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Sample records for c1 lateral mass

  1. Safety Issues and Neurological Improvement following C1- C2 Fusion using C1 Lateral Mass and C2 Pedicle Screw in Atlantoaxial Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MK Kwan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of instrumentation methods for C1-C2 fusion from the use of posterior wiring methods to transarticular screws and C1 lateral mass with C2 pedicle screw construct have improved fusion rates to almost 100%. However, the C1 lateral mass and C2 pedicle screw technique is technically demanding. This is a prospective review of a series of ten patients who was planned for C1-C2 fusion using C1 lateral mass and C2 pedicle screw technique between January 2007 and June 2009. The procedure was converted to occipital cervical fusion due to a fracture of a hypoplastic lateral mass-posterior arch complex in one patient and Gallie fusion due to a vertebral artery injury in another. Eight patients underwent the C1-C2 fusion using C1 lateral mass and C2 pedicle screw successfully without any complications. The union rate was 100% with an average union time of 5.3 months (range from 3 to 8 months. Postoperatively, the patients achieved an average of one Frankel grade neurological improvement. In conclusion, this technique provides an excellent union rate and good neurological recovery.

  2. Use of Intraoperative Navigation for Reconstruction of the C1 Lateral Mass After Resection of Aneurysmal Bone Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neva, Jennifer; Smith, Brandon W; Joseph, Jacob R; Park, Paul

    2017-06-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are rare blood-filled cystic lesions that are found in the long bones and spine. Here, we present a case of an ABC found in the lateral mass and lamina of C1. Lesions in this area provide a surgical challenge because of its difficulty to access as well as its need for reconstruction. We describe a novel use of intraoperative navigation (ION) to assist in the placement of a C1 lateral mass titanium cage. An 18-year-old female patient presented with headaches and progressive neck pain. Imaging revealed a large cystic lesion involving the C1 lamina and right lateral mass. The patient underwent ION-assisted aggressive intralesional resection of the ABC and reconstruction of the C1 lateral mass with a static titanium cage, supplemented with posterior fusion from the occiput to C3. At 2-year follow-up, there was no evidence of recurrence and the hardware remained intact. ION is a useful aid in assessing the extent of tumor resection and performing cage reconstruction of the C1 lateral mass. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. C1 lateral mass screw placement in occipitalization with atlantoaxial dislocation and basilar invagination: a report of 146 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yi-heng; Yu, Xin-guang; Qiao, Guang-yu; Guo, Sheng-li; Zhang, Jian-ning

    2014-11-15

    Retrospective study of 146 patients with the diagnosis of occipitalization, atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) and basilar invagination, using a novel surgical treatment strategy. To introduce a novel fixation and reduction technique. Atlas occipitalization associated with basilar invagination often result in fixed AAD that need reduction and occipitocervical fixation. The widely used occipitocervical fixation with suboccipital screws has several limitations such as the poor screw purchase in maldevelopment of the occipital bone, limited area available for implants in previous suboccipital craniectomy. The placement of occipitalized C1 lateral mass screw is an alternative option. From June 2007 to June 2013, 146 patients of occipitalized atlas with fixed AAD and basilar invagination, underwent fixation and reduction via C1 lateral mass and C2 pars/pedicle screw. A total of 143 patients achieved the follow-up in the range from 6 months to 4 years (average, 30 mo). Neurological improvement was seen in all the 143 patients, with the averaged Japanese Orthopedic Association scores increasing from 11.6 to 15.5. Radiographical evaluation showed that solid bony fusion was achieved in all patients, and complete reduction was attained in 95 patients, and partial reduction (>60%) in 40 patients, and no effective reduction in 8 patients who had additional transoral decompression. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that the ventral cervicomedullary compression was relieved in all patients. Although technically demanding, the C1 lateral mass placement in occipitalization is very useful in the rescue situation where more conventional stabilization alternatives are not technically possible, or as routine occipitocervical stabilization. It provides firm stabilization offering an optimum situation for bony fusion, and meanwhile the effective reduction of fixed AAD and basilar invagination. An extremely high fusion rate can be expected with minimal complications and minimal

  4. Reconstruction of C-1 lateral mass with titanium mesh cage after resection of an aneurysmal bone cyst of the atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Vincent Y; Deviren, Vedat; Ames, Christopher P

    2009-02-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are rare benign tumors with a prevalence of 0.14 cases per 100,000 people. A majority of cases arise during adolescence, and there is a female predominance. This lesion accounts for 1.4% of all primary bone tumors. Aneurysmal bone cysts occur mainly in the long bones, with spinal involvement in 10-30% of cases. Cervical spine ABCs account for about one-third of spinal ABCs, and atlas involvement occurs in 1% of cases. Resection of ABCs at the atlas is difficult because of the location and the lack of proper instrumentation for reconstruction of C-1. The authors present a case of an ABC at C-1 in a child who underwent resection of the lesion and reconstruction of the lateral mass with a titanium mesh cage.

  5. Posterior Fixation with C1 Lateral Mass Screws and C2 Pars Screws for Type II Odontoid Fracture in the Elderly: Long-Term Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobran, Mauro; Nasi, Davide; Esposito, Domenico Paolo; Iacoangeli, Maurizio

    2016-12-01

    We sought to evaluate the long-term C1-C2 fusion rates, fracture healing, and functional outcomes in geriatric patients with type II odontoid fracture treated with posterior fixation with polyaxial C1 lateral mass screws and C2 pars screws. Twenty-one consecutive patients between 2005 and 2011 with Anderson and D'Alonzo type II odontoid fracture underwent a posterior atlantoaxial fixation with polyaxial C1 lateral mass screws and C2 pars screws. A long-term clinical and radiologic follow-up was achieved in all patients with a mean follow-up period of 53.28 ± 15.41 months (range 38-91 months). All 21 patients had bilateral C1 lateral mass screws and bilateral C2 pars screws. Correct positioning of the C1 lateral mass screws and C2 pars screws was observed in all 42 placements by postoperative computed tomography scans. No vascular or neurologic complication was noted. At the last follow-up, 20 patients (95.24%) had a solid fusion (defined as Lenke fusion grade A or B) while 1 patient (4.76%) had a partial fusion (Lenke fusion grade C). Overall, no hardware failures occurred in any patient. Odontoid fracture healing was achieved in 18 patients out of 21 (85.71%). The mean postoperative Neck Disability Index score was 12.73%, and neck motion was within normal physiologic limits at 12 months. This study adds to the evidence that posterior atlantoaxial fixation with polyaxial C1 lateral mass screws and C2 pars screws is a safe and effective surgical option in the treatment of odontoid fractures including long-term stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Surgical Treatment of Occipitocervical Dislocation with Atlas Assimilation and Klippel-Feil Syndrome Using Occipitalized C1 Lateral Mass and C2 Fixation and Reduction Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yi-Heng; Qiao, Guang-Yu; Yu, Xin-Guang

    2016-11-01

    To introduce and assess a surgical treatment of occipitocervical (OC) dislocation with atlas assimilation and Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) using occipitalized C1 lateral mass and C2 fixation and reduction technique. From January 2007 to August 2013, 58 symptomatic patients with OC dislocation and KFS of C2-3 congenital fusion and atlas assimilation were surgically treated in our institution via this technique. After opening the C1-2 facet joints via a posterior approach, OC reduction was conducted by intraoperative manipulation and C1 lateral mass and C2 pedicle screw and rod fixation. The instrument position, fusion status, and clinical outcome were analyzed. The average follow-up was 36 months (range, 18-52 months). Radiologically, effective reduction was achieved in 56 patients (96.6%) and atlas assimilation, posterior manipulative reduction combined with occipitalized C1 lateral mass and C2 fixation provides a reliable and effective treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of Starting Point and Bicortical Purchase of C1 Lateral Mass Screws on Atlantoaxial Fusion: Meta-Analysis and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Robert E; Tanweer, Omar; Smith, Michael L; Frempong-Boadu, Anthony

    2015-08-01

    Structured review of literature and application of meta-analysis statistical techniques. Review published series describing clinical and radiographic outcomes of patients treated with C1 lateral mass screws (C1LMS), specifically analyzing the impact of starting point and bicortical purchase on successful atlantoaxial arthrodesis. Biomechanical studies suggest posterior arch screws and C1LMS with bicortical purchase are stronger than screws placed within the center of the lateral mass or those with unicortical purchase. Online databases were searched for English-language articles between 1994 and 2012 describing posterior atlantal instrumentation with C1LMS. Thirty-four studies describing 1247 patients having posterior atlantoaxial fusion with C1LMS met inclusion criteria. All studies provided class III evidence. Arthrodesis was quite successful regardless of technique (99.0% overall). Meta-analysis and multivariate regression analyses showed that neither posterior arch starting point nor bicortical screw purchase translated into a higher rate of successful arthrodesis. There were no complications from bicortical screw purchase. The Goel-Harms technique is a very safe and successful technique for achieving atlantoaxial fusion, regardless of minor variations in C1LMS technique. Although biomechanical studies suggest markedly increased rigidity of bicortical and posterior arch C1LMS, the significance of these findings may be minimal in the clinical setting of atlantoaxial fixation and fusion with modern techniques. The decision to use either technique must be made after careful review of the preoperative multiplanar computed tomography imaging, assessment of the unique anatomy of each patient, and the demands of the clinical scenario such as bone quality.

  8. Posterior atlantal lateral mass fixation technique with polyaxial screw and rod fixation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calişaneller, Tarkan; Yilmaz, Cem; Ozdemir, Ozgür; Caner, Hakan

    2008-04-01

    Atlantoaxial instability may result from various pathologic conditions and operative treatment may be required to correct the deformity, provide stability and prevent neurological deficits. We presented our clinic's experience using C1-C2 fusion with polyaxial screw and rod fixation for C1 and C2 instability for various reasons. Four patients with atlantoaxial instability were operated using polyaxial C1 lateral mass and C2 lateral mass or pedicle screws. The mean age of the patients was 44+/-14,07 years. Satisfactory screw placement was achieved in all patients. There were no vertebral artery injuries, C2 nerve root injuries or spinal cord injuries. No per-operative or early postoperative instrumentation failure was observed. C1 lateral mass/C2 pedicle polyaxial screw fixation is a safe technique and can be used to achieve rigid and immediate atlantoaxial stabilization.

  9. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins C1/C2 identified as autoantigens by biochemical and mass spectrometric methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N H; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Muncrief, T

    2000-01-01

    The antigenic specificity of an unusual antinuclear antibody pattern in three patient sera was identified after separating HeLa-cell nuclear extracts by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and localizing the antigens by immunoblotting with patient serum. Protein spots were excised from the 2D...... gel and their contents were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization (MALDI) or nanoelectrospray ionization time-of-flight (TOF) tandem mass spectrometry (MS) after in-gel digestion with trypsin. A database search identified the proteins as the C1 and C2 heterogeneous nuclear......-separation methods and mass-spectrometric peptide mapping in combination with database searches are powerful tools in the identification of novel autoantigen specificities....

  10. Premorbid body mass index and risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Reilly, Eilis J.; Wang, Hao; Weisskopf, Marc G.; Fitzgerald, Kathryn C.; Falcone, Guido; McCullough, Marjorie L.; Thun, Michael; Park, Yikyung; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Ascherio, Alberto

    Our objective was to determine if amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) risk varies according to body mass index (BMI) captured up to three decades earlier. At baseline 537,968 females and 562,942 males in five ongoing cohorts reported height, current weight and weight at age 18/21 years. During 14-28

  11. Association between birthweight and later body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelenkovic, Aline; Yokoyama, Yoshie; Sund, Reijo

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is evidence that birthweight is positively associated with body mass index (BMI) in later life, but it remains unclear whether this is explained by genetic factors or the intrauterine environment. We analysed the association between birthweight and BMI from infancy to adulthood ...

  12. Boundary Layer Flows in Porous Media with Lateral Mass Flux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nemati, H; H, Bararnia; Noori, F

    2015-01-01

    Solutions for free convection boundary layers on a heated vertical plate with lateral mass flux embedded in a saturated porous medium are presented using the Homotopy Analysis Method and Shooting Numerical Method. Homotopy Analysis Method yields an analytic solution in the form of a rapidly...

  13. Decompressive cervical laminectomy and lateral mass screw-rod arthrodesis. Surgical analysis and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obaidat Mouness H

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study evaluates the outcome and complications of decompressive cervical Laminectomy and lateral mass screw fixation in 110 cases treated for variable cervical spine pathologies that included; degenerative disease, trauma, neoplasms, metabolic-inflammatory disorders and congenital anomalies. Methods A retrospective review of total 785 lateral mass screws were placed in patients ages 16-68 years (40 females and 70 males. All cases were performed with a polyaxial screw-rod construct and screws were placed by using Anderson-Sekhon trajectory. Most patients had 12-14-mm length and 3.5 mm diameter screws placed for subaxial and 28-30 for C1 lateral mass. Screw location was assessed by post operative plain x-ray and computed tomography can (CT, besides that; the facet joint, nerve root foramen and foramen transversarium violation were also appraised. Results No patients experienced neural or vascular injury as a result of screw position. Only one patient needed screw repositioning. Six patients experienced superficial wound infection. Fifteen patients had pain around the shoulder of C5 distribution that subsided over the time. No patients developed screw pullouts or symptomatic adjacent segment disease within the period of follow up. Conclusion decompressive cervical spine laminectomy and Lateral mass screw stabilization is a technique that can be used for a variety of cervical spine pathologies with safety and efficiency.

  14. Myelography in achondroplasia: value of a lateral C1-2 puncture and non-ionic, water-soluble contrast medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suss, R.A.; Udvarhelyi, G.B.; Wang, H.; Kumar, A.J.; Zinreich, S.J.; Rosenbaum, A.E.

    1983-10-01

    Because of technical difficulties and diagnostic limitations encountered with other myelographic techniques in patients with achondroplasia, the authors employed a lateral C1-2 puncture and non-ionic, water-soluble contrast medium in 18 achondroplastic patients with spinal compression (21 procedures). This technique proved most appropriate for identifying the upper limit of degenerative osteophytes causing exacerbation of congenital spinal stenosis, which is crucial in planning decompressive surgery. A potentially important additional finding was the presence of degenerative lower cervical spine disease in the majority of patients. There were no serious complications. The authors recommend this technique as safe and effective in achondroplastic patients with severe congenital spinal stenosis.

  15. Minimally invasive cervical spine foraminotomy and lateral mass screw placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhael, Mark M; Celestre, Paul C; Wolf, Christopher F; Mroz, Tom E; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2012-03-01

    This technique article describes accomplishing multilevel posterior cervical decompression and lateral mass screw placement through a tubular retraction system. Multilevel foraminotomy and instrumented fusion using lateral mass screw fixation can be achieved through a minimally invasive technique using specialized retractors and intraoperative fluoroscopic imaging. Minimally invasive surgical techniques have been adapted to the cervical spine with good results. These techniques have the theoretical advantages of reducing morbidity, blood loss, perioperative pain, and length of hospital stay associated with conventional open posterior spinal exposure. Minimally invasive access to the posterior cervical spine was performed with exposure through a paramedian muscle-splitting approach. With the assistance of a specialized tubular retraction system with a deep soft tissue expansion mechanism, multilevel posterior cervical decompression and fusion can be accomplished. Minimized access to perform multilevel posterior cervical foraminotomy and fusion can be safely accomplished with tubular retraction systems. Complications associated with these techniques can include inadequate decompression, improper instrumentation placement, or neurologic injury due to poor access and visualization. Multilevel foraminotomy and instrumented fusion using lateral mass screw fixation can be safely achieved using these techniques. Complications associated with these strategies are typically due to inadequate visualization, incomplete decompression, or poor placement of instrumentation. As with all minimally invasive spine techniques, the surgeon must ensure that goals of the surgery, both technical and clinical outcomes, are comparable to those of a conventional open procedure.

  16. Floating Lateral Mass Fractures of the Cervical Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoso, Mark W; Moore, Timothy A; Agel, Julie; Bellabarba, Carlo; Bransford, Richard J

    2016-09-15

    Level I trauma center case series. The purpose of this study was (i) to characterize the floating lateral mass (FLM) fracture with the mechanism of injury, anatomical injury pattern, associated vascular injuries, neurological deficits, and key radiographic features; and (ii) to better understand the most effective method of treatment. An uncommon and poorly described subset of unilateral lateral mass fractures is FLM with fractures of the adjacent pedicle and lamina. Prospectively collected trauma registries were assessed to identify all patients with FLM fractures involving C3 to C7 between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012. After institutional review board approval, 60 consecutive cases were identified from the trauma registries. The mean follow-up was 9 months (range 0-42 months). The most common level was C6. The most common mechanism of injury was a high speed motor vehicle accident (45%). Radiographic rotational displacement manifested as an anterolisthesis. CT showed facet joint widening at the level above and below in 63%. Vertebral artery injuries occurred in 22%. Neurological deficits occurred as radiculopathy in 38% and spinal cord injury in 18%. All eight patients, who were treated nonoperatively, developed subluxation despite external immobilization and six patients required surgery. Of the 58 patients treated operatively, 31 (53%) patients underwent a 2 level Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF) alone. Nine (15%) patients had one level ACDF, with 83% demonstrating radiographic failure. Posterior fusion alone or combined with ACDF/corpectomy was performed in 6 patients (10%) and 7 patients (12%), respectively. A FLM fracture results from a high energy injury and involves two motion segments. Vertebral artery injuries and neurological deficits frequently occur. Magnetic Resonance demonstrates a significant disc injury in 81% of patients, usually at the lower level. Two level ACDF or Posterior Spinal Instrumented Fusion are effective means

  17. C 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thien; Karčiauskas, Kęstutis; Peters, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Geometrically continuous ( G k ) constructions naturally yield families of finite elements for isogeometric analysis (IGA) that are C k also for non-tensor-product layout. This paper describes and analyzes one such concrete C 1 geometrically generalized IGA element (short: gIGA element) that generalizes bi-quadratic splines to quad meshes with irregularities. The new gIGA element is based on a recently-developed G 1 surface construction that recommends itself by its a B-spline-like control net, low (least) polynomial degree, good shape properties and reproduction of quadratics at irregular (extraordinary) points. Remarkably, for Poisson's equation on the disk using interior vertices of valence 3 and symmetric layout, we observe O ( h 3 ) convergence in the L ∞ norm for this family of elements. Numerical experiments confirm the elements to be effective for solving the trivariate Poisson equation on the solid cylinder, deformations thereof (a turbine blade), modeling and computing geodesics on smooth free-form surfaces via the heat equation, for solving the biharmonic equation on the disk and for Koiter-type thin-shell analysis.

  18. Evidence for e(+)e(-)->gamma chi c1,2 at center-of-mass energies from 4.009 to 4.360 GeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin(Lin), D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrie, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yan, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    Using data samples collected at center-of-mass energies of root s=4.009, 4.230, 4.260, and 4.360 GeV with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII collider, we perform a search for the process e(+)e(-)->gamma chi(cJ) (J=0, 1, 2) and find evidence for e(+)e(-)->gamma chi(c1) and e(+)e(-)->gamma

  19. Axial loading with hyperflexion injury to the atlas resulting in crushed lateral masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaka, Kaoru K; Decker, Gerald T; El-Khoury, Georges Y

    2006-09-01

    A 40-year-old man was involved in an ATV accident, in which he landed on the top of his head. There was no neurological deficit. A plain radiograph showed prevertebral soft tissue swelling at the atlas and axis level. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated vertical fractures of the anterior aspects of both lateral masses of the atlas, extending to the junction of the lateral mass with the anterior arch bilaterally. There was no lateral offset of the lateral masses. The mechanism of injury is believed to be axial loading along with hyperflexion.

  20. Lateral sacral meningocele presenting as a gluteal mass: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seddighi Amir

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lateral meningocele is a very rare disorder. It has been reported in patients with neurofibromatosis or Marfan's syndrome. Previous reports have described lateral meningoceles in the thoracic or cervical region. Lateral meningocele in the sacral area was reported in the literature only once. Case presentation We describe a 3.5-year-old Iranian girl who presented with a lateral gluteal mass. Neuroimaging and intra-operative evaluation showed that the mass was a lateral sacral meningocele with spinal communication through the iliac bone. We also present a review of the literature about this entity. Conclusions Although lateral meningoceles especially in the sacral region are rare disorders, their possibility should always be considered in young patients presenting with a paravertebral or gluteal mass.

  1. Three-month treatment with pioglitazone reduces circulating C1q-binding adiponectin complex to total-adiponectin ratio, without changes in body mass index, in people with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuji, Hideaki; Kishida, Ken; Kobayashi, Hironori; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2013-01-01

    We measured circulating C1q-binding adiponectin (C1q-APN) levels before and after 3-month treatment with pioglitazone in people with type 2 diabetes. The results indicate 3-month treatment with pioglitazone reduces circulating levels of C1q-APN/total-adiponectin ratio without changes in body mass index. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A biomechanical evaluation of three revision screw strategies for failed lateral mass fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostin, Richard A; Wu, Chunhui; Perra, Joseph H; Polly, David W; Akesen, Burak; Wroblewski, Jill M

    2008-10-15

    This is a biomechanical study evaluating 3 revision strategies for failed cervical lateral mass screw fixation. Our primary objective was to compare, following a Magerl trajectory screw failure in the subaxial cervical spine, the pullout strength of (1) a revision screw in the same trajectory, (2) a Roy-Camille trajectory, and (3) pedicle screw fixation. We additionally analyzed the contributions of bone mineral density (BMD) and peak insertional torque to pullout strength. Biomechanical studies that have examined revision screw strategies for lateral mass fixation have found either unsatisfactory or highly variable performance. Fresh frozen cervical spinal segments were harvested and BMD testing performed. Bicortical (3.5-mm Vertex) lateral mass screws were placed in a Magerl trajectory in 57 fresh frozen human subaxial cervical vertebrae. All screws were then stripped and revision screws (4.0-mm Vertex) placed using either the same screw path or conversion to a Roy-Camille trajectory. In line pullout testing was performed on each of the revision screws (57 in Magerl revision group, 55 in Roy-Camille). Specimens that had not fractured during testing then had cervical pedicle screws (3.5-mm Vertex) placed and in-line pullout testing repeated (64 pedicles were instrumented) The pullout failure results of the Magerl revision, Roy-Camille revision, and pedicle screw revision groups were compared. No significant difference was noted in insertional torque (0.28-Nm Magerl, 0.35 Nm Roy-Camille, P > 0.05) or pullout (382-N Magerl, 351 N Roy-Camille, P > 0.05) between the Magerl and Roy-Camille revision groups. Pedicle screw revision had greater pullout strength (566 N) when compared with either the Magerl (382 N) or Roy-Camille (351 N) revision groups (P advantage over placement of an increased diameter salvage screw using the same trajectory. Pedicle screw fixation provides superior biomechanical fixation but was associated with a significant breech rate.

  3. Minimally invasive lateral mass screws in the treatment of cervical facet dislocations: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michael Y; Prusmack, Chad J; Green, Barth A; Gruen, J Peter; Levi, Allan D O

    2003-02-01

    The technique of lateral mass screw and rod or plate fixation is a major advancement in the posterior instrumentation of the cervical spine. This technique provides rigid three-dimensional fixation, restores the dorsal tension band, and provides highly effective stabilization in patients with many types of traumatic injuries. Patient 1 was a 32-year-old man who had been in a motor vehicle accident. He presented with right C5 radiculopathy. X-ray findings included 45% anterolisthesis of C4 on C5, bilateral facet disruption, and right unilateral C4-C5 facet fracture and dislocation. The patient was placed in Gardner-Wells tongs, and the fracture was reduced with 25 pounds of traction. Patient 2 was a 56-year-old woman who had been in a motor vehicle accident that resulted in complete quadriplegia. Her initial imaging studies revealed a C3-C4 right unilateral facet fracture with subluxation. She was placed in traction, and her neurological status was reassessed. The findings of her neurological examination revealed improvement: she was found to have Brown-Séquard syndrome. Patient 3 was a 33-year-old man who was involved in a diving accident that resulted in bilaterally jumped facets at C3-C4. The patient was neurologically intact, and attempts at closed reduction were not successful. Patients 1 and 2 underwent anterior cervical discectomy with iliac crest autograft fusion and plating. They were then placed in the prone position, and a dilator tubular retractor system was used to access the facet joint at the level of interest. The facet joints were then denuded and packed with autograft. Lateral mass screws were then placed by means of the Magerl technique, and a rod was used to connect the top-loading screws. Patient 3 underwent posterior surgery that included only removal of the superior facet, intraoperative reduction, and bilateral lateral mass screw and rod placement. This technical note describes the successful placement of lateral mass screw and rod

  4. Estudo tomográfico do atlas relacionado com a inserção de implantes na massa lateral Tomographic study of the atlas concerning screw fixation on lateral mass

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    Max Franco de Carvalho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A técnica de Harms para a realização da artrodese atlantoaxial possibilita o uso de manobras de redução transoperatória da subluxação atlantoaxial e facilita a fixação dessa articulação, principalmente nos pacientes hipercifóticos e nas situações em que há impossibilidade da fixação com o parafuso transarticular C1-C2. OBJETIVOS: descrever os parâmetros morfométricos do atlas relacionados à técnica de Harms para a artrodese C1-C2, o trajeto ideal e o corredor de segurança da inserção do parafuso na massa lateral do atlas mensurados através de imagens de reconstrução multiplanar com tomografia computadorizada helicoidal nos planos. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: trinta atlas de origem local foram submetidos a tomografia computadorizada e mensurados com cursor digital. RESULTADOS: o comprimento posteroanterior do implante mediu 16,5 mm à direita e 16,3mm à esquerda. Quando utilizando como ponto de entrada na porção central da massa lateral imediatamente inferior ao arco posterior, o trajeto deve ter uma congruência de 15º no plano coronal e uma angulação superior de 20º no plano sagital. CONCLUSÃO: O corredor de segurança para um parafuso na massa lateral teria uma inclinação inferior de 22º e superior de 33º no plano sagital e no plano axial de 36º medial e 26º lateral.INTRODUCTION: Harms's technique for atlanto-axial arthrodesis fusion makes possible the use of intraoperative reduction maneuvers of the atlanto-axial dislocation and facilitates the fixation of this joint, especially in hiperkyphotic patients and in situations where the fixation with transarticular screw on C1-C2 segment is impossible. OBJECTIVE: to describe the morphometric parameters of atlases related to the Harms's technique for atlanto-axial arthrodesis, the optimal path and the safety aisle for screw insertion into atlas' lateral mass measured with multiplanar reconstruction imaging with helical computed tomography scan at

  5. Preschoolers’ Delay of Gratification Predicts Their Body Mass 30 Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlam, Tanya R.; Wilson, Nicole L.; Shoda, Yuichi; Mischel, Walter; Ayduk, Ozlem

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess whether preschoolers’ performance on a delay of gratification task would predict their body mass index (BMI) 30 years later. Study design In the late 1960s/early 1970s, 4-year-olds from a university-affiliated preschool completed the classic delay of gratification task. As part of a longitudinal study, a subset (N = 164, 57% women) completed a follow-up approximately 30 years later and self-reported their height and weight. Data were analyzed using hierarchical regression. Results Performance on the delay of gratification task accounted for a significant portion of variance in BMI (4%, p delayed gratification predicted a .2 point reduction in BMI in adulthood. Conclusions Delaying gratification longer at 4 years of age was associated with having a lower BMI three decades later. The study is, however, correlational, and it is therefore not possible to make causal inferences regarding the relation between delay duration and BMI. Identifying children with greater difficulty delaying gratification could help detect children at risk of becoming overweight or obese. Interventions that improve self-control in young children have been developed and might reduce children’s risk of becoming overweight while having positive effects on other outcomes important to society. PMID:22906511

  6. Preschoolers' delay of gratification predicts their body mass 30 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlam, Tanya R; Wilson, Nicole L; Shoda, Yuichi; Mischel, Walter; Ayduk, Ozlem

    2013-01-01

    To assess whether preschoolers' performance on a delay of gratification task would predict their body mass index (BMI) 30 years later. In the late 1960s/early 1970s, 4-year-olds from a university-affiliated preschool completed the classic delay of gratification task. As part of a longitudinal study, a subset (n = 164; 57% women) were followed up approximately 30 years later and self-reported their height and weight. Data were analyzed using hierarchical regression. Performance on the delay of gratification task accounted for a significant portion of variance in BMI (4%; P delayed gratification predicted a 0.2-point reduction in BMI in adulthood. Longer delay of gratification at age 4 years was associated with a lower BMI 3 decades later. Because this study is correlational, it is not possible to make causal inferences regarding the relationship between delay duration and BMI. Identifying children with greater difficulty in delaying gratification could help detect children at risk of becoming overweight or obese. Interventions that improve self-control in young children have been developed and might reduce children's risk of becoming overweight and also have positive effects on other outcomes important to society. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. C1 esterase inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... protein called C1, which is part of the complement system. This system is a group of proteins that ... 2013:chap 20. Sullivan KE, Grumach AS. The complement system. In: Adkinson NF, Bochner BS, Burks AW, et ...

  8. Biomechanical evaluation of DTRAX® posterior cervical cage stabilization with and without lateral mass fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voronov LI

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Leonard I Voronov,1,2 Krzysztof B Siemionow,3 Robert M Havey,1,2 Gerard Carandang,2 Avinash G Patwardhan1,2 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, 2Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Laboratory, Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, Hines, 3Department of Orthopaedics, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Introduction: Lateral mass screw (LMS fixation with plates or rods is the current standard procedure for posterior cervical fusion. Recently, implants placed between the facet joints have become available as an alternative to LMS or transfacet screws for patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical stability of the DTRAX® cervical cage for single- and two-level fusion and compare this to the stability achieved with LMS fixation with rods in a two-level construct.Methods: Seven cadaveric cervical spine (C3–C7 specimens were tested in flexion–extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation to ±1.5 Nm moment without preload (0 N in the following conditions: 1 intact (C3–C7, 2 LMS and rods at C4–C5 and C5–C6, 3 removal of all rods (LMS retained and placement of bilateral posterior cages at C5–C6, 4 bilateral posterior cages at C4–C5 and C5–C6 (without LMS and rods, and 5 C4–C5 and C5–C6 bilateral posterior cages at C4–C5 and C5–C6 with rods reinserted.Results: Bilateral posterior cervical cages significantly reduced range of motion in all tested directions in both single- and multilevel constructs (P<0.05. Similar stability was achieved with bilateral posterior cages and LMS in a two-level construct: 0.6°±0.3° vs 1.2°±0.4° in flexion–­extension (P=0.001, (5.0°±2.6° vs 3.1°±1.3° in lateral bending (P=0.053, (1.3°±1.0° vs 2.2°±0.9° in axial rotation (P=0.091 for posterior cages and LMS, respectively. Posterior cages, when placed as an adjunct to LMS, further reduced

  9. Association Between Lateral Posterior Tibial Slope, Body Mass Index, and ACL Injury Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojicic, Katherine M; Beaulieu, Mélanie L; Imaizumi Krieger, Daniel Y; Ashton-Miller, James A; Wojtys, Edward M

    2017-02-01

    While body mass index (BMI), a modifiable parameter, and knee morphology, a nonmodifiable parameter, have been identified as risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, the interaction between them remains unknown. An understanding of this interaction is important because greater compressive axial force (perhaps due to greater BMI) applied to a knee that is already at an increased risk because of its geometry, such as a steep lateral posterior tibial slope, could further increase the probability of ACL injury. To quantify the relationship between BMI and select knee morphological parameters as potential risk factors for ACL injury. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Sagittal knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) files from 76 ACL-injured and 42 uninjured subjects were gathered from the University of Michigan Health System's archive. The posterior tibial slope (PTS), middle cartilage slope (MCS), posterior meniscus height (PMH), and posterior meniscus bone angle (MBA) in the lateral compartment were measured using MRI. BMI was calculated from demographic data. The association between the knee structural factors, BMI, and ACL injury risk was explored using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. PTS (P = .043) and MCS (P = .037) significantly predicted ACL injury risk. As PTS and MCS increased by 1°, odds of sustaining an ACL injury increased by 12% and 13%, respectively. The multivariate logistic regression analysis, which included PTS, BMI centered around the mean (cBMI), and their interaction, showed that this interaction predicted the odds of ACL rupture (P = .050; odds ratio, 1.03). For every 1-unit increase in BMI from the average that is combined with a 1° increase in PTS, the odds of an ACL tear increased by 15%. An increase in BMI was associated with increased risk of ACL tear in the presence of increased lateral posterior tibial slope. Larger values of PTS or MCS were associated with an increased risk of ACL tear.

  10. Plasma peptide biomarker discovery for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry profiling.

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    Laurence Conraux

    Full Text Available The diagnostic of Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS remains based on clinical and neurophysiological observations. The actual delay between the onset of the symptoms and diagnosis is about 1 year, preventing early inclusion of patients into clinical trials and early care of the disease. Therefore, finding biomarkers with high sensitivity and specificity remains urgent. In our study, we looked for peptide biomarkers in plasma samples using reverse phase magnetic beads (C18 and C8 and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis. From a set of ALS patients (n=30 and healthy age-matched controls (n=30, C18- or C8-SVM-based models for ALS diagnostic were constructed on the base of the minimum of the most discriminant peaks. These two SVM-based models end up in excellent separations between the 2 groups of patients (recognition capability overall classes > 97% and classify blinded samples (10 ALS and 10 healthy age-matched controls with very high sensitivities and specificities (>90%. Some of these discriminant peaks have been identified by Mass Spectrometry (MS analyses and correspond to (or are fragments of major plasma proteins, partly linked to the blood coagulation.

  11. Lateral Load-Resisting System Using Mass Timber Panel for High-Rise Buildings

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    Zhiyong Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available As global interest in using engineered wood products in tall buildings intensifies due to the “green” credential of wood, it is expected that more tall wood buildings will be designed and constructed in the coming years. This, however, brings new challenges to the designers. One of the major challenges is how to design lateral load-resisting systems (LLRSs with sufficient stiffness, strength, and ductility to resist strong wind and earthquakes. In this study, an LLRS using mass timber panel on a stiff podium was developed for high-rise buildings in accordance with capacity-based design principle. The LLRS comprises eight shear walls with a core in the center of the building, which was constructed with structural composite lumber and connected with dowel-type connections and wood–steel composite system. The main energy dissipating mechanism of the LLRS was detailed to be located at the panel-to-panel interface. This LLRS was implemented in the design of a hypothetical 20-storey building. A finite element (FE model of the building was developed using general-purpose FE software, ABAQUS. The wind-induced and seismic response of the building model was investigated by performing linear static and non-linear dynamic analyses. The analysis results showed that the proposed LLRS using mass timber was suitable for high-rise buildings. This study provided a valuable insight into the structural performance of LLRS constructed with mass timber panels as a viable option to steel and concrete for high-rise buildings.

  12. Effect of Presymptomatic Body Mass Index and Consumption of Fat and Alcohol on Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Mark H B; Seelen, Meinie; van Doormaal, Perry T C; de Jong, Sonja W; de Vries, Jeanne H M; van der Kooi, Anneke J; de Visser, Marianne; Schelhaas, H Jurgen; van den Berg, Leonard H; Veldink, Jan H

    2015-10-01

    Because dietary intake may influence pathophysiologic mechanisms in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the association between premorbid dietary intake and the risk of sporadic ALS will provide insight into which mechanisms are possibly involved in ALS pathophogenesis. To systematically determine the association between premorbid dietary intake and the risk of sporadic ALS. A population-based case-control study was conducted in a general community setting in the Netherlands from January 1, 2006, to September 30, 2011. Analysis was conducted April 1, 2013, to November 15, 2014. All patients with a new diagnosis of possible, probable (laboratory supported), or definite ALS according to the revised El Escorial criteria were included and multiple sources were used to ensure complete case ascertainment. Of 986 eligible patients, 674 gave informed consent and returned a complete questionnaire; 2093 controls randomly selected from the general practitioners' registers and frequency matched to the patients for sex and age were included. We studied the premorbid intake of nutrients in association with the risk of ALS by using a 199-item food frequency questionnaire adjusted for confounding factors and corrected for multiple comparisons while minimizing recall bias. Presymptomatic total daily energy intake in patients, reported as mean (SD), was significantly higher compared with controls (2258 [730] vs 2119 [619] kcal/day; P body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) was significantly lower in patients (25.7 [4.0] vs 26.0 [3.7]; P = .02). With values reported as odds ratio (95% CI), higher premorbid intake of total fat (1.14; 1.07-1.23; P body mass index, educational level, smoking, and lifetime physical activity. No significant associations between dietary intake and survival were found. The combination of independent positive associations of a low premorbid body mass index and a high fat intake together with

  13. Optimal area of lateral mass mini-screws implanted in plated cervical laminoplasty: a radiography anatomy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua; Li, Huibo; Deng, Yuxiao; Rong, Xin; Gong, Quan; Li, Tao; Song, Yueming; Liu, Hao

    2017-04-01

    Lateral mass mini-screws used in plated cervical laminoplasty might penetrate into facet joints. The objective is to observe this complication incidence and to identify the optimal areas for 5- and 7-mm-long mini-screws to implant on lateral mass. 47 patients who underwent plated cervical laminoplasty were included. The optimal area for mini-screws implanting was set according to pre-operative 3D CT reconstruction data. Then, each posterior-lateral mass surface was divided into three regions: 7-mm region, 5-mm region, and dangerous area. The mini-screw implanted region was recorded. Post-operative CT images were used to identify whether the mini-screws penetrated into facet joints. 235 mini-plates and 470 lateral mass mini-screws were used in the study. 117 (24.9%) mini-screws penetrated 88 (37.4%) facet joints. The 5-mm-long mini-screw optimal area occupied the upper 72, 65, 65, 64, and 65 % area of the posterior-lateral mass surface for C3-7, while the 7-mm-long mini-screw optimal area encompassed the upper 54, 39, 40, 33, and 32 %. Only 7-mm-long mini-screws were used to fix the plate to the lateral mass. 4 of 240 mini-screws in 7-mm region, 67 of the 179 mini-screws in 5-mm region, and 46 of the 51 mini-screws in dangerous region penetrated into the facet joint. The differences in the rate of facet joint penetration related to region were statistically significant (P areas we proposed may help guide the mini-screw implantation positions.

  14. Prediction of Lateral Ankle Sprains in Football Players Based on Clinical Tests and Body Mass Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Phillip A; Terada, Masafumi; Beard, Megan Q; Kosik, Kyle B; Lepley, Adam S; McCann, Ryan S; Pietrosimone, Brian G; Thomas, Abbey C

    2016-02-01

    The lateral ankle sprain (LAS) is the most common injury suffered in sports, especially in football. While suggested in some studies, a predictive role of clinical tests for LAS has not been established. To determine which clinical tests, focused on potentially modifiable factors of movement patterns and body mass index (BMI), could best demonstrate risk of LAS among high school and collegiate football players. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 539 high school and collegiate football players were evaluated during the preseason with the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) and Functional Movement Screen as well as BMI. Results were compared between players who did and did not suffer an LAS during the season. Logistic regression analyses and calculated odds ratios were used to determine which measures predicted risk of LAS. The LAS group performed worse on the SEBT-anterior reaching direction (SEBT-ANT) and had higher BMI as compared with the noninjured group (P football players. BMI was also significantly higher in football players who sustained an LAS. Identifying clinical tools for successful LAS injury risk prediction will be a critical step toward the creation of effective prevention programs to reduce risk of sustaining an LAS during participation in football. © 2015 The Author(s).

  15. Biomechanical comparison of a novel C1 posterior locking plate with the harms technique in a C1-C2 fixation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian P; Glaser, John A; DiAngelo, Denis J

    2008-11-15

    A biomechanical testing protocol was used to study atlantoaxial fixation techniques in a human cadaveric model. To compare the in vitro biomechanics of locking plate fixation of the posterior arch of C1 to C2 laminar screw fixation, with that of conventional C1 lateral mass to C2 pars screw fixation. Current methods of atlantoaxial fixation pose a risk to neurologic and vascular structures. A novel posterior locking plate for C1 was designed, that when rigidly linked to C2 translaminar screws may offer alternative C1-C2 fixation with greatly decreased surgical risk. No comparative in vitro biomechanical testing has been previously done to evaluate the feasibility of this method. Cadaveric and CT assessments of the thickness of the C1 ring were performed. Seven spines (C0-C4) were evaluated in flexion-extension, left-right bending, and left-right axial rotation in a cadaveric C1-C2 fixation model. Three conditions were evaluated: (1) intact spine, and after odontoidectomy, (2) C1 plate to C2 laminar screw fixation, (3) C1 lateral mass to C2 pars screw fixation. Flexibility and motion data were compared using a 1-way RM analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Kuels tests. Anatomic data indicated that 6 mm of screw purchase was viable for C1 plate fixation. Both the Harms and C1-plated conditions significantly reduced global flexibility in flexion-extension and left-right axial rotation. Motion at the C1-C2 level was significantly reduced for all loading modes for both instrumented conditions with the exception of the C1 plate in right bending. No significant differences occurred between the 2 fixation methods. A novel C1 posterior locking plate was designed and tested in a C1-C2 fixation model. The C1 locking plate technique functioned in an equivalent manner to the existing Harms technique. The C1 plate may be a viable alternative that is technically less demanding with decreased surgical risk.

  16. Homologous series of low molecular weight (C1-C10) monocarboxylic acids, benzoic acid and hydroxyacids in fine-mode (PM2.5) aerosols over the Bay of Bengal: Influence of heterogeneity in air masses and formation pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreddy, Suresh K. R.; Mochizuki, Tomoki; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Bikkina, Srinivas; Sarin, M. M.

    2017-10-01

    Low molecular weight monocarboxylic acids (LMW monoacids) are most abundant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere and often act as important contributors to the acidity of precipitation in addition to inorganic acids. However, there is a large uncertainty in the sources and secondary formations of these acids in the atmosphere. This study reports homologous series of LMW monoacids, including normal (C1-C10), branched chain (iC4-iC6), aromatic (benzoic acid) and hydroxyacids (lactic and glycolic acids) in the fine-mode (PM2.5) aerosols collected over the Bay of Bengal (BoB) during a winter cruise (December 2008 to January 2009). The samples were associated with two distinct continental air masses arriving from the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP-outflow) and Southeast Asia (SEA-outflow). The molecular distributions of organic acids are characterized by the dominance of formic acid (C1) followed by acetic acid (C2) and nonanoic acid (C9) in the IGP-outflow, whereas dominance of C1 or C9 was observed in the SEA-outflow followed by C2. Formic-to-acetic acid (C1/C2) ratios were higher than unity (mean: 1.3 ± 0.3) in the IGP-outflow, whereas they were less than unity (0.9 ± 0.5) in the SEA-outflow. These results suggest that secondary formation of organic acids is largely important in the IGP-outflow whereas primary emission is a major source of organic acids in the SEA-outflow. Based on the correlation coefficient matrix analysis and C1/C2 and C4/C3 ratios, we consider that the sources of C1 are probably associated with the secondary formation via the oxidation of biogenic VOCs, while C2 has both primary and secondary formations associated with anthropogenic sources in the IGP-outflow. On the other hand, C1 and C2 have similar sources (both primary and secondary) originated from biomass burning and bacterial activities via long-range atmospheric transport in the SEA-outflow, as inferred from the MODIS fire spot data, significant concentrations of isovaleric

  17. Enlarged laminectomy and lateral mass screw fixation for multilevel cervical degenerative myelopathy associated with kyphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei; Zhang, Peng; Shen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-ze; Ding, Wen-yuan; Ren, Long-xi

    2014-01-01

    Either an anterior approach or a posterior approach, which aims to decompress the spinal cord and restore the sagittal alignment, has been adopted to treat multilevel cervical degenerative myelopathy (CDM) associated with kyphosis. However, there is controversy on the optimal surgical strategy for the treatment of multilevel CDM with kyphotic deformity because of the complications of each surgical approach. The purpose of this study was to investigate the surgical efficacy of enlarged laminectomy (removing the inside edge of facet joints and decompressing the nerve foramina) and lateral mass screw fixation for the treatment of multilevel CDM associated with kyphosis. A retrospective radiographic and clinical study to access the efficacy of enlarged laminectomy with lateral mass screw fixation in the treatment of multilevel CDM related to kyphosis. A total of 43 patients (28 men and 15 women; average age, 59.6 years) with multilevel CDM correlated to kyphosis were obtained in the study. All radiological data were recorded on computer-based measurement from preoperative or postoperative X-ray, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computed tomography. All neurological parameters were accessed in each patient. Analysis consisted of: Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, recovery rate, curvature index (CI), the expansion degree and drift-back distance of the spinal cord, axial symptom severity, and C5 root palsy. The recovery rate based on the JOA score was calculated for each patient. Cervical CI as well as the expansion degree and drift-back distance of the spinal cord was measured using MRI. Axial symptom severity was quantified by a visual analog scale (VAS). Statistical analysis was performed using paired t test with significance set at p<.05. Enlarged laminectomy was performed over a mean of 3.97 levels (range, 3-5 levels). Follow-up information was obtained at a mean of 2.8 years (range, 1.5-5 years) after surgery. Analysis of the final follow-up data

  18. Gestational weight gain of pregnant African American adolescents affects body mass index 18 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Susan W; Holland, Margaret L; Kitzman, Harriet; Meng, Ying

    2013-01-01

    To determine if gestational weight gain (GWG) in adolescents is associated with long-term weight increases 12 years and 18 years after delivery of a first child and the differential effects of weight gain during pregnancy that is inadequate, the appropriate amount, and excessive based on the 2009 Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations. Secondary data analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial. Memphis, Tennessee. Two hundred ninety-eight (298) primiparous low-income Black women who were adolescents at the time of their first pregnancies. Linear regression was used to examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) at 12 and 18 years postdelivery and GWG, parity, prepregnancy BMI, and smoking. The total sample experienced a significant BMI increase from prepregnancy to 12 years and 18 years postdelivery. More than 50% of the women had a BMI increase greater than 10 kg/m(2) . By 18 years postdelivery, 85% were overweight or obese. Prepregnancy BMI and GWG had a positive significant effect on BMI 12 and 18 years later, whereas smoking had a negative effect. Those who gained excessive weight based on the IOM recommendations had a significantly higher BMI compared with those who gained appropriately. Gestational weight gain had long-term effects on BMI in a minority adolescent population. Excessive pregnancy weight gain is likely to contribute to long-term weight retention, especially if adolescents are overweight or obese when they become pregnant with their first children. Intervention during pregnancy to limit GWG has the potential of limiting long-term negative health consequences that result from overweight and obesity in minority women. © 2013 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  19. Alcohol binding in the C1 (C1A + C1B) domain of protein kinase C epsilon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pany, Satyabrata; Das, Joydip

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcohol regulates the expression and function of protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε). In a previous study we identified an alcohol binding site in the C1B, one of the twin C1 subdomains of PKCε. Methods In this study, we investigated alcohol binding in the entire C1 domain (combined C1A and C1B) of PKCε. Fluorescent phorbol ester, SAPD and fluorescent diacylglycerol (DAG) analog, dansyl-DAG were used to study the effect of ethanol, butanol, and octanol on the ligand binding using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). To identify alcohol binding site(s), PKCεC1 was photolabeled with 3-azibutanol and 3-azioctanol, and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The effects of alcohols and the azialcohols on PKCε were studied in NG108-15 cells. Results In the presence of alcohol, SAPD and dansyl-DAG showed different extent of FRET, indicating differential effects of alcohol on the C1A and C1B subdomains. Effects of alcohols and azialcohols on PKCε in NG108-15 cells were comparable. Azialcohols labeled Tyr-176 of C1A and Tyr-250 of C1B. Inspection of the model structure of PKCεC1 reveals that these residues are 40 Å apart from each other indicating that these residues form two different alcohol binding sites. Conclusions The present results provide evidence for the presence of multiple alcohol-binding sites on PKCε and underscore the importance of targeting this PKC isoform in developing alcohol antagonists. PMID:26210390

  20. A Modified FEM for Transverse and Lateral Vibration Analysis of Thin Beams Under a Mass Moving with a Variable Acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Esen

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, a new modified finite element method that can be used in the analysis of transverse and lateral vibrations of the thin beams under a point mass moving with a variable acceleration and constant jerk is presented. Jerk is the change in acceleration over time. In this method, the classical finite element of the beam is modified by the inclusion of the inertial effects of the moving mass. This modification is made using the relations between nodal forces and nodal deflections and shape functions of six DOF beam element. The mass, stiffness, and damping matrices of the modified finite element are determined by forces caused by the corresponding transverse and lateral accelerations and jerks, and transverse Coriolis and centripetal accelerations and jerks, respectively. This method was first applied on a simply supported beam plate to provide a comparison with the previous studies in literature, and it was proved that the results were within acceptable limits. Secondly, it was applied on a CNC type box-framed beam to analyse the dynamic response of the beam in terms of variable acceleration and jerk as well as constant velocity and mass ratios.

  1. A Rare Case of Lateral Canthal Gouty Tophus Presenting as an Eyelid Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin S. Nakatsuka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 41-year-old man with a history of gout presented with an enlarging eyelid growth. Clinical examination revealed a mildly indurated nodule at the lateral canthus. Following resection, histopathological examination revealed needle-shaped, crystalline material surrounded by multinucleated giant cells, findings consistent with gouty tophus. This represents just the sixth case of gouty tophus of the eyelid reported in the literature.

  2. Forgive Me Now, Fire Me Later: Mass Communication Students' Ethics Gap Concerning School and Journalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Mike; Groshek, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Survey data on mass communication students' perceptions of plagiarism and fabrication indicate an ethics gap in which students are more concerned about ethical breaches in journalism than in academics. Further analyses found that the ethics gap increases among students near graduation who had higher levels of concern and suggested harsher…

  3. Three atypical manifestations of granulomatosis with polyangiitis: lateral medullary syndrome, anterior cheek mass and melting scleritis of eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenavandeh, Saeedeh; Petramfar, Peyman

    2017-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, formerly Wegener granulomatosis) is a vasculitis with various organ involvement. There have been a few cases of CNS stroke and rare cases of lateral medullary infarction (LMI) as a manifestation of GPA. Also there have been reports of sinuses, nose and laryngeal masses mistakenly referred as carcinomas and subsequently GPA was diagnosed in their pathological reports. Another severe fulminant manifestation can be necrotizing scleritis leading to perforation of sclera. Therefore, here we present some rare and fulminant manifestations of GPA in 3 separate cases for further emphasis of the unusual manifestations of GPA that should always be kept in mind.

  4. Evidence for e+e- →γχc1,2 at center-of-mass energies from 4.009 to 4.360 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablikim, M.; N. Achasov, M.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; J. Ambrose, D.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; R. Baldini, Ferroli; Ban, Y.; W. Bennett, D.; V. Bennett, J.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; A. Briere, R.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; A. Cetin, S.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; F. De, Mori; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y.; P. Guo, Y.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; A. Harris, F.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; C. Ke, B.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; B. Kolcu, O.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; S. Lange, J.; M., Lara; Larin, P.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; X. Lin(Lin, D.; Liu, B. J.; L. Liu, C.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhiqing, Liu; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; E. Maas, F.; Maggiora, M.; A. Malik, Q.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; G. Messchendorp, J.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; E. Mitchell, R.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; C. Morales, Morales; Moriya, K.; Yu. Muchnoi, N.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; B. Nikolaev, I.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; H. Rashid, K.; F. Redmer, C.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; R. Shepherd, M.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; H. Thorndike, E.; Tiemens, M.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; S. Varner, G.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; D. Wang(Yadi, Y.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; A. Zafar, A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; BESIII Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Using data samples collected at center-of-mass energies of √s = 4.009, 4.230, 4.260, and 4.360 GeV with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII collider, we perform a search for the process e+e- → γχcJ (J=0, 1, 2) and find evidence for e+e- → γχc1 and e+e- → γχc2 with statistical significances of 3.0σ and 3.4σ, respectively. The Born cross sections σB(e+e- → γχcJ), as well as their upper limits at the 90% confidence level (C.L.) are determined at each center-of-mass energy. Supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (2015CB856700), Joint Funds of National Natural Science Foundation of China (11079008, 11179007, U1232201, U1332201, U1232107), National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (10935007, 11121092, 11125525, 11235011, 11322544, 11335008), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) Large-Scale Scientific Facility Program, CAS (KJCX2-YW-N29, KJCX2-YW-N45), 100 Talents Program of CAS, INPAC and Shanghai Key Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology; German Research Foundation DFG (Collaborative Research Center CRC-1044), Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Italy, Ministry of Development of Turkey (DPT2006K-120470), Russian Foundation for Basic Research (14-07-91152), U. S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-04ER41291, DE-FG02-05ER41374, DE-FG02-94ER40823, DESC0010118), U.S. National Science Foundation, University of Groningen (RuG) and Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (GSI), Darmstadt, WCU Program of National Research Foundation of Korea (R32-2008-000-10155-0)

  5. Placement of C1 Pedicle Screws Using Minimal Exposure: Radiographic, Clinical, and Literature Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, Richard P; Storey, Christopher M; Nixon, Menarvia K C; Haydel, Justin; Nanda, Anil; Sin, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Traditional C1-2 fixation involves placement of C1 lateral mass screws. Evolving techniques have led to the placement of C1 pedicle screws to avoid exposure of the C1-C2 joint capsule. Our minimal dissection technique utilizes anatomical landmarks with isolated exposure of C2 and the inferior posterior arch of C1. We evaluate this procedure clinically and radiographically through a technical report. Consecutive cases of cranial-vertebral junction surgery were reviewed for one fellowship trained spinal surgeon from 2008-2014. Information regarding sex, age, indication for surgery, private or public hospital, intra-operative complications, post-operative neurological deterioration, death, and failure of fusion was extracted. Measurement of pre-operative axial and sagittal CT scans were performed for C1 pedicle width and C1 posterior arch height respectively. 64 patients underwent posterior cranio-vertebral junction fixation surgery. 40 of these patients underwent occipital-cervical fusion procedures. 7/9 (77.8%) C1 instrumentation cases were from trauma with the remaining two (22.2%) from oncologic lesions. The average blood loss among isolated C1-C2 fixation was 160cc. 1/9 patients (11.1%) suffered pedicle breech requiring sub-laminar wiring at the C1 level. On radiographic measurement, the average height of the C1 posterior arch was noted at 4.3mm (range 3.8mm to 5.7mm). The average width of the C1 pedicle measured at 5.3mm (range 2.8 to 8.7mm). The patient with C1 pedicle screw failure had a pedicle width of 2.78mm on pre-operative axial CT imaging. Our study directly adds to the literature with level four evidence supporting a minimal dissection of C1 arch in the placement of C1 pedicle screws with both radiographic and clinical validation. Justification of this technique avoids C2 nerve root manipulation or sacrifice, reduces bleeding associated with the venous plexus, and leaves the third segment of the vertebral artery unexplored. Pre-operative review of

  6. Potential selection effects when estimating associations between the infancy peak or adiposity rebound and later body mass index in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börnhorst, C; Siani, A; Tornaritis, M; Molnár, D; Lissner, L; Regber, S; Reisch, L; De Decker, A; Moreno, L A; Ahrens, W; Pigeot, I

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to evaluate a potential selection effect caused by exclusion of children with non-identifiable infancy peak (IP) and adiposity rebound (AR) when estimating associations between age and body mass index (BMI) at IP and AR and later weight status. In 4744 children with at least 4 repeated measurements of height and weight in the age interval from 0 to 8 years (37 998 measurements) participating in the IDEFICS (Identification and Prevention of Dietary- and Lifestyle-Induced Health Effects in Children and Infants)/I.Family cohort study, fractional polynomial multilevel models were used to derive individual BMI trajectories. Based on these trajectories, age and BMI at IP and AR, BMI values and growth velocities at selected ages as well as the area under the BMI curve were estimated. The BMI growth measures were standardized and related to later BMI z-scores (mean age at outcome assessment: 9.2 years). Age and BMI at IP and AR were not identifiable in 5.4% and 7.8% of the children, respectively. These groups of children showed a significantly higher BMI growth during infancy and childhood. In the remaining sample, BMI at IP correlated almost perfectly (r⩾0.99) with BMI at ages 0.5, 1 and 1.5 years, whereas BMI at AR correlated perfectly with BMI at ages 4-6 years (r⩾0.98). In the total study group, BMI values in infancy and childhood were positively associated with later BMI z-scores where associations increased with age. Associations between BMI velocities and later BMI z-scores were largest at ages 5 and 6 years. Results differed for children with non-identifiable IP and AR, demonstrating a selection effect. IP and AR may not be estimable in children with higher-than-average BMI growth. Excluding these children from analyses may result in a selection bias that distorts effect estimates. BMI values at ages 1 and 5 years might be more appropriate to use as predictors for later weight status instead.

  7. Four lateral mass screw fixation techniques in lower cervical spine following laminectomy: a finite element analysis study of stress distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mingzhi; Zhang, Zhen; Lu, Ming; Zong, Junwei; Dong, Chao; Ma, Kai; Wang, Shouyu

    2014-08-09

    Lateral mass screw fixation (LSF) techniques have been widely used for reconstructing and stabilizing the cervical spine; however, complications may result depending on the choice of surgeon. There are only a few reports related to LSF applications, even though fracture fixation has become a severe complication. This study establishes the three-dimensional finite element model of the lower cervical spine, and compares the stress distribution of the four LSF techniques (Magerl, Roy-Camille, Anderson, and An), following laminectomy -- to explore the risks of rupture after fixation. CT scans were performed on a healthy adult female volunteer, and Digital imaging and communication in medicine (Dicom) data was obtained. Mimics 10.01, Geomagic Studio 12.0, Solidworks 2012, HyperMesh 10.1 and Abaqus 6.12 software programs were used to establish the intact model of the lower cervical spines (C3-C7), a postoperative model after laminectomy, and a reconstructive model after applying the LSF techniques. A compressive preload of 74 N combined with a pure moment of 1.8 Nm was applied to the intact and reconstructive model, simulating normal flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. The stress distribution of the four LSF techniques was compared by analyzing the maximum von Mises stress. The three-dimensional finite element model of the intact C3-C7 vertebrae was successfully established. This model consists of 503,911 elements and 93,390 nodes. During flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation modes, the intact model's angular intersegmental range of motion was in good agreement with the results reported from the literature. The postoperative model after the three-segment laminectomy and the reconstructive model after applying the four LSF techniques were established based on the validated intact model. The stress distribution for the Magerl and Roy-Camille groups were more dispersive, and the maximum von Mises stress levels were lower than the other

  8. The effect of hubbing on the pull-out strength of lateral mass screws in the cervical spine: a biomechanical experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Ki Hyoung; Yoon, S Tim; Kim, Sang Bum; Hutton, William C

    2015-02-01

    This was a cadaveric biomechanical experiment. To compare the pull-out strength of polyaxial screws that are either hubbed or not hubbed when inserted into the lateral mass. It has been shown in a study on pedicle screws in the thoracic spine that "hubbing" the head of the screw against the dorsal laminar cortex results in significantly lower pull-out strength of the screws. Fifteen segments of the human cervical spine (from C3 to C7) were prepared. Polyaxial screws 3.5 mm in diameter were used. On one side screws 12 mm in length were inserted until the screw head touched the lateral mass; they were then turned 2.5 more times until they were fully hubbed (hubbed screws). On the other side screws 14 mm in length were inserted until the screw head just touched the lateral mass (nonhubbed screws). The 2 mm difference in length was to ensure that the screws were buried to the same length. All screws inserted into the lateral masses underwent tensile pull-out by applying a tensile force down the long axis of the screw. The difference in pull-out strength between the 2 groups was evaluated using a nonparametric paired test (the Wilcoxon signed rank test), which compared side to side on each vertebra. One specimen was excluded because of cement breakage during the biomechanical test. A total of 14 vertebrae were tested. Four vertebrae in the hubbed group showed small fractures or cracks around the screw hole after screw insertion. In a side to side comparison, the hubbed screws had significantly lower pull-out strengths as compared with the nonhubbed screws (P=0.033). Hubbing of lateral mass screws lowers the potential pull-out strength of the screws as compared with the pull-out strength of nonhubbed screws. Thus, hubbing of lateral mass screws, on the basis of the parameters applied in this study, is not recommended.

  9. Assessment of anatomic parameters on lateral cephalogram and body mass index in patients with obstructive sleep apnea symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemat Mokhtari Amir Majdi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a serious and life threatening disorder caused by various anatomic and physio-pathologic factors. This study was conducted to clarify some anatomic etiologic factors of OSAS and the role of body mass index (BMI in expression of its symptoms. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study 127 patients were included. Sixty patients had OSAS symptoms and 67 patients were considered as controls. Cephalometric parameters from lateral skull view of CT scan and BMI of patients were statistically analyzed and compared between two groups. Results: The position of hyoid bone was significantly lower and soft palate was significantly larger in patients with OSAS symptoms than control group. Moreover, mean BMI measurement was significantly higher in the patient group. Conclusion: Our results suggest that in addition to apparent role of BMI in OSAS symptoms, increased soft tissue compartment of pharyngeal area and position of hyoid bone are significant etiologic factors in this syndrome.    

  10. Unilateral extended suboccipital approach for a C1 dumbbell schwanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorgan R.M.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Craniovertebral junction tumors represent a complex pathology carrying a high risk of injuring the vertebral artery and the lower cranial nerves. Dumbbell C1- C2 schannomas are very rare tumors in this location. We present a case of a 66 years old male accepted for left laterocervical localized pain, headache and vertigo, with a large C1 dumbbell schwannoma extending in lateral over the C1 arch and displacing the C3 segment of the vertebral artery superiorly and anteriorly. Complete removal of the tumor was achieved using a far lateral approach. The approach is discussed with focus on the vertebral artery anatomy as the approach should give enough space to gain control of the artery without creating instability. Safe removal of C1 nerve root schwanomas can be achieved even if they compress and displace the vertebral artery by entering a fibrous tissue plane between the tumor and the vertebral artery.

  11. Unilateral laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fixation for less invasive decompression of the cervical spine: a biomechanical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeiser, Gregor; Schilling, C; Grupp, T M; Papavero, L; Püschel, K; Kothe, R

    2015-12-01

    To compare the stabilization behavior of additional unilateral mass screw fixation with current standard procedures in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) in a biomechanical study. Ten human C2-C7 cervical specimens were tested under various segment conditions: native (NAT), laminoplasty (LP), laminoplasty with unilateral (LPU) or bilateral (LPB) stabilization, laminectomy with bilateral stabilization (LCB), and laminectomy. The instrumented level was from C3 to C6. For each segment condition, in vitro flexibility tests were performed using a spinal simulator and an applied load of ±2.5 Nm. The three-dimensional kinematics of the entire cervical segment in three main loading directions [flexion-extension (FE), lateral bending (LB), and axial rotation (AR)] was measured with an ultrasonic motion analysis system. Analysis of variance followed by a post hoc test was used to determine differences under the specific segment conditions to assess the parameters range of motion (ROM) and neutral zone (NZ). For FE, the total ROM of laminoplasty (-6.3% difference to NAT) and laminectomy (+6.4%) remained at the level of native (p > 0.56), whereas the instrumentations LPU (-37.1%), LPB (-44%), and LCB (-43.2%) lead to significant reductions (p LPU to LPB and LCB (p > 0.38). The same results were found with LB. For AR, the stabilization of all instrumentations was less pronounced, but had the same tendency seen for FE and AR. The results for the NZ showed equivalent values as that for ROM. The degree of stabilization was as expected for LC and LCB; namely, no stabilization for LC and maximal stabilization for LCB. LPU exhibited almost the same degree of stabilization as LCB. LPU could be a new treatment option for less invasive decompression for multilevel CSM.

  12. Life course body mass index and risk and prognosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: results from the ALS registry Swabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Raphael Simon; Rosenbohm, Angela; Dupuis, Luc; Brehme, Torben; Kassubek, Jan; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Nagel, Gabriele; Ludolph, Albert Christian

    2017-10-01

    Weight loss appears as a strong predictor of survival of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, yet no data are currently available to describe the life course history of pre-diagnostic body mass index (BMI) in these patients. 393 ALS cases (mean age: 65.8 years, 57.3% men) and 791 controls matched by age and sex from a population-based case-control study of the ALS Registry Swabia were analyzed. Differences of BMI change in cases and controls over time were modeled using a multilevel additive model. In addition, survival in ALS cases by BMI change was modeled using an accelerated failure time model adjusted for prognostic factors. In ALS cases, BMI was consistently higher than in controls in the 20-70 years before the interview. Conditional logistic regression revealed an odds ratio of 1.05 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.11, p = 0.041) per 1 kg/m2 higher BMI 35-45 years before interview. However, a sharp decrease was evident in the BMI of ALS cases about 10 years before disease onset. Moreover, weight loss was strongly associated with shorter survival in ALS patients. Illustrating this, patients with stable weight showed a median survival time of 22.1 (95%-CI 19.2-25.0) months, as compared to 13.4 (95%-CI 10.5-16.3) months for patients with weight loss of 2.5 kg/m2 over the last 3 months before the interview. Thus, alterations in body weight are present in ALS patients already decades before clinical manifestation of ALS, while weight loss precedes motor symptoms of several years and is associated with poor prognosis.

  13. Capillary electrophoresis tandem mass spectrometry determination of glutamic acid and homocysteine's metabolites: Potential biomarkers of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslarova, Zuzana; Lopes, Fernando Silva; do Lago, Claudimir Lucio; França, Marcondes Cavalcante; Colnaghi Simionato, Ana Valéria

    2017-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that affects both lower and upper motor neurons, leading to muscle atrophy, paralysis, and death caused by respiratory failure or infectious complications. Altered levels of homocysteine, cysteine, methionine, and glutamic acid have been observed in plasma of ALS patients. In this context, a method for determination of these potential biomarkers in plasma by capillary electrophoresis tandem mass spectrometry (CE-MS/MS) is proposed herein. Sample preparation was carefully investigated, since sulfur-containing amino acids may interact with plasma proteins. Owing to the non-thiol sulfur atom in methionine, it was necessary to split sample preparation into two methods: i) determination of homocysteine and cysteine as S-acetyl amino acids; ii) determination of glutamic acid and methionine. All amino acids were separated within 25min by CE-MS/MS using 5molL-1 acetic acid as background electrolyte and 5mmolL-1 acetic acid in 50% methanol/H2O (v/v) as sheath liquid. The proposed CE-MS/MS method was validated, presenting RSD values below 6% and 11% for intra- and inter-day precision, respectively, for the middle concentration level within the linear range. The limits of detection ranged from 35 (homocysteine) to 268nmolL-1 (glutamic acid). The validated method was applied to the analysis of plasma samples from a group of healthy individuals and patients with ALS, showing the potential of glutamic acid and homocysteine metabolites as biomarkers of ALS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison Of Lateral Mass Screw Fixation Technique And Hartshill Rectangle Technique In The Treatment Of Sub-Axial Cervical Spine Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit KM

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cervical injury in a polytrauma patient is one of the most critical injuries. The aim of this study was to compare the lateral mass screw technique with the Hartshill rectangle technique for treatment of such cases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective study consisted of 40 patients. Both groups were followed for three years clinically and radiologically. RESULTS: In the lateral mass technique, there were no cases of vertebral artery injury, radiculopathy, screw pullout, dural tears, residual kyphosis or persistent pain. In the Hartshill technique 3 patients experienced intra- operative dural tears, 1 case of wire breakage at the six months follow up, 6 patients with persistent neck pain and 1 with worsening neurological status. One hundred per cent fusion was achieved in both groups. There was significant radiation exposure in the lateral mass group. Post-operative immobilisation was required only in the Hartshill. CONCLUSION: Lateral mass screw technique is definitely a relatively better procedure. But Hartshill rectangle still stands out in certain practical situations.

  15. Lateral oscillations of the center of mass of bipeds as they walk. Inverted pendulum model with two degrees of freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo H Goldsztein

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of inverted pendulum models to study the bio-mechanics of biped walkers is a common practice. In its simplest form, the inverted pendulum consists of a point mass, which models the center of mass of the biped, attached to two straight mass-less legs. Most works using the simplest inverted pendulum model constrain the mass and the legs to the sagittal plane (the plane that contains the direction perpendicular to the ground and the direction toward the biped is walking. In this article, we remove this constrain and use this unconstrained inverted pendulum model to study the oscillations the mass experiences in the direction perpendicular to the sagittal plane as the biped walks. While small, these oscillations are unavoidable and of importance in the understanding of balance and stability of walkers, as well as walkers induced oscillations in pedestrian bridges.

  16. Lateral oscillations of the center of mass of bipeds as they walk. Inverted pendulum model with two degrees of freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    H Goldsztein, Guillermo

    2015-10-01

    The use of inverted pendulum models to study the bio-mechanics of biped walkers is a common practice. In its simplest form, the inverted pendulum consists of a point mass, which models the center of mass of the biped, attached to two straight mass-less legs. Most works using the simplest inverted pendulum model constrain the mass and the legs to the sagittal plane (the plane that contains the direction perpendicular to the ground and the direction toward the biped is walking). In this article, we remove this constrain and use this unconstrained inverted pendulum model to study the oscillations the mass experiences in the direction perpendicular to the sagittal plane as the biped walks. While small, these oscillations are unavoidable and of importance in the understanding of balance and stability of walkers, as well as walkers induced oscillations in pedestrian bridges.

  17. Utilizing a Robotic Sprayer for High Lateral and Mass Resolution MALDI FT-ICR MSI of Microbial Cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderton, Christopher R.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Tolic, Nikola; Creissen, Alain V.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2016-01-07

    The ability to visualize biochemical interactions between microbial communities using MALDI MSI has provided tremendous insights into a variety of biological fields. Matrix application using a sieve proved to be incredibly useful, but it had many limitations that include uneven matrix coverage and limitation in the types of matrices one could employ in their studies. Recently, there has been a concerted effort to improve matrix application for studying agar plated microbial cultures, many of which utilized automated matrix sprayers. Here, we describe the usefulness of using a robotic sprayer for matrix application. The robotic sprayer has two-dimensional control over where matrix is applied and a heated capillary that allows for rapid drying of the applied matrix. This method provided a significant increase in MALDI sensitivity over the sieve method, as demonstrated by FT-ICR MS analysis, facilitating the ability to gain higher lateral resolution MS images of Bacillus Subtilis than previously reported. This method also allowed for the use of different matrices to be applied to the culture surfaces.

  18. MALDI mass spectrometry imaging of bioactive lipids in mouse brain with a Synapt G2-S mass spectrometer operated at elevated pressure: improving the analytical sensitivity and the lateral resolution to ten micrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettling, Hans; Vens-Cappell, Simeon; Soltwisch, Jens; Pirkl, Alexander; Haier, Jörg; Müthing, Johannes; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2014-08-05

    Mass spectrometers from the Synapt-G1/G2 family (Waters) are widely employed for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI). A lateral resolution of about 50 μm is typically achieved with these instruments, that is, however, below the often desired cellular resolution. Here, we show the first MALDI-MSI examples demonstrating a lateral resolution of about ten micrometers obtained with a Synapt G2-S HDMS mass spectrometer without oversampling. This improvement became possible by laser beam shaping using a 4:1 beam expander and a circular aperture for spatial mode filtering and by replacement of the default focusing lens. We used dithranol as an effective matrix for imaging of acidic lipids such as sulfatides, gangliosides, and phosphatidylinositols in the negative ion mode. At the same time, the matrix enables MS imaging of more basic lipids in the positive ion mode. Uniform matrix coatings with crystals having average dimensions between 0.5 and 3 μm were obtained upon spraying a chloroform/methanol matrix solution. Increasing the cooling gas pressure in the MALDI ion source after adding an additional gas line was furthermore found to increase the ion abundances of labile lipids such as gangliosides. The combined characteristics are demonstrated with the MALDI-MSI analysis of fine structures in coronal mouse brain slices.

  19. Lateral Atlantoaxial Osteoarthritis: A Narrative Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buraimoh, Morenikeji A; Massie, Lara W; Montgomery, David M

    2017-12-01

    Lateral atlantoaxial osteoarthritis (AAOA), or C1-C2 lateral mass arthritis (LMA), is an unfamiliar degenerative cervical disease with a clinical presentation that markedly differs from subaxial spondylosis. The prevalence of LMA in the nonsurgical outpatient setting is 4%. Risk factors include age and occupation. The typical patient is between 50 and 90 years old, presents with upper cervical or occipital pain, has limited rotation, and has pain provocation during passive rotation to the affected side. Pain stems from degeneration of the lateral C1-C2 articulation and may be referred or radicular, through the greater occipital nerve. Although there is no consensus on diagnostic work-up, the disease is classically seen on the open-mouth odontoid radiograph. Computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, bone scan, and diagnostic injections are also useful. Initial treatment is conservative, and upwards of two-thirds of LMA patients obtain lasting relief with noninvasive measures and injections. In patients with severe, recalcitrant pain, limited C1-C2 fusion offers satisfactory and reliable relief. The goals of this review article are to provide a synthesis of the literature on LMA, to offer a treatment approach to LMA, and to identify problems with the current state of knowledge on LMA.

  20. Long-term outcomes and prognostic analysis of modified open-door laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fusion in treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su N

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nan Su, Qi Fei, Bingqiang Wang, Dong Li, Jinjun Li, Hai Meng, Yong Yang, Ai Guo Department of Orthopedics, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, Xicheng District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to explore and analyze the long-term outcomes and factors that affect the prognosis of expansive open-door laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fusion in treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 49 patients with multilevel CSM who had undergone expansive open-door laminoplasty with lateral mass screws fixation and fusion in our hospital between February 2008 and February 2012. The average follow-up period was 4.6 years. The clinical data of patients, including age, sex, operation records, pre- and postoperation Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA scores, cervical spine canal stenosis, and cervical curvature, were collected. Increased signal intensity (ISI on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament were also observed. Paired t-test was used to analyze the treatment effectiveness and recovery of neuronal function. The prognostic factors were analyzed with multivariable linear regression model. Results: Forty-nine patients with CSM with a mean age of 59.44 years were enrolled in this study. The average of preoperative JOA score was 9.14±2.25, and postoperative JOA score was 15.31±1.73. There was significant difference between the pre- and postoperative JOA scores. The clinical improvement rate was 80.27%. On follow-up, five patients had complaints of neck and shoulder pain, but no evidence of C5 nerve palsy was found. Developmental cervical spine canal stenosis was present in all patients before surgery. Before surgery, ISI was observed in eight patients, while ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament was found in 12 patients. The average of preoperative cervical

  1. Parafuso de massa lateral do atlas para fixação da coluna cervical superior: resultados cirúrgicos Tornillos de masa lateral del atlas para la fijación de la columna cervical superior: resultados quirúrgicos Lateral mass screws of the atlas for upper cervical spine fixation: surgical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Ghizoni

    2011-01-01

    alcanzar la fusión y la estabilidad de la columna cervical, y con el conocimiento de la anatomía y de la técnica quirúrgica es posible obtenerse excelentes resultados.OBJECTIVE: To present the surgical results of a case series of upper cervical spine stabilization with the use of lateral mass screws of the atlas. METHODS: Retrospective review of the surgical results of patients submitted to upper cervical spine stabilization with the use of lateral mass screws of the atlas. RESULTS: Six patients were operated in the period between January 2009 to April 2010, four men and two women. There was no permanent morbidity or mortality in the presented series. The main cause of atlanto-axial instability was trauma and there was just one case of odontoid pathologic fracture from a prostate metastasis. Axis fixation was achieved with the use of three different screw techniques (pars, pedicle and laminar, with equal distribution among the patients. CONCLUSIONS: The use of lateral mass screws of the atlas is an important technique to achieve fusion and stability of the upper cervical spine and with the knowledge of the anatomy and of the surgical technique good results can be achieved.

  2. Chondromyxoid fibroma of C1: first case report Fibroma condromixoide de C1: primer caso Fibroma condromixóide de C1: primeiro relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ericson Sfreddo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chondromyxoid fibroma (CMF is a rare, benign primary bone tumor. The cervical spine is an uncommon site for this tumor, with only 10 reported cases to date and none involving the first cervical vertebra (C1. CASE REPORT: Female patient, 25-year-old monozygotic female twin, presented with cervical pain. Radiographic imaging demonstrated a contrast-enhanced, right-sided lytic lesion of the insufflated type in C1, with a punched-out appearance and extending to the anterior arch. A postero-lateral and a posterior approach were performed in two steps to resect the tumor followed by occipitocervical fixation. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of CMF. At one year, the patient remains disease free with excellent spinal stability. CONCLUSION: Spinal surgeons may need to treat rare spinal tumors. Despite the proximity to neural and vascular structures, the goal of surgery is always a radical resection due to high recurrence rates.REVISIÓN: El fibroma condromixoide (FCM es un tumor óseo primario, benigno y raro. La columna cervical es un lugar raro de este tumor, con solamente 10 casos relatados, siendo que ninguno involucra a la primera vértebra cervical (C1. RELATO DEL CASO: Paciente del sexo femenino, 25 años, gemela monozigótica, presentando dolor cervical. La imagen radiográfica demostró una lesión contrastada, predominantemente en la masa lateral de C1 con extensión hacia el arco posterior y anterior. La resección del tumor se realizó en dos tiempos, inicialmente una aproximación posterolateral, seguida por la vía posterior. En esta última, se realizó una fijación occipitocervical. El análisis anatomopatológico fue compatible con FCM. Pasado un año de los procedimientos, la paciente permanecía sin enfermedad y con estabilidad cranio-cervical. CONCLUSIÓN: Especialistas de columna deben tener el conocimiento de que estos tumores raros pueden acometer a la columna vertebral y, a pesar de su proximidad con el tejido

  3. Redundant anomalous vertebral artery in a case of congenital irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation: Emphasizing on the differences from the first intersegemental artery and operative steps to prevent injury while performing C1-2 joint manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Devi P; Salunke, Pravin S; Sahoo, Sushanta K; Ghuman, Mandeep S

    2015-10-01

    Anomalous vertebral artery (VA), commonly the persistent first intersegmental artery (FIA) is often seen with congenital atlantoaxial dislocations (AAD). An unusual redundant/ectatic loop of VA passing below the C1 (upside down VA) has been described below and appears to be different from FIA. The operative technique to protect it while C1-2 joint manipulation has been described. A 35 year old male presented with progressive spastic quadriparesis after trivial trauma. Radiology showed irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation with occipitalised C1 and C2-3 fusion. The left VA was anomalous passing beneath the C1 arch with a redundant loop lying posterior to the C1-2 joint. This was unlike the persistent first intersegmental artery (FIA) and was safeguarded while dissecting the C1-2 facet. The artery was dissected and safeguarded while performing C1-2 joint manipulation. A redundant/ectatic loop lying posterior to C1-2 joint is an unusual variant of anomalous VA. Evaluation of preoperative radiology helps in diagnosing such anomalous VA. Dissection of the entire redundant loop of the anomalous artery is important in opening the C1-2 joint required for reduction and placement of spacer/ bone grafts to achieve good bony fusion. Also mobilizing the loop allows safe insertion of lateral mass screw. Care needs to be taken while fastening screws to prevent compression of the loop.

  4. On orientifolds of c=1 orbifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkstra, T.P.T. [NIKHEF, PO Box 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gato-Rivera, B. [NIKHEF, PO Box 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Riccioni, F. [NIKHEF, PO Box 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: f.riccioni@damtp.cam.ac.uk; Schellekens, A.N. [NIKHEF, PO Box 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2004-10-25

    The aim of this paper is to study orientifolds of c=1 conformal field theories. A systematic analysis of the allowed orientifold projections for c=1 orbifold conformal field theories is given. We compare the Klein bottle amplitudes obtained at rational points with the orientifold projections that we claim to be consistent for any value of the orbifold radius. We show that the recently obtained Klein bottle amplitudes corresponding to exceptional modular invariants, describing bosonic string theories at fractional square radius, are also in agreement with those orientifold projections.

  5. Viral safety of C1-inhibitor NF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, F. G.; Kleijn, M.; Koenderman, A. H. L.; Over, J.; van Engelenburg, F. A. C.; Schuitemaker, H.; van 't Wout, A. B.

    2007-01-01

    We studied the efficacy of virus reduction by three process steps (polyethylene glycol 4000 (PEG) precipitation, pasteurization, and 15nm virus filtration) in the manufacturing of C1-inhibitor NF. The potential prion removing capacity in this process was estimated based on data from the literature.

  6. Anti-C1q autoantibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    Autoantibodies to complement components are associated with various diseases. Anti-C1q antibodies are present in all patients with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis, but also, with varying prevalence, in other conditions. In SLE, these antibodies are neither sensitive nor specific for this

  7. Medial-lateral centre of mass displacement and base of support are equally good predictors of metabolic cost in amputee walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinert-Aplin, R A; Twiste, M; Jarvis, H L; Bennett, A N; Baker, R J

    2017-01-01

    Amputees are known to walk with greater metabolic cost than able-bodied individuals and establishing predictors of metabolic cost from kinematic measures, such as centre of mass (CoM) motion, during walking are important from a rehabilitative perspective, as they can provide quantifiable measures to target during gait rehabilitation in amputees. While it is known that vertical CoM motion poorly predicts metabolic cost, CoM motion in the medial-lateral (ML) and anterior-posterior directions have not been investigated in the context of gait efficiency in the amputee population. Therefore, the aims of this study were to investigate the relationship between CoM motion in all three directions of motion, base of support and walking speed, and the metabolic cost of walking in both able-bodied individuals and different levels of lower limb amputee. 37 individuals were recruited to form groups of controls, unilateral above- and below-knee, and bilateral above-knee amputees respectively. Full-body optical motion and oxygen consumption data were collected during walking at a self-selected speed. CoM position was taken as the mass-weighted average of all body segments and compared to each individual's net non-dimensional metabolic cost. Base of support and ML CoM displacement were the strongest correlates to metabolic cost and the positive correlations suggest increased ML CoM displacement or Base of support will reduce walking efficiency. Rehabilitation protocols which indirectly reduce these indicators, rather than vertical CoM displacement will likely show improvements in amputee walking efficiency. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Accurate and Simple Screw Insertion Procedure With Patient-Specific Screw Guide Templates for Posterior C1-C2 Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Taku; Higashiyama, Naoki; Kaneyama, Shuichi; Sumi, Masatoshi

    2017-03-15

    Prospective clinical trial of the screw insertion method for posterior C1-C2 fixation utilizing the patient-specific screw guide template technique. To evaluate the efficacy of this method for insertion of C1 lateral mass screws (LMS), C2 pedicle screws (PS), and C2 laminar screws (LS). Posterior C1LMS and C2PS fixation, also known as the Goel-Harms method, can achieve immediate rigid fixation and high fusion rate, but the screw insertion carries the risk of injury to neuronal and vascular structures. Dissection of venous plexus and C2 nerve root to confirm the insertion point of the C1LMS may also cause problems. We have developed an intraoperative screw guiding method using patient-specific laminar templates. Preoperative bone images of computed tomography (CT) were analyzed using three-dimensional (3D)/multiplanar imaging software to plan the trajectories of the screws. Plastic templates with screw guiding structures were created for each lamina using 3D design and printing technology. Three types of templates were made for precise multistep guidance, and all templates were specially designed to fit and lock on the lamina during the procedure. Surgery was performed using this patient-specific screw guide template system, and placement of the screws was postoperatively evaluated using CT. Twelve patients with C1-C2 instability were treated with a total of 48 screws (24 C1LMS, 20 C2PS, 4 C2LS). Intraoperatively, each template was found to exactly fit and lock on the lamina and screw insertion was completed successfully without dissection of the venous plexus and C2 nerve root. Postoperative CT showed no cortical violation by the screws, and mean deviation of the screws from the planned trajectories was 0.70 ± 0.42 mm. The multistep, patient-specific screw guide template system is useful for intraoperative screw navigation in posterior C1-C2 fixation. This simple and economical method can improve the accuracy of screw insertion, and reduce operation time and

  9. Bisphenol A determination in baby bottles by chemiluminescence enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, lateral flow immunoassay and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiolini, Elisabetta; Ferri, Elida; Pitasi, Agata Laura; Montoya, Angel; Di Giovanni, Manuela; Errani, Ermanno; Girotti, Stefano

    2014-01-07

    Two immunoassays, a Lateral Flow ImmunoAssay (LFIA) based on colloidal gold nanoparticle labels and an indirect competitive chemiluminescence enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CL-ELISA), were developed and a high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was optimized to assess the possible release of bisphenol A (BPA, 4,4'-isopropylidenediphenol) from different plastic baby bottles treated with simulating solutions. Coating conjugate concentration, anti-BPA antibody dilution, incubation time of the primary and secondary antibodies, and tolerance to different organic solvents were optimized to obtain the best performance of the ELISA with chemiluminescent end-point detection. The influence of different buffers on LFIA performance was also evaluated. Both methods showed good repeatability (mean CV value around 13%) and sensitivity. Reproducibility tests for CL-ELISA gave a mean CV value of about 25%. The IC50 and Limit of Detection (LOD) values of CL-ELISA were 0.2 and 0.02 ng mL(-1), respectively. The LOD of LFIA was 0.1 μg mL(-1). A LC-MS/MS method was also optimized. The separation was performed in a C18 column with a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer with electrospray ionisation interface. The method showed a good linearity in the range 2 to 500 ng mL(-1), with a regression coefficient of 0.998. In the simulating solutions the detection and quantification limits, calculated by the signal to noise level of 3 (S/N = 3), were 5.8 ng mL(-1) and 17.4 ng mL(-1), respectively. This limit of quantification was about 3 and 35 times lower than the permitted limits set by the official method CEN/TS 13130-13 (0.05 μg mL(-1)) and by the Directive 2004/19/EC (0.6 μg mL(-1)), respectively. The methods were applied to determine BPA release from baby bottles, performing repeated procedures according to EU and national regulations. The results demonstrated that no BPA migration from the tested plastic materials occurred with only one

  10. 'Atlas shrugged': congenital lateral angular irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation: a case series of complex variant and its management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salunke, Pravin; Sahoo, Sushanta K; Futane, Sameer; Deepak, A N; Khandelwal, N K

    2016-04-01

    The commonly described congenital atlanto-axial dislocation and Basilar-Invagination is antero-posterior or rotational or vertical plane. However, congenital dislocation in lateral plane has received scant attention. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe this unusual entity and discuss its management. The clinic-radiological feature of seven patients with congenital lateral angular AAD (CLAAAD) were studied and managed. The unilateral C1 facet had subluxed lateral to C2-3 complex. The C1 and C2 facets were drilled comprehensively and repositioned with distraction, placement of metallic spacers and facet manipulation after insertion of screws. The post operative outcome was studied. The presentation is usually with neck tilt (progressive in 3) and/or progressive spastic quadriparesis. The mean C1-2 tilt was 25.2°. C1 was bifid in six patients. C1 lateral mass was assimilated with occipital condyle on dislocated side in and the other side was normal (6 patients). The dislocated C1-2 joint was abnormally oblique as compared to contralateral side. The relationship of occiput and C1 was normal. Correction of dislocation and lateral tilt was achieved in all patients with subsequent correction of neck tilt and deficits. One patient required reoperation. The acute angulation of joint on one side and near normal on other side leads to differential vertical movement, further accentuated by splaying of bifid C1. The entity is seen in young patients and often present with neck tilt and spastic quadriparesis. Management requires reshaping the joints and facet manipulation. If the reshaping is inappropriate, the joint is likely to redislocate before fusion occurs.

  11. Posterior realignment of irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation with C1-C2 screw and rod system: a technique of direct reduction and fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yi-Heng; Qiao, Guang-Yu; Yu, Xin-Guang; Tong, Huai-Yu; Zhang, Yuan-Zheng

    2013-12-01

    Treatment of chronic and irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) with ventral compression is challenging for surgeons. The main procedures are occipitocervical/C1-C2 fusion after transoral odontoidectomy or release of the periodontoid tissues. These surgical procedures, which are performed simultaneously or intermittently, have many disadvantages that may discount their effectiveness. Therefore, a more effective way to achieve surgical reduction and to keep solid stability with only a single procedure is needed. We describe a technique to reduce chronic and irreducible AAD with C1 lateral mass and C2 pedicle screw and rod system. This was a retrospective case series. Our sample comprised 26 patients (9 men and 17 women) with irreducible AAD who ranged in age from 15 to 54 years (mean, 35 years). Patients' neurologic status was evaluated with the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scale. Twenty-six symptomatic patients underwent posterior realignment and reduction through the C1 lateral mass and C2 pedicle screw and rod system. The proposed mechanism of reduction is that the implanted screws and rods between C1 and C2 acting as a lever system drew C1 backward and pushed C2 downward and forward after removing circumambient obstruction and scars and thoroughly releasing the facet joints. The preoperative and postoperative JOA score, the extent of reduction, and the conditions of C1-C2 bony fusion were examined. No neurovascular injury occurred during surgery. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 40 months (mean 20.7 months). Radiographic evaluation showed that solid bony fusion was achieved in all patients, and that complete reduction was attained in 18 patients and partial reduction (>60% reduction) in 8 patients. The mean postoperative JOA score at last follow-up was 15.7, compared with the preoperative score of 12.1 (p<.01). This C1-C2 screw and rod system provides reliable stability and sufficient reduction of the anatomic malalignment at the craniovertebral junction

  12. Later loont

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emous, van R.A.

    2007-01-01

    Uit een inventarisatie van de Animal Sciences Group van het hanenmanagement blijkt dat er geen verschillen zijn in technische resultaten tussen koppels vleeskuikenouderdieren die voor of na 20 weken leeftijd zijn overgeplaatst. Wel is later overplaatsen financieel aantrekkelijk voor de vermeerderaar

  13. Comparison of Lateral Flow Assay, Kidney Inhibition Swab, and Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry for the Detection of Penicillin G Residues in Sow Urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelver, Weilin L; Chakrabarty, Shubhashis; Smith, David J

    2017-03-01

    Sows (n = 126) were administered penicillin G; urine, collected at slaughter, was screened by kidney inhibition swab (KIS; 4 h testing time) and then stored at -80 °C (∼1200 days) until analysis by lateral flow assay (LF, ∼5 min testing time) and tandem quadrupole LC-MS/MS (TQ) analysis. The stability of penicillin in urine during storage was verified using TQ analyses. Quantitative results were well-correlated (R 2 = 0.98) with only a ∼10% decrease in penicillin concentration during the 3-year storage period. KIS retesting of stored samples returned results consistent with the original analyses. Lateral flow assay results were highly correlated with the KIS and TQ results. A KIS positive sample, which was not confirmed by TQ or LF, was assayed by Triple-TOF LC-MS to determine the cause of the apparent false positive. This study suggests LF can be used to quickly and efficiently screen for penicillin G residues before slaughter.

  14. [Selective cervical dorsal root cutting off part of the vertebral lateral mass fixation combined with exercise therapy for treating spastic cerebral paralysis of the upper limbs caused by cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Hu, Wei; Cao, Xu; Xu, Shi-gang; Li, De-kui; Xu, Lin

    2009-10-01

    To explore the feasibility and the result for the surgical treatment of spastic cerebral paralysis of the upper limbs in patients who underwent the selective cervical dorsal root cutting off part of the vertebral lateral mass fixation combined with exercise therapy. From March 2004 to April 2008, 27 patients included 19 boys and 8 girls, aging 13-21 years with an average of 15 years underwent selective cervical dorsal root cutting off part of the vertebral lateral mass fixation with exercise therapy. The AXIS 8 holes titanium plate was inserted into the lateral mass of spinous process through guidance of the nerve stimulator, choosed fasciculus of low-threshold nerve dorsal root and cut off its 1.5 cm. After two weeks, training exercise therapy was done in patients. Training will include lying position, turning body, sitting position, crawling, kneeling and standing position, walking and so on. Spastic Bobath inhibiting abnormal pattern was done in the whole process of training. The muscular tension, motor function (GMFM), functional independence (WeeFIM) were observed after treatment. All patients were followed up from 4 to 16 months with an average of 6 months. Muscular tension score were respectively 3.30 +/- 0.47 and 1.25 +/- 0.44 before and after treatment;GMFM score were respectively 107.82 +/- 55.17 and 131.28 +/- 46.45; WeeFIM score were respectively 57.61 +/- 25.51 and 87.91 +/- 22.39. There was significant improvement before and after treatment (P cerebral paralysis of the upper limbs is safe and effective method, which can decrease muscular tension and improve motor function, which deserves more wide use.

  15. Analysis list: Nr3c1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Nr3c1 Adipocyte,Blood,Breast,Embryo,Embryonic fibroblast,Liver,Neural + mm9 http://...dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Nr3c1.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Nr3c1.5.tsv http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Nr3c1.10.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscie...ncedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Nr3c1.Adipocyte.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp.../kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Nr3c1.Blood.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Nr3c1.Breast.tsv,http:

  16. Analysis list: NR3C1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NR3C1 Blood,Bone,Breast,Liver,Others,Prostate,Uterus + hg19 http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/NR3C1.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/NR3C1.5.t...sv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/NR3C1.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyu...shu-u/hg19/colo/NR3C1.Blood.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/c...olo/NR3C1.Bone.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/NR3C1.Breast.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscience

  17. Observation of $B^0_s\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1}\\phi$ decay and study of $B^0\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1,2}K^{*0}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Holtrop, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    The first observation of the decay $B^0_s\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1}\\phi$ and a study of $B^0\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1,2}K^{*0}$ decays are presented. The analysis is performed using a dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb experiment in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The following ratios of branching fractions are measured: \\begin{equation*} \\begin{array}{lll} \\dfrac{\\cal{B}(B^0_s\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1}\\phi)}{\\cal{B}(B^0_s\\rightarrow J/\\psi\\phi)} &=& (18.9 \\pm1.8\\,(stat)\\pm1.3\\,(syst)\\pm0.8\\,(\\cal{B})) \\times 10^{-2}, \\\\ \\dfrac{\\cal{B}(B^0\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1}K^{*0})}{\\cal{B}(B^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi K^{*0})} &=& (19.8 \\pm1.1\\,(stat)\\pm1.2\\,(syst)\\pm0.9\\,(\\cal{B})) \\times 10^{-2}, \\\\ \\dfrac{\\cal{B}(B^0\\rightarrow\\chi_{c2}K^{*0})}{\\cal{B}(B^0\\rightarrow\\chi_{c 1}K^{*0})} &=& (17.1 \\pm5.0\\,(stat)\\pm1.7\\,(syst)\\pm1.1\\,(\\cal{B})) \\times 10^{-2}, \\\\ \\end{array} \\end{equation*} where the third uncertainty is due to the limited knowledge o...

  18. Unilateral C-1 posterior arch screws and C-2 laminar screws combined with a 1-side C1-2 pedicle screw system as salvage fixation for atlantoaxial instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo-Xin, Jin; Huan, Wang

    2015-10-30

    OBJECT Atlantoaxial instability often requires surgery, and the current methods for fixation pose some risk to vascular and neurological tissues. Thus, new effective and safer methods are needed for salvage operations. This study sought to assess unilateral C-1 posterior arch screws (PASs) and C-2 laminar screws (LSs) combined with 1-side C1-2 pedicle screws (PSs) for posterior C1-2 fixation using biomechanical testing with bilateral C1-2 PSs in a cadaveric model. METHODS Six fresh ligamentous human cervical spines were evaluated for their biomechanics. The cadaveric specimens were tested in their intact condition, stabilization after injury, and after injury at 1.5 Nm of pure moment in 6 directions. The 3 groups tested were bilateral C1-2 PSs (Group A); left side C1-2 PSs with an ipsilateral C-1 PAS + C-2 laminar screw (Group B); and left side C1-2 PSs with a contralateral C-1 PAS + C-2 LS (Group C). During the testing, angular motion was measured using a motion capture platform. Data were recorded, and statistical analyses were performed. RESULTS Biomechanical testing showed that there was no significant difference among the stabilities of these fixation systems in flexion-extension and rotation control. In left lateral bending, the bilateral C1-2 PS group decreased flexibility by 71.9% compared with the intact condition, the unilateral C1-2 PS and ipsilateral PAS+LS group decreased flexibility by 77.6%, and the unilateral C1-2 PS and contralateral PAS+LS group by 70.0%. Each method significantly decreased C1-2 movements in right lateral bending compared with the intact condition, and the bilateral C1-2 PS system was more stable than the C1-2 PS and contralateral PAS+LS system (p = 0.036). CONCLUSIONS A unilateral C-1 PAS + C-2 LS combined with 1-side C-1 PSs provided the same acute stability as the PS, and no statistically significant difference in acute stability was found between the 2 screw techniques. These methods may constitute an alternative method for

  19. Expression of ATP6V1C1 during oral carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira Alves, M G; Carta, C F L; Padín-Iruegas, M-E; Pérez-Sayáns, M; Suarez-Peñaranda, J M; Issa, J S; García-García, A; Almeida, J D

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the gene and protein expressions of V-type ATPase protein subunit C1 (ATP6V1C1) in cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and contralateral normal mucosa in smokers, nonsmokers and former smokers. Subjects were separated into five groups of 15: group 1, smokers with OSCC; group 2, normal contralateral mucosa of OSCC patients; group 3, chronic smokers; group 4, former smokers who had stopped smoking 1 year earlier; group 5, individuals who had never smoked. Exfoliative cytology specimens from oral mucosa of smokers, former smokers and nonsmokers showed normal gene and protein expression. We found significantly greater gene expression in the OSCC group than in the nonsmoker groups. No difference in gene expression was observed between normal contralateral mucosa and nonsmoker groups, smoker and nonsmoker groups or former smoker and nonsmoker groups. We observed intense immunostaining for ATP6V1C1 protein in all cases of OSCC and weak or no staining in smoker, former smoker and nonsmoker groups. Significantly greater expression of ATP6V1C1 protein was observed in the OSCC group compared to the other groups, which supports the role of ATP6V1C1 in effecting changes associated with oral cancer. Analysis of the mucosae of chronic smokers, former smokers and the normal contralateral mucosa of patients with OSCC showed unaltered ATP6V1C1 gene and protein expression. Early stages of carcinogenesis, represented by altered epithelium of chronic smokers, had neither gene nor protein alterations as seen in OSCC. Therefore, we infer that the changes in ATP6V1C1 occur during later stages of carcinogenesis. Our preliminary study provides a basis for future studies of using ATP6V1C1 levels for detecting early stage OSCC.

  20. Os odontoideum with "free-floating" atlantal arch causing C1-2 anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis with cervicomedullary compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behari, Sanjay; Jaiswal, Awadhesh; Srivastava, Arun; Rajput, Dinesh; Jain, Vijendra K

    2010-10-01

    Os odontoideum (OO) with C1-2 anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis may cause cervicomedullary injury both from anterior and posterior aspects. We analyzed fourteen such patients for biomechanical issues, radiological features and management of OO with free-floating atlantal arch and review pertinent literature. Fourteen patients having nonsyndromic, reducible atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) with orthotopic OO were analyzed. During neck flexion, their C1 anterior arch-os complex displaced anteriorly relative to remnant odontoid-C2 body. The posteriorly directed hypoplastic remnant odontoid sliding below the atlas and forward translation of the C1 posterior arch caused concomitant cervicomedullary compression. During neck extension, there was retrolisthesis of the "free-floating" C1 arch-os complex into spinal canal. Spinal stenosis and lateral C1-2 facet dislocation; Klippel-Feil anomaly; and posterior circulation infarcts were also present in one patient each, respectively. Posterior C1-2 (n=10) or occipitocervical fusion (n=3) was performed in neutral position to stabilize atlantoaxial movements. Follow-up (mean, 3.9 years) assessment revealed improvement in spasticity and weakness in 13 patients. One patient had neurological deterioration following C1-2 posterior sublaminar fusion, requiring its conversion to occipitocervical contoured rod fusion. One patient with posterior circulation stroke died prior to any operative intervention. Follow-up lateral view radiographs showed a bony union or a stable construct in these 13 patients. OO with free-floating atlantal arch may precipitate cord injury both during neck flexion and extension. This condition may be overlooked unless lateral radiographs of craniovertebral junction are undertaken in neck extension, along with the usual ones in neutral and flexed positions. Etiological factors include C1 ring-OO unrestrained movements above the hypoplastic odontoid; upward pull on OO by alar and apical ligaments; lax C1-2 facet

  1. Structures of C1q-like proteins reveal unique features among the C1q/TNF superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressl, Susanne; Vu, Brandon K; Vivona, Sandro; Martinelli, David C; Südhof, Thomas C; Brunger, Axel T

    2015-04-07

    C1q-like (C1QL) -1, -2, and -3 proteins are encoded by homologous genes that are highly expressed in brain. C1QLs bind to brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 3 (BAI3), an adhesion-type G-protein coupled receptor that may regulate dendritic morphology by organizing actin filaments. To begin to understand the function of C1QLs, we determined high-resolution crystal structures of the globular C1q-domains of C1QL1, C1QL2, and C1QL3. Each structure is a trimer, with each protomer forming a jelly-roll fold consisting of 10 β strands. Moreover, C1QL trimers may assemble into higher-order oligomers similar to adiponectin and contain four Ca(2+)-binding sites along the trimeric symmetry axis, as well as additional surface Ca(2+)-binding sites. Mutation of Ca(2+)-coordinating residues along the trimeric symmetry axis lowered the Ca(2+)-binding affinity and protein stability. Our results reveal unique structural features of C1QLs among C1q/TNF superfamily proteins that may be associated with their specific brain functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Anti-C1q antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbai, A-M; Truedsson, L; Sturfelt, G

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Anti-C1q has been associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis in previous studies. We studied anti-C1q specificity for SLE (vs rheumatic disease controls) and the association with SLE manifestations in an international multicenter study. METHODS: Information...... in combination with anti-dsDNA and low complement was the strongest serological association with renal involvement. These data support the usefulness of anti-C1q in SLE, especially in lupus nephritis....

  3. Direct interaction between CD91 and C1q

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, Karen; Hansen, Erik W; Tacnet, Pascale

    2010-01-01

    . C1q binding to monocytes was shown to be correlated with CD91 expression and could be inhibited by the CD91 chaperone, receptor-associated protein. We also report data showing a direct interaction between CD91 and C1q. The interaction was investigated using various protein interaction assays....... A direct interaction between purified C1q and CD91 was observed both by ELISA and a surface plasmon resonance assay, with either C1q or CD91 immobilized. The interaction showed characteristics of specificity because it was time-dependent, saturable and could be inhibited by known ligands of both CD91 and C...

  4. Comparison of fatigue strength of C2 pedicle screws, C2 pars screws, and a hybrid construct in C1-C2 fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Brian W; Shimer, Adam L; Chinthakunta, Suresh; Salloum, Kanaan; Ames, Christopher P; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Bucklen, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    A biomechanical study comparing the fatigue strength of different types of C2 fixation in a C1-C2 construct. To determine the pullout strength of a C2 pedicle screw and C2 pars screw after cyclical testing and differentiate differences in stiffness pre- and post-cyclical loading of 3 different C1-C2 fixations. Some surgeons use a short C2 pars screw in a C1-C2 construct, because it is less technically demanding and/or when the vertebral artery is high riding. Difference in construct stiffness between use of bilateral C2 pedicle screws, bilateral C2 pars screws, or a hybrid construct is unknown. Biomechanical testing was performed on 15 specimens. A bicortical C1 lateral mass screw was used in combination with 1 of 3 methods of C2 fixation: (1) bilateral long C2 pedicle screws (LL), (2) bilateral 14-mm C2 pars screws (SS), and (3) unilateral long C2 pedicle screw with a contralateral 14-mm C2 pars screw (LS). Each construct was subject to 16,000 cycles to simulate the immediate postoperative period. Changes in motion in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation were calculated. This was followed by pullout testing. The ability to limit range of motion significantly decreased after cyclical testing in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation for all 3 groups. After loading, the LL and LS groups had less percentage of increase in motion in flexion-extension and lateral bending than the SS group. Overall, the average pullout strength of a pedicle screw was 92% stronger than a pars screw. C2 pedicle screws have twice the pullout strength of C2 pars screws after cyclical loading. In cases in which the anatomy limits placement of bilateral C2 pedicle screws, a construct using a unilateral C2 pedicle screw with a contralateral short pars screw is a viable option and compares favorably with a bilateral C2 pedicle screw construct. N/A.

  5. SYNTHESIS OF THE ISOQUINO-[2,1-c][1,3]-BENZODIAZEPINE DERIVATIVE FROM PAPAVERINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Sudarma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to synthesize isoquino[2,1-c][1,3]benzodiazepine from papaverine alkaloid. Functional Group Interconversion (FGI and Carbon -Nitrogen bond connection approach was investigated. Papaverine (1 was nitrated by HNO3 to compound (2 and followed by reduction with Sn and HCl to afford aminonorlaudanosine (3. Formation of cyclic benzodiazepine (4 was achieved by reaction of (3 with CS2. Products of reactions were confirmed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonances (n.m.r, Mass Spectrum, and Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR.   Keywords: isoquino[2,1-c][1,3]benzodiazepine, papaverine

  6. 17 CFR 240.16c-1 - Brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Brokers. 240.16c-1 Section 240... Act of 1934 Exemption of Certain Transactions from Section 16(c) § 240.16c-1 Brokers. Any transaction... a broker of an order for an account in which the broker has no direct or indirect interest. ...

  7. Safety and Usage of C1-Inhibitor in Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riedl, Marc A; Bygum, Anette; Lumry, William

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The plasma-derived, highly purified, nanofiltered C1-inhibitor concentrate (Berinert; "pnfC1-INH") is approved in the United States for treating hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks and in many European countries for attack treatment and short-term prophylaxis. OBJECTIVE: The objective...... of this study was to describe safety and usage patterns of pnfC1-INH. METHODS: A multicenter, observational, registry was conducted between 2010 and 2014 at 30 United States and 7 European sites to obtain both prospective (occurring after enrollment) and retrospective (occurring before enrollment) safety...... and usage data on subjects receiving pnfC1-INH for any reason. RESULTS: Of 343 enrolled patients, 318 received 1 or more doses of pnfC1-INH for HAE attacks (11,848 infusions) or for prophylaxis (3142 infusions), comprising the safety population. Median dosages per infusion were 10.8 IU/kg (attack treatment...

  8. 17 CFR 270.3c-1 - Definition of beneficial ownership for certain 3(c)(1) funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Covered Company, the value of all securities owned by the Covered Company of all issuers that are Section... AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 § 270.3c-1... Covered Company means a company that is an investment company, a Section 3(c)(1) Company or a Section 3(c...

  9. Interaction of C1q and mannan-binding lectin (MBL) with C1r, C1s, MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2, and the MBL-associated protein MAp19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiel, S; Petersen, Steen Vang; Vorup-Jensen, T

    2000-01-01

    . There is controversy as to whether MBL can utilize C1r and C1s or, inversely, whether C1q can utilize MASP-1 and 2. Serum deficient in C1r produced no complement activation in IgG-coated microwells, whereas activation was seen in mannan-coated microwells. In serum, C1r and C1s were found to be associated only with C1q...

  10. 26 CFR 1.1402(c)-1 - Trade or business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trade or business. 1.1402(c)-1 Section 1.1402(c... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Tax on Self-Employment Income § 1.1402(c)-1 Trade or business. In order for an individual to have net earnings from self-employment, he must carry on a trade or business, either as an...

  11. Methylation of NR3C1 and SLC6A4 and internalizing problems. The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Knaap, Lisette J.; van Oort, Floor V. A.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Riese, Harriette

    2015-01-01

    Background: The relationship between early adverse life events and later internalizing problems could be mediated by DNA methylation. Adversity has been associated with higher methylation levels in the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) and the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) in adolescents.

  12. ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disorders » Patient & Caregiver Education » Fact Sheets Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Fact Sheet What is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis? ... I get more information? What is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis? Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a group of ...

  13. Distinguishing C1q nephropathy from lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Andrew; Furness, Peter; Feehally, John

    2004-06-01

    'Seronegative lupus nephritis' describes patients with renal histology typical of lupus nephritis who have no clinical or serological evidence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We report our experience in nine patients identified as having 'seronegative lupus nephritis' who met the diagnostic criteria for C1q nephropathy. A retrospective review of clinical case notes and renal histology was carried out. We describe nine patients with C1q nephropathy in whom the diagnosis of 'seronegative lupus nephritis' was initially considered. All had renal histological features typical of lupus nephritis with 'wire loop' appearances on light microscopy, 'full house' immunoglobulin and complement deposition by immunoperoxidase, and electron-dense deposits in at least two glomerular locations. None of these nine patients developed clinical or serological evidence of SLE over a median follow-up of 6 years (range 0.1-9). There was no consistent evidence of a response to immunosuppressive therapy. In all cases, C1q staining was dominant on immunoperoxidase, and no tubuloreticular inclusions were seen. These appearances accord with previous descriptions of C1q nephropathy. The implications of a diagnosis of lupus are considerable, and we propose that the term 'seronegative lupus nephritis' is unhelpful, and should be avoided when there is diagnostic uncertainty. The term C1q nephropathy should be preferred when these histological features are seen in the absence of overt lupus, when C1q deposition is dominant and when tubuloreticular bodies are absent. The clinical course in the cases reported here does not support the use of immunosuppressive therapy in C1q nephropathy.

  14. Bilateral inverted vertebral arteries (V3 segment) in a case of congenital atlantoaxial dislocation: Distinct entity or a lateral variant of persistent first intersegmental artery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salunke, Pravin; Sahoo, Sushanta K.; Ghuman, Mandeep S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anomalous vertebral arteries (VAs), commonly involving the persistent first intersegmental artery (FIA), are often seen with congenital atlantoaxial dislocations (AAD). Here we describe an unusual variant consisting of bilateral VAs with normal loops but passing below the C1 (inverted VA) arch, distinctly different from the FIA. Case Description: A 9-year-old boy presented with a spastic quadriparesis. Preoperative radiographic studies showed an irreducible AAD with an occipitalized CO-C1 and C2-3 fusion. Although both VAs exhibited proximal and distal loops like normal VA, the distal loops did not pass through the C1 transverse foramina and coursed inferior to the C1 arch instead. With this critical preoperative information, both VAs could be better safeguarded during dissection of the C1-2 facets. Conclusion: In the case presented, although the course of the inverted VAs is similar, the norm, they coursed inferior to both C1 arches. Careful evaluation of the preoperative radiological studies allowed for careful dissection of the inverted VA (horizontal loop) while opening the C1-2 joint for subsequent alignment (e.g. reduction) and bony fusion. This information also facilitates safer insertion of lateral mass screws (e.g. choosing the appropriate C1 screw length to gain adequate bony purchase without compromising anomalous VA). PMID:25024882

  15. Emerging and novel functions of complement protein C1q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna eKouser

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Complement protein C1q, the recognition subcomponent of the classical pathway, performs a diverse range of complement and non-complement functions. It can bind various ligands derived from self, non-self and altered-self and modulate the functions of immune and non-immune cells including dendritic cells and microglia. C1q involvement in the clearance of apoptotic cells and subsequent B cell tolerance is more established now. Recent evidence appears to suggest that C1q plays an important role in pregnancy where its deficiency and dysregulation can have adverse effects, leading to preeclampsia, missed abortion, miscarriage or spontaneous loss and various infections. C1q is also produced locally in the Central Nervous System, and has a protective role against pathogens and possible inflammatory functions while interacting with aggregated proteins leading to neurodegenerative diseases. C1q role in synaptic pruning, and thus CNS development, anti-cancer effects as an immune surveillance molecule, and possibly in ageing are areas of extensive research.

  16. Intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring for C1-2 spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muncie, Laura M; Ellens, Nathaniel R; Tolod-Kemp, Emeline; Feler, Claudio A; Winestone, John S

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE This study is a retrospective case series involving C1-2 spinal cord stimulation in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) under general endotracheal anesthesia. Currently, C1-2 paddle lead placement is an accepted practice, which provides effective cervical stimulation to ameliorate upper-extremity and sometimes lower-extremity symptoms experienced by patients with CRPS. However, this technique must be performed under general endotracheal anesthesia rather than in an awake or semiconscious state due to intraoperative safety concerns and patient comfort. The authors aim to provide additional data to support the following novel technique: the use of somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) diminution data to assist with proper midline placement of C1-2 leads under general anesthesia. METHODS SSEP median nerve (MN) and posterior tibial nerve (PTN) data were collected from 6 patients undergoing placement of C1-2 leads under general anesthesia. Fluoroscopy was used as an initial guide for proper anatomical midline placement. This was followed by the activation of the spinal cord stimulator and simultaneous collection of primarily MN SSEPs as well as PTN SSEPs for physiological midline placement. Unilateral and bilateral reductions in SSEPs assisted with the correct lateralization of the lead to ensure effective postoperative coverage according to the patient's individual preoperative symptoms. RESULTS Six patients were monitored using SSEPs and repeatable, reliable MN and PTN baseline responses were obtained from all. A reduction in amplitude ranging from 5% to 87% was observed, confirming inhibition of dorsal column conduction, and an average pain relief of 63% at short-term and 64% at long-term follow-up was recorded with 6 of 6 and 5 of 6 patients responding, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Intraoperative SSEP collision study testing appears to be a safe technique to monitor placement of C1-2 paddle leads intraoperatively under general anesthesia.

  17. Os odontoideum with “free-floating” atlantal arch causing C1-2 anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis with cervicomedullary compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behari, Sanjay; Jaiswal, Awadhesh; Srivastava, Arun; Rajput, Dinesh; Jain, Vijendra K

    2010-01-01

    Background: Os odontoideum (OO) with C1-2 anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis may cause cervicomedullary injury both from anterior and posterior aspects. We analyzed fourteen such patients for biomechanical issues, radiological features and management of OO with free-floating atlantal arch and review pertinent literature. Materials and Methods: Fourteen patients having nonsyndromic, reducible atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) with orthotopic OO were analyzed. During neck flexion, their C1 anterior arch-os complex displaced anteriorly relative to remnant odontoid-C2 body. The posteriorly directed hypoplastic remnant odontoid sliding below the atlas and forward translation of the C1 posterior arch caused concomitant cervicomedullary compression. During neck extension, there was retrolisthesis of the “free-floating” C1 arch-os complex into spinal canal. Spinal stenosis and lateral C1-2 facet dislocation; Klippel-Feil anomaly; and posterior circulation infarcts were also present in one patient each, respectively. Posterior C1-2 (n=10) or occipitocervical fusion (n=3) was performed in neutral position to stabilize atlantoaxial movements. Results: Follow-up (mean, 3.9 years) assessment revealed improvement in spasticity and weakness in 13 patients. One patient had neurological deterioration following C1-2 posterior sublaminar fusion, requiring its conversion to occipitocervical contoured rod fusion. One patient with posterior circulation stroke died prior to any operative intervention. Follow-up lateral view radiographs showed a bony union or a stable construct in these 13 patients. Conclusions: OO with free-floating atlantal arch may precipitate cord injury both during neck flexion and extension. This condition may be overlooked unless lateral radiographs of craniovertebral junction are undertaken in neck extension, along with the usual ones in neutral and flexed positions. Etiological factors include C1 ring-OO unrestrained movements above the hypoplastic odontoid

  18. Os odontoideum with "free-floating" atlantal arch causing C1-2 anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis with cervicomedullary compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behari Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Os odontoideum (OO with C1-2 anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis may cause cervicomedullary injury both from anterior and posterior aspects. We analyzed fourteen such patients for biomechanical issues, radiological features and management of OO with free-floating atlantal arch and review pertinent literature. Materials and Methods: Fourteen patients having nonsyndromic, reducible atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD with orthotopic OO were analyzed. During neck flexion, their C1 anterior arch-os complex displaced anteriorly relative to remnant odontoid-C2 body. The posteriorly directed hypoplastic remnant odontoid sliding below the atlas and forward translation of the C1 posterior arch caused concomitant cervicomedullary compression. During neck extension, there was retrolisthesis of the "free-floating" C1 arch-os complex into spinal canal. Spinal stenosis and lateral C1-2 facet dislocation; Klippel-Feil anomaly; and posterior circulation infarcts were also present in one patient each, respectively. Posterior C1-2 (n=10 or occipitocervical fusion (n=3 was performed in neutral position to stabilize atlantoaxial movements. Results: Follow-up (mean, 3.9 years assessment revealed improvement in spasticity and weakness in 13 patients. One patient had neurological deterioration following C1-2 posterior sublaminar fusion, requiring its conversion to occipitocervical contoured rod fusion. One patient with posterior circulation stroke died prior to any operative intervention. Follow-up lateral view radiographs showed a bony union or a stable construct in these 13 patients. Conclusions: OO with free-floating atlantal arch may precipitate cord injury both during neck flexion and extension. This condition may be overlooked unless lateral radiographs of craniovertebral junction are undertaken in neck extension, along with the usual ones in neutral and flexed positions. Etiological factors include C1 ring-OO unrestrained movements above the hypoplastic

  19. Pediatric hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkas Henriette

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary angioedema (HAE resulting from the deficiency of the C1 inhibitor (C1-INH is a rare, life-threatening disorder. It is characterized by attacks of angioedema involving the skin and/or the mucosa of the upper airways, as well as the intestinal mucosa. In approximately 50 per cent of cases, clinical manifestations may appear during childhood. The complex management of HAE in pediatric patients is in many respects different from the management of adults. Establishing the diagnosis early, preferably before the onset of clinical symptoms, is essential in cases with a positive family history. Complement studies usually afford accurate diagnosis, whereas molecular genetics tests may prove helpful in uncertain cases. Appropriate therapy, supported by counselling, suitable modification of lifestyle, and avoidance of triggering factors (which primarily include mechanical trauma, mental stress and airway infections in children may spare the patient unnecessary surgery and may prevent mortality. Prompt control of edematous attacks, short-term prophylaxis and intermittent therapy are recommended as the primary means for the management of pediatric cases. Medicinal products currently used for the treatment of children with hereditary angioedema include antifibrinolytics, attenuated androgens, and C1-INH replacement therapy. Current guidelines favour antifibrinolytics for long-term prophylaxis because of their favorable safety profile but efficacy may be lacking. Attenuated androgens administered in the lowest effective dose are another option. C1-INH replacement therapy is also an effective and safe agent for children. Regular monitoring and follow-up of patients are necessary.

  20. C1q Nephropathy: The Unique Underrecognized Pathological Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Devasahayam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available C1q nephropathy is a rare glomerular disease with characteristic mesangial C1q deposition noted on immunofluorescence microscopy. It is histologically defined and poorly understood. Light microscopic features are heterogeneous and comprise minimal change disease (MCD, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS, and proliferative glomerulonephritis. Clinical presentation is also diverse, and ranges from asymptomatic hematuria or proteinuria to frank nephritic or nephrotic syndrome in both children and adults. Hypertension and renal insufficiency at the time of diagnosis are common findings. Optimal treatment is not clear and is usually guided by the underlying light microscopic lesion. Corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment, with immunosuppressive agents reserved for steroid resistant cases. The presence of nephrotic syndrome and FSGS appear to predict adverse outcomes as opposed to favorable outcomes in those with MCD. Further research is needed to establish C1q nephropathy as a universally recognized distinct clinical entity. In this paper, we discuss the current understanding of pathogenesis, histopathology, clinical features, therapeutic options, and outcomes of C1q nephropathy.

  1. 26 CFR 1.661(c)-1 - Limitation on deduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....661(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX... any amount which is treated under section 661(b) as consisting of any item of distributable net income..., which reports on the calendar year basis, has distributable net income of $20,000, which is deemed to...

  2. Technique for direct posterior reduction in irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation: multi-planar realignment of C1-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salunke, Pravin; Sahoo, Sushanta; Khandelwal, N K; Ghuman, Mandeep S

    2015-04-01

    Apart from the commonly seen antero-posterior subluxation of C1 over C2, the dislocation may occur in vertical, lateral or rotational plane. Desired C1-2 realignment can be achieved by corrrecting its dislocation in all planes. We describe a technique for the same. The clinical and radiological features of 16 patients (4 – traumatic and 12 – congenital) with irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) admitted in the last 1.5 years were studied. Specific attention was paid to vertical dislocation with lateral and rotational components, apart from anterior-posterior subluxation. They were operated through direct posterior approach. The technique using a long rod holder as lever and screw head (tulip) as fulcrum was employed to achieve C1-2 realignment in all planes. The postoperative clinical and radiological data was analyzed and compared with preoperative data. Patients presented with progressive myelopathy and/or progressive worsening of neck pain. Vertical dislocation was seen in 11 patients with congenital AAD in addition to the antero-posterior subluxation seen in all. Three patients with traumatic AAD and 8 with congenital AAD had additional lateral dislocation or lateral tilt. Three patients with traumatic AAD and 7 with congenital AAD showed rotational component. Postoperatively, all patients showed clinical improvement. The antero-posterior and vertical realignment could be achieved in all except one. Similarly, rotational and lateral components could be completely corrected in 8 out of 10 patients. The technique appears to realign the C1-2 in all planes and provides good anatomical restoration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Bivariate C^1 quadratic finite elements and vertex splines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Charles K.; He, Tian Xiao

    1990-01-01

    Following work of Heindl and of Powell and Sabin, each triangle of an arbitrary (regular) triangulation Δ of a polygonal region Ω in {R^2} is subdivided into twelve triangles, using the three medians, yielding the refinement hat Δ of Δ , so that {C^1} quadratic finite elements can be constructed. In this paper, we derive the Bezier nets of these elements in terms of the parameters that describe function and first partial derivative values at the vertices and values of the normal derivatives at the midpoints of the edges of Δ . Consequently, bivariate {C^1} quadratic (generalized) vertex splines on Δ have an explicit formulation. Here, a generalized vertex spline is one which is a piecewise polynomial on the refined grid partition hat Δ and has support that contains at most one vertex of the original partition Δ in its interior. The collection of all {C^1} quadratic generalized vertex splines on Δ so constructed is shown to form a basis of S_2^1(hat Δ ) , the vector space of all functions on {C^1}(Ω ) whose restrictions to each triangular cell of the partition hat Δ are quadratic polynomials. A subspace with the basis given by appropriately chosen generalized vertex splines with exactly one vertex of Δ in the interior of their supports, that reproduces all quadratic polynomials, is identified, and hence, has approximation order three. Quasi-interpolation formulas using this subspace are obtained. In addition, a constructive procedure that yields a locally supported basis of yet another subspace with dimension given by the number of vertices of Δ , that has approximation order three, is given.

  4. The topological matrix model of c=1 string

    CERN Document Server

    Imbimbo, Camillo; Imbimbo, Camillo; Mukhi, Sunil

    1995-01-01

    We derive a Kontsevich-type matrix model for the c=1 string directly from the W-infinity solution of the theory. The model that we obtain is different from previous proposals, which are proven to be incorrect. Our matrix model contains the Penner and Kontsevich cases, and we study its quantum effective action. The simplicity of our model leads to an encouraging interpretation in the context of background-independent noncritical string field theory.

  5. Spectroscopic Confirmation of DES13C1feu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M.; Okouma, P.; Bassett, B.; Kasai, E.; Crawford, S. M.; Romero-Colmenero, E.; Buckley, D.; Maartens, R.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.; Kessler, R.; Covarrubias, R. A.; Cane, R.; Fischer, J. A.; Gladney, L.; March, M.; Sako, M.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; D'Andrea, C.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.; Sullivan, M.; Barbary, K.; Bernstein, J. P.; Biswas, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.; Aldering, G.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Kim, A.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Thomas, R. C.; Foley, R.

    2013-10-01

    We report optical spectroscopy of a supernova (SN) candidate discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (ATel #4668). The spectrum (400-900 nm) of DES13C1feu was obtained using the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) on the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). A fit of the spectrum with SNID (Blondin & Tonry, 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024) reveals this event to be a type Ic supernova at z=0.06 at peak brightness.

  6. Bilateral Multiple Level Lateral Meningocoele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B E Panil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lateral meningocoele is a very rare disorder characterized by extensions of the dura and arachnoid through an enlarged neural foramen. We report a case of a 23-year-old female with deformity of spine who presented with low back pain and no neurological deficits. A whole spine magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple well-defined cystic masses involving dorsal, lumbar, and sacral spinal levels bilaterally, with dural ectasia and neural foraminal widening suggestive of bilateral multiple level lateral meningocoele. The patient is being managed conservatively and is on regular follow-up.

  7. Bilateral multiple level lateral meningocoele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B E Panil; Hegde, Kishor V; Kumari, G Lalitha; Agrawal, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Lateral meningocoele is a very rare disorder characterized by extensions of the dura and arachnoid through an enlarged neural foramen. We report a case of a 23-year-old female with deformity of spine who presented with low back pain and no neurological deficits. A whole spine magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple well-defined cystic masses involving dorsal, lumbar, and sacral spinal levels bilaterally, with dural ectasia and neural foraminal widening suggestive of bilateral multiple level lateral meningocoele. The patient is being managed conservatively and is on regular follow-up.

  8. A C1qDC Protein (HcC1qDC6 with Three Tandem C1q Domains Is Involved in Immune Response of Triangle-Shell Pearl Mussel (Hyriopsis cumingii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available C1q-domain-containing (C1qDC proteins are a family of proteins with a globular C1q (gC1q domain and participate in several immune responses. In this study, a C1qDC gene was identified from the triangle-shell pearl mussel Hyriopsis cumingii (designated as HcC1qDC6. This gene has a full-length cDNA of 1782 bp and an open reading frame of 1,335 bp that encodes a 444-amino acid polypeptide containing three gC1q domains. HcC1qDC6 contains at least five exons and four introns. The mRNA transcripts of HcC1qDC6 were found to have the highest expression levels in the mantle tissue. The expression levels in the mantle and hepatopancreas were significantly upregulated by Staphylococcus aureus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus challenges. Moreover, knockdown of HcC1qDC6 inhibits the expression of two immune-related genes (tumor necrosis factor and whey acidic protein. The recombinant proteins of C1q1, C1q2, and C1q3 all exhibit a binding activity against seven bacterial species and directly bind to peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharide. The results indicate that HcC1qDC6 is involved in the innate immunity of H. cumingii.

  9. Methylation of NR3C1 and SLC6A4 and internalizing problems. The TRAILS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Knaap, Lisette J; van Oort, Floor V A; Verhulst, Frank C; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Riese, Harriëtte

    2015-07-15

    The relationship between early adverse life events and later internalizing problems could be mediated by DNA methylation. Adversity has been associated with higher methylation levels in the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) and the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) in adolescents. We investigated cross-sectional and prospective associations of NR3C1 and SLC6A4 methylation with adolescents׳ clinical diagnoses of internalizing disorders and internalizing symptom scores. In a population sample (mean age=16.2) we measured DNA methylation in three regions of NR3C1 (NR3C1_1, N=454; NR3C1_2, N=904; NR3C1_3, N=412) and one region of SLC6A4 (N=939) at baseline. Internalizing problems were operationalized as clinical DSM-IV diagnoses, assessed at 3 year follow-up with a diagnostic interview, and internalizing symptom scores, assessed with Self-Report questionnaires at baseline and follow-up. Only NR3C1_1 methylation was positively associated with risk of lifetime internalizing disorders, and with symptom scores at follow-up. However, after accounting for baseline symptom scores there was only a tendency for association with internalizing symptom scores at follow-up. There was no association between SLC6A4 methylation and risk of lifetime internalizing disorders. SLC6A4 methylation and internalizing symptom scores showed a tendency for association, also after accounting for baseline symptom scores. There was no repeated measure of DNA methylation to study causality between methylation and internalizing problems. Gene expression data were not available. Although the role of gene methylation in the development of internalizing problems remains unclear, our findings suggest that gene methylation, particularly of NR3C1, may be involved in the development of internalizing problems in adolescence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficient C1-continuous phase-potential upwind (C1-PPU) schemes for coupled multiphase flow and transport with gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiamin; Younis, Rami M.

    2017-10-01

    In the presence of counter-current flow, nonlinear convergence problems may arise in implicit time-stepping when the popular phase-potential upwinding (PPU) scheme is used. The PPU numerical flux is non-differentiable across the co-current/counter-current flow regimes. This may lead to cycles or divergence in the Newton iterations. Recently proposed methods address improved smoothness of the numerical flux. The objective of this work is to devise and analyze an alternative numerical flux scheme called C1-PPU that, in addition to improving smoothness with respect to saturations and phase potentials, also improves the level of scalar nonlinearity and accuracy. C1-PPU involves a novel use of the flux limiter concept from the context of high-resolution methods, and allows a smooth variation between the co-current/counter-current flow regimes. The scheme is general and applies to fully coupled flow and transport formulations with an arbitrary number of phases. We analyze the consistency property of the C1-PPU scheme, and derive saturation and pressure estimates, which are used to prove the solution existence. Several numerical examples for two- and three-phase flows in heterogeneous and multi-dimensional reservoirs are presented. The proposed scheme is compared to the conventional PPU and the recently proposed Hybrid Upwinding schemes. We investigate three properties of these numerical fluxes: smoothness, nonlinearity, and accuracy. The results indicate that in addition to smoothness, nonlinearity may also be critical for convergence behavior and thus needs to be considered in the design of an efficient numerical flux scheme. Moreover, the numerical examples show that the C1-PPU scheme exhibits superior convergence properties for large time steps compared to the other alternatives.

  11. Pedestrian-induced lateral vibrations of footbridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingólfsson, Einar Thór

    and the frequency of the lateral movement. These forces are self-excited in the sense that they are generated by the movement of the body’s centre of mass, which in turn is caused by the lateral acceleration of the underlying pavement. Due to the random nature of the human-induced loadings and a large scatter...

  12. Lateralized odontoid in plain film radiography. Sign of fractures? A comparison study with MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, S.; Bieck, K.; Karul, M.; Schoennagel, B.; Adam, G.; Habermann, C.; Yamamura, J. [University Hospital Hamburg Eppendorf (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2015-09-15

    To evaluate X-ray standards for the detection of odontoid fractures. Summary of background data: Cervical spine fractures are a common finding in emergency medicine, accounting for 1 - 3 % of injuries. Involvement of the C1 / C2 complex is found in 25 % of cases, affecting the odontoid peg in 55 - 80 %. Regarding the consequences of missed fractures, radiographic techniques built the groundwork for further treatment procedures. As standardized X-ray measurements have not been established, the incidence of unrecognized cervical spine fracture is expected to be up to 20 %. The establishment of X-ray-based guidelines is also limited by the presumed low specificity and sensitivity of distance measurements caused by rotational distortion which leads to a rising popularity of CT. 79 (age 60 ± 26 yrs) patients with lateralization of the odontoid process on conventional plain film radiography (anteroposterior, lateral, and open mouth odontoid process view projection) were examined. The distance between the odontoid process and lateral mass of C1, angles of vertical odontoid line and basis of C2 were measured in the ap view. In the lateral view, dorsal alignment and atlantodental distance were assessed. MDCT examinations were used as a reference. Discriminatory power test was applied to assess significance. 8/79 (10.1 %) odontoid process fractures were found. Diagnosis was achieved on conventional radiographs in 6 patients. Neither distance and angle measurements between odontoid and C1 nor the dorsal alignment of the vertebral bodies differed significantly between healthy and affected patients. Decentralization of the odontoid process is not necessarily an indirect sign for its fracture. In patients with suspected injury of the odontoid process, an MDCT scan might be the method of choice to rule out a fracture.

  13. Measurement of the $\\eta_c (1S)$ production cross-section in proton-proton collisions via the decay $\\eta_c (1S) \\rightarrow p \\bar{p}$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adeva, Bernardo; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Graverini, Elena; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gavrilov, Gennadii; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The production of the $\\eta_c (1S)$ state in proton-proton collisions is probed via its decay to the $p \\bar{p}$ final state with the LHCb detector, in the rapidity range $2.0 6.5$ GeV/c. The cross-section for prompt production of $\\eta_c (1S)$ mesons relative to the prompt $J/\\psi$ cross-section is measured, for the first time, to be $\\sigma_{\\eta_c (1S)}/\\sigma_{J/\\psi} = 1.74 \\pm 0.29 \\pm 0.28 \\pm 0.18 _{B}$ at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.7 fb$^{-1}$, and $\\sigma_{\\eta_c (1S)}/\\sigma_{J/\\psi} = 1.60 \\pm 0.29 \\pm 0.25 \\pm 0.17 _{B}$ at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV using 2.0 fb$^{-1}$. The uncertainties quoted are, in order, statistical, systematic, and that on the ratio of branching fractions of the $\\eta_c (1S)$ and $J/\\psi$ decays to the $p \\bar{p}$ final state. In addition, the inclusive branching fraction of $b$-hadron decays into $\\eta_c (1S)$ mesons is measured, for the first time, to be $B ( b \\rightarrow \\eta_c X ) = (4.88 \\pm 0.64 \\pm ...

  14. C1 Rational Quadratic Trigonometric Interpolation Spline for Data Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengjun Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new C1 piecewise rational quadratic trigonometric spline with four local positive shape parameters in each subinterval is constructed to visualize the given planar data. Constraints are derived on these free shape parameters to generate shape preserving interpolation curves for positive and/or monotonic data sets. Two of these shape parameters are constrained while the other two can be set free to interactively control the shape of the curves. Moreover, the order of approximation of developed interpolant is investigated as O(h3. Numeric experiments demonstrate that our method can construct nice shape preserving interpolation curves efficiently.

  15. Reduction of CO2 to C1 products and fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mill, T.; Ross, D.

    2002-01-01

    Photochemical semiconductor processes readily reduced CO2 to a broad range of C1 products. However the intrinsic and solar efficiencies for the processes were low. Improved quantum efficiencies could be realized utilizing quantum-sized particles, but at the expense of using less of the visible solar spectrum. Conversely, semiconductors with small bandgaps used more of the visible solar spectrum at the expense of quantum efficiency. Thermal reduction of CO2 with Fe(II) was thermodynamically favored for forming many kinds of organic compounds and occurred readily with olivine and other Fe(II) minerals above 200??C to form higher alkanes and alkenes. No added hydrogen was required.

  16. C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency and elective caesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, R J; O'Sullivan, G

    2005-07-01

    C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency is a rare disorder of the complement system characterised by episodes of cutaneous and mucosal oedema. Life-threatening airway oedema can follow airway instrumentation or minor trauma. We describe the successful management of a 37-year-old primiparous woman with inherited C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency who was admitted at 38 weeks' gestation for elective caesarean section. Whilst undergoing general anaesthesia 18 months previously she had experienced facial and pharyngeal oedema despite prophylaxis (one unit of fresh frozen plasma). On this occasion she underwent elective caesarean section following intrathecal anaesthesia with 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine 2 mL and diamorphine 300 microg. Cardiovascular stability was ensured using glycopyrolate and intravenous Hartmann's solution 2 L; a live female infant was delivered successfully. There were no peri- or postoperative complications. Regional anaesthesia is the safest method for providing surgical anaesthesia in the obstetric patient. We believe elective caesarean section under regional anaesthesia should be considered if there are predicted difficulties with vaginal delivery.

  17. Research on simulation calculation method of biomechanical characteristics of C1-3 motion segment damage mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Ju-ying

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To develop the finite element model (FEM of cervical spinal C1-3 motion segment, and to make biomechanical finite element analysis (FEA on C1-3 motion segment and thus simulate the biomechanical characteristics of C1-3 motion segment in distraction violence, compression violence, hyperextension violence and hyperflexion violence. Methods According to CT radiological data of a healthy adult, the vertebrae and intervertebral discs of cervical spinal C1-3 motion segment were respectively reconstructed by Mimics 10.01 software and Geomagic 10.0 software. The FEM of C1-3 motion segment was reconstructed by attaching the corresponding material properties of cervical spine in Ansys software. The biomechanical characteristics of cervical spinal C1-3 motion segment model were simulated under the 4 loadings of distraction violence, compression violence, hyperextension violence and hyperflexion violence by finite element method. Results In the loading of longitudinal stretch, the stress was relatively concentrated in the anterior arch of atlas, atlantoaxial joint and C3 lamina and spinous process. In the longitudinal compressive loads, the maximum stress of the upper cervical spine was located in the anterior arch of atlas. In the loading of hyperextension moment, the stress was larger in the massa lateralis atlantis, the lateral and posterior arch junction of atlas, the posterior arch nodules of the atlas, superior articular surface of axis and C2 isthmus. In the loading of hyperflexion moment, the stress was relatively concentrated in the odontoid process of axis, the posterior arch of atlas, the posterior arch nodules of atlas, C2 isthmic and C2 inferior articular process. Conclusion Finite element biomechanical testing of C1-3 motion segment can predict the biomechanical mechanism of upper cervical spine injury.

  18. Traumatic posterior atlantoaxial dislocation without related fractures of C1-C2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruti Kambali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior dislocation without any associated fracture of odontoid is exceedingly rare and only 11 cases have been reported so far. A 32 year old male presented with pain, stiffness in neck, difficulty in breathing, associated lacerations on face and deformity of mandible and inability to open mouth. His plain radiographs, CT scan, MRI demonstrated a posterior dislocation of the atlas with respect of axis and a flake of bone from odontoid process on CT scan. He was successfully managed by closed reduction, C1C2 lateral mars pedicular screw stabilization and inter facetal fusion with synthetic bone graft substitute. At 10 months followup he had lost only 30° cervical rotation. The case is reported in view of rarity and to discuss the treatment rationale.

  19. Intestinal and Hepatic Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Woo Park

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Polytopic transmembrane protein, Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1 is localized at the apical membrane of enterocytes and the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. It mediates intestinal cholesterol absorption and prevents extensive loss of cholesterol by transporting biliary cholesterol into hepatocytes. NPC1L1 is a molecular target of ezetimibe, an agent for hypercholesterolemia. Recently, NPC1L1 inhibition has been shown to prevent metabolic disorders such as fatty liver disease, obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. In this review, the identification and characterization of NPC1L1, NPC1L1-dependent cholesterol transport, the relationship with pathogenesis of metabolic disease and its newly introduced function for virus entry are discussed.

  20. Plasma enhanced C1 chemistry for green technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro

    2013-09-01

    Plasma catalysis is one of the innovative next generation green technologies that meet the needs for energy and materials conservation as well as environmental protection. Non-thermal plasma uniquely generates reactive species independently of reaction temperature, and these species are used to initiate chemical reactions at unexpectedly lower temperatures than normal thermochemical reactions. Non-thermal plasma thus broadens the operation window of existing chemical conversion processes, and ultimately allows modification of the process parameters to minimize energy and material consumption. We have been specifically focusing on dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) as one of the viable non-thermal plasma sources for practical fuel reforming. In the presentation, room temperature one-step conversion of methane to methanol and hydrogen using a miniaturized DBD reactor (microplasma reactor) is highlighted. The practical impact of plasma technology on existing C1-chemistry is introduced, and then unique characteristics of plasma fuel reforming such as non-equilibrium product distribution is discussed.

  1. A Selection of Recent Advances in C1 Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesters, Carl

    2016-06-07

    This review presents a selection of recent publications related to the chemistry and catalysis of C1 molecules, including methane, methanol, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. These molecules play an important role in the current supply of energy and chemicals and will likely become even more relevant because of the need to decarbonize fuels (shift from coal to natural gas) in line with CO2 capture and use to mitigate global warming, as well as a gradual shift on the supply side from crude oil to natural gas. This review includes both recent industrial developments, such as the huge increase in methanol-to-olefins-capacity build in China and the demonstration of oxidative coupling of methane, and scientific developments in these chemistries facilitated by improved capabilities in, for example, analytical tools and computational modeling.

  2. Primary Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... When symptoms begin, PLS may be mistaken for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or spastic paraplegia. Most neurologists follow an ... When symptoms begin, PLS may be mistaken for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or spastic paraplegia. Most neurologists follow an ...

  3. Lateral collateral ligament (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The lateral collateral ligament connects the end of the femur (thigh) to the top of the fibula (the thin bone that runs next to the shin bone). The lateral collateral ligament provides stability against varus stress. Varus stress is ...

  4. Lateral flow strip assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Robin R [Danville, CA; Benett, William J [Livermore, CA; Coleman, Matthew A [Oakland, CA; Pearson, Francesca S [Livermore, CA; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L [Livermore, CA

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  5. Precise measurement of the $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ resonance parameters with the decays $\\chi_{c1,c2}\\to J\\psi\\mu^+\\mu^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; LHCb Collaboration; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Alfonso Albero, Alejandro; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Atzeni, Michele; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Baranov, Alexander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baryshnikov, Fedor; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Beiter, Andrew; Bel, Lennaert; Beliy, Nikita; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Beranek, Sarah; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Berninghoff, Daniel; Bertholet, Emilie; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betancourt, Christopher; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørn, Mikkel; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bordyuzhin, Igor; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brundu, Davide; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Byczynski, Wiktor; Cadeddu, Sandro; Cai, Hao; Calabrese, Roberto; Calladine, Ryan; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Cattaneo, Marco; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Chamont, David; Chapman, Matthew George; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu Faye; Chitic, Stefan-Gabriel; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Chubykin, Alexsei; Ciambrone, Paolo; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Colombo, Tommaso; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Del Buono, Luigi; Dembinski, Hans Peter; Demmer, Moritz; Dendek, Adam; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Douglas, Lauren; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziewiecki, Michal; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fazzini, Davide; Federici, Luca; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez, Gerard; Fernandez Declara, Placido; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Funk, Wolfgang; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gabriel, Emmy; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, Vladimir; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Govorkova, Ekaterina; Grabowski, Jascha Peter; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greim, Roman; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruber, Lukas; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hancock, Thomas Henry; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Hasse, Christoph; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Hecker, Malte; Heinicke, Kevin; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hopchev, Plamen Hristov; Hu, Wenhua; Huard, Zachary; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hutchcroft, David; Ibis, Philipp; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kazeev, Nikita; Kecke, Matthieu; Keizer, Floris; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Kopecna, Renata; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kosmyntseva, Alena; Kotriakhova, Sofia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreps, Michal; Kress, Felix Johannes; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Pei-Rong; Li, Tenglin; Li, Yiming; Li, Zhuoming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Lionetto, Federica; Lisovskyi, Vitalii; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Loi, Angelo; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luchinsky, Alexey; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Macko, Vladimir; Mackowiak, Patrick; Maddrell-Mander, Samuel; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Maisuzenko, Dmitrii; Majewski, Maciej Witold; Malde, Sneha; Malecki, Bartosz; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Marangotto, Daniele; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marinangeli, Matthieu; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurice, Emilie; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Mead, James Vincent; Meadows, Brian; Meaux, Cedric; Meier, Frank; Meinert, Nis; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Millard, Edward James; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Minzoni, Luca; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Mombächer, Titus; Monroy, Igancio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Morgunova, Olga; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Nogay, Alla; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Ossowska, Anna; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palutan, Matteo; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pisani, Flavio; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Placinta, Vlad-Mihai; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poli Lener, Marco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Ponce, Sebastien; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Pullen, Hannah Louise; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Quintana, Boris; Rachwal, Bartlomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Ratnikov, Fedor; Raven, Gerhard; Ravonel Salzgeber, Melody; Reboud, Meril; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Robert, Arnaud; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Ruiz Vidal, Joan; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarpis, Gediminas; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schreiner, HF; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepulveda, Eduardo Enrique; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Soares Lavra, Lais; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stepanova, Margarita; Stevens, Holger; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Jiayin; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szumlak, Tomasz; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Toriello, Francis; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, Rafael; Tournefier, Edwige; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Usachov, Andrii; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagner, Alexander; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Verlage, Tobias Anton; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Viemann, Harald; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vitti, Marcela; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Weisser, Constantin; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Winn, Michael Andreas; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Menglin; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yang, Zishuo; Yao, Yuezhe; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zonneveld, Jennifer Brigitta; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The decays $\\chi_{c1} \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ and $\\chi_{c2} \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ are observed and used to study the resonance parameters of the $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ mesons. The masses of these states are measured to be \\begin{align*} m(\\chi_{c1}) = 3510.71 \\pm 0.04(stat) \\pm 0.09(syst)~ \\text{MeV}\\,, \\\\ m(\\chi_{c2}) = 3556.10 \\pm 0.06(stat) \\pm 0.11(syst)~ \\text{MeV}\\,, \\end{align*} where the knowledge of the momentum scale for charged particles dominates the systematic uncertainty. The momentum-scale uncertainties largely cancel in the mass difference \\begin{equation*} m(\\chi_{c2}) - m(\\chi_{c1}) = 45.39 \\pm 0.07(stat) \\pm 0.03(syst)~ \\text{MeV}. \\end{equation*} The natural width of the $\\chi_{c2}$ meson is measured to be \\begin{equation*} \\Gamma(\\chi_{c2}) = 2.10 \\pm 0.20(stat) \\pm 0.02(syst)~ \\text{MeV}. \\end{equation*} These results are in good agreement with and have comparable precision to the current world averages.

  6. Catalytic routes to fuels from C1 and oxygenate molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Agirrezabal-Telleria, Iker; Bhan, Aditya; Simonetti, Dante; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Iglesia, Enrique

    2017-04-28

    This account illustrates concepts in chemical kinetics underpinned by the formalism of transition state theory using catalytic processes that enable the synthesis of molecules suitable as fuels from C1 and oxygenate reactants. Such feedstocks provide an essential bridge towards a carbon-free energy future, but their volatility and low energy density require the formation of new C-C bonds and the removal of oxygen. These transformations are described here through recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and site requirements in catalysis by surfaces, with emphasis on enabling concepts that tackle ubiquitous reactivity and selectivity challenges. The hurdles in forming the first C-C bond from C1 molecules are illustrated by the oxidative coupling of methane, in which surface O-atoms form OH radicals from O2 and H2O molecules. These gaseous OH species act as strong H-abstractors and activate C-H bonds with earlier transition states than oxide surfaces, thus rendering activation rates less sensitive to the weaker C-H bonds in larger alkane products than in CH4 reactants. Anhydrous carbonylation of dimethyl ether forms a single C-C bond on protons residing within inorganic voids that preferentially stabilize the kinetically-relevant transition state through van der Waals interactions that compensate for the weak CO nucleophile. Similar solvation effects, but by intrapore liquids instead of inorganic hosts, also become evident as alkenes condense within MCM-41 channels containing isolated Ni(2+) active sites during dimerization reactions. Intrapore liquids preferentially stabilize transition states for C-C bond formation and product desorption, leading to unprecedented reactivity and site stability at sub-ambient temperatures and to 1-alkene dimer selectivities previously achieved only on organometallic systems with co-catalysts or activators. C1 homologation selectively forms C4 and C7 chains with a specific backbone (isobutane, triptane) on solid acids

  7. Catalytic routes to fuels from C1 and oxygenate molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Shuai

    2017-02-23

    This account illustrates concepts in chemical kinetics underpinned by the formalism of transition state theory using catalytic processes that enable the synthesis of molecules suitable as fuels from C-1 and oxygenate reactants. Such feedstocks provide an essential bridge towards a carbon-free energy future, but their volatility and low energy density require the formation of new C-C bonds and the removal of oxygen. These transformations are described here through recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and site requirements in catalysis by surfaces, with emphasis on enabling concepts that tackle ubiquitous reactivity and selectivity challenges. The hurdles in forming the first C-C bond from C-1 molecules are illustrated by the oxidative coupling of methane, in which surface O-atoms form OH radicals from O-2 and H2O molecules. These gaseous OH species act as strong H-abstractors and activate C-H bonds with earlier transition states than oxide surfaces, thus rendering activation rates less sensitive to the weaker C-H bonds in larger alkane products than in CH4 reactants. Anhydrous carbonylation of dimethyl ether forms a single C-C bond on protons residing within inorganic voids that preferentially stabilize the kinetically-relevant transition state through van der Waals interactions that compensate for the weak CO nucleophile. Similar solvation effects, but by intrapore liquids instead of inorganic hosts, also become evident as alkenes condense within MCM-41 channels containing isolated Ni2+ active sites during dimerization reactions. Intrapore liquids preferentially stabilize transition states for C-C bond formation and product desorption, leading to unprecedented reactivity and site stability at sub-ambient temperatures and to 1-alkene dimer selectivities previously achieved only on organometallic systems with co-catalysts or activators. C-1 homologation selectively forms C-4 and C-7 chains with a specific backbone (isobutane, triptane) on solid

  8. Study of the decay $B^0 \\to \\chi_{c1} K^+ \\pi^-$ and search of exotic resonances at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Sbordone, Francesco; Alves Junior, Antonio Augusto

    In 2008 the Belle Collaboration reported the observation of two charged resonance-like structures in the ${\\chi_c}_1 \\pi^-$ mass spectrum produced in the decay $B^0 \\to {\\chi_c}_1 K^+ \\pi^-$. These were labelled as $Z_1(4050)^-$ and $Z_2(4250)^-$. Alternatively, a single wider resonance hypothesis was also pursued by Belle, and labelled as $Z(4150)^-$. The fact that these are charged states would be a clear sample, if they really exist, of four quark bound systems; for this reason this observation has given rise to a great deal of interest. In 2012 the BABAR Collaboration has searched for these resonances in the channels $B^{0,+} \\to {\\chi_c}_1 K^{+,0} \\pi^-$ and did not find any evidence of them. In this thesis a search for these claimed exotic charmonium-like states $Z_1(4050)^-$ and $Z_2(4250)^-$ is presented, in the decay $B^0 \\to {\\chi_c}_1 K^+ \\pi^-$, where ${\\chi_c}_1 \\to J/\\psi \\gamma$ and $J/\\psi \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$. Charged conjugate are implied throughout the whole thesis. The analysis is performed us...

  9. Characterization of the T-cell response to Dau c 1, the Bet v 1-homolog in carrot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulehner, N; Nagl, B; Briza, P; Roulias, A; Ballmer-Weber, B; Zlabinger, G J; Ferreira, F; Bohle, B

    2017-02-01

    In contrast to other Bet v 1-related food allergens, the major carrot allergen, Dau c 1, has been suggested to induce food allergy independently from Bet v 1. As T cells are crucial in the sensitization process, we sought to characterize the T-cell response to Dau c 1 and its cross-reactivity with Bet v 1. Dau c 1-specific T-cell lines (TCL) and clones (TCC) established from PBMC of birch pollen-allergic patients with carrot allergy were analyzed for reactivity to Bet v 1, epitope specificity, allergen-induced cytokine secretion, and expression of integrins α4β7 and α4β1, critical for gut and lung homing, respectively. mRNA expression of GATA3 and Tbet was analyzed in sorted CD3+ CD4+ CFSElow cells proliferating upon stimulation of PBMC with Dau c 1 or Bet v 1. Dau c 1 was incubated with endolysosomal proteases, and the resulting fragments were identified by mass spectrometry. Among 14 distinct T-cell-activating regions, Dau c 1139-153 was recognized by 55% of the patients. Only 6 of 15 (40%) Dau c 1-specific TCL and 9 of 21 (43%) TCC reacted with Bet v 1. Bet v 1-nonreactive TCC were mainly Th1-like and showed a higher expression of the integrin β7 and a significantly lower expression of the integrin β1 than Bet v 1-positive TCC. A Th1-like response was also detected in Dau c 1-reactive CD3+ CD4+ CFSElow cells. Full-length Dau c 1 was still detectable after 48 h of endolysosomal degradation. Proteolytic fragments of Dau c 1 matched its T-cell-activating regions. Dau c 1 displays several characteristics of sensitizing allergens, namely a major T-cell-activating region, low susceptibility to endolysosomal degradation, and induction of a Bet v 1-independent T-cell response. These cellular insights confirm that the major carrot allergen has a special status among Bet v 1-related food allergens. © 2016 The Authors. Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Cell-specific deletion of C1qa identifies microglia as the dominant source of C1q in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Maria I; Chu, Shu-Hui; Hernandez, Michael X; Fang, Melody J; Modarresi, Lila; Selvan, Pooja; MacGregor, Grant R; Tenner, Andrea J

    2017-03-06

    The complement cascade not only provides protection from infection but can also mediate destructive inflammation. Complement is also involved in elimination of neuronal synapses which is essential for proper development, but can be detrimental during aging and disease. C1q, required for several of these complement-mediated activities, is present in the neuropil, microglia, and a subset of interneurons in the brain. To identify the source(s) of C1q in the brain, the C1qa gene was selectively inactivated in the microglia or Thy-1+ neurons in both wild type mice and a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and C1q synthesis assessed by immunohistochemistry, QPCR, and western blot analysis. While C1q expression in the brain was unaffected after inactivation of C1qa in Thy-1+ neurons, the brains of C1qa FL/FL :Cx3cr1 CreERT2 mice in which C1qa was ablated in microglia were devoid of C1q with the exception of limited C1q in subsets of interneurons. Surprisingly, this loss of C1q occurred even in the absence of tamoxifen by 1 month of age, demonstrating that Cre activity is tamoxifen-independent in microglia in Cx3cr1 CreERT2/WganJ mice. C1q expression in C1qa FL/FL : Cx3cr1 CreERT2/WganJ mice continued to decline and remained almost completely absent through aging and in AD model mice. No difference in C1q was detected in the liver or kidney from C1qa FL/FL : Cx3cr1 CreERT2/WganJ mice relative to controls, and C1qa FL/FL : Cx3cr1 CreERT2/WganJ mice had minimal, if any, reduction in plasma C1q. Thus, microglia, but not neurons or peripheral sources, are the dominant source of C1q in the brain. While demonstrating that the Cx3cr1 CreERT2/WganJ deleter cannot be used for adult-induced deletion of genes in microglia, the model described here enables further investigation of physiological roles of C1q in the brain and identification of therapeutic targets for the selective control of complement-mediated activities contributing to neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. The role of ficolins and MASPs in hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csuka, Dorottya; Munthe-Fog, Lea; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency (HAE-C1-INH) causes disturbances in the complement system. However, the influence of HAE-C1-INH on the lectin pathway of complement is unresolved. Thus, we studied the main initiator molecules, enzymes and regulators in the lectin pathway...... in patients with HAE-C1-INH....

  12. Structure and activation of C1, the complex initiating the classical pathway of the complement cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Simon A; Sander, Bjoern; Jensen, Rasmus K; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Golas, Monika M; Jensenius, Jens C; Hansen, Annette G; Thiel, Steffen; Andersen, Gregers R

    2017-01-31

    The complement system is an important antimicrobial and inflammation-generating component of the innate immune system. The classical pathway of complement is activated upon binding of the 774-kDa C1 complex, consisting of the recognition molecule C1q and the tetrameric protease complex C1r2s2, to a variety of activators presenting specific molecular patterns such as IgG- and IgM-containing immune complexes. A canonical model entails a C1r2s2 with its serine protease domains tightly packed together in the center of C1 and an intricate intramolecular reaction mechanism for activation of C1r and C1s, induced upon C1 binding to the activator. Here, we show that the serine protease domains of C1r and C1s are located at the periphery of the C1r2s2 tetramer both when alone or within the nonactivated C1 complex. Our structural studies indicate that the C1 complex adopts a conformation incompatible with intramolecular activation of C1, suggesting instead that intermolecular proteolytic activation between neighboring C1 complexes bound to a complement activating surface occurs. Our results rationalize how a multitude of structurally unrelated molecular patterns can activate C1 and suggests a conserved mechanism for complement activation through the classical and the related lectin pathway.

  13. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1IB6C-1SMKC [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1IB6C-1SMKC 1IB6 1SMK C C -MKVAVLGAAGGIGQALALLLKTQLPSGSELSLYDIAPVTPGVAVDLSHIPTAVKI...TLKKDIALGQEFVNK GFKVAILGAAGGIGQPLAMLMKM-NPLVSVLHLYDVV-NAPGVTADISHMDTGAVVRGFLGQQQLEAALTG... 1SMK C 1SMKC 1SMK C 1SMKC 1SMK C 1SMKC MLMKM-NPLVS

  14. Size distribution and chemical composition of secondary organic aerosol formed from C1-initiated oxidation of toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mingqiang; Zhang, Weijun; Gu, Xuejun; Hu, Changjin; Zhao, Weixiong; Wang, Zhenya; Fang, Li

    2012-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from C1-initiated oxidation of toluene was investigated in a home-made smog chamber. The size distribution and chemical composition of SOA particles were measured using aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer and the aerosol laser time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ALTOFMS), respectively. According to a large number of single aerosol diameter and mass spectra, the size distribution and chemical composition of SOA were obtained statistically. Experimental results showed that SOA particles created by C1-initiated oxidation of toluene is predominantly in the form of fine particles, which have diameters less than 2.5 microm (i.e., PM2.5), and glyoxal, benzaldehyde, benzyl alcohol, benzoquinone, benzoic acid, benzyl hydroperoxide and benzyl methyl nitrate are the major products components in the SOA. The possible reaction mechanisms leading to these products are also proposed.

  15. XMM-Newton study of the supersoft symbiotic system Draco C1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedi, Sara; Sasaki, Manami; Ducci, Lorenzo

    2018-01-01

    We present the results of the analysis of thirty-one XMM-Newton observations of the symbiotic star Draco C1 located in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy. This object had been identified as a supersoft source based on ROSAT data. We analysed X-ray, ultraviolet (UV) and optical data taken with XMM-Newton in order to obtain the physical parameters and the geometry of the system. We have also performed the first X-ray timing analysis of Draco C1. The X-ray spectrum is well fitted with a blackbody model with a temperature of (1.8 ± 0.3) × 105 K. We obtained a bolometric luminosity of ≳1038 erg s-1 for the white dwarf. The X-ray spectrum and luminosity suggest stable nuclear burning on the surface of the white dwarf. The low column density derived from the X-ray spectrum is consistent with the lack of nebular lines found in previous UV studies. The long-term variability in the optical and the UV suggests that the system is not observed face-on and that the variability is caused by the reflection effect. For the red giant companion, we estimate a radius of ∼110 R⊙ and an upper limit ≲1.5 M⊙ for its mass assuming Roche lobe overflow.

  16. [Investigation of C1R gene frequencies in three Han populations in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Z; Gou, Q; Wu, J; Hou, Y

    1997-12-01

    To reveal the C1R polymorphism in Chinese, three Han populations in Guangzhou (101 samples), Jilin (105 samples) and Chengdu (111 samples) were investigated with a technique using PAGIF followed by immunoblotting. The results showed in Chengdu the C1R * 1 = 0.5676, C1R * 2 = 0.3424 and C1R * 5 = 0.0856, in Guangzhou C1R * 1 = 0.5248, C1R * 2 = 0.2663 and C1R * 5 = 0.1089, and in Jilin C1R * 1 = 0.5381, C1R * 2 = 0.2619 and C1R * 5 = 0.1714. Three rare genes C1R * 6, C1R * 7 and C1R * 8 were found in the investigation. These indicate that the frequency of C1R * 2 is elevated from north to south which may imply a geographic cline in this locus. The cumulated heterogeneity of C1R in Han population is 61.5% which means that this polymorphic system is useful in anthropolgy as well as in forensic science.

  17. High-affinity, noninhibitory pathogenic C1 domain antibodies are present in patients with hemophilia A and inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batsuli, Glaivy; Deng, Wei; Healey, John F; Parker, Ernest T; Baldwin, W Hunter; Cox, Courtney; Nguyen, Brenda; Kahle, Joerg; Königs, Christoph; Li, Renhao; Lollar, Pete; Meeks, Shannon L

    2016-10-20

    Inhibitor formation in hemophilia A is the most feared treatment-related complication of factor VIII (fVIII) therapy. Most inhibitor patients with hemophilia A develop antibodies against the fVIII A2 and C2 domains. Recent evidence demonstrates that the C1 domain contributes to the inhibitor response. Inhibitory anti-C1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been identified that bind to putative phospholipid and von Willebrand factor (VWF) binding epitopes and block endocytosis of fVIII by antigen presenting cells. We now demonstrate by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry that 7 of 9 anti-human C1 mAbs tested recognize an epitope distinct from the C1 phospholipid binding site. These mAbs, designated group A, display high binding affinities for fVIII, weakly inhibit fVIII procoagulant activity, poorly inhibit fVIII binding to phospholipid, and exhibit heterogeneity with respect to blocking fVIII binding to VWF. Another mAb, designated group B, inhibits fVIII procoagulant activity, fVIII binding to VWF and phospholipid, fVIIIa incorporation into the intrinsic Xase complex, thrombin generation in plasma, and fVIII uptake by dendritic cells. Group A and B epitopes are distinct from the epitope recognized by the canonical, human-derived inhibitory anti-C1 mAb, KM33, whose epitope overlaps both groups A and B. Antibodies recognizing group A and B epitopes are present in inhibitor plasmas from patients with hemophilia A. Additionally, group A and B mAbs increase fVIII clearance and are pathogenic in a hemophilia A mouse tail snip bleeding model. Group A anti-C1 mAbs represent the first identification of pathogenic, weakly inhibitory antibodies that increase fVIII clearance. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  18. C1q nephropathy in India: A single-center study

    OpenAIRE

    K V Kanodia; Vanikar, A. V.; Patel, R.D.; Suthar, K. S.; Patel, H. V.; M A Gumber; Shah, P. R.; Trivedi, H. L.

    2015-01-01

    C1q nephropathy (C1qN) is defined by conspicuous C1q deposits in the glomerular mesangial regions of patients who do not have any evidence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We present our experience with C1qN over the last three years. In total, 1775 native renal biopsies were reviewed and dominant/co-dominant C1q mesangial deposits in patients with absence of clinical and/or serological evidence of SLE were considered as C1qN. Their clinical profile and renal function status were studie...

  19. Immunohistochemical localization of C1 subunit of V-ATPase (ATPase C1) in oral squamous cell cancer and normal oral mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, A; Pérez-Sayáns García, M; Rodríguez, M J; Antúnez-López, J; Barros-Angueira, F; Somoza-Martín, M; Gándara-Rey, J M; Aguirre-Urízar, J M

    2012-02-01

    The ATP6V1C1 gene encodes the C1 subunit of the vacuolar-ATPase (V-ATPase) proton pump. This gene is over-expressed in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) as determined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The aim of our study was to perform an immunohistochemical study of the distribution of the C1 subunit in normal epithelium of the oral cavity and in OSCC. We analyzed the expression of the C1 subunit in eight OSCC samples and two normal oral mucosa samples using polyclonal V-ATPase C1 antibody (clone H-300). In the normal oral mucosa samples, C1 subunit staining was observed in the basal and intermediate layers of the epithelium. No staining was visible in the keratinized superficial layers. More intense staining was observed in the OSCC samples, with the predominant expression at the periphery of tumor nests and absence of expression in dyskeratotic areas. C1 subunit expression in tumor cells was predominantly cytoplasmic, although there was perinuclear and nuclear expression in some samples. These findings demonstrate that V-ATPase is necessary for proper epithelial functioning and show its importance in the development of OSCC as evidenced by the over-expression of ATP6V1C1 in OSCC.

  20. Genetic analysis of complement C1s deficiency associated with systemic lupus erythematosus highlights alternative splicing of normal C1s gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armano, MT; Ferriani, VP; Florido, MP

    2008-01-01

    Deficiencies of complement proteins of the classical pathway are strongly associated with the development of autoimmune diseases. Deficiency of C1r has been observed to occur concomitantly with deficiency in C1s and 9 out of 15 reported cases presented systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here, we...

  1. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Division of Neuroscience Director, NIH BRAIN Initiative® Health Scientist Administrator Channels Synapses Circuits Cluster Scientific Director, Division of Intramural Research Featured Director's Message menu search Enter Search Term Submit Search Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis ( ...

  2. The lateral angle revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Jeannie; Lynnerup, Niels; Hoppa, R.D.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the results of a validation study of a previously published method of sex determination from the temporal bone. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the lateral angle method for the internal acoustic canal for accurately determining the sex of human skeletal remains using...... measurements taken from computed tomography (CT) scans. Previous reports have observed that the lateral angle size in females is significantly larger than in males. The method was applied to an independent series of 77 postmortem CT scans (42 males, 35 females) to validate its accuracy and reliability....... The mean lateral angle of the internal acoustic canal was found to be larger in females (46.5°) than in males (43.4°). However, the difference was not statistically significant and the sex differences reported in previous studies were not substantiated. In light of the observed results, the lateral angle...

  3. Homozygosity for a novel mutation in the C1q C chain gene in a Turkish family with hereditary C1q deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulez, N; Genel, F; Atlihan, F

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary complete deficiency of complement component C1q is associated with a high prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus and increased susceptibility to severe recurrent infections. An 11-year-old girl was screened for immunodeficiency due to a history of recurrent meningitis and pneumonia....... Immunologic studies revealed absence of classic pathway hemolytic activity and undetectable levels of Clq. Exon-specific amplification of genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequence analysis revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation at codon 48 in the C1q C gene causing a glycine......-to-arginine substitution affecting the collagen-like region of C1q. No changes were seen in the exons of the A and B chains. The mutation affected both the formation and the secretion of C1q variant molecules. We describe a novel mutation in the C1q C chain gene that leads to an interchange in amino acids resulting...

  4. Pathways of lateral spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, U; Schanzer, S; Weigmann, H-J; Patzelt, A; Vergou, T; Sterry, W; Lademann, J

    2011-01-01

    In the case of topically applied substances, usually both lateral spreading and competitive penetration into the skin occur in parallel. In the present study, the pathways of lateral spreading were studied quantitatively and visually. The local distribution and lateral spreading of the UV filter substance butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane applied in an o/w emulsion was studied on the forearm and the back. The tape stripping procedure was used to determine the recovery rates inside and outside the area of application. The skin characteristics of transepidermal water loss, pH value, hydration of the stratum corneum and sebum rate were determined at both anatomic sites. Photography and laser scanning microscopy were used to visually investigate the lateral spreading of topically applied dyes. On the back, a preferred direction of lateral spreading parallel to the body axis was observed. This result was caused by differences in the network of furrows. The furrows functioned as a pathway for lateral spreading, whereas the follicles formed a reservoir for the topically applied substance. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. 17 CFR 270.22c-1 - Pricing of redeemable securities for distribution, redemption and repurchase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pricing of redeemable securities for distribution, redemption and repurchase. 270.22c-1 Section 270.22c-1 Commodity and Securities... 1940 § 270.22c-1 Pricing of redeemable securities for distribution, redemption and repurchase. (a) No...

  6. Safety of C1-Esterase Inhibitor in Acute and Prophylactic Therapy of Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busse, Paula; Bygum, Anette; Edelman, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The plasma-derived, pasteurized C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) concentrate, Berinert has a 4-decade history of use in hereditary angioedema (HAE), with a substantial literature base that demonstrates safety and efficacy. Thromboembolic events have rarely been reported with C1-INH products, typ...

  7. 26 CFR 1.860C-1 - Taxation of holders of residual interests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Taxation of holders of residual interests. 1.860C-1 Section 1.860C-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Real Estate Investment Trusts § 1.860C-1 Taxation of holders...

  8. Marked variability in clinical presentation and outcome of patients with C1q immunodeficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Schaarenburg, Rosanne A; Schejbel, Lone; Truedsson, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Globally approximately 60 cases of C1q deficiency have been described with a high prevalence of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). So far treatment has been guided by the clinical presentation rather than the underlying C1q deficiency. Recently, it was shown that C1q production can be...

  9. 26 CFR 1.666(c)-1A - Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed. 1.666(c)-1A Section 1.666(c)-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(c)-1A Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed...

  10. 26 CFR 1.666(c)-1 - Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed. 1.666(c)-1 Section 1.666(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(c)-1 Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed...

  11. Effects of fenofibrate on hyperlipidemia and postprandial triglyceride metabolism in human apolipoprotein C1 transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, M.C.; Dahlmans, V.E.H.; Princen, H.M.G.; Hofker, M.H.; Havekes, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    To study the in vivo role of apolipoprotein (apo) C1 in lipoprotein metabolism, we have generated transgenic mice expressing the human apo C1 gene. Apo C1 is a small 6.6 kDa protein that is primarily synthesized by the liver and is present on chylomicrons, very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and

  12. 26 CFR 1.411(c)-1 - Allocation of accrued benefits between employer and employee contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.411(c)-1 Allocation of accrued benefits between employer and employee... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allocation of accrued benefits between employer and employee contributions. 1.411(c)-1 Section 1.411(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE...

  13. Prevalence and clinical significance of anti-C1q antibodies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autoantibodies against C1q are strongly linked to immune-complex disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although anti-C1q antibodies have received much interest in the recent years, their biological functions remain unclear. Anti-C1q antibodies are strongly associated with lupus nephritis. The aim of this ...

  14. Prevalence and clinical significance of anti-C1q antibodies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Asmaa Hegazy

    2012-04-21

    Apr 21, 2012 ... ponents of the complement system might be inactivated. Anti-. C1q antibodies were first identified as low-molecular weight. C1q precipitins in the sera of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus over 30years ago. Anti-C1q antibodies are strongly associated with the development of proliferative lupus.

  15. Presence of C1-Inhibitor Polymers in a Subset of Patients Suffering from Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elenius Madsen, Daniel; Hansen, Søren Werner Karlskov; Gram, Jørgen Brodersen

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a potentially life-threatening disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) C1 inhibitor (C1-inh). The mutations cause decreased functional plasma levels of C1-inh, which triggers unpredictable recurrent edema attacks...

  16. Biochemical aromatization of 2-methyleneandrostenedione: stereochemistry of hydrogen removal at the C-1 position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Handa, Wakako; Matsuzaki, Hisao

    2006-11-01

    To explore a stereochemistry of hydrogen removal at C-1 of the powerful aromatase inhibitor 2-methyleneandrostenedione (1), of which the A-ring conformation is markedly different from that of the natural substrate androstenedione (AD), in the course of the aromatase-catalyzed A-ring aromatization producing 2-methylestrone (2), we synthesized [1alpha-2H]labeled steroid 1 and its [1beta-2H]stereoisomer, and the metabolic fate of the C-1 deuterium in aromatization was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in each. Parallel experiments with the natural substrates [1alpha-2H] and [1beta-2H]ADs were also carried out. The GC-MS analysis indicated that 2-methyl estrogen 2 produced from [1alpha-2H]labeled substrate 1 retained completely the 1alpha-deuterium (1beta-H elimination), while product 2 obtained from [1beta-2H]isomer 1 lost completely the 1beta-deuterium. Stereospecific 1beta-hydrogen elimination was also observed in the parallel experiments with the labeled ADs as established previously. The results indicate that biochemical aromatization of the 2-methylene steroid 1 proceeds through the 1beta-hydrogen removal concomitant with cleavage of the C(10)-C(19) bond, yielding 1(10),4-dienone 9, in a similar manner to that involved in AD aromatization. This would give additional evidence for the stereomechanisms for the last step of aromatization of AD, requiring the stereospecific 1beta-hydrogen abstraction and cleavage of the C(10)-C(19) bond, and for the enolization of a carbonyl group at C-3 in the A-ring aromatization.

  17. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR assignments of the C1A and C1B subdomains of PKC-delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Brian P; Brian, P Ziemba; Booth, Jamie C; Jamie, C Booth; Jones, David N M; David, Jones N M

    2011-10-01

    The Protein Kinase C family of enzymes is a group of serine/threonine kinases that play central roles in cell-cycle regulation, development and cancer. A key step in the activation of PKC is translocation to membranes and binding of membrane-associated activators including diacylglycerol (DAG). Interaction of novel and conventional isotypes of PKC with DAG and phorbol esters occurs through the two C1 regulatory domains (C1A and C1B), which exhibit distinct ligand binding selectivity that likely controls enzyme activation by different co-activators. PKC has also been implicated in physiological responses to alcohol consumption and it has been proposed that PKCα (Slater et al. J Biol Chem 272(10):6167-6173, 1997; Slater et al. Biochemistry 43(23):7601-7609, 2004), PKCε (Das et al. Biochem J 421(3):405-413, 2009) and PKCδ (Das et al. J Biol Chem 279(36):37964-37972, 2004; Das et al. Protein Sci 15(9):2107-2119, 2006) contain specific alcohol-binding sites in their C1 domains. We are interested in understanding how ethanol affects signal transduction processes through its affects on the structure and function of the C1 domains of PKC. Here we present the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C NMR chemical shift assignments for the Rattus norvegicus PKCδ C1A and C1B proteins.

  18. Laterality in living beings, hand dominance, and cerebral lateralization

    OpenAIRE

    Milenković Sanja; Paunović Katarina; Kocijančić Dušica

    2016-01-01

    To date, lateralization in living beings is a phenomenon almost mythologically unexplored. Scientists have proved that lateralization is not exclusively a human feature. Investigations in molecular biology, protein structure, mobility of bacteria, and intracellular lateralization in ciliates, shows important and universal nature of lateralization in living systems. Dominant lateralization implies the appearance of a dominant extremity, or a dominant sense d...

  19. C1-inhibitor polymers activate the FXII-dependent kallikrein-kinin system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elenius Madsen, Daniel; Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen; Biltoft, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The FXII-dependent kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) is tightly regulated by the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) C1-inhibitor (C1-inh). When regulation of the FXII-dependent KKS fails, which is the case in hereditary angioedema (HAE), patients consequently experience invalidating edema...... attacks. HAE is caused by mutations in the C1-inh encoding gene, and we recently demonstrated that some mutations give rise to the presence of polymerized C1-inh in the plasma of HAE patients. METHODS: C1-inh polymers corresponding to the size of polymers observed in vivo were produced using heat...

  20. Laterally bendable belt conveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, William J.

    1985-01-01

    An endless, laterally flexible and bendable belt conveyor particularly adapted for coal mining applications in facilitating the transport of the extracted coal up- or downslope and around corners in a continuous manner is disclosed. The conveying means includes a flat rubber belt reinforced along the middle portion thereof along which the major portion of the belt tension is directed so as to cause rotation of the tubular shaped belt when trammed around lateral turns thus preventing excessive belt bulging distortion between adjacent belt supports which would inhibit belt transport. Pretension induced into the fabric reinforced flat rubber belt by conventional belt take-up means supports the load conveyed when the belt conveyor is making lateral turns. The carrying and return portions of the belt are supported and formed into a tubular shape by a plurality of shapers positioned along its length. Each shaper is supported from above by a monorail and includes clusters of idler rollers which support the belt. Additional cluster rollers in each shaper permit the belt supporting roller clusters to rotate in response to the belt's operating tension imposed upon the cluster rollers by induced lateral belt friction forces. The freely rotating roller clusters thus permit the belt to twist on lateral curves without damage to itself while precluding escape of the conveyed material by effectively enclosing it in the tube-shaped, inner belt transport length.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of a Chitinase-producing Biocontrol Bacterium Serratia sp. C-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seur Kee Park

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The chitinase-producing bacterial strain C-1 is one of the key chitinase-producing biocontrol agents used for effective bioformulations for biological control. These bioformulations are mixed cultures of various chitinolytic bacteria. However, the precise identification, biocontrol activity, and the underlying mechanisms of the strain C-1 have not been investigated so far. Therefore, we evaluated in planta biocontrol efficacies of C-1 and determined the draft genome sequence of the strain in this study. The bacterial C-1 strain was identified as a novel Serratia sp. by a phylogenic analysis of its 16S rRNA sequence. The Serratia sp. C-1 bacterial cultures showed strong in planta biocontrol efficacies against some major phytopathogenic fungal diseases. The draft genome sequence of Serratia sp. C-1 indicated that the C-1 strain is a novel strain harboring a subset of genes that may be involved in its biocontrol activities.

  2. Silencing of atp6v1c1 prevents breast cancer growth and bone metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shengmei; Zhu, Guochun; McConnell, Matthew; Deng, Lianfu; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Mengrui; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Jinshen; Qi, Jin; Li, Yi-Ping; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Atp6v1c1, a regulator of the assembly of the V0 and V1 domains of the V-ATPase complex, is up-regulated in metastatic oral tumors. Despite these studies, the function of Atp6v1c1 in tumor growth and metastasis is still unknown. Atp6v1c1's expression in metastatic oral squamous cell carcinoma indicates that Atp6v1c1 has an important function in cancer growth and metastasis. We hypothesized that elevated expression of Atp6v1c1 is essential to cancer growth and metastasis and that Atp6v1c1 promotes cancer growth and metastasis through activation of V-ATPase activity. To test this hypothesis, a Lentivirus-mediated RNAi knockdown approach was used to study the function of Atp6v1c1 in mouse 4T1 mammary tumor cell proliferation and migration in vitro and cancer growth and metastasis in vivo. Our data revealed that silencing of Atp6v1c1 in 4T1 cancer cells inhibited lysosomal acidification and severely impaired 4T1 cell growth, migration, and invasion through Matrigel in vitro. We also show that Atp6v1c1 knockdown with Lenti-c1s3, a lentivirus targeting Atp6v1c1 for shRNA mediated knockdown, can significantly inhibit 4T1 xenograft tumor growth, metastasis, and osteolytic lesions in vivo. Our study demonstrates that Atp6v1c1 may promote breast cancer growth and bone metastasis through regulation of lysosomal V-ATPase activity, indicating that Atp6v1c1 may be a viable target for breast cancer therapy and silencing of Atp6v1c1 may be an innovative therapeutic approach for the treatment and prevention of breast cancer growth and metastasis.

  3. Laterally loaded masonry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raun Gottfredsen, F.

    stress and increasing shear. The results show a transition to pure friction as the cohesion is gradually destroyed. An interface model of a mortar joint that can take into account this aspect has been developed. Laterally loaded masonry panels have also been tested and it is found to be characteristic...

  4. Onset dominance in lateralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyman, R L; Zurek, P M; Balakrishnan, U; Chiang, Y C

    1997-03-01

    Saberi and Perrott [Acustica 81, 272-275 (1995)] found that the in-head lateralization of a relatively long-duration pulse train could be controlled by the interaural delay of the single pulse pair that occurs at onset. The present study examined this further, using an acoustic pointer measure of lateralization, with stimulus manipulations designed to determine conditions under which lateralization was consistent with the interaural onset delay. The present stimuli were wideband pulse trains, noise-burst trains, and inharmonic complexes, 250 ms in duration, chosen for the ease with which interaural delays and correlations of select temporal segments of the stimulus could be manipulated. The stimulus factors studied were the periodicity of the ongoing part of the signal as well as the multiplicity and ambiguity of interaural delays. The results, in general, showed that the interaural onset delay controlled lateralization when the steady state binaural cues were relatively weak, either because the spectral components were only sparsely distributed across frequency or because the interaural time delays were ambiguous. Onset dominance can be disrupted by sudden stimulus changes within the train, and several examples of such changes are described. Individual subjects showed strong left-right asymmetries in onset effectiveness. The results have implications for understanding how onset and ongoing interaural delay cues contribute to the location estimates formed by the binaural auditory system.

  5. "Ictal" lateralized periodic discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen-Gupta, Indranil; Schuele, Stephan U; Macken, Micheal P; Kwasny, Mary J; Gerard, Elizabeth E

    2014-07-01

    Whether lateralized periodic discharges (LPDs) represent ictal or interictal phenomena, and even the circumstances in which they may represent one or the other, remains highly controversial. Lateralized periodic discharges are, however, widely accepted as being ictal when they are time-locked to clinically apparent symptoms. We sought to investigate the characteristics of "ictal" lateralized periodic discharges (ILPDs) defined by time-locked clinical symptoms in order to explore the utility of using this definition to dichotomize LPDs into "ictal" and "nonictal" categories. Our archive of all continuous EEG (cEEG) reports of adult inpatients undergoing prolonged EEG monitoring for nonelective indications between 2007 and 2011 was searched to identify all reports describing LPDs. Lateralized periodic discharges were considered ILPDs when they were reported as being consistently time-locked to clinical symptoms; LPDs lacking a clear time-locked correlate were considered to be "nonictal" lateralized periodic discharges (NILPDs). Patient charts and available neuroimaging studies were also reviewed. Neurophysiologic localization of LPDs, imaging findings, presence of seizures, discharge outcomes, and other demographic factors were compared between patients with ILPDs and those with NILPDs. p-Values were adjusted for false discovery rate (FDR). One thousand four hundred fifty-two patients underwent cEEG monitoring at our institution between 2007 and 2011. Lateralized periodic discharges were reported in 90 patients, 10 of whom met criteria for ILPDs. Nine of the patients with ILPDs demonstrated motor symptoms, and the remaining patient experienced stereotyped sensory symptoms. Ictal lateralized periodic discharges had significantly increased odds for involving central head regions (odds ratio [OR]=11; 95% confidence interval [CI]=2.16-62.6; p=0.018, FDR adjusted), with a trend towards higher proportion of lesions involving the primary sensorimotor cortex (p=0.09, FDR

  6. Limited proteolysis of beta 2-microglobulin at Lys-58 by complement component C1s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Roepstorff, P; Thim, L

    1990-01-01

    a modified form of beta 2-microglobulin with a two-chain structure. The C-terminal Lys-58 in the A chain is highly susceptible to removal by a carboxypeptidase-B-like activity causing the formation of des-Lys58-beta 2-microglobulin. This is the first demonstration of a noncomplement protein substrate......We have now demonstrated that activated complement component C1s cleaves beta 2-microglobulin at the position identical to that at which beta 2-microglobulin is cleaved in serum of patients suffering from lung cancer. The main cleavage is in the disulphide loop C-terminal to Lys-58, generating...... for the proteolytic activity of C1s. The C1s-induced cleavage of beta 2-microglobulin can be inhibited in the presence of C1 esterase inhibitor, demonstrating a regulatory function of C1 esterase inhibitor in the C1s-induced cleavage of beta 2-microglobulin....

  7. Cell surface expression and function of the macromolecular C1 complex on the surface of human monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinga K Hosszu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of the subunits of the C1 complex (C1q, C1s, C1r, and its regulator C1 inhibitor (C1-Inh by human monocytes has been previously established. However, surface expression of these molecules by monocytes has not been shown. Using flow cytometry and antigen-capture ELISA, we show here for the first time that, in addition to C1q, PB monocytes and the monocyte-derived U937 cells express C1s and C1r, as well as Factor B and C1-Inh on their surface. C1s and C1r immunoprecipitated with C1q, suggesting that at least some of the C1q on these cells is part of the C1 complex. Furthermore, the C1 complex on U937 cells was able to trigger complement activation via the classical pathway. The presence of C1-Inh may ensure that an unwarranted autoactivation of the C1 complex does not take place. Since C1-Inh closely monitors the activation of the C1 complex in a sterile or infectious inflammatory environment, further elucidation of the role of C1 complex is crucial to dissect its function in monocyte, DC and T cell activities, and its implications in host defense and tolerance.

  8. Lateral flow assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczula, Katarzyna M; Gallotta, Andrea

    2016-06-30

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are the technology behind low-cost, simple, rapid and portable detection devices popular in biomedicine, agriculture, food and environmental sciences. This review presents an overview of the principle of the method and the critical components of the assay, focusing on lateral flow immunoassays. This type of assay has recently attracted considerable interest because of its potential to provide instantaneous diagnosis directly to patients. The range and interpretation of results and parameters used for evaluation of the assay will also be discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of LFAs will be summarized and relevant future improvements to testing devices and strategies will be proposed. Finally, the major recent advances and future diagnostic applications in the LFA field will be explored. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. Lateral flow assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczula, Katarzyna M.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are the technology behind low-cost, simple, rapid and portable detection devices popular in biomedicine, agriculture, food and environmental sciences. This review presents an overview of the principle of the method and the critical components of the assay, focusing on lateral flow immunoassays. This type of assay has recently attracted considerable interest because of its potential to provide instantaneous diagnosis directly to patients. The range and interpretation of results and parameters used for evaluation of the assay will also be discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of LFAs will be summarized and relevant future improvements to testing devices and strategies will be proposed. Finally, the major recent advances and future diagnostic applications in the LFA field will be explored. PMID:27365041

  10. Estimation of immune complexes by a microplate-adapted C1q-Protein A enzyme-linked-immunosorbent-assay (C1q-PA-ELISA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, L; Glikmann, G; Jensenius, J C

    1983-01-01

    A microplate-adapted enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of C1q-binding immune complexes (IC) and aggregated IgG (delta IgG) is described. Purified human C1q was adsorbed to the wells of flat-bottomed microtiter plates and EDTA-treated serum samples were subsequently introduced....... Bound IC was measured by use of alkaline phosphatase-labelled Protein A followed by the substrate para-nitro-phenyl-phosphate. A dose response was found for both delta IgG and BSA anti-BSA complexes, while variations in the concentration of monomer IgG did not affect the optical density. Elevated levels...... of IC were found in the majority of sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and SLE. The described C1q-PA-ELISA is a simple and inexpensive method for detection of C1q-binding immune complexes. The reproducibility is acceptable and the sensitivity is higher than for most IC-methods based on C1q-binding....

  11. Complement protein C1q induces maturation of human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csomor, Eszter; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Sándor, Noémi; Kristóf, Katalin; Arlaud, Gérard J; Thiel, Steffen; Erdei, Anna

    2007-07-01

    Maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) is known to be induced by several stimuli, including microbial products, inflammatory cytokines and immobilized IgG, as demonstrated recently. Since immune complexes formed in vivo also contain C1q, moreover apoptotic cells and several pathogens fix C1q in the absence of antibodies, we undertook to investigate whether this complement protein has an impact on various functions of human DCs. Maturation of monocyte-derived immature DCs (imMDCs) cultured on immobilized C1q was followed by monitoring expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, MHCII and CCR7. The functional activity of the cells was assessed by measuring cytokine secretion and their ability to activate allogeneic T lymphocytes. Cytokine production by T cells co-cultured with C1q-matured DCs was also investigated. C1q, but not the structurally related mannose-binding lectin was found to bind to imMDC in a dose-dependent manner and induced NF-kappaB translocation to the nucleus. Immobilized C1q induced maturation of MDCs and enhanced secretion of IL-12 and TNF-alpha, moreover, elevated their T-cell stimulating capacity. As IFN-gamma levels were increased in supernatants of MDC-T cell co-cultures, our data suggest that C1q-induced DC maturation generates a Th1-type response. Interestingly, IL-10 levels were elevated by C1q-treated MDCs but not in the supernatant of their co-cultures with allogeneic T cells. Taken together, these results indicate that C1q-opsonized antigens may play a role in the induction and regulation of immune response. Moreover our data are relevant in view of the role of C1q in removal of apoptotic cells and the association between C1q-deficiency and autoimmunity.

  12. The C1q family of proteins: insights into the emerging non-traditional functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhane eGhebrehiwet

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Research conducted over the past 20 years have helped us unravel not only the hidden structural and functional subtleties of human C1q, but also has catapulted the molecule from a mere recognition unit of the classical pathway to a well-recognized molecular sensor of damage modified self or non-self antigens. Thus, C1q is involved in a rapidly expanding list of pathological disorders—including autoimmunity, trophoblast migration, preeclampsia and cancer. The results of two recent reports are provided to underscore the critical role C1q plays in health and disease. First is the observation by Singh and colleagues showing that pregnant C1q-/- mice recapitulate the key features of human preeclampsia that correlate with increased fetal death. Treatment of the C1q-/- mice with pravastatin restored trophoblast invasiveness, placental blood flow, and angiogenic balance and, thus, prevented the onset of preeclampsia. Second is the report by Hong et al., which showed that C1q can induce apoptosis of prostate cancer cells by activating the tumor suppressor molecule WW-domain containing oxydoreductase (WWOX or WOX1 and destabilizing cell adhesion. Downregulation of C1q on the other hand enhanced prostate hyperplasia and cancer formation due to failure of WOX1 activation. Recent evidence also shows that C1q belongs to a family of structurally and functionally related TNFα-like family of proteins that may have arisen from a common ancestral gene. Therefore C1q not only shares the diverse functions with the TNF family of proteins, but also explains why C1q has retained some of its ancestral cytokine-like activities. This review is intended to highlight some of the structural and functional aspects of C1q by underscoring the growing list of its non-traditional functions.

  13. Zebrafish scube1 (signal peptide-CUB (complement protein C1r/C1s, Uegf, and Bmp1)-EGF (epidermal growth factor) domain-containing protein 1) is involved in primitive hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Ku-Chi; Tu, Cheng-Fen; Lee, Shyh-Jye; Yang, Ruey-Bing

    2013-02-15

    scube1 (signal peptide-CUB (complement protein C1r/C1s, Uegf, and Bmp1)-EGF domain-containing protein 1), the founding member of a novel secreted and cell surface SCUBE protein family, is expressed predominantly in various developing tissues in mice. However, its function in primitive hematopoiesis remains unknown. In this study, we identified and characterized zebrafish scube1 and analyzed its function by injecting antisense morpholino-oligonucleotide into embryos. Whole-mount in situ hybridization revealed that zebrafish scube1 mRNA is maternally expressed and widely distributed during early embryonic development. Knockdown of scube1 by morpholino-oligonucleotide down-regulated the expression of marker genes associated with early primitive hematopoietic precursors (scl) and erythroid (gata1 and hbbe1), as well as early (pu.1) and late (mpo and l-plastin) myelomonocytic lineages. However, the expression of an early endothelial marker fli1a and vascular morphogenesis appeared normal in scube1 morphants. Overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein (bmp) rescued the expression of scl in the posterior lateral mesoderm during early primitive hematopoiesis in scube1 morphants. Biochemical and molecular analysis revealed that Scube1 could be a BMP co-receptor to augment BMP signaling. Our results suggest that scube1 is critical for and functions at the top of the regulatory hierarchy of primitive hematopoiesis by modulating BMP activity during zebrafish embryogenesis.

  14. X(3872), IG(JPC) = 0+(1++), as the χc1(2P) charmonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achasov, N. N.; Rogozina, E. V.

    2015-09-01

    Contrary to almost standard opinion that the X(3872) resonance is the D∗0D¯0 + c.c. molecule or the qcq¯c¯ four-quark state, we discuss the scenario where the X(3872) resonance is the cc¯ = χc1(2P) charmonium which “sits on” the D∗0D¯0 threshold. We explain the shift of the mass of the X(3872) resonance with respect to the prediction of a potential model for the mass of the χc1(2P) charmonium by the contribution of the virtual D∗D¯ + c.c. intermediate states into the self energy of the X(3872) resonance. This allows us to estimate the coupling constant of the X(7872) resonance with the D∗0D¯0 channel, the branching ratio of the X(3872) → D∗0D¯0 + c.c. decay, and the branching ratio of the X(3872) decay into all non-D∗0D¯0 + c.c. states. We predict a significant number of unknown decays of X(3872) via two gluon: X(3872) →gluon gluon →hadrons. We suggest a physically clear program of experimental researches for verification of our assumption.

  15. 26 CFR 1.641(c)-1 - Electing small business trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electing small business trust. 1.641(c)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.641(c)-1 Electing small business trust. (a) In general. An electing small business trust (ESBT) within the meaning of section 1361...

  16. C1 polymerisation and related C-C bond forming ‘carbene insertion’ reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, E.; Jongerius, A.L.; Reek, J.N.H.; de Bruin, B.

    2010-01-01

    In this critical review we summarise the currently available ‘C1 polymerisation’ techniques as valuable alternatives for ‘C2 polymerisation’ in the preparation of saturated main-chain carbon-based polymers. C1 polymerisation involves the growth of polymers from monomers delivering only one

  17. Stereoselective synthesis and absolute configuration of the C1'-C25' fragment of symbiodinolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Hiroyoshi; Murata, Takeshi; Asai, Takahiro; Kadota, Isao; Uemura, Daisuke

    2009-09-04

    Stereoselective synthesis of the C1'-C25' fragment of symbiodinolide, which was obtained as a degraded product from symbiodinolide by alkaline hydrolysis, has been accomplished. The synthetic route features Kotsuki coupling and Julia-Kocienski olefination in the introduction of the side chains. This enantio- and stereoselective synthesis has established the absolute configuration of the C1'-C25' fragment.

  18. Differential regulation of Aβ42-induced neuronal C1q synthesis and microglial activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenner Andrea J

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Expression of C1q, an early component of the classical complement pathway, has been shown to be induced in neurons in hippocampal slices, following accumulation of exogenous Aβ42. Microglial activation was also detected by surface marker expression and cytokine production. To determine whether C1q induction was correlated with intraneuronal Aβ and/or microglial activation, D-(--2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV, an NMDA receptor antagonist and glycine-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-serine-proline peptide (RGD, an integrin receptor antagonist, which blocks and enhances Aβ42 uptake, respectively, were assessed for their effect on neuronal C1q synthesis and microglial activation. APV inhibited, and RGD enhanced, microglial activation and neuronal C1q expression. However, addition of Aβ10–20 to slice cultures significantly reduced Aβ42 uptake and microglial activation, but did not alter the Aβ42-induced neuronal C1q expression. Furthermore, Aβ10–20 alone triggered C1q production in neurons, demonstrating that neither neuronal Aβ42 accumulation, nor microglial activation is required for neuronal C1q upregulation. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that multiple receptors are involved in Aβ injury and signaling in neurons. Some lead to neuronal C1q induction, whereas other(s lead to intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ and/or stimulation of microglia.

  19. Autoantibodies against C1q in systemic lupus erythematosus are antigen-driven

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaller, Monica; Bigler, Cornelia; Danner, Doris

    2009-01-01

    Autoantibodies against complement C1q (anti-C1q Abs) were shown to strongly correlate with the occurrence of severe nephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), suggesting a potential pathogenic role by interfering with the complement cascade. To analyze the humoral immune...

  20. Functional C1-inhibitor diagnostics in hereditary angioedema: assay evaluation and recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenaar-Bos, Ineke G A; Drouet, Christian; Aygören-Pursun, Emel

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by recurrent episodes of potentially life-threatening angioedema. The most widespread underlying genetic deficiency is a heterozygous deficiency of the serine protease inhibitor C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh). In addition ...

  1. Amplitude analysis of the chi(c1) -> eta pi(+)pi(-) decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haddadi, Z.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Löhner, H.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Tiemens, M.

    2017-01-01

    Using 448.0 x 10(6) psi(3686) events collected with the BESIII detector, an amplitude analysis is performed for psi(3686) -> gamma chi(c1), chi(c1) ->eta pi(+)pi(-) decays. The most dominant two- body structure observed is a(0)(980)(+/-) pi(-/+); a(0)(980)(+/-) -> eta pi(+/-.) line shape is modeled

  2. 26 CFR 31.3405(c)-1 - Withholding on eligible rollover distributions; questions and answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...; questions and answers. 31.3405(c)-1 Section 31.3405(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Withholding on eligible rollover distributions; questions and answers. The following questions and answers... received in a direct rollover? Questions and Answers Q-1: What are the withholding requirements under...

  3. Lateral cervical meningocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V.; Newton, G.

    1992-01-01

    Lateral cervical meningocele is an extremely rare developmental anomaly. We could find only one such case protruding from an enlarged C2-3 intervertebral foramen. It may be confused with an extradural cyst or cystic hygroma. Direct needling may introduce infection and thereby pyogenic meningitis and so should be avoided. Similarly, incision and drainage may transform it into cerebrospinal fluid fistula. A computed tomography scan is the most fruitful form of investigation for confirmation and localization of the disease. A lumboperitoneal shunt or water tight closure of the dural sac at the neck is the recommended procedure of choice. PMID:1524732

  4. C1-esterase inhibitor blocks T lymphocyte proliferation and cytotoxic T lymphocyte generation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Bregenholt, S; Nording, J A

    1998-01-01

    We have previously shown that activated C1s complement and activated T cells cleave beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) in vitro leading to the formation of desLys58 beta2m. This process can specifically be inhibited by C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-inh). Furthermore we showed that exogenously added desLys58...... beta2m in nanomolar amounts to a one-way allogenic mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) increased the endogenous production of IL-2 and the generation of allo-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. C1-inh was purified from fresh human plasma and added to human or murine MLC and mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte...... cultures grown in the presence of complement-inactivated serum. Read-outs were cell proliferation, lymphokine production and development of T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. We found that addition of C1-inh to MLC and mitogen-exposed murine and human lymphocyte cultures inhibited proliferation, the development...

  5. ERP C1 is top-down modulated by orientation perceptual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gong-Liang; Li, Hao; Song, Yan; Yu, Cong

    2015-01-01

    The brain site of perceptual learning has been frequently debated. Recent psychophysical evidence for complete learning transfer to new retinal locations and orientations/directions suggests that perceptual learning may mainly occur in high-level brain areas. Contradictorily, ERP C1 changes associated with perceptual learning are cited as evidence for training-induced plasticity in the early visual cortex. However, C1 can be top-down modulated, which suggests the possibility that C1 changes may result from top-down modulation of the early visual cortex by high-level perceptual learning. To single out the potential top-down impact, we trained observers with a peripheral orientation discrimination task and measured C1 changes at an untrained diagonal quadrant location where learning transfer was previously known to be significant. Our assumption was that any C1 changes at this untrained location would indicate top-down modulation of the early visual cortex, rather than plasticity in the early visual cortex. The expected learning transfer was indeed accompanied with significant C1 changes. Moreover, C1 changes were absent in an untrained shape discrimination task with the same stimuli. We conclude that ERP C1 can be top-down modulated in a task-specific manner by high-level perceptual learning, so that C1 changes may not necessarily indicate plasticity in the early visual cortex. Moreover, learning transfer and associated C1 changes may indicate that learning-based top-down modulation can be remapped to early visual cortical neurons at untrained locations to enable learning transfer.

  6. Similarities and dissimilarities between the binding ability of C1q and collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csákó, G; Suba, E A; Herp, A

    1981-04-01

    Based on chemical-structural similarities between C1q and collagen, we studied their activities in reactions which are typically induced in collagen or mediated by C1q. Human C1q suppressed the collagen-induced platelet aggregation in human platelet-rich plasmas. Both human C1q and a suspension in insoluble bovine collagen inhibited in time-dependent fashion the lysis of sensitized sheep erythrocytes (EA) by guinea-pig complement. They both agglutinated sheep erythrocytes (EA and EAC4) sensitized with rabbit haemolysin, mainly in the IgM type, polystyrene latex particles complexed with heat-denatured human IgG, a combination of horse, goat and sheep globulins, or deoxyribonucleoprotein. Heating of C1q and collagen (56 degrees C, 30 min), which disrupts the collagen fold into a random coil structure, almost completely abrogated all activities of C1q and considerably reduced those of collagen, suggesting that an intact triple helix is essential for their activities. In spite of their far-ranging similarities, C1q was more potent by weight in most reactions, showed evidence of a faster rate of binding to EA, and was more sensitive to heat treatment at 56 degrees C than was collagen. on the basis of the binding activities of collagen, a model is proposed according to which platelets, sensitized erythrocytes, aggregated gammaglobulins, immune complexes and deoxyribonucleoprotein might accumulate at the site of endothelial damage where blood and its components are exposed to collagenous substances. C1q is able to inhibit all these reactions, indicating that not only is C1q collagen-like in its behaviour, but that collagen also had C1q-like properties.

  7. Endogenous C1-inhibitor production and expression in the heart after acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmens, Reindert W; Baylan, Umit; Juffermans, Lynda J M; Karia, Rashmi V; Ylstra, Bauke; Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha; Simsek, Suat; van Ham, Marieke; Niessen, Hans W M; Krijnen, Paul A J

    2016-01-01

    Complement activation contributes significantly to inflammation-related damage in the heart after acute myocardial infarction. Knowledge on factors that regulate postinfraction complement activation is incomplete however. In this study, we investigated whether endogenous C1-inhibitor, a well-known inhibitor of complement activation, is expressed in the heart after acute myocardial infarction. C1-inhibitor and complement activation products C3d and C4d were analyzed immunohistochemically in the hearts of patients who died at different time intervals after acute myocardial infarction (n=28) and of control patients (n=8). To determine putative local C1-inhibitor production, cardiac transcript levels of the C1-inhibitor-encoding gene serping1 were determined in rats after induction of acute myocardial infarction (microarray). Additionally, C1-inhibitor expression was analyzed (fluorescence microscopy) in human endothelial cells and rat cardiomyoblasts in vitro. C1-inhibitor was found predominantly in and on jeopardized cardiomyocytes in necrotic infarct cores between 12h and 5days old. C1-inhibitor protein expression coincided in time and colocalized with C3d and C4d. In the rat heart, serping1 transcript levels were increased from 2h up until 7days after acute myocardial infarction. Both endothelial cells and cardiomyoblasts showed increased intracellular expression of C1-inhibitor in response to ischemia in vitro (n=4). These observations suggest that endogenous C1-inhibitor is likely involved in the regulation of complement activity in the myocardium following acute myocardial infarction. Observations in rat and in vitro suggest that C1-inhibitor is produced locally in the heart after acute myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Lateral border zone: quantitation of lateral extension of subendocardial infarction in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, R; Cho, S; Factor, S M; Kirk, E S

    1985-05-01

    This study was undertaken to quantitate the lateral extension that occurs concomitantly with the transmural extension of a subendocardial infarction. A subendocardial infarct was produced in 12 dogs by a 40 minute temporary coronary artery occlusion. Infarct extension was induced 7 days later by permanent occlusion of the same vessel. Regional myocardial blood flows confirmed that ischemia had been produced with both coronary artery occlusions. The vascular boundaries between the normally perfused and ischemic beds were defined by perfusion with different-colored Microfil solutions. The extent of subendocardial infarction and subsequent transmural and lateral extensions were assessed by point counting of histologic specimens. The initial temporary occlusion produced a 30.0 +/- 4.2% transmural infarct and the subsequent permanent occlusion a 29.2 +/- 3.5% transmural extension in a risk region of 39 +/- 4 g. Lateral extension was not measured in four dogs because the initial subendocardial infarct was patchy with markedly irregular lateral borders. In eight dogs the size of the measured lateral infarct extension from each lateral margin from two histologic sections was 0.63 +/- 0.013 cm2. The area of both lateral extensions was 1.7 +/- 0.1% of the cross-sectional area of its risk region as determined by planimetry. Using a model of the risk region, the mass of the lateral extension was estimated to be 1.4 +/- 0.3 g or 3.5 +/- 0.6% of the region at risk. Thus, at the lateral margin of a subendocardial infarct there is a border zone that is small relative to the size of the region at risk and infarcted myocardium.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Thyroid hormone transport and metabolism by OATP1C1 and consequences of genetic variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Deure, Wendy M; Hansen, Pia Skov; Peeters, Robin P

    2008-01-01

    with TH levels, nor did they affect transport function in vitro. In conclusion, OATP1C1 mediates transport of T4, T4S and rT3 and increases the access of these substrates to the intracellular active sites of the deiodinases. No effect of genetic variation on the function of OATP1C1 was observed.......OATP1C1 has been characterized as a specific thyroid hormone transporter. Based on its expression in capillaries in different brain regions, OATP1C1 is thought to play a key-role in transporting thyroid hormone across the blood-brain barrier. For this reason, we studied the specificity...... of iodothyronine transport by OATP1C1 in detail by analysis of thyroid hormone uptake in OATP1C1-transfected COS1 cells. Furthermore, we examined whether OATP1C1 is rate-limiting in subsequent thyroid hormone metabolism in cells co-transfected with deiodinases. We also studied the effect of genetic variation...

  10. Trichinella spiralis Paramyosin Binds Human Complement C1q and Inhibits Classical Complement Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Sun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Trichinella spiralis expresses paramyosin (Ts-Pmy as a defense mechanism. Ts-Pmy is a functional protein with binding activity to human complement C8 and C9 and thus plays a role in evading the attack of the host's immune system. In the present study, the binding activity of Ts-Pmy to human complement C1q and its ability to inhibit classical complement activation were investigated.The binding of recombinant and natural Ts-Pmy to human C1q were determined by ELISA, Far Western blotting and immunoprecipitation, respectively. Binding of recombinant Ts-Pmy (rTs-Pmy to C1q inhibited C1q binding to IgM and consequently inhibited C3 deposition. The lysis of antibody-sensitized erythrocytes (EAs elicited by the classical complement pathway was also inhibited in the presence of rTs-Pmy. In addition to inhibiting classical complement activation, rTs-Pmy also suppressed C1q binding to THP-1-derived macrophages, thereby reducing C1q-induced macrophages migration.Our results suggest that T. spiralis paramyosin plays an important role in immune evasion by interfering with complement activation through binding to C1q in addition to C8 and C9.

  11. Identifying a Resistance Determinant for the Antimitotic Natural Products Disorazole C1 and A1S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Celeste E.; Vogt, Andreas; Vollmer, Laura L.; Kitchens, Carolyn A.; Günther, Eckhard; Graham, Thomas H.; Hopkins, Chad D.; Wipf, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Disorazoles are macrocyclic polyketides first isolated from the fermentation broth of the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum. Both the major fermentation product disorazole A1 and its much rarer companion disorazole C1 exhibit potent cytotoxic activity against many human tumor cells. Furthermore, the disorazoles appear to bind tubulin uniquely among known antimitotic agents, promoting apoptosis or premature senescence. It is uncertain what conveys tumor cell sensitivity to these complex natural products. Therefore, we generated and characterized human tumor cells resistant to disorazole C1. Resistant cells proved exceedingly difficult to generate and required single step mutagenesis with chronic stepwise exposure to increasing concentrations of disorazole C1. Compared with wild-type HeLa cells, disorazole C1-resistant HeLa/DZR cells were 34- and 8-fold resistant to disorazole C1 and disorazole A1 growth inhibition, respectively. HeLa/DZR cells were also remarkably cross-resistant to vinblastine (280-fold), paclitaxel (2400-fold), and doxorubicin (47-fold) but not cisplatin, suggesting a multidrug-resistant phenotype. Supporting this hypothesis, MCF7/MDR cells were 10-fold cross-resistant to disorazole C1. HeLa/DZR disorazole resistance was not durable in the absence of chronic compound exposure. Verapamil reversed HeLa/DZR resistance to disorazole C1 and disorazole A1. Moreover, HeLa/DZR cells expressed elevated levels of the drug resistance ATP-binding cassette ABCB1 transporter. Loss of ABCB1 by incubation with short interfering RNA restored sensitivity to the disorazoles. Thus, the multidrug resistance transporter ABCB1 can affect the cytotoxicity of both disorazole C1 and A1. Disorazole C1, however, retained activity against cells resistant against the clinically used microtubule-stabilizing agent epothilone B. PMID:20008956

  12. Lateral Flow Immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Kathryn H

    2015-01-01

    Lateral flow immunoassays (LFIAs) are a staple in the field of rapid diagnostics. These small handheld devices require no specialized training or equipment to operate, and generate a result within minutes of sample application. They are an ideal format for many types of home test kits, for emergency responders and for food manufacturers and producers looking for a quick evaluation of a given sample. LFIAs rely on high quality monoclonal antibodies that recognize the analyte of interest. As monoclonal antibody technology becomes more accessible to smaller laboratories, there has been increased interest in developing LFIA prototypes for potential commercial manufacture. In this chapter, the basics of designing and building an LFIA prototype are described.

  13. Lateral conduction infrared photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin K [Albuquerque, NM; Carroll, Malcolm S [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-09-20

    A photodetector for detecting infrared light in a wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m is disclosed. The photodetector has a mesa structure formed from semiconductor layers which include a type-II superlattice formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5. Impurity doped regions are formed on sidewalls of the mesa structure to provide for a lateral conduction of photo-generated carriers which can provide an increased carrier mobility and a reduced surface recombination. An optional bias electrode can be used in the photodetector to control and vary a cut-off wavelength or a depletion width therein. The photodetector can be formed as a single-color or multi-color device, and can also be used to form a focal plane array which is compatible with conventional read-out integrated circuits.

  14. Aspirin, 110 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrono, C; Rocca, B

    2009-07-01

    Although conceived at the end of the 19th century as a synthetic analgesic agent with improved gastric tolerability vs. naturally occurring salicylates, acetylsalicylic acid (marketed as aspirin in 1899) turned out to be an ideal antiplatelet agent about 90 years later, following the understanding of its mechanism of action, the development of a mechanism-based biomarker for dose-finding studies, and the initiation of a series of appropriately sized, randomized clinical trials to test its efficacy and safety at low doses given once daily. At the turn of its 110th anniversary, aspirin continues to attract heated debates on a number of issues including (i) the optimal dose to maximize efficacy and minimize toxicity; (ii) the possibility that some patients may be 'resistant' to its antiplatelet effects; and (iii) the balance of benefits and risks in primary vs. secondary prevention.

  15. Creativity in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, K A; Tinker, A M

    2014-08-01

    The ageing population presents significant challenges for the provision of social and health services. Strategies are needed to enable older people to cope within a society ill prepared for the impacts of these demographic changes. The ability to be creative may be one such strategy. This review outlines the relevant literature and examines current public health policy related to creativity in old age with the aim of highlighting some important issues. As well as looking at the benefits and negative aspects of creative activity in later life they are considered in the context of the theory of "successful ageing". Creative activity plays an important role in the lives of older people promoting social interaction, providing cognitive stimulation and giving a sense of self-worth. Furthermore, it is shown to be useful as a tool in the multi-disciplinary treatment of health problems common in later life such as depression and dementia. There are a number of initiatives to encourage older people to participate in creative activities such as arts-based projects which may range from visual arts to dance to music to intergenerational initiatives. However, participation shows geographical variation and often the responsibility of provision falls to voluntary organisations. Overall, the literature presented suggests that creative activity could be a useful tool for individuals and society. However, further research is needed to establish the key factors which contribute to patterns of improved health and well-being, as well as to explore ways to improve access to services. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of Lateral Rail Restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    This report deals with the analysis of lateral rail strength using the results of experimental investigations and a nonlinear rail response model. Part of the analysis involves the parametric study of the influence of track parameters on lateral rail...

  17. Vacuum electrolysis reactor technique for quantitation of 13-carbon isotope enrichment at the C1-position of formic acid and acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Michael; Kuo, John; Tan, C T

    2004-09-15

    A specialized vacuum electrolysis reactor was designed, constructed, and utilized for 13-carbon isotope analysis of formic acid-13C and acetic acid-13C, each highly enriched at the C1-position. This reusable reactor was equipped with two platinum wire electrodes, miniature stir bar, and sidearm reaction chamber. The associated technique developed for 13-carbon isotope analysis is based upon electrolytic generation of carbon dioxide into the preevacuated reactor followed by gas inlet mass spectrometry. It proved practical to degas and electrolyze 95% formic acid (without added electrolyte) due to adequate ionic conductivity. Formic acid-13C (nominally 99 at. % 13C) was measured by electrolytic CO2 generation to be 98.9 at. % 13C. To analyze various 13C-isotopic permutations of acetic acid, lithium and acid were separately added to reactor compartments, vacuum degassed, and stirred to produce an acidic solution. Thus, acetic acid-1-13C that was nominally 99 at. % 13C1 was determined by vacuum electrolysis to be 98.9 at. % 13C1. Further, acetic acid-2-13C that was isotope depleted at the C1-position (and known to be 99 at. % 13C at C2) gave 0.8 at. % 13C by mass spectrometry.

  18. Development of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) for NPOESS C1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brann, C.; Kunkee, D.

    2008-12-01

    The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System's Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is planned for flight on the first NPOESS mission (C1) in 2013. The C1 ATMS will be the second instrument of the ATMS series and will provide along with the companion Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles for NPOESS. The first flight of the ATMS is scheduled in 2010 on the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite, which is an early instrument risk reduction component of the NPOESS mission. This poster will focus on the development of the ATMS for C1 including aspects of the sensor calibration, antenna beam and RF characteristics and scanning. New design aspects of the C1 ATMS, required primarily by parts obsolescence, will also be addressed in this poster.

  19. Methyl Chloride Measurements in the Taylor Dome M3C1 Ice Core, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes methyl chloride (CH3CI) measurements made on air extracted from 62 samples from the Taylor Dome M3C1 ice core in East Antarctica. CH3CI was...

  20. Synthesis of the C1-C25 southern domain of spirastrellolides B and F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabitha, Gowravaram; Rao, Allu Senkara; Yadav, J S

    2013-11-07

    Synthesis of the C1-C25 ABC spiroketal ring system of spirastrellolides B and F has been executed. The synthetic strategy relied on radical cyclization, HWE olefination, (BDP)CuH conjugate reduction and spiro acetalization reactions.

  1. Aneurysmal bone cyst of clivus and C1 C2: case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Dinesh; Tungaria, Arun; Jaiswal, Avdhesh; Jain, Vijendra

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst are benign rapidly expanding bone destructive lesions of any bone. They are common in the metaphysis of long bones but 10-30% involve the spine. Cervical region involvement is uncommon. We report a case of aneurysmal bone cyst of clivus C1 and C2 with minimum symptoms. Involvement of C1 and clivus separately had been reported in past, but simultaneous involvement of both is presented in this report for the very first time.

  2. Analysis of healthy cohorts for single nucleotide polymorphisms in C1q gene cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA A. RADANOVA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available C1q is the first component of the classical pathway of complement activation. The coding region for C1q is localized on chromosome 1p34.1–36.3. Mutations or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in C1q gene cluster can cause developing of Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE because of C1q deficiency or other unknown reason. We selected five SNPs located in 7.121 kbp region on chromosome 1, which were previously associated with SLE and/or low C1q level, but not causing C1q deficiency and analyzed them in terms of allele frequencies and genotype distribution in comparison with Hispanic, Asian, African and other Caucasian cohorts. These SNPs were: rs587585, rs292001, rs172378, rs294179 and rs631090. One hundred eighty five healthy Bulgarian volunteers were genotyped for the selected five C1q SNPs by quantative real-time PCR methods. International HapMap Project has been used for information about genotype distribution and allele frequencies of the five SNPs in, Hispanics, Asians, Africans and others Caucasian cohorts. Bulgarian healthy volunteers and another pooled Caucasian cohort had similar frequencies of genotypes and alleles of rs587585, rs292001, rs294179 and rs631090 SNPs. Nevertheless, genotype AA of rs172378 was significantly overrepresented in Bulgarians when compared to other healthy Caucasians from USA and UK (60% vs 31%. Genotype distribution of rs172378 in Bulgarians was similar to Greek-Cyriot Caucasians. For all Caucasians the major allele of rs172378 was A. This is the first study analyzing the allele frequencies and genotype distribution of C1q gene cluster SNPs in Bulgarian healthy population.

  3. Syntheses of the C1-C14 and C15-C25 fragments of amphidinolide C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dimao; Forsyth, Craig J

    2013-03-15

    Divergent syntheses of the C1-C14 and C15-C25 fragments of amphidinolide C have been achieved. The synthesis of the C15-C25 fragment featured cobalt-catalyzed modified Mukaiyama aerobic alkenol cyclization and sulfur-directed regiocontrolled Wacker oxidation of an internal alkene. The C1-C14 fragment was established by alkenyllithium addition to an aldehyde followed by a challenging olefination of a highly inert C9 ketone.

  4. 17 CFR 240.15c1-8 - Sales at the market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sales at the market. 240.15c1... Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Rules Relating to Over-The-Counter Markets § 240.15c1-8 Sales at the market... securities exchange that such security is being offered to such customer “at the market” or at a price...

  5. The 36C1 ages of the brines in the Magadi-Natron basin, East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Aaron; Margaritz, Mordeckai; Paul, Michael; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Hollos, George; Boaretto, Elisabetta; Taieb, Maurice

    1990-10-01

    The depression in the East African Rift which includes both Lake Magadi and Lake Natron forms a closed basin within which almost all the dissolved chloride originates in precipitation, since there is no important source of very ancient sedimentary chloride. This provides an ideal setting for the evaluation of the 36Cl methodology as a geochemical and hydrological tracer. The main source of recent water, as represented by the most dilute samples measured, is characterized by a 36C1/C1 ratio of 2.5 × 10 -14, in agreement with the calculated value expected in precipitation. Surface evaporation increases the chlorinity of the local freshwater inflow by about a factor of 110 without changing the isotopic ratio, indicating that little chloride enters the system in the form of sediment leachate. A second type of brine found in the basin occurs in a hot deep groundwater reservoir and is characterized by lower 36C1/C1 ratios (salt accumulation age of 760 Ka which is consistent with the time of the first appearance of the lake. These older brines also have lower 18O and 2H values which indicate that they were recharged during a climatically different era. The 36C1/C1 ratios in the inflowing waters and in the accumulated brine, together with the known age of the Lake Magadi basin, may be used to estimate the importance of the hypogene and epigene, as opposed to the meteoric, mode of 36C1 production. Such a calculation shows that the hypogene and epigene processes together contribute less than 6% of the total 36C1 present in the lake.

  6. Stereocontrolled Synthesis of the C(1)-C(11) Subunit of the Iejimalides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendlik, Matthew T.; Cottard, Muriel; Rein, Tobias

    1997-01-01

    An enantioselective synthesis of the C(1)-C(11) subunit of the iejimalides has been accomplished through a combination of an asymmetric Homer-Wadsworth-Emmons condensation and a chiral pool approach. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.......An enantioselective synthesis of the C(1)-C(11) subunit of the iejimalides has been accomplished through a combination of an asymmetric Homer-Wadsworth-Emmons condensation and a chiral pool approach. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd....

  7. Specific, sensitive, precise, and rapid functional chromogenic assay of activated first complement component (C1) in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkvad, S; Jespersen, J; Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen

    1990-01-01

    We present a new functional assay for the first complement component (C1) in plasma, based on its activation by inhibition of the C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-inh) when monospecific antiserum to C1-inh is added to the plasma. After maximal activation, we can determine the concentration of activated ...

  8. Complement protein C1q induces maturation of human dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosmor, E; Bajtay, Z; Sándor, N

    2007-01-01

    activity of the cells was assessed by measuring cytokine secretion and their ability to activate allogeneic T lymphocytes. Cytokine production by T cells co-cultured with C1q-matured DCs was also investigated. C1q, but not the structurally related mannose-binding lectin was found to bind to imMDC in a dose......q-induced DC maturation generates a Th1-type response. Interestingly, IL-10 levels were elevated by C1q-treated MDCs but not in the supernatant of their co-cultures with allogeneic T cells. Taken together, these results indicate that C1q-opsonized antigens may play a role in the induction......Maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) is known to be induced by several stimuli, including microbial products, inflammatory cytokines and immobilized IgG, as demonstrated recently. Since immune complexes formed in vivo also contain C1q, moreover apoptotic cells and several pathogens fix C1q...

  9. The Cyclic Peptide Ecumicin Targeting ClpC1 Is Active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Kim, Jin-Yong; Anderson, Jeffrey R.; Akopian, Tatos; Hong, Seungpyo; Jin, Ying-Yu; Kandror, Olga; Kim, Jong-Woo; Lee, In-Ae; Lee, Sun-Young; McAlpine, James B.; Mulugeta, Surafel; Sunoqrot, Suhair; Wang, Yuehong; Yang, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Tae-Mi; Goldberg, Alfred L.; Pauli, Guido F.; Cho, Sanghyun

    2014-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) has lent urgency to finding new drug leads with novel modes of action. A high-throughput screening campaign of >65,000 actinomycete extracts for inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis viability identified ecumicin, a macrocyclic tridecapeptide that exerts potent, selective bactericidal activity against M. tuberculosis in vitro, including nonreplicating cells. Ecumicin retains activity against isolated multiple-drug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis. The subcutaneous administration to mice of ecumicin in a micellar formulation at 20 mg/kg body weight resulted in plasma and lung exposures exceeding the MIC. Complete inhibition of M. tuberculosis growth in the lungs of mice was achieved following 12 doses at 20 or 32 mg/kg. Genome mining of lab-generated, spontaneous ecumicin-resistant M. tuberculosis strains identified the ClpC1 ATPase complex as the putative target, and this was confirmed by a drug affinity response test. ClpC1 functions in protein breakdown with the ClpP1P2 protease complex. Ecumicin markedly enhanced the ATPase activity of wild-type (WT) ClpC1 but prevented activation of proteolysis by ClpC1. Less stimulation was observed with ClpC1 from ecumicin-resistant mutants. Thus, ClpC1 is a valid drug target against M. tuberculosis, and ecumicin may serve as a lead compound for anti-TB drug development. PMID:25421483

  10. Post-transplant development of C1q-positive HLA antibodies and kidney graft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Antonina; Poggi, Elvira; Ozzella, Giuseppina; Adorno, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    The development of de novo human leukocyte antigen (HLA) donor specific antibodies (DSA), detected by both cytotoxic or solid phase assays, was considered the major risk factor for allograft failure in kidney transplantation. However, it was shown that not all patients with persistent production of DSA suffered loss of their grafts. Modified Luminex-Single Antigen assays, able to identify C1q-fixing antibodies, represent a new strategy in assessing the clinical relevance of detected DSA. This study demonstrated that C1q-fixing capability of de novo DSA is a clinically relevant marker of worse outcome and inferior graft survival in kidney transplantation. In fact, our findings evidenced a very low graft survival only in the patients who developed DSA able to fix C1q during post-transplant course, while patients producing C1q-negative DSA had good graft survival, which was comparable to that found in our previous study for DSA-negative patients. Moreover, anti-HLA class II antibodies had a higher incidence than anti-HLA class I, and the ability to fix C1q was significantly more frequent among anti-DQ DSA than anti-DR DSA. Monitoring of de novo C1q-DSA production represents a useful, non-invasive tool for risk stratification and prediction of graft outcome in kidney transplantation.

  11. Antithrombin III/SerpinC1 insufficiency exacerbates renal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Zhang, Guangyuan; Lu, Zeyuan; Geurts, Aron M; Usa, Kristie; Jacob, Howard J; Cowley, Allen W; Wang, Niansong; Liang, Mingyu

    2015-10-01

    Antithrombin III, encoded by SerpinC1, is a major anti-coagulation molecule in vivo and has anti-inflammatory effects. We found that patients with low antithrombin III activities presented a higher risk of developing acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery. To study this further, we generated SerpinC1 heterozygous knockout rats and followed the development of acute kidney injury in a model of modest renal ischemia/reperfusion injury. Renal injury, assessed by serum creatinine and renal tubular injury scores after 24 h of reperfusion, was significantly exacerbated in SerpinC1(+/-) rats compared to wild-type littermates. Concomitantly, renal oxidative stress, tubular apoptosis, and macrophage infiltration following this injury were significantly aggravated in SerpinC1(+/-) rats. However, significant thrombosis was not found in the kidneys of any group of rats. Antithrombin III is reported to stimulate the production of prostaglandin I2, a known regulator of renal cortical blood flow, in addition to having anti-inflammatory effects and to protect against renal failure. Prostaglandin F1α, an assayable metabolite of prostaglandin I2, was increased in the kidneys of the wild-type rats at 3 h after reperfusion. The increase of prostaglandin F1α was significantly blunted in SerpinC1(+/-) rats, which preceded increased tubular injury and oxidative stress. Thus, our study found a novel role of SerpinC1 insufficiency in increasing the severity of renal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  12. Two human homeobox genes, c1 and c8: structure analysis and expression in embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, A; Mavilio, F; Acampora, D; Giampaolo, A; Faiella, A; Zappavigna, V; D'Esposito, M; Pannese, M; Russo, G; Boncinelli, E

    1987-07-01

    Two human cDNA clones (HHO.c1.95 and HHO.c8.5111) containing a homeobox region have been characterized, and the respective genomic regions have been partially analyzed. Expression of the corresponding genes, termed c1 and c8, was evaluated in different organs and body parts during human embryonic/fetal development. HHO.c1.95 apparently encodes a 217-amino acid protein containing a class I homeodomain that shares 60 out of 61 amino acid residues with the Antennapedia homeodomain of Drosophila melanogaster. HHO.c8.5111 encodes a 153-amino acid protein containing a homeodomain identical to that of the frog AC1 gene. Clones HHO.c1 and HHO.c8 detect by blot-hydridization one and two specific polyadenylylated transcripts, respectively. These are differentially expressed in spinal cord, backbone rudiments, limb buds (or limbs), heart, and skin of human embryos and early fetuses in the 5- to 9-week postfertilization period, thus suggesting that the c1 and c8 genes play a key role in a variety of developmental processes. Together, the results of the embryonic/fetal expression of c1 and c8 and those of two previously analyzed genes (c10 and c13) indicate a coherent pattern of expression of these genes in early human ontogeny.

  13. Lateral Mixing DRI Analysis: Submesoscale Water-Mass Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    submitted. 6 Cole, S.T., and D.L. Rudnick, 2012: The spatial distribution and annual cycle of upper-ocean thermohaline structure. J. Geophys. Res...Phys. Oceanogr., 14, 489-505. Ferrari, R., and D. Ruddick, 2000: Thermohaline variability in the upper ocean. J. Geophys. Res., 105, 16,857-16,884

  14. The clinical outcome of lateral mass fixation after decompressive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ahmed Yehya

    2014-10-11

    Oct 11, 2014 ... pain and brachialgia. In group I, neck pain improved in 68.8% and brachialgia improved in 83.3% but in group II, neck pain improved in 46.7% and brachialgia improved in 61.5%. Myelopathy and sphincteric disturbance showed clinical improvement but without clinically significant difference of both groups.

  15. Bilateral C1-C2 transarticular screw and C1 laminar hook fixation and bone graft fusion for reducible atlantoaxial dislocation: a seven-year analysis of outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bilateral C1-2 transarticular screw and C1 laminar hook fixation was developed on the basis of transarticular screws fixation. The modified technique has showed a better biomechanical stability than established techniques in previous study. However, long-term (minimum follow-up 7 years outcomes of patients with reducible atlantoaxial dislocation who underwent this modified fixation technique have not still been reported. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the outcome of 36 patients who underwent this modified technique. Myelopathy was assessed using the Ranawat myelopathy score and Myelopathy Disability Index. Pain scores were assessed using Visual Analogue Scale. Radiological imaging was assessed and the following data were extracted: the atlantodental intervals, the space available for cord, presence of spinal cord signal change on T2 weighted image, C1-C2 angle, C2-C7 angle and fusion rates. FINDINGS: All patients achieved a minimum seven-year follow up. 95% patients with neck and suboccipital pain improved after surgery; in their Visual Analogue pain scores, there was a greater than 50% improvement in their VAS scores with a drop of 5 points on the VAS (P<0.05. 92% of patients improved in the Ranawat myelopathy grade; the Myelopathy Disability Index assessment showed a preoperative mean score of 35.62 with postoperative mean 12.75(P<0.05. There was not any significant atlantoaxial instability at each follow-up time. The space available for cord increased in all patients. Postoperative sagittal kyphosis of the subaxial spine was not observed. After six months after surgery, bone grafts of all patients were fused. No complications related to surgery were found in the period of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The long-term outcomes of this case series demonstrate that under the condition of thorough preoperative preparations, bilateral C1-C2 transarticular screw and C1 laminar hook fixation and bone graft fusion is a

  16. Observation of the Decays Alpha(0)(b) -> chi(c1)pK(-) and Alpha(0)(b) ->chi(c2)pK(-)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dufour, L.; Mulder, M; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Tolk, S.; van Veghel, M.

    2017-01-01

    The first observation of the decays Lambda(b)(0) -> chi(c1)pK(-) and Lambda(0)(b) -> chi(c2)pK(-) is reported using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1), collected by the LHCb experiment in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV The following ratios

  17. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 101. Alcohols + Hydrocarbons + Water. Part 2. C1-C3 Alcohols + Aliphatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oracz, Paweł; Góral, Marian; Wiśniewska-Gocłowska, Barbara; Shaw, David G.; Mączyński, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    The mutual solubilities and related liquid-liquid equilibria for 37 ternary systems of C1-C3 alcohols with aliphatic hydrocarbons and water are exhaustively and critically reviewed. Reports of experimental determination of solubility that appeared in the primary literature prior to the end of 2012 are compiled. For 14 systems, sufficient data are available (two or more independent determinations) to allow critical evaluation. All data are expressed as mass percent and mole fraction as well as the originally reported units. In addition to the standard evaluation criteria used throughout the Solubility Data Series, an additional criterion was used for each of the evaluated systems. These systems include one binary miscibility gap in the hydrocarbon + water subsystem and another one can be in the methanol + hydrocarbon subsystem. The binary tie lines were compared with the recommended values published previously.

  18. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 101. Alcohols + Hydrocarbons + Water Part 3. C1-C3 Alcohols + Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oracz, Paweł; Góral, Marian; Wiśniewska-Gocłowska, Barbara; Shaw, David G.; Mączyński, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    The mutual solubilities and related liquid-liquid equilibria for 11 ternary systems of C1-C3 alcohols with aromatic hydrocarbons and water are exhaustively and critically reviewed. Reports of experimental determination of solubility that appeared in the primary literature prior to the end of 2012 are compiled. For nine systems, sufficient data are available (two or more independent determinations) to allow critical evaluation. All new data are expressed as mass percent and mole fraction as well as the originally reported units. In addition to the standard evaluation criteria used throughout the Solubility Data Series, an additional criterion was used for each of the evaluated systems. These systems include one binary miscibility gap in the hydrocarbon + water subsystem. The binary tie lines were compared with the recommended values published previously.

  19. ClC-1 chloride channels: state-of-the-art research and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eImbrici

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The voltage-dependent ClC-1 chloride channel belongs to the CLC channel/transporter family. It is a homodimer comprising two individual pores which can operate independently or simultaneously according to two gating modes, the fast and the slow gate of the channel. ClC-1 is preferentially expressed in the skeletal muscle fibers where the presence of an efficient Cl- homeostasis is crucial for the correct membrane repolarization and propagation of action potential. As a consequence, mutations in the CLCN1 gene cause dominant and recessive forms of Myotonia Congenita, a rare skeletal muscle channelopathy caused by abnormal membrane excitation, and clinically characterized by muscle stiffness and various degrees of transitory weakness. Elucidation of the mechanistic link between the genetic defects and the disease pathogenesis is still incomplete and, at this time, there is no specific treatment for Myotonia Congenita. Still controversial is the subcellular localization pattern of ClC-1 channels in skeletal muscle as well as its modulation by some intracellular factors. The expression of ClC-1 in other tissues such as in brain and heart and the possible assembly of ClC-1/ClC-2 heterodimers further expand the physiological properties of ClC-1 and its involvement in diseases. A recent de novo CLCN1 truncation mutation in a patient with generalized epilepsy indeed postulates an unexpected role of this channel in the control of neuronal network excitability. This review summarizes the most relevant and state-of-the-art research on ClC-1 chloride channels physiology and associated diseases.

  20. ClC-1 chloride channels: state-of-the-art research and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbrici, Paola; Altamura, Concetta; Pessia, Mauro; Mantegazza, Renato; Desaphy, Jean-François; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-dependent ClC-1 chloride channel belongs to the CLC channel/transporter family. It is a homodimer comprising two individual pores which can operate independently or simultaneously according to two gating modes, the fast and the slow gate of the channel. ClC-1 is preferentially expressed in the skeletal muscle fibers where the presence of an efficient Cl(-) homeostasis is crucial for the correct membrane repolarization and propagation of action potential. As a consequence, mutations in the CLCN1 gene cause dominant and recessive forms of myotonia congenita (MC), a rare skeletal muscle channelopathy caused by abnormal membrane excitation, and clinically characterized by muscle stiffness and various degrees of transitory weakness. Elucidation of the mechanistic link between the genetic defects and the disease pathogenesis is still incomplete and, at this time, there is no specific treatment for MC. Still controversial is the subcellular localization pattern of ClC-1 channels in skeletal muscle as well as its modulation by some intracellular factors. The expression of ClC-1 in other tissues such as in brain and heart and the possible assembly of ClC-1/ClC-2 heterodimers further expand the physiological properties of ClC-1 and its involvement in diseases. A recent de novo CLCN1 truncation mutation in a patient with generalized epilepsy indeed postulates an unexpected role of this channel in the control of neuronal network excitability. This review summarizes the most relevant and state-of-the-art research on ClC-1 chloride channels physiology and associated diseases.

  1. Laterality in living beings, hand dominance, and cerebral lateralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milenković Sanja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, lateralization in living beings is a phenomenon almost mythologically unexplored. Scientists have proved that lateralization is not exclusively a human feature. Investigations in molecular biology, protein structure, mobility of bacteria, and intracellular lateralization in ciliates, shows important and universal nature of lateralization in living systems. Dominant lateralization implies the appearance of a dominant extremity, or a dominant sense during the performance of complex psychomotor activities. Hand dominance is usually defined as a tendency to use one hand rather than another to perform most activities and this is considered to be the most obvious example of cerebral lateralization and exclusive characteristic of humans. However, there are some exceptions in other species. The dominant hand is able to perform more complex and subtle manual tasks than the non-dominant hand, and this behavioral superiority is the absolute result of additional cerebral support. The asymmetry of brain organization was confirmed in rats, chimpanzees, dogs and birds, some fishes and lizards. The relationships between hand dominance with brain structure and function remain far from clear. For a long time, lateralization was considered unique to humans, but recently it has become clear that lateralization is a fundamental characteristic of the organization of brain and behavior in all vertebrates. It has been questioned to what extent lateralization in humans and other vertebrates may be comparable. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 41020 i br. 175078

  2. Cosmetic Lateral Canthoplasty: Preserving the Lateral Canthal Angle

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    Yeon-Jun Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cosmetic lateral canthoplasty, in which the size of the eye is increased by extending the palpebral fissure and decreasing the degree of the eye slant, has become a prevalent procedure for East Asians. However, it is not uncommon for there to be complications or unfavorable results after the surgery. With this in mind, the authors have designed a surgical method to reduce complications in cosmetic lateral canthoplasty by preserving the lateral canthal angle. We discuss here the anatomy required for surgery, the surgical methods, and methods for reducing complications during cosmetic lateral canthoplasty.

  3. LATERAL SURVIVAL: AN OT ACCOUNT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira Yip

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available When laterals are the targets of phonological processes, laterality may or may not survive. In a fixed feature geometry, [lateral] should be lost if its superordinate node is eliminated by either the spreading of a neighbouring node, or by coda neutralization. So if [lateral] is under Coronal (Blevins 1994, it should be lost under Place assimilation, and if [lateral] is under Sonorant Voicing (Rice & Avery 1991 it should be lost by rules that spread voicing. Yet in some languages lateral survives such spreading intact. Facts like these argue against a universal attachment of [lateral] under either Coronal or Sonorant Voicing, and in favour of an account in terms of markedness constraints on feature-co-occurrence (Padgett 2000. The core of an OT account is that IFIDENTLAT is ranked above whatever causes neutralization, such as SHARE-F or *CODAF. laterality will survive. If these rankings are reversed, we derive languages in which laterality is lost. The other significant factor is markedness. High-ranked feature co-occurrence constraints like *LATDORSAL can block spreading from affecting laterals at all.

  4. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh P Nigel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disease characterised by progressive muscular paralysis reflecting degeneration of motor neurones in the primary motor cortex, corticospinal tracts, brainstem and spinal cord. Incidence (average 1.89 per 100,000/year and prevalence (average 5.2 per100,000 are relatively uniform in Western countries, although foci of higher frequency occur in the Western Pacific. The mean age of onset for sporadic ALS is about 60 years. Overall, there is a slight male prevalence (M:F ratio~1.5:1. Approximately two thirds of patients with typical ALS have a spinal form of the disease (limb onset and present with symptoms related to focal muscle weakness and wasting, where the symptoms may start either distally or proximally in the upper and lower limbs. Gradually, spasticity may develop in the weakened atrophic limbs, affecting manual dexterity and gait. Patients with bulbar onset ALS usually present with dysarthria and dysphagia for solid or liquids, and limbs symptoms can develop almost simultaneously with bulbar symptoms, and in the vast majority of cases will occur within 1–2 years. Paralysis is progressive and leads to death due to respiratory failure within 2–3 years for bulbar onset cases and 3–5 years for limb onset ALS cases. Most ALS cases are sporadic but 5–10% of cases are familial, and of these 20% have a mutation of the SOD1 gene and about 2–5% have mutations of the TARDBP (TDP-43 gene. Two percent of apparently sporadic patients have SOD1 mutations, and TARDBP mutations also occur in sporadic cases. The diagnosis is based on clinical history, examination, electromyography, and exclusion of 'ALS-mimics' (e.g. cervical spondylotic myelopathies, multifocal motor neuropathy, Kennedy's disease by appropriate investigations. The pathological hallmarks comprise loss of motor neurones with intraneuronal ubiquitin-immunoreactive inclusions in upper motor neurones and TDP-43

  5. A comparison C1-C2 transarticular screw placement after self-education and mentored education of orthopaedic residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, John S

    2012-08-01

    Prospective randomized trial. This study will provide preliminary data on whether residents can be "self-taught" and to what extent a lecture, demonstration, and coaching can improve skills and knowledge. Practice-based learning is an essential competency in Accreditation Council for graduate Medical Education-accredited residencies. Little has been done to demonstrate whether residents can be self-taught or benefit from mentoring in understanding and performing difficult surgical tasks. A written test was given to orthopedic residents on C1-C2 transarticular screw placement. They were then provided reading on C1-C2 transarticular screw placement. Residents were then divided into a "self-directed learning" group and a "mentored learning" group. All residents then performed the technique on models, with the "mentored" group receiving a lecture and coaching from the mentor. The models were analyzed for technique errors and the previous test was administered again as a posttest. The test and screw placement were repeated 4 months later. Residents without mentoring had an average improvement of 4.5 points, those with mentoring had average improvement of 8.6 points (P=0.0068). The screw placement technique error rate for the nonmentored group (n=8) was 2.55, and for the mentored group (n=9) was 1.47 (P=0.004). Sixteen residents completed the delayed test, 7 from the nonmentored groups and 8 from the mentored group. Nine residents were able to repeat the screw placement technique 4 months after the initial test and screw placement, 3 nonentored, and 6 mentored. Although there were some trends toward the mentored group having better retention, neither knowledge nor skill was statistically different. This preliminary trial seems to indicate that residents provided a lecture and guided technical instruction will obtain knowledge and perform procedures better than those that do not. Conclusions based upon Post Graduate year, motivation, and interest in spine surgery could

  6. In silico Analysis of osr40c1 Promoter Sequence Isolated from Indica Variety Pokkali

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    W.S.I. de Silva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The promoter region of a drought and abscisic acid (ABA inducible gene, osr40c1, was isolated from a salt-tolerant indica rice variety Pokkali, which is 670 bp upstream of the putative translation start codon. In silico promoter analysis of resulted sequence showed that at least 15 types of putative motifs were distributed within the sequence, including two types of common promoter elements, TATA and CAAT boxes. Additionally, several putative cis-acing regulatory elements which may be involved in regulation of osr40c1 expression under different conditions were found in the 5′-upstream region of osr40c1. These are ABA-responsive element, light-responsive elements (ATCT-motif, Box I, G-box, GT1-motif, Gap-box and Sp1, myeloblastosis oncogene response element (CCAAT-box, auxin responsive element (TGA-element, gibberellin-responsive element (GARE-motif and fungal-elicitor responsive elements (Box E and Box-W1. A putative regulatory element, required for endosperm-specific pattern of gene expression designated as Skn-1 motif, was also detected in the Pokkali osr40c1 promoter region. In conclusion, the bioinformatic analysis of osr40c1 promoter region isolated from indica rice variety Pokkali led to the identification of several important stress-responsive cis-acting regulatory elements, and therefore, the isolated promoter sequence could be employed in rice genetic transformation to mediate expression of abiotic stress induced genes.

  7. Second-order optimality conditions for problems with C1 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginchev, Ivan; Ivanov, Vsevolod I.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we obtain second-order optimality conditions of Karush-Kuhn-Tucker type and Fritz John one for a problem with inequality constraints and a set constraint in nonsmooth settings using second-order directional derivatives. In the necessary conditions we suppose that the objective function and the active constraints are continuously differentiable, but their gradients are not necessarily locally Lipschitz. In the sufficient conditions for a global minimum we assume that the objective function is differentiable at and second-order pseudoconvex at , a notion introduced by the authors [I. Ginchev, V.I. Ivanov, Higher-order pseudoconvex functions, in: I.V. Konnov, D.T. Luc, A.M. Rubinov (Eds.), Generalized Convexity and Related Topics, in: Lecture Notes in Econom. and Math. Systems, vol. 583, Springer, 2007, pp. 247-264], the constraints are both differentiable and quasiconvex at . In the sufficient conditions for an isolated local minimum of order two we suppose that the problem belongs to the class C1,1. We show that they do not hold for C1 problems, which are not C1,1 ones. At last a new notion parabolic local minimum is defined and it is applied to extend the sufficient conditions for an isolated local minimum from problems with C1,1 data to problems with C1 one.

  8. Quantification of the catalytic performance of C1-cellulose-specific lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommhagen, Matthias; Westphal, Adrie H; Hilgers, Roelant; Koetsier, Martijn J; Hinz, Sandra W A; Visser, Jaap; Gruppen, Harry; van Berkel, Willem J H; Kabel, Mirjam A

    2018-02-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) have recently been shown to significantly enhance the degradation of recalcitrant polysaccharides and are of interest for the production of biochemicals and bioethanol from plant biomass. The copper-containing LPMOs utilize electrons, provided by reducing agents, to oxidatively cleave polysaccharides. Here, we report the development of a β-glucosidase-assisted method to quantify the release of C1-oxidized gluco-oligosaccharides from cellulose by two C1-oxidizing LPMOs from Myceliophthora thermophila C1. Based on this quantification method, we demonstrate that the catalytic performance of both MtLPMOs is strongly dependent on pH and temperature. The obtained results indicate that the catalytic performance of LPMOs depends on the interaction of multiple factors, which are affected by both pH and temperature.

  9. Detection of vanC1 gene transcription in vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus faecalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moura, Tiane Martin; Cassenego, Ana Paula Vaz; Campos, Fabrício Souza; Ribeiro, Andrea Machado Leal; Franco, Ana Cláudia; d'Azevedo, Pedro Alves; Frazzon, Jeverson; Frazzon, Ana Paula Guedes

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the presence and expression levels of the vanC 1 and vanC 2/3 genes in vancomycin-susceptible strains of Enterococcus faecalis. The vanC 1 and vanC 2/3 genes were located in the plasmid DNA and on the chromosome, respectively. Specific mRNA of the vanC 1 gene was detected in one of these strains. Additionally, analysis of the vanC gene sequences showed that these genes are related to the vanC genes of Enterococcus gallinarum and Enterococcus casseliflavus. The presence of vanC genes is useful for the identification of E. gallinarum and E. casseliflavus. Moreover, this is the first report of vanC mRNA in E. faecalis. PMID:23828012

  10. Detection of vanC 1 gene transcription in vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus faecalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiane Martin de Moura

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the presence and expression levels of the vanC 1 and vanC 2/3 genes in vancomycin-susceptible strains of Enterococcus faecalis. The vanC 1 and vanC 2/3 genes were located in the plasmid DNA and on the chromosome, respectively. Specific mRNA of the vanC 1 gene was detected in one of these strains. Additionally, analysis of the vanC gene sequences showed that these genes are related to the vanC genes of Enterococcus gallinarum and Enterococcus casseliflavus. The presence of vanC genes is useful for the identification of E. gallinarum and E. casseliflavus. Moreover, this is the first report of vanC mRNA in E. faecalis.

  11. Carbon isotope anomaly in the major plant C1 pool and its global biogeochemical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Keppler

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We report that the most abundant C1 units of terrestrial plants, the methoxyl groups of pectin and lignin, have a unique carbon isotope signature exceptionally depleted in 13C. Plant-derived C1 volatile organic compounds (VOCs are also anomalously depleted in 13C compared with Cn+1 VOCs. The results confirm that the plant methoxyl pool is the predominant source of biospheric C1 compounds of plant origin such as methanol, chloromethane and bromomethane. Furthermore this pool, comprising ca 2.5% of carbon in plant biomass, could be an important substrate for methanogenesis and thus be envisaged as a possible source of isotopically light methane entering the atmosphere. Our findings have significant implications for the use of carbon isotope ratios in elucidation of global carbon cycling. Moreover methoxyl groups could act as markers for biological activity in organic matter of terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin.

  12. Characterization of two new dominant ClC-1 channel mutations associated with myotonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Morten; Jespersen, Thomas; Colding-Jørgensen, Eskild

    2003-01-01

    Voltage-gated ClC-1 chloride channels encoded by the CLCN1 gene have a major role in setting the membrane potential in skeletal muscle. More than 60 CLCN1 mutations have been associated with myotonia congenita. These mutations are traditionally classified as recessive (Becker's disease) or dominant...... revealed a change in reversal potential compared to wild-type channels. This finding supports the notion that the E193 amino acid is an important determinant in the selectivity filter of the human ClC-1 channel. The electrophysiological behavior of both mutants demonstrates a severe reduction in ClC-1...... channel conductance under physiologically relevant membrane potentials. These studies thereby explain the molecular background for the observed myotonia in patients....

  13. Identification and Analysis of the Chloroplast rpoC1 Gene Differentially Expressed in Wild Ginseng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Kwang-Ho

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Panax ginseng is a well-known herbal medicine in traditional Asian medicine, and wild ginseng is widely accepted to be more active than cultivated ginseng in chemoprevention. However, little has actually been reported on the difference between wild ginseng and cultivated ginseng. Thus, to identify and analyze those differences, we used suppressive subtraction hybridization (SSH sequences with microarrays, realtime polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and reverse transcription PCRs (RT-PCRs. One of the clones isolated in this research was the chloroplast rpoC1 gene, a β subunit of RNA polymerase. Real-time RT-PCR results showed that the expression of the rpoC1 gene was significantly upregulated in wild ginseng as compared to cultivated ginseng, so, we conclude that the rpoC1 gene may be one of the important markers of wild ginseng.

  14. C1 Polymerization: a unique tool towards polyethylene-based complex macromolecular architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, De

    2017-05-09

    The recent developments in organoborane initiated C1 polymerization (chain grows by one atom at a time) of ylides opens unique horizons towards well-defined/perfectly linear polymethylenes (equivalent to polyethylenes, PE) and PE-based complex macromolecular architectures. The general mechanism of C1 polymerization (polyhomologation) involves the formation of a Lewis complex between a methylide (monomer) and a borane (initiator), followed by migration/insertion of a methylene into the initiator and after oxidation/hydrolysis to afford OH-terminated polyethylenes. This review summarizes efforts towards conventional and newly discovered borane-initiators and ylides (monomers), as well as a combination of polyhomologation with other polymerization methods. Initial efforts dealing with C3 polymerization and the synthesis of the first C1/C3 copolymers are also given. Finally, some thoughts for the future of these polymerizations are presented.

  15. Case C-1/05, Yunying Jia v Migrationsverket, Judgment of the Court (Grand Chamber), 9 January 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsmore, Matthew J.

    2007-01-01

      To promote the exercise of free movement of persons, Member States have adopted various bouts of secondary legislation. For Union citizens, the rules entitle accompaniment or later joining by family members, irrespective of nationality. And a common belief persisted that where such family members....... An interpretation of Akrich was sought in Case C-1/05, Jia, and though keenly anticipated, Jia is a let down for those seeking clarity and guidance, especially as to what is meant by 'lawful residence'. However, on further examination the ruling provides scope to debate unresolved issues, provided one is willing...

  16. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase PDE1C1 in human cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeput, Fabrice; Wolda, Sharon L; Krall, Judith; Hambleton, Ryan; Uher, Lothar; McCaw, Kim N; Radwanski, Przemyslaw B; Florio, Vincent; Movsesian, Matthew A

    2007-11-09

    Isoforms in the PDE1 family of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases were recently found to comprise a significant portion of the cGMP-inhibited cAMP hydrolytic activity in human hearts. We examined the expression of PDE1 isoforms in human myocardium, characterized their catalytic activity, and quantified their contribution to cAMP hydrolytic and cGMP hydrolytic activity in subcellular fractions of this tissue. Western blotting with isoform-selective anti-PDE1 monoclonal antibodies showed PDE1C1 to be the principal isoform expressed in human myocardium. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that PDE1C1 is distributed along the Z-lines and M-lines of cardiac myocytes in a striated pattern that differs from that of the other major dual-specificity cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase in human myocardium, PDE3A. Most of the PDE1C1 activity was recovered in soluble fractions of human myocardium. It binds both cAMP and cGMP with K(m) values of approximately 1 microm and hydrolyzes both substrates with similar catalytic rates. PDE1C1 activity in subcellular fractions was quantified using a new PDE1-selective inhibitor, IC295. At substrate concentrations of 0.1 microm, PDE1C1 constitutes the great majority of cAMP hydrolytic and cGMP hydrolytic activity in soluble fractions and the majority of cGMP hydrolytic activity in microsomal fractions, whereas PDE3 constitutes the majority of cAMP hydrolytic activity in microsomal fractions. These results indicate that PDE1C1 is expressed at high levels in human cardiac myocytes with an intracellular distribution distinct from that of PDE3A and that it may have a role in the integration of cGMP-, cAMP- and Ca(2+)-mediated signaling in these cells.

  17. Gaussian quadrature rules for C 1 quintic splines with uniform knot vectors

    KAUST Repository

    Bartoň, Michael

    2017-03-21

    We provide explicit quadrature rules for spaces of C1C1 quintic splines with uniform knot sequences over finite domains. The quadrature nodes and weights are derived via an explicit recursion that avoids numerical solvers. Each rule is optimal, that is, requires the minimal number of nodes, for a given function space. For each of nn subintervals, generically, only two nodes are required which reduces the evaluation cost by 2/32/3 when compared to the classical Gaussian quadrature for polynomials over each knot span. Numerical experiments show fast convergence, as nn grows, to the “two-third” quadrature rule of Hughes et al. (2010) for infinite domains.

  18. Mutational spectrum and phenotypes in Danish families with hereditary angioedema because of C1 inhibitor deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, A; Fagerberg, C R; Ponard, D

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE), type I and II, is an autosomal dominant disease with deficiency of functional C1 inhibitor protein causing episodic swellings of skin, mucosa and viscera. HAE is a genetically heterogeneous disease with more than 200 different mutations in the SERPING1 gene. A genotype......-phenotype relationship does not seem to exist in HAE, although the polymorphism c.-21T>C of exon 2 has been reported to be associated with a more severe phenotype. We aimed to establish the mutational spectrum of C1 inhibitor deficiency in Denmark and investigate the possible disease-aggravating effect of the c.-21T...

  19. C1q binding to Dengue Virus inhibits infection of THP-1 and cellular inflammatory responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douradinha, Bruno; McBurney, Sean P.; de Melo, Klecia M. Soares; Smith, Amanda P.; Krishna, Neel K.; Barratt-Boyes, Simon M.; Evans, Jared D.; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Marques, Ernesto T. A

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dengue virus infection elicits a spectrum of clinical presentations ranging from asymptomatic to severe disease. The mechanisms leading to severe dengue are not known, however it has been reported that the complement system is hyper-activated in severe dengue. Screening of complement proteins demonstrated that C1q, a pattern recognition molecule, can bind directly to Dengue Virus Envelope protein and to whole Dengue Virus serotype 2. Incubation of Dengue Virus serotype 2 with C1q prior to infection of THP-1 cells led to decreased virus infectivity and modulation of mRNA expression of immunoregulatory molecules suggesting reduced inflammatory responses. PMID:24246304

  20. Complement C1q activates tumor suppressor WWOX to induce apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qunying Hong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tissue exudates contain low levels of serum complement proteins, and their regulatory effects on prostate cancer progression are largely unknown. We examined specific serum complement components in coordinating the activation of tumor suppressors p53 and WWOX (also named FOR or WOX1 and kinases ERK, JNK1 and STAT3 in human prostate DU145 cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: DU145 cells were cultured overnight in 1% normal human serum, or in human serum depleted of an indicated complement protein. Under complement C1q- or C6-free conditions, WOX1 and ERK were mainly present in the cytoplasm without phosphorylation, whereas phosphorylated JNK1 was greatly accumulated in the nuclei. Exogenous C1q rapidly restored the WOX1 activation (with Tyr33 phosphorylation in less than 2 hr. Without serum complement C9, p53 became activated, and hyaluronan (HA reversed the effect. Under C6-free conditions, HA induced activation of STAT3, an enhancer of metastasis. Notably, exogenous C1q significantly induced apoptosis of WOX1-overexpressing DU145 cells, but not vehicle-expressing cells. A dominant negative and Y33R mutant of WOX1 blocked the apoptotic effect. C1q did not enhance p53-mediated apoptosis. By total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy, it was determined that C1q destabilized adherence of WOX1-expressing DU145 cells by partial detaching and inducing formation of clustered microvilli for focal adhesion particularly in between cells. These cells then underwent shrinkage, membrane blebbing and death. Remarkably, as determined by immunostaining, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer were shown to have a significantly reduced expression of tissue C1q, compared to age-matched normal prostate tissues. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that complement C1q may induce apoptosis of prostate cancer cells by activating WOX1 and destabilizing cell adhesion. Downregulation of C1q enhances prostate hyperplasia and cancerous

  1. Determination of Effective Thoracic Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey H. Marcus

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective thoracic mass is an important parameter in specifying mathematical and mechanical models (such as crash dummies of humans exposed to impact conditions. A method is developed using a numerical optimizer to determine effective thoracic mass (and mass distribution given a number of acceleration signals and a force signal response. Utilizing previously reported lateral and frontal impact tests with human cadaveric test specimens in a number of different conditions, the effective thoracic mass is computed. The effective thoracic masses are then computed for a variety of crash dummies exposed to identical test conditions.

  2. Psychotherapists and the clergy: Fifty years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelman, J M

    1984-03-01

    Jung's two powerful articles on psychotherapy and the clergy, written in 1928 and 1932. are looked at from the vantage point of fifty years later and the author's experience in conducting analysis with many people from both vocations. He notes that relatively few people achieve the kind of integration of the ego that Jung writes about-an essentially religious experience-wherein the center of their existence now gravitates about the Self. Yet Jung's work and views have had a profound effect on spiritually inclined people of all ages. The predictions of Jung's articles, regarding therapy, the dissemination of pyschology to the masses, and other issues are examined.

  3. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, H., E-mail: hendrik.jansen@desy.de

    2016-09-21

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  4. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, H.

    2016-09-01

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  5. C 1 natural element method for strain gradient linear elasticity and its application to microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Zhi-Feng; Zhou, Shen-Jie; Han, Ru-Jun; Xiao, Lin-Jing; Wang, Kai

    2012-02-01

    C 1 natural element method ( C 1 NEM) is applied to strain gradient linear elasticity, and size effects on microstructures are analyzed. The shape functions in C 1 NEM are built upon the natural neighbor interpolation (NNI), with interpolation realized to nodal function and nodal gradient values, so that the essential boundary conditions (EBCs) can be imposed directly in a Galerkin scheme for partial differential equations (PDEs). In the present paper, C 1 NEM for strain gradient linear elasticity is constructed, and several typical examples which have analytical solutions are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the constructed method. In its application to microstructures, the size effects of bending stiffness and stress concentration factor (SCF) are studied for microspeciem and microgripper, respectively. It is observed that the size effects become rather strong when the width of spring for microgripper, the radius of circular perforation and the long axis of elliptical perforation for microspeciem come close to the material characteristic length scales. For the U-shaped notch, the size effects decline obviously with increasing notch radius, and decline mildly with increasing length of notch.

  6. Association of the rs3743205 variant of DYX1C1 with dyslexia in Chinese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waye Mary MY

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dyslexia is a learning disability that is characterized by difficulties in the acquisition of reading and spelling skills independent of intelligence, motivation or schooling. Studies of western populations have suggested that DYX1C1 is a candidate gene for dyslexia. In view of the different languages used in Caucasian and Chinese populations, it is therefore worthwhile to investigate whether there is an association of DYX1C1 in Chinese children with dyslexia. Method and Results Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped from three hundred and ninety three individuals from 131 Chinese families with two which have been reported in the literature and six tag SNPs at DYX1C1. Analysis for allelic and haplotypic associations was performed with the UNPHASED program and multiple testing was corrected using false discovery rates. We replicated the previously reported association of rs3743205 in Chinese children with dyslexia (pcorrected = 0.0072. This SNP was also associated with rapid naming, phonological memory and orthographic skills in quantitative trait analysis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that DYX1C1 is associated with dyslexia in people of Chinese ethnicity in Hong Kong.

  7. Simulation of XPS C1s Spectra of Organic Monolayers by Quantum Chemical Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesbers, M.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Zuilhof, H.

    2013-01-01

    Several simple methods are presented and evaluated to simulate the X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) of organic monolayers and polymeric layers by density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller–Plesset theory (MP2) in combination with a series of basis sets. The simulated carbon (C1s) XPS

  8. C1-continuous Virtual Element Method for Poisson-Kirchhoff plate problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyrya, Vitaliy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mourad, Hashem Mohamed [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-20

    We present a family of C1-continuous high-order Virtual Element Methods for Poisson-Kirchho plate bending problem. The convergence of the methods is tested on a variety of meshes including rectangular, quadrilateral, and meshes obtained by edge removal (i.e. highly irregular meshes). The convergence rates are presented for all of these tests.

  9. Methyl Bromide Measurements in the Taylor Dome M3C1 Ice Core, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The data set includes methyl bromide (CH3Br) measurements made on air extracted from 70 samples from the Taylor Dome M3C1 ice core. CH3Br was measured in air from...

  10. Alterations of coagulation and fibrinolysis in patients with angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geffen, M; Cugno, M; Lap, P; Loof, A; Cicardi, M; van Heerde, W

    2012-01-01

    Patients with functional deficiency of C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) suffer from recurrent acute attacks (AA) of localized oedema associated with activation of the contact system, complement and fibrinolysis. To unravel further the role of coagulation and fibrinolysis in the pathophysiology of C1-INH deficiency, we performed simultaneous thrombin and plasmin generation measurements in plasma from patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE) due to C1-INH deficiency during AA (n = 23), in remission (R) (n = 20) and in controls (n = 20). During AA thrombin generation after in-vitro activation of plasma was higher than in controls, as demonstrated by shorter thrombin peak-time (P fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) in patients during AA providing possible evidence for a regulatory effect on fibrinolysis. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) was reduced in patients during AA indicating, together with the observed reduction of plasmin generation, the consumption of fibrinolytic factors. In conclusion, our results support the involvement of coagulation and fibrinolysis in the pathophysiology of HAE and show the possible application of simultaneous measurement of thrombin and plasmin generation to evaluate different clinical conditions in HAE patients. PMID:22288590

  11. Protection from obesity and insulin resistance in mice overexpressing human apolipoprotein C1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, M. C.; Voshol, P. J.; Muurling, M.; Dahlmans, V. E.; Romijn, J. A.; Pijl, H.; Havekes, L. M.

    2001-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (APO) C1 is a 6.6-kDa protein present in plasma and associated with lipoproteins. Using hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp tests, we previously found that in APOC1 transgenic mice, the whole-body insulin-mediated glucose uptake is increased concomitant with a decreased fatty acid

  12. C1 compounds as auxiliary substrate for engineered Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, F.W.; Winde, J.H. de; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    The solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida S12 was engineered to efficiently utilize the C1 compounds methanol and formaldehyde as auxiliary substrate. The hps and phi genes of Bacillus brevis, encoding two key steps of the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) pathway, were introduced to construct a

  13. 26 CFR 41.4482(c)-1 - Definition of State, taxable period, use, and customarily used.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... a private roadway, or other private property, does not constitute use of the vehicle within the... VEHICLES Tax on Use of Certain Highway Motor Vehicles § 41.4482(c)-1 Definition of State, taxable period...”, as used in the regulations in this part with reference to a highway motor vehicle, means the use of...

  14. Construction of pECFP-C1- CIRP and its effect on cold-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fluorescence microscopy, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot detection were done for transient and stable expression assays. CIRP gene was successfully subcloned into eukaryotic expression vector of pECFP-C1, confirmed by restrictive enzyme digestion analysis and DNA sequencing.

  15. Crossing the c=1 barrier in 2d Lorentzian quantum gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambjørn, J.; Anagnostopoulos, K.N.; Loll, R.

    1999-01-01

    In an extension of earlier work we investigate the behaviour of two-dimensional Lorentzian quantum gravity under coupling to a conformal field theory with c > 1. This is done by analyzing numerically a system of eight Ising models (corresponding to c=4) coupled to dynamically triangulated

  16. Hyperlipidemia and cutaneous abnormalities in transgenic mice overexpressing human apolipoprotein C1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, M. C.; Gijbels, M. J.; Dahlmans, V. E.; Gorp, P. J.; Koopman, S. J.; Ponec, M.; Hofker, M. H.; Havekes, L. M.

    1998-01-01

    Transgenic mice were generated with different levels of human apolipoprotein C1 (APOC1) expression in liver and skin. At 2 mo of age, serum levels of cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), and FFA were strongly elevated in APOC1 transgenic mice compared with wild-type mice. These elevated levels of serum

  17. Rh-mediated C1-polymerization: copolymers from diazoesters and sulfoxonium ylides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivos Suarez, A.I.; del Río, M.P.; Remerie, K.; Reek, J.N.H.; de Bruin, B.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present new results obtained in our investigations of Rh-catalyzed C1 (co)polymerization reactions using carbene units as monomers. We demonstrate here, for the first time, the use of transition metal catalysts in carbene polymerization using sulfur ylides as the carbene monomer

  18. 26 CFR 31.3406(c)-1 - Notified payee underreporting of reportable interest or dividend payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3406(c)-1 Notified... utilizes a universal account system described in the first sentence of paragraph (c)(3)(ii) of this section...

  19. Identifying a Resistance Determinant for the Antimitotic Natural Products Disorazole C1 and A1S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Lazo, John S; Reese, Celeste E.; Vogt, Andreas; Vollmer, Laura L.; Kitchens, Carolyn A.; Günther, Eckhard; Graham, Thomas H.; Hopkins, Chad D.; Wipf, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Disorazoles are macrocyclic polyketides first isolated from the fermentation broth of the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum. Both the major fermentation product disorazole A1 and its much rarer companion disorazole C1 exhibit potent cytotoxic activity against many human tumor cells. Furthermore, the disorazoles appear to bind tubulin uniquely among known antimitotic agents, promoting apoptosis or premat...

  20. Cloning and tissue expression of cytochrome P450 1B1 and 1C1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-05-14

    May 14, 2014 ... reading frame of 1551 bp encoding a protein of 517 amino acids; while, CYP1C1 having 2601 bp consists of an open ... expression. Key words: Cytochrome P450, Javanese medaka, salinity, starvation, heavy fuel oil, cloning, expression. .... had no influence on hepatic EROD activities, (Vigano et al., 1993) ...

  1. Cloning and tissue expression of cytochrome P450 1B1 and 1C1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-05-14

    May 14, 2014 ... cellular macromolecules like DNA, lipids and proteins. (Breimer, 1990; Romero et al., ... Starva- tion has been reported to have pro-oxidant effects, and both the inadequate ..... boxes indicate the conserved motif region and red boxes indicates substrate recognition sites (SRS). CYP1C1 shares a number of ...

  2. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. J. Appel and J. M. Capron

    2007-07-25

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground. This waste site was the primary burial ground for general wastes from the operation of the 105-C Reactor and received process tubes, aluminum fuel spacers, control rods, reactor hardware, spent nuclear fuel and soft wastes.

  3. Probing the Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c1 / c552 interaction by mutagenesis and fast kinetics†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzon, Julia; Yuan, Quan; Malatesta, Francesco; Hellwig, Petra; Ludwig, Bernd; Durham, Bill; Millett, Francis

    2008-01-01

    Electron transfer (ET) between Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c1 and cytochrome c552 was studied using the soluble redox fragments cyt c1CF and cyt c552F. A new ruthenium cyt c552F derivative labeled at C23 (Ruz-23-c552F) was designed to measure rapid electron transfer with cyt c1CF in the physiological direction using flash photolysis. The bimolecular rate constant k12 decreased rapidly with ionic strength above 40 mM, consistent with a diffusional process guided by long-range electrostatic interactions between the two proteins. However, a new kinetic phase was detected below 35 mM ionic strength with the ruthenium photoexcitation technique in which k12 became very rapid (3 × 109 M−1s−1) and nearly independent of ionic strength, suggesting that the reaction became so fast that it was controlled by short-range diffusion along the protein surfaces guided by hydrophobic interactions. These results are consistent with a two-step model for formation of the final encounter complex. No intracomplex electron transfer between Ruz-23-c552F and c1CF was observed even at the lowest ionic strength, indicating that the dissociation constant of the complex was greater than 30 µM. On the other hand, the ruthenium-labeled yeast cytochrome c derivative Ruz-39-Cc formed a tight 1:1 complex with cyt c1CF at ionic strengths below 60 mM with an intracomplex electron transfer rate constant of 50,000 s−1. A group of cyt c1CF variants in the presumed docking site were generated based on information from the yeast cyt bc1/cyt c co-crystal structure. Kinetic analysis of cyt c1CF mutants located near the heme crevice provided preliminary identification of the interaction site for cyt c552F, and suggest that formation of the encounter complex is guided primarily by the overall electrostatic surface potential rather than by defined ions. PMID:19006325

  4. DC-SIGN, C1q, and gC1qR form a trimolecular receptor complex on the surface of monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosszu, Kinga K.; Valentino, Alisa; Vinayagasundaram, Uma; Vinayagasundaram, Rama; Joyce, M. Gordon; Ji, Yan; Peerschke, Ellinor I. B.

    2012-01-01

    C1q modulates the differentiation and function of cells committed to the monocyte-derived dendritic cell (DC) lineage. Because the 2 C1q receptors found on the DC surface—gC1qR and cC1qR—lack a direct conduit into intracellular elements, we postulated that the receptors must form complexes with transmembrane partners. In the present study, we show that DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin expressed on DCs, binds directly to C1q, as assessed by ELISA, flow cytometry, and immunoprecipitation experiments. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the interaction was specific, and both intact C1q and the globular portion of C1q bound to DC-SIGN. Whereas IgG reduced this binding significantly, the Arg residues (162-163) of the C1q-A chain, which are thought to contribute to the C1q-IgG interaction, were not required for C1q binding to DC-SIGN. Binding was reduced significantly in the absence of Ca2+ and by preincubation of DC-SIGN with mannan, suggesting that C1q binds to DC-SIGN at its principal Ca2+-binding pocket, which has increased affinity for mannose residues. Antigen-capture ELISA and immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that C1q and gC1qR associate with DC-SIGN on blood DC precursors and immature DCs. The results of the present study suggest that C1q/gC1qR may regulate DC differentiation and function through the DC-SIGN–mediated induction of cell-signaling pathways. PMID:22700724

  5. Identification of IgE sequential epitopes of lentil (Len c 1) by peptide microarray immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereda, Andrea; Andreae, Doerthe A.; Lin, Jing; Shreffler, Wayne G.; Ibañez, Maria Dolores; Cuesta-Herranz, Javier; Bardina, Luda; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Lentils are oftentimes responsible for allergic reactions to legumes in Mediterranean children. Though the primary sequence of the major allergen, Len c 1 is known, the location of the IgE binding epitopes remains undefined. Objective We sought to identify IgE-binding epitopes of Len c 1 and relate epitope binding to clinical characteristics. Methods 135 peptides corresponding to the primary sequence of Len c 1 were probed with sera from 33 lentil-allergic individuals and 15 non-atopic controls by means of microarray immunoassay. Lentil-specific IgE, Skin Prick Tests and clinical reactions to lentil were determined. Epitopes were defined as overlapping signal above inter- and intra-slide cut-offs and confirmed by inhibition assays using a peptide from the respective region. Hierarchical clustering of microarray data was used to correlate binding patterns with clinical findings. Results The lentil-allergic patients specifically recognized IgE-binding epitopes located in the C-terminal region, between peptide 107 and 135. Inhibition experiments confirmed the specificity of IgE binding in this region, identifying different epitopes. Linkage of cluster results with clinical data and lentil specific IgE levels displayed a positive correlation between lentil-specific IgE levels, epitope recognition and respiratory symptoms. Modeling based on the three-dimensional structure of a homologous soy vicilin suggests that the Len c 1 epitopes identified are exposed on the surface of the molecule. Conclusion Several IgE-binding sequential epitopes of Len c 1 have been identified. Epitopes are located in the C-terminal region, and are predicted to be exposed on the surface of the protein. Epitope diversity is positively correlated with IgE levels, pointing to a more polyclonal IgE response. PMID:20816193

  6. 17 CFR 230.160 - Registered investment company exemption from Section 101(c)(1) of the Electronic Signatures in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... exemption from Section 101(c)(1) of the Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act. 230.160...(c)(1) of the Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act. A prospectus for an... 101(c)(1) of the Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act. ...

  7. A novel multi-domain C1qDC protein from Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri provides new insights into the function of invertebrate C1qDC proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Leilei; Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Daoxiang; Jiang, Qiufen; Sun, Rui; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Huan; Song, Linsheng

    2015-10-01

    The C1q domain containing (C1qDC) proteins are a family of proteins possessing globular C1q (gC1q) domains, and they rely on this domain to recognize various ligands such as PAMPs, immunoglobulins, ligands on apoptotic cell. In the present study, a novel multi-domain C1qDC protein (CfC1qDC-2) was identified from scallop Chlamys farreri, and its full length cDNA was composed of 1648 bp, encoding a signal peptide and three typical gC1q domains. BLAST analysis revealed significant sequence similarity between CfC1qDC-2 and C1qDC proteins from mollusks. Three gC1q domains were predicted in its tertiary structure to form a tightly packed bell-shaped trimer, and each one adopted a typical 10-stranded sandwich fold with a jelly-roll topology and contained six aromatic amino acids forming the hydrophobic core. The mRNA transcripts of CfC1qDC-2 were mainly detected in the tissues of hepatopancreas and gonad of adult scallops, and the expression level was up-regulated in hemocytes after stimulated by LPS, PGN and β-glucan. During the embryonic development of scallop, the mRNA transcripts of CfC1qDC-2 were presented in all the detected stages, and the expression level was up-regulated from D-hinged larvae and reached the highest at eye-spot larvae. The recombinant protein of MBP-CfC1qDC-2 (rCfC1qDC-2) could bind various PAMPs including LPS, PGN, LTA, β-glucan, mannan as well as polyI:C, and different microorganisms including three Gram-negative bacteria, three Gram-positive bacteria and two yeasts, as well as scallop apoptotic cells. Meanwhile, rCfC1qDC-2 could interact with human heat-aggregated IgG and IgM, and inhibit the C1q-dependent hemolysis of rabbit serum. All these results indicated that CfC1qDC-2 could recognize not only PAMPs as a PRR, but also the apoptotic cells. Moreover, the similar structures and functions shared by CfC1qDC-2 and complement C1q provided a new insight into the evolution of C1qDC proteins in complement system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd

  8. Lateral Transorbital Neuroendoscopic Approach to the Lateral Cavernous Sinus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bly, Randall A.; Ramakrishna, Rohan; Ferreira, Manuel; Moe, Kris S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To design and assess the quality of a novel lateral retrocanthal endoscopic approach to the lateral cavernous sinus. Design Computer modeling software was used to optimize the geometry of the surgical pathway, which was confirmed on cadaver specimens. We calculated trajectories and surgically accessible areas to the middle fossa while applying a constraint on the amount of soft tissue retraction. Setting Virtual computer model to simulate the surgical approach and cadaver laboratory. Participants The authors. Main Outcome Measures Adequate surgical access to the lateral cavernous sinus and adjacent regions as determined by operations on the cadaver specimens. Additionally, geometric limitations were imposed as determined by the model so that retraction on soft tissue structures was maintained at a clinically safe distance. Results Our calculations revealed adequate access to the lateral cavernous sinus, Meckel cave, orbital apex, and middle fossa floor. Cadaveric testing revealed sufficient access to these areas using cavernous sinus. PMID:24498584

  9. Motor laterality as an indicator of speech laterality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Kenneth A; Hudson, John M

    2013-03-01

    The determination of speech laterality, especially where it is anomalous, is both a theoretical issue and a practical problem for brain surgery. Handedness is commonly thought to be related to speech representation, but exactly how is not clearly understood. This investigation analyzed handedness by preference rating and performance on a reliable task of motor laterality in 34 patients undergoing a Wada test, to see if they could provide an indicator of speech laterality. Hand usage preference ratings divided patients into left, right, and mixed in preference. Between-hand differences in movement time on a pegboard task determined motor laterality. Results were correlated (χ2) with speech representation as determined by a standard Wada test. It was found that patients whose between-hand difference in speed on the motor task was small or inconsistent were the ones whose Wada test speech representation was likely to be ambiguous or anomalous, whereas all those with a consistently large between-hand difference showed clear unilateral speech representation in the hemisphere controlling the better hand (χ2 = 10.45, df = 1, p motor and speech laterality are related where they both involve a central control of motor output sequencing and that a measure of that aspect of the former will indicate the likely representation of the latter. A between-hand measure of motor laterality based on such a measure may indicate the possibility of anomalous speech representation. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. What causes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sarah; Al Khleifat, Ahmad; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a neurodegenerative disease predominantly affecting upper and lower motor neurons, resulting in progressive paralysis and death from respiratory failure within 2 to 3 years. The peak age of onset is 55 to 70 years, with a male predominance. The causes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are only partly known, but they include some environmental risk factors as well as several genes that have been identified as harbouring disease-associated variation. Here we review the nature, epidemiology, genetic associations, and environmental exposures associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:28408982

  11. Modeling multi-lateral wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, H. J.; Fong, W. S. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Company (United States)

    1998-12-31

    A method for modeling multi-lateral wells by using a computational scheme embedded in a general-purpose, finite difference simulator was described. The calculation of wellbore pressure profile for each lateral included the frictional pressure drop along the wellbore and proper fluid mixing at lateral connection points. To obtain a good production profile the Beggs and Brill correlation, a homogenous flow model, and the model proposed by Ouyang et al, which includes an acceleration term and accounts for the lubrication effect due to radial influx, were implemented. Well performance prediction results were compared using the three models. The impact of different tubing sizes on the well performance and the prediction contribution from each lateral were also studied. Results of the study in the hypothetical example and under normal field operating conditions were reviewed. 7 refs., 10 tabs., 3 figs.

  12. Torn lateral collateral ligament (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LCL), is an injury to the lateral collateral ligament, a ligament extending from the top-outside surface of the ... the bottom-outside surface of the femur. The ligament prevents the knee joint from side-to-side ( ...

  13. Children grow and horses race: is the adiposity rebound a critical period for later obesity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cole TJ

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The adiposity rebound is the second rise in body mass index that occurs between 3 and 7 years. An early age at adiposity rebound is known to be a risk factor for later obesity. The aim here is to clarify the connection between the age at rebound and the corresponding pattern of body mass index change, in centile terms, so as to better understand its ability to predict later fatness. Discussion Longitudinal changes in body mass index during adiposity rebound, measured both in original (kg/m2 and standard deviation (SD score units, are studied in five hypothetical subjects. Two aspects of the body mass index curve, the body mass index centile and the rate of body mass index centile crossing, determine a child's age at rebound. A high centile and upward centile crossing are both associated separately with an early rebound, while a low centile and/or downward centile crossing correspond to a late rebound. Early adiposity rebound is a risk factor for later fatness because it identifies children whose body mass index centile is high and/or crossing upwards. Such children are likely to have a raised body mass index later in childhood and adulthood. This is an example of Peto's "horse racing effect". The association of centile crossing with later obesity is statistical not physiological, and it applies at all ages not just at rebound, so adiposity rebound cannot be considered a critical period for future obesity. Body mass index centile crossing is a more direct indicator of the underlying drive to fatness. Summary An early age at adiposity rebound predicts later fatness because it identifies children whose body mass index centile is high and/or crossing upwards. Such children are likely to have a raised body mass index later. Body mass index centile crossing is more direct than the timing of adiposity rebound for predicting later fatness.

  14. Children grow and horses race: is the adiposity rebound a critical period for later obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, T J

    2004-03-12

    The adiposity rebound is the second rise in body mass index that occurs between 3 and 7 years. An early age at adiposity rebound is known to be a risk factor for later obesity. The aim here is to clarify the connection between the age at rebound and the corresponding pattern of body mass index change, in centile terms, so as to better understand its ability to predict later fatness. Longitudinal changes in body mass index during adiposity rebound, measured both in original (kg/m2) and standard deviation (SD) score units, are studied in five hypothetical subjects. Two aspects of the body mass index curve, the body mass index centile and the rate of body mass index centile crossing, determine a child's age at rebound. A high centile and upward centile crossing are both associated separately with an early rebound, while a low centile and/or downward centile crossing correspond to a late rebound. Early adiposity rebound is a risk factor for later fatness because it identifies children whose body mass index centile is high and/or crossing upwards. Such children are likely to have a raised body mass index later in childhood and adulthood. This is an example of Peto's "horse racing effect". The association of centile crossing with later obesity is statistical not physiological, and it applies at all ages not just at rebound, so adiposity rebound cannot be considered a critical period for future obesity. Body mass index centile crossing is a more direct indicator of the underlying drive to fatness. An early age at adiposity rebound predicts later fatness because it identifies children whose body mass index centile is high and/or crossing upwards. Such children are likely to have a raised body mass index later. Body mass index centile crossing is more direct than the timing of adiposity rebound for predicting later fatness.

  15. Complement component C1r mediated cleavage of the heavy chain of the major histocompatibility class I antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, H; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1992-01-01

    Apart from cleaving C1s, we demonstrate for the first time that: 1) at concentrations found in serum, the activated forms of the complement components C1r in addition to C1s can cleave the heavy chain of MHC class I antigens, 2) the cleavage by C1r and C1s is seemingly dependent upon a native con......-chain of MHC class I was shown to take place between the alpha 2- and alpha 3- domains as estimated by the Con A-Sepharose precipitation pattern on SDS-PAGE. The alpha 1/alpha 2 fragment was still shown to interact with beta 2-microglobulin as shown by immunoprecipitation.......Apart from cleaving C1s, we demonstrate for the first time that: 1) at concentrations found in serum, the activated forms of the complement components C1r in addition to C1s can cleave the heavy chain of MHC class I antigens, 2) the cleavage by C1r and C1s is seemingly dependent upon a native...... configuration of the MHC class I antigen, since heat denaturation of the HLA antigens reduce the cleavage. The proteolytic fragments following C1 cleavage were characterized by precipitation with Con A-Sepharose, anti-MHC class I and anti-beta 2-microglobulin antibodies. The proteolysis of the alpha...

  16. Fishing for biodiversity: Novel methanopterin-linked C1 transfergenes deduced from the Sargasso Sea metagenome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Nercessian, Olivier; Lapidus, Alla; Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2004-07-01

    The recently generated database of microbial genes from anoligotrophic environment populated by a calculated 1,800 of major phylotypes (the Sargasso Sea metagenome) presents a great source for expanding local databases of genes indicative of a specific function. In this paper we analyze the Sargasso Sea metagenome in terms of the presence of methanopterin-linked C1 transfer genes that are signature for methylotrophy. We conclude that more than 10 phylotypes possessing genes of interest are present in this environment, and a few of these are relatively abundant species. The sequences representative of the major phylotypes do not appear to belong to any known microbial group capable of methanopterin-linked C1 transfer. Instead, they separate from all known sequences on phylogenetic trees, pointing towards their affiliation with a novel microbial phylum. These data imply a broader distribution of methanopterin-linked functions in the microbial world than previously known.

  17. The C1XS X-ray Spectrometer on Chandrayaan-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, M.; Maddison, B. J.; Howe, C. J.; Kellett, B. J.; Sreekumar, P.; Huovelin, J.; Crawford, I. A.; Duston, C. L.; Smith, D.; Anand, M.; Bhandari, N.; Cook, A.; Fernandes, V.; Foing, B.; Gasnaut, O.; Goswami, J. N.; Holland, A.; Joy, K. H.; Kochney, D.; Lawrence, D.; Maurice, S.; Okada, T.; Narendranath, S.; Pieters, C.; Rothery, D.; Russell, S. S.; Shrivastava, A.; Swinyard, B.; Wilding, M.; Wieczorek, M.

    2009-06-01

    The Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) is a compact X-ray spectrometer for the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) Chandrayaan-1 lunar mission. It exploits heritage from the D-CIXS instrument on ESA's SMART-1 mission. As a result of detailed developments to all aspects of the design, its performance as measured in the laboratory greatly surpasses that of D-CIXS. In comparison with SMART-1, Chandrayaan-1 is a science-oriented rather than a technology mission, leading to far more favourable conditions for science measurements. C1XS is designed to measure absolute and relative abundances of major rock-forming elements (principally Mg, Al, Si, Ca and Fe) in the lunar crust with spatial resolution ⩽25 FWHM km, and to achieve relative elemental abundances of better than 10%.

  18. Cloning and tissue expression of cytochrome P450 1B1 and 1C1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytochrome P450 1 (CYP1) is widely used as an indicator of exposure to environmental contaminants. In the study, two full-length complementary DNAs encode for CYP1B1 and CYP1C1 were cloned from medaka liver exposed to 500 ppb β-naphthoflavone for 24 h. CYP1B1, having 1984 bp, contains an open reading ...

  19. Treatment of hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloisa Malbrán

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of the worldwide approval of new drugs for the treatment of acute C1-INH-HAE attacks may still not reach all patients. Identifying the current barriers in the access to medication, as well as conducting a detailed assessment of the progress in this area, is essential to achieve universal treatment. Two hundred and twenty five patients registered in the Argentina Hereditary Angioedema Patient Association (AHAEPA were randomly selected and invited to participate in a web based questionnaire on accessibility to icatibant and pdC1-INH, self-treatment, delay to treatment, and coverage. The data retrieved was compared to our previous reports in 2008 and 2013. We collected 156/225 answers. One hundred and eighteen (76% patients have either pdC1-INH (n = 86, icatibant (n = 10 or both (n = 22, while 38 (24% do not have access to treatment. In 2008, 26% had access while 82% had it in 2013. Thirty-two subjects (22% self-inject themselves, similar to 29% in 2013, even though between studies, widespread self-injection training activities have taken place. However, considering injections by proxy, home treatment reached 56%. Only half of the patients decide to receive treatment early during the attack. Ninety-nine patients (63% have full coverage, thirty (19% have no coverage at all and the rest only obtain partial reimbursement. Twenty-nine families (31% share a single treatment dose of the medication, better than 36% in 2013. Argentina's C1-INH-HAE patients had a sustained improvement in their access to medication. Efforts should continue to further improve accessibility and optimal management of HAE acute attacks to all patients in the country.

  20. Explicit Gaussian quadrature rules for C^1 cubic splines with symmetrically stretched knot sequence

    KAUST Repository

    Ait-Haddou, Rachid

    2015-06-19

    We provide explicit expressions for quadrature rules on the space of C^1 cubic splines with non-uniform, symmetrically stretched knot sequences. The quadrature nodes and weights are derived via an explicit recursion that avoids an intervention of any numerical solver and the rule is optimal, that is, it requires minimal number of nodes. Numerical experiments validating the theoretical results and the error estimates of the quadrature rules are also presented.

  1. Synthetic studies on hemicalide: development of a convergent approach toward the C1-C25 fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorin, Geoffroy; Fleury, Etienne; Tran, Christine; Prost, Elise; Molinier, Nicolas; Sautel, François; Massiot, Georges; Specklin, Simon; Meyer, Christophe; Cossy, Janine; Lannou, Marie-Isabelle; Ardisson, Janick

    2013-09-20

    Synthetic studies on hemicalide, a recently isolated marine natural product displaying highly potent antiproliferative activity and a unique mode of action, have highlighted a reliable Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons olefination to create the C6-C7 alkene and a remarkable efficient Suzuki-Miyaura coupling to form the C15-C16 bond, resulting in the development of a convergent approach toward the C1-C25 fragment.

  2. Rapid Reactivation of Deep Subsurface Microbes in the Presence of C-1 Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauliina Rajala

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms in the deep biosphere are believed to conduct little metabolic activity due to low nutrient availability in these environments. However, destructive penetration to long-isolated bedrock environments during construction of underground waste repositories can lead to increased nutrient availability and potentially affect the long-term stability of the repository systems, Here, we studied how microorganisms present in fracture fluid from a depth of 500 m in Outokumpu, Finland, respond to simple carbon compounds (C-1 compounds in the presence or absence of sulphate as an electron acceptor. C-1 compounds such as methane and methanol are important intermediates in the deep subsurface carbon cycle, and electron acceptors such as sulphate are critical components of oxidation processes. Fracture fluid samples were incubated in vitro with either methane or methanol in the presence or absence of sulphate as an electron acceptor. Metabolic response was measured by staining the microbial cells with fluorescent dyes that indicate metabolic activity and transcriptional response with RT-qPCR. Our results show that deep subsurface microbes exist in dormant states but rapidly reactivate their transcription and respiration systems in the presence of C-1 substrates, particularly methane. Microbial activity was further enhanced by the addition of sulphate as an electron acceptor. Sulphate- and nitrate-reducing microbes were particularly responsive to the addition of C-1 compounds and sulphate. These taxa are common in deep biosphere environments and may be affected by conditions disturbed by bedrock intrusion, as from drilling and excavation for long-term storage of hazardous waste.

  3. Polygonumnolides C1-C4; minor dianthrone glycosides from the roots of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Bo; Li, Li; Dai, Zhong; Wu, Yu; Geng, Xing-Chao; Li, Bo; Ma, Shuang-Cheng; Wang, Ai-Guo; Su, Ya-Lun

    2016-09-01

    Four new dianthrone glycosides, named polygonumnolides C1-C4 (1-4), were isolated from the dried roots of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb, together with two known emodin dianthrones (5-6). Their hepatotoxicities were evaluated against L-02 cell lines. Compounds 1-4 showed weak hepatotoxicity against L-02 cell lines with IC50 values of 313.05, 205.20, 294.20, and 207.35 μM, respectively.

  4. Electrodril system field test program. Phase II: Task C-1-deep drilling system demonstration. Final report for Phase II: Task C-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P D

    1981-04-01

    The Electrodril Deep Drilling System field test demonstrations were aborted in July 1979, due to connector problems. Subsequent post test analyses concluded that the field replacable connectors were the probable cause of the problems encountered. The designs for both the male and female connectors, together with their manufacturing processes, were subsequently modified, as was the acceptance test procedures. A total of nine male and nine female connectors were manufactured and delivered during the 2nd Quarter 1980. Exhaustive testing was then conducted on each connector as a precursor to formal qualification testing conducted during the month of October 1980, at the Brown Oil Tool test facility located in Houston, Texas. With this report, requirements under Phase II, Task C-1 are satisfied. The report documents the results of the connector qualification test program which was successfully completed October 28, 1980. In general, it was concluded that connector qualification had been achieved and plans are now in progress to resume the field test demonstration program so that Electrodril System performance predictions and economic viability can be evaluated.

  5. Overcoming Intrinsic Restriction Enzyme Barriers Enhances Transformation Efficiency in Arthrospira platensis C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeamton, Wattana; Dulsawat, Sudarat; Tanticharoen, Morakot; Vonshak, Avigad; Cheevadhanarak, Supapon

    2017-04-01

    The development of a reliable genetic transformation system for Arthrospira platensis has been a long-term goal, mainly for those trying either to improve its performance in large-scale cultivation systems or to enhance its value as food and feed additives. However, so far, most of the attempts to develop such a transformation system have had limited success. In this study, an efficient and stable transformation system for A. platensis C1 was successfully developed. Based on electroporation and transposon techniques, exogenous DNA could be transferred to and stably maintained in the A. platensis C1 genome. Most strains of Arthrospira possess strong restriction barriers, hampering the development of a gene transfer system for this group of cyanobacteria. By using a type I restriction inhibitor and liposomes to protect the DNA from nuclease digestion, the transformation efficiency was significantly improved. The transformants were able to grow on a selective medium for more than eight passages, and the transformed DNA could be detected from the stable transformants. We propose that the intrinsic endonuclease enzymes, particularly the type I restriction enzyme, in A. platensis C1 play an important role in the transformation efficiency of this industrial important cyanobacterium. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Reactions of water and C1 molecules on carbide and metal-modified carbide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Weiming; Tackett, Brian M; Chen, Jingguang G

    2017-04-03

    The formation of carbides can significantly modify the physical and chemical properties of the parent metals. In the current review, we summarize the general trends in the reactions of water and C1 molecules over transition metal carbide (TMC) and metal-modified TMC surfaces and thin films. Although the primary focus of the current review is on the theoretical and experimental studies of reactions of C1 molecules (CO, CO2, CH3OH, etc.), the reactions of water will also be reviewed because water plays an important role in many of the C1 transformation reactions. This review is organized by discussing separately thermal reactions and electrochemical reactions, which provides insights into the application of TMCs in heterogeneous catalysis and electrocatalysis, respectively. In thermal reactions, we discuss the thermal decomposition of water and methanol, as well as the reactions of CO and CO2 over TMC surfaces. In electrochemical reactions, we summarize recent studies in the hydrogen evolution reaction, electrooxidation of methanol and CO, and electroreduction of CO2. Finally, future research opportunities and challenges associated with using TMCs as catalysts and electrocatalysts are also discussed.

  7. Gene Expression and Methylation Signatures of MAN2C1 are Associated with PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Uddin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As potential regulators of DNA accessibility and activity, epigenetic modifications offer a mechanism by which the environment can moderate the effects of genes. To date, however, there have been relatively few studies assessing epigenetic modifications associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Here we investigate PTSD-associated methylation differences in 33 genes previously shown to differ in whole blood-derived gene expression levels between those with vs. without the disorder. Drawing on DNA samples similarly obtained from whole blood in 100 individuals, 23 with and 77 without lifetime PTSD, we used methylation microarray data to assess whether these 33 candidate genes showed epigenetic signatures indicative of increased risk for, or resilience to, PTSD. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the main and interacting effects of candidate genes’ methylation values and number of potentially traumatic events (PTEs, adjusting for age and other covariates. Results revealed that only one candidate gene–MAN2C1–showed a significant methylation x PTE interaction, such that those with both higher MAN2C1 methylation and greater exposure to PTEs showed a marked increase in risk of lifetime PTSD (OR 4.35, 95% CI: 1.07, 17.77, p = 0.04. These results indicate that MAN2C1 methylation levels modify cumulative traumatic burden on risk of PTSD, and suggest that both gene expression and epigenetic changes at specific loci are associated with this disorder.

  8. Initial Results from the C1XS X-Ray Spectrometer on Chandrayaan-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, M.; Kellett, B. J.; Maddison, B.. J.; Sreekumar, P.; Huovelin, J.; Howe, C. J.; Crawford, I. A.

    2009-04-01

    The Chandrayaan-1 lunar mission, which was successfully launched by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) on 22 October, carried as part of its payload the C1XS Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spec-trometer [1]. It exploits heritage from the D-CIXS instrument [2] on ESA's SMART-1 mission. Whereas SMART-1 was a technology mission, Chandrayaan-1 is science oriented, with a far more favourable orbit for science measurements. C1XS is designed to measure abundances of major rock-forming elements (princi-pally Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti and Fe). The instrument has been commissioned, and is operating nominally. The Sun continues to show X-ray emission charac-teristic of the Solar minimum. As has been commented by [7], the onset of this solar maximum is significantly delayed. However, C1XS has been able to observe the Moon even in these very low illumination conditions. Figure 3 shows the result of an integration during an A class flare on the 12th Dec. 2008. Characteristic energy lines at Mg, Al and Si are clearly seen and resolved from the average extreme quiet time data background. This performance shows that the instrument is easily meeting its design requirements, and in the higher illumination conditions expected during the rest of the mission will be capable of meeting its science goals.

  9. Clinical presentation of human C1q deficiency: How much of a lupus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegert, Mihaela; Bock, Merete; Trendelenburg, Marten

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary human C1q deficiency has been well described to be associated with high susceptibility for the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The majority of subjects present a clinical syndrome closely related to SLE. However, limited information is available about the primary diagnosis and particular clinical manifestations of SLE in this specific subgroup of patients. In this review, we performed a comprehensive search of electronic databases up to November 2014 to identify and analyze reports on patients with C1q deficiency. We identified 71 C1q-deficient patients descending from 45 families that had been published. According to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) diagnostic criteria for SLE 39/71 (55%) subjects could be classified as having SLE. Another 16/71 (22.5%) presented a SLE-like syndrome (defined as 3 positive ACR criteria) whereas in 16/71 (22.5%) no SLE could be diagnosed at time of publication. Symptoms began at a median age of 5 years, male and females being equally affected. Discoid rash (56% versus 10%, poral ulcers (49% versus 24%, pmanifestations were found to occur similarly frequent. The severe course of disease in some patients seemed to be mostly due to severe infections at early ages and not in particular due to more aggressive SLE manifestations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Styloid/C1 transverse process juxtaposition as a cause of Eagle's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Sandra; Luginbuhl, Adam; Finden, Steven; Curry, Joseph M; Cognetti, David M

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this case report was to characterize styloid/C1 transverse process juxtaposition as a cause for Eagle's syndrome. A case series was conducted with a chart review of 5 patients with radiographic evidence of jugular vein compression who underwent styloid process excision between 2010 and 2013. There were 4 men and 1 woman, aged 35 to 62 years (mean, 46 years). Cervicalgia (4 of 5 patients) and otalgia (4 of 5 patients) were the most commonly reported symptoms. Styloid process length ranged from 2.4 to 8.5 cm. The distance between the styloid process and the transverse process of C1 ranged from 0.05 to 0.46 cm. All patients underwent a transcervical approach for the excision of the styloid process with immediate postoperative resolution of symptoms and good cosmetic results. Styloid/C1 transverse process juxtaposition can produce symptoms of cervicalgia and otalgia even in the setting of a normal length styloid process. The transcervical approach is safe and effective for excision of the styloid process and has good functional and cosmetic results. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. [Brain lateralization and seizure semiology: ictal clinical lateralizing signs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Réka; Kalmár, Zsuzsanna; Fehér, Nóra; Fogarasi, András; Gyimesi, Csilla; Janszky, József

    2008-07-30

    Clinical lateralizing signs are the phenomena which can unequivocally refer to the hemispheric onset of epileptic seizures. They can improve the localization of epileptogenic zone during presurgical evaluation, moreover, their presence can predict a success of surgical treatment. Primary sensory phenomena such as visual aura in one half of the field of vision or unilateral ictal somatosensory sensation always appear on the contralateral to the focus. Periictal unilateral headache, although it is an infrequent symptom, is usually an ipsilateral sign. Primary motor phenomena like epileptic clonic, tonic movements, the version of head ubiquitously appear contralateral to the epileptogenic zone. Very useful lateralization sign is the ictal hand-dystonia which lateralizes to the contralateral hemisphere in nearly 100%. The last clonus of the secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizure lateralizes to the ipsilateral hemisphere in 85%. The fast component of ictal nystagmus appears in nearly 100% on the contralateral side of the epileptic focus. Vegetative symptoms during seizures arising from temporal lobe such as spitting, nausea, vomiting, urinary urge are typical for seizures originating from non-dominant (right) hemisphere. Ictal pallor and cold shivers are dominant hemispheric lateralization signs. Postictal unilateral nose wiping refers to the ipsilateral hemispheric focus compared to the wiping hand. Ictal or postictal aphasia refers to seizure arising from dominant hemisphere. Intelligable speech during complex partial seizures appears in non-dominant seizures. Automatism with preserved consciousness refers to the seizures of non-dominant temporal lobe.

  12. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases from Myceliophthora thermophila C1 differ in substrate preference and reducing agent specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommhagen, Matthias; Koetsier, Martijn J; Westphal, Adrie H; Visser, Jaap; Hinz, Sandra W A; Vincken, Jean-Paul; van Berkel, Willem J H; Kabel, Mirjam A; Gruppen, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxgygenases (LPMOs) are known to boost the hydrolytic breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass, especially cellulose, due to their oxidative mechanism. For their activity, LPMOs require an electron donor for reducing the divalent copper cofactor. LPMO activities are mainly investigated with ascorbic acid as a reducing agent, but little is known about the effect of plant-derived reducing agents on LPMOs activity. Here, we show that three LPMOs from the fungus Myceliophthora thermophila C1, MtLPMO9A, MtLPMO9B and MtLPMO9C, differ in their substrate preference, C1-/C4-regioselectivity and reducing agent specificity. MtLPMO9A generated C1- and C4-oxidized, MtLPMO9B C1-oxidized and MtLPMO9C C4-oxidized gluco-oligosaccharides from cellulose. The recently published MtLPMO9A oxidized, next to cellulose, xylan, β-(1 → 3, 1 → 4)-glucan and xyloglucan. In addition, MtLPMO9C oxidized, to a minor extent, xyloglucan and β-(1 → 3, 1 → 4)-glucan from oat spelt at the C4 position. In total, 34 reducing agents, mainly plant-derived flavonoids and lignin-building blocks, were studied for their ability to promote LPMO activity. Reducing agents with a 1,2-benzenediol or 1,2,3-benzenetriol moiety gave the highest release of oxidized and non-oxidized gluco-oligosaccharides from cellulose for all three MtLPMOs. Low activities toward cellulose were observed in the presence of monophenols and sulfur-containing compounds. Several of the most powerful LPMO reducing agents of this study serve as lignin building blocks or protective flavonoids in plant biomass. Our findings support the hypothesis that LPMOs do not only vary in their C1-/C4-regioselectivity and substrate specificity, but also in their reducing agent specificity. This work strongly supports the idea that the activity of LPMOs toward lignocellulosic biomass does not only depend on the ability to degrade plant polysaccharides like cellulose, but also on their specificity toward plant

  13. Direct posterior reduction in a case of posttraumatic irreducible lateral atlantoaxial dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salunke, Pravin; Sahoo, Sushanta K; Doddamani, Ramesh; Ahuja, Chirag K; Mukherjee, Kanchan K

    2014-06-01

    Posttraumatic true irreducible C1-2 lateral dislocation is rare. The mechanism of injury is likely to be different for this kind of dislocation. The management of such an injury and the technique for direct posterior reduction remain unclear because of its rarity. The authors describe the case of a 34-year-old man who sustained injury in a vehicular accident, leading to neck pain. Radiological studies revealed fixed right lateral and posterior C1-2 dislocation. Direct posterior open reduction was achieved by distracting the facets and rotating them in a counterclockwise direction. Care was taken to avoid direct or indirect injury to the vertebral arteries. Segmental C1-2 fusion was performed. Distraction with lateral extension injury possibly gives rise to this unique fracture dislocation. Preoperative imaging including angiography for vertebral arteries helps in defining the cause of fixity and in surgical planning. Direct posterior reduction is possible in such fixed C1-2 lateral dislocation, circumventing transoral surgery-provided the facets are preserved.

  14. Nominal Mass?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attygalle, Athula B.; Pavlov, Julius

    2017-08-01

    The current IUPAC-recommended definition of the term "nominal mass," based on the most abundant naturally occurring stable isotope of an element, is flawed. We propose that Nominal mass should be defined as the sum of integer masses of protons and neutrons in any chemical species. In this way, all isotopes and isotopologues can be assigned a definitive identifier.

  15. Characterization of a gC1qR from the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ting; Huang, Xin; Wang, Xian-Wei; Shi, Yan-Ru; Hui, Kai-Min; Ren, Qian

    2015-03-01

    gC1qR, as a multicompartmental and a multifunctional protein, plays an important role in innate immunity. In this study, a gC1qR homolog (MrgC1qR) in the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii was identified. MrgC1qR, a 258-amino-acid polypeptide, shares high identities with gC1qR from other species. MrgC1qR gene was expressed in different tissues and was highest expressed in the hepatopancreas. In addition, the MrgC1qR transcript was significantly enhanced after 6 h of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection or post 2 h, 24 h of Vibrio anguillarum challenge compared to appropriate controls. Moreover, recombinant MrgC1qR (rMrgC1qR) had bacterial binding activity, the result also revealed that rMrgC1qR could bind pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) such as LPS or PGN, suggesting that MrgC1qRmight function as a pathogen-recognition receptor (PRR). Furthermore, glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays showed that rMrgC1qR with GST-tag could bind to rMrFicolin1 or rMrFicolin2 with His-tag. Altogether, these results may demonstrate a role for MrgC1qR in innate immunity in the giant freshwater prawns. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Optineurin and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Hirofumi; Kawakami, Hideshi

    2013-07-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a devastating disease, and thus it is important to identify the causative gene and resolve the mechanism of the disease. We identified optineurin as a causative gene for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We found three types of mutations: a homozygous deletion of exon 5, a homozygous Q398X nonsense mutation and a heterozygous E478G missense mutation within its ubiquitin-binding domain. Optineurin negatively regulates the tumor necrosis factor-α-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Nonsense and missense mutations abolished this function. Mutations related to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis also negated the inhibition of interferon regulatory factor-3. The missense mutation showed a cyotoplasmic distribution different from that of the wild type. There are no specific clinical symptoms related to optineurin. However, severe brain atrophy was detected in patients with homozygous deletion. Neuropathologically, an E478G patient showed transactive response DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa-positive neuronal intracytoplasmic inclusions in the spinal and medullary motor neurons. Furthermore, Golgi fragmentation was identified in 73% of this patient's anterior horn cells. In addition, optineurin is colocalized with fused in sarcoma in the basophilic inclusions of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with fused in sarcoma mutations, and in basophilic inclusion body disease. These findings strongly suggest that optineurin is involved in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. © 2012 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  17. Association of circulating C1q/TNF-related protein 1 levels with coronary artery disease in men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Yuasa

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Recent evidence demonstrates that dysregulation of fat-derived hormones, also known as adipokines, is linked with the pathogenesis of obesity-related disorders including coronary artery disease (CAD. Here, we investigated whether circulating level of an adipokine C1q/TNF-related protein (CTRP 1 is associated with the prevalence of CAD. METHODS AND RESULTS: Consecutive 76 male CAD patients were enrolled from inpatients that underwent coronary angiography. Sixty four healthy male subjects served as controls. Plasma CTRP1 concentration was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. CTRP1 levels were correlated positively with systolic blood pressure (BP and triglyceride levels, and negatively with HDL cholesterol levels in all subjects. Plasma levels of CTRP1 were significantly higher in CAD patients than in control subjects (CAD: 443.3±18.6 ng/ml, control: 307.8±21.5 ng/ml, p<0.001. Multiple logistic regression analysis with body mass index, systolic BP, glucose, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, adiponectin and CTRP1 revealed that CTRP1 levels, together with systolic BP and HDL cholesterol, correlated with CAD. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate the close association of high CTRP1 levels with CAD prevalence, suggesting that CTRP1 represents a novel biomarker for CAD.

  18. Avaliação de série de pacientes com artrodese C1-C2 Evaluación de diferentes casos con artrodesis C1-C2 Evaluation of different cases with C1-C2 arthrodesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Salge Ghilardi

    2012-01-01

    vasculares. Complicaciones infecciosas se registraron en dos pacientes. Hemos logrado una tasa de 85% de consolidación de la artrodesis y no se requirieron cirugías de revisión. CONCLUSIONES: Todas las técnicas usadas produjeron la consolidación ósea satisfactoria y fueron excelentes para controlar la inestabilidad atlantoaxial.OBJECTIVE: Retrospective record analysis of patients with C1-C2 instability of traumatic and nontraumatic causes who underwent C1-C2 arthrodesis. METHODS: We performed retrospective analysis of medical records of 20 outpatients from the column of IOT-FMUSP aged between 7 and 83 years (mean 43 years of both sexes. The radiographic parameters for instability were based on measurement of atlanto-axial interval greater than 3 mm in adults and 5 mm in children, using measures obtained from lateral plain X-rays. RESULTS: We operated 20 patients with high cervical instability, mostly due to trauma. The surgical technique used was that described by Magerl. There were no vascular injuries. Infectious complications were reported in two patients. We achieved a solid fusion rate of 85% and no revision surgeries were required. CONCLUSIONS: All techniques produced satisfactory bone healing and were excellent for the control of atlanto-axial instability.

  19. Contributions to lateral balance control in ambulatory older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparto, Patrick J; Newman, A B; Simonsick, E M; Caserotti, P; Strotmeyer, E S; Kritchevsky, S B; Yaffe, K; Rosano, C

    2017-08-23

    In older adults, impaired control of standing balance in the lateral direction is associated with the increased risk of falling. Assessing the factors that contribute to impaired standing balance control may identify areas to address to reduce falls risk. To investigate the contributions of physiological factors to standing lateral balance control. Two hundred twenty-two participants from the Pittsburgh site of the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study had lateral balance control assessed using a clinical sensory integration balance test (standing on level and foam surface with eyes open and closed) and a lateral center of pressure tracking test using visual feedback. The center of pressure was recorded from a force platform. Multiple linear regression models examined contributors of lateral control of balance performance, including concurrently measured tests of lower extremity sensation, knee extensor strength, executive function, and clinical balance tests. Models were adjusted for age, body mass index, and sex. Larger lateral sway during the sensory integration test performed on foam was associated with longer repeated chair stands time. During the lateral center of pressure tracking task, the error in tracking increased at higher frequencies; greater error was associated with worse executive function. The relationship between sway performance and physical and cognitive function differed between women and men. Contributors to control of lateral balance were task-dependent. Lateral standing performance on an unstable surface may be more dependent upon general lower extremity strength, whereas visual tracking performance may be more dependent upon cognitive factors. Lateral balance control in ambulatory older adults is associated with deficits in strength and executive function.

  20. The Halloween Lateral Canthotomy Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur-Ain Nadir

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Audience: The Halloween Lateral Canthotomy Model” is designed to instruct Emergency Medicine residents PGY 1-4, as well as Emergency Medicine-bound students. Introduction: Although uncommon, retrobulbar hemorrhage associated with facial trauma is a potential cause of permanent vision loss due to orbital compartment syndrome. To prevent vision loss, treatment with lateral canthotomy is time-sensitive and to perform this procedure in an emergent setting requires properly trained practitioners. Objectives: The purpose of the model is to teach residents and students how to perform lateral canthotomy and to achieve competency in their skills. Method: Lateral canthotomy is an important skill to be proficient in for any Emergency Medicine Physician, as it is an uncommon, sight-saving procedure. It is indicated in scenarios of facial trauma that cause a retrobulbar hemorrhage. Patients are at risk for permanent vision loss due to acute orbital compartment syndrome if the procedure is not done expeditiously.1 A less likely cause of retrobulbar hemorrhage is spontaneous hemorrhage due to a bleeding disorder or anticoagulant use.2 The features of retrobulbar hemorrhage include acute loss of visual acuity, relative afferent pupillary defect, proptosis with resistance to retropulsion, increased intraocular pressure, and limited extra ocular movement.3 While the diagnosis is clinical, it can be confirmed by computed tomography (CT and measurement of intraocular pressure.2 When the diagnosis is established, lateral canthotomy and cantholysis should be performed emergently. Cantholysis is contraindicated when a globe rupture is suspected or with an orbital blowout fracture. Potential complications of this procedure include iatrogenic injury to the globe or lateral rectus muscle, damage to the elevator aponeurosis resulting in ptosis, injury to the lacrimal gland and lacrimal artery, bleeding and infection.3 This task trainer uses affordable materials to let

  1. Elucidating the Mechanism of Gain of Toxic Function From Mutant C1 Inhibitor Proteins in Hereditary Angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    antibodies to 5 specifically blot wild-type C1INH in the pathologic polymers.. A FLAG tag was placed into the wild-type C1INH cDNA located immediately... constructs . The table below shows the results of this experiment. Origin of mutation Co-Transfection Construct A1AT Equiv. Replicate 1 Replicate 2... Construct n/a WT-C1INH n/a 1.00 1.01 A1AT E429K-Mu-C1INH Z 0.74 0.68 A1AT H421D-Mu-C1INH King’s 0.66 0.67 A1AT S148F-Mu-C1INH Silyama 0.71 0.54

  2. 49 CFR 230.105 - Lateral motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lateral motion. 230.105 Section 230.105... Tenders Running Gear § 230.105 Lateral motion. (a) Condemning limits. The total lateral motion or play... require additional lateral motion. (c) Non-interference with other parts. The lateral motion shall in all...

  3. Evidence of $\\Upsilon(1S) \\to J/\\psi+\\chi_{c1}$ and search for double-charmonium production in $\\Upsilon(1S)$ and $\\Upsilon(2S)$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, S D; Ban, Y; Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Said, S Al; Arinstein, K; Asner, D M; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Bakich, A M; Bansal, V; Behera, P; Bhuyan, B; Bobrov, A; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Červenkov, D; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S -K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dingfelder, J; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Dutta, K; Eidelman, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Ganguly, S; Garmash, A; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Golob, B; Haba, J; Hara, T; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Hou, W -S; Huschle, M; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Jaegle, I; Joffe, D; Joo, K K; Julius, T; Kawasaki, T; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y -J; Lange, J S; Li, J; Li, Y; Gioi, L Li; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Lukin, P; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Moll, A; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Okuno, S; Ostrowicz, W; Park, C W; Park, H; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Shebalin, V; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Starič, M; Steder, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamponi, U; Tanida, K; Tatishvili, G; Teramoto, Y; Uchida, M; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Usov, Y; Vahsen, S E; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Vossen, A; Wagner, M N; Wang, C H; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Yook, Y; Yuan, C Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V

    2014-01-01

    Using data samples of $102\\times10^6$ $\\Upsilon(1S)$ and $158\\times10^6$ $\\Upsilon(2S)$ events collected with the Belle detector, a first experimental search has been made for double-charmonium production in the exclusive decays $\\Upsilon(1S,2S)\\rightarrow J/\\psi(\\psi')+X$, where $X=\\eta_c$, $\\chi_{cJ} (J=~0,~1,~2)$, $\\eta_c(2S)$, and $X(3940)$. No significant signal is observed in the spectra of the mass recoiling against the reconstructed $J/\\psi$ or $\\psi'$ except for the evidence of $\\chi_{c1}$ production with a significance of $4.6\\sigma$ for $\\Upsilon(1S)\\rightarrow J/\\psi+\\chi_{c1}$. The measured branching fraction $\\BR(\\Upsilon(1S)\\rightarrow J/\\psi+\\chi_{c1})$ is $(3.98\\pm1.24(\\rm stat.)\\pm0.22 (\\rm syst.))\\times10^{-6}$. The $90\\%$ confidence level upper limits on the branching fractions of the other modes having a significance of less than $3\\sigma$ are determined. These results are consistent with theoretical calculations using the nonrelativistic QCD factorization approach.

  4. Structural Basis for Specificity of Propeptide-Enzyme Interaction in Barley C1A Cysteine Peptidases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambra, Inés; Hernández, David; Diaz, Isabel; Martinez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    C1A cysteine peptidases are synthesized as inactive proenzymes. Activation takes place by proteolysis cleaving off the inhibitory propeptide. The inhibitory capacity of propeptides from barley cathepsin L and B-like peptidases towards commercial and barley cathepsins has been characterized. Differences in selectivity have been found for propeptides from L-cathepsins against their cognate and non cognate enzymes. Besides, the propeptide from barley cathepsin B was not able to inhibit bovine cathepsin B. Modelling of their three-dimensional structures suggests that most propeptide inhibitory properties can be explained from the interaction between the propeptide and the mature cathepsin structures. Their potential use as biotechnological tools is discussed. PMID:22615948

  5. Synthetic studies toward (-)-FR901483 using a conjugate allylation to install the C-1 quaternary carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotchev, Dimitar B; Comins, Daniel L

    2006-12-08

    Two approaches to the aza-tricyclo dodecane skeleton of (-)-FR901483 are reported. Both routes utilized a Grignard addition to an N-acylpyridinium salt to establish the absolute stereochemistry at C-6 and a highly diastereoselective conjugate allylation reaction to form the quaternary center at C-1 of the natural product in an excellent yield. Although the desired polysubstituted piperidine intermediates were prepared regio- and stereoselectively, the construction of the C-8/C-9 bond connectivity could not be achieved. All attempts at a pinacol cyclization or an intramolecular 6-exo-tet epoxide opening were unsuccessful because of an unfavorable A(1,3) strain inherent in the molecule.

  6. iAK692: a genome-scale metabolic model of Spirulina platensis C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klanchui, Amornpan; Khannapho, Chiraphan; Phodee, Atchara; Cheevadhanarak, Supapon; Meechai, Asawin

    2012-06-15

    Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis is a well-known filamentous cyanobacterium used in the production of many industrial products, including high value compounds, healthy food supplements, animal feeds, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, for example. It has been increasingly studied around the world for scientific purposes, especially for its genome, biology, physiology, and also for the analysis of its small-scale metabolic network. However, the overall description of the metabolic and biotechnological capabilities of S. platensis requires the development of a whole cellular metabolism model. Recently, the S. platensis C1 (Arthrospira sp. PCC9438) genome sequence has become available, allowing systems-level studies of this commercial cyanobacterium. In this work, we present the genome-scale metabolic network analysis of S. platensis C1, iAK692, its topological properties, and its metabolic capabilities and functions. The network was reconstructed from the S. platensis C1 annotated genomic sequence using Pathway Tools software to generate a preliminary network. Then, manual curation was performed based on a collective knowledge base and a combination of genomic, biochemical, and physiological information. The genome-scale metabolic model consists of 692 genes, 837 metabolites, and 875 reactions. We validated iAK692 by conducting fermentation experiments and simulating the model under autotrophic, heterotrophic, and mixotrophic growth conditions using COBRA toolbox. The model predictions under these growth conditions were consistent with the experimental results. The iAK692 model was further used to predict the unique active reactions and essential genes for each growth condition. Additionally, the metabolic states of iAK692 during autotrophic and mixotrophic growths were described by phenotypic phase plane (PhPP) analysis. This study proposes the first genome-scale model of S. platensis C1, iAK692, which is a predictive metabolic platform for a global understanding of

  7. iAK692: A genome-scale metabolic model of Spirulina platensis C1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klanchui Amornpan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis is a well-known filamentous cyanobacterium used in the production of many industrial products, including high value compounds, healthy food supplements, animal feeds, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, for example. It has been increasingly studied around the world for scientific purposes, especially for its genome, biology, physiology, and also for the analysis of its small-scale metabolic network. However, the overall description of the metabolic and biotechnological capabilities of S. platensis requires the development of a whole cellular metabolism model. Recently, the S. platensis C1 (Arthrospira sp. PCC9438 genome sequence has become available, allowing systems-level studies of this commercial cyanobacterium. Results In this work, we present the genome-scale metabolic network analysis of S. platensis C1, iAK692, its topological properties, and its metabolic capabilities and functions. The network was reconstructed from the S. platensis C1 annotated genomic sequence using Pathway Tools software to generate a preliminary network. Then, manual curation was performed based on a collective knowledge base and a combination of genomic, biochemical, and physiological information. The genome-scale metabolic model consists of 692 genes, 837 metabolites, and 875 reactions. We validated iAK692 by conducting fermentation experiments and simulating the model under autotrophic, heterotrophic, and mixotrophic growth conditions using COBRA toolbox. The model predictions under these growth conditions were consistent with the experimental results. The iAK692 model was further used to predict the unique active reactions and essential genes for each growth condition. Additionally, the metabolic states of iAK692 during autotrophic and mixotrophic growths were described by phenotypic phase plane (PhPP analysis. Conclusions This study proposes the first genome-scale model of S. platensis C1, iAK692, which is a

  8. Association between the presence of anti-C1q antibodies and active nephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, María De Los Ángeles; Gómez, Graciela; Khoury, Marina; Collado, María Victoria; Suárez, Lorena; Álvarez, Clarisa; Sarano, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a severe complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A retrospective analysis was carried out on a group of 24 patients with SLE to evaluate whether the presence of anti-C1q antibodies (anti-C1q) is related to renal involvement and to explore the behaviour of anti-C1q with respect to LN during a four-year follow-up period. A first serum sample stored at the serum bank, taken not more than three years after SLE diagnosis and one serum sample per year for the subsequent four years were used to detect anti-C1q. Lupus clinical manifestations and serological markers of activity corresponding to the date of each serum sample selected were collected from medical records. In the first serum sample, anti-C1q were found in 8 active SLE. LN was confirmed by histology in 5/8 patients who were positive for anti-C1q and in 1/16 patients who were negative for these autoantibodies (p = 0.0069). Three patients (3/8) had anti-C1q without renal involvement but with lupus skin manifestation. Anti-C1q levels decreased in 3/5 patients with LN who responded to treatment and remained higher in 2/5 patients who needed a new renal biopsy which showed severe renal disease. The 15 patients without severe kidney disease and anti-C1q negative at diagnosis did not develop LN and anti-C1q remained negative in the 4 years of follow up. Anti-C1q were found in SLE patients with active renal involvement or with lupus skin disease. The absence of anti-C1q seemed to be linked to low probabilities of renal involvement.

  9. Association between the presence of anti-c1q antibodies and active nephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María De Los Ángeles Gargiulo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is a severe complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. A retrospective analysis was carried out on a group of 24 patients with SLE to evaluate whether the presence of anti-C1q antibodies (anti-C1q is related to renal involvement and to explore the behaviour of anti-C1q with respect to LN during a four-year follow-up period. A first serum sample stored at the serum bank, taken not more than three years after SLE diagnosis and one serum sample per year for the subsequent four years were used to detect anti-C1q. Lupus clinical manifestations and serological markers of activity corresponding to the date of each serum sample selected were collected from medical records. In the first serum sample, anti-C1q were found in 8 active SLE. LN was confirmed by histology in 5/8 patients who were positive for anti-C1q and in 1/16 patients who were negative for these autoantibodies (p = 0.0069. Three patients (3/8 had anti-C1q without renal involvement but with lupus skin manifestation. Anti-C1q levels decreased in 3/5 patients with LN who responded to treatment and remained higher in 2/5 patients who needed a new renal biopsy which showed severe renal disease. The 15 patients without severe kidney disease and anti-C1q negative at diagnosis did not develop LN and anti-C1q remained negative in the 4 years of follow up. Anti-C1q were found in SLE patients with active renal involvement or with lupus skin disease. The absence of anti-C1q seemed to be linked to low probabilities of renal involvement.

  10. Potential therapeutic benefit of C1-esterase inhibitor in neuromyelitis optica evaluated in vitro and in an experimental rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukmanee Tradtrantip

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system in which binding of anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4 autoantibodies (NMO-IgG to astrocytes causes complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC and inflammation resulting in oligodendrocyte and neuronal injury. There is compelling evidence for a central role of complement in NMO pathogenesis. Here, we evaluated the potential of C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-inh for complement-targeted therapy of NMO. C1-inh is an anti-inflammatory plasma protein with serine protease inhibition activity that has a broad range of biological activities on the contact (kallikrein, coagulation, fibrinolytic and complement systems. C1-inh is approved for therapy of hereditary angioedema (HAE and has been studied in a small safety trial in acute NMO relapses (NCT 01759602. In vitro assays of NMO-IgG-dependent CDC showed C1-inh inhibition of human and rat complement, but with predicted minimal complement inhibition activity at a dose of 2000 units in humans. Inhibition of complement by C1-inh was potentiated by ∼10-fold by polysulfated macromolecules including heparin and dextran sulfate. In rats, intravenous C1-inh at a dose 30-fold greater than that approved to treat HAE inhibited serum complement activity by <5%, even when supplemented with heparin. Also, high-dose C1-inh did not reduce pathology in a rat model of NMO produced by intracerebral injection of NMO-IgG. Therefore, although C1r and C1s are targets of C1-inh, our in vitro data with human serum and in vivo data in rats suggest that the complement inhibition activity of C1-inh in serum is too low to confer clinical benefit in NMO.

  11. Inclusive and exclusive measurements of $B$ decays to $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ at Belle

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, V; Panzenböck, E; Trabelsi, K; Frey, A; Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Said, S Al; Arinstein, K; Asner, D M; Atmacan, H; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Babu, V; Badhrees, I; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Bala, A; Bansal, V; Barberio, E; Bhuyan, B; Biswal, J; Bobrov, A; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Červenkov, D; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S -K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Doležal, Z; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Frost, O; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Ganguly, S; Garmash, A; Gillard, R; Glattauer, R; Goh, Y M; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Greenwald, D; Haba, J; Hamer, P; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Hou, W -S; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Jaegle, I; Joffe, D; Joo, K K; Julius, T; Kato, E; Katrenko, P; Kawasaki, T; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, J B; Kim, K T; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, N; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kumar, R; Kumita, T; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y -J; Lee, I S; Li, C; Li, Y; Gioi, L Li; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Loos, A; Lukin, P; Masuda, M; Matvienko, D; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Mohanty, S; Moll, A; Moon, H K; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Natkaniec, Z; Nayak, M; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Park, C W; Park, H; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Pulvermacher, C; Purohit, M V; Rauch, J; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Seino, Y; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Sevior, M E; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Simon, F; Singh, J B; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Starič, M; Stypula, J; Sumihama, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamponi, U; Tanida, K; Teramoto, Y; Uchida, M; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Usov, Y; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Wang, C H; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Wehle, S; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Ye, H; Yook, Y; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-01-01

    We report inclusive and exclusive measurements for $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ production in $B$ decays. We measure $\\mathcal{B}(B \\to \\chi_{c1} X)$= $(3.03 \\pm 0.05(\\mbox{stat}) \\pm 0.24(\\mbox{syst})) \\times 10^{-3}$ and $\\mathcal{B}(B \\to \\chi_{c2} X)$= $(0.70 \\pm 0.06(\\mbox{stat}) \\pm 0.10(\\mbox{syst})) \\times 10^{-3}$. For the first time, $\\chi_{c2}$ production in exclusive $B$ decays in the modes $B^0 \\to \\chi_{c2}\\pi^- K^+$ and $B^+ \\to \\chi_{c2} \\pi^+ \\pi^- K^+$ has been observed, along with first evidence for the $B^+ \\to \\chi_{c2} \\pi^+ K_S^0$ decay mode. For $\\chi_{c1}$ production, we report the first observation in the $B^+ \\to \\chi_{c1} \\pi^+ \\pi^- K^+$, $B^0 \\to \\chi_{c1} \\pi^+ \\pi^- K_S^0$ and $B^0 \\to \\chi_{c1} \\pi^0 \\pi^- K^+$ decay modes. Using these decay modes, we observe a difference in the production mechanism of $\\chi_{c2}$ in comparison to $\\chi_{c1}$ in $B$ decays. In addition, we report searches for $X(3872)$ and $\\chi_{c1}(2P)$ in the $B^+ \\to (\\chi_{c1} \\pi^+ \\pi^-) K^+$ decay mode....

  12. Human and pneumococcal cell surface glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) proteins are both ligands of human C1q protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrasse, Rémi; Tacnet-Delorme, Pascale; Moriscot, Christine; Pérard, Julien; Schoehn, Guy; Vernet, Thierry; Thielens, Nicole M; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Frachet, Philippe

    2012-12-14

    C1q, a key component of the classical complement pathway, is a major player in the response to microbial infection and has been shown to detect noxious altered-self substances such as apoptotic cells. In this work, using complementary experimental approaches, we identified the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a C1q partner when exposed at the surface of human pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and human apoptotic cells. The membrane-associated GAPDH on HeLa cells bound the globular regions of C1q as demonstrated by pulldown and cell surface co-localization experiments. Pneumococcal strains deficient in surface-exposed GAPDH harbored a decreased level of C1q recognition when compared with the wild-type strains. Both recombinant human and pneumococcal GAPDHs interacted avidly with C1q as measured by surface plasmon resonance experiments (K(D) = 0.34-2.17 nm). In addition, GAPDH-C1q complexes were observed by transmission electron microscopy after cross-linking. The purified pneumococcal GAPDH protein activated C1 in an in vitro assay unlike the human form. Deposition of C1q, C3b, and C4b from human serum at the surface of pneumococcal cells was dependent on the presence of surface-exposed GAPDH. This ability of C1q to sense both human and bacterial GAPDHs sheds new insights on the role of this important defense collagen molecule in modulating the immune response.

  13. Laterally Loaded Piles in Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Helle; Niewald, Gitte

    1992-01-01

    The ultimate lateral resistance of a pile element moved horizontally can be analyzed by the theory of plasticity. At a certain depth the movements around the pile are purely horizontal and upper bound solutions can be estimated theoretically under undrained circumstances. Model tests in the labor...

  14. Lagrangian Studies of Lateral Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-19

    the Gulf Stream warm core, Ro and Rig O(1) at the Gulf Stream north wall) allowed for efficient investigation of submesoscale mixing resulting from...Float and dye revealed energetic mixing in the negative PV region, with dye spreading indicating lateral mixing rates of ~100 m2/s. Please see

  15. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2004-03-31

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center (Tank & Automotive Command--TACOM), and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the six months of the subject contract from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003. The results are presented in thirteen detailed reports on research projects headed by various faculty members at each of the five CFFS Universities. Additionally, an Executive Summary has been prepared that summarizes the principal results of all of these projects during the six-month reporting period.

  16. ZNF32 protects against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by modulating C1QBP transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Gao, Bo; Li, Jun; Chen, Haining; Li, Yanyan; Wei, Yuyan; Gong, Di; Gao, Junping; Zhang, Jie; Tan, Weiwei; Wen, Tianfu; Zhang, Le; Huang, Lugang; Xiang, Rong; Lin, Ping; Wei, Yuquan

    2015-11-10

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-driven oxidative stress has been recognized as a critical inducer of cancer cell death in response to therapeutic agents. Our previous studies have demonstrated that zinc finger protein (ZNF)32 is key to cell survival upon oxidant stimulation. However, the mechanisms by which ZNF32 mediates cell death remain unclear. Here, we show that at moderate levels of ROS, Sp1 directly binds to two GC boxes within the ZNF32 promoter to activate ZNF32 transcription. Alternatively, at cytotoxic ROS concentrations, ZNF32 expression is repressed due to decreased binding activity of Sp1. ZNF32 overexpression maintains mitochondrial membrane potential and enhances the antioxidant capacity of cells to detoxify ROS, and these effects promote cell survival upon pro-oxidant agent treatment. Alternatively, ZNF32-deficient cells are more sensitive and vulnerable to oxidative stress-induced cell injury. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that complement 1q-binding protein (C1QBP) is a direct target gene of ZNF32 that inactivates the p38 MAPK pathway, thereby exerting the protective effects of ZNF32 on oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our findings indicate a novel mechanism by which the Sp1-ZNF32-C1QBP axis protects against oxidative stress and implicate a promising strategy that ZNF32 inhibition combined with pro-oxidant anticancer agents for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment.

  17. Development of dysphagia and trismus developed after c1-2 posterior fusion in extended position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Haruo; Tanaka, Masato; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Koshimune, Kouichiro; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Cervical misalignment after upper cervical fusion including the occipital bone may cause trismus or dysphagia, because the occipito-atlanto joint is associated with most of the flex and extended motion of the cervical spine. There are no reports of dysphagia and trismus after C1-2 fusion. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the potential risk of dysphagia and trismus even after upper cervical short fusion without the occipital bone. The patient was a 69-year-old man with myelopathy caused by os odontoideum and Klippel-Feil syndrome, who developed dysphagia and trismus immediately after C1-2 fusion and C3-6 laminoplasty. Radiographs and CT revealed that his neck posture was extended, but his symptoms still existed a week after surgery. The fixation angle was hyperextended 12 days after the first surgery. His symptoms disappeared immediately after revision surgery. The fixation in the neck-flexed position is thought to be the main cause of the patient's post-operative dysphagia and trismus. Dysphagia and trismus may occur even after short upper cervical fusion without the occipital bone or cervical fusion in the neck-extended position. The pre-operative cervical alignment and range of motion of each segment should be thoroughly evaluated.

  18. Association of the DYX1C1 Dyslexia Susceptibility Gene with Orthography in the Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardif, Twila; Burmeister, Margit; Villafuerte, Sandra M.; McBride-Chang, Catherine; Li, Hong; Shi, Bingjie; Liang, Weilan; Zhang, Zhixiang; Shu, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Several independent studies have supported the association of DYX1C1 with dyslexia, but its role in general reading development remains unclear. Here, we investigated the contribution of this gene to reading, with a focus on orthographic skills, in a sample of 284 unrelated Chinese children aged 5 to 11 years who were participating in the Chinese Longitudinal Study of Reading Development. We tested this association using a quantitative approach for Chinese character reading, Chinese character dictation, orthographic judgment, and visual skills. Significant or marginally significant associations were observed at the marker rs11629841 with children's orthographic judgments at ages 7 and 8 years (all P valuesdictation (all P values<0.013) were also observed for this single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at ages 9, 10, and 11 years. Further analyses revealed that the association with orthographic skills was specific to the processing of specific components of characters (P values<0.046). No association was found at either SNP of rs3743205 or rs57809907. Our findings suggest that DYX1C1 influences reading development in the general Chinese population and supports a universal effect of this gene. PMID:23028439

  19. C1 Chemistry for the Production of Ultra-Clean Liquid Transportation Fuels and Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2005-03-31

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center (Tank & Automotive Command--TACOM), and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the six months of the subject contract from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003. The results are presented in thirteen detailed reports on research projects headed by various faculty members at each of the five CFFS Universities. Additionally, an Executive Summary has been prepared that summarizes the principal results of all of these projects during the six-month reporting period.

  20. Ebola virus entry requires the cholesterol transporter Niemann-Pick C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carette, Jan E; Raaben, Matthijs; Wong, Anthony C; Herbert, Andrew S; Obernosterer, Gregor; Mulherkar, Nirupama; Kuehne, Ana I; Kranzusch, Philip J; Griffin, April M; Ruthel, Gordon; Dal Cin, Paola; Dye, John M; Whelan, Sean P; Chandran, Kartik; Brummelkamp, Thijn R

    2011-08-24

    Infections by the Ebola and Marburg filoviruses cause a rapidly fatal haemorrhagic fever in humans for which no approved antivirals are available. Filovirus entry is mediated by the viral spike glycoprotein (GP), which attaches viral particles to the cell surface, delivers them to endosomes and catalyses fusion between viral and endosomal membranes. Additional host factors in the endosomal compartment are probably required for viral membrane fusion; however, despite considerable efforts, these critical host factors have defied molecular identification. Here we describe a genome-wide haploid genetic screen in human cells to identify host factors required for Ebola virus entry. Our screen uncovered 67 mutations disrupting all six members of the homotypic fusion and vacuole protein-sorting (HOPS) multisubunit tethering complex, which is involved in the fusion of endosomes to lysosomes, and 39 independent mutations that disrupt the endo/lysosomal cholesterol transporter protein Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1). Cells defective for the HOPS complex or NPC1 function, including primary fibroblasts derived from human Niemann-Pick type C1 disease patients, are resistant to infection by Ebola virus and Marburg virus, but remain fully susceptible to a suite of unrelated viruses. We show that membrane fusion mediated by filovirus glycoproteins and viral escape from the vesicular compartment require the NPC1 protein, independent of its known function in cholesterol transport. Our findings uncover unique features of the entry pathway used by filoviruses and indicate potential antiviral strategies to combat these deadly agents.

  1. ZNF32 protects against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by modulating C1QBP transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Wei, Yuyan; Gong, Di; Gao, Junping; Zhang, Jie; Tan, Weiwei; Wen, Tianfu; Zhang, Le; Huang, Lugang; Xiang, Rong; Lin, Ping; Wei, Yuquan

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-driven oxidative stress has been recognized as a critical inducer of cancer cell death in response to therapeutic agents. Our previous studies have demonstrated that zinc finger protein (ZNF)32 is key to cell survival upon oxidant stimulation. However, the mechanisms by which ZNF32 mediates cell death remain unclear. Here, we show that at moderate levels of ROS, Sp1 directly binds to two GC boxes within the ZNF32 promoter to activate ZNF32 transcription. Alternatively, at cytotoxic ROS concentrations, ZNF32 expression is repressed due to decreased binding activity of Sp1. ZNF32 overexpression maintains mitochondrial membrane potential and enhances the antioxidant capacity of cells to detoxify ROS, and these effects promote cell survival upon pro-oxidant agent treatment. Alternatively, ZNF32-deficient cells are more sensitive and vulnerable to oxidative stress-induced cell injury. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that complement 1q-binding protein (C1QBP) is a direct target gene of ZNF32 that inactivates the p38 MAPK pathway, thereby exerting the protective effects of ZNF32 on oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our findings indicate a novel mechanism by which the Sp1-ZNF32-C1QBP axis protects against oxidative stress and implicate a promising strategy that ZNF32 inhibition combined with pro-oxidant anticancer agents for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment. PMID:26497555

  2. Genetics Home Reference: lateral meningocele syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Lateral meningocele syndrome Lateral meningocele syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Lateral meningocele syndrome is a disorder that affects the nervous ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile primary lateral sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Juvenile primary lateral sclerosis Juvenile primary lateral sclerosis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description Juvenile primary lateral sclerosis is a rare disorder characterized by progressive weakness ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive disease that affects motor ...

  5. Glucosyltransferase UGT76C1 finely modulates cytokinin responses via cytokinin N-glucosylation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Ma, Xin-Mei; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Hou, Bing-Kai

    2013-04-01

    Cytokinins are master regulators of plant growth and development. The glucosyltransferase UGT76C1 capable of N-glucosylation of different cytokinins at the N(7)- and N(9)-position was previously identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, but its physiological relevance in plants remains unclear. In the present work, we investigated the physiological characteristics of UGT76C1 mutant (ugt76c1) and its overexpressors. Under normal growth conditions, although ugt76c1 plants and UGT76C1 overexpressors did not display obvious phenotypic alteration, ugt76c1 plants significantly reduced the accumulation of cytokinin N-glucosides, whereas UGT76C1 overexpressors increased cytokinin N-glucosides. Unexpectedly, the concentrations of free forms of cytokinins (mainly trans-zeatin and N(6)-isopentenyladenine) were comparable to those of the wild type. Upon application of exogenous cytokinin, the mutant showed the same tendency of more sensitive cytokinin response in primary root elongation, chlorophyll retention and anthocyanin accumulation. In contrast, overexpressors showed a tendency of less sensitive cytokinin response in most tests. Furthermore, cytokinin-related genes were investigated for their expression; and the expression levels of AHK3, ARR1, CYP735A2 and LOG2 noticeably changed in ugt76c1 plants, suggesting that plants employ a set of cytokinin regulation mechanisms to coordinate the loss-of-function of UGT76C1. Tissue-specific expression of UGT76C1 showed a high level of expression in germinating seeds and young seedlings. Taken together, our data suggest that the glucosyltransferase UGT76C1 could finely modulate cytokinin responses in planta via N-glucosylation of cytokinins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Observation of the ψ(1 3D2) State in e+e-→π+π-γχc1 at BESIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablikim, M; Achasov, M N; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Baldini Ferroli, R; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Han, Y L; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, H P; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Kupsc, A; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leng, C; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X M; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, R Q; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales Morales, C; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Pettersson, J; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Pu, Y N; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ren, H L; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Santoro, V; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2015-07-03

    We report the observation of the X(3823) state in the process e+e-→π+π-X(3823)→π+π-γχc1 with a statistical significance of 6.2σ, in data samples at center-of-mass energies sqrt[s]=4.230, 4.260, 4.360, 4.420, and 4.600 GeV collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII electron positron collider. The measured mass of the X(3823) state is (3821.7±1.3±0.7)  MeV/c2, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic, and the width is less than 16 MeV at the 90% confidence level. The products of the Born cross sections for e+e-→π+π-X(3823) and the branching ratio B[X(3823)→γχc1,c2] are also measured. These measurements are in good agreement with the assignment of the X(3823) state as the ψ(1 3D2) charmonium state.

  7. Cross-sectional study of the ossification center of the C1-S5 vertebral bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpinda, Michał; Baumgart, Mariusz; Szpinda, Anna; Woźniak, Alina; Małkowski, Bogdan; Wiśniewski, Marcin; Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna; Króliczewski, Dariusz

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge on the normative growth of the spine is relevant in the prenatal detection of its abnormalities. This study describes the size of the ossification center of C1-S5 vertebral bodies. Using CT, digital-image analysis, and statistics, the size of the ossification center of C1-S5 vertebral bodies in 55 spontaneously aborted human fetuses aged 17-30 weeks was examined. No sex significant differences were found. The body ossification centers were found within the entire presacral spine and in 85.5 % of S1, in 76.4 % of S2, in 67.3 % of S3, in 40.0 % of S4, and in 14.5 % of S5. All the values for the atlas were sharply smaller than for the axis. The mean transverse diameter of the body ossification center gradually increased from the axis to T12 vertebra, so as to stabilize through L1-L3 vertebrae, and finally was intensively decreasing to S5 vertebra. There was a gradual increase in sagittal diameter of the body ossification center from the axis to T5 vertebra and its stabilization for T6-T9 vertebrae. Afterward, an alternate progression was observed: a decrease in values for T10-T12 vertebrae, an increase in values for L1-L2 vertebrae, and finally a decrease in values for L3-S5 vertebrae. The values of cross-sectional area of ossification centers were gradually increasing from the axis to L2 vertebra and then started decreasing to S5 vertebra. The following cross-sectional areas were approximately equivalent to each other: for L5 and T3-T5, and for S4 and C1. The volumetric growth of the body ossification center gradually increased from the axis to L3 vertebra and then sharply decreased from L4 to S5. No male-female differences are found in the size of the body ossification centers of the spine. The growth dynamics for morphometric parameters of the body ossification centers of the spine follow similarly with gestational age.

  8. 17 CFR 270.22e-2 - Pricing of redemption requests in accordance with Rule 22c-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pricing of redemption requests in accordance with Rule 22c-1. 270.22e-2 Section 270.22e-2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....22e-2 Pricing of redemption requests in accordance with Rule 22c-1. An investment company shall not be...

  9. Molecular basis of hereditary C1q deficiency-revisited: identification of several novel disease-causing mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schejbel, L; Skattum, L; Hagelberg, S

    2011-01-01

    C1q is the central pattern-recognition molecule in the classical pathway of the complement system and is known to have a key role in the crossroads between adaptive and innate immunity. Hereditary C1q deficiency is a rare genetic condition strongly associated with systemic lupus erythematosus and...

  10. Molecular basis of hereditary C1q deficiency-revisited: identification of several novel disease-causing mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schejbel, L; Skattum, L; Hagelberg, S

    2011-01-01

    C1q is the central pattern-recognition molecule in the classical pathway of the complement system and is known to have a key role in the crossroads between adaptive and innate immunity. Hereditary C1q deficiency is a rare genetic condition strongly associated with systemic lupus erythematosus...

  11. 17 CFR 240.19c-1 - Governing certain off-board agency transactions by members of national securities exchanges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Governing certain off-board agency transactions by members of national securities exchanges. 240.19c-1 Section 240.19c-1 Commodity... members of national securities exchanges. The rules of each national securities exchange shall provide as...

  12. Use of a C1 Inhibitor Concentrate in Adults ≥65 Years of Age with Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, Anette; Martinez-Saguer, Inmaculada; Bas, Murat

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of hereditary angioedema (HAE) in 'older adults' (those aged ≥65 years) has not been well studied. The international Berinert Patient Registry collected data on the use of intravenous plasma-derived, pasteurized, nanofiltered C1-inhibitor concentrate (pnfC1-INH; Berinert(®)/...

  13. International consensus on the diagnosis and management of pediatric patients with hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farkas, H; Martinez-Saguer, I; Bork, K

    2017-01-01

    -HAE information card and medicine for emergency use. The regulatory approval status of the drugs for prophylaxis and for acute treatment is different in each country. Plasma-derived C1-INH, recombinant C1-INH, and ecallantide are the only agents licensed for the acute treatment of pediatric patients. Clinical...

  14. Dietary cholesterol induces trafficking of intestinal Niemann-Pick Type C1 Like 1 from the brush border to endosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Marianne; Tønnesen, Carina K; Hansen, Gert H

    2011-01-01

    The transmembrane protein Niemann-Pick C1 Like 1 (NPC1L1) belongs to the Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) family of cholesterol transporters and is mainly expressed in the liver and the small intestine. NPC1L1 is believed to be the main transporter responsible for the absorption of dietary cholesterol. Like...

  15. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test Concentration Ranges, Number of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specification Pollutant Concentration range...

  16. The first report of the vanC1 gene in Enterococcus faecium isolated from a human clinical specimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyue Sun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The vanC1 gene, which is chromosomally located, confers resistance to vancomycin and serves as a species marker for Enterococcus gallinarum. Enterococcus faecium TJ4031 was isolated from a blood culture and harbours the vanC1gene. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays were performed to detect vanXYc and vanTc genes. Only the vanXYc gene was found in the E. faecium TJ4031 isolate. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin and teicoplanin were 2 µg/mL and 1 µg/mL, respectively. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR results revealed that the vanC1and vanXYc genes were not expressed. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and southern hybridisation results showed that the vanC1 gene was encoded in the chromosome. E. faecalis isolated from animals has been reported to harbour vanC1gene. However, this study is the first to report the presence of the vanC1gene in E. faecium of human origin. Additionally, our research showed the vanC1gene cannot serve as a species-specific gene of E. gallinarum and that it is able to be transferred between bacteria. Although the resistance marker is not expressed in the strain, our results showed that E. faecium could acquire the vanC1gene from different species.

  17. Neutrino masses

    CERN Document Server

    Gelmini, Graciela B; Gelmini, Graciela; Roulet, Esteban

    1995-01-01

    This is a review for Reports of Progress in Physics. After an introduction we start by explaining the different neutrino masses corresponding to different types of neutrinos, Dirac or Majorana, in section 2. In section 3 we discuss the main elementary particle models for neutrino masses and their distinctive phenomenological consequences. In section 4 we describe the status of direct mass searches and Majorana mass searches in neutrinoless double beta decays. In section 5 we go over the many cosmological implications of, and constraints on, neutrino properties, mainly masses and lifetimes. Sections 6, 7 and 8 review neutrino oscillations, the solar neutrino problem and the atmospheric neutrino problem, their implications and the current and future experiments. In particular, we explain oscillations in vacuum in section 6 and oscillations in matter in section 7. Section 9 summarizes the main bounds imposed by stars, mainly SN1987A. A few concluding remarks follow.

  18. Mass Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Christian

    2017-01-01

    the negative features usually ascribed by late nineteenth-century crowd psychology to spontaneous crowds, and attributes these to the entire social fabric. However, in contrast to crowd psychology, theorists of mass society often place greater emphasis on how capitalism, technological advances, or demographic......Mass society is a societal diagnosis that emphasizes – usually in a pejorative, modernity critical manner – a series of traits allegedly associated with modern society, such as the leveling of individuality, moral decay, alienation, and isolation. As such, the notion of mass society generalizes...... developments condition such negative features, and some theorists argue that mass society produces a propensity to totalitarianism. Discussions of mass society culminated in the early and mid-twentieth century....

  19. Non-Ideal ELM Stability and Non-Axisymmetric Field Penetration Calculations with M3D-C1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, N. M.; Chu, M. S.; Snyder, P. B.; Jardin, S. C.; Luo, X.

    2009-11-01

    Numerical studies of ELM stability and non-axisymmetric field penetration in diverted DIII-D and NSTX equilibria are presented, with resistive and finite Larmor radius effects included. These results are obtained with the nonlinear two-fluid code M3D-C1, which has recently been extended to allow linear non-axisymmetric calculations. Benchmarks of M3D-C1 with ideal codes ELITE and GATO show good agreement for the linear stability of peeling-ballooning modes in the ideal limit. New calculations of the resistive stability of ideally stable DIII-D equilibria are presented. M3D-C1 has also been used to calculate the linear response to non-axisymmetric external fields; these calculations are benchmarked with Surfmn and MARS-F. New numerical methods implemented in M3D-C1 are presented, including the treatment of boundary conditions with C^1 elements in a non-rectangular mesh.

  20. Overlapping ATP2C1 and ASTE1 Genes in Human Genome: Implications for SPCA1 Expression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Micaroni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ATP2C1 gene encodes for the secretory pathway calcium (Ca2+-ATPase pump (SPCA1, which localizes along the secretory pathway, mainly in the trans-Golgi. The loss of one ATP2C1 allele causes Hailey-Hailey disease in humans but not mice. Examining differences in genomic organization between mouse and human we speculate that the overlap between ATP2C1 and ASTE1 genes only in humans could explain this different response to ATP2C1 dysregulation. We propose that ASTE1, overlapping with ATP2C1 in humans, affects alternative splicing, and potentially protein expression of the latter. If dysregulated, the composition of the SPCA1 isoform pool could diverge from the physiological status, affecting cytosolic Ca2+-signaling, and in turn perturbing cell division, leading to cell death or to neoplastic transformation.

  1. Transcriptome analysis of human brain tissue identifies reduced expression of complement complex C1Q Genes in Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peijie; Nicholls, Laura; Assareh, Hassan; Fang, Zhiming; Amos, Timothy G; Edwards, Richard J; Assareh, Amelia A; Voineagu, Irina

    2016-06-06

    MECP2, the gene mutated in the majority of Rett syndrome cases, is a transcriptional regulator that can activate or repress transcription. Although the transcription regulatory function of MECP2 has been known for over a decade, it remains unclear how transcriptional dysregulation leads to the neurodevelopmental disorder. Notably, little convergence was previously observed between the genes abnormally expressed in the brain of Rett syndrome mouse models and those identified in human studies. Here we carried out a comprehensive transcriptome analysis of human brain tissue from Rett syndrome brain using both RNA-seq and microarrays. We identified over two hundred differentially expressed genes, and identified the complement C1Q complex genes (C1QA, C1QB and C1QC) as a point of convergence between gene expression changes in human and mouse Rett syndrome brain. The results of our study support a role for alterations in the expression level of C1Q complex genes in RTT pathogenesis.

  2. Sexual behavior in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLamater, John; Moorman, Sara M

    2007-12-01

    This research tests the influences of age, biological, and psychosocial factors on sexual expression in later life. The American Association of Retired Persons Modern Maturity Sexuality Survey collected data on diagnosed illnesses, treated illnesses, sexual desire, sexual attitudes, partner circumstances, and sexual behavior from 1,384 persons ages 45 and older. Ordered logistic regression models estimate the associations of age, biological, and psychosocial factors with the frequency of five sexual behaviors. Diagnosed illnesses and treatments are generally unrelated to frequency of sexual activity. Sexual attitudes are related to frequency of partnered behavior and sexual desire is related to frequency of masturbation among both women and men. Satisfaction with the physical relationship with a partner is strongly related to behavior. Age remains significant after all other factors are controlled. The authors conclude that the nature of sexual expression in later life reflects the interplay of body, mind, and social context.

  3. Preserving Dignity in Later Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    São José, José Manuel

    2016-09-01

    This article examines how elders who receive social care in the community experience loss of dignity and how they preserve their dignity. Qualitative research revealed that loss of dignity is a major concern for these elders and that they preserve their dignity differently, ranging from actively engaging with life to detaching themselves from life. We conclude that, in later life, preserving dignity while receiving social care differs from preserving dignity in the context of health care, especially health care provided in institutional settings. Furthermore, preserving dignity in later life, while receiving social care, is a complex process, depending not only on performing activities and individual action and responsibility, but also on other actions, some of them involving a certain inactivity/passivity, and interactions with others, especially caregivers. This article offers some insights to developing better policies and care practices for promoting dignity in the context of community-based social care.

  4. Craving creativity in later life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Tine

    2013-01-01

    ’ is to be understood according to the interpretations available in different knowledge perspectives in order to discipline the future knowledge production of ageing and control the processes of subjectification in later life as the disciplining of ‘Population Ageing’: Becoming a subject to active ageing. Dominant...... but it also raises questions as to what constitutes a ‘good’ and ‘active’ life in all societies. The conflicting aspect of the discursive battlefield on active ageing constitutes a fight for authority: Who has the ‘right’ to define the meaning of being ‘active’ and how can ‘activity’ be identified? ‘Active...... discourses on ‘active ageing’ are challenged by the focus of museums and archives on using heritage and participatory arts as an arena to performAGE in later life by craving creativity as a notion of age and opportunity....

  5. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2004-09-30

    The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Science (CFFS) is a research consortium with participants from the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, West Virginia University, University of Utah, and Auburn University. The CFFS is conducting a research program to develop C1 chemistry technology for the production of clean transportation fuel from resources such as coal and natural gas, which are more plentiful domestically than petroleum. The processes under development will convert feedstocks containing one carbon atom per molecular unit into ultra clean liquid transportation fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) and hydrogen, which many believe will be the transportation fuel of the future. Feedstocks include synthesis gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification, coalbed methane, light products produced by Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, methanol, and natural gas.

  6. Calculation of the graphene C 1 s core level binding energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Toma; Mowbray, Duncan J.; Ljungberg, Mathias P.; Ayala, Paola

    2015-02-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with first-principles modeling is a powerful tool for determining the chemical composition and electronic structure of novel materials. Of these, graphene is an especially important model system for understanding the properties of other carbon nanomaterials. Here, we calculate the carbon 1 s core level binding energy of pristine graphene using two methods based on density functional theory total energy differences: a calculation with an explicit core-hole, and an all-electron extension of the delta self-consistent field (Δ SCF ) method. We study systematically their convergence and computational workload, and the dependence of the energies on the chosen exchange-correlation functional. The Δ SCF method is computationally more expensive, but gives consistently higher C 1 s energies. Although there is a significant functional dependence, the binding energy calculated using the PBE functional is found to be remarkably close to what has been measured for graphite.

  7. Epitaxial Lateral Overgrowth of Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zytkiewicz, Zbigniew R.

    The state of the art and recent developments of lateral overgrowth of compound semiconductors are reviewed. First we focus on the mechanism of epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) from the liquid phase, highlighting the phenomena that are crucial for growing high-quality layers with large aspect ratio. Epitaxy from the liquid phase has been chosen since the equilibrium growth techniques such as liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE) are the most suitable for lateral overgrowth. We then present numerous examples for which the defect filtration in the ELO procedure is very efficient and leads to significant progress in the development of high-performance semiconductor devices made of lattice-mismatched structures. Structural perfection of seams that appear when layers grown from neighboring seeds merge is also discussed. Next, we concentrate on strain commonly found in various ELO structures and arising due to the interaction of ELO layers with the mask. Its origin, and possible ways of its control, are presented. Then we show that the thermal strain in lattice-mismatched ELO structures can be relaxed by additional tilting of ELO wings while still preserving their high quality. Finally, recent progresses in the lateral overgrowth of semiconductors, including new mask materials and liquid-phase electroepitaxial growth on substrates coated by electrically conductive masks, are presented. New versions of the ELO technique from solution and from the vapor (growth from ridges and pendeo-epitaxy) are described and compared with standard ELO. A wide range of semiconductors, including III-V compounds grown from solution and vapor-grown GaN, are used to illustrate phenomena discussed. Very often, the similar behavior of various ELO structures reveals that the phenomena presented are not related to a specific group of compounds or their growth techniques, but have a much more general nature.

  8. Inconscious, brain lateralization and parapsychology

    OpenAIRE

    Alečković-Nikolić Mila S.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have tried to show that it is impossible to study and understand the language of parapsychology without knowing the problem of 'conscious' and 'unconscious' process and issues of brain lateralization. We tried to clarify the different concepts of the notion of the unconscious and to classify all parapsychological phenomena that can be explored. But the real survey of human creativity and those of physical and cognitive abilities of the human mind which are not sufficiently e...

  9. Lateral dampers for thrust bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibner, D. H.; Szafir, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The development of lateral damping schemes for thrust bearings was examined, ranking their applicability to various engine classes, selecting the best concept for each engine class and performing an in-depth evaluation. Five major engine classes were considered: large transport, military, small general aviation, turboshaft, and non-manrated. Damper concepts developed for evaluation were: curved beam, constrained and unconstrained elastomer, hybrid boost bearing, hydraulic thrust piston, conical squeeze film, and rolling element thrust face.

  10. Epitaxial lateral overgrowth of GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaumont, B.; Vennegues, P.; Gibart, P. [CNRS, Sophia Antipolis, Valbonne (France). CRHEA

    2001-09-01

    Since there is no GaN bulk single crystal available, the whole technological development of GaN based devices relies on heteroepitaxy. Numerous defects are generated in the heteroepitaxy of GaN on sapphire or 6H-SiC, mainly threading dislocations (TDs). Three types of TDs are currently observed, a type (with Burgers vector 1/3 left angle 11 anti 20 right angle); c type (with left angle 0001 right angle) and mixed a + c (1/3 left angle 11 anti 23 right angle). The epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) technology produces high quality GaN with TD densities in the mid 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}, linewidth of the low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) near-bandgap recombination peaks <1 meV and deep electron traps reduced below 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} (compared to mid 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3} in standard GaN). Numerous modifications of the ELO process have been proposed in order either to avoid technological steps (mask-less ELO) or to improve it (pendeo-epitaxy). Basically developed on either sapphire or 6H-SiC, the ELO technology is also achievable on (111)Si or (111)3C-SiC/Si provided that an appropriate buffer layer is grown to avoid cracks. More sophisticated technologies have been implemented to further increase the useable part of the ELO GaN surface (two technological steps, three-step ELO). Unfortunately, in-depth understanding of the basic ELO process is still missing, i.e. of the growth anisotropy and bending of dislocations. (orig.)

  11. Physiological and transcriptional responses to high temperature in Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyakampol, Jaruta; Cheevadhanarak, Supapon; Sutheeworapong, Sawannee; Chaijaruwanich, Jeerayut; Senachak, Jittisak; Siangdung, Wipawan; Jeamton, Wattana; Tanticharoen, Morakot; Paithoonrangsarid, Kalyanee

    2015-03-01

    Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis is a well-known commercial cyanobacterium that is used as a food and in feed supplements. In this study, we examined the physiological changes and whole-genome expression in A. platensis C1 exposed to high temperature. We found that photosynthetic activity was significantly decreased after the temperature was shifted from 35°C to 42°C for 2 h. A reduction in biomass production and protein content, concomitant with the accumulation of carbohydrate content, was observed after prolonged exposure to high temperatures for 24 h. Moreover, the results of the expression profiling in response to high temperature at the designated time points (8 h) revealed two distinct phases of the responses. The first was the immediate response phase, in which the transcript levels of genes involved in different mechanisms, including genes for heat shock proteins; genes involved in signal transduction and carbon and nitrogen metabolism; and genes encoding inorganic ion transporters for magnesium, nitrite and nitrate, were either transiently induced or repressed by the high temperature. In the second phase, the long-term response phase, both the induction and repression of the expression of genes with important roles in translation and photosynthesis were observed. Taken together, the results of our physiological and transcriptional studies suggest that dynamic changes in the transcriptional profiles of these thermal-responsive genes might play a role in maintaining cell homeostasis under high temperatures, as reflected in the growth and biochemical composition, particularly the protein and carbohydrate content, of A. platensis C1. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Electronic Cigarette Explosion Resulting in a C1 and C2 Fracture: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norii, Tatsuya; Plate, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes have seen a drastic increase in use. A lithium-ion battery is often used as the rechargeable battery of the electronic cigarette device and has recently received much attention in terms of safety. There are several recent case reports in the scientific literature of injuries due to electronic cigarette explosions that involved soft-tissue injuries. We report a significant spinal fracture from an electronic-cigarette explosion in a 27-year-old male. The electronic cigarette exploded during use, sending the mouthpiece through the pharynx and into the first cervical vertebra and resulting in fractures of the first and second vertebrae. An x-ray study of the neck showed a foreign body in the neck at the level of C1. A computed tomography scan of the neck showed fractures of C1. The foreign body was removed in the operating room. The patient was discharged home without neurologic sequelae. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Our case report is the first case of a cervical spine injury due to the explosion of an electronic cigarette. This case demonstrates that an electronic cigarette explosion can cause potentially serious penetrating neck injury. Emergency physicians should be aware of the potential danger of electronic cigarettes and have a low threshold to obtain radiographic tests and surgical consultation in the case of electronic cigarette explosion in the oral cavity. As the use of electronic cigarettes continue to increase, it is likely that injuries associated with them will also increase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Allergenicity and safety of recombinant human C1 esterase inhibitor in patients with allergy to rabbit or cow's milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Elzen, Mignon T; van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; Röckmann-Helmbach, Heike; van Hoffen, Els; Lebens, Ans F M; van Doorn, Helma; Klemans, Rob J B; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A F M; Hack, C Erik; Kaufman, Leonard; Relan, Anurag; Knulst, André C

    2016-08-01

    Recombinant human C1 inhibitor (rhC1INH) for on-demand treatment of hereditary angioedema is purified from milk of transgenic rabbits. It contains low amounts (cow's milk allergy (CMA). This study is an assessment of allergenicity and safety of rhC1INH in patients with RA and/or CMA. Patients with CMA and/or RA underwent skin prick test (SPT), intracutaneous test (ICT), and, when results for both were negative, subcutaneous (SC) challenge with up to 2100U (14 mL) rhC1INH. The negative predictive value of the skin test protocol was calculated, defined as the ratio of patients without systemic symptoms of hypersensitivity following SC challenge, over the number of patients having tested negative for both the SPT and the ICT. Adverse events after exposure to rhC1INH were recorded. Twenty-six patients with RA and/or CMA were enrolled. Twenty-four had negative SPT and ICT results for rhC1INH, whereas 2 had negative SPT result but positive ICT result to rhC1INH (only the highest concentration). Twenty-two patients with negative SPT and ICT results underwent SC challenge. None developed allergic symptoms. Local treatment-emergent adverse events occurred in 7 patients (32%) after SC challenge. In 5 these were considered drug related. All were mild. None of the patients with negative SPT and ICT results for rhC1INH had allergic symptoms during rhC1INH challenge. The negative predictive value of the combination of SPT and ICT for the outcome of the SC challenge was 100% (95% CI, 84.6%-100%). SC administration of rhC1INH was well tolerated. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. (1)H NMR-Linked Metabolomics Analysis of Liver from a Mouse Model of NP-C1 Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Rodado, Victor; Nicoli, Elena-Raluca; Probert, Fay; Smith, David A; Morris, Lauren; Wassif, Christopher A; Platt, Frances M; Grootveld, Martin

    2016-10-07

    Clinical manifestations of Niemann-Pick type C1 (NP-C1) disease include neonatal hepatosplenomegaly and in some patients progressive liver dysfunction and failure. This study involved a (1)H NMR-linked metabolomics analysis of liver samples collected from a NP-C1 disease mutant mouse model in order to explore time-dependent imbalances in metabolic pathways associated with NP-C1 liver dysfunction, including fibrosis. NP-C1 mutant (Npc1(-/-); NP-C1), control (Npc1(+/+); WT), and NP-C1 heterozygous mice (Npc1(+/-); HET) were generated from heterozygote matings. Aqueous extracts of these liver samples collected at time points of 3, 6, 9, and 11 weeks were subjected to high-resolution NMR analysis, and multivariate (MV) metabolomics analyses of data sets acquired were performed. A MV random forests (RFs) model effectively discriminated between NP-C1 and a combined WT/HET hepatic NMR profiles with very high predictive accuracy and reliability. Key distinguishing features included significant upregulations in the hepatic concentrations of phenylalanine, tyrosine, glutamate, lysine/ornithine, valine, threonine, and hypotaurine/methionine, and diminished levels of nicotinate/niacinamide, inosine, phosphoenolpyruvate, and 3-hydroxyphenylacetate. Quantitative pathway topological analysis confirmed that imbalances in tyrosine biosynthesis, and hepatic phenylalanine, tyrosine, glutamate/glutamine, and nicotinate/niacinamide metabolism were involved in the pathogenesis of NP-C1 disease-associated liver dysfunction/damage. (1)H NMR-linked metabolomics analysis provides valuable biomarker information regarding hepatic dysfunction or damage in NP-C1 disease.

  15. School readiness and later achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Greg J; Dowsett, Chantelle J; Claessens, Amy; Magnuson, Katherine; Huston, Aletha C; Klebanov, Pamela; Pagani, Linda S; Feinstein, Leon; Engel, Mimi; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Sexton, Holly; Duckworth, Kathryn; Japel, Crista

    2007-11-01

    Using 6 longitudinal data sets, the authors estimate links between three key elements of school readiness--school-entry academic, attention, and socioemotional skills--and later school reading and math achievement. In an effort to isolate the effects of these school-entry skills, the authors ensured that most of their regression models control for cognitive, attention, and socioemotional skills measured prior to school entry, as well as a host of family background measures. Across all 6 studies, the strongest predictors of later achievement are school-entry math, reading, and attention skills. A meta-analysis of the results shows that early math skills have the greatest predictive power, followed by reading and then attention skills. By contrast, measures of socioemotional behaviors, including internalizing and externalizing problems and social skills, were generally insignificant predictors of later academic performance, even among children with relatively high levels of problem behavior. Patterns of association were similar for boys and girls and for children from high and low socioeconomic backgrounds. (c) 2007 APA.

  16. Laminar Flame Characteristics of C1–C5 Primary Alcohol-Isooctane Blends at Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The laminar combustion characteristics of blends of isooctane and C1–C5 primary alcohols (i.e., methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, n-butanol and n-pentanol were investigated using the spherical expanding flame methodology in a constant volume chamber at various equivalence ratios and volume fractions of alcohol. The stretch effect was removed using the nonlinear methodology. The results indicate that the laminar flame speeds of alcohol-isooctane blends increase monotonously with the increasing volume fraction of alcohol. Among the five alcohols, the addition of methanol is identified to be the most effective in enhancing laminar flame speed. The addition of ethanol results in an approximately equivalent laminar flame speed enhancement rate as those of n-propanol, n-butanol and n-pentanol at ratios of 0.8 and 1.5, and a higher rate at 1.0 and 1.2. An empirical correlation is provided to describe the laminar flame speed variation with the volume fraction of alcohol. Meanwhile, the laminar flame speed increases with the mass content of oxygen in the fuel blends. At the equivalence ratio of 0.8 and fixed oxygen content, similar laminar flame speeds are observed with different alcohols blended into isooctane. Nevertheless, with the increase of equivalence ratio, heavier alcohol-isooctane blends tend to exhibit higher values. Markstein lengths of alcohol-isooctane blends decrease with the addition of alcohol into isooctane at 0.8, 1.0 and 1.2, however they increase at 1.5. This is consistent with the behavior deduced from the Schlieren images.

  17. Characterization of hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrins used in the treatment of Niemann-Pick Disease type C1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred L Yergey

    Full Text Available 2-Hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPβCD has gained recent attention as a potential therapeutic intervention in the treatment of the rare autosomal-recessive, neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder Niemann-Pick Disease Type C1 (NPC1. Notably, HPβCD formulations are not comprised of a single molecular species, but instead are complex mixtures of species with differing degrees of hydroxypropylation of the cyclodextrin ring. The degree of substitution is a critical aspect of the complex mixture as it influences binding to other molecules and thus could potentially modulate biological effects. VTS-270 (Kleptose HPB and Trappsol® Cyclo™ are HPβCD products under investigation as novel treatments for NPC1. The purpose of the present work is to compare these two different products; analyses were based on ion distribution and abundance profiles using mass spectrometry methodology as a means for assessing key molecular distinctions between products. The method incorporated electrospray ionization and analysis with a linear low-field ion mobility quadrupole time-of-flight instrument. We observed that the number of hydroxypropyl groups (the degrees of substitution are substantially different between the two products and greater in Trappsol Cyclo than in VTS-270. The principal ions of both samples are ammonium adducts. Isotope clusters for each of the major ions show doubly charged homodimers of the ammonium adducts. In addition, both products show doubly charged homodimers from adduction of both a proton and ammonium. Doubly charged heterodimers are also present, but are more intense in Trappsol Cyclo than in VTS-270. Based on the analytical differences observed between VTS-270 and Trappsol Cyclo with respect to the degree of substitution, the composition and fingerprint of the complex mixture, and the impurity profiles, these products cannot be considered to be the same; the potential biological and clinical implications of these differences

  18. Ionic fragmentation of a natural product, limonene (C{sub 10}H{sub 16}), following core [C 1s] photoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castilho, R.B. de [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, 21949-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Nunez, C.V. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia, INPA, Manaus, Amazonas (Brazil); Coutinho, L.H. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, 21949-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lago, A.F. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Bernini, R.B. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, 21949-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza, G.G.B. de [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, 21949-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: gerson@iq.ufrj.br

    2007-03-15

    Photoionization of the limonene [C{sub 10}H{sub 16}] molecule was studied for the first time following C 1s ionization, using synchrotron radiation and time-of-fight mass spectrometry. As a reference for further analysis of the photon induced fragmentation of the limonene molecule, the He(I) mass spectrum was also obtained. Previously unreported singly charged species have been observed at 310 eV: H{sup +}, C{sup +}, CH{sup +}, CH{sub 2}{sup +}, CH{sub 3}{sup +}. A close similarity has been observed between the high photon energy mass spectrum and the standard electron impact mass spectrum of limonene, obtained at 70 eV. In particular, the base peak [C{sub 5}H{sub 8}{sup +}, m/q = 68], known to result from a Retro Diels-Alder reaction, remains the same in both cases. Approximate values for the mean kinetic energy were determined for all ionic species.

  19. 49 CFR 229.63 - Lateral motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lateral motion. 229.63 Section 229.63....63 Lateral motion. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b), the total uncontrolled lateral motion... powered axles. (b) The total uncontrolled lateral motion may not exceed 11/4 inches on the center axle of...

  20. I = 0 C = +1 mesons from 1920 to 2410 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Anisovich, A V; Batty, C J; Bugg, D V; Hodd, C; Lu, H C; Nikonov, V A; Sarantsev, A V; Sarantsev, V V; Zou, B S; 10.1016/S0370-2693(00)01018-2

    2011-01-01

    A combined fit is presented to data on pbar-p annihilation in flight to final states eta-pizero-pizero, pizero-pizero, eta-eta, eta-etaprime and piminus-piplus. The emphasis lies in improving an earlier study of eta-pizero-pizero by fitting data at nine pbar momenta simultaneously and with parameters consistent with the two-body channels. There is evidence for all of the I=0, C=+ q-qbar states expected in this mass range. New resonances are reported with masses and widths M,Gamma as follows: JPC = 4^{-+} (2328+-38, Gamma=240+-90) MeV, 1^{++} (1971+-15, 240+-45) MeV, 0^{-+} (2285+-20, 325+-30) MeV, and 0^{-+} (2010 ^{+35}_{-60}, 270+-60) MeV. Errors on the masses and widths of other resonances are also reduced substantially. All states lie close to parallel straight line trajectories of excitation number v. mass squared.

  1. Chlamydomonas DYX1C1/PF23 is essential for axonemal assembly and proper morphology of inner dynein arms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Yamamoto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic assembly of ciliary dyneins, a process known as preassembly, requires numerous non-dynein proteins, but the identities and functions of these proteins are not fully elucidated. Here, we show that the classical Chlamydomonas motility mutant pf23 is defective in the Chlamydomonas homolog of DYX1C1. The pf23 mutant has a 494 bp deletion in the DYX1C1 gene and expresses a shorter DYX1C1 protein in the cytoplasm. Structural analyses, using cryo-ET, reveal that pf23 axonemes lack most of the inner dynein arms. Spectral counting confirms that DYX1C1 is essential for the assembly of the majority of ciliary inner dynein arms (IDA as well as a fraction of the outer dynein arms (ODA. A C-terminal truncation of DYX1C1 shows a reduction in a subset of these ciliary IDAs. Sucrose gradients of cytoplasmic extracts show that preassembled ciliary dyneins are reduced compared to wild-type, which suggests an important role in dynein complex stability. The role of PF23/DYX1C1 remains unknown, but we suggest that DYX1C1 could provide a scaffold for macromolecular assembly.

  2. [Phylogenetic comparison between Spirulina and Arthrospira based on 16S rRNA and rpoC1 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuemei; Wang, Suying; Dong, Shirui

    2016-02-04

    Based on 16S rRNA and rpoC1 gene sequences, the phylogenetic relationship between Spirulina and Arthrospira were studied and compared. We amplified, sequenced and analyzed 16S rRNA and rpoC1 of 84 strains. Then the phylogenetic trees were constructed and compared. The conserved sites percentage, average G+C content and sequence identity of rpoC1 were 49.7%, 47.7%, 76%-100% respectively, significantly lower than 79.4%, 55.6% and 91%-100% of 16S rRNA, and the heterogeneity degree was higher. The trees generated with two different genes showed similar topologies and thus inferred consistent phylogenetic relationships. Eighty-four experimental strains were divided into 3 groups belonging to 2 genera: F-35 1, F-904-2, F-1070 and TJBC14 were Spirulina and the rest were Arthrospira. Although morphospecies and geographical species could not be distinguished based on 16S rRNA and rpoC1 gene sequences, the bootstrap value of rpoC1 (100%) was higher than that of 16S rRNA (99%). Moreover, clustering effect of rpoC1 for Spirulina and Arthrospirai was better than 16S rRNA. Spirulina and Arthrospira were different genera, rpoC1 gene has more advantage to distinguish the strains in the same genus than that of 16S rRNA gene.

  3. Sialic acid on the neuronal glycocalyx prevents complement C1 binding and complement receptor-3-mediated removal by microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnartz, Bettina; Kopatz, Jens; Tenner, Andrea J; Neumann, Harald

    2012-01-18

    Microglial cells are professional phagocytes of the CNS responsible for clearance of unwanted structures. Neuronal processes are marked by complement C1 before they are removed in development or during disease processes. Target molecules involved in C1 binding and mechanisms of clearance are still unclear. Here we show that the terminal sugar residue sialic acid of the mouse neuronal glycocalyx determines complement C1 binding and microglial-mediated clearance function. Several early components of the classical complement cascade including C1q, C1r, C1s, and C3 were produced by cultured mouse microglia. The opsonin C1q was binding to neurites after enzymatic removal of sialic acid residues from the neuronal glycocalyx. Desialylated neurites, but not neurites with intact sialic acid caps, were cleared and taken up by cocultured microglial cells. The removal of the desialylated neurites was mediated via the complement receptor-3 (CR3; CD11b/CD18). Data demonstrate that mouse microglial cells via CR3 recognize and remove neuronal structures with an altered neuronal glycocalyx lacking terminal sialic acid.

  4. Enzymatically Modified Low-Density Lipoprotein Is Recognized by C1q and Activates the Classical Complement Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérard J. Arlaud

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies suggest that the complement system is involved in atherogenesis. To further investigate this question, we have studied the ability of native and modified forms of LDL to bind and activate C1, the complex protease that triggers the classical pathway of complement. Unlike native LDL, oxidized (oxLDL and enzymatically modified (E-LDL derivatives were both recognized by the C1q subunit of C1, but only E-LDL particles, obtained by sequential treatment with a protease and then with cholesterol esterase, had the ability to trigger C1 activation. Further investigations revealed that C1q recognizes a lipid component of E-LDL. Several approaches, including reconstitution of model lipid vesicles, cosedimentation, and electron microscopy analyses, provided evidence that C1 binding to E-LDL particles is mediated by the C1q globular domain, which senses unesterified fatty acids generated by cholesterol esterase. The potential implications of these findings in atherogenesis are discussed.

  5. Structure and function of complement protein C1q and its role in the development of autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Smykał-Jankowiak

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Complement plays an important role in the immune system. Three different pathways of complement activation are known: the classical, alternative, and lectin dependent. They involve more than 30 serum peptides. C1q is the first subcomponent of the classical pathway of complement activation. It is composed of three types of chains, A, B, and C, which form a molecule containing 18 peptides. Each of the chains has a short amino-terminal region followed by a collagen-like region (playing a role in the activation of C1r2C1s2 and a carboxy-terminal head, which binds to immune complexes. Recent studies have shown a great number of ligands for C1q, including aggregated IgG, IgM, human T-cell lymphotropic virus-I (HTLV-I, gp21 peptide, human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 gp21 peptide, β-amyloid, fragments of bacterial walls, apoptotic cells, and many others. However, the role of C1q is not only associated with complement activation. It also helps in the removal of immune complexes and necrotic cells, stimulates the production of some cytokines, and modulates the function of lymphocytes. Complete C1q deficiency is a rare genetic disorder. The C1q gene is located on the short arm of chromosome 1. So far, only a few mutations in C1q gene have been reported. The presence of these mutations is strongly associated with recurrent bacterial infections and the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Recent clinical studies point to the significance of anti-C1q antibodies in the diagnosis and assessment of lupus nephritis activity.

  6. Direct lateral maneuvers in hawkmoths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeter, Jeremy S. M.; Hedrick, Tyson L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We used videography to investigate direct lateral maneuvers, i.e. ‘sideslips’, of the hawkmoth Manduca sexta. M. sexta sideslip by rolling their entire body and wings to reorient their net force vector. During sideslip they increase net aerodynamic force by flapping with greater amplitude, (in both wing elevation and sweep), allowing them to continue to support body weight while rolled. To execute the roll maneuver we observed in sideslips, they use an asymmetric wing stroke; increasing the pitch of the roll-contralateral wing pair, while decreasing that of the roll-ipsilateral pair. They also increase the wing sweep amplitude of, and decrease the elevation amplitude of, the contralateral wing pair relative to the ipsilateral pair. The roll maneuver unfolds in a stairstep manner, with orientation changing more during downstroke than upstroke. This is due to smaller upstroke wing pitch angle asymmetries as well as increased upstroke flapping counter-torque from left-right differences in global reference frame wing velocity about the moth's roll axis. Rolls are also opposed by stabilizing aerodynamic moments from lateral motion, such that rightward roll velocity will be opposed by rightward motion. Computational modeling using blade-element approaches confirm the plausibility of a causal linkage between the previously mentioned wing kinematics and roll/sideslip. Model results also predict high degrees of axial and lateral damping. On the time scale of whole and half wing strokes, left-right wing pair asymmetries directly relate to the first, but not second, derivative of roll. Collectively, these results strongly support a roll-based sideslip with a high degree of roll damping in M. sexta. PMID:26740573

  7. Rotational and Fine Structure of Pseudo-Jahn Molecules with C_1 Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinjun

    2016-06-01

    It has been found in our previous works that rotational and fine-structure analysis of spectra involving nearly degenerate electronic states may aid in interpretation and analysis of the vibronic structure, specifically in the case of pseudo-Jahn-Teller (pJT) molecules with C_s symmetry. The spectral analysis of pJT derivatives (isopropoxy and cyclohexoxy of a prototypical JT molecule (the methoxy radical) allowed for quantitative determination of various contributions to the energy separation between the nearly degenerate electronic states, including the relativistic spin-orbit (SO) effect, the electrostatic interaction, and their zero-point energy difference. These states are coupled by SO and Coriolis interactions, which can also be determined accurately in rotational and fine structure analysis. Most recently, the spectroscopic model for rotational analysis of pJT molecules has been extended for analysis of molecules with C_1 symmetry, i.e., no symmetry. This model includes the six independently determinable components of the spin-rotation (SR) tensor and the three components of the SO and Coriolis interactions. It has been employed to simulate and fit high-resolution laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of jet-cooled alkoxy radicals with C_1 symmetry, including the 2-hexoxy and the 2-pentoxy radicals, as well as previously recorded LIF spectrum of the trans-conformer (defined by its OCCC dihedral angle) of the 2-butoxy radical. Although the LIF spectra can be reproduced by using either the SR constants or SO and Coriolis constants, the latter simulation offers results that are physically more meaningful whereas the SR constants have to be regarded as effective constants. Furthermore, we will review the SO and Coriolis constants of alkoxy radicals that have been investigated, starting from the well-studied methoxy radical (CH_3O). J. Liu, D. Melnik, and T. A. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 094308 (2013) J. Liu and T. A. Miller, J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 11871

  8. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2003-09-30

    The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Science (CFFS) is a research consortium with participants from the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University. The CFFS is conducting a research program to develop C1 chemistry technology for the production of clean transportation fuel from resources such as coal and natural gas, which are more plentiful domestically than petroleum. The processes under development will convert feedstocks containing one carbon atom per molecular unit into ultra clean liquid transportation fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) and hydrogen, which many believe will be the transportation fuel of the future. These feedstocks include synthesis gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. Some highlights of the results obtained during the first year of the current research contract are summarized as: (1) Terminal alkynes are an effective chain initiator for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reactions, producing normal paraffins with C numbers {ge} to that of the added alkyne. (2) Significant improvement in the product distribution towards heavier hydrocarbons (C{sub 5} to C{sub 19}) was achieved in supercritical fluid (SCF) FT reactions compared to that of gas-phase reactions. (3) Xerogel and aerogel silica supported cobalt catalysts were successfully employed for FT synthesis. Selectivity for diesel range products increased with increasing Co content. (4) Silicoaluminophosphate (SAPO) molecular sieve catalysts have been developed for methanol to olefin conversion, producing value-added products such as ethylene and propylene. (5) Hybrid Pt-promoted tungstated and sulfated zirconia catalysts are very effective in cracking n-C{sub 36} to jet and diesel fuel; these catalysts will be tested for cracking of FT wax. (6) Methane, ethane, and propane are readily decomposed to pure

  9. C1 Chemistry for the Production of Ultra-Clean Liquid Transportation Fuels and Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2006-03-30

    Professors and graduate students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and hydrocarbon gases and liquids produced from coal. An Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report summarizes the results obtained in this program during the period October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2006. The results are presented in detailed reports on 16 research projects headed by professors at each of the five CFFS Universities and an Executive Summary. Some of the highlights from these results are: (1) Small ({approx}1%) additions of acetylene or other alkynes to the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction increases its yield, causes chain initiation, and promotes oxygenate formation. (2) The addition of Mo to Fe-Cu-K/AC F-T catalysts improves catalyst lifetime and activity. (3) The use of gas phase deposition to place highly dispersed metal catalysts on silica or ceria aerogels offers promise for both the F-T and the water-gas shift WGS reactions. (4) Improved activity and selectivity are exhibited by Co F-T catalysts in supercritical hexane. (5) Binary Fe

  10. From SMART-1 D-CIXS lunar results to C1XS on Chandrayaan-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Manuel

    The D-CIXS X-ray spectrometer on SMART-1 demonstrated the potential of the technique of X-ray fluorescent spectroscopy of the Moon. We will show recent results, indicating the capabilities of the technique. The Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) is a compact X-ray spectrometer for the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) Chandrayaan-1 lunar mission, launching mid 2008. It exploits heritage from the D-CIXS instrument on ESA's SMART1 mission. By comparison with SMART-1, Chandrayaan-1 is intended as a science rather than a technology mission, leading to far more favourable conditions for science measurements. The CIXS instrument hardware is built by an international team led from the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The Principal Investigator is M. Grande at the Aberystwyth University, and there is also a major science and design contribution from ISAC, ISRO, Bangalore, India; CESR, Toulouse, France provide amplifiers. The Science team is led by I A Crawford of Birkbeck College London. In order to record the incident solar X-ray flux at the Moon, a good measure of which is essential to derive absolute lunar elemental surface abundances, CIXS carries an X-ray Solar Monitor (XSM) provided by the University of Helsinki, Finland. The baseline design consists of 24 nadir pointing Swept Charge Device detectors, which provide high detection efficiency in the 1 to 7 keV range, which contains the X-ray fluorescence lines of interest. Micro-machined collimators provide a 14 degree FWHM FOV, equivalent to 25 km from 100km altitude. A deployable door protects the instrument during launch and cruise, and also provides a Fe55 calibration X-ray sources for each of the detectors. Additional refinements to the electronics, onboard software and thermal design greatly increase detector stability and signal to noise ratio compared to D-CIXS. This will result in a significantly improved energy resolution which should therefore be better than 200eV throughout the lifetime of the

  11. Lateral impact on pressurized glass/epoxy pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago, Rafael C.; Alves, Marcilio [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica], e-mail: rafael.santiago@poli.usp.br, e-mail: maralves@usp.br

    2009-07-01

    This work studies the impact of a drop mass against glass/epoxy composite pipes. The experimental tests comprises an impact hammer and the set-up is such that a drop mass falls transversally to the main length of the tube. The impact response is measured with a non-contact laser system and reveals some issues explored here in a numerical model. Inner pressure was applied to the tube in order to access its influence on failure. It has been found that the numerical model represents well the structural collapse of a pressurized pipe under a lateral impact. (author)

  12. Experimental identification of pedestrian-induced lateral forces on footbridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingólfsson, Einar Thór; Georgakis, Christos; Ricciardelli, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    combinations of frequencies (0.33-1.07 Hz) and amplitudes 4.5-48 mm). The experimental campaign involved seventy-one male and female human adults and covered approximately 55 km of walking distributed between 4954 individual tests. When walking on a laterally moving surface, motion-induced forces develop also...... with the acceleration of the treadmill depends on the frequency of the movement, such that pedestrians (on average) add to the overall modal mass for low frequency motion and subtract from the overall modal mass at higher frequencies....

  13. Self-administration of intravenous C1-inhibitor therapy for hereditary angioedema and associated quality of life benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, Anette; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Mikkelsen, Carsten Sauer

    2009-01-01

    the impact of self-administered home therapy with intravenous C1-INH concentrate on QOL in patients with HAE. Nine patients experiencing frequent or severe debilitating HAE attacks were offered self-administration of C1-INH concentrate. QOL was assessed prior to and following home therapy using...... for the individual and combined components also improved significantly. No serious complications were documented during a follow-up period of 27 to 72 months. Self-administration of C1-INH improved QOL on both physical and psychological parameters. Patients were able to resume a normal life without restrictions...

  14. Laterally Loaded Nail-Plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jacob; Rathkjen, Arne

    Load-displacement curves from about 200 short-term and laterally loaded nail-plate joints are analysed. The nail-plates are from Gang-Nail Systems, type GNA 20 S. The test specimens and the measuring systems are described. The tests are divided into 32 different series. The influence of the number...... of nail row, edge distance, fixed nail-plate, bending direction, unloading, and grain direction, plate and load direction on the load-displacement curves are analysed. Mean load-displacement curves from all the tests are given....

  15. Inconscious, brain lateralization and parapsychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alečković-Nikolić Mila S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have tried to show that it is impossible to study and understand the language of parapsychology without knowing the problem of 'conscious' and 'unconscious' process and issues of brain lateralization. We tried to clarify the different concepts of the notion of the unconscious and to classify all parapsychological phenomena that can be explored. But the real survey of human creativity and those of physical and cognitive abilities of the human mind which are not sufficiently explained today, can not be possible without the cooperation of psychological sciences, clinical psychology, psychopathology, biochemistry, linguistics and quantum physics.

  16. Clinical Neurogenetics: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Matthew B.; Baloh, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease, about which our understanding is expanding rapidly as its genetic causes are uncovered. The pace of new gene discovery over the last 5 years has accelerated, providing new insights into the pathogenesis of disease and highlighting biological pathways for target for therapeutic development. This article reviews our current understanding of the heritability of ALS, provides an overview of each of the major ALS genes, highlighting their phenotypic characteristics and frequencies as a guide for clinicians evaluating patients with ALS. PMID:24176417

  17. Enhanced performance of methamphetamine lateral flow cassettes using an electronic lateral flow reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jerome P; Sammons, Deborah L; Robertson, Shirley A; Snawder, John E

    2015-01-01

    Surface contamination from methamphetamine in meth labs continues to be a problem. We had previously developed a lateral flow assay cassette for field detection of methamphetamine contamination that is commercially available and has been used by a number of groups to assess contamination. This cassette uses the complete disappearance of the test line as an end point for detection of 50 ng/100 cm2 of methamphetamine contamination for surface sampling with cotton swabs. In the present study, we further evaluate the response of the cassettes using an electronic lateral flow reader to measure the intensities of the test and control lines. The cassettes were capable of detecting 0.25 ng/ml for calibration solutions. For 100 cm2 ceramic tiles that were spiked with methamphetamine and wiped with cotton-tipped wooden swabs wetted in assay/sampling buffer, 1 ng/tile was detected using the reader. Semi-quantitative results can be produced over the range 0-10 ng/ml for calibration solutions and 0-25 ng/tile for spiked tiles using either a 4-parameter logistic fit of test line intensity versus concentration or spiked mass or the ratio of the control line to the test line intensity fit to concentration or spiked mass. Recovery from the tiles was determined to be about 30% using the fitted curves. Comparison of the control line to the test line was also examined as a possible visual detection end point and it was found that the control line became more intense than the test line at 0.5 to 1 ng/ml for calibration solutions or 1 to 2 ng/tile for spiked tiles. Thus the lateral flow cassettes for methamphetamine have the potential to produce more sensitive semi-quantitative results if an electronic lateral flow reader is used and can be more sensitive for detection if the comparison of the control line to the test line is used as the visual end point.

  18. Designing of skull defect implants using C1 rational cubic Bezier and offset curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Najihah; Majid, Ahmad Abd; Piah, Abd Rahni Mt; Rajion, Zainul Ahmad

    2015-05-01

    Some of the reasons to construct skull implant are due to head trauma after an accident or an injury or an infection or because of tumor invasion or when autogenous bone is not suitable for replacement after a decompressive craniectomy (DC). The main objective of our study is to develop a simple method to redesign missing parts of the skull. The procedure begins with segmentation, data approximation, and estimation process of the outer wall by a C1 continuous curve. Its offset curve is used to generate the inner wall. A metaheuristic algorithm, called harmony search (HS) is a derivative-free real parameter optimization algorithm inspired from the musical improvisation process of searching for a perfect state of harmony. In this study, data approximation by a rational cubic Bézier function uses HS to optimize position of middle points and value of the weights. All the phases contribute significantly in making our proposed technique automated. Graphical examples of several postoperative skulls are displayed to show the effectiveness of our proposed method.

  19. Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 Inhibits the Peroxidase Activity of Hemoglobin and Myoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela S. Hair

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin is the natural carrier of oxygen in red blood cells (RBCs. While intracellular hemoglobin provides life-sustaining oxygen transport, extracellular free hemoglobin displays toxicity due to inherent peroxidase activity generating reactive oxygen species that subsequently react with the hemoglobin molecule to produce toxic heme degradation products resulting in free radicals, oxidative stress damage, and lipid peroxidation. We have recently demonstrated that Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1 inhibits peroxidase activity of the heme-based enzyme myeloperoxidase. To elucidate whether PIC1 could inhibit peroxidase activity of hemoglobin, we evaluated the consequence of PIC1 on RBC lysates, methemoglobin, and myoglobin using tetramethylbenzidine (TMB as an oxidation target. PIC1 reversibly and dose-dependently prevented TMB oxidation to tetramethylbenzidine diimine by RBC lysates, methemoglobin, and myoglobin, having comparable activity to the inhibitor 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide. PIC1 inhibited TMB oxidation of RBC lysates similar to L-cysteine suggesting that the two cysteine residues contained in PIC1 may mediate peroxidase activity. PIC1 also inhibited heme destruction by NaOCl for RBC lysates, hemoglobin, and myoglobin as assayed by preservation of the Soret absorbance peak in the presence of NaOCl and reduction in free iron release. In conclusion, PIC1 inhibits peroxidase activity of hemoglobin and myoglobin likely via an antioxidant mechanism.

  20. Crambescin C1 Exerts a Cytoprotective Effect on HepG2 Cells through Metallothionein Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roel, María; Rubiolo, Juan A.; Ternon, Eva; Thomas, Olivier P.; Vieytes, Mercedes R.; Botana, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    The Mediterranean marine sponge Crambe crambe is the source of two families of guanidine alkaloids known as crambescins and crambescidins. Some of the biological effects of crambescidins have been previously reported while crambescins have undergone little study. Taking this into account, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to examine the effect of crambescin-C1 (CC1) on human tumor hepatocarcinoma cells HepG2 followed by validation experiments to confirm its predicted biological activities. We report herein that, while crambescin-A1 has a minor effect on these cells, CC1 protects them against oxidative injury by means of metallothionein induction even at low concentrations. Additionally, at high doses, CC1 arrests the HepG2 cell cycle in G0/G1 and thus inhibits tumor cell proliferation. The findings presented here provide the first detailed approach regarding the different effects of crambescins on tumor cells and provide a basis for future studies on other possible cellular mechanisms related to these bioactivities. PMID:26225985

  1. Endocan: A Novel Marker of Endothelial Dysfunction in C1-Inhibitor-Deficient Hereditary Angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirturk, Mustafa; Akpinar, Timur Selcuk; Kose, Murat; Gelincik, Aslı; Colakoğlu, Bahattin; Buyukozturk, Suna

    2017-10-24

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) related to C1-inhibitor deficiency is a rare autosomal dominant disorder. Vascular cell adhesion molecules (VCAM) are known as endothelial activation markers. Endocan (also called ESM-1) is proposed as an endothelial dysfunction indicator. We aimed to investigate endothelial activation in attack-free periods in HAE patients by measuring their levels of endocan and VCAM-1. Twenty-six HAE patients (22 female, mean age 40 ± 13 years) and 38 healthy control patients (13 female, mean age 36.9 ± 12 years) were included in the study. Peripheral blood samples were collected from HAE patients during symptom-free periods and control subjects. Endocan and VCAM-1 levels were measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. The median serum levels of endocan (647 ± 101 ng/mL) and VCAM-1 (500 ± 79 ng/mL) in the HAE patients were significantly higher than in the control patients (391 ± 41 and 325 ± 4; p < 0.001 for both). The increased endocan and VCAM-1 levels may reflect an endothelial activation even in attack-free periods in HAE patients. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Cytochrome c1 in ductal carcinoma in situ of breast associated with proliferation and comedo necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chishiki, Mayuko; Takagi, Kiyoshi; Sato, Ai; Miki, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Yuta; Ebata, Akiko; Shibahara, Yukiko; Watanabe, Mika; Ishida, Takanori; Sasano, Hironobu; Suzuki, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    It is well known that comedo necrosis is closely associated with an aggressive phenotype of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of human breast, but its molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. Therefore, in this study, we first examined the gene expression profile of comedo DCIS based on microarray data and identified CYC1 as a gene associated with comedo necrosis. Cytochrome c1 (CYC1) is a subunit of complex III in the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation that is involved in energy production. However, the significance of CYC1 has not yet been examined in DCIS. We therefore immunolocalized CYC1 in 47 DCIS cases. CYC1 immunoreactivity was detected in 40% of DCIS cases, and the immunohistochemical CYC1 status was significantly associated with tumor size, nuclear grade, comedo necrosis, van Nuys classification, and Ki-67 labeling index. Subsequent in vitro studies indicated that CYC1 was significantly associated with mitochondrial membrane potential in MCF10DCIS.com DCIS cells. Moreover, CYC1 significantly promoted proliferation activity of MCF10DCIS.com cells and the cells transfected with CYC1 siRNA decreased pro-apoptotic caspase 3 activity under hypoxic or anoxic conditions. Considering that the center of DCIS is poorly oxygenated, these results indicate that CYC1 plays important roles in cell proliferation and comedo necrosis through the elevated oxidative phosphorylation activity in human DCIS. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  3. Crossing the c=1 barrier in 2D Lorentzian quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambjørn, J.; Anagnostopoulos, K.; Loll, R.

    2000-02-01

    In an extension of earlier work we investigate the behavior of two-dimensional (2D) Lorentzian quantum gravity under coupling to a conformal field theory with c>1. This is done by analyzing numerically a system of eight Ising models (corresponding to c=4) coupled to dynamically triangulated Lorentzian geometries. It is known that a single Ising model couples weakly to Lorentzian quantum gravity, in the sense that the Hausdorff dimension of the ensemble of two-geometries is two (as in pure Lorentzian quantum gravity) and the matter behavior is governed by the Onsager exponents. By increasing the amount of matter to eight Ising models, we find that the geometry of the combined system has undergone a phase transition. The new phase is characterized by an anomalous scaling of spatial length relative to proper time at large distances, and as a consequence the Hausdorff dimension is now three. In spite of this qualitative change in the geometric sector, and a very strong interaction between matter and geometry, the critical exponents of the Ising model retain their Onsager values. This provides evidence for the conjecture that the KPZ values of the critical exponents in 2D Euclidean quantum gravity are entirely due to the presence of baby universes. Lastly, we summarize the lessons learned so far from 2D Lorentzian quantum gravity.

  4. Current Perspectives in Cardiac Laterality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Campione

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The heart is the first organ to break symmetry in the developing embryo and onset of dextral looping is the first indication of this event. Looping is a complex process that progresses concomitantly to cardiac chamber differentiation and ultimately leads to the alignment of the cardiac regions in their final topology. Generation of cardiac asymmetry is crucial to ensuring proper form and consequent functionality of the heart, and therefore it is a highly regulated process. It has long been known that molecular left/right signals originate far before morphological asymmetry and therefore can direct it. The use of several animal models has led to the characterization of a complex regulatory network, which invariably converges on the Tgf-β signaling molecule Nodal and its downstream target, the homeobox transcription factor Pitx2. Here, we review current data on the cellular and molecular bases of cardiac looping and laterality, and discuss the contribution of Nodal and Pitx2 to these processes. A special emphasis will be given to the morphogenetic role of Pitx2 and to its modulation of transcriptional and functional properties, which have also linked laterality to atrial fibrillation.

  5. Epicondilite lateral do cotovelo Lateral epicondylitis of the elbow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Cohen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A epicondilite lateral, também conhecida como cotovelo do tenista, é uma condição comum que acomete de 1 a 3% da população. O termo epicondilite sugere inflamação, embora a análise histológica tecidual não demonstre um processo inflamatório. A estrutura acometida com mais frequência é a origem do tendão extensor radial curto do carpo e o mecanismo de lesão está associado à sua sobrecarga. O tratamento incruento é o de escolha e inclui: repouso, fisioterapia, infiltração com cortisona ou plasma rico em plaquetas e a utilização de imobilização específica. O tratamento cirúrgico é recomendado quando persistem impotência funcional e dor. Tanto a técnica cirúrgica aberta quanto a artroscópica com ressecção da área tendinosa degenerada apresenta bons resultados na literatura.Lateral epicondylitis, also known as tennis elbow, is a common condition that is estimated to affect 1% to 3% of the population. The word epicondylitis suggests inflammation, although histological analysis on the tissue fails to show any inflammatory process. The structure most commonly affected is the origin of the tendon of the extensor carpi radialis brevis and the mechanism of injury is associated with overloading. Nonsurgical treatment is the preferred method, and this includes rest, physiotherapy, cortisone infiltration, platelet-rich plasma injections and use of specific immobilization. Surgical treatment is recommended when functional disability and pain persist. Both the open and the arthroscopic surgical technique with resection of the degenerated tendon tissue present good results in the literature.

  6. Toward the synthesis of spirastrellolide A: construction of two C1-C25 diastereomers containing the BC-spiroacetal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Ian; Anderson, Edward A; Dalby, Stephen M; Loiseleur, Olivier

    2005-09-15

    [reaction: see text] Stereo-controlled syntheses of two possible C1-C25 diastereomers of spirastrellolide A containing the cis-disubstituted tetrahydropyran and [6,6]-spiroacetal are reported, exploiting boron-mediated asymmetric aldol and allylation methodology.

  7. Tetrafibricin: synthesis of the C1-C13, C15-C25, and C27-C40 fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BouzBouz, Samir; Cossy, Janine

    2004-09-30

    [structure: see text] A sequence of chemoselective cross-metathesis reactions and enantioselective allyltitanations of aldehydes has been used to prepare the C1-C13, C15-C26, and C27-C40 fragments of tetrafibricin.

  8. Epigenetic Regulation of Placental NR3C1: Mechanism Underlying Prenatal Programming of Infant Neurobehavior by Maternal Smoking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, Laura R; Papandonatos, George D; Salisbury, Amy L; Phipps, Maureen G; Huestis, Marilyn A; Niaura, Raymond; Padbury, James F; Marsit, Carmen J; Lester, Barry M

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of the placental glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) was investigated as a mechanism underlying links between maternal smoking during pregnancy (MSDP) and infant neurobehavior in 45 mother-infant pairs (49% MSDP-exposed; 52% minorities; ages 18-35). The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) Network Neurobehavioral Scale was administered 7 times over the 1st postnatal month; methylation of placental NR3C1 was assessed via bisulfite pyrosequencing. Increased placental NR3C1 methylation was associated with increased infant attention and self-regulation, and decreased lethargy and need for examiner soothing over the 1st postnatal month. A causal steps approach revealed that NR3C1 methylation and MSDP were independently associated with lethargic behavior. Although preliminary, results highlight the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in elucidating pathways to neurobehavioral alterations from MSDP. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  9. Is the A-Chain the Engine That Drives the Diversity of C1q Functions? Revisiting Its Unique Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhane Ghebrehiwet

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The immunopathological functions associated with human C1q are still growing in terms of novelty, diversity, and pathologic relevance. It is, therefore, not surprising that C1q is being recognized as an important molecular bridge between innate and adaptive immunity. The secret of this functional diversity, in turn, resides in the elegant but complex structure of the C1q molecule, which is assembled from three distinct gene products: A, B, and C, each of which has evolved from a separate and unique ancestral gene template. The C1q molecule is made up of 6A, 6B, and 6C polypeptide chains, which are held together through strong covalent and non-covalent bonds to form the 18-chain, bouquet-of-flower-like protein that we know today. The assembled C1q protein displays at least two distinct structural and functional regions: the collagen-like region (cC1q and the globular head region (gC1q, each being capable of driving a diverse range of ligand- or receptor-mediated biological functions. What is most intriguing, however, is the observation that most of the functions appear to be predominantly driven by the A-chain of the molecule, which begs the question: what are the evolutionary modifications or rearrangements that singularly shaped the primordial A-chain gene to become a pluripotent and versatile component of the intact C1q molecule? Here, we revisit and discuss some of the known unique structural and functional features of the A-chain, which may have contributed to its versatility.

  10. Correlation of Serum Soluble Interleukin-7 Receptor and Anti-C1q Antibody in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhong Chi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Serum concentrations of soluble interleukin-7 receptor (sIL-7R and anti-C1q antibody have recently been identified as unique serological markers for lupus nephritis (LN in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. In this study, we evaluated the correlation of serum sIL-7R and anti-C1q in SLE patients. Methods. Sera from 134 patients with SLE and 84 healthy cohorts were tested for levels of sIL-7R and anti-C1q antibodies in terms of ELISA. Correlations of the sIL-7R and anti-C1q autoantibodies were evaluated. Results. The serum concentrations of sIL-7R and anti-C1q antibodies were significantly higher in SLE patients and LN patients in comparison with healthy individuals/controls and SLE patients with non-LN, respectively. In addition, both sIL-7R and anti-C1q concentrations were found to significantly correlate with the SLE disease activity as evaluated by SLEDAI scores. Interestingly, the serum sIL-7R concentration was strongly correlated with the level of anti-C1q antibodies (r=0.2871, p=0.0008 but not statistically correlated with other serological markers, including the anti-dsDNA and complements C3 and C4 concentrations in SLE patients. Conclusion. Both serum sIL-7R and anti-C1q antibodies were strongly associated with disease activity and LN in SLE patients, suggesting that they may be reliable serological markers for identification of SLE patients with active diseases and LN.

  11. Distinctive regulation of contact activation by antithrombin and C1-inhibitor on activated platelets and material surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäck, Jennie; Lang, Markus Huber; Elgue, Graciela; Kalbitz, Miriam; Sanchez, Javier; Ekdahl, Kristina Nilsson; Nilsson, Bo

    2009-12-01

    Activated human plate lets trigger FXII-mediated contact activation, which leads to the generation of FXIIa-antithrombin (AT) and FXIa-AT complexes. This suggests that contact activation takes place at different sites, on activated platelets and material surfaces, during therapeutic procedures involving biomaterials in contact with blood and is differentially regulated. Here we show that activation in platelet-poor plasma, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and whole blood induced by glass, kaolin, and polyphosphate elicited high levels of FXIIa-C1-inhibitor (C1INH), low levels of FXIa-C1INH and KK-C1INH, and almost no AT complexes. Platelet activation, in both PRP and blood, led to the formation of FXIIa-AT, FXIa-AT, and kallikrein (KK)-AT but almost no C1INH complexes. In severe trauma patients, FXIIa-AT and FXIa-AT were correlated with the release of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) from activated platelets. In contrast, FXIIa-C1INH complexes were detected when the FXIIa-AT levels were low. No correlations were found between FXIIa-C1INH and FXIIa-AT or TSP-1. Inhibition of FXIIa on material surfaces was also shown to affect the function of aggregating platelets. In conclusion, formation of FXIIa-AT and FXIIa-C1INH complexes can help to distinguish between contact activation triggered by biomaterial surfaces and by activated platelets. Platelet aggregation studies also demonstrated that platelet function is influenced by material surface-mediated contact activation and that generation of FXIIa-AT complexes may serve as a new biomarker for thrombotic reactions during therapeutic procedures employing biomaterial devices.

  12. Os odontoideum with ?free-floating? atlantal arch causing C1-2 anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis with cervicomedullary compression

    OpenAIRE

    Behari Sanjay; Jaiswal Awadhesh; Srivastava Arun; Rajput Dinesh; Jain Vijendra

    2010-01-01

    Background: Os odontoideum (OO) with C1-2 anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis may cause cervicomedullary injury both from anterior and posterior aspects. We analyzed fourteen such patients for biomechanical issues, radiological features and management of OO with free-floating atlantal arch and review pertinent literature. Materials and Methods: Fourteen patients having nonsyndromic, reducible atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) with orthotopic OO were analyzed. During neck flexion, their C1 anter...

  13. Deviation analysis for C1/2 pedicle screw placement using a three-dimensional printed drilling guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinghuo; Liu, Rong; Yu, Jie; Lu, Lin; Yang, Cao; Shao, Zengwu; Ye, Zhewei

    2017-06-01

    Cervical transarticular fixation is a technically demanding procedure. This study aimed to develop a safer and more accurate method for C1/2 pedicle screw placement using a three-dimensional printed drilling guide. A total of 20 patients with C1/2 fractures and dislocations were recruited, and their computed tomography scans were evaluated. Under the assistance of the three-dimensional printed drilling guide, bilateral C1/2 pedicle screws were successfully placed in the three-dimensional C1/2 models. Then, sagittal and axial computed tomography scans were obtained, and the accuracy and safety of screw placement were evaluated based on X-Y-Z axis setup. The average depths for C1 and C2 pedicle screws were 30.1 ± 1.12 and 31.81 ± 0.85 mm on the left side and 29.54 ± 1.01 and 31.35 ± 0.27 mm on the right side, respectively. The average dimensional parameters for C1/C2 pedicle screw of both sides were measured and analyzed, which showed no statistically significant differences in the ideal and the actual entry points, inclined angles, and tailed angles. The method of developing a three-dimensional printed drilling guide is an easy and safe technique. This novel technique is applicable for C1/2 pedicle screw fixation; the potential use of the three-dimensional printed guide to place C1/2 pedicle screw is promising.

  14. Suppressing ABA uridine diphosphate glucosyltransferase (SlUGT75C1) alters fruit ripening and the stress response in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yufei; Ji, Kai; Liang, Bin; Du, Yangwei; Jiang, Li; Wang, Juan; Kai, Wenbin; Zhang, Yushu; Zhai, Xiawan; Chen, Pei; Wang, Hongqing; Leng, Ping

    2017-08-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) glucose conjugation mediated by uridine diphosphate glucosyltransferases (UGTs) is an important pathway in regulating ABA homeostasis. In the present study, we investigated three tomato SlUGTs that are highly expressed in fruit during ripening, and these SlUGTs were localized to the cytoplasm and cell nucleus. Among these three UGTs, SlUGT75C1 catalyzes the glucosylation of both ABA and IAA in vitro; SlUGT76E1 can only catalyze the conjugation of ABA; and SlUGT73C4 cannot glycosylate either ABA or IAA. Therefore, SlUGT75C1 was selected for further investigation. SlUGT75C1 RNA interference significantly up-regulated the expression level of SlCYP707A2, which encodes an ABA 8'-hydroxylase but did not affect the expression of SlNCED1, which encodes a key enzyme in ABA biosynthesis. Suppression of SlUGT75C1 significantly accelerated fruit ripening by enhancing ABA levels and promoting the early release of ethylene. SlUGT75C1-RNAi altered the expression of fruit ripening genes (genes involved in ethylene release and cell wall catabolism). SlUGT75C1-RNAi seeds showed delayed germination and root growth compared with wild-type as well as increased sensitivity to exogenous ABA. SlUGT75C1-RNAi plants were also more resistant to drought stress. These results demonstrated that SlUGT75C1 plays a crucial role in ABA-mediated fruit ripening, seed germination, and drought responses in tomato. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Growth and characterization of pendeo-epitaxial GaN (1 1 2¯ 0) on 4H-SiC (1 1 2¯ 0) substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, B. P.; Reitmeier, Z. J.; Park, J. S.; Bachelor, D.; Zakharov, D. N.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Davis, R. F.

    2006-05-01

    Growth on AlN/4H-SiC (1 1 2¯ 0) substrates of coalesced, non-polar GaN (1 1 2¯ 0) films having volumes of material with reduced densities of dislocations and stacking faults has been achieved from etched stripes via the statistical and experimental determination of the effect of temperature and V/III ratio on the lateral and vertical growth rates of the GaN{0 0 0 1} faces combined with pendeo-epitaxy. AFM of the uncoalesced GaN(0 0 0 1) and GaN (0 0 0 1¯) vertical faces revealed growth steps with some steps terminating at dislocations on the former and a pitted surface without growth steps, indicative of decomposition, on the latter. Coalescence was achieved via (a) a two-step route and the parameters of (1) T=1100 °C and V/III=1323 for 40 min and (2) 1020 °C and V/III=660 for 40 min and (b) a one-step route that employed T=1020 °C and a V/III ratio=660 for 6 h. The densities of dislocations in the GaN grown vertically over and laterally from the (1 1 2¯ 0) stripes were ˜4×10 10 cm -2 and ˜2×10 8 cm -2, respectively; the densities of stacking fault in these volumes were ˜1×10 6 cm -1 and ˜2×10 4 cm -1, respectively. The defects in the wing material were observed primarily at the bottom of the film where lateral growth of the GaN occurred from the AlN and the SiC. Plan view AFM also revealed different microstructures and a reduction in the RMS roughness values from 1.2 to 0.95 nm in these respective regions.

  16. Deficits in learning and memory in mice with a mutation of the candidate dyslexia susceptibility gene Dyx1c1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendall, Amanda R; Tarkar, Aarti; Contreras-Mora, Hector M; LoTurco, Joseph J; Fitch, R Holly

    2017-09-01

    Dyslexia is a learning disability characterized by difficulty learning to read and write. The underlying biological and genetic etiology remains poorly understood. One candidate gene, dyslexia susceptibility 1 candidate 1 (DYX1C1), has been shown to be associated with deficits in short-term memory in dyslexic populations. The purpose of the current study was to examine the behavioral phenotype of a mouse model with a homozygous conditional (forebrain) knockout of the rodent homolog Dyx1c1. Twelve Dyx1c1 conditional homozygous knockouts, 7 Dyx1c1 conditional heterozygous knockouts and 6 wild-type controls were behaviorally assessed. Mice with the homozygous Dyx1c1 knockout showed deficits on memory and learning, but not on auditory or motor tasks. These findings affirm existing evidence that DYX1C1 may play an underlying role in the development of neural systems important to learning and memory, and disruption of this function could contribute to the learning deficits seen in individuals with dyslexia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. PAM-Dependent Target DNA Recognition and Cleavage by C2c1 CRISPR-Cas Endonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hui; Gao, Pu; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Patel, Dinshaw J. (MSKCC); (Cornell); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2016-12-01

    C2c1 is a newly identified guide RNA-mediated type V-B CRISPR-Cas endonuclease that site-specifically targets and cleaves both strands of target DNA. We have determined crystal structures of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris C2c1 (AacC2c1) bound to sgRNA as a binary complex and to target DNAs as ternary complexes, thereby capturing catalytically competent conformations of AacC2c1 with both target and non-target DNA strands independently positioned within a single RuvC catalytic pocket. Moreover, C2c1-mediated cleavage results in a staggered seven-nucleotide break of target DNA. crRNA adopts a pre-ordered five-nucleotide A-form seed sequence in the binary complex, with release of an inserted tryptophan, facilitating zippering up of 20-bp guide RNA:target DNA heteroduplex on ternary complex formation. Notably, the PAM-interacting cleft adopts a “locked” conformation on ternary complex formation. Structural comparison of C2c1 ternary complexes with their Cas9 and Cpf1 counterparts highlights the diverse mechanisms adopted by these distinct CRISPR-Cas systems, thereby broadening and enhancing their applicability as genome editing tools.

  18. Successful C1 inhibitor short-term prophylaxis during redo mitral valve replacement in a patient with hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coleman Suzanne

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary angioedema is characterized by sudden episodes of nonpitting edema that cause discomfort and pain. Typically the extremities, genitalia, trunk, gastrointestinal tract, face, and larynx are affected by attacks of swelling. Laryngeal swelling carries significant risk for asphyxiation. The disease results from mutations in the C1 esterase inhibitor gene that cause C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency. Attacks of hereditary angioedema result from contact, complement, and fibrinolytic plasma cascade activation, where C1 esterase inhibitor irreversibly binds substrates. Patients with hereditary angioedema cannot replenish C1 esterase inhibitor levels on pace with its binding. When C1 esterase inhibitor is depleted in these patients, vasoactive plasma cascade products cause swelling attacks. Trauma is a known trigger for hereditary angioedema attacks, and patients have been denied surgical procedures because of this risk. However, uncomplicated surgeries have been reported. Appropriate prophylaxis can reduce peri-operative morbidity in these patients, despite proteolytic cascade and complement activation during surgical trauma. We report a case of successful short-term prophylaxis with C1 esterase inhibitor in a 51-year-old man with hereditary angioedema who underwent redo mitral valve reconstructive surgery.

  19. Mass metrology

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, S V

    2012-01-01

    This book presents the practical aspects of mass measurements. Concepts of gravitational, inertial and conventional mass and details of the variation of acceleration of gravity are described. The Metric Convention and International Prototype Kilogram and BIPM standards are described. The effect of change of gravity on the indication of electronic balances is derived with respect of latitude, altitude and earth topography. The classification of weights by OIML is discussed. Maximum permissible errors in different categories of weights prescribed by national and international organizations are p

  20. Aerosol retrieval for second global imager on GCOM-C1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Itaru; Mukai, Sonoyo; Nakata, Makiko

    2017-04-01

    The second global imager (SGLI) on global change observation mission - 1st climate satellite (GCOM-C1) will be launched in December of 2017 as a part of Japanese GCOM project. In addition, GCOM-W has already been launched in 2012. The SGLI is an imager which measures Earth's reflectance's from near ultra violet (NUV) to thermal infrared (TIR) for estimation of physical parameters of atmosphere, land and ocean. It can be pointed out that unique features of SGLI are as follows; 1) high resolution imager provides us 250 m resolution dataset from NUV to near infrared (NIR) wavelengths, 2) polarization information (I, Q, and U as Stokes components) are available at two wavelengths (red and NIR) with 45 degrees forward or backward tilting along satellite tracking direction. Note that the resolution of polarization channels is 1 km x 1 km at nadir. This work introduces current status of aerosol retrieval algorithm for SGLI. Here we use the two set of stokes components (Q and U) at red and near infrared for polarization information as well as total reflectance at blue channel for aerosol retrieval. It is still difficult to retrieve variety of the aerosol properties simultaneously. We propose appropriate aerosol size distribution model which is based on compiled results of world wide NASA/AERONET observations. The proposed aerosol size distribution can reduce the number of unknown parameters. The values of complex refractive index of aerosols show weak dependence on wavelength for visible range, and hence it is assumed to be ranged from the value of 1.4 as transparent particles to the absorbing one as 1.60 - 0.02i. Further the reflectance of land surface should be taken into account. As a result, the aerosol properties obtained from the satellite data, radiation simulation and ground measurements are investigated.

  1. Magnetic properties of the charged Anderson-Brinkman-Morel state: Absence of H sub c 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kita, T. (Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, 7-22-1 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106, Japan (JP))

    1991-03-01

    Magnetic properties of the charged Anderson-Brinkman-Morel state are investigated theoretically as a special case of time-reversal-symmetry-breaking superconductivity. The magnetic field is expressed as a superposition of the one from the supercurrent {bold j}{sup {ital s}}({bold r}) and that from the magnetic moment l({bold r}) due to the internal motion of each Cooper pair. This procedure enables us to get rid of the paradox in zero external field that the moments are ordered (l=const) with no magnetic field nor supercurrent, leading to a natural conclusion that there is indeed a field due to l({bold r}) which is screened almost completely by {bold j}{sup {ital s}}({bold r}). If the system size is large enough compared with the penetration depth, the direction l({bold r}) changes gradually toward the surface and the current {bold j}{sup {ital s}}({bold r}) flows over the bulk. This means that the system is essentially nonuniform and forms a coreless vortex in zero external field. As for the magnetization process, the lattice of coreless vortices grows from the infinitesimal external field without {ital H}{sub {ital c}1} (i.e., no Meissner state), which is subsequently followed by the first-order transition to the lattice with cores. Finally, the transition to the normal state occurs at {ital H}{sub {ital c}2} enhanced over that of the conventional type-II superconductor due to the field l. An example of the magnetization curve is also given.

  2. Mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyvang Hartmeyer, Gitte; Jensen, Anne Kvistholm; Böcher, Sidsel

    2010-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is currently being introduced for the rapid and accurate identification of bacteria. We describe 2 MALDI-TOF MS identification cases - 1 directly on spinal fluid and 1 on grown bacteria. Rapidly obtained r...

  3. Primary Lateral Sclerosis : diagnostic boundaries and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugman, F.

    2010-01-01

    Primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) is a diagnosis of exclusion in sporadic patients with an adult-onset gradually progressive upper motor neuron (UMN) syndrome. Differentiation between PLS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and sporadic presentation of hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) is

  4. Nutrition management of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Daniel I

    2013-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurological disease with high risk of malnutrition. Symptoms of dysphagia, depression, cognitive impairment, difficulty with self-feeding and meal preparation, hypermetabolism, anxiety, respiratory insufficiency, and fatigue with meals increase the risk of malnutrition. Malnutrition negatively affects prognosis and quality of life, making early and frequent nutrition assessment and intervention essential. Implementation of an adequate calorie diet, dietary texture modification, use of adaptive eating utensils, and placement of a feeding tube aid in preventing malnutrition. When nutrition status is compromised by dysphagia and weight loss (5%-10% of usual body weight) or body mass index 50%, a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement is indicated. When forced vital capacity is respiratory risk. Parenteral nutrition (PN) is indicated only when enteral nutrition (EN) is contraindicated or impossible. This article reviews the background of ALS, nutrition implications and risk of malnutrition, treatment strategies to prevent malnutrition, the role of EN and PN, and feeding tube placement methods according to disease stage.

  5. Risk factors for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingre, Caroline; Roos, Per M; Piehl, Fredrik; Kamel, Freya; Fang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common motor neuron disease. It is typically fatal within 2–5 years of symptom onset. The incidence of ALS is largely uniform across most parts of the world, but an increasing ALS incidence during the last decades has been suggested. Although recent genetic studies have substantially improved our understanding of the causes of ALS, especially familial ALS, an important role of non-genetic factors in ALS is recognized and needs further study. In this review, we briefly discuss several major genetic contributors to ALS identified to date, followed by a more focused discussion on the most commonly examined non-genetic risk factors for ALS. We first review factors related to lifestyle choices, including smoking, intake of antioxidants, physical fitness, body mass index, and physical exercise, followed by factors related to occupational and environmental exposures, including electromagnetic fields, metals, pesticides, β-methylamino-L-alanine, and viral infection. Potential links between ALS and other medical conditions, including head trauma, metabolic diseases, cancer, and inflammatory diseases, are also discussed. Finally, we outline several future directions aiming to more efficiently examine the role of non-genetic risk factors in ALS. PMID:25709501

  6. The spectrum of light isovector mesons with $C=+1$ from the COMPASS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Based on the largest event sample of diffractively produced $\\pi^-\\pi^-\\pi^+$, obtained by a pion beam of $190~\\rm{GeV/c}$ momentum, the COMPASS collaboration has performed the most advanced partial wave analysis on multi-body final states, using the isobar model. The large number of waves included in the analysis reduces truncation effects. We have used fourteen out of a total of eighty-eight waves, to extract resonance parameters for eleven light meson candidates, most of them observed previously. The coherence of the analysis and the large variety of systematic studies has allowed to determine mass and width of most $a_{J}$ and $\\pi_{J}$ states with six different values of $J^{PC}$ below a mass of $2.1~\\rm{GeV/c^2}$, with high confidence. We exploited that the production rates of resonant and non-resonant contributions in these fourteen waves vary differently with the four-momentum transfer squared in the reaction. In addition, we have performed the first isobar-freed analysis in diffraction, from which we...

  7. The Spectrum of Light Isovector Mesons with C = +1 from the COMPASS Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Stephan

    Based on the largest event sample of diffractively produced π-π-π+, obtained by a pion beam of 190 GeV/c momentum, the COMPASS collaboration has performed the so far most advanced partial-wave analysis on multi-body final states, using the isobar model. The large number of 88waves included in the analysis reduces truncation effects. We have used fourteen waves, to extract resonance parameters for eleven light-meson candidates, most of them observed previously. The coherence of the analysis and the large variety of systematic studies has allowed us to determine mass and width of most aJ and πJ states with a total of six different values of JPC below a mass of 2:1 GeV/c2, with high confidence. We exploit that the production rates of resonant and non-resonant contributions in these fourteen waves vary differently with the four-momentum transfer squared in the reaction. In addition, we have performed the first isobar-freed analysis in diffraction, from which we have determined the shape of the ππ S-wave isobar for different JPC of the 3π system.

  8. A lateral electrophoretic flow diagnostic assay

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, R; Skandarajah, A; Gerver, RE; Neira, HD; Fletcher, DA; Herr, AE

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 The Royal Society of Chemistry. Immunochromatographic assays are a cornerstone tool in disease screening. To complement existing lateral flow assays (based on wicking flow) we introduce a lateral flow format that employs directed electrophoretic transport. The format is termed a "lateral e-flow assay" and is designed to support multiplexed detection using immobilized reaction volumes of capture antigen. To fabricate the lateral e-flow device, we employ mask-based UV photopatterning to ...

  9. Complement factors C1q, C3 and C5 in brain and serum of mice with cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helbok Raimund

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The patho-mechanisms leading to brain damage due to cerebral malaria (CM are yet not fully understood. Immune-mediated and ischaemic mechanisms have been implicated. The role of complement factors C1q, C3 and C5 for the pathogenesis of CM were investigated in this study. Methods C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood stages. The clinical severity of the disease was assessed by a battery of 40 standardized tests for evaluating neurological functions in mice. Brain homogenates and sera of mice with CM, infected animals without CM and non-infected control animals were analyzed for C1q, C3 and C5 up-regulation by Western blotting. Results Densitometric analysis of Western blots of brain homogenates yielded statistically significant differences in the levels of C1q and C5 in the analyzed groups. Correlation analysis showed a statistically significant association of C1q and C5 levels with the clinical severity of the disease. More severely affected animals showed higher levels of C1q and C5. No differences in complement levels were observed between frontal and caudal parts of the brain. Densitometric analysis of Western blot of sera yielded statistically lower levels of C1q in infected animals without CM compared to animals of the control group. Conclusion The current study provides direct evidence for up-regulation of complement factors C1q and C5 in the brains of animals with CM. Local complement up-regulation is a possible mechanism for brain damage in experimental cerebral malaria.

  10. Expression of CYP1C1 and CYP1A in Fundulus heteroclitus during PAH-induced carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Lu [Pharmacology and Environmental Toxicology, University of Mississippi, University, MS (United States); Camus, Alvin C. [Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Dong, Wu; Thornton, Cammi [Pharmacology and Environmental Toxicology, University of Mississippi, University, MS (United States); Willett, Kristine L., E-mail: kwillett@olemiss.edu [Pharmacology and Environmental Toxicology, University of Mississippi, University, MS (United States)

    2010-09-15

    CYP1C1 is a relatively newly identified member of the cytochrome P450 family 1 in teleost fish. However, CYP1C1's expression and physiological roles relative to the more recognized CYP1A in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) induced toxicities are unclear. Fundulus heteroclitus fry were exposed at 6-8 days post-hatch (dph) and again at 13-15 dph for 6 h to dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) control, 5 mg/L benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), or 5 mg/L dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA). Fry were euthanized at 0, 6, 18, 24 and 30 h after the second exposure. In these groups, both CYP1A and CYP1C1 protein expression were induced within 6 h after the second exposure. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) results from fry revealed strongest CYP1C1 expression in renal tubular and intestinal epithelial cells. Additional fish were examined for liver lesions 8 months after initial exposure. Gross lesions were observed in 20% of the BaP and 35% of the DMBA-treated fish livers. Histopathologic findings included foci of cellular alteration and neoplasms, including hepatocellular adenoma, hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangioma. Strong CYP1A immunostaining was detected diffusely in altered cell foci and on the invading margin of hepatocelluar carcinomas. Lower CYP1A expression was seen in central regions of the neoplasms. In contrast, CYP1C1 was only detectable and highly expressed in proliferated bile duct epithelial cells. Our CYP1C1 results suggest the potential for tissue specific CYP1C1-mediated PAH metabolism but not a more chronic role in progression to liver hepatocellular carcinoma.

  11. Acidic β-mannanase from Penicillium pinophilum C1: Cloning, characterization and assessment of its potential for animal feed application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hongying; Shi, Pengjun; Luo, Huiying; Bai, Yingguo; Huang, Huoqing; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2011-12-01

    The β-mannanase gene, man5C1, was cloned from Penicillium pinophilum C1, a strain isolated from the acidic wastewater of a tin mine in Yunnan, China, and expressed in Pichia pastoris. The sequence analysis displayed the gene consists of a 1221-bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 406 amino acids (Man5C1). The deduced amino acid sequence of Man5C1 showed the highest homology of 57.8% (identity) with a characterized β-mannanase from Aspergillus aculeatus belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 5. The purified rMan5C1 had a high specific activity of 1035U mg(-1) towards locust bean gum (LBG) and showed highest activity at pH 4.0 and 70°C. rMan5C1 was adaptable to a wide range of acidity, retaining >60% of its maximum activity at pH 3.0-7.0. The enzyme was stable over a broad pH range (3.0 to 10.0) and exhibited good thermostability at 50°C. The K(m) and V(max) values were 5.6 and 4.8mgmL(-1), and 2785 and 1608μmolmin(-1)mg(-1), respectively, when LBG and konjac flour were used as substrates. The enzyme had strong resistance to most metal ions and proteases (pepsin and trypsin), and released 8.96mgg(-1) reducing sugars from LBG in the simulated gastric fluid. All these favorable properties make rMan5C1 a promising candidate for use in animal feed. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. PhaM Is the Physiological Activator of Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) Synthase (PhaC1) in Ralstonia eutropha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) synthase (PhaC1) is the key enzyme of PHB synthesis in Ralstonia eutropha and other PHB-accumulating bacteria and catalyzes the polymerization of 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA to PHB. Activity assays of R. eutropha PHB synthase are characterized by the presence of lag phases and by low specific activity. It is assumed that the lag phase is caused by the time necessary to convert the inactive PhaC1 monomer into the active dimeric form by an unknown priming process. The lag phase can be reduced by addition of nonionic detergents such as hecameg [6-O-(N-heptyl-carbamoyl)-methyl-α-d-glucopyranoside], which apparently accelerates the formation of PhaC1 dimers. We identified the PHB granule-associated protein (PGAP) PhaM as the natural primer (activator) of PHB synthase activity. PhaM was recently discovered as a novel type of PGAP with multiple functions in PHB metabolism. Addition of PhaM to PHB synthase assays resulted in immediate polymerization of 3HB coenzyme A with high specific activity and without a significant lag phase. The effect of PhaM on (i) PhaC1 activity, (ii) oligomerization of PhaC1, (iii) complex formation with PhaC1, and (iv) PHB granule formation in vitro and in vivo was shown by cross-linking experiments of purified proteins (PhaM, PhaC1) with glutardialdehyde, by size exclusion chromatography, and by fluorescence microscopic detection of de novo-synthesized PHB granules. PMID:24212577

  13. Children grow and horses race: is the adiposity rebound a critical period for later obesity?

    OpenAIRE

    Cole TJ

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background The adiposity rebound is the second rise in body mass index that occurs between 3 and 7 years. An early age at adiposity rebound is known to be a risk factor for later obesity. The aim here is to clarify the connection between the age at rebound and the corresponding pattern of body mass index change, in centile terms, so as to better understand its ability to predict later fatness. Discussion Longitudinal changes in body mass index during adiposity rebound, measured both ...

  14. Pedestrian-induced lateral forces on footbridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingolfsson, Einar Thor; Georgakis, Christos T.; Jönsson, Jeppe

    2012-01-01

    of the underlying pavement. An extensive experimental analysis has been carried out to determine the lateral forces generated by pedestrians when walking on a laterally moving treadmill. Two different conditions are investigated; initially the treadmill is fixed and then it is laterally driven in a sinusoidal...

  15. Pedestrian-induced lateral forces on footbridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingólfsson, Einar Thór; Georgakis, Christos T.; Jönsson, Jeppe

    2011-01-01

    of the underlying pavement. An extensive experimental analysis has been carried out to determine the lateral forces generated by pedestrians when walking on a laterally moving treadmill. Two different conditions are investigated; initially the treadmill is fixed and then it is laterally driven in a sinusoidal...

  16. Lateral collateral ligament of the elbow joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Vaesel, M T; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole

    1996-01-01

    The structure and kinematics of the lateral collateral ligament of the elbow joint were investigated in 10 cadaveric specimens. The lateral collateral ligament was observed to be a distinct part of the lateral collateral ligament complex. It contains posterior fibers that pass through the annular...

  17. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of Comet Austin (1989c1) using a two-dimensional diode array detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahnow, David James

    A two-dimensional, photon-counting intensified photodiode array detector has been constructed and successfully tested in the laboratory and on a spectrograph in three sounding rocket flights. The detector is an extension of the one-dimensional intensified diode array detector used in the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope. Extensive laboratory measurements have shown that it can successfully centroid with sub-diode resolution, and can be used in place of ranicon detectors to measure the spectra of faint objects. The instrument successfully obtained long slit far-ultraviolet spectra (1250-1850 A) of Comet Austin (1989 c1) on 21 April 1990. Emissions of OI, CI, SI and CO were detected during the 270 seconds of data acquisition. The spectral resolution was 5.5 A, while the spatial resolution was limited by pointing jitter to approximately 30 arcseconds. The spatial profiles of the carbon and oxygen emissions show narrow enhancements which are suggestive of a cometary outburst which occurred 15-20 hours before the observation. The overall shape of the atomic carbon profile is similar to those measured during two observations of Comet Halley (1986 III), and is similarly incompatible with photodissociation of CO as its primary source, as determined by model calculations. The CO profile, however, is consistent with that of a parent molecule evaporating directly from the nucleus, with a production rate of 4 plus or minus 1 x 1027 molecules s-1. The O I lambda 1304 emission, also similar in spatial shape to that detected in Halley, includes a contribution due to Bowen fluorescence induced by solar HI Lyman-beta, and its profile can be understood as that due to the photodissociation of H2O, with a production rate of 6.2 plus or minus 0.3 x 1028 molecules s-1, giving an abundance of CO relative to water of 6.5 percent. Spatial profiles of SI lambda 1814 were also obtained, with profiles attributable to that of a daughter product of short-lived species such as CS2 and H2S.

  18. Covalent binding of quinones activates the Ah receptor in Hepa1c1c7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiko, Yumi; Puga, Alvaro; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2015-12-01

    Highly reactive quinone species produced by photooxidation and/or metabolic activation of mono- or bi-aromatic hydrocarbons modulate cellular homeostasis and electrophilic signal transduction pathways through the covalent modification of proteins. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, but not mono- or bi-aromatic hydrocarbons, are well recognized as ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). However, quinone species produced from mono- and bi-aromatic hydrocarbons could potentially cause AhR activation. To clarify the AhR response to mono- and bi-aromatic hydrocarbon quinones, we studied Cyp1a1 (cytochrome P450 1A1) induction and AhR activation by these quinones. We detected Cyp1a1 induction during treatment with quinones in Hepa1c1c7 cells, but not their parent compounds. Nine of the twelve quinones with covalent binding capability for proteins induced Cyp1a1. Cyp1a1 induction mediated by 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ), 1,4-NQ, 1,4-benzoquinone (1,4-BQ) and tert-butyl-1,4-BQ was suppressed by a specific AhR inhibitor and was not observed in c35 cells, which do not have a functional AhR. These quinones stimulated AhR nuclear translocation and interaction with the AhR nuclear translocator. Interestingly, 1,2-NQ covalently modified AhR, which was detected by an immunoprecipitation assay using a specific antibody against 1,2-NQ, resulting in enhancement of xenobiotic responsive element (XRE)-derived luciferase activity and binding of AhR to the Cyp1a1 promoter region. While mono- and bi-aromatic hydrocarbons are generally believed to be poor ligands for AhR and hence unable to induce Cyp1a1, our study suggests that the quinones of these molecules are able to modify AhR and activate the AhR/XRE pathway, thereby inducing Cyp1a1. Since we previously reported that 1,2-NQ and tert-butyl-1,4-BQ also activate NF-E2-related factor 2, it seems likely that some of quinones are bi-functional inducers for phase-I and phase-II reaction of xenobiotics.

  19. hnRNP C1/C2 and Pur-beta proteins mediate induction of senescence by oligonucleotides homologous to the telomere overhang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulnix RE

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Richard E Mulnix,1,* Ryan T Pitman,1 Allison Retzer,2 Ceyda Bertram,1 Kavin Arasi,2 Zachary Crees,2 Jennifer Girard,2 Srijayaprakash B Uppada,1 Amanda L Stone,1 Neelu Puri1,* 1Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Rockford, IL, USA; 2College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Rockford, IL, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Experimental disruption of the telomere overhang induces a potent DNA damage response and is the target of newly emerging cancer therapeutics. Introduction of T-oligo, an eleven-base oligonucleotide homologous to the 3'-telomeric overhang, mimics telomere disruption and induces DNA damage responses through activation of p53, p73, p95/Nbs1, E2F1, pRb, and other DNA damage response proteins. ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated was once thought to be the primary driver of T-oligo-induced DNA damage responses; however, recent experiments have highlighted other key proteins that may also play a significant role. Methods: To identify proteins associated with T-oligo, MM-AN cells were treated with biotinylated T-oligo or complementary oligonucleotide, cell lysates were run on SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the protein bands observed after treatment of cells with T-oligo or complementary oligonucleotide were analyzed using mass spectrometry. To study the effect of T-oligo on expression of hnRNP C1/C2 (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1 and C2 and purine-rich element binding proteins (Pur proteins, cells were treated with T-oligo, and immunoblotting experiments were performed. To determine their role in senescence, cells were treated with shRNA (short hairpin ribonucleic acid against these proteins, and senescence was studied using the senescence associated beta-galactosidase assay. Results: Using mass spectrometry, RNA-binding hnRNP C1/C2 and DNA-binding Pur proteins were found to associate with T-oligo. hnRNP C1

  20. Pre-operative irreducible C1-C2 dislocations: intra-operative reduction and posterior fixation. The "always posterior strategy".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visocchi, Massimiliano; Pietrini, Domenico; Tufo, Tommaso; Fernandez, Eduardo; Di Rocco, Concezio

    2009-05-01

    According to Menezes' algorithm, pre-operative dynamic neuroradiological investigation in C1-C2 dislocations (C1C2D) instability is strongly advocated in order to exclude those patients not eligible for posterior fixation and fusion without previous anterior trans-oral decompression. Anterior irreducible compression due to C1C2D instability, it is said, needs trans-oral anterior decompression. We reviewed our experience in order to refute such a paradigm. The study involves 23 patients who were operated on for cranio-vertebral junction (CVJ) instability; all of them had C1C2D of varying degree on x-ray, computerised tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the CVJ. Pre-operatively, irreducible C1C2D was demonstrated only in 3 patients, (2 with Down's Syndrome, one of them was harbouring os odontoideum, 1 Rheumatoid Arthritis), i.e. 13.04%; the remaining 19 (86.9%) had reducible C1-C2 dislocation. After an unsuccessful traction test conducted in the pre-operative phase under sedation, it was possible to completely reduce the C1C2D (with a combination of axial traction with light extension of the neck on the chest and a light flexion of the head on the neck by using a Mayfield head holder) and proceed to posterior fixation in all the patients under general anaesthesia using a precise "timing sequences fixation technique". Wiring (C0 and C3 were fixed first being stretched up to approximately 10 lbs, then C2 in order to pull up this vertebra last by forcing approximately 8 lbs) or screw fixation methods were used to achieve fusion along with post-operative external orthosis and neuroradiological assessment of the C1C2D. The instrumentation produced a lever and pulley effect which assisted reduction of the dislocation. At follow up (range 34-55 months-mean 45.33 months) the clinical picture was improved or stable in all patients. Pre-operative irreducibility of the C1C2D should not be an absolute indication for trans-oral decompression. An attempt to

  1. Cytoadhesion to gC1qR through Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 in severe malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magallón-Tejada, Ariel; Machevo, Sónia; Cisteró, Pau

    2016-01-01

    Cytoadhesion of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes to gC1qR has been associated with severe malaria, but the parasite ligand involved is currently unknown. To assess if binding to gC1qR is mediated through the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family, we analyzed...... by static binding assays and qPCR the cytoadhesion and var gene transcriptional profile of 86 P. falciparum isolates from Mozambican children with severe and uncomplicated malaria, as well as of a P. falciparum 3D7 line selected for binding to gC1qR (Pf3D7gC1qR). Transcript levels of DC8 correlated...... positively with cytoadhesion to gC1qR (rho = 0.287, P = 0.007), were higher in isolates from children with severe anemia than with uncomplicated malaria, as well as in isolates from Europeans presenting a first episode of malaria (n = 21) than Mozambican adults (n = 25), and were associated with an increased...

  2. Comparing the effects of symbiotic algae (Symbiodinium) clades C1 and D on early growth stages of Acropora tenuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuyama, Ikuko; Higuchi, Tomihiko

    2014-01-01

    Reef-building corals switch endosymbiotic algae of the genus Symbiodinium during their early growth stages and during bleaching events. Clade C Symbiodinium algae are dominant in corals, although other clades - including A and D - have also been commonly detected in juvenile Acroporid corals. Previous studies have been reported that only molecular data of Symbiodinium clade were identified within field corals. In this study, we inoculated aposymbiotic juvenile polyps with cultures of clades C1 and D Symbiodinium algae, and investigated the different effect of these two clades of Symbiodinium on juvenile polyps. Our results showed that clade C1 algae did not grow, while clade D algae grew rapidly during the first 2 months after inoculation. Polyps associated with clade C1 algae exhibited bright green fluorescence across the body and tentacles after inoculation. The growth rate of polyp skeletons was lower in polyps associated with clade C1 algae than those associated with clade D algae. On the other hand, antioxidant activity (catalase) of corals was not significantly different between corals with clade C1 and clade D algae. Our results suggested that clade D Symbiodinium algae easily form symbiotic relationships with corals and that these algae could contribute to coral growth in early symbiosis stages.

  3. Ionic liquid promoted one pot approach for the synthesis of pyrido[1,2-c][1,3,5]thiadiazin-4-ones and thiazolo[3,2-c][1,3,5]thiadiazin-4-ones in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.R. Siddiqui

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel three component one pot methodology for rapid access to pyrido[1,2-c][1,3,5]thiadiazin-4-ones and thiazolo[3,2-c][1,3,5]thiadiazin-4-ones has been developed. A task specific ionic liquid [bmIm]SCN has been used as thiocyanating reagent. The reaction provides high yields of the product and proceeds at ambient reaction conditions in water. The use of water as the reaction medium and easy recyclability of the ionic liquid used as a reagent as well as promoter of the reaction endows the reaction with green aspects.

  4. [Genetics of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcia, Philippe; Blasco, Hélène; Camu, William

    2014-05-01

    Although the pathophysiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis remains currently unknown, involvement of genetic factors is worldwide accepted as a key clue in the motor neuron death. Since 1993 and the discovery of mutation in the SOD1 gene, number of genes linked to or promoting ALS had always growing. Among them, only four (SOD1, TARDBP, FUS and C9ORF72 genes) are unanimously recognized as convincing causative genetic factors for more than 60% of familial and probably 10% of sporadic ALS cases. Geographic origin of the studied populations tends to become one of the major items in the gene-ALS relationship: this was extremely stressed for C9ORF72. Concerning susceptibility genes factors, an increase of the risk of ALS is clearly shown for SMN1 and ATXN2 genes and accepted for some VEGF haplotypes. Finally, some modulating effects might also exist as underline for the relationships between ApoE and ALS that differ between European and North American studies. In inherited ALS, The European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) edited rules that gave a legal frame to situations for which research of mutations were justified. Progress in the field of genetic raises major questions concerning the relevance of genetic studies from asymptomatic relatives. This first implies that the mutation identified in the proband case is perfectly characterized as a pathogenic mutation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. A stochastic load model for pedestrian-induced lateral forces on footbridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingólfsson, Einar Thór; Georgakis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    to support their applicability. Recently, an extensive experimental campaign was carried out, in which the lateral forces generated by pedestrians during walking on a laterally moving treadmill were determined for various combinations of lateral frequencies (0.33–1.07 Hz) and amplitudes (4.5–48 mm......). It was shown that large amplitude vibrations are the result of correlated pedestrian forces in the form of “negative damping”, with magnitudes that depend on the relationship between the pacing frequency and the frequency of the lateral movement.Herewith, a novel stochastic load model for the frequency...... and amplitude dependent pedestrian-induced lateral forces is presented. The lateral forces are modelled as a sum of an “equivalent static force” and “motion-induced” (or self-excited) forces which are quantified through equivalent pedestrian damping and mass coefficients. The parameters in the model are based...

  6. Role of physiological ClC-1 Cl- ion channel regulation for the excitability and function of working skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Riisager, Anders; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    and passive distribution—enable ClC-1 to conduct membrane current that inhibits muscle excitability. This depressing effect of ClC-1 current on muscle excitability has mostly been associated with skeletal muscle hyperexcitability in myotonia congenita, which arises from loss-of-function mutations in the CLCN1......Electrical membrane properties of skeletal muscle fibers have been thoroughly studied over the last five to six decades. This has shown that muscle fibers from a wide range of species, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, are all characterized by high resting membrane...... permeability for Cl- ions. Thus, in resting human muscle, ClC-1 Cl- ion channels account for ∼80% of the membrane conductance, and because active Cl- transport is limited in muscle fibers, the equilibrium potential for Cl- lies close to the resting membrane potential. These conditions—high membrane conductance...

  7. Anti-tumor agent celecoxib activity towards SP-C1 tongue cancer cells invasion (in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Achmad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Invasion is a characteristic of the occurrence of cancer and indicates the cancer cells' capability to destroy and degrade the border between the epithet and basal membrane to further spread into the surrounding extra-cellular matrix. The purpose of this research was to find the existence of impediment at the SP-C1 tongue cancer cell using celecoxib chemopreventive medication. The SP-C1 tongue cancer cells were treated in vitro using celecoxib medication as a research subject at the following concentrations 5, 10, 25, 50, 75, 100, 125%; and 0 as control group (only DMEM growth medium treatment. Pure experimental testing was carried out for 24 and 48 hours, with observation and calculation of an average number of SP-C1 tongue cancer cells. The data collected were analyzed using the ANOVA test with Newman Keuls paired range test or t-test. Research results indicated that the average number of SP-C1 tongue cancer cells invasion after administration of celecoxib medication based on administration concentration and time statistically yielded significant results. The ANOVA test results were statistically significant, that is, average occurrence of the number of SP-C1 tongue cancer cells due to the use of celecoxib at certain concentrations compared to that without celecoxib was different. At celecoxib of zero (control concentration was 24.4 with celecoxib concentration starting at 5 up to 125% experienced a decline from its average 11 to become 2.3. The conclusion of the research was that the greater the celecoxib concentration administered, the greater the effect on the impediment of SP-C1 tongue cancer cell invasion.

  8. Frequency and epitope specificity of anti-factor VIII C1 domain antibodies in acquired and congenital hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Joerg; Orlowski, Aleksander; Stichel, Diana; Healey, John F; Parker, Ernest T; Jacquemin, Marc; Krause, Manuela; Tiede, Andreas; Schwabe, Dirk; Lollar, Pete; Königs, Christoph

    2017-08-10

    Several studies showed that neutralizing anti-factor VIII (anti-fVIII) antibodies (inhibitors) in patients with acquired hemophilia A (AHA) and congenital hemophilia A (HA) are primarily directed to the A2 and C2 domains. In this study, the frequency and epitope specificity of anti-C1 antibodies were analyzed in acquired and congenital hemophilia inhibitor patients (n = 178). The domain specificity of antibodies was studied by homolog-scanning mutagenesis (HSM) with single human domain human/porcine fVIII proteins and antibody binding to human A2, C1, and C2 domains presented as human serum albumin (HSA) fusion proteins. The analysis with HSA-fVIII domain proteins confirmed the results of the HSM approach but resulted in higher detection levels. The higher detection levels with HSA-fVIII domain proteins are a result of antibody cross-reactivity with human and porcine fVIII leading to false-negative HSM results. Overall, A2-, C1-, and C2-specific antibodies were detected in 23%, 78%, and 68% of patients with AHA (n = 115) and in 52%, 57%, and 81% of HA inhibitor patients (n = 63). Competitive binding of the human monoclonal antibody (mAb) LE2E9 revealed overlapping epitopes with murine C1-specific group A mAbs including 2A9. Mutational analyses identified distinct crucial binding residues for LE2E9 (E2066) and 2A9 (F2068) that are also recognized by anti-C1 antibodies present in patients with hemophilia. A strong contribution of LE2E9- and 2A9-like antibodies was particularly observed in patients with AHA. Overall, our study demonstrates that the C1 domain, in addition to the A2 and C2 domains, contributes significantly to the humoral anti-fVIII immune response in acquired and congenital hemophilia inhibitor patients. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  9. Clinical Pattern and Acute and Long-term Management of Hereditary Angioedema Due to C1-Esterase Inhibitor Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Traseira, C; Pérez-Fernández, E; López-Serrano, M C; García-Ara, M C; Pedrosa, M; López-Trascasa, M; Caballero, T

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema due to C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency (HAE-C1-INH) is a life-threatening disease. To describe the clinical characteristics and management of patients with HAE-C1-INH during routine clinical practice. An observational, retrospective study was performed in patients with HAE-C1-INH. Demographic, clinical, and analytical data were collected from 2 periods: period A (October 2009-September 2010) and period B (October 2007-September 2009). We studied 112 patients with HAE-C1-INH (57.1% females). Age at onset of symptoms was 14.4 years (lower in patients who had experienced attacks in the previous year). In period B (n=87), 62.1% of patients presented at least 1 edema attack (median, 3.5 attacks/patient/2 years), and 19.1% of attacks were treated. In period A (n=77), 58.4% of patients were on maintenance therapy. Stanozolol was the most widely used drug (48.9%), with a mean weekly dose of 6.7 mg. At least 1 attack was recorded in 72.7% of patients (median, 3.0 attacks/patient/year), and 31.5% of the attacks were treated. Treatment of acute attacks increased by 12.4%. Age at onset of symptoms is associated with clinical expression of disease. The higher age at onset of symptoms, the fewer number of attacks per patient and year, and the lower dose of attenuated androgens necessary to control the disease than in other series lead us to hypothesize that HAE-C1-INH could have a less severe expression in Spain. Acute attacks seem to be treated increasingly often.

  10. Intubation Biomechanics: Laryngoscope Force and Cervical Spine Motion during Intubation in Cadavers—Cadavers vs. Patients, the Effect of Repeated Intubations, and the Effect of Type II Odontoid Fracture on C1-C2 Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindman, Bradley J.; From, Robert P.; Fontes, Ricardo B.; Traynelis, Vincent C.; Todd, Michael M.; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Puttlitz, Christian M.; Santoni, Brandon G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aims of this study were to characterize: 1) cadaver intubation biomechanics, including the effect of repeated intubations; and 2) the relationship between intubation force and the motion of an injured cervical segment. Methods Fourteen cadavers were serially intubated using force-sensing Macintosh and Airtraq laryngoscopes in random order, with simultaneous cervical spine motion recorded with lateral fluoroscopy. Motion of the C1-C2 segment was measured in the intact and injured state (Type II odontoid fracture). Injured C1-C2 motion was proportionately corrected for changes in intubation forces that occurred with repeated intubations. Results Cadaver intubation biomechanics were comparable to those of patients in all parameters other than C2-C5 extension. In cadavers, intubation force (Set 2/Set1 force ratio = 0.61 [95% CI: 0.46, 0.81]; P=0.002) and Oc-C5 extension (Set 2 –Set 1 difference = −6.1 degrees [95% CI: −11.4, −0.9]; P=0.025) decreased with repeated intubations. In cadavers, C1-C2 extension did not differ: 1) between intact and injured states; or 2) in the injured state, between laryngoscopes (with and without force correction). With force correction, in the injured state, C1-C2 subluxation was greater with the Airtraq (mean difference 2.8 mm [95% CI: 0.7, 4.9 mm]; P=0.004). Discussion With limitations, cadavers may be clinically relevant models of intubation biomechanics and cervical spine motion. In the setting of a Type II odontoid fracture, C1-C2 motion during intubation with either the Macintosh or Airtraq does not appear to greatly exceed physiologic values or to have a high likelihood of hyperextension or direct cord compression. PMID:26288267

  11. Intubation Biomechanics: Laryngoscope Force and Cervical Spine Motion during Intubation in Cadavers-Cadavers versus Patients, the Effect of Repeated Intubations, and the Effect of Type II Odontoid Fracture on C1-C2 Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindman, Bradley J; From, Robert P; Fontes, Ricardo B; Traynelis, Vincent C; Todd, Michael M; Zimmerman, M Bridget; Puttlitz, Christian M; Santoni, Brandon G

    2015-11-01

    The aims of this study are to characterize (1) the cadaver intubation biomechanics, including the effect of repeated intubations, and (2) the relation between intubation force and the motion of an injured cervical segment. Fourteen cadavers were serially intubated using force-sensing Macintosh and Airtraq laryngoscopes in random order, with simultaneous cervical spine motion recorded with lateral fluoroscopy. Motion of the C1-C2 segment was measured in the intact and injured state (type II odontoid fracture). Injured C1-C2 motion was proportionately corrected for changes in intubation forces that occurred with repeated intubations. Cadaver intubation biomechanics were comparable with those of patients in all parameters other than C2-C5 extension. In cadavers, intubation force (set 2/set 1 force ratio = 0.61; 95% CI, 0.46 to 0.81; P = 0.002) and Oc-C5 extension (set 2 - set 1 difference = -6.1 degrees; 95% CI, -11.4 to -0.9; P = 0.025) decreased with repeated intubations. In cadavers, C1-C2 extension did not differ (1) between intact and injured states; or (2) in the injured state, between laryngoscopes (with and without force correction). With force correction, in the injured state, C1-C2 subluxation was greater with the Airtraq (mean difference 2.8 mm; 95% CI, 0.7 to 4.9 mm; P = 0.004). With limitations, cadavers may be clinically relevant models of intubation biomechanics and cervical spine motion. In the setting of a type II odontoid fracture, C1-C2 motion during intubation with either the Macintosh or the Airtraq does not appear to greatly exceed physiologic values or to have a high likelihood of hyperextension or direct cord compression.

  12. Association of anti C1q and ds-DNA levels with the pathogenesis of Lupus Nephritis among SLE patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zara Sohail

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lupus nephritis (LN is the most common and serious complication associated with SLE and it results in significant morbidity and mortality. It is known by several studies that patients of LN have higher levels of anti-dsDNA and anti-C1q compared with SLE patients without renal involvement. The current study was designed to determine and compare the level of anti-dsDNA and anti-C1q in patients of SLE with and without lupus nephritis in the Pakistani population. This current study was also aimed at providing proof that anti-C1q levels are more prominent in LN/non-LN SLE as compared to anti-dsDNA. This project may help in the determination of results in Pakistan and contribute to the further confirmation of the sensitivity of anti-C1q. Method: The patient samples were collected from Sheikh Zayed hospital, Lahore. These patients were clinically diagnosed by the Rheumatologists as SLE and LN positive on the basis of ACR and SLEDAI scoring criteria. This study was performed and samples were analyzed in the Department of Medical and Laboratory Sciences, Imperial College of Business Study, Lahore on the patient’s serum by ELISA technique. Result: About 38% (12 patients with LN were positive for anti-dsDNA and 31% (9 SLE patients without LN were positive whereas about 38.7% (12 were anti-dsDNA negative in LN cases and 58.6% (17 in SLE without LN. In case of anti-C1q 100% (31 of these LN patients were positive and 93.1% (27 patients SLE without LN showed positive anti C1q results. Only 6.9% (2 patients showed negative results for anti-C1q in LN negative patients Conclusion: The higher levels of anti-C1q suggest that it may be a better diagnostic marker for LN than that of anti-dsDNA and that it can be helpful in the prognosis of SLE patients.

  13. Common European Framework of Reference for Languages in Croatia: an analysis of writing competence at level C1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Spajić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to present the results of a research conducted with advanced (C1 level learners of French as a foreign language in Croatia, in which their writing competence was studied according to the CEFR descriptors. Our hypothesis was that reaching level C1 demanded that a considerable amount of effort be invested in the development of learners’ writing and pragmatic skills.  In the evaluation of these skills, characteristics of culture-specific learning contexts are to be taken into account. To test our hypothesis, we used a structured questionnaire and interviews with teachers. The results of our research are presented in the conclusion.

  14. Critical Mass

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070299

    2017-01-01

    Critical Mass is a cycling event typically held on the last Friday of every month; its purpose is not usually formalized beyond the direct action of meeting at a set location and time and traveling as a group through city or town streets on bikes. The event originated in 1992 in San Francisco; by the end of 2003, the event was being held in over 300 cities around the world. At CERN it is held once a year in conjunction with the national Swiss campaing "Bike to work".

  15. Cerebral lesions can impair fMRI-based language lateralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, Jörg; Weber, Bernd; Urbach, Horst; Reul, Jürgen; Fernandez, Guillen; Elger, Christian E

    2009-10-01

    Several small patient studies and case reports raise concerns that the reliability of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may be impaired in the vicinity of cerebral lesions. This could affect the clinical validity of fMRI for presurgical language lateralization. The current study sets out to identify if a systematic effect of lesion type and localization on fMRI exists. We classify lesions typically occurring in epilepsy patients according to (1) their potential to disturb blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD)-effect generation or detection or to disturb spatial brain normalization, and (2) the proximity of lesions to protocol-specific volumes of interest (VOIs). The effect of lesions is evaluated through the examination of 238 epilepsy patients and a subgroup of 37 patients with suspected unilateral left-language dominance according to the Wada test. Patients with fMRI-critical lesions such as cavernomas, gliomas, and mass defects close to VOIs, or with severe atrophy, show lower lateralization indices (LIs) and more often discordant language lateralization with the Wada test than do patients without such lesions. This study points seriously toward fMRI-language lateralization being sensitive to cerebral lesions. Some lesion types and locations are more critical than others. Our results question the noncritical application of fMRI in patients with cerebral lesions.

  16. The Later Wittgenstein and the Later Husserl on Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Ricoeur

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an edited version of lectures given by Paul Ricœur at Johns Hopkins University in April 1966. Ricœur offers a comparative analysis of Wittgenstein’s and Husserl’s late works, taking the problem of language as the common ground of investigation for these two central figures of phenomenology and analytic philosophy. Ricœur develops his study in two parts. The first part considers Husserl’s approach to language after the Logical Investigations and concentrates on Formal and Transcendental Logic; leaving a transcendental reflection on language behind it re-examines a phenomenological conception, according to which the sphere of logic is not separable from that of experience. The main focus of the second part is Wittgenstein’s later philosophy as it moved on from the conception of an isomorphic relation between language and the world, as set out in the picture theory in the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, to the more pragmatic notion of a language-game in the Philosophical Investigations. In order to get beyond the irrevocable differences between the two philosophies and the unresolved theoretical issues on both sides, Ricœur suggests turning to a semiological paradigm based on the Saussurean distinction between “language” and “speaking.” Keywords: Analytic Philosophy, Husserl, Phenomenology, Semiology, Wittgenstein.Résumé Cet article est une version éditée de conférences données par Paul Ricœur à la Johns Hopkins University en avril 1966. Ricœur propose une analyse comparée des dernières œuvres de Wittgenstein et Husserl, avec le problème du langage comme sol commun d’investigations pour ces deux figures centrales de la phénoménologie et la philosophie analytique. Cette analyse de Ricœur se joue à travers deux parties. La première partie revient sur l'approche du langage chez Husserl depuis Recherches logiques avec une attention particulière aux développements de Logique formelle et

  17. Bilateral C1–C2 Transarticular Screw and C1 Laminar Hook Fixation and Bone Graft Fusion for Reducible Atlantoaxial Dislocation: A Seven-Year Analysis of Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiang; Ni, Bin; Xie, Ning; Lu, Xuhua; Guo, Qunfeng; Lu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background Bilateral C1-2 transarticular screw and C1 laminar hook fixation was developed on the basis of transarticular screws fixation. The modified technique has showed a better biomechanical stability than established techniques in previous study. However, long-term (minimum follow-up 7 years) outcomes of patients with reducible atlantoaxial dislocation who underwent this modified fixation technique have not still been reported. Methods A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the outcome of 36 patients who underwent this modified technique. Myelopathy was assessed using the Ranawat myelopathy score and Myelopathy Disability Index. Pain scores were assessed using Visual Analogue Scale. Radiological imaging was assessed and the following data were extracted: the atlantodental intervals, the space available for cord, presence of spinal cord signal change on T2 weighted image, C1–C2 angle, C2–C7 angle and fusion rates. Findings All patients achieved a minimum seven-year follow up. 95% patients with neck and suboccipital pain improved after surgery; in their Visual Analogue pain scores, there was a greater than 50% improvement in their VAS scores with a drop of 5 points on the VAS (Patlantoaxial instability at each follow-up time. The space available for cord increased in all patients. Postoperative sagittal kyphosis of the subaxial spine was not observed. After six months after surgery, bone grafts of all patients were fused. No complications related to surgery were found in the period of follow-up. Conclusions The long-term outcomes of this case series demonstrate that under the condition of thorough preoperative preparations, bilateral C1–C2 transarticular screw and C1 laminar hook fixation and bone graft fusion is a reliable posterior atlantoaxial fusion technique for reducible atlantoaxial dislocation. PMID:24498163

  18. Inactivation of GDP-fucose transporter gene (Slc35c1) in CHO cells by ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR-Cas9 for production of fucose-free antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kah Fai; Shahreel, Wahyu; Wan, Corrine; Teo, Gavin; Hayati, Noor; Tay, Shi Jie; Tong, Wen Han; Yang, Yuansheng; Rudd, Pauline M; Zhang, Peiqing; Song, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    Removal of core fucose from N-glycans attached to human IgG1 significantly enhances its affinity for the receptor FcγRIII and thereby dramatically improves its antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity activity. While previous works have shown that inactivation of fucosyltransferase 8 results in mutants capable of producing fucose-free antibodies, we report here the use of genome editing techniques, namely ZFNs, TALENs and the CRISPR-Cas9, to inactivate the GDP-fucose transporter (SLC35C1) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. A FACS approach coupled with a fucose-specific lectin was developed to rapidly isolate SLC35C1-deficient cells. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that both EPO-Fc produced in mutants arising from CHO-K1 and anti-Her2 antibody produced in mutants arising from a pre-existing antibody-producing CHO-HER line lacked core fucose. Lack of functional SLC35C1 in these cells does not affect cell growth or antibody productivity. Our data demonstrate that inactivating Slc35c1 gene represents an alternative approach to generate CHO cells for production of fucose-free antibodies. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Glucocorticoid Receptor (NR3C1 Variants Associate with the Muscle Strength and Size Response to Resistance Training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett I Ash

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1 polymorphisms associate with obesity, muscle strength, and cortisol sensitivity. We examined associations among four NR3C1 polymorphisms and the muscle response to resistance training (RT. European-American adults (n = 602, 23.8±0.4yr completed a 12 week unilateral arm RT program. Maximum voluntary contraction (MVC assessed isometric strength (kg and MRI assessed biceps size (cm2 pre- and post-resistance training. Subjects were genotyped for NR3C1 -2722G>A, -1887G>A, -1017T>C, and +363A>G. Men carrying the -2722G allele gained less relative MVC (17.3±1.2vs33.5±6.1% (p = 0.010 than AA homozygotes; men with -1887GG gained greater relative MVC than A allele carriers (19.6±1.4vs13.2±2.3% (p = 0.016. Women carrying the -1017T allele gained greater relative size (18.7±0.5vs16.1±0.9% (p = 0.016 than CC homozygotes. We found sex-specific NR3C1 associations with the muscle strength and size response to RT. Future studies should investigate whether these associations are partially explained by cortisol's actions in muscle tissue as they interact with sex differences in cortisol production.

  20. Nitrobacter winogradskyi cytochrome a1c1 is an iron-sulfur molybdoenzyme having hemes a and c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, M; Fukumori, Y; Yamanaka, T

    1987-09-01

    Cytochrome a1c1 (nitrite-cytochrome c oxidoreductase) purified from Nitrobacter winogradskyi (formerly N. agilis) contained molybdenum, non-heme iron, and acid-labile sulfur in addition to hemes a and c; it contained 1 mol of heme a, 4-5 g atoms of non-heme iron, 2-5 g atoms of acid-labile sulfur, and 1-2 g atoms of molybdenum per mol of heme c, but did not contain copper. The fluorescence spectra of the molybdenum cofactor derivative prepared from cytochrome a1c1 were very similar to those of the cofactor derivative from xanthine oxidase, and the aponitrate reductase of nit-1 mutant of Neurospora crassa was complemented by addition of the molybdenum cofactor derived from the cytochrome. Further, the ESR spectrum of cytochrome a1c1 was similar to that of liver sulfite oxidase. The content of cytochrome a1 in the cells cultivated with the medium in which tungsten was substituted for molybdenum markedly decreased as compared with that in the cells cultivated in the molybdenum-supplemented medium. These results indicate that cytochrome a1c1 is an iron-sulfur molybdoenzyme which contains hemes a and c.

  1. STABILITAS EPIGALOKATEKIN GALAT DALAM KRIM EKSTRAK TEH HIJAU DENGAN VARIASI KONSENTRASI ANTIOKSIDAN VITAMIN C 1% DAN VITAMIN E 1%

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nining Sugihartini

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Epigallocatechingallate (EGCG in green tea extract has activity as an anti-inflammatory agent. On the other hand the stability of EGCG is poor because of the oxidation. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of Vitamine C and Vitamine E in formulation of green tea extract cream to the stabiliy of EGCG. The green tea extract was obtained from the extraction process by infundation followed by fractination with ethyl acetate as the solvent. The three formulas were compiled in similar composition with the concentration of vitamine C 1% (FI, Vitamine E 1% (FII and there was no Vitamine C and Vitamine E (FIII as a control. The EGCG level was determinated by TLC-densitometry methode. The stability parameter was determinated by calculated of the Q10 of each formula. The result of this study showed that the parameter of t90 of EGCG with Vitamine C 1%, Vitamine E 1% and control addition were 0.0108 hours, 0.0087 hours, 0.0084 hours, respectively. Stability of EGCG in green tea leaf extract cream with addition of the vitamin C 1% was higher than it stability with the addition of vitamin E 1%. The concentration of Vitamin C 1% was the optimum concentration as antioxidant in formulation of green tea extract cream.

  2. C1q nephropathy and isolated CD59 deficiency manifesting as necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis: A rare association of two diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchika Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available C1q nephropathy is a recently described clinico-pathologic entity with a variable clinical presentation and pathology. Crescentic glomerulonephritis (GN has been reported in only two patients in the available literature. CD59 deficiency, along with lack of CD55, is responsible for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH. Few cases of isolated CD59 deficiency have been described with PNH-like features. A middle-aged adult male presented with rapidly progressive renal failure. Serological investigations were negative. A renal biopsy revealed necrotizing crescentic GN with rupture of Bowman′s capsule. Immunofluorescence on the frozen sections showed dominant mesangial deposits of C1q along with IgM. Hematological work-up of the patient revealed isolated CD59 deficiency. Hence, a final diagnosis of C1q nephropathy and CD59 deficiency manifesting as crescentic GN and hemolytic anemia was made. The co-existence of two rare disorders, C1q nephropathy and CD59 deficiency, in a patient with necrotizing crescentic GN is described for the first time to the best of our knowledge. The pathogenetic link of these two entities with the clinical manifestation requires further study.

  3. Metabolism of mono- and dihalogenated C1 and C2 compounds by Xanthobacter autotrophicus growing on 1,2-dichloroethane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torz, Maciej; Wietzes, Piet; Beschkov, Venko; Janssen, Dick B.

    2007-01-01

    The conversion of and toxic effects exerted by several mono- and dihalogenated C1 and C2 compounds on cultures of Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 growing on 1,2-dichloroethane were investigated. Bromochloromethane, dibromomethane and 1-bromo-2-chloroethane were utilized by strain GJ10 in batch

  4. Epigenetic Regulation of Placental "NR3C1": Mechanism Underlying Prenatal Programming of Infant Neurobehavior by Maternal Smoking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, Laura R.; Papandonatos, George D.; Salisbury, Amy L.; Phipps, Maureen G.; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Niaura, Raymond; Padbury, James F.; Marsit, Carmen J.; Lester, Barry M.

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of the placental glucocorticoid receptor gene ("NR3C1") was investigated as a mechanism underlying links between maternal smoking during pregnancy (MSDP) and infant neurobehavior in 45 mother-infant pairs (49% MSDP-exposed; 52% minorities; ages 18-35). The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) Network Neurobehavioral…

  5. Selective C1 Lesioning Slightly Decreases Angiotensin II Type I Receptor Expression in the Rat Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla (RVLM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, Erick A; Stedenfeld, Kristen A; Sved, Alan F; Speth, Robert C

    2015-10-01

    Cardiovascular homeostasis is regulated in large part by the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in mammals. Projections from the RVLM to the intermediolateral column of the thoracolumbar spinal cord innervate preganglionic neurons of the sympathetic nervous system causing elevation of blood pressure and heart rate. A large proportion, but not all, of the neurons in the RVLM contain the enzymes necessary for the production of epinephrine and are identified as the C1 cell group. Angiotensin II (Ang II) activates the RVLM acting upon AT1 receptors. To assess the proportion of AT1 receptors that are located on C1 neurons in the rat RVLM this study employed an antibody to dopamine-beta-hydroxylase conjugated to saporin, to selectively destroy C1 neurons in the RVLM. Expression of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons in the RVLM was reduced by 57 % in the toxin injected RVLM compared to the contralateral RVLM. In contrast, densitometric analysis of autoradiographic images of (125)I-sarcosine(1), isoleucine(8) Ang II binding to AT1 receptors of the injected side RVLM revealed a small (10 %) reduction in AT1-receptor expression compared to the contralateral RVLM. These results suggest that the majority of AT1 receptors in the rat RVLM are located on non-C1 neurons or glia.

  6. Palladium-gold catalyst for the electrochemical reduction of CO2 to C1-C5 hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortlever, R.; Peters, I; Balemans, C; Kas, Recep; Kwon, Y; Mul, Guido; Koper, M.T.M.

    2016-01-01

    Copper is a unique electrocatalyst for CO2 reduction, since it is one of the few catalysts able to produce methane, ethylene and ethane from CO2 with decent faradaic efficiencies. Here we report on the design and synthesis of a new non-copper-containing catalyst able to reduce CO2 to C1 to C5

  7. Structural Differences between the Streptococcus agalactiae Housekeeping and Pilus-Specific Sortases: SrtA and SrtC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khare, B.; Krishnan, V.; Rajashankar, K.R.; I-Hsiu, H.; Xin, M.; Ton-That, H.; Narayana, S.V. (Texas-HSC); (Cornell); (UAB)

    2011-10-21

    The assembly of pili on the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria requires transpeptidase enzymes called sortases. In Streptococcus agalactiae, the PI-1 pilus island of strain 2603V/R encodes two pilus-specific sortases (SrtC1 and SrtC2) and three pilins (GBS80, GBS52 and GBS104). Although either pilus-specific sortase is sufficient for the polymerization of the major pilin, GBS80, incorporation of the minor pilins GBS52 and GBS104 into the pilus structure requires SrtC1 and SrtC2, respectively. The S. agalactiae housekeeping sortase, SrtA, whose gene is present at a different location and does not catalyze pilus polymerization, was shown to be involved in cell wall anchoring of pilus polymers. To understand the structural basis of sortases involved in such diverse functions, we determined the crystal structures of S. agalactiae SrtC1 and SrtA. Both enzymes are made of an eight-stranded beta-barrel core with variations in their active site architecture. SrtA exhibits a catalytic triad arrangement similar to that in Streptococcus pyogenes SrtA but different from that in Staphylococcus aureus SrtA. In contrast, the SrtC1 enzyme contains an N-terminal helical domain and a 'lid' in its putative active site, which is similar to that seen in Streptococcus pneumoniae pilus-specific sortases, although with subtle differences in positioning and composition. To understand the effect of such differences on substrate recognition, we have also determined the crystal structure of a SrtC1 mutant, in which the conserved DP(W/F/Y) motif was replaced with the sorting signal motif of GBS80, IPNTG. By comparing the structures of WT wild type SrtA and SrtC1 and the 'lid' mutant of SrtC1, we propose that structural elements within the active site and the lid may be important for defining the role of specific sortase in pili biogenesis.

  8. Anti-C1q autoantibodies as markers of renal involvement in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Cécile; Lega, Jean-Christophe; Ranchin, Bruno; Cochat, Pierre; Cabrera, Natalia; Fabien, Nicole; Belot, Alexandre

    2017-03-25

    Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is rare, and considered more severe than its adult-onset counterpart. Lupus nephritis (LN) occurs more frequently in children, accounting for higher long-term morbidity and mortality compared with adults. Thus, reliable biological markers are needed to predict disease course. This study aimed to investigate the capacity of anti-C1q autoantibodies (Abs) to predict renal flare and global disease activity in cSLE patients, and association with disease activity and kidney involvement. Twenty-eight patients with cSLE including 19 patients (68%) with a history of LN were included retrospectively. Anti-C1q Abs were analysed by ELISA at renal flare-up or in the quiescent phase of disease and compared with Farr dsDNA assay. Thirty-one flares occurred during follow-up: anti-C1q Abs were positive in 26 (84%), strongly associated with active disease status (p < 0.0001), and correlated with global disease activity score (p < 0.0001) and anti-dsDNA Abs presence (p < 0.0001). The specificity of anti-C1q Abs was higher than anti-dsDNA (73% vs 19%) in discriminating LN patients, whereas the receiver operating characteristic curves were not statistically different (0.83 ± 0.06 vs 0.78 ± 0.08 respectively), similar to C3 dosage. The presence of anti-C1q Abs at diagnosis was not predictive for global or renal flare. Introduction of a modified SLEDAI score excluding dsDNA Abs, demonstrated a stronger correlation of anti-C1q Abs titres with SLEDAI score in comparison with the Farr test. Anti-C1q Abs seem very specific to flares, including LN in children, and their role in daily practice compared with the Farr dsDNA assay needs to be defined.

  9. Arabidopsis lateral root development : an emerging story

    OpenAIRE

    Péret, B.; De Rybel, B.; Casimiro, I; Benkova, E.; Swarup, R; Laplaze, Laurent; Beeckman, T.; Bennett, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Lateral root formation is a major determinant of root systems architecture. The degree of root branching impacts the efficiency of water uptake, acquisition of nutrients and anchorage by plants. Understanding the regulation of lateral root development is therefore of vital agronomic importance. The molecular and cellular basis of lateral root formation has been most extensively studied in the plant model Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). Significant progress has recently been made in identi...

  10. Minimally invasive percutaneous lateral plate osteosynthesis in humeral shaft fractures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Sebastian Ruchelli

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study is to retrospectively assess functional and radiological outcomes, and immediate and long term postsurgical complications in a series of patients with humeral fractures treated with osteosynthesis with minimally invasive technique. Material and Methods: Retrospective Multicentric study of 14 patients with humeral fractures treated with minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis through lateral approaches between 2007 and 2013. Seven were females and 7 males, age averaged 48.7 years (range 21 -73. Fractures were classified according to the AO classification A1 12 n: 1; 12 B1 n: 1; 12B2 n: 3; C1 n 12: 6; 12C2 n: 1; 12C3 n: 2. Two lateral incisions were used proximal and distal. The plates were slid submuscular, and the radial nerve was protected.  Results: Follow - up averaged 30 months.Union was achieved in 13 cases (92.85%, time to union averaged three months (range, 2 to 6. Flexion averaged 174.8 °, external rotation  67.2°, abduction 173.8º and internal rotation 72.1°. Elbow flexion and extension ROM averaged 140.5 °. Constant´s score averaged 82.66 points; DASH score averaged 15.27 points. Four patients had radial nerve neurapraxia (23.5%.  Discussion: Percutaneous osteosynthesis with plates using a lateral minimally invasive approach has proven effective for the treatment of humeral shaft fractures, applying the principle of bridge plate. It is a biological procedure, technically demanding, and not exempt of complications.

  11. [Idiopathic loss of lateral tarsal suspension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyano, J; Martín, E; Genol-Saavedra, I; García-Sánchez, J

    2007-06-01

    A 53-year-old man who showed a loss of tarsal suspension in the lateral third of both lower eyelids underwent lateral canthoplasty with a good post-operative result. Disinsertion of the union of the inferior tarsus with the lateral canthus, of unknown cause, is a very uncommon finding that has almost never been reported in the world literature. There are two cases described of eyelid elastolysis with loss of lateral tarsal suspension, as in our case, but both showed eyelid skin atrophy and had histopathologic confirmation. Our case did not have skin atrophy.

  12. The enigma of the lateral canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weine, F S

    1984-10-01

    It is difficult to summarize an article of this type, in which the author is certain that his case has been presented fairly, but is aware that other views that are contrary could be stated and endorsed by pertinent clinical cases. Bearing this fact in mind, I wish to reiterate the following: Lateral canals are demonstrated in endodontic cases with much less frequency than they exist. This variance rarely, if ever, causes an endodontic failure. Some demonstrated lateral canals may really be other conditions. Preoperative evaluation should include examination of radiographs for lateral, as well as periapical, lesions. Lateral canals may be demonstrated by a variety of filling techniques. Careful canal preparation may enhance the frequency of such demonstration. Cases with necrotic pulps probably yield more frequent demonstration than do cases with vital pulps. Lateral canals harboring inflamed and/or infected material may cause pain during endodontic treatment. They may simulate periodontal disease and may cause problems with treatment if present when a tooth is left open for drainage. Periodontal disease may cause pulp exposure via lateral canals located coronally. Improper use of post room may lead to lateral failure from breakdown of tissue in a lateral canal. The enigma of the lateral canal has been the object of description and discussion in many articles, but no one is truly certain of their exact significance in endodontic therapy for the long haul.

  13. Acoustic reflex patterns in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canale, Andrea; Albera, Roberto; Lacilla, Michelangelo; Canosa, Antonio; Albera, Andrea; Sacco, Francesca; Chiò, Adriano; Calvo, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate acoustic reflex testing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients. Amplitude, latency, and rise time of stapedial reflex were recorded for 500 and 1000 Hz contralateral stimulus. Statistical analysis was performed by the Wilcoxon test and the level of significance was set at 5 %. Fifty-one amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients and ten sex- and age-matched control subjects were studied. Patients were further divided in two groups: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-bulbar (38 cases, with bulbar signs at evaluation) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-spinal (13 cases, without bulbar signs at evaluation). Stapedial reflex was present in all patients. There was a statistically significant difference in the mean amplitude, latency, and rise time between the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients as compared with the controls. Amplitude was lower in both the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-bulbar and the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-spinal patients than in the controls (p amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases with bulbar signs and, moreover, suggesting a possible subclinical involvement of the stapedial motor neuron even in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-spinal patients. Amplitude and rise time seem to be good sensitive parameters for investigating subclinical bulbar involvement.

  14. 40 CFR Figure C-1 to Subpart C of... - Suggested Format for Reporting Test Results for Methods for SO 2, CO, O 3, NO 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Results for Methods for SO 2, CO, O 3, NO 2 C Figure C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53 Protection of Environment... Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Fig. C-1 Figure C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Suggested Format for Reporting Test... Difference Table C-1 spec. Pass or fail Low 1 ____ ppm 2 to ____ ppm 3 4 5 6 Medium 1 ____ ppm 2 to ____ ppm...

  15. Zebrafish slc30a10 deficiency revealed a novel compensatory mechanism of Atp2c1 in maintaining manganese homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhidan Xia

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies found that mutations in the human SLC30A10 gene, which encodes a manganese (Mn efflux transporter, are associated with hypermanganesemia with dystonia, polycythemia, and cirrhosis (HMDPC. However, the relationship between Mn metabolism and HMDPC is poorly understood, and no specific treatments are available for this disorder. Here, we generated two zebrafish slc30a10 mutant lines using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Compared to wild-type animals, mutant adult animals developed significantly higher systemic Mn levels, and Mn accumulated in the brain and liver of mutant embryos in response to exogenous Mn. Interestingly, slc30a10 mutants developed neurological deficits in adulthood, as well as environmental Mn-induced manganism in the embryonic stage; moreover, mutant animals had impaired dopaminergic and GABAergic signaling. Finally, mutant animals developed steatosis, liver fibrosis, and polycythemia accompanied by increased epo expression. This phenotype was rescued partially by EDTA- CaNa2 chelation therapy and iron supplementation. Interestingly, prior to the onset of slc30a10 expression, expressing ATP2C1 (ATPase secretory pathway Ca2+ transporting 1 protected mutant embryos from Mn exposure, suggesting a compensatory role for Atp2c1 in the absence of Slc30a10. Notably, expressing either wild-type or mutant forms of SLC30A10 was sufficient to inhibit the effect of ATP2C1 in response to Mn challenge in both zebrafish embryos and HeLa cells. These findings suggest that either activating ATP2C1 or restoring the Mn-induced trafficking of ATP2C1 can reduce Mn accumulation, providing a possible target for treating HMDPC.

  16. Comparison of gene expression profiles of HepG2 cells exposed to Crambescins C1 and A1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María R. Sánchez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Crambescins are guanidine alkaloids firstly isolated in the early 90s from the encrusting Mediterranean sponge Crambe crambe (Schmidt, 1862 (Bondu et al., 2012, Laville et al., 2009, Berlinck et al., 1990. C. crambe derivatives are divided in two families named crambescins and crambescidins (Gerlinck et al., 1992. Although data on the bioactivity of these compounds is scarce, crambescidins have recognized cytotoxic, antifungal, antioxidant, antimicrobial and antiviral activities (Buscema and Van de Vyver, 1985, Jares-Erijman., 1998, Olszewski et al., 2004, Lazaro et al., 2006, Suna et al., 2007, AOKI et al., 2004. Recently we have carefully evaluated the cytotoxic activity of C816 over several human tumor cell types and characterized some of the cellular mechanisms responsible of the anti-proliferative effect of this compound on human liver-derived tumor cells (Rubiolo et al., 2013. Taking this into account, and to better understand the mechanism of action of crambescins and their potential as therapeutic agents, we made a comparative gene expression profiling of HepG2 cells after crambescin C1 (C1 and crambescin A1 (CA1 exposures. Results have shown that C1 induces genes involved in sterol and glucose metabolisms and metabolism involving growth factors. It also down regulates genes mainly involved in cell cycle control, DNA replication, recombination and repair, and drug metabolism. Flow cytometry assays revealed that C1 produces a G0/G1 arrest in HepG2 cell cycle progression. CA1 also down-regulates genes involved in cell cycle regulation, DNA recombination and pathways related to tumor cells proliferation with lower potency when compared to C1.

  17. Comprehensive drilling of the C1-2 facets to achieve direct posterior reduction in irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salunke, Pravin; Sahoo, Sushanta K; Deepak, Arsikere N; Ghuman, Mandeep S; Khandelwal, Niranjan K

    2015-09-01

    The cause of irreducibility in irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) appears to be the orientation of the C1-2 facets. The current management strategies for irreducible AAD are directed at removing the cause of irreducibility followed by fusion, rather than transoral decompression and posterior fusion. The technique described in this paper addresses C1-2 facet mobilization by facetectomies to aid intraoperative manipulation. Using this technique, reduction was achieved in 19 patients with congenital irreducible AAD treated between January 2011 and December 2013. The C1-2 joints were studied preoperatively, and particular attention was paid to the facet orientation. Intraoperatively, oblique C1-2 joints were opened widely, and extensive drilling of the facets was performed to make them close to flat and parallel to each other, converting an irreducible AAD to a reducible one. Anomalous vertebral arteries (VAs) were addressed appropriately. Further reduction was then achieved after vertical distraction and joint manipulation. Adequate facet drilling was achieved in all but 2 patients, due to VA injury in 1 patient and an acute sagittal angle operated on 2 years previously in the other patient. Complete reduction could be achieved in 17 patients and partial in the remaining 2. All patients showed clinical improvement. Two patients showed partial redislocation due to graft subsidence. The fusion rates were excellent. Comprehensive drilling of the C1-2 facets appears to be a logical and effective technique for achieving direct posterior reduction in irreducible AAD. The extensive drilling makes large surfaces raw, increasing fusion rates.

  18. Zebrafish slc30a10 deficiency revealed a novel compensatory mechanism of Atp2c1 in maintaining manganese homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingniang; Wang, Jia; Li, Wenwen; Wang, Kai; Hong, Xiaoli; Zhao, Lu; Chen, Caiyong; Min, Junxia

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies found that mutations in the human SLC30A10 gene, which encodes a manganese (Mn) efflux transporter, are associated with hypermanganesemia with dystonia, polycythemia, and cirrhosis (HMDPC). However, the relationship between Mn metabolism and HMDPC is poorly understood, and no specific treatments are available for this disorder. Here, we generated two zebrafish slc30a10 mutant lines using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Compared to wild-type animals, mutant adult animals developed significantly higher systemic Mn levels, and Mn accumulated in the brain and liver of mutant embryos in response to exogenous Mn. Interestingly, slc30a10 mutants developed neurological deficits in adulthood, as well as environmental Mn-induced manganism in the embryonic stage; moreover, mutant animals had impaired dopaminergic and GABAergic signaling. Finally, mutant animals developed steatosis, liver fibrosis, and polycythemia accompanied by increased epo expression. This phenotype was rescued partially by EDTA- CaNa2 chelation therapy and iron supplementation. Interestingly, prior to the onset of slc30a10 expression, expressing ATP2C1 (ATPase secretory pathway Ca2+ transporting 1) protected mutant embryos from Mn exposure, suggesting a compensatory role for Atp2c1 in the absence of Slc30a10. Notably, expressing either wild-type or mutant forms of SLC30A10 was sufficient to inhibit the effect of ATP2C1 in response to Mn challenge in both zebrafish embryos and HeLa cells. These findings suggest that either activating ATP2C1 or restoring the Mn-induced trafficking of ATP2C1 can reduce Mn accumulation, providing a possible target for treating HMDPC. PMID:28692648

  19. Pump power loss and heat generation in a pivot bearing-supported Gyro centrifugal pump (C1E3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Y; Nakazawa, T; Makinouchi, K; Glueck, J; Ohara, Y; Benkowski, R J; Nosé, Y

    1996-07-01

    Pump power loss is defined as input power that is not used for the output work of the pump. Less pump power loss means a higher pump efficiency. A common opinion is that the pump power loss is closely related to heat generation of the pump, which may affect not only the endurance of pump materials, but also blood damage in a blood pump. In this study, the relationship between pump power loss and heat generation in centrifugal blood pumps was investigated using the pivot-bearing supported Gyro C1E3 pump (C1E3) and Bio-Medicus pump (BP-80) under four different total pressure heat/flow conditions. A single special torque measuring driver motor was used for operating both the C1E3 and BP-80 in the four conditions. The pump power loss was calculated from the measured motor torque and hydraulic power. The changes in blood temperature were measured while the pump was operated at room temperature (25 degrees C) to obtain the following findings: First, the C1E3 caused less pump power loss and less temperature increase in blood than the BP-80 in all clinical simulated conditions that were tested; and second, the pump power loss and heat generation had a linear correlation with temperature rise from 22 to 25 degrees C in both the C1E3 and BP-80. During this period, approximately 30% of the pump power loss was transformed to heat, independent of the centrifugal blood pump type, provided that heat conduction through the pump housing and tubing was negligible during this particular period.

  20. 26 CFR 31.6652(c)-1 - Failure of employee to report tips for purposes of the Federal Insurance Contributions Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) § 31.6652(c)-1 Failure of employee to report tips for purposes of the Federal Insurance Contributions... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Failure of employee to report tips for purposes of the Federal Insurance Contributions Act. 31.6652(c)-1 Section 31.6652(c)-1 Internal Revenue...

  1. Carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency with c.199-10 T>G and novel c.1A>G mutation: Two case reports and brief literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hui-Ming; Hu, Hao; Ahmed, Aisha; Feng, Bing-Bing; Liu, Jing; Jia, Zheng-Jun; Wang, Hua

    2017-11-01

    Carnitine-acylcarnitine translocate deficiency (CACTD) is a rare and life-threatening, autosomal recessive disorder of fatty acid β-oxidation characterized by hypoketotic hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, cardiomyopathy, liver dysfunction, and muscle weakness; culminating in early death. To date, CACTD cases screened from the Chinese mainland population, especially patient with compound heterozygote with c.199-10T>G and a novel c.1A>G mutation in the SLC25A20 gene has never been described. Herein, we report 2 neonatal cases of CACTD identified from the mainland China. These 2 patients were presented with severe metabolic crisis and their clinical conditions deteriorate rapidly and both died of cardiorespiratory collapse in the first week of life. We present the clinical and biochemical features of 2 probands and a brief literature review of previously reported CACTD cases with the c.199-10T>G mutation. The acylcarnitine profiles by tandem-mass-spectrometry and the mutation analysis of SLC25A20 gene confirmed the diagnosis of CACTD in both patients. Mutation analysis demonstrated that patient No. 1 was homozygous for c.199-10T>G mutation, while patient No. 2 was a compound heterozygote for 2 mutations, a maternally-inherited c.199-10T>G and a paternally-inherited, novel c.1A>G mutation. Both patients were treated with an aggressive treatment regimen include high glucose and arginine infusion, respiratory, and circulatory support. The first proband died 3 days after delivery due to sudden cardiac arrest. The second patient's clinical condition, at one time, was improved by high glucose infusion, intravenous arginine, and circulatory support. However, the patient failed to wean from mechanical ventilation. Unfortunately, her parents refused further treatment due to fear of financial burdens. The patient died of congestive heart failure in the 6th day of life. We report the first 2 cases of CACTD identified from the mainland China. Apart from a founder mutation c.199-10T

  2. Tongue and lateral upper airway movement with mandibular advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Elizabeth C; Cheng, Shaokoon; McKenzie, David K; Butler, Jane E; Gandevia, Simon C; Bilston, Lynne E

    2013-03-01

    To characterize tongue and lateral upper airway movement and to image tongue deformation during mandibular advancement. Dynamic imaging study of a wide range of apnea hypopnea index (AHI), body mass index (BMI) subjects. Not-for-profit research institute. 30 subjects (aged 31-69 y, AHI 0-75 events/h, BMI 17-39 kg/m(2)). Subjects were imaged using dynamic tagged magnetic resonance imaging during mandibular advancement. Tissue displacements were quantified with the harmonic phase technique. Mean mandibular advancement was 5.6 ± 1.8 mm (mean ± standard deviation). This produced movement through a connection from the ramus of the mandible to the pharyngeal lateral walls in all subjects. In the sagittal plane, 3 patterns of posterior tongue deformation were seen with mandibular advancement-(A) en bloc anterior movement, (B) anterior movement of the oropharyngeal region, and (C) minimal anterior movement. Subjects with lower AHI were more likely to have en bloc movement (P = 0.04) than minimal movement. Antero-posterior elongation of the tongue increased with AHI (R = 0.461, P = 0.01). Mean anterior displacements of the posterior nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal regions of the tongue were 20% ± 13% and 31% ± 17% of mandibular advancement. The posterior tongue compressed 1.1 ± 2.2 mm supero-inferiorly. Mandibular advancement has two mechanisms of action which increase airway size. In subjects with low AHI, the entire tongue moves forward. Mandibular advancement also produces lateral airway expansion via a direct connection between the lateral walls and the ramus of the mandible. Brown EC; Cheng S; McKenzie DK; Butler JE; Gandevia SC; Bilston LE. Tongue and lateral upper airway movement with mandibular advancement. SLEEP 2013;36(3):397-404.

  3. Measurement of the relative rate of prompt $\\chi_{c0}$, $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ production at $\\sqrt{s}=7$TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    Prompt production of charmonium $\\chi_{c0}$, $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ mesons is studied using proton-proton collisions at the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=7$TeV. The $\\chi_{c}$ mesons are identified through their decay to $J/\\psi\\gamma$, with $J/\\psi\\rightarrow\\mu^+mu^-$ using photons that converted in the detector. A data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $1.0\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ collected by the LHCb detector, is used to measure the relative prompt production rate of $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ in the rapidity range $2.0

  4. Vannevar Bush: Fifty Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1995-12-01

    It is ironic that the 50th anniversary year of Vannevar Bush's Report to President Truman entitled "Science the Endless Frontier", which put into motion the eminently successful current system of education of scientists in this country occurs at a time when serious questions are being asked about the usefulness of that very system. Bush viewed his proposal to establish a national research foundation (later to be called the National Science Foundation) as a "social compact." Judgment of scientific merit would be delegated to expert peers in return for scientific progress, which would ultimately benefit the nation in terms of scientific needs--military security, economic productivity, and enhanced quality of life. Bush wanted the funding of basic research intertwined with training, and preferred to use universities for this purpose rather than industrial or national labs. Bush viewed college and university scientists as teachers and investigators. He believed university-based research would uniquely encourage and engage the next generation of scientists as no other institutional arrangement could. Bush did not trust industry's commitment to basic research, an instinct that proved prophetic. The academic reserve of scientists (PhD's in training and postdoctoral students) that existed before World War II, and upon which the United States could draw for its needs, which were primarily associated with defense efforts, was probably one of the defining factors in Bush's suggested strategy. Currently, that reserve of talent has gotten so large that it is the obvious throttle in the pipeline slowing the continued development of the university research enterprise. Since 1977, the rate at which we have trained new scientists exceeds an average of 4% annually. Since 1987, the "science work force"--PhD's--has grown at three times the rate of the general labor supply. Temporary positions for postdoctoral scientists have grown even faster (over 5% per year since 1989). To compound

  5. N- and O-glycans of recombinant human C1 inhibitor expressed in the milk of transgenic rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koles, Kate; van Berkel, Patrick H C; Pieper, Frank R; Nuijens, Jan H; Mannesse, Maurice L M; Vliegenthart, Johannes F G; Kamerling, Johannis P

    2004-01-01

    Human C1 inhibitor (hC1INH) is a therapeutic N, O-glycoprotein with a growing number of clinical applications, but the current natural supplies are not likely to meet the clinical demands. Therefore, recombinant approaches are of interest, whereby specific attention has to be paid to the generated glycosylation patterns. Here, the N,O-glycoprotein was expressed in the mammary gland of transgenic rabbits and subjected to glycan analysis. After release of the N-glycans of recombinant-rabbit human C1 inhibitor (rhC1INH) by peptide-N4-(N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminyl)asparagine amidase F, the oligosaccharides were separated from the O-glycoprotein by centrifugal filtration, then fractionated by a combination of anion-exchange, normal-phase, and high-pH anion-exchange liquid chromatography. The O-glycans, released from the O-glycoprotein by alkaline borohydride treatment, were fractionated by anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The structures of individual components were analysed by 500 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy, in most cases combined with MALDI-TOF MS. In contrast to the structural data reported for native serum hC1INH, rhC1INH contained a broad array of different N-glycans, made up of oligomannose-, hybrid-, and complex-type structures. In the case of complex-type N-glycans (partially) (alpha2-6)-sialylated (N-acetylneuraminic acid only), mono- and diantennary chains were found; part of the diantennary structures were (alpha1-6)-core-fucosylated or (alpha1-3)-fucosylated in the lower or upper antenna (Lewis x). The manno-oligosaccharide pattern of part of the hybrid- and oligomannose-type structures indicates that besides the usual N-glycan processing route, also the alternative endo-mannosidase pathway is followed. The small core 1-type O-glycans showed the usual (alpha2-3)- and (alpha2-6)-sialylation pattern of O-glycoproteins of nonmucinous origin.

  6. Nebulized C1-Esterase Inhibitor does not Reduce Pulmonary Complement Activation in Rats with Severe Streptococcus Pneumoniae Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, Friso; Lagrand, Wim; Glas, Gerie J; Beurskens, Charlotte J P; van Mierlo, Gerard; Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Juffermans, Nicole P; Horn, Janneke; Schultz, Marcus J

    2016-12-01

    Complement activation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. We hypothesized that inhibition of the complement system in the lungs by repeated treatment with nebulized plasma-derived human C1-esterase inhibitor reduces pulmonary complement activation and subsequently attenuates lung injury and lung inflammation. This was investigated in a rat model of severe Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. Rats were intra-tracheally challenged with S. pneumoniae to induce pneumonia. Nebulized C1-esterase inhibitor or saline (control animals) was repeatedly administered to rats, 30 min before induction of pneumonia and every 6 h thereafter. Rats were sacrificed 20 or 40 h after inoculation with bacteria. Brochoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were obtained for measuring levels of complement activation (C4b/c), lung injury and inflammation. Induction of pneumonia was associated with pulmonary complement activation (C4b/c at 20 h 1.24 % [0.56-2.59] and at 40 h 2.08 % [0.98-5.12], compared to 0.50 % [0.07-0.59] and 0.03 % [0.03-0.03] in the healthy control animals). The functional fraction of C1-INH was detectable in BALF, but no effect was found on pulmonary complement activation (C4b/c at 20 h 0.73 % [0.16-1.93] and at 40 h 2.38 % [0.54-4.19]). Twenty hours after inoculation, nebulized C1-esterase inhibitor treatment reduced total histology score, but this effect was no longer seen at 40 h. Nebulized C1-esterase inhibitor did not affect other markers of lung injury or lung inflammation. In this negative experimental animal study, severe S. pneumoniae pneumonia in rats is associated with pulmonary complement activation. Repeated treatment with nebulized C1-esterase inhibitor, although successfully delivered to the lungs, does not affect pulmonary complement activation, lung inflammation or lung injury.

  7. Diagnosing Dyslexia: The Screening of Auditory Laterality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Kjeld

    A study investigated whether a correlation exists between the degree and nature of left-brain laterality and specific reading and spelling difficulties. Subjects, 50 normal readers and 50 reading disabled persons native to the island of Bornholm, had their auditory laterality screened using pure-tone audiometry and dichotic listening. Results…

  8. STABILITY MATRICES FOR LATERAL BUCKLING ANALYSIS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES OBE

    functional to investigate the lateral buckling behaviour of a class of beams comprising bi- symmetric sections. While retaining the coupled modes of displacements at ... programmed either in basic or FORTRAN and with efficient programming, a saving in computer time can be made. 1.0 INTRODUCTION. Lateral buckling of ...

  9. Gender and Marital Happiness in Later Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Gayle; Taniguchi, Hiromi

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the authors examine the effect of gender ideology on marital happiness in later life. Studies of marital satisfaction in later life have tended to neglect such attitudes, although they have received increasing attention in the literature on younger marriages. The authors use data from married individuals who range in age from 51 to…

  10. Naphthyl azomesogens with lateral chloro groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2003-10-11

    Oct 11, 2003 ... Schiff's base esters containing the naphthalene moi- ety and studied the effect of lateral thiol and methoxy substituent on mesomorphism. We have also repor- ted the synthesis of mesogenic homologous series of azomesogens without lateral substituent,26 with lat- eral methyl27 and chloro28 groups and ...

  11. Lateral Pharyngeal Diverticulum presenting with Dysphagia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lateral pharyngeal diverticulum (Pharyngocele) is the protrusion of pharyngeal mucosa through the pharyngeal wall, usually through either of two weak areas in the pharyngeal wall as an acquired or congenital case. Lateral diverticula are very rare and not to be mistaken for the rather more frequent and abundantly ...

  12. Herniographic appearance of the lateral inguinal fossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekberg, O.; Kesek, P.

    Herniography frequently reveals clinically undetected groin hernia. Thereby herniography contributes to the clinical work-up in patients with obscure groin pain. However, the distinction between clinically important and unimportant abnormalities within the lateral inguinal fossa can be difficult. This study was therefore designed in order to elucidate the herniographic appearance of the lateral inguinal fossa in patients with obscure groin pain. Herniographic findings were compared with laterality of the patients' symptoms. The lateral umbilical fold was visible in only 47% of the groins. A triangular shaped outpouching from the lateral inguinal fossa and a patent processus vaginalis were found with equal frequency on the left and right side. They were five times as frequent in men as in women. Their presence did not correlate with laterality of the patients' symptoms. Indirect hernias were almost twice as common on the symptomatic side as compared with the asymptomatic side. On the left side they were found twice as often in men as in women while there was no significant sex difference on the right side. Our results show that neither a patent processus vaginalis nor a triangular outpouching from the lateral inguinal fossa correlate with the laterality of the patients' symptoms while true indirect hernias do.

  13. DAMAGING BACKGROUNDS - LATER ADJUSTMENT OF INTERNATIONAL ADOPTEES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VERHULST, FC; ALTHAUS, M; VERSLUISDENBIEMAN, HJM

    In this study of 2,148 international adoptees aged 10 to 15 years, the influence of early adverse experiences on later adjustment was examined. It was found that early neglect, abuse, and the number of changes of caretaking environment increased the risk for later maladjustment. The older the age of

  14. Anatomy of the Lateral Ankle Ligaments

    OpenAIRE

    SİNDEL, Muzaffer

    1998-01-01

    The lateral ligaments of talocrural articulation, namely anterior talofibular ligament, posterior talofibular ligament and cal-caneofibular ligament, are important in an-atomic reconstruction. If reconstructed improperly, they are known to limit the movements of talocrural articulation and subtalar articulation (talocalcaneal articulation) Studies on anatomy of anterior talofibular ligament, posterior talofibular ligament and calcaneofibular ligament known as the lateral ligaments ...