3C protease cleavage recognition sequences in the 200kDa polyprotein substrate, reacts covalently through its propenylethylester group (X) with the active site nucleophile, Cys 139. The 3C protease-inhibitor structure permits, for the first time, the identification of substrate recognition and binding groups and provides important new information for the development of antiviral prophylactics.

  6. Production of Recombinant Rhomboid Proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunova, E; Panigrahi, R; Strisovsky, K; Lemieux, M J

    2017-01-01

    Rhomboid proteases are intramembrane enzymes that hydrolyze peptide bonds of transmembrane proteins in the lipid bilayer. They play a variety of roles in key biological events and are linked to several disease states. Over the last decade a great deal of structural and functional knowledge has been generated on this fascinating class of proteases. Both structural and kinetic analyses require milligram amounts of protein, which may be challenging for membrane proteins such as rhomboids. Here, we present a detailed protocol for optimization of expression and purification of three rhomboid proteases from Escherichia coli (ecGlpG), Haemophilus influenzae (hiGlpG), and Providencia stuartii (AarA). We discuss the optimization of expression conditions, such as concentration of inducing agent, induction time, and temperature, as well as purification protocol with precise details for each step. The provided protocol yields 1-2.5mg of rhomboid enzyme per liter of bacterial culture and can assist in structural and functional studies of intramembrane proteases. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Carbohydrase and protease supplementation increased ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2014-09-15

    Sep 15, 2014 ... Department of Animal and Wildlife Sciences, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Science ... control birds was 12% higher than that of the positive control, while diets supplemented with single enzyme ... The inclusion of exogenous proteases in maize-soya-based diets increases protein digestion by.

  8. Factor VII-activating protease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramanathan, Ramshanker; Gram, Jørgen B; Sand, Niels Peter R

    2017-01-01

    : Factor VII-activating protease (FSAP) may regulate development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We evaluated sex differences in FSAP measures and examined the association between FSAP and coronary artery calcification (CAC) in a middle-aged population. Participants were randomly selected citizens...

  9. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Novel Prodrugs of Transition State Inhibitors of Norovirus 3CL Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galasiti Kankanamalage, Anushka C; Kim, Yunjeong; Rathnayake, Athri D; Alliston, Kevin R; Butler, Michelle M; Cardinale, Steven C; Bowlin, Terry L; Groutas, William C; Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2017-07-27

    Ester and carbamate prodrugs of aldehyde bisulfite adduct inhibitors were synthesized in order to improve their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. The inhibitory activity of the compounds against norovirus 3C-like protease in enzyme and cell-based assays was determined. The ester and carbamate prodrugs displayed equivalent potency to those of the precursor aldehyde bisulfite adducts and precursor aldehydes. Furthermore, the rate of ester cleavage was found to be dependent on alkyl chain length. The generated prodrugs exhibited low cytotoxicity and satisfactory liver microsomes stability and plasma protein binding. The methodology described herein has wide applicability and can be extended to the bisulfite adducts of common warheads employed in the design of transition state inhibitors of serine and cysteine proteases of medical relevance.

  10. Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed β+ emitter C10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, J. C.; Golovko, V.; Goodwin, J.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.

    2008-04-01

    The half-life of C10 has been measured to be 19.310(4) s, a result with 0.02% precision, which is a factor of three improvement over the best previous result. Since C10 is the lightest superallowed 0+→0+ β+ emitter, its ft value has the greatest weight in setting an upper limit on the possible presence of scalar currents.

  11. Mutations in c10orf11, a melanocyte-differentiation gene, cause autosomal-recessive albinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønskov, Karen; Dooley, Christopher M; Østergaard, Elsebet

    2013-01-01

    , we identified a 3.5 Mb homozygous region (10q22.2-q22.3) on chromosome 10. The region contains five protein-coding genes, and sequencing of one of these, C10orf11, revealed a nonsense mutation that segregated with the disease and showed a recessive inheritance pattern. Investigation of additional...... albinism-affected individuals from the Faroe Islands revealed that five out of eight unrelated affected persons had the nonsense mutation in C10orf11. Screening of a cohort of autosomal-recessive-albinism-affected individuals residing in Denmark showed a homozygous 1 bp duplication in C10orf11...... in substantially decreased pigmentation and a reduction of the apparent number of pigmented melanocytes. The morphant phenotype was rescued by wild-type C10orf11, but not by mutant C10orf11. In conclusion, we have identified a melanocyte-differentiation gene, C10orf11, which when mutated causes autosomal...

  12. L-Cysteine Metabolism and Fermentation in Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Ohtsu, Iwao

    L-Cysteine is an important amino acid both biologically and commercially. Although most amino acids are industrially produced by microbial fermentation, L-cysteine has been mainly produced by protein hydrolysis. Due to environmental and safety problems, synthetic or biotechnological products have been preferred in the market. Here, we reviewed L-cysteine metabolism, including biosynthesis, degradation, and transport, and biotechnological production (including both enzymatic and fermentation processes) of L-cysteine. The metabolic regulation of L-cysteine including novel sulfur metabolic pathways found in microorganisms is also discussed. Recent advancement in biochemical studies, genome sequencing, structural biology, and metabolome analysis has enabled us to use various approaches to achieve direct fermentation of L-cysteine from glucose. For example, worldwide companies began to supply L-cysteine and its derivatives produced by bacterial fermentation. These companies successfully optimized the original metabolism of their private strains. Basically, a combination of three factors should be required for improving L-cysteine fermentation: that is, (1) enhancing biosynthesis: overexpression of the altered cysE gene encoding feedback inhibition-insensitive L-serine O-acetyltransferase (SAT), (2) weakening degradation: knockout of the genes encoding L-cysteine desulfhydrases, and (3) exploiting export system: overexpression of the gene involved in L-cysteine transport. Moreover, we found that "thiosulfate" is much more effective sulfur source than commonly used "sulfate" for L-cysteine production in Escherichia coli, because thiosulfate is advantageous for saving consumption of NADPH and relating energy molecules.

  13. Network analyses reveal pervasive functional regulation between proteases in the human protease web.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaus Fortelny

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Proteolytic processing is an irreversible posttranslational modification affecting a large portion of the proteome. Protease-cleaved mediators frequently exhibit altered activity, and biological pathways are often regulated by proteolytic processing. Many of these mechanisms have not been appreciated as being protease-dependent, and the potential in unraveling a complex new dimension of biological control is increasingly recognized. Proteases are currently believed to act individually or in isolated cascades. However, conclusive but scattered biochemical evidence indicates broader regulation of proteases by protease and inhibitor interactions. Therefore, to systematically study such interactions, we assembled curated protease cleavage and inhibition data into a global, computational representation, termed the protease web. This revealed that proteases pervasively influence the activity of other proteases directly or by cleaving intermediate proteases or protease inhibitors. The protease web spans four classes of proteases and inhibitors and so links both recently and classically described protease groups and cascades, which can no longer be viewed as operating in isolation in vivo. We demonstrated that this observation, termed reachability, is robust to alterations in the data and will only increase in the future as additional data are added. We further show how subnetworks of the web are operational in 23 different tissues reflecting different phenotypes. We applied our network to develop novel insights into biologically relevant protease interactions using cell-specific proteases of the polymorphonuclear leukocyte as a system. Predictions from the protease web on the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 8 (MMP8 and neutrophil elastase being linked by an inactivating cleavage of serpinA1 by MMP8 were validated and explain perplexing Mmp8-/- versus wild-type polymorphonuclear chemokine cleavages in vivo. Our findings supply systematically

  14. PROTEOLYTIC PROCESSING OF VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR BY ADAMTS13 AND LEUKOCYTE PROTEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Lancellotti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ADAMTS13 is a 190 kDa zinc protease encoded by a gene located on chromosome 9q34.   This protease specifically hydrolyzes von Willebrand factor (VWF multimers, thus causing VWF size reduction. ADAMTS13 belongs to the A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease with ThromboSpondin type 1 repeats (ADAMTS family, involved in proteolytic processing of many matrix proteins. ADAMTS13 consists of numerous domains including a metalloprotease domain, a disintegrin domain, several thrombospondin type 1 (TSP1 repeats, a cysteine-rich domain, a spacer domain and 2 CUB (Complement c1r/c1s, sea Urchin epidermal growth factor, and Bone morphogenetic protein domains. ADAMTS13 cleaves a single peptide bond (Tyr1605-Met1606 in the central A2 domain of the VWF molecule. This proteolytic cleavage is essential to reduce the size of ultra-large VWF polymers, which, when exposed to high shear stress in the microcirculation, are prone to form with platelets clumps, which cause severe syndromes called thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs. In this review, we a discuss the current knowledge of structure-function aspects of ADAMTS13 and its involvement in the pathogenesis of TMAs, b address the recent findings concerning proteolytic processing of VWF multimers by different proteases, such as the leukocyte-derived serine and metallo-proteases and c indicate the direction of future investigations

  15. Activity, specificity, and probe design for the smallpox virus protease K7L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleshin, Alexander E; Drag, Marcin; Gombosuren, Naran; Wei, Ge; Mikolajczyk, Jowita; Satterthwait, Arnold C; Strongin, Alex Y; Liddington, Robert C; Salvesen, Guy S

    2012-11-16

    The K7L gene product of the smallpox virus is a protease implicated in the maturation of viral proteins. K7L belongs to protease Clan CE, which includes distantly related cysteine proteases from eukaryotes, pathogenic bacteria, and viruses. Here, we describe its recombinant high level expression, biochemical mechanism, substrate preference, and regulation. Earlier studies inferred that the orthologous I7L vaccinia protease cleaves at an AG-X motif in six viral proteins. Our data for K7L suggest that the AG-X motif is necessary but not sufficient for optimal cleavage activity. Thus, K7L requires peptides extended into the P7 and P8 positions for efficient substrate cleavage. Catalytic activity of K7L is substantially enhanced by homodimerization, by the substrate protein P25K as well as by glycerol. RNA and DNA also enhance cleavage of the P25K protein but not of synthetic peptides, suggesting that nucleic acids augment the interaction of K7L with its protein substrate. Library-based peptide preference analyses enabled us to design an activity-based probe that covalently and selectively labels K7L in lysates of transfected and infected cells. Our study thus provides proof-of-concept for the design of inhibitors and probes that may contribute both to a better understanding of the role of K7L in the virus life cycle and the design of novel anti-virals.

  16. Cathepsin D inactivates cysteine proteinase inhibitors, cystatins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenarcic, B; Kos, J; Dolenc, I; Lucovnik, P; Krizaj, I; Turk, V

    1988-07-29

    The formation of inactive complexes in excess molar amounts of human cathepsins H and L with their protein inhibitors human stefin A, human stefin B and chicken cystatin at pH 5.6 has been shown by measurement of enzyme activity coupled with reverse-phase HPLC not to involve covalent cleavage of the inhibitors. Inhibition must be the direct result of binding. On the contrary the interaction of cystatins with aspartic proteinase cathepsin D at pH 3.5 for 60 min followed by HPLC resulted in their inactivation accompanied by peptide bond cleavage at several sites, preferentially those involving hydrophobic amino acid residues. The released peptides do not inhibit papain and cathepsin L. These results explain reported elevated levels of cysteine proteinases and lead to the proposal that cathepsin D exerts an important function, through inactivation of cystatins, in the increased activities of cysteine proteinases in human diseases including muscular distrophy.

  17. Large-Scale Structure-Based Prediction and Identification of Novel Protease Substrates Using Computational Protein Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethe, Manasi A; Rubenstein, Aliza B; Khare, Sagar D

    2017-01-20

    Characterizing the substrate specificity of protease enzymes is critical for illuminating the molecular basis of their diverse and complex roles in a wide array of biological processes. Rapid and accurate prediction of their extended substrate specificity would also aid in the design of custom proteases capable of selectively and controllably cleaving biotechnologically or therapeutically relevant targets. However, current in silico approaches for protease specificity prediction, rely on, and are therefore limited by, machine learning of sequence patterns in known experimental data. Here, we describe a general approach for predicting peptidase substrates de novo using protein structure modeling and biophysical evaluation of enzyme-substrate complexes. We construct atomic resolution models of thousands of candidate substrate-enzyme complexes for each of five model proteases belonging to the four major protease mechanistic classes-serine, cysteine, aspartyl, and metallo-proteases-and develop a discriminatory scoring function using enzyme design modules from Rosetta and AMBER's MMPBSA. We rank putative substrates based on calculated interaction energy with a modeled near-attack conformation of the enzyme active site. We show that the energetic patterns obtained from these simulations can be used to robustly rank and classify known cleaved and uncleaved peptides and that these structural-energetic patterns have greater discriminatory power compared to purely sequence-based statistical inference. Combining sequence and energetic patterns using machine-learning algorithms further improves classification performance, and analysis of structural models provides physical insight into the structural basis for the observed specificities. We further tested the predictive capability of the model by designing and experimentally characterizing the cleavage of four novel substrate motifs for the hepatitis C virus NS3/4 protease using an in vivo assay. The presented structure

  18. Digestive proteases in bodies and faeces of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, María E; González-Cabrera, Joel; Martínez, Manuel; Grbic, Vojislava; Castañera, Pedro; Díaz, Lsabel; Ortego, Félix

    2015-07-01

    Digestive proteases of the phytophagous mite Tetranychus urticae have been characterised by comparing their activity in body and faecal extracts. Aspartyl, cathepsin B- and L-like and legumain activities were detected in both mite bodies and faeces, with a specific activity of aspartyl and cathepsin L-like proteases about 5- and 2-fold higher, respectively, in mite faeces than in bodies. In general, all these activities were maintained independently of the host plant where the mites were reared (bean, tomato or maize). Remarkably, this is the first report in a phytophagous mite of legumain-like activity, which was characterised for its ability to hydrolyse the specific substrate Z-VAN-AMC, its activation by DTT and inhibition by IAA but not by E-64. Gel free nanoLC-nanoESI-QTOF MS/MS proteomic analysis of mite faeces resulted in the identification of four cathepsins L and one aspartyl protease (from a total of the 29 cathepsins L, 27 cathepsins B, 19 legumains and two aspartyl protease genes identified the genome of this species). Gene expression analysis reveals that four cathepsins L and the aspartyl protease identified in the mite faeces, but also two cathepsins B and two legumains that were not detected in the faeces, were expressed at high levels in the spider mite feeding stages (larvae, nymphs and adults) relative to embryos. Taken together, these results indicate a digestive role for cysteine and aspartyl proteases in T. urticae. The expression of the cathepsins B and L, legumains and aspartyl protease genes analysed in our study increased in female adults after feeding on Arabidopsis plants over-expressing the HvCPI-6 cystatin, that specifically targets cathepsins B and L, or the CMe trypsin inhibitor that targets serine proteases. This unspecific response suggests that in addition to compensation for inhibitor-targeted enzymes, the increase in the expression of digestive proteases in T. urticae may act as a first barrier against ingested plant defensive

  19. The protease degrading sperm histones post-fertilization in sea urchin eggs is a nuclear cathepsin L that is further required for embryo development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Morin

    Full Text Available Proteolysis of sperm histones in the sea urchin male pronucleus is the consequence of the activation at fertilization of a maternal cysteine protease. We previously showed that this protein is required for male chromatin remodelling and for cell-cycle progression in the newly formed embryos. This enzyme is present in the nucleus of unfertilized eggs and is rapidly recruited to the male pronucleus after insemination. Interestingly, this cysteine-protease remains co-localized with chromatin during S phase of the first cell cycle, migrates to the mitotic spindle in M-phase and is re-located to the nuclei of daughter cells after cytokinesis. Here we identified the protease encoding cDNA and found a high sequence identity to cathepsin proteases of various organisms. A phylogenetical analysis clearly demonstrates that this sperm histone protease (SpHp belongs to the cathepsin L sub-type. After an initial phase of ubiquitous expression throughout cleavage stages, SpHp gene transcripts become restricted to endomesodermic territories during the blastula stage. The transcripts are localized in the invaginating endoderm during gastrulation and a gut specific pattern continues through the prism and early pluteus stages. In addition, a concomitant expression of SpHp transcripts is detected in cells of the skeletogenic lineage and in accordance a pharmacological disruption of SpHp activity prevents growth of skeletal rods. These results further document the role of this nuclear cathepsin L during development.

  20. Interpain A, a cysteine proteinase from Prevotella intermedia, inhibits complement by degrading complement factor C3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Potempa

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the supporting structures of the teeth caused by, among other pathogens, Prevotella intermedia. Many strains of P. intermedia are resistant to killing by the human complement system, which is present at up to 70% of serum concentration in gingival crevicular fluid. Incubation of human serum with recombinant cysteine protease of P. intermedia (interpain A resulted in a drastic decrease in bactericidal activity of the serum. Furthermore, a clinical strain 59 expressing interpain A was more serum-resistant than another clinical strain 57, which did not express interpain A, as determined by Western blotting. Moreover, in the presence of the cysteine protease inhibitor E64, the killing of strain 59 by human serum was enhanced. Importantly, we found that the majority of P. intermedia strains isolated from chronic and aggressive periodontitis carry and express the interpain A gene. The protective effect of interpain A against serum bactericidal activity was found to be attributable to its ability to inhibit all three complement pathways through the efficient degradation of the alpha-chain of C3 -- the major complement factor common to all three pathways. P. intermedia has been known to co-aggregate with P. gingivalis, which produce gingipains to efficiently degrade complement factors. Here, interpain A was found to have a synergistic effect with gingipains on complement degradation. In addition, interpain A was able to activate the C1 complex in serum, causing deposition of C1q on inert and bacterial surfaces, which may be important at initial stages of infection when local inflammatory reaction may be beneficial for a pathogen. Taken together, the newly characterized interpain A proteinase appears to be an important virulence factor of P. intermedia.

  1. Mutations in c10orf11, a melanocyte-differentiation gene, cause autosomal-recessive albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grønskov, Karen; Dooley, Christopher M; Østergaard, Elsebet; Kelsh, Robert N; Hansen, Lars; Levesque, Mitchell P; Vilhelmsen, Kaj; Møllgård, Kjeld; Stemple, Derek L; Rosenberg, Thomas

    2013-03-07

    Autosomal-recessive albinism is a hypopigmentation disorder with a broad phenotypic range. A substantial fraction of individuals with albinism remain genetically unresolved, and it has been hypothesized that more genes are to be identified. By using homozygosity mapping of an inbred Faroese family, we identified a 3.5 Mb homozygous region (10q22.2-q22.3) on chromosome 10. The region contains five protein-coding genes, and sequencing of one of these, C10orf11, revealed a nonsense mutation that segregated with the disease and showed a recessive inheritance pattern. Investigation of additional albinism-affected individuals from the Faroe Islands revealed that five out of eight unrelated affected persons had the nonsense mutation in C10orf11. Screening of a cohort of autosomal-recessive-albinism-affected individuals residing in Denmark showed a homozygous 1 bp duplication in C10orf11 in an individual originating from Lithuania. Immunohistochemistry showed localization of C10orf11 in melanoblasts and melanocytes in human fetal tissue, but no localization was seen in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Knockdown of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) homolog with the use of morpholinos resulted in substantially decreased pigmentation and a reduction of the apparent number of pigmented melanocytes. The morphant phenotype was rescued by wild-type C10orf11, but not by mutant C10orf11. In conclusion, we have identified a melanocyte-differentiation gene, C10orf11, which when mutated causes autosomal-recessive albinism in humans. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Exploration of peptides that fit into the thermally vibrating active site of cathepsin K protease by alternating artificial intelligence and molecular simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2017-08-01

    Eighteen tripeptides that fit into the thermally vibrating active site of cathepsin K were discovered by alternating artificial intelligence and molecular simulation. The 18 tripeptides fit the active site better than the cysteine protease inhibitor E64, and a better inhibitor of cathepsin K could be designed considering these tripeptides. Among the 18 tripeptides, Phe-Arg-Asp and Tyr-Arg-Asp fit the active site the best and their structural similarity should be considered in the design process. Interesting factors emerged from the structure of the decision tree, and its structural information will guide exploration of potential inhibitor molecules for proteases.

  3. Crystallisation and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the protease from Southampton norovirus complexed with a Michael-acceptor inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, Leighton [ORNL; Cooper, Jon [University of Southampton, England; Hussey, Robert [University of Southampton, England

    2008-01-01

    Noroviruses are the predominant cause of human epidemic nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Viral replication requires a cysteine protease that cleaves a 200 kDa viral polyprotein into its constituent functional parts. Here, the crystallization of the recombinant protease from the Southampton norovirus is described. While the native crystals were found to diffract only to medium resolution (2.9 {angstrom}), cocrystals of an inhibitor complex diffracted X-rays to 1.7 {angstrom} resolution. The polypeptide inhibitor (Ac-EFQLQ-propenyl ethyl ester) possesses an amino-acid sequence designed to match the substrate specificity of the enzyme, but was synthesized with a reactive Michael acceptor group at the C-terminal end.

  4. Host and bacterial proteases influence biofilm formation and virulence in a murine model of enterococcal catheter-associated urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Flores-Mireles, Ana L; Cusumano, Zachary T; Takagi, Enzo; Hultgren, Scott J; Caparon, Michael G

    2017-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a leading causative agent of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), the most common hospital-acquired infection. Its ability to grow and form catheter biofilm is dependent upon host fibrinogen (Fg). Examined here are how bacterial and host proteases interact with Fg and contribute to virulence. Analysis of mutants affecting the two major secreted proteases of E. faecalis OG1RF (GelE, SprE) revealed that while the loss of either had no effect on virulence in a murine CAUTI model or for formation of Fg-dependent biofilm in urine, the loss of both resulted in CAUTI attenuation and defective biofilm formation. GelE - , but not SprE - mutants, lost the ability to degrade Fg in medium, while paradoxically, both could degrade Fg in urine. The finding that SprE was activated independently of GelE in urine by a host trypsin-like protease resolved this paradox. Treatment of catheter-implanted mice with inhibitors of both host-derived and bacterial-derived proteases dramatically reduced catheter-induced inflammation, significantly inhibited dissemination from bladder to kidney and revealed an essential role for a host cysteine protease in promoting pathogenesis. These data show that both bacterial and host proteases contribute to CAUTI, that host proteases promote dissemination and suggest new strategies for therapeutic intervention.

  5. Novel IgG-Degrading Enzymes of the IgdE Protease Family Link Substrate Specificity to Host Tropism of Streptococcus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerry, Christian; Hessle, Pontus; Lewis, Melanie J; Paton, Lois; Woof, Jenny M; von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Recently we have discovered an IgG degrading enzyme of the endemic pig pathogen S. suis designated IgdE that is highly specific for porcine IgG. This protease is the founding member of a novel cysteine protease family assigned C113 in the MEROPS peptidase database. Bioinformatical analyses revealed putative members of the IgdE protease family in eight other Streptococcus species. The genes of the putative IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. porcinus, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus were cloned for production of recombinant protein into expression vectors. Recombinant proteins of all four IgdE family proteases were proteolytically active against IgG of the respective Streptococcus species hosts, but not against IgG from other tested species or other classes of immunoglobulins, thereby linking the substrate specificity to the known host tropism. The novel IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi showed IgG subtype specificity, i.e. IgdE from S. agalactiae and S. pseudoporcinus cleaved human IgG1, while IgdE from S. equi was subtype specific for equine IgG7. Porcine IgG subtype specificities of the IgdE family proteases of S. porcinus and S. pseudoporcinus remain to be determined. Cleavage of porcine IgG by IgdE of S. pseudoporcinus is suggested to be an evolutionary remaining activity reflecting ancestry of the human pathogen to the porcine pathogen S. porcinus. The IgG subtype specificity of bacterial proteases indicates the special importance of these IgG subtypes in counteracting infection or colonization and opportunistic streptococci neutralize such antibodies through expression of IgdE family proteases as putative immune evasion factors. We suggest that IgdE family proteases might be valid vaccine targets against streptococci of both human and veterinary medical concerns and could also be of therapeutic as well as biotechnological use.

  6. Contact of Entamoeba histolytica with baby hamster kidney-21 (BHK-21) cell line on cysteine proteinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Divyendu; Naik, S R; Naik, Sita

    2004-04-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, the causative agent of amoebiasis and amoebic liver abscess, lyses host cells by direct contact using surface lectins and releases cysteine proteinase (CP). Virulence of E. histolytica is directly related to activity of its CP. The relationship of CP activity and cytotoxicity has not been established. The present study was carried out to explore the events following contact of E. histolytica with target cells. Protease activity of E. histolytica was measured by azocaseine and haemoglobin assays, and cysteine proteinase activity was assessed by substrate gel electrophoresis. Target cell lysis was measured by chromium release assay. Protease activity of E. histolytica was increased 2.5-fold following contact with BHK-21 cell line. CP activity of trophozoites alone was visualized at position 56, 35 and 29 kDa in substrate gel electrophoresis. Contact of trophozoites with target cells augmented the cytotoxic activity of amoebic CP. The increase in CP activity seen by substrate gel electrophoresis and cytotoxicity assay was blocked by pretreatment with E 64, a specific CP inhibitor and GalNAc, a contact inhibitor. The present data showed the involvement of amoebic CP in cytotoxicity and that the CP activity was enhanced on lectin-mediated contact of E. histolytica to the target cells. Further studies need to be done to understand the mechanism at the molecular level.

  7. Protease-sensitive synthetic prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Colby

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prions arise when the cellular prion protein (PrP(C undergoes a self-propagating conformational change; the resulting infectious conformer is designated PrP(Sc. Frequently, PrP(Sc is protease-resistant but protease-sensitive (s prions have been isolated in humans and other animals. We report here that protease-sensitive, synthetic prions were generated in vitro during polymerization of recombinant (rec PrP into amyloid fibers. In 22 independent experiments, recPrP amyloid preparations, but not recPrP monomers or oligomers, transmitted disease to transgenic mice (n = 164, denoted Tg9949 mice, that overexpress N-terminally truncated PrP. Tg9949 control mice (n = 174 did not spontaneously generate prions although they were prone to late-onset spontaneous neurological dysfunction. When synthetic prion isolates from infected Tg9949 mice were serially transmitted in the same line of mice, they exhibited sPrP(Sc and caused neurodegeneration. Interestingly, these protease-sensitive prions did not shorten the life span of Tg9949 mice despite causing extensive neurodegeneration. We inoculated three synthetic prion isolates into Tg4053 mice that overexpress full-length PrP; Tg4053 mice are not prone to developing spontaneous neurological dysfunction. The synthetic prion isolates caused disease in 600-750 days in Tg4053 mice, which exhibited sPrP(Sc. These novel synthetic prions demonstrate that conformational changes in wild-type PrP can produce mouse prions composed exclusively of sPrP(Sc.

  8. Regulation of cysteine dioxygenase degradation is mediated by intracellular cysteine levels and the ubiquitin–26 S proteasome system in the living rat

    OpenAIRE

    Dominy, John E.; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.; Coloso, Relicardo M.; Stipanuk, Martha H.

    2006-01-01

    Mammalian metabolism of ingested cysteine is conducted principally within the liver. The liver tightly regulates its intracellular cysteine pool to keep levels high enough to meet the many catabolic and anabolic pathways for which cysteine is needed, but low enough to prevent toxicity. One of the enzymes the liver uses to regulate cysteine levels is CDO (cysteine dioxygenase). Catalysing the irreversible oxidation of cysteine, CDO protein is up-regulated in the liver in response to the dietar...

  9. Structure and mechanism of rhomboid protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ya; Akiyama, Yoshinori; Xue, Yi

    2013-05-31

    Rhomboid protease was first discovered in Drosophila. Mutation of the fly gene interfered with growth factor signaling and produced a characteristic phenotype of a pointed head skeleton. The name rhomboid has since been widely used to describe a large family of related membrane proteins that have diverse biological functions but share a common catalytic core domain composed of six membrane-spanning segments. Most rhomboid proteases cleave membrane protein substrates near the N terminus of their transmembrane domains. How these proteases function within the confines of the membrane is not completely understood. Recent progress in crystallographic analysis of the Escherichia coli rhomboid protease GlpG in complex with inhibitors has provided new insights into the catalytic mechanism of the protease and its conformational change. Improved biochemical assays have also identified a substrate sequence motif that is specifically recognized by many rhomboid proteases.

  10. Structure and Mechanism of Rhomboid Protease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ya; Akiyama, Yoshinori; Xue, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Rhomboid protease was first discovered in Drosophila. Mutation of the fly gene interfered with growth factor signaling and produced a characteristic phenotype of a pointed head skeleton. The name rhomboid has since been widely used to describe a large family of related membrane proteins that have diverse biological functions but share a common catalytic core domain composed of six membrane-spanning segments. Most rhomboid proteases cleave membrane protein substrates near the N terminus of their transmembrane domains. How these proteases function within the confines of the membrane is not completely understood. Recent progress in crystallographic analysis of the Escherichia coli rhomboid protease GlpG in complex with inhibitors has provided new insights into the catalytic mechanism of the protease and its conformational change. Improved biochemical assays have also identified a substrate sequence motif that is specifically recognized by many rhomboid proteases. PMID:23585569

  11. Differential expression of cysteine desulfurases in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heis Marta D

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron-sulfur [Fe-S] clusters are prosthetic groups required to sustain fundamental life processes including electron transfer, metabolic reactions, sensing, signaling, gene regulation and stabilization of protein structures. In plants, the biogenesis of Fe-S protein is compartmentalized and adapted to specific needs of the cell. Many environmental factors affect plant development and limit productivity and geographical distribution. The impact of these limiting factors is particularly relevant for major crops, such as soybean, which has worldwide economic importance. Results Here we analyze the transcriptional profile of the soybean cysteine desulfurases NFS1, NFS2 and ISD11 genes, involved in the biogenesis of [Fe-S] clusters, by quantitative RT-PCR. NFS1, ISD11 and NFS2 encoding two mitochondrial and one plastid located proteins, respectively, are duplicated and showed distinct transcript levels considering tissue and stress response. NFS1 and ISD11 are highly expressed in roots, whereas NFS2 showed no differential expression in tissues. Cold-treated plants showed a decrease in NFS2 and ISD11 transcript levels in roots, and an increased expression of NFS1 and ISD11 genes in leaves. Plants treated with salicylic acid exhibited increased NFS1 transcript levels in roots but lower levels in leaves. In silico analysis of promoter regions indicated the presence of different cis-elements in cysteine desulfurase genes, in good agreement with differential expression of each locus. Our data also showed that increasing of transcript levels of mitochondrial genes, NFS1/ISD11, are associated with higher activities of aldehyde oxidase and xanthine dehydrogenase, two cytosolic Fe-S proteins. Conclusions Our results suggest a relationship between gene expression pattern, biochemical effects, and transcription factor binding sites in promoter regions of cysteine desulfurase genes. Moreover, data show proportionality between NFS1 and ISD11

  12. Gene targeting of the cysteine peptidase cathepsin H impairs lung surfactant in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Bühling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The 11 human cysteine cathepsins are proteases mainly located in the endolysosomal compartment of all cells and within the exocytosis pathways of some secretory cell types. Cathepsin H (Ctsh has amino- and endopeptidase activities. In vitro studies have demonstrated Ctsh involvement in the processing and secretion of the pulmonary surfactant protein B (SP-B. Furthermore, Ctsh is highly expressed in the secretory organelles of alveolar type II pneumocytes where the surfactant proteins are processed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hence, we generated Ctsh null mice by gene targeting in embryonic stem cells to investigate the role of this protease in surfactant processing in vivo. The targeting construct contains a ß-galactosidase (lacZ reporter enabling the visualisation of Ctsh expression sites. Ctsh-deficiency was verified by northern blot, western blot, and measurement of the Ctsh aminopeptidase activity. Ctsh(-/- mice show no gross phenotype and their development is normal without growth retardation. Broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL from Ctsh(-/- mice contained lower levels of SP-B indicating reduced SP-B secretion. The BAL phospholipid concentration was not different in Ctsh(+/+ and Ctsh(-/- mice, but measurement of surface tension by pulsating bubble surfactometry revealed an impairment of the tension reducing function of lung surfactant of Ctsh(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that cathepsin H is involved in the SP-B production and reduced SP-B levels impair the physical properties of the lung surfactant. However, Ctsh defiency does not reproduce the severe phenotype of SP-B deficient mice. Hence, other proteases of the secretory pathway of type II pneumocytes, i.e. cathepsins C or E, are still able to produce surfactant of sufficient quality in absence of Ctsh.

  13. Gene targeting of the cysteine peptidase cathepsin H impairs lung surfactant in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühling, Frank; Kouadio, Martin; Chwieralski, Caroline E; Kern, Ursula; Hohlfeld, Jens M; Klemm, Nicole; Friedrichs, Nicole; Roth, Wera; Deussing, Jan M; Peters, Christoph; Reinheckel, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The 11 human cysteine cathepsins are proteases mainly located in the endolysosomal compartment of all cells and within the exocytosis pathways of some secretory cell types. Cathepsin H (Ctsh) has amino- and endopeptidase activities. In vitro studies have demonstrated Ctsh involvement in the processing and secretion of the pulmonary surfactant protein B (SP-B). Furthermore, Ctsh is highly expressed in the secretory organelles of alveolar type II pneumocytes where the surfactant proteins are processed. Hence, we generated Ctsh null mice by gene targeting in embryonic stem cells to investigate the role of this protease in surfactant processing in vivo. The targeting construct contains a ß-galactosidase (lacZ) reporter enabling the visualisation of Ctsh expression sites. Ctsh-deficiency was verified by northern blot, western blot, and measurement of the Ctsh aminopeptidase activity. Ctsh(-/-) mice show no gross phenotype and their development is normal without growth retardation. Broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) from Ctsh(-/-) mice contained lower levels of SP-B indicating reduced SP-B secretion. The BAL phospholipid concentration was not different in Ctsh(+/+) and Ctsh(-/-) mice, but measurement of surface tension by pulsating bubble surfactometry revealed an impairment of the tension reducing function of lung surfactant of Ctsh(-/-) mice. We conclude that cathepsin H is involved in the SP-B production and reduced SP-B levels impair the physical properties of the lung surfactant. However, Ctsh defiency does not reproduce the severe phenotype of SP-B deficient mice. Hence, other proteases of the secretory pathway of type II pneumocytes, i.e. cathepsins C or E, are still able to produce surfactant of sufficient quality in absence of Ctsh.

  14. Cysteine-containing peptides having antioxidant properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielicki, John K [Castro Valley, CA

    2008-10-21

    Cysteine containing amphipathic alpha helices of the exchangeable apolipoproteins, as exemplified by apolipoprotein (apo) A-I.sub.Milano (R173C) and apoA-I.sub.Paris, (R151C) were found to exhibit potent antioxidant activity on phospholipid surfaces. The addition of a free thiol, at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of an amphipathic alpha helix of synthetic peptides that mimic HDL-related proteins, imparts a unique antioxidant activity to these peptides which inhibits lipid peroxidation and protects phospholipids from water-soluble free radical initiators. These peptides can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, ischemia, bone disease and other inflammatory related diseases.

  15. Factors Supporting Cysteine Tolerance and Sulfite Production in Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennicke, Florian; Grumbt, Maria; Lermann, Ulrich; Ueberschaar, Nico; Palige, Katja; Böttcher, Bettina; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Staib, Claudia; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Monod, Michel; Hube, Bernhard; Hertweck, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The amino acid cysteine has long been known to be toxic at elevated levels for bacteria, fungi, and humans. However, mechanisms of cysteine tolerance in microbes remain largely obscure. Here we show that the human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans excretes sulfite when confronted with increasing cysteine concentrations. Mutant construction and phenotypic analysis revealed that sulfite formation from cysteine in C. albicans relies on cysteine dioxygenase Cdg1, an enzyme with similar functions in humans. Environmental cysteine induced not only the expression of the CDG1 gene in C. albicans, but also the expression of SSU1, encoding a putative sulfite efflux pump. Accordingly, the deletion of SSU1 resulted in enhanced sensitivity of the fungal cells to both cysteine and sulfite. To study the regulation of sulfite/cysteine tolerance in more detail, we screened a C. albicans library of transcription factor mutants in the presence of sulfite. This approach and subsequent independent mutant analysis identified the zinc cluster transcription factor Zcf2 to govern sulfite/cysteine tolerance, as well as cysteine-inducible SSU1 and CDG1 gene expression. cdg1Δ and ssu1Δ mutants displayed reduced hypha formation in the presence of cysteine, indicating a possible role of the newly proposed mechanisms of cysteine tolerance and sulfite secretion in the pathogenicity of C. albicans. Moreover, cdg1Δ mutants induced delayed mortality in a mouse model of disseminated infection. Since sulfite is toxic and a potent reducing agent, its production by C. albicans suggests diverse roles during host adaptation and pathogenicity. PMID:23417561

  16. Sulphoxythiocarbamates modify cysteine residues in HSP90 causing degradation of client proteins and inhibition of cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Dayalan Naidu, S; Samarasinghe, K; Van Hecke, G C; Pheely, A; Boronina, T N; Cole, R N; Benjamin, I J; Cole, P A; Ahn, Y-H; Dinkova-Kostova, A T

    2014-01-07

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) has a key role in the maintenance of the cellular proteostasis. However, HSP90 is also involved in stabilisation of oncogenic client proteins and facilitates oncogene addiction and cancer cell survival. The development of HSP90 inhibitors for cancer treatment is an area of growing interest as such agents can affect multiple pathways that are linked to all hallmarks of cancer. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that targeting cysteine residues of HSP90 will lead to degradation of client proteins and inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Combining chemical synthesis, biological evaluation, and structure-activity relationship analysis, we identified a new class of HSP90 inhibitors. Click chemistry and protease-mass spectrometry established the sites of modification of the chaperone. The mildly electrophilic sulphoxythiocarbamate alkyne (STCA) selectively targets cysteine residues of HSP90, forming stable thiocarbamate adducts. Without interfering with the ATP-binding ability of the chaperone, STCA destabilises the client proteins RAF1, HER2, CDK1, CHK1, and mutant p53, and decreases proliferation of breast cancer cells. Addition of a phenyl or a tert-butyl group in tandem with the benzyl substituent at nitrogen increased the potency. A new compound, S-4, was identified as the most robust HSP90 inhibitor within a series of 19 derivatives. By virtue of their cysteine reactivity, sulphoxythiocarbamates target HSP90, causing destabilisation of its client oncoproteins and inhibiting cell proliferation.

  17. WSRT AND VLA OBSERVATIONS OF HI IN THE DIRECTION OF 3C-10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHWARZ, UJ; GOSS, WM; KALBERLA, PM; BENAGLIA, P

    Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope HI observations combined with Effelsberg 100 m antenna observations have been made of the galactic supernova remnant 3C 10 (Tycho) with an angular resolution similar or equal to 50 '' and a velocity resolution of 0.62 km s(-1) and with the VLA with resolutions of

  18. NF135.C10: a new Plasmodium falciparum clone for controlled human malaria infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teirlinck, A.C.; Roestenberg, M.; Vegte-Bolmer, M.G. van de; Scholzen, A.; Heinrichs, M.J.; Siebelink-Stoter, R.; Graumans, W.; Gemert, G.J.A. van; Teelen, K.A.E.M.; Vos, M.W.; Nganou Makamdop, C.K.; Borrmann, S.; Rozier, Y.P.; Erkens, M.A.; Luty, A.J.F.; Hermsen, C.C.; Sim, B.K.; Lieshout, L. van; Hoffman, S.L.; Visser, L.G.; Sauerwein, R.W.

    2013-01-01

    We established a new field clone of Plasmodium falciparum for use in controlled human malaria infections and vaccine studies to complement the current small portfolio of P. falciparum strains, primarily based on NF54. The Cambodian clone NF135.C10 consistently produced gametocytes and generated

  19. Knocking-down Meloidogyne incognita proteases by plant-delivered dsRNA has negative pleiotropic effect on nematode vigor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonino de Souza Júnior, José Dijair; Ramos Coelho, Roberta; Tristan Lourenço, Isabela; da Rocha Fragoso, Rodrigo; Barbosa Viana, Antonio Américo; Lima Pepino de Macedo, Leonardo; Mattar da Silva, Maria Cristina; Gomes Carneiro, Regina Maria; Engler, Gilbert; de Almeida-Engler, Janice; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria Fatima

    2013-01-01

    The root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita causes serious damage and yield losses in numerous important crops worldwide. Analysis of the M. incognita genome revealed a vast number of proteases belonging to five different catalytic classes. Several reports indicate that M. incognita proteases could play important roles in nematode parasitism, besides their function in ordinary digestion of giant cell contents for feeding. The precise roles of these proteins during parasitism however are still unknown, making them interesting targets for gene silencing to address protein function. In this study we have knocked-down an aspartic (Mi-asp-1), a serine (Mi-ser-1) and a cysteine protease (Mi-cpl-1) by RNAi interference to get an insight into the function of these enzymes during a host/nematode interaction. Tobacco lines expressing dsRNA for Mi-ser-1 (dsSER), Mi-cpl-1 (dsCPL) and for the three genes together (dsFusion) were generated. Histological analysis of galls did not show clear differences in giant cell morphology. Interestingly, nematodes that infected plants expressing dsRNA for proteases produced a reduced number of eggs. In addition, nematode progeny matured in dsSER plants had reduced success in egg hatching, while progeny resulting from dsCPL and dsFusion plants were less successful to infect wild-type host plants. Quantitative PCR analysis confirmed a reduction in transcripts for Mi-cpl-1 and Mi-ser-1 proteases. Our results indicate that these proteases are possibly involved in different processes throughout nematode development, like nutrition, reproduction and embryogenesis. A better understanding of nematode proteases and their possible role during a plant-nematode interaction might help to develop new tools for phytonematode control.

  20. Functional analysis of a missense mutation in the serine protease inhibitor SPINT2 associated with congenital sodium diarrhea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Faller

    Full Text Available Membrane-bound serine proteases play important roles in different biological processes. Their regulation by endogenous inhibitors is poorly understood. A Y163C mutation in the SPINT2 gene encoding the serine protease inhibitor Hepatocyte Growth Factor Inhibitor HAI-2 is associated with a congenital sodium diarrhea. The functional consequences of this mutation on HAI-2 activity and its physiological targets are unknown. We established a cellular assay in Xenopus laevis oocytes to study functional interactions between HAI-2 and candidate membrane-bound serine proteases expressed in the gastro-intestinal tract. We found that the wild-type form of HAI-2 is a potent inhibitor of nine gastro-intestinal serine proteases. The Y163C mutation in the second Kunitz domain of HAI-2 resulted in a complete loss of inhibitory activity on two intestinal proteases, prostasin and tmprss13. The effect of the mutation of the homologous Y68C in the first Kunitz domain of HAI-2 is consistent with a differential contribution of the two Kunitz domains of HAI-2 in the inhibition of serine proteases. By contrast to the Tyr to Cys, the Tyr to Ser substitution did not change the inhibitory potency of HAI-2, indicating that the thiol-group of the cysteine rather than the Tyr deletion is responsible for the HAI-2 loss of function. Our functional assay allowed us to identify membrane-bound serine proteases as cellular target for inhibition by HAI-2 wild type and mutants, and to better define the role of the Tyr in the second Kunitz domain in the inhibitory activity of HAI-2.

  1. Protease activated receptor signaling is required for African trypanosome traversal of human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J Grab

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs as an in vitro model for how African trypanosomes cross the human blood-brain barrier (BBB we recently reported that the parasites cross the BBB by generating calcium activation signals in HBMECs through the activity of parasite cysteine proteases, particularly cathepsin L (brucipain. In the current study, we examined the possible role of a class of protease stimulated HBMEC G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs known as protease activated receptors (PARs that might be implicated in calcium signaling by African trypanosomes.Using RNA interference (RNAi we found that in vitro PAR-2 gene (F2RL1 expression in HBMEC monolayers could be reduced by over 95%. We also found that the ability of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense to cross F2RL1-silenced HBMEC monolayers was reduced (39%-49% and that HBMECs silenced for F2RL1 maintained control levels of barrier function in the presence of the parasite. Consistent with the role of PAR-2, we found that HBMEC barrier function was also maintained after blockade of Galpha(q with Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT. PAR-2 signaling has been shown in other systems to have neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective roles and our data implicate a role for proteases (i.e. brucipain and PAR-2 in African trypanosome/HBMEC interactions. Using gene-profiling methods to interrogate candidate HBMEC pathways specifically triggered by brucipain, several pathways that potentially link some pathophysiologic processes associated with CNS HAT were identified.Together, the data support a role, in part, for GPCRs as molecular targets for parasite proteases that lead to the activation of Galpha(q-mediated calcium signaling. The consequence of these events is predicted to be increased permeability of the BBB to parasite transmigration and the initiation of neuroinflammation, events precursory to CNS disease.

  2. Proteases of Sporothrix schenckii: Cytopathological effects on a host-cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabanero López, Myrna; Flores Villavicencio, Lérida L; Soto Arredondo, Karla; Barbosa Sabanero, Gloria; Villagómez-Castro, Julio César; Cruz Jiménez, Gustavo; Sandoval Bernal, Gerardo; Torres Guerrero, Haydee

    Sporotrichosis is a fungal infection caused by the Sporothrix schenckii complex. The adhesion of the fungus to the host tissue has been considered the key step in the colonization and invasion, but little is known about the early events in the host-parasite interaction. To evaluate the proteolytic activity of S. schenckii on epithelial cells. The proteolytic system (at pH 5 and 7) was evaluated using azocoll and zymograms. The host-parasite interaction and epithelial cell response were also analyzed by examining the microfilament cytoskeleton using phalloidin-FITC and transmission electron microscopy. Finally, the metabolic activity was determined using an XTT assay. The zymograms showed that S. schenckii yeast cells possess high intracellular and extracellular proteolytic activities (Mr≥200, 116, 97, and 70kDa) that are pH dependent and are inhibited by PMSF and E64, which act on serine and cysteine-type proteases. During the epithelial cell-protease interaction, the cells showed alterations in the microfilament distribution, as well as in the plasma membrane structure. Moreover, the metabolic activity of the epithelial cells decreased 60% without a protease inhibitor. Our data demonstrate the complexity of the cellular responses during the infection process. This process is somehow counteracted by the action of proteases inhibitors. Furthermore, the results provide critical information for understanding the nature of host-fungus interactions and for searching a new effective antifungal therapy, which includes protease inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of ZEB1 and Leica C10 Indoor Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirmacek, Beril; Shen, Yueqian; Lindenbergh, Roderik; Zlatanova, Sisi; Diakite, Abdoulaye

    2016-06-01

    We present a comparison of point cloud generation and quality of data acquired by Zebedee (Zeb1) and Leica C10 devices which are used in the same building interior. Both sensor devices come with different practical and technical advantages. As it could be expected, these advantages come with some drawbacks. Therefore, depending on the requirements of the project, it is important to have a vision about what to expect from different sensors. In this paper, we provide a detailed analysis of the point clouds of the same room interior acquired from Zeb1 and Leica C10 sensors. First, it is visually assessed how different features appear in both the Zeb1 and Leica C10 point clouds. Next, a quantitative analysis is given by comparing local point density, local noise level and stability of local normals. Finally, a simple 3D room plan is extracted from both the Zeb1 and the Leica C10 point clouds and the lengths of constructed line segments connecting corners of the room are compared. The results show that Zeb1 is far superior in ease of data acquisition. No heavy handling, hardly no measurement planning and no point cloud registration is required from the operator. The resulting point cloud has a quality in the order of centimeters, which is fine for generating a 3D interior model of a building. Our results also clearly show that fine details of for example ornaments are invisible in the Zeb1 data. If point clouds with a quality in the order of millimeters are required, still a high-end laser scanner like the Leica C10 is required, in combination with a more sophisticated, time-consuming and elaborative data acquisition and processing approach.

  4. File list: Oth.Kid.50.C10orf12.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Kid.50.C10orf12.AllCell hg19 TFs and others C10orf12 Kidney SRX396280,SRX396282... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Kid.50.C10orf12.AllCell.bed ...

  5. Soft Cysteine Signaling Network: The Functional Significance of Cysteine in Protein Function and the Soft Acids/Bases Thiol Chemistry That Facilitates Cysteine Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wible, Ryan S; Sutter, Thomas R

    2017-03-20

    The unique biophysical and electronic properties of cysteine make this molecule one of the most biologically critical amino acids in the proteome. The defining sulfur atom in cysteine is much larger than the oxygen and nitrogen atoms more commonly found in the other amino acids. As a result of its size, the valence electrons of sulfur are highly polarizable. Unique protein microenvironments favor the polarization of sulfur, thus increasing the overt reactivity of cysteine. Here, we provide a brief overview of the endogenous generation of reactive oxygen and electrophilic species and specific examples of enzymes and transcription factors in which the oxidation or covalent modification of cysteine in those proteins modulates their function. The perspective concludes with a discussion of cysteine chemistry and biophysics, the hard and soft acids and bases model, and the proposal of the Soft Cysteine Signaling Network: a hypothesis proposing the existence of a complex signaling network governed by layered chemical reactivity and cross-talk in which the chemical modification of reactive cysteine in biological networks triggers the reorganization of intracellular biochemistry to mitigate spikes in endogenous or exogenous oxidative or electrophilic stress.

  6. Optimization of medium composition for thermostable protease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... Optimization of the fermentation medium for maximization of thermostable neutral protease production by Bacillus sp. ... at 3.6 g/l and yeast extract at 3.9 g/l gived maximum protease activity of 6804 U/ml. Key words: Medium ... face method, which is used to study the effects of several factors influencing the ...

  7. Optimization of medium composition for thermostable protease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... Full Length Research Paper. Optimization of medium composition for thermostable protease production by Bacillus sp. HS08 with a statistical method .... Table 2. Effects of some elements in basic medium on the thermostable protease production. Element. Relatively activity (%). Control. Conc. (g/l). 100.

  8. Partial Purification and Characterization of Extracellular Protease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    This is similar to the findings of Akinkugbe and Onilude. (2013) who reported that protease from Lactobacillus acidophilus had maximum activity at 2% casein concentration. Gerze et al. (2005) obtained a slightly lesser value (1.2%) for protease produced by Bacillus subtilis megaterium (BSM) in their study on the effect of.

  9. A cyclic peptidic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng; Jiang, Longguang

    2014-01-01

    Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC), of the serine protease murine urokinase...

  10. Optimization of alkaline protease production from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A protease producing bacteria was isolated from meat waste contaminated soil and identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens. Optimization of the fermentation medium for maximum protease production was carried out. The culture conditions like inoculum concentration, incubation time, pH, temperature, carbon sources, ...

  11. An Accessory Protease Inhibitor to Increase the Yield and Quality of a Tumour-Targeting mAb in Nicotiana benthamiana Leaves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe V Jutras

    Full Text Available The overall quality of recombinant IgG antibodies in plants is dramatically compromised by host endogenous proteases. Different approaches have been developed to reduce the impact of endogenous proteolysis on IgGs, notably involving site-directed mutagenesis to eliminate protease-susceptible sites or the in situ mitigation of host protease activities to minimize antibody processing in the cell secretory pathway. We here characterized the degradation profile of H10, a human tumour-targeting monoclonal IgG, in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana also expressing the human serine protease inhibitor α1-antichymotrypsin or the cysteine protease inhibitor tomato cystatin SlCYS8. Leaf extracts revealed consistent fragmentation patterns for the recombinant antibody regardless of leaf age and a strong protective effect of SlCYS8 in specific regions of the heavy chain domains. As shown using an antigen-binding ELISA and LC-MS/MS analysis of antibody fragments, SlCYS8 had positive effects on both the amount of fully-assembled antibody purified from leaf tissue and the stability of biologically active antibody fragments containing the heavy chain Fc domain. Our data confirm the potential of Cys protease inhibitors as convenient antibody-stabilizing expression partners to increase the quality of therapeutic antibodies in plant protein biofactories.

  12. Electrons initiate efficient formation of hydroperoxides from cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebicki, Janusz M

    2016-09-01

    Amino acid and protein hydroperoxides can constitute a significant hazard if formed in vivo. It has been suggested that cysteine can form hydroperoxides after intramolecular hydrogen transfer to the commonly produced cysteine sulfur-centered radical. The resultant cysteine-derived carbon-centered radicals can react with oxygen at almost diffusion-controlled rate, forming peroxyl radicals which can oxidize other molecules and be reduced to hydroperoxides in the process. No cysteine hydroperoxides have been found so far. In this study, dilute air-saturated cysteine solutions were exposed to radicals generated by ionizing radiation and the hydroperoxides measured by an iodide assay. Of the three primary radicals present, the hydroxyl, hydrogen atoms and hydrated electrons, the first two were ineffective. However, electrons did initiate the generation of hydroperoxides by removing the -SH group and forming cysteine-derived carbon radicals. Under optimal conditions, 100% of the electrons reacting with cysteine produced the hydroperoxides with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Maximum hydroperoxide yields were at pH 5.5, with fairly rapid decline under more acid or alkaline conditions. The hydroperoxides were stable between pH 3 and 7.5, and decomposed in alkaline solutions. The results suggest that formation of cysteine hydroperoxides initiated by electrons is an unlikely event under physiological conditions.

  13. A Serendipitous Formation of a Cysteine-bridged Disaccharide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    linked glycosyl cysteine derivatives,4 Lewis acid-catalyzed glycosylation,5,6 and solid phase glycosylation.7 ... to the target S-glycosylated L-cysteine derivative.5 We have previously reported that glycosylation of a ..... We acknowledge the institutional and financial support of the. Tshwane University of Technology and the ...

  14. Cysteine-free peptides in scorpion venom: geographical distribution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    channel, Ca2+-channel and ryanodine channel selective peptides. In 1993, the first cysteine-free peptide was isolated from scorpion venom. Within the last six years, cysteine-free peptides with and without antimicrobial activity have been isolated ...

  15. Antimalarial effects of vinyl sulfone cysteine proteinase inhibitors.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenthal, P J; Olson, J E; Lee, G K; Palmer, J T; Klaus, J L; Rasnick, D

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated the antimalarial effects of vinyl sulfone cysteine proteinase inhibitors. A number of vinyl sulfones strongly inhibited falcipain, a Plasmodium falciparum cysteine proteinase that is a critical hemoglobinase. In studies of cultured parasites, nanomolar concentrations of three vinyl sulfones inhibited parasite hemoglobin degradation, metabolic activity, and development. The antimalarial effects correlated with the inhibition of falcipain. Our results suggest that vinyl sulfones or...

  16. Novel Cysteine Desulfidase CdsB Involved in Releasing Cysteine Repression of Toxin Synthesis in Clostridium difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawei Gu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile, a major cause of nosocomial diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis, still poses serious health-care challenges. The expression of its two main virulence factors, TcdA and TcdB, is reportedly repressed by cysteine, but molecular mechanism remains unclear. The cysteine desulfidase CdsB affects the virulence and infection progresses of some bacteria. The C. difficile strain 630 genome encodes a homolog of CdsB, and in the present study, we analyzed its role in C. difficile 630Δerm by constructing an isogenic ClosTron-based cdsB mutant. When C. difficile was cultured in TY broth supplemented with cysteine, the cdsB gene was rapidly induced during the exponential growth phase. The inactivation of cdsB not only affected the resistance of C. difficile to cysteine, but also altered the expression levels of intracellular cysteine-degrading enzymes and the production of hydrogen sulfide. This suggests that C. difficile CdsB is a major inducible cysteine-degrading enzyme. The inactivation of the cdsB gene in C. difficile also removed the cysteine-dependent repression of toxin production, but failed to remove the Na2S-dependent repression, which supports that the cysteine-dependent repression of toxin production is probably attributable to the accumulation of cysteine by-products. We also mapped a δ54 (SigL-dependent promoter upstream from the cdsB gene, and cdsB expression was not induced in response to cysteine in the cdsR::ermB or sigL::ermB strain. Using a reporter gene fusion analysis, we identified the necessary promoter sequence for cysteine-dependent cdsB expression. Taken together, these results indicate that CdsB is a key inducible cysteine desulfidase in C. difficile which is regulated by δ54 and CdsR in response to cysteine and that cysteine-dependent regulation of toxin production is closely associated with cysteine degradation.

  17. Novel Autosomal Recessive c10orf2 Mutations Causing Infantile-Onset Spinocerebellar Ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Jessica N; Booth, Frances A; Del Bigio, Marc R; Mhanni, Aizeddin A

    2012-01-01

    Recessive mutations in genes encoding mitochondrial DNA replication machinery lead to mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes. This genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous group includes infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia (OMIM# 271245) a neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in the mtDNA helicase gene, c10orf2, with an increased frequency in the Finnish population due to a founder mutation. We describe a child of English descent who presented with a severe phenotype of IOSCA as a result of two-novel mutations in the c10orf2 gene. This paper expands the phenotypic spectrum of IOSCA and adds further evidence for the presence of a genotype-phenotype correlation among patients with recessive mutations in this gene.

  18. Novel Autosomal Recessive c10orf2 Mutations Causing Infantile-Onset Spinocerebellar Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica N. Hartley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recessive mutations in genes encoding mitochondrial DNA replication machinery lead to mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes. This genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous group includes infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia (OMIM# 271245 a neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in the mtDNA helicase gene, c10orf2, with an increased frequency in the Finnish population due to a founder mutation. We describe a child of English descent who presented with a severe phenotype of IOSCA as a result of two-novel mutations in the c10orf2 gene. This paper expands the phenotypic spectrum of IOSCA and adds further evidence for the presence of a genotype-phenotype correlation among patients with recessive mutations in this gene.

  19. Production of alkaline protease from Cellulosimicrobium cellulans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracini-Santos, Luciana; Sato, Hélia H

    2009-01-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans is one of the microorganisms that produces a wide variety of yeast cell wall-degrading enzymes, β-1,3-glucanase, protease and chitinase. Dried cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used as carbon and nitrogen source for cell growth and protease production. The medium components KH2PO4, KOH and dried yeast cells showed a significant effect (pproduction of protease was 0.2 g/l of MgSO4.7H2O, 2.0 g/l of (NH4)2SO4 and 8% of dried yeast cells in 0.15M phosphate buffer at pH 8.0. The maximum alkaline protease production was 7.0 ± 0.27 U/ml over the center point. Crude protease showed best activity at 50ºC and pH 7.0-8.0, and was stable at 50ºC. PMID:24031317

  20. Protease-degradable electrospun fibrous hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Ryan J.; Bassin, Ethan J.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-03-01

    Electrospun nanofibres are promising in biomedical applications to replicate features of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, nearly all electrospun scaffolds are either non-degradable or degrade hydrolytically, whereas natural ECM degrades proteolytically, often through matrix metalloproteinases. Here we synthesize reactive macromers that contain protease-cleavable and fluorescent peptides and are able to form both isotropic hydrogels and electrospun fibrous hydrogels through a photoinitiated polymerization. These biomimetic scaffolds are susceptible to protease-mediated cleavage in vitro in a protease dose-dependent manner and in vivo in a subcutaneous mouse model using transdermal fluorescent imaging to monitor degradation. Importantly, materials containing an alternate and non-protease-cleavable peptide sequence are stable in both in vitro and in vivo settings. To illustrate the specificity in degradation, scaffolds with mixed fibre populations support selective fibre degradation based on individual fibre degradability. Overall, this represents a novel biomimetic approach to generate protease-sensitive fibrous scaffolds for biomedical applications.

  1. Carnein, a serine protease from noxious plant weed Ipomoea carnea (morning glory).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Vijay Kumar; Jagannadham, Medicherla V

    2007-07-11

    A new serine protease from the latex of Ipomoea carnea spp. fistulosa (Morning glory), belonging to the Convolvulaceae family, was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by cation exchange chromatography. The enzyme, named carnein, has a molecular mass of 80.24 kDa (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight) and an isoelectric point of pH 5.6. The pH and temperature optima for proteolytic activity were 6.5 and 65 degrees C, respectively. The extinction coefficient (epsilon2801%) of the enzyme was estimated as 37.12, and the protein molecule consists of 35 tryptophan, 76 tyrosine, and seven cysteine residues. The effect of several inhibitors such as iodoacetic acid, diisopropylfluorophosphate, phenyl-methanesulfonyl fluoride, chymostatin, soybean trypsin inhibitor, HgCl2, 3S-3-(N-{(S)-1-[N-(4-guanidinobutyl)carbamoyl]3-ethylbutyl}carbamoyl)oxirane-2-carboxylic acid, N-ethyl maleimide, ethylene glycol-bis(alpha-amino ethyl ether)tetraacetic acid, ethylenediamminetetraacetic acid, and o-phenonthroline indicates that carnein belongs to the family of serine proteases. The enzyme is not prone to autolysis even at very low concentrations. The N-terminal sequence of carnein (T-T-H-S-P-E-F-L-G-L-A-E-S-S-G-L-X-P-N-S) exhibited considerable similarity to those of other plant serine proteases; the highest similarity was with alnus AG12, one of the subtilase family endopepetidases.

  2. Serine Protease Variants Encoded by Echis ocellatus Venom Gland cDNA: Cloning and Sequencing Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Hasson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Envenoming by Echis saw-scaled viper is the leading cause of death and morbidity in Africa due to snake bite. Despite its medical importance, there have been few investigations into the toxin composition of the venom of this viper. Here, we report the cloning of cDNA sequences encoding four groups or isoforms of the haemostasis-disruptive Serine protease proteins (SPs from the venom glands of Echis ocellatus. All these SP sequences encoded the cysteine residues scaffold that form the 6-disulphide bonds responsible for the characteristic tertiary structure of venom serine proteases. All the Echis ocellatus EoSP groups showed varying degrees of sequence similarity to published viper venom SPs. However, these groups also showed marked intercluster sequence conservation across them which were significantly different from that of previously published viper SPs. Because viper venom SPs exhibit a high degree of sequence similarity and yet exert profoundly different effects on the mammalian haemostatic system, no attempt was made to assign functionality to the new Echis ocellatus EoSPs on the basis of sequence alone. The extraordinary level of interspecific and intergeneric sequence conservation exhibited by the Echis ocellatus EoSPs and analogous serine proteases from other viper species leads us to speculate that antibodies to representative molecules should neutralise (that we will exploit, by epidermal DNA immunization the biological function of this important group of venom toxins in vipers that are distributed throughout Africa, the Middle East, and the Indian subcontinent.

  3. Human Cathepsin V Protease Participates in Production of Enkephalin and NPY Neuropeptide Neurotransmitters*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funkelstein, Lydiane; Lu, W. Douglas; Koch, Britta; Mosier, Charles; Toneff, Thomas; Taupenot, Laurent; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Reinheckel, Thomas; Peters, Christoph; Hook, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Proteases are required for processing precursors into active neuropeptides that function as neurotransmitters for cell-cell communication. This study demonstrates the novel function of human cathepsin V protease for producing the neuropeptides enkephalin and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Cathepsin V is a human-specific cysteine protease gene. Findings here show that expression of cathepsin V in neuroendocrine PC12 cells and human neuronal SK-N-MC cells results in production of (Met)enkephalin from proenkephalin. Gene silencing of cathepsin V by siRNA in human SK-N-MC cells results in reduction of (Met)enkephalin by more than 80%, illustrating the prominent role of cathepsin V for neuropeptide production. In vitro processing of proenkephalin by cathepsin V occurs at dibasic residue sites to generate enkephalin-containing peptides and an ∼24-kDa intermediate present in human brain. Cathepsin V is present in human brain cortex and hippocampus where enkephalin and NPY are produced and is present in purified human neuropeptide secretory vesicles. Colocalization of cathepsin V with enkephalin and NPY in secretory vesicles of human neuroblastoma cells was illustrated by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, expression of cathepsin V with proNPY results in NPY production. These findings indicate the unique function of human cathepsin V for producing enkephalin and NPY neuropeptides required for neurotransmission in health and neurological diseases. PMID:22393040

  4. Characterization of a novel otubain-like protease with deubiquitination activity from Nosema bombycis (Microsporidia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Dang, Xiaoqun; Luo, Bo; Li, Chunfeng; Long, Mengxian; Li, Tian; Li, Zhi; Pan, Guoqing; Zhou, Zeyang

    2015-10-01

    Otubains are a recently identified family of deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs). They are involved in diverse biological processes including protein degradation, signal transduction, and cell immune response. Several microsporidian genomes have been published in the last decade; however, little is known about the otubain-like protease in these widely-spread obligate intracellular parasites. Here, we characterized a 25 kDa otubain-like protease (NbOTU1) from the microsporidian Nosema bombycis, the pathogen causing pebrine disease in the economically important insect Bombyx mori. Sequence analysis showed that this protein contained a conserved catalytic triad of otubains composed of aspartate, cysteine, and histidine residues. The expression of Nbotu1 began on day 3 postinfection as determined by the RT-PCR method. Immunofluorescence analysis indicated that NbOTU1 is localized on the spore wall of N. bombycis. The subcellular localization of the NbOTU1 was further detected with immunoelectron microscopy, which showed that NbOTU1 is localized at the regions around endospore wall and plasma membrane. Deubiquitination analysis confirmed that the recombinant NbOTU1 possessed deubiquitination activity in vitro. Taken together, a novel microsporidian otubain-like protease NbOTU1 was partially characterized in N. bombycis, demonstrating its subcellular location and deubiquitination activity. This study provided a basic reference for further dissecting the function of otubains in microsporidia.

  5. A noncovalent class of papain-like protease/deubiquitinase inhibitors blocks SARS virus replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratia, Kiira; Pegan, Scott; Takayama, Jun; Sleeman, Katrina; Coughlin, Melissa; Baliji, Surendranath; Chaudhuri, Rima; Fu, Wentao; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Johnson, Michael E.; Baker, Susan C.; Ghosh, Arun K.; Mesecar, Andrew D. (Loyola); (Purdue); (UIC)

    2008-10-27

    We report the discovery and optimization of a potent inhibitor against the papain-like protease (PLpro) from the coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV). This unique protease is not only responsible for processing the viral polyprotein into its functional units but is also capable of cleaving ubiquitin and ISG15 conjugates and plays a significant role in helping SARS-CoV evade the human immune system. We screened a structurally diverse library of 50,080 compounds for inhibitors of PLpro and discovered a noncovalent lead inhibitor with an IC{sub 50} value of 20 {mu}M, which was improved to 600 nM via synthetic optimization. The resulting compound, GRL0617, inhibited SARS-CoV viral replication in Vero E6 cells with an EC{sub 50} of 15 {mu}M and had no associated cytotoxicity. The X-ray structure of PLpro in complex with GRL0617 indicates that the compound has a unique mode of inhibition whereby it binds within the S4-S3 subsites of the enzyme and induces a loop closure that shuts down catalysis at the active site. These findings provide proof-of-principle that PLpro is a viable target for development of antivirals directed against SARS-CoV, and that potent noncovalent cysteine protease inhibitors can be developed with specificity directed toward pathogenic deubiquitinating enzymes without inhibiting host DUBs.

  6. Novel Autosomal Recessive c10orf2 Mutations Causing Infantile-Onset Spinocerebellar Ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Hartley, Jessica N.; Booth, Frances A.; Del Bigio, Marc R.; Mhanni, Aizeddin A.

    2012-01-01

    Recessive mutations in genes encoding mitochondrial DNA replication machinery lead to mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes. This genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous group includes infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia (OMIM# 271245) a neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in the mtDNA helicase gene, c10orf2, with an increased frequency in the Finnish population due to a founder mutation. We describe a child of English descent who presented with a severe phenotype of IOSCA ...

  7. Identification of the c(10×6)-CN/Cu(001) surface structure

    KAUST Repository

    Shuttleworth, I.G.

    2014-12-01

    © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. A systematic survey of all possible c(10 x 6)-CN/Cu(0 0 1) structures has been performed using density functional theory (DFT). A group of four preferred structures is presented with one of the structures identified as optimal. An analysis of the bonding within the optimal structure has shown that a significant localisation of the surface Cu 4s bonds occurs in the saturated system.

  8. Cysteines as Redox Molecular Switches and Targets of Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Fra

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Thiol groups can undergo numerous modifications, making cysteine a unique molecular switch. Cysteine plays structural and regulatory roles as part of proteins or glutathione, contributing to maintain redox homeostasis and regulate signaling within and amongst cells. Not surprisingly therefore, cysteines are associated with many hereditary and acquired diseases. Mutations in the primary protein sequence (gain or loss of a cysteine are most frequent in membrane and secretory proteins, correlating with the key roles of disulfide bonds. On the contrary, in the cytosol and nucleus, aberrant post-translational oxidative modifications of thiol groups, reflecting redox changes in the surrounding environment, are a more frequent cause of dysregulation of protein function. This essay highlights the regulatory functions performed by protein cysteine residues and provides a framework for understanding how mutation and/or (inactivation of this key amino acid can cause disease.

  9. The possible role of dermatophyte cysteine dioxygenase in keratin degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasperova, Alena; Kunert, Jiri; Raska, Milan

    2013-07-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO, EC 1.13.11.20) is a key enzyme involved in the homeostatic regulation of cysteine level and in production of important oxidized metabolites of cysteine such as pyruvate, sulphite, sulphate, hypotaurine, and taurine in all eukaryotic cells. The intracellular CDO concentration is regulated at both transcriptional and posttranslational levels. In several fungi, CDO plays an important role as a virulence factor involved in morphological transition from yeast to mycelial forms. CDO is crucial for oxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulphinic acid and therefore for sulphite production and secretion. Because sulphite cleaves disulphide bridges as a first unavoidable step in keratinolysis, it is hypothesized that in dermatophytes, CDO is a virulence factor crucial for keratin degradation.

  10. Intercalation of a nonionic surfactant (C10E3) bilayer into a Na-montmorillonite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guégan, Régis

    2010-12-21

    A nonionic surfactant, triethylene glycol mono-n-decyl ether (C(10)E(3)), characterized by its lamellar phase state, was introduced in the interlayer of a Na-montmorillonite clay at several concentrations. The synthesized organoclays were characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering in conjunction with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and adsorption isotherms. Experiments showed that a bilayer of C(10)E(3) was intercalated into the interlayer space of the naturally exchanged Na-montmorillonite, resulting in the aggregation of the lyotropic liquid crystal state in the lamellar phase. This behavior strongly differs from previous observations of confinement of nonionic surfactants in clays where the expansion of the interlayer space was limited to two monolayers parallel to the silicate surface and cationic surfactants in clays where the intercalation of organic compounds is introduced into the clay galleries through ion exchange. The confinement of a bilayer of C(10)E(3) nonionic surfactant in clays offers new perspectives for the realization of hybrid nanomaterials, since the synthesized organoclays preserve the electrostatic characteristics of the clays, thus allowing further ion exchange while presenting at the same time a hydrophobic surface and a maximum opening of the interlayer space for the adsorption of neutral organic molecules of important size with functional properties.

  11. Cysteine sulfoxide derivatives in Petiveria alliacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubec, R; Musah, R A

    2001-11-01

    Two diastereomers of S-benzyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide have been isolated from fresh roots of Petiveria alliacea. Their structures and absolute configurations have been determined by NMR, MALDI-HRMS, IR and CD spectroscopy and confirmed by comparison with authentic compounds. Both the R(S) and S(S) diastereomers of the sulfoxide are present in all parts of the plant (root, stem, and leaves) with the latter diastereomer being predominant. Their total content greatly varied in different parts of the plant between 0.07 and 2.97 mg g(-1) fr. wt, being by far the highest in the root. S-Benzylcysteine has also been detected in trace amounts (<10 microg g(-1) fr. wt) in all parts of the plant. This represents the first report of the presence of S-benzylcysteine derivatives in nature.

  12. Comparative analysis of procoagulant and fibrinogenolytic activity of crude protease fractions of turmeric species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivalingu, B R; Vivek, H K; Nafeesa, Zohara; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2015-08-22

    %) against PMSF, indicating the presence of cysteine and serine protease(s). The CEFs of turmeric species exhibited strong procoagulant activity associated with fibrinogenolytic activity. This study provides the scientific credence to turmeric in its propensity to stop bleeding and wound healing process practiced by traditional Indian medicine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of Drug Transporter Genes on Cysteine Export and Overproduction in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Satoshi; Awano, Naoki; Inubushi, Kyoko; Maeda, Eri; Nakamori, Shigeru; Nishino, Kunihiko; Yamaguchi, Akihito; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    l-Cysteine is an important amino acid in terms of its industrial applications. We previously found a marked production of l-cysteine from glucose in recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing an altered cysE gene encoding feedback inhibition-insensitive serine acetyltransferase. Also, a lower level of cysteine desulfhydrase (CD) activity, which is involved in l-cysteine degradation, increased l-cysteine productivity in E. coli. The use of an l-cysteine efflux system could be promising for ...

  14. A two disulfide bridge Kazal domain from Phytophthora exhibits stable inhibitory activity against serine proteases of the subtilisin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamoun Sophien

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kazal-like serine protease inhibitors are defined by a conserved sequence motif. A typical Kazal domain contains six cysteine residues leading to three disulfide bonds with a 1–5/2–4/3–6 pattern. Most Kazal domains described so far belong to this class. However, a novel class of Kazal domains with two disulfide bridges resulting from the absence of the third and sixth cysteines have been found in biologically important molecules, such as human LEKTI, a 15-domain inhibitor associated with the severe congenital disease Netherton syndrome. These domains are referred to as atypical Kazal domains. Previously, EPI1, a Kazal-like protease inhibitor from the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans, was shown to be a tight-binding inhibitor of subtilisin A. EPI1 also inhibits and interacts with the pathogenesis-related P69B subtilase of the host plant tomato, suggesting a role in virulence. EPI1 is composed of two Kazal domains, the four-cysteine atypical domain EPI1a and the typical domain EPI1b. Results In this study, we predicted the inhibition constants of EPI1a and EPI1b to subtilisin A using the additivity-based sequence to reactivity algorithm (Laskowski algorithm. The atypical domain EPI1a, but not the typical domain EPI1b, was predicted to have strong inhibitory activity against subtilisin A. Inhibition assays and coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that recombinant domain EPI1a exhibited stable inhibitory activity against subilisin A and was solely responsible for inhibition and interaction with tomato P69B subtilase. Conclusion The finding that the two disulfide bridge atypical Kazal domain EPI1a is a stable inhibitor indicates that the missing two cysteines and their corresponding disulfide bond are not essential for inhibitor reactivity and stability. This report also suggests that the Laskowski algorithm originally developed and validated with typical Kazal domains might operate accurately for atypical

  15. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Paula Monteiro; Bittencourt, Mona Lisa de Assis; Caprara, Carolina Canielles; de Freitas, Marcela; de Almeida, Renata Paula Coppini; Silveira, Dâmaris; Fonseca, Yris Maria; Ferreira, Edivaldo Ximenes; Pessoa, Adalberto; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications. PMID:26273247

  16. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Monteiro de Souza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications.

  17. Gut proteases target Yersinia invasin in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freund Sandra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yersinia enterocolitica is a common cause of food borne gastrointestinal disease. After oral uptake, yersiniae invade Peyer's patches of the distal ileum. This is accomplished by the binding of the Yersinia invasin to β1 integrins on the apical surface of M cells which overlie follicle associated lymphoid tissue. The gut represents a barrier that severely limits yersiniae from reaching deeper tissues such as Peyer's patches. We wondered if gut protease attack on invasion factors could contribute to the low number of yersiniae invading Peyer's patches. Findings Here we show that invasin is rapidly degraded in vivo by gut proteases in the mouse infection model. In vivo proteolytic degradation is due to proteolysis by several gut proteases such as trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, pancreatic elastase, and pepsin. Protease treated yersiniae are shown to be less invasive in a cell culture model. YadA, another surface adhesin is cleaved by similar concentrations of gut proteases but Myf was not cleaved, showing that not all surface proteins are equally susceptible to degradation by gut proteases. Conclusions We demonstrate that gut proteases target important Yersinia virulence factors such as invasin and YadA in vivo. Since invasin is completely degraded within 2-3 h after reaching the small intestine of mice, it is no longer available to mediate invasion of Peyer's patches.

  18. Modification of Keap1 Cysteine Residues by Sulforaphane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chenqi; Eggler, Aimee L.; Mesecar, Andrew D.; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of the transcription factor NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) through modification of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) cysteines, leading to up-regulation of the antioxidant response element (ARE), is an important mechanism of cellular defense against reactive oxygen species and xenobiotic electrophiles. Sulforaphane, occurring in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, is a potent natural ARE activator that functions by modifying Keap1 cysteine residues, but there are conflicting in vitro and in vivo data regarding which of these cysteine residues react. Although most biological data indicate that modification of C151 is essential for sulforaphane action, some recent studies using mass spectrometry have failed to identify C151 as a site of Keap1 sulforaphane reaction. We have reconciled these conflicting data using mass spectrometry with a revised sample preparation protocol and confirmed that C151 is indeed among the most readily modified cysteines of Keap1 by sulforaphane. Previous mass spectrometry-based studies used iodoacetamide during sample preparation to derivatize free cysteine sulfhydryl groups causing loss of sulforaphane from highly reactive and reversible cysteine residues on Keap1 including C151. By omitting iodoacetamide from the protocol and reducing sample preparation time, our mass spectrometry-based studies now confirm previous cell-based studies which showed that sulforaphane reacts with at least four cysteine residues of Keap1 including C151. PMID:21391649

  19. Cysteine-rich mini-proteins in human biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavergne, Vincent; Taft, Ryan J; Alewood, Paul F

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between structure and function underpins both biochemistry and chemical biology, and has enabled the discovery of numerous agricultural and therapeutic agents. Small cysteine-rich proteins, which form a unique set of protein frameworks and folds, are found in all living organisms and often play crucial roles as hormones, growth factors, ion channel modulators and enzyme inhibitors in various biological pathways. Here we review secreted human cysteine-rich mini-proteins, classify them into broad families and briefly describe their structure and function. To systematically investigate this protein sub-class we designed a step-wise high throughput algorithm that is able to isolate the mature and active forms of human secreted cysteine-rich proteins (up to 200 amino acids in length) and extract their cysteine scaffolds. We limited our search to frameworks that contain an even number of cysteine residues (5% cysteine residues led to the identification of 22 cysteine-rich frameworks representing 21 protein families. Analysis of their molecular targets showed that these mini-proteins are frequently ligands for G protein- and enzyme-coupled receptors, transporters, extracellular enzyme inhibitors, and antimicrobial peptides. It is clear that these human secreted mini-proteins possess a wide diversity of frameworks and folds, some of which are conserved across the phylogenetic spectrum. Further study of these proteins will undoubtedly lead to insights into unresolved questions of basic biology, and the development of system-specific human therapeutics.

  20. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiang Yao

    Full Text Available Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat, an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  1. Contemporary protease inhibitors and cardiovascular risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens; Mocroft, Amanda; Ryom, Lene

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the evidence linking use of HIV protease inhibitors with excess risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in HIV+ populations. RECENT FINDINGS: For the two contemporary most frequently used protease inhibitors, darunavir and atazanavir [both pharmacologically boosted...... with ritonavir (/r)], darunavir/r has been shown to be associated with increased CVD risk. The effect is cumulative with longer exposure increasing risk and an effect size comparable to what has been observed for previously developed protease inhibitors. Biological mechanisms may be overlapping and include...... on individualization of care based on underlying risk of CVD....

  2. Mass spectrometry-assisted protease substrate screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlüter, Hartmut; Rykl, Jana; Thiemann, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Since sequencing of the human genome was completed, more than 500 genes have been annotated as proteases. Exploring the physiological role of each protease requires the identification of their natural substrates. However, the endogenous substrates of many of the human proteases are as yet unknown......-phase chromatography they are analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry and the substrates identified by database searching. The proof of principle in this study is demonstrated by incubating immobilized human plasma proteins with thrombin and by identifying by tandem mass spectrometry the fibrinopeptides, released...

  3. Constraining processes of landscape change with combined in situ cosmogenic 14C-10Be analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippe, Kristina

    2017-10-01

    Reconstructing Quaternary landscape evolution today frequently builds upon cosmogenic-nuclide surface exposure dating. However, the study of complex surface exposure chronologies on the 102-104 years' timescale remains challenging with the commonly used long-lived radionuclides (10Be, 26Al, 36Cl). In glacial settings, key points are the inheritance of nuclides accumulated in a rock surface during a previous exposure episode and (partial) shielding of a rock surface after the main deglaciation event, e.g. during phases of glacier readvance. Combining the short-lived in situ cosmogenic 14C isotope with 10Be dating provides a valuable approach to resolve and quantify complex exposure histories and burial episodes within Lateglacial and Holocene timescales. The first studies applying the in situ14C-10Be pair have demonstrated the great benefit from in situ14C analysis for unravelling complex glacier chronologies in various glacial environments worldwide. Moreover, emerging research on in situ14C in sedimentary systems highlights the capacity of combined in situ14C-10Be analysis to quantify sediment transfer times in fluvial catchments or to constrain changes in surface erosion rates. Nevertheless, further methodological advances are needed to obtain truly routine and widely available in situ14C analysis. Future development in analytical techniques has to focus on improving the analytical reproducibility, reducing the background level and determining more accurate muonic production rates. These improvements should allow extending the field of applications for combined in situ14C-10Be analysis in Earth surface sciences and open up a number of promising applications for dating young sedimentary deposits and the quantification of recent changes in surface erosion dynamics.

  4. Subcellular distribution of glutathione and cysteine in cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomašić, Ana; Horvat, Lucija; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione plays numerous important functions in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Whereas it can be found in virtually all eukaryotic cells, its production in prokaryotes is restricted to cyanobacteria and proteobacteria and a few strains of gram-positive bacteria. In bacteria, it is involved in the protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS), osmotic shock, acidic conditions, toxic chemicals, and heavy metals. Glutathione synthesis in bacteria takes place in two steps out of cysteine, glutamate, and glycine. Cysteine is the limiting factor for glutathione biosynthesis which can be especially crucial for cyanobacteria, which rely on both the sufficient sulfur supply from the growth media and on the protection of glutathione against ROS that are produced during photosynthesis. In this study, we report a method that allows detection and visualization of the subcellular distribution of glutathione in Synechocystis sp. This method is based on immunogold cytochemistry with glutathione and cysteine antisera and computer-supported transmission electron microscopy. Labeling of glutathione and cysteine was restricted to the cytosol and interthylakoidal spaces. Glutathione and cysteine could not be detected in carboxysomes, cyanophycin granules, cell walls, intrathylakoidal spaces, periplasm, and vacuoles. The accuracy of the glutathione and cysteine labeling is supported by two observations. First, preadsorption of the antiglutathione and anticysteine antisera with glutathione and cysteine, respectively, reduced the density of the gold particles to background levels. Second, labeling of glutathione and cysteine was strongly decreased by 98.5% and 100%, respectively, in Synechocystis sp. cells grown on media without sulfur. This study indicates a strong similarity of the subcellular distribution of glutathione and cysteine in cyanobacteria and plastids of plants and provides a deeper insight into glutathione metabolism in bacteria. PMID:20349253

  5. Cysteine-Accelerated Methanogenic Propionate Degradation in Paddy Soil Enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Li; Ma, Jinlian; Tang, Jia; Tang, Ziyang; Zhou, Shungui

    2017-05-01

    Propionate degradation is a critical step during the conversion of complex organic matter under methanogenic conditions, and it requires a syntrophic cooperation between propionate-oxidizing bacteria and methanogenic archaea. Increasing evidences suggest that interspecies electron transfer for syntrophic metabolism is not limited to the reducing equivalents of hydrogen and formate. This study tested the ability of an electron shuttle to mediate interspecies electron transfer in syntrophic methanogenesis. We found that cysteine supplementation (100, 400, and 800 μM) accelerated CH 4 production from propionate in paddy soil enrichments. Of the concentrations tested, 100 μM cysteine was the most effective at enhancing propionate degradation to CH 4 , and the rates of CH 4 production and propionate degradation were increased by 109 and 79%, respectively, compared with the cysteine-free control incubations. We eliminated the possibility that the stimulatory effect of cysteine on methanogenesis was attributable to the function of cysteine as a methanogenic substrate in the presence of propionate. The potential catalytic effect involved cysteine serving as an electron carrier to mediate interspecies electron transfer in syntrophic propionate oxidization. The redox potential of cystine/cysteine, which is dependent on the concentration, might be more suitable to facilitate interspecies electron transfer between syntrophic partners at a concentration of 100 μM. Pelotomaculum, obligately syntrophic, propionate-oxidizing bacteria, and hydrogenotrophic methanogens of the family Methanobacteriaceae are predominant in cysteine-mediated methanogenic propionate degradation. The stimulatory effect of cysteine on syntrophic methanogenesis offers remarkable potential for improving the performance of anaerobic digestion and conceptually broaden strategies for interspecies electron transfer in syntrophic metabolism.

  6. QEC values of the superallowed β emitters C10, Ar34, Ca38, and V46

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eronen, T.; Gorelov, D.; Hakala, J.; Hardy, J. C.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Penttilä, H.; Reponen, M.; Rissanen, J.; Saastamoinen, A.; Äystö, J.

    2011-05-01

    The QEC values of the superallowed β+ emitters C10, Ar34, Ca38, and V46 have been measured with the JYFLTRAP Penning-trap mass spectrometer to be 3648.12(8), 6061.83(8), 6612.12(7), and 7052.44(10) keV, respectively. All four values are substantially improved in precision over previous results. Of the well-known superallowed emitters, only O14 has yet to have had its QEC value measured with a Penning trap.

  7. Secreted fungal aspartic proteases: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandujano-González, Virginia; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2016-01-01

    The aspartic proteases, also called aspartyl and aspartate proteases or acid proteases (E.C.3.4.23), belong to the endopeptidase family and are characterized by the conserved sequence Asp-Gly-Thr at the active site. These enzymes are found in a wide variety of microorganisms in which they perform important functions related to nutrition and pathogenesis. In addition, their high activity and stability at acid pH make them attractive for industrial application in the food industry; specifically, they are used as milk-coagulating agents in cheese production or serve to improve the taste of some foods. This review presents an analysis of the characteristics and properties of secreted microbial aspartic proteases and their potential for commercial application. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Organometallic palladium reagents for cysteine bioconjugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V.; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M.; Pentelute, Bradley L.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-10-01

    Reactions based on transition metals have found wide use in organic synthesis, in particular for the functionalization of small molecules. However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal-based reactions to modify complex biomolecules, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature and mild pH) and the existence of multiple reactive functional groups found in biomolecules. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation (bioconjugation) reactions that are rapid and robust under a range of bio-compatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications.

  9. Purification and characterization of protease enzyme from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimum protease activity of 116.4 U/ml was observed in the growth medium containing 0.7% KH2PO4, 0.2% K2HPO4, 0.01% MgSO4.7H2O, 0.05% citric acid dehydrate, 0.1% yeast extract and 0.2% casein. The protease production was found to be optimized in 1: 5 cultivation volume with 1% inoculum, shaken at 150 rpm.

  10. Tooth Development and Funcional Aspects of Proteases

    OpenAIRE

    原田, 実

    1994-01-01

    During tooth development in tooth germs, a chain of reciprocal interactions between the epithelial and mesenchymal tissue regulates both morphogenesis and cell differentiation. Several extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin, tenascin, syndecan, collagens, and enamel proteins are thought to be involved in the tooth developing process on a timed schedule. The turnover of these proteins can be broken down with proteases in the tooth germs. In this review article, proteases related to ...

  11. Conserved loop cysteines of vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1-like 1 (VKORC1L1) are involved in its active site regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Jian-Ke; Jin, Da-Yun; Stafford, Darrel W

    2014-03-28

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) reduces vitamin K epoxide in the vitamin K cycle for post-translational modification of proteins that are involved in a variety of biological functions. However, the physiological function of VKORC1-like 1 (VKORC1L1), a paralogous enzyme sharing about 50% protein identity with VKORC1, is unknown. Here we determined the structural and functional differences of these two enzymes using fluorescence protease protection (FPP) assay and an in vivo cell-based activity assay. We show that in vivo VKORC1L1 reduces vitamin K epoxide to support vitamin K-dependent carboxylation as efficiently as does VKORC1. However, FPP assays show that unlike VKORC1, VKORC1L1 is a four-transmembrane domain protein with both its termini located in the cytoplasm. Moreover, the conserved loop cysteines, which are not required for VKORC1 activity, are essential for VKORC1L1's active site regeneration. Results from domain exchanges between VKORC1L1 and VKORC1 suggest that it is VKORC1L1's overall structure that uniquely allows for active site regeneration by the conserved loop cysteines. Intermediate disulfide trapping results confirmed an intra-molecular electron transfer pathway for VKORC1L1's active site reduction. Our results allow us to propose a concerted action of the four conserved cysteines of VKORC1L1 for active site regeneration; the second loop cysteine, Cys-58, attacks the active site disulfide, forming an intermediate disulfide with Cys-139; the first loop cysteine, Cys-50, attacks the intermediate disulfide resulting in active site reduction. The different membrane topologies and reaction mechanisms between VKORC1L1 and VKORC1 suggest that these two proteins might have different physiological functions.

  12. Selective Derivatization of N-Terminal Cysteines Using Cyclopentenediones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Omar; Agramunt, Jordi; Raich, Lluis; Rovira, Carme; Pedroso, Enrique; Grandas, Anna

    2016-10-07

    The outcome of the Michael-type reaction between thiols and 2,2-disubstituted cyclopentenediones varies depending on the thiol. Stable compounds with two fused rings were formed upon reaction with 1,2-aminothiols (such as N-terminal cysteines in peptides). Other thiols gave reversibly Michael-type adducts that were in equilibrium with the starting materials. This differential reactivity allows differently placed cysteines to be distinguished and has been exploited to prepare bioconjugates incorporating two or three different moieties.

  13. Identification and Functional Analysis of Escherichia coli Cysteine Desulfhydrases

    OpenAIRE

    Awano, Naoki; WADA, Masaru; Mori, Hirotada; Nakamori, Shigeru; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, three additional proteins having l-cysteine desulfhydrase activity were identified as O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-A, O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-B, and MalY protein, in addition to tryptophanase and cystathionine β-lyase, which have been reported previously. The gene disruption for each protein was significantly effective for overproduction of l-cysteine and l-cystine. Growth phenotype and transcriptional analyses suggest that tryptophanase contributes primarily to l-cy...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10178 - Distillates (Fischer-Tropsch), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Distillates (Fischer-Tropsch), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction. 721.10178 Section 721.10178 Protection of Environment...), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...

  15. Synthesis, antioxidative and whitening effects of novel cysteine derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Ji Hoon; Kim, Kyoung Mi; Jeong, Yoon Ju; Park, Young Min; Lee, Jae Young; Park, Soo Nam [Dept. of Fine Chemistry, Cosmetic R and D Center, Cosmetic Industry Coupled Collaboration Center, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jino [Daebong LS. Ltd, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Recently, development of biocompatibility functional cosmetic agents as antioxidant or whitening agent has increased. In this study, synthetic cysteine derivatives (DBLS-21, -24, and -33) were developed containing syringic acid and cysteine moieties (l-cysteine ethyl ester, N-acetyl cysteine methyl ester, and N-acetyl cysteine ethyl ester), and their antioxidative and whitening activities were evaluated. The cellular protective effect (τ{sub 50}) of DBLS-21 was 51.1 min at 50 μM on {sup 1}O{sub 2} -induced hemolysis of erythrocytes. This activity was slightly higher than that of α-tocopherol (43.6 min) as a lipophilic antioxidant. In the melanogenesis inhibitory effect, DBLS-21, -24, and -33 was 1.6-, 1.8-, and 2.5-fold higher than arbutin, respectively. In particular, DBLS-21 and -33 was 112.8- and 6.1-fold higher than arbutin, respectively (293.4 μM) on tyrosinase inhibition activity (IC{sub 50} ). But DBLS-24 had no tyrosinase inhibitory activity. These results suggest that cysteine derivatives possess potential for use as an antioxidant agent (DBLS-21) and whitening agents (all derivatives) in cosmetics.

  16. Carbohydrate protease conjugates: Stabilized proteases for peptide synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wartchow, C.A.; Wang, Peng; Bednarski, M.D.; Callstrom, M.R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The synthesis of oligopeptides using stable carbohydrate protease conjugates (CPCs) was examined in acetonitrile solvent systems. CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin] was used for the preparation of peptides containing histidine, phenylalanine, tryptophan in the P{sub 1} position in 60-93% yield. The CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin]-catalyzed synthesis of octamer Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-OEt from Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-OMe was achieved in 71% yield demonstrating that synthesis peptides containing both hydrophylic and hydrophobic amino acids. The P{sub 2} specificity of papain for aromatic residues was utilized for the 2 + 3 coupling of Z-Tyr-Gly-OMe to H{sub 2}N-Gly-Phe-Leu-OH to generate the leucine enkephalin derivative in 79% yield. Although papain is nonspecific for the hydrolysis of N-benzyloxycarbonyl amino acid methyl esters in aqueous solution, the rates of synthesis for these derivitives with nucleophile leucine tert-butyl ester differed by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. CPC[thermolysin] was used to prepare the aspartame precursor Z-Asp-Phe-OMe in 90% yield. The increased stability of CPCs prepared from periodate-modified poly(2-methacryl- amido-2-deoxy-D-glucose), poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose), and poly(5-methacryl-amido-5-deoxy-D-ribose), carbohydrate materials designed to increase the aldehyde concentration in aqueous solution, suggests that the stability of CPCs is directly related to the aldehyde concentration of the carbohydrate material. Periodate oxidation of poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose) followed by covalent attachment to {alpha}-chymotrypsin gave a CPC with catalytic activity in potassium phosphate buffer at 90{degrees}C for 2 h. 1 fig., 1 tab., 40 refs.

  17. Identification and Characterization of IgdE, a Novel IgG-degrading Protease of Streptococcus suis with Unique Specificity for Porcine IgG*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerry, Christian; Seele, Jana; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Baums, Christoph G.; von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a major endemic pathogen of pigs causing meningitis, arthritis, and other diseases. Zoonotic S. suis infections are emerging in humans causing similar pathologies as well as severe conditions such as toxic shock-like syndrome. Recently, we discovered an IdeS family protease of S. suis that exclusively cleaves porcine IgM and represents the first virulence factor described, linking S. suis to pigs as their natural host. Here we report the identification and characterization of a novel, unrelated protease of S. suis that exclusively targets porcine IgG. This enzyme, designated IgdE for immunoglobulin G-degrading enzyme of S. suis, is a cysteine protease distinct from previous characterized streptococcal immunoglobulin degrading proteases of the IdeS family and mediates efficient cleavage of the hinge region of porcine IgG with a high degree of specificity. The findings that all S. suis strains investigated possess the IgG proteolytic activity and that piglet serum samples contain specific antibodies against IgdE strongly indicate that the protease is expressed in vivo during infection and represents a novel and putative important bacterial virulence/colonization determinant, and a thus potential therapeutic target. PMID:26861873

  18. A modular chitin-binding protease associated with hemocytes and hemolymph in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielli, A; Loukeris, T G; Lagueux, M; Müller, H M; Richman, A; Kafatos, F C

    2000-06-20

    Sp22D, a modular serine protease encompassing chitin binding, low density lipoprotein receptor, and scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains, was identified by molecular cloning in the malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae. It is expressed in multiple body parts and during much of development, most intensely in hemocytes. The protein appears to be posttranslationally modified. Its integral, putatively glycosylated form is secreted in the hemolymph, whereas a smaller form potentially generated by proteolytic processing is associated with the tissues. Bacterial challenge or wounding result in low-level RNA induction, but the protein does not bind to bacteria, nor is its processing affected by infection. However, Sp22D binds to chitin with high affinity and undergoes transient changes in processing during pupal to adult metamorphosis; it may respond to exposure to naked chitin during tissue remodeling or damage.

  19. Inhibitors of cysteine cathepsin and calpain do not prevent ultraviolet-B-induced apoptosis in human keratinocytes and HeLa cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Bo; Baadsgaard, Ole; Skov, Lone

    2004-01-01

    been demonstrated to play a role in the execution of programmed cell death induced by other stimuli, e.g. TNF-alpha. The purpose of the present study was therefore to investigate whether inhibitors of cysteine cathepsins and calpains could prevent UVB-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells and keratinocytes....... This was done by investigating the effect of the irreversible cysteine protease inhibitor zFA-fmk, the cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074-Me and the calpain inhibitor ALLN on the viability of UVB-irradiated human keratinocytes and HeLa cells. At concentrations of 10 microM and above zVAD-fmk conferred partial dose......-dependent protection against UVB-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells and keratinocytes. Moreover, caspase-3 activity was completely blocked at zVAD-fmk concentrations of 1 microM in HeLa cells. This indicates that caspase-independent mechanisms could be involved in UVB-induced apoptosis. However, the protease inhibitors z...

  20. Purification and characterization of macrodontain I, a cysteine peptidase from unripe fruits of Pseudananas macrodontes (Morr.) harms (Bromeliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, L M; Sequeiros, C; Natalucci, C L; Brullo, A; Maras, B; Barra, D; Caffini, N O

    2000-03-01

    A new papain-like cysteine peptidase isolated from fruits of Pseudananas macrodontes (Morr.) Harms, a species closely related to pineapple (Ananas comosus L.), has been purified and characterized. The enzyme, named macrodontain I, is the main proteolytic component present in fruit extracts and was purified by acetone fractionation followed by anion-exchange chromatography. Separation was improved by selecting both an adequate pH value and a narrow saline gradient. Optimum pH range (more than 90% of maximum activity with casein) was achieved at pH 6.1-8.5. Homogeneity of the enzyme was confirmed by bidimensional electrophoresis and mass spectroscopy (MS). Molecular mass of the enzyme was 23,459 (MS) and its isoelectric point was 6.1. The alanine, glutamine, and tyrosine derivatives were strongly preferred when the enzyme was assayed on N-alpha-CBZ-l-amino acid p-nitrophenyl esters. The N-terminal sequence of macrodontain (by comparison with the N-terminus of 30 plant proteases with more than 50% homology) showed a great deal of sequence similarity to the other pineapple-stem-derived cysteine endopeptidases, being 85.7, 85. 2, and 77.8% identical to comosain, stem bromelain, and ananain, respectively. It seems clear that the Bromeliaceae endopeptidases are more closely related to each other than to other members of the papain family, suggesting relatively recent divergence. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  1. Thiol trapping and metabolic redistribution of sulfur metabolites enable cells to overcome cysteine overload

    OpenAIRE

    Anup Arunrao Deshpande; Amanda Waldner; Sunil Laxman; Anand Kumar Bachhawat

    2017-01-01

    Cysteine is an essential requirement in living organisms. However, due to its reactive thiol side chain, elevated levels of intracellular cysteine can be toxic and therefore need to be rapidly eliminated from the cellular milieu. In mammals and many other organisms, excess cysteine is believed to be primarily eliminated by the cysteine dioxygenase dependent oxidative degradation of cysteine, followed by the removal of the oxidative products. However, other mechanisms of tackling excess cystei...

  2. Generation and Characterization of a Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Protease-Dependent Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Vicky C. H.; Zhong, Weidong; Skelton, Angela; Ingravallo, Paul; Vassilev, Venteislav; Donis, Ruben O.; Hong, Zhi; Lau, Johnson Y. N.

    2000-01-01

    Unique to pestiviruses, the N-terminal protein encoded by the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) genome is a cysteine protease (Npro) responsible for a self-cleavage that releases the N terminus of the core protein (C). This unique protease is dispensable for viral replication, and its coding region can be replaced by a ubiquitin gene directly fused in frame to the core. To develop an antiviral assay that allows the assessment of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease inhibitors, a chimeric BVDV in which the coding region of Npro was replaced by that of an NS4A cofactor-tethered HCV NS3 protease domain was generated. This cofactor-tethered HCV protease domain was linked in frame to the core protein of BVDV through an HCV NS5A-NS5B junction site and mimicked the proteolytic function of Npro in the release of BVDV core for capsid assembly. A similar chimeric construct was built with an inactive HCV NS3 protease to serve as a control. Genomic RNA transcripts derived from both chimeric clones, PH/B (wild-type HCV NS3 protease) and PH/B(S139A) (mutant HCV NS3 protease) were then transfected into bovine cells (MDBK). Only the RNA transcripts from the PH/B clone yielded viable viruses, whereas the mutant clone, PH/B(S139A), failed to produce any signs of infection, suggesting that the unprocessed fusion protein rendered the BVDV core protein defective in capsid assembly. Like the wild-type BVDV (NADL), the chimeric virus was cytopathic and formed plaques on the cell monolayer. Sequence and biochemical analyses confirmed the identity of the chimeric virus and further revealed variant viruses due to growth adaptation. Growth analysis revealed comparable replication kinetics between the wild-type and the chimeric BVDVs. Finally, to assess the genetic stability of the chimeric virus, an Npro-null BVDV (BVDV−Npro in which the entire Npro coding region was deleted) was produced. Although cytopathic, BVDV−Npro was highly defective in viral replication and growth, a

  3. Biochemical analysis of a papain-like protease isolated from the latex of Asclepias curassavica L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggieri, Constanza; Obregon, Walter; Trejo, Sebastian; Priolo, Nora

    2009-02-01

    Most of the species belonging to Asclepiadaceae family usually secrete an endogenous milk-like fluid in a network of laticifer cells in which sub-cellular organelles intensively synthesize proteins and secondary metabolites. A new papain-like endopeptidase (asclepain c-II) has been isolated and characterized from the latex extracted from petioles of Asclepias curassavica L. (Asclepiadaceae). Asclepain c-II was the minor proteolytic component in the latex, but showed higher specific activity than asclepain c-I, the main active fraction previously studied. Both enzymes displayed quite distinct biochemical characteristics, confirming that they are different enzymes. Crude extract was purified by cation exchange chromatography (FPLC). Two active fractions, homogeneous by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, were isolated. Asclepain c-II displayed a molecular mass of 23,590 Da, a pI higher than 9.3, maximum proteolytic activity at pH 9.4-10.2, and showed poor thermostability. The activity of asclepain c-II is inhibited by cysteine proteases inhibitors like E-64, but not by any other protease inhibitors such as 1,10-phenantroline, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, and pepstatine. The Nterminal sequence (LPSFVDWRQKGVVFPIRNQGQCGSCWTFSA) showed a high similarity with those of other plant cysteine proteinases. When assayed on N-alpha-CBZ-amino acid-p-nitrophenyl esters, the enzyme exhibited higher preference for the glutamine derivative. Determinations of kinetic parameters were performed with N-alpha-CBZ-L-Gln-p-nitrophenyl ester as substrate: K(m)=0.1634 mM, k(cat)=121.48 s(-1), and k(cat)/K(m)=7.4 x 10(5) s(-1)/mM.

  4. Temporal Proteomics of Inducible RNAi Lines of Clp Protease Subunits Identifies Putative Protease Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Juan C; Martínez-Jaime, Silvia; Schwartzmann, Joram; Karcher, Daniel; Tillich, Michael; Graf, Alexander; Bock, Ralph

    2018-02-01

    The Clp protease in the chloroplasts of plant cells is a large complex composed of at least 13 nucleus-encoded subunits and one plastid-encoded subunit, which are arranged in several ring-like structures. The proteolytic P-ring and the structurally similar R-ring form the core complex that contains the proteolytic chamber. Chaperones of the HSP100 family help with substrate unfolding, and additional accessory proteins are believed to assist with Clp complex assembly and/or to promote complex stability. Although the structure and function of the Clp protease have been studied in great detail in both bacteria and chloroplasts, the identification of bona fide protease substrates has been very challenging. Knockout mutants of genes for protease subunits are of limited value, due to their often pleiotropic phenotypes and the difficulties with distinguishing primary effects (i.e. overaccumulation of proteins that represent genuine protease substrates) from secondary effects (proteins overaccumulating for other reasons). Here, we have developed a new strategy for the identification of candidate substrates of plant proteases. By combining ethanol-inducible knockdown of protease subunits with time-resolved analysis of changes in the proteome, proteins that respond immediately to reduced protease activity can be identified. In this way, secondary effects are minimized and putative protease substrates can be identified. We have applied this strategy to the Clp protease complex of tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum ) and identified a set of chloroplast proteins that are likely degraded by Clp. These include several metabolic enzymes but also a small number of proteins involved in photosynthesis. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Temporal Proteomics of Inducible RNAi Lines of Clp Protease Subunits Identifies Putative Protease Substrates1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Jaime, Silvia; Karcher, Daniel; Tillich, Michael

    2018-01-01

    The Clp protease in the chloroplasts of plant cells is a large complex composed of at least 13 nucleus-encoded subunits and one plastid-encoded subunit, which are arranged in several ring-like structures. The proteolytic P-ring and the structurally similar R-ring form the core complex that contains the proteolytic chamber. Chaperones of the HSP100 family help with substrate unfolding, and additional accessory proteins are believed to assist with Clp complex assembly and/or to promote complex stability. Although the structure and function of the Clp protease have been studied in great detail in both bacteria and chloroplasts, the identification of bona fide protease substrates has been very challenging. Knockout mutants of genes for protease subunits are of limited value, due to their often pleiotropic phenotypes and the difficulties with distinguishing primary effects (i.e. overaccumulation of proteins that represent genuine protease substrates) from secondary effects (proteins overaccumulating for other reasons). Here, we have developed a new strategy for the identification of candidate substrates of plant proteases. By combining ethanol-inducible knockdown of protease subunits with time-resolved analysis of changes in the proteome, proteins that respond immediately to reduced protease activity can be identified. In this way, secondary effects are minimized and putative protease substrates can be identified. We have applied this strategy to the Clp protease complex of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and identified a set of chloroplast proteins that are likely degraded by Clp. These include several metabolic enzymes but also a small number of proteins involved in photosynthesis. PMID:29229697

  6. Intracellular proteases of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki and a protease-deficient mutant Btk-q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Y Chandrahasa; Venkateswerlu, G

    2002-12-01

    The commencement of intracellular protease synthesis was studied by gelatin zymography in Bacillus thuringiensis ( Btk) HD1, Btk HD73, and a protease-deficient mutant Btk-q derived from the former strain. By gelatin zymography, a 92-kDa protease was detected first at 3 h of sporulation, which continued until 48 h, whereas two other proteases of mol wt 78 and 69 kDa were detectable from 6 h onwards and continued until 48 h of growth in Btk HD1. Similar studies revealed the presence of two major intracellular proteases in Btk HD73 by gelatin zymography, which first appeared at 6 h of sporulation and continued until 48 h of growth. The quantitative azocasein assay confirmed that the total protease activity increases from 3 to 21 h, thereafter reaching a plateau up to 48 h of growth examined, in HD1 and HD73 strains. Btk-q, a protease-deficient mutant, showed traces of protease activity by azocasein analysis that could not be detected by gelatin zymography. The free amino acid pool content was also increased parallel to the way that the protease activity increased in all three strains. However, this increase was found to be low (16-fold) in Btk-q when compared with Btk HD1 and HD73 strains. The following amino acids were detected by paper chromatography in Btk HD1: DL-alanine, L-glutamic acid, L-aspartic acid, tyrosine, tryptophan/methionine/valine, arginine, leucine/norleucine/isoleucine, and glycine, whereas only DL-alanine, L-glutamic acid, and L-aspartic acid were in Btk-q at 24 and 48 h, when the protease activity was maximum.

  7. Knocking-Down Meloidogyne incognita Proteases by Plant-Delivered dsRNA Has Negative Pleiotropic Effect on Nematode Vigor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonino de Souza Júnior, José Dijair; Ramos Coelho, Roberta; Tristan Lourenço, Isabela; da Rocha Fragoso, Rodrigo; Barbosa Viana, Antonio Américo; Lima Pepino de Macedo, Leonardo; Mattar da Silva, Maria Cristina; Gomes Carneiro, Regina Maria; Engler, Gilbert; de Almeida-Engler, Janice; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria Fatima

    2013-01-01

    The root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita causes serious damage and yield losses in numerous important crops worldwide. Analysis of the M. incognita genome revealed a vast number of proteases belonging to five different catalytic classes. Several reports indicate that M. incognita proteases could play important roles in nematode parasitism, besides their function in ordinary digestion of giant cell contents for feeding. The precise roles of these proteins during parasitism however are still unknown, making them interesting targets for gene silencing to address protein function. In this study we have knocked-down an aspartic (Mi-asp-1), a serine (Mi-ser-1) and a cysteine protease (Mi-cpl-1) by RNAi interference to get an insight into the function of these enzymes during a host/nematode interaction. Tobacco lines expressing dsRNA for Mi-ser-1 (dsSER), Mi-cpl-1 (dsCPL) and for the three genes together (dsFusion) were generated. Histological analysis of galls did not show clear differences in giant cell morphology. Interestingly, nematodes that infected plants expressing dsRNA for proteases produced a reduced number of eggs. In addition, nematode progeny matured in dsSER plants had reduced success in egg hatching, while progeny resulting from dsCPL and dsFusion plants were less successful to infect wild-type host plants. Quantitative PCR analysis confirmed a reduction in transcripts for Mi-cpl-1 and Mi-ser-1 proteases. Our results indicate that these proteases are possibly involved in different processes throughout nematode development, like nutrition, reproduction and embryogenesis. A better understanding of nematode proteases and their possible role during a plant-nematode interaction might help to develop new tools for phytonematode control. PMID:24392004

  8. Exploring applications of procerain b, a novel protease from Calotropis procera, and characterization by N-terminal sequencing as well as peptide mass fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhay Narayan; Dubey, Vikash Kumar

    2011-07-01

    Procerain B is a novel cysteine protease isolated from Calotropis procera by our group and published recently. We have further characterized the enzyme by N-terminal sequencing and peptide mass fingerprinting. Procerain B showed maximum sequence similarity (80%) with Asclepain. Moreover, the characteristic VDWR motif of cysteine proteases is present in procerain B. The N-terminal and peptide mass fingerprinting analysis showed a distinct nature of the enzyme. Various applications of the enzyme were also evaluated. Procerain B is very effective in milk-clotting and may be a potential candidate for this process in the cheese industry. Additionally, the enzyme has potential application as dietary supplement to aid digestion. Effects of various metal ions on milk-clotting activity were also studied. The milk-clotting activity was increased in case of few metals while others have a negative effect. It is worth mentioning that the easy availability of plant material and simple purification method makes industrial production of the enzyme feasible. A protease with easy purification and suitable properties for application is always desired.

  9. Optimization and characterization of alkaline protease and carboxymethyl-cellulase produced by Bacillus pumillus grown on Ficus nitida wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Eman Zakaria

    2013-01-01

    The potentiality of 23 bacterial isolates to produce alkaline protease and carboxymethyl-cellulase (CMCase) on Ficus nitida wastes was investigated. Bacillus pumillus ATCC7061 was selected as the most potent bacterial strain for the production of both enzymes. It was found that the optimum production of protease and CMCase were recorded at 30 °C, 5% Ficus nitida leaves and incubation period of 72 h. The best nitrogen sources for protease and CMCase production were yeast extract and casein, respectively. Also maximum protease and CMCase production were reported at pH 9 and pH 10, respectively. The enzymes possessed a good stability over a pH range of 8-10, expressed their maximum activities at pH10 and temperature range of 30-50 °C, expressed their maximum activities at 50 °C. Ions of Hg(2+), Fe2+ and Ag(+) showed a stimulatory effect on protease activity and ions of Fe(2+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Cu(2+) and Ag(+) caused enhancement of CMCase activity. The enzymes were stable not only towards the nonionic surfactants like Triton X-100 and Tween 80 but also the strong anionic surfactant, SDS. Moreover, the enzymes were not significantly inhibited by EDTA or cystein. Concerning biotechnological applications, the enzymes retained (51-97%) of their initial activities upon incubation in the presence of commercials detergents for 1 h. The potential use of the produced enzymes in the degradation of human hair and cotton fabric samples were also assessed.

  10. High throughput in vivo protease inhibitor selection platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The invention relates to a recombinant microbial cell comprising a selection platform for screening for a protease inhibitor, wherein the platform comprises transgenes encoding a protease having selective peptide bond cleavage activity at a recognition site amino acid sequence; and transgenes...... encoding polypeptides conferring resistance to microbial growth inhibitors; wherein the polypeptides comprise the recognition site amino acid sequence cleavable by the protease. Protease inhibitors are detected by their ability to inhibit protease specific cleavage and inactivation of the polypeptides...... platform for screening for a protease inhibitor....

  11. Ligand-induced movements of inner transmembrane helices of Glut1 revealed by chemical cross-linking of di-cysteine mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Mueckler

    Full Text Available The relative orientation and proximity of the pseudo-symmetrical inner transmembrane helical pairs 5/8 and 2/11 of Glut1 were analyzed by chemical cross-linking of di-cysteine mutants. Thirteen functional di-cysteine mutants were created from a C-less Glut1 reporter construct containing cysteine substitutions in helices 5 and 8 or helices 2 and 11. The mutants were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and the sensitivity of each mutant to intramolecular cross-linking by two homobifunctional thiol-specific reagents was ascertained by protease cleavage followed by immunoblot analysis. Five of 9 mutants with cysteine residues predicted to lie in close proximity to each other were susceptible to cross-linking by one or both reagents. None of 4 mutants with cysteine substitutions predicted to lie on opposite faces of their respective helices was susceptible to cross-linking. Additionally, the cross-linking of a di-cysteine pair (A70C/M420C, helices 2/11 predicted to lie near the exoplasmic face of the membrane was stimulated by ethylidene glucose, a non-transported glucose analog that preferentially binds to the exofacial substrate-binding site, suggesting that the binding of this ligand stimulates the closure of helices at the exoplasmic face of the membrane. In contrast, the cross-linking of a second di-cysteine pair (T158C/L325, helices 5/8, predicted to lie near the cytoplasmic face of the membrane, was stimulated by cytochalasin B, a glucose transport inhibitor that competitively inhibits substrate efflux, suggesting that this compound recruits the transporter to a conformational state in which closure of inner helices occurs at the cytoplasmic face of the membrane. This observation provides a structural explanation for the competitive inhibition of substrate efflux by cytochalasin B. These data indicate that the binding of competitive inhibitors of glucose efflux or influx induce occluded states in the transporter in which substrate is excluded from

  12. PIRIN2 stabilizes cysteine protease XCP2 and increases susceptibility to the vascular pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, B.; Tremousaygue, D.; Denancé, N.; Esse, van H.P.; Hörger, A.C.; Dabos, P.; Goffner, D.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.; Hoorn, van der R.A.L.; Tuominen, H.

    2014-01-01

    PIRIN (PRN) is a member of the functionally diverse cupin protein superfamily. There are four members of the Arabidopsis thaliana PRN family, but the roles of these proteins are largely unknown. Here we describe a function of the Arabidopsis PIRIN2 (PRN2) that is related to susceptibility to the

  13. Entamoeba histolytica: cysteine proteinase activity and virulence. Focus on cysteine proteinase 5 expression levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Michelle A R; Fernandes, Helen C; Calixto, Viviane C; Martins, Almir S; Silva, Edward F; Pesquero, Jorge L; Gomes, Maria A

    2009-08-01

    Cysteine proteinase (CP) activity and CP5 mRNA levels were analyzed in eleven samples of Entamoeba histolytica isolated from patients presenting different clinical profiles. The virulence degree of the isolates, determined in hamster liver, correlated well with the clinical form of the patient and culture conditions. CP5 mRNA levels were also determined in sample freshly picked up directly from liver amoebic abscess. Differences were not observed in the levels of CP5 mRNA and CP specific activity among the cultured samples. However, different levels of CP5 mRNA were observed in trophozoite freshly isolated from hepatic amoebic lesions. These results reinforce the importance of CP5 for the virulence of amoebae and the need for studies with the parasite present in lesions to validate mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of amoebiasis.

  14. Cleavage Entropy as Quantitative Measure of Protease Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Julian E.; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Huber, Roland G.; Margreiter, Michael A.; Spitzer, Gudrun M.; Wallnoefer, Hannes G.; Liedl, Klaus R.

    2013-01-01

    A purely information theory-guided approach to quantitatively characterize protease specificity is established. We calculate an entropy value for each protease subpocket based on sequences of cleaved substrates extracted from the MEROPS database. We compare our results with known subpocket specificity profiles for individual proteases and protease groups (e.g. serine proteases, metallo proteases) and reflect them quantitatively. Summation of subpocket-wise cleavage entropy contributions yields a measure for overall protease substrate specificity. This total cleavage entropy allows ranking of different proteases with respect to their specificity, separating unspecific digestive enzymes showing high total cleavage entropy from specific proteases involved in signaling cascades. The development of a quantitative cleavage entropy score allows an unbiased comparison of subpocket-wise and overall protease specificity. Thus, it enables assessment of relative importance of physicochemical and structural descriptors in protease recognition. We present an exemplary application of cleavage entropy in tracing substrate specificity in protease evolution. This highlights the wide range of substrate promiscuity within homologue proteases and hence the heavy impact of a limited number of mutations on individual substrate specificity. PMID:23637583

  15. Cleavage entropy as quantitative measure of protease specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian E Fuchs

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A purely information theory-guided approach to quantitatively characterize protease specificity is established. We calculate an entropy value for each protease subpocket based on sequences of cleaved substrates extracted from the MEROPS database. We compare our results with known subpocket specificity profiles for individual proteases and protease groups (e.g. serine proteases, metallo proteases and reflect them quantitatively. Summation of subpocket-wise cleavage entropy contributions yields a measure for overall protease substrate specificity. This total cleavage entropy allows ranking of different proteases with respect to their specificity, separating unspecific digestive enzymes showing high total cleavage entropy from specific proteases involved in signaling cascades. The development of a quantitative cleavage entropy score allows an unbiased comparison of subpocket-wise and overall protease specificity. Thus, it enables assessment of relative importance of physicochemical and structural descriptors in protease recognition. We present an exemplary application of cleavage entropy in tracing substrate specificity in protease evolution. This highlights the wide range of substrate promiscuity within homologue proteases and hence the heavy impact of a limited number of mutations on individual substrate specificity.

  16. Site-specific enzymatic hydrolysis of taxanes at C-10 and C-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R L; Wasylyk, J M; Nanduri, V B; Cazzulino, D L; Patel, R N; Szarka, L J

    1994-09-02

    The production of large amounts of paclitaxel for use as an anticancer treatment has been a challenging problem because of the low concentration of the compound in yew trees and its occurrence as part of a mixture of other taxanes. Two novel enzymes were isolated to facilitate the production of 10-deacetylbaccatin III, a precursor used for semisynthesis of paclitaxel and analogs. A strain of Nocardioides albus (SC13911) was isolated from soil and found to produce an extracellular enzyme that specifically removed the C-13 side chain from paclitaxel, cephalomannine, 7-beta-xylosyltaxol, 7-beta-xylosyl-10-deacetyltaxol, and 10-deacetyltaxol. The enzyme was purified to near homogeneity to give a polypeptide with 47,000 M(r) on a sodium dodecyl sulfate gel. A strain of Nocardioides luteus (SC13912) isolated from soil was found to produce an intracellular 10-deacetylase that removed the 10-acetate from baccatin III and paclitaxel. The 10-deacetylase was purified to give a polypeptide with 40,000 M(r) on a sodium dodecyl sulfate gel. Treatment of extracts prepared from a variety of yew cultivars with the C-13-deacylase and C-10-deacetylase converted a complex mixture of taxanes primarily to 10-deacetylbaccatin III and increased the amount of this key precursor by 4-24 times.

  17. Deep-sea fungi as a source of alkaline and cold-tolerant proteases

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Damare, S.; Raghukumar, C.; Muraleedharan, U.; Raghukumar, S.

    potential source of proteases Proteases are of immense interest in food, dairy, detergent, pharmaceutical and leather industries [10]. More than 25 % of the worldwide sale of enzymes is contributed by proteases alone, where mainly alkaline proteases...

  18. Conversion of cysteine to 3-mercaptopyruvic acid by bacterial aminotransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeßen, Christina; Gerlt, Vanessa; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    3-Mercaptopyruvate (3MPy), a structural analog of 3-mercaptopropionic acid, is a precursor compound for biosynthesis of polythioesters in bacteria. The cost-effectiveness and sustainability of the whole process could be greatly improved by using the cysteine degradation pathway for an intracellular supply of 3MPy. Transamination of cysteine to its corresponding α-keto acid 3MPy is catalyzed by cysteine aminotransferases (CAT). However, CAT activity has so far not been described for bacterial aminotransferases (AT), and it was unknown whether they can be applied for the conversion of cysteine to 3MPy. In this study, we selected eight bacterial aminotransferases based on sequence homology to CAT of Rattus norvegicus (Got1). The aminotransferases included four aspartate aminotransferases (AATs) and four aromatic amino acid aminotransferases (ArATs) from Advenella mimigardefordensis DPN7, Escherichia coli MG1655, Shimwellia blattae ATCC 33430, Ralstonia eutropha H16 and Paracoccus denitrificans PD1222. For a more detailed characterization, all selected AAT or ArAT encoding genes were heterologously expressed in E. coli and purified. CAT activity was detected for all aminotransferases when a novel continuous coupled enzyme assay was applied. Kinetic studies revealed the highest catalytic efficiency of 5.1mM/s for AAT from A. mimigardefordensis. Formation of 3MPy from cysteine could additionally be verified by an optimized approach using derivatization of 3MPy with the Girard T reagent and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Biotin Switch Assays for Quantitation of Reversible Cysteine Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R; Kast, J

    2017-01-01

    Thiol groups in protein cysteine residues can be subjected to different oxidative modifications by reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. Reversible cysteine oxidation, including S-nitrosylation, S-sulfenylation, S-glutathionylation, and disulfide formation, modulate multiple biological functions, such as enzyme catalysis, antioxidant, and other signaling pathways. However, the biological relevance of reversible cysteine oxidation is typically underestimated, in part due to the low abundance and high reactivity of some of these modifications, and the lack of methods to enrich and quantify them. To facilitate future research efforts, this chapter describes detailed procedures to target the different modifications using mass spectrometry-based biotin switch assays. By switching the modification of interest to a biotin moiety, these assays leverage the high affinity between biotin and avidin to enrich the modification. The use of stable isotope labeling and a range of selective reducing agents facilitate the quantitation of individual as well as total reversible cysteine oxidation. The biotin switch assay has been widely applied to the quantitative analysis of S-nitrosylation in different disease models and is now also emerging as a valuable research tool for other oxidative cysteine modifications, highlighting its relevance as a versatile, robust strategy for carrying out in-depth studies in redox proteomics. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Insect response to plant defensive protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu-Salzman, Keyan; Zeng, Rensen

    2015-01-07

    Plant protease inhibitors (PIs) are natural plant defense proteins that inhibit proteases of invading insect herbivores. However, their anti-insect efficacy is determined not only by their potency toward a vulnerable insect system but also by the response of the insect to such a challenge. Through the long history of coevolution with their host plants, insects have developed sophisticated mechanisms to circumvent antinutritional effects of dietary challenges. Their response takes the form of changes in gene expression and the protein repertoire in cells lining the alimentary tract, the first line of defense. Research in insect digestive proteases has revealed the crucial roles they play in insect adaptation to plant PIs and has brought about a new appreciation of how phytophagous insects employ this group of molecules in both protein digestion and counterdefense. This review provides researchers in related fields an up-to-date summary of recent advances.

  1. Dataset of cocoa aspartic protease cleavage sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Janek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The data provide information in support of the research article, “The cleavage specificity of the aspartic protease of cocoa beans involved in the generation of the cocoa-specific aroma precursors” (Janek et al., 2016 [1]. Three different protein substrates were partially digested with the aspartic protease isolated from cocoa beans and commercial pepsin, respectively. The obtained peptide fragments were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS and identified using the MASCOT server. The N- and C-terminal ends of the peptide fragments were used to identify the corresponding in-vitro cleavage sites by comparison with the amino acid sequences of the substrate proteins. The same procedure was applied to identify the cleavage sites used by the cocoa aspartic protease during cocoa fermentation starting from the published amino acid sequences of oligopeptides isolated from fermented cocoa beans.

  2. Fibrinolytic and antithrombotic protease from Spirodela polyrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H S; Sa, Y S

    2001-04-01

    A fibrinolytic protease was purified from a Chinese herb (Spirodela polyrhiza). The protease has a molecular mass of 145 kDa and 70 kDa in gel filtration and SDS-polyacrlamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), respectively, implying it is a dimer. Its optimum pH was 4.5-5.0. The enzyme was stable below 42 degrees C and after lyophilization. The enzyme activity was inhibited significantly by leupeptin and aprotinin. The protease hydrolyzed not only fibrin but also fibrinogen, cleaving Aalpha and Bbeta without affecting the gamma chain of fibrinogen. It preferentially cleaved the peptide bond of Arg or Lys of synthetic substrates (P1 position). The enzyme had an anticoagulating activity measured with activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT), and prothrombin time (PT) tests. It delayed APTT, TT, and PT two times at the concentration of 36, 39, and 128 nM, respectively and this was drastically reduced after heat treatment.

  3. The Clp protease system; a central component of the chloroplast protease network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olinares, Paul Dominic B; Kim, Jitae; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2011-08-01

    Intra-plastid proteases play crucial and diverse roles in the development and maintenance of non-photosynthetic plastids and chloroplasts. Formation and maintenance of a functional thylakoid electron transport chain requires various protease activities, operating in parallel, as well as in series. This review first provides a short, referenced overview of all experimentally identified plastid proteases in Arabidopsis thaliana. We then focus on the Clp protease system which constitutes the most abundant and complex soluble protease system in the plastid, consisting of 15 nuclear-encoded members and one plastid-encoded member in Arabidopsis. Comparisons to the simpler Clp system in photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic bacteria will be made and the role of Clp proteases in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii will be briefly reviewed. Extensive molecular genetics has shown that the Clp system plays an essential role in Arabidopsis chloroplast development in the embryo as well as in leaves. Molecular characterization of the various Clp mutants has elucidated many of the consequences of loss of Clp activities. We summarize and discuss the structural and functional aspects of the Clp machinery, including progress on substrate identification and recognition. Finally, the Clp system will be evaluated in the context of the chloroplast protease network. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Regulation of Electron Transport in Chloroplasts. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Fermentation and isolation of C10-deacetylase for the production of 10-deacetylbaccatin III from baccatin III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanduri, V B; Hanson, R L; Laporte, T L; Ko, R Y; Patel, R N; Szarka, L J

    1995-12-05

    10-Deacetylabaccatin III (10 DAB), an important precursor for paclitaxel semisynthesis, is enhanced in yew extracts using C10-deacetylase and C13-deacylase enzymes.(4) C10-deacetylase is an intracellular enzyme produced by the fermentation of a soil microorganism, Nocardioides luteus (SC 13912). During the fermentation of Nocardioides luteus, the growth of cells reaches a maximum growth at 28 h. C10-deacetylase enzyme activity starts at 26 h and peaks at 38 h of the fermentation. The cells are recovered by centrifugation. The C10-deacetylase enzyme was purified from the Nocardioides luteus cells. The enzyme was purified 190-fold to near homogeneity. The purified enzyme appeared as a single band on 12.5% SDS-PAGE analysis with a molecular weight of 40,000 daltons. (c) 1995 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Lectin, hemolysin and protease inhibitors in seed fractions with ovicidal activity against Haemonchus contortus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hévila Oliveira Salles

    Full Text Available Bioactive molecules of plant species are promising alternatives for the chemical control of gastrointestinal nematodes in ruminants. Extracts of native and exotic seed species from Brazil's semi-arid region were tested in vitro in an egg hatch assay and the bioactivity of their proteins was investigated. Each seed species was subjected to three extractions with three types of solvents. All the seeds showed ovicidal activity, which varied according to the solvents. Higher ovicidal activity was found in the molecule fractions of low molecular weight (0.05, Bonferroni test. Hemagglutinating activity was detected in the fractions of C. spectabilis and M. oleifera fractions, hemolysin activity in the A. lebbeck and M. oleifera fractions, serine protease inhibitory activity in the A. lebbeck, I. asarifolia, J. curcas, M. oleifera and R. communis fractions, cysteine protease inhibitor activity in the M. oleifera fraction, and no protein activity in the L. ferrea fraction. The results of this work reveal new plant species with a potential for use in controlling nematode parasites in goats, thus opening a new field of research involving plant protein molecules with ovicidal properties.

  6. Pulsed EPR characterization of HIV-1 protease conformational sampling and inhibitor-induced population shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanglong; Casey, Thomas M; Blackburn, Mandy E; Huang, Xi; Pham, Linh; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S; Carter, Jeffrey D; Kear-Scott, Jamie L; Veloro, Angelo M; Galiano, Luis; Fanucci, Gail E

    2016-02-17

    The conformational landscape of HIV-1 protease (PR) can be experimentally characterized by pulsed-EPR double electron-electron resonance (DEER). For this characterization, nitroxide spin labels are attached to an engineered cysteine residue in the flap region of HIV-1 PR. DEER distance measurements from spin-labels contained within each flap of the homodimer provide a detailed description of the conformational sampling of apo-enzyme as well as induced conformational shifts as a function of inhibitor binding. The distance distribution profiles are further interpreted in terms of a conformational ensemble scheme that consists of four unique states termed "curled/tucked", "closed", "semi-open" and "wide-open" conformations. Reported here are the DEER results for a drug-resistant variant clinical isolate sequence, V6, in the presence of FDA approved protease inhibitors (PIs) as well as a non-hydrolyzable substrate mimic, CaP2. Results are interpreted in the context of the current understanding of the relationship between conformational sampling, drug resistance, and kinetic efficiency of HIV-1PR as derived from previous DEER and kinetic data for a series of HIV-1PR constructs that contain drug-pressure selected mutations or natural polymorphisms. Specifically, these collective results support the notion that inhibitor-induced closure of the flaps correlates with inhibitor efficiency and drug resistance. This body of work also suggests DEER as a tool for studying conformational sampling in flexible enzymes as it relates to function.

  7. Tryptogalinin is a tick Kunitz serine protease inhibitor with a unique intrinsic disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Valdés

    Full Text Available A salivary proteome-transcriptome project on the hard tick Ixodes scapularis revealed that Kunitz peptides are the most abundant salivary proteins. Ticks use Kunitz peptides (among other salivary proteins to combat host defense mechanisms and to obtain a blood meal. Most of these Kunitz peptides, however, remain functionally uncharacterized, thus limiting our knowledge about their biochemical interactions.We discovered an unusual cysteine motif in a Kunitz peptide. This peptide inhibits several serine proteases with high affinity and was named tryptogalinin due to its high affinity for β-tryptase. Compared with other functionally described peptides from the Acari subclass, we showed that tryptogalinin is phylogenetically related to a Kunitz peptide from Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, also reported to have a high affinity for β-tryptase. Using homology-based modeling (and other protein prediction programs we were able to model and explain the multifaceted function of tryptogalinin. The N-terminus of the modeled tryptogalinin is detached from the rest of the peptide and exhibits intrinsic disorder allowing an increased flexibility for its high affinity with its inhibiting partners (i.e., serine proteases.By incorporating experimental and computational methods our data not only describes the function of a Kunitz peptide from Ixodes scapularis, but also allows us to hypothesize about the molecular basis of this function at the atomic level.

  8. Engineered tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease active in the secretory pathway of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaratto, Francesca; López-Requena, Alejandro; Burrone, Oscar R; Petris, Gianluca

    2015-10-20

    Tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp) is a unique endopeptidase with stringent substrate specificity. TEVp has been widely used as a purified protein for in vitro applications, but also as a biological tool directly expressing it in living cells. To adapt the protease to diverse applications, several TEVp mutants with different stability and enzymatic properties have been reported. Herein we describe the development of a novel engineered TEVp mutant designed to be active in the secretory pathway. While wild type TEVp targeted to the secretory pathway of mammalian cells is synthetized as an N-glycosylated and catalytically inactive enzyme, a TEVp mutant with selected mutations at two verified N-glycosylation sites and at an exposed cysteine was highly efficient. This mutant was very active in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of living cells and can be used as a biotechnological tool to cleave proteins within the secretory pathway. As an immediate practical application we report the expression of a complete functional monoclonal antibody expressed from a single polypeptide, which was cleaved by our TEVp mutant into the two antibody chains and secreted as an assembled and functional molecule. In addition, we show active TEVp mutants lacking auto-cleavage activity. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A cyclic peptidic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng; Jiang, Longguang

    2014-01-01

    plasminogen activator (uPA). We used X-ray crystal structure analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, liquid state NMR, surface plasmon resonance analysis, and isothermal titration calorimetry and wild type and engineered variants of murine and human uPA. We demonstrate that Arg6 inserts into the S1 specificity......Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC), of the serine protease murine urokinase-type...

  10. Detection of protease and protease activity using a single nanoscrescent SERS probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang L.; Ellman, Jonathan A.; Lee, Luke P.; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2013-01-29

    This invention pertains to the in vitro detection of proteases using a single peptide-conjugate nanocrescent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes with at least nanomolar sensitivity. The probe enables detection of proteolytic activity in extremely small volume and at low concentration. In certain embodiments the probes comprise an indicator for the detection of an active protease, where the indicator comprises a nanocrescent attached to a peptide, where said peptide comprises a recognition site for the protease and a Raman tag attached to the peptide.

  11. Detection of protease and protease activity using a single nanocrescent SERS probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang L.; Ellman, Jonathan A.; Lee, Luke P.; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2015-09-29

    This invention pertains to the in vitro detection of proteases using a single peptide-conjugate nanocrescent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes with at least nanomolar sensitivity. The probe enables detection of proteolytic activity in extremely small volume and at low concentration. In certain embodiments the probes comprise an indicator for the detection of an active protease, where the indicator comprises a nanocrescent attached to a peptide, where said peptide comprises a recognition site for the protease and a Raman tag attached to the peptide.

  12. Browning inhibition mechanisms by cysteine, ascorbic acid and citric acid, and identifying PPO-catechol-cysteine reaction products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hussein M; El-Gizawy, Ahmed M; El-Bassiouny, Rawia E I; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2015-06-01

    The titled compounds were examined as PPO inhibitors and antibrowning agents; their various mechanisms were investigated and discussed. All compounds reduced significantly both the browning process and PPO activity. Browning index gave strong correlation with PPO activity (r(2) = 0.96, n = 19) indicating that the browning process is mainly enzymatic. Ascorbic acid could reduce the formed quinone instantly to the original substrate (catechol) at high concentration (>1.5 %) while at lower concentrations acted as competitive inhibitor (KI = 0.256 ± 0.067 mM). Cysteine, at higher concentrations (≥1.0 %), reacted with the resulted quinone to give a colorless products while at the low concentrations, cysteine worked as competitive inhibitor (KI = 1.113 ± 0.176 mM). Citric acid acted only as PPO non-competitive inhibitor with KI = 2.074 ± 0.363 mM. The products of PPO-catechole-cysteine reaction could be separation and identification by LC-ESI-MS. Results indicated that the product of the enzymatic oxidation of catechol, quinone, undergoes two successive nucleophilic attacks by cysteine thiol group. Cysteine was condensed with the resulted mono and dithiocatechols to form peptide side chains.

  13. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection mediated by the transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirato, Kazuya; Kawase, Miyuki; Matsuyama, Shutoku

    2013-12-01

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) utilizes host proteases for virus entry into lung cells. In the current study, Vero cells constitutively expressing type II transmembrane serine protease (Vero-TMPRSS2 cells) showed larger syncytia at 18 h after infection with MERS-CoV than after infection with other coronaviruses. Furthermore, the susceptibility of Vero-TMPRSS2 cells to MERS-CoV was 100-fold higher than that of non-TMPRSS2-expressing parental Vero cells. The serine protease inhibitor camostat, which inhibits TMPRSS2 activity, completely blocked syncytium formation but only partially blocked virus entry into Vero-TMPRSS2 cells. Importantly, the coronavirus is thought to enter cells via two distinct pathways, one mediated by TMPRSS2 at the cell surface and the other mediated by cathepsin L in the endosome. Simultaneous treatment with inhibitors of cathepsin L and TMPRSS2 completely blocked virus entry into Vero-TMPRSS2 cells, indicating that MERS-CoV employs both the cell surface and the endosomal pathway to infect Vero-TMPRSS2 cells. In contrast, a single camostat treatment suppressed MERS-CoV entry into human bronchial submucosal gland-derived Calu-3 cells by 10-fold and virus growth by 270-fold, although treatment with both camostat and (23,25)-trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamindo-3-methylbutane ethyl ester, a cathepsin inhibitor, or treatment with leupeptin, an inhibitor of cysteine, serine, and threonine peptidases, was no more efficacious than treatment with camostat alone. Further, these inhibitors were not efficacious against MERS-CoV infection of MRC-5 and WI-38 cells, which were derived from lung, but these characters differed from those of mature pneumocytes. These results suggest that a single treatment with camostat is sufficient to block MERS-CoV entry into a well-differentiated lung-derived cell line.

  14. Ten Prominent Host Proteases in Plant-Pathogen Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma L. Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Proteases are enzymes integral to the plant immune system. Multiple aspects of defence are regulated by proteases, including the hypersensitive response, pathogen recognition, priming and peptide hormone release. These processes are regulated by unrelated proteases residing at different subcellular locations. In this review, we discuss 10 prominent plant proteases contributing to the plant immune system, highlighting the diversity of roles they perform in plant defence.

  15. CHANGES IN LEVELS OF ACTIVITY OF SERINE PROTEASES ACCOMPANY THE EXPOSURE OF COMMON BEAN (PHASEOLUS VULGARIS L. TO WATER DEFICIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Budič

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A wide variety of proteolytic enzymes exist in plants. On their levels depends protein turnover, a fundamental component in plant development and adaptation to environmental conditions. Cysteine proteases have frequently been reported to be influenced by drought, but only a few serine proteases (SP, among them the trypsin-like enzyme and two aminopeptidases from bean leaves (Bartels and Sunkar, 2005; Hieng et al., 2004. Our starting point was to identify proteolytic activities assigned to SPs that change with drought and then to characterize the corresponding proteases. A quantitative, analytical one-step method was used to separate endopeptidases and aminopeptidases active against a range of substrates in leaf extracts of plants grown in the field (FC. The influence of drought was determined for those of these activities which were confirmed as SPs, based on their inhibition by specific inhibitors. Under water deficit in plants grown under controlled conditions (CC their levels changed in different ways. The levels of SP activities in FC plants, observed during a period of relative drought, were similar to those measured in mildly stressed CC plants. The partial characterisations of some of these SPs will be presented. Our results point to a number of roles for different SPs in the plant response to water stress, which could range from enhanced protein turnover to limited proteolysis at specific sites.

  16. Enzyme-triggered Gelation: Targeting Proteases with Internal Cleavage Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremmer, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    A generalizable method for detecting protease activity via gelation is described. A recognition sequence is used to target the protease of interest while a second protease is used to remove the residual residues from the gelator scaffold. Using this approach, selective assays for both MMP-9 and PSA are demonstrated. PMID:24394494

  17. Production of alkaline proteases by alkalophilic Bacillus subtilis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The production of extracellular alkaline protease by Bacillus subtilis was studied with submerged fermentation. A new strain of Bacillus sp. was isolated from alkaline soil, which was able to produce extracellular alkaline protease. The production of alkaline protease involved the use of agricultural or animal wastes at pH 8 ...

  18. Optimization of protease production by an actinomycete Strain, PS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    myecete proteases in the bio-organic chemistry. Like most other microbial proteases, those from .... Various aminoacids for protease production. Gelatin broth was used for studying the influence of organic matter .... Fungicidal activity of marine actinomycetes against phyotopathogenic fungi. Indian J. Biotechnol. 4: 271-276.

  19. Optimization of alkaline protease production from Bacillus subtilis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... maximum production of protease was registered in medium with added glucose. The effect of metals ions indicated that maximum protease production was observed in medium supplemented with magnesium chloride (MgCl). Investigating the effect of sodium chloride (NaCl) concentration on protease production revealed ...

  20. Purification of acidic protease from the cotyledons of germinating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The positive correlation between the developments of acid, neutral and alkaline proteases (azocaseinolytic) with protein depletion suggest the involvement of these proteases in the degradation of proteins in germinating Indian bean. These proteases increased in the early stages of germination and decreased later.

  1. Discovery and characterization of a novel plant pathogen protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitinase modifying proteins are fungal proteases that attack specific plant defense chitinases. At least three unrelated types of proteases have evolved to have this function. They all truncate the targeted chitinases by cleaving near their amino termini, but each protease type targets a different ...

  2. Three monoclonal antibodies against the serpin protease nexin-1 prevent protease translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousted, Tina Mostrup; Skjoedt, K; Petersen, S V

    2013-01-01

    of the serpin presenting its so-called reactive centre loop as a substrate to its target protease, resulting in a covalent complex with the inactivated enzyme. Previously, three mechanisms have been proposed for the inactivation of serpins by monoclonal antibodies: steric blockage of protease recognition......, conversion to an inactive conformation or induction of serpin substrate behaviour. Until now, no inhibitory antibodies against PN-1 have been thoroughly characterised. Here we report the development of three monoclonal antibodies binding specifically and with high affinity to human PN-1. The antibodies all...... abolish the protease inhibitory activity of PN-1. In the presence of the antibodies, PN-1 does not form a complex with its target proteases, but is recovered in a reactive centre cleaved form. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we mapped the three overlapping epitopes to an area spanning the gap between...

  3. tolerant alkaline protease from Bacillus coagulans PSB

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oyaide

    2013-05-22

    May 22, 2013 ... Egg albumin. 45. BSA, Bovine serum albumin activity towards casein (100%) which was the control. The hydrolysis of BSA was indicated with 72% relative activity. The protease exhibited poor hydrolytic activity on gelatine with 18% relative activity (Table 2). Yossana et al. (2006) had similar finding on ...

  4. Safety aspects of HIV-protease inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Dieleman (Jeanne)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe objectives of this thesis were to provide more insight into the risk and risk factors of adverse drug reactions associated with HIV-protease inhibitor treatment under non-experimental everyday circumstances. By recognition of risk factors, patients at risk can be identified

  5. Optimization of alkaline protease production from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... paration (American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on. Nutrition, 1989), leather processing (George et al., 1995) and in weaving processing (Helmann, 1995). Proteases are complex multienzyme system which catalyses the hydrolysis of amide bond in a protein molecule hence it has been used in the ...

  6. Protease inhibitor mediated resistance to insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Outchkourov, N.S.

    2003-01-01

    Protease inhibitors (PIs) are among the defensive molecules that plants produce in order to defend themselves against herbivores. A major aim of this thesis is to develop novel insect resistance traits usingheterologous, non-plant PIs. Prerequisite for the success of the

  7. tolerant alkaline protease from Bacillus coagulans PSB

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oyaide

    2013-05-22

    May 22, 2013 ... optimum activity at 60°C and pH 8.0 with casein as substrate. The enzyme was .... appropriate buffers. 50 mM of buffer solutions (sodium citrate, pH .... Table 2. Hydrolysis of protein substrates by protease from Bacillus coagulans PSB-07. Substrate. Relative activity (%). Casein. 100. Gelatin. 18. BSA. 72.

  8. Purification and characterization of protease enzyme from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2013-03-20

    Mar 20, 2013 ... ting into small peptides and free amino acids, which can be absorbed and utilized by living cells. Due to ... in South Korea was used in isolating protease producing bacteria using skim milk agar plates ... nutrient broth supplemented with 1% casein (NBC), starch-soybean meal (SS) medium containing 2% ...

  9. HIV-1 protease-induced apoptosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rumlová, Michaela; Křížová, Ivana; Keprová, Alena; Hadravová, Romana; Doležal, Michal; Strohalmová, Karolína; Pichová, Iva; Hájek, Miroslav; Ruml, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 11, May 20 (2014), 37/1-37/15 ISSN 1742-4690 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1388 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : HIV protease * BCA3 * AKIP-1 * apoptosis * mitochondria Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.185, year: 2014 http://www.retrovirology.com/content/11/1/37

  10. Lipase and protease extraction from activated sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gessesse, Amare; Dueholm, Thomas; Petersen, Steffen B.

    2003-01-01

    of gentle and efficient enzyme extraction methods from environmental samples is very important. In this study we present a method for the extraction of lipases and proteases from activated sludge using the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100, EDTA, and cation exchange resin (CER), alone or in combination...

  11. The most abundant protease inhibitor in potato tuber (Cv. Elkana) is a serine protease inhibitor from the Kunitz Family.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouvreau, L.A.M.; Gruppen, H.; Koningsveld, van G.A.; Broek, van den L.A.M.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    The gene of the most abundant protease inhibitor in potato cv. Elkana was isolated and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of this gene showed 98% identity with potato serine protease inhibitor (PSPI), a member of the Kunitz family. Therefore, the most abundant protease inhibitor was

  12. Protease-activated receptor signalling by coagulation proteases in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaie, Alireza R

    2014-11-01

    Endothelial cells express several types of integral membrane protein receptors, which upon interaction and activation by their specific ligands, initiate a signalling network that links extracellular cues in circulation to various biological processes within a plethora of cells in the vascular system. A small family of G-protein coupled receptors, termed protease-activated receptors (PAR1-4), can be specifically activated by coagulation proteases, thereby modulating a diverse array of cellular activities under various pathophysiological conditions. Thrombin and all vitamin K-dependent coagulation proteases, with the exception of factor IXa for which no PAR signalling has been attributed, can selectively activate cell surface PARs on the vasculature. Thrombin can activate PAR1, PAR3 and PAR4, but not PAR2 which can be specifically activated by factors VIIa and Xa. The mechanistic details of the specificity of PAR signalling by coagulation proteases are the subject of extensive investigation by many research groups worldwide. However, analysis of PAR signalling data in the literature has proved to be challenging since a single coagulation protease can elicit different signalling responses through activation of the same PAR receptor in endothelial cells. This article is focused on briefly reviewing the literature with respect to determinants of the specificity of PAR signalling by coagulation proteases with special emphasis on the mechanism of PAR1 signalling by thrombin and activated protein C in endothelial cells.

  13. H and D attachment to naphthalene: spectra and thermochemistry of cold gas-phase 1-C10H9 and 1-C10H8D radicals and cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krechkivska, Olha; Wilcox, Callan M; Chan, Bun; Jacob, Rebecca; Liu, Yu; Nauta, Klaas; Kable, Scott H; Radom, Leo; Schmidt, Timothy W

    2015-04-02

    Excitation spectra of the 1H-naphthalene (1-C10H9) and 1D-naphthalene (1-C10H8D) radicals, and their cations, are obtained by laser spectroscopy and mass spectrometry of a skimmed free-jet expansion following an electrical discharge. The spectra are assigned on the basis of density functional theory calculations. Isotopic shifts in origin transitions, vibrational frequencies and ionization energies were found to be well reproduced by (time-dependent) density functional theory. Absolute bond dissociation energies, ionization energies and proton affinities were calculated using high-level quantum chemical methods.

  14. Structural Basis for Dual-Inhibition Mechanism of a Non-Classical Kazal-Type Serine Protease Inhibitor from Horseshoe Crab in Complex with Subtilisin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenoy, Rajesh T. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore); Thangamani, Saravanan [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore); Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian [Univ. of Zaragoza (Spain); Ho, Bow [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore); Ding, Jeak Ling [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore); Sivaraman, J. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore); Kursula, Petri [Univ. of Oulu (Germany)

    2011-04-26

    Serine proteases play a crucial role in host-pathogen interactions. In the innate immune system of invertebrates, multi-domain protease inhibitors are important for the regulation of host-pathogen interactions and antimicrobial activities. Serine protease inhibitors, 9.3-kDa CrSPI isoforms 1 and 2, have been identified from the hepatopancreas of the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda. The CrSPIs were biochemically active, especially CrSPI-1, which potently inhibited subtilisin (Ki=1.43 nM). CrSPI has been grouped with the non-classical Kazal-type inhibitors due to its unusual cysteine distribution. Here we report the crystal structure of CrSPI-1 in complex with subtilisin at 2.6 Å resolution and the results of biophysical interaction studies. The CrSPI-1 molecule has two domains arranged in an extended conformation. These two domains act as heads that independently interact with two separate subtilisin molecules, resulting in the inhibition of subtilisin activity at a ratio of 1:2 (inhibitor to protease). Each subtilisin molecule interacts with the reactive site loop from each domain of CrSPI-1 through a standard canonical binding mode and forms a single ternary complex. In addition, we propose the substrate preferences of each domain of CrSPI-1. Domain 2 is specific towards the bacterial protease subtilisin, while domain 1 is likely to interact with the host protease, Furin. Elucidation of the structure of the CrSPI-1: subtilisin (1:2) ternary complex increases our understanding of host-pathogen interactions in the innate immune system at the molecular level and provides new strategies for immunomodulation.

  15. Regulation of cysteine dioxygenase degradation is mediated by intracellular cysteine levels and the ubiquitin-26 S proteasome system in the living rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominy, John E; Hirschberger, Lawrence L; Coloso, Relicardo M; Stipanuk, Martha H

    2006-02-15

    Mammalian metabolism of ingested cysteine is conducted principally within the liver. The liver tightly regulates its intracellular cysteine pool to keep levels high enough to meet the many catabolic and anabolic pathways for which cysteine is needed, but low enough to prevent toxicity. One of the enzymes the liver uses to regulate cysteine levels is CDO (cysteine dioxygenase). Catalysing the irreversible oxidation of cysteine, CDO protein is up-regulated in the liver in response to the dietary intake of cysteine. In the present study, we have evaluated the contribution of the ubiquitin-26 S proteasome pathway to the diet-induced changes in CDO half-life. In the living rat, inhibition of the proteasome with PS1 (proteasome inhibitor 1) dramatically stabilized CDO in the liver under dietary conditions that normally favour its degradation. Ubiquitinated CDO intermediates were also seen to accumulate in the liver. Metabolic analyses showed that PS1 had a significant effect on sulphoxidation flux secondary to the stabilization of CDO but no significant effect on the intracellular cysteine pool. Finally, by a combination of in vitro hepatocyte culture and in vivo whole animal studies, we were able to attribute the changes in CDO stability specifically to cysteine rather than the metabolite 2-mercaptoethylamine (cysteamine). The present study represents the first demonstration of regulated ubiquitination and degradation of a protein in a living mammal, inhibition of which had dramatic effects on cysteine catabolism.

  16. Regulation of cysteine dioxygenase degradation is mediated by intracellular cysteine levels and the ubiquitin–26 S proteasome system in the living rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominy, John E.; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.; Coloso, Relicardo M.; Stipanuk, Martha H.

    2005-01-01

    Mammalian metabolism of ingested cysteine is conducted principally within the liver. The liver tightly regulates its intracellular cysteine pool to keep levels high enough to meet the many catabolic and anabolic pathways for which cysteine is needed, but low enough to prevent toxicity. One of the enzymes the liver uses to regulate cysteine levels is CDO (cysteine dioxygenase). Catalysing the irreversible oxidation of cysteine, CDO protein is up-regulated in the liver in response to the dietary intake of cysteine. In the present study, we have evaluated the contribution of the ubiquitin–26 S proteasome pathway to the diet-induced changes in CDO half-life. In the living rat, inhibition of the proteasome with PS1 (proteasome inhibitor 1) dramatically stabilized CDO in the liver under dietary conditions that normally favour its degradation. Ubiquitinated CDO intermediates were also seen to accumulate in the liver. Metabolic analyses showed that PS1 had a significant effect on sulphoxidation flux secondary to the stabilization of CDO but no significant effect on the intracellular cysteine pool. Finally, by a combination of in vitro hepatocyte culture and in vivo whole animal studies, we were able to attribute the changes in CDO stability specifically to cysteine rather than the metabolite 2-mercaptoethylamine (cysteamine). The present study represents the first demonstration of regulated ubiquitination and degradation of a protein in a living mammal, inhibition of which had dramatic effects on cysteine catabolism. PMID:16262602

  17. Chemoselective PEGylation of cysteine analogs of human basic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To improve the stability and bioactivity of human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF) by site-specific pegylation. Methods: Four new mutants of hbFGF were designed with substituted Asp68, Lys77, Glu78 and Arg81 with cysteine with the aid of bioinformatics technique, and then cloned into pET21a plasmid, ...

  18. Characterization and sequence analysis of cysteine and glycine-rich ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cysteine and glycine rich protein, CSRP3 also referred to as the muscle LIM protein (MLP), has been investigated in native Egyptian cattle and buffalo (river buffalo). RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis were conducted from different tissue samples. Primers specific for CSRP3 were designed using known cDNA sequences ...

  19. Chemoselective PEGylation of Cysteine Analogs of Human Basic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    electrophoresis [SDS-PAGE]. Stability of. PEGylated and non-PEGylated forms of hbFGF cysteine analog was studied by incubating them in the presence of denaturing agent such as guanidine HCl at 37 °C for 24 h. The effect of such reagent was determined by fluorescence spectrophotometry (Luminescence spectrometer.

  20. Chemical detection of cysteine-rich circular petides in selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cysteine-rich circular peptides (CRCs) comprise a large family of gene encoded and low molecular weight polypeptides that has recently engaged the attention of scientists. This class of peptides exhibit a continuous circular configuration and a cystine knot backbone, which defines their resilient nature-directed structural ...

  1. A Serendipitous Formation of a Cysteine-bridged Disaccharide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    observations that cysteine glycosyl esters are difficult to form under mild conditions. Furthermore, the ... bridged disaccharides have two glucose units, one linked in an a-configuration via the acyl group and the ... The reaction described herein represents the first reported case of a one-pot, sequential instal- lation of two ...

  2. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C

    2015-09-24

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases.

  3. Effect of cysteine supplementation on in vitro maturation of bovine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parham

    2011-11-09

    Nov 9, 2011 ... weight thiol compounds such as β-mercaptoethanol and. CySH to IVM media, promotes synthesis of GSH in pig oocytes (Abeydeera et al., 1999). Gasparrini et al. (2000) and Bai et al. (2009) reported that addition of thiol components such as cysteamine cystine, cysteine to IVM medium stimulated synthesis ...

  4. Paralogous metabolism: S-alkyl-cysteine degradation in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Che-Man; Danchin, Antoine; Marlière, Philippe; Sekowska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism is prone to produce analogs of essential building blocks in the cell (here named paralogous metabolism). The variants result from lack of absolute accuracy in enzyme-templated reactions as well as from molecular aging. If variants were left to accumulate, the earth would be covered by chemical waste. The way bacteria cope with this situation is essentially unexplored. To gain a comprehensive understanding of Bacillus subtilis sulphur paralogous metabolism, we used expression profiling with DNA arrays to investigate the changes in gene expression in the presence of S-methyl-cysteine (SMeC) and its close analog, methionine, as sole sulphur source. Altogether, more than 200 genes whose relative strength of induction was significantly different depending on the sulphur source used were identified. This allowed us to pinpoint operon ytmItcyJKLMNytmO_ytnIJ_rbfK_ytnLM as controlling the pathway cycling SMeC directly to cysteine, without requiring sulphur oxygenation. Combining genetic and physiological experiments, we deciphered the corresponding pathway that begins with protection of the metabolite by acetylation. Oxygenation of the methyl group then follows, and after deprotection (deacetylation), N-formyl cysteine is produced. This molecule is deformylated by the second deformylase present in B. subtilis DefB, yielding cysteine. This pathway appears to be present in plant-associated microbes. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Characterization and sequence analysis of cysteine and glycine-rich ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tarek

    2011-04-18

    Apr 18, 2011 ... Cysteine and glycine rich protein, CSRP3 also referred to as the muscle LIM protein (MLP), has been investigated in native Egyptian cattle and buffalo (river buffalo). RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis were conducted from different tissue samples. Primers specific for CSRP3 were designed using known.

  6. Proteases from the regenerating gut of the holothurian Eupentacta fraudatrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina E Lamash

    Full Text Available Four proteases with molecular masses of 132, 58, 53, and 47 kDa were detected in the digestive system of the holothurian Eupentacta fraudatrix. These proteases displayed the gelatinase activity and characteristics of zinc metalloproteinases. The 58 kDa protease had similar protease inhibitor sensitivity to that of mammalian matrix metalloproteinases. Zymographic assay revealed different lytic activities of all four proteases during intestine regeneration in the holothurian. The 132 kDa protease showed the highest activity at the first stage. During morphogenesis (stages 2-4 of regeneration, the highest activity was measured for the 53 and 58 kDa proteases. Inhibition of protease activity exerts a marked effect on regeneration, which was dependent on the time when 1,10-phenanthroline injections commenced. When metalloproteinases were inhibited at the second stage of regeneration, the restoration rates were decreased. However, such an effect proved to be reversible, and when inhibition ceased, the previous rate of regeneration was recovered. When protease activity is inhibited at the first stage, regeneration is completely abolished, and the animals die, suggesting that early activation of the proteases is crucial for triggering the regenerative process in holothurians. The role of the detected proteases in the regeneration processes of holothurians is discussed.

  7. Pathophysiological significance and therapeutic applications of snake venom protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Rupamoni; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2017-06-01

    Protease inhibitors are important constituents of snake venom and play important roles in the pathophysiology of snakebite. Recently, research on snake venom protease inhibitors has provided valuable information to decipher the molecular details of various biological processes and offer insight for the development of some therapeutically important molecules from snake venom. The process of blood coagulation and fibrinolysis, in addition to affecting platelet function, are well known as the major targets of several snake venom protease inhibitors. This review summarizes the structure-functional aspects of snake venom protease inhibitors that have been described to date. Because diverse biological functions have been demonstrated by protease inhibitors, a comparative overview of their pharmacological and pathophysiological properties is also highlighted. In addition, since most snake venom protease inhibitors are non-toxic on their own, this review evaluates the different roles of individual protease inhibitors that could lead to the identification of drug candidates and diagnostic molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Microbial alkaline proteases: Optimization of production parameters and their properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanupriya Miglani Sharma

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteases are hydrolytic enzymes capable of degrading proteins into small peptides and amino acids. They account for nearly 60% of the total industrial enzyme market. Proteases are extensively exploited commercially, in food, pharmaceutical, leather and detergent industry. Given their potential use, there has been renewed interest in the discovery of proteases with novel properties and a constant thrust to optimize the enzyme production. This review summarizes a fraction of the enormous reports available on various aspects of alkaline proteases. Diverse sources for isolation of alkaline protease producing microorganisms are reported. The various nutritional and environmental parameters affecting the production of alkaline proteases in submerged and solid state fermentation are described. The enzymatic and physicochemical properties of alkaline proteases from several microorganisms are discussed which can help to identify enzymes with high activity and stability over extreme pH and temperature, so that they can be developed for industrial applications.

  9. New directions for protease inhibitors directed drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yoshio; Kiso, Yoshiaki

    2016-11-04

    Proteases play crucial roles in various biological processes, and their activities are essential for all living organisms-from viruses to humans. Since their functions are closely associated with many pathogenic mechanisms, their inhibitors or activators are important molecular targets for developing treatments for various diseases. Here, we describe drugs/drug candidates that target proteases, such as malarial plasmepsins, β-secretase, virus proteases, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Previously, we reported inhibitors of aspartic proteases, such as renin, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease, human T-lymphotropic virus type I protease, plasmepsins, and β-secretase, as drug candidates for hypertension, adult T-cell leukaemia, human T-lymphotropic virus type I-associated myelopathy, malaria, and Alzheimer's disease. Our inhibitors are also described in this review article as examples of drugs that target proteases. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 563-579, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Dealing with methionine/homocysteine sulfur: cysteine metabolism to taurine and inorganic sulfur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipanuk, Martha H; Ueki, Iori

    2011-02-01

    Synthesis of cysteine as a product of the transsulfuration pathway can be viewed as part of methionine or homocysteine degradation, with cysteine being the vehicle for sulfur conversion to end products (sulfate, taurine) that can be excreted in the urine. Transsulfuration is regulated by stimulation of cystathionine β-synthase and inhibition of methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase in response to changes in the level of S-adenosylmethionine, and this promotes homocysteine degradation when methionine availability is high. Cysteine is catabolized by several desulfuration reactions that release sulfur in a reduced oxidation state, generating sulfane sulfur or hydrogen sulfide (H₂S), which can be further oxidized to sulfate. Cysteine desulfuration is accomplished by alternate reactions catalyzed by cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase. Cysteine is also catabolized by pathways that require the initial oxidation of the cysteine thiol by cysteine dioxygenase to form cysteinesulfinate. The oxidative pathway leads to production of taurine and sulfate in a ratio of approximately 2:1. Relative metabolism of cysteine by desulfuration versus oxidative pathways is influenced by cysteine dioxygenase activity, which is low in animals fed low-protein diets and high in animals fed excess sulfur amino acids. Thus, desulfuration reactions dominate when cysteine is deficient, whereas oxidative catabolism dominates when cysteine is in excess. In rats consuming a diet with an adequate level of sulfur amino acids, about two thirds of cysteine catabolism occurs by oxidative pathways and one third by desulfuration pathways. Cysteine dioxygenase is robustly regulated in response to cysteine availability and may function to provide a pathway to siphon cysteine to less toxic metabolites than those produced by cysteine desulfuration reactions.

  11. Engineering a uniquely reactive thiol into a cysteine-rich peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimony, E; Sun, T; Kolmakova-Partensky, L; Miller, C

    1994-04-01

    Cysteine mutagenesis for the purpose of chemical labelling was applied to the K+ channel neurotoxin charybdotoxin, a 37-residue peptide with six functionally essential cysteines. An additional 'spinster cysteine' was introduced at a position far away in space from the toxin's known interaction surface where it contacts its K+ channel receptor. Despite the presence of the extra unpaired cysteine residue, the toxin still folds efficiently and may be labelled by fluorescent and radioactive reagents to give a functionally competent toxin.

  12. The Kunitz-Type Protein ShPI-1 Inhibits Serine Proteases and Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana García-Fernández

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI-Kunitz-type protein ShPI-1 (UniProt: P31713 is the major protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. This molecule is used in biotechnology and has biomedical potential related to its anti-parasitic effect. A pseudo wild-type variant, rShPI-1A, with additional residues at the N- and C-terminal, has a similar three-dimensional structure and comparable trypsin inhibition strength. Further insights into the structure-function relationship of rShPI-1A are required in order to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of action of this sea anemone peptide. Using enzyme kinetics, we now investigated its activity against other serine proteases. Considering previous reports of bifunctional Kunitz-type proteins from anemones, we also studied the effect of rShPI-1A on voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels. rShPI-1A binds Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and Kv1.6 channels with IC50 values in the nM range. Hence, ShPI-1 is the first member of the sea anemone type 2 potassium channel toxins family with tight-binding potency against several proteases and different Kv1 channels. In depth sequence analysis and structural comparison of ShPI-1 with similar protease inhibitors and Kv channel toxins showed apparent non-sequence conservation for known key residues. However, we detected two subtle patterns of coordinated amino acid substitutions flanking the conserved cysteine residues at the N- and C-terminal ends.

  13. Post-transcriptional regulation of fruit ripening and disease resistance in tomato by the vacuolar protease SlVPE3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weihao; Cai, Jianghua; Wang, Peiwen; Tian, Shiping; Qin, Guozheng

    2017-03-07

    Proteases represent one of the most abundant classes of enzymes in eukaryotes and are known to play key roles in many biological processes in plants. However, little is known about their functions in fruit ripening and disease resistance, which are unique to flowering plants and required for seed maturation and dispersal. Elucidating the genetic mechanisms of fruit ripening and disease resistance is an important goal given the biological and dietary significance of fruit. Through expression profile analyses of genes encoding tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cysteine proteases, we identify a number of genes whose expression increases during fruit ripening. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated repression of SlVPE3, a vacuolar protease gene, results in alterations in fruit pigmentation, lycopene biosynthesis, and ethylene production, suggesting that SlVPE3 is necessary for normal fruit ripening. Surprisingly, the SlVPE3 RNAi fruit are more susceptible to the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Quantitative proteomic analysis identified 314 proteins that differentially accumulate upon SlVPE3 silencing, including proteins associated with fruit ripening and disease resistance. To identify the direct SlVPE3 targets and mechanisms contributing to fungal pathogen resistance, we perform a screening of SlVPE3-interacting proteins using co-immunoprecipitation coupled with mass spectrometry. We show that SlVPE3 is required for the cleavage of the serine protease inhibitor KTI4, which contributes to resistance against the fungal pathogen B. cinerea. Our findings contribute to elucidating gene regulatory networks and mechanisms that control fruit ripening and disease resistance responses.

  14. Molecular and biochemical characterization of a cathepsin B-like protease family unique to Trypanosoma congolense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Palomares, Carlos; Biteau, Nicolas; Giroud, Christiane; Coustou, Virginie; Coetzer, Theresa; Authié, Edith; Boulangé, Alain; Baltz, Théo

    2008-04-01

    Cysteine proteases have been shown to be essential virulence factors and drug targets in trypanosomatids and an attractive antidisease vaccine candidate for Trypanosoma congolense. Here, we describe an important amplification of genes encoding cathepsin B-like proteases unique to T. congolense. More than 13 different genes were identified, whereas only one or two highly homologous genes have been identified in other trypanosomatids. These proteases grouped into three evolutionary clusters: TcoCBc1 to TcoCBc5 and TcoCBc6, which possess the classical catalytic triad (Cys, His, and Asn), and TcoCBs7 to TcoCBs13, which contains an unusual catalytic site (Ser, Xaa, and Asn). Expression profiles showed that members of the TcoCBc1 to TcoCBc5 and the TcoCBs7 to TcoCBs13 groups are expressed mainly in bloodstream forms and localize in the lysosomal compartment. The expression of recombinant representatives of each group (TcoCB1, TcoCB6, and TcoCB12) as proenzymes showed that TcoCBc1 and TcoCBc6 are able to autocatalyze their maturation 21 and 31 residues, respectively, upstream of the predicted start of the catalytic domain. Both displayed a carboxydipeptidase function, while only TcoCBc1 behaved as an endopeptidase. TcoCBc1 exhibited biochemical differences regarding inhibitor sensitivity compared to that of other cathepsin B-like proteases. Recombinant pro-TcoCBs12 did not automature in vitro, and the pepsin-matured enzyme was inactive in tests with cathepsin B fluorogenic substrates. In vivo inhibition studies using CA074Me (a cell-permeable cathepsin B-specific inhibitor) demonstrated that TcoCB are involved in lysosomal protein degradation essential for survival in bloodstream form. Furthermore, TcoCBc1 elicited an important immune response in experimentally infected cattle. We propose this family of proteins as a potential therapeutic target and as a plausible antigen for T. congolense diagnosis.

  15. Novel peptide-based protease inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roodbeen, Renée

    This thesis describes the design and synthesis of peptide-based serine protease inhibitors. The targeted protease, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activates plasminogen, which plays a major role in cancer metastasis. The peptide upain-2 (S 1 ,S 12-cyclo-AcCSWRGLENHAAC-NH2) is a highly......, the disulfide bridge was replaced with amide bonds of various lengths. The novel peptides did not retain their inhibitory activity, but formed the basis for another strategy. Second, bicyclic peptides were obtained by creating head-to-tail cyclized peptides that were made bicyclic by the addition of a covalent...... bond across the ring. The second bridge was made by a disulfide bridge, amide bond formation or via ring-closing metathesis. A, with upain-2 equipotent, bicyclic inhibitor was obtained and its binding to uPA was studied by ITC, NMR and X-ray. The knowledge of how selective inhibitors bind uPA has been...

  16. Synthesis, characterization, and ligand behaviour of a new ditelluroether (C10H7)Te(CH2)4Te(C10H7) and the concurrently formed ionic [(C10H7)Te(CH2)4]Br.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poropudas, Merja J; Rautiainen, J Mikko; Oilunkaniemi, Raija; Laitinen, Risto S

    2016-11-01

    The reaction of 1-naphthyl bromide with n-butyl lithium, elemental tellurium, and 1,4-dibromobutane in THF affords both (C10H7)Te(CH2)4Te(C10H7) (1) and [(C10H7)Te(CH2)4]Br (2) in good yields. 1 is preferentially formed at low temperatures and is a rare example of a structurally characterized ditelluroether in which the tellurium atoms are bridged by a hydrocarbon chain. In the solid state, 1 shows secondary bonding TeTe interactions, which connect the molecules into layers which are further linked to 3-dimensional frameworks by TeH hydrogen bonds. [(C10H7)Te(CH2)4]Br (2) is formed concurrently during the synthesis of 1 and is the main product, when the reaction is carried out at room temperature. The revPBE/def2-TZVPP calculations of the reaction profiles indicate that the formation of 2 is somewhat more favourable than that of 1. Furthermore, at room temperature the activation energy for the formation of 2 is lower than that of 1. At low temperatures the activation energy of the reaction leading to 1 is lower than that to 2, which is consistent with the synthetic observations. When 1 was treated with CuBr, [Cu2(μ-Br)2{μ-(C10H7)Te(CH2)4Te(C10H7)}2] (3) was formed. It crystallizes as two polymorphs (3a) and (3b) in which both the packing and the conformation of the ditelluroether ligands are different. The reaction of 1 with HgCl2 produces [(C10H7)Te(CH2)4]2[HgCl4]·CH2Cl2 (4·CH2Cl2) and that of 1 with CuCl2 affords [(C10H7)Te(CH2)4]Cl (5). 2 and 5 are isomorphous.

  17. Using a discrete choice experiment to value the QLU-C10D: feasibility and sensitivity to presentation format

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norman, R.; Viney, R.; Aaronson, N.K.; Brazier, J.E.; Cella, D.; Costa, D.S.J.; Fayers, P.M.; Kemmler, G.; Peacock, S.; Pickard, A.S.; Rowen, D.; Street, D.J.; Velikova, G.; Young, T.A.; King, M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of using a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to value health states within the QLU-C10D, a utility instrument derived from the QLQ-C30, and to assess clarity, difficulty, and respondent preference between two presentation formats. Methods: We ran a DCE valuation

  18. Dysregulation of protease and protease inhibitors in a mouse model of human pelvic organ prolapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudhan Budatha

    Full Text Available Mice deficient for the fibulin-5 gene (Fbln5(-/- develop pelvic organ prolapse (POP due to compromised elastic fibers and upregulation of matrix metalloprotease (MMP-9. Here, we used casein zymography, inhibitor profiling, affinity pull-down, and mass spectrometry to discover additional protease upregulated in the vaginal wall of Fbln5(-/- mice, herein named V1 (25 kDa. V1 was a serine protease with trypsin-like activity similar to protease, serine (PRSS 3, a major extrapancreatic trypsinogen, was optimum at pH 8.0, and predominantly detected in estrogenized vaginal epithelium of Fbln5(-/- mice. PRSS3 was (a localized in epithelial secretions, (b detected in media of vaginal organ culture from both Fbln5(-/- and wild type mice, and (c cleaved fibulin-5 in vitro. Expression of two serine protease inhibitors [Serpina1a (α1-antitrypsin and Elafin] was dysregulated in Fbln5(-/- epithelium. Finally, we confirmed that PRSS3 was expressed in human vaginal epithelium and that SERPINA1 and Elafin were downregulated in vaginal tissues from women with POP. These data collectively suggest that the balance between proteases and their inhibitors contributes to support of the pelvic organs in humans and mice.

  19. Differences in Entamoeba histolytica Cysteine Proteinase 5 Gene Isolated From Bandar Abbas and Tabriz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Rostami

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Amebiasis with up to 100 000 human deaths each year is the third cause of human deadly parasitic disease. With regard to the fact that cysteine protease 5 is known to be one of the most important pathogenicity factors of the Entamoeba histolytica and also, CP5 gene has been observed only in E. histolytica, hence we discriminated E. histolytica from E. dispar on CP5 gene by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and characterized CP5 gene variation in E. histolytica isolated from patients in both cold regions and tropical regions of Iran at molecular level. Materials and Methods: In the present study, a total of 2332 stool samples (1550 from Tabriz and 782 from Bandar Abbas were studied microscopically. DNA extraction and PCR method were performed on the positive specimens, infected with E. histolytica/E. dispar. Finally we characterized CP5 gene in E. histolytica isolates from 10 positive samples in the cold regions (Tabriz and 10 positive samples in the tropical regions (Bandar Abbas by sequencing and studied the polymorphism of the gene. Results: Of 1550 subjects studied from Tabriz and 782 from Bandar Abaas, 83/1550 (8.3% and 65/782 (5.35% persons were infected with E. histolytica/E. dispar, respectively. The molecular results on 20 E. histolytica PCR positive isolates from both regions revealed that nucleotides substitution and polymorphism on CP5 gene was more in samples from Bandar Abbas than those from Tabriz. Conclusion: Prevalence of amebiasis was high in the tropical region (Bandar Abbas compared with the cold region (Tabriz. In this study, CP5 gene variation in the pathogenicity and virulence of this parasite in the tropical region was higher than that in the cold region.

  20. Cysteine proteinase from Streptococcus pyogenes enables evasion of innate immunity via degradation of complement factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda-Ogawa, Mariko; Ogawa, Taiji; Terao, Yutaka; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Nakata, Masanobu; Ikebe, Kazunori; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-05-31

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen that causes invasive diseases such as necrotizing fasciitis, sepsis, and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. We investigated the function of a major cysteine protease from S. pyogenes that affects the amount of C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) and other complement factors and aimed to elucidate the mechanism involved in occurrence of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome from the aspect of the complement system. First, we revealed that culture supernatant of a given S. pyogenes strain and recombinant SpeB degraded the C1-INH. Then, we determined the N-terminal sequence of the C1-INH fragment degraded by recombinant SpeB. Interestingly, the region containing one of the identified cleavage sites is not present in patients with C1-INH deficiency. Scanning electron microscopy of the speB mutant incubated in human serum showed the abnormal superficial architecture and irregular oval structure. Furthermore, unlike the wild-type strain, that mutant strain showed lower survival capacity than normal as compared with heat-inactivated serum, whereas it had a significantly higher survival rate in serum without the C1-INH than in normal serum. Also, SpeB degraded multiple complement factors and the membrane attack complex. Flow cytometric analyses revealed deposition of C9, one of the components of membrane the attack complex, in greater amounts on the surface of the speB mutant, whereas lower amounts of C9 were bound to the wild-type strain surface. These results suggest that SpeB can interrupt the human complement system via degrading the C1-INH, thus enabling S. pyogenes to evade eradication in a hostile environment.

  1. PARTIAL PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ALKALOPHILIC PROTEASE FROM PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Satheeskumar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Partial purification and characterization of alkalophilic protease production from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from the gut of marine and coastal waters shrimp Penaeus monodon. The protease production was assayed in submerged fermentation to produce maximum protease activity (423 ± 0.09 U/ml. The enzyme was precipitated with ammonium sulphate and partially purified by ion exchange chromatography through DEAE Sephadex A-50 column. In 10th fraction showed maximum protease activity (734 ± 0.18 U/ml with increase in purification fold. The molecular weight of protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was recorded as 60 kDa. The stability of protease was tested at various pH and temperature; it showed maximum protease activity at pH-9 and temperature 50ºC. Among the various surfactants tested for enzyme stability, maximum activity was retained in poly ethylene glycol. The compatibility of protease enzyme with various commercial detergents; the enzyme retained maximum protease activity in tide. The results are indicated that all these properties make the bacterial proteases are most suitable for wide industrial applications.

  2. Corruption of innate immunity by bacterial proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potempa, Jan; Pike, Robert N

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune system of the human body has developed numerous mechanisms to control endogenous and exogenous bacteria and thus prevent infections by these microorganisms. These mechanisms range from physical barriers such as the skin or mucosal epithelium to a sophisticated array of molecules and cells that function to suppress or prevent bacterial infection. Many bacteria express a variety of proteases, ranging from non-specific and powerful enzymes that degrade many proteins involved in innate immunity to proteases that are extremely precise and specific in their mode of action. Here we have assembled a comprehensive picture of how bacterial proteases affect the host's innate immune system to gain advantage and cause infection. This picture is far from being complete since the numbers of mechanisms utilized are as astonishing as they are diverse, ranging from degradation of molecules vital to innate immune mechanisms to subversion of the mechanisms to allow the bacterium to hide from the system or take advantage of it. It is vital that such mechanisms are elucidated to allow strategies to be developed to aid the innate immune system in controlling bacterial infections.

  3. Role of rhomboid proteases in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rather, Philip

    2013-12-01

    The first member of the rhomboid family of intramembrane serine proteases in bacteria was discovered almost 20years ago. It is now known that rhomboid proteins are widely distributed in bacteria, with some bacteria containing multiple rhomboids. At the present time, only a single rhomboid-dependent function in bacteria has been identified, which is the cleavage of TatA in Providencia stuartii. Mutational analysis has shown that loss of the GlpG rhomboid in Escherichia coli alters cefotaxime resistance, loss of the YqgP (GluP) rhomboid in Bacillus subtilis alters cell division and glucose uptake, and loss of the MSMEG_5036 and MSMEG_4904 genes in Mycobacterium smegmatis results in altered colony morphology, biofilm formation and antibiotic susceptibilities. However, the cellular substrates for these proteins have not been identified. In addition, analysis of the rhombosortases, together with their possible Gly-Gly CTERM substrates, may shed new light on the role of these proteases in bacteria. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Intramembrane Proteases. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Activated human CD4 T cells express transporters for both cysteine and cystine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levring, Trine Bøegh; Hansen, Ann Kathrine; Nielsen, Bodil Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    cystine/cysteine is required and how T cells meet this requirement. We found that early activation of T cells is independent of exogenous cystine/cysteine, whereas T cell proliferation is strictly dependent of uptake of exogenous cystine/cysteine. Naïve T cells express no or very low levels of both...... cystine and cysteine transporters. However, we found that these transporters become strongly up-regulated during T cell activation and provide activated T cells with the required amount of cystine/cysteine needed for T cell proliferation. Thus, T cells are equipped with mechanisms that allow T cell...

  5. Aerobic sulfide production and cadmium precipitation by Escherichia coli expressing the Treponema denticola cysteine desulfhydrase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C L; Lum, A M; Ozuna, S C; Clark, D S; Keasling, J D

    2001-08-01

    The cysteine desulfhydrase gene of Treponema denticola was over-expressed in Escherichia coli to produce sulfide under aerobic conditions and to precipitate metal sulfide complexes on the cell wall. When grown in a defined salts medium supplemented with cadmium and cysteine, E. coli producing cysteine desulfhydrase secreted sulfide and removed nearly all of the cadmium from solution after 48 h. A control strain produced significantly less sulfide and removed significantly less cadmium. Measurement of acid-labile sulfide and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicated that cadmium was precipitated as cadmium sulfide. Without supplemental cysteine, both the E. coli producing cysteine desulfhydrase and the control E. coli demonstrated minimal cadmium removal.

  6. Recessive C10orf2 mutations in a family with infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia, sensorimotor polyneuropathy, and myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi-Hyun; Woo, Hae-Mi; Hong, Young Bin; Park, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Bo Ram; Park, Jin-Mo; Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Koo, Heasoo; Chae, Jong-Hee; Chung, Ki Wha; Choi, Byung-Ok; Koo, Soo Kyung

    2014-08-01

    Recessive mutations in chromosome 10 open reading frame 2 (C10orf2) are relevant in infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia (IOSCA). In this study, we investigated the causative mutation in a Korean family with combined phenotypes of IOSCA, sensorimotor polyneuropathy, and myopathy. We investigated recessive mutations in a Korean family with two individuals affected by IOSCA. Causative mutations were investigated using whole exome sequencing. Electrophysiological analyses and muscle and nerve biopsies were performed, along with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and lower extremities. Compound heterozygous mutations c.1460C>T and c.1485-1G>A in C10orf2 were identified as causative of IOSCA. Skeletal muscle showed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions. Both patients showed a period of normal development until 12-15 months, followed by ataxia, athetosis, hearing loss, and intellectual disability. Electrophysiological findings indicated motor and sensory polyneuropathies. Muscle biopsy revealed variations in the size and shape of myofibers with scattered, small, and angulated degenerating myofibers containing abnormal mitochondria; these observations are consistent with myopathy and may be the result of mtDNA deletions. Sural nerve biopsy revealed an axonal neuropathy. High-signal-intensity lesions in the middle cerebellar peduncles were correlated with clinical severity, and MRI of the lower legs was compatible with the hypothesis of length-dependent axonal degeneration. We identified novel compound heterozygous mutations of the C10orf2 gene as the cause of IOSCA with sensorimotor polyneuropathy and myopathy. Signs of motor neuropathy and myopathy were discovered for the first time in IOSCA patients with C10orf2 mutations. These results suggest that the clinical spectrum of IOSCA caused by C10orf2 mutations may be more variable than previously reported.

  7. Four Amino Acid Changes in HIV-2 Protease Confer Class-Wide Sensitivity to Protease Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert A.; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protease is essential for retroviral replication, and protease inhibitors (PI) are important for treating HIV infection. HIV-2 exhibits intrinsic resistance to most FDA-approved HIV-1 PI, retaining clinically useful susceptibility only to lopinavir, darunavir, and saquinavir. The mechanisms for this resistance are unclear; although HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases share just 38 to 49% sequence identity, all critical structural features of proteases are conserved. Structural studies have implicated four amino acids in the ligand-binding pocket (positions 32, 47, 76, and 82). We constructed HIV-2ROD9 molecular clones encoding the corresponding wild-type HIV-1 amino acids (I32V, V47I, M76L, and I82V) either individually or together (clone PRΔ4) and compared the phenotypic sensitivities (50% effective concentration [EC50]) of mutant and wild-type viruses to nine FDA-approved PI. Single amino acid replacements I32V, V47I, and M76L increased the susceptibility of HIV-2 to multiple PI, but no single change conferred class-wide sensitivity. In contrast, clone PRΔ4 showed PI susceptibility equivalent to or greater than that of HIV-1 for all PI. We also compared crystallographic structures of wild-type HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases complexed with amprenavir and darunavir to models of the PRΔ4 enzyme. These models suggest that the amprenavir sensitivity of PRΔ4 is attributable to stabilizing enzyme-inhibitor interactions in the P2 and P2′ pockets of the protease dimer. Together, our results show that the combination of four amino acid changes in HIV-2 protease confer a pattern of PI susceptibility comparable to that of HIV-1, providing a structural rationale for intrinsic HIV-2 PI resistance and resolving long-standing questions regarding the determinants of differential PI susceptibility in HIV-1 and HIV-2. IMPORTANCE Proteases are essential for retroviral replication, and HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases share a great deal of structural similarity. However, only three of nine

  8. Carbon Nanotubes Facilitate Oxidation of Cysteine Residues of Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Atsushi; Kameda, Tomoshi; Wada, Momoyo; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2017-10-19

    The adsorption of proteins onto nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) governs the early stages of nanoparticle uptake into biological systems. Previous studies regarding these adsorption processes have primarily focused on the physical interactions between proteins and nanoparticles. In this study, using reduced lysozyme and intact human serum albumin in aqueous solutions, we demonstrated that CNTs interact chemically with proteins. The CNTs induce the oxidation of cysteine residues of the proteins, which is accounted for by charge transfer from the sulfhydryl groups of the cysteine residues to the CNTs. The redox reaction simultaneously suppresses the intermolecular association of proteins via disulfide bonds. These results suggest that CNTs can affect the folding and oxidation degree of proteins in biological systems such as blood and cytosol.

  9. Mercury uptake by biogenic silica modified with L-cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Marcia R M; Valsaraj, Kalliat T; DeLaune, Ronald D; Gambrell, Robert P; Buchler, Pedro M

    2011-10-01

    Contaminated sediments provide the main source of mercury for methylation by bacteria in lakes and waterways. In situ capping has been used to remediate these sediments, but traditional reactive materials have very low affinity for Hg(II). This study investigated the mercury uptake by biogenic silica modified with L-cysteine, as a potential material to be used for in situ remediation technologies. The adsorbent was obtained from rice hull ash by extraction as sodium silicate and acid hydrolysis through the sol-gel process; it was then modified with L-cysteine by impregnation from aqueous solution. The unmodified and modified biogenic silica showed structural and chemical properties suitable for mercury sorption from aqueous medium. The cysteine affected the structural properties of the unmodified silica, decreasing the specific surface area and pore volume by eightfold. On the other hand, cysteine increased the silica adsorption capacity, resulting in mercury uptake similar to that of the unmodified silica. The Hg(ll) specific adsorption by unmodified and modified silica was 0.20 mmol/g and 0.19 mmol/g SiO2, respectively, from an aqueous solution of 1 mmol/L Hg(II). The pH range of 3-7did not have an effect on Hg(II) adsorption. However, the presence of chlorine, added as HgCl2, seems to have limited the mercury adsorption, especially at high concentrations of Hg(II). The mercury adsorbed on the silica surface could not be recovered using HCl even from concentrated solutions.

  10. Reversible targeting of noncatalytic cysteines with chemically tuned electrophiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafimova, Iana M; Pufall, Miles A; Krishnan, Shyam

    2012-01-01

    of these electrophiles into a noncovalent kinase-recognition scaffold produced slowly dissociating, covalent inhibitors of the p90 ribosomal protein S6 kinase RSK2. A cocrystal structure revealed specific noncovalent interactions that stabilize the complex by positioning the electrophilic carbon near the targeted...... cysteine. Disruption of these interactions by protein unfolding or proteolysis promoted instantaneous cleavage of the covalent bond. Our results establish a chemistry-based framework for engineering sustained covalent inhibition without accumulating permanently modified proteins and peptides....

  11. Role of cysteine cathepsins in matrix degradation and cell signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermajer, Natasa; Jevnikar, Zala; Doljak, Bojan; Kos, Janko

    2008-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsins participate in extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation and remodelling and thus influence important cellular processes such as cell transformation and differentiation, motility, adhesion, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Also, cathepsins are involved in cell signalling and are capable of activating specific cell receptors and growth factors or liberating them from the ECM. In this review we emphasize recent studies on cathepsins in regard to ECM degradation and cell signalling.

  12. Advances in non-peptidomimetic HIV protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, X; Liu, Z; Zhai, G

    2014-06-01

    HIV protease plays a crucial role in the viral life cycle. It can cleave a series of heptamers in the viral Gag and GagPol precursor proteins to generate mature infectious virus particles. Successful inhibition of the protease will prevent this maturation step and hence block the spreading of HIV. However, the rapid emergence of drug resistance makes it urgent to develop new HIV protease inhibitors to combat the global disease. Besides, poor oral bioavailability, unacceptable side effects, high treatment cost and pill burden also trouble the application of HIV protease inhibitors. In such situations, non-peptidomimetic HIV protease inhibitors have drawn an increasing interest as a potential therapeutic option due to their small molecular weight, favorable bioavailability, high stability in vivo, low resistance and cost of production. In this review, we present the recent advances in non-peptidomimetic HIV protease inhibitors. Their design strategies, biological activities, resistance profiles, as well as clinical application will also be discussed.

  13. A look inside HIV resistance through retroviral protease interaction maps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksejs Kontijevskis

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses affect a large number of species, from fish and birds to mammals and humans, with global socioeconomic negative impacts. Here the authors report and experimentally validate a novel approach for the analysis of the molecular networks that are involved in the recognition of substrates by retroviral proteases. Using multivariate analysis of the sequence-based physiochemical descriptions of 61 retroviral proteases comprising wild-type proteases, natural mutants, and drug-resistant forms of proteases from nine different viral species in relation to their ability to cleave 299 substrates, the authors mapped the physicochemical properties and cross-dependencies of the amino acids of the proteases and their substrates, which revealed a complex molecular interaction network of substrate recognition and cleavage. The approach allowed a detailed analysis of the molecular-chemical mechanisms involved in substrate cleavage by retroviral proteases.

  14. Structural basis for HTLV-1 protease inhibition by the HIV-1 protease inhibitor indinavir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnert, Maren; Steuber, Holger; Diederich, Wibke E

    2014-07-24

    HTLV-1 protease (HTLV-1 PR) is an aspartic protease which represents a promising drug target for the discovery of novel anti-HTLV-1 drugs. The X-ray structure of HTLV-1 PR in complex with the well-known and approved HIV-1 PR inhibitor Indinavir was determined at 2.40 Å resolution. In this contribution, we describe the first crystal structure in complex with a nonpeptidic inhibitor that accounts for rationalizing the rather moderate affinity of Indinavir against HTLV-1 PR and provides the basis for further structure-guided optimization strategies.

  15. Cysteine oxidative posttranslational modifications: emerging regulation in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Heaseung S; Wang, Sheng-Bing; Venkatraman, Vidya; Murray, Christopher I; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2013-01-18

    In the cardiovascular system, changes in oxidative balance can affect many aspects of cellular physiology through redox-signaling. Depending on the magnitude, fluctuations in the cell's production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can regulate normal metabolic processes, activate protective mechanisms, or be cytotoxic. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can have many effects including the posttranslational modification of proteins at critical cysteine thiols. A subset can act as redox-switches, which elicit functional effects in response to changes in oxidative state. Although the general concepts of redox-signaling have been established, the identity and function of many regulatory switches remains unclear. Characterizing the effects of individual modifications is the key to understand how the cell interprets oxidative signals under physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we review the various cysteine oxidative posttranslational modifications and their ability to function as redox-switches that regulate the cell's response to oxidative stimuli. In addition, we discuss how these modifications have the potential to influence other posttranslational modifications' signaling pathways though cross-talk. Finally, we review the increasing number of tools being developed to identify and quantify the various cysteine oxidative posttranslational modifications and how this will advance our understanding of redox-regulation.

  16. N-Decyl-S-trityl-(R)-cysteine, a new chiral selector for "green" ligand-exchange chromatography applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotti, Andrea; Ianni, Federica; Camaioni, Emidio; Pucciarini, Lucia; Marinozzi, Maura; Sardella, Roccaldo; Natalini, Benedetto

    2017-09-10

    In search for new enantioselectivity profiles, the N-decyl-S-trityl-(R)-cysteine [C 10 -(R)-STC] was synthesized through a one-step procedure and then hydrophobically adsorbed onto an octadecylsilica surface to generate a stable chiral stationary phase for ligand-exchange chromatography (CLEC-CSP) applications. The CLEC analysis was carried out on underivatized amino acids, by using a Cu(II) sulphate (1.0mM) containing aqueous eluent system. Most of the analysed compounds (34 out of 45) were enantiodiscriminated by the C 10 -(R)-STC-based CSP, with resolution factor (R S ) values up to 8.86. Conformationally rigid and hydrophobic ligands often experienced the largest enantioselectivity effects. A high loadability emerged from the analysis of rac-NorVal (selected as prototype test compound): up to 20mg/mL were efficiently enantioseparated with the CLEC-CSP. Two in-line hand-made cartridges filled with a strong cation-exchange resin allowed the effective catching of Cu(II) ions after the semi-preparative enantioseparation. The quantitative recovery of the rac-NorVal enantiomers was made possible by flowing through the cartridge a 5% (v) ammonia solution. The CLEC phase proved successful in the enantioselective analysis of a commercially available (S)-Leu containing tablet. Furthermore, in order to understand the molecular basis for a successful use of the C 10 -(R)-STC-based CLEC system, a descriptive structure-separation relationship study was performed. As a result, all compounds with a MEAN-QPlogS (a hydrophilicity descriptor) value lower than 0.373 can be most likely enantioseparated with the CLEC system under investigation. In the work, the numerous aspects complying with the principles of green chromatography are highlighted and discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Economic Methods of Ginger Protease'sextraction and Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yuanyuan; Tong, Junfeng; Wei, Siqing; Du, Xinyong; Tang, Xiaozhen

    This article reports the ginger protease extraction and purification methods from fresh ginger rhizome. As to ginger protease extraction, we adapt the steps of organic solvent dissolving, ammonium sulfate depositing and freeze-drying, and this method can attain crude enzyme powder 0.6% weight of fresh ginger rhizome. The purification part in this study includes two steps: cellulose ion exchange (DEAE-52) and SP-Sephadex 50 chromatography, which can purify crude ginger protease through ion and molecular weight differences respectively.

  18. Characterization of a chemostable serine alkaline protease from Periplaneta americana

    OpenAIRE

    Sanatan, Prashant T; Purushottam R. Lomate; Giri, Ashok P; Hivrale, Vandana K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Proteases are important enzymes involved in numerous essential physiological processes and hold a strong potential for industrial applications. The proteolytic activity of insects? gut is endowed by many isoforms with diverse properties and specificities. Thus, insect proteases can act as a tool in industrial processes. Results In the present study, purification and properties of a serine alkaline protease from Periplaneta americana and its potential application as an additive in v...

  19. Extracellular protease from the antarctic yeast Candida humicola.

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, M K; Devi, K U; Kumar, G S; Shivaji, S

    1992-01-01

    The psychrotrophic, dimorphic yeast Candida humicola, isolated from Antarctic soil, secretes an acidic protease into the medium. The secretion of this protease by C. humicola was found to be dependent on the composition of the medium. In YPD or yeast nitrogen base medium containing either amino acids or ammonium sulfate as the nitrogen source, the activity of the protease in the medium was low (basal level). However, when yeast nitrogen base medium was depleted of amino acids or ammonium sulf...

  20. Protease production by Streptococcus sanguis associated with subacute bacterial endocarditis.

    OpenAIRE

    Straus, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    A viridans streptococcus (Streptococcus sanguis biotype II) isolated from the blood of a patient with subacute bacterial endocarditis was examined for protease production. In broth culture, extracellular proteolytic enzymes were not produced by this organism until after the early exponential phase of growth, with maximal protease production occurring during the stationary phase. Four distinct proteases were isolated and purified from the supernatant fluids of stationary-phase cultures, employ...

  1. Effect of Gastrointestinal Protease Digestion on Bioactivity of Marine Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ida-Johanne; Andersen, Lisa Lystbæk; Ossum, Carlo Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    executed without concerning subsequent digestion after intake and the aim of this work was hence to investigate how the in vitro antioxidative, antihypertensive and caspase activating activities of peptides are affected by digestion with gastrointestinal (GI) proteases. Five different fish protein...... of the peptides obtained by hydrolysis. The antihypertensive effect increased in all samples after digestion with GI proteases whereas the antioxidative capacity decreased. The effect on the caspase activity depended on the proteases used in the preparation of hydrolysates. In conclusion, the caspase activity...... and antihypertensive activity are maintained during digestion with GI proteases, while the antioxidative capacity seems to be reduced....

  2. Structural and functional diversities in lepidopteran serine proteases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Srinivasan, Ajay; Giri, Ashok P; Gupta, Vidya S

    2006-01-01

    .... Though the evolutionary significance of mutations that lead to structural diversity in serine proteases has been well characterized, detailing the resultant functional diversity has continually posed...

  3. Role of Protease-Inhibitors in Ocular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Pescosolido

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that the balance between proteases and protease-inhibitors system plays a key role in maintaining cellular and tissue homeostasis. Indeed, its alteration has been involved in many ocular and systemic diseases. In particular, research has focused on keratoconus, corneal wounds and ulcers, keratitis, endophthalmitis, age-related macular degeneration, Sorsby fundus dystrophy, loss of nerve cells and photoreceptors during optic neuritis both in vivo and in vitro models. Protease-inhibitors have been extensively studied, rather than proteases, because they may represent a therapeutic approach for some ocular diseases. The protease-inhibitors mainly involved in the onset of the above-mentioned ocular pathologies are: α2-macroglobulin, α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI, metalloproteinase inhibitor (TIMP, maspin, SERPINA3K, SERPINB13, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI, and calpeptin. This review is focused on the several characteristics of dysregulation of this system and, particularly, on a possible role of proteases and protease-inhibitors in molecular remodeling that may lead to some ocular diseases. Recently, researchers have even hypothesized a possible therapeutic effect of the protease-inhibitors in the treatment of injured eye in animal models.

  4. Live Cell Imaging and Profiling of Cysteine Cathepsin Activity Using a Quenched Activity-Based Probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edgington-Mitchell, L.E.; Bogyo, M.; Verdoes, M.

    2017-01-01

    Since protease activity is highly regulated by structural and environmental influences, the abundance of a protease often does not directly correlate with its activity. Because in most of the cases it is the activity of a protease that gives rise to its biological relevance, tools to report on this

  5. Preparation and Characterization of C-16 and C-10 Fluorescent Dipyrrinone Liquid Crystal Langmuir-Blodgett Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deluca, Giovanni; Carroll, Alexander; Prayaga, Chandra; Wade, Aaron; Heath, Christopher; Renaud, Amy; Huggins, Michael

    2012-02-01

    A new C-16 and C-10 Fluorescent Dipyrrinone Liquid Crystal has been synthesized by the University of West Florida's Chemistry department. The liquid crystals have amphiphilic properties with their dipyrrinone polar heads and long hydrocarbon nonpolar tails. This led to the preparation and characterization of their Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett Film, using a Nima Langmuir-Blodgett Trough. The influence of the length of the hydrocarbon tail on the behavior of the pressure-area isotherm of the Langmuir film is studied. There is considerable difference in the behavior of the C-16 and C-10 Fluorescent Dipyrrinone Liquid Crystal Films prepared. Ellipsometric characterization of the films, using an ellipsometer built by the Physics department, is used to further study the Liquid Crystal films.

  6. Structural basis and enzymatic mechanism of the biosynthesis of C9- from C10-monoterpenoid indole alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liuqing; Hill, Marco; Wang, Meitian; Panjikar, Santosh; Stöckigt, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Cutting carbons: The three-dimensional structure of polyneuridine aldehyde esterase (PNAE) gives insight into the enzymatic mechanism of the biosynthesis of C(9)- from C(10)-monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (see scheme). PNAE is a very substrate-specific serine esterase. It harbors the catalytic triad S87-D216-H244, and is a new member of the alpha/beta-fold hydrolase superfamily. Its novel function leads to the diversification of alkaloid structures.

  7. Michael-type addition of illudin S, a toxic substance from Lampteromyces japonicus, with cysteine and cysteine-containing peptides in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K; Inoue, T; Tezuka, Y; Kikuchi, T

    1996-02-01

    Reactions of illudin S with cysteine derivatives (cysteine methyl ester, glutathione and a peptide, Cys-Asp-Pro-Gly-Tyr-Ile-Gly-Ser-Arg) were investigated. In the reaction with cysteine methyl ester, four products (P1, P2, P3, P4) were obtained and their structures were determined, on the basis of MS and NMR data, to be adducts of the mercapto group of cysteine methyl ester with the alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl group of illudin S. In the reactions with glutathione and the peptide, two addition products in each case were identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and NMR analyses. The structures of these adducts also indicated that the alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl group in illudin S behaves as a Michael acceptor for the mercapto group in cysteine.

  8. MICROSPHERE-BASED FLOW CYTOMETRY PROTEASE ASSAYS FOR USE IN PROTEASE ACTIVITY DETECTION AND HIGH-THROUGHPUT SCREENING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Matthew J.; Edwards, Bruce S.; Zhu, Jingshu; Sklar, Larry A.; Graves, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    This protocol describes microsphere-based protease assays for use in flow cytometry and high-throughput screening. This platform measures a loss of fluorescence from the surface of a microsphere due to the cleavage of an attached fluorescent protease substrate by a suitable protease enzyme. The assay format can be adapted to any site or protein specific protease of interest and results can be measured in both real time and as end point fluorescence assays on a flow cytometer. End point assays are easily adapted to microplate format for flow cytometry high-throughput analysis and inhibitor screening. PMID:20938917

  9. Rigidity analysis of HIV-1 protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heal, J. W.; Wells, S. A.; Jimenez-Roldan, E.; Freedman, R. F.; Römer, R. A.

    2011-03-01

    We present a rigidity analysis on a large number of X-ray crystal structures of the enzyme HIV-1 protease using the 'pebble game' algorithm of the software FIRST. We find that although the rigidity profile remains similar across a comprehensive set of high resolution structures, the profile changes significantly in the presence of an inhibitor. Our study shows that the action of the inhibitors is to restrict the flexibility of the β-hairpin flaps which allow access to the active site. The results are discussed in the context of full molecular dynamics simulations as well as data from NMR experiments.

  10. Protease sensing using nontoxic silicon quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoyu; McVey, Benjamin F. P.; Robinson, Andrew B.; Longatte, Guillaume; O'Mara, Peter B.; Tan, Vincent T. G.; Thordarson, Pall; Tilley, Richard D.; Gaus, Katharina; Justin Gooding, John

    2017-08-01

    Herein is presented a proof-of-concept study of protease sensing that combines nontoxic silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The SiQDs serve as the donor and an organic dye as the acceptor. The dye is covalently attached to the SiQDs using a peptide linker. Enzymatic cleavage of the peptide leads to changes in FRET efficiency. The combination of interfacial design and optical imaging presented in this work opens opportunities for use of nontoxic SiQDs relevant to intracellular sensing and imaging.

  11. Mining proteases in the genome databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, David

    2002-01-01

    Protease data mining can take advantage both of the many specialist, Web-available databases that cover the genetic, protein and nucleic acid sequence information that is specific to a variety of organisms, and of a flexible, but defined, classification system. However, precomputed data, such as gene predictions, should be used with care. Unless there is definitive supporting information, ideally sequencing of a cDNA to show that the predictions are accurate, followed by expression and biochemical characterization of the predicted protein, the predicted gene and its product remains a possibility, rather than a certainty.

  12. A novel potentiometric biosensor for selective L-cysteine determination using L-cysteine-desulfhydrase producing Trichosporon jirovecii yeast cells coupled with sulfide electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Saad S.M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)], E-mail: saadsmhassan@yahoo.com; El-Baz, Ashraf F. [Department of Industrial Biotechnology, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Institute, Menofia University (Egypt); Abd-Rabboh, Hisham S.M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2007-10-17

    Trichosporon jirovecii yeast cells are used for the first time as a source of L-cysteine desulfhydrase enzyme (EC 4.4.1.1) and incorporated in a biosensor for determining L-cysteine. The cells are grown under cadmium stress conditions to increase the expression level of the enzyme. The intact cells are immobilized on the membrane of a solid-state Ag{sub 2}S electrode to provide a simple L-cysteine responsive biosensor. Upon immersion of the sensor in L-cysteine containing solutions, L-cysteine undergoes enzymatic hydrolysis into pyruvate, ammonia and sulfide ion. The rate of sulfide ion formation is potentiometrically measured as a function of L-cysteine concentration. Under optimized conditions (phosphate buffer pH 7, temperature 37 {+-} 1 deg. C and actual weight of immobilized yeast cells 100 mg), a linear relationship between L-cysteine concentration and the initial rate of sulfide liberation (dE/dt) is obtained. The sensor response covers the concentration range of 0.2-150 mg L{sup -1} (1.7-1250 {mu}mol L{sup -1}) L-cysteine. Validation of the assay method according to the quality control/quality assurance standards (precision, accuracy, between-day variability, within-day reproducibility, range of measurements and lower limit of detection) reveals remarkable performance characteristics of the proposed biosensor. The sensor is satisfactorily utilized for determination of L-cysteine in some pharmaceutical formulations. The lower limit of detection is {approx}1 {mu}mol L{sup -1} and the accuracy and precision of the method are 97.5% and {+-}1.1%, respectively. Structurally similar sulfur containing compounds such as glutathione, cystine, methionine, and D-cysteine do no interfere.

  13. HIV-1 protease-substrate coevolution in nelfinavir resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolli, Madhavi; Ozen, Ayşegül; Kurt-Yilmaz, Nese; Schiffer, Celia A

    2014-07-01

    Resistance to various human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors (PIs) challenges the effectiveness of therapies in treating HIV-1-infected individuals and AIDS patients. The virus accumulates mutations within the protease (PR) that render the PIs less potent. Occasionally, Gag sequences also coevolve with mutations at PR cleavage sites contributing to drug resistance. In this study, we investigated the structural basis of coevolution of the p1-p6 cleavage site with the nelfinavir (NFV) resistance D30N/N88D protease mutations by determining crystal structures of wild-type and NFV-resistant HIV-1 protease in complex with p1-p6 substrate peptide variants with L449F and/or S451N. Alterations of residue 30's interaction with the substrate are compensated by the coevolving L449F and S451N cleavage site mutations. This interdependency in the PR-p1-p6 interactions enhances intermolecular contacts and reinforces the overall fit of the substrate within the substrate envelope, likely enabling coevolution to sustain substrate recognition and cleavage in the presence of PR resistance mutations. Resistance to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors challenges the effectiveness of therapies in treating HIV-1-infected individuals and AIDS patients. Mutations in HIV-1 protease selected under the pressure of protease inhibitors render the inhibitors less potent. Occasionally, Gag sequences also mutate and coevolve with protease, contributing to maintenance of viral fitness and to drug resistance. In this study, we investigated the structural basis of coevolution at the Gag p1-p6 cleavage site with the nelfinavir (NFV) resistance D30N/N88D protease mutations. Our structural analysis reveals the interdependency of protease-substrate interactions and how coevolution may restore substrate recognition and cleavage in the presence of protease drug resistance mutations. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Secretion of Proteases by an Opportunistic Fungal Pathogen Scedosporium aurantiacum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiping Han

    Full Text Available Scedosporium aurantiacum is an opportunistic filamentous fungus increasingly isolated from the sputum of cystic fibrosis patients, and is especially prevalent in Australia. At the moment, very little is known about the infection mechanism of this fungus. Secreted proteases have been shown to contribute to fungal virulence in several studies with other fungi. Here we have compared the profiles of proteases secreted by a clinical isolate Scedosporium aurantiacum (WM 06.482 and an environmental strain (WM 10.136 grown on a synthetic cystic fibrosis sputum medium supplemented with casein or mucin. Protease activity was assessed using class-specific substrates and inhibitors. Subtilisin-like and trypsin-like serine protease activity was detected in all cultures. The greatest difference in the secretion of proteases between the two strains occurred in mucin-supplemented medium, where the activities of the elastase-like, trypsin-like and aspartic proteases were, overall, 2.5-75 fold higher in the clinical strain compared to the environmental strain. Proteases secreted by the two strains in the mucin-supplemented medium were further analyzed by mass spectrometry. Six homologs of fungal proteases were identified from the clinical strain and five from the environmental strain. Of these, three were common for both strains including a subtilisin peptidase, a putative leucine aminopeptidase and a PA-SaNapH-like protease. Trypsin-like protease was identified by mass spectrometry only in the clinical isolate even though trypsin-like activity was present in all cultures. In contrast, high elastase-like activity was measured in the culture supernatant of the clinical strain but could not be identified by mass spectrometry searching against other fungi in the NCBI database. Future availability of an annotated genome will help finalise identification of the S. aurantiacum proteases.

  15. Characterization of a Recombinant Cathepsin B-Like Cysteine Peptidase from Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae: A Putative Target for Control of Citrus Huanglongbing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taíse Fernanda da Silva Ferrara

    Full Text Available Huanglonbing (HLB is one of the most destructive disease affecting citrus plants. The causal agent is associated with the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas and the psyllid Diaphorina citri, vector of disease, that transmits the bacterium associated with HLB. The control of disease can be achieved by suppressing either the bacterium or the vector. Among the control strategies for HLB disease, one of the widely used consists in controlling the enzymes of the disease vector, Diaphorina citri. The insect Diaphorina citri belongs to the order Hemiptera, which frequently have cysteine peptidases in the gut. The importance of this class of enzymes led us to search for enzymes in the D. citri transcriptome for the establishment of alternatives strategies for HLB control. In this study, we reported the identification and characterization of a cathepsin B-like cysteine peptidase from D. citri (DCcathB. DCcathB was recombinantly expressed in Pichia pastoris, presenting a molecular mass of approximately 50 kDa. The enzyme hydrolyzed the fluorogenic substrate Z-F-R-AMC (Km = 23.5 μM and the selective substrate for cathepsin B, Z-R-R-AMC (Km = 6.13 μM. The recombinant enzyme was inhibited by the cysteine protease inhibitors E64 (IC50 = 0.014 μM and CaneCPI-4 (Ki = 0.05 nM and by the selective cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074 (IC50 = 0.095 nM. RT-qPCR analysis revealed that the expression of the DCcathB in nymph and adult was approximately 9-fold greater than in egg. Moreover, the expression of this enzyme in the gut was 175-fold and 3333-fold higher than in the remaining tissues and in the head, respectively, suggesting that DCcathB can be a target for HLB control.

  16. Characterization of a Recombinant Cathepsin B-Like Cysteine Peptidase from Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae): A Putative Target for Control of Citrus Huanglongbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Taíse Fernanda da Silva; Schneider, Vanessa Karine; Kishi, Luciano Takeshi; Carmona, Adriana Karaoglanovic; Alves, Marcio Fernando Madureira; Belasque-Júnior, Jose; Rosa, José César; Hunter, Wayne Brian; Henrique-Silva, Flávio; Soares-Costa, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Huanglonbing (HLB) is one of the most destructive disease affecting citrus plants. The causal agent is associated with the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) and the psyllid Diaphorina citri, vector of disease, that transmits the bacterium associated with HLB. The control of disease can be achieved by suppressing either the bacterium or the vector. Among the control strategies for HLB disease, one of the widely used consists in controlling the enzymes of the disease vector, Diaphorina citri. The insect Diaphorina citri belongs to the order Hemiptera, which frequently have cysteine peptidases in the gut. The importance of this class of enzymes led us to search for enzymes in the D. citri transcriptome for the establishment of alternatives strategies for HLB control. In this study, we reported the identification and characterization of a cathepsin B-like cysteine peptidase from D. citri (DCcathB). DCcathB was recombinantly expressed in Pichia pastoris, presenting a molecular mass of approximately 50 kDa. The enzyme hydrolyzed the fluorogenic substrate Z-F-R-AMC (Km = 23.5 μM) and the selective substrate for cathepsin B, Z-R-R-AMC (Km = 6.13 μM). The recombinant enzyme was inhibited by the cysteine protease inhibitors E64 (IC50 = 0.014 μM) and CaneCPI-4 (Ki = 0.05 nM) and by the selective cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074 (IC50 = 0.095 nM). RT-qPCR analysis revealed that the expression of the DCcathB in nymph and adult was approximately 9-fold greater than in egg. Moreover, the expression of this enzyme in the gut was 175-fold and 3333-fold higher than in the remaining tissues and in the head, respectively, suggesting that DCcathB can be a target for HLB control.

  17. Enhancement of thioredoxin/glutaredoxin-mediated L-cysteine synthesis from S-sulfocysteine increases L-cysteine production in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakatani Takeshi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli has two L-cysteine biosynthetic pathways; one is synthesized from O-acetyl L-serine (OAS and sulfate by L-cysteine synthase (CysK, and another is produced via S-sulfocysteine (SSC from OAS and thiosulfate by SSC synthase (CysM. SSC is converted into L-cysteine and sulfite by an uncharacterized reaction. As thioredoxins (Trx1 and Trx2 and glutaredoxins (Grx1, Grx2, Grx3, Grx4, and NrdH are known as reductases of peptidyl disulfides, overexpression of such reductases might be a good way for improving L-cysteine production to accelerate the reduction of SSC in E. coli. Results Because the redox enzymes can reduce the disulfide that forms on proteins, we first tested whether these enzymes catalyze the reduction of SSC to L-cysteine. All His-tagged recombinant enzymes, except for Grx4, efficiently convert SSC into L-cysteine in vitro. Overexpression of Grx1 and NrdH enhanced a 15-40% increase in the E. coliL-cysteine production. On the other hand, disruption of the cysM gene cancelled the effect caused by the overexpression of Grx1 and NrdH, suggesting that its improvement was due to the efficient reduction of SSC under the fermentative conditions. Moreover, L-cysteine production in knockout mutants of the sulfite reductase genes (ΔcysI and ΔcysJ and the L-cysteine synthase gene (ΔcysK each decreased to about 50% of that in the wild-type strain. Interestingly, there was no significant difference in L-cysteine production between wild-type strain and gene deletion mutant of the upstream pathway of sulfite (ΔcysC or ΔcysH. These results indicate that sulfite generated from the SSC reduction is available as the sulfur source to produce additional L-cysteine molecule. It was finally found that in the E. coliL-cysteine producer that co-overexpress glutaredoxin (NrdH, sulfite reductase (CysI, and L-cysteine synthase (CysK, there was the highest amount of L-cysteine produced per cell. Conclusions In this work, we

  18. Airway uric acid is a sensor of inhaled protease allergens and initiates type 2 immune responses in respiratory mucosa1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kenichiro; Iijima, Koji; Elias, Martha K.; Seno, Satoshi; Tojima, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Takao; Kephart, Gail M.; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Kita, Hirohito

    2014-01-01

    While type 2 immune responses to environmental antigens are thought to play pivotal roles in asthma and allergic airway diseases, the immunological mechanisms that initiate the responses are largely unknown. Many allergens have biologic activities, including enzymatic activities and abilities to engage innate pattern-recognition receptors such as TLR4. Here we report that IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) were produced quickly in the lungs of naïve mice exposed to cysteine proteases, such as bromelain and papain, as a model for allergens. IL-33 and TSLP sensitized naïve animals to an innocuous airway antigen OVA, which resulted in production of type 2 cytokines and IgE antibody and eosinophilic airway inflammation when mice were challenged with the same antigen. Importantly, upon exposure to proteases, uric acid (UA) was rapidly released into the airway lumen, and removal of this endogenous UA by uricase prevented type 2 immune responses. UA promoted secretion of IL-33 by airway epithelial cells in vitro, and administration of UA into the airways of naïve animals induced extracellular release of IL-33, followed by both innate and adaptive type 2 immune responses in vivo. Finally, a potent UA synthesis inhibitor, febuxostat, mitigated asthma phenotypes that were caused by repeated exposure to natural airborne allergens. These findings provide mechanistic insights into the development of type 2 immunity to airborne allergens and recognize airway UA as a key player that regulates the process in respiratory mucosa. PMID:24663677

  19. Biochemical Characterization of Function and Structure of RseP, an Escherichia coli S2P Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizukuri, Y; Akiyama, K; Akiyama, Y

    2017-01-01

    Intramembrane-cleaving proteases (I-CLiPs) are a group of membrane-associated proteases with a unique feature: they are believed to cleave their substrate within the hydrophobic lipid bilayer, even though peptide bond hydrolysis requires a water molecule. Escherichia coli RseP, which belongs to the S2P zinc metalloprotease family of I-CLiPs, plays an essential role in activation of a cell envelope stress response through cleavage of anti-σ E protein RseA, a single-span transmembrane protein. A recent study showed that it also cleaves remnant signal peptides generated upon membrane translocation of secretory proteins. Here, we describe several methods for characterization of the proteolytic functions and structure of RseP mainly in vivo, including a proteolytic activity assay using model substrates, an in vitro analysis of cleavage of signal peptides in a detergent solution and in the membrane vesicles, structural analysis of membrane-embedded RseP based on the thiol modifiability of introduced cysteine residues, and the protein interaction analysis by in vivo cross-linking protocols. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Biochemical Analysis Reveals the Multifactorial Mechanism of Histone H3 Clipping by Chicken Liver Histone H3 Protease

    KAUST Repository

    Chauhan, Sakshi

    2016-09-02

    Proteolytic clipping of histone H3 has been identified in many organisms. Despite several studies, the mechanism of clipping, the substrate specificity, and the significance of this poorly understood epigenetic mechanism are not clear. We have previously reported histone H3 specific proteolytic clipping and a protein inhibitor in chicken liver. However, the sites of clipping are still not known very well. In this study, we attempt to identify clipping sites in histone H3 and to determine the mechanism of inhibition by stefin B protein, a cysteine protease inhibitor. By employing site-directed mutagenesis and in vitro biochemical assays, we have identified three distinct clipping sites in recombinant human histone H3 and its variants (H3.1, H3.3, and H3t). However, post-translationally modified histones isolated from chicken liver and Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type cells showed different clipping patterns. Clipping of histone H3 N-terminal tail at three sites occurs in a sequential manner. We have further observed that clipping sites are regulated by the structure of the N-terminal tail as well as the globular domain of histone H3. We also have identified the QVVAG region of stefin B protein to be very crucial for inhibition of the protease activity. Altogether, our comprehensive biochemical studies have revealed three distinct clipping sites in histone H3 and their regulation by the structure of histone H3, histone modifications marks, and stefin B.

  1. Anaerobic Cysteine Degradation and Potential Metabolic Coordination in Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loddeke, Melissa; Schneider, Barbara; Oguri, Tamiko; Mehta, Iti; Xuan, Zhenyu; Reitzer, Larry

    2017-08-15

    Salmonella enterica has two CyuR-activated enzymes that degrade cysteine, i.e., the aerobic CdsH and an unidentified anaerobic enzyme; Escherichia coli has only the latter. To identify the anaerobic enzyme, transcript profiling was performed for E. coli without cyuR and with overexpressed cyuR Thirty-seven genes showed at least 5-fold changes in expression, and the cyuPA (formerly yhaOM) operon showed the greatest difference. Homology suggested that CyuP and CyuA represent a cysteine transporter and an iron-sulfur-containing cysteine desulfidase, respectively. E. coli and S. enterica ΔcyuA mutants grown with cysteine generated substantially less sulfide and had lower growth yields. Oxygen affected the CyuR-dependent genes reciprocally; cyuP-lacZ expression was greater anaerobically, whereas cdsH-lacZ expression was greater aerobically. In E. coli and S. enterica, anaerobic cyuP expression required cyuR and cysteine and was induced by l-cysteine, d-cysteine, and a few sulfur-containing compounds. Loss of either CyuA or RidA, both of which contribute to cysteine degradation to pyruvate, increased cyuP-lacZ expression, which suggests that CyuA modulates intracellular cysteine concentrations. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CyuA homologs are present in obligate and facultative anaerobes, confirming an anaerobic function, and in archaeal methanogens and bacterial acetogens, suggesting an ancient origin. Our results show that CyuA is the major anaerobic cysteine-catabolizing enzyme in both E. coli and S. enterica, and it is proposed that anaerobic cysteine catabolism can contribute to coordination of sulfur assimilation and amino acid synthesis.IMPORTANCE Sulfur-containing compounds such as cysteine and sulfide are essential and reactive metabolites. Exogenous sulfur-containing compounds can alter the thiol landscape and intracellular redox reactions and are known to affect several cellular processes, including swarming motility, antibiotic sensitivity, and biofilm

  2. Entamoeba histolytica Cysteine Proteinase 5 Evokes Mucin Exocytosis from Colonic Goblet Cells via αvβ3 Integrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Cornick

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Critical to the pathogenesis of intestinal amebiasis, Entamoeba histolytica (Eh induces mucus hypersecretion and degrades the colonic mucus layer at the site of invasion. The parasite component(s responsible for hypersecretion are poorly defined, as are regulators of mucin secretion within the host. In this study, we have identified the key virulence factor in live Eh that elicits the fast release of mucin by goblets cells as cysteine protease 5 (EhCP5 whereas, modest mucus secretion occurred with secreted soluble EhCP5 and recombinant CP5. Coupling of EhCP5-αvβ3 integrin on goblet cells facilitated outside-in signaling by activating SRC family kinases (SFK and focal adhesion kinase that resulted in the activation/phosphorlyation of PI3K at the site of Eh contact and production of PIP3. PKCδ was activated at the EhCP5-αvβ3 integrin contact site that specifically regulated mucin secretion though the trafficking vesicle marker myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS. This study has identified that EhCP5 coupling with goblet cell αvβ3 receptors can initiate a signal cascade involving PI3K, PKCδ and MARCKS to drive mucin secretion from goblet cells critical in disease pathogenesis.

  3. Purification and characterization of protease from Bacillus cereus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chitti

    2013-09-16

    Sep 16, 2013 ... Thermostable alkaline proteases of Bacillus licheniformis MIR. 29:isolation, production and characterization. Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 45:327-332. Fulzele R, DeSa E, Yadav A, Shouche Y, Bhadekar R (2011). Characterization of novel extracellular protease produced by marine bacterial isolate from the ...

  4. Purification of an Intracellular Fibrinolytic Protease from Ganoderma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Method: The intracellular fibrinolytic protease produced by Ganoderma lucidum VK12 was isolated from the mycelia grown in MCDBF broth ... The inhibitory effect of different metal ions and commercial protease inhibitors on enzyme activity was studied. ... sodium hydroxide and 2.9 %w/v sodium carbonate in glass-distilled ...

  5. An overview of Bacillus proteases: from production to application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contesini, Fabiano Jares; Melo, Ricardo Rodrigues de; Sato, Hélia Harumi

    2017-08-08

    Proteases have a broad range of applications in industrial processes and products and are representative of most worldwide enzyme sales. The genus Bacillus is probably the most important bacterial source of proteases and is capable of producing high yields of neutral and alkaline proteolytic enzymes with remarkable properties, such as high stability towards extreme temperatures, pH, organic solvents, detergents and oxidizing compounds. Therefore, several strategies have been developed for the cost-effective production of Bacillus proteases, including optimization of the fermentation parameters. Moreover, there are many studies on the use of low-cost substrates for submerged and solid state fermentation. Other alternatives include genetic tools such as protein engineering in order to obtain more active and stable proteases and strain engineering to better secrete recombinant proteases from Bacillus through homologous and heterologous protein expression. There has been extensive research on proteases because of the broad number of applications for these enzymes, such as in detergent formulations for the removal of blood stains from fabrics, production of bioactive peptides, food processing, enantioselective reactions, and dehairing of skins. Moreover, many commercial proteases have been characterized and purified from different Bacillus species. Therefore, this review highlights the production, purification, characterization, and application of proteases from a number of Bacillus species.

  6. Optimization of alkaline protease production and its fibrinolytic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens AU17 was isolated from the fish waste discharged soil and it was tested for its ability to produce the protease enzyme. The effect of different production parameters such as temperature, pH, carbon and nitrogen sources and sodium chloride concentration for protease production by the isolated ...

  7. A Protease Isolated from the Latex of Plumeria rubra Linn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: The protease was isolated from the latex of the plant by acetone precipitation method and given a trivial name, Plumerin-R. The anti-inflammatory activity of the protease was based on its effects on carrageenan-induced paw oedema in rats. Its wound healing effect was investigated using an excision wound rat ...

  8. Milk Clotting Activity of Protease, Extracted from Rhizome of Taffin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2017-03-07

    Mar 7, 2017 ... Keywords: Ginger Protease, Milk Clotting Activity, Calf rennet, Characterization, Extraction. INTRODUCTION. Ginger rhizome (Zingiber officinale roscoe), the main source of ginger proteases is grown in many parts of Africa, tropical Asia, southeast Asia,. India and the West Indies (Hou-Pin et al., 2009).

  9. Protease-induced solubilisation of carbohydrates from brewers' spent grain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faulds, C.B.; Collins, S.; Robertson, J.A.; Treimo, J.; Eijsink, V.G.H.; Hinz, S.W.A.; Schols, H.A.; Buchert, J.; Waldron, K.W.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of microbial proteases on the release of carbohydrates from BSG was studied. The proteases were able to release the non-cellulosic glucose, a portion of feruloylated arabinoxylan and over 50% of the protein from brewers' spent grain (BSG) after 24 h hydrolysis. The non-cellulosic glucose

  10. Peptide synthesis in neat organic solvents with novel thermostable proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toplak, Ana; Nuijens, Timo; Quaedflieg, Peter J L M; Wu, Bian; Janssen, Dick B

    Biocatalytic peptide synthesis will benefit from enzymes that are active at low water levels in organic solvent compositions that allow good substrate and product solubility. To explore the use of proteases from thermophiles for peptide synthesis under such conditions, putative protease genes of the

  11. Enhancement of alkaline protease production by Bacillus clausii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enhancement of alkaline protease production by Bacillus clausii using Taguchi experimental design. ... SFG Oskouie, F Tabandeh, B Yakhchali, F Eftekhar. Abstract. The effect of culture conditions on protease production and bacterial growth of Bacillus clausii was investigated using Taguchi design of experiment.

  12. Model building of a thermolysin-like protease by mutagenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frigerio, F; Margarit, [No Value; Nogarotto, R; Grandi, G; Vriend, G; Hardy, F; Veltman, OR; Venema, G; Eijsink, VGH

    The present study concerns the use of site-directed mutagenesis experiments to optimize a three-dimensional model of the neutral protease of Bacillus subtilis (NP-sub), An initial model of NP-sub was constructed using the crystal structures of the homologous neutral proteases of Bacillus

  13. Isolation of alkaline protease from Bacillus subtilis AKRS3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary screening was achieved by skim milk casein hydrolysis method. Microbiological ... The halotolerancy of B. subtilis AKRS3 for alkaline protease production indicated that 3% of sodium chloride was optimum to yield maximum protease activity. During production, agitation rate was 250 rpm at air flow rate of 1 VVM.

  14. Oxidative Stress: Promoter of Allergic Sensitization to Protease Allergens?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijt, Leonie S.; Utsch, Lara; Lutter, René; van Ree, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    Allergies arise from aberrant T helper type 2 responses to allergens. Several respiratory allergens possess proteolytic activity, which has been recognized to act as an adjuvant for the development of a Th2 response. Allergen source-derived proteases can activate the protease-activated receptor-2,

  15. Comparison of protease production from newly isolated bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Protease has gained a very important position in many industries such as food, pharmaceutical, chemical and leather industries. In this research, protease was obtained from bacteria. The bacterial strain was obtained from soil which was collected from different areas of Lahore, Pakistan. Fermentation medium (by using ...

  16. Improvement of acid protease production by a mixed culture of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The synthesis of acid protease by Aspergillus oryzae AS3042 was enhanced significantly with the mixed culture of Aspergillus niger SL-09 using solid-state fermentation technique. The influence of carbon sources, nitrogen sources and the addition of phytic acid on acid protease production were investigated. The enzyme ...

  17. Extracellular protease produced by Bacillus subtilis isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a study to evaluate the microbiological safety of some paracetamol oral solutions sold in some Nigerian drug stores, 40.0% of the samples examined was contaminated with protease-producing Bacillus subtilis. The production of extracellular protease was induced by casein in the minimal medium and was found to be the ...

  18. Enhancement of alkaline protease production by Bacillus clausii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-11-19

    Nov 19, 2007 ... Full Length Research Paper. Enhancement of alkaline protease production by. Bacillus clausii using Taguchi ... inorganic nitrogen sources, agitation and metal ion, each at four levels were selected and an orthogonal array layout of L16 (45) were performed. The proposed medium for alkaline protease ...

  19. Oxidant and solvent stable alkaline protease from Aspergillus flavus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The increase in agricultural practices has necessitated the judicious use of agricultural wastes into value added products. In this study, an extracellular, organic solvent and oxidant stable, serine protease was produced by Aspergillus flavus MTCC 9952 under solid state fermentation. Maximum protease yield was obtained ...

  20. A Protease Isolated from the Latex of Plumeria rubra Linn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To isolate, purify and characterize protease from the latex of the plant. Methods: Protease was isolated from the latex of Plumeria rubra Linn using acetone precipitation method and purified by a sequence of DEAE cellulose column chromatography, followed by two successive column purification in Sephadex G-50 ...