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Sample records for c-type cytochrome-dependent formation

  1. Relaxation Phenomenon in the Formation of the C-Type Orbital-Ordered State in the Simple Perovskite Manganite Sr1-xNdxMnO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yasuhide; Sato, Hiroki; Koyama, Yasumasa

    2016-02-01

    The formation of the C-type orbital-ordered (COO) state from the disordered cubic (DC) state in Sr1-xNdxMnO3 (SNMO) with the simple perovskite structure has been examined mainly by transmission electron microscopy. As the COO state has tetragonal I4/mcm symmetry, its formation is associated with the cubic-to-tetragonal structural transition. It was found that, when SNMO samples were cooled down from the DC state, the R25-type rotational displacement of MnO6 octahedra was first induced, together with the symmetry change into the tetragonal I4/mcm structure. The C-type orbital ordering then appeared due to the induction of the Jahn-Teller distortion as a response of a lattice system to this orbital ordering. Because no symmetry change occurred in the latter case, the Jahn-Teller distortion can be regarded as a dilatational distortion. One interesting feature is that the appearance of the dilatational Jahn-Teller distortion led to a nanometer-scale banded structure, characterized by an alternating array of two tetragonal variants with different c/a values. In addition, the formation of the COO state from the DC state exhibited a time-relaxation phenomenon. The origin of this relaxation phenomenon is also discussed here in terms of the competition between the tetragonal spontaneous strain for the rotational displacement and the dilatational Jahn-Teller distortion for orbital ordering.

  2. The lipopolysaccharide-binding protein participating in hemocyte nodule formation in the silkworm Bombyx mori is a novel member of the C-type lectin superfamily with two different tandem carbohydrate-recognition domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, N; Imamura, M; Kadotani, T; Yaoi, K; Iwahana, H; Sato, R

    1999-01-25

    We recently isolated and characterized the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein, BmLBP, from the larval hemolymph of the silkworm Bombyx mori. BmLBP is a pattern recognition molecule that recognizes the lipid A portion of LPS and participates in a cellular defense reaction. This paper describes the cDNA cloning of BmLBP. The deduced amino acid sequence of BmLBP revealed that BmLBP is a novel member of the C-type lectin superfamily with a unique structural feature that consists of two different carbohydrate-recognition domains in tandem, a short and a long form. PMID:9989592

  3. C-Type Natriuretic Peptide Analog as Therapy for Achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legeai-Mallet, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is an important regulator of bone formation. Gain-of-function mutations in the FGFR3 gene result in chondrodysplasias which include achondroplasia (ACH), the most common form of dwarfism, in which skull, appendicular and axial skeletons are affected. The skeletal phenotype of patients with ACH showed defective proliferation and differentiation of the chondrocytes in the growth plate cartilage. Both endochondral and membranous ossification processes are disrupted during development. At cellular level, Fgfr3 mutations induce increased phosphorylation of the tyrosine kinase receptor FGFR3, which correlate with an enhanced activation of its downstream signaling pathways. Potential therapeutic strategies have emerged for ACH. Several preclinical studies have been conducted such as the C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) analog (BMN111), intermittent parathyroid hormone injections, soluble FGFR3 therapy, and meclozine and statin treatments. Among the putative targets to antagonize FGFR3 signaling, CNP (or BMN111) is one of the most promising strategies. BMN111 acts as a key regulator of longitudinal bone growth by downregulating the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, which is activated as a result of a FGFR3 gain-of-function mutation. Preclinical studies showed that BMN111 treatment led to a large improvement in skeletal parameters in Fgfr3Y367C/+ mice mimicking ACH. In 2014, a clinical trial (phase 2) of BMN111 in pediatric patients with ACH has started. This first clinical trial marks the first big step towards real treatment for these patients. PMID:26684019

  4. Tetranectin, a trimeric plasminogen-binding C-type lectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtet, T L; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Clemmensen, I;

    1997-01-01

    Tetranectin, a plasminogen-binding protein belonging to the family of C-type lectins, was expressed in E. coli and converted to its native form by in vitro refolding and proteolytic processing. Recombinant tetranectin-as well as natural tetranectin from human plasma-was shown by chemical cross......-linking analysis and SDS-PAGE to be a homo-trimer in solution as are other known members of the collectin family of C-type lectins. Biochemical evidence is presented showing that an N-terminal domain encoded within exons 1 and 2 of the tetranectin gene is necessary and sufficient to govern subunit trimerization....

  5. C-type lectins%C型凝集素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢建辉; 顾建新

    2011-01-01

    C型凝集素(C-type lectin)代表一个识别碳水化合物配体依赖于钙离子(Ca2+)参与的糖原结合蛋白家族,含有一个或多个一级结构和二级结构同源的碳水化合物识别结构域.随着研究的深入,越来越多的C型凝集素能够识别体内的非糖类的配体,包括蛋白质和脂类等.这些C型凝集素在维持机体稳态、免疫防御以及免疫监视等重要生理病理过程中发挥着重要作用.就C型凝集素的结构、分类和在免疫系统中的功能作一介绍.%C-type lectins are Ca2+-dependent glycan-binding proteins and share primary and secondary structural homology in their carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). However, many members of this family are recently identified not to bind carbohydrates and have evolved to recognize non-sugar ligands such as proteins and lipids. The large family of C-type lectins has an important role in the physiological functions and pathological processes including immune homeostasis, immune defenses, and immune surveillance and so on. In this short review, we summarize the structure of C-type lectin domain, the classification of C-type lectins and their role in the immune system.

  6. Absence of C-type virus production in human leukemic B cell, T cell and null cell lines.

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    Ogura,Hajime

    1978-06-01

    Full Text Available Electron microscope observation of cultured human leukemic B cell, T cell and null cell lines and reverse transcriptase assay of the culture supernatants were all negative for the presence of C-type virus. Bat cell line, which propagates primate C-type viruses well, was cocultivated with the human leukemic cell lines, in the hope of amplification of virus if present. Three weeks after mixed culture, the culture supernatants were again examined for reverse transcriptase activity and the cells were tested for syncytia formation by cocultivation with rat XC, human KC and RSb cell lines. All these tests, except for the positive control using a simian sarcoma virus, were negative, suggesting that no C-type was produced from these human leukemic cell lines.

  7. A C-type lectin from Bothrops jararacussu venom disrupts Staphylococcal biofilms.

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    Raphael Contelli Klein

    Full Text Available Bovine mastitis is a major threat to animal health and the dairy industry. Staphylococcus aureus is a contagious pathogen that is usually associated with persistent intramammary infections, and biofilm formation is a relevant aspect of the outcome of these infections. Several biological activities have been described for snake venoms, which led us to screen secretions of Bothrops jararacussu for antibiofilm activity against S. aureus NRS155. Crude venom was fractionated by size-exclusion chromatography, and the fractions were tested against S. aureus. Biofilm growth, but not bacterial growth, was affected by several fractions. Two fractions (15 and 16 showed the best activities and were also assayed against S. epidermidis NRS101. Fraction 15 was identified by TripleTOF mass spectrometry as a galactose-binding C-type lectin with a molecular weight of 15 kDa. The lectin was purified from the crude venom by D-galactose affinity chromatography, and only one peak was observed. This pure lectin was able to inhibit 75% and 80% of S. aureus and S. epidermidis biofilms, respectively, without affecting bacterial cell viability. The lectin also exhibited a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on both bacterial biofilms. The antibiofilm activity was confirmed using scanning electron microscopy. A pre-formed S. epidermidis biofilm was significantly disrupted by the C-type lectin in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, the lectin demonstrated the ability to inhibit biofilm formation by several mastitis pathogens, including different field strains of S. aureus, S. hyicus, S. chromogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Escherichia coli. These findings reveal a new activity for C-type lectins. Studies are underway to evaluate the biological activity of these lectins in a mouse mastitis model.

  8. C-type natriuretic peptide in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Soeren Junge; Iversen, Peter; Rehfeld, Jens F.;

    2009-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is expressed in the male reproductive organs in pigs. To examine whether the human prostate also expresses the CNP gene, we measured CNP and N-terminal proCNP in prostate cancer tissue extracts and performed immunohistochemical biopsy staining. Additionally, pro......CNP-derived peptides were quantitated in plasma from patients with prostate cancer. Blood was collected from healthy controls and patients before surgery for localized prostate cancer. Tissue extracts were prepared from tissue biopsies obtained from radical prostatectomy surgery. N-terminal proCNP, proCNP (1-50) and...... CNP were measured in plasma and tissue extracts. Biopsies were stained for CNP-22 and N-terminal proCNP. Tissue extracts from human prostate cancer contained mostly N-terminal proCNP [median 5.3 pmol/g tissue (range 1.0-12.9)] and less CNP [0.14 pmol/g tissue (0.01-1.34)]. Immunohistochemistry...

  9. C-type Lectin Receptors for Tumor Eradication: Future Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Unger, Wendy W. J.; Kooyk, Yvette van, E-mail: y.vankooyk@vumc.nl [Department of Molecular Cell Biology and Immunology, VU University Medical Center, P.O. Box 7057, 1007 MB Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-08-08

    Dendritic cells are key regulators in directing immune responses and therefore are under extensive research for the induction of anti-tumor responses. DCs express a large array of receptors by which they scan their surroundings for recognition and uptake of pathogens. One of the receptor-families is the C-type lectins (CLR), which bind carbohydrate structures and internalize antigens upon recognition. Intracellular routing of antigen through CLR enhances loading and presentation of antigen through MHC class I and II, inducing antigen-specific CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T-cell proliferation and skewing T-helper cells. These characteristics make CLRs very interesting targets for DC-based immunotherapy. Profound research has been done on targeting specific tumor antigens to CLR using either antibodies or the natural ligands such as glycan structures. In this review we will focus on the current data showing the potency of CLR-targeting and discuss improvements that can be achieved to enhance anti-tumor activity in the near future.

  10. Mosquito C-type lectins maintain gut microbiome homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaojing; Xiao, Xiaoping; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Rudian; Liu, Jianying; Liu, Qiyong; Wang, Penghua; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    The long-term evolutionary interaction between the host immune system and symbiotic bacteria determines their cooperative rather than antagonistic relationship. It is known that commensal bacteria have evolved a number of mechanisms to manipulate the mammalian host immune system and maintain homeostasis. However, the strategies employed by the microbiome to overcome host immune responses in invertebrates still remain to be understood. Here, we report that the gut microbiome in mosquitoes utilizes C-type lectins (mosGCTLs) to evade the bactericidal capacity of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Aedes aegypti mosGCTLs facilitate colonization by multiple bacterial strains. Furthermore, maintenance of the gut microbial flora relies on the expression of mosGCTLs in A. aegypti. Silencing the orthologues of mosGCTL in another major mosquito vector (Culex pipiens pallens) also impairs the survival of gut commensal bacteria. The gut microbiome stimulates the expression of mosGCTLs, which coat the bacterial surface and counteract AMP activity. Our study describes a mechanism by which the insect symbiotic microbiome offsets gut immunity to achieve homeostasis. PMID:27572642

  11. Mathematical model of various statements of C-type Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar Srivastav

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Some of the important components of high level languages are statements, keywords, variable declarations, arrays, user defined functions etc. In case of object oriented programming language we use class, object, inheritance, operator overloading, function overloading, polymorphism etc. There are some common category of statements such as control statement, loop statements etc. Pointers are also one important concept in C-language. User defined functions, function subprograms or subroutines are also important concepts in different programming languages. The language like ALGOL was developed using Chomsky context free grammar. The similar concept used in C-type languages. The high level languages are now based on mathematical derivations and logic. Most of the components of any high level language can be obtained from simple mathematical logic and derivations. In the present study the authors have tried to give some unified mathematical model of few statements, arrays, user defined functions of C-language. However, the present method may further be extended to any other high level language.

  12. Magnetochrome: a c-type cytochrome domain specific to magnetotatic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siponen, Marina I; Adryanczyk, Géraldine; Ginet, Nicolas; Arnoux, Pascal; Pignol, David

    2012-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria consist of a group of taxonomically, physiologically and morphologically diverse prokaryotes, with the singular ability to align with geomagnetic field lines, a phenomenon referred to as magnetotaxis. This magnetotactic property is due to the presence of iron-rich crystals embedded in lipidic vesicles forming an organelle called the magnetosome. Magnetosomes are composed of single-magnetic-domain nanocrystals of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) or greigite (Fe(3)S(4)) embedded in biological membranes, thereby forming a prokaryotic organelle. Four specific steps are described in this organelle formation: (i) membrane specialization, (ii) iron acquisition, (iii) magnetite (or greigite) biocrystallization, and (iv) magnetosome alignment. The formation of these magnetic crystals is a genetically controlled process, which is governed by enzyme-catalysed processes. On the basis of protein sequence analysis of genes known to be involved in magnetosome formation in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, we have identified a subset of three membrane-associated or periplasmic proteins containing a double cytochrome c signature motif CXXCH: MamE, MamP and MamT. The presence of these proteins suggests the existence of an electron-transport chain inside the magnetosome, contributing to the process of biocrystallization. We have performed heterologous expression in E. coli of the cytochrome c motif-containing domains of MamE, MamP and MamT. Initial biophysical characterization has confirmed that MamE, MamP and MamT are indeed c-type cytochromes. Furthermore, determination of redox potentials for this new family of c-type cytochromes reveals midpoint potentials of -76 and -32 mV for MamP and MamE respectively. PMID:23176475

  13. A hypothesis on the origin of C-type asteroids and carbonaceous chondrites

    CERN Document Server

    Busarev, V V

    2012-01-01

    A hypothesis based on observational and theoretical results on the origin of C-type asteroids and carbonaceous chondrites is proposed. Asteroids of C-type and close BGF-types could form from hydrated silicate-organic matter accumulated in the cores of water-differentiated (due to 26Al and other short-lived isotopes decay) bodies existed in the growth zones of Jupiter. Gravitational scattering of such bodies by Jupiter at its final stage of formation to the main asteroid belt might have led to fragmentation and re-accretion of their primitive materials on the surfaces of many asteroids and/or asteroid parent bodies. The hypothesis makes clear a row of long-standing puzzling facts, the main of which are as follows. The low-albedo and carbonaceous-chondritic surface properties of (1) Ceres contradict to its probable differentiated structure and icy crust (e. g., Thomas et al., 2005, Nature 437: 224-226; Castillo-Rogez et al., 2010, Icarus 205, 443-459), but it could be explained by the process of primitive matte...

  14. DMPD: C-type lectin receptors in antifungal immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18160296 C-type lectin receptors in antifungal immunity. Willment JA, Brown GD. Tre...nds Microbiol. 2008 Jan;16(1):27-32. Epub 2007 Dec 21. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show C-type lectin receptors in antifungal... immunity. PubmedID 18160296 Title C-type lectin receptors in antifungal immunity. Author

  15. Experimental study of the occurence and properties of C-type retroviruses in radiation-induced osteosarcomas in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the radiation induced osteosarcomas of the C 3 Hx101/F1-mouse C-type virus particles had been found regularly with a density of 1.16 g/cm3, with high molecular RNA, a reverse transcriptase and the murine group-specific antigen p 30. Osteosarcomas of the NMRI-mouse, however, had only p 30 protein and so-called intra-cisternal A-type particles. After 'in vitro' cultivation retroviruses had been liberated from the osteosarcoma cells of the C 3 Hx101/F1-mice as well as from the NMRI-mice type C. During the tumour latency period a virus expression of the C-type retroviruses had been found for a certain period in the first month after irradiation of the bone tissue had begun; then followed an antibody-reaction which continued to persist until the 8th month. Another virus expression was observed in the skeleton during the period when the osteosarcomas appeared. This virus expression was accompanied by a decrease in antibodies and a temporary increase of the viral p 30 protein in the serum. The viruses which had been isolated from the radiation induced osteosarcomas showed the properties which are typical for ecotropic C-type retroviruses of mice. After infection of new-born mice these viruses produced fibrosarcomas (C 3 Hx 101/F1-mice) or lymphomas and osteomas (NMRI-mice). The results make it obvious that the endogenetic C-type retroviruses participate in the formation of radiation-induced sarcomas in mice. (orig./MG)

  16. C-type lectins do not act as functional receptors for filovirus entry into cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuno, Keita; Nakayama, Eri; Noyori, Osamu [Department of Global Epidemiology, Hokkaido University Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Sapporo (Japan); Marzi, Andrea; Ebihara, Hideki [Laboratory of Virology, Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, MT (United States); Irimura, Tatsuro [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Feldmann, Heinz [Laboratory of Virology, Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, MT (United States); Takada, Ayato, E-mail: atakada@czc.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Global Epidemiology, Hokkaido University Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Sapporo (Japan)

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Filovirus glycoprotein (GP) having a deficient receptor binding region were generated. {yields} Mutant GPs mediated virus entry less efficiently than wild-type GP. {yields} Mutant GPs bound to C-type lectins but not mediated entire steps of cellular entry. {yields} C-type lectins do not independently mediate filovirus entry into cells. {yields} Other molecule(s) are required for C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses. -- Abstract: Cellular C-type lectins have been reported to facilitate filovirus infection by binding to glycans on filovirus glycoprotein (GP). However, it is not clearly known whether interaction between C-type lectins and GP mediates all the steps of virus entry (i.e., attachment, internalization, and membrane fusion). In this study, we generated vesicular stomatitis viruses pseudotyped with mutant GPs that have impaired structures of the putative receptor binding regions and thus reduced ability to infect the monkey kidney cells that are routinely used for virus propagation. We found that infectivities of viruses with the mutant GPs dropped in C-type lectin-expressing cells, parallel with those in the monkey kidney cells, whereas binding activities of these GPs to the C-type lectins were not correlated with the reduced infectivities. These results suggest that C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses requires other cellular molecule(s) that may be involved in virion internalization or membrane fusion.

  17. C-type lectins do not act as functional receptors for filovirus entry into cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Filovirus glycoprotein (GP) having a deficient receptor binding region were generated. → Mutant GPs mediated virus entry less efficiently than wild-type GP. → Mutant GPs bound to C-type lectins but not mediated entire steps of cellular entry. → C-type lectins do not independently mediate filovirus entry into cells. → Other molecule(s) are required for C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses. -- Abstract: Cellular C-type lectins have been reported to facilitate filovirus infection by binding to glycans on filovirus glycoprotein (GP). However, it is not clearly known whether interaction between C-type lectins and GP mediates all the steps of virus entry (i.e., attachment, internalization, and membrane fusion). In this study, we generated vesicular stomatitis viruses pseudotyped with mutant GPs that have impaired structures of the putative receptor binding regions and thus reduced ability to infect the monkey kidney cells that are routinely used for virus propagation. We found that infectivities of viruses with the mutant GPs dropped in C-type lectin-expressing cells, parallel with those in the monkey kidney cells, whereas binding activities of these GPs to the C-type lectins were not correlated with the reduced infectivities. These results suggest that C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses requires other cellular molecule(s) that may be involved in virion internalization or membrane fusion.

  18. C-type natriuretic-derived peptides as biomarkers in human disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Solvej Kølvraa; Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    and extracellular fluid volume. Atrial natriuretic peptide and B-type natriuretic peptide have gained considerable diagnostic interest as biomarkers in cardiovascular disease. By contrast, C-type natriuretic peptide has not yet been ascribed a role in human diagnostics. This perspective aims at......The natriuretic peptide system comprises three structurally related peptides: atrial natriuretic peptide, B-type natriuretic peptide and C-type natriuretic peptide. In circulation, they play an important endocrine role in the regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis by maintaining blood pressure...... recapitulating the present biochemical and clinical issues concerning C-type natriuretic peptide measurement in plasma as a potential biomarker....

  19. C-type RNA viruses as possible predictors of radiation-induced bone oncogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radium-224-induced osteosarcomas of (C3H X 101)F1 mice have been investigated for the presence of C-type RNA viruses. C-type virus particles with the typical properties of RNA tumour viruses could be detected by electron microscopic, biochemical and in-vitro studies. In a long-term experiment, the expression of C-type RNA virus particles was studied during the latency period and correlated with the appearance of osteosarcomas. The tumour incidence in this experiment was 100% with 40-50% of the tumours appearing in the 11th to 12th month after the start of the radiation. C-type RNA virus expression could be found in the 1st month and in the 11th and 12th months. These results indicate a transient virus activation shortly after starting the radiation, and a second peak of virus expression coinciding with the appearance of the osteosarcomas. (author)

  20. C-type natriuretic peptide modulates permeability of the blood–brain barrier

    OpenAIRE

    BOHARA, Manoj; Kambe, Yuki; Nagayama, Tetsuya; TOKIMURA, Hiroshi; Arita, Kazunori; Miyata, Atsuro

    2014-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is abundant in brain and is reported to exert autocrine function in vascular cells, but its effect on blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability has not been clarified yet. Here, we examined this effect. Transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) of in vitro BBB model, composed of bovine brain microvascular endothelial cells and astrocytes, was significantly dose dependently decreased by CNP (1, 10, and 100 nmol/L). C-type natriuretic peptide treatment reduced ...

  1. A novel C-type lysozyme from Mytilus galloprovincialis: insight into innate immunity and molecular evolution of invertebrate C-type lysozymes.

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    Qing Wang

    Full Text Available A c-type lysozyme (named as MgCLYZ gene was cloned from the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. Blast analysis indicated that MgCLYZ was a salivary c-type lysozyme which was mainly found in insects. The nucleotide sequence of MgCLYZ was predicted to encode a polypeptide of 154 amino acid residues with the signal peptide comprising the first 24 residues. The deduced mature peptide of MgCLYZ was of a calculated molecular weight of 14.4 kD and a theoretical isoelectric point (pI of 8.08. Evolution analysis suggested that bivalve branch of the invertebrate c-type lysozymes phylogeny tree underwent positive selection during evolution. By quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR analysis, MgCLYZ transcript was widely detected in all examined tissues and responded sensitively to bacterial challenge in hemocytes and hepatopancreas. The optimal temperature and pH of recombinant MgCLYZ (rMgCLYZ were 20°C and 4, respectively. The rMgCLYZ displayed lytic activities against Gram-positive bacteria including Micrococcus luteus and Staphyloccocus aureus, and Gram-negative bacteria including Vibrio anguillarum, Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas putida, Proteus mirabilis and Bacillus aquimaris. These results suggest that MgCLYZ perhaps play an important role in innate immunity of M. galloprovincialis, and invertebrate c-type lysozymes might be under positive selection in a species-specific manner during evolution for undergoing adaptation to different environment and diverse pathogens.

  2. Reciprocal voltage sensor-to-pore coupling leads to potassium channel C-type inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Luca; Renhorn, Jakob; Gabrielsson, Anders; Turesson, Fredrik; Liin, Sara I.; Lindahl, Erik; Elinder, Fredrik

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels open at depolarized membrane voltages. A prolonged depolarization causes a rearrangement of the selectivity filter which terminates the conduction of ions – a process called slow or C-type inactivation. How structural rearrangements in the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) cause alteration in the selectivity filter, and vice versa, are not fully understood. We show that pulling the pore domain of the Shaker potassium channel towards the VSD by a Cd2+ bridge accelerates C-type inactivation. Molecular dynamics simulations show that such pulling widens the selectivity filter and disrupts the K+ coordination, a hallmark for C-type inactivation. An engineered Cd2+ bridge within the VSD also affect C-type inactivation. Conversely, a pore domain mutation affects VSD gating-charge movement. Finally, C-type inactivation is caused by the concerted action of distant amino acid residues in the pore domain. All together, these data suggest a reciprocal communication between the pore domain and the VSD in the extracellular portion of the channel.

  3. Reciprocal voltage sensor-to-pore coupling leads to potassium channel C-type inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Luca; Renhorn, Jakob; Gabrielsson, Anders; Turesson, Fredrik; Liin, Sara I; Lindahl, Erik; Elinder, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels open at depolarized membrane voltages. A prolonged depolarization causes a rearrangement of the selectivity filter which terminates the conduction of ions – a process called slow or C-type inactivation. How structural rearrangements in the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) cause alteration in the selectivity filter, and vice versa, are not fully understood. We show that pulling the pore domain of the Shaker potassium channel towards the VSD by a Cd2+ bridge accelerates C-type inactivation. Molecular dynamics simulations show that such pulling widens the selectivity filter and disrupts the K+ coordination, a hallmark for C-type inactivation. An engineered Cd2+ bridge within the VSD also affect C-type inactivation. Conversely, a pore domain mutation affects VSD gating-charge movement. Finally, C-type inactivation is caused by the concerted action of distant amino acid residues in the pore domain. All together, these data suggest a reciprocal communication between the pore domain and the VSD in the extracellular portion of the channel. PMID:27278891

  4. Antimicrobial properties of avian eggshell-specific C-type lectin-like proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman-Labadie, Olivier; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Hincke, Maxwell T

    2008-03-01

    C-type lectin-like proteins are major components of the calcified eggshell of multiple avian species. In this study, two representative avian C-type lectin-like proteins, ovocleidin-17 and ansocalcin, were purified from decalcified chicken and goose eggshell protein extracts and investigated for carbohydrate binding activity as well as antimicrobial activity. Purified ovocleidin-17 and ansocalcin were found to bind bacterial polysaccharides, and were bactericidal against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomona aeruginosa. Bactericidal activity was found to be enhanced in the presence of calcium but was not dependent on its presence. The results suggest that avian C-type lectin-like proteins may play an important antimicrobial role in defence of the avian embryo. PMID:18258195

  5. Preparation and identification of 1.3 copies C-type HBV transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Mei-Juan; Yu-qin YOU; Guang-ze LIU; Tong, Ming-Hua; Jing-wei LI; Xiu-mei LI; Kong, Xiang-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Objective To prepare 1.3 copies C-type HBV transgenic mice for providing a better model for the prevention and treatment of hepatitis B.Methods The HBV transgenic mice were generated by microinjection of 1.3 copies C-type HBV genome into the pronucleus of FVB /N zygotes.PCR,ELISA,RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the integration,replication and expression of HBV gene in the transgenic mice.Results Tow thousand two hundred and eighty-two fertilized eggs were injected and a to...

  6. Dual function of C-type lectin-like receptors in the immune system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cambi, A.; Figdor, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    Carbohydrate-binding C-type lectin and lectin-like receptors play an important role in the immune system. The large family can be subdivided into subtypes according to their structural similarities and functional differences. The selectins are of major importance in mediating cell adhesion and migra

  7. Structure of the C-type lectin carbohydrate recognition domain of human tetranectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J S; Nielsen, B B; Rasmussen, H;

    1998-01-01

    Tetranectin (TN) is a C-type lectin involved in fibrinolysis, being the only endogenous ligand known to bind specifically to the kringle 4 domain of plasminogen. TN was originally isolated from plasma, but shows a wide tissue distribution. Furthermore, TN has been found in the extracellular matrix...

  8. Targeting of macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin (MGL) induces DC signaling and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Napoletano, Chiara; Zizzari, Ilaria G; Rughetti, Aurelia;

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) sense the microenvironment through several types of receptors recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In particular, C-type lectins, expressed by distinct subsets of DCs, recognize and internalize specific carbohydrate antigen in a Ca(2+) -dependent manner. Targe...

  9. Transmission-blocking antibodies against mosquito C-type lectins for dengue prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Fuchun; Liu, Jianying; Xiao, Xiaoping; Zhang, Siyin; Qin, Chengfeng; Xiang, Ye; Wang, Penghua; Cheng, Gong

    2014-02-01

    C-type lectins are a family of proteins with carbohydrate-binding activity. Several C-type lectins in mammals or arthropods are employed as receptors or attachment factors to facilitate flavivirus invasion. We previously identified a C-type lectin in Aedes aegypti, designated as mosquito galactose specific C-type lectin-1 (mosGCTL-1), facilitating the attachment of West Nile virus (WNV) on the cell membrane. Here, we first identified that 9 A. aegypti mosGCTL genes were key susceptibility factors facilitating DENV-2 infection, of which mosGCTL-3 exhibited the most significant effect. We found that mosGCTL-3 was induced in mosquito tissues with DENV-2 infection, and that the protein interacted with DENV-2 surface envelop (E) protein and virions in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the other identified mosGCTLs interacted with the DENV-2 E protein, indicating that DENV may employ multiple mosGCTLs as ligands to promote the infection of vectors. The vectorial susceptibility factors that facilitate pathogen invasion may potentially be explored as a target to disrupt the acquisition of microbes from the vertebrate host. Indeed, membrane blood feeding of antisera against mosGCTLs dramatically reduced mosquito infective ratio. Hence, the immunization against mosGCTLs is a feasible approach for preventing dengue infection. Our study provides a future avenue for developing a transmission-blocking vaccine that interrupts the life cycle of dengue virus and reduces disease burden. PMID:24550728

  10. Transmission-blocking antibodies against mosquito C-type lectins for dengue prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available C-type lectins are a family of proteins with carbohydrate-binding activity. Several C-type lectins in mammals or arthropods are employed as receptors or attachment factors to facilitate flavivirus invasion. We previously identified a C-type lectin in Aedes aegypti, designated as mosquito galactose specific C-type lectin-1 (mosGCTL-1, facilitating the attachment of West Nile virus (WNV on the cell membrane. Here, we first identified that 9 A. aegypti mosGCTL genes were key susceptibility factors facilitating DENV-2 infection, of which mosGCTL-3 exhibited the most significant effect. We found that mosGCTL-3 was induced in mosquito tissues with DENV-2 infection, and that the protein interacted with DENV-2 surface envelop (E protein and virions in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the other identified mosGCTLs interacted with the DENV-2 E protein, indicating that DENV may employ multiple mosGCTLs as ligands to promote the infection of vectors. The vectorial susceptibility factors that facilitate pathogen invasion may potentially be explored as a target to disrupt the acquisition of microbes from the vertebrate host. Indeed, membrane blood feeding of antisera against mosGCTLs dramatically reduced mosquito infective ratio. Hence, the immunization against mosGCTLs is a feasible approach for preventing dengue infection. Our study provides a future avenue for developing a transmission-blocking vaccine that interrupts the life cycle of dengue virus and reduces disease burden.

  11. Functional environmental proteomics: elucidating the role of a c-type cytochrome abundant during uranium bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jiae; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Ueki, Toshiyuki; Lovley, Derek R

    2016-02-01

    Studies with pure cultures of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms have demonstrated that outer-surface c-type cytochromes are important electron transfer agents for the reduction of metals, but previous environmental proteomic studies have typically not recovered cytochrome sequences from subsurface environments in which metal reduction is important. Gel-separation, heme-staining and mass spectrometry of proteins in groundwater from in situ uranium bioremediation experiments identified a putative c-type cytochrome, designated Geobacter subsurface c-type cytochrome A (GscA), encoded within the genome of strain M18, a Geobacter isolate previously recovered from the site. Homologs of GscA were identified in the genomes of other Geobacter isolates in the phylogenetic cluster known as subsurface clade 1, which predominates in a diversity of Fe(III)-reducing subsurface environments. Most of the gscA sequences recovered from groundwater genomic DNA clustered in a tight phylogenetic group closely related to strain M18. GscA was most abundant in groundwater samples in which Geobacter sp. predominated. Expression of gscA in a strain of Geobacter sulfurreducens that lacked the gene for the c-type cytochrome OmcS, thought to facilitate electron transfer from conductive pili to Fe(III) oxide, restored the capacity for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Atomic force microscopy provided evidence that GscA was associated with the pili. These results demonstrate that a c-type cytochrome with an apparent function similar to that of OmcS is abundant when Geobacter sp. are abundant in the subsurface, providing insight into the mechanisms for the growth of subsurface Geobacter sp. on Fe(III) oxide and suggesting an approach for functional analysis of other Geobacter proteins found in the subsurface. PMID:26140532

  12. The Aging Heart, Myocardial Fibrosis and its Relationship to Circulating C-Type Natriuretic Peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Sangaralingham, S. Jeson; Huntley, Brenda K.; Martin, Fernando L; McKie, Paul M.; Bellavia, Diego; Ichiki, Tomoko; Harders, Gerald E.; Chen, Horng H.; Burnett, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Myocardial aging is characterized by LV fibrosis leading to diastolic and systolic dysfunction. Studies have established the potent anti-fibrotic and anti-proliferative properties of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), however the relationship between circulating CNP, LV fibrosis and associated changes in LV function with natural aging are undefined. Accordingly, we characterized the relationship of plasma CNP with LV fibrosis and function in 2, 11 and 20 month old male Fischer rats. Further in...

  13. The role of Syk/CARD9 coupled C-type lectins in antifungal immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Drummond, Rebecca A.; Saijo, Shinobu; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Brown, Gordon D.

    2010-01-01

    Fungal infections are affecting an increasing number of people, and the failure of current therapies in treating systemic infection has resulted in an unacceptably high mortality rate. It is therefore of importance that we understand immune mechanisms operating during fungal infections, in order to facilitate development of adjunctive immunotherapies for the treatment of these diseases. C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) are pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that are critical for immune respon...

  14. Analysis of C-type lectin receptor induced NF-kappaB signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Straßer, Andreas Dominikus

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) that signal via Syk and the central Card9-Bcl10-Malt1 (CBM) complex induce the transcription of NF-κB-regulated genes. Activation of those receptors mediates inflammatory reactions and the defense against various pathogens. Despite the non-redundant role of CLRs for the induction of innate immune responses, particularly receptor-proximal events that transduce ligand binding to downstream signaling remain to be defined. This dissertation identifies PKCδ a...

  15. Purification and biological effects of a C-type lectin isolated from Bothrops moojeni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PSF Barbosa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Snake venom proteins from the C-type lectin family have very distinct biological activities despite their highly conserved primary structure, which is homologous to the carbohydrate recognition region of true C-type lectins. We purified a lectin-like protein (BmLec from Bothrops moojeni venom and investigated its effect on platelet aggregation, insulin secretion, antibacterial activity, and isolated kidney cells. The BmLec was purified using two chromatographic steps: affinity chromatography and reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. BmLec showed a dose-dependent platelet aggregation and significantly decreased the bacterial growth rate in approximately 15%. During scanning electron microscopy, the profile of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. passiflorae treated with lectin disclosed a high vesiculation and membrane rupture. BmLec induced a strong and significant increase in insulin secretion at 2.8 and 16.7 mM glucose concentrations, and this effect was seen in the presence of EGTA in both experiments. BmLec (10 µg/mL increased the perfusion pressure, renal vascular resistance and urinary flow. The glomerular filtration rate and percentages of sodium, potassium and chloride tubular transport were reduced at 60 minutes of perfusion. Renal alterations caused by BmLec were completely inhibited by indomethacin in all evaluated parameters. In conclusion, the C-type lectin isolated from Bothrops moojeni affected platelet aggregation, insulin secretion, antibacterial activity and isolated kidney function.

  16. Prenatal diagnosis of methymalonic aciduria and homocystinuria cblC type using DNA analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta Zappu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA and homocystinuria, cblC type is the most frequent inborn error of vitamin B12. CblC patients present with a heterogeneous clinical picture.To date, the early prenatal diagnosis of MMA and homocystinuria, cblC type is performed by determination of methylmalonic acid and total homocysteine (Hcy in amniotic fluid supernatant. In this paper we report a case of prenatal diagnosis, using genetic analysis, of MMA and homocystinuria, cblC type in an at risk couple. Direct sequencing analysis of the amplified products of chorionic villi biopsy extracted DNA showed normal sequence in the fetal DNA. Mutation analysis of the MMACHC gene is more cost-effective and less time-consuming than the biochemical approach. Early prenatal treatment may have an impact on the long-term complications associated with cblC disease. Future studies with the aim of determining the long-term benefits of daily parenteral OHCbl started soon after conception in at risk mothers should be considered. In this context early prenatal diagnosis could determine whether therapy needs to be continued.

  17. Preparation and identification of 1.3 copies C-type HBV transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-juan CHEN

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To prepare 1.3 copies C-type HBV transgenic mice for providing a better model for the prevention and treatment of hepatitis B.Methods The HBV transgenic mice were generated by microinjection of 1.3 copies C-type HBV genome into the pronucleus of FVB /N zygotes.PCR,ELISA,RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the integration,replication and expression of HBV gene in the transgenic mice.Results Tow thousand two hundred and eighty-two fertilized eggs were injected and a total of 2024 survived.The survival rate of injection was 88.7%.The injected eggs were transplanted into 72 pseudo pregnant female mice,among which 59 became pregnant.The pregnancy rate was 81.9%.One hundred and eighty-five F0 offsprings were produced with 19 positive mice as detected by PCR,and the positive rate was 10.3%.RT-PCR revealed that HBV DNA replication of 102-103 copies/ml existed in serum of 6 mice.Ninety-six F1 offsprings were produced,of which 33 were positive for HBV DNA replication as detected by PCR,the positive rate was 34.4%.RT-PCR showed that HBV DNA replication was observed in 10 mice with 102-103 copies/ml.Three mice were randomly chosen from each of F0 and F1 generations to detect the HBsAg expression in livers and kidneys by immunohistochemistry.The results showed that HBsAg expressed in both livers and kidneys,and it was stronger in kidneys than in livers.Conclusion The 1.3 copies C-type HBV gene can not only replicate and express in the transgenic mice produced,but it also can be transmitted to the next generation of these mice.

  18. Sensing of cell death by myeloid C-type lectin receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, David; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2015-01-01

    Molecules associated with dead or dying cells can be detected by receptors on macrophages and dendritic cells. Signals from these receptors impact myeloid cell function and play a role in determining whether death is silent or proinflammatory, tolerogenic or immunogenic. Prominent among myeloid receptors detecting dead cells are C-type lectin receptors (CLRs). Signals from these receptors variably induce endocytosis of cell corpses, corpse degradation, retrieval of dead cell-associated antigens and/or modulation of immune responses. The sensing of tissue damage by myeloid CLRs complements detection of pathogens in immunity and represents an ancient response aimed at restoring tissue homeostasis. PMID:23332826

  19. Intestinally secreted C-type lectin Reg3b attenuates salmonellosis but not listeriosis in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ampting, Van, M.T.J.; Loonen, L.M.P.; Schonewille, A.J.; Konings, I.; Vink, C; Iovanna, J.; Chamaillard, M; Dekker, J.; Meer, Van Der; Wells, J.; Bovee-Oudenhoven, I.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    The Reg3 protein family, including the human member designated pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP), consists of secreted proteins that contain a C-type lectin domain involved in carbohydrate binding. They are expressed by intestinal epithelial cells. Colonization of germ-free mice and intestinal infection with pathogens increase the expression of Reg3g and Reg3b in the murine ileum. Reg3g is directly bactericidal for Gram-positive bacteria, but the exact role of Reg3b in bacterial infection...

  20. Processing-independent analysis for pro-C-type natriuretic peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Solvej Kølvraa; Rehfeld, Jens F.; Gøtze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is expressed in several human tissues. We designed a specific processing-independent assay for proCNP-derived products and quantitated the concentrations in human seminal plasma from normal and vasectomized men. Antibodies were raised against the N-terminus of human...... proCNP 11-27. Samples were incubated with trypsin prior to immunoassay, which allows for the measurement of "total" proCNP irrespective of the degree of post-translational processing. Seminal plasma from normal young men and vasectomized men were collected and quantitated; the molecular heterogeneity...

  1. Quantitative Expression of C-Type Lectin Receptors in Humans and Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hans-Joachim Anders; Roman Günthner; Regina Gröbmayr; Christoph Römmele; Heni Eka Susanti; Maciej Lech

    2012-01-01

    C-type lectin receptors, their adaptor molecules and S-type lectins (galectins) are involved in the recognition of glycosylated self-antigens and pathogens. However, little is known about the species- and organ-specific expression profiles of these molecules. We therefore determined the mRNA expression levels of Dectin-1, MR1, MR2, DC-SIGN, Syk, Card-9, Bcl-10, Malt-1, Src, Dec-205, Galectin-1, Tim-3, Trem-1, and DAP-12 in 11 solid organs of human and mice. Mouse organs revealed lower mRNA...

  2. The relationship between C-type natriuretic peptide and cognitive impairment in older patients with Type 2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between C-type natriuretic peptide and cognitive impairment in older patients with type 2 diabetes, and to explore the pathogenesis of diabetic cognitive impairment. Methods: According to the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) scores, 80 type 2 diabetic patients over the age of 60 years were divided into two groups, one group including 31 cases with cognitive impairment, the other 49 patients with non-cognitive impairment. And 80 normal participants were selected as the control group. Plasma level of C-type natriuretic peptide was measured by radio-immunity assay in all subjects. The changes and associations of the plasma C-type natriuretic peptide level among three groups was analyzed. Result: In the non-cognitive impairment group, plasma level of C-type natriuretic peptide was higher than that in the control group (P<0.01). But the plasma level of C-type natriuretic peptide in the cognitive impairment group was degraded, significantly deferent with those in the control group and the non-cognitive impairment group (P<0.01). MoCA scores of the cognitive impairment group positively correlated with plasma level of C-type natriuretic peptide (r=0.513, P<0.01). Conclusion: In the early period of type 2 diabetes,the secretion of C-type natriuretic peptide was increased. When diabetic cognitive impairment complicated,the secretion of C-type natriuretic peptide was decompensated. Then plasma level of C-type natriuretic peptide become low. The level of C-type natriuretic peptide closely correlated with diabetic cognitive impairment. It was suggested that diabetic angiopathies may act an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic cognitive impairment. (authors)

  3. Hemolytic C-type lectin CEL-III from sea cucumber expressed in transgenic mosquitoes impairs malaria parasite development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeto Yoshida

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The midgut environment of anopheline mosquitoes plays an important role in the development of the malaria parasite. Using genetic manipulation of anopheline mosquitoes to change the environment in the mosquito midgut may inhibit development of the malaria parasite, thus blocking malaria transmission. Here we generate transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes that express the C-type lectin CEL-III from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata, in a midgut-specific manner. CEL-III has strong and rapid hemolytic activity toward human and rat erythrocytes in the presence of serum. Importantly, CEL-III binds to ookinetes, leading to strong inhibition of ookinete formation in vitro with an IC(50 of 15 nM. Thus, CEL-III exhibits not only hemolytic activity but also cytotoxicity toward ookinetes. In these transgenic mosquitoes, sporogonic development of Plasmodium berghei is severely impaired. Moderate, but significant inhibition was found against Plasmodium falciparum. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of stably engineered anophelines that affect the Plasmodium transmission dynamics of human malaria. Although our laboratory-based research does not have immediate applications to block natural malaria transmission, these findings have significant implications for the generation of refractory mosquitoes to all species of human Plasmodium and elucidation of mosquito-parasite interactions.

  4. Hemolytic C-type lectin CEL-III from sea cucumber expressed in transgenic mosquitoes impairs malaria parasite development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shigeto; Shimada, Yohei; Kondoh, Daisuke; Kouzuma, Yoshiaki; Ghosh, Anil K; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo; Sinden, Robert E

    2007-12-01

    The midgut environment of anopheline mosquitoes plays an important role in the development of the malaria parasite. Using genetic manipulation of anopheline mosquitoes to change the environment in the mosquito midgut may inhibit development of the malaria parasite, thus blocking malaria transmission. Here we generate transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes that express the C-type lectin CEL-III from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata, in a midgut-specific manner. CEL-III has strong and rapid hemolytic activity toward human and rat erythrocytes in the presence of serum. Importantly, CEL-III binds to ookinetes, leading to strong inhibition of ookinete formation in vitro with an IC(50) of 15 nM. Thus, CEL-III exhibits not only hemolytic activity but also cytotoxicity toward ookinetes. In these transgenic mosquitoes, sporogonic development of Plasmodium berghei is severely impaired. Moderate, but significant inhibition was found against Plasmodium falciparum. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of stably engineered anophelines that affect the Plasmodium transmission dynamics of human malaria. Although our laboratory-based research does not have immediate applications to block natural malaria transmission, these findings have significant implications for the generation of refractory mosquitoes to all species of human Plasmodium and elucidation of mosquito-parasite interactions. PMID:18159942

  5. Isolation and characterization of a c-type lysozyme from the nurse shark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds Vaughan, Nichole; Smith, Sylvia L

    2013-12-01

    Lysozyme is a ubiquitous antibacterial enzyme that occurs in numerous invertebrate and vertebrate species. Three forms have been described c-type, g-type and i-type which differ in primary structure. Shark lysozyme has not been characterized; here we report on the isolation and characterization of lysozyme from unstimulated shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum) leukocytes and provide amino acid sequence data across the highly conserved active site of the molecule identifying it to be a c-type lysozyme. A leukocyte lysate was applied either (a) to the first of two sequential DE-52 cellulose columns or alternatively, (b) to a DEAE-Sepharose column. Lysozyme activity in lysate and active fractions was identified by zones of lysis of Micrococcus lysodeikticus cell walls on lysoplates and zones of growth inhibition in agar diffusion assays using Planococcus citreus as the target organism. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed a 14 kDa protein which was identified as lysozyme by mass spectroscopic analysis of peptides, reactivity against anti-HEWL antibodies on a Western blot, hydrolysis of M. lysodeikticus cell walls, and inhibition of growth of P. citreus on AU-gel blots in which the area of growth inhibition correlated to a 14 kDa protein. PMID:24084042

  6. Galactose recognition by a tetrameric C-type lectin, CEL-IV, containing the EPN carbohydrate recognition motif.

    OpenAIRE

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Kamiya, Takuro; Kusunoki, Masami; Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Hirabayashi, Jun; Goda, Shuichiro; Unno, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    CEL-IV is a C-type lectin isolated from a sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of four identical C-type carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). X-ray crystallographic analysis of CEL-IV revealed that its tetrameric structure was stabilized by multiple interchain disulfide bonds among the subunits. Although CEL-IV has the EPN motif in its carbohydrate-binding sites, which is known to be characteristic of mannose binding C-type CRDs, it showed preferential binding of galac...

  7. Galactose Recognition by a Tetrameric C-type Lectin, CEL-IV, Containing the EPN Carbohydrate Recognition Motif*

    OpenAIRE

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Kamiya, Takuro; Kusunoki, Masami; Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Hirabayashi, Jun; Goda, Shuichiro; Unno, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    CEL-IV is a C-type lectin isolated from a sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of four identical C-type carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). X-ray crystallographic analysis of CEL-IV revealed that its tetrameric structure was stabilized by multiple interchain disulfide bonds among the subunits. Although CEL-IV has the EPN motif in its carbohydrate-binding sites, which is known to be characteristic of mannose binding C-type CRDs, it showed preferential binding of galac...

  8. Processing-independent analysis for pro-C-type natriuretic peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Solvej Kølvraa; Rehfeld, Jens F.; Gøtze, Jens Peter

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is expressed in several human tissues. We designed a specific processing-independent assay for proCNP-derived products and quantitated the concentrations in human seminal plasma from normal and vasectomized men. Antibodies were raised against the N-terminus of human...... proCNP 11-27. Samples were incubated with trypsin prior to immunoassay, which allows for the measurement of "total" proCNP irrespective of the degree of post-translational processing. Seminal plasma from normal young men and vasectomized men were collected and quantitated; the molecular heterogeneity...... 104-933 pmol/L, age 18-25 years); gel chromatography suggested the presence of several molecular forms. Parameters associated to male fertility, proCNP concentrations in blood plasma and time of abstinence did not correlate to the seminal proCNP concentrations. Measurement in vasectomized men...

  9. Comparison of the Window-Frame RHIC-abort kicker with C-type Kicker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoupas, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Hahn, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Meng, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Severance, Michael [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); McMahan, Brandon [Westhampton High School, NY (United States)

    2014-08-26

    The high intensity proton bunches (~2.5x1011 p/bunch ) circulating in RHIC increase the temperature of the ferrite-made RHIC-abort-kickers above the Curie point; as a result, the kickers cannot provide the required field to abort the beam at the beam dump. A team of experts in the CAD department worked on modifying the design of the window-frame RHIC-abort kicker to minimize the hysteresis losses responsible for the increase of the ferrite’s temperature. In this technical note we report some results from the study of two possible modifications of the window-frame RHIC-abort kicker, and we compare these results with those of a propose C-type RHIC-abort kicker. We also include an Appendix where we describe a method which may further reduce the hysteresis losses of the window-frame kicker.

  10. Comparison of the Window-Frame RHIC-abort kicker with C-type Kicker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high intensity proton bunches (~2.5x1011 p/bunch ) circulating in RHIC increase the temperature of the ferrite-made RHIC-abort-kickers above the Curie point; as a result, the kickers cannot provide the required field to abort the beam at the beam dump. A team of experts in the CAD department worked on modifying the design of the window-frame RHIC-abort kicker to minimize the hysteresis losses responsible for the increase of the ferrite's temperature. In this technical note we report some results from the study of two possible modifications of the window-frame RHIC-abort kicker, and we compare these results with those of a propose C-type RHIC-abort kicker. We also include an Appendix where we describe a method which may further reduce the hysteresis losses of the window-frame kicker.

  11. Overproduction of CcmG and CcmFHRc Fully Suppresses the c-Type Cytochrome Biogenesis Defect of Rhodobacter capsulatus CcmI-Null Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Carsten; Deshmukh, Meenal; Astor, Doniel; Kranz, Robert G.; Daldal, Fevzi

    2005-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria like Rhodobacter capsulatus use intertwined pathways to carry out the posttranslational maturation of c-type cytochromes (Cyts). This periplasmic process requires at least 10 essential components for apo-Cyt c chaperoning, thio-oxidoreduction, and the delivery of heme and its covalent ligation. One of these components, CcmI (also called CycH), is thought to act as an apo-Cyt c chaperone. In R. capsulatus, CcmI-null mutants are unable to produce c-type Cyts and thus sustain photosynthetic (Ps) growth. Previously, we have shown that overproduction of the putative heme ligation components CcmF and CcmHRc (also called Ccl1 and Ccl2) can partially bypass the function of CcmI on minimal, but not on enriched, media. Here, we demonstrate that either additional overproduction of CcmG (also called HelX) or hyperproduction of CcmF-CcmHRc is needed to completely overcome the role of CcmI during the biogenesis of c-type Cyts on both minimal and enriched media. These findings indicate that, in the absence of CcmI, interactions between the heme ligation and thioreduction pathways become restricted for sufficient Cyt c production. We therefore suggest that CcmI, along with its apo-Cyt chaperoning function, is also critical for the efficacy of holo-Cyt c formation, possibly via its close interactions with other components performing the final heme ligation steps during Cyt c biogenesis. PMID:15937187

  12. Molecular characterization of a c-type lysozyme from the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Amr A; Zhang, Long; Dorrah, Moataza A; Elmogy, Mohamed; Yousef, Hesham A; Bassal, Taha T M; Duvic, Bernard

    2016-08-01

    Lysozymes are bacteriolytic peptides that are implicated in the insect nonspecific innate immune responses. In this study, a full-length cDNA encoding a c-type lysozyme from Schistocerca gregaria (SgLys) has been cloned and characterized from the fat body of immune-challenged 5(th) instar. The deduced mature lysozyme is 119 amino acid residues in length, has a calculated molecular mass of 13.4 kDa and an isoelectric point (Ip) of 9.2. SgLys showed high identities with other insect lysozymes, ranging from 41.5% to 93.3% by BLASTp search in NCBI. Eukaryotic in vitro expression of the SgLys ORF (rSgLys) with an apparent molecular mass of ∼16 kDa under SDS-PAGE is close to the calculated molecular weight of the full-length protein. rSgLys displayed growth inhibitory activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. 3D structure modeling of SgLys, based on comparison with that of silkworm lysozyme, and sequence comparison with the helix-loop-helix (α-hairpin) structure of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) were employed to interpret the antibacterial potencies. Phylogenetic alignments indicate that SgLys aligns well with insect c-type lysozymes that expressed principally in fat body and hemocytes and whose role has been defined as immune-related. Western blot analysis showed that SgLys expression was highest at 6-12 h post-bacterial challenge and subsequently decreased with time. Transcriptional profiles of SgLys were determined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis. SgLys transcript was upregulated at the highest level in fat body, hemocytes, salivary gland, thoracic muscles, and epidermal tissue. It was expressed in all developmental stages from egg to adult. These data indicate that SgLys is a predominant acute-phase protein that is expressed and upregulated upon immune challenge. PMID:26997372

  13. B and C types natriuretic peptides modify norepinephrine uptake and release in the rat adrenal medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatta, M S; Presas, M F; Bianciotti, L G; Rodriguez-Fermepin, M; Ambros, R; Fernandez, B E

    1997-01-01

    We have previously reported that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) modulates adrenomedullar norepinephrine (NE) metabolism. On this basis, the aim of the present work was to study the effects of B and C types natriuretic peptides (BNP and CNP) on the uptake, intracellular distribution and release of 3H-NE. Experiments were carried out in rat adrenal medulla slices incubated "in vitro." Results showed that 100 nM of both, CNP and BNP, enhanced total and neuronal NE uptake. Both peptides (100 nM) caused a rapid increase in NE uptake during the first minute, which was sustained for 60 min. NE intracellular distribution was only modified by CNP (100 nM), which increased the granular fraction and decreased the cytosolic pool. On the other hand, spontaneous as well as evoked (KCl) NE release, was decreased by BNP and CNP (50 and 100 nM for spontaneous release and 1, 10, 50 and 100 nM for evoked output). The present results suggest that BNP and CNP may regulate catecholamine secretion and modulate adrenomedullary biological actions mediated by catecholamines, such as blood arterial pressure, smooth muscle tone, and metabolic activities. PMID:9437706

  14. The Macrophage Galactose-Type C-Type Lectin (MGL Modulates Regulatory T Cell Functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Grazia Zizzari

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs are physiologically designed to prevent autoimmune disease and maintain self-tolerance. In tumour microenvironments, their presence is related to a poor prognosis, and they influence the therapeutic outcome due to their capacity to suppress the immune response by cell-cell contact and to release immunosuppressive cytokines. In this study, we demonstrate that Treg immunosuppressive activity can be modulated by the cross-linking between the CD45RA expressed by Tregs and the C-type lectin MGL. This specific interaction strongly decreases the immunosuppressive activity of Tregs, restoring the proliferative capacity of co-cultured T lymphocytes. This effect can be attributed to changes in CD45RA and TCR signalling through the inhibition of Lck and inactivation of Zap-70, an increase in the Foxp3 methylation status and, ultimately, the reduced production of suppressive cytokines. These results indicate a role of MGL as an immunomodulator within the tumour microenvironment interfering with Treg functions, suggesting its possible use in the design of anticancer vaccines.

  15. Signalling versatility following self and non-self sensing by myeloid C-type lectin receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iborra, Salvador; Sancho, David

    2015-01-01

    Among myeloid immune receptors, C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) have a remarkable capacity to sense a variety of self and non-self ligands. The coupling of CLRs to different signal transduction modules is influenced not only by the receptor, but also by the nature, density and architecture of the ligand, which can affect the rate of receptor internalization and trafficking to diverse intracellular compartments. Understanding how the variety of self and non-self ligands triggers differential CLR signalling and function presents a fascinating biological challenge. Non-self ligands usually promote inflammation and immunity, whereas self ligands are frequently involved in communication and tolerance. But pathogens can mimic self-inhibitory signals to escape immune surveillance, and endogenous ligands can contribute to the sensing of pathogens through CLRs. In this review, we survey the complexity and flexibility in functional outcome found in the myeloid CLRs, which is not only based on their differing intracellular motifs, but is also conditioned by the physical nature, affinity and avidity of the ligand. PMID:25269828

  16. Thickness controlled proximity effects in C-type antiferromagnet/superconductor heterostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Awadhesh; Kumary, T Geetha; Lin, J G

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of the superconducting state possessing a C-type antiferromagnetic phase in the Nd0.35Sr0.65MnO3/YBa2Cu3O7 heterostructure is investigated, with the Nd0.35Sr0.65MnO3 thickness (t) varying from 40 to 200 nm. Both the superconducting transition temperature and the upper critical field along the c-axis decrease with increasing t; while the in-plane coherence length increases from 2.0 up to 3.6 nm. Meanwhile, the critical current density exhibits a field-independent behavior, indicating an enhanced flux pinning effect. Furthermore, low-temperature spin canting induces a breakdown and re-entrance of the superconductivity, demonstrating a dynamic completion between the superconducting pairing and the exchange field. An unexpected colossal magnetoresistance is observed below the superconducting re-entrance temperature at t = 200 nm, which is attributed to the dominant influence of the exchange field over the pairing energy. PMID:26239479

  17. Fungal engagement of the C-type lectin mincle suppresses dectin-1-induced antifungal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wevers, Brigitte A; Kaptein, Tanja M; Zijlstra-Willems, Esther M; Theelen, Bart; Boekhout, Teun; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H; Gringhuis, Sonja I

    2014-04-01

    Recognition of fungal pathogens by C-type lectin receptor (CLR) dectin-1 on human dendritic cells is essential for triggering protective antifungal TH1 and TH17 immune responses. We show that Fonsecaea monophora, a causative agent of chromoblastomycosis, a chronic fungal skin infection, evades these antifungal responses by engaging CLR mincle and suppressing IL-12, which drives TH1 differentiation. Dectin-1 triggering by F. monophora activates transcription factor IRF1, which is crucial for IL12A transcription via nucleosome remodeling. However, simultaneous F. monophora binding to mincle induces an E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2-dependent degradation pathway, via Syk-CARD9-mediated PKB signaling, that leads to loss of nuclear IRF1 activity, hence blocking IL12A transcription. The absence of IL-12 leads to impaired TH1 responses and promotes TH2 polarization. Notably, mincle is similarly exploited by other chromoblastomycosis-associated fungi to redirect TH responses. Thus, mincle is a fungal receptor that can suppress antifungal immunity and, as such, is a potential therapeutic target. PMID:24721577

  18. E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP interacts with C-type lectin-like receptor CLEC-2 and promotes its ubiquitin-proteasome degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Miaomiao; Li, Lili; Song, Shushu; Wu, Weicheng; Peng, Peike; Yang, Caiting; Zhang, Mingming; Duan, Fangfang; Jia, Dongwei; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Hao; Zhao, Ran; Wang, Lan; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) was originally identified as a member of non-classical C-type lectin-like receptors in platelets and immune cells. Activation of CLEC-2 is involved in thrombus formation, lymphatic/blood vessel separation, platelet-mediated tumor metastasis and immune response. Nevertheless, the regulation of CLEC-2 expression is little understood. In this study, we identified that the C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) interacted with CLEC-2 by mass spectrometry analysis, and CHIP decreased the protein expression of CLEC-2 through lysine-48-linked ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Deleted and point mutation also revealed that CHIP controlled CLEC-2 protein expression via both tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) domain and Ubox domain in a HSP70/90-independent manner. Moreover, reduced CHIP expression was associated with decreased CLEC-2 polyubiquitination and increased CLEC-2 protein levels in PMA-induced differentiation of THP-1 monocytes into macrophages. These results indicate that CLEC-2 is the target substrate of E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP, and suggest that the CHIP/CLEC-2 axis may play an important role in the modulation of immune response. PMID:27443248

  19. B and C types natriuretic peptides modulate norepinephrine uptake and release in the rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatta, M S; Presas, M; Bianciotti, L G; Zarrabeitia, V; Fernández, B E

    1996-09-16

    We previously reported that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) regulates catecholamine metabolism in the central nervous system. ANF, B and C types natriuretic peptides (BNP and CNP) also play a regulatory role in body fluid homeostasis, cardiovascular activity and hormonal and neuro-hormonal secretions. The aim of the present work was to investigate BNP and CNP effects on the uptake and release of norepinephrine (NE) in rat hypothalamic slices incubated in vitro. Results showed that BNP (100 nM) and CNP (1, 10 and 100 nM) enhanced total and neuronal [3H]NE uptake but did not modify non-neuronal uptake. BNP (100 nM) and CNP (1 nM) caused a rapid increase in NE uptake (1 min), which was sustained for 60 min. BNP (100 nM) did not modify the intracellular distribution of NE; however, 1 nM CNP increased the granular store and decreased the cytosolic pool of NE. BNP (100 nM) and CNP (1, 10 and 100 nM), diminished spontaneous NE release. In addition, BNP (1, 10, 100 nM) and CNP (1, 10 and 100 pM, as well as 1, 10 and 100 nM) reduced NE output induced by 25 mM KCl. These results suggest that BNP and CNP may be involved in the regulation of several central as well as peripheral physiological functions through the modulation of noradrenergic neurotransmission at the presynaptic neuronal level. Present results provide evidence to consider CNP as the brain natriuretic peptide since physiological concentrations of this peptide (pM) diminished NE evoked release. PMID:8897640

  20. C-type Lectin Receptor Expression on Human Basophils and Effects of Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, K; Rydnert, F; Broos, S; Andersson, M; Greiff, L; Lindstedt, M

    2016-09-01

    Basophils are emerging as immunoregulatory cells capable of interacting with their environment not only via their characteristic IgE-mediated activation, but also in an IgE-independent manner. Basophils are known to express and respond to stimulation via TLR2, TLR4, DC-SIGN and DCIR, but whether basophils also express other C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) is largely unknown. In this study, we investigate the CLR expression profile of human basophils using multicolour flow cytometry. As FcRs as well as some CLRs are associated with allergen recognition and shown to be involved in subsequent immune responses, the expression of CLRs and FcRs on peripheral blood basophils, as well as their frequency, was monitored for 1 year in subjects undergoing subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT). Here, we show that human basophils express CLECSF14, DEC205, Dectin-1, Dectin-2 and MRC2. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the frequencies of basophils expressing the allergy-associated CLRs Dectin-1 and Dectin-2 were significantly reduced after 1 year and 8 weeks of AIT, respectively. In contrast, the frequency of basophils positive for FcγRII, as well as the fraction of total basophils, significantly increased after 1 year of AIT. The herein demonstrated expression of various CLRs on basophils, and their altered CLR and FcR expression profile upon AIT, suggest yet unexplored ways by which basophils can interact with antigens and may point to novel immunoregulatory functions targeted through AIT. PMID:27354239

  1. Dexamethasone stimulates expression of C-type Natriuretic Peptide in chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beier Frank

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growth of endochondral bones is regulated through the activity of cartilaginous growth plates. Disruption of the physiological patterns of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation – such as in endocrine disorders or in many different genetic diseases (e.g. chondrodysplasias – generally results in dwarfism and skeletal defects. For example, glucocorticoid administration in children inhibits endochondral bone growth, but the molecular targets of these hormones in chondrocytes remain largely unknown. In contrast, recent studies have shown that C-type Natriuretic Peptide (CNP is an important anabolic regulator of cartilage growth, and loss-of-function mutations in the human CNP receptor gene cause dwarfism. We asked whether glucocorticoids could exert their activities by interfering with the expression of CNP or its downstream signaling components. Methods Primary mouse chondrocytes in monolayer where incubated with the synthetic glucocorticoid Dexamethasone (DEX for 12 to 72 hours. Cell numbers were determined by counting, and real-time PCR was performed to examine regulation of genes in the CNP signaling pathway by DEX. Results We show that DEX does influence expression of key genes in the CNP pathway. Most importantly, DEX significantly increases RNA expression of the gene encoding CNP itself (Nppc. In addition, DEX stimulates expression of Prkg2 (encoding cGMP-dependent protein kinase II and Npr3 (natriuretic peptide decoy receptor genes. Conversely, DEX was found to down-regulate the expression of the gene encoding its receptor, Nr3c1 (glucocorticoid receptor, as well as the Npr2 gene (encoding the CNP receptor. Conclusion Our data suggest that the growth-suppressive activities of DEX are not due to blockade of CNP signaling. This study reveals a novel, unanticipated relationship between glucocorticoid and CNP signaling and provides the first evidence that CNP expression in chondrocytes is regulated by endocrine

  2. C-type lectin receptors and RIG-I-like receptors: new points on the oncogenomics map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The group of pattern recognition receptors includes families of Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors, C-type lectin receptors, and RIG-I-like receptors. They are key sensors for a number of infectious agents, some of which are oncogenic, and they launch an immune response against them, normally promoting their eradication. Inherited variations in genes encoding these receptors and proteins and their signaling pathways may affect their function, possibly modulating cancer risk and features of cancer progression. There are numerous studies investigating the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms within or near genes encoding Toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors, cancer risk, and features of cancer progression. However, there is an almost total absence of articles analyzing the correlation between polymorphisms of genes encoding C-type lectin receptors and RIG-I-like receptors and cancer risk or progression. Nevertheless, there is some evidence supporting the hypothesis that inherited C-type lectin receptor and RIG-I-like receptor variants can be associated with increased cancer risk. Certain C-type lectin receptors and RIG-I-like receptors recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns of potentially oncogenic infectious agents, and certain polymorphisms of genes encoding C-type lectin receptors and RIG-I-like receptors may have functional consequences at the molecular level that can lead to association of such single nucleotide polymorphisms with risk or progression of some diseases that may modulate cancer risk, so these gene polymorphisms may affect cancer risk indirectly. Polymorphisms of genes encoding C-type lectin receptors and RIG-I-like receptors thereby may be correlated with a risk of lung, oral, esophageal, gastric, colorectal, and liver cancer, as well as nasopharyngeal carcinoma, glioblastoma, multiple myeloma, and lymphoma. The list of the most promising polymorphisms for oncogenomic investigations may include rs1926736, rs2478577

  3. Critical roles of sea cucumber C-type lectin in non-self recognition and bacterial clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiumei; Liu, Xiangquan; Yang, Jianmin; Wang, Sheng; Sun, Guohua; Yang, Jialong

    2015-08-01

    C-type lectin is one important pattern recognition receptor (PRR) that plays crucial roles in multiple immune responses. A C-type lectin from sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (AjCTL-1) was characterized in the present study. The amino acid sequence of AjCTL-1 shared high similarities with other C-type lectins from invertebrates and vertebrates. The C-type lectin domain (CTLD) of AjCTL-1 contained a Ca(2+)-binding site 2 and four conserved cysteine residues. AjCTL-1 mRNA expression patterns in tissues and after bacterial challenge were then analysed. Quantitative PCR revealed that AjCTL-1 mRNA was widely expressed in the tested tissues of healthy sea cucumber. The highest expression level occurred in gonad followed by body wall, coelomocytes, tentacle, intestinum and longitudinal muscle, and the lowest expression level was in respiratory tree. AjCTL-1 mRNA expression in coelomocytes was significantly induced by gram-negative Listonella anguillarum and gram-positive Micrococcus luteus, with different up-regulation patterns post-challenge. Recombinant AjCTL-1 exhibited the ability to bind peptidoglycan directly, agglutinate M. luteus, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, in a Ca(2+)-dependant manner, and enhance the phagocytosis of coelomocytes against E. coli in vitro. The results indicated that AjCTL-1 could act as a PRR in Apostichopus japonicus and had critical roles in non-self recognition and bacterial clearance against invading microbes. PMID:26052017

  4. Galactose recognition by a tetrameric C-type lectin, CEL-IV, containing the EPN carbohydrate recognition motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Kamiya, Takuro; Kusunoki, Masami; Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Hirabayashi, Jun; Goda, Shuichiro; Unno, Hideaki

    2011-03-25

    CEL-IV is a C-type lectin isolated from a sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of four identical C-type carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). X-ray crystallographic analysis of CEL-IV revealed that its tetrameric structure was stabilized by multiple interchain disulfide bonds among the subunits. Although CEL-IV has the EPN motif in its carbohydrate-binding sites, which is known to be characteristic of mannose binding C-type CRDs, it showed preferential binding of galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine. Structural analyses of CEL-IV-melibiose and CEL-IV-raffinose complexes revealed that their galactose residues were recognized in an inverted orientation compared with mannose binding C-type CRDs containing the EPN motif, by the aid of a stacking interaction with the side chain of Trp-79. Changes in the environment of Trp-79 induced by binding to galactose were detected by changes in the intrinsic fluorescence and UV absorption spectra of WT CEL-IV and its site-directed mutants. The binding specificity of CEL-IV toward complex oligosaccharides was analyzed by frontal affinity chromatography using various pyridylamino sugars, and the results indicate preferential binding to oligosaccharides containing Galβ1-3/4(Fucα1-3/4)GlcNAc structures. These findings suggest that the specificity for oligosaccharides may be largely affected by interactions with amino acid residues in the binding site other than those determining the monosaccharide specificity. PMID:21247895

  5. Chicken lung lectin is a functional C-type lectin and inhibits haemagglutination by influenza A virus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogenkamp, A.; Isohadouten, N.; Reemers, S.S.N.; Romijn, R.A.; Hemrika, W.; White, M.R.; Tefsen, B.; Vervelde, L.; van Eijk, M.; Veldhuizen, E.J.A.; Haagsman, H.P.

    2008-01-01

    Many proteins of the calcium-dependent (C-type) lectin family have been shown to play an important role in innate immunity. They can bind to a broad range of carbohydrates, which enables them to interact with ligands present on the surface of micro-organisms.We previously reported the finding of a n

  6. A C-Type Lectin from Bothrops jararacussu Venom Disrupts Staphylococcal Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Raphael Contelli Klein; Mary Hellen Fabres-Klein; Leandro Licursi de Oliveira; Renato Neves Feio; François Malouin; Andréa de Oliveira Barros Ribon

    2015-01-01

    Bovine mastitis is a major threat to animal health and the dairy industry. Staphylococcus aureus is a contagious pathogen that is usually associated with persistent intramammary infections, and biofilm formation is a relevant aspect of the outcome of these infections. Several biological activities have been described for snake venoms, which led us to screen secretions of Bothrops jararacussu for antibiofilm activity against S. aureus NRS155. Crude venom was fractionated by size-exclusion chro...

  7. Hemolytic C-Type Lectin CEL-III from Sea Cucumber Expressed in Transgenic Mosquitoes Impairs Malaria Parasite Development

    OpenAIRE

    Shigeto Yoshida; Yohei Shimada; Daisuke Kondoh; Yoshiaki Kouzuma; Ghosh, Anil K.; Marcelo Jacobs-Lorena; Sinden, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    The midgut environment of anopheline mosquitoes plays an important role in the development of the malaria parasite. Using genetic manipulation of anopheline mosquitoes to change the environment in the mosquito midgut may inhibit development of the malaria parasite, thus blocking malaria transmission. Here we generate transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes that express the C-type lectin CEL-III from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata, in a midgut-specific manner. CEL-III has strong and ra...

  8. Four functionally distinct C-type natriuretic peptides found in fish reveal evolutionary history of the natriuretic peptide system

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Koji; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Yamagami, Sayaka; Mitani, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Norio; Takei, Yoshio

    2003-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs) are major cardiovascular and osmoregulatory hormones in vertebrates. Although tetrapods generally have three subtypes, atrial NP (ANP), B-type NP (BNP), and C-type NP (CNP), some teleosts lack BNP, and sharks and hagfish have only one NP. Thus, NPs have diverged during fish evolution, possibly reflecting changes in osmoregulatory systems. In this study, we found, by cDNA cloning, four distinct CNPs (1 through 4) in the medaka (Oryzias latipes...

  9. Differential expression of two C-type lectins in grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella and their response to grass carp reovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, C S; He, L B; Pei, Y Y; Jiang, Y; Huang, R; Li, Y M; Liao, L J; Jang, S H; Wang, Y P

    2016-02-01

    The cDNAs of two C-type lectins in grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella, galactose-binding lectin (galbl) and mannose-binding lectin (mbl), were cloned and analysed in this study. Both of them exhibited the highest expression level in liver, whereas their expression pattern differed in early phase of embryonic development. Following exposure to grass carp reovirus (GCRV), the mRNA expression level of galbl and mbl was significantly up-regulated in liver and intestine. PMID:26643267

  10. Mechanistic insights into the role of C-type lectin receptor/CARD9 signaling in human antifungal immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Drummond, Rebecca A.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2016-01-01

    Human CARD9 deficiency is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disorder caused by biallelic mutations in the gene CARD9, which encodes a signaling protein that is found downstream of many C-type lectin receptors (CLRs). CLRs encompass a large family of innate recognition receptors, expressed predominantly by myeloid and epithelial cells, which bind fungal carbohydrates and initiate antifungal immune responses. Accordingly, human CARD9 deficiency is associated with the spontaneous d...

  11. C-type lectin receptor-induced NF-κB activation in innate immune and inflammatory responses

    OpenAIRE

    Kingeter, Lara M.; Lin, Xin

    2012-01-01

    The C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) belong to a large family of proteins that contain a carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) and calcium binding sites on their extracellular domains. Recent studies indicate that many CLRs, such as Dectin-1, Dectin-2 and Mincle, function as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) recognizing carbohydrate ligands from infected microorganisms. Upon ligand binding, these CLRs induce multiple signal transduction cascades through their own immunoreceptor tyrosine-base...

  12. Mechanistic Insights into the Role of C-Type Lectin Receptor/CARD9 Signaling in Human Antifungal Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Drummond, Rebecca A.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2016-01-01

    Human CARD9 deficiency is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disorder caused by biallelic mutations in the gene CARD9, which encodes a signaling protein that is found downstream of many C-type lectin receptors (CLRs). CLRs encompass a large family of innate recognition receptors, expressed predominantly by myeloid and epithelial cells, which bind fungal carbohydrates and initiate antifungal immune responses. Accordingly, human CARD9 deficiency is associated with the spontaneous d...

  13. C-type lectin receptors differentially induce Th17 cells and vaccine immunity to the endemic mycosis of North America

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Huafeng; LeBert, Vanessa; Hung, Chiung Yu; Galles, Kevin; Saijo, Shinobu; Lin, Xin; Cole, Garry T.; Bruce S Klein; Wüthrich, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine immunity to the endemic mycoses of North America requires Th17 cells, but the pattern recognition receptors and signaling pathways that drive these protective responses have not been defined. We show that C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) exert divergent contributions to the development of anti-fungal Th17 cells and vaccine resistance against Blastomyces dermatitidis, Histoplasma capsulatum and Coccidioides posadasii. Acquired immunity to B. dermatitidis requires Dectin-2, whereas vaccin...

  14. The utility of three dimensional DSA with bi-C-typed arms in the embolization of intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the value of three dimensional DSA(3D-DSA) with bi-C-typed arms on the embolization of intracranial aneurysms. Methods: 3D-DSA was performed in eight patients (aged 43-73 years) with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by frontal, lateral and various oblique projections including rotational angiography and three dimensional reconstruction. The perfect vision angle of aneurysms could be found on the 3D-workstation by the auto positioning function of 3D-DSA which could send the parameters to the main machine and make the bi-C-typed arms turning to the proper angle to have aneurysms embolized totally. Results: Eight SAH cases were found with aneurysms including one micro-aneurysm and four with bleb (6 blebs). Six cases were under-taken selective embolization with 5 of total occlusion showing no bleb in follow up angiography and the other one of partial occlusion. The patient with micro-aneurysm didn't receive embolization and another one received microneurosurgery operation. No blebs were found in the follow up angiography. Conclusions: 3D-DSA with bi-C-typed arms can facilitate in finding intracranial aneurysms, micro-aneurysms and blebs' and provide the best procedural angulation for embolization with more safe. (authors)

  15. Differential Use of the C-Type Lectins L-SIGN and DC-SIGN for Phlebovirus Endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Psylvia; Tetard, Marilou; Youness, Berthe; Cordes, Nicole; Rouxel, Ronan N; Flamand, Marie; Lozach, Pierre-Yves

    2016-06-01

    Bunyaviruses represent a growing threat to humans and livestock globally. The receptors, cellular factors and endocytic pathways used by these emerging pathogens to infect cells remain largely unidentified and poorly characterized. DC-SIGN is a C-type lectin highly expressed on dermal dendritic cells that has been found to act as an authentic entry receptor for many phleboviruses (Bunyaviridae), including Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), Toscana virus (TOSV) and Uukuniemi virus (UUKV). We found that these phleboviruses can exploit another C-type lectin, L-SIGN, for infection. L-SIGN shares 77% sequence homology with DC-SIGN and is expressed on liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. L-SIGN is required for UUKV binding but not for virus internalization. An endocytosis-defective mutant of L-SIGN was still able to mediate virus uptake and infection, indicating that L-SIGN acts as an attachment receptor for phleboviruses rather than an endocytic receptor. Our results point out a fundamental difference in the use of the C-type lectins L-SIGN and DC-SIGN by UUKV to enter cells, although both proteins are closely related in terms of molecular structure and biological function. This study sheds new light on the molecular mechanisms by which phleboviruses target the liver and also highlights the added complexity in virus-receptor interactions beyond attachment. PMID:26990254

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of a C-type lectin from Ancylostoma ceylanicum: evidence for a role in hookworm reproductive physiology.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Allison C.; Harrison, Lisa M.; Kapulkin, Wadim; Jones, Brian F.; Sinha, Anindita; Savage, Amy; Villalon, Nicholas; Cappello, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Lectins comprise a family of related proteins that mediate essential cell functions through binding to carbohydrates. Within this protein family, C-type lectins are defined by the requirement of calcium for optimal biologic activity. Using reverse transcription PCR, a cDNA corresponding to a putative C-type lectin has been amplified from the hookworm parasite Ancylostoma ceylanicum. The 550 nucleotide open reading frame of the Ancylostoma ceylanicum C-type Lectin-1 (AceCTL-1) cDNA corresponds...

  17. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of a novel dual-CRD C-type lectin in kuruma shrimp (Marsupenaeus japonicus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Man; MAO Yong; WANG Jun; FENG Wenrong; SONG Xiaohong; SU Yongquan

    2015-01-01

    C-type lectins are among the most significant pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) found in invertebrate. They are a class of carbohydrate-binding proteins that can recognize specific sugar moieties on the surface of pathogens. In the present study, a novel C-type lecitn (termed MjLectin) from kuruma shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus was identified. The full-length cDNA of MjLectin was 1 245 bp with a 1 011 bp open reading frame (ORF) that encoded a polypeptide of 336 amino acid residues. MjLectin consisted of two tandemly arrayed carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs), unlike other reported M. japonicus C-type lectins with only one CRD. It showed a high similarity to other shrimp dual-CRD lectins. Among the Ca2+-binding Site 2, the tripeptide motif dictating the carbohydrate binding specificity was exhibited as a rare mutant LPN (Leu134-Pro135-Asn136) in CRD1 and a traditional EPN (Glu299-Pro300-Asn301) in CRD2, respectively. MjLectin showed a specific expression pattern in both tissue and cellular levels, for its mRNA transcript was mainly expressed in the F-cells of the hepatopancreas. After white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge (3.6×108 virions/μL), the expression of MjLectin in the hepatopancreas was up-regulated significantly at 48 h (P<0.01) compared with the control group. These results suggested that MjLectin might be involved in the innate immune defense against WSSV infection.

  18. Vixapatin (VP12, a C-Type Lectin-Protein from Vipera xantina palestinae Venom: Characterization as a Novel Anti-angiogenic Compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Lazarovici

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A C-type lectin-like protein (CTL, originally identified as VP12 and lately named Vixapatin, was isolated and characterized from Israeli viper Vipera xantina palestinae snake venom. This CTL was characterized as a selective α2β1 integrin inhibitor with anti-melanoma metastatic activity. The major aim of the present study was to prove the possibility that this protein is also a potent novel anti-angiogenic compound. Using an adhesion assay, we demonstrated that Vixapatin selectively and potently inhibited the α2 mediated adhesion of K562 over-expressing cells, with IC50 of 3 nM. 3 nM Vixapatin blocked proliferation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC; 25 nM inhibited collagen I induced migration of human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells; and 50 nM rat C6 glioma and human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells. 1 µM Vixapatin reduced HDMEC tube formation by 75% in a Matrigel assay. Furthermore, 1 µM Vixapatin decreased by 70% bFGF-induced physiological angiogenesis, and by 94% C6 glioma-induced pathological angiogenesis, in shell-less embryonic quail chorioallantoic membrane assay. Vixapatin’s ability to inhibit all steps of the angiogenesis process suggest that it is a novel pharmacological tool for studying α2β1 integrin mediated angiogenesis and a lead compound for the development of a novel anti-angiogenic/angiostatic/anti-cancer drug.

  19. Bilinexin, a snake C-type lectin from Agkistrodon bilineatus venom agglutinates platelets via GPIb and alpha2beta1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, X Y; Navdaev, A; Clemetson, J M; Magnenat, E; Wells, T N; Clemetson, K J

    2001-11-01

    A new snake protein, named bilinexin, has been purified from Agkistrodon bilineatus venom by ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. Under non-reducing conditions it has a mass of 110 kDa protein on SDS-PAGE. On reduction, it can be separated into five subunits with masses in the range 13-25 kDa. The N-terminal sequences of these subunits are very similar to those of convulxin or the alboaggregins, identifying bilinexin as a new member of the snake C-type lectin family, unusual in having multiple subunits. Bilinexin agglutinates fixed platelets. washed platelets and platelet rich plasma (PRP) without obvious activation (shape change) as confirmed by light microscope examination. Both inhibitory and binding studies indicate that antibodies against alpha2beta1 inhibit not only platelet agglutination induced by bilinexin, but also bilinexin binding to platelets. VM16d, a monoclonal anti-GPIbalpha antibody, completely inhibits platelet agglutination induced by bilinexin, and polyclonal antibodies against GPIbalpha prevent its binding to platelets. However, neither convulxin, polyclonal anti-GPVI antibodies, nor GPIIb/IIIa inhibitors affect its binding to and agglutination of platelets. Bilinexin neither activates GPIIb/IIIa integrin on platelets nor induces tyrosine phosphorylation of platelet proteins, nor increases intracellular Ca2+ in platelets. Like alboaggregin B, bilinexin agglutinates platelets, which makes it a good tool to investigate the differences in mechanism between snake C-type lectins causing platelet agglutination and those that induce full activation. PMID:11816718

  20. C-type lectin receptors differentially induce th17 cells and vaccine immunity to the endemic mycosis of North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huafeng; LeBert, Vanessa; Hung, Chiung Yu; Galles, Kevin; Saijo, Shinobu; Lin, Xin; Cole, Garry T; Klein, Bruce S; Wüthrich, Marcel

    2014-02-01

    Vaccine immunity to the endemic mycoses of North America requires Th17 cells, but the pattern recognition receptors and signaling pathways that drive these protective responses have not been defined. We show that C-type lectin receptors exert divergent contributions to the development of antifungal Th17 cells and vaccine resistance against Blastomyces dermatitidis, Histoplasma capsulatum, and Coccidioides posadasii. Acquired immunity to B. dermatitidis requires Dectin-2, whereas vaccination against H. capsulatum and C. posadasii infection depends on innate sensing by Dectin-1 and Dectin-2, but not Mincle. Tracking Ag-specific T cells in vivo established that the Card9 signaling pathway acts indispensably and exclusively on differentiation of Th17 cells, while leaving intact their activation, proliferation, survival, and migration. Whereas Card9 signaling is essential, C-type lectin receptors offer distinct and divergent contributions to vaccine immunity against these endemic fungal pathogens. Our work provides new insight into innate immune mechanisms that drive vaccine immunity and Th17 cells. PMID:24391211

  1. Hayabusa's follow-on mission for surface and sub-surface sample return from a C-type NEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Hajime; Yoshikawa, M.; Yano, H.; Tsuda, Y.; Nakazawa, S.; Mimamino, H.; Terui, F.; Saiki, T.; Nishiyama, K.; Kubota, T.; Okada, T.; Morimoto, M. Y.; Ogawa, N.; Okamoto, C.; Takagi, Y.; Tachibana, S.; Nakamura, R.; Hirata, N.; Demura, H.

    n JAXA's Long-term Vision 2005-2025, acquiring the capability of deep space round trip be-yond the Earth-Moon system is one of key elements for the future space exploration and that has been Hayabusa's primary engineering goal. According to the solar system exploration sci-ence roadmap set by ISAS and JSPEC in 2007, a programmatic approach to small body sample returns from S-type, C-type and then P/D-type asteroids as well as dormant comets, i.e., 'the further, the smaller, the more primitive strategy', is recommended for strengthening Japan's unique position in the field of space exploration. In a more recent international context, NEOs and Martian satellites have been identified as critical targets for the future human space explo-ration en route to Mars; thus their robotic precursor missions with the round trip capability have become more important than ever. Thus, Hayabusa's immediate follow-on mission, nicknamed so far as 'Hayabusa-2', is to aim establishing round trip exploration capability with both technical and operational heritage and lessons leaerned from the original Haybusa mission. It will also conduct in-situ observation and surface and sub-surface sample returns of a C-type NEO after Hayabusa's investigation and sampling attempt at Itokawa, a sub-km, S-type NEO. Important to be reminded is that C-type asteroid exploration is not just matching with carbona-ceous chondrites and interplanetary dust but also enhancing chances to discover new extrater-restrial materials unknown to us today that may become clues to decode interactions among organic, inorganic compounds and "water" kept in various forms inside the object. These three groups of asteroidal materials are basic constituents of the planet Earth, its ocean and its life. Also physical probing inside solid planetary bodies has been recognized as an effective tool to open new scientific insights. By excavating sub-surface materials with artificial physical in-teractions such as an impactor

  2. Activation of endogenous C-type retroviral genomes by internal alpha-irradiation of mice with 224Radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensitive cocultivation techniques were applied to study the radiation-induced activation of endogenous retroviral genomes in different mouse strains by the alpha-emitting radionuclide 224Radium. Activated infectious C-type retroviruses were detected in spleen, bone marrow and bone tissues of C57BL/6-, BALB/c- and NMRI mice. The titres of high-dose-irradiated animals were higher than those found in low-dose-irradiated animals. Infectious retrovirus could be detected with a dose of 13.2 rad (maximum dose rate 0.9 rad/day) in the skeleton, and a dose of 4.2 rad (maximum dose rate 0.3 rad/day) in the spleen. The virus activation pattern was different in the three mouse strains. These data indicate that activation of endogenous retroviral genomes by alpha-irradiation shows a dose-effect relationship and a dependence on the genetic background of the mouse. (orig.)

  3. Ammonia inhibits the C-type natriuretic peptide-dependent cyclic GMP synthesis and calcium accumulation in a rat brain endothelial cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopacka, Agnieszka; Zielińska, Magdalena; Albrecht, Jan

    2008-05-01

    Recently we reported a decrease of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP)-dependent, natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2)-mediated cyclic GMP (cGMP) synthesis in a non-neuronal compartment of cerebral cortical slices of hyperammonemic rats [Zielińska, M., Fresko, I., Konopacka, A., Felipo, V., Albrecht, J., 2007. Hyperammonemia inhibits the natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2)-mediated cyclic GMP synthesis in the astrocytic compartment of rat cerebral cortex slices. Neurotoxicology 28, 1260-1263]. Here we accounted for the possible involvement of cerebral capillary endothelial cells in this response by measuring the effect of ammonia on the CNP-mediated cGMP formation and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) accumulation in a rat cerebral endothelial cell line (RBE-4). We first established that stimulation of cGMP synthesis in RBE-4 cells was coupled to protein kinase G (PKG)-mediated Ca2+ influx from the medium which was inhibited by an L-type channel blocker nimodipine. Ammonia treatment (1h, 5mM NH4Cl) evoked a substantial decrease of CNP-stimulated cGMP synthesis which was related to a decreased binding of CNP to NPR2 receptors, and depressed the CNP-dependent [Ca2+]i accumulation in these cells. Ammonia also abolished the CNP-dependent Ca2+ accumulation in the absence of Na+. In cells incubated with ammonia in the absence of Ca2+ a slight CNP-dependent increase of [Ca2+]i was observed, most likely representing Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. Depression of CNP-dependent cGMP-mediated [Ca2+]i accumulation may contribute to cerebral vascular endothelial dysfunction associated with hyperammonemia or hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:18222015

  4. Gene Encoding a C-Type Cyclin in Mycosphaerella Graminicola is Involved in Mycelium Formation, Melanin Biosynthesis, Stress Response, and Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycosphaerella graminicola is an important wheat pathogen causing septoria tritici blotch. To date, an efficient strategy to control M. graminicola has not been developed. More significantly, we have a limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms of M. graminicola pathogenicity. In this study, ...

  5. Gene encoding a C-type cyclin in Mycosphaerella graminicola is involved in aerial mycelium formation, filamentous growth, hyphal swelling, melanin biosynthesis, stress response, and pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycosphaerella graminicola is an important wheat pathogen causing septoria tritici blotch. To date, an efficient strategy to control M. graminicola has not been developed. More significantly, we have a limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms of M. graminicola pathogenicity. In this study, ...

  6. Differential expression of skin mucus C-type lectin in two freshwater eel species, Anguilla marmorata and Anguilla japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Shigeyuki; Yoshinaga, Tatsuki; Komiya, Kaoru; Yamashita, Hiroka; Nakamura, Osamu

    2016-08-01

    Two types of lactose-specific lectins, galectin (AJL-1) and C-type lectin (AJL-2), were previously identified in the mucus of adult Anguilla japonica. Here, we compared the expression profiles of these two homologous lectins at the adult and juvenile stages between the tropical eel Anguilla marmorata and the temperate eel A. japonica. Only one lectin, predicted to be an orthologue of AJL-1 by LC-MS/MS, was detected in the mucus of adult A. marmorata. We also found that an orthologous gene to AJL-2 was expressed at very low levels, or not at all, in the skin of adult A. marmorata. However, we detected the gene expression of an AJL-2-orthologue in the skin of juvenile A. marmorata, and a specific antibody also detected the lectin in the juvenile fish epidermis. These findings suggest that expression profiles of mucosal lectins vary during development as well as between species in the Anguilla genus. PMID:27026508

  7. Conservation of the C-type lectin fold for massive sequence variation in a Treponema diversity-generating retroelement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Coq, Johanne; Ghosh, Partho (UCSD)

    2012-06-19

    Anticipatory ligand binding through massive protein sequence variation is rare in biological systems, having been observed only in the vertebrate adaptive immune response and in a phage diversity-generating retroelement (DGR). Earlier work has demonstrated that the prototypical DGR variable protein, major tropism determinant (Mtd), meets the demands of anticipatory ligand binding by novel means through the C-type lectin (CLec) fold. However, because of the low sequence identity among DGR variable proteins, it has remained unclear whether the CLec fold is a general solution for DGRs. We have addressed this problem by determining the structure of a second DGR variable protein, TvpA, from the pathogenic oral spirochete Treponema denticola. Despite its weak sequence identity to Mtd ({approx}16%), TvpA was found to also have a CLec fold, with predicted variable residues exposed in a ligand-binding site. However, this site in TvpA was markedly more variable than the one in Mtd, reflecting the unprecedented approximate 10{sup 20} potential variability of TvpA. In addition, similarity between TvpA and Mtd with formylglycine-generating enzymes was detected. These results provide strong evidence for the conservation of the formylglycine-generating enzyme-type CLec fold among DGRs as a means of accommodating massive sequence variation.

  8. The Structure of the Poxvirus A33 Protein Reveals a Dimer of Unique C-Type Lectin-Like Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Hua-Poo; Singh, Kavita; Gittis, Apostolos G.; Garboczi, David N. (NIH)

    2010-11-03

    The current vaccine against smallpox is an infectious form of vaccinia virus that has significant side effects. Alternative vaccine approaches using recombinant viral proteins are being developed. A target of subunit vaccine strategies is the poxvirus protein A33, a conserved protein in the Chordopoxvirinae subfamily of Poxviridae that is expressed on the outer viral envelope. Here we have determined the structure of the A33 ectodomain of vaccinia virus. The structure revealed C-type lectin-like domains (CTLDs) that occur as dimers in A33 crystals with five different crystal lattices. Comparison of the A33 dimer models shows that the A33 monomers have a degree of flexibility in position within the dimer. Structural comparisons show that the A33 monomer is a close match to the Link module class of CTLDs but that the A33 dimer is most similar to the natural killer (NK)-cell receptor class of CTLDs. Structural data on Link modules and NK-cell receptor-ligand complexes suggest a surface of A33 that could interact with viral or host ligands. The dimer interface is well conserved in all known A33 sequences, indicating an important role for the A33 dimer. The structure indicates how previously described A33 mutations disrupt protein folding and locates the positions of N-linked glycosylations and the epitope of a protective antibody.

  9. Plasma C-type natriuretic peptide as a predictor for therapeutic response to metoprolol in children with postural tachycardia syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lin

    Full Text Available POTS is a global public-health disease, but predictor for therapeutic response to metoprolol in children with POTS is lacking. This study was designed to investigate predictive value of plasma C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP in the therapeutic efficacy of metoprolol on postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS in children. Totally 34 children with POTS and 27 healthy children were included in the study. The head-up test or head-up tilt test was used to check heart rate and blood pressure from supine to upright in subjects. A double antibody (competitive sandwich immunoluminometric assay was used to detect plasma CNP. Metoprolol was used to treat children with POTS. The difference in plasma concentrations of CNP between responders and non-responders was compared. An ROC curve was used to analyze plasma CNP to predict efficacy of metoprolol on POTS in children. Plasma CNP in children with POTS was significantly higher than that of healthy children [(51.9 ± 31.4 vs. (25.1 ± 19.1 pg/ml, P 32.55 pg/ml yielded a sensitivity of 95.8% and specificity of 70% in predicting therapeutic efficacy of metoprolol on POTS children. Plasma CNP might serve as a useful predictor for the therapeutic efficacy of metoprolol on POTS in children.

  10. Mechanistic Insights into the Role of C-Type Lectin Receptor/CARD9 Signaling in Human Antifungal Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Rebecca A; Lionakis, Michail S

    2016-01-01

    Human CARD9 deficiency is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disorder caused by biallelic mutations in the gene CARD9, which encodes a signaling protein that is found downstream of many C-type lectin receptors (CLRs). CLRs encompass a large family of innate recognition receptors, expressed predominantly by myeloid and epithelial cells, which bind fungal carbohydrates and initiate antifungal immune responses. Accordingly, human CARD9 deficiency is associated with the spontaneous development of persistent and severe fungal infections that primarily localize to the skin and subcutaneous tissue, mucosal surfaces and/or central nervous system (CNS). In the last 3 years, more than 15 missense and nonsense CARD9 mutations have been reported which associate with the development of a wide spectrum of fungal infections caused by a variety of fungal organisms. The mechanisms by which CARD9 provides organ-specific protection against these fungal infections are now emerging. In this review, we summarize recent immunological and clinical advances that have provided significant mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of human CARD9 deficiency. We also discuss how genetic mutations in CARD9-coupled receptors (Dectin-1, Dectin-2) and CARD9-binding partners (MALT1, BCL10) affect human antifungal immunity relative to CARD9 deficiency, and we highlight major understudied research questions which merit future investigation. PMID:27092298

  11. Mechanistic insights into the role of C-type lectin receptor/CARD9 signaling in human antifungal immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A. Drummond

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Human CARD9 deficiency is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disorder caused by biallelic mutations in the gene CARD9, which encodes a signaling protein that is found downstream of many C-type lectin receptors (CLRs. CLRs encompass a large family of innate recognition receptors, expressed predominantly by myeloid and epithelial cells, which bind fungal carbohydrates and initiate antifungal immune responses. Accordingly, human CARD9 deficiency is associated with the spontaneous development of persistent and severe fungal infections that primarily localize to the skin and subcutaneous tissue, mucosal surfaces and/or central nervous system (CNS. In the last few years, more than 15 missense and nonsense CARD9 mutations have been reported which associate with the development of a wide spectrum of fungal infections caused by a variety of fungal organisms. The mechanisms by which CARD9 provides organ-specific protection against these fungal infections are now emerging. In this review, we summarize recent immunological and clinical advances that have provided significant mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of human CARD9 deficiency. We also discuss how genetic mutations in CARD9-coupled receptors (Dectin-1, Dectin-2 and CARD9-binding partners (MALT1, BCL10 affect human antifungal immunity relative to CARD9 deficiency, and we highlight major understudied research questions which merit future investigation.

  12. 树突状细胞相关凝集素受体1和2在真菌免疫领域的研究进展%DC-associated C-type lecxin-1 and DC-associated C-type lecxin-2 in antifungal dfences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄晓强; 陈剑

    2012-01-01

    树突状细胞相关凝集素受体1和2(Dectin1和2)是2C型凝集素受体家族(CLR)的重要成员,作为模式识别受体( PRRs),其有效地识别病原体相关分子模式(PAMPs);Dectin-1识别β-葡聚糖,通过自身免疫受体络氨酸激活基序( ITAM)向胞内转导信号;Dectin-2识别α-甘露聚糖,通过耦联FcRγ链上的ITAM结构转导信号.ITAM招募并激活非受体络氨酸蛋白激酶(Syk),后者激活MAPKs或介导CARD9-Malt1-Bcl10复合体组装,激活核因子-κB(NF-κB),诱导合成炎症因子等一系列细胞活动.其配体β-葡聚糖和甘露聚糖都是真菌细胞壁的主要成分.近年来研究表明,Dectin-1和Dectin-2受体在真菌免疫防御中具有重要作用.%DC-associated C-type lectin-1 and 2 (Dectin-1 and Dectin-2) are pivotal C-type lectin family members,both of them function as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to initiate innate and adaptive immunity by recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs).Dectin-1 recognizes β-glucans and signals with its cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-like motif,whereas Dectin-2 recognizes α-mannans and signals through association with the ITAM-containing Fc receptor γ chain.Upon ligand ligation,spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is recruited to the ITAM.Syk mediates the activation of MAPKs;or induces the formation of the CARD9-Malt1-Bcl10 complex,resulting in the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB).Recert studies indicate that Dectin-1 and Dectin-2 play important roles in immune defense against fungi.

  13. KynR, a Lrp/AsnC-type transcriptional regulator, directly controls the kynurenine pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoten, Claire A; Hudson, L Lynn; Coleman, James P; Farrow, John M; Pesci, Everett C

    2011-12-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can utilize a variety of carbon sources and produces many secondary metabolites to help survive harsh environments. P. aeruginosa is part of a small group of bacteria that use the kynurenine pathway to catabolize tryptophan. Through the kynurenine pathway, tryptophan is broken down into anthranilate, which is further degraded into tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates or utilized to make numerous aromatic compounds, including the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS). We have previously shown that the kynurenine pathway is a critical source of anthranilate for PQS synthesis and that the kynurenine pathway genes (kynA and kynBU) are upregulated in the presence of kynurenine. A putative Lrp/AsnC-type transcriptional regulator (gene PA2082, here called kynR), is divergently transcribed from the kynBU operon and is highly conserved in gram-negative bacteria that harbor the kynurenine pathway. We show that a mutation in kynR renders P. aeruginosa unable to utilize L-tryptophan as a sole carbon source and decreases PQS production. In addition, we found that the increase of kynA and kynB transcriptional activity in response to kynurenine was completely abolished in a kynR mutant, further indicating that KynR mediates the kynurenine-dependent expression of the kynurenine pathway genes. Finally, we found that purified KynR specifically bound the kynA promoter in the presence of kynurenine and bound the kynB promoter in the absence or presence of kynurenine. Taken together, our data show that KynR directly regulates the kynurenine pathway genes. PMID:21965577

  14. Natriuretic peptide receptor-B (guanylyl cyclase-B) mediates C-type natriuretic peptide relaxation of precontracted rat aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewett, J G; Fendly, B M; Garbers, D L; Lowe, D G

    1995-03-01

    The most potent known agonist for the natriuretic peptide receptor-B (NPR-B)/guanylyl cyclase-B is C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP). A homologous ligand-receptor system consists of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and NPR-A/guanylyl cyclase-A. A third member of this family is NPR-C, a non-guanylyl cyclase receptor. Monoclonal antibodies were raised against NPR-B by immunizing mice with a purified receptor-IgG fusion protein consisting of the extracellular domain of NPR-B and the Fc portion of human IgG-gamma 1. One monoclonal antibody, 3G12, did not recognize NPR-A or NPR-C and bound to human and rat NPR-B. CNP binding to NPR-B and stimulation of cGMP synthesis were inhibited by 3G12. With cells isolated from either the media or adventitia layers of rat thoracic aorta, 3G12 did not interfere with ANP-stimulated cGMP synthesis, but it inhibited CNP-stimulated cGMP levels in cells from both layers. CNP (IC50 = 10 nM) and ANP (IC50 = 1 nM) caused relaxation of phenylephrine-contracted rat aortic rings. 3G12 caused a marked increase in the IC50 for CNP, from 10 nM to 140 nM, but failed to affect ANP-mediated relaxation. Therefore, our results for the first time demonstrate that CNP relaxes vascular smooth muscle by virtue of its binding to NPR-B. PMID:7876238

  15. C-type natriuretic-peptide-potentiated relaxation response of gastric smooth muscle in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Lan Cai; Dong-Yuan Xu; Xiang-Lan Li; Zhang-Xun Qiu; Zheng Jin; Wen-Xie Xu

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study the sensitivity of gastric smooth muscle to C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. METHODS: The spontaneous contraction of a gastric smooth muscle strip was recorded by using physiological methods in rats. The expressions of CNP and natriuretic peptide receptor-B (NPR-B) in gastric tissue were examined by using immunohistochemistry techniques in the diabetic rat. RESULTS: At 4 wk after injection of STZ and vehicle, the frequency of spontaneous contraction of gastric smooth muscle was significantly reduced in diabetic rats, and the frequency was decreased from 3.10 ± 0.14 cycle/min in controls to 2.23 ± 0.13 cycle/min ( n = 8, P < 0.01). However, the ampli tude of spontaneous contraction was not significant different from the normal rat. CNP significantly inhibited spontaneous contraction of gastric smooth muscle in normal and diabetic rats, but the inhibitory effect was significantly potentiated in the diabetic rats. The amplitudes of spontaneous contraction were suppressed by 75.15% ± 0.71% and 58.92% ± 1.32% while the frequencies were decreased by 53.33% ± 2.03% and 26.95% ± 2.82% in diabetic and normal rats, respectively ( n = 8, P < 0.01). The expression of CNP in gastric tissue was not changed in diabetic rats, however the expression of NPR-B was significantly increased in diabetic rats, and the staining indexes of NPR-B were 30.67 ± 1.59 and 17.63 ± 1.49 in diabetic and normal rat, respectively ( n = 8, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: The results suggest that CNP induced an inhibitory effect on spontaneous contraction of gastric smooth muscle, potentiated in diabetic rat via up-regulation of the natriuretic peptides-NPR-Bparticulate guanylyl cyclase-cyclic GMP signal pathway.

  16. Mannose-recognition mutant of the galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine-specific C-type lectin CEL-I engineered by site-directed mutagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Moriuchi, Hiromi; Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2015-01-01

    Background CEL-I is a galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine-specific C-type lectin isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata. Its carbohydrate-binding site contains a QPD (Gln-Pro-Asp) motif, which is generally recognized as the galactose specificity-determining motif in the C-type lectins. In our previous study, replacement of the QPD motif by an EPN (Glu-Pro-Asn) motif led to a weak binding affinity for mannose. Therefore, we examined the effects of an additional mutation in the carbohydr...

  17. Overproduction of CcmG and CcmFHRc Fully Suppresses the c-Type Cytochrome Biogenesis Defect of Rhodobacter capsulatus CcmI-Null Mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, Carsten; Deshmukh, Meenal; Astor, Doniel; Kranz, Robert G.; Daldal, Fevzi

    2005-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria like Rhodobacter capsulatus use intertwined pathways to carry out the posttranslational maturation of c-type cytochromes (Cyts). This periplasmic process requires at least 10 essential components for apo-Cyt c chaperoning, thio-oxidoreduction, and the delivery of heme and its covalent ligation. One of these components, CcmI (also called CycH), is thought to act as an apo-Cyt c chaperone. In R. capsulatus, CcmI-null mutants are unable to produce c-type Cyts and thus sust...

  18. Characteristic recognition of N-acetylgalactosamine by an invertebrate C-type Lectin, CEL-I, revealed by X-ray crystallographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Hajime; Kusunoki, Masami; Kurisu, Genji; Fujimoto, Tokiko; Aoyagi, Haruhiko; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2004-10-22

    CEL-I is a C-type lectin, purified from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata, that shows a high specificity for N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc). We determined the crystal structures of CEL-I and its complex with GalNAc at 2.0 and 1.7 A resolution, respectively. CEL-I forms a disulfide-linked homodimer and contains two intramolecular disulfide bonds, although it lacks one intramolecular disulfide bond that is widely conserved among various C-type carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs). Although the sequence similarity of CEL-I with other C-type CRDs is low, the overall folding of CEL-I was quite similar to those of other C-type CRDs. The structure of the complex with GalNAc revealed that the basic recognition mode of GalNAc was very similar to that for the GalNAc-binding mutant of the mannose-binding protein. However, the acetamido group of GalNAc appeared to be recognized more strongly by the combination of hydrogen bonds to Arg115 and van der Waals interaction with Gln70. Mutational analyses, in which Gln70 and/or Arg115 were replaced by alanine, confirmed that these residues contributed to GalNAc recognition in a cooperative manner. PMID:15319425

  19. cDNA cloning,sequence analysis,and recombinant expression of akitonin beta,a C-type lectin-like protein from Agkistrodon acutus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-dong ZHA; Jing LIU; Kang-sen XU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To clone the cDNA of a new member of snake venom C-type lectin-like proteins, to study its structurefunction relationships and to achieve its recombinant production. METHODS: PCR primers were designed based on the homology and cDNA was amplified by RT-PCR using total RNA from snake venom gland as the template.The PCR products were cloned into the plasmid pGEM-T and sequenced. The deduced protein sequence was analyzed with some bioinformatic programs. A recombinant expression plasmid was constructed using pBADTOPO as vector and transformed into E. coli TOP10 competent cells. RESULTS: A novel cDNA sequence encoding akitonin β was found and accepted by GenBank (accession number AF387100). Akitonin β consists of a typical carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of C-type lectins, and it is homologous with other snake venom C-type lectin-like proteins. It was predicted to be a platelet antagonist. Upon induction with arabinose rAkitonin β expressing in E coli was achieved at a high level (superior to 150 mg/L). The recombinant fusion protein exhibited inhibitory activities on rat platelet aggregation in vitro. CONCLUSION: A new member of snake venom C-type lectin-like proteins was discovered and characterized, and an efficient recombinant expression system was established for its production.

  20. Draft Genome Sequences of Seven Bacterial Strains Isolated from a Polymicrobial Culture of Coccolith-Bearing (C-Type) Emiliania huxleyi M217

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosana, Albert Remus R.; Orata, Fabini D.; Xu, Yue; Simkus, Danielle N.; Bramucci, Anna R.; Boucher, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Strains of Rhodobacteraceae, Sphingomonadales, Alteromonadales, and Bacteroidetes were isolated from a polymicrobial culture of the coccolith-forming (C-type) haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi strain M217. The genomes encode genes for the production of algal growth factors and the consumption of their hosts’ metabolic by-products, suggesting that the polymicrobial culture harbors many symbiotic interactions. PMID:27417845

  1. The dendritic cell-specific C-type lectin DC-SIGN is a receptor for Schistosoma mansoni egg antigens and recognizes the glycan antigen Lewis x.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Die, van I.M.; Vliet, van SJ; Nyame, AK; Cummings, RD; Bank, CM; Appelmelk, B.J.; Geijtenbeek, T.B.H.; Kooijk, van Y.

    2003-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg antigens (SEAs) are crucially involved in modulating the host immune response to infection by S. mansoni. We report that human dendritic cells bind SEAs through the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN). Monoclonal antibodies agai

  2. Comparative study in the effect of C-type natriuretic peptide on gastric motility in various animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Shu Guo; Zheng Jin; Zheng-Yuan Jin; Zhe-Hao Li; Yi-Feng Cui; Zuo-Yu Wang; Wen-Xie Xu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of natriuretic peptides on gastric motility in various animals, and the effect of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) on spontaneous contraction of gastric smooth muscle in rat, guinea-pig and human in vitro was compared.METHODS: Spontaneous contraction of gastric smooth muscle was recorded by four channel physiograph.RESULTS: In the guinea-pig and rat gastric antral circular smooth muscle, CNP markedly decreased the amplitude of spontaneous contraction but it didn't affect the frequency,however, the contractile activity was completely inhibited by CNP in gastric antral longitudinal smooth muscle. In the human gastric antral circular and longitudinal smooth musie, CNP completely inhibited spontaneous contraction. In the circular smooth muscle of guinea-pig and rat gastric fundus,CNP obviously decreased the amplitude of spontaneous contraction but it didn't affect the frequency, however, the contractile activity was completely inhibited by CNP in smooth muscle of fundus longitudinal. In the circular and longitudinal smooth muscle of guinea-pig gastric body, CNP at first induced a relaxation and then an increase in amplitude of spontaneous contraction (rebound contraction), but the frequency was not changed. After the circular smooth muscle of gastric body was pretreated with atropine, an M receptor blocker, the rebound contraction was abolished; In circular and longitudinal smooth muscle of rat gastric body, CNP induced a transient and slight relaxation and successively followed by the recovery in amplitude of spontaneous contraction but it also didn't affect the frequency. After the smooth muscle was pretreated with atropine, the transient and slight relaxation was replaced by long term and complete inhibition; The percentage of CNP-induced inhibition was 76.77±6.21% (fundus), 67.21±5.32 % (body) and 58.23±6.21% (antral) in the gastric circular muscle, however, the inhibitory percentage was 100±0.00 % (fundus), 68.66±3.55 % (body

  3. Invasive potential of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto ospC type L strains increases the possible disease risk to humans in the regions of their distribution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Golovchenko, Maryna; Šíma, Radek; Hajdušek, Ondřej; Grubhoffer, Libor; Oliver, J. H., Jr.; Rudenko, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 7, NOV 28 2014 (2014), s. 538. ISSN 1756-3305 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-27630P; GA ČR GP13-12816P Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : B. burgdorferi ospC type * Invasive potential * Lyme disease * Southeastern U.S.A. * Tick vector * Vertebrate host Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.430, year: 2014

  4. Natriuretic peptide receptor-3 underpins the disparate regulation of endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by C-type natriuretic peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Khambata, Rayomand S.; Panayiotou, Catherine M; Hobbs, Adrian J

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is an endothelium-derived vasorelaxant, exerting anti-atherogenic actions in the vasculature and salvaging the myocardium from ischaemic injury. The cytoprotective effects of CNP are mediated in part via the Gi-coupled natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)3. As GPCRs are well-known to control cell proliferation, we investigated if NPR3 activation underlies effects of CNP on endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell mitogenesis. EXPERIMENT...

  5. Syk Kinase-Coupled C-type Lectin Receptors Engage Protein Kinase C-δ to Elicit Card9 Adaptor-Mediated Innate Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Strasser, Dominikus; Neumann, Konstantin; Bergmann, Hanna; Marakalala, Mohlopheni J.; Guler, Reto; Rojowska, Anna; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Brombacher, Frank; Urlaub, Henning; Baier, Gottfried; Brown, Gordon D.; Leitges, Michael; Ruland, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Summary C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) that couple with the kinase Syk are major pattern recognition receptors for the activation of innate immunity and host defense. CLRs recognize fungi and other forms of microbial or sterile danger, and they induce inflammatory responses through the adaptor protein Card9. The mechanisms relaying CLR proximal signals to the core Card9 module are unknown. Here we demonstrated that protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) was activated upon Dectin-1-Syk signaling, mediated ...

  6. CEL-I, an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-specific C-type lectin, induces nitric oxide production in RAW264.7 mouse macrophage cell line.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamanishi, Tomohiro; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; YAMAGUCHI, Kenichi; Oda, Tatsuya

    2009-01-01

    We found that CEL-I, a GalNAc-specific C-type lectin isolated from the marine invertebrate Holothuroidea (Cucumaria echinata), induces inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and NO production in RAW264.7 cells. The NO production was inhibited by an iNOS inhibitor, L-NAME, but was not by a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibitor, polymyxin B. In the presence of 0.1-M GalNAc, increased NO production by CEL-I-treated RAW264.7 cells was observed rather than the inhibition. Bovine serum albu...

  7. Recombinant Expression, In Vitro Refolding and Characterizing Disulfide Bonds of a Mouse Inhibitory C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor Nkrp1b

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hernychová, Lucie; Mrázek, Hynek; Ivanova, Ljubina; Kukačka, Zdeněk; Chmelík, Josef; Novák, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 2015 (2015), s. 85-93. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk LO1509 Grant ostatní: OPPC(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24023 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : NK cell * C-type lectin-like receptor (CTLR) * Nkrp1 Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  8. Alteration of the carbohydrate-binding specificity of a C-type lectin CEL-I mutant with an EPN carbohydrate-binding motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Ishimine, Tomohiro; Baba, Tomohiro; Kimura, Masanari; Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro

    2013-07-01

    CEL-I is a Gal/GalNAc-specific C-type lectin isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of two carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) with the carbohydrate-recognition motif QPD (Gln-Pro- Asp), which is generally known to exist in galactose-specific C-type CRDs. In the present study, a mutant CEL-I with EPN (Glu-Pro-Asn) motif, which is thought to be responsible for the carbohydrate-recognition of mannose-specific Ctype CRDs, was produced in Escherichia coli, and its effects on the carbohydrate-binding specificity were examined using polyamidoamine dendrimer (PD) conjugated with carbohydrates. Although wild-type CEL-I effectively formed complexes with N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-PD but not with mannose-PD, the mutant CEL-I showed relatively weak but definite affinity for mannose-PD. These results indicated that the QPD and EPN motifs play a significant role in the carbohydrate-recognition mechanism of CEL-I, especially in the discrimination of galactose and mannose. Additional mutations in the recombinant CEL-I binding site may further increase its specificity for mannose, and should provide insights into designing novel carbohydrate-recognition proteins. PMID:23157284

  9. Evolution of the C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor Genes of the DECTIN-1 Cluster in the NK Gene Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Sattler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors are crucial in initiating and shaping innate and adaptive immune responses and often belong to families of structurally and evolutionarily related proteins. The human C-type lectin-like receptors encoded in the DECTIN-1 cluster within the NK gene complex contain prominent receptors with pattern recognition function, such as DECTIN-1 and LOX-1. All members of this cluster share significant homology and are considered to have arisen from subsequent gene duplications. Recent developments in sequencing and the availability of comprehensive sequence data comprising many species showed that the receptors of the DECTIN-1 cluster are not only homologous to each other but also highly conserved between species. Even in Caenorhabditis elegans, genes displaying homology to the mammalian C-type lectin-like receptors have been detected. In this paper, we conduct a comprehensive phylogenetic survey and give an up-to-date overview of the currently available data on the evolutionary emergence of the DECTIN-1 cluster genes.

  10. The Cryptosporidium parvum C-Type Lectin CpClec Mediates Infection of Intestinal Epithelial Cells via Interactions with Sulfated Proteoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludington, Jacob G; Ward, Honorine D

    2016-05-01

    The apicomplexan parasite Cryptosporidium causes significant diarrheal disease worldwide. Effective anticryptosporidial agents are lacking, in part because the molecular mechanisms underlying Cryptosporidium-host cell interactions are poorly understood. Previously, we identified and characterized a novel Cryptosporidium parvum C-type lectin domain-containing mucin-like glycoprotein, CpClec. In this study, we evaluated the mechanisms underlying interactions of CpClec with intestinal epithelial cells by using an Fc-tagged recombinant protein. CpClec-Fc displayed Ca(2+)-dependent, saturable binding to HCT-8 and Caco-2 cells and competitively inhibited C. parvum attachment to and infection of HCT-8 cells. Binding of CpClec-Fc was specifically inhibited by sulfated glycosaminoglycans, particularly heparin and heparan sulfate. Binding was reduced after the removal of heparan sulfate and following the inhibition of glycosaminoglycan synthesis or sulfation in HCT-8 cells. Like CpClec-Fc binding, C. parvum attachment to and infection of HCT-8 cells were inhibited by glycosaminoglycans and were reduced after heparan sulfate removal or inhibition of glycosaminoglycan synthesis or sulfation. Lastly, CpClec-Fc binding and C. parvum sporozoite attachment were significantly decreased in CHO cell mutants defective in glycosaminoglycan synthesis. Together, these results indicate that CpClec is a novel C-type lectin that mediates C. parvum attachment and infection via Ca(2+)-dependent binding to sulfated proteoglycans on intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:26975991

  11. Expression of c-type lysozyme gene in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) is highly regulated and time dependent after salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yi; Liang, Xue-Wang; Chang, Ya-Qing; Song, Jian

    2015-02-01

    Lysozymes have been confirmed to possess varieties of functions in a range of organisms. In the present study, we cloned and sequenced c-type lysozyme cDNAs, constructed the recombinant protein over-expression of c-type lysozyme and analyzed the expression of transcription level in various tissues. The c-type lysozyme cDNA contained an open reading frame of 759 bp encoding a polypeptide of 252 amino acids. The molecular weight of the deduced amino acid of AjcLYZ is 26.7 kDa with an estimated pI of 4.66. Multiple sequence alignments revealed that AjcLYZ had two highly conserved active sites (Glu147 and Asp159) and eight typical Cys residues. The tertiary structure and modeled AjcLYZ showed structural similarity to Meretrix lusoria LYZ. The results of mRNA transcripts showed that the highest expression was found in the tube foot, followed by the muscle, body wall, and coelomic fluid. In contrast, the intestine, tentacle and respiratory tree exhibited very low expression levels. Under salinity stress, significant down-regulation of AjcLYZ was observed in response to salinity stress in the intestine and coelomic fluid. Significant up-regulation and down-regulation of AjcLYZ were observed in response to salinity stress in body wall and respiratory tree. The purified recombinant protein was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and a single band with a molecular mass of 45.09 kDa, which was in agreement with the theoretical size (26.7 kDa for AjcLYZ and 18.39 kDa Trx-His-S tags) of the recombinant protein. Radial diffusion assay was employed to determine the antimicrobial spectrum of recombinant AjcLYZ against three Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and three sea cucumber pathogenic Vibrio species. From the radius of the antimicrobial zone, it was found that recombinant AjcLYZ harbored remarkable in vitro inhibitive effect on tested Gram-positive bacteria, while lytic activity against Gram-negative bacteria was relatively weak. The results will provide new clues about the

  12. Cloning and characterization of sulfite dehydrogenase, two c-type cytochromes, and a flavoprotein of Paracoccus denitrificans GB17: essential role of sulfite dehydrogenase in lithotrophic sulfur oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodara, C; Bardischewsky, F; Friedrich, C G

    1997-08-01

    A 13-kb genomic region of Paracoccus dentrificans GB17 is involved in lithotrophic thiosulfate oxidation. Adjacent to the previously reported soxB gene (C. Wodara, S. Kostka, M. Egert, D. P. Kelly, and C. G. Friedrich, J. Bacteriol. 176:6188-6191, 1994), 3.7 kb were sequenced. Sequence analysis revealed four additional open reading frames, soxCDEF. soxC coded for a 430-amino-acid polypeptide with an Mr of 47,339 that included a putative signal peptide of 40 amino acids (Mr of 3,599) with a RR motif present in periplasmic proteins with complex redox centers. The mature soxC gene product exhibited high amino acid sequence similarity to the eukaryotic molybdoenzyme sulfite oxidase and to nitrate reductase. We constructed a mutant, GBsoxC delta, carrying an in-frame deletion in soxC which covered a region possibly coding for the molybdenum cofactor binding domain. GBsoxC delta was unable to grow lithoautotrophically with thiosulfate but grew well with nitrate as a nitrogen source or as an electron acceptor. Whole cells and cell extracts of mutant GBsoxC delta contained 10% of the thiosulfate-oxidizing activity of the wild type. Only a marginal rate of sulfite-dependent cytochrome c reduction was observed from cell extracts of mutant GBsoxC delta. These results demonstrated that sulfite dehydrogenase was essential for growth with thiosulfate of P. dentrificans GB17. soxD coded for a periplasmic diheme c-type cytochrome of 384 amino acids (Mr of 39,983) containing a putative signal peptide with an Mr of 2,363. soxE coded for a periplasmic monoheme c-type cytochrome of 236 amino acids (Mr of 25,926) containing a putative signal peptide with an Mr of 1,833. SoxD and SoxE were highly identical to c-type cytochromes of P. denitrificans and other organisms. soxF revealed an incomplete open reading frame coding for a peptide of 247 amino acids with a putative signal peptide (Mr of 2,629). The deduced amino acid sequence of soxF was 47% identical and 70% similar to the sequence

  13. Stellar formation

    CERN Document Server

    Reddish, V C

    1978-01-01

    Stellar Formation brings together knowledge about the formation of stars. In seeking to determine the conditions necessary for star formation, this book examines questions such as how, where, and why stars form, and at what rate and with what properties. This text also considers whether the formation of a star is an accident or an integral part of the physical properties of matter. This book consists of 13 chapters divided into two sections and begins with an overview of theories that explain star formation as well as the state of knowledge of star formation in comparison to stellar structure

  14. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of an invertebrate C-type lectin, CEL-I, from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Matsuo, Noriaki; Aoyagi, Haruhiko; Sugawara, Hajime; Uchida, Tatsuya; Kurisu, Genji; Kusunoki, Masami

    2002-01-01

    CEL-I is a GalNAc-specific carbohydrate-binding protein (lectin) isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata. This protein belongs to the widely distributed C-type lectin family of animal lectins, which require Ca(2+) for their carbohydrate-binding ability and play important roles in various molecular-recognition processes in organisms. CEL-I was crystallized with 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique. The CEL-I crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 92.38 (3), b = 69.94 (3), c = 76.69 (3) A, beta = 136.46 (2) degrees. Diffraction data were collected to 2.0 A resolution using synchrotron radiation. The asymmetric unit contains one CEL-I molecule. PMID:11752793

  15. Mitogenic activity of CEL-I, an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-specific C-type lectin, isolated from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata (Holothuroidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zedong; Kim, Daekyung; Yamasaki, Yasuhiro; Yamanishi, Tomohiro; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Tatsuya

    2010-01-01

    An N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-specific Ca(2+)-dependent lectin (C-type lectin), isolated from the marine invertebrate Holothuroidea (Cucumaria echinata), CEL-I, showed potent mitogenic activity toward normal mouse spleen cells. The mitogenic activity of CEL-I, which reached a maximum at 100 microg/ml, was inhibited by GalNAc in a concentration-dependent manner. The mitogenic effect of CEL-I at 10 microg/ml on T cell- enriched splenocytes was at a similar level due to a well-known T cell mitogen, concanavalin A (Con A), at 10 microg/ml. Furthermore, CEL-I evoked a mitogenic response from nude mouse spleen cells, while no significant effects of Con A on this cell population were observed over a wide range of concentrations. These results suggest that CEL-I is a potent mitogenic lectin with the ability to stimulate both T and B cells. PMID:20699569

  16. D-Amino acid residue in the C-type natriuretic peptide from the venom of the mammal, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, the Australian platypus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Allan M; Menz, Ian; Alewood, Paul F; Bansal, Paramjit; Lahnstein, Jelle; Gallagher, Clifford H; Kuchel, Philip W

    2002-07-31

    The C-type natriuretic peptide from the platypus venom (OvCNP) exists in two forms, OvCNPa and OvCNPb, whose amino acid sequences are identical. Through the use of nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, and peptidase digestion studies, we discovered that OvCNPb incorporates a D-amino acid at position 2 in the primary structure. Peptides containing a D-amino acid have been found in lower forms of organism, but this report is the first for a D-amino acid in a biologically active peptide from a mammal. The result implies the existence of a specific isomerase in the platypus that converts an L-amino acid residue in the protein to the D-configuration. PMID:12135762

  17. Alternation of plasma c-type natriuretic peptide in cerebral infarction%脑梗死患者血浆c-型利钠肽变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵文凤; 宋利春

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effects of c type natriuretic peptide (CNP) on cerebral infarction.METHODS:Plasma levels of CNP were concomitantly measured by radioimmunoassay in 30 patients with cerebral infarction and in 30 normal controls.RESULTS:Plasma levels of CNP were increased significantly in the acute stage of cerebral infarction than those in the normal controls(P< 0.01) and levels in the moderate and serious cases were lower than those in the slight cases(P< 0.01).CONCLUSION:In cerebral infarction the increase of plasma CNP was in accordance with the severity of the disease .CNP in the pathophysiology of acute cerebral ischemia had a deleterious effect on the evolution of cerebral infarction.

  18. Identification of a novel C-type lectin from the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei and its role in defense against pathogens infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Zhan; ZHANG Jiquan; LI Fuhua; ZHANG Xiaojun; LIU Chengzhang; XIANG Jianhai

    2011-01-01

    Acting as one of the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs),C-type lectin is believed to mediate pathogen recognition and plays an important role in the clearance of pathogens as part of the innate immune system.In this work,a novel C-type lectin gene (named LvLecl) was cloned from the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.The ORF of LvLecl is 510 bp,encoding 169 amino acids.The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal peptide of 19 amino acids at the N-terminal and a carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) at the C-terminal.LvLecl was mainly expressed in the hepatopancreas.Real-time PCR analysis indicated that the level of LvLecl transcripts significantly changed in the hepatopancreas after the shrimp were artificially challenged with LPS,Micrococcus lysodeikticus and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV).RNAi-based silencing of LvLecl resulted in increases in mortality when the shrimp were challenged with WSSV,and the median lethal time was reduced compared with controls.Although there was no characteristic “EPN” (Glu-Pro-Ser) or “QPD” (Gln-Pro-Asp) motif,the recombinant LvLecl,expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3),could also agglutinate M.lysodeikticus and Vibrio anguillarum.The agglutinating activities were calcium-dependent and could be inhibited by D-mannose,D-glucose,D-galactose and N-Acetyl-D-mannose.These results suggest that LvLecl might be involved in the immune response against WSSV and bacterial infections and contribute to non-self recognition as a pattem recognition receptor in the innate immune system of the shrimp L.vannamei.

  19. Isolation, homology modeling and renal effects of a C-type natriuretic peptide from the venom of the Brazilian yellow scorpion (Tityus serrulatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Renata S; Ximenes, Rafael M; Jorge, Antonio R C; Nascimento, Nilberto R F; Martins, René D; Rabello, Marcelo M; Hernandes, Marcelo Z; Toyama, Daniela O; Toyama, Marcos H; Martins, Alice M C; Havt, Alexandre; Monteiro, Helena S A

    2013-11-01

    Mammalian natriuretic peptides (NPs) have been extensively investigated for use as therapeutic agents in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Here, we describe the isolation, sequencing and tridimensional homology modeling of the first C-type natriuretic peptide isolated from scorpion venom. In addition, its effects on the renal function of rats and on the mRNA expression of natriuretic peptide receptors in the kidneys are delineated. Fractionation of Tityus serrulatus venom using chromatographic techniques yielded a peptide with a molecular mass of 2190.64 Da, which exhibited the pattern of disulfide bridges that is characteristic of a C-type NP (TsNP, T. serrulatus Natriuretic Peptide). In the isolated perfused rat kidney assay, treatment with two concentrations of TsNP (0.03 and 0.1 μg/mL) increased the perfusion pressure, glomerular filtration rate and urinary flow. After 60 min of treatment at both concentrations, the percentages of sodium, potassium and chloride transport were decreased, and the urinary cGMP concentration was elevated. Natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) mRNA expression was down regulated in the kidneys treated with both concentrations of TsNP, whereas NPR-B, NPR-C and CG-C mRNAs were up regulated at the 0.1 μg/mL concentration. In conclusion, this work describes the isolation and modeling of the first natriuretic peptide isolated from scorpion venom. In addition, examinations of the renal actions of TsNP indicate that its effects may be related to the activation of NPR-B, NPR-C and GC-C. PMID:23911732

  20. CLEC4F is an inducible C-type lectin in F4/80-positive cells and is involved in alpha-galactosylceramide presentation in liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ya Yang

    Full Text Available CLEC4F, a member of C-type lectin, was first purified from rat liver extract with high binding affinity to fucose, galactose (Gal, N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc, and un-sialylated glucosphingolipids with GalNAc or Gal terminus. However, the biological functions of CLEC4F have not been elucidated. To address this question, we examined the expression and distribution of murine CLEC4F, determined its binding specificity by glycan array, and investigated its function using CLEC4F knockout (Clec4f-/- mice. We found that CLEC4F is a heavily glycosylated membrane protein co-expressed with F4/80 on Kupffer cells. In contrast to F4/80, CLEC4F is detectable in fetal livers at embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5 but not in yolk sac, suggesting the expression of CLEC4F is induced as cells migrate from yolk cells to the liver. Even though CLEC4F is not detectable in tissues outside liver, both residential Kupffer cells and infiltrating mononuclear cells surrounding liver abscesses are CLEC4F-positive upon Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes infection. While CLEC4F has strong binding to Gal and GalNAc, terminal fucosylation inhibits CLEC4F recognition to several glycans such as Fucosyl GM1, Globo H, Bb3∼4 and other fucosyl-glycans. Moreover, CLEC4F interacts with alpha-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer in a calcium-dependent manner and participates in the presentation of α-GalCer to natural killer T (NKT cells. This suggests that CLEC4F is a C-type lectin with diverse binding specificity expressed on residential Kupffer cells and infiltrating monocytes in the liver, and may play an important role to modulate glycolipids presentation on Kupffer cells.

  1. Galaxy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galaxy formation is at the forefront of observation and theory in cosmology. An improved understanding is essential for improving our knowledge both of the cosmological parameters, of the contents of the universe, and of our origins. In these lectures intended for graduate students, galaxy formation theory is reviewed and confronted with recent observational issues. In lecture 1, the following topics are presented: star formation considerations, including IMF, star formation efficiency and star formation rate, the origin of the galaxy luminosity function, and feedback in dwarf galaxies. In lecture 2, we describe formation of disks and massive spheroids, including the growth of supermassive black holes, negative feedback in spheroids, the AGN-star formation connection, star formation rates at high redshift and the baryon fraction in galaxies.

  2. Tile C型骨盆骨折的后路手术治疗%Surgical treatment for Tile C type pelvis fracture through posterior approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志伟; 杨乐忠; 刘春磊

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨经后入路手术内固定治疗Tile C型骨盆骨折的疗效.方法:2005年1月至2009年6月采用单纯后侧入路治疗12例Tile C型骨盆骨折患者,其中男8例,女4例;年龄25-58岁,平均39.5岁.伤后至手术时间7~10d,平均9.5d.入院后均行X线及CT三维立体成像检查,按照Tile分型标准:C1型5例,C2型2例,C1+C2型4例,C3型1例.经抗休克处理,全身情况稳定后,重建钢板固定后环,前环不予内固定.术后常规惠侧下肢行3~4kg皮肤牵引3周.结果:所有患者均获得随访,随访时间6~24个月,平均12.6个月,伤口愈合良好,骨折均愈合,无骨盆畸形愈合、腰骶部疼痛、下肢不等长等并发症.按照Majeed的疗效评定标准:总分(91.50±6.95)分;优10例,良2例.结论:采用单纯后侧入路固定后环治疗TileC型骨盆骨折,可矫正畸形,重建骨盆环的稳定性,效果满意.%Objective: To study the clinical results of surgical treatment for Tile C type pelvis fractures with internal fixation by posterior approach. Methods: From January 2005 to June 2009,12 patients with Tile C type pelvis fracture were treated by open reduction through posterior approach. There were 8 males and 4 females, with an average age of 39.5 years ranging from 25 to 58 years. The time from injury to operation was ranged from 7 to 10 days with an average of 9.5 days. All the patients were given X-ray, 3-D CT examinations before operation. The fracture were classified by Tile classification:Type C 1 in 5 cases,Type C2 in 2 cases,Type C1 and Type C2 in 4 cases,Type C3 in 1 case. All the posterior rings were fixed by re-establishing steel board without anterior ring fixation after stabilization of body condition. All the patients were treated with skin traction for 3 weeks after operation. Results:All 12 patients were followed up for 6 months to 24 months with an average of 12.6 months. All the incisions healed well,and the fractures got union. No pelvic malunion,low back pain or

  3. Biological and serological characterization of the C-type RNA viruses isolated from the C57BL/Ka strain of mice; 1. Influence of some chemical and physical agents on the quantitation of murine C-type RNA viruses in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments reveal that several factors such as cell growth rate, initial cell number, adsorption time, thermal inactivation, UV and X-ray inactivation, and X-ray or IUdR treatment of host cells all exert significant effects on murine C-type RNA virus growth and quantitation in cell cultures in vitro. These data have firmly established the basis of the assay systems developed by the authors and now commonly used in biological studies on virus isolates from the C57BL/Ka strain of mice. The RadLV was used in this strain of mice to render the BL/Ka(6) isolates

  4. Spectroscopic Studies of Abiotic and Biological Nanomaterials: Silver Nanoparticles, Rhodamine 6G Adsorbed on Graphene, and c-Type Cytochromes and Type IV Pili in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrall, Elizabeth S.

    This thesis describes spectroscopic studies of three different systems: silver nanoparticles, the dye molecule rhodamine 6G adsorbed on graphene, and the type IV pili and c-type cytochromes produced by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. Although these systems are quite different in some ways, they can all be considered examples of nanomaterials. A nanomaterial is generally defined as having at least one dimension below 100 nm in size. Silver nanoparticles, with sub-100 nm size in all dimensions, are examples of zero-dimensional nanomaterials. Graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon atoms, is the paradigmatic two-dimensional nanomaterial. And although bacterial cells are on the order of 1 μm in size, the type IV pili and multiheme c-type cytochromes produced by G. sulfurreducens can be considered to be one- and zero-dimensional nanomaterials respectively. A further connection between these systems is their strong interaction with visible light, allowing us to study them using similar spectroscopic tools. The first chapter of this thesis describes research on the plasmon-mediated photochemistry of silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles support coherent electron oscillations, known as localized surface plasmons, at resonance frequencies that depend on the particle size and shape and the local dielectric environment. Nanoparticle absorption and scattering cross-sections are maximized at surface plasmon resonance frequencies, and the electromagnetic field is amplified near the particle surface. Plasmonic effects can enhance the photochemistry of silver particles alone or in conjunction with semiconductors according to several mechanisms. We study the photooxidation of citrate by silver nanoparticles in a photoelectrochemical cell, focusing on the wavelength-dependence of the reaction rate and the role of the semiconductor substrate. We find that the citrate photooxidation rate does not track the plasmon resonance of the silver

  5. Amino acid sequence and carbohydrate-binding analysis of the N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-specific C-type lectin, CEL-I, from the Holothuroidea, Cucumaria echinata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Matsuo, Noriaki; Shiba, Kouhei; Nishinohara, Shoichi; Yamasaki, Nobuyuki; Sugawara, Hajime; Aoyagi, Haruhiko

    2002-01-01

    CEL-I is one of the Ca2+-dependent lectins that has been isolated from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata. This protein is composed of two identical subunits held by a single disulfide bond. The complete amino acid sequence of CEL-I was determined by sequencing the peptides produced by proteolytic fragmentation of S-pyridylethylated CEL-I. A subunit of CEL-I is composed of 140 amino acid residues. Two intrachain (Cys3-Cys14 and Cys31-Cys135) and one interchain (Cys36) disulfide bonds were also identified from an analysis of the cystine-containing peptides obtained from the intact protein. The similarity between the sequence of CEL-I and that of other C-type lectins was low, while the C-terminal region, including the putative Ca2+ and carbohydrate-binding sites, was relatively well conserved. When the carbohydrate-binding activity was examined by a solid-phase microplate assay, CEL-I showed much higher affinity for N-acetyl-D-galactosamine than for other galactose-related carbohydrates. The association constant of CEL-I for p-nitrophenyl N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosaminide (NP-GalNAc) was determined to be 2.3 x 10(4) M(-1), and the maximum number of bound NP-GalNAc was estimated to be 1.6 by an equilibrium dialysis experiment. PMID:11866098

  6. CEL-I, an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-specific C-type lectin, induces nitric oxide production in RAW264.7 mouse macrophage cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanishi, Tomohiro; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Tatsuya

    2009-08-01

    We found that CEL-I, a GalNAc-specific C-type lectin isolated from the marine invertebrate Holothuroidea (Cucumaria echinata), induces inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and NO production in RAW264.7 cells. The NO production was inhibited by an iNOS inhibitor, L-NAME, but was not by a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibitor, polymyxin B. In the presence of 0.1-M GalNAc, increased NO production by CEL-I-treated RAW264.7 cells was observed rather than the inhibition. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) significantly inhibited the CEL-I-induced NO production as well as the binding of FITC-labelled CEL-I on RAW264.7 cells. Three MAP kinase inhibitors (specific to extra-cellular regulated kinase, c-jun NH(2)-terminal kinase and p38 MAP kinase) inhibited CEL-I-induced NO production with different extents. Heat-treatment of CEL-I resulted in a decreased activity of CEL-I depending on the temperature. These results suggest that CEL-I induces NO production in RAW264.7 cells through the protein-cell interaction rather than the binding to the specific carbohydrate chains on the cell surface. PMID:19351706

  7. Involvement of viral envelope GP2 in Ebola virus entry into cells expressing the macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usami, Katsuaki [Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Molecular Immunology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Matsuno, Keita; Igarashi, Manabu [Department of Global Epidemiology, Hokkaido University Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Sapporo 001-0020 (Japan); Denda-Nagai, Kaori [Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Molecular Immunology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Takada, Ayato [Department of Global Epidemiology, Hokkaido University Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Sapporo 001-0020 (Japan); Irimura, Tatsuro, E-mail: irimura@mol.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Molecular Immunology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields} Ebola virus infection is mediated by binding to and fusion with the target cells. {yields} Structural feature of the viral glycoprotein determines the infectivity. {yields} Surface C-type lectin, MGL, of macrophages and dendritic cells mediate the infection. {yields} GP2, one of glycoprotein subunits, plays an essential role in MGL-mediated infection. {yields} There is a critical amino acid residue involved in high infectivity. -- Abstract: Ebola virus (EBOV) infection is initiated by the interaction of the viral surface envelope glycoprotein (GP) with the binding sites on target cells. Differences in the mortality among different species of the Ebola viruses, i.e., Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) and Reston ebolavirus (REBOV), correspond to the in vitro infectivity of the pseudo-typed virus constructed with the GPs in cells expressing macrophage galactose-type calcium-type lectin (MGL/CD301). Through mutagenesis of GP2, the transmembrane-anchored subunit of GP, we found that residues 502-527 of the GP2 sequence determined the different infectivity between VSV-ZEBOV GP and -REBOV GP in MGL/CD301-expressing cells and a histidine residue at position 516 of ZEBOV GP2 appeared essential in the differential infectivity. These findings may provide a clue to clarify a molecular basis of different pathogenicity among EBOV species.

  8. Involvement of viral envelope GP2 in Ebola virus entry into cells expressing the macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Ebola virus infection is mediated by binding to and fusion with the target cells. → Structural feature of the viral glycoprotein determines the infectivity. → Surface C-type lectin, MGL, of macrophages and dendritic cells mediate the infection. → GP2, one of glycoprotein subunits, plays an essential role in MGL-mediated infection. → There is a critical amino acid residue involved in high infectivity. -- Abstract: Ebola virus (EBOV) infection is initiated by the interaction of the viral surface envelope glycoprotein (GP) with the binding sites on target cells. Differences in the mortality among different species of the Ebola viruses, i.e., Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) and Reston ebolavirus (REBOV), correspond to the in vitro infectivity of the pseudo-typed virus constructed with the GPs in cells expressing macrophage galactose-type calcium-type lectin (MGL/CD301). Through mutagenesis of GP2, the transmembrane-anchored subunit of GP, we found that residues 502-527 of the GP2 sequence determined the different infectivity between VSV-ZEBOV GP and -REBOV GP in MGL/CD301-expressing cells and a histidine residue at position 516 of ZEBOV GP2 appeared essential in the differential infectivity. These findings may provide a clue to clarify a molecular basis of different pathogenicity among EBOV species.

  9. Shear wave anisotropy beneath the volcanic front in South Kyushu area, Japan: Development of C-type olivine CPO under H2O-rich conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Tadashi; Hiramatsu, Yoshihiro; Mizukami, Tomoyuki

    2013-08-01

    wave splitting from local intermediate-depth earthquakes is investigated to detect the anisotropic structure in the mantle wedge beneath the South Kyushu area, Japan. We observed shear wave splitting with NEE-SWW to NWW-SEE polarization directions and delay times of 0.04-0.63 s. Trench-normal shear wave polarization anisotropy with a delay time greater than 0.3 s probably overlaps in the high VP/VS region at a depth of 100-150 km beneath the volcanic front. Model calculations for the cause of the anisotropy suggest that the development of "C-type" olivine crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) with a trench-parallel b axis concentration and a trench-normal a axis concentration best reproduces observations compared to A-, B-, or E-type olivine CPOs and antigorite CPO. We conclude that a thick anisotropic layer, approximately 50 km, is formed by concentration of interstitial fluid in peridotite. We briefly discuss the mechanism carrying water to the deep mantle wedge. A possible explanation is that interstitial fluids in the mantle wedge are effectively released because of a decrease in dihedral angles of olivine-fluid interfaces at 150 km depth. Our results imply a close relation between the high density of explosive volcanoes in the South Kyushu area and the underlying water-rich mantle.

  10. The C-type lectin receptor SIGNR3 binds to fungi present in commensal microbiota and influences immune regulation in experimental colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena eEriksson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease is a condition of acute and chronic inflammation of the gut. An important factor contributing to pathogenesis is a dysregulated mucosal immunity against commensal bacteria and fungi. Host pattern recognition receptors sense commensals in the gut and are involved in maintaining the balance between controlled responses to pathogens and overwhelming innate immune activation. C-type lectin receptors (CLRs are pattern recognition receptors recognizing glycan structures on pathogens and self-antigens. Here we examined the role of the murine CLR SIGNR3 in the recognition of commensals and its involvement in intestinal immunity. SIGNR3 is the closest murine homologue of the human DC-SIGN receptor recognizing similar carbohydrate ligands such as terminal fucose or high-mannose glycans. We discovered that SIGNR3 recognizes fungi present in the commensal microbiota. To analyze if this interaction impacts the intestinal immunity against microbiota, the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced colitis model was employed. SIGNR3-/- mice exhibited an increased weight loss associated with more severe colitis symptoms compared to wild-type control mice. The increased inflammation in SIGNR3-/- mice was accompanied by a higher level of TNF-α in colon. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that SIGNR3 recognizes intestinal fungi and has an immune regulatory role in colitis.

  11. Neutral endopeptidase-resistant C-type natriuretic peptide variant represents a new therapeutic approach for treatment of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3-related dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Daniel J; Dvorak-Ewell, Melita; Bullens, Sherry; Lorget, Florence; Bell, Sean M; Peng, Jeff; Castillo, Sianna; Aoyagi-Scharber, Mika; O'Neill, Charles A; Krejci, Pavel; Wilcox, William R; Rimoin, David L; Bunting, Stuart

    2015-04-01

    Achondroplasia (ACH), the most common form of human dwarfism, is caused by an activating autosomal dominant mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 gene. Genetic overexpression of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), a positive regulator of endochondral bone growth, prevents dwarfism in mouse models of ACH. However, administration of exogenous CNP is compromised by its rapid clearance in vivo through receptor-mediated and proteolytic pathways. Using in vitro approaches, we developed modified variants of human CNP, resistant to proteolytic degradation by neutral endopeptidase, that retain the ability to stimulate signaling downstream of the CNP receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor B. The variants tested in vivo demonstrated significantly longer serum half-lives than native CNP. Subcutaneous administration of one of these CNP variants (BMN 111) resulted in correction of the dwarfism phenotype in a mouse model of ACH and overgrowth of the axial and appendicular skeletons in wild-type mice without observable changes in trabecular and cortical bone architecture. Moreover, significant growth plate widening that translated into accelerated bone growth, at hemodynamically tolerable doses, was observed in juvenile cynomolgus monkeys that had received daily subcutaneous administrations of BMN 111. BMN 111 was well tolerated and represents a promising new approach for treatment of patients with ACH. PMID:25650377

  12. In Situ Spectral Kinetics of Cr(VI) Reduction by c-Type Cytochromes in A Suspension of Living Shewanella putrefaciens 200

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tongxu; Li, Xiaomin; Li, Fangbai; Han, Rui; Wu, Yundang; Yuan, Xiu; Wang, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Although c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts) mediating metal reduction have been mainly investigated with in vitro purified proteins of dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria, the in vivo behavior of c-Cyts is still unclear given the difficulty in measuring the proteins of intact cells. Here, c-Cyts in living Shewanella putrefaciens 200 (SP200) was successfully quantified using diffuse-transmission UV/Vis spectroscopy due to the strong absorbance of hemes, and the in situ spectral kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction by c-Cyts were examined over time. The reduced product Cr(III) observed on the cell surface may play a role in inhibiting the Cr(VI) reduction and reducing the cell numbers with high concentrations (>200 μM) of Cr(VI) evidenced by the 16S rRNA analysis. A brief kinetic model was established with two predominant reactions, redox transformation of c-Cyts and Cr(VI) reduction by reduced c-Cyts, but the fitting curves were not well-matched with c-Cyts data. The Cr(III)-induced inhibitory effect to the cellular function of redox transformation of c-Cyts was then added to the model, resulting in substantially improved the model fitting. This study provides a case of directly examining the reaction properties of outer-membrane enzyme during microbial metal reduction processes under physiological conditions.

  13. Macrophage-inducible C-type lectin is associated with anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies-positive rheumatoid arthritis in men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xin-yu; GUO Jian-ping; YIN Fang-rui; LU Xiao-lan; LI Ru; HE Jing; LIU Xu; LI Zhan-guo

    2012-01-01

    Background Macrophage-inducible C-type lectin (MINCLE) is an important member of C-type lectin superfamily,which has been shown evidence for susceptibility to arthritis in animal models.We aimed to investigate the possible association of MINCLE with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility in Chinese Hart population.Methods Haplotypes from HapMap database (Chinese Hart Beijing,CHB) were used to select tag-single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (r2=0.8) residing in MINCLE gene.A total of 563 patients with RA and 404 healthy controls were TagMan genotyped for SNP rs10841845.Association analyses were performed on the whole data set and on RA subsets based on gender difference and the status of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody in RA patients.Association statistics were calculated by age and sex adjusted logistic regression.Results Overall,MINCLE SNP rs10841845 was not associated with susceptibility to RA.However,following anti-CCP stratification,rs10841845 GG genotypes conferred a significantly protective effects against anti-CCP-positive RA (OR 0.65,95% CI 0.430-0.995,P=0.048).Following gender stratification,SNP rs10841845 G allele appeared to insert its RA protective effect only in male patients,both at allele level (G vs.A OR 0.66,95% CI 0.46-0.93,P=0.018) and at genotype level (GG vs.AA+AG,OR 0.429,95% CI 0.20-0.95,P=0.036).Notably,the male RA protective effect of rs10841845 G allele was only seen in anti-CCP-positive RA (G vs.A:OR 0.64,95% CI 0.43-0.96,P=0.029; GG vs.AA+AG:OR 0.375,95% Cl 0.14-0.94,P=0.038).Furthermore,we observed a significant reduction of Disease Activity Score (DAS) 28 score (3.91±0.70 vs.5.66±0.31,P=0.022) and serum C-reactive protein levels (31.64±24.13 vs.91.80±12.02,P=0.012)in male anti-CCP-positive RA patients carrying rs10841845 GG genotype,compared with patients carrying AA+AG genotypes.Conclusions Our study provides the evidence for a gender specific association between MINCLE rs10841845 and RA

  14. Super-resolution imaging of C-type lectin spatial rearrangement within the dendritic cell plasma membrane at fungal microbe contact sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle S Itano

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells express DC-SIGN and CD206, C-type lectins (CTLs that bind a variety of pathogens and may facilitate pathogen uptake for subsequent antigen presentation. Both proteins form punctate membrane nanodomains (~80 nm on naïve cells. We analyzed the spatiotemporal distribution of CTLs following host-fungal particle contact using confocal microscopy and three distinct methods of cluster identification and measurement of receptor clusters in super-resolution datasets: DBSCAN, Pair Correlation and a custom implementation of the Getis spatial statistic. Quantitative analysis of confocal and super-resolution images demonstrated that CTL nanodomains become concentrated in the contact site relative to non-contact membrane after the first hour of exposure and established that this recruitment is sustained out to four hours. DC-SIGN nanodomains in fungal contact sites exhibit a 70% area increase and a 38% decrease in interdomain separation. Contact site CD206 nanodomains possess 90% greater area and 42% lower interdomain separation relative to non-contact regions. Contact site CTL clusters appear as disk-shaped domains of approximately 150-175 nm in diameter. The increase in length scale of CTL nanostructure in contact sites suggests that the smaller nanodomains on resting membranes may merge during fungal nanodomain structure, or that they become packed closely enough to achieve sub-resolution inter-domain edge separations of < 30 nm. This study provides evidence of local receptor spatial rearrangements on the nanoscale that occur in the plasma membrane upon pathogen binding and may direct important signaling interactions required to recognize and respond to the presence of a relatively large pathogen.

  15. Lack of association of tcdC type and binary toxin status with disease severity and outcome in toxigenic Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Simon D; French, Gary L

    2011-05-01

    The production of binary toxin and presence of truncating mutations in the putative toxin repressor gene, tcdC, have been associated with the increased virulence and spread of Clostridium difficile, especially ribotype 027. We analysed the prevalence of binary toxin genes and tcdC mutations in 207 clinical C. difficile isolates collected between 2008-2010. The majority (83%) belonged to one of five tcdC types and 8% were ribotype 027. There was little evidence of epidemic spread but there was a high prevalence of both predicted tcdC truncating mutations (15%) and binary toxin genes (28%), which occurred in both 027 and other ribotypes. We measured risk factors (age and laboratory markers) and patient outcomes (severity of disease, ICU admission, mortality, recurrence and length of stay) for patients infected with C. difficile strains with and without these mutations and genes. There was a significantly higher serum C-reactive protein and total peripheral white cell count in the group with predicted tcdC truncating mutations, but no difference in patient outcome. The group with binary toxin genes had a significantly higher total peripheral white cell count and 30 day all cause mortality. We have demonstrated a high prevalence of both predicted tcdC truncating mutations and binary toxin genes in a variety of C. difficile ribotypes, however neither of these factors by themselves predicted clinical virulence. This and other work show that commonly described deletions and truncating mutations do not by themselves explain the virulence of ribotype 027 and other C. difficile strains and further work is required to explain why some isolates appear to produce more severe disease than others. PMID:21396957

  16. Characterization of a recombinant C-type lectin, rCEL-IV, expressed in Escherichia coli cells using a synthetic gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Hozawa, Takao; Hirotani, Iyo; Tsuda, Nobuaki; Kusunoki, Masami; Shiba, Kohei

    2006-03-01

    The body fluid of marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata (Holothuroidea) contains four Ca2+-dependent galactose-specific lectins. One of these lectins, CEL-IV, is composed of a C-type carbohydrate-recognition domain homotetramer. CEL-IV exhibits higher specificity for alpha-galactosides than for beta-galactosides, while other C. echinata lectins show preferential binding of beta-galactosides. We constructed an artificial synthetic gene for recombinant CEL-IV (rCEL-IV) based on the amino acid sequence previously determined from the purified protein. rCEL-IV was expressed in Escherichia coli cells as inclusion bodies. After the refolding process, most of rCEL-IV spontaneously formed a homotetramer structure having interchain disulfide bonds. The secondary structure of rCEL-IV was similar to that of the native one, as judged by the comparison of the far UV-circular dichroism spectra of rCEL-IV and native CEL-IV (nCEL-IV). Carbohydrate-binding specificity of rCEL-IV was confirmed to be similar to that of nCEL-IV from the results of the binding-inhibition assay using liposomes composed of rabbit erythrocyte lipids. Crystals of rCEL-IV were obtained in a few days by the sitting drop vapor diffusion method. These results indicate that rCEL-IV achieved essentially correct three-dimensional structure, including the carbohydrate-binding sites, and it would be very useful for further study on the carbohydrate-recognition mechanism by mutational and X-ray crystallographic analyses. PMID:16503091

  17. Characterization of recombinant CEL-I, a GalNAc-specific C-type lectin, expressed in Escherichia coli using an artificial synthetic gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Shiba, Kouhei; Matsuo, Noriaki; Fujimoto, Tokiko; Oda, Tatsuya; Sugawara, Hajime; Aoyagi, Haruhiko

    2004-01-01

    CEL-I is a C-type lectin isolated from the Holothuroidea Cucumaria echinata. This lectin shows very high N-acetylgalactosamine-binding specificity. We constructed an artificial gene encoding recombinant CEL-I (rCEL-I) using a combination of synthetic oligonucleotides, and expressed it in Escherichia coli cells. Since the recombinant protein was obtained as inclusion bodies, the latter were solubilized using urea and 2-mercaptoethanol, and the protein was refolded during the purification and dialysis steps. The purified rCEL-I showed comparable hemagglutinating activity to that of native CEL-I at relatively high Ca(2+)-concentrations, whereas it was weaker at lower Ca(2+)-concentrations due to decreased Ca(2+)-binding affinity. rCEL-I exhibited similar carbohydrate-binding specificity to native CEL-I, including strong GalNAc-binding specificity, as examined by hemagglutination inhibition assay. Comparison of the far UV-CD spectra of recombinant and native CEL-I revealed that the two proteins undergo a similar conformational change upon binding of Ca(2+). Single crystals of rCEL-I were also obtained under the same conditions as those used for the native protein, suggesting that they have similar tertiary structures. Although native CEL-I exhibited strong cytotoxicity toward cultured cells, rCEL-I showed low cytotoxicity. These results indicate that rCEL-I has a tertiary structure and carbohydrate-binding specificity similar to those of native CEL-I. Howeger, there is a subtle difference in the properties between the two proteins probably due to the additional methionine residue at the N-terminus of rCEL-I. PMID:14999015

  18. C-type lectin-like carbohydrate recognition of the hemolytic lectin CEL-III containing ricin-type -trefoil folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Unno, Hideaki; Kouzuma, Yoshiaki; Uchida, Tatsuya; Eto, Seiichiro; Hidemura, Haruki; Kato, Norihisa; Yonekura, Masami; Kusunoki, Masami

    2007-12-28

    CEL-III is a Ca(2+)-dependent hemolytic lectin, isolated from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata. The three-dimensional structure of CEL-III/GalNAc and CEL-III/methyl alpha-galactoside complexes was solved by x-ray crystallographic analysis. In these complexes, five carbohydrate molecules were found to be bound to two carbohydrate-binding domains (domains 1 and 2) located in the N-terminal 2/3 portion of the polypeptide and that contained beta-trefoil folds similar to ricin B-chain. The 3-OH and 4-OH of bound carbohydrate molecules were coordinated with Ca(2+) located at the subdomains 1alpha, 1gamma, 2alpha, 2beta, and 2gamma, simultaneously forming hydrogen bond networks with nearby amino acid side chains, which is similar to carbohydrate binding in C-type lectins. The binding of carbohydrates was further stabilized by aromatic amino acid residues, such as tyrosine and tryptophan, through a stacking interaction with the hydrophobic face of carbohydrates. The importance of amino acid residues in the carbohydrate-binding sites was confirmed by the mutational analyses. The orientation of bound GalNAc and methyl alpha-galactoside was similar to the galactose moiety of lactose bound to the carbohydrate-binding site of the ricin B-chain, although the ricin B-chain does not require Ca(2+) ions for carbohydrate binding. The binding of the carbohydrates induced local structural changes in carbohydrate-binding sites in subdomains 2alpha and 2beta. Binding of GalNAc also induced a slight change in the main chain structure of domain 3, which could be related to the conformational change upon binding of specific carbohydrates to induce oligomerization of the protein. PMID:17977832

  19. Super-resolution imaging of C-type lectin spatial rearrangement within the dendritic cell plasma membrane at fungal microbe contact sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itano, Michelle; Graus, Matthew; Pehlke, Carolyn; Wester, Michael; Liu, Ping; Lidke, Keith; Thompson, Nancy; Jacobson, Ken; Neumann, Aaron

    2014-08-01

    Dendritic cells express DC-SIGN and CD206, C-type lectins (CTLs) that bind a variety of pathogens and may facilitate pathogen uptake for subsequent antigen presentation. Both proteins form punctate membrane nanodomains (~80 nm) on naïve cells. We analyzed the spatiotemporal distribution of CTLs following host-fungal particle contact using confocal microscopy and three distinct methods of cluster identification and measurement of receptor clusters in super-resolution datasets: DBSCAN, Pair Correlation and a custom implementation of the Getis spatial statistic. Quantitative analysis of confocal and super-resolution images demonstrated that CTL nanodomains become concentrated in the contact site relative to non-contact membrane after the first hour of exposure and established that this recruitment is sustained out to four hours. DC-SIGN nanodomains in fungal contact sites exhibit a 70% area increase and a 38% decrease in interdomain separation. Contact site CD206 nanodomains possess 90% greater area and 42% lower interdomain separation relative to non-contact regions. Contact site CTL clusters appear as disk-shaped domains of approximately 150-175 nm in diameter. The increase in length scale of CTL nanostructure in contact sites suggests that the smaller nanodomains on resting membranes may merge during fungal nanodomain structure, or that they become packed closely enough to achieve sub-resolution inter-domain edge separations of < 30 nm. This study provides evidence of local receptor spatial rearrangements on the nanoscale that occur in the plasma membrane upon pathogen binding and may direct important signaling interactions required to recognize and respond to the presence of a relatively large pathogen.

  20. Effects of Incubation Conditions on Cr(VI) Reduction by c-type Cytochromes in Intact Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Rui; Li, Fangbai; Liu, Tongxu; Li, Xiaomin; Wu, Yundang; Wang, Ying; Chen, Dandan

    2016-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the outer membrane c-type cytochromes (OM c-Cyts) of metal-reducing bacteria play a key role in microbial metal reduction processes. However, the in situ redox status of OM c-Cyts during microbial metal reduction processes remain poorly understood. In this study, diffuse-transmission UV/Vis spectroscopy is used to investigate the in situ spectral reaction of Cr(VI) reduction by c-Cyts in intact Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells under different incubation conditions. The reduced c-Cyts decreased transiently at the beginning and then recovered gradually over time. The Cr(VI) reduction rates decreased with increasing initial Cr(VI) concentrations, and Cr(III) was identified as a reduced product. The presence of Cr(III) substantially inhibited Cr(VI) reduction and the recovery of reduced c-Cyts, indicating that Cr(III) might inhibit cell growth. Cr(VI) reduction rates increased with increasing cell density. The highest Cr(VI) reduction rate and fastest recovery of c-Cyts were obtained at pH 7.0 and 30°C, with sodium lactate serving as an electron donor. The presence of O2 strongly inhibited Cr(VI) reduction, suggesting that O2 might compete with Cr(VI) as an electron acceptor in cells. This study provides a case of directly examining in vivo reaction properties of an outer-membrane enzyme during microbial metal reduction processes under non-invasive physiological conditions. PMID:27242759

  1. Monocyte galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine-specific C-type lectin receptor stimulant immunotherapy of an experimental glioma. Part II: combination with external radiation improves survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A peptide mimetic of a ligand for the galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine-specific C-type lectin receptors (GCLR) exhibited monocyte-stimulating activity, but did not extend survival when applied alone against a syngeneic murine malignant glioma. In this study, the combined effect of GCLRP with radiation was investigated. C57BL/6 mice underwent stereotactic intracranial implantation of GL261 glioma cells. Animals were grouped based on randomized tumor size by magnetic resonance imaging on day seven. One group that received cranial radiation (4 Gy on days seven and nine) only were compared with animals treated with radiation and GCLRP (4 Gy on days seven and nine combined with subcutaneous injection of 1 nmol/g on alternative days beginning on day seven). Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess tumor growth and correlated with survival rate. Blood and brain tissues were analyzed with regard to tumor and contralateral hemisphere using fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, histology, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GCLRP activated peripheral monocytes and was associated with increased blood precursors of dendritic cells. Mean survival increased (P < 0.001) and tumor size was smaller (P < 0.02) in the GCLRP + radiation group compared to the radiation-only group. Accumulation of dendritic cells in both the tumoral hemisphere (P < 0.005) and contralateral tumor-free hemisphere (P < 0.01) was associated with treatment. Specific populations of monocyte-derived brain cells develop critical relationships with malignant gliomas. The biological effect of GCLRP in combination with radiation may be more successful because of the damage incurred by tumor cells by radiation and the enhanced or preserved presentation of tumor cell antigens by GCLRP-activated immune cells. Monocyte-derived brain cells may be important targets for creating effective immunological modalities such as employing the receptor system described in this study

  2. Matrilin-3 as a putative effector of C-type natriuretic peptide signaling during TGF-β induced chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babadagli, Mustafa Ege; Tezcan, Berna; Yilmaz, Seda Tasir; Tufan, A Cevik

    2014-09-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) signaling has been implicated as an important regulator of chondrogenic differentiation during endochondral bone development. This preliminary study further investigated the putative effectors and/or targets of CNP signaling in transforming growth factor (TGF)-β induced in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Previously characterized human trabecular bone derived MSCs were induced either with only TGF-β1 or with a combination of TGF-β1 and CNP in micromass culture for 10 or 20 days. Genome wide gene expression profile changes in between these two groups were analyzed on day-10 or day-20 of culture. Results revealed that there were only 7 genes, whose expression change was fourfolds or higher in TGF-β1 and CNP fed group in comparison to only TGF-β1 fed group. The up-regulated genes included matrilin-3 (MATN3), engulfment and cell motility 1 (ELMO1), CD24, and DCN1, defective in cullin neddylation 1, domain containing 1 (DCUN1D1). The down-regulated genes, on the other hand, included LIM domain kinase 2 (LIMK2), Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1, and guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein), gamma 12 (GNG12). The up-regulation of MATN3 was confirmed on the basis of RT-PCR. The known literature on both CNP signaling and MATN3 function in chondrogenesis match with each other and suggest MATN3 as a putative effector and/or target of CNP signaling during this process. PMID:24934313

  3. Bulge Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Combes, F

    1999-01-01

    The currently discussed theories of bulge formation are reviewed, including the primordial scenario, where bulges form rapidly and then accrete disks, the secular scenario, where bulges are formed by dynamical evolution of disks through bars and galaxy interactions, and some combinations of both, where formation of bulges and disks are more continuous and interleaved. The various scenarios make specific predictions about the relative masses, angular momenta, colours, metallicities of bulges relative to disks, and the bulge-to-disk ratio as a function of time. Dynamical processes relevant to the formation of bulges (bar instabilities, mergers) are described and tested against observed statistics. Current data suggest a dynamical feedback from gravitational instabilities in bulge and disk formation. It is very difficult to discriminate between the various scenarios from surveys at z=0 only, and observations at high redshift are presently the best hope for large progress.

  4. Molecular characterization of the reniform nematode C-type lectin gene family reveals a likely role in mitigating environmental stresses during plant parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji, Satish; Jenkins, Johnie N; Wubben, Martin J

    2014-03-10

    The reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis, is a damaging semi-endoparasitic pathogen of more than 300 plant species. Transcriptome sequencing of R. reniformis parasitic females revealed an enrichment for sequences homologous to C-type lectins (CTLs), an evolutionarily ancient family of Ca(+2)-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins that are involved in the innate immune response. To gain further insight as to the potential role of CTLs in facilitating plant parasitism by R. reniformis, we performed a comprehensive assessment of the CTL gene family. 5'- and 3'-RACE experiments identified a total of 11 R. reniformis CTL transcripts (Rr-ctl-1 through Rr-ctl-11) that ranged in length from 1083 to 1,194 bp and showed 93-99% identity with one another. An alignment of cDNA and genomic sequences revealed three introns with the first intron residing within the 5'-untranslated region. BLAST analyses showed the closest homologs belonging to the parasitic nematodes Heligmosomoides polygyrus and Heterodera glycines. Rr-ctl-1, -2, and -3 were expressed throughout the R. reniformis life cycle; whereas, the remaining Rr-ctl genes showed life stage-specific expression. Quantitative real time RT-PCR determined that Rr-ctl transcripts were 839-fold higher in sedentary female nematodes than the next most abundant life stage. Predicted Rr-CTL peptides ranged from 301 to 338 amino acids long, possessed an N-terminal signal peptide for secretion, and contained a conserved CLECT domain, including the mannose-binding motifs EPN and EPD and the conserved WND motif that is required for binding Ca(+2). In addition, Rr-CTL peptides harbored repeats of a novel 17-mer motif within their C-terminus that showed similarity to motifs associated with bacterial ice nucleation proteins. In situ hybridization of Rr-ctl transcripts within sedentary females showed specific accumulation within the hypodermis of the body regions exposed to the soil environment; those structures embedded within the

  5. A novel C-type lectin, Nattectin-like protein, with a wide range of bacterial agglutination activity in large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Changhuan; Zhang, Dongling; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-03-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are generally recognized as a superfamily of Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins, which serve as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in innate immunity of vertebrates. In this study, the molecular characterization and immune roles of a novel CTL from Larimichthys crocea (designated as LcNTC) were investigated. LcNTC is a novel protein that shared 33%-49% homology with other teleosts CTLs. The full-length cDNA of LcNTC was composed of 859 bp with a 465 bp open reading frame encoding a putative protein of 154 residues. LcNTC contained a single CRD with four conserved disulfide-bonded cysteine residues (Cys(57)-Cys(148), Cys(126)-Cys(140)) and EPN/AND motifs instead of invariant EPN/WND motifs required for carbohydrate-binding specificity and constructing Ca(2+)-binding sites. LcNTC mRNA was detected in all examined tissues with the most abundant in the gill. After challenged with poly I:C and Vibrio parahaemolyticus, the temporal expression of LcNTC was significantly up-regulated in the liver, spleen and head-kidney. LcNTC transcripts were also induced in the gill, skin, spleen and head-kidney post-infection with Cryptocaryon irritans. The recombinant LcNTC (rLcNTC) purified from Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) exhibited strong agglutination activity against erythrocytes from human, rabbit and large yellow croaker in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, and the agglutination could be inhibited by d-Mannose, d-Glucose, d-Fructose, α-Lactose, d-Maltose and LPS. Positive microbial agglutination activities of rLcNTC were observed against all tested bacteria in the presence of Ca(2+), including Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and Micrococcus lysoleikticus) and Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli, V. parahaemolyticus, Vibrio alginolyticus and Aeromonas hydrophila). These findings collectively indicated that LcNTC might be involved in the innate immunity of L. crocea as a PRR. PMID:26828263

  6. Star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical models of star formation are discussed beginning with the earliest stages and ending in the formation of rotating, self-gravitating disks or rings. First a model of the implosion of very diffuse gas clouds is presented which relies upon a shock at the edge of a galactic spiral arm to drive the implosion. Second, models are presented for the formation of a second generation of massive stars in such a cloud once a first generation has formed. These models rely on the ionizing radiation from massive stars or on the supernova shocks produced when these stars explode. Finally, calculations of the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds are discussed with special focus on the question of whether rotating disks or rings are the result of such a collapse. 65 references

  7. Galaxy Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, Martin

    Galaxy formation is an enormously complex discipline due to the many physical processes that play a role in shaping galaxies. The objective of this thesis is to study galaxy formation with two different approaches: First, numerical simulations are used to study the structure of dark matter and how...... galaxies form stars throughout the history of the Universe, and secondly it is shown that observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be used to probe galaxies with active star formation in the early Universe. A conclusion from the hydrodynamical simulations is that the galaxies from the stateof...... important, since it helps constraining chemical evolution models at high redshift. A new project studying how the population of galaxies hosting GRBs relate to other galaxy population is outlined in the conclusion of this thesis. The core of this project will be to quantify how the stellar mass function of...

  8. Effect of porin loss on the activity of tigecycline against Klebsiella pneumoniae producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases or plasmid-mediated AmpC-type beta-lactamases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conejo, M Carmen; Hernández, J Ramón; Pascual, Alvaro

    2008-07-01

    Tigecycline showed excellent in vitro activity against 50 clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases, plasmid-mediated AmpC-type beta-lactamases, or both. This activity was not affected by porin loss. Porin loss, however, did affect the activity of imipenem against strains that expressed both types of enzymes. PMID:18339509

  9. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten;

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including an...... overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid...

  10. Biological and serological characterization of C-type RNA viruses isolated from the C57BL/Ka strain of mice; 3. Characterization of the isolates and their interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of the several classes of C-type RNA viruses isolated from the C57BL/Ka strain, only RadLV and RadLV-LTC are thymotropic and leukemogenic (lymphomagenic) and can therefore be properly designated as murine leukemia viruses. Both preparations are distinct from the previously recognized classes of endogenous murine ecotropic and xenotropic C-type viruses which are capable of replication on fibroblasts in vitro (fibrotropic), but are neither thymotropic nor leukemogenic in vivo. Recent studies have demonstrated the serological and biological differences between these various isolates and indicate that some preparations are mixtures of particles with different biological attributes. Experiments designed to assess the in vitro and in vivo interactions between the thymotropic-leukemogenic (TL) viruses and the non-thymotropic isolates have confirmed the TL competence of RadLV and RadLV-LTC and revealed the presence of defective TL virions in some of the virus preparations passaged in vitro. These experiments indicated that RadLV and RadLV-LTC are autonomous MuLV preparations and are not mixtures of the non-thymotropic C-type RNA viruses endogenous in the C57BL/Ka strain of mice. The present report summarizes the available data concerning the serological characteristics of the various isolates from C57BL/Ka mouse strains and their in vivo and in vitro interactions

  11. Structural and computational analysis of peptide recognition mechanism of class-C type penicillin binding protein, alkaline D-peptidase from Bacillus cereus DF4-B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Shogo; Okazaki, Seiji; Ishitsubo, Erika; Kawahara, Nobuhiro; Komeda, Hidenobu; Tokiwa, Hiroaki; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline D-peptidase from Bacillus cereus DF4-B, called ADP, is a D-stereospecific endopeptidase reacting with oligopeptides containing D-phenylalanine (D-Phe) at N-terminal penultimate residue. ADP has attracted increasing attention because it is useful as a catalyst for synthesis of D-Phe oligopeptides or, with the help of substrate mimetics, L-amino acid peptides and proteins. Structure and functional analysis of ADP is expected to elucidate molecular mechanism of ADP. In this study, the crystal structure of ADP (apo) form was determined at 2.1 Å resolution. The fold of ADP is similar to that of the class C penicillin-binding proteins of type-AmpH. Docking simulations and fragment molecular orbital analyses of two peptides, (D-Phe)4 and (D-Phe)2-(L-Phe)2, with the putative substrate binding sites of ADP indicated that the P1 residue of the peptide interacts with hydrophobic residues at the S1 site of ADP. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation of ADP for 50 nsec suggested that the ADP forms large cavity at the active site. Formation of the cavity suggested that the ADP has open state in the solution. For the ADP, having the open state is convenient to bind the peptides having bulky side chain, such as (D-Phe)4. Taken together, we predicted peptide recognition mechanism of ADP. PMID:26370172

  12. C-type related order in the defective fluorites La2Ce2O7 and Nd2Ce2O7 studied by neutron scattering and ab initio MD simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalland, Liv-Elisif; Norberg, Stefan T; Kyrklund, Jakob; Hull, Stephen; Eriksson, Sten G; Norby, Truls; Mohn, Chris E; Knee, Christopher S

    2016-09-14

    This work presents a structural investigation of La2-xNdxCe2O7 (x = 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0) using X-ray powder diffraction and total scattering neutron powder diffraction, analysed using Rietveld and the reverse Monte Carlo method (RMC). Ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) modelling is also performed for further investigations of the local order. The main intensities in the neutron diffraction data for the La2-xNdxCe2O7 series correspond to the fluorite structure. However, additional C-type superlattice peaks are visible for x > 0 and increase in intensity with increasing x. The Nd-containing compositions (x > 0) are best fitted with Rietveld analysis by using a combination of oxygen deficient fluorite and oxygen excess C-type structures. No indications of cation order are found in the RMC or Rietveld analysis, and the absence of cation order is supported by the MD modelling. We argue that the superlattice peaks originate from oxygen vacancy ordering and associated shift in the cation position away from the ideal fluorite site similar to that in the C-type structure, which is seen from the Rietveld refinements and the observed ordering in the MD modelling. The vacancies favour alignments in the 〈110〉, 〈111〉 and especially the 〈210〉 direction. Moreover, we find that such ordering might also be found to a small extent in La2Ce2O7, explaining the discernible modulated background between the fluorite peaks. The observed overlap of the main Bragg peaks between the fluorite and C-type phase supports the co-existence of vacancy ordered and more disordered domains. This is further supported by the observed similarity of the radial distribution functions as modelled with MD. The increase in long range oxygen vacancy order with increasing Nd-content in La2-xNdxCe2O7 corresponds well with the lower oxide ion conductivity in Nd2Ce2O7 compared to La2Ce2O7 reported earlier. PMID:27526388

  13. API和VITEK2诊断VanC型肠球菌的准确性研究%Comparing the API and VITEK2 in identifying VanC type Enterococcus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代强; 薛峰; 王似锦; 高春; 郑波

    2014-01-01

    目的:比较API和VITEK2法鉴别VanC型肠球菌的准确性。方法针对2005~2011年收集的50株VanC型肠球菌,采用API和VITEK2方法进行种属鉴定,结合细菌动力实验,用分子生物学方法做对照,以判断API和VITEK2鉴定结果的准确性。结果 API和VITEK2方法分别筛选出VanC型肠球菌21,15株,与分子生物学方法比较,其准确率分别为28.6%,86.7%,结合动力实验结果后,其准确率均达到100%。结论 VITEK2比API在诊断VanC型肠球菌时具有更好的准确性,2种方法联合动力实验可为临床提供准确的细菌学诊断。%Objective To compare the API and VITEK2 in identifying VanC type Enterococcus.Method A total of 50 VanC type Entero-coccus isolates from 2005~2011 were investigated.We performed the API and VITEK2 test to identified the VanC type Enterococcus respec-tively.API and VITEK2 results combining with the motility test was compared with molecular biology methods to determine the accuracy of API and VITEK2.The MIC of vancomycin and tecoplanin for the strains was performed by agar dilution method.Results Twenty -one and 15 strains of VanC phenotype Enterococcus were identified by the API and VITEK2 test respectively.Compared with molecular bio-logy methods, the accuracy rate was 28.6% and 86.7% respective-ly.Combined with motility test, the accuracy rate of API and VITEK2 reached 100%.Conclusion The VITEK2 had a higher accuracy rate in identifying VanC phenotype Enterococcus than API.API/VITEK2 method combined with bacterial motility test can provide an accurate bacteriological diagnosis for the patients.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Proteus mirabilis NO-051/03, Representative of a Multidrug-Resistant Clone Spreading in Europe and Expressing the CMY-16 AmpC-Type β-Lactamase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Giani, Tommaso; Henrici De Angelis, Lucia; Ciacci, Nagaia; Gniadkowski, Marek; Miriagou, Vivi; Torricelli, Francesca; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2016-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis NO-051/03, representative of a multidrug-resistant clone expressing the CMY-16 AmpC-type β-lactamase and circulating in Europe since 2003, was sequenced by a MiSeq platform using a paired-end approach. The genome was assembled in 100 scaffolds with a total length of 4,197,318 bp. Analysis of the draft genome sequence revealed the presence of several acquired resistance determinants to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, phenicols, tetracyclines, trimethoprim, and sulfonamides, of one plasmid replicon, and of a type I-E clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated protein (Cas) adaptive immune system. PMID:26868393

  15. Study on the relationship between the serum levels of several cytokines (L-selectin, sICAM-1, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-18) and the severity of liver function impairment in patients with virus C type hepatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the role of several cytokines (L-selectin, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-l i.e. sICAM-1, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-18) in the pathogenesis of liver function injury in patients with C type hepatitis. Method: Serum L-selectin, sICAM-1, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-18 levels were measured with ELISA in 62 patients with hepatitis C and 36 controls. The serum ALT and total bilirubin levels were also examined. Results: The serum level of L-selectin, sICAM-1, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-18 levels in the hepatitis C patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P<0.01). The levels of these cytokines were significantly positively correlated with those of ALT and total bilirubin. Conclusion: Detection of the levels of these cytokines might reflect the immune status and severity of liver cell injury in patients with hepatitis C. (authors)

  16. Biological and serological characterization of the C-type RNA viruses isolated from the C57BL/Ka strain of mice; 2. Induction and propagation of the isolates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several classes of C-type RNA viruses have been isolated from the tissues of C57BL/Ka mice. Normal lymphocytes and haemopoietic tissues, lymphoid tumors induced by X-rays or virus inoculation, and embryo fibroblast cultures have yielded an array of virus preparations with distinct biological and serological characteristics. The type of virus isolated depends on the cell of origin and on the procedures used for viral induction, isolation, and propagation. Parallel studies in vivo and in vitro indicate that some isolates are thymotropic and leukemogenic (TL+), while others which replicate well on fibroblastic cells in vitro (fibrotropism) lack TL activity in vivo. The thymotropic, leukemogenic isolates lose their TL activity, partially or totally, when passaged in fibroblastic cells, and the emerging virus has significantly different characteristics. This report describes the procedures of induction, isolation, and propagation which yield these two distinctively different classes of virus isolates, and characterizes their biological activities in vivo and in vitro

  17. Enhancement of solubility and yield of a β-glucan receptor Dectin-1 C-type lectin-like domain in Escherichia coli with a solubility-enhancement tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulal, Hari Prasad; Nagae, Masamichi; Ikeda, Akemi; Morita-Matsumoto, Kana; Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Naohito; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki

    2016-07-01

    Dectin-1 is a C-type lectin-like pattern recognition receptor for β(1-3)-glucans. It plays a crucial role in protecting against fungal invasion through binding to β-glucans which are commonly present on the fungal cell wall. To probe its ligand binding mechanism by NMR, we expressed the recombinant murine Dectin-1 C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) in E. coli using pCold vector and purified it. However, the high concentration of Dectin-1 CTLD required for NMR analysis could not be attained due to its inherent low solubility and low bacterial expression. In this study, we tried to increase expression and solubility of Dectin-1 CTLD by codon optimization and fusion of a GB1 tag (B1 domain of streptococcal Protein G). GB1 was inserted on either the N-terminal (NT) or C-terminal end as well as both terminal ends of human and mouse Dectin-1 CTLDs. A pure monomeric sample was only obtained with NT-GB1 fused mouse Dectin-1. Expression of mouse Dectin-1 CTLD yielded 0.9 ± 0.2 mg/L culture, codon optimized mouse Dectin-1 CTLD produced 1.4 ± 0.2 mg/L, and the tag-fused domain 7.1 ± 0.3 mg/L. The tag also increased solubility from 0.1 mM to 1.4 mM. The recombinant protein was correctly folded, in a monomeric state, and specifically bound β-glucan laminarin. These results indicate that fusing GB1 to the N-terminus of mouse Dectin-1 domain advantageously increases yield and solubility, allows retention of native structure, and that the site of fusion is critical. PMID:27062941

  18. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan R. Crable

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is produced by either CoA-dependent cleavage of pyruvate or enzymatic reduction of CO2 in an NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent manner. Formate is consumed through oxidation to CO2 and H2 or can be further reduced via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation or industrially for the production of methanol. Here, we review the enzymes involved in the interconversion of formate and discuss potential applications for biofuels production.

  19. Monocyte galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine-specific C-type lectin receptor stimulant immunotherapy of an experimental glioma. Part 1: stimulatory effects on blood monocytes and monocyte-derived cells of the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushchayev SV

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sergiy V Kushchayev,1 Tejas Sankar,1 Laura L Eggink,4,5 Yevgeniya S Kushchayeva,5 Philip C Wiener,1,5 J Kenneth Hoober,5,6 Jennifer Eschbacher,3 Ruolan Liu,2 Fu-Dong Shi,2 Mohammed G Abdelwahab,4 Adrienne C Scheck,4 Mark C Preul11Neurosurgery Research Laboratory, 2Neuroimmunology Laboratory, 3Department of Pathology, 4Neurooncology Research, Barrow Neurological Institute, St Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, 5School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, 6Susavion Biosciences, Inc, Tempe, AZ, USAObjectives: Immunotherapy with immunostimulants is an attractive therapy against gliomas. C-type lectin receptors specific for galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine (GCLR regulate cellular differentiation, recognition, and trafficking of monocyte-derived cells. A peptide mimetic of GCLR ligands (GCLRP was used to activate blood monocytes and populations of myeloid-derived cells against a murine glioblastoma.Methods: The ability of GCLRP to stimulate phagocytosis by human microglia and monocyte-derived cells of the brain (MDCB isolated from a human glioblastoma was initially assessed in vitro. Induction of activation markers on blood monocytes was assayed by flow cytometry after administration of GCLRP to naive mice. C57BL/6 mice underwent stereotactic intracranial implantation of GL261 glioma cells and were randomized for tumor size by magnetic resonance imaging, which was also used to assess increase in tumor size. Brain tumor tissues were analyzed using flow cytometry, histology, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with respect to tumor, peritumoral area, and contralateral hemisphere regions.Results: GCLRP exhibited strong stimulatory effect on MDCBs and blood monocytes in vitro and in vivo. GCLRP was associated with an increased percentage of precursors of dendritic cells in the blood (P = 0.003, which differentiated into patrolling macrophages in tumoral (P = 0.001 and peritumoral areas (P = 0.04, rather than into dendritic cells

  20. lemmingA encodes the Apc11 subunit of the APC/C in Drosophila melanogaster that forms a ternary complex with the E2-C type ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, Vihar and Morula/Apc2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy Olga

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation is a critical step in key cell cycle events, such as metaphase-anaphase transition and mitotic exit. The anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C plays a pivotal role in these transitions by recognizing and marking regulatory proteins for proteasomal degradation. Its overall structure and function has been elucidated mostly in yeasts and mammalian cell lines. The APC/C is, however, a multisubunit assembly with at least 13 subunits and their function and interaction within the complex is still relatively uncharacterized, particularly in metazoan systems. Here, lemming (lmg mutants were used to study the APC/C subunit, Apc11, and its interaction partners in Drosophila melanogaster. Results The lmg gene was initially identified through a pharate adult lethal P element insertion mutation expressing developmental abnormalities and widespread apoptosis in larval imaginal discs and pupal abdominal histoblasts. Larval neuroblasts were observed to arrest mitosis in a metaphase-like state with highly condensed, scattered chromosomes and frequent polyploidy. These neuroblasts contain high levels of both cyclin A and cyclin B. The lmg gene was cloned by virtue of the lmg03424 P element insertion which is located in the 5' untranslated region. The lemming locus is transcribed to give a 2.0 kb mRNA that contains two ORFs, lmgA and lmgB. The lmgA ORF codes for a putative protein with more than 80% sequence homology to the APC11 subunit of the human APC/C. The 85 amino acid protein also contains a RING-finger motif characteristic of known APC11 subunits. The lmgA ORF alone was sufficient to rescue the lethal and mitotic phenotypes of the lmg138 null allele and to complement the temperature sensitive lethal phenotype of the APC11-myc9 budding yeast mutant. The LmgA protein interacts with Mr/Apc2, and they together form a binding site for Vihar, the E2-C type ubiquitin conjugating enzyme. Despite

  1. Skeletal overgrowth syndrome caused by overexpression of C-type natriuretic peptide in a girl with balanced chromosomal translocation, t(1;2)(q41;q37.1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Min; Bae, Jun-Seok; Choi, Jin Sun; Miura, Kohji; Lee, Hye Ran; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Kim, Nayoung K D; Oh, Sun Kyung; Ozono, Keiichi; Lee, Choon-Ki; Choi, In Ho; Park, Woong-Yang; Cho, Tae-Joon

    2015-05-01

    Chromosomal translocation of 2q37.1 just distal to the NPPC gene coding for C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and subsequent overproduction of CNP have been reported to cause a skeletal overgrowth syndrome. Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is one of marfanoid overgrowth syndromes, of which subtype IV is caused by haploinsufficiency of transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGFB2). We report on a girl with clinical phenotypes of overgrowth syndrome, including long and slim body habitus, macrodactyly of the big toe, scoliosis, ankle valgus deformity, coxa valga, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, and aortic root dilatation. Karyotyping revealed a balanced chromosomal translocation between 1q41 and 2q37.1, and the breakpoints could be mapped by targeted resequencing analysis. On chromosome 2q37.1, the translocation took place 200,365 bp downstream of NPPC, and serum level of the amino terminal of CNP was elevated. The contralateral site of translocation on chromosome 1q41 disrupted TGFB2 gene, presumed to cause its haploinsufficiency. This case supports the concept that NPPC is overexpressed because of the loss of a specific negative regulatory control in the normal chromosomal location, and demonstrates the effectiveness of targeted resequencing in the mapping of breakpoints. PMID:25728306

  2. Star Formation in Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  3. Collisional Family Formation and Scaling Laws: Effects of Porosity and Explicit Formation of Spinning Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Patrick; Jutzi, M.; Richardson, D. C.; Benz, W.

    2008-09-01

    Main belt asteroid families are the products of impact events. In recent years, we have been able for the first time to simulate the formation of families and reproduce their main properties. The fragmentation of the asteroid was computed using a 3D SPH hydrocode and the mutual gravitational interaction of the generated fragments was computed with a parallel N-body code (pkdgrav). In our previous simulations, all fragments during the gravitational phase were treated as spheres. We have improved our model by implementing a semi-rigid body approximation. The shapes and spins of the aggregates are preserved as clumps reaccumulate. We will present simulations of asteroid family formation including this explicit formation of spinning aggregates. Our model can provide some clues regarding the likely physical structure (surface, internal) of small bodies resulting from reaccumulation. Our earlier model of fragmentation was adapted to brittle materials with no porosity at microscales, limiting it to the study of families of S taxonomic type, believed to be composed of such material. Dark (C) type asteroids, Kuiper Belt objects and comets are believed to contain microporosity. We have extended our hydrocode to include the effect of porosity at a sub-resolution scale by adapting the so-called P-alpha model. A first validation at laboratory scale has been performed. We will show its application to dark-type family formation and to the characterization of the impact energy threshold for disruption (Q*D) of porous bodies as a function of their size. This work is supported by the ESA Advanced Concept Team (Ariadna study "NEO Encounter 2029"), the French Programme National de Planétologie, the Swiss National Science Foundation, NASA under Grant NNX08AM39G issued through the Office of Space Science, the NSF under Grant AST0708110, the cooperation program CNRS-JSPS 2008. We also thank the Mésocentre de Calcul-SIGAMM (Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, France).

  4. C-type lectin receptor dectin-3 mediates trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM)-induced Mincle expression through CARD9/Bcl10/MALT1-dependent nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue-Qiang; Zhu, Le-Le; Chang, Qing; Jiang, Changying; You, Yun; Luo, Tianming; Jia, Xin-Ming; Lin, Xin

    2014-10-24

    Previous studies indicate that both Dectin-3 (also called MCL or Clec4d) and Mincle (also called Clec4e), two C-type lectin receptors, can recognize trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM), a cell wall component from mycobacteria, and induce potent innate immune responses. Interestingly, stimulation of Dectin-3 by TDM can also induce Mincle expression, which may enhance the host innate immune system to sense Mycobacterium infection. However, the mechanism by which Dectin-3 induces Mincle expression is not fully defined. Here, we show that TDM-induced Mincle expression is dependent on Dectin-3-mediated NF-κB, but not nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT), activation, and Dectin-3 induces NF-κB activation through the CARD9-BCL10-MALT1 complex. We found that bone marrow-derived macrophages from Dectin-3-deficient mice were severely defective in the induction of Mincle expression in response to TDM stimulation. This defect is correlated with the failure of TDM-induced NF-κB activation in Dectin-3-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages. Consistently, inhibition of NF-κB, but not NFAT, impaired TDM-induced Mincle expression, whereas NF-κB, but not NFAT, binds to the Mincle promoter. Dectin-3-mediated NF-κB activation is dependent on the CARD9-Bcl10-MALT1 complex. Finally, mice deficient for Dectin-3 or CARD9 produced much less proinflammatory cytokines and keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH)-specific antibodies after immunization with an adjuvant containing TDM. Overall, this study provides the mechanism by which Dectin-3 induces Mincle expression in response to Mycobacterium infection, which will have significant impact to improve adjuvant and design vaccine for antimicrobial infection. PMID:25202022

  5. Monocyte galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine-specific C-type lectin receptor stimulant immunotherapy of an experimental glioma. Part 1: stimulatory effects on blood monocytes and monocyte-derived cells of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunotherapy with immunostimulants is an attractive therapy against gliomas. C-type lectin receptors specific for galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine (GCLR) regulate cellular differentiation, recognition, and trafficking of monocyte-derived cells. A peptide mimetic of GCLR ligands (GCLRP) was used to activate blood monocytes and populations of myeloid-derived cells against a murine glioblastoma. The ability of GCLRP to stimulate phagocytosis by human microglia and monocyte-derived cells of the brain (MDCB) isolated from a human glioblastoma was initially assessed in vitro. Induction of activation markers on blood monocytes was assayed by flow cytometry after administration of GCLRP to naive mice. C57BL/6 mice underwent stereotactic intracranial implantation of GL261 glioma cells and were randomized for tumor size by magnetic resonance imaging, which was also used to assess increase in tumor size. Brain tumor tissues were analyzed using flow cytometry, histology, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with respect to tumor, peritumoral area, and contralateral hemisphere regions. GCLRP exhibited strong stimulatory effect on MDCBs and blood monocytes in vitro and in vivo. GCLRP was associated with an increased percentage of precursors of dendritic cells in the blood (P = 0.003), which differentiated into patrolling macrophages in tumoral (P = 0.001) and peritumoral areas (P = 0.04), rather than into dendritic cells, as in control animals. Treatment with GCLRP did not result in a significant change in survival of mice bearing a tumor. In vitro and in vivo activation of monocytes was achieved by administration of GCLR to mice. GCLRP-activated blood monocytes were recruited to the brain and exhibited specific phenotypes corresponding with tumor region (glioma, peritumoral zone, and contralateral glioma-free hemisphere). GCLRP treatment alone was associated with increased glioma mass as the result of the infiltration of phagocytic cells. Regional specificity for MDCB may have

  6. Biosurfactant as a Promoter of Methane Hydrate Formation: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Amit; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh; Kumar, Rajnish; Balomajumder, Chandrajit; Singh, Anil Kumar; Santhakumari, B.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Laik, Sukumar

    2016-02-01

    Natural gas hydrates (NGHs) are solid non-stoichiometric compounds often regarded as a next generation energy source. Successful commercialization of NGH is curtailed by lack of efficient and safe technology for generation, dissociation, storage and transportation. The present work studied the influence of environment compatible biosurfactant on gas hydrate formation. Biosurfactant was produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain A11 and was characterized as rhamnolipids. Purified rhamnolipids reduced the surface tension of water from 72 mN/m to 36 mN/m with Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC) of 70 mg/l. Use of 1000 ppm rhamnolipids solution in C type silica gel bed system increased methane hydrate formation rate by 42.97% and reduced the induction time of hydrate formation by 22.63% as compared to water saturated C type silica gel. Presence of rhamnolipids also shifted methane hydrate formation temperature to higher values relative to the system without biosurfactant. Results from thermodynamic and kinetic studies suggest that rhamnolipids can be applied as environment friendly methane hydrate promoter.

  7. 应用3'RACE技术扩增仿刺参C型凝集素基因及实验条件的优化%Clone of C-type lectin gene of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus and optimization of experimental conditions using 3' RACE technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莹; 韩璐璐

    2012-01-01

    The express sequence tag (EST) of C-type leetin of Apostichopus japonicus from GenBank was obtained. Based on this sequence, we utilize software of primer 5. 0 to design a pair of RACE primer. After the PCR reaction, the cDNA sequence of C-type leetin of Apostichopus japonicus was obtained. Based on part of the known partial cDNA sequence,gene specific primers (GSPF) was designed which work together with universal primers (UPM). The 3' cDNA end of C-type leetin in Apostichopus japonicus was successfully cloned. At the same time, we optimized this experiment and an amplified fragment of 670 bp in length which overlapped the known C-type leetin sequence by 417 bp was obtained subsequently. The result showed that this sequence was consistent with expected aim gene.%从GenBank上调取刺参C型凝集素(C-type Lectin)基因序列EST,根据此序列设计RACE引物,采用PCR扩增技术得到了仿刺参C-type Lectin基因序列(EST),根据这段EST序列设计1个基因特异引物(GSPF),与通用引物(UPM)扩增,成功地克隆到了该基因的3’末端序列.同时,对仿刺参C型凝集素基因3’克隆的实验条件进行了优化.该扩增片段长度为670 bp,与已知序列重叠部分为417 bp.经测序和比对发现该段序列与预期的目标基因的序列一致.

  8. Star Formation for Predictive Primordial Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Milosavljevic, Milos

    2015-01-01

    The elegance of inflationary cosmology and cosmological perturbation theory ends with the formation of the first stars and galaxies, the initial sources of light that launched the phenomenologically rich process of cosmic reionization. Here we review the current understanding of early star formation, emphasizing unsolved problems and technical challenges. We begin with the first generation of stars to form after the Big Bang and trace how they influenced subsequent star formation. The onset of chemical enrichment coincided with a sharp increase in the overall physical complexity of star forming systems. Ab-initio computational treatments are just now entering the domain of the predictive and are establishing contact with local observations of the relics of this ancient epoch.

  9. Star Formation for Predictive Primordial Galaxy Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosavljević, Miloš; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence

    The elegance of inflationary cosmology and cosmological perturbation theory ends with the formation of the first stars and galaxies, the initial sources of light that launched the phenomenologically rich process of cosmic reionization. Here we review the current understanding of early star formation, emphasizing unsolved problems and technical challenges. We begin with the first generation of stars to form after the Big Bang and trace how they influenced subsequent star formation. The onset of chemical enrichment coincided with a sharp increase in the overall physical complexity of star forming systems. Ab-initio computational treatments are just now entering the domain of the predictive and are establishing contact with local observations of the relics of this ancient epoch.

  10. The Conic Benchmark Format

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Henrik A.

    This document constitutes the technical reference manual of the Conic Benchmark Format with le extension: .cbf or .CBF. It unies linear, second-order cone (also known as conic quadratic) and semidenite optimization with mixed-integer variables. The format has been designed with benchmark libraries...... in mind, and therefore focuses on compact and easily parsable representations. The problem structure is separated from the problem data, and the format moreover facilitate benchmarking of hotstart capability through sequences of changes....

  11. Fracture formation in austenitic cast steel during thermal fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tuleja

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In the paper are presented the results of numerical analyses of carburisation and thermal shock effect on fracture formation in stable austenitic cast steel of Fe–Ni–Cr–C type used in the charge–carrying elements of carburising furnaces. Using the method of finite element method, the distribution of stresses developing in carbides and their surrounding matrix were determined during rapid temperature changes. It was showed that very large tensile stresses developed in the carbides “out–coming” onto the alloy surface, regardless of the volume, type and anisotropy of properties, which could have led to their cracking as early as in the first cycles of heating and rapid cooling.

  12. Data format translation routines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To enable the effective connection of several dissimilar computers into a network, modification of the data being passed from one computer to another may become necessary. This document describes a package of routines which permit the translation of data in PDP-8 formats to PDP-11 or DECsystem-10 formats or from PDP-11 format to DECsystem-10 format. Additional routines are described which permit the effective use of the translation routines in the environment of the Fusion Energy Division (FED) network and the Elmo Bumpy Torus (EBT) data base

  13. Data format translation routines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burris, R.D.

    1981-02-01

    To enable the effective connection of several dissimilar computers into a network, modification of the data being passed from one computer to another may become necessary. This document describes a package of routines which permit the translation of data in PDP-8 formats to PDP-11 or DECsystem-10 formats or from PDP-11 format to DECsystem-10 format. Additional routines are described which permit the effective use of the translation routines in the environment of the Fusion Energy Division (FED) network and the Elmo Bumpy Torus (EBT) data base.

  14. ENDF/B format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a brief user's description of the format of ENDF/B. This format, originally designed for the US Evaluated Nuclear Data File, is recommended for international use. This summary is an aid to customers of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section when receiving data retrievals in ENDF/B format. For more detailed information the report BNL-NCS-50496 (ENDF 102) should be consulted. An Appendix to the present document gives a summary of the format differences between ENDF/B-4 and ENDF/B-5. (author)

  15. CEL-I, an invertebrate N-acetylgalactosamine-specific C-type lectin, induces TNF-alpha and G-CSF production by mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanishi, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Yoshiko; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Tatsuya

    2007-11-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that CEL-I, an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-specific C-type lectin purified from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata (Holothuroidea) showed potent cytotoxicity to several cell lines such as HeLa, MDCK and XC cells. In this study, we found that CEL-I induced increased secretion of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and granulocyte colony stimulation factor (G-CSF) by mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas this cell line was highly resistant to CEL-I cytotoxicity. The cytokine-inducing activity of CEL-I was stronger than that of phytohaemagglutinin (PHA-L). A binding study using FITC-labelled CEL-I (F-CEL-I) indicated that the amount of bound F-CEL-I on RAW264.7 cells was greater than that of F-PHA-L, suggesting that the greater activity of CEL-I to induce cytokine secretion by RAW264.7 cells is partly due to the higher binding ability. Since the cell binding and cytokine-inducing activity of CEL-I were partly but significantly inhibited by the specific sugar (GalNAc), it is considered that the binding of CEL-I to cell-surface-specific saccharide moieties, which may be recognized by CEL-I with higher affinity than GalNAc, is essential for the induction of cytokine secretion. The secretion of TNF-alpha and G-CSF from CEL-I-treated RAW264.7 cells were almost completely prevented by brefeldin A (BFA), whereas increase in mRNA levels of these cytokines were not affected by BFA. Bio-Plex beads assay suggested that temporal increase in phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK), c-jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAP kinase occurred at relatively early time following CEL-I treatment. Furthermore, the secretion of TNF-alpha and G-CSF were inhibited by specific inhibitors for these MAP kinases. These results suggest that the intracellular signal transduction through the activation of MAP kinase system is involved in CEL-I-induced cytokine secretion. PMID:17846063

  16. Identification of two domains and distal histidine ligands to the four haems in the bacterial c-type cytochrome NapC; the prototype connector between quinol/quinone and periplasmic oxido-reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartron, Michaël L; Roldán, M Dolores; Ferguson, Stuart J; Berks, Ben C; Richardson, David J

    2002-12-01

    NapC is a tetra-haem member of a family of bacterial membrane-anchored multi-haem c -type cytochromes implicated in electron transfer between membrane quinols and periplasmic enzymes. The water-soluble tetra-haem fragment of Paracoccus pantotrophus NapC has been expressed as a periplasmic protein (NapC(sol)) in Paracoccus denitrificans, P. pantotrophus and Escherichia coli. Site-specific mutagenesis of NapC(sol), combined with spectroscopic studies, suggests that each haem iron centre has bis -histidinyl co-ordination. Four proximal ligands arise from each of four Cys-Xaa-Xaa-Cys-His haem-binding motifs; candidates for the four distal ligands are His(81), His(99), His(174) and His(194). NapC(H81A), NapC(H99A), NapC(H174A) and NapC(H194A) mutants (with alanine substituted for each of the four candidate residues) have all been purified from E. coli. In each case, one of the haems has become high-spin, as judged by the presence of a broad absorption band between 620 nm and 650 nm for the oxidized cytochrome; this feature is absent for wild-type protein and presumably arises because of the absence of the distal histidine ligand from one of the haems. NapC(H81A) and NapC(H174A) are less well expressed in E. coli than NapC(H99A) and NapC(H194A) and cannot be detected when expressed in P. denitrificans or P. pantotrophus. In vitro and in vivo complementation studies demonstrate that the soluble periplasmic NapC can mediate electron transfer from quinols to the periplasmic nitrate reductase. This capacity was retained in vitro with the NapC(H99A) and NapC(H194A) mutants but was lost in vivo. A model for the structural organization of NapC(sol) into two domains, each containing a di-haem pair, is proposed. In this model, each haem pair obtains one distal haem ligand from its own domain and a second from the other domain. The suggestion of two domains is supported by observations that the 24 kDa NapC(sol) cleaves to yield a 12 kDa haem-staining band. Determination of the

  17. GLOBAL STAR FORMATION REVISITED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general treatment of disk star formation is developed from a dissipative multiphase model, with the dominant dissipation due to cloud collisions. The Schmidt-Kennicutt (SK) law emerges naturally for star-forming disks and starbursts. We predict that there should be an inverse correlation between Tully-Fisher law and SK law residuals. The model is extended to include a multiphase treatment of supernova feedback that leads to a turbulent pressure-regulated generalization of the star formation law and is applicable to gas-rich starbursts. Enhanced pressure, as expected in merger-induced star formation, enhances star formation efficiency. An upper limit is derived for the disk star formation rate in starbursts that depends on the ratio of global ISM to cloud pressures. We extend these considerations to the case where the interstellar gas pressure in the inner galaxy is dominated by outflows from a central active galactic nucleus (AGN). During massive spheroid formation, AGN-driven winds trigger star formation, resulting in enhanced supernova feedback and outflows. The outflows are comparable to the AGN-boosted star formation rate and saturate in the super-Eddington limit. Downsizing of both SMBH and spheroids is a consequence of AGN-driven positive feedback. Bondi accretion feeds the central black hole with a specific accretion rate that is proportional to the black hole mass. AGN-enhanced star formation is mediated by turbulent pressure and relates spheroid star formation rate to black hole accretion rate. The relation between black hole mass and spheroid velocity dispersion has a coefficient (Salpeter time to gas consumption time ratio) that provides an arrow of time. Highly efficient, AGN-boosted star formation can occur at high redshift.

  18. Formative Assessment in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxenford-O'Brian, Julie

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation responds to critical gaps in current research on formative assessment practice which could limit successful implementation of this practice within the K-12 classroom context. The study applies a socio cultural perspective of learning to interpret a cross-case analysis of formative assessment practice occurring during one…

  19. When efficient star formation drives cluster formation

    CERN Document Server

    Parmentier, G

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the impact of the star formation efficiency in cluster forming cores on the evolution of the mass in star clusters over the age range 1-100Myr, when star clusters undergo their infant weight-loss/mortality phase. Assuming a constant formation rate of gas-embedded clusters and a weak tidal field, we show that the ratio between the total mass in stars bound to the clusters over that age range and the total mass in stars initially formed in gas-embedded clusters is a strongly increasing function of the averaged local SFE, with little influence from any assumed core mass-radius relation. Our results suggest that, for young starbursts with estimated tidal field strength and known recent star formation history, observed cluster-to-star mass ratios, once corrected for the undetected clusters, constitute promising probes of the local SFE, without the need of resorting to gas mass estimates. Similarly, the mass ratio of stars which remain in bound clusters at the end of the infant mortality/weight-loss ...

  20. Recognition of the mycobacterial cord factor by Mincle: relevance for granuloma formation and resistance to tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland eLang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The world’s most successful intracellular bacterial pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB, survives inside macrophages by blocking phagosome maturation and establishes chronic infection characterized by the formation of granulomas. Trehalose-6,6-dimycolate (TDM, the mycobacterial cord factor, is the most abundant cell wall lipid of virulent mycobacteria, is sufficient to cause granuloma formation, and has long been known to be a major virulence factor of MTB. Recently, TDM has been shown to activate the Syk-Card9 signaling pathway in macrophages through binding to the C-type lectin receptor Mincle. The Mincle-Card9 pathway is required for activation of macrophages by TDM in vitro and for granuloma formation in vivo following injection of TDM. Whether this pathway is also exploited by MTB to reprogram the macrophage into a comfortable niche has not been explored yet. Several recent studies have investigated the phenotype of Mincle-deficient mice in mycobacterial infection, yielding divergent results in terms of a role for Mincle in host resistance. Here, we review these studies, discuss possible reasons for discrepant results and highlight open questions in the role of Mincle and other C-type lectin receptors in the infection biology of MTB.

  1. Analysis of the Outcomes of Anatomical Lock Plate for C Type Distal Humerus Fracture%解剖锁定接骨板治疗C型肱骨远端骨折的疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱前拯; 刘成刚; 段亚景; 杨雨润; 杨欢; 陈星佐; 王立强; 陈瀛; 杨连发; 林朋

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察解剖锁定接骨板治疗C型肱骨远端骨折以及术后规范化康复的疗效。方法2009年12月至2013年6月使用解剖锁定接骨板治疗17例C型肱骨远端骨折患者,其中男性6例,女性11例;年龄24~84岁,平均51.2岁。损伤原因:低能量损伤9例(低能量组);高能量损伤8例(高能量组)。受伤至手术时间为1~30d,平均8.4d。术后患者开始规范化肘关节功能康复治疗。末次随访时记录患侧肘关节活动范围并采用M ayo肘关节功能评分。结果所有患者术后获9~48个月(平均18.59个月)随访,所有骨折均愈合,1例合并尺骨鹰嘴截骨处延迟愈合。末次随访时,肘关节伸直15.0°±10.2°,屈曲103.2°±16.3°,活动范围88.2°±22.8°。M EPS评分(83.9±19.2)分,优良率76.5%(13/17)。高能量组与低能量组MEPS评分分别为(71.9±22.5)分和(94.6 ± 4.9)分,差异有统计学意义( P=0.025)。结论 A O解剖锁定接骨板治疗C型肱骨远端骨折的疗效肯定,高能量损伤患者的预后较差,初始损伤因素影响患者肘关节功能恢复,规范化的康复治疗有助于肘关节功能恢复。%Background Among AO types ,C type distal humerus fracture is a very complicated intra‐articular fracture .The distal humerus metaphysis and the articular surface are easy to get severe smash ,which add more difficulties to the treatment .C type distal humerus fracture is complicated with bone defects ,soft tissue injury ,nerve injury ,osteoporosis and other symptoms ,which add to the unsteady fixation and can lead to adverse impacts to prognosis .AO distal humerus lock plates are paralleled plates that vertically fix the internal fracture .It designs to be anatomical plastotype and the distal point is fixed with the 2 .7mm screws .It is more flexible and convenient to use in the operation , and can effectively prevent the

  2. Manuel UNIMARC format bibliographique

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    This manual is the French translation of the second edition of UNIMARC Manual: bibliographic format published in English in 1994 and completed by 5 updates published from 1996 to 2005. This 5th French edition is composite. It reproduces identically a part of the 4th edition published in 2002 and, for the fields of the format modified in the Update 5, it offers a new more structured presentation. This is a handbook dedicated to French-speaking users of the UNIMARC format for bibliographic descriptions.

  3. Teaching Letter Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Steve; Madan, Avi J.

    1981-01-01

    The authors describe a remedial technique for teaching letter formation to students with handwriting difficulties. The approach blends traditional procedures (modeling, physical prompts, tracing, self correction, etc.) with cognitive behavior modification principles. (CL)

  4. Notes on Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Krumholz, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the field of star formation at a level suitable for graduate students or advanced undergraduates in astronomy or physics. The structure of the book is as follows. The first two chapters begin with a discussion of observational techniques, and the basic phenomenology they reveal. The goal is to familiarize students with the basic techniques that will be used throughout, and to provide a common vocabulary for the rest of the book. The next five chapters provide a similar review of the basic physical processes that are important for star formation. Again, the goal is to provide a basis for what follows. The remaining chapters discuss star formation over a variety of scales, starting with the galactic scale and working down to the scales of individual stars and their disks. The book concludes with a brief discussion of the clearing of disks and the transition to planet formation. The book includes five problem sets, complete with solutions.

  5. Formation of Bulges

    CERN Document Server

    Silk, J; Silk, Joseph; Bouwens, Rychard J.

    1998-01-01

    Bulges, often identified with the spheroidal component of a galaxy, have a complex pedigree. Massive bulges are generally red and old, but lower mass bulges have broader dispersions in color that may be correlated with disk colors. This suggests different formation scenarios. I will review possible formation sequences for bulges, describe the various signatures that distinguish these scenarios, and discuss implications for the high redshift universe.

  6. Tetrahydrofuran Clathrate Hydrate Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Conrad, Heiko; Lehmkuhler, Felix; Sternemann, Christian; Sakko, Arto; Paschek, Dietmar; Simonelli, Laura; Huotari, Simo; Feroughi, Omid; Tolan, Metin; HÀmÀlÀinen, Keijo

    2009-01-01

    We report on the formation of tetrahydrofuran clathrate hydrate studied by x-ray Raman scattering measurements at the oxygen K edge. A comparison of x-ray Raman spectra measured from water-tetrahydrofuran mixtures and tetrahydrofuran hydrate at different temperatures supports stochastic hydrate formation models rather than models assuming hydrate precursors. This is confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations of x-ray Raman spectra. In addition, chan...

  7. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  8. Expression of C-type lectin receptors and Toll-like receptors in decidua of unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortion. Expression of C-type lectin receptors and Toll-like receptors in decidua of unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortion%C 型凝集素受体和 Toll 样受体在原因不明复发性流产患者蜕膜中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱添; 滕银成; 王玉东; 徐亮

    2014-01-01

    目的:研究原因不明复发性流产(URSA)患者蜕膜中树突细胞(DC)特异性细胞间黏附分子-3结合非整合素因子(DC-SIGN)和甘露糖受体( MR)及 Toll 样受体2(TLR-2)和 TLR-4的表达情况。方法:采集 URSA 患者及正常妊娠人工流产妇女(对照组)的新鲜蜕膜。采用免疫组化和 Western blot 法检测蜕膜中 DC-SIGN、MR、TLR-2和TLR-4蛋白表达,RT-PCR 检测蜕膜中 DC-SIGN、MR、TLR-2和 TLR-4 mRNA 表达;流式细胞检测蜕膜中 DC 表面表达 DC-SIGN、MR、TLR-2和 TLR-4的水平。结果:与对照组比较, URSA 组蜕膜中及 DC 表面的 TLR-2和 TLR-4表达水平明显升高(P0.05)。结论:相对于正常妊娠妇女,URSA 患者蜕膜中及树突细胞表面的 C 型凝集素受体(CLRs)弱势表达,而 TLRs 优势表达。 CLRs 与 TLRs 之间的免疫平衡失调可能是 UR-SA 发病机制中的重要因素之一。%Objective:To investigate the expression of C-typed lectin receptors (CLRs) of DC-SIGN and MR and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) of TLR-2 and TLR-4 in decidua of unex-plained recurrent spontaneous abortion( URSA) patients. Methods:The decidua tissues were obtained from URSA patients (URSA group,n =20) and normal pregnant women (NP group,n= 20). The expressions of DCSIGN,MR,TLR-2 and TLR-4 protein in decidua were detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. The levels of DCSIGN,MR,TLR-2 and TLR-4 mRNA in decidua were detected by RT-PCR. The expressions of DCSIGN,MR,TLR-2 and TLR-4 mol-ecule on DC were detected by flow cytometry. Results:The expressions of TLR-2 and TLR-4 on DC and in decidua in URSA group were higher than that in NP group (P0. 05). Conclusion:Compared with normal pregnant women,the weak expression of CLRs and the overexpression of TLRs were observed in decidua in URSA patients. The imbal-ance between CLRs and TLRs may play an important role in the pathogenesis of URSA.

  9. Formation peculiarities of tourism documentation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhezhnych, Pavlo; Soprunyuk, Oksana

    2013-01-01

    The article describes formation peculiarities of tourism documentation, the role of tourism data consolidation for unified format creation and the the need to use existing software tools to handle tourism information, formation process of tourism documentation is presented.

  10. Molecules in star formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, F. H.

    The author reviews current ideas and models in the problem of star formation from molecular cloud cores that are relatively isolated from the influences of other forming stars. He discusses the time scales, flow dynamics, and density and temperature structures applicable to each of the four stages of the entire process: (1) formation of a magnetized cloud core by ambipolar diffusion and evolution to a pivotal state of gravomagneto catastrophe; (2) self-similar collapse of the pivotal configuration and the formation of protostars, disks, and pseudo-disks; (3) onset of a magnetocentrifugally driven, lightly ionized wind from the interaction of an accretion disk and the magnetosphere of the central star, and the driving of bipolar molecular outflows; (4) evolution of pre-main-sequence stars surrounded by dusty accretion disks. For each of these stages and processes, he considers the characteristics of the molecular diagnostics needed to investigate the crucial aspects of the observational problem.

  11. Meningococcal biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappann, M.; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Claus, H.;

    2006-01-01

    We show that in a standardized in vitro flow system unencapsulated variants of genetically diverse lineages of Neisseria meningitidis formed biofilms, that could be maintained for more than 96 h. Biofilm cells were resistant to penicillin, but not to rifampin or ciprofloxacin. For some strains......, microcolony formation within biofilms was observed. Microcolony formation in strain MC58 depended on a functional copy of the pilE gene encoding the pilus subunit pilin, and was associated with twitching of cells. Nevertheless, unpiliated pilE mutants formed biofilms showing that attachment and accumulation...... PilX alleles was identified among genetically diverse meningococcal strains. PilX alleles differed in their propensity to support autoaggregation of cells in suspension, but not in their ability to support microcolony formation within biofilms in the continuous flow system....

  12. Galaxy formation and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Mo, Houjun; White, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of galaxy formation lies at the interface between astronomy, particle physics, and cosmology. Covering diverse topics from these disciplines, all of which are needed to understand how galaxies form and evolve, this book is ideal for researchers entering the field. Individual chapters explore the evolution of the Universe as a whole and its particle and radiation content; linear and nonlinear growth of cosmic structure; processes affecting the gaseous and dark matter components of galaxies and their stellar populations; the formation of spiral and elliptical galaxies; central supermassive black holes and the activity associated with them; galaxy interactions; and the intergalactic medium. Emphasizing both observational and theoretical aspects, this book provides a coherent introduction for astronomers, cosmologists, and astroparticle physicists to the broad range of science underlying the formation and evolution of galaxies.

  13. Star Formation Rate Indicators

    CERN Document Server

    Calzetti, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    What else can be said about star formation rate indicators that has not been said already many times over? The `coming of age' of large ground-based surveys and the unprecedented sensitivity, angular resolution and/or field-of-view of infrared and ultraviolet space missions have provided extensive, homogeneous data on both nearby and distant galaxies, which have been used to further our understanding of the strengths and pitfalls of many common star formation rate indicators. The synergy between these surveys has also enabled the calibration of indicators for use on scales that are comparable to those of star-forming regions, thus much smaller than an entire galaxy. These are being used to investigate star formation processes at the sub-galactic scale. I review progress in the field over the past decade or so.

  14. Densities and Kinematic Viscosities for the Systems Benzene + Methyl Formate, Benzene + Ethyl Formate, Benzene + Propyl Formate, and Benzene + Butyl Formate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmerling, Uwe; Rasmussen, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Densities and kinematic viscosities have been measured for the system benzene + methyl formate at 20°C and for the systems benzene + ethyl formate, benzene + propyl formate, and benzene + butyl formate from 20°C to 50°C. The results for the system benzene + methyl formate have been correlated using...... a Redlich-Kister type of expression with temperature-independent parameters and the data for the systems benzene + ethyl formate, benzene + propyl formate, and benzene + butyl formate with temperature-dependent parameters. The viscosities have furthermore been compared to values predicted by means...

  15. Tea aroma formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Tang Ho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Besides water, tea is one of the most popular beverages around the world. The chemical ingredients and biological activities of tea have been summarized recently. The current review summarizes tea aroma compounds and their formation in green, black, and oolong tea. The flavor of tea can be divided into two categories: taste (non-volatile compounds and aroma (volatile compounds. All of these aroma molecules are generated from carotenoids, lipids, glycosides, etc. precursors, and also from Maillard reaction. In the current review, we focus on the formation mechanism of main aromas during the tea manufacturing process.

  16. Exploring Opponent Formats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Møller; Rasmussen, Majken; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2013-01-01

    The recent growth in development and research in computer-supported physical games has sprouted a wide variety of games merging qualities from both computer games and sports. Despite the increasing interest in this type of games, exploration of their specific game mechanics and the understanding ...... football-training platform, as well as games designed to explore the different opponent formats. The games are qualitatively evaluated to illuminate the qualities of and distinctions between different types of opponent formats, proposed by the framework terminology....

  17. Formats and data storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The currently used ENDF-6 format has a number of shortcomings that originate from the punch-card legacy. Some, such as redundancy, counting lines, too short MAT number and too many options could be resolved within the current format. The more critical issues, such as rigidity to extensions, limited accuracy due to fixed number of digits, difficulty of reading by humans, lack of native software support, and lack of integration with EXFOR and ENSDF libraries, would require such considerable efforts that migration to a new and modern format, offering additional advantages, is a more attractive option. Actually, such an option is even more justified by the existence of the well advanced General Nuclear Data (GND) format being developed by LLNL. This XML based framework is easily extensible, its numerical precision is not fixed, it is easier to edit, can store additional information (e.g. renormalized experimental data used in the evaluation), allows for storing various versions side by side (e.g. reconstructed data, group-wise data, alternative evaluations), it may include hyperlinks to documentation or another set of data (e.g. covariances). Two additional advantages are the possibility of using native Python support software and already available conversion (in both directions) to the binary HDF5 format which allows to organize, store, access, analyze, share, and preserve data huge in both size and complexity. The GND format comes with the processing software FUDGE, whose class structure mirrors the GND format. It provides for arbitrary alteration of the data, energy deposition/kermas, data checking, translation to different format (ENDF-6, HDF5, ENDL), grouping, resonance reconstruction, visualization and sampling from covariances. It is deemed advantageous to the Nuclear Data community to adopt this new system and develop interfaces to the currently used processing codes and retrieval systems to take full advantage of the evolving technology. Such modernization is

  18. The formation of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Stahler, Steven W

    2008-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive treatment of star formation, one of the most active fields of modern astronomy. The reader is guided through the subject in a logically compelling manner. Starting from a general description of stars and interstellar clouds, the authors delineate the earliest phases of stellar evolution. They discuss formation activity not only in the Milky Way, but also in other galaxies, both now and in the remote past. Theory and observation are thoroughly integrated, with the aid of numerous figures and images. In summary, this volume is an invaluable resource, both as a text f

  19. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; /UC, Irvine; Zentner, Andrew R.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI; Bullock, James S.; /UC, Irvine; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo

    2007-09-12

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding

  20. Terrestrial planet formation

    OpenAIRE

    Righter, K.; D. P. O’Brien

    2011-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (∼106 y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few × 106 y), and finally e...

  1. Isothermal Martensite Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo

    Isothermal (i.e. time dependent) martensite formation in steel was first observed in the 40ies of the XXth century and is still treated as an anomaly in the description of martensite formation which is considered as a-thermal (i.e. independent of time). Recently, the clarification of the mechanism...... leading to isothermal kinetics acquired new practical relevance because of the identification of isothermal martensite formation as the most likely process responsible for enhanced performances of sub-zero Celsius treated high carbon steel products. In the present work, different iron based alloys are...... chosen to investigate time dependent martensite formation. Among them, a Fe-11wt%Ni-0.6wt%C model alloy and Fe-1.6wt%Cr-1wt%C (AISI 52100), Fe-17wt%Cr-7wt%Ni (AISI 631) and Fe-16wt%Cr-5wt%Ni (AISI 630) commercial steels. The investigation was performed with in situ magnetometry, dilatometry, synchrotron...

  2. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted

  3. Airship formation control

    OpenAIRE

    Bicho, E.; Moreira, André; Diegues, Sérgio; Carvalheira, Manuel Pereira; Monteiro, Sérgio

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem underlying the control and coordination of multiple autonomous airships that must travel maintaining a desired geometric formation and simultaneously avoid collisions with moving or stationary obstacles. The control architecture is based on the attractor dynamics approach to behaviour generation. The airship physical model is presented and the mathematical background for the control architecture is explained. Simulations (with perturbations) ...

  4. Triggered Star Formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palouš, Jan

    Berlin: Springer, 2014 - (Stamatellos, D.), s. 181-184. ( Astrophysics and Space Science Proceedings. 36). ISBN 978-3-319-03040-1. ISSN 1570-6591. [The Labyrinth of Star Formation. Crete (GR), 18.06.2012-22.06.2012] Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : interstellar gas layers * expanding shells * irregular galaxies Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  5. Syntactic Formats for Free

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klin, Bartek; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2003-01-01

    A framework of Plotkin and Turi’s, originally aimed at providing an abstract notion of bi-simulation, is modified to cover other operational equivalences and preorders. Combined with bi-algebraic methods, it yields a technique for the derivation of syntactic formats for transition system...

  6. Dynamic Aspects of Synapse Formation

    OpenAIRE

    McAllister, A. Kimberley

    2007-01-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) requires the proper formation of exquisitely precise circuits to function correctly. These neuronal circuits are assembled during development by the formation of synaptic connections between thousands of differentiating neurons. Proper synapse formation during childhood provides the substrate for cognition while improper formation or function of these synapses leads to neurodevelopmental disorders, including mental retardation and autism. Recent work...

  7. Disposal in argillaceous formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general description is made of clay as a geochemical medium, including a rapid review of the principal mineralogic data characterizing typical clay minerals, whereafter a description follows of the formation of geologic clay deposits. Two examples are used as illustration: the Boom clay formation at the Nuclear Center of Mol in Belgium and the marly clay layer at the Trisaia Nuclear Research Center in Italy. The principal physico-chemical and hydrogeologic properties of clays e.g. permeability and pore water composition are discussed in some detail due to their importance in assessing clay layers as host rock. Ion exchange of clays is reviewed with particular emphasis on the distribution coefficients, the diffusion coefficient and the migration parameters of radionuclides. Specific data relating to the Boom clay are commented in connection to the required conditioning techniques. The influence of heat on clay is shortly addressed and data are given of the heat transfer coefficients found in Belgium and Italy

  8. Moment formation in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of moment formation in metallic systems lies at the interface of localized and itinerant magnetism. The phenomena observed correspond to destruction rather than to formation of spin-correlations. They give rise to the progression from localized ground states through Kondo and mixed-valence behavior to itinerant magnetic or non-magnetic systems. Somewhere in the progression superconductivity can occur in the presence of f-moments. This conference presents information on the following topics: neuron inelastic scattering as a probe of moments in metallic systems; cyclotron resonance and relaxation of hot charge carriers; orbital effects in actinide systems; theory of elementary excitations in intermediate valence materials: phenomena involving magnetic moment suppresion; and superconducting ground state of a strongly interacting electron system: UBe13

  9. Emptiness Formation Probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Nicholas; Ng, Stephen; Starr, Shannon

    2016-08-01

    We present rigorous upper and lower bounds on the emptiness formation probability for the ground state of a spin-1/2 Heisenberg XXZ quantum spin system. For a d-dimensional system we find a rate of decay of the order {exp(-c L^{d+1})} where L is the sidelength of the box in which we ask for the emptiness formation event to occur. In the {d=1} case this confirms previous predictions made in the integrable systems community, though our bounds do not achieve the precision predicted by Bethe ansatz calculations. On the other hand, our bounds in the case {d ≥ 2} are new. The main tools we use are reflection positivity and a rigorous path integral expansion, which is a variation on those previously introduced by Toth, Aizenman-Nachtergaele and Ueltschi.

  10. Pattern formation during vasculogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czirok, Andras; Little, Charles D

    2012-06-01

    Vasculogenesis, the assembly of the first vascular network, is an intriguing developmental process that yields the first functional organ system of the embryo. In addition to being a fundamental part of embryonic development, vasculogenic processes also have medical importance. To explain the organizational principles behind vascular patterning, we must understand how morphogenesis of tissue level structures can be controlled through cell behavior patterns that, in turn, are determined by biochemical signal transduction processes. Mathematical analyses and computer simulations can help conceptualize how to bridge organizational levels and thus help in evaluating hypotheses regarding the formation of vascular networks. Here, we discuss the ideas that have been proposed to explain the formation of the first vascular pattern: cell motility guided by extracellular matrix alignment (contact guidance), chemotaxis guided by paracrine and autocrine morphogens, and sprouting guided by cell-cell contacts. PMID:22692888

  11. Format( )MEDIC( )Input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, K.

    1994-09-01

    This document is a description of a computer program called Format( )MEDIC( )Input. The purpose of this program is to allow the user to quickly reformat wind velocity data in the Model Evaluation Database (MEDb) into a reasonable 'first cut' set of MEDIC input files (MEDIC.nml, StnLoc.Met, and Observ.Met). The user is cautioned that these resulting input files must be reviewed for correctness and completeness. This program will not format MEDb data into a Problem Station Library or Problem Metdata File. A description of how the program reformats the data is provided, along with a description of the required and optional user input and a description of the resulting output files. A description of the MEDb is not provided here but can be found in the RAS Division Model Evaluation Database Description document.

  12. Photochemical formation of intricarene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stichnoth, Desiree; Kölle, Patrick; Kimbrough, Thomas J; Riedle, Eberhard; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina; Trauner, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Sunlight is the ultimate driver of biosynthesis but photochemical steps late in biosynthetic pathways are very rare. They appear to play a role in the formation of certain furanocembranoids isolated from Caribbean corals. One of these compounds, intricarene, has been suspected to arise from an intramolecular 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition involving an oxidopyrylium. Here we show, by a combination of experiments and theory, that the oxidopyrylium forms under photochemical conditions and that its cycloaddition occurs via a triplet state. The formation of a complex by-product can be rationalized by another photochemical step that involves a conical intersection. Our work raises the question whether intricarene is biosynthesized in the natural habitat of the corals or is an artefact formed during workup. It also demonstrates that the determination of exact irradiation spectra, in combination with quantum chemical calculations, enables the rationalization of complex reaction pathways that involve multiple excited states. PMID:25470600

  13. Plasma formation in TBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work are presented and discussed results of the formation and equilibrium of the plasma current in TBR, a small tokamak, designed and contructed at the Instituto de Fisica of Universidade de Sao Paulo. The measured breakdown curves for H2, A and He are compared with the predictions of a simple model with reasonable agreement. The influence of stray magnetic fields in the plasma formation is investigated and conditions are chosen to facilitate the breakdown. The time profile of loop voltage and plasma current for shots with plasma equilibrium are shown. A comparison is made between experimental results and analytical-numerical model for tokamaks discharges with ohmic heating. Reasonable agreement is obtained when Z, effective atomic number, is assumed as a parameter. (Author)

  14. Formation of multiple networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnani, Matteo; Rossi, Luca

    2013-01-01

    While most research in Social Network Analysis has focused on single networks, the availability of complex on-line data about individuals and their mutual heterogenous connections has recently determined a renewed interest in multi-layer network analysis. To the best of our knowledge, in this paper...... we introduce the first network formation model for multiple networks. Network formation models are among the most popular tools in traditional network studies, because of both their practical and theoretical impact. However, existing models are not sufficient to describe the generation of multiple...... networks. Our model, motivated by an empirical analysis of real multi-layered network data, is a conservative extension of single-network models and emphasizes the additional level of complexity that we experience when we move from a single- to a more complete and realistic multi-network context....

  15. Frost formation with salt

    OpenAIRE

    Guadarrama-Cetina, J.; Mongruel, A. (Anne); González-Viñas, W.; Beysens, D.A. (Daniel A.)

    2015-01-01

    The formation of frost in presence of salt (NaCl) crystal is experimentally investigated on a hydrophobic surface. It presents several remarkable features due to the interplay of salty-water saturation pressure evolution, initially lower than the saturation pressure of ice and water, and the percolating propagation of ice dendrites from defects throughout the supercooled water droplet pattern. In particular, it is remarkable that nucleation of supercooled water and/or ice is prevented around ...

  16. Formate-assisted pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSisto, William Joseph; Wheeler, Marshall Clayton; van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

    2015-03-17

    The present invention provides, among other thing, methods for creating significantly deoxygenated bio-oils form biomass including the steps of providing a feedstock, associating the feedstock with an alkali formate to form a treated feedstock, dewatering the treated feedstock, heating the dewatered treated feedstock to form a vapor product, and condensing the vapor product to form a pyrolysis oil, wherein the pyrolysis oil contains less than 30% oxygen by weight.

  17. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet age:

  18. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet

  19. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet age:

  20. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet

  1. Egg Formation in Lepidoptera

    OpenAIRE

    William H. Telfer

    2009-01-01

    Reproductive biology in the Twentieth Century produced comprehensive descriptions of the mechanisms of egg formation in most of the major orders of insects. While many general principles of ovarian development and physiology emerged, every order turned out to have a set of its own special motifs. Discovery of the lepidopteran motifs is summarized in this essay. The emphasis is on developmental mechanisms, beginning with the early growth and differentiation of female germ cells and ending, aft...

  2. Modeling river delta formation

    OpenAIRE

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Andrade, José S.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2007-01-01

    A model to simulate the time evolution of river delta formation process is presented. It is based on the continuity equation for water and sediment flow and a phenomenological sedimentation/erosion law. Different delta types are reproduced by using different parameters and erosion rules. The structures of the calculated patterns are analyzed in space and time and compared with real data patterns. Furthermore, our model is capable of simulating the rich dynamics related to the switching of the...

  3. Galaxy Formation and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamine, Kentaro; Reddy, Naveen; Daddi, Emanuele; Sargent, Mark T.

    2016-07-01

    In this chapter, we discuss the current status of observational and computational studies on galaxy formation and evolution. In particular, a joint analysis of star-formation rates (SFRs), stellar masses, and metallicities of galaxies throughout cosmic time can shed light on the processes by which galaxies build up their stellar mass and enrich the environment with heavy elements. Comparison of such observations and the results of numerical simulations can give us insights on the physical importance of various feedback effects by supernovae and active galactic nuclei. In Sect. 1, we first discuss the primary methods used to deduce the SFRs, stellar masses, and (primarily) gas-phase metallicities in high-redshift galaxies. Then, we show how these quantities are related to each other and evolve with time. In Sect. 2, we further examine the distribution of SFRs in galaxies following the `Main Sequence' paradigm. We show how the so-called `starbursts' display higher specific SFRs and SF efficiencies by an order of magnitude. We use this to devise a simple description of the evolution of the star-forming galaxy population since z ˜3 that can successfully reproduce some of the observed statistics in the infrared (IR) wavelength. We also discuss the properties of molecular gas. In Sect. 3, we highlight some of the recent studies of high-redshift galaxy formation using cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We discuss the physical properties of simulated galaxies such as luminosity function and escape fraction of ionizing photons, which are important statistics for reionization of the Universe. In particular the escape fraction of ionizing photons has large uncertainties, and studying gamma-ray bursts (which is the main topic of this conference) can also set observational constraints on this uncertain physical parameter as well as cosmic star formation rate density.

  4. Formation of Personal Identity

    OpenAIRE

    Secher, Louise; Thulin, Cecilie; Miller, Juliet; Coulson, Maya

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The starting point for this project was our interest in how personal identity is formed, assuming that identity is acquired, not innate. Furthermore, we were interested in whether the formation of identity changes in relation to societal changes. We commenced by using theorist George Herbert Mead to specify the relationship between identity and society. We continued with Anthony Giddens’ theory regarding the construction of identity in a postmodern world. Phenomena demonstrated in...

  5. Layer Formation in Semiconvection

    OpenAIRE

    Biello, Joseph A.

    2001-01-01

    Layer formation in a thermally destabilized fluid with stable density gradient has been observed in laboratory experiments and has been proposed as a mechanism for mixing molecular weight in late stages of stellar evolution in regions which are unstable to semiconvection. It is not yet known whether such layers can exist in a very low viscosity fluid: this work undertakes to address that question. Layering is simulated numerically both at high Prandtl number (relevant to the laboratory) in or...

  6. Formation of transient lamellipodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Zimmermann

    Full Text Available Cell motility driven by actin polymerization is pivotal to the development and survival of organisms and individual cells. Motile cells plated on flat substrates form membrane protrusions called lamellipodia. The protrusions repeatedly appear and retract in all directions. If a lamellipodium is stabilized and lasts for some time, it can take over the lead and determine the direction of cell motion. Protrusions traveling along the cell perimeter have also been observed. Their initiation is in some situations the effect of the dynamics of the pathway linking plasma membrane receptors to actin filament nucleation, e.g. in chemotaxis. However, lamellipodia are also formed in many cells incessantly during motion with a constant state of the signaling pathways upstream from nucleation promoting factors (NPFs, or spontaneously in resting cells. These observations strongly suggest protrusion formation can also be a consequence of the dynamics downstream from NPFs, with signaling setting the dynamic regime but not initiating the formation of individual protrusions. A quantitative mechanism for this kind of lamellipodium dynamics has not been suggested yet. Here, we present a model exhibiting excitable actin network dynamics. Individual lamellipodia form due to random supercritical filament nucleation events amplified by autocatalytic branching. They last for about 30 seconds to many minutes and are terminated by filament bundling, severing and capping. We show the relevance of the model mechanism for experimentally observed protrusion dynamics by reproducing in very good approximation the repetitive protrusion formation measured by Burnette et al. with respect to the velocities of leading edge protrusion and retrograde flow, oscillation amplitudes, periods and shape, as well as the phase relation between protrusion and retrograde flow. Our modeling results agree with the mechanism of actin bundle formation during lamellipodium retraction suggested by

  7. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows GB/T 7714—2005.The citation should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article Sun,Y.,Li,B.,&Qu,J.F.Design and implementation of library intelligent IM reference robot.New Technology of Library and Information Service(in Chinese),

  8. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows GB/T 7714—2005.The citation should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article Sun,Y.,Li,B.,&Qu,J.F.Design and implementation of library intelligent IM reference robot.New Technology of Library and Information Service(in Chinese),2011,205:88–92.

  9. Unemployment and Household formation

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahim, Amina; Woolard, Ingrid; Leibbrandt, Murray

    2013-01-01

    In comparison to other continents, Africa has received little scholarly attention with regard to household composition. Household composition is endogenous to a variety of welfare issues and little is understood about the determinants of this composition. Understanding the household composition and formation decision may improve our understanding of how the unemployed gain access to resources and how household composition could provide a safety net to the unemployed. However, increasingly, mo...

  10. THE ALLIANCE FORMATION PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    Whipple, Judith M.; Frankel, Robert

    1998-01-01

    While interest in developing strategic alliances within the food system continues to increase, there remains considerable risk when firms adopt such a cooperative strategy. The risk is due in part to the lack of concrete guidelines that illustrate the steps or stages of alliance development and the important strategic and operational decisions required at each stage. The existence of such guidelines would facilitate alliance formation and enable managers and researchers to better understand a...

  11. Terrestrial planet formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K; O'Brien, D P

    2011-11-29

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (~10(6) y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few 10(6) y), and finally embryos to planets (10(7)-10(8) y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids. PMID:21709256

  12. Mars brine formation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Bullock, Mark A.; Stoker, Carol R.

    1992-01-01

    Evaporites, particularly carbonates, nitrates, and sulfates, may be major sinks of volatiles scavenged from the martian atmosphere. Mars is thought to have once had a denser, warmer atmosphere that permitted the presence of liquid surface water. The conversion of atmospheric CO2 into carbonate is hypothesized to have degraded the martian climate to its present state of a generally subfreezing, desiccated desert. The rate for such a conversion under martian conditions is poorly known, so the time scale of climate degradation by this process cannot be easily evaluated. If some models are correct, carbonate formation may have been fast at geological time scales. The experiments of Booth and Kieffer also imply fast (10(exp 6) - 10(exp 7) yr) removal of the missing CO2 inventory, estimated to be 1 - 5 bar, by means of carbonate formation. The timing of formation of many of the fluvial features observed on Mars is, in large part, dependent on when and how fast the atmosphere changed. A knowledge of the rate at which carbonates and nitrates formed is also essential for assessing the probability that life, or its chemical precursors, could have developed on Mars. No previous experiments have quantitatively evaluated the rate of solution for a suite of mobile anions and cations from unaltered minerals and atmospheric gases into liquid water under Mars-like conditions. Such experiments are the focus of this task.

  13. Cosmic Star Formation History

    CERN Document Server

    Madau, Piero

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade and a half, an avalanche of new data from multiwavelength imaging and spectroscopic surveys has revolutionized our view of galaxy formation and evolution. Making sense of it all and fitting it together into a coherent picture remains one of astronomy's great challenges. Here we review the range of complementary techniques and theoretical tools that are allowing astronomers to map the cosmic history of star formation, heavy element production, and reionization of the universe from the cosmic "dark ages" to the present epoch. A consistent picture is emerging from modern galaxy surveys, whereby the star formation rate density peaked about 3.5 Gyr after the Big Bang, at redshift 1.9, and declined exponentially at later times, with an e-folding timescale of 3.9 Gyr. Half of the stellar mass observed today was formed before redshift 1.3. Less than 1% of today's stars formed during the epoch of reionization, at redshift greater than 6. Under the simple assumption of a universal initial mass func...

  14. Formation of Lunar Swirls

    CERN Document Server

    Bamford, R A; Cruz, F; Kellett, B J; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O; Trines, R M G M; Halekas, J S; Kramer, G; Harnett, E; Cairns, R A; Bingham, R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we show a plausible mechanism that could lead to the formation of the Dark Lanes in Lunar Swirls, and the electromagnetic shielding of the lunar surface that results in the preservation of the white colour of the lunar regolith. We present the results of a fully self-consistent 2 and 3 dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of mini-magnetospheres that form above the lunar surface and show that they are consistent with the formation of `lunar swirls' such as the archetypal formation Reiner Gamma. The simulations show how the microphysics of the deflection/shielding of plasma operates from a kinetic-scale cavity, and show that this interaction leads to a footprint with sharp features that could be the mechanism behind the generation of `dark lanes'. The physics of mini-magnetospheres is described and shown to be controlled by space-charge fields arising due to the magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions. A comparison between model and observation is shown for a number of key plasma parameters...

  15. The Star Formation Camera

    CERN Document Server

    Scowen, Paul A; Beasley, Matthew; Calzetti, Daniela; Desch, Steven; Fullerton, Alex; Gallagher, John; Lisman, Doug; Macenka, Steve; Malhotra, Sangeeta; McCaughrean, Mark; Nikzad, Shouleh; O'Connell, Robert; Oey, Sally; Padgett, Deborah; Rhoads, James; Roberge, Aki; Siegmund, Oswald; Shaklan, Stuart; Smith, Nathan; Stern, Daniel; Tumlinson, Jason; Windhorst, Rogier; Woodruff, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The Star Formation Camera (SFC) is a wide-field (~15'x19, >280 arcmin^2), high-resolution (18x18 mas pixels) UV/optical dichroic camera designed for the Theia 4-m space-borne space telescope concept. SFC will deliver diffraction-limited images at lambda > 300 nm in both a blue (190-517nm) and a red (517-1075nm) channel simultaneously. Our aim is to conduct a comprehensive and systematic study of the astrophysical processes and environments relevant for the births and life cycles of stars and their planetary systems, and to investigate and understand the range of environments, feedback mechanisms, and other factors that most affect the outcome of the star and planet formation process. This program addresses the origins and evolution of stars, galaxies, and cosmic structure and has direct relevance for the formation and survival of planetary systems like our Solar System and planets like Earth. We present the design and performance specifications resulting from the implementation study of the camera, conducted ...

  16. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5th Ed.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet age:A citation analysis of computer science literature.Information Processing and Management,2001,37:661-675.

  17. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet age:A citation analysis of computer science literature.Information Processing and Manage-

  18. Modeling river delta formation

    CERN Document Server

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Herrmann, Hans J

    2007-01-01

    A new model to simulate the time evolution of river delta formation process is presented. It is based on the continuity equation for water and sediment flow and a phenomenological sedimentation/ erosion law. Different delta types are reproduced using different parameters and erosion rules. The structures of the calculated patterns are analyzed in space and time and compared with real data patterns. Furthermore our model is capable to simulate the rich dynamics related to the switching of the mouth of the river delta. The simulation results are then compared with geological records for the Mississippi river.

  19. Modeling river delta formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2007-10-23

    A model to simulate the time evolution of river delta formation process is presented. It is based on the continuity equation for water and sediment flow and a phenomenological sedimentation/erosion law. Different delta types are reproduced by using different parameters and erosion rules. The structures of the calculated patterns are analyzed in space and time and compared with real data patterns. Furthermore, our model is capable of simulating the rich dynamics related to the switching of the mouth of the river delta. The simulation results are then compared with geological records for the Mississippi River. PMID:17940031

  20. Symbol Formation Reconsidered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagoner, Brady

    2013-01-01

    begins with a brief outline and contextualization of the book as well as of the articles that this special issue comprises. The first two articles were written by contributors who were part of the Werner era at Clark University. They explore the key concepts of the organismic and development, and situate......Werner and Kaplan’s Symbol formation was published 50 years ago but its insights have yet to be adequately explored by psychology and other social sciences. This special issue aims to revisit this seminal work in search of concepts to work on key issues facing us today. This introductory article...

  1. The Star Formation Camera

    OpenAIRE

    Scowen, Paul A.; Jansen, Rolf; Beasley, Matthew; Calzetti, Daniela; Desch, Steven; Fullerton, Alex; Gallagher, John; Lisman, Doug; Macenka, Steve; Malhotra, Sangeeta; McCaughrean, Mark; Nikzad, Shouleh; O'Connell, Robert; Oey, Sally; Padgett, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    The Star Formation Camera (SFC) is a wide-field (~15'x19, >280 arcmin^2), high-resolution (18x18 mas pixels) UV/optical dichroic camera designed for the Theia 4-m space-borne space telescope concept. SFC will deliver diffraction-limited images at lambda > 300 nm in both a blue (190-517nm) and a red (517-1075nm) channel simultaneously. Our aim is to conduct a comprehensive and systematic study of the astrophysical processes and environments relevant for the births and life cycles of stars and ...

  2. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet age:A citation analysis of computer science literature.Information Processing and Management,2001,37:661-675.2 Fernandez,M.,Kadiyska,Y.,&Suciu,D.,et al.SilkRoute:A framework for publishing

  3. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet age:A citation analysis of computer science literature.Information Processing and Management,2001,37:661-675.2 Fernandez.M

  4. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  5. Standard exercise report format (SERF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This talk summarizes the reasons for the development of draft SERF the Standard Exercise Report Format used for reporting the results of emergency preparedness exercises, and gives a summary of the format and rational behind it

  6. The Planet Formation Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, S.; Buscher, D. F.; Monnier, J. D.; PFI Science, the; Technical Working Group

    2014-04-01

    Among the most fascinating and hotly-debated areas in contemporary astrophysics are the means by which planetary systems are assembled from the large rotating disks of gas and dust which attend a stellar birth. Although important work is being done both in theory and observation, a full understanding of the physics of planet formation can only be achieved by opening observational windows able to directly witness the process in action. The key requirement is then to probe planet-forming systems at the natural spatial scales over which material is being assembled. By definition, this is the so-called Hill Sphere which delineates the region of influence of a gravitating body within its surrounding environment. The Planet Formation Imager project has crystallized around this challenging goal: to deliver resolved images of Hill-Sphere-sized structures within candidate planet-hosting disks in the nearest star-forming regions. In this contribution we outline the primary science case of PFI and discuss how PFI could significantly advance our understanding of the architecture and potential habitability of planetary systems. We present radiation-hydrodynamics simulations from which we derive preliminary specifications that guide the design of the facility. Finally, we give an overview about the interferometric and non-interferometric technologies that we are investigating in order to meet the specifications.

  7. Formation of planetary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It seemed appropriate to devote the 1980 School to the origin of the solar system and more particularly to the formation of planetary systems (dynamic accretion processes, small bodies, planetary rings, etc...) and to the physics and chemistry of planetary interiors, surface and atmospheres (physical and chemical constraints associated with their formation). This Summer School enabled both young researchers and hard-nosed scientists, gathered together in idyllic surroundings, to hold numerous discussions, to lay the foundations for future cooperation, to acquire an excellent basic understanding, and to make many useful contacts. This volume reflects the lectures and presentations that were delivered in this Summer School setting. It is aimed at both advanced students and research workers wishing to specialize in planetology. Every effort has been made to give an overview of the basic knowledge required in order to gain a better understanding of the origin of the solar system. Each article has been revised by one or two referees whom I would like to thank for their assistance. Between the end of the School in August 1980 and the publication of this volume in 1982, the Voyager probes have returned a wealth of useful information. Some preliminary results have been included for completeness

  8. Compact toroid formation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the design and experimental performance of a compact toroid (CT) formation experiment. The device has co-axial electrode diameters of 0.9 m (inner) and 1.25 m (outer), and an electrode length of ∼ 1.2 m, including an expansion/drift section. The CT is formed by a 0.1--0.2 Tesla initial radial magnetic field embedded co-axial puff gas discharge. The gas puff is injected with an array of 60 pulsed solenoid driven fast valves. The formation discharge is driven by a 108 microfarad, 40 to 100 KV, 86 to 540 kilojoule 2 to 5 megamp capacitor discharge with ∼ 20 nanohenry initial total discharge inductance. The hardware includes transmission line connections for a Shiva Star (1300 microfarad, up to 120 KV, 0.4 megajoule) capacitor bank driven acceleration discharge. Experimental measurements include current, voltage; azimuthal, radial and axial magnetic field at numerous location; fast photography, optical spectroscopy; microwave, CO2 laser, and He-Ne laser interferometry. Auxiliary experiments include Penning ionization gauge, pressure probe, and breakdown gas trigger diagnostics of gas injection, and Hall probe measurements of magnetic field injection

  9. Thiol isomerases in thrombus formation

    OpenAIRE

    Furie, Bruce; Flaumenhaft, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase, ERp5 and ERp57, among perhaps other thiol isomerases, are important for the initiation of thrombus formation. Using the laser injury thrombosis model in mice to induce in vivo arterial thrombus formation, it was shown that thrombus formation is associated with PDI secretion by platelets, that inhibition of PDI blocked platelet thrombus formation and fibrin generation, and that endothelial cell activation leads to PDI secretion. Similar results using this and other...

  10. Social Network Formation with Consent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilles, R.P.; Sarangi, S.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the equilibria of game theoretic models of network formation that are based on individual actions only.Our approach is grounded in three simple and realistic principles: (1) Link formation should be a binary process of consent.(2) Link formation should be costly.(3) The class of netwo

  11. Formative Assessment: Simply, No Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskos, Kathleen; Neuman, Susan B.

    2012-01-01

    Among the types of assessment the closest to daily reading instruction is formative assessment. In contrast to summative assessment, which occurs after instruction, formative assessment involves forming judgments frequently in the flow of instruction. Key features of formative assessment include identifying gaps between where students are and…

  12. Dislocation Formation in Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Akihiko; Onuki, Akira

    2006-05-01

    An interaction between dislocations and phase transitions is studied by a phase field model both in two and three dimensional systems. Our theory is a simple extension of the traditional linear elastic theory, and the elastic energy is a periodic function of local strains which is reflecting the periodicity of crystals. We find that the dislocations are spontaneously formed by quenching. Dislocations are formed from the interface of binary alloys, and slips are preferentially gliding into the soft metals. In three dimensional systems, formation of dislocations under applied strain is studied in two phase state. We find that the dislocation loops are created from the surface of hard metals. We also studied the phase separation above the coexisting temperature which is called as the Cottrell atmosphere. Clouds of metals cannot catch up with the motion of dislocations at highly strained state.

  13. DUST FORMATION IN MACRONOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine dust formation in macronovae (as known as kilonovae), which are the bright ejecta of neutron star binary mergers and one of the leading sites of r-process nucleosynthesis. In light of information about the first macronova candidate associated with GRB 130603B, we find that dust grains of r-process elements have difficulty forming because of the low number density of the r-process atoms, while carbon or elements lighter than iron can condense into dust if they are abundant. Dust grains absorb emission from ejecta with an opacity even greater than that of the r-process elements, and re-emit photons at infrared wavelengths. Such dust emission can potentially account for macronovae without r-process nucleosynthesis as an alternative model. This dust scenario predicts a spectrum with fewer features than the r-process model and day-scale optical-to-ultraviolet emission

  14. Standardizing exchange formats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An international network of co-operating data centres is described who maintain identical data bases which are simultaneously updated by an agreed data exchange procedure. The agreement covers ''data exchange formats'' which are compatible to the centres' internal data storage and retrieval systems which remain different, optimized at each centre to the available computer facilities and to the needs of the data users. Essential condition for the data exchange is an agreement on common procedures for the data exchange is an agreement on common procedures for the data compilation, including critical data analysis and validation. The systems described (''EXFOR'', ''ENDF'', ''CINDA'') are used for ''nuclear reaction data'', but the principles used for data compilation and exchange should be valid also for other data types. (author). 24 refs, 4 figs

  15. Cosmological Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Primack, Joel R

    2015-01-01

    LCDM is remarkably successful in predicting the cosmic microwave background and large-scale structure, and LCDM parameters have been determined with only mild tensions between different types of observations. Hydrodynamical simulations starting from cosmological initial conditions are increasingly able to capture the complex interactions between dark matter and baryonic matter in galaxy formation. Simulations with relatively low resolution now succeed in describing the overall galaxy population. For example, the EAGLE simulation in volumes up to 100 cubic Mpc reproduces the observed local galaxy mass function nearly as well as semi-analytic models. It once seemed that galaxies are pretty smooth, that they generally grow in size as they evolve, and that they are a combination of disks and spheroids. But recent HST observations combined with high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations are showing that most star-forming galaxies are very clumpy; that galaxies often undergo compaction which reduces their radius and ...

  16. Synapse formation and remodeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Synapses are specialized structures that mediate information flow between neurons and target cells,and thus are the basis for neuronal system to execute various functions,including learning and memory.There are around 1011 neurons in the human brain,with each neuron receiving thousands of synaptic inputs,either excitatory or inhibitory.A synapse is an asymmetric structure that is composed of pre-synaptic axon terminals,synaptic cleft,and postsynaptic compartments.Synapse formation involves a number of cell adhesion molecules,extracellular factors,and intracellular signaling or structural proteins.After the establishment of synaptic connections,synapses undergo structural or functional changes,known as synaptic plasticity which is believed to be regulated by neuronal activity and a variety of secreted factors.This review summarizes recent progress in the field of synapse development,with particular emphasis on the work carried out in China during the past 10 years(1999-2009).

  17. Group Formation in Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demange, Gabrielle; Wooders, Myrna

    2005-01-01

    Broad and diverse ranges of activities are conducted within and by organized groups of individuals, including political, economic and social activities. These activities have recently become a subject of intense interest in economics and game theory. Some of the topics investigated in this collection are models of networks of power and privilege, trade networks, co-authorship networks, buyer-seller networks with differentiated products, and networks of medical innovation and the adaptation of new information. Other topics are social norms on punctuality, clubs and the provision of club goods and public goods, research and development and collusive alliances among corporations, and international alliances and trading agreements. While relatively recent, the literature on game theoretic studies of group formation in economics is already vast. This volume provides an introduction to this important literature on game-theoretic treatments of situations with networks, clubs, and coalitions, including some applications.

  18. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet age:A citation analysis of computer science literature.Information Processing and Management,2001,37:661-675.2 Fernandez,M.,Kadiyska,Y.,&Suciu,D.,et al.SilkRoute:A framework for publishing relational data in XML.ACM Transactions on Database Systems,2002,27(4):438-493.

  19. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet age:A citation analysis of computer science literature.Information Processing and Management,2001,37:661-675.2 Fernandez,M.,Kadiyska,Y.,&Suciu,D.,et al.SilkRoute:A framework for publishing relational data in XML.ACM Transactions on Database Systems,2002,27(4):438-493.

  20. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet age:A citation analysis of computer science literature.Information Processing and Management,2001,37:661-675.2 Fernandez,M.,Kadiyska,Y.,&Suciu,D.,et al.SilkRoute:A framework for publishing relational data in XML.ACM Transactions on Database Systems,2002,27(4):438-493.

  1. Nuclear Pasta Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, A S; Hughto, J; Berry, D K

    2013-01-01

    The formation of complex nonuniform phases of nuclear matter, known as nuclear pasta, is studied with molecular dynamics simulations containing 51200 nucleons. A phenomenological nuclear interaction is used that reproduces the saturation binding energy and density of nuclear matter. Systems are prepared at an initial density of 0.10fm$^{-3}$ and then the density is decreased by expanding the simulation volume at different rates to densities of 0.01 fm$^{-3}$ or less. An originally uniform system of nuclear matter is observed to form spherical bubbles ("swiss cheese"), hollow tubes, flat plates ("lasagna"), thin rods ("spaghetti") and, finally, nearly spherical nuclei with decreasing density. We explicitly observe nucleation mechanisms, with decreasing density, for these different pasta phase transitions. Topological quantities known as Minkowski functionals are obtained to characterize the pasta shapes. Different pasta shapes are observed depending on the expansion rate. This indicates non equilibrium effects...

  2. Recipes for planet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael R.

    2009-11-01

    Anyone who has ever used baking soda instead of baking powder when trying to make a cake knows a simple truth: ingredients matter. The same is true for planet formation. Planets are made from the materials that coalesce in a rotating disk around young stars - essentially the "leftovers" from when the stars themselves formed through the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds of gas and dust. The planet-making disk should therefore initially have the same gas-to-dust ratio as the interstellar medium: about 100 to 1, by mass. Similarly, it seems logical that the elemental composition of the disk should match that of the star, reflecting the initial conditions at that particular spot in the galaxy.

  3. Streamer formation in sprites

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHarg, M. G.; Kammae, T.; Nielsen, H. C.

    2005-12-01

    Models of sprite formation for positive cloud-to-ground lightning strokes predict both downward (positive), and upward (negative) propagating streamers. Previous high speed camera observations of sprites are generally consistent with these predictions, but have been unable to resolve the temporal formation of the streamers due to frame rates limited to a few thousand frames per second. We report observations made during the evening of 9 July 2005 at 10,000 frames per second, with the image intensifier gated to 50 microseconds per frame. These observations often show the streamer head to be a bead-like structure propagating downward at approximately 7x106 m/s for 1,500 microseconds. The bead is followed by a dark region, and the main emissions from the sprite column are delayed ~800 microseconds after the passage of the streamer head. There are also "beads" which clearly propagate upward. Some events appear to be very similar to laboratory images of time resolved streamer zones. We interpret these observations in terms of positive/negative streamers. We see evidence for branching of the streamer tips in several cases, as well as evidence of upward propagating streamers transitioning into a more diffuse emission. Previous work (Pasko and Stenbaek-Nielsen, GRL 29(10), 2002) indicates this transition region has a lower border at an altitude when the dielectric relaxation time scale equals the time scale for an individual electron to develop into a streamer, and an upper border when the dielectric relaxation time scale roughly equals the dissociative attachment time scale. The present observations appear to be broadly consistent with this interpretation.

  4. Word-formation aspects of proper names - Word-formation or name-formation?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harvalík, Milan

    Cluj-Napoca: Mega, 2015 - (Felecan, O.), s. 37-43 ISBN 978-606-543-671-8. [Name and Naming /3./ Conventiona/Unconventional in Onomastics. Baia Mare (RO), 01.09.2015-03.09.2015] Institutional support: RVO:68378092 Keywords : proper names * common nouns * word-formation * name-formation * parasystemic formation Subject RIV: AI - Linguistics

  5. Formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes in isolated developing pea chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to chlorophyll-protein complexes, other proteins were labeled when isolated developing pea chloroplasts were incubated with [14C]-5-aminolevulinic acid [14C]-ALA. The major labeled band (M/sub r/ = 43 kDa by LDS-PAGE) was labeled even in the presence of chloramphenicol. Heme-dependent peroxidase activity (as detected by the tetramethyl benzidine-H2O2 stain) was not visibly associated with this band. The radioactive band was stable to heat, 5% HCl in acetone, and was absent if the incubation with [14C]-5-aminolevulinic acid was carried out in the presence of N-methyl protoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (a specific inhibitor of ferrochelatase). Organic solvent extraction procedures for the enrichment of cytochrome f from chloroplast membranes also extracted this unknown labeled product. It was concluded that this labeled product was probably a c-type cytochrome. The effect of exogenous iron, iron chelators, gabaculine (an inhibitor of ALA synthesis) and other incubation conditions upon the in vitro formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes will be discussed

  6. Formation of telluric planets and the origin of terrestrial water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Sean

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of planet formation have failed to reproduce Mars’ small mass (compared with Earth for 20 years. Here I will present a solution to the Mars problem that invokes large-scale migration of Jupiter and Saturn while they were still embedded in the gaseous protoplanetary disk. Jupiter first migrated inward, then “tacked” and migrated back outward when Saturn caught up to it and became trapped in resonance. If this tack occurred when Jupiter was at 1.5 AU then the inner disk of rocky planetesimals and embryos is truncated and the masses and orbits of all four terrestrial planet are quantitatively reproduced. As the giant planets migrate back outward they re-populate the asteroid belt from two different source populations, matching the structure of the current belt. C-type material is also scattered inward to the terrestrial planet-forming zone, delivering about the right amount of water to Earth on 10-50 Myr timescales.

  7. Gas formation. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, D A; Lawson, M; Davis, C L; Ferreira, A A; Santos Neto, E V; Ellis, G S; Lewan, M D; Martini, A M; Tang, Y; Schoell, M; Sessions, A L; Eiler, J M

    2014-06-27

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a "clumped isotope" technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yield formation temperatures consistent with their comparatively lower-temperature formational environments (<50°C). In systems where gases have migrated and other proxies for gas-generation temperature yield ambiguous results, methane clumped-isotope temperatures distinguish among and allow for independent tests of possible gas-formation models. PMID:24970083

  8. Modeling Formation of Globular Clusters: Beacons of Galactic Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Gnedin, Oleg Y

    2010-01-01

    Modern hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation are able to predict accurately the rates and locations of the assembly of giant molecular clouds in early galaxies. These clouds could host star clusters with the masses and sizes of real globular clusters. I describe current state-of-the-art simulations aimed at understanding the origin of the cluster mass function and metallicity distribution. Metallicity bimodality of globular cluster systems appears to be a natural outcome of hierarchical formation and gradually declining fraction of cold gas in galaxies. Globular cluster formation was most prominent at redshifts z>3, when massive star clusters may have contributed as much as 20% of all galactic star formation.

  9. Inside-Out Planet Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2013-01-01

    The compact multi-transiting planet systems discovered by Kepler challenge planet formation theories. Formation in situ from disks with radial mass surface density, $\\Sigma$, profiles similar to the minimum mass solar nebula (MMSN) but boosted in normalization by factors $\\gtrsim 10$ has been suggested. We propose that a more natural way to create these planets in the inner disk is formation sequentially from the inside-out via creation of successive gravitationally unstable rings fed from a ...

  10. Alliance Formation and War Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Jack S. Levy

    1981-01-01

    The question of whether alliance formation contributes to peace or to war is analyzed for the modern Great Power system over the last 500 years. It is found that for none of the last five centuries has alliance formation been correlated (tau-b) with war involving the Great Powers, and has often been correlated with peace. Furthermore, disproportionately few wars have been preceded by alliance formation (compared to random probability models), suggesting that alliances are not among the more i...

  11. Lexicon management and standard formats

    CERN Document Server

    Laporte, Eric

    2005-01-01

    International standards for lexicon formats are in preparation. To a certain extent, the proposed formats converge with prior results of standardization projects. However, their adequacy for (i) lexicon management and (ii) lexicon-driven applications have been little debated in the past, nor are they as a part of the present standardization effort. We examine these issues. IGM has developed XML formats compatible with the emerging international standards, and we report experimental results on large-coverage lexica.

  12. Developing the common communication format

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkinson, Alan

    1986-01-01

    The Unesco Common Communication Format (CCF) is described in the context of other exchange formats. A definition is given of 'exchange format', and the CCF is compared against this definition. The history of its development is outlined and its major technical features are summarized. Examples are given of the ways in which it is being used and is likely to be used in the future, and a number of implementation manuals are mentioned which have been developed to assist in its use.

  13. Formative assessments as pedagogic tools

    OpenAIRE

    Ashwin Kumar

    2013-01-01

    This article aims at presenting a state of the art status of formative assessment as a pedagogic tool. To this end, a brief developmental account of different modes of assessment over the last decades will be presented first. Then, formative assessment will be discussed in its constructivist guise. The present literature on assessment suggests that assessment for learning (formative assessment) not only represents an assessment tool but it also serves as a pedagogic tool to enhance learning a...

  14. Earth and Terrestrial Planet Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Walsh, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    The growth and composition of Earth is a direct consequence of planet formation throughout the Solar System. We discuss the known history of the Solar System, the proposed stages of growth and how the early stages of planet formation may be dominated by pebble growth processes. Pebbles are small bodies whose strong interactions with the nebula gas lead to remarkable new accretion mechanisms for the formation of planetesimals and the growth of planetary embryos. Many of the popular models for ...

  15. Pregnancy and pregnancy outcome in hepatitis C type 1b.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jabeen, T

    2012-02-03

    A large cohort of rhesus-negative women in Ireland were inadvertently infected with hepatitis C virus following exposure to contaminated anti-D immunoglobulin in 1977-8. This major iatrogenic episode was discovered in 1994. We studied 36 women who had been infected after their first pregnancy, and compared them to an age- and parity-matched control group of rhesus-positive women. The presence of hepatitis C antibody was confirmed in all 36 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by recombinant immunoblot assay, while 26 (72%) of the cohort were HCV-RNA-positive (type 1b) on PCR testing. In the 20 years post-infection, all members of the study group had at least one pregnancy, and mean parity was 3.5. They had a total of 100 pregnancies and 85 of these went to term. There were four premature births, one being a twin pregnancy, and 11 spontaneous miscarriages. One miscarriage occurred in the pregnancy following HCV infection. There were two neonatal deaths due to severe congenital abnormalities in the PCR-positive women. Of the children born to HCV-RNA positive mothers, only one (2.3%) tested positive for the virus. Significant portal fibrosis on liver biopsy was confined to HCV-RNA-positive mothers apart from one single exception in the antibody-positive HCV-RNA-negative group. Comparison with the control group showed no increase in spontaneous miscarriage rate, and no significant difference in obstetric complications; birth weights were similar for the two groups.

  16. Functional Monomerization of a ClC-Type Fluoride Transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, Nicholas B; Miller, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Anion channels and antiporters of the ClC superfamily have been found to be exclusively dimeric in nature, even though each individual monomer contains the complete transport pathway. Here, we describe the destabilization through mutagenesis of the dimer interface of a bacterial F(-)/H(+) antiporter, ClC(F)-eca. Several mutations that produce monomer/dimer equilibrium of the normally dimeric transporter were found, simply by shortening a hydrophobic side chain in some cases. One mutation, L376W, leads to a wholly monomeric variant that shows full activity. Furthermore, we discovered a naturally destabilized homologue, ClC(F)-rla, which undergoes partial monomerization in detergent without additional mutations. These results, in combination with the previous functional monomerization of the distant relative ClC-ec1, demonstrate that the monomer alone is the functional unit for several clades of the ClC superfamily. PMID:26449639

  17. C-type natriuretic peptide in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Soeren Junge; Iversen, Peter; Rehfeld, Jens F.;

    2009-01-01

    CNP-derived peptides were quantitated in plasma from patients with prostate cancer. Blood was collected from healthy controls and patients before surgery for localized prostate cancer. Tissue extracts were prepared from tissue biopsies obtained from radical prostatectomy surgery. N-terminal proCNP, proCNP (1-50) and...

  18. Geminate carbon monoxide rebinding to a c-type haem

    OpenAIRE

    Silkstone, G.; Jasaitis, Audrius; Vos, Marten,; Wilson, M

    2005-01-01

    International audience A chemically modified form of cytochrome c (cyt. c), termed carboxymethyl cytochrome c (cm cyt. c), possesses a vacant sixth coordination site to the haem iron that is available to bind external ligands. We present data on the rapid flash photolysis of CO from the ferrous haem iron of cm cyt. c and describe the kinetics and spectral transitions that accompany the recombination. This was achieved using 30-femtosecond laser pulses and a white light continuum to monitor...

  19. C-type period-doubling transition in nephron autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Jakob Lund; Mosekilde, Erik; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The functional units of the kidney, called nephrons, utilize mechanisms that allow the individual nephron to regulate the incoming blood flow in response to fluctuations in the arterial pressure. This regulation tends to be unstable and to generate self-sustained oscillations, period-doubling bif......The functional units of the kidney, called nephrons, utilize mechanisms that allow the individual nephron to regulate the incoming blood flow in response to fluctuations in the arterial pressure. This regulation tends to be unstable and to generate self-sustained oscillations, period......-doubling bifurcations, mode-locking and other nonlinear dynamic phenomena in the tubular pressures and flows. Using a simplified nephron model, the paper examines how the regulatory mechanisms react to an external periodic variation in arterial pressure near a region of resonance with one of the internally generated...

  20. Spray formation: an inverse cascade

    CERN Document Server

    Ling, Yue; Tryggvason, Gretar; zaleski, Stephane

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of droplet formation in a gas-liquid mixing layer using direct numerical simulation. It is seen that two mechanisms compete to generate the droplets: fingering at the tip of the waves and hole formation in the thin liquid sheet. The three dimensional liquid structures are much shorter than the longitudinal wavelength of the instability at the first instant of their formation. As time evolves, the structures evolves to larger and larger scales, in a way similar to the inverse cascade of length scales in droplet impact and impact crown formation.

  1. Formation of Bidisperse Particle Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Jenn Wei; Zhao, Bing; Law, Adrian W. K.; Adams, E. Eric

    2014-11-01

    When a group of dense particles is released instantaneously into water, their motion has been conceptualized as a circulating particle thermal (Ruggerber 2000). However, Wen and Nacamuli (1996) observed the formation of particle clumps characterized by a narrow, fast moving core shedding particles into wakes. They observed the clump formation even for particles in the non-cohesive range as long as the source Rayleigh number was large (Ra > 1E3) or equivalently the source cloud number (Nc) was small (Nc < 3.2E2). This physical phenomenon has been investigated by Zhao et al. (2014) through physical experiments. They proposed the theoretical support for Nc dependence and categorized the formation processes into cloud formation, transitional regime and clump formation. Previous works focused mainly on the behavior of monodisperse particles. The present study further extends the experimental investigation to the formation process of bidisperse particles. Experiments are conducted in a glass tank with a water depth of 90 cm. Finite amounts of sediments with various weight proportions between coarser and finer particles are released from a cylindrical tube. The Nc being tested ranges from 6E-3 to 9.9E-2, which covers all the three formation regimes. The experimental results showed that the introduction of coarse particles promotes cloud formation and reduce the losses of finer particles into the wake. More quantitative descriptions of the effects of source conditions on the formation processes will be presented during the conference.

  2. Formative Assessment Probes: Is It a Rock? Continuous Formative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Page

    2013-01-01

    A lesson plan is provided for a formative assessment probe entitled "Is It a Rock?" This probe is designed for teaching elementary school students about rocks through the use of a formative assessment classroom technique (FACT) known as the group Frayer Model. FACT activates students' thinking about a concept and can be used to…

  3. The formation of Pangea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfli, G. M.; Hochard, C.; Vérard, C.; Wilhem, C.; vonRaumer, J.

    2013-05-01

    The making of Pangea is the result of large-scale amalgamation of continents and micro-continents, which started at the end of the Neoproterozoic with the formation of Gondwana. As pieces were added to Gondwana on its South-American, Antarctica and Australia side, ribbon-like micro-continents were detached from its African and South-Chinese side: Cadomia in the late Neoproterozoic, Avalonia and Hunia in the Ordovician, Galatia in the Devonian and Cimmeria in the Permian. Cadomia was re-accreted to Gondwana, but the other ribbon-continents were accreted to Baltica, North-China, Laurussia or Laurasia. Finding the origin of these numerous terranes is a major geological challenge. Recently, a global plate tectonic model was developed together with a large geological/geodynamic database, at the Lausanne University, covering the last 600 Ma of the Earth's history. Special attention was given to the placing of Gondwana derived terranes in their original position, using all possible constraints. We propose here a solution for the Variscan terranes, another paper deals with the Altaids. The Galatian super-terrane was detached from Gondwana in the Devonian, during the opening of Paleotethys, and was quickly separated into four sub-terranes that started to by-pass each other. The leading terranes collided at the end of the Devonian with the Hanseatic terrane detached from Laurussia. In the Carboniferous, Gondwana started to impinge onto the amalgamated terranes, creating the Variscan chain and the Pangean super-continent. East of Spain Paleotethys remained opened until the Triassic, subducting northward under Laurasia. Roll-back of the Paleotethyan slab triggered the collapse of most of the European Variscan orogen, which was replaced by series of Permian rifts, some of them becoming oceanized back-arc basins during the Triassic. Major force changes at the Pangean plate limits at the end of the Triassic provoked its break-up, through the opening of the proto

  4. Target-point formation control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mou, Shaoshuai; Cao, Ming; Morse, A. Stephen

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a new distributed feedback strategy is proposed for controlling a rigid, acyclic formation of kinematic point-modeled mobile autonomous agents in the plane. The strategy makes use of a new concept called a "target point" and is applicable to any two-dimensional, acyclic formation whose

  5. Portable File Format (PFF) specifications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,

    2015-02-01

    Created at Sandia National Laboratories, the Portable File Format (PFF) allows binary data transfer across computer platforms. Although this capability is supported by many other formats, PFF files are still in use at Sandia, particularly in pulsed power research. This report provides detailed PFF specifications for accessing data without relying on legacy code.

  6. Pathogenesis of postoperative adhesion formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellebrekers, B.W.J.; Kooistra, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Current views on the pathogenesis of adhesion formation are based on the "classical concept of adhesion formation", namely that a reduction in peritoneal fibrinolytic activity following peritoneal trauma is of key importance in adhesion development. Methods: A non-systematic literature s

  7. Identity formation in multiparty negotiations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaab, R; Postmes, T.; Spears, R.

    2008-01-01

    Based on the recently proposed Interactive Model of Identity Formation, we examine how top-down deductive and bottom-up inductive identity formations influence intentions and behaviour in multiparty negotiations. Results show that a shared identity can be deduced from the social context through reco

  8. SAS FORMATS: USES AND ABUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAS formats are a very powerful tool. They allow you to display the data in a more readable manner without modifying it. Formats can also be used to group data into categories for use in various procedures like PROC FREQ, PROC TTEST, and PROC MEANS (as a class variable). As ...

  9. Pellicle formation in Shewanella oneidensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Lin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although solid surface-associated biofilm development of S. oneidensis has been extensively studied in recent years, pellicles formed at the air-liquid interface are largely overlooked. The goal of this work was to understand basic requirements and mechanism of pellicle formation in S. oneidensis. Results We demonstrated that pellicle formation can be completed when oxygen and certain cations were present. Ca(II, Mn(II, Cu(II, and Zn(II were essential for the process evidenced by fully rescuing pellicle formation of S. oneidensis from the EDTA treatment while Mg (II, Fe(II, and Fe(III were much less effective. Proteins rather than DNA were crucial in pellicle formation and the major exopolysaccharides may be rich in mannose. Mutational analysis revealed that flagella were not required for pellicle formation but flagellum-less mutants delayed pellicle development substantially, likely due to reduced growth in static media. The analysis also demonstrated that AggA type I secretion system was essential in formation of pellicles but not of solid surface-associated biofilms in S. oneidensis. Conclusion This systematic characterization of pellicle formation shed lights on our understanding of biofilm formation in S. oneidensis and indicated that the pellicle may serve as a good research model for studying bacterial communities.

  10. New Frontiers in Formative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyce, Pendred E., Ed.; Hickey, Daniel T., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Formative assessment is a powerful learning tool that is too seldom, too haphazardly, and too ineffectively used in the United States," Pendred E. Noyce writes in the introduction to this volume. "The purpose of this book is to delve into why this is so and how it can be changed." Formative assessment involves constantly monitoring student…

  11. Formative Assessment: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Randy Elliot

    2011-01-01

    This paper covers six interrelated issues in formative assessment (aka, "assessment for learning"). The issues concern the definition of formative assessment, the claims commonly made for its effectiveness, the limited attention given to domain considerations in its conceptualisation, the under-representation of measurement principles in that…

  12. Modes of clustered star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Pfalzner, S; Olczak, C

    2012-01-01

    The realization that most stars form in clusters, raises the question of whether star/planet formation are influenced by the cluster environment. The stellar density in the most prevalent clusters is the key factor here. Whether dominant modes of clustered star formation exist is a fundamental question. Using near-neighbour searches in young clusters Bressert et al. (2010) claim this not to be the case and conclude that star formation is continuous from isolated to densely clustered. We investigate under which conditions near-neighbour searches can distinguish between different modes of clustered star formation. Near-neighbour searches are performed for model star clusters investigating the influence of the combination of different cluster modes, observational biases, and types of diagnostic and find that the cluster density profile, the relative sample sizes, limitations in observations and the choice of diagnostic method decides whether modelled modes of clustered star formation are detected. For centrally ...

  13. Formation depths of Fraunhofer lines

    CERN Document Server

    Gurtovenko, E A

    2015-01-01

    We have summed up our investigations performed in 1970--1993. The main task of this paper is clearly to show processes of formation of spectral lines as well as their distinction by validity and by location. For 503 photospheric lines of various chemical elements in the wavelength range 300--1000 nm we list in Table the average formation depths of the line depression and the line emission for the line centre and on the half-width of the line, the average formation depths of the continuum emission as well as the effective widths of the layer of the line depression formation. Dependence of average depths of line depression formation on excitation potential, equivalent widths, and central line depth are demonstrated by iron lines.

  14. Formative assessments as pedagogic tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kumar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at presenting a state of the art status of formative assessment as a pedagogic tool. To this end, a brief developmental account of different modes of assessment over the last decades will be presented first. Then, formative assessment will be discussed in its constructivist guise. The present literature on assessment suggests that assessment for learning (formative assessment not only represents an assessment tool but it also serves as a pedagogic tool to enhance learning and thinking. It has also gone to lengths to affect the design of classroom tasks and activities. Attempts have been made to delineate the underlying principles of formative assessment which can be used to picture the formation process of learners’ knowledge and development. Subsequently, alternative assessment techniques of which the present article will give an account have been suggested by scholars to operationalize these principles.

  15. SOME QUESTIONS CONCERNING PSYCHOANALYTICAL FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Soeiro Cruxên

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The psychoanalytical formation is a question without a definitive answer. The development of its study requests treatment of the evolution of the clinical theory. This work begins with a distinction between analytical and academic formation. It includes Jacques Lacan’s approach concerning the question of psychoanalytical formation. It discusses the relationship between the named intentional and extensional psychoanalysis. This article resumes some theoretical aspects of a post-doctoral investigation developed in the clinical-school of Psychology (Universidade Federal do Ceará e SAP ( Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande doSul.

  16. AGN feedback in galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Antonuccio-Delogu, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    During the past decade, convincing evidence has been accumulated concerning the effect of active galactic nuclei (AGN) activity on the internal and external environment of their host galaxies. Featuring contributions from well-respected researchers in the field, and bringing together work by specialists in both galaxy formation and AGN, this volume addresses a number of key questions about AGN feedback in the context of galaxy formation. The topics covered include downsizing and star-formation time scales in massive elliptical galaxies, the connection between the epochs of supermassive black h

  17. Zonal flows and pattern formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general aspects of zonal flow physics, their formation, damping and interplay with quasi two dimensional turbulence are explained in the context of magnetized plasmas and quasi-geostrophic fluids with an emphasis on formation and selection of spatial patterns. General features of zonal flows as they appear in planetary atmospheres, rotating convection experiments and fusion plasmas are reviewed. Detailed mechanisms for excitation and damping of zonal flows, and their effect on turbulence via shear decorrelation is discussed. Recent results on nonlocality and staircase formation are outlined. (topical review)

  18. Free-format RPG IV

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This how-to guide offers a concise and thorough introduction to the increased productivity, better readability, and easier program maintenance that comes with the free-format style of programming in RPG IV. Although free-format information is available in IBM manuals, it is not separated from everything else, thereby requiring hours of tedious research to track down the information needed. This book provides everything one needs to know to write RPG IV in the free-format style, and author Jim Martin not only teaches rules and syntax but also explains how this new style of coding has the pot

  19. Identity formation in multiparty negotiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaab, Roderick I; Postmes, Tom; Spears, Russell

    2008-03-01

    Based on the recently proposed Interactive Model of Identity Formation, we examine how top-down deductive and bottom-up inductive identity formations influence intentions and behaviour in multiparty negotiations. Results show that a shared identity can be deduced from the social context through recognition of superordinate similarities. However, shared identities can also be induced by intragroup processes in which individuals get acquainted with one another on an interpersonal basis. Both top-down and bottom-up processes led to the formation of a sense of shared identity, and this in turn exerted a positive influence on behavioural intentions and actual behaviour in multiparty negotiations. PMID:17588289

  20. cbIC型甲基丙二酸血症基因型与临床表型及疗效的关系%Relationship of genotypes with clinical phenotypes and outcomes in children with cobalamin C type combined methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宇亚芬; 黎芳; 麻宏伟

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo analyze mutation types, clinical features, and treatment outcomes of cobalamin C (cblC) type combined methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria (MMA-HC) and to investigate the relationship of genotypes with clinical phenotypes and outcomes.MethodsThe clinical data of 16 Chinese children diagnosed with cblC type MMA-HC by gene analysis were retrospectively analyzed. According to the onset age, the patients were classified into early onset (≤1 year) and late onset (>1 year). According to the clinical phenotype, the patients were classiifed into mild, moderate, and severe groups. All the patients were treated with vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) or hydroxocobalamin, betaine, folate, vitamin B6, and L-carnitine.ResultsFifteen patients belonged to the early onset type, including 11 in the severe group and 4 in the moderate group. The remaining one belonged to the late onset type. Seven reported mutations and two novel mutations (c.445_446delTG and c.349G>c) were detected. The c.609G>A and c.658_660delAAG were the most common mutations detected in 13 (81%) out of 16 patients. The genotype caused by compound heterozygous mutations of these two alleles (c.609 G>A/c.658_660delAAG) was the most common in the patients, detected in 4 (25%) out of 16 patients. Patients with this genotype had severe microcephaly and eye diseases and these clinical manifestations were not improved after the treatment. The patient with late-onset cblC type MMA-HC had normal clinical phenotypes after treatment. In the 15 early onset patients, the more severe the clinical phenotype, the worse the treatment outcome.ConclusionsThe cblC type MMA-HC mainly manifests as early onset in China and c.609G >A and c.658_660delAAGare the most common mutations causing this disease. The clinical phenotypes are associated with the outcomes in children with cblC type MMA-HC.%目的:分析cbIC型甲基丙二酸血症伴同型半胱氨酸血症(合并型MMA)基因突变情况、临床特点及治疗

  1. M-brane singularity formation

    OpenAIRE

    Eggers, Jens; Hoppe, Jens

    2008-01-01

    We derive self-similar string solutions in a graph representation, near the point of singularity formation, which can be shown to extend to point-like singularities on M-branes, as well as to the radially symmetric case.

  2. Portfolio Optimization under Habit Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Naryshkin, Roman

    2008-01-01

    The "standard" Merton formulation of optimal investment and consumption involves optimizing the integrated lifetime utility of consumption, suitably discounted, together with the discounted future bequest. In this formulation the utility of consumption at any given time depends only on the amount consumed at that time. However, it is both theoretically and empirically reasonable that an individuals utility of consumption would depend on past consumption history. Economists term this "Habit Formation". We introduce a new formulation of habit formation which allows non-addictive consumption patterns for a wide variety of utility specification. In this paper we construct a simple mathematical description of this habit formation and present numerical solutions. We compare the results with the standard ones and draw insights obtained from the habit formation. The consumption path tends to increase with time and be less sensitive to the market fluctuations, which perfectly reflects the existence of habit persistenc...

  3. Maximum likelihood topographic map formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hulle, Marc M

    2005-03-01

    We introduce a new unsupervised learning algorithm for kernel-based topographic map formation of heteroscedastic gaussian mixtures that allows for a unified account of distortion error (vector quantization), log-likelihood, and Kullback-Leibler divergence. PMID:15802004

  4. Current Concepts of Metastasis Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Gassman

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of secondary distant organ and lymph node metastasis has an extraordinary impact on the prognosis of patients with solid cancer. In most cases the advent of metastatic growth represents the turning point from a local, potentially curable, disease to a systemic non-curable situation. As a highly regulated process, metastasis formation follows a distinct, non-random pattern characteristic for each tumor entity. Metastasis formation and strategies to prevent this lethal event in the progression of cancer is of fundamental interest for cancer science and patient care. In this special issue of Cancers, papers highlighting cellular mechanisms of metastasis formation, genetic and epigenetic aspects associated with organ and tumor specific metastasis formation, as well as papers outlining experimental and clinical therapeutic concepts for anti-metastatic treatment are included.

  5. ENDL transmittal format. Brief summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LLNL Evaluated Neutron Data Library of 1982 (ENDL-82) and the LLNL Evaluated Charged Particle Library (ECPL-86) are available in the ENDL Transmittal Format, of which a brief user's guide is given in this document. (author)

  6. Dynamics of interfacial pattern formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Langer, J. S.; Schon, G.

    1983-01-01

    A phenomenological model of dendritic solidification incorporating interfacial kinetics, crystalline anisotropy, and a local approximation for the dynamics of the thermal diffusion field is proposed. The preliminary results are in qualitative agreement with natural dendrite-like pattern formation.

  7. The multifaceted planetesimal formation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Anders; Blum, Jürgen; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Ormel, Chris; Bizzarro, Martin; Rickman, Hans

    Accumulation of dust and ice particles into planetesimals is an important step in the planet formation process. Planetesimals are the seeds of both terrestrial planets and the solid cores of gas and ice giants forming by core accretion. Left-over planetesimals in the form of asteroids, trans......-Neptunian objects and comets provide a unique record of the physical conditions in the solar nebula. Debris from planetesimal collisions around other stars signposts that the planetesimal formation process, and hence planet formation, is ubiquitous in the Galaxy. The planetesimal formation stage extends from...... micrometer-sized dust and ice to bodies which can undergo run-away accretion. The latter ranges in size from 1 km to 1000 km, dependent on the planetesimal eccentricity excited by turbulent gas density fluctuations. Particles face many barriers during this growth, arising mainly from inefficient sticking...

  8. Understanding Galaxy Formation and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Avila-Reese, V

    2006-01-01

    The old dream of integrating into one the study of micro and macrocosmos is now a reality. Cosmology, astrophysics, and particle physics intersect in a scenario (but still not a theory) of cosmic structure formation and evolution called Lambda Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) model. This scenario emerged mainly to explain the origin of galaxies. In these lecture notes, I first present a review of the main galaxy properties, highlighting the questions that any theory of galaxy formation should explain. Then, the cosmological framework and the main aspects of primordial perturbation generation and evolution are pedagogically detached. Next, I focus on the ``dark side'' of galaxy formation, presenting a review on LCDM halo assembling and properties, and on the main candidates for non-baryonic dark matter. It is shown how the nature of elemental particles can influence on the features of galaxies and their systems. Finally, the complex processes of baryon dissipation inside the non-linearly evolving CDM halos, formation o...

  9. Robust Decentralized Formation Flight Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Weihua

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the idea of multiplexed model predictive control (MMPC, this paper introduces a new framework for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs formation flight and coordination. Formulated using MMPC approach, the whole centralized formation flight system is considered as a linear periodic system with control inputs of each UAV subsystem as its periodic inputs. Divided into decentralized subsystems, the whole formation flight system is guaranteed stable if proper terminal cost and terminal constraints are added to each decentralized MPC formulation of the UAV subsystem. The decentralized robust MPC formulation for each UAV subsystem with bounded input disturbances and model uncertainties is also presented. Furthermore, an obstacle avoidance control scheme for any shape and size of obstacles, including the nonapriorily known ones, is integrated under the unified MPC framework. The results from simulations demonstrate that the proposed framework can successfully achieve robust collision-free formation flights.

  10. Chain formation of metal atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahn, Sune Rastad; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of formation of single-atomic chains by manipulation of nanocontacts is studied for a selection of metals (Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au). Molecular dynamics simulations show that the tendency for chain formation is strongest for Au and Pt. Density functional theory calculations indicate...... that the metals which form chains exhibit pronounced many-atom interactions with strong bonding in low coordinated systems....

  11. Problem of professional personality formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pryazhnikova E.Yu.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the current approaches to the problem of professional personality formation. It ana-lyzes the impact of professional identity of students on the choice of the specialist field they make. The article highlights certain aspects of the educational environment which promote to formation of compe-tences in students, relating to their choice of professional occupations. The article presents the analysis of students’ internal and external strivings after graduation from the university and their fulfillment.

  12. EPR dosimetric properties of formates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of a program to develop an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimeter suited for clinical use (doses in the cGy range), polycrystalline samples of lithium formate monohydrate (HCO2Li·H2O), magnesium formate dihydrate (C2H2O4Mg·2H2O), and calcium formate (C2H2O4Ca) have been examined. L-Alanine was included for comparison and reference. Samples were irradiated with 60Co γ-rays and 60-220 kV X-rays. The dosimeter response was assessed using the peak-to-peak amplitude of the first-derivative EPR spectrum. Dose-response curves for the 60Co γ-irradiated samples were constructed, and the dependences of the response on the photon energy, microwave power, and modulation amplitude were studied. Stability of the irradiation products upon storage (signal fading) was also investigated. Lithium formate monohydrate is by far the best candidate of the tested formates, suitable for measuring doses down to approximately 0.1 Gy. Lithium formate monohydrate is more sensitive than alanine by a factor of 5.6-6.8 in the tested photon energy range, it exhibits no zero-dose signal and shows a linear dose response in the dose range from 0.2 to 1000 Gy. Its EPR signal was found unchanged in shape and intensity 1 week after irradiation to 10 Gy. Various less favorable properties rendered the other formates generally unsuitable, although calcium formate exhibits some interesting EPR dosimetric properties

  13. Galaxy formation and chemical evolution

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The manner the galaxy accretes matter along with the star formation rates at different epochs, influence the evolution of the stable isotopic inventories of the galaxy. A detailed analysis is presented here to study the dependence of the galactic chemical evolution on the accretion scenario of the galaxy along with the star formation rate during the early accretionary phase of the galactic thick disk and thin disk. Our results indicate that a rapid early accretion of the galaxy during the for...

  14. Dynamics in European identity formation

    OpenAIRE

    Kolind, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    This thesis investigates the dynamics of European identity formation with the purpose of contributing to our understanding of the circumstances affecting the potential for collective identity formation within the EU. Theoretically the thesis draws upon self-categorization theory according to which collective identities take form on the basis of a very basic human need for a social identity. As such collective identities emerge when individual’s social identity are activated. In such situatio...

  15. Immigration, Integration and Ghetto Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Ortmanns, Hildegard

    We study ghetto formation in a population with natives and immigrants in the framework of the two-dimensional Ising-model with Kawasaki-exchange dynamics. It is the phase structure of the Ising model, the integration speed and the immigration rate which determine whether ghetto formation between natives and immigrants can be avoided or not. Our simulations are performed in- and out-of-equilibrium.

  16. Immigration, integration and ghetto formation

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer-Ortmanns, Hildegard

    2002-01-01

    We study ghetto formation in a population with natives and immigrants in the framework of the two-dimensional Ising-model with Kawasaki-exchange dynamics. It is the phase structure of the Ising model, the integration speed and the immigration rate which determine whether ghetto formation between natives and immigrants can be avoided or not. Our simulations are performed in and out-of equilibrium.

  17. Electronic formation of a contract:

    OpenAIRE

    Kežmah, Urška

    2001-01-01

    This paper analysis main legal problems that are related to formation of e-contracts. Because of the different legal consequences it is highly important for parties to be aware and understand the basic phases of contract formation process. For a contract to exist, usually one party must have made offer, and the other must have accepted it. Once acceptance takes effect, a contract will usually be binding on both parties. A variety of procedures are available for forming an electronic contract,...

  18. Political parties and network formation

    OpenAIRE

    Miettinen, Topi; Poutvaara, Panu

    2006-01-01

    We argue that anti-corruption laws may provide an efficiency rationale for why political parties should meddle in the distribution of political nominations and government contracts. Anti-corruption laws forbid trade in spoils that politicians distribute. However, citizens may pay for gaining access to politicians and, thereby, to become potential candidates for nominations. Such rent-seeking results in excessive network formation. Political parties may reduce wasteful network formation, thank...

  19. HISTONE METHYLATION REGULATES MEMORY FORMATION

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Swati; Kim, Se Y.; Artis, Sonja; Molfese, David L.; Schumacher, Armin; Sweatt, J. David; Paylor, Richard E.; Lubin, Farah D.

    2010-01-01

    It has been established that regulation of chromatin structure through post-translational modification of histone proteins, primarily histone H3 phosphorylation and acetylation, is an important early step in the induction of synaptic plasticity and formation of long-term memory. In this study, we investigated the contribution of another histone modification, histone methylation, to memory formation in the adult hippocampus. We found that tri-methylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 (H3K4), an ac...

  20. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  1. The dynamics of latifundia formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Luis Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Land tenure inequity is a major social problem in developing nations worldwide. In societies, where land is a commodity, inequities in land tenure are associated with gaps in income distribution, poverty and biodiversity loss. A common pattern of land tenure inequities through the history of civilization has been the formation of latifundia [Zhuāngyuán in chinese], i.e., a pattern where land ownership is concentrated by a small fraction of the whole population. Here, we use simple Markov chain models to study the dynamics of latifundia formation in a heterogeneous landscape where land can transition between forest, agriculture and recovering land. We systematically study the likelihood of latifundia formation under the assumption of pre-capitalist trade, where trade is based on the average utility of land parcels belonging to each individual landowner during a discrete time step. By restricting land trade to that under recovery, we found the likelihood of latifundia formation to increase with the size of the system, i.e., the amount of land and individuals in the society. We found that an increase of the transition rate for land use changes, i.e., how quickly land use changes, promotes more equitable patterns of land ownership. Disease introduction in the system, which reduced land profitability for infected individual landowners, promoted the formation of latifundia, with an increased likelihood for latifundia formation when there were heterogeneities in the susceptibility to infection. Finally, our model suggests that land ownership reforms need to guarantee an equitative distribution of land among individuals in a society to avoid the formation of latifundia. PMID:24376597

  2. The dynamics of latifundia formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Chaves

    Full Text Available Land tenure inequity is a major social problem in developing nations worldwide. In societies, where land is a commodity, inequities in land tenure are associated with gaps in income distribution, poverty and biodiversity loss. A common pattern of land tenure inequities through the history of civilization has been the formation of latifundia [Zhuāngyuán in chinese], i.e., a pattern where land ownership is concentrated by a small fraction of the whole population. Here, we use simple Markov chain models to study the dynamics of latifundia formation in a heterogeneous landscape where land can transition between forest, agriculture and recovering land. We systematically study the likelihood of latifundia formation under the assumption of pre-capitalist trade, where trade is based on the average utility of land parcels belonging to each individual landowner during a discrete time step. By restricting land trade to that under recovery, we found the likelihood of latifundia formation to increase with the size of the system, i.e., the amount of land and individuals in the society. We found that an increase of the transition rate for land use changes, i.e., how quickly land use changes, promotes more equitable patterns of land ownership. Disease introduction in the system, which reduced land profitability for infected individual landowners, promoted the formation of latifundia, with an increased likelihood for latifundia formation when there were heterogeneities in the susceptibility to infection. Finally, our model suggests that land ownership reforms need to guarantee an equitative distribution of land among individuals in a society to avoid the formation of latifundia.

  3. Formation of Molecular Clouds and Global Conditions for Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Dobbs, Clare L; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier; Bolatto, Alberto D; Fukui, Yasuo; Heyer, Mark; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Ostriker, Eve C; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Giant molecular clouds (GMCs) are the primary reservoirs of cold, star-forming molecular gas in the Milky Way and similar galaxies, and thus any understanding of star formation must encompass a model for GMC formation, evolution, and destruction. These models are necessarily constrained by measurements of interstellar molecular and atomic gas, and the emergent, newborn stars. Both observations and theory have undergone great advances in recent years, the latter driven largely by improved numerical simulations, and the former by the advent of large-scale surveys with new telescopes and instruments. This chapter offers a thorough review of the current state of the field.

  4. PCDF formation from PAH reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullana, A.; Nakka, H.; Sidhu, S. [Dayton Univ., OH (United States). Environmental Engineering

    2004-09-15

    It is clear that PAHs play an important role in PCDF formation. It does not matter if PCDF are formed from carbonaceous material or from PAH adsorbed on the carbon surface. The role of PAH in the formation of PCDF has been studied by several authors. Probably one of the most complete investigations was conducted by Wilhelm et al. They investigated PCDF formation from twelve different PAHs with structures similar to the PCDF. The results of this study showed that biphenyl-like structures can be easily converted to PCDFs. Although the biphenyl-like structures are clearly involved in PCDF formation, there are several aspects of this formation pathway that are not well understood. Iino et al. found that higher PCDF yields could be obtained from pyrene than phenanthrene, contradicting biphenyl intermediate formation pathway theory as phenantrene structure can more easily be converted to biphenyl than pyrene. All previous PCDD/F formation studies from PAHs were conducted using CuCl{sub 2} as model fly ash. CuCl{sub 2} is highly volatile and probably not present in any significant quantities in the actual fly ash. High temperature oxidative conditions in the high temperature zone are able to oxidize all transition metals to their oxides. Therefore, Cu in actual fly ash is most probably present as CuO or Cu2O. Also in previous studies, PAH - model fly ash mixtures were prepared at room temperature and then heated to experimental temperatures. This experimental method can lead to some uncertainties because depending on PAH boiling point, various amounts of different PAHS would have evaporated by the time experimental temperatures were achieved. The main objective of this study is to address all the above issues and develop a better understanding of the role of biphenyl structures in PCDF formation. The salient features of this study are: Use of CuO+HCl as model fly ash instead of CuCl{sub 2} which was traditionally used in earlier De Novo studies. Study major non

  5. Formation of porous gas hydrates

    CERN Document Server

    Salamatin, Andrey N

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates grown at gas-ice interfaces are examined by electron microscopy and found to have a submicron porous texture. Permeability of the intervening hydrate layers provides the connection between the two counterparts (gas and water molecules) of the clathration reaction and makes further hydrate formation possible. The study is focused on phenomenological description of principal stages and rate-limiting processes that control the kinetics of the porous gas hydrate crystal growth from ice powders. Although the detailed physical mechanisms involved in the porous hydrate formation still are not fully understood, the initial stage of hydrate film spreading over the ice surface should be distinguished from the subsequent stage which is presumably limited by the clathration reaction at the ice-hydrate interface and develops after the ice grain coating is finished. The model reveals a time dependence of the reaction degree essentially different from that when the rate-limiting step of the hydrate formation at...

  6. The MARC II Format: A Communications Format for Bibliographic Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avram, Henriette D.; And Others

    Utilizing both the experience gained from the Machine-Readable Cataloging (MARC) Pilot Project, which tested the feasibility of distributing Library of Congress cataloging in machine readable form to various users, and the results of extensive consultation with the library community and persons at the Library of Congress, a format for…

  7. Dense Cloud Formation and Star Formation in a Barred Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Nimori, M; Sorai, K; Watanabe, Y; Hirota, A; Namekata, D

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the properties of massive, dense clouds formed in a barred galaxy and their possible relation to star formation, performing a two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulation with the gravitational potential obtained from the 2Mass data from the barred spiral galaxy, M83. Since the environment for cloud formation and evolution in the bar region is expected to be different from that in the spiral arm region, barred galaxies are a good target to study the environmental effects on cloud formation and the subsequent star formation. Our simulation uses for an initial 80 Myr an isothermal flow of non-self gravitating gas in the barred potential, then including radiative cooling, heating and self-gravitation of the gas for the next 40 Myr, during which dense clumps are formed. We identify many cold, dense gas clumps for which the mass is more than $10^4M_{\\odot}$ (a value corresponding to the molecular clouds) and study the physical properties of these clumps. The relation of the velocity dispersion of the i...

  8. Formation of the first stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the formation of the first stars is one of the frontier topics in modern astrophysics and cosmology. Their emergence signalled the end of the cosmic dark ages, a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, leading to a fundamental transformation of the early Universe through the production of ionizing photons and the initial enrichment with heavy chemical elements. We here review the state of our knowledge, separating the well understood elements of our emerging picture from those where more work is required. Primordial star formation is unique in that its initial conditions can be directly inferred from the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model of cosmological structure formation. Combined with gas cooling that is mediated via molecular hydrogen, one can robustly identify the regions of primordial star formation, the so-called minihalos, having total masses of ∼106 M⊙ and collapsing at redshifts z ≃ 20–30. Within this framework, a number of studies have defined a preliminary standard model, with the main result that the first stars were predominantly massive. This model has recently been modified to include a ubiquitous mode of fragmentation in the protostellar disks, such that the typical outcome of primordial star formation may be the formation of a binary or small multiple stellar system. We will also discuss extensions to this standard picture due to the presence of dynamically significant magnetic fields, of heating from self-annihalating WIMP dark matter, or cosmic rays. We conclude by discussing possible strategies to empirically test our theoretical models. Foremost among them are predictions for the upcoming James Webb space telescope (JWST), to be launched ∼2018, and for ‘stellar archaeology’, which probes the abundance pattern in the oldest, most-metal poor stars in our cosmic neighborhood, thereby constraining the nucleosynthesis inside the first supernovae. (review article)

  9. Prediction of tar ball formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khelifa, A.; Gamble, L. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science and Technology Division, Environmental Technology Centre, Science and Technology Branch

    2006-07-01

    The presence of small tar balls ranging in size from less than a millimetre to 60 centimetres have been observed during cleanup assessment operations following accidental oil spills on water. The tar balls are composed of heavy oil residues and suspended particulate matter (SPM) from the water column. They can be found on shorelines, settled on the seafloor and floating at or near the water surface. Their abundance on the shorelines varies from site to site and depends on the conditions of the spill and mixing conditions. Aggregation between SPM and micro-sized oil droplets occurs naturally in coastal waters and enhances the dispersion of spilled oil. Although tar balls are among the important end states of spilled oil in the marine environment, no model exists to estimate the percentage of the spilled oil that becomes tar balls. This paper offered some insight into the modeling of tar ball formation. Current modeling understanding of oil-SPM aggregate formation was used to predict tar ball formation. The formation of oil droplets was examined with respect to a range of conditions under which the formation of large droplets is expected. The role of aggregation was then presented to demonstrate the effects of concentration and type of SPM on the buoyancy of tar balls. Good agreement was found between modeling results and field data reported in the literature regarding the size and density of tar balls. Oil viscosity and mixing energy were found to be the main factors controlling the formation of tar balls. The aggregation of tar balls with SPM and shoreline material results in significant increases or decreases in density, depending on the type and concentration of SPM. 42 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  10. Formation of the First Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Bromm, Volker

    2005-01-01

    How and when did the first generation of stars form at the end of the cosmic dark ages? Quite generically, within variants of the cold dark matter model of cosmological structure formation, the first sources of light are expected to form in ~ 10^{6} M_sun dark matter potential wells at redshifts z > 20. I discuss the physical processes that govern the formation of the first stars. These so-called Population~III stars are predicted to be predominantly very massive, and to have contributed sign...

  11. Pattern formations and oscillatory phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Kinoshita, Shuichi

    2013-01-01

    Patterns and their formations appear throughout nature, and are studied to analyze different problems in science and make predictions across a wide range of disciplines including biology, physics, mathematics, chemistry, material science, and nanoscience. With the emergence of nanoscience and the ability for researchers and scientists to study living systems at the biological level, pattern formation research has become even more essential. This book is an accessible first of its kind guide for scientists, researchers, engineers, and students who require a general introduction to thi

  12. Star formation and gas supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catinella, B.

    2016-06-01

    A detailed knowledge of how gas cycles in and around galaxies, and how it depends on galaxy properties such as stellar mass and star formation rate, is crucial to understand galaxy formation and evolution. We take advantage of the most sensitive surveys of cold gas in massive galaxies, GASS and COLD GASS, as well as of the state-of-the-art HI blind survey ALFALFA to investigate how molecular and atomic hydrogen reservoirs vary along and across the main sequence of star-forming galaxies.

  13. High-Mass Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Schilke, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A review on current theories and observations of high-mass star formation is given. Particularly the influence of magnetic fields and feedback mechanisms, and of varying initial conditions on theories are discussed. The, in my biased view, most important observations to put strong constraints on models of high-mass star formation are pres ented, in particular bearing on the existence and properties of high-mass starless cores, the role of filaments in the mass transport to high-mass cores, and the propertie s of disks around high-mass stars.

  14. Expectation Formation and Social Influence

    OpenAIRE

    Karpf, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Cet article étudie le rôle de l'influence sociale sur la formation des anticipations des agents économiques. Utilisant des cartes auto-organisatrices de Kohonen, les données transversales reprises de l'enquête auprès des consommateurs de l'Université de Michigan sont transformées en pseudo-panel permettant de surveiller la formation des anticipations pour l'ensemble de la durée disponible (de janvier 1978 à juin 2013). Le concept de l'entropie informationnelle, relevant de la théorie de l'inf...

  15. Constraints on galaxy formation theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalay, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    The present theories of galaxy formation are reviewed. The relation between peculiar velocities, temperature fluctuations of the microwave background and the correlation function of galaxies point to the possibility that galaxies do not form uniformly everywhere. The velocity data provide strong constraints on the theories even in the case when light does not follow mass of the universe.

  16. The Road to Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Keel, William C

    2007-01-01

    The formation of galaxies is one of the greatest puzzles in astronomy, the solution is shrouded in the depths of space and time, but has profound implications for the universe we observe today. The book discusses the beginnings of the process from cosmological observations and calculations, considers the broad features of galaxies that we need to explain and what we know of their later history. The author compares the competing theories for galaxy formation and considers the progress expected from new generations of powerful telescopes both on earth and in space. In this second edition the author has retained the observationally-based approach of the first edition, a feature which was particularly well-reviewed: Writing in Nature, Carlton Baugh noted in February 2003 that “It is refreshing, in a market dominated by theorists, to come across a book on galaxy formation written from an observational perspective. The Road to Galaxy Formation should prove to be a handy primer on observations for graduate student...

  17. Exciton Formation in Disordered Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klochikhin, A.; Reznitsky, A.; Permogorov, S.;

    1999-01-01

    Stationary luminescence spectra of disordered solid solutions can be accounted by the model of localized excitons. Detailed analysis of the long time decay kinetics of luminescence shows that exciton formation in these systems is in great extent due to the bimolecular reaction of separated carrie...

  18. The multifaceted planetesimal formation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Anders; Blum, Jürgen; Tanaka, Hidekazu;

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of dust and ice particles into planetesimals is an important step in the planet formation process. Planetesimals are the seeds of both terrestrial planets and the solid cores of gas and ice giants forming by core accretion. Left-over planetesimals in the form of asteroids, trans-Nept...

  19. Genetic analysis of symbiosome formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ovchinnikova, E.

    2012-01-01

    Endosymbiotic interactions form a fundament of life as we know it and are characterized by the formation of new specialized membrane compartments, in which the microbes are hosted inside living plant cells. A striking example is the symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium bacteria (r

  20. Stereotype Formation : Biased by Association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Pelley, Mike E.; Reimers, Stian J.; Calvini, Guglielmo; Spears, Russell; Beesley, Tom; Murphy, Robin A.

    2010-01-01

    We propose that biases in attitude and stereotype formation might arise as a result of learned differences ill the extent its which social groups have previously been predictive elf behavioral or physical properties Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrate that differences in the experienced predictiveness o

  1. Data formats for phonological corpora

    CERN Document Server

    Romary, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the present chapter is to explore the possibility of providing the research (but also the industrial) community that commonly uses spoken corpora with a stable portfolio of well-documented standardised formats that allow a high re-use rate of annotated spoken resources and, as a consequence, better interoperability across tools used to produce or exploit such resources.

  2. Earth and Terrestrial Planet Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobson, Seth A

    2015-01-01

    The growth and composition of Earth is a direct consequence of planet formation throughout the Solar System. We discuss the known history of the Solar System, the proposed stages of growth and how the early stages of planet formation may be dominated by pebble growth processes. Pebbles are small bodies whose strong interactions with the nebula gas lead to remarkable new accretion mechanisms for the formation of planetesimals and the growth of planetary embryos. Many of the popular models for the later stages of planet formation are presented. The classical models with the giant planets on fixed orbits are not consistent with the known history of the Solar System, fail to create a high Earth/Mars mass ratio, and, in many cases, are also internally inconsistent. The successful Grand Tack model creates a small Mars, a wet Earth, a realistic asteroid belt and the mass-orbit structure of the terrestrial planets. In the Grand Tack scenario, growth curves for Earth most closely match a Weibull model. The feeding zon...

  3. The EPRDATA Format: A Dialogue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Henry Grady III [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-08-18

    Recently the Los Alamos Nuclear Data Team has communicated certain issues of concern in relation to the new electron/photon/relaxation ACE data format as released in the eprdata12 library. In this document those issues are parsed, analyzed, and answered.

  4. Star formation in Galactic flows

    CERN Document Server

    Smilgys, R

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the triggering of star formation in clouds that form in Galactic scale flows as the ISM passes through spiral shocks. We use the Lagrangian nature of SPH simulations to trace how the star forming gas is gathered into self-gravitating cores that collapse to form stars. Large scale flows that arise due to Galactic dynamics create shocks of order 30 km/s that compress the gas and form dense clouds $(n> $several $\\times 10^2$ cm$^{-3}$) in which self-gravity becomes relevant. These large-scale flows are necessary for creating the dense physical conditions for gravitational collapse and star formation. Local gravitational collapse requires densities in excess of $n>10^3$ cm$^{-3}$ which occur on size scales of $\\approx 1$ pc for low-mass star forming regions ($M10^3 M_{\\odot}$). Star formation in the 250 pc region lasts throughout the 5 Myr timescale of the simulation with a star formation rate of $\\approx 10^{-1} M_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-2}$. In the absence of feedback, the efficiency of the sta...

  5. Formative Assessment in Dance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Heidi; Lui, Angela; Palma, Maria; Hefferen, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Feedback is crucial to students' growth as dancers. When used within the framework of formative assessment, or assessment for learning, feedback results in actionable next steps that dancers can use to improve their performances. This article showcases the work of two dance specialists, one elementary and one middle school teacher, who have…

  6. Formative Assessment in Primary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughland, Tony; Kilpatrick, Laetitia

    2015-01-01

    This action learning study in a year three classroom explored the implementation of five formative assessment principles to assist students' understandings of the scientific topic of liquids and solids. These principles were employed to give students a greater opportunity to express their understanding of the concepts. The study found that…

  7. Periostin secreted by mesenchymal stem cells supports tendon formation in an ectopic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Sandra; Seiffart, Virginia; Willbold, Elmar; Laggies, Sandra; Winkel, Andreas; Shahab-Osterloh, Sandra; Flörkemeier, Thilo; Hertwig, Falk; Steinhoff, Christine; Nuber, Ulrike A; Gross, Gerhard; Hoffmann, Andrea

    2014-08-15

    True tendon regeneration in human patients remains a vision of musculoskeletal therapies. In comparison to other mesenchymal lineages the biology of tenogenic differentiation is barely understood. Specifically, easy and efficient protocols are lacking that might enable tendon cell and tissue differentiation based on adult (stem) cell sources. In the murine mesenchymal progenitor cell line C3H10T½, overexpression of the growth factor bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and a constitutively active transcription factor, Smad8 L+MH2, mediates tendon cell differentiation in vitro and the formation of tendon-like tissue in vivo. We hypothesized that during this differentiation secreted factors involved in extracellular matrix formation exert a major impact on tendon development. Gene expression analyses revealed four genes encoding secreted factors that are notably upregulated: periostin, C-type lectin domain family 3 (member b), RNase A4, and follistatin-like 1. These factors have not previously been implicated in tendon biology. Among these, periostin showed a specific expression in tenocytes of adult mouse Achilles tendon and in chondrocytes within the nonmineralized fibrocartilage zone of the enthesis with the calcaneus. Overexpression of periostin alone or in combination with constitutively active BMP receptor type in human mesenchymal stem cells and subsequent implantation into ectopic sites in mice demonstrated a reproducible moderate tenogenic capacity that has not been described before. Therefore, periostin may belong to the factors contributing to the development of tenogenic tissue. PMID:24809660

  8. Inside-out planet formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The compact multi-transiting planet systems discovered by Kepler challenge planet formation theories. Formation in situ from disks with radial mass surface density, Σ, profiles similar to the minimum mass solar nebula but boosted in normalization by factors ≳ 10 has been suggested. We propose that a more natural way to create these planets in the inner disk is formation sequentially from the inside-out via creation of successive gravitationally unstable rings fed from a continuous stream of small (∼cm-m size) 'pebbles', drifting inward via gas drag. Pebbles collect at the pressure maximum associated with the transition from a magnetorotational instability (MRI)-inactive ('dead zone') region to an inner MRI-active zone. A pebble ring builds up until it either becomes gravitationally unstable to form an ∼1 M ⊕ planet directly or induces gradual planet formation via core accretion. The planet may undergo Type I migration into the active region, allowing a new pebble ring and planet to form behind it. Alternatively, if migration is inefficient, the planet may continue to accrete from the disk until it becomes massive enough to isolate itself from the accretion flow. A variety of densities may result depending on the relative importance of residual gas accretion as the planet approaches its isolation mass. The process can repeat with a new pebble ring gathering at the new pressure maximum associated with the retreating dead-zone boundary. Our simple analytical model for this scenario of inside-out planet formation yields planetary masses, relative mass scalings with orbital radius, and minimum orbital separations consistent with those seen by Kepler. It provides an explanation of how massive planets can form with tightly packed and well-aligned system architectures, starting from typical protoplanetary disk properties.

  9. Formation of positronium in polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of positronium (Ps) in polyethylene (PE) depends strongly on structure, temperature, electric field and irradiation with high energy electrons or positrons. The purpose of this work is to study the Ps formation under the influence of all these parameters in well defined PE samples. The electric field influences the stopping of the positrons in solids too. This gives rise to a field dependence of the linear absorption coefficient, which was measured up to 2 MV/cm. The absolute Ps-yield as a function of the electric field up to 1.75 MV/cm was determined here for the first time. This determination was made with two independent measurements: lifetime of positrons and angular correlation of annihilation radiation. The absolute Ps-yield decreases at first with the electric field, passes through a minimum, then suddenly increases and approaches 1 for a field higher than 1 MV/cm, i.e. all positrons form Ps at high field. Between 0 and 0.3 MV/cm the Ps formation is controlled by two mechanisms described by the Ore gap model and the spur model. Above 0.3 MV/cm the Ps formation can only be explained by the Ore gap model; the positrons are heated up in the electric field, their energy distribution reaches the Ore gap, where they can form Ps. The analogy with hot electrons is obvious. It is well known that the electron-phonon interaction is stronger in quartz than in PE. We have measured the field-dependence of Ps formation in fused quartz as high as 1.5 MV/cm. Only a decrease of the Ps-yield was observed. Like electrons the positrons remain thermalized in quartz for field as high as 1.5 MV/cm. (author) 27 figs., 7 tabs., 86 refs

  10. Consensus formation on coevolving networks: groups' formation and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the effect of adaptivity on a social model of opinion dynamics and consensus formation. We analyse how the adaptivity of the network of contacts between agents to the underlying social dynamics affects the size and topological properties of groups and the convergence time to the stable final state. We find that, while on static networks these properties are determined by percolation phenomena, on adaptive networks the rewiring process leads to different behaviors: adaptive rewiring fosters group formation by enhancing communication between agents of similar opinion, though it also makes possible the division of clusters. We show how the convergence time is determined by the characteristic time of link rearrangement. We finally investigate how the adaptivity yields nontrivial correlations between the internal topology and the size of the groups of agreeing agents

  11. Stratigraphy and dissolution of the Rustler Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the physical stratigraphy of the Rustler Formation, because the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant will be constructed in salt beds that underlie this formation. Described are subdivisions of the formations, the major karst features, and a proposed method for the formation of Nash Draw. 2 refs., 2 figs

  12. C型凝集素受体和Toll样受体在子(癎)前期重度患者胎盘中的表达%Expression of C-type lectin receptors and Toil-like receptors in placenta of severe pre-eclampsia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李黎; 徐亮; 滕银成

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of C-typed lectin receptors of dendritic cells specific intercellular adhesion raolecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin ( DC-SIGN) and mannose receptor (MR) and Toll-like receptors (TLR) of TLR-2 and TLR-4 in placenta tissues in patients with pre-eclampsia ( PE). Methods The placenta tissues were obtained from patients with severe pre-eclampsia ( PE group, n = 20) and normal pregnant women ( NP group, n - 20). The expression of DC-SIGN, MR, TLR-2 and TLR-4 in placenta tissues was localized by immunohistochemistry, and the expression of DC-SIGN, MR, TLR-2 and TLR-4 protein in placenta tissues was detected by Western blotting. Results There was expression of DC-SIGN, MR, TLR-2 and TLR-4 in syncytiotrophoblasts and cytotrophoblasts of placenta tissues in both groups, and the majority was in syncytiotrophoblasts. The expression of TLR-4 in placenta tissues in PE group was significantly higher than that in NP group (P 0. 05). Conclusion Compared with normal pregnant women, the expression of C-typed lectin receptors of DC-SIGN and MR is lower, while the expression of TLR-4 is abnormally higher in placenta tissues in patients with PE. The imbalance between these two receptors may play an important role in the pathogenesis of PE.%目的 分析子(癎)前期(PE)患者胎盘组织中C型凝集素样受体家族中DC-SIGN和甘露糖受体(MR)以及Toll样受体(TLR)家族中TLR-2和TLR-4的表达情况.方法 采集PE重度患者(PE组,n=20)及正常妊娠妇女(NP组,n=20)的新鲜胎盘标本;采用免疫组织化学技术对胎盘组织中DC-SIGN、MR、TLR-2和TLR-4的表达进行定位分析;采用Western blotting法检测胎盘组织中的DC-SIGN、MR、TLR-2和TLR-4的蛋白表达.结果 两组胎盘组织中均有DC-SIGN、MR、TLR-2和TLR-4的表达,主要位于胎盘合体滋养层细胞,在细胞滋养层细胞中亦有少量表达.PE组与NP组比较,胎盘组织TLR-4阳性细胞表达率明显升高(P <0.01);DC-S1GN、MR

  13. Transparent Format Migration of Preserved Web Content

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenthal, David S. H.; Lipkis, Thomas; Robertson, Thomas; Morabito, Seth

    2005-01-01

    The LOCKSS digital preservation system collects content by crawling the web and preserves it in the format supplied by the publisher. Eventually, browsers will no longer understand that format. A process called format migration converts it to a newer format that the browsers do understand. The LOCKSS program has designed and tested an initial implementation of format migration for Web content that is transparent to readers, building on the content negotiation capabilities of HTTP.

  14. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may include dolomite and hydrocarbons. Methods may include providing heat at less than the decomposition temperature of dolomite from one or more heaters to at least a portion of the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids are mobilized in the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  15. Formation of quasiparallel Alfven solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, R. L.; Kennel, C. F.; Mjolhus, E.

    1992-01-01

    The formation of quasi-parallel Alfven solitons is investigated through the inverse scattering transformation (IST) for the derivative nonlinear Schroedinger (DNLS) equation. The DNLS has a rich complement of soliton solutions consisting of a two-parameter soliton family and a one-parameter bright/dark soliton family. In this paper, the physical roles and origins of these soliton families are inferred through an analytic study of the scattering data generated by the IST for a set of initial profiles. The DNLS equation has as limiting forms the nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS), Korteweg-de-Vries (KdV) and modified Korteweg-de-Vries (MKdV) equations. Each of these limits is briefly reviewed in the physical context of quasi-parallel Alfven waves. The existence of these limiting forms serves as a natural framework for discussing the formation of Alfven solitons.

  16. Controlled Irradiative Formation of Penitentes

    CERN Document Server

    Bergeron, V; Betterton, M D

    2006-01-01

    Spike-shaped structures are produced by light-driven ablation in very different contexts. Penitentes 1-4 m high are common on Andean glaciers, where their formation changes glacier dynamics and hydrology. Laser ablation can produce cones 10-100 microns high with a variety of proposed applications in materials science. We report the first laboratory generation of centimeter-scale snow and ice penitentes. Systematically varying conditions allows identification of the essential parameters controlling the formation of ablation structures. We demonstrate that penitente initiation and coarsening requires cold temperatures, so that ablation leads to sublimation rather than melting. Once penitentes have formed, further growth of height can occur by melting. The penitentes intially appear as small structures (3 mm high) and grow by coarsening to 1-5 cm high. Our results are an important step towards understanding and controlling ablation morphologies.

  17. Formation of Supermassive Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Volonteri, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Evidence shows that massive black holes reside in most local galaxies. Studies have also established a number of relations between the MBH mass and properties of the host galaxy such as bulge mass and velocity dispersion. These results suggest that central MBHs, while much less massive than the host (~ 0.1%), are linked to the evolution of galactic structure. In hierarchical cosmologies, a single big galaxy today can be traced back to the stage when it was split up in hundreds of smaller components. Did MBH seeds form with the same efficiency in small proto-galaxies, or did their formation had to await the buildup of substantial galaxies with deeper potential wells? I briefly review here some of the physical processes that are conducive to the evolution of the massive black hole population. I will discuss black hole formation processes for `seed' black holes that are likely to place at early cosmic epochs, and possible observational tests of these scenarios.

  18. Shock Formation in Lovelock Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Reall, Harvey S; Way, Benson

    2014-01-01

    We argue that Lovelock theories of gravity suffer from shock formation, unlike General Relativity. We consider the propagation of (i) a discontinuity in curvature, and (ii) weak, high frequency, gravitational waves. Such disturbances propagate along characteristic hypersurfaces of a "background" spacetime and their amplitude is governed by a transport equation. In GR the transport equation is linear. In Lovelock theories, it is nonlinear and its solutions can blow up, corresponding to the formation of a shock. We show that this effect is absent in some simple cases e.g. a flat background spacetime, and demonstrate its presence for a plane wave background. We comment on weak cosmic censorship, the evolution of shocks, and the nonlinear stability of Minkowski spacetime, in Lovelock theories.

  19. New Paradigms For Asteroid Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Johansen, Anders; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Gounelle, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Asteroids and meteorites provide key evidence on the formation of planetesimals in the Solar System. Asteroids are traditionally thought to form in a bottom-up process by coagulation within a population of initially km-scale planetesimals. However, new models challenge this idea by demonstrating that asteroids of sizes from 100 to 1000 km can form directly from the gravitational collapse of small particles which have organised themselves in dense filaments and clusters in the turbulent gas. Particles concentrate passively between eddies down to the smallest scales of the turbulent gas flow and inside large-scale pressure bumps and vortices. The streaming instability causes particles to take an active role in the concentration, by piling up in dense filaments whose friction on the gas reduces the radial drift compared to that of isolated particles. In this chapter we review new paradigms for asteroid formation and compare critically against the observed properties of asteroids as well as constraints from meteo...

  20. Magnetic Diffusion in Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Shantanu

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic diffusion plays a vital role in star formation. We trace its influence from interstellar cloud scales down to star-disk scales. On both scales, we find that magnetic diffusion can be significantly enhanced by the buildup of strong gradients in magnetic field structure. Large scale nonlinear flows can create compressed cloud layers within which ambipolar diffusion occurs rapidly. However, in the flux-freezing limit that may be applicable to photoionized molecular cloud envelopes, supersonic motions can persist for long times if driven by an externally generated magnetic field that corresponds to a subcritical mass-to-flux ratio. In the case of protostellar accretion, rapid magnetic diffusion (through Ohmic dissipation with additional support from ambipolar diffusion) near the protostar causes dramatic magnetic flux loss. By doing so, it also allows the formation of a centrifugal disk, thereby avoiding the magnetic braking catastrophe.

  1. Coevolutionary modeling in network formation

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Shyoukh, Ibrahim

    2014-12-03

    Network coevolution, the process of network topology evolution in feedback with dynamical processes over the network nodes, is a common feature of many engineered and natural networks. In such settings, the change in network topology occurs at a comparable time scale to nodal dynamics. Coevolutionary modeling offers the possibility to better understand how and why network structures emerge. For example, social networks can exhibit a variety of structures, ranging from almost uniform to scale-free degree distributions. While current models of network formation can reproduce these structures, coevolutionary modeling can offer a better understanding of the underlying dynamics. This paper presents an overview of recent work on coevolutionary models of network formation, with an emphasis on the following three settings: (i) dynamic flow of benefits and costs, (ii) transient link establishment costs, and (iii) latent preferential attachment.

  2. Singularities formation, structure, and propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Eggers, J

    2015-01-01

    Many key phenomena in physics and engineering are described as singularities in the solutions to the differential equations describing them. Examples covered thoroughly in this book include the formation of drops and bubbles, the propagation of a crack and the formation of a shock in a gas. Aimed at a broad audience, this book provides the mathematical tools for understanding singularities and explains the many common features in their mathematical structure. Part I introduces the main concepts and techniques, using the most elementary mathematics possible so that it can be followed by readers with only a general background in differential equations. Parts II and III require more specialised methods of partial differential equations, complex analysis and asymptotic techniques. The book may be used for advanced fluid mechanics courses and as a complement to a general course on applied partial differential equations.

  3. Othering, identity formation and agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sune Qvotrup Jensen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the potentials of the concept of othering to describe identity formation among ethnic minorities. First, it outlines the history of the concept, its contemporary use, as well as some criticisms. Then it is argued that young ethnic minority men in Denmark are subject to intersectional othering, which contains elements of exoticist fascination of the other. On the basis of ethnographic material, it is analysed how young marginalized ethnic minority men react to othering. Two types of reactions are illustrated: 1 capitalization on being positioned as the other, and 2 refusing to occupy the position of the other by disidentification and claims to normality. Finally, it is argued that the concept of othering is well suited for understanding the power structures as well as the historic symbolic meanings conditioning such identity formation, but problematic in terms of agency.

  4. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  5. Strategy Formation in Eastern Jutland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Kristian

    2008-01-01

    questions about on which level a serious strategy formation process can take place.  There is a danger that a common strategic spatial plan is more an expression of the lowest common denominator and the municipalities request for infrastructure investments rather than being a spatial strategy with......  In Eastern Jutland a strategy formation process has been initiated with the aim of developing a strategic spatial plan for the city region.  An organisation has been set up to deal with the first phase of the process, which is to carry out three functional analyses and prepare a common vision for...... in the area.   The municipalities acknowledge the articulation of the city region and the initiated planning process.  However, the municipalities might see the arena as means to lobby for infrastructure investments in Eastern Jutland, as it is doubtful whether the municipalities will feel encouraged...

  6. The formation of new compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasparoli, A.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available The formation of new compounds The study of model systems allows us to reconstruct the complex mosaic of reactions which make up the frying process. In particular such systems, if made up of single oils or their components, verify the transformation of the triglyceride matrix by thermo-oxidizing treatment. Should this then have added specific substrates (protein, starch they reconstruct the oil-substrate interaction and the influence of the same substrate in the transformation. The contribution of the information is equally distributed between the volatile products and the complex products; in fact both contribute to indicate the reactions in play, supporting the previous considerations for investigation at an analytical level. The present work discusses the newly formed products (volatile or nonvolatile, verifying in particular the formation of reaction products with the substrates.

  7. THE BLACK HOLE FORMATION PROBABILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A longstanding question in stellar evolution is which massive stars produce black holes (BHs) rather than neutron stars (NSs) upon death. It has been common practice to assume that a given zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass star (and perhaps a given metallicity) simply produces either an NS or a BH, but this fails to account for a myriad of other variables that may effect this outcome, such as spin, binarity, or even stochastic differences in the stellar structure near core collapse. We argue that instead a probabilistic description of NS versus BH formation may be better suited to account for the current uncertainties in understanding how massive stars die. We present an initial exploration of the probability that a star will make a BH as a function of its ZAMS mass, P BH(M ZAMS). Although we find that it is difficult to derive a unique P BH(M ZAMS) using current measurements of both the BH mass distribution and the degree of chemical enrichment by massive stars, we demonstrate how P BH(M ZAMS) changes with these various observational and theoretical uncertainties. We anticipate that future studies of Galactic BHs and theoretical studies of core collapse will refine P BH(M ZAMS) and argue that this framework is an important new step toward better understanding BH formation. A probabilistic description of BH formation will be useful as input for future population synthesis studies that are interested in the formation of X-ray binaries, the nature and event rate of gravitational wave sources, and answering questions about chemical enrichment

  8. The formation of new compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Gasparoli, A.

    1998-01-01

    The formation of new compounds The study of model systems allows us to reconstruct the complex mosaic of reactions which make up the frying process. In particular such systems, if made up of single oils or their components, verify the transformation of the triglyceride matrix by thermo-oxidizing treatment. Should this then have added specific substrates (protein, starch) they reconstruct the oil-substrate interaction and the influence of the same substrate in the transformation. The contribut...

  9. Biofilm formation by Clostridium difficile

    OpenAIRE

    Dapa, Tanja; Unnikrishnan, Meera

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major healthcare-associated disease worldwide. Recurring infections and increasing antibiotic resistance have complicated treatment of CDI. While C. difficile spores are important for transmission and persistence of CDI, other factors such as gut colonization and formation of bacterial communities in the gut may also contribute to pathogenesis and persistence, but have not been well investigated. Recently, we reported that important clinical C. diffi...

  10. Memory Formation Shaped by Astroglia

    OpenAIRE

    Zorec, Robert; Horvat, Anemari; Vardjan, Nina; VERKHRATSKY, ALEXEI

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes, the most heterogeneous glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS), execute a multitude of homeostatic functions and contribute to memory formation. Consolidation of synaptic and systemic memory is a prolonged process and hours are required to form long-term memory. In the past, neurons or their parts have been considered to be the exclusive cellular sites of these processes, however, it has now become evident that astrocytes provide an important and essential contribution to ...

  11. Formation of artificial ionospheric ducts

    OpenAIRE

    Milikh, G. M.; Papadopoulos, K.; Shroff, H; Chang, C. L.; Wallace, T; E. V. Mishin; Parrot, Michel; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques

    2008-01-01

    International audience It is well known that strong electron heating by a powerful HF-facility can lead to the formation of electron and ion density perturbations that stretch along the magnetic field line. Those density perturbations can serve as ducts for ELF waves, both of natural and artificial origin. This paper presents the first experimental evidence of plasma modifications associated with ion outflows due to HF heating. The experiments were conducted using the HAARP heater during t...

  12. Cycling Behavior and Memory Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Gerstner, Jason R.; Lyons, Lisa C.; Wright, Kenneth P.; Loh, Dawn H; Rawashdeh, Oliver; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin L.; Roman, Gregg W.

    2009-01-01

    Circadian research has spent considerable effort in the determining clock output pathways, including identifying both physiological and behavioral processes that demonstrate significant time-of-day variation. Memory formation and consolidation represent notable processes shaped by endogenous circadian oscillators. To date, very few studies on memory mechanisms have considered potential confounding effects of time-of-day and the organism’s innate activity cycles (e.g., nocturnal, diurnal, or c...

  13. Cataract formation following vitreoretinal procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Feng H; Adelman RA

    2014-01-01

    Hao Feng, Ron A Adelman Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and prevalence of cataract formation, progression, and extraction in patients that underwent vitreoretinal procedures and to evaluate factors that can potentially predispose patients to postoperative cataracts.Materials and methods: The medical records of consecutive patients who underwent vitreoretinal surgery at the Yale Eye Cent...

  14. Formation of binary radio pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the standard scenario of the evolution of massive binary stars a study is made of the formation of final binary systems in which at least one of the components is a neutron star. It is found that about every fortieth radio pulsar must be a member of a close binary system. This is confirmed by observations. Radio pulsars are not formed in wide binary systems, possibly because of the very slow rotation of the presupernova stars

  15. Neutron Stars: Formation and Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Kutschera, Marek

    1998-01-01

    A short introduction is given to astrophysics of neutron stars and to physics of dense matter in neutron stars. Observed properties of astrophysical objects containing neutron stars are discussed. Current scenarios regarding formation and evolution of neutron stars in those objects are presented. Physical principles governing the internal structure of neutron stars are considered with special emphasis on the possible spin ordering in the neutron star matter.

  16. Hydrodynamics of catheter biofilm formation

    CERN Document Server

    Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar; Rodriguez-Perez, Daniel; Martinez-Escobar, Sergio; Fernandez-Barbero, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model is proposed to describe one of the most critical problems in intensive medical care units: the formation of biofilms inside central venous catheters. The incorporation of approximate solutions for the flow-limited diffusion equation leads to the conclusion that biofilms grow on the internal catheter wall due to the counter-stream diffusion of blood through a very thin layer close to the wall. This biological deposition is the first necessary step for the subsequent bacteria colonization.

  17. UNION FORMATION IN FRAGILE FAMILIES*

    OpenAIRE

    Carlson, Marcia; McLanahan, Sara; England, Paula

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we use data from a new longitudinal survey—the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study—to examine union formation among unmarried parents who have just had a child together. We use multinomial logistic regression to estimate the effects of economic, cultural/interpersonal, and other factors on whether (relative to having no romantic relationship) parents are romantically involved living apart, cohabiting, or married to each other about one year after the child’s birth. Net o...

  18. Formation of a collaborative society

    OpenAIRE

    Buřita, Ladislav; Ondryhal, Vojtěch

    2014-01-01

    The MilUNI knowledge portal, based on the knowledge base developed in ATOM software has been created at the authors' workplace with the aim to form a collaborative society of military universities. The analysis of the collaborative society concept is presented. The description of the MilUNI project is included. Some areas for university cooperation are proposed, as well as the measures facilitating the formation and development of the collaborative society.

  19. Othering, identity formation and agency

    OpenAIRE

    Sune Qvotrup Jensen

    2011-01-01

    The article examines the potentials of the concept of othering to describe identity formation among ethnic minorities. First, it outlines the history of the concept, its contemporary use, as well as some criticisms. Then it is argued that young ethnic minority men in Denmark are subject to intersectional othering, which contains elements of exoticist fascination of the other. On the basis of ethnographic material, it is analysed how young marginalized ethnic minority men react to othering. Tw...

  20. Supercoil formation in DNA denaturation

    OpenAIRE

    Kabakcioglu, A.; Orlandini, E.; Mukamel, D.

    2008-01-01

    We generalize the Poland-Scheraga (PS) model to the case of a circular DNA, taking into account the twisting of the two strains around each other. Guided by recent single-molecule experiments on DNA strands, we assume that the torsional stress induced by denaturation enforces formation of supercoils whose writhe absorbs the linking number expelled by the loops. Our model predicts that, when the entropy parameter of a loop satisfies $c \\le 2$, denaturation transition does not take place. On th...

  1. Formation of Cosmic Dust Bunnies

    OpenAIRE

    Matthews, Lorin S.; Hayes, Ryan L.; Freed, Michael S.; Hyde, Truell W.

    2007-01-01

    Planetary formation is an efficient process now thought to take place on a relatively short astronomical time scale. Recent observations have shown that the dust surrounding a protostar emits more efficiently at longer wavelengths as the protoplanetary disk evolves, suggesting that the dust particles are coagulating into fluffy aggregates, "much as dust bunnies form under a bed." One poorly understood problem in this coagulation process is the manner in which micron-sized, charged grains form...

  2. Non cooperative Stackelberg network formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M.C Larrosa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-cooperative network formation games in industrial organizations analyze how firms create links. We assume that links portray cost-reducing information and that access to this information is not reciprocal. We study the consequences in terms of profits if one firm can move first in establishing a link. A classic model of exogenous Stackelberg leadership is developed and first-mover advantage is observed.

  3. THE BLACK HOLE FORMATION PROBABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausen, Drew; Piro, Anthony L.; Ott, Christian D., E-mail: dclausen@tapir.caltech.edu [TAPIR, Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Mailcode 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    A longstanding question in stellar evolution is which massive stars produce black holes (BHs) rather than neutron stars (NSs) upon death. It has been common practice to assume that a given zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass star (and perhaps a given metallicity) simply produces either an NS or a BH, but this fails to account for a myriad of other variables that may effect this outcome, such as spin, binarity, or even stochastic differences in the stellar structure near core collapse. We argue that instead a probabilistic description of NS versus BH formation may be better suited to account for the current uncertainties in understanding how massive stars die. We present an initial exploration of the probability that a star will make a BH as a function of its ZAMS mass, P {sub BH}(M {sub ZAMS}). Although we find that it is difficult to derive a unique P {sub BH}(M {sub ZAMS}) using current measurements of both the BH mass distribution and the degree of chemical enrichment by massive stars, we demonstrate how P {sub BH}(M {sub ZAMS}) changes with these various observational and theoretical uncertainties. We anticipate that future studies of Galactic BHs and theoretical studies of core collapse will refine P {sub BH}(M {sub ZAMS}) and argue that this framework is an important new step toward better understanding BH formation. A probabilistic description of BH formation will be useful as input for future population synthesis studies that are interested in the formation of X-ray binaries, the nature and event rate of gravitational wave sources, and answering questions about chemical enrichment.

  4. Star formation in dense clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    A model of core-clump accretion with equally likely stopping describes star formation in the dense parts of clusters, where models of isolated collapsing cores may not apply. Each core accretes at a constant rate onto its protostar, while the surrounding clump gas accretes as a power of protostar mass. Short accretion flows resemble Shu accretion, and make low-mass stars. Long flows resemble reduced Bondi accretion and make massive stars. Accretion stops due to environmental processes of dyna...

  5. Tube Formation in Nanoscale Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Chenglin; Liu Jun; Liu Fei; Wu Junshu; Gao Kun; Xue Dongfeng

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The formation of tubular nanostructures normally requires layered, anisotropic, or pseudo-layered crystal structures, while inorganic compounds typically do not possess such structures, inorganic nanotubes thus have been a hot topic in the past decade. In this article, we review recent research activities on nanotubes fabrication and focus on three novel synthetic strategies for generating nanotubes from inorganic materials that do not have a layered structure. Specifically, thermal ...

  6. Theory of Planetary System Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassen, Patrick

    1996-01-01

    Observations and theoretical considerations support the idea that the Solar System formed by the collapse of tenuous interstellar matter to a disk of gas and dust (the primitive solar nebula), from which the Sun and other components separated under the action of dissipative forces and by the coagulation of solid material. Thus, planets are understood to be contemporaneous byproducts of star formation. Because the circumstellar disks of new stars are easier to observe than mature planetary systems, the possibility arises that the nature and variety of planets might be studied from observations of the conditions of their birth. A useful theory of planetary system formation would therefore relate the properties of circumstellar disks both to the initial conditions of star formation and to the consequent properties of planets to those of the disk. Although the broad outlines of such a theory are in place, many aspects are either untested, controversial, or otherwise unresolved; even the degree to which such a comprehensive theory is possible remains unknown.

  7. Hypothesis Formation, Paradigms, and Openness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad P. Pritscher

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A part of hypothesis formation, while necessary for scientific investigation, is beyond direct observation. Powerful hypothesis formation is more than logical and is facilitated by mind­opening. As Percy Bridgeman, Nobel laureate, said, science is: “Nothing more than doing one's damnedest with one's mind, no holds barred.” This paper suggests more open schooling helps generate more open hypothesizing which helps one do one's damnedest with one's mind. It is hypothesized that a more open process of hypothesis formation may help schools and society forge new ways of living and learning so that more people more often can do their damnedest with their mind. This writing does not offer a new paradigm but rather attempts to elaborate on the notion that new paradigms are difficult to form without openness to what was previously quasi­unthinkable. More on these topics and issues is included in the author's Reopening Einstein's Thought: About What Can't Be Learned From Textbooks ­­to be published by Sense Publishers in June 2008.

  8. Theory of Remote Image Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blahut, Richard E.

    2004-11-01

    In many applications, images, such as ultrasonic or X-ray signals, are recorded and then analyzed with digital or optical processors in order to extract information. Such processing requires the development of algorithms of great precision and sophistication. This book presents a unified treatment of the mathematical methods that underpin the various algorithms used in remote image formation. The author begins with a review of transform and filter theory. He then discusses two- and three-dimensional Fourier transform theory, the ambiguity function, image construction and reconstruction, tomography, baseband surveillance systems, and passive systems (where the signal source might be an earthquake or a galaxy). Information-theoretic methods in image formation are also covered, as are phase errors and phase noise. Throughout the book, practical applications illustrate theoretical concepts, and there are many homework problems. The book is aimed at graduate students of electrical engineering and computer science, and practitioners in industry. Presents a unified treatment of the mathematical methods that underpin the algorithms used in remote image formation Illustrates theoretical concepts with reference to practical applications Provides insights into the design parameters of real systems

  9. NSDF: Neuroscience Simulation Data Format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Subhasis; Chintaluri, Chaitanya; Bhalla, Upinder S; Wójcik, Daniel K

    2016-04-01

    Data interchange is emerging as an essential aspect of modern neuroscience. In the areas of computational neuroscience and systems biology there are multiple model definition formats, which have contributed strongly to the development of an ecosystem of simulation and analysis tools. Here we report the development of the Neuroscience Simulation Data Format (NSDF) which extends this ecosystem to the data generated in simulations. NSDF is designed to store simulator output across scales: from multiscale chemical and electrical signaling models, to detailed single-neuron and network models, to abstract neural nets. It is self-documenting, efficient, modular, and scalable, both in terms of novel data types and in terms of data volume. NSDF is simulator-independent, and can be used by a range of standalone analysis and visualization tools. It may also be used to store variety of experimental data. NSDF is based on the widely used HDF5 (Hierarchical Data Format 5) specification and is open, platform-independent, and portable. PMID:26585711

  10. Pattern formation in optical resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review pattern formation in optical resonators. The emphasis is on 'particle-like' structures such as vortices or spatial solitons. On the one hand, similarities impose themselves with other fields of physics (condensed matter, phase transitions, particle physics, fluds/super fluids). On the other hand the feedback is led by the resonator mirrors to bi- and multi-stability of the spatial field structure, which is the basic ingredient for optical information processing. The spatial dimension or the 'parallelism' is the strength of optics compared to electronics (and will have to be employed to fully use the advantages optics offers in information processing). But even in the 'serial' processing tasks of telecoms (e.g. information buffering) spatial resonator solitons can do better than the schemes proposed so far-including 'slow light'. Pattern formation in optical resonators will likely be the key to brain-like information processing like cognition, learning and association; to complement the precise but limited algorithmic capabilities of electronic processing. But even in the short term it will be useful for solving serial optical processing problems. The prospects for technical uses of pattern formation in resonators are one motivation for this research. The fundamental similarities with other fields of physics, on the other hand, inspire transfer of concepts between fields; something that has always proven fruitful for gaining deeper insights or for solving technical problems

  11. Kinetic competition during glass formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The kinetics of glass formation has been elucidated in an Fe and Au-base alloy. • A critical cooling rate range should be considered for glass formation. • Wedge casting, calorimetry and upquenching data are used to model TTT curves. - Abstract: For vitrification of an alloy melt during cooling there is a kinetic competition with the nucleation and growth of metastable and stable crystalline phases. Many of the measures of glass forming ability (GFA) attempt to capture some of the features of the kinetic competition, but the GFA metrics are static measures and the kinetic processes are dynamic in nature. In fact, the critical cooling rate for glass formation should be viewed in terms of a critical cooling rate range to acknowledge the stochastic nature of crystal nucleation behavior. Direct measurements of the critical cooling rate range confirm this behavior and also provide useful input for kinetics analysis. Usually kinetics analyses are based upon crystallization behavior that is measured either isothermally or upon heating to temperatures near the crystallization onset, Tx and the results are extrapolated to much higher temperatures. This practice is based upon a number of assumptions about transport behavior in the undercooled liquid. With rapid up-quenching of amorphous samples, the high temperature crystallization behavior can be measured and used to refine the kinetics analysis and provide useful insight on the kinetic competition and glass forming ability

  12. Star Formation in Satellite Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gutíerrez, C M; Funes, J G; Ribeiro, M B

    2006-01-01

    We present narrow-band observations of the H$\\alpha$ emission in a sample of 31 satellite orbiting isolated giant spiral galaxies. The sample studied spans the range $-19formation rates are 0.68 and 3.66 M$_\\sun$ yr$^{-1}$ respectively. Maps of the spatial distribution of ionized gas are presented. The star-forming regions show a rich structure in which frequently discrete complexes are imposed over more diffuse structures. In general, the current star formation rates are smaller that the mean values in the past obtained from the current stellar content; this probably indicates a declining rhythm with time in the generation of new stars. However, the reserve of gas is enough to continue fueling the current levels of star formation activity for at least another Hubble time. Four of the o...

  13. Modeling of Dynamic FRC Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Yung; Barnes, Dan; Dettrick, Sean

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a 2-D resistive MHD code, Lamy Ridge, to simulate the entire FRC formation process in Tri Alpha's C2 device, including initial formation, translation, merging and settling into equilibrium. Two FRC's can be created simultaneously, and then translated toward each other so that they merge into a single FRC. The code couples the external circuits around the formation tubes to the partially ionized plasma inside. Plasma and neutral gas are treated as two fluids. Dynamic and energetic equations, which take into account ionization and charge exchange, are solved in a time advance manner. The geometric shape of the vessel is specified by a set of inputs that defines the boundaries, which are handled by a cut-cell algorithm in the code. Multiple external circuits and field coils can be easily added, removed or relocated through individual inputs. The design of the code is modular and flexible so that it can be applied to future devices. The results of the code are in reasonable agreement with experimental measurements on the C2 device.

  14. Austenite formation during intercritical annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lis

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of this paper is the effect of the soft annealing of initial microstructure of the 6Mn16 steel on the kinetics of the austenite formation during next intercritical annealing.Design/methodology/approach: Analytical TEM point analysis with EDAX system attached to Philips CM20 was used to evaluate the concentration of Mn, Ni and Cr in the microstructure constituents of the multiphase steel and mainly Bainite- Martensite islands.Findings: The increase in soft annealing time from 1-60 hours at 625°C increases Mn partitioning between ferrite and cementite and new formed austenite and decreases the rate of the austenite formation during next intercritical annealing in the (α+γ temperature range at 700 and 750°C. The general equations for carbide dissolution and austenite formation in intercritical temperature range were established.Research limitations/implications: The final multiphase microstructure can be optimised by changing the time / temperature parameters of the intercritical heating in the (α+γ temperature range.Originality/value: The knowledge of partitioning of alloying elements mainly Mn during soft annealing and intercritical heating is very important to optimise the processing technology of intercritical annealing for a given amount of the austenite.

  15. Formation mechanisms of metal colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halaciuga, Ionel

    Highly dispersed uniform metallic particles are widely used in various areas of technology and medicine and are likely to be incorporated into many other applications in the future. It is commonly accepted that size, shape and composition of the particles represent critical factors in most applications. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of formation of metal particles and the ways to control the physical (e.g. shape, size) and chemical (e.g. composition) properties is of great importance. In the current research, the formation of uniform silver spheres is investigated experimentally. The parameters that influence the formation of silver particles when concentrated iso-ascorbic acid and silver-polyamine complex solutions are rapidly mixed were studied in the absence of dispersants. We found that by varying the nature of the amine, temperature, concentration of reactants, silver/amine molar ratio, and the nature of the silver salt, the size of the resulting silver particles can be varied in a wide range (0.08--1.5 microm). The silver particles were formed by aggregation of nanosize subunits as substantiated by both electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques and by the vivid rapid color changes during the chemical precipitation process. From the practical standpoint, the goal of this research was to prepare well dispersed spherical silver particles having a relatively smooth surface and a diameter of about 1 microm to satisfy the demands of the current electronic materials market. A two stage particle growth model previously developed to explain the narrow size distribution occurring in synthesis of gold spheres was applied to the present experimental system, and the parameters that control the size distribution characteristics were identified. The kinetic parameter required to match the final particle size was found to be in agreement with the one used previously in modeling formation of gold spheres, suggesting that similar kinetics governs the

  16. Dioxin formation from waste incineration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibamoto, Takayuki; Yasuhara, Akio; Katami, Takeo

    2007-01-01

    There has been great concern about dioxins-polychlorinated dibenzo dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzo furans (PCDFs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)-causing contamination in the environment because the adverse effects of these chemicals on human health have been known for many years. Possible dioxin-contamination has received much attention recently not only by environmental scientists but also by the public, because dioxins are known to be formed during the combustion of industrial and domestic wastes and to escape into the environment via exhaust gases from incinerators. Consequently, there is a pressing need to investigate the formation mechanisms or reaction pathways of these chlorinated chemicals to be able to devise ways to reduce their environmental contamination. A well-controlled small-scale incinerator was used for the experiments in the core references of this review. These articles report the investigation of dioxin formation from the combustion of various waste-simulated samples, including different kinds of paper, various kinds of wood, fallen leaves, food samples, polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyvinylidene chloride, polyethylene tetraphthalate (PET), and various kinds of plastic products. These samples were also incinerated with inorganic chlorides (NaCl, KCl, CuCI2, MgCl2, MnCl2, FeCl2, CoCl2, fly ash, and seawater) or organic chlorides (PVC, chlordane, and pentachlorophenol) to investigate the role of chlorine content and/or the presence of different metals in dioxin formation. Some samples, such as newspapers, were burned after they were impregnated with NaCl or PVC, as well as being cocombusted with chlorides. The roles of incineration conditions, including chamber temperatures, O2 concentrations, and CO concentrations, in dioxin formation were also investigated. Dioxins (PCDDs, PCDFs, and coplanar-PCBs) formed in the exhaust gases from a controlled small-scale incinerator, where experimental waste

  17. Package Formats for Preserved Digital Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zierau, Eld

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the best suitable package formats for long term digital preservation. The choice of a package format for preservation is crucial for future access, thus a thorough analysis of choice is important. The investigation presented here covers setting up...... requirements for package formats used for long term preserved digital material, and using these requirements as the basis for analysing a range of package formats. The result of the concrete investigation is that the WARC format is the package format best suited for the listed requirements. Fulfilling the...

  18. DIKE FORMATION WITH SUBMERGED VANE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Umesh P.GUPTA; C.S.P.OJHA; Nayan SHARMA

    2006-01-01

    Submerged vanes are submerged foils constructed in a river at an angle of attack to induce horizontal circulation in the downstream flow. The initial height of vanes is 0.2 - 0.4 times the local water depth (d) at the design stage. Its length expressed as a multiple of the height to length ratio (H/L) normally is 0.25 to 0.5. With the use of a submerged vane in straight channels, dikes (heaps of sediment) were formed downstream. At an optimal angle of attack of 40o and at a Froude number of 0.25, the formation of the dike starts at some distance from the trailing edge of the rectangular and trapezoidal submerged vanes with a collar. A significant scour hole results at the trailing edge of a vane with a collar. A typical dike formed along the vane on the suction side with a symmetric bell-shaped profile. The dike formation phenomenon triggered by a vane close to the bank-line at a flow with a relatively higher Froude number, such as 0.25, does not seem to follow a straight alignment, but has a sort of curvilinear shape bent towards the suction side. The dike formation process for a flow with a smaller Froude number, such as 0.13, is observed to not be appreciable. With the same installation height of H, a vane without a collar was dislodged by the flow at a Froude number of 0.25, whereas it was stable at a Froude number of 0.13.

  19. Relativistic jets and star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicknell, Geoffrey Vincent; Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Wagner, Alex; Slatyer Sutherland, Ralph

    2015-08-01

    We are conducting simulations of jets interacting with molecular and atomic gas on scales of a few kpc in forming galaxies. Competing processes, such as the dispersion of gas in the galaxy and star formation in the high-pressure environment determine whether positive or negative feedback predominates. We shall present our new simulations including an assessment of these different effects. Our simulations also predict the velocity and velocity dispersion of atomic and molecular gas in galaxies, which are undergoing interaction with relativistic jets. These results are of interest to radio and optical spectral imaging observations of galaxies undergoing feedback.

  20. Dark Matter and Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Primack, Joel R

    2009-01-01

    The four lectures that I gave in the XIII Ciclo de Cursos Especiais at the National Observatory of Brazil in Rio in October 2008 were (1) a brief history of dark matter and structure formation in a LambdaCDM universe; (2) challenges to LambdaCDM on small scales: satellites, cusps, and disks; (3) data on galaxy evolution and clustering compared with simulations; and (4) semi-analytic models. These lectures, themselves summaries of much work by many people, are summarized here briefly.

  1. Quality guidance and quality formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Carsten Stig; Juhl, Hans Jørn; Kristensen, Kai;

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an extension of the quality guidance model of Steenkamp and van Trijp that includes consumer quality formation processes. Quality expectations and quality experiences are seen as antecedents of perceived overall product quality conceptual model is applied using LISREL to a data...... set on Danish butter cookies. Five plausible models of the relation between expectation, experience and perceived product quality are estimated. Finally one model is selected on the basis of three criteria: chi-square, RMSEA and AIC: The results show a model where expectations are indirectly related...... to perceived quality through experience. Udgivelsesdato: APR...

  2. Biofilm formation and microbial corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, R.; Porcella, D.

    1992-07-01

    Biofilms-colonies of microorganisms growing on surfaces - can greatly accelerate the corrosion rates of metals and alloys in utility water systems. Fundamental EPRI research is showing how mechanisms of biofilm formation, interactions between bacterial species, and metabolic activities control such biofilm properties as corrosive potential This research is identifying methods to control biofilm development and prevent microbially influenced corrosion. The results should also apply to the control of other processes involving biological consortia, including the bioremediation of contaminated groundwater and soil and the biodesulfurization of coal.

  3. Multilevel Modulation formats for Optical Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Bevensee

    2008-01-01

    This thesis studies the use of multilevel modulation formats for optical communication systems. Multilevel modulation is an attractive method of increasing the spectral efficiency of optical communication systems. Various modulation formats employing phase modulation, amplitude modulation or a...

  4. Molecular mechanism of bone formation and regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira Yamaguchi

    2008-01-01

    @@ Bone formation and regeneration are mediated by the coordinate action of various factors. Among these, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and runt-related gene 2 (Runx2) play crucial roles in bone formation.

  5. The Current Status of Galaxy Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Silk, Joe; Mamon, Gary A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding galaxy formation is one of the most pressing issues in cosmology. We review the current status of galaxy formation from both an observational and a theoretical perspective, and summarise the prospects for future advances.

  6. On the modelling of river delta formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geleynse, N.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents approaches to the modelling of river delta formation. In particular, it provides results of numerical stratigraphic-morphodynamic modelling of river delta formation under various environmental forcings.

  7. Negative ion formation processes: A general review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal negative ion formation processes will be briefly reviewed. Primary emphasis will be placed on the more efficient and universal processes of charge transfer and secondary ion formation through non-thermodynamic surface ionization. 86 refs., 20 figs

  8. FORMATE-BASED FLUIDS: FORMULATION AND APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Formate-based fluids has been successfully used in over hunders HPHT well operations since they introduced in field practice. They have many advantages when compared with conventional HPHT drilling and completion fluids such as: minimal formation damage, maintenance of additve properties at high temperatures, reduced hydraulic flow resistance, low potential for differential sticking, naturally lubricating, very low corrosion rates, biodegradable and pose little risk to the environment etc. Formate-based fluids can be applied during deep slim hole drilling, shale drilling, reservoir drilling, salt and gas hydrate formations drilling. The laboratory research was carried out to evaluate the rheological behavior of formate-based fluids as a function of temperature. Formate-based fluids were formulated using potassium formate brine, xanthan polymer, PAC, starch and calcium carbonate. Experimental results show that potassium formate improves the thermal stability of polymers.

  9. The Epoch of Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Baugh, C M; Frenk, C S; Lacey, C

    1997-01-01

    We use a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation in hierarchical clustering theories to interpret recent data on galaxy formation and evolution, focussing primarily on the recently discovered population of Lyman-break galaxies at z galaxy catalogues subject to identical selection criteria to those applied to the real data. We find that the expected number of Lyman-break galaxies is very sensitive to the assumed stellar initial mass function and to the normalization of the primordial power spectrum. For reasonable choices of these and other model parameters, it is possible to reproduce the observed abundance of Lyman-break galaxies in CDM models with Ømega_0=1 and with Ømega_0<1. The Lyman break galaxies generally form from rare peaks at high redshift and, as a result, their spatial distribution is strongly biased, with a typical bias parameter, b\\simeq 4, and a comoving correlation length, r_0\\simeq 4 \\mpc. In combination with data at lower redshifts, the Lyman-break galaxies can be used to trace the cos...

  10. Simulations for terrestrial planets formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,the formation of terrestrial planets in the late stage of planetary formation is investigated using the two-planet model.At that time,the protostar formed for about 3 Ma and the gas disk dissipated.In the model,the perturbations from Jupiter and Saturn are considered.Variations of the mass of outer planet,and the initial eccentricities and inclinations of embryos and planetesimals are also considered.Our results show that,terrestrial planets are formed in 50 Ma,and the accretion rate is about 60%-80%.In each simulation,3-4 terrestrial planets are formed inside"Jupiter"with masses of 0.15 -3.6M⊕.In the 0.5-4 AU,when the eccentricities of planetesimals are excited,planetesimals are able to accrete material from wide radial direction.The plenty of water material of the terrestrial planet in the Habitable Zone may be transferred from the farther places by this mechanism.Accretion could also happen a few times between two major planets only if the outer planet has a moderate mass and the small terrestrial planet could survive at some resonances over time scale of 10 8 a.In one of our simulations,commensurability of the orbital periods of planets is very common.Moreover,a librating-circulating 3:2 configuration of mean motion resonance is found.

  11. Simulations for terrestrial planets formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Niu; JI JiangHui

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the formation of terrestrial planets in the late stage of planetary formation is Investigated using the two-planet model. At that time, the protostar formed for about 3 Ma and the gas disk dissipated. In the model, the perturbations from Jupiter and Saturn are considered. Variations of the mass of outer planet, and the initial eccentricities and inclinations of embryos and planetesimals are also considered. Our results show that, terrestrial planets are formed in 50 Ma, and the accretion rate is about 60%-80%. In each simulation, 3-4 terrestrial planets are formed inside "Jupiter" with masses of 0.15-3.6 M(⊙). In the 0.5-4 AU, when the eccentricities of planetesimals are excited, planetesimals are able to accrete material from wide radial direction. The plenty of water material of the terrestrial planet in the Habitable Zone may be transferred from the farther places by this mechanism. Accretion could also happen a few times between two major planets only if the outer planet has a moderate mass and the small terrestrial planet could survive at some resonances over time scale of 108a. In one of our simulations, commensurability of the orbital periods of planets is very common. Moreover, a librating-circulating 3:2 configuration of mean motion resonance is found.

  12. Formation of dendritic metallic nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjan, Nitesh; Mertig, Michael [Institute for Materials Science, Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, Dresden University of Technology, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Vinzelberg, Hartmut [IFW Dresden, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Recently, we reported an electrical-field-controlled growth process for the directed bottom-up assembly of one-dimensional palladium nanowires between micro-fabricated electrodes. The wires, grown from an aqueous palladium salt solution by dielectrophoresis, had a thickness of only 5-10 nm and a length of up to several micrometers. The growth process was found to depend largely on the deposition conditions like the strength and the frequency of the applied AC field and the concentration of the metal salt solution. Here, we report the formation of thin, but straight and dendritic metallic nanowires, obtained in the low-frequency regime. The morphology of the wires was characterized by scanning force microscopy (SFM), scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. SFM investigations revealed that the palladium nanowires grown over the glass and silicon substrates have a typical thickness of about 25 nm. Room temperature I-V measurements show them to be Ohmic in nature with a resistance of about 80 kOhm. Low-temperature measurements show the phenomenon of zero bias anomaly. The investigated growth method is capable of controllable in-place formation of complex circuit patterns for future nanoelectronics.

  13. Characteristic Scales in Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Dekel, A

    2004-01-01

    Recent data, e.g. from SDSS and 2dF, reveal a robust bi-modality in the distribution of galaxy properties, with a characteristic transition scale at stellar mass M_*~3x10^{10} Msun (near L_*), corresponding to virial velocity V~100 km/s. Smaller galaxies tend to be blue disks of young populations. They define a "fundamental line" of decreasing surface brightness, metallicity and velocity with decreasing M_*, which extends to the smallest dwarf galaxies. Galaxies above the critical scale are dominated by red spheroids of old populations, with roughly constant high surface brightens and metallicity, and they tend to host AGNs. A minimum in the virial M/L is obtained at the same magic scale. This bi-modality can be the combined imprint of several different physical processes. On smaller scales, disks are built by cold flows, and supernova feedback is effective in regulating star formation. On larger scales, the infalling gas is heated by a virial shock and star formation can be suppressed by AGN feedback. Anothe...

  14. Bar Formation from Galaxy Flybys

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Meagan; Sinha, Manodeep

    2014-01-01

    Recently, both simulations and observations have revealed that flybys - fast, one-time interactions between two galaxy halos - are surprisingly common, nearing/comparable to galaxy mergers. Since these are rapid, transient events with the closest approach well outside the galaxy disk, it is unclear if flybys can transform the galaxy in a lasting way. We conduct collisionless N-body simulations of three co-planer flyby interactions between pure-disk galaxies to take a first look at the effects flybys have on disk structure, with particular focus on stellar bar formation. We find that some flybys are capable of inciting a bar with bars forming in both galaxies during our 1:1 interaction and in the secondary during our 10:1 interaction. The bars formed have ellipticities >0.5, sizes on the order of the host disk's scale length, and persist to the end of our simulations, ~5 Gyr after pericenter. The ability of flybys to incite bar formation implies that many processes associated with secular bar evolution may be ...

  15. The Black Hole Formation Probability

    CERN Document Server

    Clausen, Drew; Ott, Christian D

    2014-01-01

    A longstanding question in stellar evolution is which massive stars produce black holes (BHs) rather than neutron stars (NSs) upon death. It has been common practice to assume that a given zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass star (and perhaps a given metallicity) simply produces either an NS or a BH, but this fails to account for a myriad of other variables that may effect this outcome, such as spin, binarity, or even stochastic differences in the stellar structure near core collapse. We argue that instead a probabilistic description of NS versus BH formation may be better suited to account for the current uncertainties in understanding how massive stars die. Using the observed BH mass distribution from Galactic X-ray binaries, we derive the probability that a star will make a BH as a function of its ZAMS mass, $P_{\\rm BH}(M_{\\rm ZAMS})$. We explore possible biases in the observed BH mass distribution and find that this sample is best suited for studying BH formation in stars with ZAMS masses in the range $12-...

  16. Tube Formation in Nanoscale Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chenglin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The formation of tubular nanostructures normally requires layered, anisotropic, or pseudo-layered crystal structures, while inorganic compounds typically do not possess such structures, inorganic nanotubes thus have been a hot topic in the past decade. In this article, we review recent research activities on nanotubes fabrication and focus on three novel synthetic strategies for generating nanotubes from inorganic materials that do not have a layered structure. Specifically, thermal oxidation method based on gas–solid reaction to porous CuO nanotubes has been successfully established, semiconductor ZnS and Nb2O5nanotubes have been prepared by employing sacrificial template strategy based on liquid–solid reaction, and an in situ template method has been developed for the preparation of ZnO taper tubes through a chemical etching reaction. We have described the nanotube formation processes and illustrated the detailed key factors during their growth. The proposed mechanisms are presented for nanotube fabrication and the important pioneering studies are discussed on the rational design and fabrication of functional materials with tubular structures. It is the intention of this contribution to provide a brief account of these research activities.

  17. The Formation of Very Massive Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Krumholz, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter I review theoretical models for the formation of very massive stars. After a brief overview of some relevant observations, I spend the bulk of the chapter describing two possible routes to the formation of very massive stars: formation via gas accretion, and formation via collisions between smaller stars. For direct accretion, I discuss the problems of how interstellar gas may be prevented from fragmenting so that it is available for incorporation into a single very massive st...

  18. Towards the Rosetta Stone of planet formation

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt T.O.B.; Roell T.; Raetz St.; Pribulla T.; Moualla M.; Marka C.; Kramm U.; Hohle M.; Ginski Ch.; Fiedler S.; Eisenbeiss T.; Berndt A.; Adam Ch.; Mugrauer M.; Errmann R.

    2011-01-01

    Transiting exoplanets (TEPs) observed just about 10 Myrs after formation of their host systems may serve as the Rosetta Stone for planet formation theories. They would give strong constraints on several aspects of planet formation, e.g. time-scales (planet formation would then be possible within 10 Myrs), the radius of the planet could indicate whether planets form by gravitational collapse (being larger when young) or accretion growth (being smaller when young). We present a survey, the main...

  19. Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-06-11

    A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

  20. Formation of embryoid bodies using dielectrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, Sneha; Sebastian, Anil; Forrester, Lesley M; Markx, Gerard H

    2012-01-01

    Embryoid body (EB) formation forms an important step in embryonic stem cell differentiation invivo. In murine embryonic stem cell (mESC) cultures EB formation is inhibited by the inclusion of leukaemic inhibitory factor (LIF) in the medium. Assembly of mESCs into aggregates by positive dielectrophoresis (DEP) in high field regions between interdigitated oppositely castellated electrodes was found to initiate EB formation. Embryoid body formation in aggregates formed with DEP occurred at a mor...

  1. Structure Formation in Acid Milk Gels

    OpenAIRE

    Heertje, I.; Visser, J.; Smits, P

    1985-01-01

    The structure formation in acid milk gels is influenced by many factors such as heat, salt system, pH, culture and thickening agents. Understanding of the mechanism of structure formation is important in order to be able to influence the final texture of these products. In the present study the network formation in acid milk gels during acidification is monitored by freeze-fracture electron microscopy. Network formation appears to be a much more complex process than just an aggregation of ...

  2. cDNA, genomic sequence cloning and overexpression of troponin C type ( TNNC1 ) gene of the giant panda and the black bear%大熊猫和亚洲黑熊TNNC1基因的克隆、表达与序列分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯怡铃; 丁祥; 侯万儒

    2012-01-01

    慢肌肌钙蛋白C (Troponin C type 1,TNNC1)具有高度保守性,调控骨骼肌慢肌和心肌的收缩,影响肌蛋白的生成,从而可能导致动物肌肉的生长、进化和功能的差异.本研究以大熊猫和亚洲黑熊骨骼肌为材料,提取总RNA和基因组DNA,运用RT-PCR和Touch-down PCR分别扩增出TNNC1基因的cDNA序列和结构基因序列,并且构建了含有TNNC1 cDNA的重组表达载体,转化进入E.coli BL21进行超表达研究.结果表明大熊猫TNNC1基因的cDNA片段长602 bp,包含一个编码161个氨基酸的开放阅读框,其结构基因全长2 831 bp,包含6个外显子和5个内含子.亚洲黑熊TNNC1基因的cDNA片段长486 bp,亦包含一个编码161个氨基酸的开放阅读框,其结构基因全长2 758 bp,同样包含6个外显子和5个内含子.该两个物种的TNNC1基因与已报道的13种动物的TNNC1基因具有很高的相似性.拓扑预测表明,大熊猫和亚洲黑熊TNNC1蛋白有1个蛋白激酶C磷酸化位点,5个酪蛋白激酶Ⅱ磷酸化位点,1个N-豆蔻酰化位点,3个EF手性钙结合域及1个N-糖基化位点.将TNNC1基因在大肠杆菌中表达发现TNNC1蛋白与氮端多聚组氨酸标签蛋白(His6)融合成大小为23.5kD左右的多肽,这与预期结果相一致.本研究结果为进一步深入探讨大熊猫和亚洲黑熊TNNC1基因及蛋白的结构、功能和进化关系提供资料.%Troponin C type 1 (TNNCl) regulates the contraction of slow-twitch skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle, which may lead to differences in animal muscle growth, evolution, and function. In this study, the genomic sequences and cDNA of the TNNC1 gene of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and the black bear ( Ursus thibetanus) were cloned successfully using RT-PCR. The TNNCl gene length of cDNA fragment of the giant panda contains an open reading frame of 486 bp encoding 161 amino acids and the length of the genomic sequence is 2 831 bp, contains six exons and five introns. Cloned

  3. Supermassive Black Holes and Galaxy Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Silk, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    The formation of supermassive black holes (SMBH) is intimately related to galaxy formation, although precisely how remains a mystery. I speculate that formation of, and feedback from, SMBH may alleviate problems that have arisen in our understanding of the cores of dark halos of galaxies.

  4. Diet History Questionnaire II: Size Formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two serving size formats are used on the NCI versions of the DHQ as shown below. Format 1 is used for nearly all serving size questions. Format 2 is used only in special cases, where 'never' is allowed as a response.

  5. Teacher Candidates’ (Pedagogical Formation Students’) Communication Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Süleyman Göksoy

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify pedagogical formation students’ (teacher candidates’) communication skills based on their perceptions. The study sought answers to the following research question: What are the perceptions of pedagogical formation students (teacher candidates) related to their communication skills? Assessment of pedagogical formation students’ (teacher candidates’) perceptions regarding their communication skills was undertaken through qualitativ...

  6. ENDF/B-5 formats manual 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ENDF-5 Format, originally the format of the US Evaluated Nuclear Data File ENDF/B-5, was internationally recommended for the computer storage, processing and exchange of evaluated neutron nuclear data. The present document contains the original Formats Manual of 1979, updated with revisions of Nov. 1983. (author)

  7. String Formatting Considered Harmful for Novice Programmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michael C.; Jadud, Matthew C.; Rodrigo, Ma. Mercedes T.

    2010-01-01

    In Java, "System.out.printf" and "String.format" consume a specialised kind of string commonly known as a format string. In our study of first-year students at the Ateneo de Manila University, we discovered that format strings present a substantial challenge for novice programmers. Focusing on their first laboratory we found that 8% of all the…

  8. Successful Student Writing through Formative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Harry Grover

    2010-01-01

    Use formative assessment to dramatically improve your students' writing. In "Successful Student Writing Through Formative Assessment", educator and international speaker Harry G. Tuttle shows you how to guide middle and high school students through the prewriting, writing, and revision processes using formative assessment techniques that work.…

  9. Formative Assessment: Responding to Your Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Harry Grover

    2009-01-01

    This "how-to" book on formative assessment is filled with practical suggestions for teachers who want to use formative assessment in their classrooms. With practical strategies, tools, and examples for teachers of all subjects and grade levels, this book shows you how to use formative assessment to promote successful student learning. Topics…

  10. Formative Assessment: Guidance for Early Childhood Policymakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley-Ayers, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    This policy report provides a guide and framework to early childhood policymakers considering formative assessment. The report defines formative assessment and outlines its process and application in the context of early childhood. The substance of this document is the issues for consideration in the implementation of the formative assessment…

  11. Formative Assessment: Policy, Perspectives and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Proponents of formative assessment (FA) assert that students develop a deeper understanding of their learning when the essential components of formative feedback and cultural responsiveness are effectively incorporated as central features of the formative assessment process. Even with growing international agreement among the research community…

  12. Restucturing the Project Work Format

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The chapter is based on an evaluation of a pedagogical experiment at Roskilde University, the Antology Experiment. The objective of the experiment was to develop and expand the framework for project work through the production of anthologies compiled collectively by a number of project groups. The...... novel aspects of the Anthology Experiment were most notably its magnitude and complexity. In this experiment the groups were totalling some 50 students who were working together. The experiment used a well-known publishing format from research, namely the anthology form, which usually focuses on a...... specific research topic and includes contributions from various researchers. In the Anthology Experiment, the project groups could be viewed as ‘research units’ that produce the contributions to the anthology. The complexity of the experiment offered challenges, both for students and supervisors. The...

  13. The dynamics of fragment formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate that in the Quantum Molecular Dynamics model, dynamical correlations can result in the production rate for final state nucleon clusters (and hence composite fragments) being higher than would be expected if statistics and the available phase space were dominant in determining composite formation. An intranuclear cascade or a Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck model, combined with a statistical approach in the late stage of the collision to determine composites, provides an equivalent description only under limited conditions of centrality and beam energy. We use data on participant fragment production in Au + Au collisions in the Bevalac's BOS time projection chamber to map out the parameter space where statistical clustering provides a good description. In particular, we investigate momentum-space densities of fragments up to 4He as a function of fragment transverse momentum, azimuth relative to the reaction plane, rapidity, multiplicity and beam energy

  14. The formation of postcolonial theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazare S. Rukundwa

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to outline certain options and struggles, which gave rise to postcolonial theory. The author deals with various experiences of anti-slavery and anti-colonial movements in Western and tricontinental countries, comprising the development of postcolonial theory. It is argued that postcolonial theory provides a means of defiance by which any exploitative and discriminative practices, regardless of time and space, can be challenged. The article consists of a section in which terminology is clarified, secondly a discussion of the elements that functioned as justification of the formation of postcolonial theory, namely a humanitarian, economic, political, and religious justification. The role of feminism and anti-colonialism is discussed in the third instance, followed by a reflection on the concept “hybrid identities”.

  15. Systems genetics of wood formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrachi, Eshchar; Myburg, Alexander A

    2016-04-01

    In woody plants, xylogenesis is an exceptionally strong carbon sink requiring robust transcriptional control and dynamic coordination of cellular and metabolic processes directing carbon allocation and partitioning into secondary cell wall biosynthesis. As a biological process, wood formation is an excellent candidate for systems modeling due to the strong correlation patterns and interconnectedness observed for transcriptional and metabolic component traits contributing to complex phenotypes such as cell wall chemistry and ultrastructure. Genetic variation in undomesticated tree populations provides abundant perturbation of systems components, adding another dimension to plant systems biology (besides spatial and temporal variation). High-throughput analysis of molecular component traits in adult trees has provided the first insights into the systems genetics of wood, an important renewable feedstock for biomaterials and bioenergy. PMID:26943939

  16. Formation of ion damage tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombrello, T. A.; Wie, C. R.; Itoh, N.; Nakayama, T.

    1984-01-01

    A new model is proposed to explain both localized damage regions and preferential etching of damage tracks caused by the passage of energetic ions in insulators. The formation of each region of extended defects is initiated by the Auger decay of a vacancy produced in an inner electronic shell of an atom of the insulator by an incident ion. This decay produces an intense source of ionization within a small volume around the decaying atom, which causes decomposition of the material in a manner similar to that observed in pulsed laser irradiation. The resulting chemical or crystalline modification of the material is the latent track, which can be preferentially etched due to its changed structure.

  17. Butanol formation from gaseous substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürre, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Mostly, butanol is formed as a product by saccharolytic anaerobes, employing the so-called ABE fermentation (for acetone-butanol-ethanol). However, this alcohol can also be produced from gaseous substrates such as syn(thesis) gas (major components are carbon monoxide and hydrogen) by autotrophic acetogens. In view of economic considerations, a biotechnological process based on cheap and abundant gases such as CO and CO2 as a carbon source is preferable to more expensive sugar or starch fermentation. In addition, any conflict for use of substrates that can also serve as human nutrition is avoided. Natural formation of butanol has been found with, e.g. Clostridium carboxidivorans, while metabolic engineering for butanol production was successful using, e.g. C. ljungdahlii. Production of butanol from CO2 under photoautotrophic conditions was also possible by recombinant DNA construction of a respective cyanobacterial Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 strain. PMID:26903012

  18. Two-Phase Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, M; Granato, G L

    2009-01-01

    We propose and test a scenario for the assembly and evolution of luminous matter in galaxies which substantially differs from that adopted by other semianalytic models. As for the dark matter (DM), we follow the detailed evolution of halos within the canonical LCDM cosmology using standard Montecarlo methods. However, when overlaying prescriptions for baryon evolution, we take into account an effect pointed out in the past few years by a number of studies mostly based on intensive N-body simulations, namely that typical halo growth occurs in two phases: an early, fast collapse phase featuring several major merger events, followed by a late, quiescent accretion onto the halo outskirts. We propose that the two modes of halo growth drive two distinct modes for the evolution of baryonic matter, favoring the development of the spheroidal and disc components of galaxies, respectively. We test this idea using the semianalytic technique. Our galaxy formation model envisages an early coevolution of spheroids and the c...

  19. Tree Formation Using Coordinate Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Choudhary

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we are introducing a new method of tree formation, we propose a coordinate based method by which we can store and access tree structures. As we know in NLP, parsing is the most important module. The output of this module is generally parsed trees. Currently, TAG (Tree Adjoining Grammar is widely used grammar due to its linguistic and formal nature. It is simply tree generating system. The unit structure used in TAG is structured trees. So we used our new method to store trees where we worked on English to Hindi language. We worked on different sentences from English to Hindi, our method is the easiest way to manipulate tree. We have implemented within small corpus and for finite number of structures and further can be extended in future.

  20. Simulations of Nuclear Cluster formation

    CERN Document Server

    Miocchi, P

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented about a fully self-consistent N-body simulation of a sample of four massive globular clusters in close interaction within the central region of a galaxy. The N-body representation (with N=1.5x10^6 particles in total) of both the clusters and the galaxy allows to include in a natural and self-consistent way dynamical friction and tidal interactions. The results confirm the decay and merging of globulars as a viable scenario for the formation/accretion of compact nuclear clusters. Specifically: i) the frictional orbital decay is about 2 times faster than that predicted by the generalized Chandrasekhar formula; ii) the progenitor clusters merge in less than 20 galactic core-crossing time; iii) the NC configuration keeps a quasi-stable state at least within 70 galactic core-crossing times.

  1. Structure formation from supersymmetric inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently a supersymmetric inflationary potential was proposed by Ross and Sarkar, (OUTP-95-15p) which when normalised to COBE requires the inflationary scale to be about 3x1014 GeV, implying a reheating temperature of the order of 105 GeV. This is below the upper limit derived from considerations on the thermal generation of unstable gravitinos and their effects on primordial nucleosynthesis, but high enough to allow baryogenesis after inflation. In this project we investigate the consequences for structure formation given by the proposed potential. We calculate the form of the power spectrum normalized to COBE and obtain the theoretical predictions for observations of the distribution of galaxies and clusters of galaxies and the local streaming motion of galaxies. We find agreement with observations. (author)

  2. Chaos in Terrestrial Planet Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, Volker; Moore, Ben; Stadel, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial planets are thought to be the result of a vast number of gravitational interactions and collisions between smaller bodies. We use numerical simulations to show that practically identical initial conditions result in a wide array of final planetary configurations. This highly chaotic behaviour questions the predictability of different scenarios for the formation and evolution of our solar system and planetary systems in general. However, multiple realisations of the same initial conditions can be used to predict certain global statistics. We present two sets of numerical experiments that quantify this behaviour. Firstly, we demonstrate that simulations with slightly displaced particles are completely divergent after ~500 years, irrespective of initial displacement, particle number, and code accuracy. If a single planetesimal is moved by less than one millimetre, then a different set of planets results -- this timescale for chaotic divergence decreases with increasing particle number. Secondly, we s...

  3. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria can attach to any surface in contact with water and proliferate into complex communities enclosed in an adhesive matrix, these communities are called biofilms. The matrix makes the biofilm difficult to remove by physical means, and bacteria in biofilm can survive treatment with many...... antibiotics, disinfectants and cleaning agents. Biofilms are therefore very difficult to eradicate, and an attractive approach to limit biofilm formation is to reduce bacterial adhesion. In this thesis it was shown that lowering the surface roughness had a greater effect on bacterial retention compared to...... changing the surface hydrophobicity. The influence of surface topography in the <100 nanometer range was less clear and its effect on bacterial retention depended on the strain used in the experiment. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is an the ubiquitous biomolecule of great importance for bacterial adhesion. The...

  4. Energy conditions and galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Visser, M

    1997-01-01

    This note summarizes a model-independent analysis of the age of the universe problem that trades off precision in favour of robustness: The energy conditions of Einstein gravity are designed to extract as much information as possible from classical general relativity without specifying a particular equation of state. This is particularly useful in a cosmological setting, where the equation of state for the cosmological fluid is extremely uncertain. The strong energy condition (SEC) provides a simple and robust bound on the behaviour of the look-back time as a function of red-shift. Observation suggests that the SEC may be violated sometime between the epoch of galaxy formation and the present.

  5. New Office Software course format

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Always interested to anticipate your training needs, the Technical Training service is pleased to propose two new Office Software course formats : “Focus on... ” : On a monthly basis we will propose a theme such as “Sharepoint Collaboration Workspace” or “Word 2007” or “charts” etc. You will have to send us in advance your questions regarding the proposed topic and register for the course through our Training Catalogue. During the session, our trainer will answer all the questions received and participants will increase their knowledge thanks to the solutions discussed for everyone. The course will last two hours, from 09h00 to 11h00 - with open questions on the proposed topic at the end. “Office software Individual coaching”: If one or several particular topics cause you sleepless nights, you can get the help of our trainer who will come to your workplace for a multiple of 1-hour slots . All fields ...

  6. Combuster. [low nitrogen oxide formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, R. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A combuster is provided for utilizing a combustible mixture containing fuel and air, to heat a load fluid such as water or air, in a manner that minimizes the formation of nitrogen oxide. The combustible mixture passes through a small diameter tube where the mixture is heated to its combustion temperature, while the load fluid flows past the outside of the tube to receive heat. The tube is of a diameter small enough that the combustible mixture cannot form a flame, and yet is not subject to wall quench, so that combustion occurs, but at a temperature less than under free flame conditions. Most of the heat required for heating the combustible mixture to its combustion temperature, is obtained from heat flow through the walls of the pipe to the mixture.

  7. Mud Volcanoes Formation And Occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guliyev, I. S.

    2007-12-01

    Mud volcanoes are natural phenomena, which occur throughout the globe. They are found at a greater or lesser scale in Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Georgia, on the Kerch and Taman peninsulas, on Sakhalin Island, in West Kuban, Italy, Romania, Iran, Pakistan, India, Burma, China, Japan, Indonesia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Mexico, Colombia, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela and Ecuador. Mud volcanoes are most well-developed in Eastern Azerbaijan, where more than 30% of all the volcanoes in the world are concentrated. More than 300 mud volcanoes have already been recognized here onshore or offshore, 220 of which lie within an area of 16,000 km2. Many of these mud volcanoes are particularly large (up to 400 m high). The volcanoes of the South Caspian form permanent or temporary islands, and numerous submarine banks. Many hypotheses have been developed regarding the origin of mud volcanoes. Some of those hypotheses will be examined in the present paper. Model of spontaneous excitation-decompaction (proposed by Ivanov and Guliev, 1988, 2002). It is supposed that one of major factors of the movement of sedimentary masses and formation of hydrocarbon deposits are phase transitions in sedimentary basin. At phase transitions there are abnormal changes of physical and chemical parameters of rocks. Abnormal (high and negative) pressure takes place. This process is called as excitation of the underground environment with periodicity from several tens to several hundreds, or thousand years. The relationship between mud volcanism and the generation of hydrocarbons, particularly methane, is considered to be a critical factor in mud volcano formation. At high flow rates the gas and sediment develops into a pseudo-liquid state and as flow increases the mass reaches the "so-called hover velocity" where mass transport begins. The mass of fluid moves as a quasi-uniform viscous mass through the sediment pile in a piston like manner until expelled from the surface as a "catastrophic eruption

  8. Foam formation in low gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessling, Francis C.; Mcmanus, Samuel P.; Matthews, John; Patel, Darayas

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus that produced the first polyurethane foam in low gravity has been described. The chemicals were mixed together in an apparatus designed for operation in low gravity. Mixing was by means of stirring the chemicals with an electric motor and propeller in a mixing chamber. The apparatus was flown on Consort 1, the first low-gravity materials payload launched by a commercial rocket launch team. The sounding rocket flight produced over 7 min of low gravity during which a polyurethane spheroidal foam of approximately 2300 cu cm was formed. Photographs of the formation of the foam during the flight show the development of the spheroidal form. This begins as a small sphere and grows to approximately a 17-cm-diam spheroid. The apparatus will be flown again on subsequent low-gravity flights.

  9. Biofilm Formation by Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Luis R; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-06-01

    The fungus Cryptococcus neoformans possesses a polysaccharide capsule and can form biofilms on medical devices. The increasing use of ventriculoperitoneal shunts to manage intracranial hypertension associated with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis highlights the importance of investigating the biofilm-forming properties of this organism. Like other microbe-forming biofilms, C. neoformans biofilms are resistant to antimicrobial agents and host defense mechanisms, causing significant morbidity and mortality. This chapter discusses the recent advances in the understanding of cryptococcal biofilms, including the role of its polysaccharide capsule in adherence, gene expression, and quorum sensing in biofilm formation. We describe novel strategies for the prevention or eradication of cryptococcal colonization of medical prosthetic devices. Finally, we provide fresh thoughts on the diverse but interesting directions of research in this field that may result in new insights into C. neoformans biology. PMID:26185073

  10. The Formation of Lake Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Victor C

    2007-01-01

    Star patterns, reminiscent of a wide range of diffusively controlled growth forms from snowflakes to Saffman-Taylor fingers, are ubiquitous features of ice covered lakes. Despite the commonality and beauty of these ``lake stars'' the underlying physical processes that produce them have not been explained in a coherent theoretical framework. Here we describe a simple mathematical model that captures the principal features of lake-star formation; radial fingers of (relatively warm) water-rich regions grow from a central source and evolve through a competition between thermal and porous media flow effects in a saturated snow layer covering the lake. The number of star arms emerges from a stability analysis of this competition and the qualitative features of this meter-scale natural phenomena are captured in laboratory experiments.

  11. Glass formation in eutectic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have analyzed the glass forming ability around eutectic composition in terms of the competitive growth/formation of primary dendrites, eutectic and glass. It is concluded that the glass forming ability of a eutectic alloy system depends on the type of the eutectics, i.e. symmetric or asymmetric eutectic coupled zone. For the alloy systems with symmetric eutectic coupled zone, the best glass forming alloys should be at or very close to the eutectic composition. For the alloys with asymmetric eutectic coupled zone, which is associated with the irregular eutectic, the best glass forming alloys should be at off-eutectic compositions, probably towards the side of the faceted phase with a high entropy in the phase diagram. (orig.)

  12. The Physics of Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Larson, R B

    2003-01-01

    Our current understanding of the physical processes of star formation is reviewed, with emphasis on processes occurring in molecular clouds like those observed nearby. The dense cores of these clouds are predicted to undergo gravitational collapse characterized by the runaway growth of a central density peak that evolves toward a singularity. As long as collapse can occur, rotation and magnetic fields do not change this qualitative behavior. The result is that a very small embryonic star or protostar forms and grows by accretion at a rate that is initially high but declines with time as the surrounding envelope is depleted. Rotation causes some of the remaining matter to form a disk around the protostar, but accretion from protostellar disks is not well understood and may be variable. Most, and possibly all, stars form in binary or multiple systems in which gravitational interactions can play a role in redistributing angular momentum and driving episodes of disk accretion. Variable accretion may account for s...

  13. Positronium formation in condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AMOC (age-momentum correlation) studies of the slowing-down of positronium in condensed matter have demonstrated that positronium formation does not require special sites (e.g., 'free volumes') and diffusion of thermalized e+ to these sites. The differences in the energies E0 at which ps becomes 'permanent' (i.e., does no longer break up into its constituents) between disordered (e.g., organic liquids) and highly ordered (e.g., rare-gas crystals) Ps-formers are explained by the different character of the forces acting on the constituents. It is proposed that information on the break-up may be obtained from the relaxation of the positron spin polarization and that very long slowing-down times may be investigated by ACAR-based AMOC measurements. (orig.)

  14. Field experiments in salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field experiments in salt formations started as early as 1965 with Project Salt Vault in the Lyons Mine, Kansas, U.S.A., and with the purchase of the Asse salt mine by the German Federal Government. Underground tests concentrated on the heat dissipation around buried high-level radioactive wastes and the geomechanical consequences of their disposal. Near-field investigations cover the properties of water and gas release, radiolysis and corrosion. Further objectives of field experiments are the development and underground testing of a handling system for high-level wastes. The performance of an underground test disposal for such wastes is not only considered to be necessary for technical and scientific reasons but also for improving public acceptance of the concept of radioactive waste disposal. (author)

  15. MDF: Magnetic Particle Imaging Data Format

    CERN Document Server

    Knopp, Tobias; Bringout, Gael; Ahlborg, Mandy; Rahmer, Jürgen; Hofmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a tomographic method to determine the spatial distribution of magnetic nanoparticles. In this document a file format for the standardized storage of MPI data is introduced. The aim of the Magnetic Particle Imaging Data Format (MDF) is to provide a coherent way of exchanging MPI data acquired with different MPI scanners worldwide. The focus of the file format is on sequence parameters, raw measurement data, calibration data, and reconstruction data. The format is based on the hierarchical document format (HDF) in version 5 (HDF5).

  16. Biomineralization: mineral formation by organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve

    2014-09-01

    Organisms form many different types of minerals, with diverse shapes and sizes. These minerals fulfill a variety of functions. Inspired by the late H A Lowenstam, Steve Weiner and Lia Addadi have addressed many questions that relate to the mechanisms by which biological organisms produce these mineral phases and how their structures relate to their functions. Addadi and Weiner have explored the manner in which macromolecules extracted from mineralized tissues can interact with some crystal planes and not others, how these macromolecules can be occluded inside the forming crystals residing preferentially on specific crystal planes, and how they can induce one polymorph of calcium carbonate and not another to nucleate. Addadi and Weiner have also identified a novel strategy used by the sea urchin to form its smooth and convoluted mineralized skeletal elements. The strategy involves the initial production by cells of a highly disordered mineral precursor phase in vesicles, and then the export of this so-called amorphous phase to the site of skeletal formation, where it crystallizes. This strategy is now known to be used by many different invertebrate phyla, as well as by vertebrates to build bones and teeth. One of the major current research aims of the Weiner--Addadi group is to understand the biomineralization pathways whereby ions are extracted from the environment, are transported and deposited inside cells within vesicles, how these disordered phases are then transferred to the site of skeletal formation, and finally how the so-called amorphous phase crystallizes. Biology has clearly evolved unique strategies for forming crystalline minerals. Despite more than 300 years of research in this field, many challenging questions still remain unanswered.

  17. Drill cuttings mount formation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Su Yean; Koh, Hock Lye

    2014-07-01

    Oil, Gas and Energy sector has been identified as an essential driving force in the Malaysian Economic Transformation Programs (ETP). Recently confirmed discovery of many offshore oil and gas deposits in Malaysian waters has ignited new confidence in this sector. However, this has also spurred intense interest on safeguarding the health and environment of coastal waters in Malaysia from adverse impact resulting from offshore oil and gas production operation. Offshore discharge of spent drilling mud and rock cuttings is the least expensive and simplest option to dispose of large volumes of drilling wastes. But this onsite offshore disposal may have adverse environmental impacts on the water column and the seabed. It may also pose occupational health hazards to the workers living in the offshore platforms. It is therefore important to model the transport and deposition of drilling mud and rock cuttings in the sea to enable proper assessment of their adverse impacts on the environment and the workers. Further, accumulation of drill particles on the seabed may impede proper operation of pipelines on the seabed. In this paper, we present an in-house application model TUNA-PT developed to cater to local oil and gas industry needs to simulate the dispersion and mount formation of drill cuttings by offshore oil and gas exploration and production platforms. Using available data on Malaysian coastal waters, simulation analyses project a pile formation on the seabed with a maximum height of about 1 m and pile radius of around 30 to 50 m. Simulated pile heights are not sensitive to the heights of release of the cuttings as the sensitivity has been mitigated by the depth of water.

  18. Uranium price formation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modern uranium industry came into existence in 1946. Until 1966, its sole customer was the Atomic Energy Commission, whose needs for U3O8 relative to industry capacity declined over the years. The development of the commercial market after 1965 coincided with a period of excess capacity and falling nominal and real prices. Gradually in 1973 and dramatically thereafter, market conditions changed and prices rose as utilities sought larger quantities of U3O8 and longer term contracts. Questions about availability of long-run supplies were raised, given the known reserve base. The response of the supply of U3O8 to incentives offered first by the AEC and later by the utilities in the context of new and developing market conventions is examined. The methodology used is microeconomic analysis, qualitatively applied to the history of price formation in the market. Because the study emphasizes the implications of the history of uranium price formation for forecasting supply response, the study presents many different kinds of data and evaluates their quality and appropriateness for forecasting. A simple, very-useful framework for analyzing the history of the market for U3O8 was developed and used to describe supply responses in selected important periods of the industry's development. It is concluded that the response of supply of U3O8 to rising prices or to expectations of demand growth has been impressively strong. The potential reserve inventory is large enough to meet the needs for nuclear power generation through the end of this century. The price necessary to induce producers to find and produce these reserves is uncertain, partly because of problems inherent in estimating long-run supply curves and partly because recent inflation has created major uncertainties about the cost of future supplies

  19. Thermal Behaviour of clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The programme carried out by ENEA to model the thermal-hydraulic-mechanical behaviour of the clay formations and to measure, in situ and in laboratory, the thermal properties of these rocks, is presented. An in situ heating experiment has been carried out in an open clay quarry in the area of Monterotondo, near Rome. The main goal of the experiment was to know the temperature field and the thermal effects caused by the high level radioactive waste disposed of in a clayey geological formation. The conclusions are as follows: - the thermal conduction codes are sufficiently accurate to forecast the temperature increases caused in the clay by the dissipation of the heat generated by high level radioactive waste; - the thermal conductivity deduced by means of the ''curve fitting'' method ranges from 0.015 to 0.017 W.cm-1.0C-1 - the temperature variation associated with the transport of clay interstitial water caused by temperature gradient is negligible. A laboratory automated method has been designed to measure the thermal conductivity and diffusivity in clay samples. A review of experimental data concerning thermomechanical effects in rocks as well as results of thermal experiments performed at ISMES on clays are presented. Negative thermal dilation has been found both in the elastic and plastic range under constant stress. Thermoplastic deformation appears ten times greater than the thermoelastic one. A mathematical model is proposed in order to simulate the above and other effects that encompass thermal-elastic-plastic-pore water pressure response of clays at high temperature and effective pressure with undrained and transient drainage conditions. Implementation of the two versions into a finite element computer code is described

  20. Format SPARQL Query Results into HTML Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Sunitha Abburu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available SPARQL is one of the powerful query language for querying semantic data. It is recognized by the W3C as a query language for RDF. As an efficient query language for RDF, it has defined several query result formats such as CSV, TSV and XML etc. These formats are not attractive, understandable and readable. The results need to be converted in an appropriate format so that user can easily understand. The above formats require additional transformations or tool support to represent the query result in user readable format. The main aim of this paper is to propose a method to build HTML report dynamically for SPARQL query results. This enables SPARQL query result display, in HTML report format easily, in an attractive understandable format without the support of any additional or external tools or transformation.

  1. Nonlocal Optical Real Image Formation Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gilson, Greyson

    2010-01-01

    A nonlocal theory of optical real image formation is developed from the basic physics associated with an optical real image formation apparatus. The theory shows how two separated illuminated object points are required for real image formation. When the distance between the points exceeds twice the wavelength of the light used two equi-amplitude plane waves propagate independently away from the object plane toward the imaging system. Quantum amplitude components with spatial frequencies that are within the passband of the imaging system pass through the imaging system. Each plane wave pair that propagates through the imaging system and ultimately arrives at the image plane contributes to real image formation. Object and image field depths are treated and found to be very different than they are ordinarily thought to be. Resolution limits related to real image formation are investigated. Reference distribution real image formation (RIF) is introduced. Real image formation with no fundamental resolution limit i...

  2. Effects of Propafenone, Amiodarone and Dilthiazem on the potassium channel of c-Type Kv1.4△N%普罗帕酮、胺碘酮、地尔硫卓对Kv1.4△N钾通道的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王智泉; 蒋学俊; 王世敏; 徐林; 王能; 张冬

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨不同类别抗心律失常药物普罗帕酮、胺碘酮和地尔硫卓对去N端Kv1.4通道(Kv1.4△N)的作用方式,以及这些作用的差异性.方法 将Kv1.4△N的mRNA注射入非洲爪蟾卵母细胞并使用双电极钳制法(two electrodes voltage clamp,TEV),运用Clampfit 9.0软件分别观察三种药物对KV1..4△N电生理特性的影响.结果 三种药物对ELvl.4△N通道的作用都具有浓度、频率和电压依赖性.在亲和力方面,propafenone的IC50最小,dilthiazem次之,amiodarone的IC50最大(P=0.031);在频率抑制性方面,propafenone组达到稳态时为对照组的41%,amiodarone为32%左右,dilthiazem为21%左右(P=0.045);在电压抑制性方面,100μMpropafenone,500μM amiodarone、350μM dilthjazem在+50 mV电压下分别能使fKv1.4△N通道电流抑制到对照组的(54.6±1.9)%,(46.3±3.5)%和(52.8±2.8)%(P=0.046).结论 三者都是fKv1.4△N通道的开放通道阻滞剂,对fKv1.4△N通道的作用和机制既有相同之处,又有不同特点,这可能是三者抗心律失常的机制之一.%Objective To study the effects of the antiarrhythmic drugs of propafenone, amiodarone and dilthiazem on c-type Kv1. 4 channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes with two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Methods Defolliculated oocytes ( stage Ⅴ - Ⅵ) had transcribed cRNAs of ferret Kv1. 4△N channels injected. The oocytes were continuously perfused with control solution or propafenone, amiodarone and dilthiazem under monitoring of software of Clampfit v 9. 0. Results All of the three drugs blocked ferret Kv1. 4△N channel in voltage-, frequency- and concentration-dependent manners. The values of IC50 (50%inhibiting concentration ) of propafenone, amiodarone and dilthiazem were ( 103.4± 2. 2 ) μ mol/L,(501.22 +5.9) μmol/L and (353.62 +9.9) μmol/L, respectively. The currents under the actions of propafenone , amiodarone and dilthiazem were decreased to 41%, 32% and 21% of control group, respectively. Propafenone

  3. Cataract formation following vitreoretinal procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng H

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hao Feng, Ron A Adelman Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and prevalence of cataract formation, progression, and extraction in patients that underwent vitreoretinal procedures and to evaluate factors that can potentially predispose patients to postoperative cataracts.Materials and methods: The medical records of consecutive patients who underwent vitreoretinal surgery at the Yale Eye Center with at least 6 months of follow-up and no prior intraocular surgery were obtained. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative data were recorded and analyzed in this retrospective observational study. The main outcome measures were defined as cataract extraction, formation, and progression after vitreoretinal procedures. The lens status of the surgical eye was recorded preoperatively and at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, 24 months, and 36 months postoperatively.Results: A total of 193 eyes of 180 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The percentages of eyes with mild lens change were 96% after 20-gauge pars plana vitrectomy (PPV, 72% after small gauge (23- and 25-gauge PPV, 38% after scleral buckle (SB, 38% after pneumatic retinopexy (PR, and 91% after PPV plus SB (PPV+SB. Posterior subcapsular and nuclear sclerotic cataracts were the most common with almost all developing within 24 months. There was no statistically significant difference (P=1.00 between the rate of cataract extraction after 20-gauge (41% and small gauge PPV (42%, but there was a statistically significant difference between PPV and non-PPV (SB, 6%; PR, 7%; P<0.001 and PPV and PPV+SB groups (69%; P=0.0063.Conclusion: Cataracts were common following PPV regardless of the gauge. SB and PR led to the lowest while PPV+SB led to the highest risk of postoperative cataracts. Keywords: cataracts, vitreoretinal surgery, vitrectomy, scleral buckle, pneumatic retinopexy

  4. Spheromak formation studies in SSPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results from the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) at LLNL, which has been built to study energy confinement in spheromak plasmas sustained for up to 2 ms by coaxial DC helicity injection. Peak toroidal currents as high as 600kA have been obtained in the 1m dia. (0.23m minor radius) device using injection currents between 200-400kA; these currents generate edge poloidal fields in the range of 0.2-0.4T. The internal field and current profiles are inferred from edge field measurements using the CORSICA code. Density and impurity control is obtained using baking, glow discharge cleansing, and titanium gettering, after which long plasma decay times (τ≥1.5ms) are observed and impurity radiation losses are reduced from ∼50% to e(0)∼120eV and ∼7%. Edge field measurements show the presence of n=1 modes during the formation phase, as has been observed in other spheromaks. This mode dies away during sustainment and decay so that edge fluctuation levels as low as 1% have been measured. These results are compared with numerical simulations using the NIMROD code. (author)

  5. Dark Energy and Structure Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the gravitational dynamics of dark energy configurations. We report on the time evolution of the dark energy field configurations as well as the time evolution of the energy density to demonstrate the gravitational collapse of dark energy field configurations. We live in a Universe which is dominated by Dark Energy. According to current estimates about 75% of the Energy Density is in the form of Dark Energy. Thus when we consider gravitational dynamics and Structure Formation we expect Dark Energy to play an important role. The most promising candidate for dark energy is the energy density of fields in curved space-time. It therefore become a pressing need to understand the gravitational dynamics of dark energy field configurations. We develop and describe the formalism to study the gravitational collapse of fields given any general potential for the fields. We apply this formalism to models of dark energy motivated by particle physics considerations. We solve the resulting evolution equations which determine the time evolution of field configurations as well as the dynamics of space-time. Our results show that gravitational collapse of dark energy field configurations occurs and must be considered in any complete picture of our universe.

  6. Dark Energy and Structure Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Anupam, E-mail: morisi@ific.uv.es [Physics Department, L.N. Mittal I.I.T, Jaipur, Rajasthan (India)

    2010-11-01

    We study the gravitational dynamics of dark energy configurations. We report on the time evolution of the dark energy field configurations as well as the time evolution of the energy density to demonstrate the gravitational collapse of dark energy field configurations. We live in a Universe which is dominated by Dark Energy. According to current estimates about 75% of the Energy Density is in the form of Dark Energy. Thus when we consider gravitational dynamics and Structure Formation we expect Dark Energy to play an important role. The most promising candidate for dark energy is the energy density of fields in curved space-time. It therefore become a pressing need to understand the gravitational dynamics of dark energy field configurations. We develop and describe the formalism to study the gravitational collapse of fields given any general potential for the fields. We apply this formalism to models of dark energy motivated by particle physics considerations. We solve the resulting evolution equations which determine the time evolution of field configurations as well as the dynamics of space-time. Our results show that gravitational collapse of dark energy field configurations occurs and must be considered in any complete picture of our universe.

  7. New Office Software course format!

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Always keen to anticipate your  training needs, the Technical Training service is pleased to propose two new Office Software course formats: “Focus on... ”:  On a monthly basis we will propose a theme such as “Sharepoint Collaboration Workspace” or “Word 2007” or “charts”, etc.  You will be invited to send us in advance your questions regarding the proposed topic and register  for the course through our Training Catalogue. During the session, our trainer will answer all the questions received and participants will increase their knowledge thanks to the solutions discussed for everyone. The course will last two hours, from 9-00 to 11-00 a.m. - with open questions on the proposed topic at the end.   “Office software Individual coaching”: If one or more specific topics are causing you sleepless nights, you can get the help of our trainer who will ...

  8. New Office Software course format!

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    Always keen to anticipate your  training needs, the Technical Training service is pleased to propose two new Office Software course formats: “Focus on... ”:  On a monthly basis we will propose a theme such as “Sharepoint Collaboration Workspace” or “Word 2007” or “charts”, etc.  You will be invited to send us in advance your questions regarding the proposed topic and register  for the course through our Training Catalogue. During the session, our trainer will answer all the questions received and participants will increase their knowledge thanks to the solutions discussed for everyone. The course will last two hours, from 9-00 to 11-00 a.m. - with open questions on the proposed topic at the end.   “Office software Individual coaching”: If one or more specific topics are causing you sleepless nights, you can get the help of our trainer who will ...

  9. Rowing sportswomen motor actions formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Bogush

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study the formation of motor action sportswomen different ages depending on the level of sportsmanship. Material and Methods: girls which are specialized in a boat-racing in age groups 13–14 years inspected, 15–16 years, 17–18 years, in every group was for 20–25 persons, in all 72 sportswomen. Motive actions were probed on the method of measuring of training effect developed by us an action, and also the functional state was determined by methods: measuring of sensorimotor reaction is on sound and light irritants, speed of current of air, exactness of implementation of the set muscular effort. Results: testing showed the dynamics of forming motive, namely technique of mastering of receptions and actions, reliability, presence of errors, efficiency of active voice of consciousness in correct implementation of motion in a biomechanics relation. Conclusions: application of this method in the process of sporting preparation will allow to define quality of mastering of technique of the proper motive actions, forming of abilities, subsequent learning and becoming of more difficult motive skills

  10. Testing Models for Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, N

    1993-01-01

    I review a number of tests of theories for structure formation. Large-scale flows and IRAS galaxies indicate a high density parameter $\\Omega \\simeq 1$, in accord with inflationary predictions, but it is not clear how this meshes with the uniformly low values obtained from virial analysis on scales $\\sim$ 1Mpc. Gravitational distortion of faint galaxies behind clusters allows one to construct maps of the mass surface density, and this should shed some light on the large vs small-scale $\\Omega$ discrepancy. Power spectrum analysis reveals too red a spectrum (compared to standard CDM) on scales $\\lambda \\sim 10-100$ $h^{-1}$Mpc, but the gaussian fluctuation hypothesis appears to be in good shape. These results suggest that the problem for CDM lies not in the very early universe --- the inflationary predictions of $\\Omega = 1$ and gaussianity both seem to be OK; furthermore, the COBE result severely restricts modifications such as tilting the primordial spectrum --- but in the assumed matter content. The power s...

  11. STAR FORMATION IN DENSE CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model of core-clump accretion with equally likely stopping describes star formation in the dense parts of clusters, where models of isolated collapsing cores may not apply. Each core accretes at a constant rate onto its protostar, while the surrounding clump gas accretes as a power of protostar mass. Short accretion flows resemble Shu accretion and make low-mass stars. Long flows resemble reduced Bondi accretion and make massive stars. Accretion stops due to environmental processes of dynamical ejection, gravitational competition, and gas dispersal by stellar feedback, independent of initial core structure. The model matches the field star initial mass function (IMF) from 0.01 to more than 10 solar masses. The core accretion rate and the mean accretion duration set the peak of the IMF, independent of the local Jeans mass. Massive protostars require the longest accretion durations, up to 0.5 Myr. The maximum protostar luminosity in a cluster indicates the mass and age of its oldest protostar. The distribution of protostar luminosities matches those in active star-forming regions if protostars have a constant birthrate but not if their births are coeval. For constant birthrate, the ratio of young stellar objects to protostars indicates the star-forming age of a cluster, typically ∼1 Myr. The protostar accretion luminosity is typically less than its steady spherical value by a factor of ∼2, consistent with models of episodic disk accretion.

  12. Collagen fibril formation during development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies with embryonic skin and bone suggested that the aminopropeptide (AP) and carboxylpropeptide (CP) of type I pro-callagen (pro-col) play a role in fibril formation. Chick leg metatarsal tendons were studied by electron microscopy. AP and CP of type I pro-col were purified from chick leg tendons; antibodies developed in rabbits and purity tested by radioimmunoassays. Antibodies were used for immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) and immunoblotting (IB). The peritendineum, consisting of thin 20-30 nm fibrils, revealed the AP of type I and type III procol. In the tendon area, collagen fibrils were arranged within small compartments and were of uniform diameter at 10d, 14d and 18d. However, beyond 21d, there was confluency of the compartments and a wide range of fibril diameters. IFM revealed fine streaks of collagen, staining with the AP of type I throughout the tendon. The CP was mainly intracellular with only a small amount present in the extracellular space. IB revealed procollagen, pN-collagen (AP+collagen) and pC-collagen, (CP+collagen) at all stages of development. Ratios of pN/pC collagen, determined by spectrophotometric scanning of autoradiographs, correlated well with the distribution of fibril diameter. This study suggests the hypothesis that AP initiates fibrillogenesis while CP may regulate additional fibril growth

  13. Star Formation in Tadpole Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Munoz-Tunon, Casiana; Elmegreen, Debra M; Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2014-01-01

    Tadpole Galaxies look like a star forming head with a tail structure to the side. They are also named cometaries. In a series of recent works we have discovered a number of issues that lead us to consider them extremely interesting targets. First, from images, they are disks with a lopsided starburst. This result is firmly established with long slit spectroscopy in a nearby representative sample. They rotate with the head following the rotation pattern but displaced from the rotation center. Moreover, in a search for extremely metal poor (XMP) galaxies, we identified tadpoles as the dominant shapes in the sample- nearly 80% of the local XMP galaxies have a tadpole morphology. In addition, the spatially resolved analysis of the metallicity shows the remarkable result that there is a metallicity drop right at the position of the head. This is contrary to what intuition would say and difficult to explain if star formation has happened from gas processed in the disk. The result could however be understood if the ...

  14. Clumpy Disc and Bulge Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, J; Tissera, P; Michel-Dansac, L

    2013-01-01

    We present a set of hydrodynamical/Nbody controlled simulations of isolated gas rich galaxies that self-consistently include SN feedback and a detailed chemical evolution model, both tested in cosmological simulations. The initial conditions are motivated by the observed star forming galaxies at z ~ 2-3. We find that the presence of a multiphase interstellar media in our models promotes the growth of disc instability favouring the formation of clumps which in general, are not easily disrupted on timescales compared to the migration time. We show that stellar clumps migrate towards the central region and contribute to form a classical-like bulge with a Sersic index, n > 2. Our physically-motivated Supernova feedback has a mild influence on clump survival and evolution, partially limiting the mass growth of clumps as the energy released per Supernova event is increased, with the consequent flattening of the bulge profile. This regulation does not prevent the building of a classical-like bulge even for the most ...

  15. Giant Planet Formation, Evolution, and Internal Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Helled, Ravit; Podolak, Morris; Boley, Aaron; Meru, Farzana; Nayakshin, Sergei; Fortney, Jonathan J; Mayer, Lucio; Alibert, Yann; Boss, Alan P

    2013-01-01

    The large number of detected giant exoplanets offers the opportunity to improve our understanding of the formation mechanism, evolution, and interior structure of gas giant planets. The two main models for giant planet formation are core accretion and disk instability. There are substantial differences between these formation models, including formation timescale, favorable formation location, ideal disk properties for planetary formation, early evolution, planetary composition, etc. First, we summarize the two models including their substantial differences, advantages, and disadvantages, and suggest how theoretical models should be connected to available (and future) data. We next summarize current knowledge of the internal structures of solar- and extrasolar- giant planets. Finally, we suggest the next steps to be taken in giant planet exploration.

  16. Autonomous Formations of Multi-Agent Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhali, Sanjana; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous formation control of multi-agent dynamic systems has a number of applications that include ground-based and aerial robots and satellite formations. For air vehicles, formation flight ("flocking") has the potential to significantly increase airspace utilization as well as fuel efficiency. This presentation addresses two main problems in multi-agent formations: optimal role assignment to minimize the total cost (e.g., combined distance traveled by all agents); and maintaining formation geometry during flock motion. The Kuhn-Munkres ("Hungarian") algorithm is used for optimal assignment, and consensus-based leader-follower type control architecture is used to maintain formation shape despite the leader s independent movements. The methods are demonstrated by animated simulations.

  17. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, D.A.; Lawson, M.; Davis, C.L.; Ferreira, A.A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Ellis, G.S.; Lewan, M.D.; Martini, A.M.; Tang, Y.; Schoell, M.; Sessions, A.L.; Eiler, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a “clumped isotope” technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yield formation temperatures consistent with their comparatively lower-temperature formational environments (<50°C). In systems where gases have migrated and other proxies for gas-generation temperature yield ambiguous results, methane clumped-isotope temperatures distinguish among and allow for independent tests of possible gas-formation models.

  18. Black-hole formation from stellar collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I review the end-state of massive stellar evolution, following the evolution of these massive stars from the onset of collapse through the formation of a compact remnant and the possible supernova or hypernova explosion. In particular, I concentrate on the formation of black holes from stellar collapse: the fraction of stars that form black holes, the black-hole mass distribution and the velocities these black-hole remnants may receive during their formation process

  19. Models of formation of lignin polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Gričar, Jožica; Oven, Primož; Čufar, Katarina

    2005-01-01

    In paper, two models of formation of lignin macromolecule are described. Random coupling model suggests lignin formation process through coupling of monomer radicals to growing lignin polymer in a near-random fashion. According to the dirigent protein model, process of lignin polymerization is fully controlled by specific dirigent proteins that direct formation of individual bonds. Critical judgements and scientific opinions of both models are given.

  20. Rate of enamel formation and hypoplasia timing

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Shorman, Abdulla; Alrousan, Mohammad; Khwaileh, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Linear Enamel Hypoplasia (LEH) is a decrease in enamel thickness resulting from a temporary disruption in enamel formation during times of dental development. To establish a statistical relationship between the timing of enamel formation and the length of the crown, the published data of Reid and Dean (2006) were statistically analyzed using SPSS. The results indicate that the relationship between the crown length and the days of enamel formation is nonlinear as proposed by previous studies b...

  1. Control of star formation by supersonic turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the formation of stars in galaxies is central to much of modern astrophysics. For several decades it has been thought that stellar birth is primarily controlled by the interplay between gravity and magnetostatic support, modulated by ambipolar diffusion. Recently, however, both observational and numerical work has begun to suggest that support by supersonic turbulence rather than magnetic fields controls star formation. In this review we outline a new theory of star formation re...

  2. Education, values and union formation in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, Elizabeth; Bernhardt, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Education provides opportunities for as well as barriers and alternatives to the formation of intimate unions. In this study, we consider the several mechanisms through which educational attainment may delay or speed up union formation. As do most other studies, we include both educational enrolment and attainment, the former viewed as a constraint on union formation, the latter facilitating the accumulation of resources that enable young couples to establish their own household. A third comp...

  3. Negative ion formation and neutralization processes, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review has been made preliminary for the purpose of contribute to the plasma heating by ''negative ion based neutral beam injection'' in the magnetic confinement fusion reactor. A compilation includes the survey of the general processes of negative ion formation, the data of the cross section of H- ion formation and the neutralization of H- ion, and some of new processes of H- ion formation. The data of cross section are mainly experimental, but partly include the results of theoretical calculation. (author)

  4. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane

    OpenAIRE

    Stolper, D. A.; Lawson, M.; Davis, C. L.; Ferreira, A. A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Ellis, G.S.; Lewan, M.D.; Martini, A. M.; Tang, Y.; Schoell, M.; Sessions, A.L.; Eiler, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a “clumped isotope” technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yiel...

  5. Dynamics of sheet nacre formation in bivalves

    OpenAIRE

    Rousseau, Marthe; Meibom, Anders; Gèze, Marc; Bourrat, Xavier; Angellier, Martine; Lopez, Evelyne

    2009-01-01

    Formation of nacre (mother-of-pearl) is a biomineralization process of fundamental scientific as well as industrial importance. However, the dynamics of the formation process is still not understood. Here, we use scanning electron microscopy and high spatial resolution ion microprobe depth-profiling to image the full three-dimensional distribution of organic materials around individual tablets in the top-most layer of forming nacre in bivalves. Nacre formation proceeds by lateral, symmetric g...

  6. Maggot Excretions Inhibit Biofilm Formation on Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Cazander, G.; Veerdonk, van de, RJM Rene; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C. M. J. E.; Schreurs, M.W.J.; Jukema, G.N.

    2010-01-01

    Background Biofilm-associated infections in trauma surgery are difficult to treat with conventional therapies. Therefore, it is important to develop new treatment modalities. Maggots in captured bags, which are permeable for larval excretions/secretions, aid in healing severe, infected wounds, suspect for biofilm formation. Therefore we presumed maggot excretions/secretions would reduce biofilm formation. Questions/purposes We studied biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus...

  7. Precursors of Young Women's Family Formation Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Amato, Paul R.; Landale, Nancy S.; Havasevich, Tara C.; Booth, Alan; Eggebeen, David J.; Schoen, Robert; McHale, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    We used latent class analysis to create family formation pathways for women between the ages of 18 and 23. Input variables included cohabitation, marriage, parenthood, full-time employment, and attending school. Data (n = 2,290) came from Waves I and III of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). The analysis revealed seven latent pathways: college-no family formation (29%), high school-no family formation (19%), cohabitation without children (15%), married mothers ...

  8. Complications and mortality following stoma formation.

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, D. A.; Egbeare, D.; Jones, S; Benjamin, H; Woodward, A; Foster, M E

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: As stoma formation is thought to be declining, we performed a study to evaluate the rate of stoma formation and the impact on stoma complication rates, together with risk factors for complications. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Stoma incidence, individual complications and mortality rates were retrieved from a stoma nurse database of 345 stomas created over an 8-year period. RESULTS: Stoma formation increased over the study period, although the incidence of complications declined. Stoma...

  9. STRATEGIC ALLIANCES – THEIR DEFINITION AND FORMATION

    OpenAIRE

    Kinderis, Remigijus; Jucevičius, Giedrius

    2013-01-01

    The article presents analysis of the definition of strategic alliances, the analysis of alliance and the research of a strategic alliance concept; furthermore, it focuses on the contingent hierarchy of alliances. The motives of strategic alliances formation, their categories, groups and benefit for business have been revealed in this article. Special attention is paid to the process of strategic alliance formation and the analysis of factors that influence the formation of strategic alliances...

  10. Laser filament-induced aerosol formation

    OpenAIRE

    Saathoff, H.; Henin, S.; Stelmaszczyk, K.; Petrarca, M.; Delagrange, R.; Hao, Z.; Lüder, J.; Möhler, O.; Y. Petit; Rohwetter, P.; Schnaiter, M.; Kasparian, J.; Leisner, T.; J.-P. Wolf; Wöste, L.

    2012-01-01

    Using the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA we investigated the laser filament induced particle formation in ambient air, humid synthetic air, humid nitrogen, argon-oxygen mixture, and pure argon in order to simulate the particle formation under realistic atmospheric conditions as well as to investigate the influence of typical gas-phase atmospheric constituents on the particle formation. Terawatt laser plasma filaments generated new particles in the size range 3 to 130 nm with partic...

  11. Laser filament-induced aerosol formation

    OpenAIRE

    Saathoff, H.; Henin, S.; Stelmaszczyk, K.; Petrarca, M.; Delagrange, R.; Hao, Z.; Lüder, J.; Möhler, O.; Y. Petit; Rohwetter, P.; Schnaiter, M.; Kasparian, J.; Leisner, T.; J.-P. Wolf; Wöste, L.

    2013-01-01

    Using the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA, we investigated the laser filament induced particle formation in ambient air, humid synthetic air, humid nitrogen, argon–oxygen mixture, and pure argon in order to simulate the particle formation under realistic atmospheric conditions as well as to investigate the influence of typical gas-phase atmospheric constituents on the particle formation. Terawatt laser plasma filaments generated new particles in the size range 3 to 130 nm with parti...

  12. Laser filament-induced aerosol formation

    OpenAIRE

    Saathoff, H.; Henin, S.; Stelmaszczyk, K.; Petrarca, M.; Delagrange, R.; Hao, Z.; Lüder, J.; Möhler, O.; Y. Petit; Rohwetter, P.; Schnaiter, M.; Kasparian, J.; Leisner, T.; Wolf, J.-P.; Wöste, L.

    2013-01-01

    Using the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA, we investigated the laser filament induced particle formation in ambient air, humid synthetic air, humid nitrogen, argon–oxygen mixture, and pure argon in order to simulate the particle formation under realistic atmospheric conditions as well as to investigate the influence of typical gas-phase atmospheric constituents on the particle formation. Terawatt laser plasma filaments generated new particles in the size range 3 to...

  13. COOPERATIVE TEAM FORMATION USING DISTRIBUTED DECOMPOSITION KNOWLEDGE

    OpenAIRE

    Carpenter, Martin Richard John

    2010-01-01

    Cooperative team formation using distributed decomposition knowledgeA thesis submitted in August 2010 by Martin Carpenter to the University ofManchester for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. In recent years, the problem of automating the formation of Virtual Organisations (VO) has risen to prominence. Work in this area has typically considered the process of VO formation to be a centralised process driven by a company with responsibility for the business opportunity.Such systems use two mai...

  14. New Particle Formation Study Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, JN; McMurry, PH [University of Minnesota

    2015-01-01

    The scientific foci of the New Particle Formation Study were the formation and evolution of atmospheric aerosols and the impacts of newly formed particles on cloud processes. Specifically, we planned to: (1) to identify the species and mechanisms responsible for the initial steps of new particle formation, i.e., the formation of thermodynamically stable clusters; (2) investigate the role of acid-base chemistry in new particle growth through measurements of ammonia and amines as well as organic and inorganic acids in both atmospheric nanoparticles and the gas phase; (3) investigate the contribution of other surface area or volume-controlled processes to nanoparticle formation and growth; (4) create a comprehensive dataset related to new particle formation and growth that can be used as input for our own thermodynamic models as well as the modeling efforts by our Department of Energy (DOE) Aerosol Life Cycle working group collaborators; (5) characterize the increase of the number and activity of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) due to particle formation and growth; (6) determine the regional extent of new particle formation to address the role that atmospheric transport plays in determining the impacts, if any, of new particle formation on cloud number and properties.

  15. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2013-10-15

    A method for treating a karsted formation containing heavy hydrocarbons and dolomite includes providing heat to at least part of one or more karsted layers in the formation from one or more heaters located in the karsted layers. A temperature in at least one of the karsted layers is allowed to reach a decomposition temperature of dolomite in the formation. The dolomite is allowed to decompose and at least some hydrocarbons are produced from at least one of the karsted layers of the formation.

  16. Towards the Rosetta Stone of planet formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt T.O.B.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Transiting exoplanets (TEPs observed just ~10 Myrs after formation of their host systems may serve as the Rosetta Stone for planet formation theories. They would give strong constraints on several aspects of planet formation, e.g. time-scales (planet formation would then be possible within 10 Myrs, the radius of the planet could indicate whether planets form by gravitational collapse (being larger when young or accretion growth (being smaller when young. We present a survey, the main goal of which is to find and then characterise TEPs in very young open clusters.

  17. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2011-04-26

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  18. Processes and problems in secondary star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments relating the conditions in molecular clouds to star formation triggered by a prior stellar generation are reviewed. Primary processes are those that lead to the formation of a first stellar generation. The secondary processes that produce stars in response to effects caused by existing stars are compared and evaluated in terms of the observational data presently available. We discuss the role of turbulence to produce clumpy cloud structures and introduce new work on colliding inter-cloud gas flows leading to non-linear inhomogeneous cloud structures in an intially smooth cloud. This clumpy morphology has important consequences for secondary formation. The triggering processes of supernovae, stellar winds, and H II regions are discussed with emphasis on the consequences for radiation driven implosion as a promising secondary star formation mechanism. Detailed two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamic calculations of radiation driven implosion are discussed. This mechanism is shown to be highly efficient in synchronizing the formation of new stars in congruent to 1-3 x 104 years and could account for the recent evidence for new massive star formation in several UCHII regions. It is concluded that, while no single theory adequately explains the variety of star formation observed, a uniform description of star formation is likely to involve several secondary processes. Advances in the theory of star formation will require multiple dimensional calculations of coupled processes. The important non-linear interactions include hydrodynamics, radiation transport, and magnetic fields

  19. Antagonistic formation motion of cooperative agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢婉婷; 代明香; 薛方正

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a new formation motion problem of a class of first-order multi-agent systems with antagonis-tic interactions. A distributed formation control algorithm is proposed for each agent to realize the antagonistic formation motion. A sufficient condition is derived to ensure that all agents make an antagonistic formation motion in a distributed manner. It is shown that all agents can be spontaneously divided into several groups, and agents in the same group collab-orate while agents in different groups compete. Finally, a numerical simulation is included to demonstrate our theoretical results.

  20. Processes and problems in secondary star formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, R.I.; Whitaker, R.W.; Sandford M.T. II

    1984-03-01

    Recent developments relating the conditions in molecular clouds to star formation triggered by a prior stellar generation are reviewed. Primary processes are those that lead to the formation of a first stellar generation. The secondary processes that produce stars in response to effects caused by existing stars are compared and evaluated in terms of the observational data presently available. We discuss the role of turbulence to produce clumpy cloud structures and introduce new work on colliding inter-cloud gas flows leading to non-linear inhomogeneous cloud structures in an intially smooth cloud. This clumpy morphology has important consequences for secondary formation. The triggering processes of supernovae, stellar winds, and H II regions are discussed with emphasis on the consequences for radiation driven implosion as a promising secondary star formation mechanism. Detailed two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamic calculations of radiation driven implosion are discussed. This mechanism is shown to be highly efficient in synchronizing the formation of new stars in congruent to 1-3 x 10/sup 4/ years and could account for the recent evidence for new massive star formation in several UCHII regions. It is concluded that, while no single theory adequately explains the variety of star formation observed, a uniform description of star formation is likely to involve several secondary processes. Advances in the theory of star formation will require multiple dimensional calculations of coupled processes. The important non-linear interactions include hydrodynamics, radiation transport, and magnetic fields.